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Sample records for epilepsy anxiety aggression

  1. Impact of aggression, depression, and anxiety levels on quality of life in epilepsy patients

    PubMed Central

    Izci, Filiz; Fındıklı, Ebru; Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Tuncel, Deniz; Şahin, Merve

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of aggression levels on the quality of life (QoL) of epilepsy patients. This study was conducted on 66 volunteer control subjects, who were matched by age and sex to the patient group, which consisted of 66 patients who applied to the Psychiatry and Neurology clinics for outpatient treatment, were aged between 18 years and 65 years, and were diagnosed with epilepsy. A sociodemographic and clinical data form designed by us was distributed among the study participants, along with Buss–Perry Aggression Scale, Beck Anxiety Scale, Beck Depression Scale, and the Quality of Life Scale Short Form (SF-36). Compared with the control group, the patient group displayed higher scores in all subgroups of Buss–Perry Aggression Scale subscales at a statistically significant level (P<0.05). As per the SF-36 questionnaire, physical functioning, physical role disability, general health perception, social functioning, mental health perception, and pain subscales were statistically lower in the patient group (P<0.05). Significant links between Beck Depression Scale and Beck Anxiety Scale levels, as well as some subscales of QoL and aggression levels, were also determined. In conclusion, epilepsy patients experienced impaired QoL compared with the healthy control group and their QoL was further impaired due to increased levels of anxiety, depression, and aggression. PMID:27785037

  2. Anxiety in adolescent epilepsy. A clinimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Carrozzino, Danilo; Marchetti, Daniela; Laino, Daniela; Minna, Maria; Verrocchio, Maria Cristina; Fulcheri, Mario; Verrotti, Alberto; Bech, Per

    2016-08-01

    Background Anxiety and depression have been considered to be neglected disorders in epilepsy. Because panic disorder is one of the most important anxiety disorders, it has been problematic to use very comprehensive anxiety questionnaires in epilepsy patients, as panic attacks and epileptic seizures, although two distinct clinical entities from a diagnostic point of view, show a significant overlap of symptoms. Aims We have focused on single items for anxiety and depression as screening candidates in adolescent epilepsy. Methods The individual panic attack item in the Screen for Children Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders Scale (SCARED) and the single depression item in the Kellner Symptom Questionnaire were tested. Our samples consisted of adolescent patients with epilepsy and a matched control group with healthy participants, as well as two numerical groups acting as controls. Results The single panic attack item identified panic anxiety in 24.1% in the group of patients with epilepsy and 0.0% in the matched control group (p = 0.01). The single depression item identified 52.2% with depression in the epilepsy group and 6.2% in the matched control group (p = 0.001). Conclusion As screening instruments, single items of panic attack and depression are sufficient to screen for these affective states in adolescent epilepsy. The clinical implications are that it is important to be quite specific when screening for depression and panic attacks in adolescent patients with epilepsy.

  3. Treating Comorbid Anxiety and Aggression in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Karyn; Hunt, Caroline; Heriot, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention that targeted both anxious and aggressive behaviors in children with anxiety disorders and comorbid aggression by parent report. Method: The effects of a cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention targeting comorbid anxiety and aggression problems were compared…

  4. Depression and Anxiety in People with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh-Young

    2014-01-01

    Many recent epidemiological studies have found the prevalence of depression and anxiety to be higher in people with epilepsy (PWE) than in people without epilepsy. Furthermore, people with depression or anxiety have been more likely to suffer from epilepsy than those without depression or anxiety. Almost one-third of PWE suffer from depression and anxiety, which is similar to the prevalence of drug-refractory epilepsy. Various brain areas, including the frontal, temporal, and limbic regions, are associated with the biological pathogenesis of depression in PWE. It has been suggested that structural abnormalities, monoamine pathways, cerebral glucose metabolism, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and interleukin-1b are associated with the pathogenesis of depression in PWE. The amygdala and the hippocampus are important anatomical structures related to anxiety, and γ-aminobutyric acid and serotonin are associated with its pathogenesis. Depression and anxiety may lead to suicidal ideation or attempts and feelings of stigmatization. These experiences are also likely to increase the adverse effects associated with antiepileptic drugs and have been related to poor responses to pharmacological and surgical treatments. Ultimately, the quality of life is likely to be worse in PWE with depression and anxiety than in PWE without these disorders, which makes the early detection and appropriate management of depression and anxiety in PWE indispensable. Simple screening instruments may be helpful for in this regard, particularly in busy epilepsy clinics. Although both medical and psychobehavioral therapies may ameliorate these conditions, randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm that. PMID:25045369

  5. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B.; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  6. The Lombrosian prejudice in medicine. The case of epilepsy. Epileptic psychosis. Epilepsy and aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Granieri, Enrico; Fazio, Patrik

    2012-02-01

    In the nineteenth century, epilepsy became subject of experimental research. Lombroso established a relationship between epilepsy and criminality believing in the existence of epileptoid traits and atavism. He tried to demonstrate the common origin of epilepsy, criminality, and genius; factors deteriorating the CNS would act upon centers, which control behavior and ethics. This impairment would cause a lack of control on the lower nervous centers, reducing restraints of instincts and criminal behavior. He described developmental frontal cortex lesions in epileptic patients (today Taylor's dysplasia) and these observations supported the erroneous conviction of a relationship between criminality and epilepsy. Neurological, behavioral, and criminological sciences analyzed Lombroso's doctrine, whereas it was controversial that epileptic patients should be prone to violent actions and aggressive behavior. Today, there is an international panel of experts on epilepsy, which suggests five relevant criteria to determine if a crime committed with aggressiveness could result from epileptic seizures.

  7. Epilepsy and anxiety: epidemiology, classification, aetiology, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kimiskidis, Vasilios K; Valeta, Thalia

    2012-09-01

    Anxiety in epilepsy has recently become a focus of interest for a number of reasons. Epidemiological studies have established that anxiety disorders are twice as common in patients with epilepsy compared to the general population, while in referral centres their prevalence is even higher. In addition, it has been recently appreciated that anxiety exerts a significant negative impact on the quality of life of patients with epilepsy of any age. With regard to the pathogenesis of anxiety in epilepsy, a number of theories have been put forward including those based on psychodynamics, learning-cognition, and neurobiology. From a clinical point of view, anxiety may occur as a comorbid disorder with epilepsy or be directly linked with epilepsy as a preictal, ictal, postictal or interictal phenomenon. The treatment of anxiety in patients with epilepsy requires a comprehensive, multidisciplinary, clinical assessment. Regarding pharmacological therapies, it should be recognised that some drugs prescribed for anxiety disorders are associated with a high risk of seizures, whereas some antiepileptic drugs possess anxiolytic properties that could be of use in the management of epileptic patients with anxiety. The correct diagnosis and successful treatment of anxiety is expected to have significant benefits for the quality of life of epileptic patients.

  8. Social Anxiety and Aggression in Behaviorally Disordered Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Ketty P.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Thirty-nine boys in classes for students with behavioral disturbances were given questionnaires on trait anxiety, social anxiety, empathy, depression, and self-esteem, while teachers rated their aggression. Results showed that anxiety and empathy scores were not correlated with aggression, while social anxiety was positively correlated with trait…

  9. Family Conflict and Childhood Aggression: The Role of Child Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Akiho; Raishevich, Natoshia; Scarpa, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Family conflict and childhood anxiety has been implicated in the development of aggressive behaviors, but the nature of these relationships has not been fully explored. Thus, the present study examined the role of anxiety in moderating the relationship between family conflict and childhood aggression in 50 children aged 7 to 13 years.…

  10. Parental anxiety in childhood epilepsy: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jones, Chloe; Reilly, Colin

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to systematically review studies that have focused on symptoms of anxiety reported by parents of children (0-18 years) with epilepsy. PubMed was used to identify relevant studies. Selected studies were reviewed with respect to prevalence of above threshold scores and comparisons with controls on standardized measures of anxiety. Studies are also reported with respect to factors associated with parental anxiety, impact on child outcomes, and comparisons with studies that have included equivalent measures of symptoms of depression. Fifteen studies that met inclusion criteria were identified. None of the studies were population based. The percentage of parents scoring above cutoffs on standardized measures of anxiety was 9-58%. In comparison with parents of healthy controls, parents of children with epilepsy had higher mean scores in two of three studies where this was measured. Possible correlates of parental anxiety in childhood epilepsy that were considered varied widely across studies. Factors such as seizure frequency and use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been associated with parental anxiety in some but not all studies. With respect to child outcome, increased parental anxiety has been associated with lower quality of life and lower scores on adaptive behavior domains. Symptoms of anxiety are common among parents of children with epilepsy. There is a need for more systematic, representative studies to identify the prevalence of clinically significant anxiety and track the course of symptoms. Such studies will help to identify more clearly factors associated with parental anxiety and impact of symptoms on child and parent outcomes. Intervention studies are needed to evaluate approaches that target a reduction in symptoms and the potential impact on parental and child functioning. Furthermore, there is a need to evaluate the impact of antiepileptic therapies and interventions that focus on child neurobehavioral comorbidities on parental anxiety.

  11. Influence of anxiety on memory performance in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Franklin C.; Westerveld, Michael; Langfitt, John T.; Hamberger, Marla; Hamid, Hamada; Shinnar, Shlomo; Sperling, Michael R.; Devinsky, Orrin; Barr, William; Tracy, Joseph; Masur, David; Bazil, Carl W.; Spencer, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which anxiety contributed to inconsistent material-specific memory difficulties among 243 temporal lobe epilepsy patients from the Multisite Epilepsy Study. Visual memory performance on the Rey Complex Figure Test (RCFT) was lower for those with high versus low level of anxiety, but was not found to be related to side of TLE. Verbal memory on the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) was significantly lower for left than right TLE patients with low anxiety, but equally impaired for those with high anxiety. These results suggest that we can place more confidence in the ability of verbal memory tests like the CVLT to lateralize to left TLE for those with low anxiety, but that verbal memory will be less likely to produce lateralizing information for those with high anxiety. This suggests that more caution is needed when interpreting verbal memory tests for those with high anxiety. These results indicated that RCFT performance was significantly affected by anxiety and did not lateralize to either side, regardless of anxiety level. This study adds to the existing literature which suggests that drawing-based visual memory tests do not lateralize among TLE patients, regardless of anxiety level. PMID:24291525

  12. Experimentally induced anxiety attenuates alcohol-related aggression in men.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joshua P; Giancola, Peter R

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that state anxiety operates as moderator of the alcohol-aggression relation. Participants were 80 healthy male social drinkers between 21 and 33 years of age. They were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: (a) alcohol + anxiety induction (n = 20), (b) placebo + anxiety induction (n = 20), (c) alcohol + no anxiety induction (n = 20), and (d) placebo + no anxiety induction (n = 20). Anxiety was induced by informing participants that they had to deliver a speech about what they liked and disliked about their body in front of a video camera. A modified version of the Taylor Aggression Paradigm (S. Taylor, 1967) was then used to measure aggressive behavior in a situation where electric shocks were administered to, and received from, a fictitious opponent under the guise of a competitive reaction time task. Results indicated that the anxiety induction was successful in suppressing aggression for participants who received alcohol equal to levels seen in placebo controls. Findings are discussed within the context of a number of theories of alcohol's anxiolytic effects in relation to intoxicated aggression.

  13. Social Anxiety as a Predictor of Dating Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanby, Michelle S. R.; Fales, Jessica; Nangle, Douglas W.; Serwik, Agnieszka K.; Hedrich, Uriah J.

    2012-01-01

    By far, most research on the behavior of socially anxious individuals has focused on the "flight" rather than the "fight" response described in the traditional conceptualization of anxiety. More recently, however, there has been some speculation and emerging evidence suggesting that social anxiety and aggression may be related. The present study…

  14. Treating anxiety disorders in children and adolescents with epilepsy: what do we know?

    PubMed

    Jones, Jana E

    2014-10-01

    Children with epilepsy are at significant risk of psychiatric disorders, which can in turn negatively impact social skills development, academic achievement, and quality of life. The most commonly reported psychiatric comorbidities in pediatric epilepsy are ADHD, depression, and anxiety. The prevalence rates of anxiety disorders in pediatric epilepsy range from 5 to 49%, and in the general population, anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric disorder in childhood. For the purposes of this review, anxiety disorders will be examined in order to 1) examine rates of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents with epilepsy, 2) review treatment options for anxiety disorders in children with epilepsy, and 3) identify future avenues for the development of evidence-based practices for the treatment of anxiety disorders in youth with epilepsy.

  15. Rapamycin attenuates aggressive behavior in a rat model of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoxing; McMahon, John; Huang, Yunfei

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are fairly common comorbidities of epilepsy in humans. Following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE), experimental animals not only developed spontaneous recurrent seizures, but also exhibited significantly elevated levels of aggressive behavior. The cellular and molecular mechanism triggering these behavioral alterations remains unclear. In the present study, we found that aggression is positively correlated with development of spontaneous seizures. Treatment with rapamycin, a potent mTOR pathway inhibitor, markedly diminished aggressive behavior. Therefore, the mTOR pathway may have significance in the underlying molecular mechanism leading to aggression associated with epilepsy. PMID:22522471

  16. Social Anxiety Level in Adult Patients With Epilepsy and Their First-Degree Cohabiting Relatives.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Ebru; Yerdelen, V Deniz; Taskintuna, Nilgün

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy affects not only the patient but also the patient's cohabiting relatives, to various degrees. This study investigated state and trait anxiety, depression, and social fear and avoidance levels in 48 adult patients with epilepsy and 48 family members, compared with 43 healthy control subjects, using the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. The results suggested that the patients and their first-degree relatives had higher levels of depression, state and trait anxiety, and avoidance compared with healthy subjects. The mothers of patients with epilepsy had the highest level of depression and anxiety.

  17. Arousal, Anxiety, Aggression, and Attitude Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Philip H.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    This experiment investigated the effects of an aggressive habit and emtional arousal, measured by heart rate, blood pressure, and self-report, on two types of attitude change. Psychological arousal was positively related to degree of influence by the reflaxation communication. (DB)

  18. Connection between classroom abuse and manifest aggressiveness, anxiety and altruism.

    PubMed

    Bilić, Vesna

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to find out if the students exposed to abuse differ in their level of anxiety, aggressiveness, and altruism from other students, and to test if the pattern of these differences differs depending on whether the abuse they suffer is emotional or physical. The research was carried out on a sample of 127 senior elementary school students. The data was gathered at the end of the 2003/04 school year, and obtained through the respondents' self-statements in questionnaires about childhood abuse and by the scales of manifest aggressiveness, anxiety and altruism. The frequency analysis has shown that various forms of emotional abuse are more common in schools than physical abuse, and that they are reaching disturbing proportions. For example, more than half of the participants in the study reported facing intimidation and threats in school, and over a third of them have been yelled at. Although less commonplace, physical abuse in school can by no means be ignored. Those students who suffer from frequent physical abuse are more dissatisfied with school (r=0.174, p<0.05), display more aggressiveness (r=0.441, p<0.001), and are more often boys (r=0.324, p<0.01). Those students who are frequently emotionally abused are more anxious (r=0.281, p<0.01), dissatisfied with school (r=0.237, p<0.01), and display more manifest aggressiveness (r=398, p<0.01). The discriminant analysis has shown that the bullied students can be differentiated from their non-abused schoolmates as they are manifestly more anxious and aggressive, regardless of whether they suffer physical or emotional abuse. Instances of different forms of emotional and physical classroom abuse have increased alarmingly. Such traumatic experiences affect children's health and functioning in school, as well as in their private lives. The interdisciplinary studies of this phenomenon and the education of all those who work with young people emerge as the top priority in the prevention of this kind

  19. Aggression among Children with ADHD, Anxiety, or Co-Occurring Symptoms: Competing Exacerbation and Attenuation Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Stephen P.; Luebbe, Aaron M.; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani; Fite, Paula J.

