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Sample records for epidural patient-controlled analgesia

  1. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results.

  2. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results. PMID:27062173

  3. Epidural analgesia in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Tan, T K

    1998-03-01

    An ideal analgesic for labour would preferably be non-invasive, as effective as spinals and epidurals without their attendant complications and is safe to mother and child and should not complicate the labour process. Analgesia for labouring women ranges from the use of opioid injections to invasive methods, chiefly epidural injections. Each has its advantages and drawbacks. This article provides a review of analgesic methods and techniques for labouring women. It focuses mainly on the role of epidurals, how it is utilised by anaesthetists and the differing methods of drug delivery through the epidural route. It discusses various concoctions of local anaesthetics and adjuvants used. The epidural route is probably the most effective and most commonly used invasive route for achieving analgesia during labour. Local anaesthetics of varying concentrations are administered as intermittent boluses or as a continuous infusion. Adjuvant drugs are able to enhance the quality and duration of the analgesia. Opioids including fentanyl and sufentanil, and clonidine are discussed. The use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia and combined spinal-epidural analgesia are reviewed. Ambulatory or mobile epidurals are increasingly popular. They are known to improve maternal satisfaction because of preservation of motor power. Ambulation may help with cervical dilatation and engagement, and abolition of backpain, among other advantages. This article describes the methods of establishing mobile epidurals and offers guidelines on safe ambulation and contraindications to its use. PMID:9663317

  4. A comparison of thoracic or lumbar patient-controlled epidural analgesia methods after thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to compare patient-controlled thoracic or lumbar epidural analgesia methods after thoracotomy operations. Methods One hundred and twenty patients were prospectively randomized to receive either thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA group) or lumbar epidural analgesia (LEA group). In both groups, epidural catheters were administered. Hemodynamic measurements, visual analog scale scores at rest (VAS-R) and after coughing (VAS-C), analgesic consumption, and side effects were compared at 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours postoperatively. Results The VAS-R and VAS-C values were lower in the TEA group in comparison to the LEA group at 2, 4, 8, and 16 hours after surgery (for VAS-R, P = 0.001, P = 0.01, P = 0.008, and P = 0.029, respectively; and for VAS-C, P = 0.035, P = 0.023, P = 0.002, and P = 0.037, respectively). Total 24-hour analgesic consumption was different between groups (175 +/- 20 mL versus 185 +/- 31 mL; P = 0.034). The comparison of postoperative complications revealed that the incidence of hypotension (21/57, 36.8% versus 8/63, 12.7%; P = 0.002), bradycardia (9/57, 15.8% versus 2/63, 3.2%; P = 0.017), atelectasis (1/57, 1.8% versus 7/63, 11.1%; P = 0.04), and the need for intensive care unit (ICU) treatment (0/57, 0% versus 5/63, 7.9%; P = 0.03) were lower in the TEA group in comparison to the LEA group. Conclusions TEA has beneficial hemostatic effects in comparison to LEA after thoracotomies along with more satisfactory pain relief profile. PMID:24885545

  5. [Patient-controlled intravenous versus epidural analgesia after major joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Peng, W L; Wu, G J; Sun, W Z; Fan, S Z; Chen, T L; Huang, F Y

    1992-06-01

    The analgesic efficacy, side effects, and satisfaction of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with intravenous and epidural morphine for postoperative pain were evaluated in this study. Twenty patients undergoing major joint replacement surgery were randomly allocated to intravenous PCA (IPCA) group or epidural PCA (EPCA) group. All patients had a standardized balanced anesthesia, and an epidural catheter was introduced after the operation in EPCA group. Postoperative pain relief was evaluated with verbal pain scale. The result showed that pain intensity and pain relief were similar in either group without significant difference (p greater than 0.05). Morphine consumption in IPCA group was 1.72 +/- 0.30 mg/h in the postoperative 0 - 12 h and 1.14 +/- 0.44 mg/h in 12 - 24 h. In EPCA group, relatively low doses of morphine were used, i.e., 0.20 +/- 0.07 mg/h in the postoperative 0 - 12 h and 0.17 +/- 0.07 mg/h in 12 - 24 h. Both groups showed an "incomplete" but satisfactory analgesia with relatively low doses of morphine. The "equianalgesic dose ratio" of IPCA to EPCA with morphine was approximately 8.5:1. Sedation was minimal in both groups. No respiratory depression developed in all patients. Nausea and vomiting were the most prominent side effects which might limit the usefulness of PCA. The incidence was 5 out of 10 patients in IPCA group and 4 out of 10 patients in EPCA group, despite under the treatment of droperidol (15 micrograms/kg, iv, prn) for most of the patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Epidural Analgesia Versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia for Pain Relief in Uterine Artery Embolization for Uterine Fibroids: A Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kooij, Sanne M. van der Moolenaar, Lobke M.; Ankum, Willem M.; Reekers, Jim A.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Hehenkamp, Wouter J. K.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to compare the costs and effects of epidural analgesia (EDA) to those of patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) for postintervention pain relief in women having uterine artery embolization (UAE) for systematic uterine fibroids. Methods: Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) based on data from the literature by constructing a decision tree to model the clinical pathways for estimating the effects and costs of treatment with EDA and PCA. Literature on EDA for pain-relief after UAE was missing, and therefore, data on EDA for abdominal surgery were used. Outcome measures were compared costs to reduce one point in visual analogue score (VAS) or numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain 6 and 24 h after UAE and risk for complications. Results: Six hours after the intervention, the VAS was 3.56 when using PCA and 2.0 when using EDA. The costs for pain relief in women undergoing UAE with PCA and EDA were Euro-Sign 191 and Euro-Sign 355, respectively. The costs for EDA to reduce the VAS score 6 h after the intervention with one point compared with PCA were Euro-Sign 105 and Euro-Sign 179 after 24 h. The risk of having a complication was 2.45 times higher when using EDA. Conclusions: The results of this indirect comparison of EDA for abdominal surgery with PCA for UAE show that EDA would provide superior analgesia for post UAE pain at 6 and 24 h but with higher costs and an increased risk of complications.

  7. Predicting postoperative vomiting among orthopedic patients receiving patient-controlled epidural analgesia using SVM and LR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Yun; Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been applied to reduce postoperative pain in orthopedic surgical patients. Unfortunately, PCEA is occasionally accompanied by nausea and vomiting. The logistic regression (LR) model is widely used to predict vomiting, and recently support vector machines (SVM), a supervised machine learning method, has been used for classification and prediction. Unlike our previous work which compared Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) with LR, this study uses a SVM-based predictive model to identify patients with high risk of vomiting during PCEA and comparing results with those derived from the LR-based model. From January to March 2007, data from 195 patients undergoing PCEA following orthopedic surgery were applied to develop two predictive models. 75% of the data were randomly selected for training, while the remainder was used for testing to validate predictive performance. The area under curve (AUC) was measured using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC). The area under ROC curves of LR and SVM models were 0.734 and 0.929, respectively. A computer-based predictive model can be used to identify those who are at high risk for vomiting after PCEA, allowing for patient-specific therapeutic intervention or the use of alternative analgesic methods. PMID:27247165

  8. Predicting postoperative vomiting among orthopedic patients receiving patient-controlled epidural analgesia using SVM and LR

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsin-Yun; Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been applied to reduce postoperative pain in orthopedic surgical patients. Unfortunately, PCEA is occasionally accompanied by nausea and vomiting. The logistic regression (LR) model is widely used to predict vomiting, and recently support vector machines (SVM), a supervised machine learning method, has been used for classification and prediction. Unlike our previous work which compared Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) with LR, this study uses a SVM-based predictive model to identify patients with high risk of vomiting during PCEA and comparing results with those derived from the LR-based model. From January to March 2007, data from 195 patients undergoing PCEA following orthopedic surgery were applied to develop two predictive models. 75% of the data were randomly selected for training, while the remainder was used for testing to validate predictive performance. The area under curve (AUC) was measured using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC). The area under ROC curves of LR and SVM models were 0.734 and 0.929, respectively. A computer-based predictive model can be used to identify those who are at high risk for vomiting after PCEA, allowing for patient-specific therapeutic intervention or the use of alternative analgesic methods. PMID:27247165

  9. Patient-Controlled Epidural Analgesia or Multimodal Pain Regimen with Periarticular Injection After Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jules-Elysee, Kethy M.; Goon, Amanda K.; Westrich, Geoffrey H.; Padgett, Douglas E.; Mayman, David J.; Ranawat, Amar S.; Ranawat, Chitranjan S.; Lin, Yi; Kahn, Richard L.; Bhagat, Devan D.; Goytizolo, Enrique A.; Ma, Yan; Reid, Shane C.; Curren, Jodie; YaDeau, Jacques T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The optimal postoperative analgesia after primary total hip arthroplasty remains in question. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) with use of a multimodal pain regimen including periarticular injection (PAI). We hypothesized that PAI would lead to earlier readiness for discharge, decreased opioid consumption, and lower pain scores. Methods: Forty-one patients received PAI, and forty-three patients received PCEA. Preoperatively, both groups were administered dexamethasone (6 mg, orally). The PAI group received a clonidine patch and sustained-release oxycodone (10 mg), while the PCEA group had placebo. Both groups received combined spinal-epidural anesthesia and used an epidural pain pump postoperatively; the PAI group had normal saline solution, while the PCEA group had bupivacaine and hydromorphone. The primary outcome, readiness for discharge, required the discontinuation of the epidural, a pain score of <4 (numeric rating scale) without parenteral narcotics, normal eating, minimal nausea, urination without a catheter, a dry surgical wound, no acute medical problems, and the ability to independently transfer and walk 12.2 m (40 ft). Results: The mean time to readiness for discharge (and standard deviation) was 2.4 ± 0.7 days (PAI) compared with 2.3 ± 0.8 days (PCEA) (p = 0.86). The mean length of stay was 3.0 ± 0.8 days (PAI) compared with 3.1 ± 0.7 days (PCEA) (p = 0.46). A significant mean difference in pain score of 0.74 with ambulation (p = 0.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 1.31) and 0.80 during physical therapy (p = 0.03; 95% CI, 0.09 to 1.51) favored the PCEA group. The mean opioid consumption (oral morphine equivalents in milligrams) was significantly higher in the PAI group on postoperative day 0 (43 ± 21 compared with 28 ± 23; p = 0.002) and postoperative days 0 through 2 (136 ± 59 compared with 90 ± 79; p = 0.004). Opioid-Related Symptom

  10. [Postoperative epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Donato, S; Malisano, A M; Dogareschi, T; Chiarandini, P; Spasiano, A; Pasetto, A

    1995-01-01

    Epidural analgesia with local anesthetics and opioids is one of the most effective methods for postoperative pain control. In critical patients it seems to improve outcome as well as pain control. This technique works better when started in the intraoperative time. Epidural analgesia is safe on surgical wards if nursing staff is trained in managing epidural catheters and in early detection and treatment of major and minor side effects. Nursing staff cooperates with the Acute Pain Service doctors and nurses who are on call on a 24 hour basis. Many perspective and retrospective studies showed a very low incidence of major side effects with epidurals. So we can consider it safe and effective even if we consider its invasiveness.

  11. [The comparison of the effects and side effects of local anesthetic and opioid combinations in epidural patient controlled analgesia].

    PubMed

    Eti, Zeynep; Umuroğlu, Tümay; Takil, Arzu; Göğüş, Yilmaz

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and side effects of local anesthetic and opioid combinations in 457 patients who have received epidural patient-controlled analgesia (EPCA). Hemodynamic parameters, numeric rating scale, sedation scores, the degree of motor and sensory blockage, the presence of side effects, the parameters of PCA device were recorded from the postoperative pain records. 253 patients received 0.1 % bupivacaine + 3 microg/ml fentanyl (Group B1F3), 80 patients received 0.125 % bupivacaine + 3 microg/ml fentanyl (Group B12F3), 43 patients received 0.125 % bupivacaine + 4 microg/ml fentanyl (Group B12F4), 46 patients received 0.1 % bupivacaine + 0.1 mg/ml morphine (Group B1M1) and 35 patients received 0.125 % bupivacaine + 0.1 mg/ml morphine (Group B12M1). Nausea was significantly higher in group B1M1 compared to B12F3, in group B12M1 compared to B1F3 and B12F3 (p<0.05), vomiting was significantly higher in group B1M1 and B12M1 (p<0.05) compared to B12F3, pruritus was significantly higher in group B12F4 compared to B12F3 and B1F3, in group B1M1 compared to B1F3 and B12F3 and in group B12M1 compared to B1F3 and B12F3 (p<0.05). As a result, in EPCA, the combination of bupivacaine and fentanyl provides as effective analgesia as the combination of bupivacaine and morphine and 3 mg/ml fentanyl admixture may be preferred with less side effects such as nausea, vomiting and pruritus.

  12. Postoperative pain control using continuous i.m. bupivacaine infusion plus patient-controlled analgesia compared with epidural analgesia after major hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Lun-Hing, Edgar M; van Dam, Ronald M; Welsh, Fenella K S; Wells, John K G; John, Timothy G; Cresswell, Adrian B; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Rees, Myrddin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is debate concerning the best mode of delivery of analgesia following liver resection, with continuous i.m. infusion of bupivacaine (CIB) plus patient-controlled i.v. analgesia (PCA) suggested as an alternative to continuous epidural analgesia (CEA). This study compares these two modalities. Methods A total of 498 patients undergoing major hepatectomy between July 2004 and July 2011 were included. Group 1 received CIB + PCA (n = 429) and Group 2 received CEA (n = 69). Groups were analysed on baseline patient and surgical characteristics. Primary endpoints were pain severity scores and total opioid consumption. Secondary endpoints were pain management failures, need for rescue medication, postoperative (opioid-related) morbidity and hospital length of stay (LoS). Results In both groups pain was well controlled and >70% of patients had no or minimal pain on PoDs 1 and 2. The numbers of patients experiencing severe pain were similar in both groups: PoD 1 at rest: 0.3% in Group 1 and 0% in Group 2 (P = 1.000); PoD 1 on movement: 8% in Group 1 and 2% in Group 2 (P = 0.338); PoD 2 at rest: 0% in Group 1 and 2% in Group 2 (P = 0.126), and PoD 2 on movement: 5% in Group 1 and 5% in Group 2 (P = 1.000). Although the CIB + PCA group required more opioid rescue medication on PoD 0 (53% versus 22%; P < 0.001), they used less opioids on PoDs 0–3 (P ≤ 0.001), had lower morbidity (26% versus 39%; P = 0.018), and a shorter LoS (7 days versus 8 days; P = 0.005). Conclusions The combination of CIB + PCA provides pain control similar to that provided by CEA, but facilitates lower opioid consumption after major hepatectomy. It has the potential to replace epidural analgesia, thereby avoiding the occurrence of rare but serious complications. PMID:24151899

  13. EPIDURAL ANALGESIA IN LABOR - CONTROVERSIES.

    PubMed

    Bilić, Nada; Djaković, Ivka; Kličan-Jaić, Katarina; Rudman, Senka Sabolović; Ivanec, Željko

    2015-09-01

    Labor pain is one of the most severe pains. Labor is a complex and individual process with varying maternal requesting analgesia. Labor analgesia must be safe and accompanied by minimal amount of unwanted consequences for both the mother and the child, as well as for the delivery procedure. Epidural analgesia is the treatment that best meets these demands. According to the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology and American Society of Anesthesiologists, mother's demand is a reason enough for the introduction of epidural analgesia in labor, providing that no contraindications exist. The application of analgesics should not cease at the end of the second stage of labor, but it is recommended that lower concentration analgesics be then applied. Based on the latest studies, it can be claimed that epidural analgesia can be applied during the major part of the first and second stage of labor. According to previous investigations, there is no definitive conclusion about the incidence of instrumental delivery, duration of second stage of labor, time of epidural analgesia initiation, and long term outcomes for the newborn. Cooperation of obstetric and anesthesiology personnel, as well as appropriate technical equipment significantly decrease the need of instrumental completion of a delivery, as well as other complications encountered in the application of epidural analgesia. Our hospital offers 24/7 epidural analgesia service. The majority of pregnant women in our hospital were aware of the advantages of epidural analgesia for labor, however, only a small proportion of them used it, mainly because of inadequate level of information.

  14. Effect of Parecoxib as an Adjunct to Patient-Controlled Epidural Analgesia after Abdominal Hysterectomy: A Multicenter, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-Feng; Shu, Hai-Hua; Zhao, Guo-Dong; Peng, Shu-Ling; Xiao, Jin-Fang; Zhang, Guan-Rong; Liu, Ke-Xuan; Huang, Wen-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Objective This multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled study evaluated the efficacy and side effects of parecoxib during patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) after abdominal hysterectomy. Methods A total of 240 patients who were scheduled for elective abdominal hysterectomy under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia received PCEA plus postoperative intravenous parecoxib 40 mg or saline every 12 h for 48 h after an initial preoperative dose of parecoxib 40 mg or saline. An epidural loading dose of a mixture of 6 mL of 0.25% ropivacaine and 2 mg morphine was administered 30 min before the end of surgery, and PCEA was initiated using 1.25 mg/mL ropivacaine and 0.05 mg/mL morphine with a 2-mL/h background infusion and 2-mL bolus with a 15-min lockout. The primary end point of this study was the quantification of the PCEA-sparing effect of parecoxib. Results Demographic data were similar between the two groups. Patients in the parecoxib group received significantly fewer self-administrated boluses (0 (0, 3) vs. 7 (2, 15), P < 0.001) and less epidural morphine (5.01 ± 0.44 vs. 5.95 ± 1.29 mg, P < 0.001) but experienced greater pain relief compared with the control group (P < 0.001). Patient global satisfaction was higher in the parecoxib group than the control group (P < 0.001). Length of hospitalization (9.50 ± 2.1, 95% CI 9.12~9.88 vs. 10.41 ± 2.6, 95% CI 9.95~10.87, P = 0.003) and postoperative vomiting (17% vs. 29%, P < 0.05) were also reduced in the parecoxib group. There were no serious adverse effects in either group. Conclusion Our data suggest that adjunctive parecoxib during PCEA following abdominal hysterectomy is safe and efficacious in reducing pain, requirements of epidural analgesics, and side effects. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01566669) PMID:27622453

  15. A Retrospective Observational Study Examining the Effect of Thoracic Epidural and Patient Controlled Analgesia on Short-term Outcomes in Blunt Thoracic Trauma Injuries.

    PubMed

    Baker, Edward James; Lee, Geraldine Ann

    2016-01-01

    Effective analgesia in the early stages after any major traumatic event remains pivotal to optimal trauma management. For patients with significant thoracic injuries, this is paramount to ensure ongoing efficient respiratory function. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of analgesic modes in the management of patients with a primary thoracic injury and blunt mechanism of injury. By understanding variables that influence the use of varying analgesic modes and influence the development of pulmonary complications, there should be more uniform evidence-based prescription in the future.This retrospective study considered analgesic use in patients admitted after blunt thoracic injuries at one major trauma center over a 2-year period. Pulmonary complications measured included both infective and ventilator-associated failure. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify patient and injury severity characteristics and their association with respiratory complications.A total of 401 cases were reviewed and analyzed: 159 received Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA), 32 received PCA and epidural analgesia (EA), 6 received EA alone, and 204 received interval-administered analgesia. There were no significant differences in the rates of complication when compared between analgesic modes. Patients who developed pneumonia had significantly increased number of thoracic fractures and underlying organ injury (P < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis highlighted duration of intercostal drain insertion (OR 1.377, P = 0.001) and premorbid cardiac disease (OR 2.624, P = 0.042) and ICU length of stay (OR: 1.146, P < 0.001) as significant predictors of developing pneumonia in this patient group.Examining the different analgesic modes, this study failed to identify a particular analgesic mode that was more effective in preventing pulmonary complications in blunt thoracic injuries. However, variables that may influence usage of different analgesic modes

  16. Epidural optogenetics for controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Robert P; Wang, Feng; Desrochers-Couture, Mireille; Ga¸secka, Alicja; Boulanger, Marie-Eve; Côté, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Background Optogenetic tools enable cell selective and temporally precise control of neuronal activity; yet, difficulties in delivering sufficient light to the spinal cord of freely behaving animals have hampered the use of spinal optogenetic approaches to produce analgesia. We describe an epidural optic fiber designed for chronic spinal optogenetics that enables the precise delivery of light at multiple wavelengths to the spinal cord dorsal horn and sensory afferents. Results The epidural delivery of light enabled the optogenetic modulation of nociceptive processes at the spinal level. The acute and repeated activation of channelrhodopsin-2 expressing nociceptive afferents produced robust nocifensive behavior and mechanical sensitization in freely behaving mice, respectively. The optogenetic inhibition of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn through the activation of archaerhodopsin also produced a transient, but selective induction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Finally, we demonstrate the capacity of optogenetics to produce analgesia in freely behaving mice through the inhibition of nociceptive afferents via archaerhodopsin. Conclusion Epidural optogenetics provides a robust and powerful solution for activation of both excitatory and inhibitory opsins in sensory processing pathways. Our results demonstrate the potential of spinal optogenetics to modulate sensory behavior and produce analgesia in freely behaving animals. PMID:27030718

  17. [Incidence of the post-operative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients with general anesthesia combined with epidural anesthesia and patient-controlled epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Xiaohua; Li, Haiying

    2016-08-01

    目的:探讨全麻联合硬膜外麻醉及硬膜外自控镇痛对老年患者术后认知功能障碍(post-operative cognitive dysfunction,POCD)发生率的影响。方法:选取2012年3月至2015年3月于延安市人民医院行胃癌根治术的老年患者共100例,采用随机数字表法将其分为3组:全麻+静脉自控镇痛(patient-controlled intravenous analgesia,PCIA)组(I组,n=35) 、全麻联合硬膜外麻醉+PCIA组(II组,n=30)和全麻联合硬膜外麻醉+硬膜外自控镇痛(patient-controlled epidural analgesia,PCEA)组(III组,n=35)。3组患者年龄、性别、BMI和手术时长及美国麻醉师协会(American Society of Anesthesiologists,ASA)分级和术前简易精神状态量表(Mini-Mental State Examination,MMSE)评分等各项指标相比较,差异均无统计学意义(均P>0.05)。于术前1 d以及术后6 h,12 h,2 d和6 d对患者进行MMSE认知功能评价,比较3组POCD发生率。同时考察患者手术过程中各时间点平均动脉压(mean arterial pressure,MAP)、血糖、皮质醇及TNF-α含量变化,记录术中七氟醚(sevoflurane, SEVO)用量,随访患者术后6,12和24 h的疼痛评分。结果:对患者术POCD的发生率进行比较,I组术后6 h发生率为45.71%,II组为34.28%,均高于III组(10.00%);I组12 h发生率为34.29%,II组为28.57%,均高于III组(3.33%);I组2 d发生率为28.57%,II组为17.14%,均高于III组(0);I组6 d发生率为17.14%,II组为2.85%,均高于III组(0)。血糖值、皮质醇以及TNF-α含量与POCD发生率各组趋势一致,差异均具有统计学意义(均P<0.05)。II组、III组术中MAP波动幅度显著小于I组,III组的术后镇痛效果明显优于其他两组(均P<0.05)。结论:全麻联合硬膜外麻醉与硬膜外镇痛相结合的方式可有效稳定患者的血流状态,对患者认知功能的影响较小,可作为一种值得推荐的麻醉及手术方式。.

  18. Epidural anaesthesia and analgesia for liver resection.

    PubMed

    Tzimas, P; Prout, J; Papadopoulos, G; Mallett, S V

    2013-06-01

    Although epidural analgesia is routinely used in many institutions for patients undergoing hepatic resection, there are unresolved issues regarding its safety and efficacy in this setting. We performed a review of papers published in the area of anaesthesia and analgesia for liver resection surgery and selected four areas of current controversy for the focus of this review: the safety of epidural catheters with respect to postoperative coagulopathy, a common feature of this type of surgery; analgesic efficacy; associated peri-operative fluid administration; and the role of epidural analgesia in enhanced recovery protocols. In all four areas, issues are raised that question whether epidural anaesthesia is always the best choice for these patients. Unfortunately, the evidence available is insufficient to provide definitive answers, and it is clear that there are a number of areas of controversy that would benefit from high-quality clinical trials.

  19. Comparison of continuous epidural infusion and programmed intermittent epidural bolus in labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yunan; Li, Qiang; Liu, Jinlu; Yang, Ruimin; Liu, Jingchen

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate differences between continuous epidural infusion (CEI) and programmed intermittent epidural bolus (IEB) analgesia for the Chinese parturients undergoing spontaneous delivery and to approach their safety to parturients and neonates. Methods Two hundred healthy American Society of Anesthesiologists class I or II, term (≥37 weeks’ gestation), nulliparous women who requested analgesia for labor were recruited. Epidural analgesia was initiated with a solution of 0.15% ropivacaine 10 mL and maintained with 0.1% ropivacaine mixed with sufentanil 0.3 μg/mL by CEI at a rate of 5 mL/h combined with a patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture or IEB of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture combined with a PCEA bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture. The lockout interval was 20 minutes in each arm between the CEI and the IEB group. After 20 minutes of first dosage, visual analog scale (VAS) score was obtained every 60 minutes. The maternal and fetal outcome and total consumption of analgesic solution were compared. Results There was no difference in demographic characteristics, duration of first and second stages, delivery methods, sensory block, fetal Apgar scores, and the maternal outcomes between the CEI and IEB groups. There was a significant difference in VAS scores and epidural ropivacaine total consumption between the two groups (IEB vs CEI: 51.27±9.61 vs 70.44±12.78 mg, P<0.01). Conclusion The use of programmed IEB mixed with PCEA improved labor analgesia compared to CEI mixed with PCEA, which could act as maintenance mode for epidural labor analgesia. PMID:27471390

  20. [Epidural analgesia in combination with general anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Antje; Poepping, Daniel M

    2015-07-01

    Epidural anaesthesia is a widely used and accepted technique for perioperative analgesia in different kinds of surgery. Apart from analgetic effect and due to wide positve effects on patients outcome epidural analgesia is often used with general anaesthesia. It represents a reliable and reversible neural deafferentation technique that effectively contributes to a reduction of the surgical stress response with subsequent positive effects on cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal, and immune function. Animal studies suggest that the use of epidural anaesthesia may be beneficial for cancer surgery because of less tumour recurrence. Further, a benefit is expected in patient's mortality. This article summarizes and critically discusses the current knowledge on the effects of epidural anaesthesia on pain management, cardiopulmonary as well as gastrointestinal functions and patient's outcome.

  1. Ropivacaine 0.025% mixed with fentanyl 3.0 μg/ml and epinephrine 0.5 μg/ml is effective for epidural patient-controlled analgesia after cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Shaul; Chhokra, Renu; Stein, Mark H; Denny, John T; Shah, Shruti; Mohiuddin, Adil; Naftalovich, Rotem; Zhao, Rong; Pashkova, Anna; Rolleri, Noah; Patel, Arpan G; Hunter-Fratzola, Christine W

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: We aimed to determine the ropivacaine concentration that provided adequate analgesia with early ambulation and minimal urinary retention or other side-effects when used with fentanyl and epinephrine for patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) after elective cesarean section. Material and Methods: Forty-eight patients were randomized to four groups in a double-blinded fashion. All groups received an initial 10 ml/h of epidural study solution for 24 h. The solution contained: 0.2, 0.1, 0.05, or 0.025% ropivacaine for Groups I-IV, respectively, with fentanyl 3.0 μg/ml and epinephrine 0.5 μg/ml. Patients could administer additional PCEA doses of 4 ml of their study solution with a lock-out time of 10 min. Overall satisfaction, side-effects, motor block, neurologic function, and pain using Visual Analog Scale were assessed. Results: Patients in all groups showed no difference in sedation, pruritus, nausea, vomiting, and uterine cramps. Pain scores at rest were lower for Group IV than Groups I-III (P < 0.001). Twelve, five, one, and zero patients could not ambulate in Groups I-IV, respectively. Nine, nine, two, and zero (III

  2. An epidural analgesia program: balancing risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Rosen, H F; Calio, M M

    1990-09-01

    An alternative to parenteral narcotic management is the administration of analgesics into the epidural space. The recognition and prevention of complications or side effects of epidural analgesia are prime concerns in planning nursing care for these patients.

  3. Effects of local anesthetic on the time between analgesic boluses and the duration of labor in patient-controlled epidural analgesia: prospective study of two ultra-low dose regimens of ropivacaine and sufentanil.

    PubMed

    Costa-Martins, José Manuel; Dias, Cláudia Camila; Pereira, Marco; Tavares, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: A patient-controlled epidural analgesia com baixas concentrações de anestésicos é eficaz na redução da dor de parto. O objectivo deste estudo foi comparar dois regimes de doses ultrabaixas de ropivacaína e sufentanil (0,1% ropivacaína associada a 0,5 μg.ml-1 sufentanil vs. 0,06% ropivacaína associada a 0,5 μg.ml-1 sufentanil) nos intervalos entre bólus e na duração do trabalho de parto. Material e Métodos: Neste estudo prospectivo não-randomizado, realizado entre Janeiro e Julho de 2010, dois grupos de parturientes receberam patient-controlled epidural analgesia: o Grupo I (n = 58; 1 mg.ml-1 ropivacaína + 0,5 μg.ml-1 sufentanil) e o Grupo II (n = 57; 0,6 mg.ml-1 ropivacaína + 0,5 μg.ml-1 sufentanil). Quando necessário administraram-se doses de resgate de ropivacaína na concentração definida para cada grupo e sem sufentanil. Registaram-se a dor, os consumos de analgésicos, as características do bloqueio neuroaxial, do trabalho de parto, do recém-nascido, e a satisfação materna. Resultados: A dose de ropivacaína foi maior no Grupo I (9,5 [7,7-12,7] mg.h-1 vs. 6,1 [5,1-9,8 mg.h-1], p < 0,001). No Grupo I observouse um aumento do intervalo de tempo entre bólus (beta = 32,61 min, 95% CI [25,39; 39,82], p < 0,001), enquanto no Grupo II se observou uma diminuição dos intervalos (beta = -1,40 min, 95% CI [-2,44; -0,36], p = 0,009). A duração do segundo estadio do trabalho de parto foi significativamente maior no Grupo I do que no Grupo II (78 min vs. 65 min, p < 0,001). Conclusões: As parturientes que receberam ropivacaína a 0,06% exibiram uma menor evidência de efeitos cumulativos e um segundo estadio do trabalho de parto mais rápido do que as que receberam ropivacaína a 0,1%.

  4. Comparison of Transversus Abdominis Plane Infiltration with Liposomal Bupivacaine versus Continuous Epidural Analgesia versus Intravenous Opioid Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Ayad, Sabry; Babazade, Rovnat; Elsharkawy, Hesham; Nadar, Vinayak; Lokhande, Chetan; Makarova, Natalya; Khanna, Rashi; Sessler, Daniel I.; Turan, Alparslan

    2016-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is considered the standard of care but cannot be provided to all patients Liposomal bupivacaine has been approved for field blocks such as transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks but has not been clinically compared against other modalities. In this retrospective propensity matched cohort study we thus tested the primary hypothesis that TAP infiltration are noninferior (not worse) to continuous epidural analgesia and superior (better) to intravenous opioid analgesia in patients recovering from major lower abdominal surgery. 318 patients were propensity matched on 18 potential factors among three groups (106 per group): 1) TAP infiltration with bupivacaine liposome; 2) continuous Epidural analgesia with plain bupivacaine; and; 3) intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA). We claimed TAP noninferior (not worse) over Epidural if TAP was noninferior (not worse) on total morphine-equivalent opioid and time-weighted average pain score (10-point scale) within first 72 hours after surgery with noninferiority deltas of 1 (10-point scale) for pain and an increase less of 20% in the mean morphine equivalent opioid consumption. We claimed TAP or Epidural groups superior (better) over IV PCA if TAP or Epidural was superior on opioid consumption and at least noninferior on pain outcome. Multivariable linear regressions within the propensity-matched cohorts were used to model total morphine-equivalent opioid dose and time-weighted average pain score within first 72 hours after surgery; joint hypothesis framework was used for formal testing. TAP infiltration were noninferior to Epidural on both primary outcomes (p<0.001). TAP infiltration were noninferior to IV PCA on pain scores (p = 0.001) but we did not find superiority on opioid consumption (p = 0.37). We did not find noninferiority of Epidural over IV PCA on pain scores (P = 0.13) and nor did we find superiority on opioid consumption (P = 0.98). TAP infiltration with liposomal bupivacaine and

  5. Epidural analgesia for labour: maternal knowledge, preferences and informed consent.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, S; Tan, T; Walsh, A; Carey, M

    2011-01-01

    Epidural analgesia has become increasingly popular as a form of labour analgesia in Ireland. However obtaining true inform consent has always been difficult. Our study recruited 100 parturients who had undergone epidural analgesia for labour, aimed to determine the information they received prior to regional analgesia, and to ascertain their preferences regarding informed consent. Only 65 (65%) of patients planned to have an epidural. Knowledge of potential complications was variable and inaccurate, with less than 30 (30%) of women aware of the most common complications. Most women 79 (79%) believed that discomfort during labour affected their ability to provide informed consent, and believe consent should be taken prior to onset of labour (96, 96%). The results of this study helps define the standards of consent Irish patients expect for epidural analgesia during labour.

  6. Labor Epidural Analgesia and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    French, Cynthia A; Cong, Xiaomei; Chung, Keun Sam

    2016-08-01

    Despite widespread use of epidural analgesia during labor, no consensus has been reached among obstetric and anesthesia providers regarding its effects on breastfeeding. The purpose of this review was to examine the relationship between labor epidural analgesia and breastfeeding in the immediate postpartum period. PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched for articles published in 1990 or thereafter, using the search term breastfeeding combined with epidural, labor epidural analgesia, labor analgesia, or epidural analgesia Of 117 articles, 23 described empirical studies specific to labor epidural analgesia and measured a breastfeeding outcome. Results were conflicting: 12 studies showed negative associations between epidural analgesia and breastfeeding success, 10 studies showed no effect, and 1 study showed a positive association. Most studies were observational. Of 3 randomized controlled studies, randomization methods were inadequate in 2 and not evaluable in 1. Other limitations were related to small sample size or inadequate study power; variation and lack of information regarding type and dosage of analgesia or use of other intrapartum interventions; differences in timing, definition, and method of assessing breastfeeding success; or failure to consider factors such as mothers' intention to breastfeed, social support, siblings, or the mother's need to return to work or school. It is also unclear to what extent results are mediated through effects on infant neurobehavior, maternal fever, oxytocin release, duration of labor, and need for instrumental delivery. Clinician awareness of factors affecting breastfeeding can help identify women at risk for breastfeeding difficulties in order to target support and resources effectively.

  7. Labor Epidural Analgesia and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    French, Cynthia A; Cong, Xiaomei; Chung, Keun Sam

    2016-08-01

    Despite widespread use of epidural analgesia during labor, no consensus has been reached among obstetric and anesthesia providers regarding its effects on breastfeeding. The purpose of this review was to examine the relationship between labor epidural analgesia and breastfeeding in the immediate postpartum period. PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched for articles published in 1990 or thereafter, using the search term breastfeeding combined with epidural, labor epidural analgesia, labor analgesia, or epidural analgesia Of 117 articles, 23 described empirical studies specific to labor epidural analgesia and measured a breastfeeding outcome. Results were conflicting: 12 studies showed negative associations between epidural analgesia and breastfeeding success, 10 studies showed no effect, and 1 study showed a positive association. Most studies were observational. Of 3 randomized controlled studies, randomization methods were inadequate in 2 and not evaluable in 1. Other limitations were related to small sample size or inadequate study power; variation and lack of information regarding type and dosage of analgesia or use of other intrapartum interventions; differences in timing, definition, and method of assessing breastfeeding success; or failure to consider factors such as mothers' intention to breastfeed, social support, siblings, or the mother's need to return to work or school. It is also unclear to what extent results are mediated through effects on infant neurobehavior, maternal fever, oxytocin release, duration of labor, and need for instrumental delivery. Clinician awareness of factors affecting breastfeeding can help identify women at risk for breastfeeding difficulties in order to target support and resources effectively. PMID:27121239

  8. Epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure

    PubMed Central

    Walaszczyk, Malgorzata; Knapik, Piotr; Misiolek, Hanna; Korlacki, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Parents have the right to decide on behalf of their children and deny consent to regional anaesthesia. The investigators decided to investigate quality of postoperative analgesia in adolescents undergoing epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure. Material/Methods The study subjects were 61 adolescents aged 11–18 years who underwent pectus excavatum repair with the Nuss procedure. Patients were divided into epidural (n=41) and opioid (n=20) groups, depending on their parents’ consent to epidural catheter insertion. Intraoperatively, 0.5% epidural ropivacaine with fentanyl or intermittent intravenous injections of fentanyl were used. Postoperative analgesia was achieved with either epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine with fentanyl, or subcutaneous morphine via an intraoperatively inserted “butterfly” cannula. Additionally, both groups received metamizol and paracetamol. Primary outcome variables were postoperative pain scores (Numeric Rating Scale and Prince Henry Hospital Pain Score). Secondary outcome variables included hemodynamic parameters, additional analgesia and side effects. Results Heart rate and blood pressure values in the postoperative period were significantly higher in the opioid group. Pain scores requiring intervention were noted almost exclusively in the opioid group. Conclusions Denial of parental consent to epidural analgesia following the Nuss procedure results in significantly worse control of postoperative pain. Our data may be useful when discussing with parents the available anaesthetic techniques for exceptionally painful procedures. PMID:22037752

  9. [Combined subarachnoid-epidural technique for obstetric analgesia].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guisasola, J; García del Valle, S; Gómez-Arnau, J I

    2000-05-01

    Combined spinal-epidural blockade for labor pain has enjoyed increasing popularity in obstetric anesthesia. The usual procedure is to use a single space and a single needle for dural puncture, inserting a spinal needle through an epidural needle followed by insertion of a catheter. A small dose of one or several substances (usually a lipophilic opioid and a local anesthetic) is first injected in the intrathecal space to provide rapid, effective analgesia with minimal muscle blockade. The epidural catheter is used if labor lasts longer than the spinal block, if the spinal block is insufficient, or in case of cesarean section. Combined spinal-epidural blockade is a safe, valid alternative to conventional epidural analgesia and has become the main technique for providing obstetric analgesia in many hospitals. The most widely-recognized advantage of the technique is high maternal satisfaction with rapid and effective analgesia. Mobility of the lower extremities is preserved and the mother is often able to walk. Because opioids are injected into the intrathecal space and because the technique is more invasive than standard epidural analgesia, the potential risk to mother and fetus increases.

  10. Postoperative epidural opioid analgesia: what are the choices?

    PubMed

    de Leon-Casasola, O A; Lema, M J

    1996-10-01

    The administration of hydrophilic opioids via a continuous infusion results in selective spinal analgesia with a low incidence of side effects. Lipophilic opioids may also be associated with spinal effects. However, the doses required to produce postoperative analgesia also produce plasma concentrations within the MEAC. Thus, in clinical practice it may not be possible to limit epidural doses of lipophilic opioids to those associated with spinal analgesia. Regardless of the mechanism of action, epidural administration of lipophilic opioids may offer no clinical advantages over the IV route. Notwithstanding, epidural administration of small doses of lipophilic opioids in combination with local anesthetics may offer significant clinical advantages over systemic administration of opioids alone. Dose-ranging studies will be necessary to determine the ideal concentrations of opioids and local anesthetics, as well as the ratios of the two drugs to obtain optimal analgesia with minimal incidence of side effects.

  11. Effects of a 30-mL Epidural Normal Saline Bolus on Time to Full Motor Recovery in Parturients Who Received Patient-Controlled Epidural Analgesia With 0.125% Bupivacaine With 2 µg/mL of Fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Couture, Darren; Osborne, Lisa; Peterson, Jeffery A; Clements, Sharon M; Sanders, Andrew; Spring, Julie A; Spence, Dennis L

    2016-06-01

    Previous research suggests that an epidural bolus of 30 mL of normal saline after vaginal delivery may decrease the time for recovery from motor block. A double-blind, randomized controlled study was conducted in 46 parturients to determine if a 30-mL normal saline bolus or sham administered via epidural approach after delivery reduces the time to full motor recovery and the time to 2-dermatome regression. No significant difference was found in time to full motor recovery (saline group 83.18 ± 54 minutes vs control group 100.23 ± 48 minutes, P = .27) or time to 2-dermatome sensory regression (saline group 29.32 ± 16.35 minutes vs control group 36.14 ± 14.39 minutes, P = .15). Results suggest no advantage to the administration of a saline bolus after delivery to hasten the motor recovery in parturients. A post hoc power analysis suggested a sample size of 204 subjects would have been needed to show a difference for this dilute local anesthetic regimen. There were no complications to the technique, which suggests that it is safe to perform, but the difference in recovery (approximately 17 minutes) from a dilute local anesthetic dose may not be clinically significant. PMID:27501650

  12. Is epidural analgesia necessary after video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy?

    PubMed

    Kamiyoshihara, Mitsuhiro; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Ibe, Takashi; Atsumi, Jun; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Takeyoshi, Isumi

    2010-10-01

    Most studies have shown that thoracic epidural analgesia reduces postoperative pain, but it carries potential risks. Recently, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery has become an established technique that causes minimal postoperative pain. This report shows that thoracic epidural analgesia is not always necessary after video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy. From January to December 2007, 30 consecutive patients who underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy were examined retrospectively. We analyzed the necessity for routine thoracic epidural analgesia. The continuous subcutaneous analgesia catheter for morphine (2 mg in 48 h) was removed from 15 patients on postoperative day 1, and from the other 15 on day 2. We administered loxoprofen sodium hydrate, diclofenac sodium suppository, pentazocine hydrochloride, and mexiletine hydrochloride for postoperative analgesia, as needed. The mean pain score was no more than 1.0. The maximum score was 3.0 on day 0, and 2.0 on day 14; subsequently, no pain score exceeded 2.0. The postoperative hospital stay was 8.7 ± 0.8 days. All patients made uneventful postoperative recoveries. There is no need for thoracic epidural analgesia after every video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy because our patients recovered with no serious complication. Less invasive surgical approaches should require simpler postoperative pain management. PMID:20947601

  13. Unilateral anhidrosis: A rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Gulbahar, Gultekin; Gundogdu, Ahmet Gokhan; Alkan, Güzide; Baysalman, Hatice Baran; Kaplan, Tevfik

    2016-02-01

    Management of pain following thoracotomy is an important issue for the control of early morbidity. We herein present the case of a patient who was referred to our hospital after a fall from a height. Right-sided multiple rib fractures, hemopneumothorax, and diaphragmatic rupture were detected. Thoracic epidural catheterization was performed for pain management just before thoracotomy. The patient developed unilateral anhidrosis postoperatively. We discuss this rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia with a review of relevant literature.

  14. Horner syndrome during lumbar epidural analgesia for obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Schachner, S M; Reynolds, A C

    1982-06-01

    Horner syndrome (ptosis, miosis, anhidrosis, and facial and conjunctival vasodilation) is a recognized complication of lumbar epidural analgesia for labor and delivery. Alone, it presents no significant risk to mother or fetus, as resolution is spontaneous and complete. Horner syndrome may, however, be associated with significant maternal hypotension and therefore should be an indication for close maternal and fetal monitoring to provide reassurance.

  15. Epidural analgesia complicated by dural ectasia in the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Chelsea; Hofkamp, Michael P.; Noonan, Patrick T.; McAllister, Russell K.; Pilkinton, Kimberly A.; Diao, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the Marfan syndrome are considered to be high risk during pregnancy and warrant a complete multidisciplinary evaluation. One goal is to minimize hemodynamic fluctuations during labor since hypertensive episodes may result in aortic dissection or rupture. Although they may prevent these complications, neuraxial techniques may be complicated by dural ectasia. The case of a parturient with the Marfan syndrome and mild dural ectasia is presented. During attempted labor epidural placement, unintentional dural puncture occurred. A spinal catheter was used for adequate labor analgesia, and a resultant postdural puncture headache was alleviated by an epidural blood patch under fluoroscopic guidance.

  16. Epidural analgesia complicated by dural ectasia in the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Chelsea; Hofkamp, Michael P.; Noonan, Patrick T.; McAllister, Russell K.; Pilkinton, Kimberly A.; Diao, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the Marfan syndrome are considered to be high risk during pregnancy and warrant a complete multidisciplinary evaluation. One goal is to minimize hemodynamic fluctuations during labor since hypertensive episodes may result in aortic dissection or rupture. Although they may prevent these complications, neuraxial techniques may be complicated by dural ectasia. The case of a parturient with the Marfan syndrome and mild dural ectasia is presented. During attempted labor epidural placement, unintentional dural puncture occurred. A spinal catheter was used for adequate labor analgesia, and a resultant postdural puncture headache was alleviated by an epidural blood patch under fluoroscopic guidance. PMID:27695168

  17. Effect of parecoxib combined with thoracic epidural analgesia on pain after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiao-Min; Fang, Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Ding, Ming; Liu, Qiu-A-Xue

    2016-01-01

    Background Thoracotomy results in severe postoperative pain potentially leading to chronic pain. We investigated the potential benefits of intravenous parecoxib on postoperative analgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA). Methods Eighty-six patients undergoing thoracic surgery were randomized into two groups. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) was used until chest tubes were removed. Patients received parecoxib (group P) or placebo (group C) intravenously just 0.5 h before the operation and every 12 h after operation for 3 days. The intensity of pain was measured by using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and recorded at 2, 4, 8, 24, 48, 72 h after operation. The valid number of PCA, the side effects and the overall satisfaction to analgesic therapy in 72 h were recorded. Venous blood samples were taken before operation, the 1st and 3rd day after operation for plasma cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α level. The occurrence of residual pain was recorded using telephone questionnaire 2 and 12 months after surgery. Results Postoperative pain scores at rest and on coughing were significantly lower with the less valid count of PCA and greater patient satisfaction in group P (P<0.01). Adverse effect and the days fit for discharge were comparable between two groups. The cortisol levels in placebo group were higher than parecoxib group at T2. The level of ACTH both decreased in two groups after operation but it was significantly lower in group P than that in group C. There were no changes in plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels before and after analgesia at T1 and T2 (P>0.05). The occurrence of residual pain were 25% and 51.2% separately in group P and C 3 months postoperatively (P<0.05). Conclusions Intravenous parecoxib in multimodal analgesia improves postoperative analgesia provided by TEA, relieves stress response after thoracotomy, and may restrain the development of chronic pain. PMID:27162662

  18. Patient-controlled sedation and analgesia during SWL.

    PubMed

    Uyar, M; Uyar, M; Uğur, G; Bílge, S; Ozyar, B; Ozyurt, C

    1996-10-01

    Sixty unpremedicated outpatients undergoing elective extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) using a Dornier MPL 9000 lithotripter were randomly assigned to receive either propofol-alfentanil (PA group; N = 30) or midazolam-alfentanil (MA group; N = 30) by a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) device for sedation and analgesia. Although pain intensity scores were lower after 20 minutes and sedation was more pronounced in the MA group, both drug regimens produced satisfactory sedation and analgesia and allowed the maximum number of shockwaves to be given. Alfentanil consumption was less in the MA group (P < 0.05). Both groups were hemodynamically stable. The patients in the MA group had slower ventilation rates, lower oxygen saturation, and higher end-tidal carbon dioxide levels. Use of MA was associated with more episodes of oxygen desaturation to < 90% (30% vs. 11%; P < 0.05). One patient in the PA group and three patients in the MA group developed bradypnea (< 10 breaths/min). Patient satisfaction was very high with the two sedative-analgesic techniques. Propofol and midazolam, when given in combination with alfentanil using a PCA pump, may provide safe, effective analgesia and sedation during lithotripsy. Patient-controlled sedation and analgesia may provide optimal conditions for SWL of urinary tract stones and is a useful alternative to other forms of anesthesia and analgesia.

  19. Overdose of opioid from patient-controlled analgesia pumps.

    PubMed

    Notcutt, W G; Knowles, P; Kaldas, R

    1992-07-01

    Two incidence have occurred in our hospital when a patient-controlled analgesia pump has accidentally delivered the whole contents of the syringe of diamorphine (60 mg) over a period of approximately 1 h. Electrical corruption of the pumps' program has been identified as the probable cause. All pumps of this type have been modified to prevent such occurrences.

  20. Comparison of epidural analgesia and cryoanalgesia in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Brichon, P Y; Pison, C; Chaffanjon, P; Fayot, P; Buchberger, M; Néron, L; Bocca, A; Verdier, J; Sarrazin, R

    1994-01-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 120 patients undergoing elective thoracotomy for parenchymal disease. Patients were randomized into three groups: A (control group), B (epidural analgesia), C (freezing of intercostal nerves). Subjective pain relief was assessed on a linear visual analog scale. Analgesic requirements were evaluated during the 12 days following surgery, or until discharge if earlier. The vital capacity (VC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) were measured on the day before operation and on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 7th postoperative days (POD). Subjective pain relief was significantly better in Group B in comparison with Group A (P < 0.05) or C (P < 0.05). Group C had the lowest score on the 11th and 12th POD but differences were not statistically significant. Requirements for intravenous analgesics were lower in Group B than in the control group (P < 0.05) during the first 3 POD, and in group C than in the control group the day of operation (P < 0.05). Oral analgesic requirements, when compared with controls, were lower in group B during the first 5 POD, and lower in group C on the 3rd and the 4th POD (P < 0.05). Cryoanalgesia led to a slight but not significant increase in VC and FEV1. Epidural analgesia led to a significant increase when compared with controls in FEV1 during the first 3 POD, and in FVC on the 7th POD (P < 0.05). It is concluded that epidural analgesia led to the best pain relief and restoration of pulmonary function after thoracotomy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7811482

  1. [Failure of extension of epidural analgesia to anesthesia for emergency cesarean section].

    PubMed

    Gago, A; Guasch, E; Gutiérrez, C; Guiote, P; Gilsanz, F

    2009-01-01

    Epidural analgesia provides effective control of labor pain and allows emergency cesarean section to be performed without recourse to general anesthesia. This technique is subject to failure, however. We sought to determine the incidence of failure of extension of epidural analgesia for labor to epidural anesthesia for emergency cesarean section. We also analyzed possible risk factors for failure. A 2-month observational study was carried out in a tertiary-care university hospital in patients who had an epidural catheter inserted for labor analgesia and who later underwent emergency cesarean section. Epidural catheter failure was defined if additional analgesia was required during surgery or if general anesthesia was required. Data were gathered on possible risk factors, such as obesity, difficult epidural puncture, leakage of blood on insertion, history of cesarean delivery, need for rescue analgesia, and level of satisfaction with analgesia during dilation. In total, 134 emergency cesareans were performed in women carrying an epidural catheter. The catheter failed to administer the anesthetic in 18 patients (13.4%). General anesthesia was required in 9 cases (6.7%). Difficult insertion (more than 2 attempts) was associated with a higher failure rate (P=.064). The relative risk of epidural catheter failure was 2.86-fold higher when rescue analgesia was needed during delivery than in cases when no supplement was required (P=.021). Receiving adequate analgesia during labor seems to be a protective factor (80%) against anesthetic catheter failure during cesarean section (P=.01). We conclude that high demand for rescue analgesia and signs of inadequate analgesia during labor should warn of epidural catheter failure if extension to anesthesia becomes necessary for a cesarean delivery.

  2. Epidural analgesia for childbirth: effects of newer techniques on neonatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Capogna, Giorgio; Camorcia, Michela

    2004-01-01

    New low-dose, local anesthetic-opioid combinations, combined spinal epidural analgesia, and new anesthetic drugs, such as ropivacaine and levobupivacaine, have modified the anesthetic practice in obstetric labor analgesia. These new analgesic techniques have less or no neonatal effects when compared with traditional epidural labor analgesia. They also have less effect on mode of delivery, which may in turn affect neonatal outcome. The use of very diluted or low concentrations of local anesthetic solutions may reduce their placental passage and thus the possible subtle neonatal effects. Small doses of epidural or spinal opioids alone or combined with low doses of local anesthetics does not affect the well-being of the neonate at birth. When considering the neonatal outcome, combined spinal epidural analgesia is as well tolerated as low-dose epidural analgesia. Transient fetal heart rate changes have been described immediately after the administration of intrathecal or epidural opioids. Maternal hypotension may also occur at the onset of epidural analgesia. Whether the occurrence of transient fetal heart rate changes or maternal hypotension immediately after the epidural block may influence the neonatal outcome at birth needs verification.

  3. The effects of cryoanalgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia in patients undergoing thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Yang, M K; Cho, C H; Kim, Y C

    2004-11-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects of cryoanalgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia on pain and respiratory complications in patients undergoing thoracotomy. Ninety patients were prospectively randomised to epidural analgesia alone (n = 45) or epidural analgesia and cryoanalgesia combined (n = 45). We monitored the use of rescue pain medication and changes in forced vital capacity and forced expired volume in 1 s, and recorded pain and opioid-related side-effects during the immediate postoperative period. The incidence of post-thoracotomy pain and numbness were also assessed up to the sixth month after surgery. Cryoanalgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia was associated with earlier recovery in pulmonary function, less pain during movement and a lower daily requirement for rescue analgesia one week after surgery. However, the combination of cryoanalgesia and epidural analgesia failed to decrease the incidence of long-term pain and numbness. In view of its associated long-term morbidity, cryoanalgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia is not recommended for patients undergoing thoracotomy. PMID:15479314

  4. Patient-controlled oral analgesia versus nurse-controlled parenteral analgesia after caesarean section: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bonnal, A; Dehon, A; Nagot, N; Macioce, V; Nogue, E; Morau, E

    2016-05-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of early patient-controlled oral analgesia compared with parenteral analgesia in a randomised controlled non-inferiority trial of women undergoing elective caesarean section under regional anaesthesia. Seventy-seven women received multimodal paracetamol, ketoprofen and morphine analgesia. The woman having patient-controlled oral analgesia were administered four pillboxes on the postnatal ward containing tablets and instructions for self-medication, the first at 7 h after the spinal injection and then three more at 12-hourly intervals. Pain at rest and on movement was evaluated using an 11-point verbal rating scale at 2 h and then at 6-hourly intervals for 48 h. The pre-defined non-inferiority limit for the difference in mean pain scores (patient-controlled oral analgesia minus parenteral) was one. The one-sided 95% CI of the difference in mean pain scores was significantly lower than one at all time-points at rest and on movement, demonstrating non-inferiority of patient-controlled oral analgesia. More women used morphine in the patient-controlled oral analgesia group (22 (58%)) than in the parenteral group (9 (23%); p = 0.002). The median (IQR [range]) number of morphine doses in the patient-controlled oral analgesia group was 2 (1-3 [1-7]) compared with 1 (1-1 [1-2]); p = 0.006) in the parenteral group. Minor drug errors or omissions were identified in five (13%) women receiving patient-controlled oral analgesia. Pruritus was more frequent in the patient-controlled oral analgesia group (14 (37%) vs 6 (15%) respectively; p = 0.03), but no differences were noted for other adverse events and maternal satisfaction. After elective caesarean section, early patient-controlled oral analgesia is non-inferior to standard parenteral analgesia for pain management, and can be one of the steps of an enhanced recovery process. PMID:26931110

  5. Maternal pyrexia associated with the use of epidural analgesia in labour.

    PubMed

    Fusi, L; Steer, P J; Maresh, M J; Beard, R W

    1989-06-01

    To establish the effect of pain relief on maternal temperature during labour forty patients who went into spontaneous labour with a single fetus, had a normal temperature (less than 37.5 degrees C), and had no clinical evidence of infection were investigated prospectively. They were divided into two comparable groups--one receiving pethidine and the other epidural analgesia. Both groups had much the same temperatures at the beginning of labour and before any analgesic administration. The mean temperature in the pethidine group remained constant during labour, whereas in the epidural analgesia group it showed a significant rise after only 6 hours of labour. This rise was not related to any clinical evidence of infection. Patients receiving epidural analgesia during labour are at increased risk of developing pyrexia. This pyrexia may be the result of vascular and thermoregulatory modifications induced by epidural analgesia.

  6. [Labor epidural analgesia for a woman with a pityriasis versicolor in the lumbar region].

    PubMed

    Dubar, G; Omarjee, M; Viguié, C; Barbarot, S; Mignon, A

    2011-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is usually contraindicated in case of infection at the site of needle insertion. Tinea versicolor is a benign superficial cutaneous fungal infection caused by the proliferation of a skin commensal yeast of low pathogenicity. We report the case of a pregnant woman with a tinea versicolor in the lumbar region, who benefited from a labor epidural analgesia, realised with reinforced antiseptic measures. No neurological or infectious complication occurred.

  7. Evaluation of use of electronic patient controlled analgesia pumps to improve patient safety in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Dykes, Patricia; Mcintosh, Kathleen; Buckley, Elizabeth; Yoon, Catherine; Luppi, Carol; Bane, Anne; Bates, David W

    2014-01-01

    Patient controlled analgesia (PCA) and Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) pumps are methods of pain control with complex smart infusion devices and are widely used in hospitals. Smart PCA/PCEA pumps can be programmed with the dose and rate of medications within pre-set ranges. However, adverse effects have been reported associated with these pumps' use. In this paper, we describe a prevalence observational study where observers used an electronic data collection tool to record pump settings and medications with PCA pumps, corresponding medication orders to identify errors. The results showed that there were many labeling and tubing change tag errors, which were a violation of hospital policy. A few potential harmful medication errors were identified but no critical errors. Study results suggest the importance of a standard process of PCA pump use. Next steps include implementing a safety bundle for improving PCA practice to support safe and effective pain management.

  8. Postoperative urinary retention in a dog following morphine with bupivacaine epidural analgesia.

    PubMed Central

    Herperger, L J

    1998-01-01

    Urinary retention, overflow incontinence, and subsequent detrusor atony were observed following surgery in which a morphine with bupivacaine epidural injection was used for perioperative analgesia. The premise that the urinary retention may have been due to the effects of the morphine component of the epidural is discussed, along with other possible causes. PMID:9789679

  9. Epidural hematoma after thoracic epidural analgesia in a patient treated with ketorolac, mefenamic acid, and naftazone: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Dae Geun; Kim, Seok-Kon; Kim, Juri

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male undergoing thoracotomy and bleeding control received a preoperative thoracic epidural for postoperative analgesia. On the fifth postoperative day, paralysis of both lower limbs occurred and urgent magnetic resonance imaging showed massive anterior epidural hematoma. During laminectomy and decompression, platelet dysfunction was diagnosed and preoperative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs medications were supposed to the cause of platelet dysfunction. After infusion of ten units of platelet concentrate, coagulopathy was improved. We should be more careful to drugs with antiplatelet effect when using regional analgesia. PMID:24729848

  10. [Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) in clinical practice: effects, technique, complications and suggestions during anticoagulant treatment].

    PubMed

    Passarani, S; Pedrazzini, G; Paino, R; Paleari, G

    2001-03-01

    The effects of thoracic peridural analgesia (TEA) on the neuroendocrine response to surgery are well known, but, at the present this technique is not widely used especially in Italy. The aim of this paper is to give information and suggestions on thoracic epidural analgesia in thoracic and cardiac surgery, and to discuss how anticoagulant therapy may interfere on this technique.

  11. Epidural analgesia is superior to local infiltration analgesia in children with cerebral palsy undergoing unilateral hip reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kjeldgaard Pedersen, Line; Nikolajsen, Lone; Rahbek, Ole; Uldall Duch, Birgitte; Møller-Madsen, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Treatment of postoperative pain in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is a major challenge. We investigated the effect of epidural analgesia, high-volume local infiltration analgesia (LIA), and an approximated placebo control on early postoperative pain in children with CP who were undergoing unilateral hip reconstruction. Patients and methods — Between 2009 and 2014, we included 18 children with CP. The first part of the study was a randomized double-blind trial with allocation to either LIA or placebo for postoperative pain management, in addition to intravenous or oral analgesia. In the second part of the study, the children were consecutively included for postoperative pain management with epidural analgesia in addition to intravenous or oral analgesia. The primary outcome was postoperative pain 4 h postoperatively using 2 pain assessment tools (r-FLACC and VAS-OBS) ranging from 0 to 10. The secondary outcome was opioid consumption over the 21-h study period. Results — The mean level of pain 4 h postoperatively was lower in the epidural group (r-FLACC: 0.7; VAS-OBS: 0.6) than in both the LIA group (r-FLACC: 4.8, p = 0.01; VAS-OBS: 5.2, p = 0.02) and the placebo group (r-FLACC: 5.2, p = 0.01; VAS-OBS: 6.5, p < 0.001). Corrected for body weight, the mean opioid consumption was lower in the epidural group than in the LIA group and the placebo group (both p < 0.001). Interpretation — Epidural analgesia is superior to local infiltration analgesia for early postoperative pain management in children with cerebral palsy who undergo unilateral hip reconstruction. PMID:26541479

  12. Epidural analgesia for labour and delivery. Current evidence.

    PubMed

    Marucci, M; Fiore, T

    2004-09-01

    Currently, evidence-based medicine indicates that epidural analgesia (EA) labor is not associated with cesarean and instrumental delivery for dystocia. This evidence was obtained from clinical investigations of variability in clinical labor management. An optimized balance between anesthesiological and obstetric practice is vitally important for securing spontaneous delivery. The total dose of local anesthetic for EA may be associated with operative delivery when there is a lack of obstetric care standardization and co-interventions reducing unintended EA effects. Furthermore, combining local anesthetic low dose and opioid low dose may produce a new balance with obstetric management. Physiological and pharmacological knowledge together with recent clinical findings suggest that combined opioid-local anesthetic low dose EA causes minimal negative effects on labor progress and is effective and safe in terms of maternal and neonatal outcome. Internal communication between obstetricians and anesthesiologists is essential for optimizing EA labor management. Processes of health care quality management, such as medical audit and peer review, should be routinely practiced to reach this goal. PMID:15467496

  13. Fentanyl versus tramadol with levobupivacaine for combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labor

    PubMed Central

    Chatrath, Veena; Khetarpal, Ranjana; Sharma, Sujata; Kumari, Pratibha; Sudha; Bali, Kusum

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neuraxial labor analgesia using new local anesthetics such as levobupivacaine has become very popular by virtue of the safety and lesser motor blockade caused by these agents. Combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) has become the preferred method for labor analgesia as it combines benefits of both spinal analgesia and flexibility of the epidural catheter. Adding opioids to local anesthetic drugs provide rapid onset and prolonged analgesia but may be associated with several maternal and fetal adverse effects. The purpose of this study is to compare fentanyl and tramadol used in CSEA in terms of duration of analgesia and frequency of the adverse fetomaternal outcome. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 primiparas with a singleton pregnancy in active labor were given CSEA after randomly allocating them in two groups of 30 each. Group I received intrathecal 2.5 mg levobupivacaine + 25 μg fentanyl followed by epidural top ups of 20 ml 0.125% solution of the same combination. Group II received 25 mg tramadol instead of fentanyl. Epidural top ups were given when parturient complained of two painful contractions (visual analogue scale ≥ 4). Data collected were demographic profile of the patients, analgesic qualities, side- effects and the fetomaternal outcome. Results: Patients in Group II had significantly prolonged analgesia (145 ± 9 minutes) than in Group I (95 ± 7 minutes). Patients receiving fentanyl showed rapid onset of analgesia, but there were more incidence of side-effects like shivering, pruritus, transient fetal bradycardia, hypotension, nausea and vomiting. Only side-effect in the tramadol group was nausea and vomiting. During labor, maternal satisfaction was excellent. Conclusions: Adding tramadol to local anesthetic provides prolonged analgesia with minimal side effects. Fentanyl, when used as adjuvant to local anesthetic, has a rapid onset of analgesia but has certain fetomaternal side-effects. PMID:26240543

  14. Giving Birth With Epidural Analgesia: The Experience of First-Time Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, Ryoko; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our qualitative descriptive study was to describe the birth experiences of women using epidural analgesia for pain management. We interviewed nine primiparas who experienced vaginal births. Five themes emerged: (a) coping with pain, (b) finding epidural administration uneventful, (c) feeling relief having an epidural, (d) experiencing joy, and (e) having unsettled feelings of ambivalence. Although epidural analgesia was found to be effective for pain relief and may contribute to some women’s satisfaction with the birth experience, it does not guarantee a quality birth experience. In order to support and promote childbearing women’s decision making, we recommend improved education on the variety of available pain management options, including their risks and benefits. Fostering a sense of caring, connection, and control in women is a key factor to ensure positive birth experiences, regardless of pain management method. PMID:23277728

  15. Efficacy of continuous epidural analgesia and the implications for patient care in the early postoperative phase.

    PubMed

    Slack, J F; Faut-Callahan, M

    1990-06-01

    Management of postoperative pain has been shown to be inadequately controlled, and, in fact, can have significant deleterious effects on a patient's early postoperative recovery. Continuous epidural analgesia has recently been used to control postoperative pain. This mode of analgesia controls postoperative pain without the delays inherent in the PRN administration of systemic narcotics. This was a multidisciplinary, prospective, randomized, double-blind study of various epidural analgesic agents in 53 thoracic and 81 abdominal surgery patients. The focus of the study was to identify the benefits and problems of continuous epidural analgesia for postoperative pain management and the implications for the nursing care of the patients. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the analgesia was based on the following measures: (1) pain measured at regular intervals in the 72-hour period with a visual analog; (2) pain as measured after 72 hours with the word descriptor section of the McGill Pain Questionnaire; (3) amount of supplemental systemic narcotic analgesic needed; (4) recovery of ambulatory and respiratory function, including ability to perform coughing and deep-breathing exercises; (5) occurrence of adverse effects; and (6) the type and distribution of nursing care problems associated with continuous epidural infusions. The results of this study showed that the level of pain relief and recovery of postoperative function was superior to that provided by the more widely used (PRN) systemic administration of narcotics. With the exception of the report of back pain by patients receiving the normal saline epidural solution, complications did not occur in a significantly greater proportion when using the epidural route. Although some nursing care problems were identified, patients who received epidural analgesia were able to be cared for on general care units with no adverse effects reported. PMID:2285719

  16. Lumbar epidural analgesia in labour: relation to fetal malposition and instrumental delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Hoult, I J; MacLennan, A H; Carrie, L E

    1977-01-01

    The incidence of instrumental delivery and malposition immediately before delivery was compared in patients who were given lumbar epidural analgesia and those who were not. Instrumental delivery was five times more common and a malposition of the fetal head was more than three times as common in the epidural group as in women who did not receive regional analgesia. Similar incidences were found even when the epidural was electively chosen before labour in the absence of medical indications. The instrumental delivery rate was affected by parity, the length of the second stage of labour, and the return of sensation by the second stage but not by other factors studied. The high incidence (20%) of malposition associated with epidural analgesia was not affected by any of the factors studied. The psychological and physical disadvantages of malposition and instrumental delivery have yet to be assessed. In the meantime, when there are no medical indications for epidural analgesia, the advantages of pain relief should be weighed against those of a normal spontaneous delivery. PMID:831964

  17. Ethnic differences in the use of intrapartum epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obstetric epidural analgesia (EA) is widely applied, but studies have reported that its use may be less extensive among immigrant women or those from minority ethnic groups. Our aim was to examine whether this was the case in our geographic area, which contains an important immigrant population, and if so, to describe the different components of this phenomenon. Methods Cross-sectional observational study. Setting: general acute care hospital, located in Marbella, southern Spain. Analysis of computer records of deliveries performed from 2004 to 2010. Comparison of characteristics of deliveries according to the mothers’ geographic origins and of vaginal deliveries noting whether EA was received, using univariate and bivariate statistical analysis and multiple logistic regression (MLR). Results A total of 21,034 deliveries were recorded, and 37.4% of these corresponded to immigrant women. EA was provided to 61.1% of the Spanish women and to 51.5% of the immigrants, with important variations according to geographic origin: over 52% of women from other European countries and South America received EA, compared with around 45% of the African women and 37% of the Asian women. These differences persisted in the MLR model after adjusting for the mother's age, type of labor initiation, the weight of the neonate and for single or multiple gestation. With the Spanish patients as the reference category, all the other countries of origin presented lower probabilities of EA use. This was particularly apparent for the patients from Asia (OR 0.38; 95%CI 0.31-0.46), Morocco (OR 0.49; 95%CI 0.43-0.54) and other Africa (OR 0.55; 95%CI 0.37-0.81). Conclusions We observed a different use of EA in vaginal deliveries, according to the geographic origin of the women. The explanation for this involves a complex set of factors, depending both on the patient and on the healthcare staff. PMID:22818255

  18. Bacterial Infection in Deep Paraspinal Muscles in a Parturient Following Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xuhong; Song, Jiefu; Liang, Qingyuan; Qin, Jibin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial infection related to epidural catheterizations could occur. In general, the incidence of postoperative infection at the insertion site is very low. Paucity literatures are reported for paraspinal muscle infection after epidural analgesia in parturient. We report a case of paraspinal muscle infection shortly after epidural analgesia in a parturient, who was subjected to because of threatened preterm labor. Epidural morphine was administered for 2 days for childbirth pain control. She began to have constant low-back pain and fever on postpartum Day 2. Magnetic resonance image revealed a broad area of subcutaneous edema with a continuum along the catheter trajectory deep to the paraspinal muscles. A catheter-related bacterial infection was suspected. The surgical debridement and drainage was required combined with intravenous antibiotics on postpartum Day 3. She was soon cured uncomplicatedly. Epidural analgesia is effective to control labor pain and, in general, it is safe. However, the sequelae of complicated infection may be underestimated. A literature search yielded 7 other cases of catheter-related epidural abscess or soft tissue infection. Vigilance for these infections, especially in postpartum patients with backache, is needed. Moreover, early detection and proper treatment of infectious signs at postanesthetic visit are very important. PMID:26683923

  19. Addition of transversus abdominis plane block to patient controlled analgesia for laparoscopic high anterior resection improves analgesia, reduces opioid requirement and expedites recovery of bowel function

    PubMed Central

    Ris, F; Findlay, JM; Hompes, R; Rashid, A; Warwick, J; Cunningham, C; Jones, O; Crabtree, N

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Opioid sparing in postoperative pain management appears key in colorectal enhanced recovery. Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks offer such an effect. This study aimed to quantify this effect on pain, opioid use and recovery of bowel function after laparoscopic high anterior resection. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of prospective data on 68 patients. Patients received an epidural (n=24), intravenous morphine patient controlled analgesia (PCA, n=22) or TAP blocks plus PCA (n=22) determined by anaesthetist preference. Outcome measures were numerical pain scores (0–3), cumulative intravenous morphine dose and time to recovery of bowel function (passage of flatus or stool). Results There were no differences in patient characteristics, complications or extraction site. The TAP block group had lower pain scores (0.7 vs 1.36, p<0.001) and morphine requirements (8mg vs 15mg, p=0.01) than the group receiving PCA alone at 12 hours and 24 hours. Earlier passage of flatus (2.0 vs 2.7 vs 3.4 days, p=0.002), stool (3.1 vs 4.1 vs 5.5 days, p=0.04) and earlier discharge (4 vs 5 vs 6 days, p=0.02) were also seen. Conclusions Use of TAP blocks was found to reduce pain and morphine use compared with PCA, expedite recovery of bowel function compared with PCA and epidural, and expedite hospital discharge compared with epidural. PMID:25350178

  20. Bilateral interpleural versus lumbar epidural bupivacaine-morphine analgesia for upper abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Demian, Atef D; Wahba, Ashraf M; Atia, Emad M; Hussein, Sami H

    2003-10-01

    This randomized study was designed to compare the effectiveness of bilateral interpleural analgesia with lumbar epidural analgesia, on postoperative pain relief in upper abdominal surgery. The studied patients were randomely allocated into either interpleural group "IP" (n = 15) or epidural group "EP" (n = 15). In "IP" group, preanesthetic bilateral interpleural block was done using a mixture of bupivacaine 0.5% (0.8 mg/kg) and 2 mg morphine diluted to 50 ml saline for each side. In "EP" group, the same mixture-diluted in 20 ml saline-was injected in the epidural space (L2-3). The general anesthetic technique was the same in both groups. Hemodynamic, gasometric, verbal pain score (VPS) values and complications were compared in both techniques. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) readings were in the accepted normal range in the perioperative period although significant lower readings were detected in "EP" group. No significant differences were displayed in blood gasometric variables between the two groups. There were considerable level of analgesia in both groups in the postoperative period although "EP" analgesia was superior to "IP". More pain free patients (9 versus 4) and significant lower consumption of nalbuphine were detected in "EP" group. The results of this study indicate that bilateral "IP" analgesia may offer a satisfactory analgesia for upper abdominal surgery when the use of other analgesic techniques may be contraindicated.