    2012-01-01

    Competing hypotheses for explaining the role of anxiety in the relation between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and childhood aggression were evaluated. Two studies tested whether anxiety exacerbated, attenuated, or had no effect on the relation between ADHD and aggression subtypes among psychiatrically hospitalized…

  20. Adolescents' Aggressive and Prosocial Behavior: Associations with Jealousy and Social Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culotta, Carmen M.; Goldstein, Sara E.

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined how relational aggression, physical aggression, and proactive prosocial behavior were associated with jealousy and social anxiety in a diverse sample of 60 middle school students. After the authors controlled for gender and race, jealousy predicted relational aggression and proactive prosocial behavior, but it did not predict…

  1. The role of anxiety in the development, maintenance, and treatment of childhood aggression.

    PubMed

    Granic, Isabela

    2014-11-01

    The majority of aggressive children exhibit symptoms of anxiety, yet none of our developmental models of aggression incorporate the role of anxiety, and our treatments ignore this comorbidity. This article outlines a novel theoretical model that specifies three hypotheses about comorbid anxious and aggressive children: (a) unpredictable parenting induces anxiety in children that in turn triggers aggressive behavior; (b) prolonged periods of anxiety deplete children's capacity to inhibit impulses and trigger bouts of aggression, and aggression in turn functions to regulate levels of anxiety; and (c) minor daily stressors give rise to anxiety while cognitive perseveration maintains anxious moods, increasingly disposing children to aggress. Little or no research has directly tested these hypotheses. Extant research and theory consistent with these claims are herein reviewed, and future research designs that can test them specifically are suggested. The clinical implications most relevant to the hypotheses are discussed, and to improve the efficacy of treatments for childhood aggression, it is proposed that anxiety may need to be the primary target of treatment.

  2. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Epilepsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Epilepsy Print A A A ... With Epilepsy Different? en español Epilepsia What Is Epilepsy? Epilepsy comes from a Greek word meaning "to ...

  3. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Epilepsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Epilepsy A A A What's ... With Epilepsy Different? en español Epilepsia What Is Epilepsy? Epilepsy comes from a Greek word meaning "to ...

  4. Acute fluoxetine exposure alters crab anxiety-like behaviour, but not aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Trevor James; Kwan, Garfield T.; Gallup, Joshua; Tresguerres, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Aggression and responsiveness to noxious stimuli are adaptable traits that are ubiquitous throughout the animal kingdom. Like vertebrate animals, some invertebrates have been shown to exhibit anxiety-like behaviour and altered levels of aggression that are modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin. To investigate whether this influence of serotonin is conserved in crabs and whether these behaviours are sensitive to human antidepressant drugs; the striped shore crab, Pachygrapsus crassipes, was studied using anxiety (light/dark test) and aggression (mirror test) paradigms. Crabs were individually exposed to acute doses of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (5 or 25 mg/L), commonly known as Prozac®, followed by behavioural testing. The high dose of fluoxetine significantly decreased anxiety-like behaviour but had no impact on mobility or aggression. These results suggest that anxiety-like behaviour is more sensitive to modulation of serotonin than is aggressiveness in the shore crab. PMID:26806870

  5. Acute fluoxetine exposure alters crab anxiety-like behaviour, but not aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Trevor James; Kwan, Garfield T; Gallup, Joshua; Tresguerres, Martin

    2016-01-25

    Aggression and responsiveness to noxious stimuli are adaptable traits that are ubiquitous throughout the animal kingdom. Like vertebrate animals, some invertebrates have been shown to exhibit anxiety-like behaviour and altered levels of aggression that are modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin. To investigate whether this influence of serotonin is conserved in crabs and whether these behaviours are sensitive to human antidepressant drugs; the striped shore crab, Pachygrapsus crassipes, was studied using anxiety (light/dark test) and aggression (mirror test) paradigms. Crabs were individually exposed to acute doses of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (5 or 25 mg/L), commonly known as Prozac®, followed by behavioural testing. The high dose of fluoxetine significantly decreased anxiety-like behaviour but had no impact on mobility or aggression. These results suggest that anxiety-like behaviour is more sensitive to modulation of serotonin than is aggressiveness in the shore crab.

  6. Vasopressin differentially modulates aggression and anxiety in adolescent hamsters administered anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Thomas R; Ricci, Lesley A; Melloni, Richard H

    2016-11-01

    Adolescent Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) treated with anabolic/androgenic steroids display increased offensive aggression and decreased anxiety correlated with an increase in vasopressin afferent development, synthesis, and neural signaling within the anterior hypothalamus. Upon withdrawal from anabolic/androgenic steroids, this neurobehavioral relationship shifts as hamsters display decreased offensive aggression and increased anxiety correlated with a decrease in anterior hypothalamic vasopressin. This study investigated the hypothesis that alterations in anterior hypothalamic vasopressin neural signaling modulate behavioral shifting between adolescent anabolic/androgenic steroid-induced offensive aggression and anxiety. To test this, adolescent male hamsters were administered anabolic/androgenic steroids and tested for offensive aggression or anxiety following direct pharmacological manipulation of vasopressin V1A receptor signaling within the anterior hypothalamus. Blockade of anterior hypothalamic vasopressin V1A receptor signaling suppressed offensive aggression and enhanced general and social anxiety in hamsters administered anabolic/androgenic steroids during adolescence, effectively reversing the pattern of behavioral response pattern normally observed during the adolescent exposure period. Conversely, activation of anterior hypothalamic vasopressin V1A receptor signaling enhanced offensive aggression in hamsters exposed to anabolic/androgenic steroids during adolescence. Together, these findings suggest that the state of vasopressin neural development and signaling in the anterior hypothalamus plays an important role in behavioral shifting between aggression and anxiety following adolescent exposure to anabolic/androgenic steroids.

  7. Liquid courage or liquid fear: alcohol intoxication and anxiety facilitate physical aggression.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Dominic J; Gallagher, Kathryn E; Zeichner, Amos

    2012-06-01

    Participants were 138 male social drinkers between 18 and 30 years of age from a university community in the southeastern United States in 2000. Trait and state anxiety was measured using the Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Facial Action Coding System, respectively. Participants consumed an alcoholic or nonalcoholic control beverage and completed a shock-based aggression task. Regression analysis indicated that alcohol-facilitated elevations in anxiety mediated the relation between alcohol consumption and aggression and that trait anxiety and physical provocation moderated this effect. Implications and limitations of this study are noted and future research directions are suggested.

  8. Culture of honour theory and social anxiety: Cross-regional and sex differences in relationships among honour-concerns, social anxiety and reactive aggression.

    PubMed

    Howell, Ashley N; Buckner, Julia D; Weeks, Justin W

    2015-01-01

    Consistent with the "flight or fight" model of anxiety, social anxiety may incite withdrawal or attack; yet, it is unclear why some socially anxious individuals are vulnerable to aggress. It may be that culture impacts tendencies to "fight" or "flee" from social threat. Honour cultures, including the American South, permit or even promote aggression in response to honour-threats. Thus, social anxiety in the South may be more associated with aggression than in non-honour cultures. In the current sample, region moderated the relation between social anxiety and aggression; social anxiety related positively to reactive (but not proactive) aggression among Southerners (n = 285), but not Midwesterners (n = 258). Participant sex further moderated the relationship, such that it was significant only for Southern women. Also, for Southerners, prototypically masculine honour-concerns mediated the relationship between social anxiety and reactive aggression. Cultural factors may play key roles in aggressive behaviour among some socially anxious individuals.

  9. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Epilepsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Epilepsy A A A What's ... embarrass himself or scare his friends. What Is Epilepsy? Epilepsy is a condition of the nervous system ...

  10. Anxiety and aggression in rural youth: baseline results from the rural adaptation project.

    PubMed

    Smokowski, Paul R; Cotter, Katie L; Robertson, Caroline I B; Guo, Shenyang

    2013-08-01

    There is little research on the prevalence of and risk factors for mental health disorders, including anxiety and aggression, for low income, rural youth. The research that does exist suggests that rural youth may be at increased risk for negative outcomes, including low educational achievement, drug use and possession of weapons among gang members, and alcohol use. Using multilevel logistic regression, we examined individual, family, and school risk and protective factors for adolescent anxiety and aggression in a large, racially diverse sample of 4,321 middle school students who came from two impoverished, rural counties in a Southeastern state. Parent-child conflict, negative peer relationships, and negative friend behaviors were key risk factors associated with both anxiety and aggressive behaviors. The teacher turnover rate at school was also associated with both anxiety and aggression. Significant direct effects, cross-level moderation effects, and implications for prevention programming were discussed.

  11. Social Anxiety Predicts Aggression in Children with ASD: Clinical Comparisons with Socially Anxious and Oppositional Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugliese, Cara E.; White, Bradley A.; White, Susan W.; Ollendick, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the degree to which social anxiety predicts aggression in children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFASD, n = 20) compared to children with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD, n = 20) or with Oppositional Defiant Disorder or Conduct Disorder (ODD/CD, n = 20). As predicted, children with HFASD reported levels…

  12. Female Anxiety and Male Depression: Links between Economic Strain and Psychological Aggression in Argentinean Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconier, Mariana K.

    2010-01-01

    A dyadic model of economic strain was applied to the study of anxiety and depression as mediating mechanisms in the economic strain-psychological aggression relation. Data came from self-report questionnaires completed by 143 Argentinean clinical couples. Structural equation modeling analysis indicated that anxiety and depression increased for…

  13. Anabolic/androgenic steroid administration during adolescence and adulthood differentially modulates aggression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Thomas R; Ricci, Lesley A; Melloni, Richard H

    2015-03-01

    Anabolic/androgenic steroid (AAS) use remains high in both teens and adults in the U.S. and worldwide despite studies showing that AAS use is associated with a higher incidence of aggression and anxiety. Recently we showed that chronic exposure to AAS through adolescence increases aggression and decreases anxious behaviors, while during AAS-withdrawal aggression is lowered to species-normative levels and anxiety increases. AAS exposure is known to differentially alter behaviors and their underlying neural substrates between adults and adolescents and thus the current study investigated whether exposure to AAS during adulthood affects the relationship between aggression and anxiety in a manner similar to that previously observed in adolescents. Male hamsters were administered a moderate dose of AAS (5.0mg/kg/day×30days) during adolescence (P27-56) or young adulthood (P65-P94) and then tested for aggression and anxiety during AAS exposure (i.e., on P57 or P95) and during AAS withdrawal (i.e., 30days later on P77 or P115). Adolescent exposure to AAS increased aggressive responding during the AAS exposure period and anxiety-like responding during AAS withdrawal. Neither behavior was similarly influenced by adult exposure to AAS. Adult AAS exposure produced no difference in aggressive responding during AAS exposure (P95) or AAS withdrawal (P115); however, while AAS exposure during adulthood produced no difference in anxiety-like responding during AAS exposure, adult hamsters administered AAS were less anxious than vehicle control animals following AAS withdrawal. Together these data suggest that the aggression and anxiety provoking influence of AAS are likely a developmental phenomenon and that adult exposure to AAS may be anxiolytic over the long term.

  14. Online gaming addiction: the role of sensation seeking, self-control, neuroticism, aggression, state anxiety, and trait anxiety.

    PubMed

    Mehroof, Mehwash; Griffiths, Mark D

    2010-06-01

    Research into online gaming has steadily increased over the last decade, although relatively little research has examined the relationship between online gaming addiction and personality factors. This study examined the relationship between a number of personality traits (sensation seeking, self-control, aggression, neuroticism, state anxiety, and trait anxiety) and online gaming addiction. Data were collected over a 1-month period using an opportunity sample of 123 university students at an East Midlands university in the United Kingdom. Gamers completed all the online questionnaires. Results of a multiple linear regression indicated that five traits (neuroticism, sensation seeking, trait anxiety, state anxiety, and aggression) displayed significant associations with online gaming addiction. The study suggests that certain personality traits may be important in the acquisition, development, and maintenance of online gaming addiction, although further research is needed to replicate the findings of the present study.

  15. Buspirone treatment of psychiatrically hospitalized prepubertal children with symptoms of anxiety and moderately severe aggression.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, C R; Jiang, H; Domeshek, L J

    1997-01-01

    Open-label buspirone was studied in 25 prepubertal psychiatric inpatients (age 8.0 +/- 1.8 years, 76% boys) presenting with anxiety symptoms and moderately aggressive behavior. Patients with severe aggression, requiring rapid treatment with mood stabilizers or neuroleptics, were excluded. A 3-week titration (maximum 50 mg daily) preceded a 6-week maintenance phase at optimal dose. Buspirone was discontinued in 6 children (25%): 4 developed increased aggression and agitation, and 2 developed euphoric mania. For the 19 patients who completed the study, mean optimal dose was 28 mg daily. Among completers, depressive symptoms were reduced 52% by Week 6 on Children's Depression Inventory (p < or = 0.001). Decreased aggressivity was reflected in a 29% reduction on Measure of Aggression, Violence, and Rage in Children [MAVRIC] ratings (p < or = 0.02) and in 86% less time in seclusion or physical restraints (p < or = 0.02). Clinical Global Assessment scores improved (CGAS 41 vs. 54, p < or = 0.01). Only 3 children improved sufficiently to continue buspirone after the study. Residual aggressivity and global functioning remained problematic. Buspirone may pose behavioral risks in treating moderate aggressivity in 24% of children with anxiety; in the others, the therapeutic effects on aggression, anxiety, and depression were limited but significant.

  16. Effects of inhaled Linalool in anxiety, social interaction and aggressive behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Linck, V M; da Silva, A L; Figueiró, M; Caramão, E B; Moreno, P R H; Elisabetsky, E

    2010-07-01

    Aromatherapy uses essential oils (EOs) for several medical purposes, including relaxation. The association between the use of aromas and a decrease in anxiety could be a valuable instrument in managing anxiety in an ever increasing anxiogenic daily life style. Linalool is a monoterpene commonly found as the major volatile component of EOs in several aromatic plant species. Adding to previously reported sedative effects of inhaled linalool, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of inhaled linalool on anxiety, aggressiveness and social interaction in mice. Additionally, we investigated the effects of inhaled linalool on the acquisition phase of a step-down memory task in mice. Inhaled linalool showed anxiolytic properties in the light/dark test, increased social interaction and decreased aggressive behavior; impaired memory was only seen the higher dose of linalool. These results strengthen the suggestion that inhaling linalool rich essential oils can be useful as a mean to attain relaxation and counteract anxiety.

  17. Direct Aggression and Generalized Anxiety in Adolescence: Heterogeneity in Development and Intra-Individual Change.

    PubMed

    Meeus, Wim; Van de Schoot, Rens; Hawk, Skyler T; Hale, William W; Branje, Susan

    2016-02-01

    Co-occurrence of aggression and anxiety might change during adolescence, or stay stable. We studied change and stability of four types of co-occurrence regarding direct aggression and anxiety in adolescence: an anxious and non-aggressive type, an aggressive and non-anxious type, a comorbid aggressive-anxious type and a no problems type. We applied a person-centered approach to assess increases and decreases of these types, and tested various models of intra-individual change of the types: the stability, acting out and failure models. We used data from a five-wave study of 923 early-to-middle and 390 middle-to-late adolescents (48.5 % male), thereby covering the ages of 12-20. We observed accelerated development in the older cohort: adolescents tended to grow faster out of the aggressive types in middle-to-late adolescence than in early-to-middle adolescence. We observed one other group-dependent pattern of heterogeneity in development, namely "gender differentiation": gender differences in aggression and generalized anxiety became stronger over time. We found support for two perspectives on intra-individual change of the four types, namely the stability and the acting out perspective. The no problems--and to a lesser extent the anxious--type proved to be stable across time. Acting out was found in early-to-middle adolescents, males, and adolescents with poorer-quality friendships. In all three groups, there were substantial transitions from the anxious type to the aggressive type during 4 years (between 20 and 41 %). Remarkably, acting out was most prevalent in subgroups that, generally speaking, are more vulnerable for aggressive behavior, namely early-to-middle adolescents and males. We interpret acting out as the attempt of adolescents to switch from anxiety to instrumental aggression, in order to become more visible and obtain an autonomous position in the adolescent world. Acting out contributed to the explanation of accelerated development and gender

  18. Paternal and maternal psychological and physical aggression and children's anxiety in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meifang; Wang, Xinxin; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research was to examine the unique relationships between paternal and maternal psychological aggression (PA) and physical aggression (corporal punishment [CP] and severe physical abuse [SPA]) and children's anxiety in China. A total of 1,971 father-mother dyads completed the Chinese version of Parent-Child Conflict Tactics Scales (CTSPC) and the Chinese version of Spence Children's Anxiety Scale for Parents (SCAS-P). Results indicated that when paternal and maternal PA, CP, and SPA were considered simultaneously, parental PA and maternal CP were both significantly predictive of children's anxiety, whereas SPA had no significant effects on children's anxiety. Specifically, both paternal and maternal PA were the most unique predictors of children's anxiety among parental psychological and physical aggression, whereas the effects of maternal CP and paternal CP were different, with maternal CP having a stronger effect on children's anxiety compared with paternal CP. The findings indicated that appropriate prevention and intervention efforts are needed to target parental PA and maternal CP.