  1. Bilateral interpleural versus lumbar epidural bupivacaine-morphine analgesia for upper abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Demian, Atef D; Wahba, Ashraf M; Atia, Emad M; Hussein, Sami H

    2003-10-01

    This randomized study was designed to compare the effectiveness of bilateral interpleural analgesia with lumbar epidural analgesia, on postoperative pain relief in upper abdominal surgery. The studied patients were randomely allocated into either interpleural group "IP" (n = 15) or epidural group "EP" (n = 15). In "IP" group, preanesthetic bilateral interpleural block was done using a mixture of bupivacaine 0.5% (0.8 mg/kg) and 2 mg morphine diluted to 50 ml saline for each side. In "EP" group, the same mixture-diluted in 20 ml saline-was injected in the epidural space (L2-3). The general anesthetic technique was the same in both groups. Hemodynamic, gasometric, verbal pain score (VPS) values and complications were compared in both techniques. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) readings were in the accepted normal range in the perioperative period although significant lower readings were detected in "EP" group. No significant differences were displayed in blood gasometric variables between the two groups. There were considerable level of analgesia in both groups in the postoperative period although "EP" analgesia was superior to "IP". More pain free patients (9 versus 4) and significant lower consumption of nalbuphine were detected in "EP" group. The results of this study indicate that bilateral "IP" analgesia may offer a satisfactory analgesia for upper abdominal surgery when the use of other analgesic techniques may be contraindicated. PMID:14740589

  2. Comparison of epidural oxycodone and epidural morphine for post-caesarean section analgesia: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sng, Ban Leong; Kwok, Sarah Carol; Mathur, Deepak; Ithnin, Farida; Newton-Dunn, Clare; Assam, Pryseley Nkouibert; Sultana, Rehena; Sia, Alex Tiong Heng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Epidural morphine after caesarean section may cause moderate to severe pruritus in women. Epidural oxycodone has been shown in non-obstetric trials to reduce pruritus when compared to morphine. We hypothesised that epidural oxycodone may reduce pruritus after caesarean section. Methods: A randomised controlled trial was conducted in pregnant women at term who underwent caesarean section with combined spinal-epidural technique initiated with intrathecal fentanyl 15 μg. Women received either epidural morphine 3 mg or epidural oxycodone 3 mg via the epidural catheter after delivery. The primary outcome was the incidence of pruritus at 24 h after caesarean section. The secondary outcomes were the pruritus scores, treatment for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), pain scores and maternal satisfaction. Results: One hundred women were randomised (group oxycodone O = 50, morphine M = 50). There was no difference between Group O and M in the incidence of pruritus (n [%] 28 [56%] vs. 31 [62%], P = 0.68) and the worst pruritus scores (mean [standard deviation] 2.6 (2.8) vs. 3.3 [3.1], P = 0.23), respectively. Both groups had similar pain scores at rest (2.7 [2.3] vs. 2.0 [2.7], P = 0.16) and sitting up (5.0 [2.3] vs. 4.6 [2.4], P = 0.38) at 24 h. Pruritus scores were lower at 4–8, 8–12 and 12–24 h with oxycodone, but pain scores were higher. Both groups had a similar need for treatment of PONV and maternal satisfaction with analgesia. Conclusion: There was no difference in the incidence of pruritus at 24 h between epidural oxycodone and morphine. However, pruritus scores were lower with oxycodone between 4 and 24 h after surgery with higher pain scores in the same period. PMID:27053782

  3. Bupivacaine versus bupivacaine plus fentanyl for epidural analgesia: effect on maternal satisfaction.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, J D; Henderson, K; Bowden, M I; Lewis, M; Cooper, G M

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare a combination of epidural fentanyl and bupivacaine with bupivacaine alone for epidural analgesia in labour and to evaluate factors in addition to analgesia that may influence maternal satisfaction. DESIGN--A prospective randomised pilot study. SETTING--Birmingham Maternity Hospital. SUBJECTS--85 primiparous women who requested epidural analgesia in labour and their babies. INTERVENTIONS--Group 1 mothers were treated with bupivacaine conventionally, group 2 mothers with bupivacaine and fentanyl in a more complex way designed to provide satisfactory analgesia but with less troublesome side effects. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Overall maternal satisfaction, maternal perception of epidural analgesia and its side effects, and aspects of mothers' psychological states during labour, quantified using 100 mm visual linear analogue scales; the frequency of normal and operative deliveries; and measurements of neonatal wellbeing. RESULTS--Satisfaction was higher in group 2 mothers (median group difference +3 mm, 95% confidence interval +1 to +5, p = 0.012): this was associated with more normal deliveries (difference between proportions 0.23, 95% confidence interval +0.03 to +0.42); greater self control (median group difference -7 mm, -17 to -2, p = 0.003); and reduced unpleasantness of motor blockade (-10 mm, -19 to -5, p less than 0.001), sensory blockade (-5 mm, -11 to -2, p = 0.002) and shivering (-5 mm, -18 to 0, p = 0.046) at the expense of mild itching (0 mm, 0 to 0, p less than 0.001). Group 1 mothers found restricted movements more unpleasant (-1 mm, -11 to 0, p = 0.006) and were more sleepy (-4 mm, -20 to 0, p = 0.032). The addition of fentanyl to bupivacaine reduced the requirement for local anaesthetic (-33 mg, -55 to -15, p less than 0.001) without compromising analgesia. No adverse effects in neonates were attributed to the use of fentanyl. CONCLUSIONS--The already high maternal satisfaction from conventional epidural analgesia can be improved

  4. The efficacy and safety of low dose epidural butorphanol on postoperative analgesia following cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, K; Rahman, T R; Singh, S N; Bhattarai, B; Basnet, N; Khaniya, S

    2008-01-01

    Butorphanol is considered an effective and safe analgesic after cesarean delivery but is associated with profound dose-dependent sedation. Somnolence may cause hindrance in early mother-baby interaction. This study was designed to assess the analgesic efficacy and to monitor side-effects of low doses (0.5 mg and 0.75 mg) of epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine compared to bupivacaine alone in parturients following cesarean delivery. One hundred and twenty parturients (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 and 2) undergoing cesarean delivery were allocated into three groups: group 1 received epidural 0.125% bupivacaine while group 2 and 3 received an additional 0.5 mg and 0.75 mg butorphanol respectively. A combined spinal, epidural technique was used. Spinal anaesthesia was used for surgery. The epidural route was used for postoperative analgesia with the study drug. Onset, duration and quality of analgesia, lowest visual analogue scales (VAS) score, and side effects were noted. The onset and duration of analgesia in group 2 (4.1+/-2.6 min and 202.4+/-62.8 min) and group 3 (4.0+/-2.5 min and 192.3+/-69.1 min) were significantly different (P<0.01) from group 1 (6.6+/-2.7 min and 145.7+/-89.6 min). The quality of analgesia in terms of time to first independent movement and satisfactory VAS were statistically better (P<0.01) in group 2 (3.9+/-0.3 hour and 8.1+/-0.1 mm) and group 3 (3.8+/-0.4 hour and 8.1+/-0.9 mm) than in group 1 (5.2+/-0.4 hour and 6.3+/-1.3 mm). The incidence of sedation was 5% in all the three groups. A lower dose of epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine produces a significantly earlier onset, longer duration and better quality of analgesia than bupivacaine does. PMID:18709032

  5. Combined general–epidural anesthesia with continuous postoperative epidural analgesia preserves sigmoid colon perfusion in elective infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Panaretou, Venetiana; Siafaka, Ioanna; Theodorou, Dimitrios; Manouras, Andreas; Seretis, Charalampos; Gourgiotis, Stavros; Katsaragakis, Stylianos; Sigala, Fragiska; Zografos, George; Filis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Background: In elective open infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair the use of epidural anesthesia and analgesia may preserve splanchnic perfusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of epidural anesthesia on gut perfusion with gastrointestinal tonometry in patients undergoing aortic reconstructive surgery. Methods: Thirty patients, scheduled to undergo an elective infrarenal abdominal aortic reconstructive procedure were randomized in two groups: the epidural anesthesia group (Group A, n=16) and the control group (Group B, n=14). After induction of anesthesia, a transanally inserted sigmoid tonometer was placed for the measurement of sigmoid and gastric intramucosal CO2 levels and the calculation of regional–arterial CO2 difference (ΔPCO2). Additional measurements included mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and arterial lactate levels. Results: There were no significant intra- and inter-group differences for MAP, CO, SVR, and arterial lactate levels. Sigmoid pH and PCO2 increased in both the groups, but this increase was significantly higher in Group B, 20 min after aortic clamping and 10 min after aortic declamping. Conclusions: Patients receiving epidural anesthesia during abdominal aortic reconstruction appear to have less severe disturbances of sigmoid perfusion compared with patients not receiving epidural anesthesia. Further studies are needed to verify these results. PMID:23493852

  6. Informed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of Irish practice.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, A; Omer, W; Harmon, D

    2014-06-01

    Currently, we do not have a national standard regarding epidural consent in Ireland. The aim of this survey was to assess practice in obstetric units in Ireland with regard to obtaining informed consent prior to epidural insertion, and whether the risks discussed with women are being documented. A postal survey of anaesthetists in Irish obstetric units was performed in January 2012 to assess practice regarding obtaining informed consent prior to epidural insertion, and documentation of the risks discussed. The response rate was 16/18 (88%). There was major variation both in which risks are discussed with women in labour and what risks are quoted. The most frequently quoted risks were headache--15/16 (93.8% of the respondents), partially/not working epidural--15/16 (93.8%), drop in blood pressure--14/16 (87.5%) and temporary backache/local tenderness--12/16 (75%). The more serious risks were not discussed as frequently: permanent nerve damage--8/16 (50%), paralysis--8/16 (50%), epidural abscess/haematoma--6/16 (37.5%), meningitis--3/16 (18.7%). The vast majority of respondents supported introduction of a national standardised information leaflet, detailing all the benefits and risks of epidural analgesia, to be shown to all women before consenting to epidural insertion.

  7. Coagulation status using thromboelastography in patients receiving warfarin prophylaxis and epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Hepner, David L; Concepcion, Mercedes; Bhavani-Shankar, Kodali

    2002-09-01

    To determine the coagulation status of patients receiving postoperative warfarin and epidural analgesia using thromboelastography (TEG(R)).Prospective, observational, clinical study.Orthopedic postoperative division at a university hospital.52 ASA physical status II and III patients undergoing knee arthroplasty and receiving prophylactic warfarin and epidural analgesia.Patients' preoperative and postoperative coagulation status was determined by TEG(R). Daily TEG(R) parameters were obtained until the epidural catheter was removed. TEG(R) parameters include reaction time (R-time or time until the first significant levels of detectable clot formation), K-time (clot firmness), maximum amplitude (MA-clot strength), alpha angle (clot development), and coagulation index (overall coagulation). In addition, daily international normalized ratios (INRs) were obtained as per our routine practice. On the day of catheter removal reaction time was significantly increased compared with preoperative values (p < 0.0001), but it remained within normal ranges. There was no change in the coagulation index. However, INR was abnormal and significantly increased (INR = 1.48+/-0.3; p < 0.0001), compared with preoperative values, on the day when the epidural catheter was removed. When the epidural catheters are removed, overall coagulation status, as measured by TEG(R), and despite an elevated INR (mean INR <1.5), remained within normal limits in patients receiving low-dose warfarin prophylaxis.

  8. Analgesia after total knee replacement: local infiltration versus epidural combined with a femoral nerve blockade. A prospective, randomised pragmatic trial

    PubMed Central

    Goytizolo, Enrique A.; Padgett, Douglas E.; Liu, Spencer S.; Mayman, David J.; Ranawat, Amar S.; Rade, Matthew C.; Westrich, Geoffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    In a randomised controlled pragmatic trial we investigated whether local infiltration analgesia would result in earlier readiness for discharge from hospital after total knee replacement (TKR) than patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) plus femoral nerve block. A total of 45 patients with a mean age of 65 years (49 to 81) received a local infiltration with a peri-articular injection of bupivacaine, morphine, and methylprednisolone, as well as adjuvant analgesics. In 45 PCEA+femoral nerve blockade patients with a mean age of 67 years (50 to 84), analgesia included a bupivacaine nerve block, bupivacaine/hydromorphone PCEA, and adjuvant analgesics. The mean time until ready for discharge was 3.2 days (1 to 14) in the local infiltration group and 3.2 days (1.8 to 7.0) in the PCEA+femoral nerve blockade group. The mean pain scores for patients receiving local infiltration were higher when walking (p = 0.0084), but there were no statistically significant differences at rest. The mean opioid consumption was higher in those receiving local infiltration. The choice between these two analgesic pathways should not be made on the basis of time to discharge after surgery. Most secondary outcomes were similar, but PCEA+femoral nerve blockade patients had lower pain scores when walking and during continuous passive movement. If PCEA+femoral nerve blockade is not readily available, local infiltration provides similar length of stay and similar pain scores at rest following TKR. PMID:23632672

  9. Continuous Cervical Epidural Analgesia in Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Mahesh; Taha, Nafisa; Purohit, Navita; Kothari, Vatsal; Singh, Shweta

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression is a devastating complication of cancer. Patients may often require high doses of opioids that may cause side effects, myoclonus being one such. A 63-year-old male suffering from malignant spinal cord compression was admitted to our institution. The primary team managed him conservatively with pharmacotherapy with no relief of pain, and he experienced myoclonus and sedation as adverse effects. A continuous cervical epidural catheter with local anesthetic infusion was inserted for 5 days to control his pain. This relieved his pain, which was sustained even after we removed the epidural catheter on day 5, for up to 64 days until the time of his death. Continuous cervical epidural local anesthetic infusions may help with refractory pain by deafferentation of noxious stimuli. Central neuraxial blocks may be a valuable rescue in selected patients. PMID:27803576

  10. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Duvekot, J. J.; Roos-Hesselink, J. W.; Gonzalez Candel, A.; van der Marel, C. D.; Adriaens, V. F. R.

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour. PMID:27668095

  11. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Duvekot, J. J.; Roos-Hesselink, J. W.; Gonzalez Candel, A.; van der Marel, C. D.; Adriaens, V. F. R.

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour.

  12. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation.

    PubMed

    van der Knijff-van Dortmont, A L M J; Dirckx, M; Duvekot, J J; Roos-Hesselink, J W; Gonzalez Candel, A; van der Marel, C D; Scoones, G P; Adriaens, V F R; Dons-Sinke, I J J

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour. PMID:27668095

  13. [The characteristics of epidural analgesia during the removal of lumbar intervertebral disk hernias].

    PubMed

    Arestov, O G; Solenkova, A V; Lubnin, A Iu; Shevelev, I N; Konovalov, N A

    2000-01-01

    Epidural analgesia (EA) was used in 29 patients undergoing surgical removal of lumbar discal hernia. Marcain EA with controlled medicinal sleep and non-assisted breathing allowed to perform the whole operation in 27 patients. EA may be ineffective in combination of sequestrated disk hernia with scarry adhesive process. The technique of the operation demands a single use of the anesthetic drug which is potent enough to make blockade throughout the operation up to the end. PMID:10738758

  14. Comparison of epidural analgesia and intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia for post-thoracotomy pain control.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hui; Feng, Yi; Yang, Ba-Xian; Wang, Jun

    2008-04-01

    Epidural analgesia is regarded as the gold method for controlling post-thoracotomy pain. Intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia can also produce satisfactory analgesic effects, but is suspected to increase the incidence of chronic pain. However, randomized controlled trials comparing these two methods for post-thoracotomy acute pain analgesic effects and chronic pain incidents have not been conducted previously. We studied 107 adult patients, allocated randomly to thoracic epidural bupivacaine and morphine or intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia. Acute pain scores and opioid-related side effects were evaluated for three postoperative days. Chronic pain information, including the incidence, severity, and allodynia-like pain, was acquired on the first, third, sixth and twelfth months postoperatively. There was no significant difference on numeral rating scales (NRS) at rest or on motion between the two groups during the three postoperative days. The patient satisfaction results were also similar between the groups. The side effects, especially mild pruritus, were reported more often in the epidural group. Both groups showed high incidence of chronic pain (42.1-72.1%), and no significance between the groups. The incidence of allodynia-like pain reported in cryo group was higher than that in Epidural group on any postoperative month, with significance on the sixth and the twelfth months postoperatively (P<0.05). More patients rated their chronic pain intensity on moderate and severe in cryo group and interfered with daily life (P<0.05). Both thoracic epidural analgesia and intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia showed satisfactory analgesia for post-thoracotomy acute pain. The incidence of post-thoracotomy chronic pain is high. Cryoanalgesia may be a factor that increases the incidence of neuropathic pain. PMID:17870625

  15. Informed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of UK practice.

    PubMed

    Middle, J V; Wee, M Y K

    2009-02-01

    Anaesthetists are legally obliged to obtain informed consent before performing regional analgesia in labour. A postal survey of consultant-led UK anaesthetic units was performed in September 2007 to assess practice regarding obtaining informed consent before inserting an epidural, and documentation of the risks discussed. The response rate was 72% (161/223). There was great variation between units regarding which risks women were informed about and the likely incidence of that risk. One hundred and twenty-three respondents out of 157 providing an epidural service (78%) supported a national standardised information card endorsed by the Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association, with all the benefits and risks stated, to be shown to all women before consenting to an epidural in labour.

  16. Communications during epidural catheter placement for labour analgesia.

    PubMed

    Slater, P; Sellors, J; Cyna, A M

    2011-11-01

    Evidence suggests that anaesthetists' communication can affect patient experience. There is a lack of guidance for anaesthetists as to the optimal verbal communication to use during insertion of epidurals on the labour ward. We recorded the verbal communication used by 14 anaesthetists during the siting of epidural catheters in women on the labour ward; a classification of the language used was subsequently devised. We found that commands and information statements were the most common types of communication used. Individual anaesthetists differed markedly in their use of positive and negative verbal language. This classification of verbal communication that we produced may be of value in future training and research of verbal communication used by anaesthetists on the labour ward.

  17. Comparison Between the Use of Ropivacaine Alone and Ropivacaine With Sufentanil in Epidural Labor Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian; Xu, Shiqin; Qin, Xiang; Li, Xiaohong; Feng, Shan-Wu; Liu, Yusheng; Wang, Wei; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Rong; Shen, Xiaofeng; Wang, Fuzhou

    2015-10-01

    To compare the analgesic efficacy and safety of the sole local anesthetic ropivacaine with the combination of both local anesthetic ropivacaine and opioidergic analgesic sufentanil given epidurally on the labor pain control.After institutional review board approval and patient consent, a total of 500 nulliparas requesting epidural labor analgesia were enrolled and 481 eventually were randomized into 2 groups: a sole local anesthetic group (ropivacaine 0.125%) and a combination of local anesthetic and opioidergic analgesic group (0.125% ropivacaine + 0.3 μg/mL sufentanil). After the test dose, a 10-mL epidural analgesic solution was given in a single bolus, followed by intermittent bolus injection of 10 to 15 mL of the solution. The primary outcome was the analgesic efficacy measured using Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) of pain. Other maternal and infant variables were evaluated as secondary outcomes.A total of 346 participants completed the study. The median NRS pain score during the 1st stage of labor was significantly lower in the combination group 2.2 (interquartile range [IQR]: 1.8-2.7) comparing to the sole local analgesic group 2.4 (IQR: 2.0-2.8) (P < 0.0001). No significant difference was observed in NRS pain score prior epidural analgesia and during the 2nd stage of labor. Patients in both groups rated same satisfaction of analgesia. Patients in the sole local analgesic group experienced fewer side effects than those in the combination group (37.7% vs 47.2%, P = 0.082). The individual analgesia-related cost in the sole local analgesic group was less ($5.7 ± 2.06) than that in the combination group ($9.76 ± 3.54) (P < 0.0001). The incidence of 1-minute Apgar ≤ 7 was lower in the sole local analgesic group 2 (1.2%) than the combination group 10 (5.5%) (P = 0.038). No difference was found between other secondary outcomes.The sole local anesthetic ropivacaine produces a comparable labor analgesic effect as the combination of

  18. Epidural anesthesia and analgesia in the neonate: a review of current evidences.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Souvik; Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Pawar, Dilip K; Arora, Mahesh Kumar; Khanna, Puneet

    2014-10-01

    The role of single shot spinal anesthesia has been established in ex-premature infants at risk of apnea. However, use of epidural anesthesia in neonates is on the rise. In this systematic analysis, we have reviewed the current evidence on the safety and efficacy of the use of single shot and continuous epidural anesthesia/analgesia in neonates. Current clinical practice is guided by evidence based mostly on non-randomized studies, prospective/retrospective case series and surveys. Single shot caudal blockade as a sole technique has been used in neonates mainly for inguinal hernia repair and circumcision. Use of continuous epidural anesthesia through the caudal route or caudo-thoracic advancement of the catheter for major thoracic and abdominal surgery offers good perioperative analgesia. Other observed benefits are early extubation, attenuation of stress response, early return of bowel function and reduction of general anesthesia-related postoperative complications. However, risk of procedure-related and drug-related complications to the developing neural structure remains a serious concern.

  19. Randomized study of intravenous fluid preload before epidural analgesia during labour.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Pirlet, M; Mills, M S; Tuckey, J P; Thomas, T A

    2000-08-01

    We performed a randomized controlled trial of the effect of intravenous fluid preload on maternal hypotension and fetal heart rate (FHR) changes in labour after the first epidural injection. Group 1 (49 women) received 1 litre of crystalloid preload. Group 2 (46 women) received no preload. No statistically significant difference was shown between the two groups for either of the outcomes. Hypotension was found in three women in group 1 and five in group 2 (P = 0.4). Deterioration in FHR pattern was found in four women in group 1 and 11 in group 2 (P = 0.08). This study has not shown a significant increase in the incidence of hypotension when intravenous preload is omitted before epidural analgesia using a low concentration of bupivacaine during labour. Because of the clinical importance of the difference in the rate of FHR deterioration between the two groups, we continue to administer preload for high-risk cases.

  20. Thoracic epidural analgesia to control malignant pain until viability in a pregnant patient

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Jaideep H; Gibson, Mary Elizabeth; Amaro-Driedger, David; Hussain, Mahammad N

    2016-01-01

    Management of nonobstetric pain in the pregnant patient presents unique challenges related to transplacental fetal exposure to opioids and the subsequent risk of neonatal withdrawal syndrome. We present the case of a pregnant patient suffering from the pain of a progressively enlarging thoracoabdominal sarcoma. Epidural analgesia (using local anesthetics with minimal opioid) was utilized over a span of weeks to manage oncologic pain, limiting fetal opioid exposure and culminating in the birth of a healthy infant. While nonobstetric abdominal pain during pregnancy is not that uncommon, neoplastic abdominal pain does appear to be rare. Combined local anesthetic and opioid continuous epidural infusion should be considered a viable option in the pain management approach to obstetric patients with nonobstetric pain associated with malignancy. PMID:27358573

  1. Randomized study of intravenous fluid preload before epidural analgesia during labour.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Pirlet, M; Mills, M S; Tuckey, J P; Thomas, T A

    2000-08-01

    We performed a randomized controlled trial of the effect of intravenous fluid preload on maternal hypotension and fetal heart rate (FHR) changes in labour after the first epidural injection. Group 1 (49 women) received 1 litre of crystalloid preload. Group 2 (46 women) received no preload. No statistically significant difference was shown between the two groups for either of the outcomes. Hypotension was found in three women in group 1 and five in group 2 (P = 0.4). Deterioration in FHR pattern was found in four women in group 1 and 11 in group 2 (P = 0.08). This study has not shown a significant increase in the incidence of hypotension when intravenous preload is omitted before epidural analgesia using a low concentration of bupivacaine during labour. Because of the clinical importance of the difference in the rate of FHR deterioration between the two groups, we continue to administer preload for high-risk cases. PMID:10992845

  2. Efficacy of epidural analgesia for pain management of critically ill patients and the implications for nursing care.

    PubMed

    Slack, J F; Faut-Callahan, M

    1991-11-01

    Management of pain for critically ill patients has been shown to be inadequately controlled and can have serious deleterious effects on a patient's recovery. Continuous epidural analgesia can be used to control pain in critical care patients. This mode of analgesia administration provides pain relief without the delays inherent in the as-needed administration of analgesics. Fifteen critical care unit patients were part of a multidisciplinary, prospective, randomized, double-blind study of various epidural analgesic agents in 43 thoracic and 66 abdominal surgery patients. The purpose of the study was to identify the benefits and problems associated with continuous epidural analgesia administration and the implications for the nursing care of critically ill patients. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the analgesia was based on the following measures: 1) pain measured at regular intervals in the 72-hour period with a visual analog; 2) pain as measured after 72 hours with the word descriptor section of the McGill pain questionnaire; 3) amount of supplemental systemic narcotic analgesic needed; 4) recovery of ambulatory and respiratory function, including ability to perform coughing and deep-breathing exercises; 5) occurrence of adverse effects, and 6) the type and distribution of nursing care problems associated with continuous epidural infusions. The results of this study showed that the level of pain relief and recovery of postoperative function was superior to that provided by the more widely used as-needed systemic administration of narcotics. Although some nursing care problems were identified, continuous epidural analgesia can be used for pain relief in critical care patients, if the analgesia is administered by accurate reliable infusion systems and carefully monitored by nursing staff who are knowledgeable about the pharmacologic considerations of epidural analgesic agents and the management of patient care. PMID:1954060

  3. Exploring factors influencing patient request for epidural analgesia on admission to labor and delivery in a predominantly Latino population.

    PubMed

    Orejuela, Francisco J; Garcia, Tiffany; Green, Charles; Kilpatrick, Charlie; Guzman, Sara; Blackwell, Sean

    2012-04-01

    Ethnic disparities in labor pain management exist. Our purpose is to identify patients' attitudes and beliefs about epidural analgesia in order to develop a culturally competent educational intervention. A prospective observational study was conducted in patients admitted for vaginal delivery between July 1st-31st, 2009. Inclusion criteria were: singleton, term, cephalic, normal fetal heart tracing and no contraindications for epidural. Patients were surveyed regarding their wishes for analgesia, and their reasons for declining epidural. The obstetrics physician performed pain management counseling as is usually done. Patients were asked again about their choice for analgesia. Likert scale questionnaires were used. Wilcoxon signed ranked test was used for categorical variables. Logistic regression was performed to look for predictors of epidural request. Fifty patients were interviewed. Average age was (27.9 ± 6.7), gestational age (39.3 ± 1.3), and a median parity of 2 (range 0-6). 72% declined epidural upon admission, and 61% after counseling (P = 0.14). Most common reasons for declined epidural were 'women should cope with labor pain' (57%), 'fear of back pain' (54%) and 'family/friends advise against epidural' (36%). Acculturation was assessed by years living in the US (10 ± 6.3), preferred language (Spanish 80%) and ethnic self-identification (Hispanic 98%). 38% were high school graduates. In multivariate logistic regression, graduation from high school was the only variable associated to request for epidural in labor (OR 4.94, 95% CI 1.6-15.1). Educational level is associated to requesting an epidural in labor. Knowledge of patients' fears and expectations is essential to develop adequate counseling interventions.

  4. Patient-controlled analgesia using remifentanil in the parturient with thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Jones, R; Pegrum, A; Stacey, R G

    1999-05-01

    Patient-controlled intravenous remifentanil was used to provide analgesia in labour for three thrombocytopaenic women. The most successful regimen comprised a patient-demand bolus of 0.5 microg x kg(-1) with a lockout period of 2-3 min, allowing for a successful demand with each contraction. There was an initial period during which the patient learned to anticipate the next contraction and to deliver a bolus about 30 s beforehand; subsequently the remifentanil provided excellent analgesia, with a range of consumption of 426-1050 microg x h(-1). Apart from one episode of maternal sedation and fetal heart rate decelerations resulting from an excessive demand bolus, mothers and neonates tolerated the remifentanil without sequelae. Owing to rapid metabolism by tissue esterase, the use of remifentanil allows adequate doses of opioid to be administered to the mother to achieve good analgesia, without its accumulation in the fetus.

  5. Analgesia after Epidural Dexamethasone is Further Enhanced by IV Dipyrone, but Not IV Parecoxibe Following Minor Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Righeti, Claudia CF; Kitayama, Antonio T

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural administration of dexamethasone has been suggested for pain control after minor orthopedic surgery. This study was conducted to assess its efficacy after such surgery, combined or not to IV dipyrone, IV parecoxibe or their combination. Methods 91 patients were randomly assigned to seven groups. Patients were submitted to spinal bupivacaine anesthesia combined to epidural administration of either 10 ml saline or 10 mg dexamethasone diluted to 10-ml volume. Patients also received 10 ml IV saline or 1 gr dipyrone and/or 40 mg parecoxibe diluted to 10 ml with saline. Control group (CG) received epidural and IV saline. Dexamethasone group (DexG) received epidural dexamethasone and IV saline. Dipyrone group (DipG) received epidural saline and IV dipyrone. Dex-Dip G received epidural dexamethasone and IV dipyrone. Parecoxibe group (ParG) received epidural saline and IV parecoxibe. Dex-ParG received epidural dexamethasone and IV parecoxibe. Finally, Dex-Dip-ParG received epidural dexamethasone and IV dipyrone plus IV parecoxibe. Results The CG expressed 4h of analgesia and sooner requested pain killer. DexG was similar to DipG or ParG or Dex-ParG (7-hours), and they requested less ketoprofen compared to the CG (P < 0.05). However, the Dex-DipG and the Dex-Dip-ParG resulted in longer time to demand pain killer (17-hours) and less ketoprofen consumption in 24-hours (P < 0.002). Adverse effects were similar among groups. Conclusions The analgesia secondary to epidural dexamethasone was enhanced by IV dipyrone, while no effects were observed by the addition of IV parecoxibe. PMID:25317284

  6. Factors influencing the quality of postoperative epidural analgesia: an observational multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Wranicz, Piotr; Andersen, Hege; Nordbø, Arve; Kongsgaard, Ulf E

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural analgesia (EDA) is used widely for postoperative pain treatment. However, studies have reported a failure rate of EDA of up to 30%. We aimed to evaluate the quality of postoperative EDA in patients undergoing a laparotomy in five Norwegian hospitals. Methods This was a multicenter observational study in patients undergoing a laparotomy with epidural-based postoperative analgesia. Data were registered at three time points. Technical aspects, infusion rates, pain intensity, assessment procedures, side effects, and satisfaction of patients and health personnel were recorded. The use of other pain medications and coanalgesics was registered. Results Three hundred and seventeen patients were included. Pain control at rest was satisfactory in 89% of patients at 24 hours and in 91% at 48 hours. Pain control when coughing was satisfactory in 62% at 24 hours and in 59% at 48 hours. The spread of hypoesthesia was consistent for each individual patient but varied between patients. The hypoesthetic area was not associated with pain intensity, and the precision of the EDA insertion point was not associated with the pain score. Few side effects were reported. EDA was regarded as effective and functioning well by 64% of health personnel. Conclusion EDA was an effective method for postoperative pain relief at rest but did not give sufficient pain relief during mobilization. The use of cold stimulation to assess the spread of EDA had limited value as a clinical indicator of the efficacy of postoperative pain control. Validated tools for the control of EDA quality are needed. PMID:25206312

  7. The fentanyl HCl patient-controlled transdermal system (PCTS): an alternative to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia in the postoperative setting.

    PubMed

    Sinatra, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    Inadequate pain control in the postoperative period not only contributes to patient discomfort, but also causes physiological changes that may result in increased risk of myocardial ischaemia, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. These events complicate postoperative recovery and may lead to longer hospital stays as well as increased healthcare costs. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) has emerged as an effective way for patients to manage their pain, allowing self-administration of small doses of analgesics to maintain a certain level of pain control. PCA is most commonly delivered via an intravenous (IV) or epidural route, and while patient satisfaction is higher with PCA than with conventional methods of analgesic administration, the invasiveness, costs and risk of errors associated with currently available modalities may limit their utility. These systems also require significant healthcare resources, as nurses must manually program the pumps to deliver the correct amount of medication. Several new PCA modalities are being developed to address these limitations. These systems deliver drug through a variety of routes, including nasal transmucosal and transdermal. Most notably, a self-contained, credit card-sized, transdermal PCA system is currently in the final stages of development. The fentanyl HCl patient-controlled transdermal system (PCTS; IONSYS, Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Inc., Raritan, NJ) uses an imperceptible, low-intensity direct current to transfer fentanyl on demand across the skin into the systemic circulation. This compact system is patient-activated, can be applied to the patient's upper arm or chest, and is designed to manage moderate-to-severe pain requiring opioid analgesia. The system delivers a preprogrammed amount of fentanyl HCI over 10 minutes, for a total of 80 doses, or for 24 hours, whichever occurs first. The on-demand dosing and pharmacokinetics of this system differentiate it from the passive transdermal formulation of

  8. Comparison of intramuscular and epidural morphine for postoperative analgesia in the grossly obese: influence on postoperative ambulation and pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Rawal, N; Sjöstrand, U; Christoffersson, E; Dahlström, B; Arvill, A; Rydman, H

    1984-06-01

    In a randomized double-blind study of thirty grossly obese patients undergoing gastroplasty for weight reduction, the effects of intramuscular and epidural morphine were compared as regards analgesia, ambulation, gastrointestinal motility, early and late pulmonary function, duration of hospitalization, and occurrence of deep vein thrombosis in the postoperative period. The patients were operated on under thoracic epidural block combined with light endotracheal anesthesia. A six-grade scale was devised to quantify postoperative mobilization. A radioactive isotope method using 99mTc -plasmin was employed to detect postoperative deep vein thrombosis. For 14 hr after the first analgesic injection, respiratory frequency was noted every 15 min and arterial blood gases were measured hourly. Peak expiratory flow was recorded daily until the patient was discharged from hospital. Spirometry was performed the day before and the day after surgery. Plasma concentrations of morphine were measured after both intramuscular and epidural administration. Both intramuscular and epidural morphine gave effective analgesia, but the average dose of intramuscular morphine was up to seven times greater than that required by the epidural route. A larger number of patients receiving epidural morphine postoperatively were able to sit, stand, or walk unassisted within 6, 12, and 24 hr, respectively. Being alert and more mobile as a result of superior postoperative analgesia from epidural morphine, patients in this group benefited more from vigorous physiotherapy routine, which resulted in fewer pulmonary complications. Furthermore, earlier postoperative recovery of peak expiratory flow and bowel function presumably contributed to a significantly shorter hospitalization in patients receiving epidural morphine. There was no evidence of prolonged respiratory depression in this high-risk category of patients. The 99mTc -plasmin tests revealed no significant difference between the two groups.

  9. Xylazine, ketamine and their combination for lumbar epidural analgesia in water buffalo calves (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Singh, P; Pratap, K; Kinjavdekar, P; Aithal, H P; Singh, G R; Pathak, R

    2006-10-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of xylazine individually (0.05 mg/kg), ketamine individually (2.5 mg/kg), and a combination of xylazine and ketamine (0.05 mg/kg and 2.5 mg/kg) after lumbar epidural administration in water buffalo calves. Fifteen non-descript, male water buffalo calves of 6-8 months of age weighing between 55 and 75 kg were randomly placed in three groups (groups A, B and C). The agents were administered at the first lumbar epidural space. Clinico-physiological parameters, such as analgesia, ataxia, sedation, salivation, heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature were studied. Other haematological and biochemical parameters monitored were haemoglobin, packed cell volume, total leukocyte count, plasma glucose, cortisol, protein albumin, globulin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, alanineamino transferase (ALT), sodium, potassium and chloride. The onset of analgesia (mean +/- SEM) was faster in group C (3.2 +/- 0.20 min) compared with that of group B (4.6 +/- 0.22 min) and group A (34.0 +/- 1.86 min). Analgesia of the thorax, flank, inguinal region, hind limbs, perineum and tail was complete in group C, but mild to moderate in groups A and B. Ataxia was severe in group C and mild in groups A and B. Mild to deep sedation was produced by groups A and C animals. Group B animals failed to produce sedation. Longer duration and greater depth of analgesia was produced in animals of group C. Heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature decreased in groups A and C. The haematological parameters decreased in all the groups. The biochemical parameters like glucose, cortisol, BUN, creatinine, and ALT increased in all the animals. However, total proteins and albumin decreased in the three groups. The plasma electrolytes sodium, potassium and chloride did not show any significant change. The results of this study indicated a possible synergistic analgesic interaction between epidurally administered xylazine and ketamine, without

  10. Consent for labour epidural analgesia: an observational study in a single institution.

    PubMed

    Trumble, J; Lee, J; Slater, P M; Sellors, J; Cyna, A M

    2015-05-01

    There is a wide range of practice amongst obstetric anaesthetists when obtaining consent for women requesting labour epidural analgesia. This is the first prospective observational study recording the number and types of risks mentioned and whether the risk was quantified. Statements of benefits and alternatives to the procedure were also noted. Fourteen anaesthetists, each consulting a single patient, were recorded during the process of obtaining consent and inserting the epidural. The most commonly mentioned risks (median 7) were headache/dural puncture, failure/difficulty with insertion, nerve damage, bleeding/haematoma and infection/epidural abscess. There was no difference between consultants and trainees, although consultants showed greater variance. It was uncommon for anaesthetists to state a benefit (21%) or mention an alternative option (21%), but there was usually a quantitative statement of risk (71%). Data showed a deviation from the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists guidelines and these findings may encourage anaesthetists to reflect on their own practice and guide future research.

  11. Epidural Analgesia With Bupivacaine and Fentanyl Versus Ropivacaine and Fentanyl for Pain Relief in Labor

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shanbin; Li, Bo; Gao, Chengjie; Tian, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of the combinational use of bupivacaine and fentanyl versus ropivacaine and fentanyl in epidural analgesia for labor. Multiple electronic databases were searched by using appropriate MeSH terms, and keywords for original research papers published before October 2014. Meta-analyses were based on mean differences between the groups as well as odds ratios. Statistical heterogeneity was tested by I2 index. Fifteen randomized controlled trials, recruiting 2097 parturient mothers overall, were selected for the meta-analyses. Concentrations of the preparations used (weight/volume; mean and standard deviations) were bupivacaine 0.1023% ± 0.0375%, ropivacaine 0.1095% ± 0.042%, and fentanyl 0.00021% ± 0.000089%. There were no statistically significant differences between both the combinations in the mean change in Visual Analog Score for pain during labor, incidence of instrumental or cesarean delivery, neonate Apgar score of <7, maternal satisfaction, duration of either first or second stage of labor, oxytocin use for induction, onset of analgesia, and duration of analgesia. Women who received ropivacaine and fentanyl had significantly lower incidence of motor blocks (odds ratio [95% CI] = 0.38 [0.30, 0.48] P < 0.00001, fixed effect and 0.38 [0.27, 0.54] P < 0.0001, random effects I2 30%) when compared with women who received bupivacaine and fentanyl. Incidence of side effects was similar for both the combinations. Analgesia with ropivacaine in combination with fentanyl at 0.1%:0.0002% ratio for labor pain relief is associated with lower incidence of motor blocks in comparison with analgesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl at similar ratio (0.1%: 0.0002%). PMID:26061307

  12. Evaluation of Efficacy of Epidural Clonidine with 0.5% Bupivacaine for Postoperative Analgesia for Orthopaedic Lower Limb Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Saravanan; Ganesan, Ilango

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of epidural clonidine in intra and postoperative analgesia, the level of sedation caused by clonidine and monitor its side effects. Materials and Methods Forty patients of ASA1 & ASA2 scheduled for lower limb orthopaediac surgeries were chosen for the study. Study group received 50μg of clonidine diluted to 1ml along with first dose of epidural injection and Control group received 1ml of normal saline along with first dose of epidural. Intra and postoperative vitals, verbal pain rating scale (VRS), sedation score and number of rescue anlgesics required postoperatively were noted. Patients received rescue analgesic when VRS was 1. Results Addition of clonidine to bupivacaine definitely improves the quality of analgesia by reducing the overall pain score, prolonging the duration of the time of first rescue analgesia and causing reduction of total analgesic consumption in the postoperative period without any hemodynamic instability. Sedation may be beneficial during the intraoperative period. Conclusion Epidural clonidine produces long lasting, good quality analgesia with good level of sedation and with minimal side effects. PMID:26500983

  13. Role of Epidural Analgesia within an ERAS Program after Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery: A Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Nader Kamal; Chapuis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural analgesia has been a cornerstone of any ERAS program for open colorectal surgery. With the improvements in anesthetic and analgesic techniques as well as the introduction of the laparoscopy for colorectal resection, the role of epidural analgesia has been questioned. The aim of the review was to assess through a meta-analysis the impact of epidural analgesia compared to other analgesic techniques for colorectal laparoscopic surgery within an ERAS program. Methods. Literature research was performed on PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. All randomised clinical trials that reported data on hospital stay, postoperative complications, and readmissions rates within an ERAS program with and without an epidural analgesia after a colorectal laparoscopic resection were included. Results. Five randomised clinical trials were selected and a total of 168 patients submitted to epidural analgesia were compared to 163 patients treated by an alternative analgesic technique. Pooled data show a longer hospital stay in the epidural group with a mean difference of 1.07 (95% CI 0.06–2.08) without any significant differences in postoperative complications and readmissions rates. Conclusion. Epidural analgesia does not seem to offer any additional clinical benefits to patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery within an ERAS program.

  14. Role of Epidural Analgesia within an ERAS Program after Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery: A Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Studies.

    PubMed

    Borzellino, Giuseppe; Francis, Nader Kamal; Chapuis, Olivier; Krastinova, Evguenia; Dyevre, Valérie; Genna, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural analgesia has been a cornerstone of any ERAS program for open colorectal surgery. With the improvements in anesthetic and analgesic techniques as well as the introduction of the laparoscopy for colorectal resection, the role of epidural analgesia has been questioned. The aim of the review was to assess through a meta-analysis the impact of epidural analgesia compared to other analgesic techniques for colorectal laparoscopic surgery within an ERAS program. Methods. Literature research was performed on PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. All randomised clinical trials that reported data on hospital stay, postoperative complications, and readmissions rates within an ERAS program with and without an epidural analgesia after a colorectal laparoscopic resection were included. Results. Five randomised clinical trials were selected and a total of 168 patients submitted to epidural analgesia were compared to 163 patients treated by an alternative analgesic technique. Pooled data show a longer hospital stay in the epidural group with a mean difference of 1.07 (95% CI 0.06-2.08) without any significant differences in postoperative complications and readmissions rates. Conclusion. Epidural analgesia does not seem to offer any additional clinical benefits to patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery within an ERAS program. PMID:27642630

  15. Role of Epidural Analgesia within an ERAS Program after Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery: A Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Nader Kamal; Chapuis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural analgesia has been a cornerstone of any ERAS program for open colorectal surgery. With the improvements in anesthetic and analgesic techniques as well as the introduction of the laparoscopy for colorectal resection, the role of epidural analgesia has been questioned. The aim of the review was to assess through a meta-analysis the impact of epidural analgesia compared to other analgesic techniques for colorectal laparoscopic surgery within an ERAS program. Methods. Literature research was performed on PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. All randomised clinical trials that reported data on hospital stay, postoperative complications, and readmissions rates within an ERAS program with and without an epidural analgesia after a colorectal laparoscopic resection were included. Results. Five randomised clinical trials were selected and a total of 168 patients submitted to epidural analgesia were compared to 163 patients treated by an alternative analgesic technique. Pooled data show a longer hospital stay in the epidural group with a mean difference of 1.07 (95% CI 0.06–2.08) without any significant differences in postoperative complications and readmissions rates. Conclusion. Epidural analgesia does not seem to offer any additional clinical benefits to patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery within an ERAS program. PMID:27642630

  16. Postoperative epidural analgesia for patients undergoing pectus excavatum corrective surgery: a 10-year retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Asad; Tse, Andrew; Paul, James E; Fitzgerald, Peter; Teh, Bernice

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Managing postoperative pain in patients undergoing minimally invasive pectus excavatum repair (Nuss procedure) is challenging but essential in facilitating ambulation and minimizing the length of stay. Although multiple epidural regimens with varying opioids are presently used for pain management, there is currently no clinical consensus regarding which epidural regimen provides the best analgesia outcomes with the fewest side effects. This 10-year retrospective cohort study was performed to compare the quality of analgesia and the incidence of side effects associated with the three most common epidural regimens used at a tertiary care children’s hospital, in patients undergoing the Nuss procedure. Methods Seventy-two pediatric patients were identified as having been treated with one of three epidural regimens for postoperative pain management following the Nuss procedure: Group A (n=12) received 0.125% bupivacaine and 5 µg/mL fentanyl, Group B (n=21) received 0.125% bupivacaine and 10 µg/mL hydromorphone, and Group C (n=39) received 0.1% ropivacaine and 20 µg/mL hydromorphone. Our primary outcome was maximal daily pain scores (numerical rating scale 0–10), with an analytical focus on postoperative day 1 scores. The primary outcome was analyzed using linear regression. The secondary outcomes included the length of stay, side-effect profiles as reflected by the number of treatments for nausea and pruritus, pain scores according to epidural site insertion, occurrence of breakthrough pain, and presence of severe pain throughout their hospital stay. Secondary outcomes were analyzed using linear or logistic regression adjusted for pain scores at baseline. The criterion for statistical significance was set a priori at alpha =0.05. Results Group A had significantly higher day-1 pain scores (score 5.42/10) than Group B (4.52/10; P=0.030) and Group C (4.49/10; P=0.015) after adjusting for baseline pain and age. No significant difference in maximum daily

  17. Differences Between Patient and Provider Perceptions of Informed Decision Making About Epidural Analgesia Use During Childbirth

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Holly Bianca; Shorten, Allison

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether differences exist between patient and provider perceptions regarding the decision-making process around use of epidural analgesia during childbirth. The dyadic patient–provider Decisional Conflict Scale was modified to measure first-time mother (n = 35) and maternity care provider (n = 52) perceptions. Providers perceived a greater degree of informed decision making than patients (84.97 vs. 79.41, p = .04) and were more likely to recall they upheld patients’ rights to make informed choices than patients were to perceive their rights had been upheld (85.95 vs. 71.73, p < .01). This incongruity highlights the need to align legal principles with practice to create mutual agreement between stakeholder perceptions of informed decision making. PMID:24839385

  18. Epidural diamorphine infusions with and without 0.167% bupivacaine for post-operative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lowson, S M; Alexander, J I; Black, A M; Bambridge, A D

    1994-09-01

    Forty patients who underwent upper or mid-abdominal surgery were randomly allocated to receive a post-operative epidural infusion of 0.083 mg ml-1 of diamorphine in either 0.167% bupivacaine or 0.9% NaCl solution. The nursing staff, who were unaware of which solution was being infused, managed the patients' pain according to a standardized scheme. They adjusted the epidural infusion rates to 3, 5 or 7 ml h-1 according to the patient's hourly reports of pain on a four point verbal rating scale (none, mild, moderate or severe), aiming to use the lowest allowed infusion rate to prevent or reduce any pain that was more than mild. Additional analgesia was given as diclofenac 75 mg intramuscularly if the patients report moderate pain while on the highest infusion rate. The nurses were instructed to summon anaesthetic help if pain relief was still unsatisfactory after diclofenac, but this was never necessary. Diclofenac was needed by six patients receiving diamorphine in saline and one receiving diamorphine in bupivacaine (P < 0.05). The range of average hourly epidural infusion rates was constrained by design to between 3 and 7 ml h-1 but the median of these values was 5 ml h-1 in the diamorphine-saline group and 3.35 ml h-1 in the diamorphine-bupivacaine group (P < 0.02). In patients receiving diamorphine in saline, a median of 6 (range 0-16) of the 24 h reports were of more than mild pain, whereas in the diamorphine-bupivacaine group, the corresponding figures were 2 (range 0-13) (P < 0.02)).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Epidural diamorphine infusions with and without 0.167% bupivacaine for post-operative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lowson, S M; Alexander, J I; Black, A M; Bambridge, A D

    1994-09-01

    Forty patients who underwent upper or mid-abdominal surgery were randomly allocated to receive a post-operative epidural infusion of 0.083 mg ml-1 of diamorphine in either 0.167% bupivacaine or 0.9% NaCl solution. The nursing staff, who were unaware of which solution was being infused, managed the patients' pain according to a standardized scheme. They adjusted the epidural infusion rates to 3, 5 or 7 ml h-1 according to the patient's hourly reports of pain on a four point verbal rating scale (none, mild, moderate or severe), aiming to use the lowest allowed infusion rate to prevent or reduce any pain that was more than mild. Additional analgesia was given as diclofenac 75 mg intramuscularly if the patients report moderate pain while on the highest infusion rate. The nurses were instructed to summon anaesthetic help if pain relief was still unsatisfactory after diclofenac, but this was never necessary. Diclofenac was needed by six patients receiving diamorphine in saline and one receiving diamorphine in bupivacaine (P < 0.05). The range of average hourly epidural infusion rates was constrained by design to between 3 and 7 ml h-1 but the median of these values was 5 ml h-1 in the diamorphine-saline group and 3.35 ml h-1 in the diamorphine-bupivacaine group (P < 0.02). In patients receiving diamorphine in saline, a median of 6 (range 0-16) of the 24 h reports were of more than mild pain, whereas in the diamorphine-bupivacaine group, the corresponding figures were 2 (range 0-13) (P < 0.02)).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7988577

  20. [Pressure Ulcer Caused by Long-term Keeping of the Same Body Position during Epidural Labour Analgesia].

    PubMed

    Naruse, Satoshi; Uchizaki, Sakiko; Mimura, Shinichiro; Taniguchi, Mizuki; Akinaga, Chieko; Sato, Shigehito

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old woman (height: 153 cm, weight : 62.4 kg, non-pregnant weight : 52 kg, uniparous) without underlying diseases who developed pressure ulcer due to keeping a similar body position during long-term epidural delivery. Induction of childbirth was started in gestational week 40, causing reduction of fetal heart rate, which improved after adoption of a right lateral recumbent position. Severe contractions occurred and epidural labour analgesia was started. The fetal heart rate decreased again and induction of childbirth was suspended, but the right lateral recumbent position was maintained. Epidural administration was continued due to persistent contractions. Next morning, induction of childbirth was restarted and birth occurred in approximately 6 hours. The right lateral recumbent position was maintained for approximately 20 hours. At childbirth, a pressure ulcer was present in the intertrochanteric part of the right femur. The causes included insufficient knowledge of medical staff about the risk of pressure ulcer during epidural delivery, and no position change. A decreased sensation and blocked motor nerve caused by epidural anesthesia might have accelerated pressure ulcer development. This case suggests that preventive measures against pressure ulcer are required in epidural anesthesia in pregnant women.

  1. [Pressure Ulcer Caused by Long-term Keeping of the Same Body Position during Epidural Labour Analgesia].

    PubMed

    Naruse, Satoshi; Uchizaki, Sakiko; Mimura, Shinichiro; Taniguchi, Mizuki; Akinaga, Chieko; Sato, Shigehito

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old woman (height: 153 cm, weight : 62.4 kg, non-pregnant weight : 52 kg, uniparous) without underlying diseases who developed pressure ulcer due to keeping a similar body position during long-term epidural delivery. Induction of childbirth was started in gestational week 40, causing reduction of fetal heart rate, which improved after adoption of a right lateral recumbent position. Severe contractions occurred and epidural labour analgesia was started. The fetal heart rate decreased again and induction of childbirth was suspended, but the right lateral recumbent position was maintained. Epidural administration was continued due to persistent contractions. Next morning, induction of childbirth was restarted and birth occurred in approximately 6 hours. The right lateral recumbent position was maintained for approximately 20 hours. At childbirth, a pressure ulcer was present in the intertrochanteric part of the right femur. The causes included insufficient knowledge of medical staff about the risk of pressure ulcer during epidural delivery, and no position change. A decreased sensation and blocked motor nerve caused by epidural anesthesia might have accelerated pressure ulcer development. This case suggests that preventive measures against pressure ulcer are required in epidural anesthesia in pregnant women. PMID:27483666

  2. Patient and Provider Perceptions of Decision Making About Use of Epidural Analgesia During Childbirth: A Thematic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Holly Bianca; Shorten, Allison

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the nature of differences in perceptions of decision making between patients and providers about use of epidural analgesia during labor. Thematic analysis was used to identify patterns in written survey responses from 14 patients, 13 labor nurses, and 7 obstetrician–gynecologists. Results revealed patients attempted to place themselves in an informed role in decision making and sought respect for their decisions. Some providers demonstrated paternalism and a tendency to steer patients in the direction of their own preferences. Nurses observed various pressures on decision making, reinforcing the importance of patients being supported to make an informed choice. Differences in perceptions suggest need for improvement in communication and shared decision-making practices related to epidural analgesia use in labor. PMID:25364218

  3. Can intravenous patient-controlled analgesia be omitted in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Yeon; Park, Jun Seok; Park, Soo Yeun; Kim, Hye Jin; Yeo, Jinseok; Kim, Jong-Chan; Park, Sungsik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Opioid-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) is a popular method of postoperative analgesia, but many patients suffer from PCA-related complications. We hypothesized that PCA was not essential in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery by minimal invasive approach. Methods Between February 2013 and August 2013, 297 patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer were included in this retrospective comparative study. The PCA group received conventional opioid-based PCA postoperatively, and the non-PCA group received intravenous anti-inflammatory drugs (Tramadol) as necessary. Patients reported their postoperative pain using a subjective visual analogue scale (VAS). The PCA-related adverse effects and frequency of rescue analgesia were evaluated, and the recovery rates were measured. Results Patients in the PCA group experienced less postoperative pain on days 4 and 5 after surgery than those in the non-PCA group (mean [SD] VAS: day 4, 6.2 [0.3] vs. 7.0 [0.3], P = 0.010; and day 5, 5.1 [0.2] vs. 5.5 [0.2], P = 0.030, respectively). Fewer patients in the non-PCA group required additional parenteral analgesia (41 of 93 patients vs. 53 of 75 patients, respectively), and none in the non-PCA group required rescue PCA postoperatively. The incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting was significantly higher in the non-PCA group than in the PCA group (P < 0.001). The mean (range) length of hospital stay was shorter in the non-PCA group (7.9 [6-10] days vs. 8.7 [7-16] days, respectively, P = 0.03). Conclusion Our Results suggest that IV-PCA may not be necessary in selected patients those who underwent minimal invasive surgery for colorectal cancer. PMID:25692119

  4. Reporting of 'hypotension' after epidural analgesia during labour. Effect of choice of arm and timing of baseline readings.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Black, A M

    1998-02-01

    We studied 20 women in labour to see how reporting 'hypotension' after obstetric epidural analgesia is affected by position of the blood pressure cuff and baseline definition. Blood pressure was recorded from both arms simultaneously while the woman was semirecumbent and then in the left lateral position. Three readings were then taken after epidural bupivacaine, one left lateral and the remainder right lateral. Before the epidural, blood pressure in the dependent arm in the lateral position was similar to blood pressure in either arm in the semirecumbent position and an average of 10 mmHg (systolic) and 14 mmHg (diastolic) higher than blood pressure in the uppermost arm (p < or = 0.00005). This difference persisted in both lateral positions as epidural analgesia became established. Choosing different definitions of hypotension, baselines and arm to measure blood pressure resulted in 'hypotension rates' between 0% and 75%. For blood pressure measurement in the lateral position, the blood pressure cuff should be placed on the dependent arm.

  5. Reporting of 'hypotension' after epidural analgesia during labour. Effect of choice of arm and timing of baseline readings.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Black, A M

    1998-02-01

    We studied 20 women in labour to see how reporting 'hypotension' after obstetric epidural analgesia is affected by position of the blood pressure cuff and baseline definition. Blood pressure was recorded from both arms simultaneously while the woman was semirecumbent and then in the left lateral position. Three readings were then taken after epidural bupivacaine, one left lateral and the remainder right lateral. Before the epidural, blood pressure in the dependent arm in the lateral position was similar to blood pressure in either arm in the semirecumbent position and an average of 10 mmHg (systolic) and 14 mmHg (diastolic) higher than blood pressure in the uppermost arm (p < or = 0.00005). This difference persisted in both lateral positions as epidural analgesia became established. Choosing different definitions of hypotension, baselines and arm to measure blood pressure resulted in 'hypotension rates' between 0% and 75%. For blood pressure measurement in the lateral position, the blood pressure cuff should be placed on the dependent arm. PMID:9534634

  6. A Comparative Efficacy of Propacetamol and Ketorolac in Postoperative Patient Controlled Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Bong Ha; Park, Ji Hun; Choi, Jung Il; Kim, Woong Mo; Lee, Hyoung Gon; Cho, Soo Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketorolac has been used as a postoperative analgesia in combination with opioids. However, the use of ketorolac may produce serious side effects in vulnerable patients. Propacetamol is known to induce fewer side effects than ketorolac because it mainly affects the central nervous system. We compared the analgesic effects and patient satisfaction levels of each drug when combined with fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Methods The patients were divided into two groups, each with n = 46. The patients in each group were given 60 mg of ketorolac or 2 g of propacetamol (mixed with fentanyl) for 10 minutes. The patients were then given 180 mg of ketorolac or 8 g of propacetamol (mixed with fentanyl and ramosetron) through PCA. We assessed the visual analogue pain scale (VAS) at the time point immediately before administration (baseline) and at 15, 30, and 60 minutes, and 24 hours after administration. Also, the side effects of each regimen and each patient's degree of satisfaction were assessed. Results There was a significant decline in the VAS score in both groups (P < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences in the VAS scores between the groups at each time point. Satisfaction scores between the groups showed no significant difference. Conclusions The efficacy of propacetamol is comparable to that of ketorolac in postoperative PCA with fentanyl. PMID:26175881

  7. Effects of xylazine, lignocaine and their combination for lumber epidural analgesia in water buffalo calves (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Singh, P; Pratap, K; Amarpal; Kinjavdekar, P; Aithal, H P; Singh, G R

    2005-09-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of xylazine alone (0.05 mg/kg), lignocaine alone (2.0 mg/kg) and a combination of xylazine and lignocaine (0.05 mg/kg and 2.0 mg/kg, respectively) after lumbar epidural administration in water buffalo calves. Fifteen nondescript, male water buffalo calves of 6-8 months of age and weighing between 55 and 75 kg were randomly placed in 3 groups (A, B and C). The agents were administered at the 1st lumbar epidural space. Clinico-physiological parameters such as analgesia, ataxia, sedation, salivation, heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature were studied. Other haematological and biochemical parameters monitored were haemoglobin, packed cell volume, total leukocyte count, plasma glucose, cortisol, protein albumin, globulin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, ALT, sodium, potassium and chloride. The onset of analgesia was faster in group C (3.0 +/- 0.44 min) compared with that of group B (4.4 +/- 0.40 min) and group A (34.0 +/- 1.86 min). Analgesia of the thorax, flank, inguinal region, hind limbs, perineum and tail was complete in group C, but mild to moderate in groups A and B. Ataxia was severe in groups B and C and mild in group A. Mild to deep sedation were produced by groups A and C animals. Longer duration and greater depth of analgesia was produced in animals in group C. Heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature decreased in groups A and C. The haematological parameters decreased in all the groups. The biochemical parameters like glucose, cortisol, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, ALT increased in all the animals. However, total proteins and albumin decreased in the 3 groups. The plasma electrolytes sodium, potassium and chloride did not show any significant change. The results of this study indicated a possible additive analgesic interaction between epidurally administered xylazine and lignocaine, without causing any marked systemic effects in water buffalo calves.

  8. Thoracic epidural analgesia: a new approach for the treatment of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Windisch, Olivier; Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Giraud, Raphaël; Morel, Philippe; Bühler, Léo

    2016-01-01

    This review article analyzes, through a nonsystematic approach, the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP) with a focus on the effects of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) on the disease. The benefit-risk balance is also discussed. AP has an overall mortality of 1 %, increasing to 30 % in its severe form. The systemic inflammation induces a strong activation of the sympathetic system, with a decrease in the blood flow supply to the gastrointestinal system that can lead to the development of pancreatic necrosis. The current treatment for severe AP is symptomatic and tries to correct the systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the multiorgan dysfunction. Besides the removal of gallstones in biliary pancreatitis, no satisfactory causal treatment exists. TEA is widely used, mainly for its analgesic effect. TEA also induces a targeted sympathectomy in the anesthetized region, which results in splanchnic vasodilatation and an improvement in local microcirculation. Increasing evidence shows benefits of TEA in animal AP: improved splanchnic and pancreatic perfusion, improved pancreatic microcirculation, reduced liver damage, and significantly reduced mortality. Until now, only few clinical studies have been performed on the use of TEA during AP with few available data regarding the effect of TEA on the splanchnic perfusion. Increasing evidence suggests that TEA is a safe procedure and could appear as a new treatment approach for human AP, based on the significant benefits observed in animal studies and safety of use for human. Further clinical studies are required to confirm the clinical benefits observed in animal studies. PMID:27141977

  9. Thoracic epidural analgesia: a new approach for the treatment of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Windisch, Olivier; Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Giraud, Raphaël; Morel, Philippe; Bühler, Léo

    2016-05-04

    This review article analyzes, through a nonsystematic approach, the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP) with a focus on the effects of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) on the disease. The benefit-risk balance is also discussed. AP has an overall mortality of 1 %, increasing to 30 % in its severe form. The systemic inflammation induces a strong activation of the sympathetic system, with a decrease in the blood flow supply to the gastrointestinal system that can lead to the development of pancreatic necrosis. The current treatment for severe AP is symptomatic and tries to correct the systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the multiorgan dysfunction. Besides the removal of gallstones in biliary pancreatitis, no satisfactory causal treatment exists. TEA is widely used, mainly for its analgesic effect. TEA also induces a targeted sympathectomy in the anesthetized region, which results in splanchnic vasodilatation and an improvement in local microcirculation. Increasing evidence shows benefits of TEA in animal AP: improved splanchnic and pancreatic perfusion, improved pancreatic microcirculation, reduced liver damage, and significantly reduced mortality. Until now, only few clinical studies have been performed on the use of TEA during AP with few available data regarding the effect of TEA on the splanchnic perfusion. Increasing evidence suggests that TEA is a safe procedure and could appear as a new treatment approach for human AP, based on the significant benefits observed in animal studies and safety of use for human. Further clinical studies are required to confirm the clinical benefits observed in animal studies.

  10. [The dosage of sedative was reduced by patient-controlled sedation during epidural anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, K

    1995-01-01

    The dosage of sedatives required for sedation was studied in patients who underwent total abdominal histerectomy under epidural anesthesia using patient-controlled sedation (PCS) and in those with anesthesiologist-controlled sedation (ACS). Patients in experimental groups received 1.0 or 1.5 mg bolus dose of midazolam by their request until desirable sedation was obtained using a computer-controlled device. In control group, anesthesiologists gave 1.5 mg bolus dose of midazolam and repeated until enough sedation was obtained. The total amount of midazolam was 12.15 +/- 3.90 mg (mean +/- SD) in ACS group and showed significant differences from experimental groups (PCS-1.0 group: 7.43 +/- 1.81 mg, PCS-1.5 group: 6.30 +/- 2.81 mg). The level of sedation showed wider variation in PCS groups than in ACS groups. The results suggest that PCS is a technique which allows reduction of sedatives in patients who undergo operation under local anesthesia.

  11. Intravenous Paracetamol Versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia With Morphine for the Pain Management Following Diagnostic Knee Arthroscopy in Trauma Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Seyed Masoud; Esmaeelijah, Aliakbar; Golzari, Samad; Keyhani, Sohrab; Maserrat, Azita; Mohseni, Gholamreza; Ardehali, Seyed Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most patients undergoing outpatient surgeries have the unpleasant experience of high level pain after surgery. Compared with open surgeries, arthroscopic procedures are less painful; however, inadequate pain management could be associated with significant concerns. Opioids alone or in combination with local anesthetics are frequently used for diminishing postoperative pain using intravenous or epidural infusion pumps. Despite morphine various disadvantages, it is commonly used for controlling pain after surgery. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare intravenous paracetamol and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with morphine for the pain management following diagnostic knee arthroscopy in trauma patients. Patients and Methods: Sixty trauma patients who were scheduled to undergo knee arthroscopy were randomly divided into two groups. Patients immediately received intravenous infusion of 1 g paracetamol within 15 minutes after surgery and every 6 hours to 24 hours in the paracetamol group. The patient-controlled analgesia group received morphine through PCA infusion pump at 2 mL/h base rate and 1mL bolus every 15 minutes. Pain level, nausea and vomiting, and sedation were measured and recorded during entering the recovery, 15 and 30 minutes after entering the recovery, 2, 6, and 24 hours after starting morphine pump infusion in the morphine and paracetamol in the paracetamol groups. Results: There was no significant difference regarding the pain level at different times after entering the recovery between the two groups. No one from the paracetamol group developed drug complications. However, 22.3% in the PCA morphine suffered from postoperative nausea; there was a statistically significant difference regarding the sedation level, nausea, and vomiting at various times between the two groups. Conclusions: Intravenous administration of paracetamol immediately after knee arthroscopy improved postoperative pain, decreased analgesic administration

  12. Patient-controlled epidural diamorphine for post-operative pain: verbal rating and visual analogue assessments of pain.

    PubMed

    Kunst, G; Chrubasik, S; Black, A M; Chrubasik, J; Schulte-Mönting, J; Alexander, J I

    1996-03-01

    Twenty-two patients were studied while receiving epidural analgesia with diamorphine after major lower abdominal surgery under combined regional and general anaesthesia. Epidural PCA began when the intraoperative epidural block with bupivacaine wore off enough for the patient to request treatment. It was started with 2 mg of diamorphine and continued with a reducible background infusion that was initially set at 0.2 mg h-1 and supplemented by on-demand doses of 0.2 mg, with a lockout time of 15 min. The patients received routine post-operative monitoring and care, with pain at rest being assessed on a four-point verbal rating scale (VRS, none, mild, moderate, severe) at 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min from the start of ePCA, then hourly until 24 h and then 2-hourly until 48 h. VRS on coughing and a 10 cm visual analogue score (VAS) at rest and on coughing were recorded at the same times at 4 h, then 4 hourly until 24 h and then at 48 h, at which times, blood samples were also taken to measure morphine concentrations by radioimmunoassay. Analgesia started promptly and reached a maximum at between 30 and 45 min, accompanied by maximum sedation. Thereafter clinically acceptable analgesia was maintained without undue sedation for 48 h, though pain on coughing was less well controlled than pain at rest. After the initial loading dose of diamorphine, the 95% confidence intervals (CI) for further consumption were 3.7 to 17 mg (average 9.7) in the first 24 h and 2.1 to 12.9 mg (average 6.7 mg) in the second 24 h. The plasma morphine concentrations rose to a plateau by about 15 min, with concentrations within 95% CI from 0 to 11 ng mliters-1 (average 5 ng mliters-1. The VRS and VAS pain scores were analysed by a conservative approach that treated them as ordinal data, and by a parametric approach that treated them as interval data. Both approaches conveyed broadly similar information about the post-operative analgesia.

  13. Long-Term Stability of Tramadol and Ketamine Solutions for Patient-Controlled Analgesia Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Junfeng; Qin, Wengang; Chen, Fuchao; Xia, Zhongyuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Subanesthetic doses of ketamine as an adjuvant to tramadol in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for postoperative pain have been shown to improve the quality of analgesia. However, there are no such commercially available drug mixtures, and the stability of the combination has rarely been assessed. Material/Methods Admixtures were assessed for periods of up to 14 days at 4°C and 25°C. Three different mixtures of tramadol and ketamine (tramadol 5.0 mg/mL + ketamine 0.5 mg/mL, tramadol 5.0 mg/mL + ketamine 1.0 mg/mL, and tramadol 5.0 mg/mL + ketamine 2.0 mg/mL) were prepared in polyolefin bags by combining these 2 drugs with 0.9% sodium chloride (normal saline [NS]). The chemical stability of the admixtures was evaluated by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and by measurement of pH values. Solution appearance and color were assessed by observing the samples against black and white backgrounds. Solutions were considered stable if they maintained 90% of the initial concentration of each drug. Results The percentages of initial concentration of tramadol and ketamine in the various solutions remained above 98% when stored at 4°C or 25°C over the testing period. No changes in color or turbidity were observed in any of the prepared solutions. Throughout this period, pH values remained stable. Conclusions The results indicate that the drug mixtures of tramadol with ketamine in NS for PCA delivery systems were stable for 14 days when stored in polyolefin bags at 4°C or 25°C. PMID:26306476

  14. Effect of Dexmedetomidine Alone for Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia After Gynecological Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuqin; Liu, Wenjuan; Xu, Zan; Wang, Fumei; Zhang, Chuanfeng; Wang, Baosheng; Wang, Kaiguo; Yu, Jingui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gynecological laparoscopic surgery is minimally invasive compared with open surgical approaches, but postoperative pain is generally undermanaged. Pain management strategies related to the procedure-specific efficacy are needed. Many studies have shown that dexmedetomidine (DEX) has opioid-sparing properties. It is not clear whether DEX used alone for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) could reduce postoperative pain after an invasive procedure. We hypothesized that DEX alone would reduce postoperative pain in women patients undergoing an elective gynecological laparoscopic procedure. This CONSORT-prospective randomized controlled clinical study aimed to investigate the effects of DEX alone for intravenous PCA after gynecological laparoscopic operation. Forty women patients scheduled for elective gynecological laparoscopy were enrolled into the study at Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute and randomly allocated into two groups (n = 20 each). In the DEX group (group D), the intravenous PCA protocol was DEX 0.25 μg/kg/h diluted to 100 mL in 0.9% saline. In the fentanyl group (group F), the PCA protocol was fentanyl 20 μg/kg diluted to 100 mL in 0.9% saline. The primary outcome was the mean pain score on a visual analogue scale (VAS) at 6 hours after the operation. The secondary outcomes included the Ramsay sedation score, the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), satisfaction with pain control, and time to recovery of gastrointestinal function. There were no significant differences in the patients’ characteristics and intraoperative measurements (P > 0.05). No patients received rescue analgesic. The mean VAS scores at 6 hours post-operatively were not significantly different between the groups (P > 0.05). The incidence of PONV was less in group D than in group F (P < 0.05). The Ramsay sedation scores were not significantly between the groups (P > 0.05). Satisfaction with pain control was

  15. Patient-controlled inhalational analgesia in prehospital care: a study of side-effects and feasibility.

    PubMed

    Stewart, R D; Paris, P M; Stoy, W A; Cannon, G

    1983-11-01

    A clinical trial of a 50:50 mixture of nitrous oxide and oxygen for pain relief was carried out to determine the feasibility of its use in a field setting and the side-effects produced by this sedative/analgesic. The gas mixture was delivered from a single-tank system using a demand-valve apparatus which was triggered by the patient's inspiratory effort. This "patient-controlled" sedation/analgesia was provided to 1243 patients over a period of 18 months. Of the 1201 patients evaluated, 20.6% reported minor side-effects consisting of nausea or vomiting (5.7%), dizziness or lightheadedness (10.3%), excitement (3.7%), and numbness (0.3%). Ninety-one (7.6%) patients became drowsy or fell into a light sleep but all were readily aroused by verbal command. All retained the ability to cough or swallow on command. No consistent or clinically adverse changes were found in BP or pulse rates. The trial supports the concept that this agent is a promising sedative/analgesic for the relief of mild to moderate pain and anxiety. Because of its safety, it is particularly suited to use in prehospital emergency care.

  16. Patient-Controlled Analgesia Following Vertical Gastroplasty: a Comparison with Intramuscular Narcotics.

    PubMed

    Kyzer; Ramadan; Gersch; Chaimoff

    1995-02-01

    BACKGROUND: patient-controlled analgesia PCA is a rapidly spreading approach to the management of post-operative pain. The suitability of this method for the morbidly obese patient undergoing bariatric surgery has not yet been determined. METHODS: in the present study we randomly compared two groups of patients undergoing silastic ring vertical gastroplasty. One group received PCA (12 patients) and the other (11 patients) received intermittent doses of pethidine intramuscularly. RESULTS: the cumulative morphine use during the first post-operative day was 52.71 +/- 1.83 mg by the PCA group and an equivalent of 24.55 +/- 3.42 mg morphine by the IM pethidine group (p = 0.0002). The analgesic and sedative effects by the PCA were found to be superior. There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidence of side-effects or complications, except a higher, unexplained incidence of wound infection in the PCA group. CONCLUSION: use of PCA in patients undergoing bariatric surgery has obvious advantages and appears to be a safe procedure. PMID:10733789

  17. A comparison of oxycodone and fentanyl in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nan-Seol; Yoo, Sie Hyeon; Chung, Jin Hun; Chung, Ji-Won; Seo, Yonghan; Chung, Ho-Soon; Jeon, Hye-Rim; Gong, Hyung Youn; Lee, Hyun-Young; Mun, Seong-Taek

    2015-01-01

    Background We planned to compare the effect of intravenous oxycodone and fentanyl on post-operative pain after laparoscopic hysterectomy. Methods We examined 60 patients were randomized to postoperative pain treatment with either oxycodone (n = 30, Group O) or fentanyl (n = 30, Group F). The patients received 10 mg oxycodone/100 µg fentanyl with ketorolac 30 mg before the end of anesthesia and then continued with patient-controlled analgesia for 48 h postoperatively. Results The accumulated oxycodone consumption was less than fentanyl during 8, 24 and 48 h postoperatively. Numeric rating score of Group O showed significantly lower than that of Group F during 30 min, 2, 4, 8 and 24 h postoperatively. The incidences of adverse reactions were similar in the two groups, though the incidence of nausea was higher in the Group O during the 24 and 48 h postoperative period. Conclusions Oxycodone IV-PCA was more advantageous than fentanyl IV-PCA for laparoscopic hysterectomy in view of accumulated oxycodone consumption, pain control and cost beneficial effect. However, patient satisfaction was not good in the group O compared to group F. PMID:26045929

  18. Morphine for Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia May Inhibit Delirium Tremens

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chia-Ta; Liao, Wen-Wei; Huang, William

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alcoholism is common among trauma patients and often lacks the appropriate monitoring. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS), including delirium tremens (DT), can be associated with significant postoperative morbidity and mortality. However, appropriate acute pain management may protect against delirium; the administration of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV - PCA) may not only alleviate pain, but also reduce the incidence of post-operative delirium. IV-PCA is widely used today; however, little attention has been paid to its influence on the development of AWS or DT post-surgery. Here we present a case in which the administration of IV-PCA may have delayed the onset of DT that interfered with postoperative care and the initiation of psychiatric consultation. The literature was reviewed to determine the potential mechanisms behind the effects of IV-PCA on the onset of AWS or DT. IV-PCA may delay the onset of DT. It is imperative to take into consideration trauma patients’ psychiatric history including answers to questions on alcoholism, so that when an IV-PCA is administered and then discontinued, adequate interventions to prevent further morbidity associated with AWS and DT can be initiated in sufficient time. PMID:26512587

  19. Risk of acute hypotension following epidural analgesia during deep regional hyperthermia: a case report.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, J; Hoff, A M; Oudkerk, M; de Kock, W; van de Merwe, S A; de Jong, P C

    1992-01-01

    A potentially dangerous complication occurring during deep regional hyperthermia is described. A patient receiving epidural analgesics for pain caused by a large pelvic recurrent rectal tumour was treated by hyperthermia induced by electromagnetic radiation. The epidural infusion pump failed during heating and further analgesics were administered by bolus injections into the epidural space. Following the second bolus injection, a severe drop in arterial blood pressure was observed. The most likely multifactorial pathogenesis is discussed and measures to avoid such an event are recommended.

  20. [Factors justifying the choice of labor epidural analgesia by nulliparous women: experience at a maternity center in Antananarivo, Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Ramorasata, J A C; Raveloson, N E; Randriamahavonjy, R; Tohaina, D; Keita, H

    2011-10-01

    Epidural analgesia is the most effective method for pain relief during labor. This 10-year exploratory descriptive study on factors underlying women's decisions to request or refuse labor epidural analgesia (LEA) was carried out at a level III maternity hospital in Antananarivo, Madagascar. All patients underwent a pre-anesthesia check-up (PAC) between 32 and 34 weeks of amenorrhea. During the PAC, a questionnaire was administered to determine socio-economic aspects, level of education, and knowledge about labor pain and LEA. In addition, LEA was proposed and patients were asked to explain their reasons for accepting or refusing the procedure. The purpose of this report was to describe the factors underlying acceptance or refusal of EA by nulliparous women. A total of 41 nulliparous women were included. Fourteen (34.14%) accepted LEA and 27 (63.86%) refused. Mean age was 27 years in the acceptance group and 25 years in the refusal group. No patient had good knowledge about LEA. Nulliparous women that accepted EA had a higher socio-economic level, expected stronger labor pain, were better informed about EA, and expressed greater confidence in medical care. In addition to economic aspects, the main reasons for refusing EA involved fear and family background. PMID:22235633

  1. Development of the fentanyl iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS) for patient-controlled analgesia of postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Minkowitz, Harold S; Danesi, Hassan; Ding, Li; Jones, James B

    2015-09-01

    The fentanyl iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS) is a needle-free, patient-activated drug delivery system used for patient-controlled analgesia in adult hospitalized patients with postoperative pain. The system design has been updated to a separated system consisting of a Controller and a Drug Unit, and has had regulatory submissions in USA and Europe in 2014. Fentanyl ITS has been shown to be therapeutically equivalent to morphine intravenous (iv.) patient-controlled analgesia. One of the advantages of fentanyl ITS is that patients have better mobility as there is no need for an iv. pump, iv. lines and pole. The introduction of the updated fentanyl ITS will add a versatile tool to the postoperative pain management armamentarium.

  2. Epidural Analgesia With Bupivacaine and Fentanyl Versus Ropivacaine and Fentanyl for Pain Relief in Labor: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shanbin; Li, Bo; Gao, Chengjie; Tian, Yue

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of the combinational use of bupivacaine and fentanyl versus ropivacaine and fentanyl in epidural analgesia for labor. Multiple electronic databases were searched by using appropriate MeSH terms, and keywords for original research papers published before October 2014. Meta-analyses were based on mean differences between the groups as well as odds ratios. Statistical heterogeneity was tested by I² index. Fifteen randomized controlled trials, recruiting 2097 parturient mothers overall, were selected for the meta-analyses. Concentrations of the preparations used (weight/volume; mean and standard deviations) were bupivacaine 0.1023% ± 0.0375%, ropivacaine 0.1095% ± 0.042%, and fentanyl 0.00021% ± 0.000089%. There were no statistically significant differences between both the combinations in the mean change in Visual Analog Score for pain during labor, incidence of instrumental or cesarean delivery, neonate Apgar score of <7, maternal satisfaction, duration of either first or second stage of labor, oxytocin use for induction, onset of analgesia, and duration of analgesia. Women who received ropivacaine and fentanyl had significantly lower incidence of motor blocks (odds ratio [95% CI] = 0.38 [0.30, 0.48] P < 0.00001, fixed effect and 0.38 [0.27, 0.54] P < 0.0001, random effects I² 30%) when compared with women who received bupivacaine and fentanyl. Incidence of side effects was similar for both the combinations. Analgesia with ropivacaine in combination with fentanyl at 0.1%:0.0002% ratio for labor pain relief is associated with lower incidence of motor blocks in comparison with analgesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl at similar ratio (0.1%: 0.0002%).

  3. Differences in the Frequency of Use of Epidural Analgesia between Immigrant Women of Turkish Origin and Non-Immigrant Women in Germany – Explanatory Approaches and Conclusions of a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Petruschke, I.; Ramsauer, B.; Borde, T.; David, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The starting point of this study was the considerably lower rate of epidural analgesia use among women of Turkish origin in Germany compared to non-immigrant women in the German Research Foundation (DFG)-funded study entitled “Perinatal Health and Migration Berlin”. The study aimed to identify possible differences in the womenʼs attitudes towards epidural analgesia. Methods: Exploratory study with semi-structured interviews, interviews lasting 17 minutes on average were conducted with 19 women of Turkish origin and 11 non-immigrant women at a Berlin hospital. The interviews were subjected to a qualitative content analysis. Results: Immigrant women of Turkish origin in Germany more frequently ascribe meaning to the pain associated with vaginal delivery. They more frequently categorically reject the use of epidural analgesia, 1) for fear of long-term complications such as paralysis and back pain and 2) based on the view that vaginal delivery with epidural analgesia is not natural. Information on epidural analgesia is frequently obtained from a variety of sources from their social setting, in particular, by word of mouth. The women in both groups stated that they would take the decision to use epidural analgesia independent of their partnerʼs opinion. Discussion: The differences in epidural analgesia use rates observed correspond to the womenʼs attitudes. For the immigrant women of Turkish origin in Germany, the attitude towards using epidural analgesia is based in part on misinformation. In order to enable the women to make an informed decision, epidural analgesia could receive a stronger focus during childbirth courses.

  4. Differences in the Frequency of Use of Epidural Analgesia between Immigrant Women of Turkish Origin and Non-Immigrant Women in Germany – Explanatory Approaches and Conclusions of a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Petruschke, I.; Ramsauer, B.; Borde, T.; David, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The starting point of this study was the considerably lower rate of epidural analgesia use among women of Turkish origin in Germany compared to non-immigrant women in the German Research Foundation (DFG)-funded study entitled “Perinatal Health and Migration Berlin”. The study aimed to identify possible differences in the womenʼs attitudes towards epidural analgesia. Methods: Exploratory study with semi-structured interviews, interviews lasting 17 minutes on average were conducted with 19 women of Turkish origin and 11 non-immigrant women at a Berlin hospital. The interviews were subjected to a qualitative content analysis. Results: Immigrant women of Turkish origin in Germany more frequently ascribe meaning to the pain associated with vaginal delivery. They more frequently categorically reject the use of epidural analgesia, 1) for fear of long-term complications such as paralysis and back pain and 2) based on the view that vaginal delivery with epidural analgesia is not natural. Information on epidural analgesia is frequently obtained from a variety of sources from their social setting, in particular, by word of mouth. The women in both groups stated that they would take the decision to use epidural analgesia independent of their partnerʼs opinion. Discussion: The differences in epidural analgesia use rates observed correspond to the womenʼs attitudes. For the immigrant women of Turkish origin in Germany, the attitude towards using epidural analgesia is based in part on misinformation. In order to enable the women to make an informed decision, epidural analgesia could receive a stronger focus during childbirth courses. PMID:27681522

  5. Bupivacaine in combination with fentanyl or sufentanil in epidural/intrathecal analgesia for labor: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Wang, Huixia; Gao, Chengjie

    2015-05-01

    This study is to compare the effectiveness of combinational use of bupivacaine with fentanyl (BUPI-FEN) and sufentanil (BUPI-SUF) in epidural/intrathecal analgesia for labor. Electronic databases were searched for relevant research papers published between 1985 and 2014. Meta-analyses of mean differences or odds ratios were performed and statistical heterogeneity between the studies tested by I(2) index. Ten studies recruiting a total of 728 women in labor were selected. Concentrations of the anesthetics used as mean ± sd were bupivacaine 0.115 ± 0.056%, fentanyl 0.0007 ± 0.001%, and sufentanil 0.00017 ± 0.00022%. Duration of analgesia was not significantly different between BUPI-SUF and BUPI-FEN administered mothers (mean difference [95%CI] of -33.55 [-74.94, 7.83] minutes; P = .11) under random effects. The onset of analgesia was also not significantly different between both groups (mean difference [95%CI] of -0.61 [-1.38, 0.16] minutes; P = .12). The number of neonates with Apgar score < 7 was significantly lower in BUPI-FEN group (odd ratio [95%CI] of 0.31 [0.10, 0.95]; P < .05). Pruritus incidence was similar. In conclusion, BUPI-FEN combination exhibits significantly better tolerability at an approximate ratio of 6 FEN:1 SUF, albeit, both fentanyl and sufentanil in combination with bupivacaine provide similar analgesic properties via the epidural or intrathecal routes for labor pain relief.

  6. Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia to manage the postoperative pain in patients undergoing craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyo-Seok; An, Sang-Bum; Park, Hee-Pyoung; Lim, Young-Jin; Hwang, Jung-Won; Jeon, Young-Tae

    2011-01-01

    Background This randomized controlled study evaluated the efficacy of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) with fentanyl and ketorolac for neurosurgical patients, and compared the effectiveness of IV-PCA with intermittent analgesics injection. Methods The patients undergoing craniotomy were randomly assigned to two groups. Patients of group P (n = 53) received fentanyl (0.2 µg/kg/hr) and ketorolac (0.3 mg/kg/hr) via IV-PCA, and those of group N (n = 53) received intermittent fentanyl or ketorolac injection as needed. Pain was evaluated using a 0-10 visual analogue scale (VAS) at postoperative 1, 4, and 24 hr. The amount of infused analgesic drugs, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, systolic arterial pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and the incidence of nausea and miosis were measured at the same time points. Results Although VAS of pain (VASp) was comparable at postoperative 1 hr (P = 0.168) between the two groups, the group P had significantly lower VASp at postoperative 4 hr (P = 0.007) and 24 hr (P = 0.017). In group P, less analgesic drugs were administered at postoperative 1 hr, and more analgesic drugs were administered at postoperative 24 hr. There were no differences between two groups with respect to nausea, GCS, systolic arterial pressure, and heart rate. IV-PCA did not further incur respiratory depression or miosis. Conclusions IV-PCA with fentanyl and ketorolac after craniotomy is more effective analgesic technique, without adverse events, than the intermittent administration of analgesics. PMID:21359078

  7. Serial Analgesic Consumptions and Predictors of Intravenous Patient-controlled Analgesia with Cluster Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To elucidate the dynamics of analgesic consumption regarding intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IVPCA) during postoperative period is rather complex partly due to between-patient variation and partly due to within-patient variation. A statistical method was proposed to classify serial analgesic consumption into different classifications that were further taken as the multiple outcomes on which to explore the associated predictors. Methods: We retrospectively included 3284 patients administrated by IVPCA for 3 days after surgery. A repeated measurement design corresponding to serial analgesic consumption variables defined as six-hour total analgesic consumptions was adopted. After determining the numbers of clusters, serial analgesic consumptions were classified into several homogeneous subgroups. Factors associated with new classifications were identified and quantified with a multinominal logistic regression model. Results: Three distinct analgesic classifications were aggregated, including “high”, ”middle” and “low” level of analgesic consumption of IVPCA. The mean analgesic consumptions on 12 successive analgesic consumptions at 6-hour interval of each classification consistently revealed a decreasing trend. As the trends were almost parallel with time, this suggests the time-invariant proportionality of analgesic consumption between the levels of analgesic consumption of IVPCA. Patient’s characteristics, like age, gender, weight, height, and cancer status, were significant factors associated with analgesic classifications. Surgical sites had great impacts on analgesic classifications. Discussion: The serial analgesic consumptions were simplified into 3 analgesic consumptions classifications. The identified predictors are useful to recognize patient’s analgesic classifications before using IVPCA. This study explored a new approach to analysing dynamic changes of postoperative analgesic consumptions. PMID:26710218

  8. Nurses' Perceptions and Attitudes Toward Use of Oral Patient-Controlled Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Riemondy, Susan; Gonzalez, Lorie; Gosik, Kirk; Ricords, Amy; Schirm, Victoria

    2016-04-01

    Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) administered intravenously is a generally well-accepted therapy by nurses and patients. PCA devices are now available for oral medications, allowing patients to self-administer pain pills without requesting them from the nurse. Successful introduction of new pain medication delivery devices can depend on nurses' knowledge and attitudes. The aim of this institutional review board approved project was to evaluate nurses' perceptions and attitudes toward using an oral PCA device for patients' pain. A 4-week study was designed and conducted at an academic medical center on an orthopedic unit and a women's health unit. Nurse participants received education on using the oral PCA device and were invited to complete a pre- and poststudy knowledge and attitude survey regarding pain management. Nurses and patients also completed a questionnaire about perceptions related to using the oral PCA device. Findings showed that nurses' attitudes toward using the oral PCA device were less favorable than those of patients, suggesting that nurses may require additional education for acceptance of this device. Results from 37 nurses showed improvement in overall knowledge and attitudes, from 70.8% pretest to 74.2% post-test. Although improvement was not statistically significant (p = .1637), two items showed significant improvement. Knowledge about the effectiveness of NSAIDS was 27.5% pretest compared with 60.0% post-test (p = .0028); and understanding about use of opioids in patients with a history of substance abuse was 50% pretest compared with 70% post-test (p = .0531). Helping nurses overcome the perceived barriers to use of an oral PCA device has potential implications for better pain management as well as enhanced patient satisfaction. PMID:27091584

  9. Epidural analgesia for post-caesarean pain relief: a comparison between morphine and fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Blanco, J; Blanco, E; Carceller, J M; Sarabia, A; Solares, G

    1987-11-01

    In 20 post-operative patients who had undergone caesarean section, morphine 2 mg or fentanyl 75 micrograms in 0.9% saline were given epidurally in a randomized study, to compare their effectiveness in providing post-operative pain relief and the incidence of untoward reaction. There was a faster onset of action (P less than 0.01) and the quality of pain relief was substantially better after epidural fentanyl (P less than 0.01). However, the duration of action was markedly longer after epidural morphine (P less than 0.01). There was a significantly greater incidence of urinary retention after morphine administration (P less than 0.05). It is suggested that fentanyl gives better relief of pain than morphine when given epidurally.

  10. Simultaneous appearance of cerebral venous thrombosis and subdural hematomas as rare cause of headache in puerperium following epidural analgesia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Župan, Željko; Sotošek Tokmadžić, Vlatka; Matanić-Manestar, Marinka; Šustić, Alan; Antončić, Igor; Dunatov, Siniša; Pavlović, Ivan; Antulov, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report the first case of simultaneous appearance of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) and bilateral subdural hematomas (SDHs) following epidural analgesia for labor and delivery and to point out the difficulty of establishing such a diagnosis in the presence of postpartum headache. A 26-year old primigravida with a history of epilepsy received epidural analgesia for delivery. Three days after the uneventful spontaneous vaginal delivery she complained about the headache. Patient responded very well to the pain medication and oral hydration, and the headache was relieved. Ten days after the delivery, the headache reoccurred, and an epidural blood patch was performed that successfully relieved her symptom. Stronger progressive headache with nausea reappeared two days later and the parturient was readmitted to hospital. Urgent neuroimaging examinations detected CVT of right the transverse sinus, ipsilateral cortical veins, and partially occluded superior sagittal sinus, as well as bilateral subacute/chronic SDHs. The treatment of the patient with low molecular weight heparin and antiaggregation therapy was effective. In this case, the diagnosis was delayed because of atypical clinical presentation and potentially confounding events (epidural analgesia and assumption that it was a case of PDPH). It is important to carefully observe patients in such conditions and promptly conduct suitable diagnostic tests. Otherwise, unrecognized intracranial complications and delay of appropriate therapy could be life-threatening. PMID:22911532

  11. Regional anesthesia or patient-controlled analgesia and compartment syndrome in orthopedic surgical procedures: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Elizabeth BS; Maleki, Ana Hosseinzadeh; Jahromi, Leila; Hermecz, Brittany Nelson; Nelson, Lauren E; Vetter, Imelda L; Evenhuis, Spencer; Riesenberg, Lee Ann

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature on the use of regional anesthesia (RA) and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) was conducted in patients who require orthopedic extremity procedures to determine whether either analgesic technique contributes to a delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome (CS). A total of 34 relevant articles (28 case reports and six research articles) were identified. Of all case report articles published after 2009, the majority (75%) concluded that RA does not put the patient at an increased risk of a delayed diagnosis of CS. Of these, only two relevant prospective research studies focusing on RA or PCA and their relationship to CS were identified. Neither study resulted in any cases of CS. However, both had relatively small sample sizes. Given the lack of evidence identified in this systematic review, prospective studies or large-scale retrospective data reviews are needed to more strongly advocate the use of one modality of analgesia over the other in this patient population. PMID:27785097

  12. A Comparison of the Analgesia Efficacy and Side Effects of Paravertebral Compared with Epidural Blockade for Thoracotomy: An Updated Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaoyin; Ren, Hao; Fu, Shukun; Li, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Objective The most recent systematic review and meta-analysis comparing the analgesic efficacy and side effects of paravertebral and epidural blockade for thoracotomy was published in 2006. Nine well-designed randomized trials with controversial results have been published since then. The present report constitutes an updated meta-analysis of this issue. Summary of Background Thoracotomy is a major surgical procedure and is associated with severe postoperative pain. Epidural analgesia is the gold standard for post-thoracotomy pain management, but has its limitations and contraindications, and paravertebral blockade is increasingly popular. However, it has not been decided whether the analgesic effect of the two methods is comparable, or whether paravertebral blockade leads to a lower incidence of adverse side effects after thoracotomy. Methods Two reviewers independently searched the databases PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (last performed on 1 February, 2013) for reports of studies comparing post-thoracotomy epidural analgesia and paravertebral blockade. The same individuals independently extracted data from the appropriate studies. Result Eighteen trials involving 777 patients were included in the current analysis. There was no significant difference in pain scores between paravertebral blockade and epidural analgesia at 4–8, 24, 48 hours, and the rates of pulmonary complications and morphine usage during the first 24 hours were also similar. However, paravertebral blockade was better than epidural analgesia in reducing the incidence of urinary retention (p<0.0001), nausea and vomiting (p = 0.01), hypotension (p<0.00001), and rates of failed block were lower in the paravertebral blockade group (p = 0.01). Conclusions This meta-analysis showed that PVB can provide comparable pain relief to traditional EPI, and may have a better side-effect profile for pain relief after thoracic surgery. Further high-powered randomized trials are to need to

  13. Efficacy of epidural local anesthetic and dexamethasone in providing postoperative analgesia: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jebaraj, B; Khanna, P; Baidya, DK; Maitra, S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dexamethasone is a potent anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antiemetic drug. Individual randomized controlled trials found a possible benefit of epidural dexamethasone. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to estimate the benefit of epidural dexamethasone on postoperative pain and opioid consumption and to formulate a recommendation for evidence-based practice. Materials and Methods: Prospective, randomized controlled trials comparing the analgesic efficacy of epidural local anesthetic and dexamethasone combination, with local anesthetic alone for postoperative pain management after abdominal surgery, were planned to be included in this meta-analysis. PubMed, PubMed Central, Scopus, and Central Register of Clinical Trials of the Cochrane Collaboration (CENTRAL) databases were searched for eligible controlled trials using the following search words: “Epidural”, “dexamethasone”, and “postoperative pain”, until February 20, 2015. Results: Data from five randomized control trials have been included in this meta-analysis. Epidural dexamethasone significantly decreased postoperative morphine consumption (mean difference −7.89 mg; 95% confidence interval [CI]: −11.66 to −3.71) and number of patients required postoperative rescue analgesic boluses (risk ratio: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.41-0.63). Conclusion: The present data shows that the addition of dexamethasone to local anesthetic in epidural is beneficial for postoperative pain management. PMID:27375389

  14. Comparison of Pain Scores in Postoperative Patients: Intravenous Morphine Patient-Controlled Analgesia vs Iontophoretic Transdermal Fentanyl

    PubMed Central

    Caram, Anthony M; Patel, Nirav; Sandler, Hayden M

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative management of pain has traditionally utilized intravenous (IV) morphine for pain control. An alternative approach to the invasive patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) system is the administration of transdermal analgesics, such as fentanyl. In 2006 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the fentanyl hydrochloride (fentanyl HCl) iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS), which utilizes iontophoretic technology to produce a controlled electrical current that propels ionized fentanyl molecules into the systemic vasculature. Transdermal fentanyl has been shown to be equivalent or superior to IV morphine PCA in a variety of postoperative settings with patients experiencing decreased pain scores and a favorable side effect profile. PMID:27688989

  15. Comparison of Pain Scores in Postoperative Patients: Intravenous Morphine Patient-Controlled Analgesia vs Iontophoretic Transdermal Fentanyl

    PubMed Central

    Caram, Anthony M; Patel, Nirav; Sandler, Hayden M

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative management of pain has traditionally utilized intravenous (IV) morphine for pain control. An alternative approach to the invasive patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) system is the administration of transdermal analgesics, such as fentanyl. In 2006 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the fentanyl hydrochloride (fentanyl HCl) iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS), which utilizes iontophoretic technology to produce a controlled electrical current that propels ionized fentanyl molecules into the systemic vasculature. Transdermal fentanyl has been shown to be equivalent or superior to IV morphine PCA in a variety of postoperative settings with patients experiencing decreased pain scores and a favorable side effect profile.

  16. Comparison of Pain Scores in Postoperative Patients: Intravenous Morphine Patient-Controlled Analgesia vs Iontophoretic Transdermal Fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Glaun, Gabriel D; Caram, Anthony M; Patel, Nirav; Sandler, Hayden M

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative management of pain has traditionally utilized intravenous (IV) morphine for pain control. An alternative approach to the invasive patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) system is the administration of transdermal analgesics, such as fentanyl. In 2006 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the fentanyl hydrochloride (fentanyl HCl) iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS), which utilizes iontophoretic technology to produce a controlled electrical current that propels ionized fentanyl molecules into the systemic vasculature. Transdermal fentanyl has been shown to be equivalent or superior to IV morphine PCA in a variety of postoperative settings with patients experiencing decreased pain scores and a favorable side effect profile. PMID:27688989

  17. Thoracic epidural analgesia for off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Yatin; Vats, Mayank; Sharma, Munish; Arora, Reetesh; Trehan, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    The benefits of thoracic epidural analgesia in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting are well documented. However, the literature available on the role of high thoracic epidural analgesia (HTEA) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCAB) surgery is scarce. We conducted a randomized clinical trial to establish whether HTEA is beneficial in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing elective OPCAB surgery. After institutional ethics board approval and informed consent, 62 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients undergoing elective OPCAB were randomly grouped into two (n = 31 each). Both groups received general anesthesia (GA), but in the HTEA group patients, TEA was also administered. Standardized surgical and anesthetic techniques were used for both the groups. Pulmonary function tests were performed pre-operatively, 6 h and 24 h post-extubation and on days 2, 3, 4 and 5 along with arterial blood gas analysis (ABG) analysis. Time for extubation (h) and time for oxygen withdrawal (h) were recorded. Pain score was assessed by the 10-cm visual analogue scale. All hemodynamic/oxygenation parameters were noted. Any complications related to the TEA were also recorded. Patients in the HTEA group were extubated earlier (10.8 h vs. 13.5 h, P < 0.01) and their oxygen withdrawal time was also significantly lower (26.26 h vs. 29.87 h, P < 0.01). The VAS score, both at rest and on coughing, was significantly lower in the HTEA group at all times, post-operatively (P < 0.01). The forced vital capacity improved significantly at 6 h post-operatively in the HTEA group (P = 0.026) and remained significantly higher thereafter. A similar trend was observed in forced expiratory volume in the first second on day 2 in the HTEA group (P = 0.024). We did not observe any significant side-effects/mortality in either group. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients undergoing

  18. Thoracic epidural analgesia for off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Yatin; Vats, Mayank; Sharma, Munish; Arora, Reetesh; Trehan, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    The benefits of thoracic epidural analgesia in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting are well documented. However, the literature available on the role of high thoracic epidural analgesia (HTEA) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCAB) surgery is scarce. We conducted a randomized clinical trial to establish whether HTEA is beneficial in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing elective OPCAB surgery. After institutional ethics board approval and informed consent, 62 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients undergoing elective OPCAB were randomly grouped into two (n = 31 each). Both groups received general anesthesia (GA), but in the HTEA group patients, TEA was also administered. Standardized surgical and anesthetic techniques were used for both the groups. Pulmonary function tests were performed pre-operatively, 6 h and 24 h post-extubation and on days 2, 3, 4 and 5 along with arterial blood gas analysis (ABG) analysis. Time for extubation (h) and time for oxygen withdrawal (h) were recorded. Pain score was assessed by the 10-cm visual analogue scale. All hemodynamic/oxygenation parameters were noted. Any complications related to the TEA were also recorded. Patients in the HTEA group were extubated earlier (10.8 h vs. 13.5 h, P < 0.01) and their oxygen withdrawal time was also significantly lower (26.26 h vs. 29.87 h, P < 0.01). The VAS score, both at rest and on coughing, was significantly lower in the HTEA group at all times, post-operatively (P < 0.01). The forced vital capacity improved significantly at 6 h post-operatively in the HTEA group (P = 0.026) and remained significantly higher thereafter. A similar trend was observed in forced expiratory volume in the first second on day 2 in the HTEA group (P = 0.024). We did not observe any significant side-effects/mortality in either group. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients undergoing

  19. Short and Long-Term Outcomes of Epidural or Intravenous Analgesia after Esophagectomy: A Propensity-Matched Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Shengquan; Rong, Tiehua

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives As a well-established technique for postoperative pain relief, the benefits of epidural analgesia (EDA) have been under debate recently. This study aimed to determine whether EDA could improve perioperative outcomes and survival in patients undergoing esophagectomy. Methods From January 2010 to December 2012, 587 consecutive cases undergoing McKeown-type esohpageactomy were retrospectively identified from a prospectively maintained database. Results After propensity-matching, incorporating baseline characteristics, 178 cases were included in each group, and patients characteristics distributions were well-balanced between two groups. Compared with intravenous analgesia, the use of EDA significantly decreased the incidence of pneumonia from 32% to 19.7% (P = 0.008), and anastomotic leakage from 23.0% to 14.0% (P = 0.029). The change in CRP level of EDA group was significantly decreased (preoperative, 6.2 vs. 6.2; POD 1, 108.1 vs. 121.3; POD 3, 131.5 vs. 137.8; POD 7, 69.3 vs. 82.1 mg/L; P = 0.044). EDA patients had a significantly longer duration of indwelling urinary catheter (P<0.001), and lower levels in both systolic (P = 0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (P<0.001). There weren't significant differences in overall survival (log-rank P = 0.47) and recurrence (Gray-test P = 0.46) between two groups. Conclusions These findings revealed that EDA could attenuate inflammatory response and reduce the incidence of pneumonia and anastomotic leakage after esophagectomy, at the price of delayed urinary catheter removal and lower blood pressure. EDA remains an important component of multimodal perioperative management after esophagectomy. PMID:27110939

  20. A Patient-Controlled Analgesia Adaptor to Mitigate Postsurgical Pain for Combat Casualties With Multiple Limb Amputation: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Pasquina, Paul F; Isaacson, Brad M; Johnson, Elizabeth; Rhoades, Daniel S; Lindholm, Mark P; Grindle, Garrett G; Cooper, Rory A

    2016-08-01

    The use of explosive armaments during Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn has resulted in a significant number of injured U.S. service members. These weapons often generate substantial extremity trauma requiring multiple surgical procedures to preserve life, limb, and restore function. For those individuals who require multiple surgeries, the use of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) devices can be an effective way to achieve adequate pain management and promote successful rehabilitation and recovery during inpatient treatment. A subpopulation of patients are unable to independently control a PCA device because of severe multiple limb dysfunction and/or loss. In response to the needs of these patients, our team designed and developed a custom adaptor to assist service members who would otherwise not be able to use a PCA. Patient feedback of the device indicated a positive response, improved independence, and overall satisfaction during inpatient hospitalization. PMID:27483540

  1. Butorphanol and Ketamine Combined in Infusion Solutions for Patient-Controlled Analgesia Administration: A Long-Term Stability Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fuchao; Xiong, Hui; Yang, Jinguo; Fang, Baoxia; Zhu, Jun; Zhou, Benhong

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketamine in subanesthetic dose added to butorphanol has been reported to give superior pain control when used for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) after surgery. However, this admixture is not available commercially and stability data applicable to hospital practice are limited. Material/Methods The butorphanol-ketamine admixtures were prepared in polyolefin bags and stored in the dark at 4°C, 25°C, or 37°C for 15 days. The initial concentrations were 50–150 microgram/ml for butorphanol and 1–4 mg/ml for ketamine, respectively. The stabilities were determined by visual inspection, pH measurement, and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay of drug concentrations. Results Over the 15 days, all solutions were clear in appearance, and no color change or precipitation was observed among the three temperatures. The percentages of initial concentration of each drug were over 95% during the study period, and the pH value did not change significantly. Conclusions The results indicate that the drug mixtures of butorphanol and ketamine in 0.9% sodium chloride injection were stable for 15 days when stored in polyolefin bags at 4°C, 25°C, or 37°C. PMID:25896429

  2. [Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome following Scoliosis Surgery during Intravenous Patient Controlled Analgesia (IV-PCA) with Fentanyl: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Doi, Hiroyoshi; Izumi, Kaoru; Kawasaki, Sho; Jimi, Nobuo; Sumiyoshi, Rieko; Mizuno, Keiichiro

    2016-01-01

    Compression and obstruction of the duodenum can occur after surgical correction of spinal scoliosis. We report a case of 15-year-old girl who developed superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) following scoliosis surgery. On the 4th postoperative day, the patient complained of nausea and vomiting, which was considered as side effects of opioids as she was treated with intravenous fentanyl infusion with patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) device. Nasogastric tube was placed and background infusion rate of the PCA was tapered. On the 5th postoperative day, fentanyl infusion was stopped, but she complained of persistent nausea and vomiting. Barium upper gastrointestinal series and abdominal echography revealed compression in the third portion of the duodenum between the superior mesenteric artery and aorta on the 7th postoperative day. She responded to conservative treatment (nutritional and fluid supplementation), which lasted about two weeks. She was discharged home on the 51st postoperative day. SMAS is rare but sometimes carries serious complications. Vomiting following scoliosis surgery should be examined thoroughly including the possibility of SMAS, especially during postoperative pain management with opioids (i. e., IV-PCA with fentanyl). Early diagnosis and institution of appropriate conservative therapy is essential to reduce the likelihood of future complications and avoid the need for surgery.

  3. Thoracic epidural analgesia in obese patients with body mass index of more than 30 kg/m2 for off pump coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Munish; Mehta, Yatin; Sawhney, Ravinder; Vats, Mayank; Trehan, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    Perioperative Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) is an important part of a multimodal approach to improve analgesia and patient outcome after cardiac and thoracic surgery. This is particularly important for obese patients undergoing off pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB). We conducted a randomized clinical trial at tertiary care cardiac institute to compare the effect of TEA and conventional opioid based analgesia on perioperative lung functions and pain scores in obese patients undergoing OPCAB. Sixty obese patients with body mass index >30 kg/m2 for elective OPCAB were randomized into two groups (n=30 each). Patients in both the groups received general anesthesia but in group 1, TEA was also administered. We performed spirometry as preoperative assessment and at six hours, 24 hours, second, third, fourth and fifth day after extubation, along with arterial blood gases analysis. Visual analogue scale at rest and on coughing was recorded to assess the degree of analgesia. The other parameters observed were: time to endotracheal extubation, oxygen withdrawal time and intensive care unit length of stay. On statistical analysis there was a significant difference in Vital Capacity at six hours, 24 hours, second and third day postextubation. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second followed the same pattern for first four postoperative days and peak expiratory flow rate remained statistically high till second postoperative day. ABG values and PaO2/FiO2 ratio were statistically higher in the study group up to five days. Visual analogue scale at rest and on coughing was significantly lower till fourth and third postoperative day respectively. Tracheal extubation time, oxygen withdrawal time and ICU stay were significantly less in group 1. The use of TEA resulted in better analgesia, early tracheal extubation and shorter ICU stay and should be considered for obese patients undergoing OPCAB. PMID:20075532

  4. Stability of Butorphanol–Tropisetron Mixtures in 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection for Patient-Controlled Analgesia Use

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fu-Chao; Shi, Xiao-Ya; Li, Peng; Yang, Jin-Guo; Zhou, Ben-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Tropisetron is an adjuvant for butorphanol used in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and has been reported to provide superior pain control. It is efficacious in reducing the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. However, this admixture is not available commercially and stability data applicable to hospital practice are limited. This study aimed to describe the drug compounding and evaluates the long-term (up to 14 days) stability of butorphanol and tropisetron in 0.9% sodium chloride injection for PCA use. In this study, commercial solutions of butorphanol tartrate and tropisetron hydrochloride were combined and further diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride injection to final concentrations of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and tropisetron hydrochloride 0.05 mg/mL. The polyolefin bags and glass bottles were stored at 4°C and 25°C for up to 14 days. The drug stabilities were determined by visual inspection, pH measurement, and high-pressure liquid chromatography assay of drug concentrations. The data obtained for admixtures prepared and stored at temperatures of 25°C and 4°C show the drugs have maintained at least 98% of the initial concentration. All solutions remained clear and colorless over the 14-day period, and the pH value did not change significantly. The results indicate that admixtures of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and tropisetron hydrochloride 0.05 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride injection solution were stable for 14 days when stored in polyolefin bags or glass bottles at 4°C and 25°C and protected from light. The infusion is feasible for manufacturing in pharmacy aseptic units and can be stored for up to 14 days for routine use in PCA infusions. PMID:25674732

  5. Stability of butorphanol-tropisetron mixtures in 0.9% sodium chloride injection for patient-controlled analgesia use.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fu-Chao; Shi, Xiao-Ya; Li, Peng; Yang, Jin-Guo; Zhou, Ben-Hong

    2015-02-01

    Tropisetron is an adjuvant for butorphanol used in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and has been reported to provide superior pain control. It is efficacious in reducing the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. However, this admixture is not available commercially and stability data applicable to hospital practice are limited. This study aimed to describe the drug compounding and evaluates the long-term (up to 14 days) stability of butorphanol and tropisetron in 0.9% sodium chloride injection for PCA use.In this study, commercial solutions of butorphanol tartrate and tropisetron hydrochloride were combined and further diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride injection to final concentrations of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and tropisetron hydrochloride 0.05 mg/mL. The polyolefin bags and glass bottles were stored at 4°C and 25°C for up to 14 days. The drug stabilities were determined by visual inspection, pH measurement, and high-pressure liquid chromatography assay of drug concentrations.The data obtained for admixtures prepared and stored at temperatures of 25°C and 4°C show the drugs have maintained at least 98% of the initial concentration. All solutions remained clear and colorless over the 14-day period, and the pH value did not change significantly.The results indicate that admixtures of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and tropisetron hydrochloride 0.05 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride injection solution were stable for 14 days when stored in polyolefin bags or glass bottles at 4°C and 25°C and protected from light. The infusion is feasible for manufacturing in pharmacy aseptic units and can be stored for up to 14 days for routine use in PCA infusions. PMID:25674732

  6. Sex Differences in the Morphine-Sparing Effects of Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine in Patient-Controlled Analgesia Following General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Ge, Dong-Jian; Li, Jin-Yu; Qi, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have reported that intraoperative dexmedetomidine has morphine-sparing effects in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The present study was designed to investigate the possible sex differences in the morphine-sparing effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine following general anesthesia. A total of 223 patients scheduled for surgeries under general anesthesia were divided into female and male groups. Each group was then subdivided into 2 subgroups that were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During the first 24 hours postsurgery, both female and male PRD patients had lower scores on a visual analog scale (VAS) (fPRS vs fPRD, P < 0.05 or P < 0.01; mPRS mPRD, P < 0.05, P < 0.01, or P < 0.001) and consumed less morphine than their controls from the PRS group (fPRS vs fPRD, P = 0.0392; mPRS vs mPRD, P = 0.0041). Interestingly, the female PRD patients had similar VAS scores (fPRD vs mPRD, P > 0.05) and consumed comparable morphine compared to the male PRD patients (fPRD vs mPRD, P = 0.4238). However, when normalized to body weight, they consumed much more morphine than male PRD patients (fPRD vs mPRD, P < 0.001), and this effect was not seen in the PRS patients. Intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appeared to have a stronger morphine-sparing effect in controlling postoperative acute pain in male patients than in female patients. PMID:27149500

  7. Pain Levels Within 24 Hours After UFE: A Comparison of Morphine and Fentanyl Patient-Controlled Analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun S. Czuczman, Gregory J.; Nicholson, Wanda K.; Pham, Luu D.; Richman, Jeffrey M.

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the presence and severity of pain levels during 24 h after uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) for symptomatic leiomyomata and compare the effectiveness and adverse effects of morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) versus fentanyl PCA. We carried out a prospective, nonrandomized study of 200 consecutive women who received UFE and morphine or fentanyl PCA after UFE. Pain perception levels were obtained on a 0-10 scale for the 24-h period after UFE. Linear regression methods were used to determine pain trends and differences in pain trends between two groups and the association between pain scores and patient covariates. One hundred eighty-five patients (92.5%) reported greater-than-baseline pain after UFE, and 198 patients (99%) required IV opioid PCA. One hundred thirty-six patients (68.0%) developed nausea during the 24-h period. Seventy-two patients (36%) received morphine PCA and 128 (64%) received fentanyl PCA, without demographic differences. The mean dose of morphine used was 33.8 {+-} 26.7 mg, while the mean dose of fentanyl was 698.7 {+-} 537.4 {mu}g. Using this regimen, patients who received morphine PCA had significantly lower pain levels than those who received fentanyl PCA (p < 0.0001). We conclude that patients develop pain requiring IV opioid PCA within 24 h after UFE. Morphine PCA is more effective in reducing post-uterine artery embolization pain than fentanyl PCA. Nausea is a significant adverse effect from opioid PCA.

  8. Stability of butorphanol-tropisetron mixtures in 0.9% sodium chloride injection for patient-controlled analgesia use.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fu-Chao; Shi, Xiao-Ya; Li, Peng; Yang, Jin-Guo; Zhou, Ben-Hong

    2015-02-01

    Tropisetron is an adjuvant for butorphanol used in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and has been reported to provide superior pain control. It is efficacious in reducing the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. However, this admixture is not available commercially and stability data applicable to hospital practice are limited. This study aimed to describe the drug compounding and evaluates the long-term (up to 14 days) stability of butorphanol and tropisetron in 0.9% sodium chloride injection for PCA use.In this study, commercial solutions of butorphanol tartrate and tropisetron hydrochloride were combined and further diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride injection to final concentrations of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and tropisetron hydrochloride 0.05 mg/mL. The polyolefin bags and glass bottles were stored at 4°C and 25°C for up to 14 days. The drug stabilities were determined by visual inspection, pH measurement, and high-pressure liquid chromatography assay of drug concentrations.The data obtained for admixtures prepared and stored at temperatures of 25°C and 4°C show the drugs have maintained at least 98% of the initial concentration. All solutions remained clear and colorless over the 14-day period, and the pH value did not change significantly.The results indicate that admixtures of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and tropisetron hydrochloride 0.05 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride injection solution were stable for 14 days when stored in polyolefin bags or glass bottles at 4°C and 25°C and protected from light. The infusion is feasible for manufacturing in pharmacy aseptic units and can be stored for up to 14 days for routine use in PCA infusions.

  9. Analgesia following thoracotomy: a survey of Australian practice.

    PubMed

    Cook, T M; Riley, R H

    1997-10-01

    This survey examines pain management after thoracotomy in Australian hospitals. Questionnaires were sent to senior thoracic anaesthetists at 27 hospitals (16 public and 11 private) with thoracic surgical units. Twenty-six anaesthetists replied and 24 responses were included in the analyses. Seventy-two percent of respondents were from hospitals with acute pain services (APS), and in 94% of these hospitals patients are reportedly visited by the APS. The most frequently used analgesic modalities are epidural analgesia, intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA), and nurse-controlled intravenous opioid infusions. Over half of the anaesthetists reported using local anaesthetic intercostal nerve block, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or paracetamol. Combinations of analgesic techniques were cited frequently. Respondents reported that cryoanalgesia, interpleural blockade, paravertebral blockade, subarachnoid infusions, ketamine, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation are used infrequently. Anaesthetists from public hospitals reported using epidural analgesia, IVPCA and NSAIDs more frequently than those from private hospitals. When epidural analgesia is used, most respondents place the catheter in the mid-thoracic region (91%), use a regimen of opioids plus local anaesthetic (96%), use a constant infusion technique (100%), and continue analgesia for up to three days (83%). Over half of the respondents reported that post-thoracotomy patients are nursed in a high-dependency area. Seventy-nine percent of respondents selected epidural analgesia as the best available analgesia technique, whereas 21% consider IVPCA to be the best. Only 75% of respondents reported that the type of analgesia they consider best is also the type which they use most frequently. PMID:9352765

  10. Evaluation of peri-operative epidural analgesia with ropivacaine, ropivacaine and sufentanil, and ropivacaine, sufentanil and epinephrine in isoflurane anesthetized dogs undergoing tibial plateau levelling osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Adami, C; Veres-Nyéki, K; Spadavecchia, C; Rytz, U; Bergadano, A

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare four epidural protocols for peri-operative analgesia in dogs undergoing tibial plateau levelling osteotomy. Forty client-owned dogs were randomly assigned to one of four treatments - groups R0.5 and R1 received 0.5mg/kg and 1mg/kg ropivacaine, respectively. Group SR0.5 received 1 μg/kg sufentanil plus 0.5mg/kg ropivacaine, and group SER0.5 received 1 μg/kg sufentanil, 0.5mg/kg ropivacaine plus 6 μg/kg epinephrine. Dilution, when required, was performed with saline, so that the injected volume was always 0.2 mL/kg. Intra-operatively, nociception assessment was based on the evaluation of changes in heart rate, respiratory rate and mean arterial pressure. Post-operative pain assessment was performed using the Glasgow visual analogue pain scale, and an ad hoc multifactorial pain score. Motor block was evaluated using a modified Bromage score. Intra-operatively, none of the animals was hypotensive. All groups except SER0.5 required rescue intra-operative fentanyl (40%, 30% and 40% of the animals in groups R0.5, R1 and SR0.5, respectively). Group SER0.5 showed lower post-operative pain scores, and group R1 significantly greater motor block, compared to the other treatment groups. None of the dogs had urinary retention. Epidural sufentanil-epinephrine-ropivacaine provided superior peri-operative analgesia compared to the other treatments, without producing clinically relevant side effects.

  11. Patient-controlled modalities for acute postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Miaskowski, Christine

    2005-08-01

    Although numerous clinical practice guidelines for pain management have been published throughout the last 12 years, inadequate pain relief remains a significant health care issue. Several patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) modalities are currently available for the treatment of acute postoperative pain, including intravenous (IV) PCA, epidural (PCEA), and oral PCA. Although PCEA and IV PCA are both commonly used modalities, IV PCA is considered the standard of care for postoperative pain management. Limitations of this modality do exist, however. Consequently, noninvasive PCA systems are under development to circumvent many of these limitations, including the fentanyl hydrochloride patient-controlled transdermal system (PCTS); (IONSYS Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ) and a number of patient-controlled intranasal analgesia (PCINA) delivery systems. The objective of this article is to review the PCA modalities currently in use and to discuss those in development for the treatment of acute postoperative pain.

  12. A Comparative Study of the Efficacy of IV Dexketoprofen, Lornoxicam, and Diclophenac Sodium on Postoperative Analgesia and Tramadol Consumption in Patients Receiving Patient-Controlled Tramadol

    PubMed Central

    Kılıçkaya, Refika; Güleç, Ersel; Ünlügenç, Hakkı; Gündüz, Murat; Işık, Geylan

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to compare the effects of dexketoprofen, lornoxicam, and diclophenac sodium on postoperative analgesia and tramadol consumption in patients receiving postoperative patient-controlled tramadol after a major abdominal surgery. Methods Eighty patients were randomized to receive one of the four study drugs. Patients in group dexketoprofen (DT) received IV 50 mg dexketoprofen, group lornoxicam (LR) received IV 8 mg lornoxicam, group diclophenac sodium (DS) received 75 mg IV diclophenac sodium and group saline (S) received 0.9% saline in 2 mL syringes, 20 min before the end of anaesthesia. A standardized (1 mg kg−1) dose of tramadol was routinely administered to all patients as the loading dose at the end of surgery. Postoperatively, whenever patients requested, they were allowed to use a tramadol patient-controlled analgesia device giving a bolus dose (0.2 mg kg−1) of tramadol. Pain, discomfort, and sedation scores, cumulative tramadol consumption, supplemental meperidine requirement, and side effects were recorded. Results Visual rating scale and patient discomfort scores were significantly lower in DT, LR and DS groups compared to those in in group S (p<0.001). Cumulative tramadol consumption was significantly lower in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-treated groups at each study period after the second postoperative hour than in group S (p<0.001). Supplemental meperidine requirement was significantly higher in group S at each study period after postoperative 30 min than in NSAID-treated groups (p<0.01). Conclusion After major abdominal surgery, adding IV diclophenac, lornoxicam or dexketoprofen to patient-controlled tramadol resulted in lower pain scores, smaller tramadol consumption, less rescue supplemental analgesic requirement, and fewer side effects compared with the tramadol alone group. PMID:27366491

  13. Patient-controlled analgesia versus continuous infusion of morphine during vaso-occlusive crisis in sickle cell disease, a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van Beers, Eduard J; van Tuijn, Charlotte F J; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T; Friederich, Philip W; Vranken, Jan H; Biemond, Bart J

    2007-11-01

    Intravenous morphine is the treatment of choice for severe pain during vaso- occlusive crisis in sickle cell disease (SCD). However, side effects of morphine may hamper effective treatment, and high plasma levels of morphine are associated with severe complications such as acute chest syndrome. Furthermore, adequate dosing remains a problem since no objective measurement of pain severity exists and analgesia should be titrated upon the patient's reported pain. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) may therefore be an interesting alternative since patients can titrate the level of analgesia themselves. In this randomized controlled study, the efficacy of intravenous morphine administration with PCA was compared with continuous infusion (CI) of morphine in patients with SCD during vaso-occlusive crisis. Twenty five consecutive episodes of vaso-occlusive crisis in 19 patients with SCD were included in the study. Patients in the PCA-group had a markedly and significant lower mean and cumulative morphine consumption when compared with the patients in the CI-group (0.5 mg/hr versus 2.4 mg/hr (P < 0.001) and 33 mg versus 260 mg (P = 0.018, respectively). The mean daily pain scores were comparable (4.9 versus 5.3). The lower mean and cumulative morphine consumption in the PCA-group led to significant less nausea and constipation during treatment when compared with the CI-group (area under the curve, respectively, 11 versus 18 (P = 0.045) and 30 versus 45 (P = 0.021). Furthermore, a nonsignificant reduction in the duration of hospital admission of 3 days was observed in the PCA-group. PCA results in adequate pain relief at a much lower morphine consumption and should considered to be the first choice in morphine administration to sickle cell patients admitted with vaso-occlusive crisis.

  14. End tidal halothane concentration and postoperative analgesia requirements in dogs: a comparison between intravenous oxymorphone and epidural bupivacaine alone and in combination with oxymorphone.

    PubMed Central

    Torske, K E; Dyson, D H; Pettifer, G

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of epidural bupivacaine (BUP) and oxymorphone/bupivacaine (O/B) and intravenous (i.v.) oxymorphone (IVO) on halothane requirements during hind end surgery and postoperative analgesia in 24 dogs. Dogs were randomly assigned to treatment groups: O/B--oxymorphone (0.1 mg/kg) in 0.75% bupivacaine (1 mg/kg for a total volume of 0.2 ml/kg); BUP--0.5% bupivacaine (1 mg/kg for a total volume of 0.2 ml/kg) with i.v. oxymorphone (0.05 mg/kg) postoperatively; and IVO--oxymorphone (0.05 mg/kg) pre- and postoperatively. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate, arterial blood pressure, end-tidal carbon dioxide and halothane, and arterial blood gases were recorded prior to treatment and every 15 minutes thereafter. Once surgery had begun, end-tidal halothane concentrations were decreased as low as possible while still maintaining a stable anesthetic plane. Data were analyzed using ANOVA with P < 0.05 considered significant. End-tidal halothane requirements did not differ significantly among treatments. Respiratory depression was increased and HR was decreased in the O/B and IVO groups. Postoperative analgesic requirements were significantly less in dogs receiving O/B. PMID:9635170

  15. Delayed akathisia and suicidal attempts following epidural droperidol infusion--a case report.

    PubMed

    Hung, Y C; Ho, Y Y; Shen, C L

    1999-09-01

    Epidural administration of droperidol has been used to prevent postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) caused by opioids, but the adverse reactions were relatively neglected. We present a patient who received patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) with bupivacaine-morphine-droperidol mixture for one and half days following hemorrhoidectomy, developed paroxysmal adverse reactions of akathisia, dysphoria, and suicidal attempts 3 days after the initiation of the treatment. The use of droperidol in PCEA for prevention of nausea and vomiting therefore needs to be re-evaluated according to the serious side effects occurring in our case.

  16. [THE USE OF 20% LIPOFUNDIN INFUSIONS AT THE APPEARANCE OF TOXIC PROPERTIES OF ROPIVACAINE 2 MG/ML IN CHILD 1.5 MONTHS AT THE POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD WITH EPIDURAL ANALGESIA].

    PubMed

    Sichkar, S Yu; Afukov, I I; Koshko, O V; Yeliseeva, N V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction of local anesthetic proved application of epidural (EP) as an effective and safe way of an analgesia in intra- and the post-operational period and now it is widely applied at children of all age groups (1). However there is a number of contraindications for application of this type of an analgesia. At children till 6 months lower dosages of a ropivacain of 2 mg/kg are applied, considering their age features. At the phenomena of system toxicity infusion of 20% lipofundin is applied. The child has an age 1.5 months, weight 5230 g, with the diagnosis a cystous dysplasia of both kidneys, a megaureter at the left and on the right, lack offunction of the left kidney operation a laparoscopic nefrureterektomia is executed at the left. In the postoperative period at application of EP of an analgesia ofropivacain 2 mg/ml by a drop way introduction in a standard dosage of 0.2 mg/kg of body weight an hour the repeating episodes of convulsions which were regarded as manifestation of toxic properties of local anesthetic were noted. Infusion of 20% lipofundin of 15 ml (2.8 ml/kg of body weight) within 30 minutes with a positive effect was applied. EP an analgesia was recoloured. PMID:27192857

  17. A Comparison of Oxycodone and Alfentanil in Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia with a Time-Scheduled Decremental Infusion after Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ji Su; Kim, Seong Su; Kim, Young Ki; Hwang, Byeong Mun; Kang, Seong Sik; Son, Hee Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oxycodone, a semisynthetic opioid, has been widely used for acute and chronic pain. Objectives. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic and adverse effects of oxycodone and alfentanil on postoperative pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods. This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study. A total of 82 patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly assigned to receive either oxycodone or alfentanil using intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). PCA was administered as a time-scheduled decremental continuous infusion based on lean body mass for 48 hours postoperatively. Patients were assessed for pain with a visual analogue scale (VAS), the cumulative PCA dose, adverse effects, sedation level at 1, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, and satisfaction during the postoperative 48 hours. Results. There were no significant differences (p < 0.05) between the two groups in VAS score, cumulative PCA dose, adverse effects, sedation level at 1, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, and satisfaction during the postoperative 48 hours. Conclusions. Our data showed that the analgesic and adverse effects of oxycodone and alfentanil were similar. Therefore, oxycodone may be a good alternative to alfentanil for pain management using intravenous PCA after laparoscopic cholecystectomy when used at a conversion ratio of 10 : 1. This trial is registered with KCT0001962. PMID:27725791

  18. Physico-chemical stability of butorphanol-tramadol and butorphanol-fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia infusion solutions over 168 hours.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fuchao; Fang, Baoxia; Li, Peng; Zhu, Xuesong; Zhou, Benhong

    2014-08-01

    This study was to investigate the physical and chemical compatibility of butorphanol with tramadol or fentanyl in 0.9% sodium chloride injections for patient controlled analgesia administration. The solutions were prepared in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) infusion bags and stored without protected from light exposure at room temperature (25 degrees C) or refrigerated (4 degrees C). Over a period of 168 hours, stabilities were determined by visual inspection, pH measurement, and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay of drug concentrations. At both temperatures, admixtures of butorphanol-tramadol and butorphanol-fentanyl were clear in appearance, and no color change or precipitation was observed during the study period. The maximum losses obtained were lower than 5% for the three drugs after 168 hours of storage. The results indicate that, at ambient or refrigerated storage conditions, the drug mixtures of butorphanol-tramadol and butorphanol-fentanyl in 0.9% sodium chloride injections were physically and chemically stable for at least 168 hours when stored in PVC syringes. PMID:25158568

  19. Levobupivacaine for labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Attri, Joginder Pal; Makhni, Reena; Sethi, Savinder

    2016-01-01

    Background: Combined spinal-epidural analgesia has become the preferred technique for labor analgesia as it combines the benefits of both spinal analgesia and flexibility of epidural catheter. Study was carried out with the primary aim to compare levobupivacaine and ropivacaine with fentanyl in terms of onset and duration of sensory block and to know maternal and fetal outcome. Materials and Methods: In a prospective randomized double-blind study, 60 primipara of the American Society of Anesthesiologists health status Class I and II with singleton pregnancy in active stage of labor were randomly allocated into two groups of 30 each. Group A received 3 mg intrathecal levobupivacaine with 25 μg fentanyl followed by epidural top-ups of 14 ml of levobupivacaine 0.125% with fentanyl 30 μg whereas Group B received 4 mg intrathecal ropivacaine with 25 μg fentanyl followed by epidural top-ups of 14 ml of ropivacaine 0.2% with fentanyl 30 μg. Patients were monitored for sensory and motor block characteristics, hemodynamics, maternal and fetal outcome, side effects, and complications. These characteristics were analyzed using the “Chi-square tests” and “unpaired t-test.” Results: Onset of analgesia was rapid in Group A (4.72 ± 0.54 min) as compared to Group B (5.58 ± 0.49 min). Duration of analgesia was also prolonged in Group A (117.00 ± 11.86 min) as compared to Group B (90.17 ± 8.85 min). Patients remained hemodynamically stable and side effects, and complications were comparable in both groups. Conclusion: Levobupivacaine with fentanyl leads to early onset and prolonged duration of analgesia as compared to ropivacaine with fentanyl during labor analgesia. PMID:27746539

  20. Efficacy of subpleural continuous infusion of local anesthetics after thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer compared to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joonho; Haam, Seokjin

    2016-01-01

    Background This study compared the efficacy and side effects of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) with those of a subpleural continuous infusion of local anesthetic (ON-Q system) in patients undergoing thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients who underwent thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer from January 2014 to August 2015 (36 in the IV-PCA group and 30 in the ON-Q group). The numeric pain intensity scale (NPIS), additional IV injections for pain control, side effects, and early discontinuation of the pain control device were compared. Results There were no differences in the general characteristics of the two groups. The NPIS scores gradually decreased with time (P<0.001), but the two groups had differences in pattern of NPIS scores (P=0.111). There were no differences in the highest NPIS score during admission (4.75±2.35 vs. 5.27±1.87, P=0.334) or the number of additional IV injections for pain control in the same period (0.72±0.94 for IV-PCA vs. 0.83±0.65 for ON-Q; P=0.575). Side effects such as nausea, dizziness, and drowsiness were significantly more frequent with IV-PCA (36.1% vs. 10.0%, P=0.014), and early discontinuation of the pain control device was more frequent in the IV-PCA group (33.3% vs. 6.7%, P=0.008). Conclusions The ON-Q system was equivalent to the IV-PCA for postoperative pain control after thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer, and it also had fewer effects and early discontinuations. PMID:27499973

  1. Incidence and Risk Factors of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Patients with Fentanyl-Based Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia and Single Antiemetic Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Bum; Shim, Yon Hee; Lee, Youn-Woo; Lee, Jeong Soo; Choi, Jong-Rim

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the incidence and risk factors of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in patients with fentanyl-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) and single antiemetic prophylaxis of 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5 HT3)-receptor antagonist after the general anesthesia. Materials and Methods In this retrospective study, incidence and risk factors for PONV were evaluated with fentanyl IV-PCA during postoperative 48 hours after various surgeries. Results Four hundred-forty patients (23%) of 1878 had showed PONV. PCA was discontinued temporarily in 268 patients (14%), mostly due to PONV (88% of 268 patients). In multivariate analysis, female, non-smoker, history of motion sickness or PONV, long duration of anesthesia (>180 min), use of desflurane and intraoperative remifentanil infusion were independent risk factors for PONV. If one, two, three, four, five, or six of these risk factors were present, the incidences of PONV were 18%, 19%, 22%, 31%, 42%, or 50%. Laparoscopic surgery and higher dose of fentanyl were not risk factors for PONV. Conclusion Despite antiemetic prophylaxis with 5 HT3-receptor antagonist, 23% of patients with fentanyl-based IV-PCA after general anesthesia showed PONV. Long duration of anesthesia and use of desflurane were identified as risk factors, in addition to risk factors of Apfel's score (female, non-smoker, history of motion sickness or PONV). Also, intraoperative remifentanil infusion was risk factor independent of postoperative opioid use. As the incidence of PONV was up to 50% according to the number of risk factors, risk-adapted, multimodal or combination therapy should be applied. PMID:25048507

  2. Long-term tolerability of capnography and respiratory inductance plethysmography for respiratory monitoring in pediatric patients treated with patient-controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Karen M.; Kim, Andrew Y.; Yaster, Myron; Kudchadkar, Sapna R.; White, Elizabeth; Fackler, James; Monitto, Constance L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation has advocated the use of continuous electronic monitoring of oxygenation and ventilation to preemptively identify opioid-induced respiratory depression. In adults, capnography is the gold standard in respiratory monitoring. An alternative technique used in sleep laboratories is respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP). However, it is not known if either monitor is well tolerated by pediatric patients for prolonged periods of time. Aim The goal of this study was to determine whether capnography or RIP is better tolerated in non-intubated, spontaneously breathing pediatric patients being treated with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA). Methods Nasal cannula capnography with oral sampling and thoracic and abdominal inductance plethysmography bands were placed along with routine monitors on pediatric patients being treated for acute pain with IVPCA. Study monitors were left in place for as long as they were tolerated by the patient, for a maximum of 24 consecutive hours. If the patient did not wear a particular study monitor for any reason, but tolerated the remaining monitor, participation in the study continued. If the patient would not wear either monitor, participation was terminated. Results Twenty-six patients (18 female, 8 male, average age 10.1 ± 5.5 years) consented to participate, but only 14 patients attempted to wear one or both devices. Among those who wore either device, median time to device removal was 8.33 hours (range 0.3–23.6 hours) for capnography and 23.5 hours (range 0.7–24 hours) for RIP bands. Conclusion Children did not tolerate wearing capnography cannulae for prolonged periods of time, limiting the usefulness of this device as a continuous monitor of ventilation in children. RIP bands were better tolerated; however, they require further assessment of their utility. Until more effective, child-friendly monitors are developed and their utility validated, guidelines

  3. The effect of combination treatment using palonosetron and dexamethasone for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting versus dexamethasone alone in women receiving intravenous patient-controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Seung-hwa; Yoo, Jae Hwa; Kim, Mun Gyu; Lee, Ki Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of palonosetron combined with dexamethasone for the prevention of PONV compared to dexamethasone alone in women who received intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) using fentanyl. Methods In this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study, 204 healthy female patients who were scheduled to undergo elective surgery under general anesthesia followed by IV-PCA for postoperative pain control were enrolled. Patients were divided into two groups: the PD group (palonosetron 0.075 mg and dexamethasone 5 mg IV; n = 102) and the D group (dexamethasone 5 mg IV; n = 102). The treatments were given after the induction of anesthesia. The incidence of nausea, vomiting, severity of nausea, and the use of rescue anti-emetics during the first 48 hours after surgery were evaluated. Results The incidence of PONV was significantly lower in the PD group compared with the D group during the 0-24 hours (43 vs. 59%) and 0-48 hours after surgery (45 vs. 63%) (P < 0.05). The severity of nausea during the 6-24 hours after surgery was significantly less in the PD group compared with the D group (P < 0.05). The incidence of rescue antiemetic used was significantly lower in the PD group than in the D group during the 0-6 hours after surgery (13.1 vs. 24.5%) (P < 0.05). Conclusions Palonosetron combined with dexamethasone was more effective in preventing PONV compared to dexamethasone alone in women receiving IV-PCA using fentanyl. PMID:26045930

  4. Postoperative continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine has comparable analgesic effects and fewer complications as compared to traditional patient-controlled analgesia with sufentanil in patients undergoing non-cardiac thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Tang, Jun; Jin, Li; Li, Wei-Yan; Zhang, Li-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the postoperative analgesic effects of continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine with traditional patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with sufentanil after non-cardiac thoracotomy. Methods: One hundred and twenty adult patients undergoing open thoracotomy were recruited into this assessor-blinded, randomized study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive analgesia through a wound catheter placed below the fascia and connected to a 2 ml/h ropivacaine 0.5% (RWI group) or sufentanil PCA (SPCA group). Analgesia continued for 48 h. Visual analogue scores (VAS) at rest and movement, Ramsay scores and adverse effects were recorded at 2, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h after surgery. Three months after discharge, patient’s satisfaction, residual pain and surgical wound complications were assessed. Results: General characteristics of patients were comparable between two groups. There were no statistical differences in the VAS scores and postoperative pethidine consumption between two groups (P > 0.05). However, when compared with SPCA group, the incidences of drowsiness, dizziness and respiratory depression, ICU stay and hospital expenditure reduced significantly in RWI group (P < 0.05). Patients’ satisfaction with pain management was also improved markedly in RWI group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Continuous wound infusion with ropivacaine is effective for postoperative analgesia and has comparable effects to traditional PCA with sufentanil. Furthermore, this therapy may also reduce the incidences of drowsiness, dizziness, respiratory depression and decrease the ICU stay and hospital expenditure. PMID:26131121

  5. Acute compartment syndrome of the lower limb and the effect of postoperative analgesia on diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mar, G J; Barrington, M J; McGuirk, B R

    2009-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome can cause significant disability if not treated early, but the diagnosis is challenging. This systematic review examines whether modern acute pain management techniques contribute to delayed diagnosis. A total of 28 case reports and case series were identified which referred to the influence of analgesic technique on the diagnosis of compartment syndrome, of which 23 discussed epidural analgesia. In 32 of 35 patients, classic signs and symptoms of compartment syndrome were present in the presence of epidural analgesia, including 18 patients with documented breakthrough pain. There were no randomized controlled trials or outcome-based comparative trials available to include in the review. Pain is often described as the cardinal symptom of compartment syndrome, but many authors consider it unreliable. Physical examination is also unreliable for diagnosis. There is no convincing evidence that patient-controlled analgesia opioids or regional analgesia delay the diagnosis of compartment syndrome provided patients are adequately monitored. Regardless of the type of analgesia used, a high index of clinical suspicion, ongoing assessment of patients, and compartment pressure measurement are essential for early diagnosis.