  19. The effects of lacosamide on depression and anxiety in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Brian D; Cole, Devlin; Iwuora, Ogonna; Strawn, Jeffrey R; Privitera, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Depression and anxiety are common in patients with epilepsy. Moreover, some antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have mood stabilizing and anxiolytic effects, while others may worsen psychiatric symptoms. The effects of lacosamide, a third generation AED approved for the treatment of focal onset seizures, on depressive and anxiety symptoms are unknown. We evaluated changes in depression and anxiety following the initiation of lacosamide. We compared patients' scores on the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E, n = 91) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7, n = 20) scales prior to and following lacosamide treatment. Following the initiation of lacosamide, there were no significant changes in NDDI-E scores when all patients were analyzed aggregately (baseline: 12.14 ± 4.64 vs post-treatment: 11.91 ± 4.14, p = 0.51). Similarly, the mean GAD-7 scores at baseline (4.10 ± 4.52) and after treatment (4.75 ± 5.51) did not differ (p = 0.23). In the 25 patients with initial NDDI-E scores of >15, lacosamide was associated with a significant decrease in depressive symptoms (baseline: 17.60 ± 1.63 vs post-treatment: 14.64 ± 2.78, p < 0.001). NDDI-E and GAD-7 scores pre- and post-lacosamide initiation were not significantly affected by a history of mood disorders, concomitant psychiatric medications, or concomitant AEDs with mood-stabilizing effects.

  20. Adolescent anabolic/androgenic steroids: Aggression and anxiety during exposure predict behavioral responding during withdrawal in Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Ricci, Lesley A; Morrison, Thomas R; Melloni, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    In the U.S. and worldwide anabolic/androgenic steroid use remains high in the adolescent population. This is concerning given that anabolic/androgenic steroid use is associated with a higher incidence of aggressive behavior during exposure and anxiety during withdrawal. This study uses pubertal Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) to investigate the hypothesis that an inverse behavioral relationship exists between anabolic/androgenic steroid-induced aggression and anxiety across adolescent exposure and withdrawal. In the first experiment, we examined aggression and anxiety during adolescent anabolic/androgenic steroid exposure and withdrawal. Adolescent anabolic/androgenic steroid administration produced significant increases in aggression and decreases in anxiety during the exposure period followed by significant decreases in aggression and increases in anxiety during anabolic/androgenic steroid withdrawal. In a second experiment, anabolic/androgenic steroid exposed animals were separated into groups based on their aggressive response during the exposure period and then tested for anxiety during exposure and then for both aggression and anxiety during withdrawal. Data were analyzed using a within-subjects repeated measures predictive analysis. Linear regression analysis revealed that the difference in aggressive responding between the anabolic/androgenic steroid exposure and withdrawal periods was a significant predictor of differences in anxiety for both days of testing. Moreover, the combined data suggest that the decrease in aggressive behavior from exposure to withdrawal predicts an increase in anxiety-like responding within these same animals during this time span. Together these findings indicate that early anabolic/androgenic steroid exposure has potent aggression- and anxiety-eliciting effects and that these behavioral changes occur alongside a predictive relationship that exists between these two behaviors over time.

  1. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have recurring seizures. The seizures happen when clusters ... may have violent muscle spasms or lose consciousness. Epilepsy has many possible causes, including illness, brain injury, ...

  2. Systemic Family Therapy of Comorbidity of Anxiety and Depression with Epilepsy in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Meng, Huaqing; Zeng, Kebin; Quan, Fengying; Liu, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to find if systemic family therapy (SFT) does work in anxiety and depression with epilepsy in adolescents (ADAE). Methods 104 adolescents with epilepsy, aged 13–20 years old, were included from December 2009 to December 2010, the enrolled patients were with anxiety [Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) score ≥14 points] or depression [Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) score ≥20 points]. The patients were randomly divided into the control group (n=52) treated with antiepileptic drugs (AED) and the intervention group (n=52) undergone Systemic Family Therapy (SFT) as well as AED. The AED improvements, anxiety and depression scores, Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS), Family Assessment Device (FAD) and scale of systemic family dynamics (SSFD) were observed after 3-month treatment. Results The frequencies of epileptic seizures in intervention group was decreased much more significantly than the control group (4.22±3.54 times/month vs. 6.20±5.86 times/month, p=0.04); and the scores of anxiety (9.52±6.28 points vs. 13.48±8.47 points, p=0.01) and depression (13.86±9.17 points vs. 18.89±8.73 points, p=0.02) were significantly decreased than the control group; meanwhile, the family dynamics and family functions were significantly improved, and the social support was also increased (p<0.05). Conclusion SFT combined with AEDs had better efficacies than AEDs alone, not only the frequency of epileptic seizures was decreased, but also the patients' anxiety and depression were improved, and the family dynamics, family functions and social support were improved. PMID:27247596

  3. Social experiences during adolescence affect anxiety-like behavior but not aggressiveness in male mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Neele; Jenikejew, Julia; Richter, S Helene; Kaiser, Sylvia; Sachser, Norbert

    2017-03-09

    Adolescence has lately been recognized as a key developmental phase during which an individual's behavior can be shaped. In a recent study with male mice varying in the expression of the serotonin transporter, escapable adverse social experiences during adolescence led to decreased anxiety-like behavior and increased exploratory and aggressive behavior compared to throughout beneficial experiences. Since in this study some behavioral tests took place with a delay of one week after the last social experiences have been made, it was not clear whether the observed effects really reflected the consequences of the experienced different social environments. To test this, the present study focused on the direct effects of beneficial and adverse social experiences on aggressiveness and anxiety-like behavior in C57BL/6J mice. In contrast to the previous study, behavioral testing took place immediately after the last social experiences had been made. Interestingly, whereas individuals from an escapable adverse environment showed significantly lower levels of anxiety-like and higher levels of exploratory behavior than animals from a beneficial environment, aggressive behavior was not affected. From this, we conclude that different social experiences during adolescence exert immediate effects on anxiety-like but not aggressive behavior in male mice.

  4. Anxious and aggressive: the co-occurrence of IED with anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Katherine M.; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Vo, Thomas; Galbraith, Todd; Heimberg, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that impulsive aggression and explosive anger are common among individuals with anxiety disorders; yet, the influence of IED on the onset, course, consequences, and patterns of comorbidity among those with anxiety disorders is unknown. Methods Data were drawn from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (N=9,282) and Adolescent Supplement (N=9,632), nationally representative surveys conducted between 2001–2004. Diagnoses were based on structured lay-administered interviews. Lifetime diagnoses assessed with structured instruments. Outcomes included comorbidity, functional and role impairment, and treatment utilization. Results Adolescents with a lifetime anxiety disorder had a higher prevalence of a lifetime anger attacks (68.5%) and IED (22.9%) than adolescents without a lifetime anxiety disorder (48.6% and 7.8%, respectively), especially social phobia and panic disorders. Similar elevation was found for adults. Age of onset and course of anxiety disorders did not differ by IED. Severe functional impairment associated with anxiety was higher among adolescents (39.3%) and adults (45.7%) with IED than those without IED (29.2% and 28.2%, respectively). Comorbidity for all other disorders was elevated. However, individuals with anxiety disorders and IED were no more likely to use treatment services than those with anxiety disorders without IED. Conclusions Individuals with IED concomitant to anxiety disorder, especially social phobia and panic, are at marked risk for worse functional impairment and a higher burden of comorbidity, but onset and course of anxiety disorder do not differ, and those with anxiety and IED are no more likely to utilize treatment services. Assessment, identification, and specialized treatment of anger in the context of anxiety disorders are critical to reducing burden. PMID:26422701

  5. Social anxiety and aggression in early adolescents: examining the moderating roles of empathic concern and perspective taking.

    PubMed

    Batanova, Milena D; Loukas, Alexandra

    2011-11-01

    Guided by a social information processing perspective, this study examined the unique and interactive contributions of social anxiety and two distinct components of empathy, empathic concern and perspective taking, to subsequent relational and overt aggression in early adolescents. Participants were 485 10- to 14-year old middle school students (54% female; 78% European-American) involved in two waves of a study with one year between each wave. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that higher levels of empathic concern were directly associated with decreases in subsequent relational and overt aggression one year later and buffered the impact of social anxiety on subsequent relational aggression. Although perspective taking did not moderate the impact of social anxiety on either form of aggression, it was a unique predictor of increased relational aggression one year later. Findings call for future research to assess both components of empathy separately as they relate to relational and overt aggression.

  6. The Sturm und Drang of anabolic steroid use: angst, anxiety, and aggression

    PubMed Central

    Oberlander, Joseph G.; Henderson, Leslie P.

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are illicitly administered to enhance athletic performance and body image. Although conferring positive actions on performance, steroid abuse is associated with changes in anxiety and aggression. AAS users are often keenly invested in understanding the biological actions of these drugs. Thus, mechanistic information on AAS actions is important not only for the biomedical community, but also for steroid users. Here we review findings from animal studies on the impact of AAS exposure on neural systems that are crucial for the production of anxiety and aggression, and compare the effects of the different classes of AAS and their potential signaling mechanisms, as well as context-, age- and sex-dependent aspects of their actions. PMID:22516619

  7. The Unexpected Effects of Beneficial and Adverse Social Experiences during Adolescence on Anxiety and Aggression and Their Modulation by Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Neele; Richter, S. Helene; Schreiber, Rebecca S.; Kloke, Vanessa; Kaiser, Sylvia; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Sachser, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and aggression are part of the behavioral repertoire of humans and animals. However, in their exaggerated form both can become maladaptive and result in psychiatric disorders. On the one hand, genetic predisposition has been shown to play a crucial modulatory role in anxiety and aggression. On the other hand, social experiences have been implicated in the modulation of these traits. However, so far, mainly experiences in early life phases have been considered crucial for shaping anxiety-like and aggressive behavior, while the phase of adolescence has largely been neglected. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to elucidate how levels of anxiety-like and aggressive behavior are shaped by social experiences during adolescence and serotonin transporter (5-HTT) genotype. For this purpose, male mice of a 5-HTT knockout mouse model including all three genotypes (wildtype, heterozygous and homozygous 5-HTT knockout mice) were either exposed to an adverse social situation or a beneficial social environment during adolescence. This was accomplished in a custom-made cage system where mice experiencing the adverse environment were repeatedly introduced to the territory of a dominant opponent but had the possibility to escape to a refuge cage. Mice encountering beneficial social conditions had free access to a female mating partner. Afterwards, anxiety-like and aggressive behavior was assessed in a battery of tests. Surprisingly, unfavorable conditions during adolescence led to a decrease in anxiety-like behavior and an increase in exploratory locomotion. Additionally, aggressive behavior was augmented in animals that experienced social adversity. Concerning genotype, homozygous 5-HTT knockout mice were more anxious and less aggressive than heterozygous 5-HTT knockout and wildtype mice. In summary, adolescence is clearly an important phase in which anxiety-like and aggressive behavior can be shaped. Furthermore, it seems that having to cope with challenge during

  8. Raphe serotonin neuron-specific oxytocin receptor knockout reduces aggression without affecting anxiety-like behavior in male mice only

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Jerome H.; Williams Avram, Sarah K.; Cui, Zhenzhong; Song, June; Mezey, Éva; Senerth, Julia M.; Baumann, Michael H.; Young, W. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin and oxytocin influence aggressive and anxiety-like behaviors, though it is unclear how the two may interact. That the oxytocin receptor is expressed in the serotonergic raphe nuclei suggests a mechanism by which the two neurotransmitters may cooperatively influence behavior. We hypothesized that oxytocin acts on raphe neurons to influence serotonergically-mediated anxiety-like, aggressive and parental care behaviors. We eliminated expression of the oxytocin receptor in raphe neurons by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of the serotonin transporter promoter (Slc6a4) with our conditional oxytocin receptor knockout line. The knockout mice generated by this cross are normal across a range of behavioral measures: there are no effects for either sex on locomotion in an open-field, olfactory habituation/dishabituation or, surprisingly, anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated O and plus mazes. There was a profound deficit in male aggression: only one of 11 raphe oxytocin receptor knockouts showed any aggressive behavior, compared to eight of 11 wildtypes. In contrast, female knockouts displayed no deficits in maternal behavior or aggression. Our results show that oxytocin, via its effects on raphe neurons, is a key regulator of resident-intruder aggression in males but not maternal aggression. Furthermore, this reduction in male aggression is quite different from the effects reported previously after forebrain or total elimination of oxytocin receptors. Finally, we conclude that when constitutively eliminated, oxytocin receptors expressed by serotonin cells do not contribute to baseline anxiety-like behaviors or maternal care. PMID:25677455

  9. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of basic, translational, and clinical research on the processes by which epilepsy develops, including mechanisms associated with brain malformations, genetic defects, and precipitating insults like TBI, stroke, brain tumor, childhood febrile seizures, or infection. These studies are identifying ...

  10. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... look at the brain and nervous system. An EEG (electroencephalogram) will be done to check the electrical ... epilepsy surgery, you may need to: Wear an EEG recorder for days or weeks as you go ...

  11. Anxiety symptoms as a moderator of the reciprocal links between forms of aggression and peer victimization in middle childhood.

    PubMed

    Cooley, John L; Frazer, Andrew L; Fite, Paula J; Brown, Shaquanna; DiPierro, Moneika

    2017-02-20

    The current short-term longitudinal study evaluated whether anxiety symptoms moderated the bidirectional associations between forms (i.e., physical and relational) of aggression and peer victimization over a 1-year period during middle childhood. Participants were 228 predominantly Caucasian children (50.4% boys; M = 8.32 years, SD = .95 years) in the second through fourth grades and their homeroom teachers. Children completed a self-report measure of anxiety symptoms at Time 1. Peer victimization was assessed using self-reports at Time 1 and approximately 1 year later (Time 2), and teachers provided ratings of children's aggressive behavior at both time points. A series of cross-lagged path analysis models indicated that high (+1 SD) initial levels of anxiety symptoms exacerbated the prospective link from Time 1 relational aggression to Time 2 peer victimization; conversely, when initial levels of anxiety symptoms were low (-1 SD), relational aggression predicted lower levels of subsequent peer victimization. Time 1 peer victimization was also found to predict lower levels of Time 2 physical aggression when initial levels of anxiety symptoms were low, and Time 1 anxiety symptoms were uniquely related to higher levels of relational aggression over a 1-year period. Regions of significance were calculated to further decompose significant interactions, which did not differ according to gender. Study findings are discussed within a social information processing theoretical framework, and directions for future research and implications for practice are reviewed. Specifically, co-occurring anxiety symptoms may need to be addressed in interventions for both aggression and peer victimization during middle childhood.