  6. Pain control of thoracoscopic major pulmonary resection: is pre-emptive local bupivacaine injection able to replace the intravenous patient controlled analgesia?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee Chul; Lee, Ja-young; Ahn, Soyeon; Cho, Sukki; Kim, Kwhanmien; Jheon, Sanghoon

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this open-label, non-inferiority trial was to evaluate whether pre-emptive local bupivacaine injection (PLBI) can replace intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IV PCA) in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) major pulmonary resection. Methods A total of 86 patients scheduled for VATS segmentectomy/lobectomy were randomly assigned into two groups. The PLBI group (n=42) received 0.5% bupivacaine wound infiltration before skin incision, and the IV PCA group (n=44) received a continuous infusion of fentanyl with a basal rate of 10 µg/mL/h. Visual analogue scale (VAS; range, 0-10) was measured as the primary endpoint. The secondary endpoint was an additional use of analgesics and drug induced side effects. Results Both groups showed no difference in terms of age, sex, disease entity, operation time, chest tube indwelling time, and hospital stay. Serial pain scores between the PLBI and IV PCA groups demonstrated no statistical differences (non-inferiority margin; ΔVAS =1.0) (Recovery room: 8.3±2.1 vs. 8.5±1.7; Day 0: 5.1±1.6 vs. 5.2±1.4; Day 1: 3.5±1.6 vs. 3.3±1.2; Day 2: 2.7±1.3 vs. 2.5±1.2; Day 3: 2.3±1.3 vs. 2.1±1.5; 1 week after discharge: 3.0±1.7 vs. 2.8±1.5; 1 month: 1.9±1.2 vs. 2.3±1.4 and 2 months: 1.5±1.2 vs. 1.3±1.2; 95% confidential interval (CI) of ΔVAS <1.0; P>0.05). The mean one-additional usage of IV analgesics was needed in the PLBI group (3.3±2.1 vs. 2.3±1.3; P=0.03). The occurrence of nausea/vomiting was higher in the IV PCA group (12.5% vs. 38.9%; P=0.026) and 41.7% of IV PCA patients experienced drug side effects that required IV PCA removal within postoperative day (POD) 1. Conclusions PLBI is a simple, safe, effective, and economical method, which is not inferior to IV PCA in VATS major pulmonary resection. PMID:26716034

  7. Current Strategies in Anesthesia and Analgesia for Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Moucha, Calin Stefan; Weiser, Mitchell C; Levin, Emily J

    2016-02-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is associated with substantial postoperative pain that may impair mobility, reduce the ability to participate in rehabilitation, lead to chronic pain, and reduce patient satisfaction. Traditional general anesthesia with postoperative epidural and patient-controlled opioid analgesia is associated with an undesirable adverse-effect profile, including postoperative nausea and vomiting, hypotension, urinary retention, respiratory depression, delirium, and an increased infection rate. Multimodal anesthesia--incorporating elements of preemptive analgesia, neuraxial perioperative anesthesia, peripheral nerve blockade, periarticular injections, and multimodal oral opioid and nonopioid medications during the perioperative and postoperative periods--can provide superior pain control while minimizing opioid-related adverse effects, improving patient satisfaction, and reducing the risk of postoperative complications.

  8. [Paravertebral analgesia in thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Arnal, D; Garutti, I; Olmedilla, L

    2004-10-01

    Managing postoperative pain from thoracotomy is one of the greatest challenges anesthesiologists face in daily practice. Proper management is assumed to improve the patient's prognosis. The thoracic paravertebral block, following its rediscovery, is being used with increasing frequency and success for both surgery and recovery from thoracotomy, challenging the supremacy of thoracic epidural analgesia, which to date has been considered the gold standard. We describe the history, anatomy, techniques and complications of the thoracic paravertebral block and review published randomized controlled trials comparing the thoracic paravertebral block to placebo and to epidural analgesia. In view of published evidence, it seems that the thoracic paravertebral block may replace the thoracic epidural technique as the gold standard for providing analgesia for patients undergoing thoracotomy.

  9. Comparison of the Efficacy and Safety of a Pharmacokinetic Model-Based Dosing Scheme Versus a Conventional Fentanyl Dosing Regimen For Patient-Controlled Analgesia Immediately Following Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seok-Joon; Lim, Hyeong-Seok; Kwon, Youn-Ju; Park, Se-Ung; Yi, Jung-Min; Chin, Ji-Hyun; Hwang, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Young-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Conventional, intravenous, patient-controlled analgesia, which is only administered by demand bolus without basal continuous infusion, is closely associated with inappropriate analgesia. Pharmacokinetic model-based dosing schemes can quantitatively describe the time course of drug effects and achieve optimal drug therapy. We compared the efficacy and safety of a conventional dosing regimen for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia that was administered by demand bolus without basal continuous infusion (group A) versus a pharmacokinetic model-based dosing scheme performed by decreasing the dosage of basal continuous infusion according to the model-based simulation used to achieve a targeted concentration (group B) following robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy.In total, 70 patients were analyzed: 34 patients in group A and 36 patients in group B. The postoperative opioid requirements, pain scores assessed by the visual analog scale, and adverse events (eg, nausea, vomiting, pruritis, respiratory depression, desaturation, sedation, confusion, and urinary retention) were compared on admission to the postanesthesia care unit and at 0.5, 1, 4, 24, and 48 h after surgery between the 2 groups. All patients were kept for close observation in the postanesthesia care unit for 1 h, and then transferred to the general ward.The fentanyl requirements in the postanesthesia care unit for groups A and B were 110.0 ± 46.4 μg and 77.5 ± 35.3 μg, respectively. The pain scores assessed by visual analog scale at 0.5, 1, 4, and 24 h after surgery in group B were significantly lower than in group A (all P < 0.05). There were no differences in the adverse events between the 2 groups.We found that the pharmacokinetic model-based dosing scheme resulted in lower opioid requirements, lower pain scores, and no significant adverse events in the postanesthesia care unit following robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy in comparison with conventional dosing

  10. Use of infusion devices for epidural or intrathecal administration of spinal opioids.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J W

    1990-08-01

    The use of infusion devices for epidural or intrathecal administration of spinal opioids is described. The risks of infection and mechanical catheter complications, the need for escalating doses, reservoir volume, drug stability, and cost are practical considerations associated with use of both external and internal infusion systems. Use of patient criteria to identify suitable candidates for intraspinal administration of pain medication helps ensure successful management. The criteria for intraspinal delivery pumps are safety, accuracy, reliability, ease of management by the patient and the health-care professional, and compatibility of the drug with the pump components. The primary factors to consider when comparing pumps to be used for intraspinal delivery of pain medication are the volume and flow rate requirements of the devices. External portable infusion devices are classified according to the mechanism of operation into three primary groups: syringe pumps, peristaltic mechanisms, and elastomeric reservoir pumps. Portable patient-controlled analgesia pumps that have syringes, flexible reservoir bags, and elastomeric reservoirs have been developed. Implanted systems with flow rates that are preset at the factory make pain management more difficult when the patient requires changes or escalations in doses over time. A programmable implanted pump is available. Two advantages of continuous epidural or intrathecal infusion are (1) the peaks and valleys of pain relief with bolus injections are eliminated and (2) the need for multiple injections is reduced. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pumps enhance the efficacy of continuous infusions by allowing the patient to administer bolus doses to control acute pain. PMID:2202209

  11. Risk Assessment of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in the Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia Environment: Predictive Values of the Apfel's Simplified Risk Score for Identification of High-Risk Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin Hyung; Shin, Yang-Sik; Oh, Young Jun; Lee, Jeong Rim; Chung, Sung Chan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Opioid-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) is popular method of postoperative pain control, but many patients suffer from IV PCA-related postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). In this retrospective observational study, we have determined independent predictors of IV PCA-related PONV and predictive values of the Apfel's simplified risk score in pursuance of identifying high-risk patients. Materials and Methods We analyzed 7000 patients who received IV PCA with background infusion after elective surgery. Patients who maintained IV PCA for a postoperative period of 48 hr (completion group, n=6128) were compared with those who have discontinued IV PCA within 48 hr of surgery due to intractable PONV (cessation group, n=872). Patients, anesthetics, and surgical factors known for predicting PONV were evaluated by logistic regression analysis to identify independent predictors of IV PCA related intractable PONV. Results In a stepwise multivariate analysis, weight, background infusion dose of fentanyl, addition of ketolorac to PCA, duration of anesthesia, general anesthesia, head and neck surgery, and Apfel's simplified risk score were revealed as independent risk factors for intractable PONV followed by the cessation of IV PCA. In addition, Apfel's simplified risk score, which demonstrated the highest odds ratio among the predictors, was strongly correlated with the cessation rate of IV PCA. Conclusion Multimodal prophylactic antiemetic strategies and dose reduction of opioids may be considered as strategies for the prevention of PONV with the use of IV PCA, especially in patients with high Apfel's simplified risk scores. PMID:23918581

  12. Randomized trial of epidural vs. subcutaneous catheters for managing pain after modified Nuss in adults

    PubMed Central

    Temkit, M’hamed; Ewais, MennatAllah M.; Luckritz, Todd C.; Stearns, Joshua D.; Craner, Ryan C.; Gaitan, Brantley D.; Ramakrishna, Harish; Thunberg, Christopher A.; Weis, Ricardo A.; Myers, Kelly M.; Merritt, Marianne V.; Rosenfeld, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum (MIRPE) is now performed in adults. Managing adult patients’ pain postoperatively has been challenging due to increased chest wall rigidity and the pressure required for supporting the elevated sternum. The optimal pain management regimen has not been determined. We designed this prospective, randomized trial to compare postoperative pain management and outcomes between thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) and bilateral subcutaneous infusion pump catheters (On-Q). Methods Patients undergoing MIRPE (modified Nuss) underwent random assignment to TEA or On-Q group. Both groups received intravenous, patient-controlled opioid analgesia, with concomitant delivery of local anesthetic. Primary outcomes were length of stay (LOS), opioid use, and pain scores. Results Of 85 randomly assigned patients, 68 completed the study [52 men, 76.5%; mean (range) age, 32.2 (20.0–58.0) years; Haller index, 5.9 (range, 3.0-26.7)]. The groups were equally matched for preoperative variables; however, the On-Q arm had more patients (60.3%). No significant differences were found between groups in mean daily pain scores (P=0.52), morphine-equivalent opioid usage (P=0.28), or hospital stay 3.5 vs. 3.3 days (TEA vs. On-Q; P=0.55). Thirteen patients randomized to TEA refused the epidural and withdrew from the study because they perceived greater benefit of the On-Q system. Conclusions Postoperative pain management in adults after MIRPE can be difficult. Both continuous local anesthetic delivery by TEA and On-Q catheters with concomitant, intravenous, patient-controlled anesthesia maintained acceptable analgesia with a reasonable LOS. In our cohort, there was preference for the On-Q system for pain management. PMID:27621865

  13. Randomized trial of epidural vs. subcutaneous catheters for managing pain after modified Nuss in adults

    PubMed Central

    Temkit, M’hamed; Ewais, MennatAllah M.; Luckritz, Todd C.; Stearns, Joshua D.; Craner, Ryan C.; Gaitan, Brantley D.; Ramakrishna, Harish; Thunberg, Christopher A.; Weis, Ricardo A.; Myers, Kelly M.; Merritt, Marianne V.; Rosenfeld, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum (MIRPE) is now performed in adults. Managing adult patients’ pain postoperatively has been challenging due to increased chest wall rigidity and the pressure required for supporting the elevated sternum. The optimal pain management regimen has not been determined. We designed this prospective, randomized trial to compare postoperative pain management and outcomes between thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) and bilateral subcutaneous infusion pump catheters (On-Q). Methods Patients undergoing MIRPE (modified Nuss) underwent random assignment to TEA or On-Q group. Both groups received intravenous, patient-controlled opioid analgesia, with concomitant delivery of local anesthetic. Primary outcomes were length of stay (LOS), opioid use, and pain scores. Results Of 85 randomly assigned patients, 68 completed the study [52 men, 76.5%; mean (range) age, 32.2 (20.0–58.0) years; Haller index, 5.9 (range, 3.0-26.7)]. The groups were equally matched for preoperative variables; however, the On-Q arm had more patients (60.3%). No significant differences were found between groups in mean daily pain scores (P=0.52), morphine-equivalent opioid usage (P=0.28), or hospital stay 3.5 vs. 3.3 days (TEA vs. On-Q; P=0.55). Thirteen patients randomized to TEA refused the epidural and withdrew from the study because they perceived greater benefit of the On-Q system. Conclusions Postoperative pain management in adults after MIRPE can be difficult. Both continuous local anesthetic delivery by TEA and On-Q catheters with concomitant, intravenous, patient-controlled anesthesia maintained acceptable analgesia with a reasonable LOS. In our cohort, there was preference for the On-Q system for pain management.

  14. [Techniques for identifying the epidural space].

    PubMed

    Figueredo, E

    2005-01-01

    A large part of the success of epidural anesthesia rests on correct identification of the epidural space. The last hundred years have seen the description of numerous techniques for locating the space in the most straightforward, effective, safe, and reliable manner. To evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches and the complications associated with each, we carried out a MEDLINE search using the following key words: "epidural analgesia," "epidural anesthesia," "epidural space," "identification," and "loss of resistance" (LOR). Traditional, complementary, and instrument-guided techniques used to identify the epidural space were analyzed. The results of clinical trials comparing different LOR techniques were evaluated. LOR with air, with isotonic saline, or a combination of both were the techniques shown to be simplest and safest. With respect to safety, LOR with air led to the greatest number of complications (pneumocephalus, air embolism, insufficient analgesia, higher incidence of dural puncture, nerve root compression, subcutaneous emphysema). When a small air bubble is created inside the syringe, LOR with saline solution is reliable and teachable, as well as safe and effective.

  15. Postoperative pain relief with epidural buprenorphine versus epidural butorphanol in laparoscopic hysterectomies: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Dona Elsa; Ganapathi, P.; Anish Sharma, N. G.; Shankaranarayana, P.; Aiyappa, D. S.; Nazim, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of postoperative analgesia with epidural buprenorphine and butorphanol tartrate. Methods: Sixty patients who were scheduled for elective laparoscopic hysterectomies were randomly enrolled in the study. At the end of the surgery, in study Group A 1 ml (0.3 mg) of buprenorphine and in Group B 1 ml (1 mg) of butorphanol tartrate both diluted to 10 ml with normal saline was injected through the epidural catheter. Visual analog pain scales (VAPSs) were assessed every hour till the 6th h, then 2nd hourly till the 12th h. To assess sedation, Ramsay sedation score was used. The total duration of postoperative analgesia was taken as the period from the time of giving epidural drug until the patients first complain of pain and the VAPS is more than 6. Patients were observed for any side effects such as respiratory depression, nausea, vomiting, hypotension, bradycardia, pruritus, and headache. Results: Buprenorphine had a longer duration of analgesia when compared to butorphanol tartrate (586.17 ± 73.64 vs. 342.53 ± 47.42 [P < 0.001]). Nausea, vomiting (13% vs. 10%), and headache (20% vs. 13%) were more in buprenorphine group; however, sedation score and pruritus (3% vs. 6%) were found to be more with butorphanol. Conclusion: Epidural buprenorphine significantly reduced pain and increased the quality of analgesia with a longer duration of action and was a better alternative to butorphanol for postoperative pain relief. PMID:26957696

  16. Post-thoracotomy analgesia and perioperative outcome.

    PubMed

    Sandler, A N

    1999-05-01

    Post-thoracotomy pain is the most severe form of pain after surgery and is continuously exacerbated by ventilatory function. Due to the multiplicity of nociceptive inputs from the chest wall, thoracic viscera, diaphragm and postoperative chest tubes, postoperative pain may be difficult to control with single modalities. The aim is excellent analgesia with function i.e. normal ventilation and rapid mobilisation. A variety of agents and techniques have been shown to be effective analgesics with varying degrees of functional success. These include systemic opioids, NSAIDS and ketamine, regional analgesia (including epidural, spinal, paravetebral, intercostal and intrapleural techniques) and cryoanalgesia. The most popular and probably most effective technique at the present time is thoracic epidural analgesia using a combination of different local anesthetic agents and opioids. There are few data indicating any influence on outcome of different postthoracotomy analgesic techniques. Improvement in outcome requires a co-ordinated approach from all caregivers using the best possible analgesic techniques. PMID:10389403

  17. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Assessment Tools Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysial (Facet) Joint Injections Surgical Options Nonsurgical Treatments Alternative Medicine Epidural Steroid Injections General Information Why Get an Epidural Steroid ...

  18. [Experience of application of multimodal combined spinal-epidural anesthesia during operative interventions for abdominal cavity tumors in children].

    PubMed

    Dmutriiev, D V

    2014-10-01

    The investigations were conducted in 44 children, operated on for abdominal cavity tumors and tumors of ovaries. In patients of the first group a combined spinal-epidural analgesia and a continuous intravenous phentanyl infusion were applied; while in the second group--the intravenous continuous infusion of phentanyl. Conduction of a multimodal analgesia have had reduced significantly a negative outcomes of insufficient analgesia in children and secured an effective analgesia after traumatic operations.

  19. [History and Technique of Epidural Anaesthesia].

    PubMed

    Waurick, Katrin; Waurick, René

    2015-07-01

    In 1901, the first Epidural anesthesia via a caudal approach was independently described by two FrenchmanJean-Anthanase Sicard and Fernand Cathelin.. The Spanish military surgeon, Fidel Pagés Miravé, completed the lumbar approach successfully in 1921. The two possibilities for identification of the epidural space the "loss of resistance" technique and the technique of the "hanging drop" were developed by Achille Mario Dogliotti, an Italian, and Alberto Gutierrez, an Argentinean physician, at the same time. In 1956 John J. Bonica published the paramedian approach to the epidural space. As early as 1931 Eugene Aburel, a Romanian obstetrician, injected local anaesthetics via a silk catheter to perform lumbar obstetric Epidural analgesia. In 1949 the first successful continuous lumbar Epidural anaesthesia was reported by Manuel Martinez Curbelo, a Cuban. Epidural anaesthesia can be performed in sitting or lateral position in all segments of the spinal column via the median or paramedian approach. Different off-axis angles pose the challenge in learning the technique.

  20. Anaesthetists' experiences with the early labour epidural recommendation for obese parturients: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Va, Eley; Lk, Callaway; Aaj, van Zundert; J, Lipman; C, Gallois

    2016-09-01

    Caring for obese pregnant women presents challenges for all medical professionals. Despite a lack of supporting evidence, expert opinion and international guidelines suggest early labour epidural insertion for obese women. Anecdotally this is not supported by all anaesthetists. This qualitative study explored the experiences of anaesthetists regarding early epidural analgesia in obese parturients, to answer the research question: Are anaesthetists consistent in how they apply early epidural analgesia in obese parturients? Personal in-depth interviews with 42 specialist anaesthetists working in south-east Queensland, Australia, were completed between February and April, 2015. Leximancer™ text analysis software applied a validated algorithm to the data to identify themes and concepts. The major themes were explored by the first author to answer the research question. Three major themes were identified: the demands associated with caring for obese women; concern regarding the anaesthetic technique used in obese women; and the importance of communication with obstetric staff. Disagreement regarding interpretation and application of early epidural analgesia was identified within this group of anaesthetists. These anaesthetists were inconsistent in how they interpreted and applied early epidural analgesia for obese parturients, with some questioning the validity of the practice. The combination of uncertainty, urgency and technical difficulty presented by obese parturients provoked anxiety in these clinicians, particularly the anticipation of unplanned general anaesthesia. Consistent anaesthetic practice could improve the implementation of early epidural analgesia in obese parturients. PMID:27608347

  1. Neuraxial analgesia effects on labour progression: facts, fallacies, uncertainties and the future.

    PubMed

    Grant, E N; Tao, W; Craig, M; McIntire, D; Leveno, K

    2015-02-01

    Approximately 60% of women who labour in the USA receive some form of neuraxial analgesia, but concerns have been raised regarding whether it negatively impacts the labour and delivery process. In this review, we attempt to clarify what has been established as truths, falsities and uncertainties regarding the effects of this form of pain relief on labour progression, negative and/or positive. Additionally, although the term 'epidural' has become synonymous with neuraxial analgesia, we discuss two other techniques, combined spinal-epidural and continuous spinal analgesia, that are gaining popularity, as well as their effects on labour progression.

  2. Obstetric Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Thistlewood, John M.

    1988-01-01

    This article deals with current knowledge about labour pain; the effects of labour pain on the parturient, the fetus, and uterine activity; the benefits and risks of the various labour-pain options; and the parturient's right to exercise informed choice of analgesia options. PMID:21253234

  3. Developments in labour analgesia and their use in Australia.

    PubMed

    Eley, V A; Callaway, L; van Zundert, A A

    2015-07-01

    Since the introduction of chloroform for labour analgesia in 1847, different methods and medications have been used to relieve the pain of labour. The use of heavy sedative medication in the early 1900s was encouraged by enthusiastic doctors and by women empowered by the women's suffrage movement in America. Nitrous oxide by inhalation has been used in Australia since the 1950s and improved methods of administration have made this method of analgesia safe and practical. Caudal epidural analgesia and lumbar epidural analgesia were first made popular in America and by the 1970s these techniques were more widely available in Australia. In 1847, physicians and the public were unsure whether relieving labour pains was the 'right' thing to do. However, many medical and social changes have occurred thanks to the clinical connection between Australia and the United Kingdom and those first settlers to land on Australian shores. Thanks to this historical connection, in today's Australia there is no question that women should use analgesia as a pain relief if they wish. Currently, the majority of women worldwide use some form of analgesia during labour and different methods are widely available. This paper discusses the four milestones of the development of obstetric analgesia and how they were introduced into patient care in Australia.

  4. Developments in labour analgesia and their use in Australia.

    PubMed

    Eley, V A; Callaway, L; van Zundert, A A

    2015-07-01

    Since the introduction of chloroform for labour analgesia in 1847, different methods and medications have been used to relieve the pain of labour. The use of heavy sedative medication in the early 1900s was encouraged by enthusiastic doctors and by women empowered by the women's suffrage movement in America. Nitrous oxide by inhalation has been used in Australia since the 1950s and improved methods of administration have made this method of analgesia safe and practical. Caudal epidural analgesia and lumbar epidural analgesia were first made popular in America and by the 1970s these techniques were more widely available in Australia. In 1847, physicians and the public were unsure whether relieving labour pains was the 'right' thing to do. However, many medical and social changes have occurred thanks to the clinical connection between Australia and the United Kingdom and those first settlers to land on Australian shores. Thanks to this historical connection, in today's Australia there is no question that women should use analgesia as a pain relief if they wish. Currently, the majority of women worldwide use some form of analgesia during labour and different methods are widely available. This paper discusses the four milestones of the development of obstetric analgesia and how they were introduced into patient care in Australia. PMID:26126071

  5. [Perioperative analgesia in adults : The concept of balanced analgesia.].

    PubMed

    Jage, J

    1993-09-01

    The spectrum of perioperative pain treatment is discussed in the present review. The analgesic efficacy of various drugs and the dosage methods of administration and side effects reported for them in such reference works as the practical guide on the management of acute pain recently published by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) are described. Effective postoperative analgesia can diminish stress reactions following surgery. Recovery and physical mobilization are improved as the result of adequate treatment. Results obtained in recent studies have demonstrated that primary adaptive hyperalgesia in the peripheral nociceptive area may develop into secondary maladaptive hypersensibility with a high degree of nociceptive excitability and pain. Chronic pain can develop following acute alterations. Increasing nociceptive activity of primary afferents induces alterations in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. These alterations imply an increase in the excitability of nociceptive neurons, which has been described as neuronal plasticity. Clinical results have demonstrated prevention or delay of acute postoperative pain after injection of local anaesthetics, analgesic premedication or epidural injection of opioids just before the start of surgery. Continuous perioperative spinal analgesia has contributed significantly to the prevention of phantom limb pain in patients undergoing amputation of extremities. The development of pain memory may be prevented as a result of effective acute pain treatment. Several changes to the terminology of acute pain treatment for animal and clinical studies have recently been proposed, including such new terms as preemptive analgesia and pain prevention, which indicate new strategies in the treatment of postoperative pain. The concept of balanced analgesia refers to a strategy for the improvement of analgesic efficacy as a result of a combination of drugs with different local actions on nociception. The combination of

  6. Analgesia in thoracic surgery: review.

    PubMed

    De Cosmo, G; Aceto, P; Gualtieri, E; Congedo, E

    2009-06-01

    Post-thoracotomy pain is one of the most severe types of postoperative pain. It can last up to 2 months and can become chronic in 30% of patients. Pain relief after thoracic surgery is of particular significance, not only for ethical considerations but also for reduction of postoperative pulmonary and cardiac complications. Because of the difficulty in pain control, many approaches have been suggested, but a multimodal therapeutic strategy that provides a central or peripheral block associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) and adjuvant drugs is now the cornerstone of treatment, offering the possibility of reducing opioid requirements and side effects. Thoracic epidural analgesia with local anesthetics and opioids is regarded as the gold standard treatment for post-thoracotomy pain management because it results in early extubation, better ventilatory mechanisms and gas exchange, decreased incidence of atelectasis, pneumonia and chronic postoperative pain. When epidural analgesia is contraindicated or cannot be performed, other regional techniques of analgesia can be used. An alternative method of providing adequate pain relief is a thoracic paravertebral block: continuous paravertebral infusion of local anesthetic via a catheter placed percutaneously or under direct vision during thoracotomy. This is effective in controlling postoperative pain and in preserving pulmonary function. Other techniques, such as intercostal and interpleural blocks, are rarely utilized, whereas a single shot of intrathecal injection of a hydrophilic opioid, such as morphine, appears to be effective. Cryoanalgesia, which is successful in the immediate postoperative period, has been abandoned for its brief duration and increased incidence of chronic pain. PMID:18953284

  7. [Current approaches to the analgesia of spontaneous child birth].

    PubMed

    Neĭmark, M I; Geronimus, V Iu

    2007-01-01

    The authors have compared various modes of spontaneous labor. Prolonged epidural infusion of naropine in combination with fentanyl has been found to cause a less motor block and therefore it may be used in the late first-to-second period of labor. Adequate analgesia ensures a smooth course of the second labor period and promotes the reduction in its duration and the correction of central hemodynamic and hormonal homeostastic disorders. The administration of moradol provides adequate analgesia of the first labor period, prevention, and elimination of abnormal labor activity, without exerting a depressive effect on maternal and neonatal respiration, which makes it possible to consider this procedure as an alternative mode of labor pain relief if there are contraindications to epidural analgesia. PMID:18330019

  8. Spinal and epidural anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    Intraspinal anesthesia; Subarachnoid anesthesia; Epidural; Peridural anesthesia ... Spinal and epidural anesthesia have fewer side effects and risks than general anesthesia (asleep and pain-free). Patients usually recover their senses ...

  9. Depth of the thoracic epidural space in children.

    PubMed

    Masir, F; Driessen, J J; Thies, K C; Wijnen, M H; van Egmond, J

    2006-01-01

    Thoracic epidural anaesthesia in anaesthetized children requires a meticulous technique and may have an increased success rate when the distance between skin and epidural space is known. The objective of this observational study was to measure the skin to epidural distance (SED) during thoracic epidural puncture in 61 children. The epidural puncture was performed using the loss of resistance technique with saline 0.9%. The distance from the needle tip to the point where the needle emerged from the skin was measured. The post-operative analgesia parameters were also measured. Skin to epidural distance correlated significantly with the age and weight of the children. The equation for the relation between SED (cm) and age was 2.15 + (0.01 x months) and for SED vs weight was 1.95 + (0.045 x kg). Despite considerable variability among individuals, the observed correlation of SED with both age and weight shows that this parameter may be helpful to guide thoracic epidural puncture in anaesthetized children. PMID:17067139

  10. Effect of preloading epidural space with normal saline on the incidence of complications of epidural catheter placement and spinal anesthesia for cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Geng, Guiqi; Sun, Xingfeng; Huang, Shaoqiang

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of preloading the epidural space with normal saline (NS) on the incidence of complications of epidural catheter placement and spinal anesthesia for cesarean section. Two hundred and ninety parturients at full term, who were scheduled for cesarean section under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia were randomly divided into two groups: group control (I) and group NS (II). The epidural puncture was performed at the estimated L3-4 interspace with a Tuohy needle attached to a 5 ml syringe. Loss of resistance to air was used to identify the epidural space. In group I no fluid was injected into the epidural space before insertion of the catheter; while in group II NS 5 ml was injected into the epidural space before catheter insertion. The incidence of blood vessel trauma and paraesthesia were evaluated. The effect of spinal anesthesia was evaluated. Blood vessel trauma in group II was significantly lower than in group I, P < 0.05. However, the incidence of paraesthesia was similar between the two groups, P > 0.05. Preloading the epidural space with NS can decrease the incidence of clinically apparent injury to blood vessels during epidural catheter placement, and can improve the effects of spinal analgesia, but does not reduce the incidence of paraesthesia.

  11. Postoperative analgesia for day-case herniorrhaphy patients. A comparison of cryoanalgesia, paravertebral blockade and oral analgesia.

    PubMed

    Wood, G J; Lloyd, J W; Bullingham, R E; Britton, B J; Finch, D R

    1981-06-01

    Patients were admitted as day-cases for inguinal herniorrhaphy under epidural anaesthesia and chlormethiazole sedation. The patients were given oral analgesia, and in addition, some were given either a paravertebral block with a dextran/bupivacaine mixture or cryoanalgesia of the ilio-inguinal nerve for postoperative pain relief. These anaesthetic and analgesic techniques are discussed in relation to day-case herniorrhaphy. PMID:7270829

  12. Postoperative pain relief after hepatic resection in cirrhotic patients: the efficacy of a single small dose of ketamine plus morphine epidurally.

    PubMed

    Taurá, Pilar; Fuster, Josep; Blasi, Anabel; Martinez-Ocon, Julia; Anglada, Teresa; Beltran, Joan; Balust, Jaume; Tercero, Javier; Garcia-Valdecasas, Juan-Carlos

    2003-02-01

    In cirrhotic patients undergoing hepatic surgery, postoperative analgesia remains a challenge. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of a single dose of morphine combined with small-dose ketamine given epidurally for postoperative pain relief. One-hundred-four classification "Child A" cirrhotic patients were randomly assigned to two groups: 1) (MKG, n = 54): epidural morphine (3.5-5 mg) plus ketamine (20/30 mg); and 2) epidural morphine (3.5/5 mg) (MG, n = 50). The level of analgesia, side effects, psychomimetic and neurological disorders, additional analgesic needs, and overall quality of the analgesia were recorded. The mean duration of analgesia was longer in the MKG group (27.2 +/- 8 h versus 16.4 +/- 10 h; P < 0.05). In the MKG group, the visual analog scale (VAS) score began to be significantly lower from 14 h at rest and 12 h on coughing until the end of the study. The need for additional analgesia was also smaller in the MKG group (P < 0.05): at 24 h, only 10% of patients in the MKG group needed complementary analgesia, whereas in the MG group it was 100% (P = 0.003). Side effects were similar in both groups. Psychomimetic side effects and neurological disorders were not detected. These results suggest that postoperative analgesia provided by a single dose of epidural morphine with small-dose ketamine is effective in cirrhotic Child's A patients having major upper abdominal surgery. PMID:12538199

  13. Patient-controlled drug delivery for acute postoperative pain management: a review of current and emerging technologies.

    PubMed

    Viscusi, Eugene R

    2008-01-01

    Postoperative pain management has dramatically improved with the advent of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) delivery. The optimal PCA system would encompass several key characteristics, including consistent efficacy across a number of surgeries; safety of both the analgesic drug delivered and the delivery system; ease of setup, maintenance, and administration; patient comfort during analgesic delivery; avoidance of analgesic gaps; minimal invasiveness; and it would be associated with high patient satisfaction. Existing PCA modalities (using intravenous or epidural routes) encompass some of these characteristics (e.g., they have demonstrated efficacy across a number of surgeries); however, they are limited by the need for an indwelling catheter and the time and resources required for system setup and use. Device programming-related medication errors by hospital staff are an unfortunate risk, and could lead to significant harm. New PCA technologies are on the horizon that address some of the limitations to existing modalities; however, the added complexity of these newer systems are a concern, and their benefits and drawbacks remain to be assessed. These technologies include "smart" intravenous PCA infusion pumps to improve the safety of analgesic administration; needle-free options, such as the fentanyl HCl iontophoretic transdermal system for transdermal delivery; and a number of PCA devices for intranasal delivery, as well as several new options for patient-controlled regional analgesia. This review will discuss the benefits and drawbacks of both existing and emerging PCA modalities in the context of the ideal PCA system, and provide a critical evaluation of their use in postoperative settings. PMID:18299096

  14. [Cesarean delivery and exeresis of a pheochromocytoma performed under epidural and general anesthesia].

    PubMed

    García Hernández, E; González Rodríguez, J L; Vega Cruz, M S

    2004-04-01

    A 33-year-old pregnant woman with episodes of nocturnal tachycardia and anxiety diagnosed with extra-renal pheochromocytoma in her 28th month of gestation was admitted in her 38th week for an alpha-adrenergic block prior to elective cesarean section and tumor exeresis. The cesarean section was performed with the patient given an epidural lumbar block, and immediately after delivery of the fetus total intravenous anesthesia (with propofol, remifentanil, and rocuronium) was administered in addition to the continuous epidural analgesia used during tumor resection and postoperatively. No complications developed during surgery or recovery and the clinical courses were satisfactory for both mother and child. The use of propofol and remifentanil in combination with epidural anesthesia is not common in our clinical context. We point out that the multimodal technique affords good hemodynamic stability, guarantees satisfactory analgesia, and reduces the need for vasoactive drugs.

  15. Epidural catheter fixation. A comparison of subcutaneous tunneling versus device fixation technique

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashima; Parasa, Sujay Kumar; Tejvath, Kiran; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The technique of securing the epidural catheter has a major bearing on the efficacy of epidural analgesia. Specific fixator devices, for e.g., Lockit epidural catheter clamp, which successfully prevents catheter migration, are available. The possibility of catheter snapping and surgical retrieval has been reported with tunneling of catheters. These techniques have not been compared for safety, efficacy and appropriateness of achieving secure epidural catheter fixation in the postoperative period. Material and Methods: A total of 200 patients who required postoperative epidural analgesia were included. They were randomized into two groups: Group I (n = 100) in whom epidural catheters were tunneled vertically in the paravertebral subcutaneous tissue and group II (n = 100) wherein a Lockit device was used to fix the catheter. Likert score was used to quantify patient's comfort during procedure. The techniques were compared for migration, catheter dislodgement, local trauma, catheter snapping and catheter obstruction. Results: 12% of tunneled catheters had migrated significantly outward. 22% of patients had erythema and 77% had significant procedural discomfort in group I. In group II, 3% catheters had kinked and 14% had erythema from device adhesive. Conclusion: Our results support the use of Lockit device as a safe and comfortable fixation device compared to subcutaneous tunneling of catheters. PMID:27006544

  16. Postoperative analgesic efficacy of epidural tramadol as adjutant to ropivacaine in adult upper abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anil P.; Singh, Dharmraj; Singh, Yashpal; Jain, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain control after major abdominal surgery is the prime concern of anesthesiologist. Among various methodologies, epidural analgesia is the most preferred technique because of the excellent quality of analgesia with minimum side-effects. Aim: The present study was designated to compare postoperative analgesic efficacy and safety of epidural tramadol as adjuvant to ropivacaine (0.2%) in adult upper abdominal surgery. Settings and Design: Prospective, randomized-controlled, double-blinded trial. Materials and Methods: Ninety patients planned for upper abdominal surgery under general anesthesia were randomized into three equal groups to receive epidural drug via epidural catheter at start of incisional wound closure: Group R to receive ropivacaine (0.2%); Group RT1 to receive tramadol 1 mg/kg with ropivacaine (0.2%); and RT2 to receive tramadol 2 mg/kg with ropivacaine (0.2%). Duration and quality of analgesia (visual analog scale [VAS] score), hemodynamic parameters, and adverse event were recorded and statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis: One-way analysis of variance test, Fisher's exact test/Chi-square test, whichever appropriate. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Mean duration of analgesia after epidural bolus drug was significantly higher in Group RT2 (584 ± 58 min) when compared with RT1 (394 ± 46 min) or R Group (283 ± 35 min). VAS score was always lower in RT2 Group in comparison to other group during the study. Hemodynamic parameter remained stable in all three groups. Conclusion: We conclude that tramadol 2 mg/kg with ropivacaine (0.2%) provides more effective and longer-duration analgesia than tramadol 1 mg/kg with ropivacaine (0.2%). PMID:26712976

  17. Single-dose intrathecal analgesia to control labour pain

    PubMed Central

    Minty, R.G.; Kelly, Len; Minty, Alana; Hammett, D.C.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the safety and efficacy of single-dose spinal analgesia (intrathecal narcotics [ITN]) during labour. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE was searched and the references of 2 systematic reviews and a meta-analysis were reviewed to find articles on obstetric analgesia and pain measurement. The 33 articles selected included 14 studies, 1 meta-analysis, and 2 systematic reviews, all providing level I evidence. MAIN MESSAGE The literature supports use of ITN as a safe and effective alternative to epidural anesthesia. The recent decrease in rates of episiotomies and use of forceps during deliveries means patients require less dense perineal anesthesia. The advantageof single-dose ITN is that fewer physicians and nurses are needed to administer it even though its safety and effectiveness are comparable with other analgesics. Use of ITN is associated with a shorter first stage of labour and more rapid cervical dilation. A combination of 2.5 mg of bupivacaine, 25 μg of fentanyl, and 250 μg of morphine intrathecally usually provides a 4-hour window of acceptable analgesia for patients without complications not anticipating protracted labour. The evolution in dosing of ITN warrants a re-examination of its usefulness in modern obstetric practice. CONCLUSION Physicians practising modern obstetrics in rural and small urban centres might find single-dose ITN a useful alternative to parenteral or epidural analgesia for appropriately selected patients. PMID:17872679

  18. [Labor analgesia in the US and Japan].

    PubMed

    Morishima, Hisayo O

    2007-09-01

    Obstetric anesthesia has made significant progress over the last 50 years. It is one of the major subspecialties in anesthesia in US. Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology (SOAP) was founded in 1968. According to its SCORE project on the practice of obstetric anesthesia, 82.4% of all parturients received some form of anesthesia for cesarean section or labor analgesia. Epidural analgesia was the most common form of labor analgesia (65%), followed by CSEA. This high percentage of anesthesia care for parturients mandates the presence of obstetric anesthesiologists at labor and delivery suites in major hospitals in US. The Japanese Society of Obstetrics and Anesthesia, formerly "Mutsu-bunben Kenkyukai", now called "Bunben to Masui Kenkyukai", was founded in Japan at about the same time as SOAP. Despite its long history, obstetric anesthesia is yet to be a major subspecialty in Japan. It is encouraging, however, that the number of attendants in obstetric anesthesia sessions in JSA seems increasing. SOAP has played an important role in the education and progress of obstetric anesthesia in US. I hope that the joint symposium of SOAP, Bunben to Masui Kenkyukai, and JSA at 39th SOAP annual meeting will facilitate the progress of obstetric anesthesia in Japan.

  19. Postoperative pain relief by demand analgesia.

    PubMed

    Peeters, M; Brugmans, J

    1980-01-01

    Postoperative pain relief is only apparently an easy task. A brief survey of literature investigating the discomfort experienced in the postoperative phase is all but encouraging. One can identify four basic problems in obtaining adequate results by delivery of analgesic drugs: a) the biological variability among individual patients, b) the unpredictable uptake of the drug administered intramuscularly, c) the time lag involved between request by the patient and the subsequent administration of a single dose and d) the lack of knowledge about the nature of the discomfort and its remedies. An alternative strategy introducing "On-Demand" analgesia administering prescribed doses at the right moment is presented and analysed a) as an operant conditioning process implementing a particular reinforcement schedule (behavioural sciences), as well as b) a negative feedback control loop that entrust the central judgement to the patient (system theory). Both approaches give insight into the results: the technique copes with biological variability; anticipating pain induced by fear disappears; the feedback strategy works well and patients adapt to a wide range in prescriptions; intermittent administration makes more efficient use of the analgesic; an optimal result is demonstrated in studies comparing on-demand analgesia with the normal IM-regime and epidural analgesia; continuity in pain relief can be obtained in routine clinical practice.

  20. Analgesia after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Milan, Zoka

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses postoperative analgesia in patients with end-stage liver disease who have undergone liver transplantation (LT). Postoperative analgesia determines how patients perceive LT. Although important, this topic is underrepresented in the current literature. With an increased frequency of fast tracking in LT, efficient intra- and postoperative analgesia are undergoing changes. We herein review the current literature, compare the benefits and disadvantages of the therapeutic options, and make recommendations based on the current literature and clinical experience. PMID:26413222

  1. A double-blind comparison between epidural morphine and epidural clonidine in patients with chronic non-cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Glynn, C; Dawson, D; Sanders, R

    1988-08-01

    In a randomised double-blind study of 20 patients with chronic pain, epidural morphine 5 mg in 5 ml of saline was compared with epidural clonidine 150 micrograms in 5 ml of saline. Thirteen patients had a clinical and radiological diagnosis of arachnoiditis, 6 had low back pain and 1 had post-operative scar pain. There were 18 females and 2 males with an average age of 52 years, range 22-76 years. There was no difference found between the 2 solutions in the resultant analgesia measured by the visual analogue scale for pain, pain relief or the pain word score during the 3 h period of the study. No difference was found in the patient's mood which was also measured with the visual analogue scale. Two patients had no analgesia from either injection, 2 patients did not obtain any relief from clonidine and another 2 obtained no relief from morphine. Six patients reported that clonidine was better than morphine, 5 reported that morphine and clonidine were the same and 3 reported that morphine was better than clonidine. The duration of analgesia from the clonidine varied from 6 h to 1 month; the duration of analgesia from morphine varied from 6 to 24 h. Clonidine was associated with sedation and a fall in blood pressure of greater than 20 mm Hg in all patients, 1 patient required ephedrine to treat hypotension. Twelve patients had pruritus, 7 nausea and 2 vomiting following the morphine. Statistically there was no difference found between morphine and clonidine for short-term (3 h) analgesia in these patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Evidence for using air or fluid when identifying the epidural space.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Curtis L; Rodriguez, Ricardo E; Schmidt, James; Austin, Paul N

    2013-02-01

    Lumbar epidural analgesia is frequently employed to provide pain relief for women during labor. Anesthesia providers use various methods to identify the epidural space. Some providers use air, some use fluid, and others use a combination of air and fluid during the loss of resistance technique. Loss of resistance to air has been speculated to result in a lesser quality of analgesia compared with loss of resistance to only fluid. A search strategy focusing on preappraised sources was used to locate evidence from interventional and observational studies. Four evidence sources were located, including a systematic review with meta-analysis of 4 older studies. The evidence reviewed was inconclusive in determining whether a difference in analgesia quality results from the use of air or fluid during the loss of resistance technique. Future studies should include an adequate number of subjects and address other problems such as operator experience, observer blinding, equivalence of subject characteristics, outcomes definition and measurement, and composition of epidural solution. Providers should consider other factors when selecting loss of resistance medium, such as the reported complications of large amounts of air injected into the epidural space and surrounding structures.

  3. Low-dose spinal neostigmine further enhances the analgesic effect of spinal bupivacaine combined with epidural dexamethasone, following orthopedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lauretti, Gabriela Rocha; Veloso, Fabricio S.; Kitayama, Antonio T; Mattos, Anita Leocadia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Opioids are considered mainstream for combined spinal-epidural anesthesia, but frequently limited by adverse effects. The aim of this study was to examine whether low-dose spinal neostigmine, epidural dexamethasone or their combination enhances analgesia from spinal bupivacaine without adverse effects. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery were randomized to one of four groups and evaluated for 24-h after surgery for analgesia (time to first rescue analgesic) and rescue analgesic consumption. Patients received 15 mg bupivacaine plus the test drug intrathecally (saline or 1 microgram (μg) neostigmine). The epidural test drug was either saline or 10 mg dexamethasone. The Control group (CG) received spinal and epidural saline. The Neostigmine group (NG), spinal neostigmine and epidural saline; the Dexamethasone group (DG), spinal saline and epidural dexamethasone; and the Neostigmine-dexamethasone group (NDG), spinal neostigmine and epidural dexamethasone. Results: The CG (282 ± 163 min) and NG (524 ± 142 min) were similar in their times to first rescue analgesic and analgesic consumption. The time to first rescue analgesic was longer for the DG (966 ± 397 min) compared with CG and NG (P < 0.0002), and the DG had less ketoprofen consumption and lower overall visual analogue scale-pain sores compared with CG and NG (P < 0.0005). Addition of 1 mg-neostigmine (NDG) resulted in longer time to rescue analgesic (1205 ± 303 min; P < 0.02) and lower ketoprofen consumption (P < 0.05) compared to DG. Sporadic cases of vesical catheterization and emesis were observed, however adverse effects were similar among groups. Conclusion: Spinal 1 microgram (μg) neostigmine further enhanced analgesia from spinal bupivacaine combined with epidural dexamethasone, without increasing the incidence of adverse effects. PMID:25535491

  4. Epidural Lysis of Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Frank; Jamison, David E.; Hurley, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    As our population ages and the rate of spine surgery continues to rise, the use epidural lysis of adhesions (LOA) has emerged as a popular treatment to treat spinal stenosis and failed back surgery syndrome. There is moderate evidence that percutaneous LOA is more effective than conventional ESI for both failed back surgery syndrome, spinal stenosis, and lumbar radiculopathy. For cervical HNP, cervical stenosis and mechanical pain not associated with nerve root involvement, the evidence is anecdotal. The benefits of LOA stem from a combination of factors to include the high volumes administered and the use of hypertonic saline. Hyaluronidase has been shown in most, but not all studies to improve treatment outcomes. Although infrequent, complications are more likely to occur after epidural LOA than after conventional epidural steroid injections. PMID:24478895

  5. [Caudal epidural anesthesia in pyloromyotomy in infants: our experience].

    PubMed

    Busto Aguirreurreta, N; Cía Armendáriz, M L; Carrascosa Moreno, S; Martínez Bermejo, M A; Conde Cortés, J; Gracia Velilla, A; Bento Bravo, L

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this work is to introduce an alternative to ordinary anaesthetic with tracheal intubation for the surgery of pyloric stenosis. We argue in favour of this alternative that it can be achieved with relative ease if the technique of caudal epidural is well known, a better control of peri and post-operative analgesia without the need of opiates, and that this technique obviates orotracheal intubation and intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Based on our experience with 18 patients, we introduce the anaesthetic technique, the monitoring systems and the obtained results. Our conclusion is that this technique is a good alternative to general anaesthetic for the surgical treatment of pyloric stenosis.

  6. Comparative study of epidural bupivacaine with butorphanol and bupivacaine with tramadol for postoperative pain relief in abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Swathi, N.; Ashwini, N.; Shukla, Mukesh I.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: To compare the efficacy of combination of epidural local anesthetic with tramadol and butorphanol in major abdominal surgeries. Aims: To evaluate duration of analgesia, analgesic efficacy, and safety profile of two groups of drugs-epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine and epidural tramadol with bupivacaine. Materials and Methods: A prospective, randomized controlled, double-blinded study was undertaken in 50 patients scheduled for major abdominal surgeries. Group B received epidural butorphanol 2 mg + bupivacaine 0.125% first dose and subsequent doses, butorphanol 1 mg + bupivacaine 0.125% (total volume 10 ml). Group T received epidural tramadol 2 mg/kg + bupivacaine 0.125% first dose and subsequent doses, tramadol 1 mg/kg + bupivacaine 0.125% (total volume 10 ml). Observed parameters were the quality of analgesia, sedation, and hemodynamic parameters in the intra and post-operative period. Time for request of rescue analgesia was noted in all the patients. Continuous data are analyzed by Student's t-test using IBM SPSS software version 20. P ≤0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. P ≤ 0.001 was considered to be statistically highly significant. Results: Visual analog scale better with butorphanol group than tramadol (0.12 ± 0.332 and 0.84 ± 0.746 for Group B and Group T) at 30 min after first dose. Onset of action (8.44 ± 1.158 min in Group B and 12.80 ± 1.354 min in Group T) faster with butorphanol but duration of analgesia longer with tramadol (5.92 ± 0.76 h in Group B vs. 7.68 ± 0.76 h in Group T). Sedation was seen in patients with butorphanol group. Nausea and vomiting more frequent with tramadol group. Conclusions: Epidural tramadol with antiemetic is better than butorphanol for its longer duration in ambulatory surgery, elderly patients, obese patients, and suitable high-risk patients. PMID:27746533

  7. Effect of epidural clonidine on characteristics of spinal anaesthesia in patients undergoing gynaecological surgeries: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rachna; Rao, RS Raghavendra; Turai, Ashwini; Prabha, P; Shreyavathi, R; Harsoor, Karuna

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Combined spinal–epidural (CSE) anaesthesia is being increasingly used for effective post-operative analgesia. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of epidural clonidine on characteristics of spinal anaesthesia for gynaecological surgeries. Methods: This was a prospective randomised, double-blind, controlled study involving sixty patients belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status I and II who underwent gynaecological surgeries were randomly divided into clonidine (C) group and saline (S) group of thirty each. All patients received CSE anaesthesia. Ten minutes before subarachnoid block (SAB), Group C received clonidine 150 μg diluted to 5 ml in normal saline (NS) and Group S received NS epidurally. Hyperbaric bupivacaine (15 mg) was administered intrathecally for both groups after epidural injection. Sensory and motor block characteristics, analgesia, sedation and haemodynamics were observed. Statistical analysis was performed using appropriate tests. Results: Epidural clonidine produced faster onset (37.83 ± 8.58 s in Group C compared to 50.33 ± 8.80 s in Group S, P = 0.001) and prolonged duration of sensory block (241.17±18.65 minutes in group C compared to 150.33±19.16 minutes in group S, P = 0.001). Time for two segment regression of sensory block was193.67 ± 19.82 min in Group C and 109.33 ± 18.56 min Group S (P < 0.001). The duration of analgesia was 299.00 ± 43.38 min in Group C and 152.50 ± 21.04 min in Group S (P < 0.001). Haemodynamics and sedation scores were comparable between two groups. Conclusion: Administration of clonidine epidurally, 10 min before SAB, caused early onset and prolonged duration of motor blockade and analgesia, without any significant post-operative complication. PMID:27330201

  8. Traumatic epidural hematoma in children.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Giovanni; Caroli, Emanuela; Raco, Antonino; Salvati, Maurizio; Delfini, Roberto

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of childhood acute epidural hematoma and to report our experience in recent years. A series of 35 patients below the age of 15 years treated for acute epidural hematoma at our institution between June 1991 and December 2000 was analyzed in detail. Pediatric epidural hematoma presents both age-related and atypical features when compared with epidural hematoma in adults. In selected cases, prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma results in an excellent outcome. Outcomes seem to be directly related to the patient's preoperative neurologic status and the presence of associated intracranial lesions.

  9. [PROPHYLAXIS OF POSTOPERATIVE HYPERALGESIA, BASED ON MORPHOLOGICAL SUBSTANTIATION OF THE ANALGESIA METHOD].

    PubMed

    Dmytriyev, D V; Konoplytskyi, V S

    2016-03-01

    The investigation was conducted in 20 children, operated on for abdominal oncological diseases in a 2010-2015 yrs period, using various methods of analgesia. While application of a constant infusion of high doses of phentanyl--1-4 MKr/(kg x h) in perioperative period the occurrence of the opiate-induced hyperalgesia is possible with the accompanied morphological changes in intestinal wall; in anesthesia of a transverse abdominal muscle (a TAP-blockade) and combined spinal epidural analgesia such changes were not observed. PMID:27514091

  10. [Use of a mix of lidocaine and butorphanol as a caudal epidural anesthesia in a mare].

    PubMed

    Csik-Salmon, J; Blais, D; Vaillancourt, D; Garon, O; Bisaillon, A

    1996-10-01

    Loss of rear motor control is the main limiting factor in the use of caudal epidural anesthesia in the horse. In man and laboratory animals, a small dose of an opiate combined with a local anesthetic enhances analgesia without impairing motor function. Thus, the amount of local anesthetic administered may be reduced. Butorphanol is an opiate widely used in horses. It has a good margin of safety and few cardiorespiratory effects. The effects of lidocaine (0.25 mg/kg) and lidocaine-butorphanol (0.25 mg/kg, and 0.04 mg/kg, respectively) were compared in 2 groups of 5 healthy unsedated mares. Horses in each group received either lidocaine or lidocaine-butorphanol in saline solution for a total volume of 0.0165 mg/kg. Epidural injection was performed at the first coccygeal interspace. Each mare was used only once. Cutaneous analgesia was assessed by a response to a pin prick; and visceral analgesia was assessed by response to a noxious stimulus applied to the urethra. Heart rate, respiratory rate, and arterial blood pressure were also measured. Analysis of the results showed an increase in duration of both cutaneous and visceral analgesia in the mares given lidocaine-butorphanol. Cutaneous analgesia increased from 36 +/- 13 to 150 +/- 21 min and visceral analgesia increased from 22 +/- 10 to 162 +/- 16 min. A cranial extension of the cutaneous analgesia was also observed. Cardiorespiratory depression or signs of excitation were not observed. However, these mares demonstrated peculiar walking in the hind limbs, not associated with signs of ataxia or hyperkinesia.

  11. Unilateral Horner Syndrome Following Epidural Anaesthesia in a Morbidly Obese Parturient.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Canan; Karasu, Derya; Özer, Demet; Çağlayan, Ümit; Karakaş, Oya

    2015-06-01

    Horner's syndrome is rarely observed in epidural anaesthesia; it is characterized by ptosis and enophthalmos on the affected side; miosis, anisocoria, and conjunctival hyperemia in the affected eye and anhydrosis, flushing on the affected side of the face. It is usually a complication spontaneously resolved without permanent neurological deficits. Intraoral anaesthesia, stellate, cervical and brachial plexus block, thoracic, lumbar and caudal epidural anaesthesia and intrapleural analgesia are the main causes associated with Horner's syndrome in anaesthesia. Among the other causes of Horner's syndrome are head and neck surgery, trauma and puncture of the internal jugular vein. We aimed to present a case with unilateral Horner's syndrome, which appeared in the morbidly obese parturient after lumbar epidural anaesthesia. PMID:27366494

  12. Clinical Practice of Epidural Puncture in Dogs and Cats Assisted by a Commercial Acoustic Puncture Assist Device-Epidural Locator: Preliminary Results.

    PubMed

    Ertelt, Katrin; Turković, Veljko; Moens, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare an Acoustic Puncture Assist Device-Epidural Locator (APAD-EL) with the "pop sensation" (POP) and "lack of resistance" (LOR) commonly used to confirm penetration of the ligamentum flavum and to ensure correct epidural placement in dogs and cats. We recruited 38 dogs and cats undergoing surgery and receiving epidural analgesia. Two anesthetists performed epidural puncture using the POP and LOR signs. Simultaneously, APAD-EL was used to collect visual and acoustic confirmation during advancement and placement of the needle tip for post hoc evaluation. A positive APAD-EL sign consists of a sudden pressure drop at the needle tip visible on a display and a concomitant pitch change of an acoustic signal. Failure to record a sudden pressure drop is considered a negative APAD sign. Descriptive statistics were used. In 32 patients with positive POP and LOR, the APAD was also positive. In one patient, POP was positive with a negative LOR and APAD result. Five patients had negative POP but positive LOR. Four patients had APAD positive and one (a dog) APAD negative. The study results showed that the APAD-EL information supports the subjective signs of correct needle placement suggested by positive POP and LOR experienced by trained anesthetists. The technique can be useful to assist difficult epidural puncture and as a training and teaching tool.

  13. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, B.F. III; Weiner, M.H.; McGee, Z.A.

    1982-12-17

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host.

  14. Comparison of dexmedetomidine and clonidine as an adjuvant to ropivacaine for epidural anesthesia in lower abdominal and lower limb surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Arunkumar, Sruthi; Hemanth Kumar, V.R; Krishnaveni, N.; Ravishankar, M.; Jaya, Velraj; Aruloli, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The quality and duration of analgesia is improved when a local anesthetic is combined with alpha 2 adrenergic agonist. Though, the effects of clonidine on local anesthetics have been extensively studied, there are limited studies demonstrating the effects of epidural dexmedetomidine on local anesthetics. The aim of our study is to compare the effect of clonidine and dexmedetomidine when used as an adjuvant to epidural ropivacaine in lower abdominal and lower limb surgeries. Materials and Methods: Patients were randomized into two groups-group ropivacaine with clonidine (RC) received 15 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1 μg/kg clonidine and group ropivacaine with dexmedetomidine (RD) received 15 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine epidurally. Onset of sensory analgesia using cold swab, onset of motor blockade using Bromage scale, time to 2 dermatome regression of sensory level, time to first demand for analgesia, sedation using Ramsay sedation scale, intra operative hemodynamic parameters and complications were assessed. Results: The onset (RD-8.53 ± 1.81, RC-11.93 ± 1.96) and duration of sensory blockade (RD-316 ± 31.5, RC-281 ± 37, sedation were found to be significantly better in the dexmedetomidine group. No significant difference was found in terms of onset of motor blockade and hemodynamic changes. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine at doses of 1 μg/kg is an effective adjuvant to ropivacaine for epidural anesthesia, which is comparable to clonidine. PMID:26543457

  15. A comparative study of epidural catheter colonization and infection in Intensive Care Unit and wards in a Tertiary Care Public Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Harde, Minal; Bhadade, Rakesh; Iyer, Hemlata; Jatale, Amol; Tiwatne, Sagar

    2016-01-01

    Infection is a potentially serious complication of epidural analgesia and with an increase in its use in wards there is a necessity to demonstrate its safety. We aimed to compare the incidence of colonization of epidural catheters retained for short duration (for 48 h) postoperative analgesia in postanesthesia care unit and wards. It was a prospective observational study done in a tertiary care teaching public hospital over a period of 2 years and included 400 patients with 200 each belonged to two groups PACU and ward. We also studied epidural tip culture pattern, skin swab culture at the entry point of the catheter, their relation to each other and whether colonization is equivalent to infection. Data were analyzed using statistical software GraphPad. Overall positive tip culture was 6% (24), of them 7% (14) were from PACU and 5% (10) were from ward (P = 0.5285). Positive skin swab culture was 38% (150), of them 20% (80) were from PACU and 18% (70) were from ward (P = 0.3526). The relation between positive tip culture and positive skin swab culture in same patients is extremely significant showing a strong linear relationship (95% confidence interval = 0.1053–0.2289). The most common microorganism isolated was Staphylococcus epidermidis. No patient had signs of local or epidural infection. There is no difference in the incidence of epidural catheter tip culture and skin swab culture of patients from the general ward and PACU. Epidural analgesia can be administered safely for 48 h in general wards without added risk of infection. The presence of positive tip culture is not a predictor of epidural space infection, and colonization is not equivalent to infection; hence, routine culture is not needed. Bacterial migration from the skin along the epidural track is the most common mode of bacterial colonization; hence, strict asepsis is necessary. PMID:27076712

  16. A comparative study of epidural catheter colonization and infection in Intensive Care Unit and wards in a Tertiary Care Public Hospital.

    PubMed

    Harde, Minal; Bhadade, Rakesh; Iyer, Hemlata; Jatale, Amol; Tiwatne, Sagar

    2016-02-01

    Infection is a potentially serious complication of epidural analgesia and with an increase in its use in wards there is a necessity to demonstrate its safety. We aimed to compare the incidence of colonization of epidural catheters retained for short duration (for 48 h) postoperative analgesia in postanesthesia care unit and wards. It was a prospective observational study done in a tertiary care teaching public hospital over a period of 2 years and included 400 patients with 200 each belonged to two groups PACU and ward. We also studied epidural tip culture pattern, skin swab culture at the entry point of the catheter, their relation to each other and whether colonization is equivalent to infection. Data were analyzed using statistical software GraphPad. Overall positive tip culture was 6% (24), of them 7% (14) were from PACU and 5% (10) were from ward (P = 0.5285). Positive skin swab culture was 38% (150), of them 20% (80) were from PACU and 18% (70) were from ward (P = 0.3526). The relation between positive tip culture and positive skin swab culture in same patients is extremely significant showing a strong linear relationship (95% confidence interval = 0.1053-0.2289). The most common microorganism isolated was Staphylococcus epidermidis. No patient had signs of local or epidural infection. There is no difference in the incidence of epidural catheter tip culture and skin swab culture of patients from the general ward and PACU. Epidural analgesia can be administered safely for 48 h in general wards without added risk of infection. The presence of positive tip culture is not a predictor of epidural space infection, and colonization is not equivalent to infection; hence, routine culture is not needed. Bacterial migration from the skin along the epidural track is the most common mode of bacterial colonization; hence, strict asepsis is necessary. PMID:27076712

  17. Potentiation of epidural lidocaine by co-administering tramadol by either intramuscular or epidural route in cats

    PubMed Central

    Hermeto, Larissa C.; DeRossi, Rafael; Marques, Beatriz C.; Jardim, Paulo H.A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the analgesic and systemic effects of intramuscular (IM) versus epidural (EP) administration of tramadol as an adjunct to EP injection of lidocaine in cats. Six healthy, domestic, shorthair female cats underwent general anesthesia. A prospective, randomized, crossover trial was then conducted with each cat receiving the following 3 treatments: EP injection of 2% lidocaine [LEP; 3.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)]; EP injection of a combination of lidocaine and 5% tramadol (LTEP; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively); or EP injection of lidocaine and IM injection of tramadol (LEPTIM; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively). Systemic effects, spread and duration of analgesia, behavior, and motor blockade were determined before treatment and at predetermined intervals afterwards. The duration of analgesia was 120 ± 31 min for LTEP, 71 ± 17 min for LEPTIM, and 53 ± 6 min for LEP (P < 0.05; mean ± SD). The cranial spread of analgesia obtained with LTEP was similar to that with LEP or LEPTIM, extending to dermatomic region T13–L1. Complete motor blockade was similar for the 3 treatments. It was concluded that tramadol produces similar side effects in cats after either EP or IM administration. Our findings indicate that EP and IM tramadol (2 mg/kg BW) with EP lidocaine produce satisfactory analgesia in cats. As an adjunct to lidocaine, EP tramadol provides a longer duration of analgesia than IM administration. The adverse effects produced by EP and IM administration of tramadol were not different. Further studies are needed to determine whether EP administration of tramadol could play a role in managing postoperative pain in cats when co-administered with lidocaine after painful surgical procedures. PMID:26130854

  18. Potentiation of epidural lidocaine by co-administering tramadol by either intramuscular or epidural route in cats.

    PubMed

    Hermeto, Larissa C; DeRossi, Rafael; Marques, Beatriz C; Jardim, Paulo H A

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the analgesic and systemic effects of intramuscular (IM) versus epidural (EP) administration of tramadol as an adjunct to EP injection of lidocaine in cats. Six healthy, domestic, shorthair female cats underwent general anesthesia. A prospective, randomized, crossover trial was then conducted with each cat receiving the following 3 treatments: EP injection of 2% lidocaine [LEP; 3.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)]; EP injection of a combination of lidocaine and 5% tramadol (LTEP; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively); or EP injection of lidocaine and IM injection of tramadol (LEPTIM; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively). Systemic effects, spread and duration of analgesia, behavior, and motor blockade were determined before treatment and at predetermined intervals afterwards. The duration of analgesia was 120 ± 31 min for LTEP, 71 ± 17 min for LEPTIM, and 53 ± 6 min for LEP (P < 0.05; mean ± SD). The cranial spread of analgesia obtained with LTEP was similar to that with LEP or LEPTIM, extending to dermatomic region T13-L1. Complete motor blockade was similar for the 3 treatments. It was concluded that tramadol produces similar side effects in cats after either EP or IM administration. Our findings indicate that EP and IM tramadol (2 mg/kg BW) with EP lidocaine produce satisfactory analgesia in cats. As an adjunct to lidocaine, EP tramadol provides a longer duration of analgesia than IM administration. The adverse effects produced by EP and IM administration of tramadol were not different. Further studies are needed to determine whether EP administration of tramadol could play a role in managing postoperative pain in cats when co-administered with lidocaine after painful surgical procedures. PMID:26130854

  19. Lumbar spinal epidural angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Nanassis, Kimon; Tsitsopoulos, Parmenion; Marinopoulos, Dimitrios; Mintelis, Apostolos; Tsitsopoulos, Philippos

    2008-04-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are rare benign tumours most commonly found in the thoracic spine. A case of an extradural lumbar angiolipoma in a 47-year-old female is described. She had a recent history of lower back pain accompanied by sciatica. Lumbar MRI revealed a dorsal epidural mass at the L2-L3 level. The patient underwent a bilateral laminectomy, in which the tumour was totally excised. The pathological examination indicated haemangiolipoma. Post-operatively, the patient's neurological signs and symptoms improved remarkably quickly. MRI at 6 and 18 months after surgery revealed no evidence of tumour recurrence.

  20. Portable optical epidural needle-a CMOS-based system solution and its circuit design.

    PubMed

    Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lin, Shih-Pin; Mandell, M Susan; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Chang, Yin; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2014-01-01

    Epidural anesthesia is a common anesthesia method yet up to 10% of procedures fail to provide adequate analgesia. This is usually due to misinterpreting the tactile information derived from the advancing needle through the complex tissue planes. Incorrect placement also can cause dural puncture and neural injury. We developed an optic system capable of reliably identifying tissue planes surrounding the epidural space. However the new technology was too large and cumbersome for practical clinical use. We present a miniaturized version of our optic system using chip technology (first generation CMOS-based system) for logic functions. The new system was connected to an alarm that was triggered once the optic properties of the epidural were identified. The aims of this study were to test our miniaturized system in a porcine model and describe the technology to build this new clinical tool. Our system was tested in a porcine model and identified the epidural space in the lumbar, low and high thoracic regions of the spine. The new technology identified the epidural space in all but 1 of 46 attempts. Experimental results from our fabricated integrated circuit and animal study show the new tool has future clinical potential.

  1. Portable Optical Epidural Needle-A CMOS-Based System Solution and Its Circuit Design

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lin, Shih-Pin; Mandell, M. Susan; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Chang, Yin; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2014-01-01

    Epidural anesthesia is a common anesthesia method yet up to 10% of procedures fail to provide adequate analgesia. This is usually due to misinterpreting the tactile information derived from the advancing needle through the complex tissue planes. Incorrect placement also can cause dural puncture and neural injury. We developed an optic system capable of reliably identifying tissue planes surrounding the epidural space. However the new technology was too large and cumbersome for practical clinical use. We present a miniaturized version of our optic system using chip technology (first generation CMOS-based system) for logic functions. The new system was connected to an alarm that was triggered once the optic properties of the epidural were identified. The aims of this study were to test our miniaturized system in a porcine model and describe the technology to build this new clinical tool. Our system was tested in a porcine model and identified the epidural space in the lumbar, low and high thoracic regions of the spine. The new technology identified the epidural space in all but 1 of 46 attempts. Experimental results from our fabricated integrated circuit and animal study show the new tool has future clinical potential. PMID:25162150

  2. The efficacy and safety of epidural dexmedetomidine and clonidine with bupivacaine in patients undergoing lower limb orthopedic surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Safiya I; Mahesh, Sarala B

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Alpha (α-2) adrenergic agonists have both analgesic and sedative properties when used as an adjuvant in regional anesthesia. A prospective randomized double-blind study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of epidural route and to compare the efficacy and clinical profile of dexmedetomidine and clonidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine with special emphasis on their quality of analgesia, sedation and the ability to provide the smooth intra-operative and postoperative course. Material and Methods: The study was conducted in prospective, randomized and double-blind manner. It included 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists Class I and II patients undergoing lower limb surgery under epidural anesthesia. Patients were randomly divided into Group A receiving 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine 15 ml with dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg and Group B receiving 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine 15 ml with clonidine 2 μg/kg epidurally. Onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks, duration of analgesia, sedation, and adverse effects were assessed. Results: Demographic data, surgical characteristics cardio-respiratory parameters, side-effect profile were comparable and statistically not significant in both the groups. However, sedation scores with dexmedetomidine were better than clonidine and turned out to be statistically significant. The onset times for sensory and motor blocks were significantly shorter in Group A as compared to Group B. The duration of analgesia and motor block was significantly longer in A Group as compared to Group B. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine is a superior neuraxial adjuvant to bupivacaine when compared to clonidine for early onset of analgesia, superior intra-operative analgesia, stable cardio-respiratory parameters, prolonged postoperative analgesia and providing patient comfort. PMID:27275050

  3. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  4. Analgesia in Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Heesen, M.; Veeser, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: An effective relief of labour pain has become an important part of obstetric medicine. Therefore regional nerve blocks, systemic analgesic and non-pharmacologic techniques are commonly used. This review article gives a summary of pathophysiology and anatomy of labour pain as well as advantages, disadvantages, risks and adverse reactions of analgesic techniques in newborns and parturients. Methods: We performed a selective literature search in Medline via PubMed using the search-terms “Analgesia” and “Obstetrics”. We also included the current guidelines of the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Results: PDA and CSE are safe techniques for the relief of labour pain if contraindications are excluded. The risk for instrumental delivery but not for caesarean section is increased under neuraxial analgesia. PDA and CSE should be performed in an early stage of labour using low doses of local anaesthetics if possible. It is not necessary to wait for a defined cervical dilatation before starting neuraxial analgesia. Anesthesiologists and obstetricians should inform patients as soon as possible before the situation of stress during labour. Systemic opioid analgesia is a possible alternative for neuraxial techniques. Because of possible side effects systemic remifentanil analgesia should only be performed under continuous monitoring. Several nonpharmacologic methods can also relieve labour pain, but results of studies about their effectiveness are inconsistent. PMID:25264376

  5. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ESI; Spinal injection for back pain; Back pain injection; Steroid injection - epidural; Steroid injection - back ... pillow under your stomach. If this position causes pain, you either sit up or lie on your ...

  6. Epidural Injections for Spinal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... located outside the dural membrane. Steroids, anesthetics and anti-inflammatory medications are typically delivered in an epidural injection. ... create different effects for patients. Corticosteroids act as anti-inflammatory agents, reducing swelling and nerve irritation to allow ...