  12. Measuring virgin female aggression in the female intruder test (FIT): effects of oxytocin, estrous cycle, and anxiety.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Trynke R; Beiderbeck, Daniela I; Neumann, Inga D

    2014-01-01

    The costs of violence and aggression in our society have stimulated the scientific search for the predictors and causes of aggression. The majority of studies have focused on males, which are considered to be more aggressive than females in most species. However, rates of offensive behavior in girls and young women are considerable and are currently rising in Western society. The extrapolation of scientific results from males to young, non-maternal females is a priori limited, based on the profound sex differences in brain areas and functioning of neurotransmitters involved in aggression. Therefore, we established a paradigm to assess aggressive behavior in young virgin female rats, i.e. the female intruder test (FIT). We found that approximately 40% of un-manipulated adult (10-11 weeks old) female Wistar rats attack an intruder female during the FIT, independent of their estrous phase or that of their intruder. In addition, adolescent (7-8 weeks old) female rats selected for high anxiety behavior (HABs) displayed significantly more aggression than non-selected (NAB) or low-anxiety (LAB) rats. Intracerebroventricular infusion of oxytocin (OXT, 0.1 µg/5 µl) inhibited aggressive behavior in adult NAB and LAB, but not HAB females. Adolescent NAB rats that had been aggressive towards their intruder showed increased pERK immunoreactivity (IR) in the hypothalamic attack area and reduced pERK-IR in OXT neurons in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus compared to non-aggressive NAB rats. Taken together, aggressive behavior in young virgin female rats is partly dependent on trait anxiety, and appears to be under considerable OXT control.

  13. Epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.S.; Frost, J.J. )

    1991-04-01

    As surgical treatments for adult and pediatric forms of epilepsy have become more refined, methods for noninvasive localization of epileptogenic foci have become increasingly important. Detection of focal brain metabolic or flow abnormalities is now well recognized as an essential step in the presurgical evaluation of many patients with epilepsy. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning is most beneficial when used in the context of the total clinical evaluation of patients, including scalp EEG, invasive EEG, neuropsychologic testing, etc. Metabolic PET studies also give insight into pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy. The dynamic nature of the interictal hypometabolism observed with 18(F)FDG in some patients suggests that excitatory or inhibitory neurotransmitters and their receptors may be involved. An exciting current application of PET scanning is the use of tracers for neurotransmitter receptors in the study of epilepsy patients. Mu and non-mu opiate receptors have been extensively studied and are beginning to give new insights into this disorder. Increased labeling of mu receptors in temporal neocortex using 11C-carfentanil has been demonstrated and, in some patients, supplements the clinical localization information from 18(F)FDG studies. Increased mu opiate receptor number or affinity is thought to play a role in anticonvulsant mechanisms. Specificity of increased mu receptors is supported by the absence of significant changes in non-mu opiate receptors. Other brain receptors are also of interest for future studies, particularly those for excitatory neurotransmitters. Combined studies of flow, metabolism, and neuroreceptors may elucidate the factors responsible for initiation and termination of seizures, thus improving patient treatment.95 references.

  14. Impaired cognitive ability and anxiety-like behavior following acute seizures in the Theiler's virus model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Umpierre, Anthony D; Remigio, Gregory J; Dahle, E Jill; Bradford, Kate; Alex, Anitha B; Smith, Misty D; West, Peter J; White, H Steve; Wilcox, Karen S

    2014-04-01

    Viral infection of the CNS can result in encephalitis and acute seizures, increasing the risk for later-life epilepsy. We have previously characterized a novel animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy that recapitulates key sequela in the development of epilepsy following viral infection. C57BL/6J mice inoculated with the Daniel's strain of Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus (TMEV; 3×10(5) PFU, i.c.) display acute limbic seizures that secondarily generalize. A majority of acutely seized animals develop spontaneous seizures weeks to months later. As part of our investigation, we sought to assess behavioral comorbidity following TMEV inoculation. Anxiety, depression, cognitive impairment, and certain psychoses are diagnosed in persons with epilepsy at rates far more frequent than in the general population. We used a battery of behavioral tests to assess anxiety, depression, cognitive impairment, and general health in acutely seized animals inoculated with TMEV and compared behavioral outcomes against age-matched controls receiving a sham injection. We determined that TMEV-seized animals are less likely to move through the exposed center of an open field and are less likely to enter into the lighted half of a light/dark box; both behaviors may be indicative of anxiety-like behavior. TMEV-seized animals also display early and persistent reductions in novel object exploration during novel object place tasks and do not improve in their ability to find a hidden escape platform in Morris water maze testing, indicative of impairment in episodic and spatial memory, respectively. Cresyl violet staining at 35 and 250 days after injection reveals bilateral reductions in hippocampal area, with extensive sclerosis of CA1 evident bilaterally along the rostral-caudal axis. Early and persistent behavioral changes in the TMEV model provide surrogate markers for assessing disease progression as well as endpoints in screening for the efficacy of novel compounds to manage both

  15. Examining the Presence of Anxiety in Aggressive Individuals: The Illuminating Role of Fight-or-Flight Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunimatsu, Melissa M.; Marsee, Monica A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although internalizing and externalizing problems are often considered in isolation from one another, they frequently co-occur in individuals leading to unique behavioral profiles. Objective: To examine the overlap and divergence of anxious and aggressive behaviors, as well as the differential presence of anxiety within the forms,…

  16. Social Anxiety and Aggression in Early Adolescents: Examining the Moderating Roles of Empathic Concern and Perspective Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batanova, Milena D.; Loukas, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Guided by a social information processing perspective, this study examined the unique and interactive contributions of social anxiety and two distinct components of empathy, empathic concern and perspective taking, to subsequent relational and overt aggression in early adolescents. Participants were 485 10- to 14-year old middle school students…

  17. Poverty and involuntary engagement stress responses: examining the link to anxiety and aggression within low-income families.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Brian C; Santiago, Catherine DeCarlo; Wadsworth, Martha E

    2009-05-01

    Families living with the burdens of poverty-related stress are at risk for developing a range of psychopathology. The present study examines the year-long prospective relationships among poverty-related stress, involuntary engagement stress response (IESR) levels, and anxiety symptoms and aggression in an ethnically diverse sample of 98 families (300 individual family members) living at or below 150% of the US federal poverty line. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) moderator model analyses provided strong evidence that IESR levels moderated the influence of poverty-related stress on anxiety symptoms and provided mixed evidence for the same interaction effect on aggression. Higher IESR levels, a proxy for physiological stress reactivity, worsened the impact of stress on symptoms. Understanding how poverty-related stress and involuntary stress responses affect psychological functioning has implications for efforts to prevent or reduce psychopathology, particularly anxiety, among individuals and families living in poverty.

  18. Hostility, aggression, and anxiety levels of divorce and nondivorce children as manifested in their responses to projective tests.

    PubMed

    Spigelman, G; Spigelman, A; Englesson, I

    1991-06-01

    The effects of parental divorce on the levels of aggression, hostility, and anxiety in children, as measured by the Rorschach test, together with the type and direction of aggression, as measured by the Rosenzweig Picture-Frustration (P-F) Study, were studied. The Rorschach and the Rosenzweig P-F study were administered to a nonclinical sample of 108 Swedish children ranging in age from 10 to 12 years old. The subjects constituted a divorce and a nondivorce group of 27 girls and 27 boys each. Children of divorced parents (hereafter referred to as divorce children, divorce boys, or divorce girls) showed significantly higher levels of hostility, aggression, and anxiety than children of married parents (hereafter referred to as nondivorce children, nondivorce boys, nondivorce girls). There were significant differences found in the type and direction of aggression between divorce girls and boys. Divorce boys showed more extraggression and ego defensive reactions, whereas divorce girls tended to evade aggression. The differences between divorce and nondivorce groups and the diversity of reactions between divorce boys and girls are discussed.

  19. A longitudinal study of the role of children's altruism and forgiveness in the relation between parental aggressive discipline and anxiety of preschoolers in China.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Sylvia Y C L; Gu, Minmin; Cheung, Andy P S

    2017-03-01

    Using data collected over a 1-year period on a stratified random sample of 368 parents with children studying in nurseries (mean age=3.97years), this study assessed the predictive effects of parental corporal punishment, parental psychological aggression, preschoolers' altruism, and preschoolers' forgiveness on preschoolers' anxiety symptoms in Hong Kong, China. Results of hierarchical regression analyses showed that parental psychological aggression, preschoolers' altruism and preschoolers' forgiveness at Time 1 significantly predicted preschoolers' anxiety at Time 2, when controlling for the initial level of preschoolers' anxiety and important demographic variables that co-vary with preschoolers' anxiety. Moreover, preschoolers' altruism moderated the predictive effect of parental psychological aggression on preschoolers' anxiety symptoms. The study has several significant contributions. First, the study supports the predictive effect of parental aggressive discipline on preschoolers' anxiety. Second, we provide evidence that preschoolers' altruism and forgiveness negatively predict preschoolers' anxiety symptoms. Third, preschoolers' altruism and forgiveness are shown to protect them against parental psychological aggression. A dual-focus approach to intervention and prevention is proposed to reduce aggressive discipline by parents as well as to enhance altruism and forgiveness in children. Parent training programs could be provided to teach parents positive discipline strategies. Home-based or school-based interventions could be designed for preschool children to foster and enhance their altruism and forgiveness.

  20. The impact of anxiety, seizure severity, executive dysfunction, subjectively perceived psychological deficits, and depression on social function in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Christina; Walter, Uwe; Rösche, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    The impact of anxiety, seizure severity, executive dysfunction, subjectively perceived psychological deficits, and depression on social function in patients with epilepsy (PWE) was analyzed. A brief cognitive screening test (EpiTrack) and an estimation of the last 6 months' cumulative seizure severity (Chalfont seizure severity scale) were performed, and questionnaires on subjectively perceived cognitive deficits (c.I.-Skala), anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, STAIX1 and STAIX2), depression (Self Rating Depression Scale, SDS), and social function (Soziale Aktivität Selbstbeurteilungsskala, SASS) were completed. Forty PWE (aged 41.8 years, SD 16; 24 female, 16 male) were analyzed. Thirty-eight point 5 percent had a score signifying depression in the SDS; 20% had a pathological result in at least one of the anxiety scores. The ANOVA revealed that only anxiety as a trait symptom (STAIX2) had a significant influence on social function apart from the other factors (p<0.004). Additionally there was a trend for a significant influence of depressive symptoms (SDS) on social functioning (p=0.093). Symptoms of anxiety impair the social function of patients with epilepsy apart from depression, cognitive function, and seizure severity. They should be taken into account in the treatment of patients with epilepsy.

  1. Epilepsy - children

    MedlinePlus

    Seizure disorder - children; Convulsion - childhood epilepsy; Medically refractory childhood epilepsy; Anticonvulsant - childhood epilepsy; Antiepileptic drug - childhood epilepsy; AED - childhood epilepsy

  2. Association of Reactive-Proactive Aggression and Anxiety Sensitivity with Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Bilgiç, Ayhan; Tufan, Ali Evren; Yılmaz, Savaş; Özcan, Özlem; Özmen, Sevgi; Öztop, Didem; Türkoğlu, Serhat; Akça, Ömer Faruk; Yar, Ahmet; Işık, Ümit; Çolak Sivri, Rukiye; Polat, Hatice; Irmak, Ayşe; Dönmez, Yunus Emre; Çon Bayhan, Pelin; Uçur, Ömer; Cansız, Mehmet Akif; Savcı, Uğur

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluates the associations among the symptoms of anxiety, depression, and disruptive behavioral disorders (DBD) in the context of their relationships with reactive-proactive aggression and anxiety sensitivity in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The sample consisted of 342 treatment-naive children with ADHD. The severity of ADHD and DBD symptoms were assessed via parent- and teacher-rated inventories. Anxiety sensitivity, reactive-proactive aggression and severity of anxiety and depression symptoms of children were evaluated by self-report inventories. According to structural equation modeling, depression and anxiety scores had a relation with the DBD scores through reactive-proactive aggression. Results also showed a negative relation of the total scores of anxiety sensitivity on DBD scores, while conduct disorder scores had a positive relation with anxiety scores. This study suggests that examining the relations of reactive-proactive aggression and anxiety sensitivity with internalizing and externalizing disorders could be useful for understanding the link among these disorders in ADHD.

  3. The impact of a short depression and anxiety screening tool in epilepsy care in primary health care settings in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Mbewe, Edward K; Uys, Leana R; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2013-11-01

    Up to 60% of the 50 million persons with epilepsy (PWE) worldwide have depression and anxiety and 80% of PWE live in low-income regions. Common psychiatric comorbidities are often unrecognized and undertreated. We developed and validated a 10-item screening tool for the detection of depression and anxiety at primary healthcare clinics in Zambia in which the baseline detection rate among PWE was 1%. We trained primary care clinic workers in selected clinics to use this screening tool. A retrospective chart review was conducted for 120 consecutive PWE who received care one month after training. Detection improved from 1% to 49%, and treatment was frequently initiated. Of the 120 screened, 59 (49.2%) scored above cutoff point of 18. Of these persons, 43 (73.0%) were positive for depression, 16 (23.0%) were positive for anxiety, 38 (64.4%) received counseling, 18 (30.5%) received antidepressants, and 3 (5.1%) were referred to a psychiatrist. Use of this screening tool resulted in improved mental health care for PWE.

  4. Antidepressant Regulatory Warnings, Prescription Patterns, Suicidality and Other Aggressive Behaviors in Major Depressive Disorder and Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Saurabh; Gersing, Kenneth Ronald; Erkanli, Alaattin; Burt, Tal

    2016-06-01

    In 2004 the Food and Drug Administration issued a warning on the risk of suicidality in children and adolescents receiving antidepressants. This was followed by reports of changes in antidepressant prescription patterns, suicidality and other aggressive behaviors, but debate is continuing regarding the nature and magnitude of these changes. We examined a large physician database for impact of the warning on antidepressant prescriptions, suicidality and other aggressive behaviors in major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders in adult and pediatric patients. We analyzed electronic database covering over 100,000 patients, treated in Pre- (before 2003) and Post- (after 2004) warning periods. We compared strength of the association between the measures and the time period with two tests. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to ascertain the unique effect of each parameter. Of 10,089 MDD (61.0 %) and anxiety disorders (39.0 %) patients, 65.2 % received antidepressant prescription and 16.1 % were pediatric patients. In post-warning period, there was a greater reduction in adult versus pediatric antidepressant prescription rates. Logistic modeling showed greater likelihood of antidepressant prescription in MDD as compared with anxiety disorders in post-warning period. Pediatric patients were more likely than adults to receive fluoxetine during the post-warning period. There was an overall reduction in suicidality and other aggressive behaviors in the post-warning period. Regulatory warnings may have had an impact on antidepressant benefit/risk assessment and consequent utilization, therapeutic effects, and adverse events. Our observations suggest that psychiatrists may heed regulatory warnings, but may also exert professional independence and discrimination in their application.

  5. Creating Inclusive School Environments: Recommendations for the Management of Neurobehavioural Comorbidities in Children with Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKinnon, Cheryl; Roberts, Jillian; Wylie, Jaimie

    2016-01-01

    The neurobehavioural comorbidities associated with childhood epilepsy present significant physical challenges (i.e., excessive fatigue, memory impairment, headaches, visual impairments), emotional challenges (i.e., depression, anxiety), behavioural challenges (i.e., inattentiveness, distractibility, aggression), and social challenges (i.e., peer…

  6. The Effects of Mind Subtraction Meditation on Depression, Social Anxiety, Aggression, and Salivary Cortisol Levels of Elementary School Children in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yang-Gyeong; Lee, Duck-Joo; Lee, In-Soo; Shin, Namin; Park, Ju-Yeon; Yoon, Mi-Ra; Yu, Boas

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed the effects of a school-based mind subtraction meditation program on depression, social anxiety, aggression, and salivary cortisol levels of 42 elementary school children in South Korea. The research design was a nonequivalent group comparison with pretest and post-test. The experimental group was given 8weeks of the meditation program. The results showed social anxiety, aggression, and salivary cortisol levels were significantly lowered in the experimental group. This demonstrated that the school-based mind subtraction meditation program could be effective in improving psychosocial and behavioral aspects of mental health in elementary school children.

  7. Effects of Jasminum multiflorum leaf extract on rodent models of epilepsy, motor coordination and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Addae, Jonas I; Pingal, Ramish; Walkins, Kheston; Cruickshank, Renee; Youssef, Farid F; Nayak, Shivananda B

    2017-03-01

    Jasmine flowers and leaves are used extensively in folk medicine in different parts of the world to treat a variety of diseases. However, there are very few published reports on the neuropsychiatric effects of Jasmine extracts. Hence, the objectives of the present study were to examine the effects of an alcohol extract of Jasminum multiflorum leaves on topically-applied bicuculline (a model of acute simple partial epilepsy) and maximal electroshock (MES, a model of generalized tonic-clonic seizure) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The objectives also included an examination of the anxiolytic properties of the extract using an elevated plus maze and the effect of the extract on motor coordination using a rotarod treadmill. Phytochemical analysis of the extract showed the presence of three flavonoids and four additional compounds belonging to the steroid, terpenoid, phenol or sugar classes of compounds. The Jasmine alcohol extract, diluted with water and given orally or intraperitoneally, reduced the number of bicuculline-induced epileptiform discharges in a dose-dependent manner. The extract did not cause a significant increase in the current needed to induce hind limb extension in MES experiments. The extract significantly affected motor coordination when injected at 500mg/kg but not at 200mg/kg. At the latter dose, the extract increased open-arm entries and duration in the elevated plus maze to a level comparable to that of diazepam at 2mg/kg. We conclude that Jasmine leaf extract has a beneficial effect against an animal model of acute partial complex epilepsy, and significant anxiolytic effect at a dose that does not affect motor co-ordination.

  8. Infant-Mother Attachment Security and Children's Anxiety and Aggression at First Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallaire, Danielle H.; Weinraub, Marsha

    2007-01-01

    With a large and diverse sample of children from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, the role of infant-mother attachment security as a protective factor against the development of children's anxious and aggressive behaviors at first grade was examined. When child's sex,…

  9. Yoga for the Prevention of Depression, Anxiety, and Aggression and the Promotion of Socio-Emotional Competencies in School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velásquez, Ana María; López, María Adelaida; Quiñonez, Natalia; Paba, Diana Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Children and youth coming from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds are at risk of developing behavioural problems. This study examined the efficacy of a Yoga programme implemented in a low-socioeconomic status school, for the prevention of depression, anxiety, and aggression. After-school workshops were delivered twice a week during 12 weeks…

  10. Exploring the Association between Cognitive Functioning and Anxiety in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Role of Social Understanding and Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niditch, Laura A.; Varela, R. Enrique; Kamps, Jodi L.; Hill, Trenesha

    2012-01-01

    This study examined relations between anxiety, aggression, social understanding, IQ, and diagnosis in a sample of 231 children (ages 2-9) diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs; Autistic Disorder, Asperger's Disorder, Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified) in a hospital setting. Children were administered tests of IQ,…

  11. [Coexistent depressive and anxiety disorders in epilepsy and multiple sclerosis: a challenge to neuropsychiatric practice].

    PubMed

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The high rate of co-existent emotional disorders in major neurological disorders, such as epilepsy and multiple sclerosis is challenging. As a rule, this co-existence comprises a more dramatic subjective suffering, a reduced psychological coping, possible negative interferences with somatic treatments and rehabilitations, an impaired quality of life and higher grades of psychosocial disability. It may also lead to an overall increased risk of somatic morbidity and even mortality in the further course of illness. These complex interrelations may be favourably integrated within a biopsychosocial model. Psychological and psychosocial stressors can be appreciated on their own discrete levels, have to be reflected, however, in their neurobiological correlates. Both neurological and emotional disorders frequently share decisive pathogenetic mechanisms, i.e. the underlying process of neurological disease may contribute to major affective problems also in a somato-psychic direction. In addition, mutual interactions of both neurological and psychiatric treatments in their impact on the emotional and neurological risks have to be appreciated.

  12. Effects of physical and verbal aggression, depression, and anxiety on drinking behavior of married partners: a prospective and retrospective longitudinal examination.

    PubMed

    Keiley, Margaret K; Keller, Peggy S; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2009-01-01

    In an ethnically diverse sample of 195 married couples, we conducted a latent factor growth analysis to investigate the longitudinal link (4 time points over 4 1/2 years) between marital aggression (physical and verbal aggression self- and partner-reports) and individual internalizing symptoms (depression and anxiety) as they relate to trajectories of alcohol use among husbands and wives. Alcohol use was operationalized as a latent factor with self- and partner reports of problem drinking as measured by the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test and the Alcohol Dependence Scale. Verbal aggression by husbands or wives, by itself, has no effect on their alcohol use over time. In conjunction with depression, however, verbally aggressive husbands do have elevated drinking levels. The effects of husbands' and wives' physical aggression on their own and their partners' drinking behavior were also significant. This study is one of the first to examine the change over time in alcohol use for marital partners as related to marital aggression and internalizing symptoms. Our results shed light on areas of marital functioning (aggression, internalizing, alcohol use) that have not been investigated in conjunction with each other in a longitudinal design.

  13. Excessive masturbation after epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Mine; Erdogan, Ayten; Duvenci, Sirin; Ozyurt, Emin; Ozkara, Cigdem

    2004-02-01

    Sexual behavior changes as well as depression, anxiety, and organic mood/personality disorders have been reported in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients before and after epilepsy surgery. The authors describe a 14-year-old girl with symptoms of excessive masturbation in inappropriate places, social withdrawal, irritability, aggressive behavior, and crying spells after selective amygdalohippocampectomy for medically intractable TLE with hippocampal sclerosis. Since the family members felt extremely embarrassed, they were upset and angry with the patient which, in turn, increased her depressive symptoms. Both her excessive masturbation behavior and depressive symptoms remitted within 2 months of psychoeducative intervention and treatment with citalopram 20mg/day. Excessive masturbation is proposed to be related to the psychosocial changes due to seizure-free status after surgery as well as other possible mechanisms such as Kluver-Bucy syndrome features and neurophysiologic changes associated with the cessation of epileptic discharges. This case demonstrates that psychiatric problems and sexual changes encountered after epilepsy surgery are possibly multifactorial and in adolescence hypersexuality may be manifested as excessive masturbation behavior.

  14. Adolescent mice show anxiety- and aggressive-like behavior and the reduction of long-term potentiation in mossy fiber-CA3 synapses after neonatal maternal separation.

    PubMed

    Shin, S Y; Han, S H; Woo, R-S; Jang, S H; Min, S S

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to maternal separation (MS) during early life is an identified risk factor for emotional disorders such as anxiety and depression later in life. This study investigated the effects of neonatal MS on the behavior and long-term potentiation (LTP) as well as basic synaptic transmission at hippocampal CA3-CA1 and mossy fiber (MF)-CA3 synapses in adolescent mice for 19days. When mice were adolescents, we measured depression, learning, memory, anxious and aggressive behavior using the forced swimming test (FST), Y-maze, Morris water maze (MWM), elevated plus maze (EPM), three consecutive days of the open field test, the social interaction test, the tube-dominance test and the resident-intruder test. The results showed that there was no difference in FST, Y-maze, and MWM performance. However, MS mice showed more anxiety-like behavior in the EPM test and aggressive-like behavior in the tube-dominance and resident-intruder tests. In addition, the magnitude of LTP and release probability in the MF-CA3 synapses was reduced in the MS group but not in the CA3-CA1 synapse. Our results indicate that early life stress due to MS may induce anxiety- and aggressive-like behavior during adolescence, and these effects are associated with synaptic plasticity at the hippocampal MF-CA3 synapses.

  15. Comorbid Anxiety and Social Avoidance in Treatment of Severe Childhood Aggression: Response to Adding Risperidone to Stimulant and Parent Training; Mediation of Disruptive Symptom Response

    PubMed Central

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Farmer, Cristan A.; Findling, Robert L.; Bukstein, Oscar; Molina, Brooke S.G.; Brown, Nicole V.; Li, Xiaobai; Rundberg-Rivera, E. Victoria; Bangalore, Srihari; Buchan-Page, Kristin; Hurt, Elizabeth A.; Rice, Robert; McNamara, Nora K.; Aman, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In the four-site Treatment of Severe Childhood Aggression (TOSCA) study, addition of risperidone to stimulant and parent training moderately improved parent-rated disruptive behavior disorder (DBD) symptoms. This secondary study explores outcomes other than DBD and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as measured by the Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory-4R (CASI-4R). Methods: A total of 168 children ages 6–12 with severe aggression (physical harm), DBD, and ADHD were randomized to parent training plus stimulant plus placebo (basic treatment) or parent training plus stimulant plus risperidone (augmented treatment) for 9 weeks. All received only parent training plus stimulant for the first 3 weeks, then those with room for improvement received a second drug (placebo or risperidone) for 6 weeks. CASI-4R category item means at baseline and week 9 were entered into linear mixed-effects models for repeated measures to evaluate group differences in changes. Mediation of the primary DBD outcome was explored. Results: Parent ratings were nonsignificant with small/negligible effects, but teacher ratings (n=46 with complete data) showed significant augmented treatment advantage for symptoms of anxiety (p=0.013, d=0.71), schizophrenia spectrum (p=0.017, d=0.45), and impairment in these domains (p=0.02, d=0.26), all remaining significant after false discovery rate correction for multiple tests. Improvement in teacher-rated anxiety significantly (p=0.001) mediated the effect of risperidone augmentation on the primary outcome, the Disruptive-total of the parent-rated Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form. Conclusions: Addition of risperidone to parent training plus stimulant improves not only parent-rated DBD as previously reported, but also teacher-rated anxiety–social avoidance. Improvement in anxiety mediates improvement in DBD, suggesting anxiety-driven fight-or-flight disruptive behavior with aggression, with implications for potential

  16. [Girls are more successful than boys at the university. Gender group differences in models integrating motivational and aggressive components correlated with Test-Anxiety].

    PubMed

    Masson, A-M; Hoyois, Ph; Cadot, M; Nahama, V; Petit, F; Ansseau, M

    2004-01-01

    performance value were scored higher in women, self-confidence and procrastination higher in men. Because TASTE didn't discriminate the different components of motivation (performance value referred to intrinsic and extrinsic motivations without precise distinction) we decided to use the MPS (Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale) which gave the opportunity to distinguish SOP (Self Oriented Perfectionism) ie, the self-imposed unrealistic standards with inability to accept faults in order to know and master a subject, that corresponded to intrinsic motivation; SPP (Socially Prescribed Perfectionism) ie, the exaggerated expectancies of others which are subjectively believed as imposed and uncontrollable leading to anxiety, feelings of failure or helplessness, that corresponded to extrinsic motivation; POO (Perfectionism Oriented to Others) ie, the unrealistic demands expected from significant others, which especially characterized males. We assumed that women attached more importance to succeed and submitted more to society exigencies. That way extrinsic and intrinsic motivations were probably more combined unlike men who, dreading a loss of self esteem, tried to avoid failure responsibility in using self handicapping or aggressive behaviours, so separating motivation in an extrinsic part turned to performance value and an intrinsic one more concerned by self confidence and sense of competence with the result that the motivational balance was surely disrupted in case of high competition leading to failure or avoidance. In another previous study we established a structural model illustrating, according to gender, correlations between anxiety, sense of incompetence, self-oriented perfectionism and socially prescribed perfectionism. Self-oriented perfectionism was less correlated to socially prescribed perfectionism in boys than in girls; furthermore especially by those who had never failed, it was negatively correlated to sense of incompetence, thus leading to lower scores of

  17. Chronic Inactivation of the Orbitofrontal Cortex Increases Anxiety-Like Behavior and Impulsive Aggression, but Decreases Depression-Like Behavior in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kuniishi, Hiroshi; Ichisaka, Satoshi; Matsuda, Sae; Futora, Eri; Harada, Riho; Hata, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is involved in emotional processing, and orbitofrontal abnormalities have often been observed in various affective disorders. Thus, chronic dysfunction of the OFC may cause symptoms of affective disorders, such as anxiety, depression and impulsivity. Previous studies have investigated the effect of orbitofrontal dysfunction on anxiety-like behavior and impulsive aggression in rodents, but the results are inconsistent possibly reflecting different methods of OFC inactivation. These studies used either a lesion of the OFC, which may affect other brain regions, or a transient inactivation of the OFC, whose effect may be restored in time and not reflect effects of chronic OFC dysfunction. In addition, there has been no study on the effect of orbitofrontal inactivation on depression-like behavior in rodents. Therefore, the present study examined whether chronic inactivation of the OFC by continuous infusion of a GABAA receptor agonist, muscimol, causes behavioral abnormalities in rats. Muscimol infusion inactivated the ventral and lateral part of the OFC. Following a week of OFC inactivation, the animals showed an increase in anxiety-like behavior in the open field test and light-dark test. Impulsive aggression was also augmented in the chronically OFC-inactivated animals because they showed increased frequency of fighting behavior induced by electric foot shock. On the other hand, chronic OFC inactivation reduced depression-like behavior as evaluated by the forced swim test. Additionally, it did not cause a significant change in corticosterone secretion in response to restraint stress. These data suggest that orbitofrontal neural activity is involved in the regulation of anxiety- and depression-like behaviors and impulsive aggression in rodents. PMID:28167902

  18. Sleep and behavioral problems in rolandic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Samaitienė, Rūta; Norkūnienė, Jolita; Tumienė, Birutė; Grikinienė, Jurgita

    2013-02-01

    Although patients with benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes exhibit a benign course of the disease, some of them display sleep and behavioral problems. Sixty-one patients with rolandic epilepsy, aged 6-11 years, were included in this study. The patients were divided into two subgroups according to the presence of seizures over the preceding 6 months. The control group comprised 25 patients without epilepsy and with similar characteristics in terms of age and sex. All patients underwent evaluation of sleep (Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children) and behavior (Lithuanian version of the Child Behaviour Checklist). Only patients who had had seizures over the preceding 6 months displayed significantly higher scores for sleep problems (disorders of excessive daytime sleepiness, disorders of sleep-wake transition, and scores for total sleep problems), worse sleep quality (longer sleep-onset latency), and behavioral problems (anxiety/depression, social problems, thought problems, attention problems, and aggressive behavior) than the patients of the control group. Our data add to evidence that active epilepsy has an impact on sleep and behavior. Clinically significant sleep problems were related to the higher risk of behavioral problems. Parents' ratings for existing sleep problems were sensitive to Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children scores above normal values.

  19. Epilepsy and homicide

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Neil S; Vrbancic, Mirna; Ladino, Lady Diana; Téllez-Zenteno, José F

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We report the rare case of a patient with intractable epilepsy and escalating aggression, resulting in murder, who had complete resolution of her seizures and explosive behavior following a right temporal lobectomy. Patients and methods We searched the available literature from 1880 to 2013 for cases of epilepsy being used as a court defense for murder and collected information regarding the final sentencing outcomes. We selected 15 papers with a total of 50 homicides. Results We describe the case of a 47-year-old woman with drug-resistant right temporal epilepsy who developed increasing emotional lability, outbursts of anger and escalating violent behavior culminating in a violent murder. The patient was imprisoned while awaiting trial. In the interim, she underwent a successful temporal lobectomy with full resolution of seizures, interictal rage and aggressive behaviors. After the surgery, her charges were downgraded and she was transferred to a psychiatric facility. Conclusion The aggressive behavior associated with epilepsy has been described in the literature for over a century. A link between epilepsy and aggression has been disproportionally emphasized. These patients share some common characteristics: they are usually young men with a long history of epilepsy and lower than average intelligence. The violent act is postictal, sudden-onset, more likely to occur after a cluster of seizures and is usually related with alcohol abuse. PMID:23700367

  20. Anxiety

    MedlinePlus

    ... include Panic disorder Obsessive-compulsive disorder Post-traumatic stress disorder Phobias Generalized anxiety disorder Treatment can involve medicines, therapy or both. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  1. Epilepsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - epilepsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on epilepsy : Epilepsy Foundation -- www.epilepsy.com National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/ ...