  7. Advancement of epidural catheter from lumbar to thoracic space in children: Comparison between 18G and 23G catheters

    PubMed Central

    Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Pawar, Dilip Kumar; Dehran, Maya; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds and Objectives: Lumbar-to-thoracic advancement of epidural catheter is a safe alternative to direct thoracic placement in children. In this prospective randomized study, success rate of advancement of two different types and gauges of catheter from lumbar-to-thoracic space were studied. Materials and Methods: Forty ASA I and II children (up to 6 years) undergoing thoracic or upper-abdominal surgery were allocated to either Group I (18G catheter) or Group II (23G catheter). After induction of general anesthesia a pre-determined length of catheter was inserted. Successful catheter placement was defined as the catheter tip within two segment of surgical incision in radio-contrast study. Intra-operative analgesia was provided by epidural bupivacaine and intravenous morphine. Post-operative analgesia was provided with epidural infusion of 0.1% bupivacaine+1mcg/ml fentanyl. Observations and Results: Catheter advancement was successful in 3 cases in Group I and 2 cases in Group II. Five different types of catheter positions were found on X-ray. Negative correlation was found between age and catheter advancement [significance (2-tailed) =0.03]. However, satisfactory post-operative analgesia was obtained in 35 cases. Positive correlation was found between infusion rate, the number of segment of gap between desired level and the level reached [significance (2-tailed) =0.00]. 23G catheter use was associated with more technical complications. Conclusion: Advancement of epidural catheter from lumbar to thoracic level was successful in only 10-15% cases but satisfactory analgesia could be provided by increasing the infusion rates. PMID:22345940

  8. Anesthetic management of a patient with multiple sclerosis undergoing cesarean section with low dose epidural bupivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sameer; Kapil, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year-old Indian female 38 weeks pregnant, with a history of multiple sclerosis since 2008 was admitted in obstetric ward for safe confinement. She had a history of diminution of vision in both eyes and limb weakness, relapsing – remitting type with movement-induced muscle spasms, in all the four limbs. Her symptoms were usually diplopia, difficulty in vision and ataxic gait. Sh was then treated with methylprednisolone. She was on oral dimethyl fumarate trial, which was stopped at the beginning of pregnancy. Presently, she was completely asymptomatic. Epidural anesthesia with an indwelling catheter was administered with 15 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine in 5 ml increments. A total of 3 mg of epidural morphine was given for post-operative analgesia. The surgery evolved without any intercurrences and patient was discharged from the hospital 72 h after surgery without worsening of her symptoms. We report a safe anesthetic management of a patient with MS undergoing cesarean section with low dose epidural bupivacaine with the addition of morphine for post-operative analgesia. PMID:25191198

  9. [Treatment with desmopressin before epidural anesthesia in a patient with type I von Willebrand disease].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Barrero, P; Gil, L; Martínez, C; Bueno, A B; Casado, A I; Oro, J

    2003-12-01

    A 33-year-old primipara with von Willebrand disease type I was admitted in labor at 37 weeks, requesting epidural analgesia. The consultant hematologist advised treating with desmopressin acetate (DDAVP) before inserting an epidural catheter. Desmopressin at a dose of 0.3 microgram/Kg was administered intravenously and the catheter was inserted to L3-L4 to infuse 0.1% bupivacaine with 2 micrograms/mL of fentanyl at a rate of 12 mL/h. Four hours later the patient was brought to the operating room for forceps delivery of a healthy boy. One hour later, she had recovered normal motor tone followed by normal sensitivity in the lower extremities. The catheter was then withdrawn with no signs of bleeding. A woman with von Willebrand's disease can receive an epidural block for analgesia during childbirth. The decision to perform the block should be individualized, based on coagulation tests. DDAVP may play a role in improving hemostasis.

  10. [Application of multimodal anesthesia/analgesia in complex of anesthesiological support of reconstructive operations, performed on the lower extremity arteries].

    PubMed

    Homon, M L

    2014-09-01

    Anesthesiological support of 47 patients, while performing reconstructive operations on the lower extremities arteries in presence of the third level of operative risk (according to ASA), was analyzed; of them in 24 - a spinal anesthesia was applied, in 23 - a reduced spino-epidural anesthesia. Application of a spino-epidural anesthesia/analgesia with reduction of the dose of a spinal component and usage of analgesia instead of anesthesia secures lesser intraoperative oscillations of hemodynamic indices in comparison with such while performing spinal anesthesia, as well as better antinociceptive protection, is also characterized by small toxic impact on the patient, demands application of a sedative and the infusion therapy of lesser volume. While performing a potentially complex and durable reconstructive operations on the lower extremities arteries a wide application of the method depicted is recommended.

  11. Postoperative analgesia in children when using clonidine in addition to fentanyl with bupivacaine given caudally

    PubMed Central

    Jarraya, Anouar; Elleuch, Sahar; Zouari, Jawhar; Smaoui, Mohamed; Laabidi, Sofiene; Kolsi, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of clonidine in association with fentanyl as an additive to bupivacaine 0.25% given via single shot caudal epidural in pediatric patients for postoperative pain relief. In the present prospective randomized double blind study, 40 children of ASA-I-II aged 1-5 years scheduled for infraumblical surgical procedures were randomly allocated to two groups to receive either bupivacaine 0.25% (1 ml/kg) with fentanyl 1 μg/kg and clonidine 1μg/kg (group I) or bupivacaine 0.25% (1 ml/kg) with fentanyl 1 μg/kg (group II). Caudal block was performed after the induction of general anesthesia. Postoperatively patients were observed for analgesia, sedation, hemodynamic parameters, and side effects or complications. Both the groups were similar with respect to patient and various block characteristics. Heart rate and blood pressure were not different in 2 groups. Significantly prolonged duration of post-operative analgesia was observed in group I (P<0.05). Side effects such as respiratory depression, vomiting and bradycardia were similar in both groups. The adjunction of clonidine to fentanyl as additives to bupivacaine in single shot caudal epidural in children may provide better and longer analgesia after infraumblical surgical procedures.

  12. Sciatica and epidural corticosteroid injections.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    According to trials conducted in hundreds of patients with sciatica, epidural corticosteroid injections have no demonstrated efficacy beyond the placebo effect, either in the short-term or the long-term. However, they expose patients to a risk of sometimes serious neurological adverse effects.

  13. Comparison between Thoracic Epidural Block and Thoracic Paravertebral Block for Post Thoracotomy Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Soniya; Bhatia, Vinod Kumar; Chaudhary, Ajay Kumar; Chandra, Girish; Prakash, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative pain after thoracotomy is being considered one of the most severe pain and if not treated well, can result in various respiratory and other complications. Aim Present study was conducted with the aim to compare continuous thoracic epidural infusion with continuous paravertebral infusion for postoperative pain using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score and four point observer ranking. The secondary outcomes measured were pulmonary functions and any complication like hypotension, bradycardia, nausea, vomiting, urinary retention and neurological complications if any. Materials and Methods Sixty patients of age group 18-60 years posted for anterolateral thoracotomy surgery for lung resection were randomised either to epidural or paravertebral group in this randomised prospective double blind study. In Epidural group 7.5ml bolus of 0.125% Bupivacaine with 50μg Fentanyl and in Paravertebral group 15ml bolus of 0.125% Bupivacaine with 50μg Fentanyl was given 30 minutes before the anticipated end of surgery. Bolus dose was followed by infusion of 0.125% Bupivacaine with 2μg/ml Fentanyl at the rate of 5 ml/hr in both groups. Parameters noted were Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP), Heart Rate (HR), Oxygen Saturation (SpO2), Arterial Blood Gas (PaCO2, P/F ratio), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Four Point Observer Ranking Scale (FPORS) for pain, number of sensory segments blocked (by checking for pinprick sensation), requirement of infusion top ups and rescue analgesia (Tramadol), pre and postoperative pulmonary function test {(Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV)1, Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC, Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR)} and complications from start of infusion till 24 hours in the postoperative period. Results Both the techniques were effective in relieving pain but pain relief was significantly better with epidural. Postoperatively, HR, SpO2, P/F ratio and PaCO2 were comparable between group E and P. There was significant decline in FeV1

  14. Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Promotes Postoperative Analgesia in Patients After Abdominal Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-Jian; Qi, Bin; Tang, Gang; Li, Jin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Surgery-induced acute postoperative pain may lead to prolonged convalescence. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia following abdominal colectomy surgeries. Eighty patients scheduled for abdominal colectomy surgery under general anesthesia were divided into 2 groups, which were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During surgery, patients in the PRD group had a lower bispectral index (BIS) value, which indicated a deeper anesthetic state, and a higher sedation score right after extubation than patients in the PRS group. During the first 24 hours post surgery, PRD patients consumed less morphine in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and had a lower score in the visual analog scale (VAS) testing than their controls from the PRS group. Intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appears to promote the analgesic property of morphine-based PCA in patients after abdominal colectomy. PMID:26376397

  15. [The effect of combination epidural anesthesia techniques in upper abdominal surgery on the stress reaction, pain control and respiratory mechanics].

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, B; Leibe, S; Kätzel, R; Grube, U; Landgraf, R; Bierwolf, B

    1991-11-01

    Twenty-eight patients undergoing upper abdominal operations (mainly selective proximal vagotomy [SPV]) were referred for assessment of the hormonal metabolic reaction (adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH], arginine vasopressin [AVP], cortisol, and glucose), the postoperative pain reaction, and respiration according to the method of anesthesia (group 1: neuroleptanesthesia [NLA], group 2: NLA in combination with epidural opiate analgesia, group 3: NLA in combination with local anesthesia). To alleviate postoperative pain piritramide was systematically administered in group 1, whereas in groups 2 and 3 a thoracic epidural catheter was injected with morphine or bupivacaine. Postoperative analgesia was better in patients with epidural administration than in those with systemic application. On the 1st and 2nd postoperative days the vital capacity was statistically significantly higher by 10%-15% in groups 2 and 3 than in group 1. As expected, the neurohormonal and metabolic stress response was highest in all patients in the intraoperative and immediate postoperative phases: ACTH, AVP, and glucose levels were in most cases significantly higher compared with the initial values. However, cortisol levels decreased intraoperatively, probably as a result of the generally used induction agent etomidate. Comparison of the three methods of anesthesia revealed that all mean hormone levels analyzed in group 2 patients were lower both intraoperatively and 2 h postoperatively, which implies that epidurally administered morphine reduces the stress reaction, probably indirectly through additional selective alleviation of pain at the spinal cord level. The various differences in hormonal reactions of patients in groups 1 and 3 gave no clear evidence, however, of possible mitigation of the stress reaction by epidural local anesthetics in upper abdominal operations.

  16. Review article: Intrapartum neuraxial analgesia and breastfeeding outcomes: limitations of current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Ashley L

    2013-02-01

    Although numerous studies have addressed the relationship between intrapartum neuraxial analgesia, particularly epidural fentanyl, and breastfeeding, substantial study design limitations have precluded the current literature from furnishing strong, clinically significant conclusions. Lack of randomized controlled trials, nonstandardization of breastfeeding evaluations across studies, and failure to control for confounding variables all pose significant problems. Further research is needed to elucidate the specific relationship between neuraxial opioids and breastfeeding and, if there are significant associations, whether these drugs act directly on neonatal brain tissue to attenuate exhibition of breastfeeding behaviors. In this review, I will detail the deficiencies of the current literature and make recommendations for future research. PMID:23302971

  17. Serratus Anterior Plane (SAP) Block Used for Thoracotomy Analgesia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Okmen, Burcu Metin; Uysal, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Thoracotomy is a surgical technique used to reach the thoracic cavity. Management of pain due to thoracotomy is important in order to protect the operative respiratory reserves and decrease complications. For thoracotomy pain, blocks (such as thoracic epidural, paravertebral, etc.) and pleural catheterization and intravenous drugs (such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], and opioids, etc., can be used. We performed a serratus anterior plane (SAP) block followed by catheterization for thoracotomy pain. We used 20 ml 0.25% bupivacaine for analgesia in a patient who underwent wedge resection for a lung malignancy. We provided analgesia for a period of close to seven hours for the patient, whose postoperative VAS (visual analog scale) scores were recorded. We believe that an SAP block is effective and efficient for the management of pain after thoracotomy. PMID:27413485

  18. Serratus Anterior Plane (SAP) Block Used for Thoracotomy Analgesia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Okmen, Korgün; Okmen, Burcu Metin; Uysal, Serkan

    2016-07-01

    Thoracotomy is a surgical technique used to reach the thoracic cavity. Management of pain due to thoracotomy is important in order to protect the operative respiratory reserves and decrease complications. For thoracotomy pain, blocks (such as thoracic epidural, paravertebral, etc.) and pleural catheterization and intravenous drugs (such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], and opioids, etc., can be used. We performed a serratus anterior plane (SAP) block followed by catheterization for thoracotomy pain. We used 20 ml 0.25% bupivacaine for analgesia in a patient who underwent wedge resection for a lung malignancy. We provided analgesia for a period of close to seven hours for the patient, whose postoperative VAS (visual analog scale) scores were recorded. We believe that an SAP block is effective and efficient for the management of pain after thoracotomy.

  19. Serratus Anterior Plane (SAP) Block Used for Thoracotomy Analgesia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Okmen, Korgün; Okmen, Burcu Metin; Uysal, Serkan

    2016-07-01

    Thoracotomy is a surgical technique used to reach the thoracic cavity. Management of pain due to thoracotomy is important in order to protect the operative respiratory reserves and decrease complications. For thoracotomy pain, blocks (such as thoracic epidural, paravertebral, etc.) and pleural catheterization and intravenous drugs (such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], and opioids, etc., can be used. We performed a serratus anterior plane (SAP) block followed by catheterization for thoracotomy pain. We used 20 ml 0.25% bupivacaine for analgesia in a patient who underwent wedge resection for a lung malignancy. We provided analgesia for a period of close to seven hours for the patient, whose postoperative VAS (visual analog scale) scores were recorded. We believe that an SAP block is effective and efficient for the management of pain after thoracotomy. PMID:27413485

  20. Epidural spinal myelolipoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroshi; Miyake, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Yamada, Kazutaka; Uzuka, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    Epidural spinal myelolipoma was diagnosed in a 13-year-old, male Siberian husky that was referred for evaluation of progressive pelvic limb paresis and urinary incontinence. An epidural mass was detected by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. The mass was removed and identified histopathologically as an epidural myelolipoma. Pelvic limb paresis improved after surgery, but urinary retention associated with neurological bladder dysfunction persisted.

  1. Whole Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyeong-Wook; Song, Jae Gyok; Ryu, Jae-Wook

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male who had no underlying disease, including coagulopathy, underwent thoracotomy and bleeding control due to hemothorax. On the fifth postoperative day, paralysis of both lower limbs occurred. Urgent spine magnetic resonance imaging showed a massive anterior spinal epidural hematoma from C2 to L1 level with different signal intensities, which was suspected to be staged hemorrhage. Hematoma evacuation with decompressive laminectomy was performed. The patient's neurologic deterioration was recovered immediately, and he was discharged without neurological deficits. A drug history of naftazone, which could induce a drug-induced platelet dysfunction, was revealed retrospectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of whole spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a young patient, with a history of hemorrhoid medication. PMID:24967052

  2. Thoracic Extraosseous Epidural Cavernous Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Asil, Kiyasettin; Ceylan, Davut; Erdem, Sahin

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas were first reported in 1929 by Globus and Doshay, and are defined as benign vascular structures developed between the neural tissues occurring in the central nervous system, consisting of a dilated vascular bed. Cavernous hemangiomas comprise nearly 5-12% of all spinal vascular malformations; however, existence in the epidural space without bone involvement is rare. Only 4% of all cavernous hemangiomas (0.22/1.000.000) are purely epidural cavernous hemangiomas. In this case report, we removed a hemorrhagic thoracic mass presenting with progressive neurological deficits in a 55-year-old male patient. We found this case to be appropriate for presentation due to the rare occurrence of this type of cavernous hemangioma. PMID:25674348

  3. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Report.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Sunil; Nanda, Anil

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a 12-year-old female, who presented with significant upper and lower extremities weakness preceded by pain around the neck and shoulder girdle. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed epidural hematoma extending from C6-T2 with characteristic heterogeneously hyperintensity on T2 and homogenously isointensity on T1. Emergent spinal decompression was performed. However, the patient remained substantially weak in her lower extremities and was wheelchair bound at 3 months postoperatively. We have discussed clinical features, predisposing events, pathogenesis and treatment guidelines described in the literature. We also aim to reinforce the notion of keeping a high degree of clinical suspicion to identify and intervene at the earliest stage to prevent the physically and socially challenging consequences of SSEH. PMID:27598898

  4. Computed tomographic staging of traumatic epidural bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1982-09-01

    The computed tomographic findings in 45 patients with post-traumatic epidural hemotomas are subdivided into three categories (acute, subacute, and chronic) and correlated with the severity of bleeding, clot formation, and clot resorption. Active epidural bleeding may be identified in acute cases.

  5. [Systemic analgesia for postoperative pain management in the adult].

    PubMed

    Binhas, M; Marty, J

    2009-02-01

    Severe postsurgical pain contributes to prolonged hospital stay and is also believed to be a risk factor for the development of chronic pain. Locoregional anesthesia, which results in faster patient recovery with fewer side effects, is favored wherever feasible, but is not applicable to every patient. Systemic analgesics are the most widely used method for providing pain relief in the postoperative period. Improvements in postoperative systemic analgesia for pain management should be applied and predictive factors for severe postoperative pain should be anticipated in order to control pain while minimizing opioid side effects. Predictive factors for severe postoperative pain include severity of preoperative pain, prior use of opiates, female gender, non-laparoscopic surgery, and surgeries involving the knee and shoulder. Pre- and intraoperative use of small doses of ketamine has a preventive effect on postoperative pain. Multimodal or balanced analgesia (the combined use of various analgesic agents) such as NSAID/morphine, NSAID/nefopam, morphine/ketamine improves analgesia with morphine-sparing effects. Nausea and vomiting, the principle side effects of morphine, can be predicted using Apfel's simplified score; patients with a high Apfel score risk should receive preemptive antiemetic agents aimed at different receptor sites, such as preoperative dexamethasone and intraoperative droperidol. Droperidol can be combined with morphine for postoperative patient-controlled anesthesia (PCA). When PCA is used, dosage parameters should be adjusted every day based on pain evaluation. Patients with presurgical opioid requirements will require preoperative administration of their daily opioid maintenance dose before induction of anesthesia: PCA offers useful options for effective postsurgical analgesia using a basal rate equivalent to the patient's hourly oral usage plus bolus doses as required.

  6. Postoperative analgesia in children when using clonidine or fentanyl with ropivacaine given caudally

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Usha; Prabhakar, T; Malhotra, Kiran

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of clonidine and fentanyl as an additive to ropivacaine given via single shot caudal epidural in pediatric patients for postoperative pain relief. Materials and Methods: In the present double blind study, 90 children of ASA-I-II aged 3-8 years scheduled for infraumblical surgical procedures were randomly allocated to two groups to receive either ropivacaine 0.25% 1 ml/kg + clonidine 2 μg/kg (group I) or ropivacaine 0.25% 1 μl/kg + fentanyl 1 μg/kg (group II). Caudal block was performed after the induction of general anesthesia. Postoperatively patients were observed for analgesia, sedation, hemodynamics, and side effects/complications. Results: Both the groups were similar with respect to patient and various block characteristics. The analgesic properties and hemodynamics were also comparable in both groups (P > 0.05). Side effects such as respiratory depression, vomiting bradycardia were significantly less in group I than group II (P < 0.05) ensuing more patient comfort. Conclusions: The analgesic properties of clonidine and fentanyl as additives to ropivacaine in single shot caudal epidural in children are comparable but clonidine offers a more favorable side effect profile. The use of clonidine as additive to ropivacaine in caudal epidural is superior choice to fentanyl because of lack of unwanted side effects and increased patient comfort. PMID:21772681

  7. [New opioids for general anaesthesia and in- and out-hospital analgesia].

    PubMed

    Dabrowska-Wójciak, Iwona; Piotrowski, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, three new opioids of the piperidine family have been introduced to anaesthesia clinical practice: sufentanil, alfentanil and remifentanil. Alfentanil is a derivative of fentanyl, with quicker onset than that of fentanyl and with shorter duration and more intense vagomimetic properties than those of fentanyl and sufentanil. It may cause less intense respiratory depression than equianalgesic doses of fentanyl. Clinical trials indicate that alfentanil can be used effectively as an analgesic, as an analgesic supplement to anaesthesia, and as the major component of a general anaesthetic. Its short duration of effect makes it attractive as an analgesic supplement for short ambulatory surgical procedures. Sufentanil is a more potent and more lipophilic analgesic than fentanyl. It would appear to maintain haemodynamic stability during surgery better than other opioids. Epidural sufentanil produces a rapid onset and good quality of analgesia. In addition, low doses administered intravenously via a PCA pump seem to have a potential role for analgesia during labour. Remifentanil is an opioid analgesic that is rapidly metabolized by non-specific blood and tissue esterases. According to its unique pharmacokinetic profile, remifentanil-based anaesthesia combines high-dosage opioid analgesia intraoperatively with a rapid and predictable postoperative awakening, even after long procedures. Its vagomimetic properties are especially pronounced in small children, the elderly and hypovolaemic patients, and in these groups atropine should be always given before remifentanil administration. Remifentanil also minimises the adrenergic response to endotracheal intubation. Three mju agonist-antagonists have been used for pain treatment: nalbuphine, butorphanol and buprenorphine. They can be used in ambulatory settings. Nalbuphine can be used parenterally. It reverses morphine-induced respiratory depression while maintaining adequate analgesic effect. Buprenorphine

  8. Comparative Evaluation of Continuous Lumbar Paravertebral Versus Continuous Epidural Block for Post-Operative Pain Relief in Hip Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Surange, Pankaj N; Venkata Rama Mohan, Brig Chadalavada

    2012-01-01

    Background: Effective control of postoperative pain remains one of the most important and pressing issues in the field of surgery and has a significant impact on our health care system. In too many patients, pain is treated inadequately, causing them needless suffering and they can develop complications as an indirect consequence of pain. Analgesic modalities, if properly applied, can prevent or at least minimize this needless suffering and these complications. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of continuous infusions of local anesthetic drugs by paravertebral and epidural routes in controlling postoperative pain in patients undergoing hip surgeries. Patients and Methods: The study involved 60 patients who were undergoing hip surgery under the subarachnoid block. They were randomly divided into 2 groups of 30 patients. Group I (paravertebral group) received a single dose of spinal anesthesia with 2.5 mL 0.5% bupivacaine (heavy) + a continuous infusion of 0.125% bupivacaine at 5 mL/h in the paravertebral space. Group II (epidural group) received a single dose of spinal anesthesia with 0.5% bupivacaine (heavy) + a continuous infusion of 0.125% bupivacaine at a rate of 5 mL/hr in the epidural space for 48 hours in the postoperative period. Visual analogue scale (VAS) score, vital statistics, rescue analgesia, and procedure time were compared with the corresponding times between the 2 groups by student’s t-test and repeated measures ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni. P < 0.05 was considered significant. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups regarding mean pain score in the first 48 hours. Results: Mean arterial pressure was significantly lower in the epidural group compared with the paravertebral group from 2 hours after start of the infusion until 48 hrs. Regional anesthesia procedure time was significantly longer in the epidural group (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups

  9. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  10. Epidural steroid warning controversy still dogging FDA.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Candido, Kenneth D; Singh, Vijay; Gharibo, Christopher G; Boswell, Mark V; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Falco, Frank J E; Grider, Jay S; Diwan, Sudhir; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    On April 23, 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a letter of warning that injection of corticosteroids into the epidural space of the spine may result in rare, but serious adverse events, including "loss of vision, stroke, paralysis, and death." The advisory also advocated that patients should discuss the benefits and risks of epidural corticosteroid injections with their health care professionals, along with the benefits and risks associated with other possible treatments. In addition, the FDA stated that the effectiveness and safety of the corticosteroids for epidural use have not been established, and the FDA has not approved corticosteroids for such use. To raise awareness of the risks of epidural corticosteroid injections in the medical community, the FDA's Safe Use Initiative convened a panel of experts including pain management experts to help define the techniques for such injections with the aim of reducing preventable harm. The panel was unable to reach an agreement on 20 proposed items related to technical aspects of performing epidural injections. Subsequently, the FDA issued the above referenced warning and a notice that a panel will be convened in November 2014. This review assesses the inaccuracies of the warning and critically analyzes the available literature. The literature has been assessed in reference to alternate techniques and an understanding of the risk factors when performing transforaminal epidural injections in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions, ultimately resulting in improved safety. The results of this review show the efficacy of epidural injections, with or without steroids, in a multitude of spinal ailments utilizing caudal, cervical, thoracic, and lumbar interlaminar approaches as well as lumbar transforaminal epidural injections . The evidence also shows the superiority of steroids in managing lumbar disc herniation utilizing caudal and lumbar interlaminar approaches without any significant difference as

  11. Evaluation of low-dose dexmedetomidine and neostigmine with bupivacaine for postoperative analgesia in orthopedic surgeries: A prospective randomized double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashima; Kumar, Naresh J; Azharuddin, Mohammad; Mohan, Lalith C; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Neuraxial adjuants to local anesthetics is an effective technique of improving the quality and duration of postoperative analgesia. The safety and efficacy of drugs like dexmedetomidine and neostigmine as epidural medications have been sparsely investigated. Material and Methods: Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia was performed in 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II patients who required lower limb surgeries of ≤3 h duration. The epidural drug was administered at the end of surgery with patients randomized into three groups. Group I, II and III received 6 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine alone, with 1 ug/kg of neostigmine and with 0.5 ug/kg of dexmedetomidine + 1 ug/kg of neostigmine, respectively. The patients were prescribed 50 mg tramadol intravenous as rescue analgesic. Patients were assessed for hemodynamic parameters, pain scores, duration of analgesia, rescue analgesic requirements and the incidence of side-effects over the next 10 h. Data was analyzed using SPSS® version 17.0 (Chicago, IL, USA). P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Patients in Group III had significantly longer mean duration of analgesia (273.5 min) compared to Group II (176.25 min) and Group I (144 min). There was increased requirement of fluids to maintain blood pressures in Group III. Neostigmine did not cause significant incidence of gastrointestinal side effects. Conclusions: Epidurally administered dexmedetomidine and neostigmine exhibit synergism in analgesic action. The incidence of drug-related side-effects was low in our study. PMID:27275047

  12. Intravenous regional analgesia using bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Ware, R J

    1975-11-01

    Intravenous regional analgesia using bupivacaine (Marcain) was employed as the anaesthetic technique in a series of 50 cases undergoing a variety of surgical procedures on the upper limb. A short pilot study was undertaken to determine the optimal dosage and concentration of bupivacaine. This was found to be 1-5 mg/kg in 0-2% concentration and proved suitable for all patients regardless of age or physical condition. The use of bupivacaine produced highly successful results in 98% of cases. Onset of analgesia was very rapid (3-5 minutes) and profound muscular relaxation occurred in approximately half of the cases. The degree of muscle relaxation was, however, always adequate for the successful reduction of fractures. Only one patient exhibited an adverse reaction to the dose of bupivacaine used and this was limited to a brief period of slight drowsiness. The results of this series suggest that bupivacaine may provide advantages over previously used local analgesic agents for intravenous regional analgesia and that it may be the agent of choice for this useful technique.

  13. Pharmacogenomic considerations in opioid analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Vuilleumier, Pascal H; Stamer, Ulrike M; Landau, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Translating pharmacogenetics to clinical practice has been particularly challenging in the context of pain, due to the complexity of this multifaceted phenotype and the overall subjective nature of pain perception and response to analgesia. Overall, numerous genes involved with the pharmacokinetics and dynamics of opioids response are candidate genes in the context of opioid analgesia. The clinical relevance of CYP2D6 genotyping to predict analgesic outcomes is still relatively unknown; the two extremes in CYP2D6 genotype (ultrarapid and poor metabolism) seem to predict pain response and/or adverse effects. Overall, the level of evidence linking genetic variability (CYP2D6 and CYP3A4) to oxycodone response and phenotype (altered biotransformation of oxycodone into oxymorphone and overall clearance of oxycodone and oxymorphone) is strong; however, there has been no randomized clinical trial on the benefits of genetic testing prior to oxycodone therapy. On the other hand, predicting the analgesic response to morphine based on pharmacogenetic testing is more complex; though there was hope that simple genetic testing would allow tailoring morphine doses to provide optimal analgesia, this is unlikely to occur. A variety of polymorphisms clearly influence pain perception and behavior in response to pain. However, the response to analgesics also differs depending on the pain modality and the potential for repeated noxious stimuli, the opioid prescribed, and even its route of administration. PMID:23226064

  14. Symptomatic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis After a Single Local Epidural Steroid Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Tok, Chung Hong Kaur, Shaleen; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-02-15

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare disorder that can manifest with progressive neurological deficits. It is characterized by abnormal accumulation of unencapsulated epidural fat commonly associated with the administration of exogenous steroids associated with a variety of systemic diseases, endocrinopathies, and Cushing syndrome (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). Occasionally, spinal epidural lipomatosis may occur in patients not exposed to steroids or in patients with endocrinopathies, primarily in obese individuals (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). However, spinal lumbar epidural lipomatosis resulting from local steroid injection has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 45-year-old diabetic man with claudication that was probably due to symptomatic lumbar spinal lipomatosis resulting from a single local epidural steroid injection.

  15. Retroperitoneoscopic unroofing of a renal cyst under epidural anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Yagisawa, T; Ito, F; Shimizu, T; Toma, H; Yamagata, K; Ikeda, M

    2001-08-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has routinely been performed under general anesthesia. Our first case of a large renal cyst treated successfully with retroperitoneoscopic unroofing under epidural anesthesia is presented here. Epidural anesthesia can be used for retroperitoneoscopic surgery if necessary.

  16. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  17. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  18. Comparison of ropivacaine with levobupivacaine under epidural anesthesia in the lower limb orthopedic surgeries: A randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Vijeta; Rasheed, Mohd Asim; Singh, Raj Bahadur; Choubey, Sanjay; Sarkar, Arindam

    2016-01-01

    Context: Epidural anesthesia is nowadays considered as the gold standard anesthetic technique for lower limb orthopedic surgeries, and the present study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of levobupivacaine and ropivacaine in terms of onset, duration of sensory and motor block with duration of postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing lower limb orthopedic surgeries under epidural anesthesia. Aims: To compare the efficacy of 15 mL of levobupivacaine 0.5% with that of 15 mL of ropivacaine 0.75% in patients undergoing lower limb orthopedic surgeries under epidural anesthesia and to determine the better of the two agents with respect to onset, duration of sensory and motor blockade, postoperative analgesia, and adverse effects; if any. Settings and Design: A double-blind randomized study. Subjects and Methods: A total of seventy patients planned to undergo elective lower limb orthopedic surgeries fulfilling the criteria were enrolled in the study. Group I (n = 35): Received 15 mL 0.5% levobupivacaine epidurally. Group II (n = 35): Received 15 mL 0.75% ropivacaine epidurally. Statistical Analysis: Statistical Analysis was done by Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Version 15.0) statistical analysis software. The values were represented in number (%) and mean ± standard deviation. Results: Time to achieve sensory onset and motor onset were significantly lower in Group II (17.86 ± 2.51 and 23.14 ± 2.73) as compared to Group I (26.14 ± 2.45 and 31.43 ± 2.59) while the duration of sensory block was significantly higher in Group II (173.29 ± 6.29 min) as compared to Group I (156.71 ± 6.96 min). Although motor block duration of Group I (142.43 ± 8.43 min) was higher than that of Group II (141.43 ± 12.81 min), but this difference was not found to be statistically significant. Conclusions: The inference drawn from this discussion, in general, indicated that both the drugs are comparable for block onset, quality, and duration along with similar

  19. Solitary Spinal Epidural Metastasis from Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sako, Taisei; Iida, Yasuaki; Yokoyama, Yuichirou; Tsuge, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Keiji; Wada, Akihito; Mikami, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Solitary epidural space metastasis of a malignant tumor is rare. We encountered a 79-year-old male patient with solitary metastatic epidural tumor who developed paraplegia and dysuria. The patient had undergone total gastrectomy for gastric cancer followed by chemotherapy 8 months priorly. The whole body was examined for suspected metastatic spinal tumor, but no metastases of the spine or important organs were observed, and a solitary mass was present in the thoracic spinal epidural space. The mass was excised for diagnosis and treatment and was histopathologically diagnosed as metastasis from gastric cancer. No solitary metastatic epidural tumor from gastric cancer has been reported in English. Among the Japanese, 3 cases have been reported, in which the outcome was poor in all cases and no definite diagnosis could be made before surgery in any case. Our patient developed concomitant pneumonia after surgery and died shortly after the surgery. When a patient has a past medical history of malignant tumor, the possibility of a solitary metastatic tumor in the epidural space should be considered. PMID:27703825

  20. Unusual Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis and Lumbosacral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Picazo, David; Ramírez Villaescusa, José

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural lipomatosis is most frequently observed in patients on chronic steroid treatment. Only a few idiopathic epidural lipomatosis cases have been described. Material and Methods. 64-year-old male patient presented with low back pain and left leg pain. Later, the patient experienced neurogenic claudication and radicular pain in the left leg without urinary dysfunction. Plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an abnormal fat tissue overgrowth in the epidural space with compression of the dural sac, degenerative disc disease at L4-L5 level, and instability at L5-S1. Endocrinopathic diseases and chronic steroid therapy were excluded. If conservative treatment failed, surgical treatment can be indicated. Results. After surgery, there was a gradual improvement in symptoms and signs, and six months later the patient returned to daily activities and was neurologically normal. Conclusion. In the absence of common causes of neurogenic claudication, epidural lipomatosis should be considered. The standard test for the diagnosis of epidural lipomatosis is magnetic resonance (MR). At first, conservative treatment must be considered; weight loss and the suspension of prior corticosteroid therapy are indicated. In the presence of neurological impairment, the operative treatment of wide surgical decompression must be performed soon after diagnosis. PMID:27069704

  1. Thoracic epidural angiolipoma: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jun; Du, Yong; Yang, Han-Feng; Hu, Fu-Bi; Huang, Ya-Yong; Li, Bing; Zee, Chi-Shing

    2013-04-28

    Angiolipoma of the spine is a benign neoplasm consisting of both mature fatty tissue and abnormal vascular elements, and usually presents with a slow progressive clinical course. Our patient presented with bilateral lower extremity weakness and chest-back numbness. Physical examination revealed adipose elements superficial hypesthesia below the T5 level and analgesia below the T6 level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed an avidly and heterogeneously enhancing mass which was located in the posterior epidural space. Compression of the thoracic cord by the fusiform mass was seen between T3-T4. During the operation, a flesh pink vascular mass (4.7 cm × 1.0 cm × 1.0 cm) with obscure margin and strong but pliable texture was found in the posterior epidural space extending from T3 to T4. There was no infiltration of the dura or the adjacent bony spine. Histopathological study of the surgical specimen showed a typical angiolipoma. We review the previously documented cases of spinal extradural angiolipomas performed with MRI.

  2. Neonatal sepsis is mediated by maternal fever in labour epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Wassen, M M L H; Winkens, B; Dorssers, E M I; Marcus, M A; Moonen, R M J; Roumen, F J M E

    2014-11-01

    Women delivering with EA (EA group) were matched on parity with 453 women with deliveries without EA (non-EA group). Significantly more neonates born in the EA-group had fever ≥ 38.0°C (11.6% vs 1.8%, p < 0.001) at birth. The overall incidence of neonatal sepsis, based on clinical symptoms and defined as proven (by a positive blood culture) or suspected (no positive blood culture), was significantly higher in the EA group (6.0% vs 2.2%; p = 0.002), but the incidence of proven neonatal sepsis alone was not (0.4% vs 0%; p = 0.250). EA turned out to be an independent risk factor for neonatal sepsis (adjusted OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.15-5.13; p = 0.020). However, in the EA group as well as the non-EA group, the incidence of neonatal sepsis was significantly higher in mothers with intrapartum fever compared with afebrile mothers (11.0% vs 2.9% in the EA group; p = 0.004; 8.2% vs 1.3% in the non-EA group; p = 0.006). Therefore we conclude, that the positive association between neonatal sepsis and labour EA is possibly mediated by maternal intrapartum fever.

  3. Evaluation of Analgesic Effect of Caudal Epidural Tramadol, Tramadol-Lidocaine, and Lidocaine in Water Buffalo Calves (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Atiba, Ayman; Ghazy, Alaa; Gomaa, Naglaa; Kamal, Tarek; Shukry, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of tramadol and a combination of tramadol-lidocaine with that produced by lidocaine administration in the epidural space in buffalo calves. In a prospective randomized crossover study, ten male buffalo calves were used to compare the epidural analgesic effect of tramadol (1 mg/kg) and tramadol-lidocaine combination (0.5 mg/kg and 0.11 mg/kg, resp.) with that produced by 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg). Loss of sensation was examined by pin-prick test. Onset time, duration, and degree of analgesia and ataxia were recorded after each treatment. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), rectal temperature, and haematobiochemical parameters were recorded after all treatments. Time to onset and duration of analgesia, respectively, were as follows: tramadol 11 ± 2 min and 208 ± 15 min; tramadol-lidocaine 6 ± 2 min and 168 ± 9 min; lidocaine 4 ± 1 min and 67 ± 13 min. Onset time and duration were significantly longer with tramadol than the other treatments. Duration was significantly longer with tramadol-lidocaine than lidocaine. Ataxia was mildly observed in tramadol-lidocaine and was moderate in lidocaine. HR, RR, and rectal temperature did not differ significantly from baseline after any treatment. Haematobiochemical parameters returned to basal levels by 24 h after all treatments. This combination might be clinically useful to provide analgesia in buffalo for long-duration surgical procedures. PMID:26770870

  4. Evaluation of Analgesic Effect of Caudal Epidural Tramadol, Tramadol-Lidocaine, and Lidocaine in Water Buffalo Calves (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Atiba, Ayman; Ghazy, Alaa; Gomaa, Naglaa; Kamal, Tarek; Shukry, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of tramadol and a combination of tramadol-lidocaine with that produced by lidocaine administration in the epidural space in buffalo calves. In a prospective randomized crossover study, ten male buffalo calves were used to compare the epidural analgesic effect of tramadol (1 mg/kg) and tramadol-lidocaine combination (0.5 mg/kg and 0.11 mg/kg, resp.) with that produced by 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg). Loss of sensation was examined by pin-prick test. Onset time, duration, and degree of analgesia and ataxia were recorded after each treatment. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), rectal temperature, and haematobiochemical parameters were recorded after all treatments. Time to onset and duration of analgesia, respectively, were as follows: tramadol 11 ± 2 min and 208 ± 15 min; tramadol-lidocaine 6 ± 2 min and 168 ± 9 min; lidocaine 4 ± 1 min and 67 ± 13 min. Onset time and duration were significantly longer with tramadol than the other treatments. Duration was significantly longer with tramadol-lidocaine than lidocaine. Ataxia was mildly observed in tramadol-lidocaine and was moderate in lidocaine. HR, RR, and rectal temperature did not differ significantly from baseline after any treatment. Haematobiochemical parameters returned to basal levels by 24 h after all treatments. This combination might be clinically useful to provide analgesia in buffalo for long-duration surgical procedures.

  5. Evaluation of Analgesic Effect of Caudal Epidural Tramadol, Tramadol-Lidocaine, and Lidocaine in Water Buffalo Calves (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Atiba, Ayman; Ghazy, Alaa; Gomaa, Naglaa; Kamal, Tarek; Shukry, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of tramadol and a combination of tramadol-lidocaine with that produced by lidocaine administration in the epidural space in buffalo calves. In a prospective randomized crossover study, ten male buffalo calves were used to compare the epidural analgesic effect of tramadol (1 mg/kg) and tramadol-lidocaine combination (0.5 mg/kg and 0.11 mg/kg, resp.) with that produced by 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg). Loss of sensation was examined by pin-prick test. Onset time, duration, and degree of analgesia and ataxia were recorded after each treatment. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), rectal temperature, and haematobiochemical parameters were recorded after all treatments. Time to onset and duration of analgesia, respectively, were as follows: tramadol 11 ± 2 min and 208 ± 15 min; tramadol-lidocaine 6 ± 2 min and 168 ± 9 min; lidocaine 4 ± 1 min and 67 ± 13 min. Onset time and duration were significantly longer with tramadol than the other treatments. Duration was significantly longer with tramadol-lidocaine than lidocaine. Ataxia was mildly observed in tramadol-lidocaine and was moderate in lidocaine. HR, RR, and rectal temperature did not differ significantly from baseline after any treatment. Haematobiochemical parameters returned to basal levels by 24 h after all treatments. This combination might be clinically useful to provide analgesia in buffalo for long-duration surgical procedures. PMID:26770870

  6. Treatment of shivering after epidural lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Harris, M M; Lawson, D; Cooper, C M; Ellis, J

    1989-01-01

    The effectiveness of intravenous meperidine and warm local anesthetic for prevention of postanesthetic shivering was evaluated in urology patients undergoing epidural blockade for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. When administered before the blockade, meperidine, 12.5 mg or 25 mg, was not significantly better than saline placebo for preventing postepidural shivering. Changes in the concentrations of catecholamines or lidocaine did not result in differences between patients who shivered and those who did not shiver. In a second experiment, patients receiving body-temperature or room-temperature epidural lidocaine did not differ with respect to the incidence of postanesthetic shivering, onset of sensory blockade, or core temperature during a 30-minute observation period. The authors concluded that neither meperidine, in doses employed, nor body-temperature lidocaine prevents shivering after epidural blockade. This shivering appears to be different from that observed during emergence from general anesthesia.

  7. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Bursalı, Adem; Akyoldas, Goktug; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4-5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  8. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  9. Sciatica caused by lumbar epidural gas.

    PubMed

    Belfquih, Hatim; El Mostarchid, Brahim; Akhaddar, Ali; gazzaz, Miloudi; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Gas production as a part of disc degeneration can occur but rarely causes nerve compression syndromes. The clinical features are similar to those of common sciatica. CT is very useful in the detection of epidural gas accumulation and nerve root compression. We report a case of symptomatic epidural gas accumulation originating from vacuum phenomenon in the intervertebral disc, causing lumbo-sacral radiculopathy. A 45-year-old woman suffered from sciatica for 9 months. The condition worsened in recent days. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated intradiscal vacuum phenomenon, and accumulation of gas in the lumbar epidural space compressing the dural sac and S1 nerve root. After evacuation of the gas, her pain resolved without recurrence.

  10. Spinal epidural angiolipoma: A rare cause of spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, Rajesh K; Koti, Kalyan; Dandamudi, Srinivas

    2012-09-01

    Spinal epidural angiolipomas are rare, benign tumors composed of mature lipocytes admixed with abnormal blood vessels. Only 128 cases of spinal epidural angiolipomas have been reported in literature till now. Spinal angiolipomas are predominantly located in the mid-thoracic region. We report a case of dorsal epidural angiolipoma in a 56-year-old male who presented with paraparesis and was diagnosed to have D4-5 epidural angiolipoma. Total surgical excision of the epidural angiolipoma was done and his paraparesis gradually improved.

  11. Spontaneous epidural hematoma due to cervico-thoracic angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Eap, C; Bannwarth, M; Jazeron, J-F; Kleber, J-C; Theret, É; Duntze, J; Litre, C-F

    2015-12-01

    Epidural angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumors of the spine. Their clinical presentation is usually a progressive spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 22-year-old patient who presented with an acute paraparesis and a spontaneous epidural hematoma, which revealed a epidural angiolipoma which extended from C7 to T3. The patient underwent a C7-T3 laminectomy, in emergency, with evacuation of the hematoma and extradural complete resection of a fibrous epidural tumor bleeding. The postoperative course was favorable with regression of neurological symptoms. Epidural angiolipomas can be revealed by spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage without traumatism. The standard treatment is total removal by surgery.

  12. Ion channels in analgesia research.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Tamara; Simon, Sidney A; Islas, Leon D

    2010-01-01

    Several recent techniques have allowed us to pinpoint the receptors responsible for the detection of nociceptive stimuli. Among these receptors, ion channels play a fundamental role in the recognition and transduction of stimuli that can cause pain. During the last decade, compelling evidence has been gathered on the role of the TRPV1 channel in inflammatory and neuropathic states. Activation of TRPV1 in nociceptive neurons results in the release of neuropeptides and transmitters, leading to the generation of action potentials that will be sent to higher CNS areas, where they will often be perceived as pain. Its activation will also evoke the peripheral release of pro-inflammatory compounds that may sensitize other neurons to physical, thermal, or chemical stimuli. For these reasons, and because its continuous activation causes analgesia, TRPV1 is now considered a viable drug target for clinical use in the management of pain. Using the TRPV1 channel as an example, here we describe some basic biophysical approaches used to study the properties of ion channels involved in pain and in analgesia.

  13. A comparative study-efficacy and safety of combined spinal epidural anesthesia versus spinal anesthesia in high-risk geriatric patients for surgeries around the hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Tummala, Vengamamba; Rao, Lella Nageswara; Vallury, Manoj Kumar; Sanapala, Anitha

    2015-01-01

    Context: Combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA) has a significant advantage by enabling the use of low dose intrathecal local anesthetic, with knowledge that the epidural catheter may be used to extend the block as necessary. CSEA is useful in high-risk geriatric patients by providing greater hemodynamic stability. Aim: This study is designed to compare the clinical effects of CSEA versus spinal anesthesia in high-risk geriatric patients undergoing surgeries around the hip joint. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients aged >65 years, American Society of Anaesthesiology III and IV were randomly allocated into two equal groups. Group A (n = 30) received CSEA with 1 ml (5 mg) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine with 25 μg fentanyl through spinal route, and the expected incompleteness of spinal block was managed with small incremental dose of 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine through epidural catheter, 1–1.5 ml for every unblocked segment to achieve T10 sensory level. Group B (n = 30) received spinal anesthesia with 2.5 ml (12.5 mg) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine and 25 μg fentanyl. Result: Both the groups showed rapid onset, excellent analgesia and good quality motor block. Group A showed a significantly less incidence of hypotension (P < 0.01) along with the provision of prolonging analgesia as compared to Group B. Conclusion: CSEA is a safe, effective, reliable technique with better hemodynamic stability along with the provision of prolonging analgesia compared to spinal anesthesia for high-risk geriatric patients undergoing surgeries around the hip joint. PMID:26417125

  14. Rapidly Progressive Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Ozgür Yusuf; Guzey, Feyza Karagoz; Tufan, Azmi; Isler, Cihan; Aycan, Nur; Gulsen, İsmail

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare disease which is often rapidly progressive. Delayed diagnosis of SEA may lead to serious complications and the clinical findings of SEA are generally nonspecific. Paraspinal abscess should be considered in the presence of local low back tenderness, redness, and pain with fever, particularly in children. In case of delayed diagnosis and treatment, SEA may spread to the epidural space and may cause neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the method of choice in the diagnosis of SEA. Treatment of SEA often consists of both medical and surgical therapy including drainage with percutaneous entry, corpectomy, and instrumentation. PMID:27688918

  15. Scoliosis associated with idiopathic lumbosacral epidural lipomatosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    There are very few reports of spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) in association with scoliosis. A 49-year-old man presented with persistent back pain and right hip lump. The lumbar spine X-rays showed scoliosis (Lenke classification 5BN). Lumbar MRI demonstrated circumferential epidural fat deposit from L1 to lower S2 level. There was no obvious etiology of SEL except mild increased body mass index (BMI). The patient was managed with conservative treatment. After 6 months medication (limaprost and ginkgo), his symptoms were relieved.

  16. Rapidly Progressive Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Abscess.

    PubMed

    Aycan, Abdurrahman; Aktas, Ozgür Yusuf; Guzey, Feyza Karagoz; Tufan, Azmi; Isler, Cihan; Aycan, Nur; Gulsen, İsmail; Arslan, Harun

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare disease which is often rapidly progressive. Delayed diagnosis of SEA may lead to serious complications and the clinical findings of SEA are generally nonspecific. Paraspinal abscess should be considered in the presence of local low back tenderness, redness, and pain with fever, particularly in children. In case of delayed diagnosis and treatment, SEA may spread to the epidural space and may cause neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the method of choice in the diagnosis of SEA. Treatment of SEA often consists of both medical and surgical therapy including drainage with percutaneous entry, corpectomy, and instrumentation. PMID:27688918

  17. Scoliosis associated with idiopathic lumbosacral epidural lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong Rok

    2016-03-01

    There are very few reports of spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) in association with scoliosis. A 49-year-old man presented with persistent back pain and right hip lump. The lumbar spine X-rays showed scoliosis (Lenke classification 5BN). Lumbar MRI demonstrated circumferential epidural fat deposit from L1 to lower S2 level. There was no obvious etiology of SEL except mild increased body mass index (BMI). The patient was managed with conservative treatment. After 6 months medication (limaprost and ginkgo), his symptoms were relieved. PMID:27683700

  18. Rapidly Progressive Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Ozgür Yusuf; Guzey, Feyza Karagoz; Tufan, Azmi; Isler, Cihan; Aycan, Nur; Gulsen, İsmail

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare disease which is often rapidly progressive. Delayed diagnosis of SEA may lead to serious complications and the clinical findings of SEA are generally nonspecific. Paraspinal abscess should be considered in the presence of local low back tenderness, redness, and pain with fever, particularly in children. In case of delayed diagnosis and treatment, SEA may spread to the epidural space and may cause neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the method of choice in the diagnosis of SEA. Treatment of SEA often consists of both medical and surgical therapy including drainage with percutaneous entry, corpectomy, and instrumentation.

  19. Spinal epidural abscess and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative analgaesia.

    PubMed

    van Rappard, Juliaan R M; Tolenaar, Jip L; Smits, Anke B; Go, Peter M N Y H

    2015-08-20

    We present a case of a patient with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative pain relief after a laparoscopic sigmoid resection. On the fifth postoperative day, 2 days after removal of the epidural catheter, the patient developed high fever, leucocytosis and elevated C reactive protein. Blood cultures showed a methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. A photon emission tomography scan revealed increased activity of the spinal canal, suggesting S. aureus meningitis. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed a SEA that was localised at the epidural catheter insertion site. Conservative management with intravenous flucloxacillin was initiated, as no neurological deficits were seen. At last follow-up, 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient showed complete recovery.

  20. [Pneumoencephalotomography under diaz-analgesia and narco-analgesia].

    PubMed

    Bergeron, J L; Renou, A M; Boulard, G; Vernhiet, J; Nicod, J

    1978-01-01

    The authors reported 92 observations of anesthesia for gaseous encephalotomography interest the adult. The contrast produce is air. 49 under diazanalgesia and myoresolution. Diazepam, +Fentanyl, pancuronium bromide N2O to 60 p. 100. 25 under diazanalgesia and myoresolution. Diazepam, +Fentanyl, succinylcholine, N2O to 60 p. 100. 18 under narco-analgesia and myoresolution. +Fentyl, pancuronium bromide N2O to 60 p. 100. The conditions of the study are described in the first part. The results and their analysis permit the appreciation of: - the patient confort, the quality of the examination; -the respect of the hemodynamics for this examination, reputed to be "difficult"; -the immediatly noticeable diminution of side effects; -the absence of side effects; -the justification and interesting of the control ventilation; -the quality of waking up. In the conclusion the authors underline the interest of their different techniques and the possibility of using them in operations in sitting position in neurosurgery, and all important chirurgical intervention.

  1. [Pneumoencephalotomography under diaz-analgesia and narco-analgesia].

    PubMed

    Bergeron, J L; Renou, A M; Boulard, G; Vernhiet, J; Nicod, J

    1978-01-01

    The authors reported 92 observations of anesthesia for gaseous encephalotomography interest the adult. The contrast produce is air. 49 under diazanalgesia and myoresolution. Diazepam, +Fentanyl, pancuronium bromide N2O to 60 p. 100. 25 under diazanalgesia and myoresolution. Diazepam, +Fentanyl, succinylcholine, N2O to 60 p. 100. 18 under narco-analgesia and myoresolution. +Fentyl, pancuronium bromide N2O to 60 p. 100. The conditions of the study are described in the first part. The results and their analysis permit the appreciation of: - the patient confort, the quality of the examination; -the respect of the hemodynamics for this examination, reputed to be "difficult"; -the immediatly noticeable diminution of side effects; -the absence of side effects; -the justification and interesting of the control ventilation; -the quality of waking up. In the conclusion the authors underline the interest of their different techniques and the possibility of using them in operations in sitting position in neurosurgery, and all important chirurgical intervention. PMID:677506

  2. Epidural volume extension in combined spinal epidural anaesthesia for elective caesarean section: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Loubert, C; O'Brien, P J; Fernando, R; Walton, N; Philip, S; Addei, T; Columb, M O; Hallworth, S

    2011-05-01

    We investigated the effect of epidural volume extension on spinal blockade in pregnant women undergoing elective caesarean section with a combined spinal-epidural technique. We randomly allocated 90 healthy subjects to three groups to receive spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg (group B7.5), spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg immediately followed by epidural volume extension with saline 5 ml (group B7.5-EVE) or spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine 10 mg without epidural volume extension (group B10). We evaluated the height of the block every 5 min for 15 min following the spinal injection. The overall sensory block level increased with time (p < 0.001), regardless of the group studied, and there were significantly fewer failures of block in the group B10 compared with both B7.5 and B7.5-EVE groups (p = 0.001). In conclusion, we could not demonstrate a benefit in using epidural volume extension with 5 ml saline as part of a combined spinal epidural technique in term parturients undergoing elective caesarean section.

  3. Four cases of spinal epidural angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Sim, Kenneth; Tsui, Alpha; Paldor, Iddo; Kaye, Andrew H; Gaillard, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumours composed of mature fatty tissue and abnormal vascular elements, most commonly found within the posterior spinal epidural space. Most tumours are located within the mid-thoracic spine; in contrast thoracolumbar junction and purely lumbar angiolipomas are rare. We report a case series of four spinal angiolipomas, including a thoracolumbar junction and a purely lumbar tumour.

  4. [Spinal epidural angiolipoma: a case report].

    PubMed

    Dufrenot, Leïla; Pelé, Eric; Cursolle, Jean-Christophe; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Lepreux, Sébastien

    2010-02-01

    Spinal epidural angiolipoma is a rare tumor revealed by a slowly progressive paraplegia. We reported a case of a 44-year-old female and point out the peculiar pattern of this lesion characterized by the prominence of the vascular component over the lipomatous component. Recognition of this entity is important because this is a benign and curable cause of paraplegia.

  5. Spontaneous extracranial decompression of epidural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Neely, John C; Jones, Blaise V; Crone, Kerry R

    2008-03-01

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) is a common sequela of head trauma in children. An increasing number are managed nonsurgically, with close clinical and imaging observation. We report the case of a traumatic EDH that spontaneously decompressed into the subgaleal space, demonstrated on serial CT scans that showed resolution of the EDH and concurrent enlargement of the subgaleal hematoma.

  6. [Clinical use of spinal or epidural steroids].

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, F; Ciccozzi, A; Donatelli, F; Paladini, A; Varrassi, G

    2002-01-01

    Steroids, drugs with potent antiinflammatory properties on the damaged nervous roots, have been especially used as adjuvants of local anesthetics, by spinal route, in the treatments of low-back pain. Spinal route was chosen to obtain a higher local concentration of drug, with few systemic side effects and to improve drug's action mechanism. Steroids seem to interact with GABA receptors and thus control neural excitability through a stabilising effect on membranes, modification of nervous conduction and membrane hyperpolarization, in supraspinal and spinal site. Epidural steroids are especially used in the treatment of low back pain due to irritation of nervous roots. They have been administered alone or in association with local anesthetics and/or saline solution. Slow release formulations have been generally used (methylprednisolone acetate, and triamcinolone diacetate). Other indications of epidural steroids are: postoperative hemilaminectomy pain, prevention of post herpetic neuralgia, degenerative ostheoartrithis. Intra-thecal steroids have been frequently used in the treatment of lumbar radiculopathy due to discopathy, as an alternative treatment when epidural administration is ineffective. Positive results have been obtained with methylprednisolone acetate, alone or in association with local anesthetics. Complications related to intraspinal steroids injections are due to execution of the block and side effects of drugs. Complications associated with intrathecal steroids are more frequent and severe than epidural injections and include: adhesive arachnoiditis, aseptic meningitis, cauda equina syndrome. Steroidal toxicity seems to be related to the polyethylenic glycole vehicle. Anyway, slow release formulations contain less concentrated polyethylenic glycole. The epidural administration, a correct dilution of steroid with local anesthetics solution and/or saline solution, and a limited number of injections (no more than three) allows a significant reduction of

  7. Epidural infusions of sufentanil with and without bupivacaine: comparison with diamorphine-bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Black, A M; Wolf, A; McKenzie, I M; Tonkin, P A; Inglis, S T; Prys-Roberts, C

    1994-07-01

    The requirements for supplementary 3 ml epidural injections of bupivacaine 0.5% (top-ups) were used in a randomized double-blind study to compare the effects of five types of thoracic epidural infusions given at 2.5 ml h-1 for the first 24 h after major surgery to the upper abdomen in 99 patients and the lower abdomen in 72. The infusions were: bupivacaine 0.167% alone; diamorphine 0.167 mg ml-1 (0.417 mg h-1) in bupivacaine 0.167%; sufentanil 2 micrograms ml-1 (5 micrograms h-1) in 0.167% bupivacaine; sufentanil 4 micrograms ml-1 (10 micrograms h-1) in 0.167% bupivacaine; and sufentanil 4 micrograms ml-1 (10 micrograms h-1) in normal saline. The patients who had upper abdominal surgery were on average older than those having lower abdominal surgery and a larger proportion of them were female. They received on average fewer top-ups. After both upper and lower abdominal surgery, epidural infusions of bupivacaine alone required the most frequent supplementation (inter-quartile range 6-14 top-ups in 24 h) and the two sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures required the fewest (interquartile range 0-12 top-ups in 24 h). The infusions of sufentanil without bupivacaine were significantly less effective than the sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures after upper (but not lower) abdominal surgery. Although the two sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures were indistinguishable in analgesic effectiveness after either upper or lower abdominal surgery, the lower (5 micrograms h-1) dose rate of sufentanil gave a significantly higher average breathing rate and lower average PaCO2 for the first 24 h after lower (but not upper) abdominal surgery. Blood samples were taken (as an afterthought) from 11 patients receiving sufentanil 10 micrograms h-1, just before the epidural infusion was stopped. The concentrations were mostly above the range for systemic analgesia, but below the values that would have been expected if a steady state had been achieved.

  8. Epidural infusions of sufentanil with and without bupivacaine: comparison with diamorphine-bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Black, A M; Wolf, A; McKenzie, I M; Tonkin, P A; Inglis, S T; Prys-Roberts, C

    1994-07-01

    The requirements for supplementary 3 ml epidural injections of bupivacaine 0.5% (top-ups) were used in a randomized double-blind study to compare the effects of five types of thoracic epidural infusions given at 2.5 ml h-1 for the first 24 h after major surgery to the upper abdomen in 99 patients and the lower abdomen in 72. The infusions were: bupivacaine 0.167% alone; diamorphine 0.167 mg ml-1 (0.417 mg h-1) in bupivacaine 0.167%; sufentanil 2 micrograms ml-1 (5 micrograms h-1) in 0.167% bupivacaine; sufentanil 4 micrograms ml-1 (10 micrograms h-1) in 0.167% bupivacaine; and sufentanil 4 micrograms ml-1 (10 micrograms h-1) in normal saline. The patients who had upper abdominal surgery were on average older than those having lower abdominal surgery and a larger proportion of them were female. They received on average fewer top-ups. After both upper and lower abdominal surgery, epidural infusions of bupivacaine alone required the most frequent supplementation (inter-quartile range 6-14 top-ups in 24 h) and the two sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures required the fewest (interquartile range 0-12 top-ups in 24 h). The infusions of sufentanil without bupivacaine were significantly less effective than the sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures after upper (but not lower) abdominal surgery. Although the two sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures were indistinguishable in analgesic effectiveness after either upper or lower abdominal surgery, the lower (5 micrograms h-1) dose rate of sufentanil gave a significantly higher average breathing rate and lower average PaCO2 for the first 24 h after lower (but not upper) abdominal surgery. Blood samples were taken (as an afterthought) from 11 patients receiving sufentanil 10 micrograms h-1, just before the epidural infusion was stopped. The concentrations were mostly above the range for systemic analgesia, but below the values that would have been expected if a steady state had been achieved. PMID:7925334

  9. Lab in a needle for epidural space identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, B.; Micco, A.; Ricciardi, A.; Amorizzo, E.; Mercieri, M.; Cutolo, A.; Cusano, A.

    2016-05-01

    This work relies on the development of a sensorized medical needle with an all-optical guidance (Lab in a Needle) system for epidural space identification. The device is based on the judicious integration of a Fiber Bragg grating sensor inside the lumen of an epidural needle to discriminate between different types of tissue and thus providing continuous and real time measurements of the pressure experienced by the needle tip during its advancement. Experiments carried out on an epidural training phantom demonstrate the validity of our approach for the correct and effective identification of the epidural space.

  10. [Complications related to epidural catheter in caesarean delivery].

    PubMed

    Leykin, Y; Lucca, M

    2001-09-01

    A review of complications related to epidural catheters in caesarean delivery is presented. Catheters for prolongation of nerve blocks were first used in 1940s. Thereafter, there has been steady development in the design and plastic material technology of the different catheters. In the last decade the regional anaesthesia for caesarean section became very popular, as well as continuous increase in the use of epidural catheters. The anatomical changes of pregnancy like marked distension of the epidural veins resulted in increased risk of the complications due to the epidural catheter placement. It is likely that permanent neurologic sequelae due to regional anaesthesia in obstetrics almost never occur, while minor self-limiting complications do occur. The possible complications of epidural catheter techniques are: trauma, malposition and migration of the catheter, knotting and breaking, radiculopathy, dural puncture, subdural injection, abscess and infection, haematoma and wrong solution injection. Most of the malpositions of the epidural catheter can be avoided by a careful technique, advancing the catheter with no forceful movement and not more than 3 to 4 cm into epidural space. Broken parts of the catheters should be left as a rule within the spinal space. Test dose should be always done for continuous epidural anaesthesia. Early diagnosis and prompt appropriate treatment will usually lead to complete resolution of the neurological deficit even in cases of epidural haematoma or abscess.

  11. Salmonella Typhi Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Ying Ying; Chen, John L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella vertebral osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of Salmonella infection. We report a case of a 57-year-old transgender male who presented with lower back pain for a period of one month following a fall. Physical examination only revealed tenderness over the lower back with no neurological deficits. MRI of the thoracic and lumbar spine revealed a spondylodiscitis at T10-T11 and T12-L1 and right posterior epidural collection at the T9-T10 level. He underwent decompression laminectomy with segmental instrumentation and fusion of T8 to L3 vertebrae. Intraoperatively, he was found to have acute-on-chronic osteomyelitis in T10 and T11, epidural abscess, and discitis in T12-L1. Tissue and wound culture grew Salmonella Typhi and with antibiotics susceptibility guidance he was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for a period of six weeks. He recovered well with no neurological deficits. PMID:27034871

  12. Spinal epidural empyema in a cat.

    PubMed

    Maeta, Noritaka; Kanda, Teppei; Sasaki, Takanori; Morita, Takehito; Furukawa, Toshinori

    2010-06-01

    The diagnosis and surgical treatment of spinal epidural empyema (SEE) in a 2-year-old neutered male domestic shorthaired cat is described. SEE was diagnosed by computed tomographic myelography (CT myelography) and surgical exploration. The lesion was missed on both non-enhanced CT and conventional myelography. SEE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of progressive myelopathy in cats, and CT myelography should be undertaken when magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cannot be performed. PMID:20226705

  13. Continous epidural butorphanol decreases the incidence of intrathecal morphine-related pruritus after cesarean section: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial: Epidural butorphanol decreases the incidence of intrathecal morphine-related pruritus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhen; Kong, Mingjian; Chen, Jianqing; Wen, Laiyou; Wang, Jing; Tan, Jie

    2014-09-01

    This randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial investigated the effect of continuous epidural butorphanol on intrathecal morphine-related pruritus in patients undergoing cesarean section. Eighty-three patients undergoing elective cesarean section under spinal anesthesia (1.5 mL of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5 % and 0.1 mg of preservative-free morphine) were enrolled in this study. Subjects were randomized to receive epidural butorphanol (n = 43) or normal saline combined bupivacaine (n = 40). In the study group, after the umbilical cord was clamped, patients were administered an epidural loading dose of 1 mg followed by a 48-h infusion of 0.004 % butorphanol with 0.1 % bupivacaine at a rate of 2 mL/h. In the normal saline group, saline was used for the loading dose and the infusion 0.1 % bupivacaine at a same rate. Postoperatively, a blinded observer recorded the incidence/severity of pruritus, visual analog pain scores and sedation level at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24 and 48 h. The 48-h consumption of breakthrough analgesic (tramadol) was also noted. The primary outcome was the incidence of pruritus at 48 h. At 48 h, the incidence of pruritus was significantly lower in the butorphanol group (16.3 vs. 52.5 %; P < 0.001). Furthermore, compared with the normal saline group, the intensity of pruritus was also decreased with epidural butorphanol at 3, 6 and 9 h (all P ≤ 0.008). The pain scores were significantly lower at 12, 24 and 48 h (all P < 0.05) in the butorphanol groups. Patients only receiving bupivacaine required a higher cumulative dose of tramadol (37.5 ± 62.8 vs. 9.3 ± 36.6; P = 0.014). In patients undergoing elective cesarean section, continuous epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine decreases the incidence and severity of intrathecal morphine-related pruritus without adversely affecting the quality of postoperative analgesia. PMID:24639106

  14. Dexmedetomidine in Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Undergoing Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chunguang; Chi, Meiying; Zhang, Yanwei; Zhang, Zongwang; Qi, Feng; Liu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Both dexmedetomidine and sufentanil modulate spinal analgesia by different mechanisms, and yet no human studies are available on their combination for analgesia during the first 72 hours after abdominal hysterectomy. This CONSORT-prospective, randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of dexmedetomidine and sufentanil in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for 72 hours after abdominal hysterectomy. Ninety women undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy were divided into 3 equal groups that received sufentanil (Group C; 0.02 μg/kg/h), sufentanil plus dexmedetomidine (Group D1; 0.02 μg/kg/h, each), or sufentanil (0.02 μg/kg/h) plus dexmedetomidine (0.05 μg/kg/h) (Group D2) for 72 hours after surgery in this double-blinded, randomized study. The primary outcome measure was the postoperative sufentanil consumption, whereas the secondary outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analogue scale), requirement of narcotic drugs during the operation, level of sedation, Bruggrmann comfort scale, and concerning adverse effects. The postoperative sufentanil consumption was significantly lower in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C during the observation period (P < 0.05), but lower in Group D2 than in Group D1 at 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery (P < 0.05). The heart rate after intubation and incision was lower in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C (P < 0.05). On arrival at the recovery room, Groups D1 and D2 had lower mean blood pressure than Group C (P < 0.05). The intraoperative requirement of sevoflurane was 30% lesser in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C. The sedation levels were greater in Groups D1 and D2 during the first hour (P < 0.05). Compared with Groups C and D1, Group D2 showed lower levels of the overall incidence of nausea and vomiting (P < 0.05). Among the tested PCA options, the addition of dexmedetomidine (0.05 μg/kg/h) and sufentanil (0

  15. Vecuronium and fentanyl requirement in abdominal surgery under combined epidural-general anaesthesia and general anaesthesia alone.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M; Hoq, M F; Rahman, M S; Yeasmeen, S; Ahmed, A; Huda, M R; Rahman, M M

    2012-01-01

    Individual effect of epidural block and general anaesthesia is well established in the field of anaesthesiology. But adequate literature is yet not available to give decisive answer regarding the requirement of muscle relaxants and opioid analgesic when the two methods are combined together. In the present study, sixty patients, aged 18-50 years of both sexes with ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) grading I and II scheduled to undergo for major abdominal surgery were assigned randomly into two groups (30 in each group), where Group A received general anesthesia and Group B received combined epidural-general anesthesia. The patients with combined technique, epidural catheter tip were placed between T9-10. Ten ml of 0.125% bupivacaine was administered through the epidural catheter. Peripheral nerve stimulator was used to monitor neuromuscular transmission and subsequently to administer incremental dose of neuromuscular blocking drugs. All the patients were pre-medicated with fentanyl (2μg/kg) to reduce intubation reflex. Then the patients of both groups were pre-oxygenated for 3 minute and anaesthesia was induced with thiopental sodium 3-5 mg/kg body weight. Endotrachial intubation was facilitated by vecuronium 0.1mg/kg body weight. Anaesthesia was maintained with 60% N2O in O2 and halothane (0.4 to 0.8%). Fentanyl was given in incremental dose of 0.5 μg/kg to maintain an adequate analgesia. The vecuronium was given at the dose of 0.02 mg/kg, when TOF return to 25% of the base line. The mean±SD requirement of vecuronium in general anaesthesia group was 0.0016±0.00013 mg/kg/min and whereas in combined epidural-general anaesthesia, it was 0.0011±0.00014 mg/kg/min. The requirement of fentanyl was 0.71μg/kg/hr in general anaesthetic group whereas in combined group it was 0.31μg/kg/hr. These findings prompt us to place optimal dosing guidelines so as to avoid overdosing and thus delay recovery and help to get the excellent outcome of the surgery.