  2. Anxiety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Anxiety Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  3. Treatment issues for children with epilepsy transitioning to adult care.

    PubMed

    Nabbout, Rima; Camfield, Carol S; Andrade, Danielle M; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Chiron, Catherine; Cramer, Joyce A; French, Jacqueline A; Kossoff, Eric; Mula, Marco; Camfield, Peter R

    2017-02-07

    This is the third of three papers that summarize the second symposium on Transition in Epilepsies held in Paris in June 2016. This paper focuses on treatment issues that arise during the course of childhood epilepsy and make the process of transition to adult care more complicated. Some AEDs used during childhood, such as stiripentol, vigabatrin, and cannabidiol, are unfamiliar to adult epilepsy specialists. In addition, new drugs are being developed for treatment of specific childhood onset epilepsy syndromes and have no indication yet for adults. The ketogenic diet may be effective during childhood but is difficult to continue in adult care. Regional adult epilepsy diet clinics could be helpful. Polytherapy is common for patients transitioning to adult care. Although these complex AED regimes are difficult, they are often possible to simplify. AEDs used in childhood may need to be reconsidered in adulthood. Rescue medications to stop prolonged seizures and clusters of seizures are in wide home use in children and can be continued in adulthood. Adherence/compliance is notoriously difficult for adolescents, but there are simple clinical approaches that should be helpful. Mental health issues including depression and anxiety are not always diagnosed and treated in children and young adults even though effective treatments are available. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and aggressive behavior disorders may interfere with transition and successful adulthood but these can be treated. For the majority, the adult social outcome of children with epilepsy is unsatisfactory with few proven interventions. The interface between pediatric and adult care for children with epilepsy is becoming increasingly complicated with a need for more comprehensive transition programs and adult epileptologists who are knowledgeable about special treatments that benefit this group of patients.

  4. Cortisol in the morning and dimensions of anxiety, depression, and aggression in children from a general population and clinic-referred cohort: An integrated analysis. The TRAILS study.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Andrea; Ormel, Johan; Buitelaar, Jan K; Verhulst, Frank C; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hartman, Catharina A

    2013-08-01

    Anxiety and depressive problems have often been related to higher hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activity (basal morning cortisol levels and cortisol awakening response [CAR]) and externalizing problems to lower HPA-axis activity. However, associations appear weaker and more inconsistent than initially assumed. Previous studies from the Tracking Adolescents Individual Lives Study (TRAILS) suggested sex-differences in these relationships and differential associations with specific dimensions of depressive problems in a general population sample of children (10-12 years). Using the TRAILS population sample (n=1604), we tested hypotheses on the association between single day cortisol (basal morning levels and CAR) and specifically constructed dimensions of anxiety (cognitive versus somatic), depressive (cognitive-affective versus somatic), and externalizing problems (reactive versus proactive aggression), and explored the modifying role of sex. Moreover, we repeated analyses in an independent same-aged clinic-referred sample (n=357). Structural Equation Modeling was used to investigate the association between cortisol and higher- and lower-order (thus, broad and specific) problem dimensions based on self-reports in an integrated model. Overall, findings were consistent across the population and clinic-referred samples, as well as with the existing literature. Most support was found for higher cortisol (mainly CAR) in relation to depressive problems. However, in general, associations were weak in both samples. Therefore, the present results shed doubt on the relevance of single day cortisol measurements for problem behaviors in the milder range. Associations may be stronger in more severe or persistent psychopathology.

  5. Epilepsy Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Facts Take Charge of the Storm Rick Harrison of 'Pawn Stars' Partners with Epilepsy Foundation to ... the Facts Take Charge of the Storm Rick Harrison of 'Pawn Stars' Partners with Epilepsy Foundation to ...

  6. RNA splicing and editing modulation of 5-HT(2C) receptor function: relevance to anxiety and aggression in VGV mice.

    PubMed

    Martin, C B P; Ramond, F; Farrington, D T; Aguiar, A S; Chevarin, C; Berthiau, A-S; Caussanel, S; Lanfumey, L; Herrick-Davis, K; Hamon, M; Madjar, J J; Mongeau, R

    2013-06-01

    Changes in serotonin(2C) receptor (5-HTR2c) editing, splicing and density were found in conditions such as depression and suicide, but mechanisms explaining the changes in 5-HTR2c function are unknown. Thus, mice expressing only the fully edited VGV isoform of 5-HTR2c, in which clinically relevant behavioral changes are associated with alterations in splicing and receptor density, were studied. VGV mice displayed enhanced anxiety-like behavior in response to a preferential 5-HTR2c agonist in the social interaction test. Nearly half of interactions between pairs of VGV congeners consisted of fighting behaviors, whereas no fighting occurred in wild-type (WT) mice. VGV mice also exhibited a striking increase in freezing behaviors in reaction to an innately aversive ultrasonic stimulus. This behavioral phenotype occurred in conjunction with decreased brain 5-HT turnover during stress. These functional data were put in relation with the 5-HTR2c mRNA splicing process generating a truncated protein (5-HTR2c-Tr) in addition to the full-length receptor (5-HTR2c-Fl). 5-HTR2c-Tr mRNA was less abundant in many brain regions of VGV mice, which concomitantly had more 5-HTR2c than WT mice. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer studies in transfected living HEK293T cells showed that 5-HTR2c-Tr interacts with 5-HTR2c-Fl. The 5-HTR2c-Tr was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum where it retained 5-HTR2c-Fl, preventing the latter to reach the plasma membrane. Consequently, 5-HTR2c-Tr decreased (3)H-mesulergine binding to 5-HTR2c-Fl at the plasma membrane in a concentration-dependent manner and more strongly with edited 5-HTR2c-Fl. These results suggest that 5-HTR2c pre-mRNA editing and splicing are entwined processes determining increased 5-HTR2c levels in pathological conditions through a deficit in 5-HTR2c-Tr.

  7. Relation of Psychiatric Symptoms with Epilepsy, Asthma, and Allergy in Youth with ASD vs. Psychiatry Referrals.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rebecca J; Gadow, Kenneth D

    2016-10-11

    The present study aimed to characterize the association of psychopathology with the clinical correlates of epilepsy, asthma, and allergy within and between neurobehavioral syndromes. Participants were consecutively evaluated youth (6-18 years, 75 % male) with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; n = 589) and non-ASD outpatient psychiatry referrals (n = 653). Informants completed a background questionnaire (parents) and a psychiatric symptom severity rating scale (parents, teachers). Youth with ASD had higher rates of epilepsy and allergy but not asthma than psychiatry referrals, even when analyses were limited to youth with IQ ≥ 70. Somatic conditions evidenced variable associations with medical services utilization, educational interventions, family income, and maternal education. Youth with ASD with versus without epilepsy had more severe ASD social deficits (parents' ratings) and less severe ASD repetitive behaviors (teachers' ratings). Epilepsy was associated with more severe depression, mania, and schizophrenia symptoms in youth with ASD. Youth with allergy (psychiatry referrals only) had more severe anxiety and depression symptoms (parents' ratings) but less severe aggression (teachers' ratings) thus providing evidence of both context- and diagnostic-specificity. Youth with ASD versus non-ASD psychiatry referrals evidence a variable pattern of relations between somatic conditions and a range of clinical correlates, which suggests that the biologic substrates and psychosocial concomitants of neurodevelopmental disorders and their co-occurring somatic conditions may interact to produce unique clinical phenotypes.

  8. Cingulate Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Alkawadri, Rafeed; So, Norman K.; Van Ness, Paul C.; Alexopoulos, Andreas V.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The literature on cingulate gyrus epilepsy in the magnetic resonance imaging era is limited to case reports and small case series. To our knowledge, this is the largest study of surgically confirmed epilepsy arising from the anterior or posterior cingulate region. OBJECTIVE To characterize the clinical and electrophysiological findings of epilepsies arising from the anterior and posterior cingulate gyrus. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We studied consecutive cingulate gyrus epilepsy cases identified retrospectively from the Cleveland Clinic and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center epilepsy databases from 1992 to 2009. Participants included 14 consecutive cases of cingulate gyrus epilepsies confirmed by restricted magnetic resonance image lesions and seizure freedom or marked improvement following lesionectomy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The main outcome measure was improvement in seizure frequency following surgery. The clinical, video electroencephalography, neuroimaging, pathology, and surgical outcome data were reviewed. RESULTS All 14 patients had cingulate epilepsy confirmed by restricted magnetic resonance image lesions and seizure freedom or marked improvement following lesionectomy. They were divided into 3 groups based on anatomical location of the lesion and corresponding seizure semiology. In the posterior cingulate group, all 4 patients had electroclinical findings suggestive of temporal origin of the epilepsy. The anterior cingulate cases were divided into a typical (Bancaud) group (6 cases with hypermotor seizures and infrequent generalization with the presence of fear, laughter, or severe interictal personality changes) and an atypical group (4 cases presenting with simple motor seizures and a tendency for more frequent generalization and less-favorable long-term surgical outcome). All atypical cases were associated with an underlying infiltrative astrocytoma. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Posterior cingulate gyrus epilepsy may

  9. Gelastic epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gumpert, John; Hansotia, Phiroze; Upton, Adrian

    1970-01-01

    A case of retinitis pigmentosa with laughing epilepsy is described. Stereotyped repetitive episodes of limb movement, rigidity, and cackling laughter responding to diazepam are recorded. One episode is presented as gelastic status epilepticus and the clinical and EEG features are reported. Features of gelastic epilepsy are discussed and briefly compared with other laughing disorders. A short history of the condition is accompanied by a relevant review of the literature. The possible importance of hypothalamic lesions in laughing epilepsy is discussed and the absence of consistent EEG findings is noted. Images PMID:5505675

  10. Epilepsy, Mental Health Disorder, or Both?

    PubMed Central

    Beletsky, Vadim; Mirsattari, Seyed M.

    2012-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), a subset of the seizure disorder family, represents a complex neuropsychiatric illness, where the neurological presentation may be complemented by varying severity of affective, behavioral, psychotic, or personality abnormalities, which, in turn, may not only lead to misdiagnosis, but also affect the management. This paper outlines a spectrum of mental health presentations, including psychosis, mood, anxiety, panic, and dissociative states, associated with epilepsy that make the correct diagnosis a challenge. PMID:22934158

  11. About Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosed? How is epilepsy treated? What is an electroencephalography (EEG)? What is a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) ... Go back to the top What is an electroencephalography (EEG)? An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test to ...

  12. About Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... EEG Telemetry? What is Magnetoencephalography (MEG)? What is Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)? About Pre-surgical Evaluation for Epilepsy. What ... In most cases, an EEG (electroencephalogram) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) test will be performed as well. You will ...

  13. Obtaining genetic testing in pediatric epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ream, Margie A; Patel, Anup D

    2015-10-01

    The steps from patient evaluation to genetic diagnosis remain complicated. We discuss some of the genetic testing methods available along with their general advantages and disadvantages. We briefly review common pediatric epilepsy syndromes with strong genetic association and provide a potentially useful algorithm for genetic testing in drug-resistant epilepsy. We performed an extensive literature review of available information as it pertains to genetic testing and genetics in pediatric epilepsy. If a genetic disorder is suspected as the cause of epilepsy, based on drug resistance, family history, or clinical phenotype, timely diagnosis may reduce overall cost, limit the diagnostic odyssey that can bring much anxiety to families, improve prognostic accuracy, and lead to targeted therapy. Interpretation of complicated results should be performed only in collaboration with geneticists and genetic counselors, unless the ordering neurologist has a strong background in and understanding of genetics. Genetic testing can play an important role in the care provided to patients with epilepsy.

  14. Epilepsy in School-Aged Children: More than Just Seizures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Colin; Ballantine, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder in childhood and can have a significant impact on a child's schooling. Children with epilepsy may have special educational needs due to having learning disability, specific learning difficulties, specific cognitive deficits or having symptoms associated with ASD, ADHD, depression or anxiety. These…

  15. Isolated Hyperreligiosity in a Patient with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Santibanez, Rocio; Sarva, Harini

    2015-01-01

    A 40-year-old man with history of temporal lobe epilepsy presented to the emergency department with hyperreligiosity after medication noncompliance. After medications were resumed, he returned to baseline. Many famous prophets are believed to have suffered epilepsy. Waxman and Geschwind described a group of traits in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy consisting of hyperreligiosity, hypergraphia, altered sexual behavior, aggressiveness, preoccupation with details, and circumstantiality. The incidence of religious experiences ranges from 0.3 to 3.1 percent in patients with epilepsy. Religious experiences can be ictal, interictal, or postictal. Treatment is aimed at the underlying seizure etiology. PMID:26351599

  16. Paraneoplastic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Anna; Lukas, Rimas V; VanHaerents, Stephen; Warnke, Peter; Tao, James X; Rose, Sandra; Wu, Shasha

    2016-08-01

    Epilepsy can be a manifestation of paraneoplastic syndromes which are the consequence of an immune reaction to neuronal elements driven by an underlying malignancy affecting other organs and tissues. The antibodies commonly found in paraneoplastic encephalitis can be divided into two main groups depending on the target antigen: 1) antibodies against neuronal cell surface antigens, such as against neurotransmitter (N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)) receptors, ion channels (voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)), and channel-complex proteins (leucine rich, glioma inactivated-1 glycoprotein (LGI1) and contactin-associated protein-2 (CASPR2)) and 2) antibodies against intracellular neuronal antigens (Hu/antineuronal nuclear antibody-1 (ANNA-1), Ma2/Ta, glutamate decarboxylase 65 (GAD65), less frequently to CV2/collapsin response mediator protein 5 (CRMP5)). In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of the current literature on paraneoplastic epilepsy indexed by the associated onconeuronal antibodies. While a range of seizure types can be seen with paraneoplastic syndromes, temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common because of the association with limbic encephalitis. Early treatment of the paraneoplastic syndrome with immune modulation/suppression may prevent the more serious potential consequences of paraneoplastic epilepsy.

  17. American Epilepsy Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epilepsy Society CLINICAL RESOURCES FAQs GUIDELINES IOM EPILEPSY MEDICAL MARIJUANA SUDEP SURGERY DEVICES GENETICS TREATMENTS Drug Alerts and ... RESOURCES Navigation CLINICAL RESOURCES FAQs GUIDELINES IOM EPILEPSY MEDICAL MARIJUANA SUDEP SURGERY DEVICES GENETICS TREATMENTS Drug Alerts and ...

  18. Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain, and Mind: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Rektor, Ivan; Schachter, Steven C; Arya, Ravindra; Arzy, Shahar; Braakman, Hilde; Brodie, Martin J; Brugger, Peter; Chang, Bernard S; Guekht, Alla; Hermann, Bruce; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Jones-Gotman, Marilyn; Kanner, Andres M; Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Mareš, Pavel; Mula, Marco; Neufeld, Miri; Risse, Gail L; Ryvlin, Philippe; Seeck, Margitta; Tomson, Torbjörn; Korczyn, Amos D

    2015-09-01

    Epilepsy is both a disease of the brain and the mind. Here, we present the second of two papers with extended summaries of selected presentations of the Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain and Mind (April 3-5, 2014; Brno, Czech Republic). Humanistic, biologic, and therapeutic aspects of epilepsy, particularly those related to the mind, were discussed. The extended summaries provide current overviews of epilepsy, cognitive impairment, and treatment, including brain functional connectivity and functional organization; juvenile myoclonic epilepsy; cognitive problems in newly diagnosed epilepsy; SUDEP including studies on prevention and involvement of the serotoninergic system; aggression and antiepileptic drugs; body, mind, and brain, including pain, orientation, the "self-location", Gourmand syndrome, and obesity; euphoria, obsessions, and compulsions; and circumstantiality and psychiatric comorbidities.

  19. Aggressive Behavior

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Aggressive Behavior Page Content Article Body My child is sometimes very aggressive. What is the best ... once they are quiet and still reinforces this behavior, so your child learns that time out means “quiet and still.” ...