  16. Is there a measurable association of epidural use at cystectomy and postoperative outcomes? A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Christopher Doiron, R.; Jaeger, Melanie; Booth, Christopher M.; Wei, Xuejiao; Robert Siemens, D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) is commonly used to manage postoperative pain and facilitate early mobilization after major intra-abdominal surgery. Evidence also suggests that regional anesthesia/analgesia may be associated with improved survival after cancer surgery. Here, we describe factors associated with TEA at the time of radical cystectomy (RC) for bladder cancer and its association with both short- and long-term outcomes in routine clinical practice. Methods: All patients undergoing RC in the province of Ontario between 2004 and 2008 were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry (OCR). Modified Poisson regression was used to describe factors associated with epidural use, while a Cox proportional hazards model describes associations between survival and TEA use. Results: Over the five-year study period, 1628 patients were identified as receiving RC, 54% (n=887) of whom received TEA. Greater anesthesiologist volume (lowest volume providers relative risk [RR] 0.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75–0.96) and male sex (female sex RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.79–0.99) were independently associated with greater use of TEA. TEA use was not associated with improved short-term outcomes. In multivariable analysis, TEA was not associated with cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio [HR] 1.02, 95% CI 0.87–1.19; p=0.804) or overall survival (HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.80–1.03; p=0.136). Conclusions: In routine clinical practice, 54% of RC patients received TEA and its use was associated with anesthesiologist provider volume. After controlling for patient, disease and provider variables, we were unable to demonstrate any effect on either short- or long-term outcomes at the time of RC. PMID:27800053

  17. Acoustic puncture assist device versus loss of resistance technique for epidural space identification

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Amit Kumar; Goel, Nitesh; Chowdhury, Itee; Shah, Shagun Bhatia; Singh, Brijesh Pratap; Jakhar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The conventional techniques of epidural space (EDS) identification based on loss of resistance (LOR) have a higher chance of complications, patchy analgesia and epidural failure, which can be minimised by objective confirmation of space before catheter placement. Acoustic puncture assist device (APAD) technique objectively confirms EDS, thus enhancing success, with lesser complications. This study was planned with the objective to evaluate the APAD technique and compare it to LOR technique for EDS identification and its correlation with ultrasound guided EDS depth. Methods: In this prospective study, the lumbar vertebral spaces were scanned by the ultrasound for measuring depth of the EDS and later correlated with procedural depth measured by either of the technique (APAD or LOR). The data were subjected to descriptive statistics; the concordance correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis with 95% confidence limits. Results: Acoustic dip in pitch and descent in pressure tracing on EDS localisation was observed among the patients of APAD group. Analysis of concordance correlation between the ultrasonography (USG) depth and APAD or LOR depth was significant (r ≥ 0.97 in both groups). Bland-Altman analysis revealed a mean difference of 0.171cm in group APAD and 0.154 cm in group LOR. The 95% limits of agreement for the difference between the two measurements were − 0.569 and 0.226 cm in APAD and − 0.530 to 0.222 cm in LOR group. Conclusion: We found APAD to be a precise tool for objective localisation of the EDS, co-relating well with the pre-procedural USG depth of EDS. PMID:27212720

  18. Myoclonus-like involuntary movements following cesarean delivery epidural anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hee Yong; Lee, Sang Wook; Hong, Eun Pyo; Sim, Yeo Hae; Lee, Su-Mi; Park, Sung Wook; Kang, Jong-Man

    2016-11-01

    Spinal myoclonus following neuraxial anesthesia is rare. This report describes a case of myoclonus-like involuntary movement that occurred during the recovery from epidural anesthesia for a cesarean delivery. The patient's symptom improved with the administration of benzodiazepine, and the patient recovered with no neurological sequelae. In conclusion, epidural anesthesia can cause spinal myoclonus, which can be treated with a benzodiazepine. PMID:27687419

  19. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia.

  20. Self-administered methoxyflurane for procedural analgesia: experience in a tertiary Australasian centre.

    PubMed

    Gaskell, A L; Jephcott, C G; Smithells, J R; Sleigh, J W

    2016-04-01

    Methoxyflurane, an agent formerly used as a volatile anaesthetic but that has strong analgesic properties, will soon become available again in the UK and Europe in the form of a small hand-held inhaler. We describe our experience in the use of inhaled methoxyflurane for procedural analgesia within a large tertiary hospital. In a small pilot crossover study of patients undergoing burns-dressing procedures, self-administered methoxyflurane inhalation was preferred to ketamine-midazolam patient-controlled analgesia by five of eight patients. Patient and proceduralist outcomes and satisfaction were recorded from a subsequent case series of 173 minor surgical and radiological procedures in 123 patients performed using inhaled methoxyflurane. The procedures included change of dressing, minor debridement, colonoscopy and incision-and-drainage of abscess. There was a 97% success rate of methoxyflurane analgesia to facilitate these procedures. Limitations of methoxyflurane include maximal daily and weekly doses, and uncertainty regarding its safety in patients with pre-existing renal disease.

  1. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in sedation-analgesia].

    PubMed

    Berger, M; Brandstetter, A; Chowanetz, E; Gasser, G; Mossig, H; Schmidt, P

    1988-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of combined sedation and analgesia during extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy using the Dornier lithotriptor HM III. We used a combination of a benzodiazepin derivatives with an opioid. We tested the dosage of drugs needed in relation to the length of treatment, the size of the stone and the overall energy output of the lithotriptor. In addition, continuous records were made of the patient's blood pressure and the oxygen saturation in the blood, with and without oxygen insufflation. Our results show that sedation combined with analgesia is a reasonable and useable alternative to general or regional anaesthesia for extracorporeal lithotripsy.

  2. Acupuncture for analgesia in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Fry, Lindsey M; Neary, Susan M; Sharrock, Joseph; Rychel, Jessica K

    2014-06-01

    Acupuncture for analgesia is growing rapidly in popularity with veterinarians and pet owners. This article summarizes the mechanisms of analgesia derived from acupuncture and reviews current literature on the topic. Areas covered include the local effects at area of needle insertion, systemic effects secondary to circulating neurotransmitters and changes in cell signaling, central nervous system effects including the brain and spinal cord, and myofascial trigger point and pathology treatment. Clinical applications are discussed and suggested in each section. When used by appropriately trained professionals, acupuncture offers a compelling and safe method for pain management in our veterinary patients and should be strongly considered as a part of multimodal pain management plans. PMID:25454374

  3. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by caffeine.

    PubMed Central

    Misra, A. L.; Pontani, R. B.; Vadlamani, N. L.

    1985-01-01

    Significant potentiation of morphine (5 mg kg-1 s.c. or 1 mg kg-1 i.v.) analgesia (tail-withdrawal reflex at 55 degrees C) was observed in caffeine-treated (100 mg kg-1 i.p.) rats as compared to the control group and lower doses of caffeine (2mg kg-1 i.p.) did not show this effect. Potentiated analgesia was reversed by naloxone. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors appear to be involved in part in this potentiation. PMID:4005485

  4. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by caffeine.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1985-04-01

    Significant potentiation of morphine (5 mg kg-1 s.c. or 1 mg kg-1 i.v.) analgesia (tail-withdrawal reflex at 55 degrees C) was observed in caffeine-treated (100 mg kg-1 i.p.) rats as compared to the control group and lower doses of caffeine (2mg kg-1 i.p.) did not show this effect. Potentiated analgesia was reversed by naloxone. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors appear to be involved in part in this potentiation. PMID:4005485

  5. Skin pulse wave monitoring during lumbar epidural and spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Meijer, J; de Lange, J J; Ros, H H

    1988-04-01

    The effectiveness of pulse wave monitoring of the big toes was compared with loss of cold discrimination to determine the onset of nerve blockade during lumbar epidural and spinal anesthesia. Forty-seven patients scheduled for elective urologic or lower extremity operations were assigned to one of three groups. Group 1 (15 patients) received epidural mepivacaine 1.5% with epinephrine; group 2 (12 patients), epidural bupivacaine 0.5%, and group 3 (20 patients), spinal bupivacaine 0.5%. In the epidural groups, the mean time to onset of increases in pulse wave amplitude was less than half the mean time to onset of decrease in cold discrimination (P less than 0.05). In patients given spinal anesthesia, there was no significant difference. The pulse wave monitor seems to be a sensitive and objective detector of early anesthetic effect during spinal and epidural anesthesia.

  6. The Epidural Treatment of Sciatica: Its Origin and Evolution.

    PubMed

    Ter Meulen, Bastiaan C; Weinstein, Henry; Ostelo, Raymond; Koehler, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Epidural injection with corticosteroids is a common treatment option for patients with lower back pain or sciatica. In this paper we review its origin and evolution. The first injections were given around 1900 in Paris by Jean Sicard (1872-1929) and Fernand Cathelin (1873-1945), who worked independently. They both injected small volumes of cocaine into the sacral hiatus. After a slow start, the epidural treatment of back pain and sciatica gradually spread to other parts of Europe and Northern America. In the early 1950s, corticosteroids were introduced for epidural use. Since the 1970s, there have been numerous clinical trials that show a significant, although small, effect of epidural corticosteroid injections compared with placebo for leg pain in the short term. Despite an ongoing debate about effectiveness and safety, epidural injections remain popular. PMID:26820578

  7. Prolonged Epidural Infusion Improves Functional Outcomes Following Knee Arthroscopy in Patients with Arthrofibrosis after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Retrospective Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, Bryan M; Dave, Ankur; Young, Adam; Ahuja, Mukesh; Amin, Sandeep D; Bush-Joseph, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    A total of 20 consecutive patients with knee stiffness post total knee arthroplasty (TKA) underwent arthroscopic lysis of adhesions and manipulation plus indwelling epidural were evaluated retrospectively. Epidural catheters were placed preoperatively for an intended 6 weeks of postoperative analgesia to facilitate intensive physical therapy. The mean loss of knee extension immediately before incision was 13.5 ± 9.1 degrees (range, 0-35 degrees) and flexion was 77.65 ± 19.2 degrees (range, 45-125 degrees). At the 6-week and final (mean, 0.47 years) follow-up, the loss of extension was 1.5 ± 5.1 degrees (range, -10 to +7 degrees) and 5.4 ± 4.7 degrees (range, 0-15 degrees), respectively, and flexion was 99.7 ± 12.3 degrees (range, 75-120 degrees) and 98.5 ± 16.1 degrees (range, 75-130 degrees), respectively. Of the 20 patients, 2 missed their 6-week clinic visit. Improvements in motion immediately preoperative to 6-week and final follow-up were each significant (p < 0.01). At examination 6 weeks postoperatively, 94.4% of patients met the definition for clinical motion success and 70% maintained success at final follow-up. Visual analog scale improved significantly from 5.4 to 2.0 (p < 0.01) at 6 weeks postoperative in the 12 patients with this data recorded. On the basis of this data, use of tunneled epidurals with arthroscopic lysis of adhesions for arthrofibrosis after TKA is correlated with a high likelihood of functional success postoperatively as measured by range of motion improvement.

  8. Low-dose epidural dexmedetomidine improves thoracic epidural anaesthesia for nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Zeng, X Z; Xu, Y M; Cui, X G; Guo, Y P; Li, W Z

    2014-03-01

    Thoracic epidural anaesthesia alone is an applied technique of anaesthesia for nephrectomy which has both advantages and limitations. Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective alpha2-adrenoreceptor agonist which has both central and peripheral analgesic properties. Forty patients undergoing nephrectomy were enrolled in this clinical trial and allocated randomly to two groups, a control group (C group) and a dexmedetomidine group (D group). The C group received epidural 0.75% levobupivacaine 12 ml with 1 ml of isotonic sodium chloride solution, while the D group received epidural 0.75% levobupivacaine 12 ml with 1 ml (0.5 µg/kg) of dexmedetomidine. Haemodynamic changes, onset time and duration of sensory and motor block, muscle relaxation score, verbal rating score for pain, sedation score and the total postoperative analgesic consumption were evaluated. Sensory blockade duration was longer in the D group than in the C group (P=0.01). The incidence of motor block and the muscle relaxation score were significantly higher in the D group compared with the C group (P=0.01). Compared with the C group, pain scores were significantly lower in the first four postoperative hours in the D group (two hours rest P=0.038; two hours activity P=0.009; four hours rest P=0.044; four hours activity P=0.003). The total amount of flurbiprofen analgesic was significantly lower in the D group compared with the C group (P=0.03). Epidural dexmedetomidine 0.5 µg/kg appears to intensify thoracic epidural anaesthesia with levobupivacaine.

  9. Liposome Bupivacaine for Postsurgical Analgesia in Adult Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Colectomy: Results from Prospective Phase IV Sequential Cohort Studies Assessing Health Economic Outcomes☆

    PubMed Central

    Candiotti, Keith A.; Sands, Laurence R.; Lee, Edward; Bergese, Sergio D.; Harzman, Alan E.; Marcet, Jorge; Kumar, Anjali S.; Haas, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Background Opioid-based postsurgical analgesia exposes patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy to elevated risk for gastrointestinal motility problems and other opioid-related adverse events (ORAEs). The purpose of our research was to investigate postsurgical outcomes, including opioid consumption, hospital length of stay, and ORAE risk associated with a multimodal analgesia regimen, employing a single administration of liposome bupivacaine as well as other analgesics that act by different mechanisms. Methods We analyzed combined results from 6 Phase IV, prospective, single-center studies in which patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy received opioid-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) or multimodal analgesia incorporating intraoperative administration of liposome bupivacaine. As-needed rescue therapy was available to all patients. Primary outcome measures were postsurgical opioid consumption, hospital length of stay, and hospitalization costs. Secondary measures included time to first rescue opioid use, patient satisfaction with analgesia (assessed using a 5-point Likert scale), and ORAEs. Results Eighty-two patients underwent laparoscopic colectomy and did not meet intraoperative exclusion criteria (PCA n = 56; multimodal analgesia n = 26). Compared with the PCA group, the multimodal analgesia group had significantly lower mean total postsurgical opioid consumption (96 vs 32 mg, respectively; P < 0.0001) and shorter median postsurgical hospital length of stay (3.0 vs 4.0 days; P = 0.0019). Geometric mean costs were $11,234 and $13,018 in the multimodal analgesia and PCA groups, respectively (P = 0.2612). Median time to first rescue opioid use was longer in the multimodal analgesia group versus PCA group (1.1 hours vs 0.6 hours, respectively; P=0.0003). ORAEs were experienced by 41% of patients receiving intravenous opioid PCA and 8% of patients receiving multimodal analgesia (P = 0.0019). Study limitations included use of an open

  10. Epidural anaesthesia and familial dysautonomia (the Riley Day syndrome). Three case reports.

    PubMed

    Challands, J F; Facer, E K

    1998-01-01

    Epidural anaesthesia in Familial Dysautonomia (FD) or the Riley Day syndrome has not previously been reported. Three children with FD presenting for redo Nissen fundoplication were managed with epidural anaesthesia. Cases 1 and 2 had had their original Nissen fundoplication without epidural anaesthesia. In Case 3, FD had not yet been diagnosed when she had her first operation, and it was performed with epidural anaesthesia. The anaesthetic management of these cases with and without epidural anaesthesia is described and discussed.

  11. [The effects of application of rectal naproxen on postoperative analgesia, sedation and morphine use in heart surgery operations].

    PubMed

    Kayacan, T; Güzelmeriç, F; Oğuş, H; Yaltirik, R; Barutçuoğlu, O; Erentuğ, V; Koçak, T

    2004-04-01

    In this study, effects and side effects of application of rectal naproxen, combined with patient controlled intravenous morphine analgesia, were investigated in the elective coronary bypass operations for postoperative pain control, sedation and opioid use. Following the ethical committee approval and individual patient self consent, 40 patients, who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery were included in the study. A double blind study was performed by administering rectal naproxen to group N (n = 20) and placebo to group P (n = 20), at the end of the operation. Doses were repeated at the 12th hour postoperatively. Patient controlled intravenous morphine analgesia was performed to all patients for postoperative 24 hours. Postoperative pain and sedation levels were assessed, the side effects were noted. There was no difference between two groups with respect to their demographic features duration of surgery, extubation time and side effects (p > 0.05). With respect to group P, decrease in opioid use, better sedation and decrease in pain scores during both resting and coughing was seen in group N (p < 0.05). In conclusion, analgesia applied by addition of rectal naproxen to opioids achieved better pain management in selected patients after cardiac surgery.

  12. Continuous epidural block versus continuous popliteal nerve block for postoperative pain relief after major podiatric surgery in children: a prospective, comparative randomized study.

    PubMed

    Dadure, Christophe; Bringuier, Sophie; Nicolas, Florence; Bromilow, Luke; Raux, Olivier; Rochette, Alain; Capdevila, Xavier

    2006-03-01

    Foot and ankle surgery in children is very painful postoperatively. Adverse effects from opioids and continuous epidural block (CEB) limit their use in children. Continuous popliteal nerve blocks (CPNB) have not been studied for this indication in children. In this prospective, randomized study we evaluated the effectiveness and adverse events of CPNB or CEB in children after podiatric surgery. Fifty-two children scheduled for foot surgery were separated into four groups by age and analgesia technique. After general anesthesia, 0.5 to 1 mL/kg of an equal-volume mixture of 0.25% bupivacaine and 1% lidocaine with 1:200000 epinephrine was injected via epidural or popliteal catheters. In the postoperative period, 0.1 mL x kg(-1) x h(-1) (group CPNB) or 0.2 mL x kg(-1) x h(-1) (group CEB) of 0.2% ropivacaine was administered for 48 h. Niflumic acid was routinely used. Adverse events were noted in each treatment group. Postoperative pain during motion was evaluated at 1, 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, and 48 h. Requirement for rescue analgesia (first-line propacetamol 30 mg/kg 4 times daily or second-line 0.2 mg/kg IV nalbuphine), and motor blockade were recorded. Parental satisfaction was noted at 48 h. Twenty-seven patients were included in the CEB groups and 25 in CPNB groups. There were 32 children 1 to 6 yr of age (CPNB = 15; CEB = 17) and 20 children 7 to 12 yr of age (CPNB = 10; CEB = 10). The demographic data were comparable among groups. Postoperative analgesia was excellent for the two continuous block techniques and in the two age groups. Motor block intensity was equal between techniques. Adverse events (postoperative nausea or vomiting, urinary retention, and premature discontinuation of local anesthetic infusion in the 1- to 6-yr-old group) were significantly more frequent in the CEB group (P < 0.05). Eighty-six percent of the parents in the CEB groups and 100% in the CPNB groups were satisfied. We conclude that although both CEB and CPNB resulted in excellent

  13. Management of infiltrating spinal epidural angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Nadi, Mustafa M; Nadi, Arwa M; Zabara, Mohammad Y; Ahmad, Tahani M

    2015-04-01

    Angiolipomas of the spine are rare benign tumors commonly presenting with compressive myelopathy. The present report describes a case of spinal angiolipoma with thoracic mediastinal extension in a 50-year-old woman. She presented with a long-standing history of mid-back pain with progressive lower extremities weakness. An MRI showed a heterogeneously enhancing mass located in the posterior epidural space of the thoracic spine with mediastinal extension. Histopathological examination demonstrated features consistent with spinal angiolipoma. This report emphasizes the diagnosis and therapeutic management options of infiltrating spinal angiolipomas.

  14. Management of infiltrating spinal epidural angiolipoma

    PubMed Central

    Nadi, Mustafa M.; Nadi, Arwa M.; Zabara, Mohammad Y.; Ahmad, Tahani M.

    2015-01-01

    Angiolipomas of the spine are rare benign tumors commonly presenting with compressive myelopathy. The present report describes a case of spinal angiolipoma with thoracic mediastinal extension in a 50-year-old woman. She presented with a long-standing history of mid-back pain with progressive lower extremities weakness. An MRI showed a heterogeneously enhancing mass located in the posterior epidural space of the thoracic spine with mediastinal extension. Histopathological examination demonstrated features consistent with spinal angiolipoma. This report emphasizes the diagnosis and therapeutic management options of infiltrating spinal angiolipomas. PMID:25864069

  15. Nefopam and Ketamine Comparably Enhance Postoperative Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kapfer, Barbara; Alfonsi, Pascal; Guignard, Bruno; Sessler, Daniel I.; Chauvin, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    Summary Opioids alone sometimes provide insufficient postoperative analgesia. Co-administration of drugs may reduce opioid use and to improve opioid efficacy. We therefore tested the hypothesis that administration of ketamine or nefopam, to postoperative patients with pain only partly alleviated by morphine, limits the amount of subsequent opioid necessary to produce adequate analgesia. Patients (n=77) recovering from major surgery were given up to 9 mg intravenous morphine. Those still suffering from pain were randomly assigned to blinded administration of: 1) isotonic saline (Control, n=21); 2) ketamine 10 mg (Ketamine, n=22); or, 3) nefopam 20 mg (Nefopam, n=22). Three-mg morphine boluses were subsequently given at 5-minute intervals until adequate analgesia was obtained, or 60 minutes elapsed after the beginning of the study drug administration, or ventilation became insufficient (respiratory rate < 10 breath/minute or saturation by pulse oxymetery < 95%). Supplemental morphine (i.e., after test drug administration) requirements were significantly greater in the Control group [17 ± 10 (SD) mg] than in the Nefopam (10 ± 5 mg, P < 0.005) or Ketamine (9 ± 5 mg, P < 0.001) groups. Morphine titration was successful in all Ketamine and Nefopam patients, but failed in four Control patients (two from respiratory toxicity and two from persistent pain). Tachycardia and profuse sweating were more frequent in patients given nefopam and sedation was greater with ketamine; however, the incidence of other potential complications did not differ between groups. Implications We conclude that ketamine 10 mg and nefopam 20 mg comparably potentiate opioid analgesia, each reducing opioid need by approximately 40%. Ketamine administration was associated with sedation whereas nefopam produced tachycardia and sweating. However, none of the side effects was serious. Either drug can thus be used to potentiate opioid analgesia. PMID:15616073

  16. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Isoyama-Shirakawa, Yuko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Abe, Madoka; Kunitake, Naonobu; Matsumoto, Keiji; Ohga, Saiji; Sasaki, Tomonari; Uehara, Satoru; Okushima, Kazuhiro; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

  17. General versus epidural anesthesia for lumbar microdiscectomy.

    PubMed

    Ulutas, Murat; Secer, Mehmet; Taskapilioglu, Ozgur; Karadas, Soner; Akyilmaz, Ahmet Aykut; Baydilek, Yunus; Kocamer, Betul; Ozboz, Ayse; Boyaci, Suat

    2015-08-01

    This study was a retrospective analysis of 850 lumbar microdiscectomy (LMD) under epidural anesthesia (EA; n=573) or general anesthesia (GA; n=277) performed by the same surgeon and paid by invoice to the Social Security Institution of the Turkish Republic between April 2003 and May 2013. Although GA is the most frequently used method of anesthesia during LMD, the choice of regional anesthetia (epidural, spinal or a combination of these) differs between surgeons and anesthetists. Studies have reported that EA in surgery for lumbar disc herniation may be more reliable than GA, as it enables the surgeon to communicate with the patient during surgery, but few studies have compared the costs of these two anesthetic methods in LMD. We found that EA patient costs were significantly lower than GA patient costs (p<0.01) and there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of the time spent in the operating room (p<0.01). There was no difference in the duration of surgery (p>0.05). The anesthetic method used during LMD affected the complication rate, cost and efficiency of operating room use. We suggest that EA is an anesthetic method that can contribute to health care cost savings and enable LMD to be completed with less nerve root manipulation and more comfort, efficacy, reliability and cost efficiency without affecting the success rate of the surgical procedure.

  18. General versus epidural anesthesia for lumbar microdiscectomy.

    PubMed

    Ulutas, Murat; Secer, Mehmet; Taskapilioglu, Ozgur; Karadas, Soner; Akyilmaz, Ahmet Aykut; Baydilek, Yunus; Kocamer, Betul; Ozboz, Ayse; Boyaci, Suat

    2015-08-01

    This study was a retrospective analysis of 850 lumbar microdiscectomy (LMD) under epidural anesthesia (EA; n=573) or general anesthesia (GA; n=277) performed by the same surgeon and paid by invoice to the Social Security Institution of the Turkish Republic between April 2003 and May 2013. Although GA is the most frequently used method of anesthesia during LMD, the choice of regional anesthetia (epidural, spinal or a combination of these) differs between surgeons and anesthetists. Studies have reported that EA in surgery for lumbar disc herniation may be more reliable than GA, as it enables the surgeon to communicate with the patient during surgery, but few studies have compared the costs of these two anesthetic methods in LMD. We found that EA patient costs were significantly lower than GA patient costs (p<0.01) and there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of the time spent in the operating room (p<0.01). There was no difference in the duration of surgery (p>0.05). The anesthetic method used during LMD affected the complication rate, cost and efficiency of operating room use. We suggest that EA is an anesthetic method that can contribute to health care cost savings and enable LMD to be completed with less nerve root manipulation and more comfort, efficacy, reliability and cost efficiency without affecting the success rate of the surgical procedure. PMID:26067543

  19. Fever following an Epidural Blood Patch in a Child.

    PubMed

    Hunyady, Agnes I; Anderson, Corrie T M; Kuratani, John D; Kundu, Anjana

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that children suffer from the consequences of spontaneous or iatrogenic intracranial hypotension. Pediatric epidural blood patch is gaining popularity because of its ability to alter cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and to alleviate headaches attributed to low cerebrospinal fluid pressure. There is, however, still not enough data to document the safety profile of an epidural blood patch. Here we describe a case of a fever in a child temporally related to the administration of an epidural blood patch. This case depicts the dilemmas in making the diagnosis and instituting treatment for complications of this procedure in the pediatric population.

  20. Fever following an Epidural Blood Patch in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Hunyady, Agnes I.; Anderson, Corrie T. M.; Kuratani, John D.; Kundu, Anjana

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that children suffer from the consequences of spontaneous or iatrogenic intracranial hypotension. Pediatric epidural blood patch is gaining popularity because of its ability to alter cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and to alleviate headaches attributed to low cerebrospinal fluid pressure. There is, however, still not enough data to document the safety profile of an epidural blood patch. Here we describe a case of a fever in a child temporally related to the administration of an epidural blood patch. This case depicts the dilemmas in making the diagnosis and instituting treatment for complications of this procedure in the pediatric population. PMID:23029626

  1. Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in β-thalassaemia intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin Hoi; Li, Allen; Lui, Tun Hing; Sit, Yan Kit

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old man known to have β-thalassaemia intermedia since childhood presented with bilateral lower limb weakness after spinal anaesthesia for an elective minor operation of his left leg. MRI and CT scans were performed to rule out acute epidural haematoma; coincidental imaging features of marrow hyperplasia and spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis were found. This article will present and discuss the imaging features, differential diagnosis, management and literature review of the rare occurrence of extramedullary haematopoiesis in the spinal epidural space. PMID:24390965

  2. [Epidural extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma. Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Rafael; Bernal-García, Luis Miguel; Pineda-Palomo, Manuel; Botana-Fernández, Marcos; Gilete-Tejero, Ignacio Javier; Cabezudo-Artero, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is a malignant tumour of the bone that sometimes presents extraskeletal involvement, with the epidural location being rare. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with paresthesia, paresis and urinary retention. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an epidural mass from C6 to D3. Laminectomy from C7 to D2 and partial resection of the lesion was performed. Pathological analysis was consistent with Ewing sarcoma. The patient received chemotherapy and radiotherapy, without evidence of disease at 8 months follow-up. A review of the literature on all published cases of extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma with epidural involvement is presented. PMID:25497289

  3. Central temperature changes are poorly perceived during epidural anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Glosten, B; Sessler, D I; Faure, E A; Karl, L; Thisted, R A

    1992-07-01

    Hypothermia and shivering are common during epidural anesthesia for cesarean delivery but are not always accompanied by a sensation of coldness. To test the hypothesis that central temperature changes are not perceived during epidural anesthesia, we measured central and skin temperatures and thermal perception in 30 patients undergoing cesarean delivery with epidural anesthesia. Central temperature decreased 1.0 +/- 0.6 degrees C from control values during anesthesia and surgery, but thermal perception scores did not reflect central temperatures (P = 0.56) or changes in central temperature (P = 0.63). A feeling of warmth was significantly correlated with increased mean skin temperature (P = 0.02) and increased upper body skin temperature (P = 0.03). We conclude that central temperature is poorly perceived and is less important than skin temperature in determining thermal perception during high levels of epidural anesthesia.

  4. Analgesia for patients with advanced disease: 2

    PubMed Central

    Hall, E; Sykes, N

    2004-01-01

    The first article in this series explored epidemiology and patterns of pain in advanced disease, non-pharmacological treatments, and the use of opioids to manage pain. This second article examines the use of non-opioid drugs and anaesthetic interventions for pain relief in advanced disease. It also discusses an approach to managing analgesia in dying patients and finally looks at future developments. PMID:15082837

  5. Somatosympathetic reflex and acupuncture-related analgesia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Shin; Tsai, Yuan-Feen

    2009-11-30

    Both acute and chronic pains correspond to nociceptive substances (NSs), which are naturally produced and metabolized by the organism experiencing the pains. The accumulation of NSs in regional tissues triggers a series of pathophysiological reactions and initiates certain threats to the health and the quality of human life. Pharmacological intervention is the most popular treatment for pain relief, which is achieved by either reducing the production of NSs or blocking the transmission of nociceptive signals through the nervous system, but no drug has been developed for the elimination of NSs. Therefore, improving blood circulation to eliminate NSs in painful tissues is an alternative strategy for pain relief. Acupuncture has been proved to be effective for the treatment of certain kinds of pain, but the mechanisms therein remain unclear. The effectiveness of acupuncture analgesia is also variable owing to the uncertainty surrounding the mechanism and the poor standardization of the technique. There is some evidence that acupuncture may induce pain relief by changing the regional blood flow through somatosympathetic reflex (SSR). Therefore, when exploring the mechanisms of SSR in detail, it is helpful to clarify the mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia and to develop a more standardized and effective protocol for acupuncture analgesia. Increasing evidence has suggested that both sympathetic activity and stimulation-induced SSR are differentially controlled in an organ-specific and activity-dependent manner. Vasomotor outflow, which involves the regulation of impaired regional blood circulation, is also differentially controlled in response to specific somatic stimulation. Therefore, we vigorously review the relations between SSR and acupuncture-related analgesia so that we can develop a targeted pain therapy where in certain areas of the body undergo site-specific somatic stimulation, which in turn, can adjust the impaired regional blood circulation. PMID:20359125

  6. Using visual prompts to aid analgesia prescribing.

    PubMed

    Ryland, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Analgesia prescribing is fundamental to a patient's journey, affecting length of stay and patient experience. Laminated prompts are used throughout the NHS Foundation Trust to aid doctors prescribing. A baseline questionnaire was carried out to gather doctors' prescribing habits and current ability to convert opioids to their morphine equivalent. Ninety three percent of doctors said they were moderately to extremely confident when prescribing analgesia. However, when asked to carry out a simple opioid conversion only 14% answered correctly. Eighty three percent of doctors said they were prescribing laxatives alongside opioids frequently (57%) or almost all the time (25%). When actual rates were sampled only 14% of patients were prescribed a concurrent laxative. Laminated pain management guideline cards were created and distributed to doctors at sign in for weekly teaching. Doctor interviews were carried out to see if they were in possession of a prompt card and a simple opioid conversion question was asked. If they did not have a prompt card at the time of interview they were issued with one after answering the conversion question. Rates of concurrent laxative prescribing were collected from the electronic prescribing record of patients on the acute medical unit. Posters were displayed in doctors' offices and drug rooms. Laxative prescribing rates were re-collected and compared with the survey responses. Distribution of laminated prompts increased accuracy of opioid conversion by 86%. Error rates fell as prompt prevalence increased until there was 100% prevalence and 0% error. Concurrent prescribing of laxatives increased to 50% after posters were displayed around the acute medical unit. Doctors reported they were confident when prescribing analgesia. They reported that they often prescribed concurrent medications, however this did not relate to actual prescribing practices. Visual prompts improved doctors analgesia conversion knowledge and prescribing practices

  7. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Vien, Christine; Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia. PMID:27651956

  8. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia. PMID:27651956

  9. Is epidural steroid injection effective for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Molina, Marcelo

    2015-11-16

    There are several nonsurgical alternatives to treat radicular pain in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Epidural steroid injections have been used for several decades, but the different studies have shown variable effects. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified nine systematic reviews including seven pertinent randomized controlled trials. We concluded epidural steroid injection probably leads to little or no effect on reducing radicular pain of spinal stenosis.

  10. Is epidural steroid injection effective for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Molina, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    There are several nonsurgical alternatives to treat radicular pain in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Epidural steroid injections have been used for several decades, but the different studies have shown variable effects. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified nine systematic reviews including seven pertinent randomized controlled trials. We concluded epidural steroid injection probably leads to little or no effect on reducing radicular pain of spinal stenosis. PMID:26610278

  11. Unusual presentation of a spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Panciani, Pier Paolo; Forgnone, Sara; Fontanella, Marco; Ducati, Alessandro; Lanotte, Michele

    2009-06-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma (SSEH) is a rare clinical entity that generally requires an urgent surgical evacuation. The combination of Brown-Séquard syndrome (BSS) and Horner's syndrome (HS) as the presenting symptoms of a traumatic spinal epidural haematoma is very unusual, but it has never been observed in cases of spontaneous haematoma. We herein describe a case of SSEH presenting with simultaneous BSS and HS. The possibility of a conservative management in similar cases is discussed.

  12. Analgesia accompanying food consumption requires ingestion of hedonic foods

    PubMed Central

    Foo, H.; Mason, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    Animals eat rather than react to moderate pain. Here, we examined the behavioral, hedonic, and neural requirements for ingestion analgesia in ad libitum fed rats. Noxious heat-evoked withdrawals were similarly suppressed during self-initiated chocolate-eating and ingestion of intraorally infused water, sucrose, or saccharin, demonstrating that ingestion analgesia does not require feeding motivation, self-initiated food procurement, sucrose or calories. Rather, food hedonics is important since neither salt ingestion nor quinine rejection elicited analgesia. During quinine-induced nausea and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced illness, conditions when chocolate-eating was presumably less pleasurable, analgesia accompanying chocolate consumption was attenuated. Yet, analgesia during water ingestion was preserved in LPS-injected rats who showed enhanced palatability for water within this context. The dependence of ingestion analgesia on the positive hedonics of an ingestate was confirmed in rats with a conditioned taste aversion to sucrose: after paired exposure to sucrose and LPS, rats no longer showed analgesia during sucrose ingestion but continued to show analgesia during chocolate consumption. Eating pauses tended to occur less often and for shorter durations in the presence of ingestion analgesia than in its absence. Therefore, we propose that ingestion analgesia functions to defend eating from ending. Muscimol inactivation of the medullary raphe magnus (RM) blocked the analgesia normally observed during water ingestion, showing the involvement of brainstem endogenous pain inhibitory mechanisms in ingestion analgesia. Brainstem-mediated defense of the consumption of palatable foods may explain, at least in part, why overeating tasty foods is so irresistible even in the face of opposing cognitive and motivational forces. PMID:19828818

  13. Anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia of invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Cooper, John E

    2011-01-01

    Invertebrate animals have long played an important role in biomedical research in such fields as genetics, physiology, and development. However, with few exceptions, scientists, veterinarians, and technicians have paid little attention to the anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia of these diverse creatures. Indeed, some standard research procedures are routinely performed without anesthesia. Yet various chemical agents are available for the immobilization or anesthesia of invertebrates, ranging from gases or volatile liquids that can be pumped into either an anesthetic chamber (for terrestrial species) or a container of water (aquatic species), to benzocaine and other substances for fish. Many invertebrates are not difficult to immobilize or anesthetize and the procedures recommended in this article appear to be safe; however, none should be considered totally risk-free. Analgesia of invertebrates is as yet a largely unexplored field; until scientific data are available, other measures can promote the well-being of these animals in the laboratory. For euthanasia, various methods (physical or chemical or a combination of both) have been recommended for different taxa of invertebrates, but most have not been properly studied under laboratory conditions and some can be problematic in the context of research procedures and tissue harvesting. Furthermore, relevant data are scattered, sometimes available only in languages other than English, and there is no international approach for seeking and collating such information. In this article I review various methods of anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia for terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates, as well as areas requiring further research. PMID:21709312

  14. Anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia of invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Cooper, John E

    2011-01-01

    Invertebrate animals have long played an important role in biomedical research in such fields as genetics, physiology, and development. However, with few exceptions, scientists, veterinarians, and technicians have paid little attention to the anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia of these diverse creatures. Indeed, some standard research procedures are routinely performed without anesthesia. Yet various chemical agents are available for the immobilization or anesthesia of invertebrates, ranging from gases or volatile liquids that can be pumped into either an anesthetic chamber (for terrestrial species) or a container of water (aquatic species), to benzocaine and other substances for fish. Many invertebrates are not difficult to immobilize or anesthetize and the procedures recommended in this article appear to be safe; however, none should be considered totally risk-free. Analgesia of invertebrates is as yet a largely unexplored field; until scientific data are available, other measures can promote the well-being of these animals in the laboratory. For euthanasia, various methods (physical or chemical or a combination of both) have been recommended for different taxa of invertebrates, but most have not been properly studied under laboratory conditions and some can be problematic in the context of research procedures and tissue harvesting. Furthermore, relevant data are scattered, sometimes available only in languages other than English, and there is no international approach for seeking and collating such information. In this article I review various methods of anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia for terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates, as well as areas requiring further research.

  15. [Ultrasonography-guided identification of the lumbar epidural space].

    PubMed

    Bonazzi, M; Bianchi De Grazia, L; Di Gennaro, S; Lensi, C; Migliavacca, S; Marsicano, M; Riva, A; Laveneziana, D

    1995-05-01

    The study was designed to assess the reliability of sonographic evaluation in the prediction of the depth of the lumbar epidural space. Forty males, scheduled for epidural anesthesia for surgical repair of inguinal hernia, were prospectively studied. Patients were placed in a sitting position and sagittal scanning of the lumbar spine was performed with a 5-MHz transducer over the fourth or fifth interspace in order to identify the deeper hyperechogen interface, which represents the landmark between the ligamentum flavum and the epidural space. Ultrasound depth was measured and transducer removed. A Tuohy needle 18 G was then introduced percutaneously according to the standard technique and a rubber slide placed over it, so that it depth of insertion could be accurately measured. The potential for using ultrasounds for prediction of the distance from skin to epidural space was analyzed using a simple linear regression analysis; p values < 0.05 were considered significant. Mean values of ultrasound depth and needle depth were respectively 51 mm (SD 6.3) and 50.9 mm (SD 6.2); the correlation coefficient was 0.99. Ultrasound scanning of the lumbar spine provides an accurate measurement of the depth of the epidural space, which can facilitate the performance of the epidural anaesthesia and may decrease the complication rate, particularly in those patients in which anatomic landmarks are obscured.

  16. Cervical epidural arteriovenous fistula with radiculopathy mimicking cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Kawabori, Masahito; Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Shunsuke; Asano, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2009-03-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with a rare case of cervical epidural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) manifesting as radiculopathy of the right upper extremity that mimicked cervical spondylosis. She had a 2-month history of gradually progressive right-hand motor weakness and sensory disturbance. The initial diagnosis was cervical disk herniation. However, computed tomography with contrast medium showed abnormal enhancement at the right C5-6 and C6-7 intervertebral foramina. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with gadolinium disclosed an enhanced abnormal epidural mass at the dorsal surface of the dural tube between the C5 and C6 vertebrae. T(2)-weighted MR imaging showed a slight flow void on the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the spinal cord between C3 and T4. Digital subtraction angiography disclosed cervical epidural and dural AVFs fed by the C5 and C6 radicular arteries. The diagnosis was concomitant epidural and dural AVFs. The dilated internal vertebral venous plexus attributable to epidural AVF was considered to be responsible for the radiculopathy. Transarterial embolization using n-butylcyanoacrylate achieved complete occlusion of the lesions. Her symptoms improved immediately and MR imaging and angiography performed 10 days postembolization showed reduction of both the epidural and dural AVFs.

  17. Cervical epidural abscess caused by brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Lampropoulos, Christos; Kamposos, Panagiotis; Papaioannou, Ioanna; Niarou, Vasiliki

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old Greek lady presented with fever, arthralgias of knees, cervical and lumbar pain during the last month. On clinical examination the patient was found to have tenderness of the cervical and the lumbar spine with great motion restriction. The blood tests revealed high erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, abnormal liver function tests and a positive rheumatoid factor. Serological test for Brucella was positive while cervical MRI revealed epidural abscess and spondylodiscitis. Conservative treatment with streptomycin (it was substituted by rifampicin after the third week) and doxycyclin for 4 months significantly improved her symptoms. The frequency as well as the diagnosis and management of this manifestation are discussed. PMID:23188848

  18. Epidural hematoma after minor oral trauma.

    PubMed

    Rice, J O; Walters, C; Olson, R E; Pearson, D

    1976-07-01

    A case report was presented in which a 15-year-old boy was beaten about the head with a baseball bat. Intraoral trauma and facial lacerations were repaired. Since results of the neurological examination were within normal limits, the patient was discharged. The next day, the patient became lethargic; however, the patient's mother did not bring the patient back to the hospital until the routine postoperative visit. At that time, the patient had right hemiparesis, was unable to speak, and was clearly obtunded. A carotid angiogram disclosed a left venous epidural hematoma in the parietal area. A craniotomy was performed with good results. The importance of follow-up neurologic examinations in cases of trauma to the face and head is stressed.

  19. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Chouchou, Florian; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Rainville, Pierre; Lavigne, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers). Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1) placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2) pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3) REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated. PMID:26678391

  20. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Chouchou, Florian; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Rainville, Pierre; Lavigne, Gilles J

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers). Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1) placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2) pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3) REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated.

  1. Microscopic epidural lesions in goats given repeated epidural injections of morphine: use of a modified autopsy procedure.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J J; Svendsen, O; Andersen, H B

    1986-01-01

    Epidural catheterization was performed in six goats. Five days later either saline or 20 mg (5 mg/ml) preservative free morphine was injected epidurally once daily for 8 days. The goats were sacrificed 4, 24 or 48 hours after the last injection. The lumbar part of columna was removed in toto for microscopic examination of the spinal cord and the entire epidural space after decalcification and transverse sectioning. After saline, minimal changes including a fibrous membrane surrounding the catheter, scattered fat cell necrosis, scattered small focal cell infiltrations and occasionally focal haemorrhages were seen. After morphine the changes were considerably more severe including diffuse cellular inflammatory reaction in the epidural space, fat cell necrosis, occasionally focal exudative inflammation and chronic inflammatory reaction in the vicinity of the fibrous membrane demarcating position of the catheter. It is concluded that the present modified autopsy procedure permits microscopic examination of the epidural space. It has been shown that repeated administration of morphine caused tissue damage in the epidural space of goats. The human predictability of the results obtained is unknown. However, the results are encouraging for investigations with similar procedure in humans. PMID:3953294

  2. Microscopic epidural lesions in goats given repeated epidural injections of morphine: use of a modified autopsy procedure.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J J; Svendsen, O; Andersen, H B

    1986-01-01

    Epidural catheterization was performed in six goats. Five days later either saline or 20 mg (5 mg/ml) preservative free morphine was injected epidurally once daily for 8 days. The goats were sacrificed 4, 24 or 48 hours after the last injection. The lumbar part of columna was removed in toto for microscopic examination of the spinal cord and the entire epidural space after decalcification and transverse sectioning. After saline, minimal changes including a fibrous membrane surrounding the catheter, scattered fat cell necrosis, scattered small focal cell infiltrations and occasionally focal haemorrhages were seen. After morphine the changes were considerably more severe including diffuse cellular inflammatory reaction in the epidural space, fat cell necrosis, occasionally focal exudative inflammation and chronic inflammatory reaction in the vicinity of the fibrous membrane demarcating position of the catheter. It is concluded that the present modified autopsy procedure permits microscopic examination of the epidural space. It has been shown that repeated administration of morphine caused tissue damage in the epidural space of goats. The human predictability of the results obtained is unknown. However, the results are encouraging for investigations with similar procedure in humans.

  3. Severe Scapular Pain Following Unintentional Cervical Epidural Air Injection.

    PubMed

    Henthorn, Randall W; Murray, Kerra

    2016-03-01

    This a unique case of severe scapular pain following unintentional epidural space air injection during epidural steroid injection.A 70-year-old woman presented for a fluoroscopically guided C7-T1 interlaminar epidural steroid injection. Three injection attempts were made using the loss of resistance with air technique. On the first attempt the epidural space was entered, but contrast injection showed that the needle was intravenous. On the second attempt an equivocal loss of resistance with air was perceived and 5 mL of air was lost from the syringe. The needle was withdrawn and redirected, and upon the third needle passage the contrast injection showed appropriate epidural space filling up to the C4-5 level. Injection of betamethasone mixed in lidocaine was initially uneventful.However, 20 minutes post-injection the patient experienced sudden sharp and continuous pain along the medial edge of the scapula. After failing to respond to multiple intravascular analgesics, the patient was transferred to the emergency room. Her pain subsided completely following an intravenous diazepam injection. Cervical spine computerized tomography showed obvious air in the posterior epidural space from C4-5 to C6-7 as well as outside the spinal canal from (C4-T2). Having recovered fully, she was discharged the following morning. In reviewing the procedure, the equivocal loss of resistance on the second passage was actually a true loss of resistance to epidural space and air was unintentionally injected. Surprisingly, severe scapular pain resulted in a delayed manner after the steroid solution was injected. The authors theorize that unintentional prefilling of the epidural space with air prior to the injection of the subsequent steroid mixture added sufficient pressure to the epidural space to cause right-sided C4 nerve root stretching/entrapment and ensuing radicular pain to the right scapular border. The subsequent intravenous diazepam provided cervical muscle relaxation and

  4. Obstetrical epidural and spinal anesthesia in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ellen; Zhao, Yinshan; Dahlgren, Leanne; Preston, Roanne; van der Kop, Mia; Synnes, Anne; Sadovnick, A Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony; Tremlett, Helen

    2013-10-01

    To examine obstetrical epidural and spinal anesthesia use in women with multiple sclerosis (MS) and the relationship with MS clinical factors. This was a retrospective cohort study, linking clinical data from women with MS in the British Columbia (BC) MS database to obstetrical data (1998-2009) from the BC Perinatal Database Registry. We compared epidural use in 431 deliveries to women with MS and 2,959 deliveries from the general population, as well as spinal use in cesarean deliveries (128 to women with MS and 846 in the general population), considering parity and using multivariate models. We also examined the association between epidural or spinal anesthesia and MS clinical factors-disease duration and disability [Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score]. Of 431 deliveries to women with MS, 116 were exposed to epidural anesthesia and of 128 cesarean deliveries, 82 were exposed to spinal anesthesia. The use of epidural anesthesia was similar in nullipara (adjusted OR = 0.86, 95 % CI = 0.63-1.18, p = 0.36), but more likely in multipara with MS (adjusted OR = 1.75, 95 % CI = 1.20-2.54, p = 0.004). Spinal anesthesia use in cesarean deliveries was comparable between the MS and general population cohorts (adjusted OR = 0.84, 95 % CI = 0.55-1.31, p = 0.45). Women who delivered 5 to <10 years after MS onset were less likely to have an epidural (adjusted OR = 0.57, 95 % CI = 0.34-0.95, p = 0.03) vs. those delivering within 5 years. EDSS was not associated with use of either type of anesthesia (adjusted p > 0.1). Contrary to previous studies, epidural anesthesia use differed between women with MS and the general population and was influenced by parity and MS disease duration; these findings warrant further investigation.

  5. Labor epidural anesthesia, obstetric factors and breastfeeding cessation.

    PubMed

    Dozier, Ann M; Howard, Cynthia R; Brownell, Elizabeth A; Wissler, Richard N; Glantz, J Christopher; Ternullo, Sharon R; Thevenet-Morrison, Kelly N; Childs, Cynthia K; Lawrence, Ruth A

    2013-05-01

    Breastfeeding benefits both infant and maternal health. Use of epidural anesthesia during labor is increasingly common and may interfere with breastfeeding. Studies analyzing epidural anesthesia's association with breastfeeding outcomes show mixed results; many have methodological flaws. We analyzed potential associations between epidural anesthesia and overall breast-feeding cessation within 30 days postpartum while adjusting for standard and novel covariates and uniquely accounting for labor induction. A pooled analysis using Kaplan-Meier curves and modified Cox Proportional Hazard models included 772 breastfeeding mothers from upstate New York who had vaginal term births of healthy singleton infants. Subjects were drawn from two cohort studies (recruited postpartum between 2005 and 2008) and included maternal self-report and maternal and infant medical record data. Analyses of potential associations between epidural anesthesia and overall breastfeeding cessation within 1 month included additional covariates and uniquely accounted for labor induction. After adjusting for standard demographics and intrapartum factors, epidural anesthesia significantly predicted breastfeeding cessation (hazard ratio 1.26 [95% confidence interval 1.10, 1.44], p < 0.01) as did hospital type, maternal age, income, education, planned breastfeeding goal, and breastfeeding confidence. In post hoc analyses stratified by Baby Friendly Hospital (BFH) status, epidural anesthesia significantly predicted breastfeeding cessation (BFH: 1.19 [1.01, 1.41], p < 0.04; non-BFH: 1.65 [1.31, 2.08], p < 0.01). A relationship between epidural anesthesia and breastfeeding was found but is complex and involves institutional, clinical, maternal and infant factors. These findings have implications for clinical care and hospital policies and point to the need for prospective studies.

  6. The role of intercostal cryoanalgesia in post-thoracotomy analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Sepsas, Evangelos; Misthos, Panagiotis; Anagnostopulu, Maria; Toparlaki, Olga; Voyagis, Gregorios; Kakaris, Stamatios

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Patients undergoing thoracotomy were studied to compare the effects of cryoanalgesia, combined with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA), against IVPCA alone during the four days following surgery. METHODS Fifty patients were randomized into two groups: an IVPCA group (n = 25) and an IVPCA-cryo group (n = 25). Subjective pain intensity was assessed on a verbal analogue scale at rest and during coughing. The intensity and the incidence of post-thoracotomy pain, numbness, epigastric distension and/or back pain, the analgesic requirements, as well as the blood gas values and respiratory function tests were evaluated up to the second postoperative (postop) month. Haemodynamic data and episodes of nausea and/or vomiting were recorded over the four postop days. RESULTS In the cryo group there was a statistically significant improvement in postop pain scores (P = 10–4), reduction in consumption of morphine (P = 10–4) and other analgesics (P = 10–4), optimization (less acidosis) of the pH values of blood gases (P < 0.015 over 72 hours postop and P < 0.03 on the first and second postop months), increase in systolic blood pressure (P < 0.05 over 96 hours postop), reduction in heart rate (P < 0.05 over 96 hours postop), increase in values of FEV1 (P < 0.02) and FVC (P < 0.05) at the first and second postop months, reduction in the incidence of nausea (0.05 < P < 0.1 over 18 hours postop), numbness, epigastric distension and back pain (P < 0.05 at days 5, 6, 7, 14, 30 and 60 following surgery). CONCLUSIONS We suggest that cryoanalgesia be considered as a simple, safe, inexpensive, long-term form of post-thoracotomy pain relief. Cryoanalgesia effectively restores FEV1 values at the second postop month. PMID:23424242

  7. Changes in total plasma and serum N-glycome composition and patient-controlled analgesia after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Gudelj, Ivan; Baciarello, Marco; Ugrina, Ivo; De Gregori, Manuela; Napolioni, Valerio; Ingelmo, Pablo M; Bugada, Dario; De Gregori, Simona; Đerek, Lovorka; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Novokmet, Mislav; Gornik, Olga; Saccani Jotti, Gloria; Meschi, Tiziana; Lauc, Gordan; Allegri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation participates to the complex healing process occurring after major surgery, thus directly affecting the surgical outcome and patient recovery. Total plasma N-glycome might be an indicator of inflammation after major surgery, as well as an anti-inflammatory therapy response marker, since protein glycosylation plays an essential role in the inflammatory cascade. Therefore, we assessed the effects of surgery on the total plasma N-glycome and the association with self-administration of postoperative morphine in two cohorts of patients that underwent major abdominal surgery. We found that plasma N-glycome undergoes significant changes one day after surgery and intensifies one day later, thus indicating a systemic physiological response. In particular, we observed the increase of bisialylated biantennary glycan, A2G2S[3,6]2, 12 hours after surgery, which progressively increased until 48 postoperative hours. Most changes occurred 24 hours after surgery with the decrease of most core-fucosylated biantennary structures, as well as the increase in sialylated tetraantennary and FA3G3S[3,3,3]3 structures. Moreover, we observed a progressive increase of sialylated triantennary and tetraantennary structures two days after surgery, with a concomitant decrease of the structures containing bisecting N-acetylglucosamine along with bi- and trisialylated triantennary glycans. We did not find any statistically significant association between morphine consumption and plasma N-glycome. PMID:27501865

  8. Changes in total plasma and serum N-glycome composition and patient-controlled analgesia after major abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gudelj, Ivan; Baciarello, Marco; Ugrina, Ivo; De Gregori, Manuela; Napolioni, Valerio; Ingelmo, Pablo M.; Bugada, Dario; De Gregori, Simona; Đerek, Lovorka; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Novokmet, Mislav; Gornik, Olga; Saccani Jotti, Gloria; Meschi, Tiziana; Lauc, Gordan; Allegri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation participates to the complex healing process occurring after major surgery, thus directly affecting the surgical outcome and patient recovery. Total plasma N-glycome might be an indicator of inflammation after major surgery, as well as an anti-inflammatory therapy response marker, since protein glycosylation plays an essential role in the inflammatory cascade. Therefore, we assessed the effects of surgery on the total plasma N-glycome and the association with self-administration of postoperative morphine in two cohorts of patients that underwent major abdominal surgery. We found that plasma N-glycome undergoes significant changes one day after surgery and intensifies one day later, thus indicating a systemic physiological response. In particular, we observed the increase of bisialylated biantennary glycan, A2G2S[3,6]2, 12 hours after surgery, which progressively increased until 48 postoperative hours. Most changes occurred 24 hours after surgery with the decrease of most core-fucosylated biantennary structures, as well as the increase in sialylated tetraantennary and FA3G3S[3,3,3]3 structures. Moreover, we observed a progressive increase of sialylated triantennary and tetraantennary structures two days after surgery, with a concomitant decrease of the structures containing bisecting N-acetylglucosamine along with bi- and trisialylated triantennary glycans. We did not find any statistically significant association between morphine consumption and plasma N-glycome. PMID:27501865

  9. The Effect of Intravenous Magnesium Sulfate on Post-Operative Analgesia During Laminectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffaripour, Sina; Eghbal, Hossein; Rahimi, Ashkan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Post-operative pain control is an important concern for both patients and physicians. Magnesium is being used as an adjuvant for anesthesia and analgesia during and after various surgeries. We aimed to investigate the effects of intravenous magnesium sulfate on post-operative analgesia after laminectomy. Methods Materials: In this randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial, we enrolled 40 adult patients aged 18-60 with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)  Class I-II who were candidates for elective laminectomy. The patients were randomly assigned in two control groups and were similarly anesthetized. In the case group, after the induction of anesthesia, a loading dose of magnesium sulfate (30 mg/kg) was administered within five to 10 minutes followed by a maintenance dose of 10 mg/kg/hr up to the end of the surgery; while, the patients in the control group received the same volume of saline. After the surgery, all patients received a patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) pump containing morphine. The first time of using PCA, the amount of consumed morphine during the first 24 hours, and pain score were recorded at 6,12,18 and 24 hours in the post-operative period. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the amount of morphine consumed in 24 hours after the surgery (P value =0.23), the first time of using of PCA pump (P value =0.79) and pain intensity (P value=0.52). Conclusion: The infusion of Magnesium Sulfate during laminectomy had no effect on patients’ pain and opioid requirement during the first 24 hours after the surgery. PMID:27433405

  10. ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bradley K; Corder, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains accelerator), and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR–AC1-mediated pain sensitization create a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either: a) facilitating endogenous opioid

  11. A prospective, randomized comparison of interpleural and paravertebral analgesia in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Richardson, J; Sabanathan, S; Mearns, A J; Shah, R D; Goulden, C

    1995-10-01

    We have undertaken a prospective, randomized comparison of the superficially similar techniques of interpleural and paravertebral (extrapleural) analgesia in 53 patients undergoing posterolateral thoracotomy. Local anaesthetic placed anterior to the superior costotransverse ligament and posterior to the parietal pleura produces a paravertebral block and instilled between the parietal and visceral pleurae produces an interpleural block. Patients received preoperative and postoperative continuous bupivacaine paravertebral blocks in group 1 and interpleural blocks in group 2. Premedication comprised diclofenac and morphine, and after operation all patients had regular diclofenac and patient-controlled morphine (PCM). Analgesia was assessed by visual analogue pain scores (VAS), PCM requirements, ratio of preoperative to postoperative spirometric values (PFT), rates of postoperative respiratory morbidity (PORM) and hospital stay, all recorded by blinded observers. Eight patients were withdrawn and data from 45 patients were analysed. Patient characteristics, surgery, VAS scores and PCM use were similar in both groups. PFT were significantly better (P = 0.03-0.0001) in group 1, and PORM was lower and hospital stay approximately 1 day less in this group. Five patients in group 2 became temporarily confused, probably because of bupivacaine toxicity (P = 0.02). We conclude that bupivacaine deposited paravertebrally produced greater preservation of lung function and fewer side effects than bupivacaine administered interpleurally. PMID:7488477

  12. Local infiltration analgesia is not improved by postoperative intra-articular bolus injections for pain after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Karen V; Nikolajsen, Lone; Daugaard, Henrik; Andersen, Niels T; Haraldsted, Viggo; Søballe, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — The effect of postoperative intra-articular bolus injections after total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that intra-articular bolus injections administered every 6 hours after surgery during the first 24 hours would significantly improve analgesia after THA. Patients and methods — 80 patients undergoing THA received high-volume local infiltration analgesia (LIA; 200 mg ropivacaine and 30 mg ketorolac) followed by 4 intra-articular injections with either ropivacaine (100 mg) and ketorolac (15 mg) (the treatment group) or saline (the control group). The intra-articular injections were combined with 4 intravenous injections of either saline (treatment group) or 15 mg ketorolac (control group). All patients received morphine as patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The primary outcome was consumption of intravenous morphine PCA and secondary outcomes were consumption of oral morphine, pain intensity, side effects, readiness for hospital discharge, length of hospital stay, and postoperative consumption of analgesics at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery. Results — There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups regarding postoperative consumption of intravenous morphine PCA. Postoperative pain scores during walking were higher in the treatment group from 24–72 hours after surgery, but other pain scores were similar between groups. Time to readiness for hospital discharge was longer in the treatment group. Other secondary outcomes were similar between groups. Interpretation — Postoperative intra-articular bolus injections of ropivacaine and ketorolac cannot be recommended as analgesic method after THA. PMID:26312445

  13. Pentoxifylline Inhibits Epidural Fibrosis in Post-Laminectomy Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kelten, Bilal; Erdogan, Hakan; Antar, Veysel; Sanel, Selim; Tuncdemir, Matem; Kutnu, Muge; Karaoglan, Alper; Orki, Tulay

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the effectiveness of intramuscular pentoxifylline in the prevention of postoperative fibrosis. Material/Methods We divided 16 adult Wistar albino rats into 2 equal groups: treatment and control. Both groups underwent L1 vertebral total laminectomy to expose the dura. The intramuscular treatment group received pentoxifylline. Four weeks later, epidural fibrosis was studied in both groups using electron microscopy, light microscopy, histology, biochemistry, and macroscopy. Results The evaluation of epidural fibrosis in the 2 groups according to macroscopic (p<0.01) assessment and light microscopy revealed that epidural scar tissue formation was lower in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.001) and the number of fibroblasts was also decreased significantly in the pentoxifylline-treated group (p<0.05). More immature fibers were demonstrated in the treatment group by electron microscopy in comparison with the control group. In biochemical analysis, a statistically significant decrease was detected in hydroxyproline, which indicates fibrosis and myeloperoxidase activity, and shows an inflammatory response (P<0.001). Conclusions Systemic pentoxifylline application prevents postoperative epidural fibrosis and adhesions with various mechanisms. Our study is the first to present evidence of experimental epidural fibrosis prevention with pentoxifylline. PMID:26974057

  14. Efficacy of caudal epidural injection of lidocaine, xylazine and xylazine plus hyaluronidase in reducing discomfort produced by electroejaculation in bulls

    PubMed Central

    PAGLIOSA, Ronaldo C.; DEROSSI, Rafael; COSTA, Deiler S.; FARIA, Fabio J.C.

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that epidural administration of lidocaine, xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase provides reduced pain and stress during electroejaculation in bulls, eight 30-month-old Nellore bulls received saline solution (control), 2% lidocaine, 2% xylazine or 2% xylazine plus hyaluronidase injected into the first intercoccygeal (Co1–Co2) epidural space in randomized order. Heart rate, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, analgesia, animal behavior and motor blockade were evaluated before treatment and at predetermined intervals during and after treatment. Pain and stress were scored subjectively, and semen quality was evaluated. The onset of anesthetic action was significantly faster with lidocaine (3.0 ± 1.2 min) than with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase (8.9 ± 1.5 and 5.5 ± 2.6 min, P=0.021 and P=0.012, respectively), and the onset of anesthesia with xylazine plus hyaluronidase was significantly faster than that with xylazine alone (P=0.032). Treatment with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase resulted in less discomfort than treatment with lidocaine, as indicated by animal behavior. Changes in heart rate, respiratory rate and arterial pressure were within acceptable limits. Penile protrusion and semen emission occurred in all animals during all four treatments. Our results suggest that xylazine plus hyaluronidase reduced discomfort during electroejaculation more effectively than xylazine or lidocaine alone. Further experiments are necessary to determine whether electroejaculation with xylazine plus hyaluronidase is feasible for obtaining semen from Nellore bulls unaccustomed to being handled or restrained. PMID:26097016

  15. Association of thoracic epidural analgesia with risk of atrial arrhythmias after pulmonary resection: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Ryu; Makarova, Natalya; Dalton, Jarrod E.; Sun, Zhuo; Chang, Dennis; Grandhe, Radhika; Sreedharan, Roshni; Dias, Karine De Oliveira; Pal, Rakhi; Bashour, Allen; Murthy, Sudish C.; Turan, Alparslan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Atrial arrhythmias are common after non-cardiac thoracic surgery. We tested the hypothesis that TEA reduces the risk of new-onset atrial arrhythmias after pulmonary resection. Methods We evaluated patients who had pulmonary resection. New-onset atrial arrhythmias detected before hospital discharge was our primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included other cardiovascular complications, pulmonary complications, time-weighted average pain score over 72 h, and duration of hospitalization. Patients with combination of general anesthesia and TEA were matched on propensity scores with patients given general anesthesia only. The matched groups were compared by use of logistic regression, linear regression, or Cox proportional hazards regression, as appropriate. Results Among 1,236 patients who had pulmonary resections, 937 received a combination of general anesthesia and TEA (TEA) and 299 received general anesthesia only (non-TEA). We successfully matched 311 TEA patients with 132 non-TEA patients. We did not find a significant association between TEA and postoperative atrial arrhythmia (odds ratio (95 % CI) of 1.05 (0.50, 2.19), P = 0.9). TEA was not significantly associated with length of hospital stay or postoperative pulmonary complications (odds ratio (95 % CI) of 0.71 (0.22, 2.29), P = 0.47). TEA patients experienced fewer postoperative cardiovascular complications; although the association was not statistically significant (odds ratio (95 % CI) of 0.30 (0.06, 1.45), P = 0.06). Time-weighted average pain scores were similar in the two groups. Conclusion TEA was not associated with reduced occurrence of postoperative atrial arrhythmia. Although postoperative pulmonary complications were similar with and without TEA, TEA patients tended to experience fewer cardiovascular complications. PMID:24957190

  16. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of intravenous Paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in multimodal analgesia after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Çiğdem; Çakan, Türkay; Baltaci, Bülent; Başar, Hülya

    2013-01-01

    Backround: We aimed to evaluate analgesic efficacy, opioid-sparing, and opioid-related adverse effects of intravenous paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in combination with iv morphine after total abdominal hysterectomy. Materials and Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologist Physical Status Classification I-II patients scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy were enrolled to this double-blinded, randomized, placebo controlled, and prospective study. Patients were divided into three groups as paracetamol, dexketoprofen trometamol, and placebo (0.9% NaCl) due to their post-operative analgesic usage. Intravenous patient controlled analgesia morphine was used as a rescue analgesic in all groups. Pain scores, hemodynamic parameters, morphine consumption, patient satisfaction, and side-effects were evaluated. Results: Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores were not statistically significantly different among the groups in all evaluation times, but decrease in VAS scores was statistically significant after the evaluation at 12th h in all groups. Total morphine consumption (morphine concentration = 0.2 mg/ml) in group paracetamol (72.3 ± 38.0 ml) and dexketoprofen trometamol (69.3 ± 24.1 ml) was significantly lower than group placebo (129.3 ± 22.6 ml) (P < 0.001). Global satisfaction scores of the patients in group placebo was significantly lower than group dexketoprofen trometamol after surgery and the increase in global satisfaction score was significant only in group placebo. Conclusion: Dexketoprofen trometamol and Paracetamol didn’t cause significant change on pain scores, but increased patients’ comfort. Although total morphine consumption was significantly decreased by both drugs, the incidence of nausea and vomiting were similar among the groups. According to results of the present study routine addition of dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol to patient controlled analgesia morphine after hysterectomies is not recommended. PMID

  17. Computational modeling of epidural cortical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-12-01

    Epidural cortical stimulation (ECS) is a developing therapy to treat neurological disorders. However, it is not clear how the cortical anatomy or the polarity and position of the electrode affects current flow and neural activation in the cortex. We developed a 3D computational model simulating ECS over the precentral gyrus. With the electrode placed directly above the gyrus, about half of the stimulus current flowed through the crown of the gyrus while current density was low along the banks deep in the sulci. Beneath the electrode, neurons oriented perpendicular to the cortical surface were depolarized by anodic stimulation, and neurons oriented parallel to the boundary were depolarized by cathodic stimulation. Activation was localized to the crown of the gyrus, and neurons on the banks deep in the sulci were not polarized. During regulated voltage stimulation, the magnitude of the activating function was inversely proportional to the thickness of the CSF and dura. During regulated current stimulation, the activating function was not sensitive to the thickness of the dura but was slightly more sensitive than during regulated voltage stimulation to the thickness of the CSF. Varying the width of the gyrus and the position of the electrode altered the distribution of the activating function due to changes in the orientation of the neurons beneath the electrode. Bipolar stimulation, although often used in clinical practice, reduced spatial selectivity as well as selectivity for neuron orientation.

  18. Epidural infection: Is it really an abscess?

    PubMed Central

    Avilucea, Frank R.; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We reviewed the literature regarding the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of spinal epidural abscess (SEA). Methods: Utilizing PubMed, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature on SEAs. Results: SEA remains a difficult infectious process to diagnose. This is particularly true in the early stages, when patients remain neurologically intact, and before the classic triad of fever, back pain, and neurologic deficit develop. However, knowledge of risk factors, obtaining serologic markers, and employing magnetic resonance scans facilitate obtaining a prompt and accurate diagnosis. In patients without neurologic deficits, lone medical therapy may prove effective. Conclusions: More prevalent over the previous three decades, SEA remains a rare but deleterious infectious process requiring prompt identification and treatment. Historically, identification of SEA is often elusive, diagnosis is delayed, and clinicians contend that surgical debridement is the cornerstone of treatment. Early surgery leads to more favorable outcomes and preserves neurologic function, particularly in the early stages of disease when minimal or no neurologic deficits are present. The advent of improved imaging modalities, diagnostic techniques, and multidrug antimicrobial agents has enabled medical/spinal surgical consultants to more rapidly diagnose SEA and institute more effective early medical treatment (e.g., data suggest that lone medical therapy may prove effective in the early management of SEA). PMID:23248757

  19. Placebo analgesia induced by social observational learning.

    PubMed

    Colloca, Luana; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2009-07-01

    Although it has long been known that psychosocial factors play a crucial role in placebo responses, no attempt has been made to understand if social observation shapes the placebo analgesic effect. To address this question, we compared placebo analgesia induced through social observation (Group 1) with first-hand experience via a typical conditioning procedure (Group 2) and verbal suggestion alone (Group 3). In Group 1, subjects underwent painful stimuli and placebo treatment after they had observed a demonstrator (actually a simulator) showing analgesic effect when the painful stimuli were paired to a green light. In Group 2, subjects were conditioned according to previous studies, whereby a green light was associated to the surreptitious reduction of stimulus intensity, so as to make them believe that the treatment worked. In Group 3, subjects received painful stimuli and were verbally instructed to expect a benefit from a green light. Pain perception was assessed by means of a Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) ranging from 0=no pain to 10=maximum imaginable pain. Empathy trait and heart rate were also measured. We found that observing the beneficial effects in the demonstrator induced substantial placebo analgesic responses, which were positively correlated with empathy scores. Moreover, observational social learning produced placebo responses that were similar to those induced by directly experiencing the benefit through the conditioning procedure, whereas verbal suggestions alone produced significantly smaller effects. These findings show that placebo analgesia is finely tuned by social observation and suggest that different forms of learning take part in the placebo phenomenon. PMID:19278785

  20. Spinal epidural abscess: the importance of early diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, A; Laing, R; Smith, C; Kaar, G; Smith, F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To remind clinicians of the dangers of delayed diagnosis and the importance of early treatment of spinal epidural abscess.
METHODS—A review of the literature on spinal epidural abscess and a comparison of the published literature with local experience.
RESULTS—Imaging with MRI or CT enables early diagnosis of spinal epidural abcess and optimal therapy is surgical evacuation combined with 6-12 weeks (median 8 weeks) of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Clinical features are fever, pain, and focal neurological signs and may be associated with preceding and pre-existing bone or joint disease. The commonest aetiological organism is S aureus.
CONCLUSION—Early diagnosis and appropriate early antimicrobial chemotherapy with surgery is associated with an excellent prognosis.

 PMID:9703173

  1. Surgical treatment of supra- and infratentorial epidural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Xiaoyu, Wang; Guoping, Li

    2013-01-01

    Supra- and infratentorial acute epidural hematoma (SIEDH) is a common type of posterior fossa epidural hematoma (PFEDH), representing 11- 64% of all PFEDHs. Although SIEDH is associated with typical characteristics, it might be difficult to diagnose when presenting as infratentorial acute epidural hematoma, which is clinically silent and has nonspecific symptoms. However, this type of hematoma can often be rapidly deteriorating, causing a sharp rise in intracranial pressure that leads to a life-threatening foramen magnum herniation. Early diagnosis and management of SIEDH are imperative. Traditional surgical management has always required relatively large craniotomies, larger than the hematoma itself, to expose its edge, and then tack up the dura matter). It usually opens the window and emphasizes retention of the bone bridge outside the transverse sinus. This method can effectively eliminate the hematoma, but it is associated with larger postoperative wound, longer operation time, larger skull defect, and more complications. Hence, exploration into a better surgical method is direly needed.

  2. Lumbar epidural varices: An unusual cause of lumbar claudication

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Meenakshisundaram; Yegumuthu, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices can also present with radiculopathy similar to acute intervertebral disc prolapse (IVDP). However as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients are usually normal without significant compressive lesions of the nerve roots, the diagnosis is commonly missed or delayed leading to persistent symptoms. We present a rare case of acute severe unilateral claudication with a normal MRI unresponsive to conservative management who was treated surgically. The nerve root on the symptomatic side was found to be compressed by large anterior epidural varices secondary to an abnormal cranial attachment of ligamentum flavum. Decompression of the root and coagulation of the varices resulted in complete pain relief. To conclude, lumbar epidural varices should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute onset radiculopathy and claudication in the absence of significant MRI findings. PMID:27512228

  3. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension following epidural anesthesia: a case report.