  20. [Clinical guidelines for epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2014-05-01

    Many international guidelines for epilepsy from the countries in Europe, USA and Asia have been published since the introduction of evidence-based medicine. In Japan, the clinical guidelines for epilepsy management were published by the Japanese Society of Neurology (JSN) in 2002 and 2010. The clinical guideline for epilepsy 2010 primarily targets general practitioners treating epilepsy patients. The Japan Epilepsy Society has been publishing 16 guidelines for several topics since 2005. The clinical guideline for epilepsy 2010 recommends that carbamazepine can be regarded for new onset partial epilepsy and sodium valproate is for new onset generalized epilepsy as anti-epileptic drug (AED) monotherapy. The new AEDs received approval by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, mainly in the add-on treatment of adults with partial epilepsy. The clinical guideline for epilepsy 2010 will contribute to improvement in the management of epilepsy in Japan.

  1. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds.

  2. Epilepsy and violence: medical and legal issues.

    PubMed

    Treiman, D M

    1986-01-01

    A possible relationship between epilepsy and violence has been debated for over a century. The debate has taken on new importance because of the increasing use of the "epilepsy defense" in criminal cases. In this review the following issues are addressed: (1) Is epilepsy more common among violent criminals and patients? (2) Is violence more common among epileptics? (3) Can directed violence or aggression occur as part of an epileptic seizure? (4) What medical and legal criteria should be used to determine whether a specific violent crime was the result of an epileptic seizure? Answers to these questions may be summarized as follows. (1) There is a two- to fourfold greater prevalence of epilepsy in prisoners than in control populations, but the prevalence is similar to the prevalence in other lower socioeconomic populations from which most prisoners come. There is no greater prevalence of epilepsy in persons convicted of violent crimes than in other prisoners matched as controls. (2) There is no evidence that violence is more common among epileptics than among non-epileptics, and no evidence that violence is more common in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy than in those with other types of epilepsy. (3) Ictal violence is rare, and when it does occur usually takes the form of "resistive violence" as the result of physical restraint at the end of a seizure, while the patient is still confused. Violence early in a seizure is extremely rare, stereotyped, and never supported by consecutive series of purposeful movements. (4) Five criteria should be used to determine if a specific violent act was the result of an epileptic seizure: a. the diagnosis of epilepsy should be established by a neurologist with special competence in epilepsy; b. the presence of epileptic automatisms should be documented by the case history and closed-circuit TV-EEG; c. aggression during epileptic automatisms should be documented on closed-circuit TV-EEG; d. the aggressive act should be

  3. Epilepsy-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Lin, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Liu; Xu, Hai-Qing; Shi, Yi-Wu; Yi, Yong-Hong; He, Na; Liao, Wei-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Development in genetic technology has led to the identification of an increasing number of genes associated with epilepsy. These discoveries will both provide the basis for including genetic tests in clinical practice and improve diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy. By searching through several databases (OMIM, HGMD, and EpilepsyGene) and recent publications on PubMed, we found 977 genes that are associated with epilepsy. We classified these genes into 4 categories according to the manifestation of epilepsy in phenotypes. We found 84 genes that are considered as epilepsy genes: genes that cause epilepsies or syndromes with epilepsy as the core symptom. 73 genes were listed as neurodevelopment-associated genes: genes associated with both brain-development malformations and epilepsy. Several genes (536) were epilepsy-related: genes associated with both physical or other systemic abnormalities and epilepsy or seizures. We found 284 additional genes putatively associated with epilepsy; this requires further verification. These integrated data will provide new insights useful for both including genetic tests in the clinical practice and evaluating the results of genetic tests. We also summarized the epilepsy-associated genes according to their function, with the goal to better characterize the association between genes and epilepsies and to further understand the mechanisms underlying epilepsy.

  4. Social attention in children with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lunn, Judith; Donovan, Tim; Litchfield, Damien; Lewis, Charlie; Davies, Robert; Crawford, Trevor

    2017-04-01

    Children with epilepsy may be vulnerable to impaired social attention given the increased risk of neurobehavioural comorbidities. Social attentional orienting and the potential modulatory role of attentional control on the perceptual processing of gaze and emotion cues have not been examined in childhood onset epilepsies. Social attention mechanisms were investigated in patients with epilepsy (n=25) aged 8-18years old and performance compared to healthy controls (n=30). Dynamic gaze and emotion facial stimuli were integrated into an antisaccade eye-tracking paradigm. The time to orient attention and execute a horizontal saccade toward (prosaccade) or away (antisaccade) from a peripheral target measured processing speed of social signals under conditions of low or high attentional control. Patients with epilepsy had impaired processing speed compared to healthy controls under conditions of high attentional control only when gaze and emotions were combined meaningfully to signal motivational intent of approach (happy or anger with a direct gaze) or avoidance (fear or sad with an averted gaze). Group differences were larger in older adolescent patients. Analyses of the discrete gaze emotion combinations found independent effects of epilepsy-related, cognitive and behavioural problems. A delayed disengagement from fearful gaze was also found under low attentional control that was linked to epilepsy developmental factors and was similarly observed in patients with higher reported anxiety problems. Overall, findings indicate increased perceptual processing of developmentally relevant social motivations during increased cognitive control, and the possibility of a persistent fear-related attentional bias. This was not limited to patients with chronic epilepsy, lower IQ or reported behavioural problems and has implications for social and emotional development in individuals with childhood onset epilepsies beyond remission.

  5. Video game epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Bhalla, A; Lehl, S S; Sachdev, A

    2001-12-01

    Reflex epilepsy is the commonest form of epilepsy in which seizures are provoked by specific external stimulus. Photosensitive reflex epilepsy is provoked by environmental flicker stimuli. Video game epilepsy is considered to be its variant or a pattern sensitive epilepsy. The mean age of onset is around puberty and boys suffer more commonly as they are more inclined to play video games. Television set or computer screen is the commonest precipitants. The treatment remains the removal of the offending stimulus along with drug therapy. Long term prognosis in these patients is better as photosensitivity gradually declines with increasing age. We present two such case of epilepsy induced by video game.

  6. Childhood epilepsy and sleep

    PubMed Central

    Al-Biltagi, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and epilepsy are two well recognized conditions that interact with each other in a complex bi-directional way. Some types of epilepsies have increased activity during sleep disturbing it; while sleep deprivation aggravates epilepsy due to decreased seizure threshold. Epilepsy can deteriorate the sleep-related disorders and at the same time; the parasomnias can worsen the epilepsy. The secretion of sleep-related hormones can also be affected by the occurrence of seizures and supplementation of epileptic patients with some of these sleep-related hormones may have a beneficial role in controlling epilepsy. PMID:25254184

  7. Risk factors for fatigue in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Song; Wu, Yuanbin; Deng, Yanchun; Liu, Yonghong; Zhao, Jingjing; Ma, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Fatigue is highly prevalent in patients with epilepsy and has a major impact on quality of life, but little data is available on its effects and management in epilepsy. To identify the incidence and risk factors of fatigue in patients with epilepsy, 105 epilepsy patients (45 women and 60 men) were enrolled in our study. Demographic and clinical data were collected and psychological variables including fatigue, sleep quality, excess daytime sleepiness, anxiety, and depression were measured by Fatigue Severity Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, respectively. Of 105 patients, 29.5% exhibited fatigue (FSS score ⩾4). We found no correlation between the occurrence of fatigue and any of our demographic or clinical variables. Fatigue is correlated with low sleep quality, anxiety, and depression, but not with excess daytime sleepiness. Thus, we concluded that fatigue is highly prevalent in patients with epilepsy, and that low sleep quality, anxiety, and depression are significantly correlated with fatigue in epileptics, while excess daytime sleepiness not.

  8. Surgery for childhood epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Jayalakshmi, Sita; Panigrahi, Manas; Nanda, Subrat Kumar; Vadapalli, Rammohan

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 60% of all patients with epilepsy suffer from focal epilepsy syndromes. In about 15% of these patients, the seizures are not adequately controlled with antiepileptic drugs; such patients are potential candidates for surgical treatment and the major proportion is in the pediatric group (18 years old or less). Epilepsy surgery in children who have been carefully chosen can result in either seizure freedom or a marked (>90%) reduction in seizures in approximately two-thirds of children with intractable seizures. Advances in structural and functional neuroimaging, neurosurgery, and neuroanaesthesia have improved the outcomes of surgery for children with intractable epilepsy. Early surgery improves the quality of life and cognitive and developmental outcome and allows the child to lead a normal life. Surgically remediable epilepsies should be identified early and include temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis, lesional temporal and extratemporal epilepsy, hemispherical epilepsy, and gelastic epilepsy with hypothalamic hamartoma. These syndromes have both acquired and congenital etiologies and can be treated by resective or disconnective surgery. Palliative procedures are performed in children with diffuse and multifocal epilepsies who are not candidates for resective surgery. The palliative procedures include corpus callosotomy and vagal nerve stimulation while deep brain stimulation in epilepsy is still under evaluation. For children with “surgically remediable epilepsy,” surgery should be offered as a procedure of choice rather than as a treatment of last resort. PMID:24791093

  9. Musicogenic epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Brien, S E; Murray, T J

    1984-01-01

    A case of musicogenic epilepsy is reported in which the seizures were precipitated by singing voices. It was found that some singers' voices were particularly epileptogenic and that some of their songs, but not others, would precipitate a seizure. A study of the "offending" songs and singers did not reveal a common key, chord, harmonic interval, pitch or rhythm, and the emotional feeling or intensity of the music did not seem to be relevant. However, the voices that caused the seizures had a throaty, "metallic" quality. Such a singing voice results from incorrect positioning of the larynx such that it is not allowed to descend fully during singing; consequently, the vowel sounds produced must be manipulated by the lips or jaw to be distinguished. This trait is most common in singers with a low voice range who sing softly and use a microphone. It is not seen in trained operatic or musical theatre singers. The results of repeated testing showed that the seizures in this patient were caused by listening to singers who positioned the larynx incorrectly. PMID:6498678

  10. Sexual dysfunction in women with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Karan, Vivek; Harsha, S.; Keshava, B. S.; Pradeep, R.; Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.; Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sexual functioning and variables that influence sexual functioning have not been studied in Indian women with epilepsy. Materials and Methods: In a pilot study, female (age, 18–45 years) outpatients with epilepsy who were in a stable sexual relationship for at least 1-year were screened using the mini international neuropsychiatric interview. Those without anxiety or depressive disorders (n = 60) were studied using the female sexual function index (FSFI; higher scores indicate better functioning). Findings were compared with age- and sex- matched sample of healthy control women drawn from the same sociodemographic population. Results: Women with epilepsy had significantly poorer sexual functioning on all FSFI subscales (desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, pain), as well as on the total scale scores, and >70% of these women were rated as dysfunctional on individual FSFI subscales and on the total scale. In multivariate analysis, use of clobazam and phenobarbitone, and longer time after the last seizure were each associated with significantly higher FSFI scores; and longer duration of epilepsy was associated with significantly lower FSFI scores. Conclusion: There is a substantial impairment of sexual functioning in women with epilepsy. This study demonstrates the need for increased awareness of the problem, better case identification, and improved seizure control. PMID:26600586

  11. Genetics of pediatric epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hani, Abeer J; Mikati, Husam M; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2015-06-01

    As the genetic etiologies of an expanding number of epilepsy syndromes are revealed, the complexity of the phenotype genotype correlation increases. As our review will show, multiple gene mutations cause different epilepsy syndromes, making identification of the specific mutation increasingly more important for prognostication and often more directed treatment. Examples of that include the need to avoid specific drugs in Dravet syndrome and the ongoing investigations of the potential use of new directed therapies such as retigabine in KCNQ2-related epilepsies, quinidine in KCNT1-related epilepsies, and memantine in GRIN2A-related epilepsies.

  12. Myoclonus and epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Fejerman, N

    1997-01-01

    The possible associations of myoclonic phenomenae, progressive or non-progressive encephalopathies and epileptic features are reviewed, with special emphasis on pediatric age. This leads to recognize the following five groups of conditions: (1) Myoclonus without encephalopathy and without epilepsy; (2) Encephalopathies with non-epileptic myoclonus; (3) Progressive encephalopathies presenting myoclonus seizures of epileptic syndromes (Progressive myoclonus epilepsies); (4) Epileptic encephalopathies with myoclonic seizures; (5) Myoclonic epilepsies. Within the first group, which also includes physiologic myoclonus, a more thorough description of "Benign sleep myoclonus of newborn" and "Benign myoclonus of early infancy" is given. Characteristics of group 2 are "Kinsbourne Syndrome" and certain types of "Hyperekplexia" which pose interesting differential diagnosis with stimulus-sensitive epilepsies. In group 3, the concept of progressive encephalopathies is stressed. The fourth group refers to severe epilepsies, mainly on infancy and childhood, which lead to mental retardation irrespective of their aetiology. Group 5 comprises the true myoclonic epilepsies, differentiating syndromes recognized as idiopathic--such as "Benign myoclonic epilepsy of infancy" and "Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy"--from those which are cryptogenic and carry a more cautious prognosis--as "Cryptogenic myoclonic and myoclonoastatic epilepsies" and "Severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy". Other epileptic syndromes not usually considered as myoclonic epilepsies, but presenting sometimes as myoclonic seizures, are finally referred.

  13. [Epilepsy care network].

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Taisuke

    2014-05-01

    Build-up of community health coalition system is now an essential part of medicine. However, little attention has been paid to epilepsy care in Japan, which resulted in a chaotic and difficult situation to find epilepsy-care physicians in the community. The reason is that responsible medical specialty in charge has been ambiguous historically in Japan and a lack of post-in-charge in the government to plan epilepsy care system is aggravating this condition. To solve this issue, epilepsy care network connecting the primary, secondary and tertiary epilepsy care physicians should be established and open to the community. In this context, our Epilepsy Care Network-Japan was started on July 2012 proposing a new epilepsy care algorithm suitable for our complex medical community.

  14. Psychoneuroendocrine aspects of temporolimbic epilepsy. Part I. Brain, reproductive steroids, and emotions.

    PubMed

    Herzog, A G

    1999-01-01

    The temporolimbic structures of the brain that subserve emotional representation are highly epileptogenic and play an important role in the modulation of hormonal secretion and mediation of hormonal feedback. Estrogen is highly epileptogenic and exerts energizing and antidepressant effects. Excessive estrogen influence produces anxiety, agitation, irritability, and lability. It can promote the development of anxiety manifestations (e.g., panic, phobias, and obsessive-compulsive disorder). Progesterone and its metabolites inhibit kindling and seizure activity. They have potent anxiolytic effects, possibly by virtue of their GABAergic activity. Excessive progesterone influence produces sedation and depression. Testosterone has two major metabolites: estradiol, which can exacerbate seizures, and dihydrotestosterone, which blocks NMDA-type glutamate transmission and may be responsible for antiseizure effects. Testosterone has energizing effects and increases sexual desire in both men and women. In excess, however, it may promote aggressive, impulsive, and hypersexual behavior. Hormonal effects tend to be exaggerated or idiosyncratic in the setting of an abnormal or anomalous temporolimbic substrate, especially temporolimbic epilepsy. This may reflect altered neuronal responsivity to hormonal exposure perhaps by virtue of changes in the number of dendritic spines and receptors.

  15. Primary sleep disorders in people with epilepsy: clinical questions and answers.

    PubMed

    Grigg-Damberger, Madeleine M; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The questions facing clinicians with patients with sleep disorder and epilepsy are addressed in this article. Both adult and child epilepsy are discussed in the context of the most typical questions a clinician would have, such as "Are parasomnias more common in people with epilepsy?", "Is sleep architecture abnormal in children with epilepsy", along with outcomes of numerous questionnaire-based, case-based, and double-blind placebo studies on such aspects as sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, anxiety and fears, limb movement, nocturnal seizures, agitation, behavioral disorders, and learning disorders.