    PubMed

    An, X; Wu, S; He, F; Li, C; Fang, X

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of refractory spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) following epidural anesthesia. In this case, typical clinical symptoms and concomitant use of regional anesthesia led to the misdiagnosis of SIH as post-dural puncture headache (PDPH). A 56-year-old man received a successful appendectomy under epidural anesthesia performed at a T11-T12 intravertebral space. About 20 h later, the patient started complaining about orthostatic headache when getting up from his lying position, then a PDPH was diagnosed. However, the patient did not respond well to conservative treatment. Three months later, the first epidural blood patch was performed at the L3-L4 level, however, the patient still had an orthostatic headache. Five days later, spine magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple meningeal diverticulum in the cervicothoracic junction, and computerized tomography myelography demonstrated a C5-C6 spinal dural tear suggesting cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Finally, the patient was diagnosed as SIH and received a second epidural blood patch at the T2-T3 level and responded with improvements in symptomatology. The patient was then discharged, and at a 2-year follow-up, he had fully recovered except for some remaining neck stiffness. This case illustrates that SIH was misdiagnosed as PDPH because of the common clinical symptoms and potentially confounding events (epidural/spinal anesthesia and assumption that it was a case of PDPH). It is important to carefully observe patients in such conditions and promptly conduct suitable diagnostic tests. For a successful treatment of SIH, a timely epidural blood patch should be considered as soon as the diagnosis is established. PMID:26939569

  4. Safety assessment of encapsulated morphine delivered epidurally in a sustained-release multivesicular liposome preparation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Yaksh, T L; Provencher, J C; Rathbun, M L; Myers, R R; Powell, H; Richter, P; Kohn, F R

    2000-01-01

    We have shown that the epidural (EPI) delivery of morphine encapsulated in multivesicular liposomes (DepoFoam drug delivery system) produces a sustained clearance of morphine and a prolonged analgesia. We have sought to subsequently determine the likelihood of deleterious effects on local tissue of repetitive epidural injections of this encapsulated morphine preparation (C0401). Beagle dogs were prepared according to protocol approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee under volatile general anesthesia with chronic lumbar EPI catheters and subcutaneous injection ports. Male and female dogs (three groups) received a total of 4 EPI injections at 8-day intervals of 3 mL of C0401 (10 mg/mL morphine) (N = 6), DepoFoam vehicle (N = 6), or 0.9% sodium chloride (N = 6). Following EPI-C0401, but not saline or DepoFoam vehicle, there were transient (< 72 hr) decreases in food consumption, arousal, hindlimb muscle tone, and body temperature. Heart rate was unaltered, but there were modest decreases in blood pressure and respiratory rate, which persisted for 24-72 hr after C0401. No persistent changes in sensory/motor function, body weight, or stool/urine production were observed. Cerebrospinal fluid, blood chemistry, and urinalysis performed at surgery and on the day of sacrifice (24 hr after the last dose) were within normal ranges. Gross pathology at necropsy was unremarkable. Spinal histopathology findings were judged to be minimal (e.g., modest pericatheter inflammation and fibrosis) and present in all dogs. However, a statistical trend in the rank order of pathology scores was noted (Saline < DepoFoam vehicle < C0401). Repeated EPI injection of C0401 at the maximum dose that could be administered (30 mg) resulted in moderate, transient behavioral and physiological effects after each injection, consistent with morphine administration, and a modest effect on cord histopathology. This level of pathology is reflected in the lack of change observed in

  5. Spinal epidural angiolipoma complicated by an intratumoral abscess. Case report.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Gianpaolo; Tamburrini, Gianpiero; Lauriola, Libero; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2005-08-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are rare, benign lesions representing 0.14 to 1.2% of all spinal axis tumors. They most commonly involve the midthoracic spine and are located in the posterior epidural space. Up to now, six pediatric cases have been reported in the literature; two of them involved an acute clinical onset that was related to a venous infarction of a tumor. The authors report the case of a 16-year-old boy with a midthoracic epidural angiolipoma who was admitted with a clinical history of an acute paraparesis. In contrast to previous descriptions, the acute onset in this case was related to a spontaneous intratumoral abscess within the tumor.

  6. Epidural myelolipoma in a Husky-cross: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Marina Verena; Ludwig, Davina Claudia; Lempp, Charlotte; Haist, Verena; Stein, Veronika Maria

    2013-04-04

    Epidural spinal myelolipoma was diagnosed in an 11.5-year-old castrated male Husky-cross that was evaluated at the veterinary teaching hospital due to progressive thoracolumbar spinal hyperaesthesia and mild proprioceptive pelvic limb ataxia. A focal, ill-defined mildly inhomogenous extradural mass lesion was detected by MRI. The dog was euthanized. At necropsy an extradurally located reddish mass of about 2.5 cm in diameter was present in the vertebral canal. The mass was identified histopathologically as an epidural myelolipoma.

  7. Does labour epidural slow the progress of labour and lead to complications? Obstetricians’ perception working in private and public sector teaching hospitals in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Sohaib, Muhammad; Ismail, Samina

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Obstetricians play a major role in the decision making for provision of analgesia for the woman in labour. As epidural analgesia (EA) is the most preferred technique, it is important to know obstetricians' perception regarding its effect on progress of labour and associated complications. Methods: The 6 months cross-sectional study included 114 obstetricians from teaching hospitals. After informed consent, obstetricians were asked to fill a predesigned questionnaire containing 13 close ended questions regarding their perception on the effect of EA on progress of labour, EA complications and whether they would recommend EA to their patients or not. Other variables included age, gender, training in EA, practice type and hospital settings (private or public sector). Results: Majority of the obstetricians had the perception of EA prolonging the first stage (89.5%) and second stage (98.2%) of labour, increasing the rate of caesarean section (87.7%), instrumental delivery (58.8%) and increasing the incidence of backache (85.5%). None of the obstetricians received any formal training in EA. Majority (84.2%) were not sure if they would recommend EA to their patients. When these responses were compared between public and private sector, a statistically higher percentage (P < 0.001) of public sector obstetricians had negative perception of EA. Conclusion: Perception of obstetrician regarding EA is contrary to the current evidence. There is a need to introduce formal curriculum on EA in obstetric training program and conduct regular refresher courses. PMID:26903670

  8. Epidural anesthesia for permanent spinal cord stimulation with a cylindrical type lead: a case series.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Eun; Choi, Rak Min; Kee, Rim; Lee, Kang Hun; Jeon, Sangyoon; Jung, Jae-Wook; Kim, Woo-Jin; Yoon, Jin Sun

    2015-04-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in trials involving external stimulation are easily conducted under local anesthesia. However, implantation of a permanent SCS system is painful, and can be intolerable in some patients. Epidural anesthesia can be used to perform the SCS implantation without discomfort if the patient can localize the area of paresthesia. However, little is known about epidural anesthesia for SCS. This paper reports 23 cases of permanent SCS with a cylindrical type lead implanted under the epidural anesthesia. Epidural anesthesia was sufficient in 22 patients without discomfort and significant complications. The remaining patient experienced incomplete epidural anesthesia and required additional analgesics to blunt the pain. All the leads were placed consistent with the patient's report of paresthesia area under epidural anesthesia. Thus, epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe method for the optimal placement of SCS to minimize the discomfort for patients without impairing patients' response to the intraoperative stimulation test.

  9. Unusual case of persistent Horner's syndrome following epidural anaesthesia and caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Goel, Shubhra; Burkat, Cat Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    This is a rare case of persistent Horner's syndrome following epidural anesthesia and Caesarean section. A 33-year-old female presented with persistent ptosis and miosis following epidural anesthesia and Caesarian section several months prior. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of head, neck, and chest were unremarkable. Medline search using terms Horner's, epidural, spinal anesthesia, delivery, childbirth, Caesarian, and pregnancy identified 31 articles describing Horner's syndrome in obstetric epidural anesthesia, of which 11 were following Caesarean section. The increased incidence of Horner's syndrome in the setting of epidural anesthesia in pregnancy may be related to epidural venous engorgement and cephalic spread of the local anaesthetic, with disruption in the oculosympathetic pathway. It is important to include recent epidural anesthesia within the differential diagnosis of acute Horner's syndrome in a postpartum female. Rarely, the ptosis may be permanent and require surgical intervention.

  10. Intravenous analgesia with opioids versus femoral nerve block with 0.2% ropivacaine as preemptive analgesic for fracture femur: A randomized comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arvinder Pal; Kohli, Vaneet; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Femoral fractures are extremely painful and pain invariably worsens on any movement. Anesthesia for fracture femur surgery is usually provided by spinal block. This study was undertaken to compare the analgesic effects of femoral nerve block (FNB) using nerve stimulator with 0.2% ropivacaine (15 ml) and intravenous (I.V.) fentanyl before patient positioning for fracture femur surgery under spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, comparative study was conducted on 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II patients (18–60 years) scheduled for femur surgery under combined spinal epidural anesthesia. Patients in Group I (n = 30), were administered FNB using nerve stimulator with 0.2% ropivacaine (15 ml) and in Group II patients (n = 30), I.V. fentanyl 0.5 μg/kg was given as preemptive analgesia. Parameters observed included time to spinal anesthesia, intra-operative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) for any pain and postoperative epidural top-ups dosages. Results: Demographic profile was comparable in both the groups. VAS at 2 min in Group I was 5.63 and in Group II it was 8.00. Satisfaction score was better in Group I as compared to Group II patients. Time to administer subarachnoid block was 17.80 min in patients of Group I as compared to 25.03 min in Group II patients. Postoperatively, VAS scores were lower in Group I than Group II patients. The frequency of epidural top-ups was higher in Group II than in Group I patients. Conclusions: FNB is comparatively better in comparison to I.V. fentanyl when used as preemptive and postoperative analgesic in patients being operated for fracture femur. PMID:27212771

  11. [Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma during pregnancy: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Hack, I; Cademartori, M S; Mamani, R S; Beltrame, C M; Cademartori, C G

    1984-03-01

    A case of spontaneous dorso- lumbar spinal epidural hematoma during pregnancy is reported. The hematoma was removed 8 hours after the onset of paraplegia, and there was no evidence of vascular malformation. The motor deficit remained unchanged post-operatively. The etiology, clinical findings and the value of early laminectomy are discussed.

  12. Translaminar lumbar epidural endoscopy: anatomy, technique, and indications.

    PubMed

    De Antoni, D J; Claro, M L; Poehling, G G; Hughes, S S

    1996-06-01

    This article describes a new technique to achieve access to the epidural space via a direct posterior portal. This minimally invasive technique allows treatment of disc protrusions and extrusions with full visualization and minimal dissection of the paraspinal musculature. Hemostasis, visualization, and triangulation is performed with standard arthroscopic instrumentation. The anatomy of, indications for, and advantages of this techniques are described. PMID:8783828

  13. Spinal cord injury following an attempted thoracic epidural.

    PubMed

    Mayall, M F; Calder, I

    1999-10-01

    Unsuccessful attempts were made to insert a thoracic epidural in an anaesthetised patient. Signs of spinal cord damage were observed the following day. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a haematoma anterior to the spinal cord. Surgical exploration revealed an intradural haematoma and a needle puncture of the cord. The patient suffered a permanent paraparesis.

  14. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in Clinical Practice: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Al-Aref, Rami; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective Upper cervical epidural abscess (UCEA) is a rare surgical emergency. Despite increasing incidence, uncertainty remains as to how it should initially be managed. Risk factors for UCEA include immunocompromised hosts, diabetes mellitus, and intravenous drug use. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature including the history, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of UCEA. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to 2015 were analyzed. We used the keywords “Upper cervical epidural abscess,” “C1 osteomyelitis,” “C2 osteomyelitis,” “C1 epidural abscess,” “C2 epidural abscess.” We excluded cases with tuberculosis. Results The review addresses epidemiology, etiology, imaging, microbiology, and diagnosis of this condition. We also address the nonoperative and operative management options and the relative indications for each as reviewed in the literature. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this rare condition with magnetic resonance imaging being the imaging modality of choice. There has been a shift toward surgical management of this condition in recent times, with favorable outcomes. PMID:27190742

  15. Epidural angiomatous meningioma of the thoracic spine: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YANG, TAO; WU, LIANG; YANG, CHENLONG; XU, YULUN

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural angiomatous meningiomas (AMs) are extremely rare lesions. Here, we report on a case of an epidural AM of the thoracic spine with chronic but severe cord compression. The patient underwent a T6-T8 laminectomy through the posterior approach. En bloc resection was achieved, and histopathological examination demonstrated an AM. Delayed paraplegia occurred 4 h postoperatively. The patient was treated with methylprednisolone, hyperbaric oxygen and rehabilitation. Gradually, over the next six months, the bilateral leg strength was improved compared with the preoperative status, and no tumor recurrence was noted. Although epidural AM is extremely rare, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural lesions. A definitive diagnosis is difficult based on magnetic resonance imaging alone due to the nonspecific characteristics of the tumor. Since AM is a histologically benign and highly vascularized tumor, timely gross total resection (GTR) is the most effective treatment. A good clinical outcome may be expected following GTR (Simpson grade I and II resection). PMID:26870233

  16. Spinal epidural angiolipomas: Clinical characteristics, management and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bouali, Sofiene; Maatar, Nidhal; Bouhoula, Asma; Abderrahmen, Khansa; Said, Imed Ben; Boubaker, Adnen; Kallel, Jalel; Jemel, Hafedh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The spinal epidural angiolipomas are rare expansive processes made of mature lipomatous and angiomatous elements. They often have a benign character. Their etiology, pathogenesis remains uncertain, and it is a cause of spinal cord compression. The magnetic resonance imaging is the most important neuroradiological examination. Histological examination is the only examination to confirm the diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice. Methods: A retrospective study of all patients operated on for a spinal epidural angiolipoma at the Department of Neurosurgery at the National Institute of Neurology of Tunis between January 2000 and December 2014 (15 years) was performed. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical, radiological, histological characteristics and the treatment of this tumor. Results: A total of nine patients were operated from January 01, 2000 to November 30, 2014. The average age of our patients was 51 years with ages that ranged from 29 to 65 with a male predominance. The period between onset of symptoms and diagnosis ranged from 24 months with an average 12 months. Posterior localization of the tumor was seen in all patients. Surgical resection was performed for all cases. The postoperative course has been satisfactory, with a complete recovery of neurological functions in all patients. Conclusions: The spinal epidural angiolipomas is rare expansive process causing spinal cord compression. Treatment is exclusively surgical resection. The functional outcome of spinal epidural angiolipomas is particularly favorable with a complete neurological recovery is if the patient was quickly operated. PMID:27695535

  17. [Epidural sacral anesthesia with 3% mepivacaine in rectal surgery].

    PubMed

    Marzocchi, M; Monti, E; Cesari, D; Vespignani, M G; Gelli, G; Pirazzoli, G

    1990-09-01

    The authors think that the sacral epidural anaesthesia effected with Mepivacaine 3%, 6 ml (180 mg) and Fentanyl 2 ml (100 mcg) is perfectly indicated for the proctologic surgery as it is of simple execution and presents a short latency (12 min.), good deepness and perfect haemodynamic stability. Besides, it does not endanger the lower limbs innervation. No urinary retention.

  18. Translaminar lumbar epidural endoscopy: anatomy, technique, and indications.

    PubMed

    De Antoni, D J; Claro, M L; Poehling, G G; Hughes, S S

    1996-06-01

    This article describes a new technique to achieve access to the epidural space via a direct posterior portal. This minimally invasive technique allows treatment of disc protrusions and extrusions with full visualization and minimal dissection of the paraspinal musculature. Hemostasis, visualization, and triangulation is performed with standard arthroscopic instrumentation. The anatomy of, indications for, and advantages of this techniques are described.

  19. Spinal epidural angiolipomas: Clinical characteristics, management and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bouali, Sofiene; Maatar, Nidhal; Bouhoula, Asma; Abderrahmen, Khansa; Said, Imed Ben; Boubaker, Adnen; Kallel, Jalel; Jemel, Hafedh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The spinal epidural angiolipomas are rare expansive processes made of mature lipomatous and angiomatous elements. They often have a benign character. Their etiology, pathogenesis remains uncertain, and it is a cause of spinal cord compression. The magnetic resonance imaging is the most important neuroradiological examination. Histological examination is the only examination to confirm the diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice. Methods: A retrospective study of all patients operated on for a spinal epidural angiolipoma at the Department of Neurosurgery at the National Institute of Neurology of Tunis between January 2000 and December 2014 (15 years) was performed. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical, radiological, histological characteristics and the treatment of this tumor. Results: A total of nine patients were operated from January 01, 2000 to November 30, 2014. The average age of our patients was 51 years with ages that ranged from 29 to 65 with a male predominance. The period between onset of symptoms and diagnosis ranged from 24 months with an average 12 months. Posterior localization of the tumor was seen in all patients. Surgical resection was performed for all cases. The postoperative course has been satisfactory, with a complete recovery of neurological functions in all patients. Conclusions: The spinal epidural angiolipomas is rare expansive process causing spinal cord compression. Treatment is exclusively surgical resection. The functional outcome of spinal epidural angiolipomas is particularly favorable with a complete neurological recovery is if the patient was quickly operated.

  20. Symptomatic lumbar epidural varices. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, G A; Weingarten, K; Lavyne, M H

    1994-05-01

    Lumbar epidural varices have been infrequently described in the literature and rarely accepted as a primary pathophysiological entity. The authors' total experience with symptomatic lumbar epidural varices over the last 15 years includes four cases (incidence 0.067% of all lumbar spine operations), two of which are described in detail in this paper. The mechanism for their formation is proposed: central disc herniations obstruct the anterior epidural venous flow leading to anterolateral caudal venous distention. Subsequent venous endothelial injury predisposes to varying degrees of phlebothrombosis. Decompression of partially thrombosed varices may occur during operative discectomy or spontaneously during regression of the nonoperated disc prolapse. Regression of the central disc herniation may also explain the "disappearing disc" phenomenon, in which patients with clinical and radiographic evidence of apparently large caudal disc herniations exhibit clinical and radiographic resolution. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of the epidural varix depend upon the degree of thrombosis within this anomaly. A thrombosed varix is hyperintense on T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted images, whereas flowing blood is hypointense. The variable hypo- and hyperintensity on the T2-weighted MR imaging sequences correlate with a partially patent lumen within the varix. PMID:8169634

  1. Evaluation of a single-dose, extended-release epidural morphine formulation for pain control after lumbar spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Vineyard, Joseph C; Toohey, John S; Neidre, Arvo; Fogel, Guy; Joyner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    DepoDur, an extended-release epidural morphine, has been used effectively for postoperative pain control following many orthopaedic and general surgery procedures and has provided prolonged analgesia when compared with Duramorph. The goal of this article was to compare the safety and analgesic efficacy of DepoDur versus Duramorph after lumbar spine surgery. A prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical study was completed at a single extended-stay ambulatory surgery center. All patients over 18 undergoing posterior lumbar spine fusions were considered for the study. Sixty patients were randomly assigned to a control or treatment group. The control group received DepoDur before surgery, while the treatment group received Duramorph. Although results show no significant differences between the two groups in postoperative visual analog pain scale scores, use of pain medication, and adverse events, subjects receiving DepoDur were less likely to receive Naloxone and oxygen supplementation, experience nausea or fever, and were more likely to experience hypotension. DepoDur proved to be safe and effective, offering similar prolonged analgesic activity when compared with Duramorph.

  2. Incidence of intravascular penetration in transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Furman, Michael B; Giovanniello, Michael T; O'Brien, Erin M

    2003-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN A prospective, observational, human, study was conducted. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the incidence of vascular penetration during fluoroscopically guided, contrast-enhanced transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections, and to determine whether the observation of blood in the needle hub can be used to predict a vascular injection. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA Incorrectly placed intravascular cervical spinal injections result in medication flow systemically and not to the desired target. A recently published study demonstrates a high incidence of intravascular injections in transforaminal lumbosacral epidural injections. No studies so far have evaluated the incidence of vascular injections in transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections, nor have they calculated the ability of observed blood in the needle hub to predict a vascular injection in the cervical spine.METHODS The incidence of fluoroscopically confirmed intravascular uptake of contrast was prospectively observed in 337 patients treated with cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injections. The ability of observed blood in the needle hub to predict intravascular injection was also investigated. For each subject, the injection level was chosen on the basis of the clinical scenario including history, physical examination, and review of imaging studies. Some patients had multilevel injections. Using fluoroscopic guidance, the authors placed a 25-gauge needle into the epidural space using a transforaminal approach according to accepted standard technique. Needle tip location was confirmed with biplanar imaging. The presence or absence of blood in the needle hub spontaneously ("flash") and after attempted aspiration by pulling back on the syringe's plunger was documented. Contrast then was injected under real-time fluoroscopy to determine whether the location of the needle tip was intravascular. The results were recorded in a prospective manner indicating the presence or absence of blood

  3. Acoustic puncture assist device: A novel technique to identify the epidural space

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mokaddam, MA; Al-Harbi, MK; El-Jandali, ST; Al-Zahrani, TA

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acoustic puncture assist device (APAD) is designed to detect and signal the loss of resistance during the epidural procedure. We aimed to evaluate this device in terms of successful identification of the epidural space and the incidence of accidental dural puncture. Patients and Methods: Following Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent obtained from all patients, 200 adult patients (107 males) American Society of Anesthesiologists I-III who underwent lower limb orthopedic surgery under lumbar epidural anesthesia using APAD were enrolled in the study. APAD system was connected to the epidural needle using normal saline prefilled extension tube. Numbers of successful epidural attempts and accidental dural tap were documented. Results: The mean values of the depth of epidural space and the time to perform epidural puncture were 5.8 ± 1.0 cm and 3.3 ± 1.4 min, respectively. In 63% of patients, epidural puncture was successful from the first attempt and in 1% it was successful from the fourth attempt. Epidural anesthesia by APAD was successful in 198 cases (99 %). Dural tap occurred in 2 cases (1%). Conclusions: Using APAD, the success of identifying the epidural space was high and reliable. PMID:27051369

  4. [The influence of epidural anestesia of the incidence of vaginal operative deliveries. Study of 6,110 deliveries with 4.590 epidrual anesthesias (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Elert, A

    1979-12-01

    6,110 labors and deliveries are reviewed. 4,590 were done under epidural anaesthesia. The incidence of vaginal operative deliveries was not increased by epidural anaesthesia. The technique, complications and advantage of epidural anaesthesia are discussed.

  5. Analgesic and motor effects of a high-volume intercoccygeal epidural injection of 0.125% or 0.0625% bupivacaine in adult cows.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Eva; Rubio-Martínez, Luis M; Monteith, Gabrielle; Kerr, Carolyn L

    2013-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the analgesic and motor effects of a high-volume intercoccygeal epidural injection of bupivacaine at 2 concentrations in cows. A prospective, randomized, blinded, crossover trial was conducted on 6 adult cows. An indwelling epidural catheter was placed in the first intercoccygeal space and advanced 10 cm cranially. All the cows received 3 treatments with a washout period of 48 h: saline (control), 0.125% bupivacaine (high dose), or 0.0625% bupivacaine (low dose), at a final volume of 0.15 mL per kilogram of body weight, infused manually into the epidural space over a period of 15 min. The anal and tail tone and motor deficits of the pelvic limbs were evaluated in 5 of the cows with use of a numerical rating scale and a visual analogue scale (VAS). Sensory block was assessed in 4 of the cows by the response to needle pricks in different regions with the use of a VAS. Measurements were obtained before and at different time points after injection, up to 360 min. Analysis of variance for repeated measures and post-hoc Tukey's and Dunnett's tests were used. Differences were considered significant when the P-value was ≤ 0.05. One cow became recumbent 6 h after injection. Anal and tail tones were significantly decreased and motor deficits of the pelvic limbs were significantly increased after bupivacaine treatment compared with control treatment. The overall mean VASpain scores ± standard deviation were 66 ± 8 after control treatment, 52 ± 5 after low-dose bupivacaine treatment, and 43 ± 5 after high-dose bupivacaine treatment. The pain scores were significantly lower in caudal regions up to the saphenous nerve after high-dose bupivacaine treatment compared with control treatment and significantly lower in the anus, vulva, and tail after low-dose bupivacaine treatment compared with control treatment. Thus, analgesia with moderate motor deficits of the pelvic limbs may be obtained with 0.125% bupivacaine administered

  6. No evidence of a clinically important effect of adding local infusion analgesia administrated through a catheter in pain treatment after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Postoperative analgesia after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) using opioids is associated with troublesome side effects such as nausea and dizziness, and epidural analgesic means delayed mobilization. Thus, local infiltration analgesia (LIA) during surgery prolonged with local infusion analgesia (LINFA) into the soft tissue in the hip region through a catheter in the first postoperative days has gained major interest in THA fast-track settings within a short period of time. LIA at the time of surgery is a validated treatment. We investigated the additional effect of giving postoperative LINFA after THA in patients already having LIA during surgery. Patients and methods 60 consecutive patients undergoing non-cemented THA were randomized into two groups in a double-blind and controlled study. During surgery, all patients received standardized pain treatment with LIA. Postoperatively, they were treated either with a solution of Ropivacain, Ketorolac, and Adrenaline (LINFA group) or placebo (placebo group) administered through a catheter to the hip 10 and 22 h after surgery. Pain score, opioid consumption, and length of stay (LOS) were evaluated. Results After adjustment for multiple testing, there was no statistically significant postoperative difference between the LINFA group and the placebo group regarding pain and tiredness. We found some evidence of a short-term effect on nausea and vomiting. Opioid consumption and length of stay were similar in the two groups. Interpretation We found some evidence of a short-term effect of LINFA on nausea and vomiting, but no evidence of an effect on postoperative pain and tiredness. Thus, LINFA cannot be recommended as a standard pain treatment in patients with THA. PMID:21619503

  7. A double-blind assessment of segmental sensory changes with epidural fentanyl versus epidural saline in patients undergoing extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Hore, P J; Silbert, B S; Cook, R J; Beilby, D S

    1990-04-01

    Segmental changes to pin prick and cold stimuli were tested in a double-blind manner in pain-free patients scheduled for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL). Fifty patients were randomly allocated to receive either epidural fentanyl (100 micrograms in 10 ml normal saline) or 10 ml epidural normal saline. In a further 25 patients an epidural catheter was inserted but no solution injected. In contrast to this latter group, epidural fentanyl and normal saline both produced segmental sensory changes. There were no significant differences between fentanyl and normal saline groups in the number of patients reporting sensory changes to pin prick, rate of onset of these changes, or segmental level. For cold stimuli, more patients in the fentanyl group than in the normal saline group reported a change (16 vs. 8; P = 0.02) but the segmental level was similar. The effect of normal saline as a diluent in epidurally administered opioids may be of clinical importance.

  8. Newborn Analgesia Mediated by Oxytocin during Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuca, Michel; Minlebaev, Marat; Shakirzyanova, Anastasia; Tyzio, Roman; Taccola, Giuliano; Janackova, Sona; Gataullina, Svetlana; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Giniatullin, Rashid; Khazipov, Rustem

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling pain in newborns during delivery are poorly understood. We explored the hypothesis that oxytocin, an essential hormone for labor and a powerful neuromodulator, exerts analgesic actions on newborns during delivery. Using a thermal tail-flick assay, we report that pain sensitivity is two-fold lower in rat pups immediately after birth than 2 days later. Oxytocin receptor antagonists strongly enhanced pain sensitivity in newborn, but not in 2-day-old rats, whereas oxytocin reduced pain at both ages suggesting an endogenous analgesia by oxytocin during delivery. Similar analgesic effects of oxytocin, measured as attenuation of pain-vocalization induced by electrical whisker pad stimulation, were also observed in decerebrated newborns. Oxytocin reduced GABA-evoked calcium responses and depolarizing GABA driving force in isolated neonatal trigeminal neurons suggesting that oxytocin effects are mediated by alterations of intracellular chloride. Unlike GABA signaling, oxytocin did not affect responses mediated by P2X3 and TRPV1 receptors. In keeping with a GABAergic mechanism, reduction of intracellular chloride by the diuretic NKCC1 chloride co-transporter antagonist bumetanide mimicked the analgesic actions of oxytocin and its effects on GABA responses in nociceptive neurons. Therefore, endogenous oxytocin exerts an analgesic action in newborn pups that involves a reduction of the depolarizing action of GABA on nociceptive neurons. Therefore, the same hormone that triggers delivery also acts as a natural pain killer revealing a novel facet of the protective actions of oxytocin in the fetus at birth. PMID:21519396

  9. The mysterious persistence of hypnotic analgesia.

    PubMed

    Barber, J

    1998-01-01

    Hypnotic treatment of pain has a long history and, among hypnotic phenomena, pain relief is a relatively commonplace focus for intervention, yet we lack a conceptual explanation for this treatment. Hilgard's neodissociation theory accounts for the phenomenon of acute hypnotic analgesia, but not of persistent pain relief. Perhaps the enduring effect of hypnotic treatment can be explained at either of two levels: a neurophysiological model or a learning model. This explanation leads to the further question: How does hypnotic treatment of recurring pain achieve enduring relief? Clinical experience suggests a two-component model. First, the clinician communicates specific ideas that strengthen the patient's ability to derive therapeutic support and to develop a sense of openness to the unexplored possibilities for pain relief within the security of nurturing therapeutic relationship. Second, the clinician employs posthypnotic suggestions that capitalize on the patient's particular pain experiences, which simultaneously ameliorate the pain experience, and which, in small, repetitive increments, tend to maintain persistent pain relief over increasing periods of time.

  10. Dose response study of subarachnoid diamorphine for analgesia after elective caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Skilton, R W; Kinsella, S M; Smith, A; Thomas, T A

    1999-10-01

    Subarachnoid diamorphine provides excellent analgesia after elective caesarean section but the optimum dose is still uncertain. We therefore investigated the effects of three regimens of subarachnoid diamorphine. Forty parturients were assigned to one of four groups. A control group received no diamorphine in their subarachnoid bupivacaine and three study groups received 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg or 0.3 mg diamorphine added to 12.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% in a semi-blind randomised design study. All women received a 100 mg diclofenac suppository at the end of the caesarean section and were provided with morphine patient controlled analgesia (PCA) postoperatively. The patients were assessed for pain, morphine usage and side-effects at 2, 4, 8 and 24 h after the subarachnoid injection. Postoperative visual analogue scores for pain and PCA morphine consumption were significantly lower, and mean time to first use of morphine was significantly longer in the 0.3 mg diamorphine group. The mean (SD) dose of PCA morphine used over 24 h was 39.4 (14.7), 25.6 (16.5), 21.6 (15.9) and 3.1 (3.6) mg, and mean time to first use of morphine was 1.6 (0.5), 3.0 (1.4), 3.4 (2.4) and 14.1 (9.4) h, in the 0, 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg and 0.3 mg groups respectively. Side-effects of pruritus, nausea and vomiting were dependent on the dose of spinal diamorphine but did not require treatment in any patients. We conclude that 0.3 mg subarachnoid diamorphine provides significantly better postoperative pain relief than the smaller doses with an acceptable increase in side-effects.

  11. Transversus Abdominis Plane Versus Ilioinguinal and Iliohypogastric Nerve Blocks for Analgesia Following Open Inguinal Herniorrhaphy*

    PubMed Central

    Stav, Anatoli; Reytman, Leonid; Stav, Michael-Yohay; Troitsa, Anton; Kirshon, Mark; Alfici, Ricardo; Dudkiewicz, Mickey; Sternberg, Ahud

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We hypothesized that preoperative (pre-op) ultrasound (US)-guided posterior transversus abdominis plane block (TAP) and US-guided ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve block (ILI+IHG) will produce a comparable analgesia after Lichtenstein patch tension-free method of open inguinal hernia repair in adult men. The genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve will be blocked separately. Methods This is a prospective, randomized, controlled, and observer-blinded clinical study. A total of 166 adult men were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a pre-op TAP group, a pre-op ILI+IHG group, and a control group. An intraoperative block of the genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve was performed in all patients in all three groups, followed by postoperative patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with morphine. The pain intensity and morphine consumption immediately after surgery and during the 24 hours after surgery were compared between the groups. Results A total of 149 patients completed the study protocol. The intensity of pain immediately after surgery and morphine consumption were similar in the two “block” groups; however, they were significantly decreased compared with the control group. During the 24 hours after surgery, morphine consumption in the ILI+IHG group decreased compared with the TAP group, as well as in each “block” group versus the control group. Twenty-four hours after surgery, all evaluated parameters were similar. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided ILI+IHG provided better pain control than US-guided posterior TAP following the Lichtenstein patch tension-free method of open inguinal hernia repair in men during 24 hours after surgery. (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01429480.) PMID:27487311

  12. Dose response study of subarachnoid diamorphine for analgesia after elective caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Skilton, R W; Kinsella, S M; Smith, A; Thomas, T A

    1999-10-01

    Subarachnoid diamorphine provides excellent analgesia after elective caesarean section but the optimum dose is still uncertain. We therefore investigated the effects of three regimens of subarachnoid diamorphine. Forty parturients were assigned to one of four groups. A control group received no diamorphine in their subarachnoid bupivacaine and three study groups received 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg or 0.3 mg diamorphine added to 12.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% in a semi-blind randomised design study. All women received a 100 mg diclofenac suppository at the end of the caesarean section and were provided with morphine patient controlled analgesia (PCA) postoperatively. The patients were assessed for pain, morphine usage and side-effects at 2, 4, 8 and 24 h after the subarachnoid injection. Postoperative visual analogue scores for pain and PCA morphine consumption were significantly lower, and mean time to first use of morphine was significantly longer in the 0.3 mg diamorphine group. The mean (SD) dose of PCA morphine used over 24 h was 39.4 (14.7), 25.6 (16.5), 21.6 (15.9) and 3.1 (3.6) mg, and mean time to first use of morphine was 1.6 (0.5), 3.0 (1.4), 3.4 (2.4) and 14.1 (9.4) h, in the 0, 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg and 0.3 mg groups respectively. Side-effects of pruritus, nausea and vomiting were dependent on the dose of spinal diamorphine but did not require treatment in any patients. We conclude that 0.3 mg subarachnoid diamorphine provides significantly better postoperative pain relief than the smaller doses with an acceptable increase in side-effects. PMID:15321116

  13. [Involuntary Movement of Bilateral Lower Limbs Caused by Epidural Anesthesia: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Toki, Keiko; Yokose, Masashi; Miyashita, Tetsuya; Sato, Hitoshi; Fujimoto, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Sayoko; Goto, Takahisa

    2016-06-01

    Regional anesthesia, especially epidural anesthesia, rarely causes involuntary movement Here we present a case of a patient who demonstrated myoclonus-like involuntary movement of the lower limbs during continuous infusion of ropivacaine, fentanyl, and droperidol through the thoracic epidural catheter. This movement disappeared when the epidural infusion was stopped, but reappeared when the epidural infusion was restarted. Naloxone did not eliminate the movement The patient was thereafter discharged uneventfully. This case and other reports in the literature suggest that involuntary movement associated with regional anesthesia is rare and self-limiting. However, careful consideration should be given to exclude other, potentially dangerous complications. PMID:27483662

  14. Histopathological Alterations after Single Epidural Injection of Ropivacaine, Methylprednizolone Acetate, or Contrast Material in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Kitsou, Maria-Chrysanthi; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Kalimeris, Konstantinos; Vlachodimitropoulos, Demetrios; Soultanis, Konstantinos; Batistaki, Chrysanthi; Kelekis, Alexis

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The consequences from the injection of different types of drugs in the epidural space remains unknown. Increasing evidence suggests that localized inflammation, fibrosis, and arachnoiditis can complicate sequential epidural blockades, or even epidural contrast injection. We investigate the in vivo effect of epidural injections in the epidural space in an animal model. Materials and Methods: A group of ten male adult pigs, five punctures to each at distinct vertebral interspaces under general anesthesia, were examined, testing different drugs, used regularly in the epidural space (iopamidol, methylprednisolone acetate, ropivacaine). Each site was marked with a percutaneous hook wire marker. Histological analysis of the epidural space, the meninges, and the underlying spinal cord of the punctured sites along with staining for caspase-3 followed 20 days later. Results: The epidural space did not manifest adhesions or any other pathology, and the outer surface of the dura was not impaired in any specimen. The group that had the contrast media injection showed a higher inflammation response compared to the other groups (P = 0.001). Positive staining for caspase-3 was limited to <5% of neurons with all substances used. Conclusion: No proof of arachnoiditis and/or fibrosis was noted in the epidural space with the use of the above-described drugs. A higher inflammation rate was noted with the use of contrast media.

  15. Microbiological and physicochemical stability of fentanyl and sufentanil solutions for patient-controlled delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Chapalain-Pargade, Sophie; Laville, Isabelle; Paci, Angelo; Chachaty, Elisabeth; Mercier, Lionel; Bourget, Philippe

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the microbiological and physicochemical stability of opioid solutions containing fentanyl or sufentanil and thereby determine the feasibility of extending the expiration dates after mixing. Five systems containing fentanyl or sufentanil solutions at 50 microg/mL in portable patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) systems were filled and stored at room temperature for 14 days. They were sampled immediately after preparation, at day 3, and each day of the following weeks. Microbiological stability was assessed by performing sterility tests. The physicochemical study was performed by determining aspect, pH, and osmolality evolution. All samples were tested for appearance, change in color, and loss of concentration using an analytical method. There was no significant change in pH and osmolality values of any solutions. No precipitation or change in color was observed in any of the sample solutions. There was no significant loss of fentanyl or sufentanil over 14 days (4.3% and 4.1%, respectively). This study indicates that both drug solutions in the PCA systems are stable for a minimum of 14 days at room temperature. PMID:16824989

  16. Spontaneous spinal epidural hemorrhage from intense piano playing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Ju; Su, Fang Jy; Huang, Ying C; Chen, Shih-Han

    2014-06-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is a rare but real neurosurgical emergency. It is caused by atraumatic rupture of the vertebral epidural vein that results in nerve root or spinal cord compression. Most cases of SSEH have a multifactorial etiology, including congenital and acquired coagulopathies; platelet dysfunction; vascular malformation; tumors; uncontrolled hypertension; pregnancy; and, very rarely, activities requiring Valsalva. Herein we reported the case of a young pianist who was attacked by SSEH during piano practice. Playing the piano is a joyful, relaxing entertainment; however, this musical activity can be a highly demanding physical and mental exercise for pianists. Emotional and expressive performance, especially in professional performing, has been reported to result in significant increase of sympathetic and decrease of parasympathetic activities and thus influence the cardiorespiratory variables. The increased biomechanical stress from fluctuating hemodynamics was thought to trigger the rupture of her spinal arteriovenous malformation. PMID:24418452

  17. Transient bladder and fecal incontinence following epidural blood patch

    PubMed Central

    Palomero-Rodríguez, Miguel Angel; Palacio-Abinzada, Francisco J.; Campollo, Sara Chacón; Laporta-Báez, Yolanda; Mendez Cendón, Jose Carlos; López-García, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Epidural blood patch (EBP) is the currently accepted treatment of choice for postdural puncture headache because of its high initial success rates and infrequent complications. Many authors recommended a small volume (10-20 mL) of blood to be delivered for an effective EBP. Here, we report an obstetric patient who developed a transient bladder and fecal incontinence after 19 mL of blood EBP at L1 -L2 level. Since the magnetic resonance image did not demonstrate any definitive spinal cord lesion, the exact mechanism remains unclear. We suggest that accumulation of blood performed at L1 to L2 level in a closed relationship with the sacral cord, may have trigger a significant pressure elevation of the epidural space at this level, resulting in a temporal spinal cord-related injury in the sacral cord. PMID:26543470

  18. Cauda Equina Syndrome Caused by Idiopathic Epidural Lipomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Seong; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) is a rare condition that presents as a back pain with progressive neurologic symptoms. Most affected patients are obese and receiving steroid therapy, or have an endocrinopathies. We report a rare case of cauda equina syndrome caused by SEL in a non-obese healthy young man without any evident traumatic episode. A healthy 19-year-old man, who had experienced lower back pain for two months, visited our emergency room because of the sudden development of motor weakness and voiding difficulty. Lumbar magnetic resonance image revealed extradural fat compressing the cauda equina. Urgent decompression via posterior laminectomy and excision of excess epidural fat resulted in an immediate symptom improvement. PMID:26834816

  19. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Isolated to the Thoracic Epidural Spine.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Benjamin; Talbott, Jason; Uzelac, Alina; Rehani, Bhavya

    2015-11-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare benign histiocytic disease that infrequently presents in the spine. We report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease isolated to the epidural thoracic spine in a 26-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the 15th reported case of isolated spinal disease and only the fourth case of isolated thoracic epidural disease. Given its rarity as well as non-specific symptoms and imaging findings, Rosai-Dorfman disease is often not considered and misdiagnosed on imaging studies. To help improve awareness of Rosai-Dorfman spinal disease, we review the literature and discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment considerations for this condition. PMID:27252790

  20. Spontaneous spinal epidural hemorrhage from intense piano playing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Ju; Su, Fang Jy; Huang, Ying C; Chen, Shih-Han

    2014-06-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is a rare but real neurosurgical emergency. It is caused by atraumatic rupture of the vertebral epidural vein that results in nerve root or spinal cord compression. Most cases of SSEH have a multifactorial etiology, including congenital and acquired coagulopathies; platelet dysfunction; vascular malformation; tumors; uncontrolled hypertension; pregnancy; and, very rarely, activities requiring Valsalva. Herein we reported the case of a young pianist who was attacked by SSEH during piano practice. Playing the piano is a joyful, relaxing entertainment; however, this musical activity can be a highly demanding physical and mental exercise for pianists. Emotional and expressive performance, especially in professional performing, has been reported to result in significant increase of sympathetic and decrease of parasympathetic activities and thus influence the cardiorespiratory variables. The increased biomechanical stress from fluctuating hemodynamics was thought to trigger the rupture of her spinal arteriovenous malformation.

  1. Evaluation of intercostal cryoanalgesia versus conventional analgesia in postthoracotomy pain.

    PubMed

    Pastor, J; Morales, P; Cases, E; Cordero, P; Piqueras, A; Galán, G; París, F

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of cryoanalgesia in patients undergoing posterolateral thoracotomy. A double-blind randomized and prospective study was performed in 100 patients undergoing thoracotomy. They were randomized into two groups: Group A, 55 patients, who had undergone an intercostal cryoanalgesia and group B, control, 45 patients treated only with pharmacological analgesia ad libitum. In both groups we assessed pain in the first 7 postsurgical days, the amount of analgesia required, electromyography of the intercostal muscles involved and recording of maximal static respiratory pressures. Postsurgical pain was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in group A. No patient in group A needed major analgesia and the amount of aminopyrines required was significantly lower (p < 0.001) than those used in group B. Maximal static inspiratory pressure (PImax) showed no significant changes and no significant differences were found between the two groups. Maximal static expiratory pressure (PEmax) significantly decreased (p < 0.001) in the 1st and 2nd week and it was not related to the type of analgesia used. We advocate the use of cryoanalgesia since it significantly reduces pain as well as the doses of analgesia. PMID:8815972

  2. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum and epidural pneumatosis after oral ecstasy consumption.

    PubMed

    Clause, A L; Coche, E; Hantson, P; Jacquet, L M

    2014-04-01

    A 19-year-old man was admitted with acute dyspnoea. Physical examination revealed subcutaneous emphysema in the cervical and thoracic area. This was further confirmed by the total body computed tomography that also demonstrated mediastinal emphysema. Epidural pneumatosis of the thoracis spine was also evident. There was no history of trauma, but well of a recent oral ecstasy consumption during a techno rave party, associated with intense dancing and jumping. Clinical course was favourable with conservative therapy.

  3. Solitary Spinal Epidural Metastasis from Prostatic Small Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Solitary, spinal epidural metastasis (SEM) that is not related to vertebral metastasis is very rare. And solitary SEM from prostatic cancer is rarely found in previously published reports. However, it is clinically significant due to the possibility of neurologic dysfunction, and it can be assessed by MRI. In this report, we show a case of solitary SEM arising from prostatic small cell carcinoma detected by MRI. PMID:27413569

  4. Subdural Hematoma as a Consequence of Epidural Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Tracy M.; Elsayed, Kareem S.; Kane, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Regional spinal and epidural anesthesia are used commonly in operative procedures. While the most frequent complication, postdural puncture headache (PDPH), is a clinically diagnosed positional headache that is usually self-limited, subdural hemorrhage (SDH) is a potentially fatal complication that cannot be missed. We report a case of an otherwise healthy female who presented with persistent positional headache and was ultimately found to have a large subdural hematoma with midline shift requiring surgical evacuation. PMID:26697237

  5. Experimental Model of Intervertebral Disk Mediated Postoperative Epidural Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Larionov, Sergey N.; Sorokovikov, V.A.; Erdyneyev, K.C.; Lepekhova, S.A.; Goldberg, O.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative epidural fibrosis (EF) after lumbar discectomy is the most common and at the same time controversial issue. Purpose The etiology and pathogenesis creates a lot of discussion and selection of methods of treatment and prevention continues. Methods LIV laminectomy with dura mater (DM) exposition was done in 24 rats, and then, 0.3 ml of elements of suspension of autologous intervertebral disk was implicated on DM. As autologous intervertebral disk, we used the intervertebral disk from amputated tail. In all the animals, incisions were closed with 3/0 Vicryl. EF was examined. Fibroblast cell density was calculated in each field at ×40 magnification: Grade 1 - fewer than 100 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 2 - 100-150 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 3 - more than 150 fibroblasts in each field. Results Based on histological results, we confirmed our model of experiment. On the 30th day of evaluation, there were significant histological evidences of postoperative epidural adhesions in experimental animals, which included the obliteration of epidural space, the presence of adhesions in the dura and nerve roots, the restructuring of the yellow ligament, bone sclerosis, excessive appearance of fibrous tissue around the autologous intervertebral disk tissue that applied on the DM. Conclusion In our work, we describe a new experimental model, where the elements of autologous intervertebral disk play the role of inflammation trigger, which cause postoperative scar and EF. PMID:27647957

  6. Experimental Model of Intervertebral Disk Mediated Postoperative Epidural Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Larionov, Sergey N.; Sorokovikov, V.A.; Erdyneyev, K.C.; Lepekhova, S.A.; Goldberg, O.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative epidural fibrosis (EF) after lumbar discectomy is the most common and at the same time controversial issue. Purpose The etiology and pathogenesis creates a lot of discussion and selection of methods of treatment and prevention continues. Methods LIV laminectomy with dura mater (DM) exposition was done in 24 rats, and then, 0.3 ml of elements of suspension of autologous intervertebral disk was implicated on DM. As autologous intervertebral disk, we used the intervertebral disk from amputated tail. In all the animals, incisions were closed with 3/0 Vicryl. EF was examined. Fibroblast cell density was calculated in each field at ×40 magnification: Grade 1 - fewer than 100 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 2 - 100-150 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 3 - more than 150 fibroblasts in each field. Results Based on histological results, we confirmed our model of experiment. On the 30th day of evaluation, there were significant histological evidences of postoperative epidural adhesions in experimental animals, which included the obliteration of epidural space, the presence of adhesions in the dura and nerve roots, the restructuring of the yellow ligament, bone sclerosis, excessive appearance of fibrous tissue around the autologous intervertebral disk tissue that applied on the DM. Conclusion In our work, we describe a new experimental model, where the elements of autologous intervertebral disk play the role of inflammation trigger, which cause postoperative scar and EF.

  7. Efficacy of continuous epidural block in acute herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo Na; Kim, Dae Woo; Kim, Eung Don

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to investigate efficacy of continuous epidural block for prevent postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) progression in cases of acute herpes zoster with severe pain and also to identify predictive factors for PHN in such conditions. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of patients with herpes zoster who underwent continuous epidural block between March 2013 and October 2015. Time points were set as 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after zoster onset. PHN was defined as the presence of pain with NRS ≥3 at certain time points. The incidence of developing PHN was 38.1%, 27.0%, and 19.0% 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after zoster onset, respectively. Age and duration of catheterization were predictive factors for PHN at 1 month. Age, duration of catheterization, and NRS at first visit were identified as predictive factors for PHN at 3 months. Presence of diabetes, duration of catheterization, and NRS during catheterization were significant predictive factors for PHN at 6 months. The incidence of PHN is higher in zoster patients with severe pain that requires continuous epidural block compared to incidence in the general population. Advanced age and severe initial pain intensity were predictive factors of PHN development. Prolonged catheterization resulting from weak response to treatment strongly suggested progression to PHN. PMID:27512887

  8. Transient neurologic syndrome after spinal anesthesia with epidural steroid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cöcelli, L. Pirbudak; Erkutlu, Ibrahim; Karakurum, Gunhan; Avci, Neslihan; Gül, Rauf; Öner, Ünsal

    2009-01-01

    Background: Transient neurologic syndrome (TNS) is a rare complication of spinal and epidural anesthesia. It is defined as paradoxic postoperative back pain radiating to the lower extremities with no neurologic deficits. Because it is a self-limited disease, the treatment is usually symptomatic and consists of NSAIDs and injections of a neuromuscular-blocking drug at the trigger points. The syndrome may be resistant to this treatment regimen and may last for several months, resulting in a long convalescence. Case summary: A 63-year-old Turkish woman (height, 165 cm; weight, 71 kg) underwent hemorrhoidectomy in the jackknife position using spinal anesthesia. No adverse events occurred during puncture or surgery or in the immediate postoperative recovery period. Recovery from the sensory and motor block was normal. Twenty-four hours after surgery, lower limb and plantar pain developed with no sensory or motor deficit. Neurologic examination revealed normal motor and sensory function. Electroneuromyography showed partial denervation potential of muscles innervated by the left sciatic nerve. The symptoms were suggestive of TNS. Combination oral NSAID treatment with amitriptyline (25 mg/d) and gabapentin (1200 mg/d) was initiated. Because the pain still persisted 6 weeks after surgery, epidural steroid injection with triamcinolone acetate (80 mg) with isotonic saline was administered, resulting in definite pain relief (visual analog scale score = 0). Conclusions: Epidural steroid treatment was effective in this patient with TNS resistant to treatment with NSAIDs, amitriptyline, and gabapentin. Future studies are needed to evaluate this treatment. PMID:24683240

  9. [Technical difficulties in epidural blocks and spinal bleeding complications].

    PubMed

    Nava, S; Rossignoli, L; Tagariello, V; Bertini, L

    2001-12-01

    The clinical cases of two patients with neurological complications following neuroaxial blocks are reported. The events took place in different institutions where thousands of central blocks were yearly performed. In both instances the blocking procedures presented technical difficulties needing repeated lumbar punctures. The first case concerns a patient receiving anticoagulant and fibrinolytic therapy for vascular pathology. This 89 year-old female experienced severe cord compression requiring surgical decompression and laminectomy. The second case regards a patient with previous minor surgical procedure requiring postoperative antiinflammatory treatment. This 74 year-old male experienced subarachnoid hemorrhage and spinal/epidural hematoma as shown by NMR. The symptoms regressed with steroid therapy. The authors emphasise the risks of mechanical trauma of epidural or spinal anesthesia both during positioning or removal of an epidural catheter. The problem related to the compatibility between central blocks and antithrombotic/anticoagulant prophylaxis/therapy is now of primary concern and has led to publications about guide lines on this topic. If central block is carried out in patients with bleeding diathesis it is mandatory to co-ordinate multidisciplinary assistance for early detection of significant symptoms of the above described complications and subsequent treatment.

  10. NOP receptor mediates anti-analgesia induced by agonist-antagonist opioids.

    PubMed

    Gear, R W; Bogen, O; Ferrari, L F; Green, P G; Levine, J D

    2014-01-17

    Clinical studies have shown that agonist-antagonist opioid analgesics that produce their analgesic effect via action on the kappa-opioid receptor, produce a delayed-onset anti-analgesia in men but not women, an effect blocked by co-administration of a low dose of naloxone. We now report the same time-dependent anti-analgesia and its underlying mechanism in an animal model. Using the Randall-Selitto paw-withdrawal assay in male rats, we found that nalbuphine, pentazocine, and butorphanol each produced analgesia during the first hour followed by anti-analgesia starting at ∼90min after administration in males but not females, closely mimicking its clinical effects. As observed in humans, co-administration of nalbuphine with naloxone in a dose ratio of 12.5:1 blocked anti-analgesia but not analgesia. Administration of the highly selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 produced analgesia without subsequent anti-analgesia, and confirmed by the failure of the selective kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine to block nalbuphine-induced anti-analgesia, indicating that anti-analgesia is not mediated by kappa-opioid receptors. We therefore tested the role of other receptors in nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) and sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors were chosen on the basis of their known anti-analgesic effects and receptor binding studies. The selective NOP receptor antagonists, JTC801, and J-113397, but not the sigma receptor antagonist, BD 1047, antagonized nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Furthermore, the NOP receptor agonist NNC 63-0532 produced anti-analgesia with the same delay in onset observed with the three agonist-antagonists, but without producing preceding analgesia and this anti-analgesia was also blocked by naloxone. These results strongly support the suggestion that clinically used agonist-antagonists act at the NOP receptor to produce anti-analgesia. PMID:24188792

  11. CLASSICAL CONDITIONING AND PAIN: CONDITIONED ANALGESIA AND HYPERALGESIA

    PubMed Central

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity. PMID:24269884

  12. Liposomal extended-release bupivacaine for postsurgical analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, Mark; O’Brien, Michael J; Savoie, Felix H; You, Zongbing

    2013-01-01

    When physicians consider which analgesia to use postsurgery, the primary goal is to relieve pain with minimal adverse side effects. Bupivacaine, a commonly used analgesic, has been formulated into an aqueous suspension of multivesicular liposomes that provide long-lasting analgesia for up to 72 hours, while avoiding the adverse side effects of opioids. The increased efficacy of liposomal extended-release bupivacaine, compared to bupivacaine hydrochloride, has promoted its usage in a variety of surgeries including hemorrhoidectomy, bunionectomy, inguinal hernia repair, total knee arthroplasty, and augmentation mammoplasty. However, like other bupivacaine formulations, the liposomal extended-release bupivacaine does have some side effects. In this brief review, we provide an update of the current knowledge in the use of bupivacaine for postsurgical analgesia. PMID:24043932

  13. Liposomal extended-release bupivacaine for postsurgical analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Mark; O'Brien, Michael J; Savoie, Felix H; You, Zongbing

    2013-09-06

    When physicians consider which analgesia to use postsurgery, the primary goal is to relieve pain with minimal adverse side effects. Bupivacaine, a commonly used analgesic, has been formulated into an aqueous suspension of multivesicular liposomes that provide long-lasting analgesia for up to 72 hours, while avoiding the adverse side effects of opioids. The increased efficacy of liposomal extended-release bupivacaine, compared to bupivacaine hydrochloride, has promoted its usage in a variety of surgeries including hemorrhoidectomy, bunionectomy, inguinal hernia repair, total knee arthroplasty, and augmentation mammoplasty. However, like other bupivacaine formulations, the liposomal extended-release bupivacaine does have some side effects. In this brief review, we provide an update of the current knowledge in the use of bupivacaine for postsurgical analgesia.

  14. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by subanesthetic doses of pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L; Misra, A L

    1985-03-01

    Pentobarbital pretreatment reportedly either inhibits, enhances or has no effect on morphine analgesia. The effect of subanesthetic doses of sodium pentobarbital (8-12 mg kg-1, SC) delivered via a delivery system on analgesia of morphine (5 mg kg-1, SC or 1 mg kg-1, IV) acutely administered 45 min after the sodium pentobarbital pellet implantation was assessed using the warm water (55 degrees C)-induced tail-withdrawal reflex in male Wistar rats. Significant potentiation of morphine analgesia was observed in sodium pentobarbital as compared to the placebo-pelleted animals. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors were not involved in this potentiation, which was possibly due to the activation of the descending inhibitory control pathways of nociceptive spinal tail-withdrawal reflex by a combined interaction of two drugs at spinal and supraspinal sites of action, that mediate opiate antinociception. PMID:3991755

  15. Classical conditioning and pain: conditioned analgesia and hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A; Miller, Ralph R

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity.

  16. Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Promotes Postoperative Analgesia and Recovery in Patients after Abdominal Hysterectomy: a Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-Jian; Qi, Bin; Tang, Gang; Li, Jin-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Surgery-induced acute postoperative pain and stress response can lead to prolonged convalescence. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia and recovery following abdominal hysterectomy surgeries. Sixty-four patients scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia were divided into two groups that were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During surgery, patients in the PRD group had a lower bispectral index (BIS) value, which indicated a deeper anesthetic state, and a higher sedation score immediately after extubation than patients in the PRS group. During the first 24 hours post-surgery, PRD patients consumed less morphine with patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and had lower scores on a visual analogue scale (VAS) than their controls from the PRS group. The global 40-item quality of recovery questionnaire and 9-question fatigue severity score both showed higher recovery scores from day 3 after surgery in the PRD group. with the data are considered together, intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appeared to promote the analgesic properties of morphine-based PCA and to expedite recovery following surgery in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:26903197

  17. DHEA administration modulates stress-induced analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Cecconello, Ana Lúcia; Torres, Iraci L S; Oliveira, Carla; Zanini, Priscila; Niches, Gabriela; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia Marques

    2016-04-01

    An important aspect of adaptive stress response is the pain response suppression that occurs during or following stress exposure, which is often referred to as acute stress-induced analgesia. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) participates in the modulation of adaptive stress response, changing the HPA axis activity. The effect of DHEA on the HPA axis activity is dependent on the state and uses the same systems that participate in the regulation of acute stress-induced analgesia. The impact of DHEA on nociception has been studied; however, the effect of DHEA on stress-induced analgesia is not known. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of DHEA on stress-induced analgesia and determine the best time for hormone administration in relation to exposure to stressor stimulus. The animals were stressed by restraint for 1h in a single exposure and received treatment with DHEA by a single injection before the stress or a single injection after the stress. Nociception was assessed with a tail-flick apparatus. Serum corticosterone levels were measured. DHEA administered before exposure to stress prolonged the acute stress-induced analgesia. This effect was not observed when the DHEA was administered after the stress. DHEA treatment in non-stressed rats did not alter the nociceptive threshold, suggesting that the DHEA effect on nociception is state-dependent. The injection of DHEA had the same effect as exposure to acute stress, with both increasing the levels of corticosterone. In conclusion, acute treatment with DHEA mimics the response to acute stress indexed by an increase in activity of the HPA axis. The treatment with DHEA before stress exposure may facilitate adaptive stress response, prolonging acute stress-induced analgesia, which may be a therapeutic strategy of interest to clinics.

  18. DHEA administration modulates stress-induced analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Cecconello, Ana Lúcia; Torres, Iraci L S; Oliveira, Carla; Zanini, Priscila; Niches, Gabriela; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia Marques

    2016-04-01

    An important aspect of adaptive stress response is the pain response suppression that occurs during or following stress exposure, which is often referred to as acute stress-induced analgesia. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) participates in the modulation of adaptive stress response, changing the HPA axis activity. The effect of DHEA on the HPA axis activity is dependent on the state and uses the same systems that participate in the regulation of acute stress-induced analgesia. The impact of DHEA on nociception has been studied; however, the effect of DHEA on stress-induced analgesia is not known. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of DHEA on stress-induced analgesia and determine the best time for hormone administration in relation to exposure to stressor stimulus. The animals were stressed by restraint for 1h in a single exposure and received treatment with DHEA by a single injection before the stress or a single injection after the stress. Nociception was assessed with a tail-flick apparatus. Serum corticosterone levels were measured. DHEA administered before exposure to stress prolonged the acute stress-induced analgesia. This effect was not observed when the DHEA was administered after the stress. DHEA treatment in non-stressed rats did not alter the nociceptive threshold, suggesting that the DHEA effect on nociception is state-dependent. The injection of DHEA had the same effect as exposure to acute stress, with both increasing the levels of corticosterone. In conclusion, acute treatment with DHEA mimics the response to acute stress indexed by an increase in activity of the HPA axis. The treatment with DHEA before stress exposure may facilitate adaptive stress response, prolonging acute stress-induced analgesia, which may be a therapeutic strategy of interest to clinics. PMID:26852948

  19. Analgesia in Amphibians: Preclinical Studies and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Preclinical studies of analgesia in amphibians or recommendations for clinical use of analgesics in amphibian species are extremely limited. This article briefly reviews the issues surrounding the use of analgesics in amphibians starting with common definitions of pain and analgesia when applied to non-human animals. Nociceptive and endogenous opioid systems in amphibians are reviewed and results of preclinical research on opioid and non-opioid analgesics summarized. Recommended opioid and non-opioid analgesics are summarized and practical recommendations made for their clinical use. PMID:21074701

  20. Vaccum drainage system application in the management of operation-related non-regional epidural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidural intracranial hematoma is one of the most common complications of surgeries for intracranial tumors. The non-regional epidural hematoma is related to severe fluctuation of the intracranial pressure during the operation. The traditional management of hematoma evacuation through craniotomy is time-consuming and may aggravate intracranial pressure imbalance, which causes further complications. We designed a method using vaccum epidural drainage system, and tried to evaluate advantage and the disadvantage of this new technique. Methods Seven patients of intracranial tumors were selected. All of the patients received tumor resection and intra-operative non-regional epidural hematoma was confirmed through intra-operative ultrasound or CT scan. The vaccum drainage system was applied. Another ten patients who received craniotomy for intra-operative non-regional epidural hematoma evacuation were selected as comparison. Regular tests, like serial CT scan, were performed afterward to evaluate the effectiveness and to help deciding when to remove the drainage system. Results The vaccum drainage method was effective in epidual hemotoma clearance and prevented recurrent epidural hemorrhage. The drainage systems were removed within 4 days. All of the patients recovered well. No complications related to the drainage system were observed. Conclusions Compared to the traditional craniotomy, the new method of epidural hemoatoma management using vaccum epidural drainage system proved to be as effective in hematoma clearance, and was less-invasive and easier to perform, with less complication, shorter hospitalization, less economic burden, and better prognosis. PMID:23842198

  1. Epidural hematoma secondary to sinusitis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Aviner, Shraga; Olshinka, Noam; Cherniavsky, Evgenia; Forer, Boaz; Bibi, Haim

    2014-02-01

    Epidural hematoma is a potentially life threatening event that demands prompt diagnosis and surgical treatment, usually following head trauma. We present a case of a 9-year-old boy with no history of head trauma, and who was diagnosed with epidural hematoma secondary to frontal sinusitis; and the medical literature was reviewed. PMID:24370469

  2. Comparison of relative oxycodone consumption in surgical pleth index-guided analgesia versus conventional analgesia during sevoflurane anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Won, Young Ju; Lim, Byung Gun; Lee, So Hyun; Park, Sangwoo; Kim, Heezoo; Lee, Il Ok; Kong, Myoung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The surgical pleth index (SPI) is proposed for titration of analgesic drugs during general anesthesia. Several reports have investigated the effect of SPI on the consumption of opioids including remifentanil, fentanyl, and sufentanil during anesthesia, but there are no reports about oxycodone. We aimed to investigate intravenous oxycodone consumption between SPI-guided analgesia and conventional analgesia practices during sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Methods: Forty-five patients undergoing elective thyroidectomy were randomly assigned to an SPI group (SPI-guided analgesia group, n = 23) or a control group (conventional analgesia group, n = 22). Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane to achieve bispectral index values between 40 and 60. In the SPI group, oxycodone 1 mg was administered intravenously at SPI values over 50; in the control group, oxycodone 1 mg was administered intravenously at the occurrence of tachycardia or hypertension event. Intraoperative oxycodone consumption and extubation time were recorded. The number of hemodynamic and somatic movement events was recorded, as were postoperative pain and recovery scores. Results: Patients’ characteristics were comparable between the groups. Intraoperative oxycodone consumption in the SPI group was significantly lower than the control group (3.5 ± 2.4 vs 5.1 ± 2.4 mg; P = 0.012). Extubation time was significantly shorter in the SPI group (10.6 ± 3.5 vs 13.4 ± 4.6 min; P = 0.026). Hemodynamic and somatic movement events during anesthesia were comparable between the groups, as were numeric rating scales for pain and modified Aldrete scores at postanesthesia care unit. Conclusions: SPI-guided analgesia reduces intravenous oxycodone consumption and extubation time compared with conventional analgesia based on clinical parameters during sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. PMID:27583920

  3. Paraplegia following cervical epidural catheterization using loss of resistance technique with air: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyung Ream; Park, Hyung Bae; Kim, Chan; Nam, Si Gweon

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of paraplegia without neurologic deficit of upper extremities following cervical epidural catheterization using air during the loss of resistance technique. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome had upper and lower extremity pain. A thoracic epidural lead was inserted for a trial spinal cord stimulation for treating lower extremity pain and cervical epidural catheterization was performed for treating upper extremity pain. Rapidly progressive paraplegia developed six hours after cervical epidural catheterization. Spine CT revealed air entrapment in multiple thoracic intervertebral foraminal spaces and surrounding epidural space without obvious spinal cord compression before the decompressive operation, which disappeared one day after the decompressive operation. Her paraplegia symptoms were normalized immediately after the operation. The presumed cause of paraplegia was transient interruption of blood supply to the spinal cord through the segmental radiculomedullary arteries feeding the spinal cord at the thoracic level of the intervertebral foramen caused by the air.

  4. Mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia for clinical and experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Staud, Roland; Price, Donald D

    2006-05-01

    There is convincing evidence that acupuncture (AP) is effective for the treatment of postoperative and chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, as well as postoperative dental pain. Less convincing data support AP's efficacy for chronic pain conditions, including headache, fibromyalgia and low back pain. There is no evidence that AP is effective in treating addiction, insomnia, obesity, asthma or stroke deficits. AP seems to be efficacious for alleviating experimental pain by increasing pain thresholds in human subjects and it appears to activate analgesic brain mechanisms through the release of neurohumoral factors, some of which can be inhibited by the opioid antagonist naloxone. In contrast to placebo analgesia, AP-related pain relief takes some time to develop and to resolve. Furthermore, repetitive use of AP analgesia can result in tolerance that demonstrates cross-tolerance with morphine. However, it appears that not all forms of AP are equally effective for providing analgesia. In particular, electro-AP seems to best deliver stimuli that activate powerful opioid and nonopioid analgesic mechanisms. Thus, future carefully controlled clinical trials using adequate electro-AP may be able to provide the necessary evidence for relevant analgesia in chronic pain conditions, such as headache, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and low back pain. PMID:16734514

  5. Clinical effects of computed tomography-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, and translaminar epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Annalisa P; Girod, Maud; Peeters, Dominique; Sandersen, Charlotte; Couvreur, Thierry; Bolen, Géraldine

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine clinical effects of CT-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, and translaminar epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate in healthy dogs. ANIMALS 15 healthy Beagles. PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to 3 groups (5 dogs/group) and received a single CT-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, or translaminar epidural injection of methylprednisolone acetate (0.1 mg/kg). Contrast medium was injected prior to injection of methylprednisolone to verify needle placement. Neurologic examinations were performed 1, 3, 7, and 10 days after the injection. In dogs with neurologic abnormalities, a final neurologic examination was performed 24 days after the procedure. RESULTS Methylprednisolone injections were successfully performed in 14 of the 15 dogs. In 1 dog, vascular puncture occurred, and the methylprednisolone injection was not performed. No major or minor complications were identified during or immediately after the procedure, other than mild transient hyperthermia. During follow-up neurologic examinations, no motor, sensory, or postural deficits were identified, other than mild alterations in the patellar, withdrawal, cranial tibial, and perineal reflexes in some dogs. Overall, altered reflexes were observed in 11 of the 14 dogs, during 27 of 65 neurologic examinations. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that CT-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, and translaminar epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate were associated with few complications in healthy dogs. However, the number of dogs evaluated was small, and additional studies are needed to assess clinical efficacy and safety of these procedures. PMID:27668585

  6. Bionic epidural stimulation restores arterial pressure regulation during orthostasis.

    PubMed

    Yanagiya, Yusuke; Sato, Takayuki; Kawada, Toru; Inagaki, Masashi; Tatewaki, Teiji; Zheng, Can; Kamiya, Atsunori; Takaki, Hiroshi; Sugimachi, Masaru; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2004-09-01

    A bionic baroreflex system (BBS) is a computer-assisted intelligent feedback system to control arterial pressure (AP) for the treatment of baroreflex failure. To apply this system clinically, an appropriate efferent neural (sympathetic vasomotor) interface has to be explored. We examined whether the spinal cord is a candidate site for such interface. In six anesthetized and baroreflex-deafferentiated cats, a multielectrode catheter was inserted into the epidural space to deliver epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS). Stepwise changes in ESCS rate revealed a linear correlation between ESCS rate and AP for ESCS rates of 2 pulses/s and above (r2, 0.876-0.979; slope, 14.3 +/- 5.8 mmHg.pulses(-1).s; pressure axis intercept, 35.7 +/- 25.9 mmHg). Random changes in ESCS rate with a white noise sequence revealed dynamic transfer function of peripheral effectors. The transfer function resembled a second-order, low-pass filter with a lag time (gain, 16.7 +/- 8.3 mmHg.pulses(-1).s; natural frequency, 0.022 +/- 0.007 Hz; damping coefficient, 2.40 +/- 1.07; lag time, 1.06 +/- 0.41 s). On the basis of the transfer function, we designed an artificial vasomotor center to attenuate hypotension. We evaluated the performance of the BBS against hypotension induced by 60 degrees head-up tilt. In the cats with baroreflex failure, head-up tilt dropped AP by 37 +/- 5 mmHg in 5 s and 59 +/- 11 mmHg in 30 s. BBS with optimized feedback parameters attenuated hypotension to 21 +/- 2 mmHg in 5 s (P < 0.05) and 8 +/- 4 mmHg in 30 s (P < 0.05). These results indicate that ESCS-mediated BBS prevents orthostatic hypotension. Because epidural stimulation is a clinically feasible procedure, this BBS can be applied clinically to combat hypotension associated with various pathophysiologies.

  7. Effects of epidural-and-general anesthesia combined versus general anesthesia alone on the venous hemodynamics of the lower limb. A randomized study.

    PubMed

    Delis, Konstantinos T; Knaggs, Alison L; Mason, Peter; Macleod, Ken G

    2004-11-01

    Our hypothesis was that, due to its sympatholytic action, epidural anesthesia (EA) administered as part of anesthesia in abdominal surgery would generate a marked venous leg flow enhancement, thus aiding in the prevention of peroperative venous stasis. We studied, and comprehensively quantified the venous haemodynamic changes in the lower limb during and immediately after abdominal surgery performed under EA and general (GA) anesthesia combined, in comparison to GA alone. This is a prospective, randomized, controlled study, stratified for hypertension and smoking, comprising ASA 1-2 patients undergoing elective total abdominal hysterectomy. Those with peripheral vascular or chronic venous disease, prior DVT or BMI>35 were excluded. Eligible recruits received either GA (Group GA) (n = 10; age 36-65, median 50) alone or epidural anesthesia (EA) and GA combined (Group EA/GA) (n = 9; age 32-58, median 46). EA (L(1-2)) was administered using lignocaine 2%. Both groups had GA induced with fentanyl and propofol, maintained with N(2)O and isoflurane; larygoscopy was facilitated with vecuronium; analgesia was provided either with morphine (Group GA) or epidurally with 2% lignocaine boli (Group EA/GA). Hemodynamics were determined at the popliteal vein in the horizontal supine position at baseline (resting prior to anesthesia), post epidural (20 min after delivery of EA), post induction (15 min after laryngeal intubation), surgery (upon uterus removal) and recovery (30 min after extubation). There was no difference in the mean velocity[V(mean)] between the 2 groups at baseline (p = 0.35([Mann-Whitney])), and post induction (p = 0.5([Mann-Whitney])). However V(mean) was significantly higher in Group EA/GA than Group GA, both at surgery (point estimate[PE]: 1.8 cm/s; 95% CI: 0.01, 6.3 cm/s; p <0.05([Mann-Whitney])) and recovery (PE: 2.6 cm/s; 95% CI: 0.4, 5.1 cm/s; p = 0.02([Mann-Whitney])). Volume flow[V(Q)] was similar in the 2 groups at baseline and post induction (both, p

  8. Inflammation and Epidural-Related Maternal Fever: Proposed Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Pervez; David, Anna L; Fernando, Roshan; Ackland, Gareth L

    2016-05-01

    Intrapartum fever is associated with excessive maternal interventions as well as higher neonatal morbidity. Epidural-related maternal fever (ERMF) contributes to the development of intrapartum fever. The mechanism(s) for ERMF has remained elusive. Here, we consider how inflammatory mechanisms may be modulated by local anesthetic agents and their relevance to ERMF. We also critically reappraise the clinical data with regard to emerging concepts that explain how anesthetic drug-induced metabolic dysfunction, with or without activation of the inflammasome, might trigger the release of nonpathogenic, inflammatory molecules (danger-associated molecular patterns) likely to underlie ERMF.

  9. Epidural Tube: A Useful Device in Sialendoscopy Operations.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Fang, Wei; Chen, Ju-feng; Long, Xing

    2016-03-01

    Salivary endoscopy, which was first described in 1991, is a safe technique with few complications. The sialendoscopy operation has been developed and successfully offered as a minimally invasive and gland-preserving approach for the treatment of chronic obstructive sialadenitis. For many surgeons, entering the duct lumen of the salivary gland is the most difficult and time-consuming step of the sialendoscopy operation. This report introduces a timesaving and straightforward method for entering the duct lumen using an epidural tube, which is a plastic tube with a blunt tip. PMID:26433042

  10. Spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma mimicking acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Noor; Shahid, Muhammad; Haque, Munirul; Qureshi, Masood

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is an acute neurological emergency which carries significant morbidity unless diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion. Some cases of SSEH are idiopathic but there is a well-recognised association with deranged coagulation and abnormalities of clotting. In recent years there has been increasing availability of novel anti-platelet agents, often prescribed in the setting of suspected acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and following percutaneous coronary interventions and these agents also present an increased risk of SSEH. We present a case of SSEH following an acute presentation with chest pain and treatment with dual anti-platelet therapy. PMID:26807374

  11. Patient-Controlled Transdermal Fentanyl Versus Intravenous Morphine Pump After Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Emily M; Milligan, Kenneth; Farmer, Ryan; Burger, Evalina L; Patel, Vikas V

    2015-09-01

    Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) is regularly used to manage pain following major surgery. The fentanyl hydrochloride iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS) was developed to overcome some of the limitations of intravenous (IV) PCA. The small, self-adhesive, needle-free disposable system is applied to the skin on the upper arm or chest and is controlled by patients clicking a button on the device. The authors identified patients who were underwent spinal surgery from 2 prior multicenter, randomized studies and analyzed their data. Of the 1296 patients in the original trials, 170 underwent spine surgery procedures: 90 were randomized to the fentanyl ITS (40 mcg/activation) and 80 to IV PCA morphine (1 mg/dose). More patients treated with the fentanyl ITS rated their method of pain control as "excellent" across all time points, but differences did not reach statistical significance. However, investigators' ratings of "excellent" satisfaction with study treatment were significantly higher for the fentanyl ITS. Discontinuation rates and overall adverse event rates were similar between groups. The only significant difference was that patients treated with the fentanyl ITS had a higher rate of application site reactions than infusion site reactions in the IV PCA morphine group; the reactions were typically mild-to-moderate erythema that resolved shortly after removal of the fentanyl ITS device and did not require further treatment. Ratings of satisfaction with pain control method were consistently higher for the fentanyl ITS than the IV PCA morphine. The 2 groups had a similar safety profile. These results suggest that the fentanyl ITS appears to be a safe, efficacious alternative to IV PCA in spine surgery patients.

  12. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease.

  13. An Active Learning Algorithm for Control of Epidural Electrostimulation.

    PubMed

    Desautels, Thomas A; Choe, Jaehoon; Gad, Parag; Nandra, Mandheerej S; Roy, Roland R; Zhong, Hui; Tai, Yu-Chong; Edgerton, V Reggie; Burdick, Joel W

    2015-10-01

    Epidural electrostimulation has shown promise for spinal cord injury therapy. However, finding effective stimuli on the multi-electrode stimulating arrays employed requires a laborious manual search of a vast space for each patient. Widespread clinical application of these techniques would be greatly facilitated by an autonomous, algorithmic system which choses stimuli to simultaneously deliver effective therapy and explore this space. We propose a method based on GP-BUCB, a Gaussian process bandit algorithm. In n = 4 spinally transected rats, we implant epidural electrode arrays and examine the algorithm's performance in selecting bipolar stimuli to elicit specified muscle responses. These responses are compared with temporally interleaved intra-animal stimulus selections by a human expert. GP-BUCB successfully controlled the spinal electrostimulation preparation in 37 testing sessions, selecting 670 stimuli. These sessions included sustained autonomous operations (ten-session duration). Delivered performance with respect to the specified metric was as good as or better than that of the human expert. Despite receiving no information as to anatomically likely locations of effective stimuli, GP-BUCB also consistently discovered such a pattern. Further, GP-BUCB was able to extrapolate from previous sessions' results to make predictions about performance in new testing sessions, while remaining sufficiently flexible to capture temporal variability. These results provide validation for applying automated stimulus selection methods to the problem of spinal cord injury therapy.

  14. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease. PMID:26275629

  15. The distance from the skin to the epidural space in a Chinese patient population.

    PubMed

    Lau, H P

    1989-09-01

    The inter-relationship between age, height, weight and distance from the skin to the epidural space correlated with the patient's weight (r = 0.52, F = 23.96, P less than 0.001), and showed no correlation with patient's height (r = 0.18, F = 0.04, P greater than 0.05) or age (r = 0.13, F = 1.88, P greater than 0.05). The epidural space was found at a depth range of 3-7 cm, and 60% of patients had a depth of 4-5 cm. The results may be useful as a guideline for successful epidural blocks.

  16. Epidural pneumatosis associated with spontaneous pneumomediastinum: a rare complication of diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Healy, Mary-Louise; O'Shea, Donal; Crowley, Rachel K

    2016-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum and epidural pneumatosis are rare complications of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). These result from the emesis and hyperventilation associated with DKA which lead to alveolar rupture and air escape into the mediastinal and epidural spaces. These complications are often asymptomatic and resolve with the correction of the underlying metabolic abnormality. Oesophageal contrast studies are only required if oesophageal perforation is suspected in patients presenting with persistent vomiting and chest pain. We report the rare association of pneumomediastinum and epidural pneumatosis complicating DKA in a 19-year-old female patient. PMID:27451054

  17. Cervical epidural abscess: rare complication of bacterial endocarditis with streptococcus viridans: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Doh, Jae-Won

    2015-03-01

    Although many patients with infective endocarditis (IE) complain of joint, muscle, and back pain, infections at these sights are rare. The incidence of spinal abscess in cervical spine complicating endocarditis is very rare. Although the surgical management is the mainstay of treatment, conservative treatment can get success in selected patients. We report a patient with cervical epidural abscess due to Streptococcus viridans endocarditis. Both epidural abscess and IE were managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics for 8 weeks, with recovery. It is important to remind spinal epidural abscess can occur in those patients with bacterial endocarditis. PMID:25883665

  18. Pleasure-related analgesia activates opioid-insensitive circuits.

    PubMed

    Kut, Elvan; Candia, Victor; von Overbeck, Jan; Pok, Judit; Fink, Daniel; Folkers, Gerd

    2011-03-16

    Recent findings suggest that pain and pleasure share common neurochemical circuits, and studies in animals and humans show that opioid-mediated descending pathways can inhibit or facilitate pain. We explored the role of endogenous opioid neurotransmission in pleasure-related analgesia. μ-Opioidergic activity was blocked with 0.2 mg/kg naloxone to assess its effects on hedonic responses to pleasant emotional pictures (International Affective Picture System) and its modulating effects on heat pain tolerance. Naloxone did not alter subjective and autonomous reactions to pleasure induction or overall mood of participants. In addition, pleasure-related increases in pain tolerance persisted after reversal of endogenous μ-opioidergic neurotransmission. Subjective pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings increased after naloxone administration. These findings suggest that, in addition to opioid-sensitive circuits, mainly opioid-insensitive pain-modulating circuits are activated during pleasure-related analgesia. PMID:21411655

  19. CNS Animal fMRI imaging in Pain and Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino

    2010-01-01

    Animal imaging of brain systems offers exciting opportunities to better understand the neurobiology of pain and analgesia. Overall functional studies have lagged behind human studies as a result of technical issues including the use of anesthesia. Now that many of these issues have been overcome including the possibility of imaging awake animals, there are new opportunities to study whole brain systems neurobiology of acute and chronic pain as well as analgesic effects on brain systems de novo (using pharmacological MRI) or testing in animal models of pain. Understanding brain networks in these areas may provide new insights into translational science, and use neural networks as a “language of translation” between preclinical to clinical models. In this review we evaluate the role of functional and anatomical imaging in furthering our understanding in pain and analgesia. PMID:21126534

  20. Two opioid forms of stress analgesia: studies of tolerance and cross-tolerance.

    PubMed

    Terman, G W; Lewis, J W; Liebeskind, J C

    1986-03-12

    We have previously reported that stress analgesia sensitive to and insensitive to opiate antagonists can be differentially produced in rats by varying the severity or temporal pattern of inescapable footshock. In these studies, we give further evidence for the opioid and non-opioid bases of these paradigms of stress analgesia. We find that naloxone-sensitive analgesia demonstrates tolerance with repeated stress and cross-tolerance with morphine, whereas naloxone-insensitive analgesia demonstrates neither of these characteristics. Moreover, different forms of opioid, but not non-opioid, stress analgesia manifest cross-tolerance with each other. These data are discussed in terms of the similarities and differences between two forms of opioid stress analgesia.

  1. Stereospecific potentiation of opiate analgesia by cocaine: predominant role of noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1987-01-01

    Cocaine hydrochloride (50 mg) pellets implanted subcutaneously in male Wistar rats potentiated the analgesia of morphine, levorphanol, methadone and buprenorphine as measured by the tail-withdrawal test. Potentiated opiate analgesia was abolished by naloxone and further enhanced by desipramine and phenoxybenzamine. Yohimbine, alpha-methyl p-tyrosine, haloperidol, zimelidine, methysergide, p-chlorophenylalanine produced no significant effect on potentiated opiate analgesia. Pseudo-cocaine (dextro-cocaine), which is several-fold less potent than cocaine as an inhibitor of noradrenaline and dopamine reuptake in the CNS, had no significant effect on opiate analgesia. Analgesia produced by low doses of baclofen, a GABA agonist, was also not potentiated by cocaine. This study suggests a predominant role for noradrenaline in the stereospecific potentiation of opiate analgesia by cocaine. PMID:3822492

  2. Needle Tip Position and Bevel Direction Have No Effect in the Fluoroscopic Epidural Spreading Pattern in Caudal Epidural Injections: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Won Kyoung; Kim, Ah Na; Lee, Pil Moo; Park, Cheol Hwan; Kim, Jae Hun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Caudal epidural steroid injections (CESIs) are an effective treatment for pain. If the injection spreads in a specific pattern depending on the needle position or bevel direction, it would be possible to inject the agent into a specific and desired area. Objectives. We conducted a prospective randomized trial to determine if the needle position and bevel direction have any effect on the epidural spreading pattern in CESI. Methods. Demographic data of the patient were collected. During CESI, the needle position (middle or lateral) and direction (ventral or dorsal) were randomly allocated. Following fluoroscope-guided injection of 4 mL contrast media and 10 mL of injectates, the epidural spreading patterns (ventral or dorsal, bilateral or lateral) were imaged. Results. In the 210 CESIs performed, the needle tip position and bevel direction did not influence the epidural spreading patterns at L4-5 and L5-S1 disc levels. A history of Lumbar spine surgery was associated with a significantly limited spread to each disc level. A midline needle tip position was more effective than the lateral position in spreading to the distant disc levels. Conclusions. Neither the needle tip position nor the bevel direction affected the epidural drug spreading pattern during CESI. PMID:27445609

  3. Preemptive analgesia: the prevention of neurogenous orofacial pain.

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Chronic neurogenous pain is often an extremely difficult condition to manage. In the orofacial region, trauma from injury or dental procedures may lead to the development of severe neuralgic pains and major distress to the patient. Clinical and experimental evidence suggests that the use of adequate preemptive regional anesthesia, systemic analgesia, and the avoidance of repeated, painful stimuli may reduce the incidence of this problem. PMID:8934952

  4. [Preemptive analgesia for postoperative pain after frontotemporal craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Honnma, Toshimi; Imaizumi, Toshio; Chiba, Masahiko; Niwa, Jun

    2002-02-01

    Two thirds of patients suffer from moderate to severe pain after frontotemporal craniotomy. We think neurosurgeons must try to reduce the postoperative pain, which may induce postoperative hypertension, restlessness, and pathological pains. To investigate how preemptive analgesia effects postoperative pain, we assessed the pain in 20 consecutive patients who underwent neck clipping for non-ruptured cerebral aneurysms of anterior circulation systems by frontotemporal craniotomies. Ten patients underwent preemptive analgesia with four procedures (preemptive group) as follows, 1) oral administration of long-acting non-steroid anti inflammatory drug (NSAID, ampiroxicam) two hours before the surgical operation, 2) nerve blockades of the supra-orbital nerve and the infra-orbital nerve by bupivacaine, 3) local anesthesia of the scalp along the marker of a skin incision by xylocaine, 4) local anesthesia by bupivacaine along a skin incision after the skin closure. Ten patients of the control group underwent only procedure No. 3. Visual analog pain score (VAS) for postoperative pain 6, 12, and 24 hours, and 3, 5, 7, and 14 days after operation and NSAID administration for the pain were evaluated. Patients of the preemptive group had significantly less postoperative pain during the whole post-surgery period and required less administration of NSAID than the control group. Preemptive analgesia procedures No. 1, 2 and 4 reduced the postoperative pain and the total administration of NSAID. Postoperative pain may be reduced after other types of brain surgery, with proper nerve blocks like procedure No. 2, procedures No. 1, 3 and 4. PMID:11857941

  5. Design Plans for an Inexpensive Tail Flick Analgesia Meter

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Aaron; Butcher, Greg Q.; Messina, Troy C.

    2011-01-01

    While the pedagogical benefits of incorporating inquiry driven labs into an undergraduate curriculum are well established, often the prohibitive costs of providing equipment for such labs limits the types of experiences that can be offered. For example, the lab portion of Advanced Neuroscience at Centenary College of Louisiana consists of a semester-long research project developed by the students. Frequently, these junior- and senior-level students generate interesting research questions that must be culled or scaled back simply due to a lack of appropriate equipment. In the most recent iteration of the class, the students wanted to examine analgesia using the tail flick test, a measure of spinal nociception. In this test a rodent subject is restrained; its tail is exposed to a heat source; and the latency to flick its tail away from the noxious stimuli is recorded. As commercial devices were far beyond the lab budget, we sought to develop an inexpensive tail flick analgesia meter that was easy to use and generated reliable data. The prototype device was tested by students in the above-mentioned class and was found to consistently produce reliable data in agreement with the literature. Here we present plans for a tail flick analgesia meter that can be constructed for $50–75, roughly 100 times cheaper than commercial devices. PMID:23626497

  6. Multimodal analgesia versus traditional opiate based analgesia after cardiac surgery, a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate if an opiate sparing multimodal regimen of dexamethasone, gabapentin, ibuprofen and paracetamol had better analgesic effect, less side effects and was safe compared to a traditional morphine and paracetamol regimen after cardiac surgery. Methods Open-label, prospective randomized controlled trial. 180 patients undergoing cardiac procedures through median sternotomy, were included in the period march 2007- August 2009. 151 patients were available for analysis. Pain was assessed with the 11-numeric rating scale (11-NRS). Results Patients in the multimodal group demonstrated significantly lower average pain scores from the day of surgery throughout the third postoperative day. Extensive nausea and vomiting, was found in no patient in the multimodal group but in 13 patients in the morphine group, p < 0.001. Postoperative rise in individual creatinine levels demonstrated a non-significant rise in the multimodal group, 33.0±53.4 vs. 19.9±48.5, p = 0.133. Patients in the multimodal group suffered less major in-hospital events in crude numbers: myocardial infarction (MI) (1 vs. 2, p = 0.54), stroke (0 vs. 3, p = 0.075), dialysis (1 vs. 2, p = 0.54), and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding (0 vs. 1, p = 0.31). 30-day mortality was 1 vs. 2, p = 0.54. Conclusions In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, a multimodal regimen offered significantly better analgesia than a traditional opiate regimen. Nausea and vomiting complaints were significantly reduced. No safety issues were observed with the multimodal regimen. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01966172 PMID:24650125

  7. How I teach evidence-based epidural information in a hospital and keep my job.

    PubMed

    Tumblin, Ann

    2007-01-01

    A childbirth educator reveals her dilemma in teaching evidence-based practice in today's high-tech birth climate. She focuses on strategies to use when sharing epidural information with expectant parents. PMID:18769516

  8. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Cheddhi; Modrek, Aram S.; Bayin, N. Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Schiff, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes. PMID:27610254

  9. [Acute epidural hematoma with extravasation on cerebral angiogram in an infant (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Oseki, J; Oana, K; Kobayashi, T; Kawada, Y; Kanaya, H

    1977-03-01

    The authors recently operated on a boy four years of age with acute epidural hematoma showing an extravasation on the cerebral angiogram. The hematoma (hematoma volume 125 ml) was evacuated 7 hours after the head injury. The postoperative course was quite uneventful, and he was discharged a month after surgery without any neurologic deficits. The authors reviewed the literature and found 4 cases of acute epidural hematoma with extravasations in infants and children. In all cases the operative results were good. The age incidence and frequency of occurence overall for acute epidural hematomas, extravasations on cerebral angiograms and their mechanism, and the length of time from injury to operation were also discussed. It should be emphasized that, for acute epidural hematoma in infants and children, the early diagnosis and early surgery are essential to save the patients.

  10. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Bustoros, Mark; Thomas, Cheddhi; Frenster, Joshua; Modrek, Aram S; Bayin, N Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Rosen, Gerald; Schiff, Peter B; Placantonakis, Dimitris G

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes. PMID:27610254

  11. A missed Behçet’s case presenting with spontaneous epidural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Karataş, Levent; Mengi, Gönen; Özyemişçi-Taşkıran, Özden

    2015-01-01

    Spinal vascular events related to Behçet’s disease are relatively uncommon. Deep vein thrombosis is the most frequent vascular involvement. Anticoagulant therapy is a debated issue in Behçet’s disease. In this case report, we present a patient with a delayed diagnosis of Behçet’s disease after development of cervical epidural hematoma following anticoagulant therapy due to deep venous thrombosis. Anticoagulant therapy without immunosuppressive therapy leading to uncontrolled systemic inflammation may be the cause of spinal epidural hematoma. On the other hand, epidural vascular involvement as a vasculitic manifestation of Behçet’s disease in conjunction with anticoagulant therapy may have predisposed to spontaneous bleeding via increased fragility or microaneurysms in epidural arteries. In this case report, the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to Behçet’s disease is emphasized.

  12. Towards a realistic in vitro experience of epidural Tuohy needle insertion.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Neil; Dubey, Venketesh N; Wee, Michael Y K; Isaacs, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The amount of pressure exerted on the syringe and the depth of needle insertion are the two key factors for successfully carrying out epidural procedure. The force feedback from the syringe plunger is helpful in judging the loss of pressure, and the depth of the needle insertion is crucial in identifying when the needle is precisely placed in the epidural space. This article presents the development of two novel wireless devices to measure these parameters to precisely guide the needle placement in the epidural space. These techniques can be directly used on patients or implemented in a simulator for improving the safety of procedure. A pilot trial has been conducted to collect depth and pressure data with the devices on a porcine cadaver. These measurements are then combined to accurately configure a haptic device for creating a realistic in vitro experience of epidural needle insertion. PMID:23636758

  13. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Cheddhi; Modrek, Aram S.; Bayin, N. Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Schiff, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes.

  14. Body region shocked need not critically define the neurochemical basis of stress analgesia.

    PubMed

    Cannon, J T; Terman, G W; Lewis, J W; Liebeskind, J C

    1984-12-10

    Both opioid and non-opioid forms of stress-induced analgesia have been demonstrated in rats, although the conditions leading to their selective activation are still being investigated. We have shown that variations in shock intensity, duration or temporal pattern can determine whether opioid or non-opioid stress analgesia occurs. Others have suggested that body region shocked is the critical determinant, analgesia from front paw shock being opioid and that from hind paw shock non-opioid. We now report that either opioid or non-opioid stress analgesia can be evoked from either front or hind paws depending only on footshock intensity when duration and temporal pattern are held constant.

  15. Low dose combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia for caesarean section in a patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pirlet, M; Baird, M; Pryn, S; Jones-Ritson, M; Kinsella, S M

    2000-07-01

    A patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy was scheduled for elective caesarean section after stabilization on medical therapy. Wer performed a combined spinal epidural using one ml 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (5 mg) with 0.3 mg diamorphine for the spinal. The epidural was topped up with 10 mL bupivacaine 0.5%. Significant haemodynamic changes consisted of reduction in heart rate and hypotension after the spinal, and tachycardia after delivery. The benefits and risks of this approach are discussed.

  16. A sheared Racz catheter in cervical epidural space for thirty months: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jae Hyuk; Choi, Hoon; Kim, Jin Sung; Lee, Min Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous epidural neuroplasty may lead to complications such as hematoma, infection, epidural abscess, meningitis, hypotension, respiratory depression, urinary and fecal dysfunction, sexual dysfunction and paresthesia. Other technical complications may include shearing or tearing, misplacement, blockage and migration of the catheter. We report a case of a 41-year-old female patient, who underwent surgical removal of a sheared catheter, which was retained for 30 months after cervical Racz neuroplasty. PMID:25844142

  17. Computed tomographic epidurography: an aid to understanding deformation of the lumbar dural sac by epidural injections.

    PubMed

    Fukushige, T; Kano, T; Sano, T; Irie, M

    1999-09-01

    Local anaesthetics injected into the epidural space may deform the dural sac to a variable degree, thereby contributing to variability in the extent of the block. We investigated deformation of the lumbar dural sac after injection into the lumbar epidural space. The subjects were 26 patients with low-back pain who underwent lumbar epidurography and computed tomographic (CT) epidurography, of whom seven also underwent myelography and computed tomographic myelography. The epidural space was entered via the sacral hiatus in 24 patients and through the L5/S1 interspace in two patients. Ten millilitres of local anaesthetic was then injected into the epidural space followed by 20 mL of contrast medium. Computed tomographic epidurography was undertaken approximately 30-min after the epidural injection at the mid-vertebral and mid-discal levels from the first lumbar through to the first sacral vertebrae. The dural sac usually showed an oval or hexagonal shape on the transverse views at the first and second lumbar vertebral levels, and the shape of an inverted triangle below the level of the third lumbar vertebra. A median line of translucency was also observed on the posteroanterior epidurographic view in 25 of the 26 patients. This line was though to be a manifestation of the dural deformation to the inverted triangle. Dural sac deformation usually shows a specific pattern, although there are individual variations. Dural deformability is an important consideration in any analysis of the spread of epidural block or of the changes of epidural pressure after epidural injection of local anaesthetics. PMID:10549463

  18. Lumbar epidural catheter placement in the presence of low back tattoos: a review of the safety concerns.

    PubMed

    Welliver, Dawn; Welliver, Mark; Carroll, Tammy; James, Peggy

    2010-06-01

    Current fashion in body art includes low back tattoos of varying designs and colors, a trend that presents unique concerns for anesthesia providers. Does the placement of epidural catheters risk the introduction of tattoo pigment dyes into the epidural space through the process of coring? Are there specific risks associated with tattoo dyes and epidural needle placement? We performed a comprehensive review of the literature using multiple search databases with the intent to form guidelines for practice using a level of evidence taxonomy. The available evidence does not identify any specific risks associated with epidural catheter placement through low back tattoos, although tissue coring with tissue transport to deeper sites has been confirmed. Continued investigation is necessary before comprehensive practice guidelines regarding the practice of placing epidural needles and catheters through lumbar tattoos can be developed. We suggest avoidance of piercing tattoos when performing epidural punctures until there is sound evidence of short-term and long-term safety. PMID:20572405

  19. Lumbar epidural catheter placement in the presence of low back tattoos: a review of the safety concerns.

    PubMed

    Welliver, Dawn; Welliver, Mark; Carroll, Tammy; James, Peggy

    2010-06-01

    Current fashion in body art includes low back tattoos of varying designs and colors, a trend that presents unique concerns for anesthesia providers. Does the placement of epidural catheters risk the introduction of tattoo pigment dyes into the epidural space through the process of coring? Are there specific risks associated with tattoo dyes and epidural needle placement? We performed a comprehensive review of the literature using multiple search databases with the intent to form guidelines for practice using a level of evidence taxonomy. The available evidence does not identify any specific risks associated with epidural catheter placement through low back tattoos, although tissue coring with tissue transport to deeper sites has been confirmed. Continued investigation is necessary before comprehensive practice guidelines regarding the practice of placing epidural needles and catheters through lumbar tattoos can be developed. We suggest avoidance of piercing tattoos when performing epidural punctures until there is sound evidence of short-term and long-term safety.

  20. The pathogenesis of spinal epidural abscess: microangiographic studies in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Feldenzer, J A; McKeever, P E; Schaberg, D R; Campbell, J A; Hoff, J T

    1988-07-01

    An experimental model of spinal epidural abscess was developed in rabbits by injecting Staphylococcus aureus into the posterior thoracolumbar epidural space. This model has been shown to reproduce the neurological, bacteriological, and radiological aspects of the human disease. In this study, the effect of the infectious epidural mass on the vasculature of the spinal cord in paraplegic rabbits was studied using microangiographic techniques. The normal vascular anatomy of the rabbit spinal cord was defined in control experiments. Vascular proliferation was demonstrated in the epidural space surrounding the abscesses. Anterior and paired posterior spinal arteries remained patent in paraplegic rabbits with mild or moderate spinal cord compression and in some cases of severe compression. In animals with severe compression, the anterior epidural venous plexus remained patent, but the dorsal spinal vein was occluded. Occlusion of perforating arteries occurred only with extreme spinal cord compression. These data indicate that the initial neurological deficit associated with experimental spinal epidural abscess is not due to vascular thrombosis. PMID:2454302

  1. Spinal epidural abscess in a young girl without risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mantadakis, Elpis; Birbilis, Theodosios; Michailidis, Lambros; Souftas, Vasileios; Chatzimichael, Athanassios

    2011-07-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare infection associated with well-established risk factors mainly in adults. We describe an 11-year-old girl without any known risk factors who presented with fever and localized spinal tenderness in the lumbar area and was diagnosed with spinal MRI as suffering from a posterior SEA extending between T11 and L4. She was successfully managed with sequential intravenous and oral antibiotics along with minimally invasive surgery without laminectomy. Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was the responsible pathogen isolated at surgery. Immediate institution of antibiotics, spinal MRI, and well-timed neurosurgical consultation are mandatory for a favorable outcome in cases of SEA in children. PMID:21360025

  2. Fluoroscopy guided transforaminal epidural anesthesia in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Channabasappa, SM; Dharmappa, S; Pandurangi, R

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old male patient with a long-standing history of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) presented for ureteroscopic stone removal. On preoperative assessment, tracheal intubation was likely to be difficult due to decreased cervical spine mobility. Traditional neuraxial block was impossible due to the fusion of vertebral bodies. AS patients present the most serious array of intubation, which is secondary to decrease in cervical spine mobility and possible temporomandibular joint disease. Management of a case of AS can be very challenging when the airway and the central neuraxial blockade, both are difficult. Fluoroscopic assisted central neuraxial blockade may lead to predictable success in AS. We present a case report with severe AS where conventional techniques failed and C-arm assisted helped in successful epidural anesthesia for ureteroscopic stone removal. PMID:26955319

  3. [A Case of Spinal Epidural Hematoma Presenting with Transient Hemiplegia].

    PubMed

    Komai, Takanori; Nakashima, Kazuya; Tominaga, Takashi; Nogaki, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with spinal epidural hematoma who presented with transient hemiplegia. A 90-year-old man awakened from sleep due to sudden neck pain. Fifteen minutes later, the man experienced progressively worsening weakness in his left hand, and was transported in an ambulance to our hospital. At the hospital, he presented with hemiplegia, and we suspected intracranial disease. Therefore, we performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which revealed no intracranial lesions. Shortly after the MRI, the patient showed no signs of hemiplegia. However, since the severe neck pain persisted, we performed cervical MRI, which showed a high-intensity area at the C2-C5 level, predominantly on the left side. Despite recovery from hemiplegia, we performed a laminectomy of C3-C5 with evacuation of a hematoma at the C2-C6 level. After the surgery, the patient had no neck pain. PMID:27056873

  4. Catheter-Based Transepidural Approach to Cervical and Thoracic Posterior and Perineural Epidural Spaces: A Cadaveric Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Malik, Ahmed A.; Khan, Asif A.; Sohail, Amna; Saed, Aveen; Jadhav, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Approaching the cervical and high thoracic level epidural space through transepidural route from lumbar region represents a method to lower the occurrence of complications associated with direct approach. The authors performed a cadaveric pilot project to determine the feasibility of various catheter-based manipulation and cephalad advancement using the transepidural route. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Two cadavers were used to determine the following: 1. Ability to place a guide sheath over a guidewire using a percutaneous approach within the posterior lumbar epidural space; 2. The highest vertebral level catheter can be advanced within the posterior epidural space; 3. Ability to cross midline within the posterior epidural space; and 4. Ability to catheterize the perineural epidural sheaths of the nerve roots exiting at cervical and thoracic vertebral levels. RESULTS We were able to advance the catheters up to the level of cervical vertebral level of C2 within the posterior epidural space under fluoroscopic guidance from a sheath inserted via oblique parasagittal approach at the lumbar L4–L5 intervertebral space. We were able to cross midline within the posterior epidural space and catheterize multiple perineural epidural sheaths of the nerve roots exiting at cervical vertebral level of C2, C3, and C4 on ipsilateral or contralateral sides. We also catheterized multiple epidural sheaths that surround the nerve roots exiting at the thoracic vertebral level on ipsilateral or contralateral sides. CONCLUSIONS We were able to advance a catheter or microcatheter up to the cervical vertebral level within the posterior epidural space and catheterize the perineural epidural sheath of the nerve root exiting at cervical and thoracic vertebral levels. Such observations support further exploration of percutaneous catheter based transepidural approach to cervical and thoracic dorsal epidural spaces for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26060530

  5. Rectus sheath block for postoperative analgesia in patients with mesenteric vascular occlusion undergoing laparotomy: A randomized single-blinded study

    PubMed Central

    Elbahrawy, Khaled; El-Deeb, Alaa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute mesenteric ischemia is a life-threatening vascular emergency that requires early diagnosis, immediate anticoagulation, and intervention to restore mesenteric blood flow adequately. Aims: To investigate the effect of rectus sheath block (RSB) for postoperative analgesia in patients with mesenteric vascular occlusion. Settings and Design: Forty patients with mesenteric vascular occlusion, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II or III, scheduled for laparotomy were enrolled in this study. Subjects and Methods: Patients were randomized into two groups; control group (C Group) and rectus block group (RB Group). In both groups, general anesthesia was induced fentanyl 1 μg/kg with sleeping dose of propofol and 0.15 mg/kg cisatracurium. Then, anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane in oxygen 100%. In RB Group, under aseptic condition, RSB guided by ultrasound was performed. Surgery is then continued and intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia pump started. Postoperative pain, sedation, and opioid side effects were assessed. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 19.0, Chicago, IL, USA). Results: Patients in the RB Group consumed statistically significant less opioid in comparison to control group either intraoperatively or postoperatively. Mean pain scores were statistically significant less in RB Group than in the control group at 2, 4, and 6 h postoperatively. Sedation score, incidence of nausea and vomiting were statistically significant less in the RB Group in comparison to control group. More patients’ satisfaction was reported in the RB Group. Conclusions: Ultrasound-guided RSB resulted in postoperative reduction of pain scores and opioid consumption compared with general anesthesia alone. Moreover, RSB was associated with better patient satisfaction and less nausea and vomiting. PMID:27746544

  6. Delayed Presentation of a Cervical Spinal Epidural Abscess of Dental Origin after a Fall in an Elderly Patient

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Margaret; Chin, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscesses are an uncommon cause of spinal cord injury but, depending on the size and presence of neurological deficits, urgent neurosurgical intervention may be required. We present a unique case of a patient presenting with a spinal epidural collection several days after a fall. While a spinal epidural hematoma was suspected based on the patient’s history and MRI findings, a spinal epidural abscess was found during surgery. The patient underwent laminectomy and instrumented fusion with successful treatment of her infection. PMID:27382529

  7. Significance of neuronal cytochrome P450 activity in opioid-mediated stress-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Hough, Lindsay B; Nalwalk, Julia W; Yang, Weizhu; Ding, Xinxin

    2014-08-26

    Stressful environmental changes can suppress nociceptive transmission, a phenomenon known as "stress-induced analgesia". Depending on the stressor and the subject, opioid or non-opioid mechanisms are activated. Brain μ opioid receptors mediate analgesia evoked either by exogenous agents (e.g. morphine), or by the release of endogenous opioids following stressful procedures. Recent work with morphine and neuronal cytochrome P450 (P450)-deficient mice proposed a signal transduction role for P450 enzymes in µ analgesia. Since µ opioid receptors also mediate some forms of stress-induced analgesia, the present studies assessed the significance of brain P450 activity in opioid-mediated stress-induced analgesia. Two widely-used models of opioid stress-induced analgesia (restraint and warm water swim) were studied in both sexes of wild-type control and P450-deficient (Null) mice. In control mice, both stressors evoked moderate analgesic responses which were blocked by pretreatment with the opioid antagonist naltrexone, confirming the opioid nature of these responses. Consistent with literature, sex differences (control female>control male) were seen in swim-induced, but not restraint-induced, analgesia. Null mice showed differential responses to the two stress paradigms. As compared with control subjects, Null mice showed highly attenuated restraint-induced analgesia, showing a critical role for neuronal P450s in this response. However, warm water swim-induced analgesia was unchanged in Null vs. control mice. Additional control experiments confirmed the absence of morphine analgesia in Null mice. These results are the first to show that some forms of opioid-mediated stress-induced analgesia require brain neuronal P450 activity.

  8. Dexmedetomidine infusion for analgesia up to 48 hours after lung surgery performed by lateral thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Kate B.; Leeper, Barbara; Hamman, Baron L.; Hebeler, Robert F.; Henry, A. Carl; Kourlis, Harry; Wood, Richard E.; Stecher, Jack A.; Hein, H. A. Tillmann

    2014-01-01

    Patients undergoing a lateral thoracotomy for pulmonary resection have moderate to severe pain postoperatively that is often treated with opioids. Opioid side effects such as respiratory depression can be devastating in patients with already compromised respiratory function. This prospective double-blinded clinical trial examined the analgesic effects and safety of a dexmedetomidine infusion for postthoracotomy patients when administered on a telemetry nursing floor, 24 to 48 hours after surgery, to determine if the drug's known early opioid-sparing properties were maintained. Thirty-eight thoracotomy patients were administered dexmedetomidine intraoperatively and overnight postoperatively and then randomized to receive placebo or dexmedetomidine titrated from 0.1 to 0.5 μg·kg·h−1 the day following surgery for up to 24 hours on a telemetry floor. Opioids via a patient-controlled analgesia pump were available for both groups, and vital signs including transcutaneous carbon dioxide, pulse oximetry, respiratory rate, and pain and sedation scores were monitored. The dexmedetomidine group used 41% less opioids but achieved pain scores equal to those of the placebo group. The mean heart rate and systolic blood pressure were lower in the dexmedetomidine group but sedation scores were better. The mean respiratory rate and oxygen saturation were similar in the two groups. Mild hypercarbia occurred in both groups, but periods of significant respiratory depression were noted only in the placebo group. Significant hypotension was noted in one patient in the dexmedetomidine group in conjunction with concomitant administration of a beta-blocker agent. The placebo group reported a higher number of opioid-related adverse events. In conclusion, the known opioid-sparing properties of dexmedetomidine in the immediate postoperative period are maintained over 48 hours. PMID:24381392

  9. Involvement of calmodulin inhibition in analgesia induced with low doses of intrathecal trifluoperazine.

    PubMed

    Golbidi, Saeid; Moriuchi, Hiroshi; Irie, Tetsumi; Ghafghazi, Taghi; Hajhashemi, Valiollahe

    2002-02-01

    We examined which of the known properties of trifluoperazine, including calmodulin inhibition, are involved in its analgesic effect. Furthermore, we tried to find any possible interaction between opioidergic system and calmodulin inhibition-induced analgesia. Intrathecal trifluoperazine (1, 10, 100 microg) showed a biphasic effect in the formalin test; i.e., analgesia at relatively low doses (1, 10 microg) and hyperalgesia at a high dose (100 microg). No analgesic effects were observed after intrathecal injection of sulpiride (1, 10, 100 microg), atropine (0.1, 1, 10 microg), phentolamine (0.1, 1, 10 microg) and brompheniramine (0.1, 1, 10 microg). Meanwhile, intrathecal calmidazolium (10, 50, 250 microg) induced a dose-dependent analgesia. Histamine (1 microg), physostigmine (1 microg), bromocriptine (1 microg) and norepinephrine (1 microg) did not affect trifluoperazine-induced analgesia. Calcium (20 microg) attenuated the antinociceptive effect of trifluoperazine and inhibited the analgesic effect of calmidazolium. Finally, naloxone (2 mg/kg) decreased trifluoperazine-induced antinociception but did not have any effects on calmidazolium-induced analgesia. We concluded that calmodulin inhibition may be involved in the analgesia produced by trifluoperazine. With increasing doses of trifluoperazine, the algesic effect seems to overcome the analgesic effect. It is also suggested that the opioidergic system does not interact with calmodulin inhibition-induced analgesia even though this system has a possible role in trifluoperazine-induced analgesia.

  10. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  13. Subcutaneous L-tyrosine elicits cutaneous analgesia in response to local skin pinprick in rats.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Wen; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of the study was to estimate the ability of L-tyrosine to induce cutaneous analgesia and to investigate the interaction between L-tyrosine and the local anesthetic lidocaine. After subcutaneously injecting the rats with L-tyrosine and lidocaine in a dose-dependent manner, cutaneous analgesia (by blocking the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex-CTMR) was evaluated in response to the local pinprick. The drug-drug interaction was analyzed by using an isobolographic method. We showed that both L-tyrosine and lidocaine produced dose-dependent cutaneous analgesia. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the rank of drug potency was lidocaine (5.09 [4.88-5.38] μmol)>L-tyrosine (39.1 [36.5-41.8] μmol) (P<0.05). At the equipotent doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75), the duration of cutaneous analgesia caused by L-tyrosine lasted longer than that caused by lidocaine (P<0.01). Lidocaine co-administered with L-tyrosine exhibited an additive effect on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Our pre-clinical study demonstrated that L-tyrosine elicits the local/cutaneous analgesia, and the interaction between L-tyrosine and lidocaine is additive. L-tyrosine has a lower potency but much greater duration of cutaneous analgesia than lidocaine. Adding L-tyrosine to lidocaine preparations showed greater duration of cutaneous analgesia compared with lidocaine alone. PMID:26376025

  14. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  16. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided epidural access at the lumbo-sacral space in dogs.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Annalisa; Busoni, Valeria; Carrozzo, Maria Valentina; Sandersen, Charlotte; Gabriel, Annick; Bolen, Géraldine

    2015-01-01

    Epidural injections are commonly performed blindly in veterinary medicine. The aims of this study were to describe the lumbosacral ultrasonographic anatomy and to assess the feasibility of an ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique in dogs. A cross sectional anatomic atlas of the lumbosacral region and ex vivo ultrasound images were obtained in two cadavers to describe the ultrasound anatomy and to identify the landmarks. Sixteen normal weight canine cadavers were used to establish two variations of the technique for direct ultrasound-guided injection, using spinal needles or epidural catheters. The technique was finally performed in two normal weight cadavers, in two overweight cadavers and in five live dogs with radiographic abnormalities resulting of the lumbosacral spine. Contrast medium was injected and CT was used to assess the success of the injection. The anatomic landmarks to carry out the procedure were the seventh lumbar vertebra, the iliac wings, and the first sacral vertebra. The target for directing the needle was the trapezoid-shaped echogenic zone between the contiguous articular facets of the lumbosacral vertebral canal visualized in a parasagittal plane. The spinal needle or epidural catheter was inserted in a 45° craniodorsal-caudoventral direction through the subcutaneous tissue and the interarcuate ligament until reaching the epidural space. CT examination confirmed the presence of contrast medium in the epidural space in 25/25 dogs, although a variable contamination of the subarachnoid space was also noted. Findings indicated that this ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique is feasible for normal weight and overweight dogs, with and without radiographic abnormalities of the spine.

  17. Comparison of Transforaminal and Parasagittal Epidural Steroid Injections in Patients With Radicular Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Seyed Masoud; Aryani, Mohamad Reza; Momenzadeh, Sirus; Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Mohseni, Gholamreza; Mohajerani, Seyed Amir; Esmilijah, Ali Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epidural steroid injection (ESI), including transforaminal (TF) epidural injections and interlaminar (IL) epidural steroid injections are commonly performed procedures for the management of lumbosacral radicular pain. Parasagittal interlaminar (PIL) approach could enable higher ventral epidural spread, with fewer complications than TF. Objectives: This study aims to compare the effectiveness of PIL and TF ESI in relieving the pain and disability of patients with lumbosacral pain. Patients and Methods: This prospective study enrolled 64 patients, aged between 18 to 75 years, with a diagnosis of low back pain and unilateral lumbosacral radicular pain. The patients were randomized to receive fluoroscopically guided epidural injection, through either the PIL or TF approach. Patients were evaluated for effective pain relief [numerical rating scale (NRS) < 3] by 0 - 10 numeric rating scale (NRS) and functional improvement by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results: Effective pain relief [numeric rating scale (NRS) < 3] was observed in 77.3% (95% CI: 67‒90.5%) of patients in PIL group and 74.2% (95% CI: 62.4 - 89.4%) of patients in the TF group (P = 0.34), at 4 weeks. Mean NRS score was not significantly different between the PIL group compared to the TF group, at 4 weeks (P = 0.19). Number of patients with improved disability (measured by ODI < 20%) was not significantly different in PIL group (78% of cases) compared to the TF group (76% of cases), at 4 weeks (P = 0.21). There were no adverse effects observed in any of our patients. Conclusions: The PIL epidural injection is as effective as TF epidural injection in improving pain and functional status, in patients with chronic lumbosacral low back pain, due to disc degeneration. PMID:26587400

  18. Efficacy of Intravenous Infusion of Acetaminophen for Intrapartum Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Zutshi, Vijay; Rani, Kumari Usha; Patel, Madhumita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The intensity of pain experienced by women in labour, has been found to affect the progress of labour, foetal well-being and maternal psychology. Adverse effects associated with commonly used opioids for providing intrapartum analgesia have created a need for an alternative non-opioid drug. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of an intravenous infusion of 1000 mg of acetaminophen as an intrapartum analgesic. Materials and Methods The present prospective single-centre, single blind, placebo-controlled randomized interventional study was conducted in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Vardhaman Mahavir Medical College & Safdarjung Hospital over a period of six months from September 2014 to March 2015. After receiving the ethical clearance and written informed consent. The first 200 consecutive parturients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were recruited into the study. Women were then randomised to receive either intravenous 1000 mg (100ml) of acetaminophen (Group A, n=100) or 100 ml normal saline (Group B, n=100). Primary outcome assessed was effectiveness of acetaminophen to provide an adequate amount of analgesia, as measured by a change in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain intensity score at various times after drug administration. Secondary outcomes measured were duration of labour, need for additional rescue analgesia and presence of adverse maternal or foetal effect. Results There was pain reduction at 1 and 2 hours in both groups (p<0.001). However, it was more significant in the acetaminophen group, especially at 1 hour. Duration of labour was shortened in both the groups, without any maternal and foetal adverse effects. Conclusion Intravenous acetaminophen is an efficacious non-opioid drug for relieving labour pain without any significant maternal and foetal adverse effects. PMID:27656511

  19. The elusive rat model of conditioned placebo analgesia.

    PubMed

    McNabb, Christopher T; White, Michelle M; Harris, Amber L; Fuchs, Perry N

    2014-10-01

    Recent research on human placebo analgesia has suggested the need for rodent models to further elucidate the neural substrates of the placebo effect. This series of 3 experiments therefore was performed in an attempt to develop a model of placebo analgesia in rats. In each study, female Sprague-Dawley rats received an L5 spinal nerve ligation to induce a neuropathic pain condition. Each rat then underwent a 4-day conditioning procedure in which an active analgesic drug or its vehicle (unconditioned stimulus) was associated with the following cues (conditioned stimuli): novel testing room (environmental), vanilla scent cue (olfactory), dim incandescent lighting (visual), restraint procedure/injection (tactile), and time of day and injection-test latency (temporal). The analgesics for each experiment were as follows: Experiment 1 used 90 mg/kg gabapentin, experiment 2 used 3mg/kg loperamide hydrochloride, and experiment 3 used 6 mg/kg morphine sulfate. On the following test day, half of the animals received the opposite treatment, resulting in 4 conditioning manipulations: drug/drug, drug/vehicle, vehicle/drug, and vehicle/vehicle. Nociceptive thresholds were assessed with the mechanical paw withdrawal threshold test each day after the conditioning procedure. In all 3 experiments, no significant differences were detected on test day between control and placebo groups, indicating a lack of a conditioned placebo analgesic response. Our results contrast with prior research that implies the existence of a reliable and robust response to placebo treatment. We conclude that placebo analgesia in rats is not particularly robust and that it is difficult to achieve using conventional procedures and proper experimental design. PMID:25026214

  20. Doubtful effect of continuous intraarticular analgesia after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdulemir; Sundberg, Martin; Hansson, Ulrik; Malmvik, Johan; Flivik, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Local infiltration analgesia (LIA) is well established for effective postoperative pain relief in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). To prolong the effect of LIA, infusion pumps with local intraarticular analgesia can be used. We evaluated the effect of such an infusion pump for the first 48 h postoperatively regarding pain, knee function, length of stay (LOS) in hospital, and complications. Patients and methods 200 patients received peroperative LIA and a continuous intraarticular elastomeric infusion pump set at 2 mL/h. The patients were randomized either to ropivacaine (7.5 mg/mL) or to NaCl (9 mg/mL) in the pump. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain (0–100 mm), analgesic consumption, side effects of medicine, range of motion (ROM), leg-raising ability, LOS, and complications during the first 3 months were recorded. Results On the first postoperative day, the ropivacaine group had lower VAS pain (33 vs. 40 at 12 noon and 36 vs. 43 at 8 p.m.; p = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively), but after that all recorded variables were similar between the groups. During the first 3 months, the ropivacaine group had a greater number of superficial and deep surgical wound infections (11 patients vs. 2 patients, p = 0.02). There were no other statistically significant differences between the groups. Interpretation Continuous intraarticular analgesia (CIAA) with ropivacaine after TKA has no relevant clinical effect on VAS pain and does not affect LOS, analgesic consumption, ROM, or leg-raising ability. There may, however, be a higher risk of wound-healing complications including deep infections. PMID:25428755

  1. Butorphanol in labour analgesia: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Ajay; Agarwal, Rachana

    2013-01-01

    Objective Parenteral opioids can be administered with ease at a very low cost with high efficacy as labour analgesia. However, there are insufficient data available to accept the benefits of parenteral opioids over other proven methods of labour analgesia. Butorphanol, a new synthetic opioid, has emerged as a promising agent in terms of efficacy and a better safety profile. This study investigates the effect of butorphanol as a labour analgesia to gather further evidence of its safety and efficacy to pave the way for its widespread use in low resource settings. Material and Methods One hundred low risk term consenting pregnant women were recruited to take part in a prospective cohort study. Intramuscular injections of butorphanol tartrate 1 mg (Butrum 1/2mg, Aristo, Mumbai, India) were given in the active phase of labour and repeated two hourly. Pain relief was noted on a 10-point visual pain analogue scale (VPAS). Obstetric and neonatal outcome measures were mode of delivery, duration of labour, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit admissions. Collected data were analysed for statistically significant pain relief between pre- and post-administration VPAS scores and also for the incidence of adverse outcomes. Results Pain started to decrease significantly within 15 minutes of administration and reached the nadir (3.08 SD0.51) at the end of two hours. The pain remained below four on the VPAS until the end of six hours and was still significantly low after eight hours. The incidence of adverse outcomes was low in the present study. Conclusion Butorphanol is an effective parenteral opioid analgesic which can be administered with reasonable safety for the mother and the neonate. The study has the drawback of lack of control and small sample size. PMID:24592110

  2. Intravenous Dexmedetomidine Promotes Spinal Bupivacaine Anesthesia and Postoperative Analgesia in Lower Limb Surgery: A Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical CONSORT Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Ming; Zhang, Sai-Yu; Fu, Min; Zhang, Si-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dexmedetomidine (DEX) has been reported to have synergistic action with local anesthetics. This prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical study was designed to observe the efficacy of intravenous DEX without loading dose on spinal blockade duration, postoperative sedation, patient-controlled analgesia and its morphine-sparing effect in lower limb surgeries. Seventy-five patients, scheduled for lower limb surgery under spinal anesthesia, were randomly allocated into 2 groups: group BS (received 15 mg of 0.5% of bupivacaine for subarachnoid anesthesia and continuous intravenous infusion of saline in Ringer solution) and BD group (received 15 mg of 0.5% of bupivacaine for subarachnoid anesthesia and continuous intravenous infusion of DEX in Ringer solution at a rate of 0.25 μg/kg/h). Intravenous infusion started 15 minutes before spinal anesthesia. The onset time of sensory and motor blockade was shorten, the duration of sensory and motor blockade was significantly prolonged in BD patients when compared to BS patients. The Ramsay sedation score measured immediately after surgery was greater in BD group than BS group. BD patients also shown increased time to the first request of postoperative morphine and decreased total morphine consumption as compared with BS patients. Collectively, intravenous administration of DEX without loading dose promoted the efficacy of spinal bupivacaine anesthesia and postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing lower limb surgery. PMID:26937924

  3. Imaging-guided hyperstimulation analgesia in low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gorenberg, Miguel; Schwartz, Kobi

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain in patients with myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by painful active myofascial trigger points (ATPs) in muscles. This article reviews a novel, noninvasive modality that combines simultaneous imaging and treatment, thus taking advantage of the electrodermal information available from imaged ATPs to deliver localized neurostimulation, to stimulate peripheral nerve endings (Aδ fibers) and in turn, to release endogenous endorphins. "Hyperstimulation analgesia" with localized, intense, low-rate electrical pulses applied to painful ATPs was found to be effective in 95% patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain, in a clinical validation study.

  4. Imaging-guided hyperstimulation analgesia in low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gorenberg, Miguel; Schwartz, Kobi

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain in patients with myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by painful active myofascial trigger points (ATPs) in muscles. This article reviews a novel, noninvasive modality that combines simultaneous imaging and treatment, thus taking advantage of the electrodermal information available from imaged ATPs to deliver localized neurostimulation, to stimulate peripheral nerve endings (Aδ fibers) and in turn, to release endogenous endorphins. "Hyperstimulation analgesia" with localized, intense, low-rate electrical pulses applied to painful ATPs was found to be effective in 95% patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain, in a clinical validation study. PMID:23847430

  5. Regional anaesthesia and analgesia on the front line.

    PubMed

    Scott, D M

    2009-11-01

    Deployment to a combat zone with the military poses many challenges to the anaesthetist. One of these challenges is the safe, rapid and comfortable initial wound management and repatriation of wounded combat soldiers to their home country or tertiary treatment facility for definitive care and rehabilitation. The current conflict in Afghanistan is associated with injury patterns that differ from wars such as Vietnam or Korea. This report describes the experience of an Australian military anaesthetist and the value of regional anaesthesia and analgesia for the care of the wounded combat soldier

  6. Stress antagonizes morphine-induced analgesia in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Shannon, L.; Heybach, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Exposure to restraint stress resulted in antagonism of the analgesic effect of administered morphine in adult male rats. This antagonism of morphine-induced analgesia by restraint stress was not affected by adrenalectomy one day prior to testing, suggesting that stress-induced secretion of corticosteroids is not critical to this antagonism. In addition, parenteral administration of exogenous adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) mimicked the effect of stress in antagonizing morphine's analgesic efficacy. The hypothesis that ACTH is an endogenous opiate antagonist involved in modulating pain sensitivity is supported.

  7. Intravenous regional analgesia in a patient with Glanzmann thrombastenia.

    PubMed

    Goksu, Sitki; Gul, Rauf; Ozen, Onder; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Buyukbebeci, Orhan; Oner, Unsal

    2010-02-01

    Glanzmann thrombastenia (GT) is a rare condition of an inherited autosomal recessive gene characterized with bleeding tendency. The condition is rarely met in the OR. and therefore it is essential that anesthesiologist be cognizant of the risk involved and be prepared with all necessary precautionary measures. We present a GT case in a 27-year-old male with a mass in the anticubital region of right wrist that was successfully excised using the non-invasive intravenous regional analgesia (IVRA). The use of platelet transfusion and the recombinant factor VIIa, are stressed.

  8. Learning to cope with biting flies: rapid NMDA-mediated acquisition of conditioned analgesia.

    PubMed

    Kavaliers, M; Colwell, D D; Choleris, E; Ossenkopp, K P

    1999-02-01

    A 30-min exposure to intact biting flies (stable flies) induced an opioid-mediated analgesia in fly-naive male deer mice, whereas exposure to either altered biting flies whose biting mouthparts were removed or nonbiting house flies had no significant effects. However, mice that were previously exposed to intact stable flies for 30 min exhibited significant analgesia when exposed 24-168 hr later to stable flies whose biting parts were removed, but not to nonbiting house flies. Administration of the specific N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist NPC 12626 to fly-naive mice before exposure to intact flies, although not significantly reducing the analgesic response, blocked the subsequent conditioned analgesia. Naloxone, which blocked the intact biting fly-induced analgesia, did not alter the acquisition of the conditioned analgesic response to the altered stable flies. This demonstrates an NMDA-mediated acquisition of conditioned analgesia to a natural aversive stimulus. PMID:10197912

  9. [Assessment of pain relief in patients receiving different variants of multimodal analgesia after major gynecological surgery].

    PubMed

    Timerbaev, V H; Smimova, O V; Genov, P G; Olejnikova, O N; Rebrova, O Yu

    2014-01-01

    The major gynecology surgery generally results in severe postoperative pain. Currently multimodal analgesia concept is widely used for the aim of postoperative pain relief optimization. According to this theory it is worth using the medication with different mechanism in order to increase analgesia qualify, decrease analgesic consumption and avoid adverse reaction. Unfortunately the surveys recently conducted have been pointed out the postoperative analgesia quality is still insufficient despite of using the concept mentioned above. One way to solve the problem is appearing in daily practice nefopam--centrally acting non-opioid analgesic that inhibits reuptake of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine and also mitigates glutamatergic neurotransmission. In this trial we tried to assess the postoperative daily used analgesia quality and potency of preemptive multimodal analgesia model consisted of nefopam, ketoprofen, paracetamol and morphine.

  10. The Effects of Rifampin, Povidone-Iodine and Hydrogen Peroxide on the Formation of Epidural Fibrosis in the Experimental Epidural Fibrosis Model.

    PubMed

    Kizilay, Zahir; Cetin, Nesibe Kahraman; İsmailoglu, Özgur; Yılmaz, Ali; Omurlu, İmran Kurt; Coskun, Mehmet Erdal; Aktaş, Serdar

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of direct application of rifampin, povidone-iodine, and hydrogen peroxide on the formation of epidural fibrosis in rats. Forty-eight adult male Wistar albino rats were equally and randomly divided into four groups (laminectomy, topical rifampin, topical povidone-iodine, and topical hydrogen peroxide). Laminectomy was performed at the T12 level in all rats. Four weeks later, the extent of epidural fibrosis was assessed both macroscopically and histopathologically. ANOVA test was used for the evaluation of dural thickness. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for the pathology and macroscopic evaluation. Chi-square test was used for evaluation of the arachnoid involvement. p value <0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. Our data revealed that topical application of both povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide were effective in reducing epidural fibrosis formation. The results of our study provide the experimental evidence of the preventive effects of topical application of povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide over epidural fibrosis. PMID:27251380

  11. The Effects of Rifampin, Povidone-Iodine and Hydrogen Peroxide on the Formation of Epidural Fibrosis in the Experimental Epidural Fibrosis Model.

    PubMed

    Kizilay, Zahir; Cetin, Nesibe Kahraman; İsmailoglu, Özgur; Yılmaz, Ali; Omurlu, İmran Kurt; Coskun, Mehmet Erdal; Aktaş, Serdar

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of direct application of rifampin, povidone-iodine, and hydrogen peroxide on the formation of epidural fibrosis in rats. Forty-eight adult male Wistar albino rats were equally and randomly divided into four groups (laminectomy, topical rifampin, topical povidone-iodine, and topical hydrogen peroxide). Laminectomy was performed at the T12 level in all rats. Four weeks later, the extent of epidural fibrosis was assessed both macroscopically and histopathologically. ANOVA test was used for the evaluation of dural thickness. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for the pathology and macroscopic evaluation. Chi-square test was used for evaluation of the arachnoid involvement. p value <0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. Our data revealed that topical application of both povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide were effective in reducing epidural fibrosis formation. The results of our study provide the experimental evidence of the preventive effects of topical application of povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide over epidural fibrosis.

  12. Effect of epidural saline washout on regression of sensory and motor block after epidural anaesthesia with 2% lidocaine and fentanyl in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Park, E Y; Kil, H K; Park, W S; Lee, N-H; Hong, J-Y

    2009-03-01

    Seventy elderly males received lumbar epidural anaesthesia with 12 ml of 2% lidocaine containing fentanyl 50 mug. At the end of transurethral surgery, the washout group (n = 33) received an epidural bolus of 30 ml saline while the control group (n = 34) did not. Mean (SD) times to 1-grade (17.2 (11.9) vs 32.7 (11.3) min) and 2-grade regression (23.8 (12.2) vs 56.0 (23.9) min) of motor block, 3-dermatomal sensory regression (31.4 (11.6) vs 42.2 (14.4) min for cold and 30.8 (15.6) vs 40.6 (14.2) min for pinprick), and regression to S1 (57.7 (16.1) vs 76.2 (20.2) min for cold and 56.8 (17.3) vs 69.2 (16.2) min for pinprick) were significantly shorter in the washout group than the control group. There were no differences in postoperative pain scores and side effects between the two groups. We concluded that epidural washout facilitates regression of both motor and sensory block following epidural anaesthesia without reducing the postoperative analgesic benefit.

  13. Pre-puncture ultrasound guided epidural insertion before vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Mahmoud; Abdelazim, Ibrahim A

    2015-10-01

    Palpation method is widely used in clinical practice to identify the puncture site during combined spinal-epidural (CSE) blocks. Tuffier's line, is an anatomical landmark between two iliac crests (inter-cristal), which is widely used to identify the puncture site during CSE blocks is not always an indicator for specific vertebral level or inter-vertebral space. One hundred and Ten (110) women were scheduled for normal vaginal delivery and were randomized into two equal groups; palpation group and an ultrasound guided group to detect the efficacy of puncture ultrasound before CSE blocks to increase chances of successful CSE procedure on the first attempt and to reduce the number of attempts or punctures during insertion of CSE catheter. There were no significant differences between two studied groups regarding; maternal age, weight and height, while, there was a significant difference between two studied groups regarding; parity. Percentage of successful CSE procedure on the first attempt was significantly higher (67.27%) in ultrasound compared to palpation group (40%). Number of punctures (attempts) were significantly less in ultrasound (1.2 ± 0.6) compared to palpation group (2.3 ± 0.8) and the number of redirections was also significantly less in ultrasound (1.4 ± 0.5) compared to palpation group (2.8 ± 1.6). Although, time to identify puncture site was significantly longer in ultrasound compared to palpation group and total procedure time was longer in ultrasound (9.1 ± 1.5 min) compared to palpation group (6.2 ± 1.2 min), there was no significant difference between two studied groups regarding; time to identify puncture site and total procedure time. Two cases of dural puncture in palpation versus no cases in ultrasound group and two cases of intravascular catheter placement (one in each group), with no significant difference between two groups. Pre- puncture ultrasound guided epidural insertion before vaginal delivery, increases the chance of a

  14. Is it necessary to rotate the epidural needle to obtain successful sacral segment block?

    PubMed

    Lin, C C; Fan, S Z; Huang, F Y; Lin, S Y

    1990-09-01

    The effect of rotating the level of touhy needle to obtain successful sacral blockade was controversial. During the rotation, dural puncture was reported by some studies. In our study, we divided forty patients into two groups randomly. They all belonged to ASA I-II, receiving epidural needle insertion at L 2-3 epidural space, before epidural catheter was inserted. Total of 10 mL of 2% xylocaine was injected into the epidural space. In group A, the level of Touhy needle was pointed upward, that is, parallel to the ligament flavum. In group B, the level was pointed caudally. We determined the cutaneous extension of loss of cold sensation by using a swab of cotton wool soaked with alcohol 15 min and 25 min after the test injection. Our result showed no different in loss of cold sensation in sacral area between these two groups. So we concluded that there is no need to rotate the epidural needle for sacral blockade.

  15. Saline as the Sole Contrast Agent for Successful MRI-guided Epidural Injections

    SciTech Connect

    Deli, Martin; Mateiescu, Serban Busch, Martin; Becker, Jan Garmer, Marietta Groenemeyer, Dietrich

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the performance of sterile saline solution as the sole contrast agent for percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided epidural injections at 1.5 T. Methods. A retrospective analysis of two different techniques of MRI-guided epidural injections was performed with either gadolinium-enhanced saline solution or sterile saline solution for documentation of the epidural location of the needle tip. T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FLASH) images or T2-weighted single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images visualized the test injectants. Methods were compared by technical success rate, image quality, table time, and rate of complications. Results. 105 MRI-guided epidural injections (12 of 105 with gadolinium-enhanced saline solution and 93 of 105 with sterile saline solution) were performed successfully and without complications. Visualization of sterile saline solution and gadolinium-enhanced saline solution was sufficient, good, or excellent in all 105 interventions. For either test injectant, quantitative image analysis demonstrated comparable high contrast-to-noise ratios of test injectants to adjacent body substances with reliable statistical significance levels (p < 0.001). The mean table time was 22 {+-} 9 min in the gadolinium-enhanced saline solution group and 22 {+-} 8 min in the saline solution group (p = 0.75). Conclusion. Sterile saline is suitable as the sole contrast agent for successful and safe percutaneous MRI-guided epidural drug delivery at 1.5 T.

  16. [Effect of epidural anesthesia on the function of hormonal regulation in the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis].

    PubMed

    Nagata, A; Yoshida, H; Imamura, K; Masuda, Y; Hosoyamada, A

    1990-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of epidural anesthesia on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, we examined the concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T). The effects of epidural anesthesia on plasma levels of LH, FSH and T were investigated in 8 men aged from 64 to 87 years, suffering from untreated prostate cancer. There were no significant differences in plasma levels of LH, FSH or T between patients under epidural anesthesia and patients under no anesthesia. The effects of epidural anesthesia on plasma levels of LH, FSH and T after LH releasing hormone (LH-RH) administration were studied in 10 men between 65 and 84 years with diagnoses of untreated prostate cancer. Plasma LH and FSH levels increased significantly after LH-RH administration under epidural anesthesia or no anesthesia. Plasma LH and FSH were lower under epidural anesthesia than under no anesthesia. No change in plasma T level was observed after LH-RH administration under epidural anesthesia. We conclude that there is no effect of epidural anesthesia on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis.

  17. Human models of pain for the prediction of clinical analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, Jörn; Oertel, Bruno G; Ultsch, Alfred

    2014-10-01

    Human experimental pain models are widely used to study drug effects under controlled conditions. However, efforts to improve both animal and human experimental model selection, on the basis of increased understanding of the underlying pathophysiological pain mechanisms, have been disappointing, with poor translation of results to clinical analgesia. We have developed an alternative approach to the selection of suitable pain models that can correctly predict drug efficacy in particular clinical settings. This is based on the analysis of successful or unsuccessful empirical prediction of clinical analgesia using experimental pain models. We analyzed statistically the distribution of published mutual agreements or disagreements between drug efficacy in experimental and clinical pain settings. Significance limits were derived by random permutations of agreements. We found that a limited subset of pain models predicts a large number of clinically relevant pain settings, including efficacy against neuropathic pain for which novel analgesics are particularly needed. Thus, based on empirical evidence of agreement between drugs for their efficacy in experimental and clinical pain settings, it is possible to identify pain models that reliably predict clinical analgesic drug efficacy in cost-effective experimental settings.

  18. Congenital neuroblastoma with symptoms of epidural compression at birth.

    PubMed

    Gigliotti, A R; De Ioris, M A; De Grandis, E; Podda, M; Cellini, M; Sorrentino, S; De Bernardi, B; Paladini, D; Gandolfo, C

    2016-03-01

    The occurrence of congenital neuroblastoma presenting at birth with symptoms of epidural compression secondary to spinal canal invasion is rare. Almost all cases reported in the literature have survived from the tumor but suffer severe sequelae, with the exception of the 2 most recently described whose birth was anticipated. The 3 cases of this article have been followed for a minimum of 5 years with the aim to describe their definitive late complications. In none of these cases had the routine ultrasound scan performed in third trimester of pregnancy discovered a tumor mass, nor had it shown abnormal fetal movements. All had leg hypotonia detected on the first day of life. In all, both primary and intraspinal tumors responded well to chemotherapy. All survive with motor deficit and severe bladder dysfunction despite early physiotherapy. Scoliosis has developed in the case with the longest follow-up. The description of these patients enforces the importance of early diagnosis of tumor masses in late pregnancy. Neonatologists should be aware of this rare clinical entity and take it into account in the differential diagnosis with other conditions of early-onset hypotonia. On the other hand, obstetric sonologists should be aware of the possibility to detect such rare tumors in late pregnancy, as anticipation of delivery may reduce the risk of late sequelae. PMID:26901768

  19. [Hemodynamic repercussion of epidural bupivacaine in thoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Pérez Gallardo, A; Lajara Montell, A M; Manzanos Luna, A M

    1991-01-01

    Systemic and pulmonary hemodynamic effects of 8 to 10 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine containing 1:200,000 adrenaline administered at the midthoracic level were prospectively assessed in 20 patients (aged 45 +/- 16 years) with thoracic trauma presenting 6 +/- 2 rib fractures and pulmonary contusion of different extent and radiologic density. The study was carried out at comparable evolving times, 24 h after trauma, during the second or third day of treatment, and when the hemodynamic stability of the patient was achieved. Hemodynamic measurements were performed before and 30 min after administration of the analgesic agent using a Swan-Ganz catheter. The results indicate that administration of moderate doses of epidural bupivacaine at the middle thoracic level in patients with normovolemic thoracic traumatism were not followed by alterations in the hemodynamic function except for a slight decrease in systemic arterial and pulmonary pressure. The mean arterial pressure decreased by 8% (p less than 0.05), the cardiac index showed a 4% reduction (p = 0.05), and the mean pulmonary pressure experienced a 14% decrease (p less than 0.05).

  20. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Reirradiation for Recurrent Epidural Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Floyd, Scott; Wong, Eric; Jeyapalan, Suriya; Groff, Michael; Kasper, Ekkehard

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: When patients show progression after conventional fractionated radiation for spine metastasis, further radiation and surgery may not be options. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been successfully used in treatment of the spine and may be applicable in these cases. We report the use of SBRT for 60 consecutive patients (81 lesions) who had radiological progressive spine metastasis with epidural involvement after previous radiation for spine metastasis. Methods and Materials: SBRT was used with fiducial and vertebral anatomy-based targeting. The radiation dose was prescribed based on the extent of spinal canal involvement; the dose was 8 Gy Multiplication-Sign 3 = 24 Gy when the tumor did not touch the spinal cord and 5 to 6 Gy x 5 = 25 to 30 Gy when the tumor abutted the cord. The cord surface received up to the prescription dose with no hot spots in the cord. Results: The median overall survival was 11 months, and the median progression-free survival was 9 months. Overall, 93% of patients had stable or improved disease while 7% of patients showed disease progression; 65% of patients had pain relief. There was no significant toxicity other than fatigue. Conclusions: SBRT is feasible and appears to be an effective treatment modality for reirradiation after conventional palliative radiation fails for spine metastasis patients.