  16. Contemplating stem cell therapy for epilepsy-induced neuropsychiatric symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Gautam; Mashkouri, Sherwin; Aum, David; Marcet, Paul; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a debilitating disease that impacts millions of people worldwide. While unprovoked seizures characterize its cardinal symptom, an important aspect of epilepsy that remains to be addressed is the neuropsychiatric component. It has been documented for millennia in paintings and literature that those with epilepsy can suffer from bouts of aggression, depression, and other psychiatric ailments. Current treatments for epilepsy include the use of antiepileptic drugs and surgical resection. Antiepileptic drugs reduce the overall firing of the brain to mitigate the rate of seizure occurrence. Surgery aims to remove a portion of the brain that is suspected to be the source of aberrant firing that leads to seizures. Both options treat the seizure-generating neurological aspect of epilepsy, but fail to directly address the neuropsychiatric components. A promising new treatment for epilepsy is the use of stem cells to treat both the biological and psychiatric components. Stem cell therapy has been shown efficacious in treating experimental models of neurological disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, and neuropsychiatric diseases, such as depression. Additional research is necessary to see if stem cells can treat both neurological and neuropsychiatric aspects of epilepsy. Currently, there is no animal model that recapitulates all the clinical hallmarks of epilepsy. This could be due to difficulty in characterizing the neuropsychiatric component of the disease. In advancing stem cell therapy for treating epilepsy, experimental testing of the safety and efficacy of allogeneic and autologous transplantation will require the optimization of cell dosage, delivery, and timing of transplantation in a clinically relevant model of epilepsy with both neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms of the disease as the primary outcome measures. PMID:28260906

  17. Autism and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul; Almqvist, Catarina; Hultman, Christina M.; Tomson, Torbjörn; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in individuals with epilepsy and in their first-degree relatives to determine shared etiology. Methods: Through the Swedish Patient Register, we identified 85,201 individuals with epilepsy, as well as all their siblings (n = 80,511) and offspring (n = 98,534). Each individual with epilepsy was compared with 5 controls, matched for age, sex, calendar period, and county, while siblings and offspring were compared with siblings and offspring of controls. We excluded siblings and offspring with epilepsy. Using Cox regression, we calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for future diagnosis of ASD. Logistic regression was applied to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for prior diagnosis of ASD. Results: During follow-up, 1,381 (1.6%) individuals with epilepsy and 700 (0.2%) controls were diagnosed with ASD. Individuals with epilepsy were therefore at increased risk of future ASD (HR 10.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 9.55–11.53), with the highest risk seen in individuals diagnosed with epilepsy in childhood. Both siblings (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.43–1.83) and offspring (HR 1.64, 95% CI 1.46–1.84) of epilepsy patients were at increased risk of ASD. The risk in the offspring was particularly high in mothers with epilepsy (HR 1.91; 95% CI 1.63–2.23). Epilepsy was also associated with a prior diagnosis of ASD (OR 4.56, 95% CI 4.02–5.18). Conclusions: Individuals with epilepsy are at increased risk of ASD, especially if epilepsy appears in childhood. Further, ASD is more common in the siblings and offspring of individuals with epilepsy, suggesting shared etiology. PMID:27306624

  18. Genetics of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Vadlamudi, Lata; Milne, Roger L.; Lawrence, Kate; Heron, Sarah E.; Eckhaus, Jazmin; Keay, Deborah; Connellan, Mary; Torn-Broers, Yvonne; Howell, R. Anne; Mulley, John C.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Hopper, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Analysis of twins with epilepsy to explore the genetic architecture of specific epilepsies, to evaluate the applicability of the 2010 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) organization of epilepsy syndromes, and to integrate molecular genetics with phenotypic analyses. Methods: A total of 558 twin pairs suspected to have epilepsy were ascertained from twin registries (69%) or referral (31%). Casewise concordance estimates were calculated for epilepsy syndromes. Epilepsies were then grouped according to the 2010 ILAE organizational scheme. Molecular genetic information was utilized where applicable. Results: Of 558 twin pairs, 418 had confirmed seizures. A total of 534 twin individuals were affected. There were higher twin concordance estimates for monozygotic (MZ) than for dizygotic (DZ) twins for idiopathic generalized epilepsies (MZ = 0.77; DZ = 0.35), genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (MZ = 0.85; DZ = 0.25), and focal epilepsies (MZ = 0.40; DZ = 0.03). Utilizing the 2010 ILAE scheme, the twin data clearly demonstrated genetic influences in the syndromes designated as genetic. Of the 384 tested twin individuals, 10.9% had mutations of large effect in known epilepsy genes or carried validated susceptibility alleles. Conclusions: Twin studies confirm clear genetic influences for specific epilepsies. Analysis of the twin sample using the 2010 ILAE scheme strongly supported the validity of grouping the “genetic” syndromes together and shows this organizational scheme to be a more flexible and biologically meaningful system than previous classifications. Successful selected molecular testing applied to this cohort is the prelude to future large-scale next-generation sequencing of epilepsy research cohorts. Insights into genetic architecture provided by twin studies provide essential data for optimizing such approaches. PMID:25107880

  19. Addressing Social Aggression in State Anti-Bullying Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temkin, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Social aggression, or victimization using social exclusion, rumors, and body language, has been overlooked in state anti-bullying policies since the policy surge following the 1999 Columbine Massacres. Social aggression has been associated with social anxiety disorder, depression and suicide, and lowered academic achievement and involvement. An…

  20. Aggressive Adolescents Benefit from Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Shaw, Jon A.; Rothe, Eugenio M.; Castellanos, Daniel; Mesner, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Seventeen aggressive adolescents were assigned to a massage therapy group or a relaxation therapy group to receive 20-minute therapy sessions, twice a week for five weeks. The massaged adolescents had lower anxiety after the first and last sessions. By the end of the study, they also reported feeling less hostile and they were perceived by their…

  1. Epilepsy in the dental office: concern, care and management.

    PubMed

    Haller, Jerome S

    2008-04-01

    Epilepsy, also known as seizure disorder, encompasses several different modes of presentation. Patients of all ages, from early childhood to the elderly, who present for dental care may be taking anticonvulsants or may have an unanticipated seizure in the dental office. Dentists should be familiar with the varied manifestations of seizures, the medications used in their treatment and management of a seizure in the dental office. It is estimated that 1% of the population of the United States are afflicted with epilepsy. There is indication that the elderly are becoming included in that number because of their affliction with cardiovascular disorders. The word "epilepsy" raises anxiety in many people because they fear that such an event is life threatening. However, the term epilepsy applies primarily to prolonged or repetitive seizures requiring intervention by trained individuals.

  2. Christianity and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Owczarek, K; Jędrzejczak, J

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic seizures have been known from time immemorial. Throughout the ages, however, ideas concerning the aetiology and treatment of epilepsy have changed considerably. Epilepsy is mentioned many times in the Pentateuch, where it is portrayed as a mysterious condition, whose symptoms, course and contingencies evade rational laws and explanations. In the Middle Ages, the accepted view which prevailed in social consciousness was that patients with epilepsy were possessed by Satan and other impure spirits. One common method of treatment of epileptic seizures was to submit the patient to cruel exorcisms. Patients were frequently injured in the process and some of them even died. Our understanding of epilepsy and its social consequences has improved considerably within the last century. The most significant progress as far as diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy is concerned took place in the last four decades of the twentieth century. Although we now know much more about epilepsy than we used to, this knowledge is still insufficiently popularized.

  3. Headache and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bauer, P R; Carpay, J A; Terwindt, G M; Sander, J W; Thijs, R J; Haan, J; Visser, G H

    2013-08-01

    Headache and epilepsy often co-occur. Epidemiologic studies conducted in the past few years reinforce the notion of a bi-directional association between migraine and epilepsy. Data on an association between headache (in general) and epilepsy, however, are less clear. Peri-ictal headache often presents with migraine-like symptoms and can be severe. A correct diagnosis and management are paramount. It was demonstrated that cortical hyperexcitability may underlie both epilepsy and migraine. A recent study linked spreading depolarisation, the supposed underlying pathophysiological mechanism of migraine with aura, to epilepsy. Although this study was carried out in patients who had suffered a subarachnoid haemorrhage, the finding may shed light on pathophysiological mechanisms common to epilepsy and migraine.

  4. Pharmacoresistant epilepsy and nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Rosillo-de la Torre, Argelia; Luna-Bárcenas, Gabriel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; Salgado-Ceballos, Hermelinda; García, Perla; Lazarowski, Alberto; Rocha, Luisa

    2014-06-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological disorders. Furthermore, it is associated to diminished health-related quality of life and is thus considered a major public health problem. In spite of the large number of available and ongoing development of several new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), a high percentage of patients with epilepsy (35-40%) are resistant to pharmacotherapy. A hypothesis to explain pharmacoresistance in epilepsy suggests that overexpression of multidrug resistance proteins, such as P-glycoprotein, on the endothelium of the blood brain barrier represents a challenge for effective AED delivery and concentration levels in the brain. Proven therapeutic strategies to control pharmacoresistant epilepsy include epilepsy surgery and neuromodulation. Unfortunately, not all patients are candidates for these therapies. Nanotechnology represents an attractive strategy to overcome the limited brain access of AEDs in patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. This manuscript presents a review of evidences supporting this idea.

  5. Photoacoustic Imaging of Epilepsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Numbers 1–5 indi- cate the corresponding blood vessels in the PAT image and rat brain photograph. 241L. Xiang et al. / NeuroImage 66 (2013) 240–248( Bertram ...the epileptic circuitry have enhanced excitability throughout ( Bertram et al., 1998; Fountain et al., 1998; Mangan et al., 2000). The implication of...antiepileptic drugs after epilepsy surgery: a survey of U.S. epilepsy center neurologists. Epilepsy Behav. 10, 219–222. Bertram , E.H., 2009. Temporal lobe

  6. Epilepsy, psychiatry, and neurology.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Edward H; Trimble, Michael R

    2009-03-01

    This article reviews the relationship between the psychiatry and neurology of epilepsy, especially in the last 100 years. Throughout most of its recorded history of 3 to 4 millennia epilepsy has been viewed as a supernatural or mental disorder. Although first suggested by Hippocrates in the 5th century B.C., the concept of epilepsy as a brain disorder only began to take root in the 17th and 18th centuries. The discipline of neurology emerged from "nervous disorders" or neuropsychiatry in the late 19th century, when vascular theories of epilepsy predominated. By the turn of the 19th century psychiatry and neurology were diverging and epilepsy remained to some extent in both disciplines. It was only in the middle of the 20th century with the development of electromagnetic theories of epilepsy that the concept of epilepsy per se as a neurological disorder was finally adopted in international classifications of disease. This was associated with a refined definition of the ictal, pre-, post-, and interictal psychological disorders of epilepsy, which have contributed to a renaissance of neuropsychiatry. At the beginning of the 21st century and the centenary of the ILAE psychiatry and neurology have been converging again, led in some respects by epilepsy, which has provided several useful models of mental illness and a bridge between the two disciplines.

  7. Epilepsy: Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Santhosh, Nandanavana Subbareddy; Sinha, Sanjib; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy

    2014-01-01

    There are 50 million people living with epilepsy worldwide, and most of them reside in developing countries. About 10 million persons with epilepsy are there in India. Many people with active epilepsy do not receive appropriate treatment for their condition, leading to large treatment gap. The lack of knowledge of antiepileptic drugs, poverty, cultural beliefs, stigma, poor health infrastructure, and shortage of trained professionals contribute for the treatment gap. Infectious diseases play an important role in seizures and long-term burden causing both new-onset epilepsy and status epilepticus. Proper education and appropriate health care services can make tremendous change in a country like India. There have been many original researches in various aspects of epilepsy across India. Some of the geographically specific epilepsies occur only in certain regions of our country which have been highlighted by authors. Even the pre-surgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy is available in many centers in our country. This article attempts to provide a complete preview of epilepsy in India. PMID:24791085

  8. Approaches to refractory epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological conditions, and 30 to 40% of people with epilepsy have seizures that are not controlled by medication. Patients are considered to have refractory epilepsy if disabling seizures continue despite appropriate trials of two antiseizure drugs, either alone or in combination. At this point, patients should be referred to multidisciplinary epilepsy centers that perform specialized diagnostic testing to first determine whether they are, in fact, pharmacoresistant, and then, if so, offer alternative treatments. Apparent pharmacoresistance can result from a variety of situations, including noncompliance, seizures that are not epileptic, misdiagnosis of the seizure type or epilepsy syndrome, inappropriate use of medication, and lifestyle issues. For patients who are pharmacoresistant, surgical treatment offers the best opportunity for complete freedom from seizures. Surgically remediable epilepsy syndromes have been identified, but patients with more complicated epilepsy can also benefit from surgical treatment and require more specialized evaluation, including intracranial EEG monitoring. For patients who are not surgical candidates, or who are unwilling to consider surgery, a variety of other alternative treatments can be considered, including peripheral or central neurostimulation, ketogenic diet, and complementary and alternative approaches. When such alternative treatments are not appropriate or effective, quality of life can still be greatly improved by the psychological and social support services offered by multidisciplinary epilepsy centers. A major obstacle remains the fact that only a small proportion of patients with refractory epilepsy are referred for expert evaluation and treatment. PMID:24791078

  9. EPILEPSY AND MENTAL RETARDATION

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Thuppal; Narayan, Jayanthi

    1992-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most frequently associated conditions with mental retardation which interferes with the learning process. Vie present study investigates the 1207 cases (Male -8I4, Female-393) registered at NIMH, Secunderabad, over a period of two years. Vie factors studied were the prevalence of epilepsy, degree of mental retardation, aetiology and associated factors. Ten mentally retarded persons with epilepsy were followed up longitudinally to study the effect of epilepsy on learning. It was observed that an attack of seizure resulted in a setback in the learning of skills. The results are discussed. PMID:21776089

  10. Epilepsy: Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Nandanavana Subbareddy; Sinha, Sanjib; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy

    2014-03-01

    There are 50 million people living with epilepsy worldwide, and most of them reside in developing countries. About 10 million persons with epilepsy are there in India. Many people with active epilepsy do not receive appropriate treatment for their condition, leading to large treatment gap. The lack of knowledge of antiepileptic drugs, poverty, cultural beliefs, stigma, poor health infrastructure, and shortage of trained professionals contribute for the treatment gap. Infectious diseases play an important role in seizures and long-term burden causing both new-onset epilepsy and status epilepticus. Proper education and appropriate health care services can make tremendous change in a country like India. There have been many original researches in various aspects of epilepsy across India. Some of the geographically specific epilepsies occur only in certain regions of our country which have been highlighted by authors. Even the pre-surgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy is available in many centers in our country. This article attempts to provide a complete preview of epilepsy in India.

  11. Surgical treatment for epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Jerome; Wiebe, Samuel; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Palmini, André

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment for epilepsy remains highly underutilized: in the United States, there has been no increase in the number of surgical procedures performed annually since 19901; for most patients referred, the average duration of epilepsy is 22 years2; and there has been no change in this delay to surgery3, despite two randomized controlled trials4, 5 and an American Academy of Neurology practice parameter that recommended surgery as the treatment of choice for medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy6. This session addressed issues relevant to increasing the availability of epilepsy surgery, particularly in countries with limited resources.

  12. Genes, Seizures & Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Alica M.

    2006-01-01

    The chance that someone will develop any disease is influenced by heredity and environment. Epilepsy is not an exception. Everybody inherits a unique degree of susceptibility to seizures. About 3 percent of the United States population is prone to seizures and will get epilepsy at some point of their lives (1). Two thirds of the people with…

  13. Epilepsy and oral care.

    PubMed

    Fiske, Janice; Boyle, Carole

    2002-05-01

    Epilepsy is a common symptom of an underlying neurological disorder. The seizures can take a variety of forms. Both the condition and its medical management can affect oral health. Prevention of oral disease and carefully planned dental treatment are essential to the well-being of people with epilepsy.

  14. Epilepsy surgery in patients with autism.

    PubMed

    Kokoszka, Malgosia A; McGoldrick, Patricia E; La Vega-Talbott, Maite; Raynes, Hillary; Palmese, Christina A; Wolf, Steven M; Harden, Cynthia L; Ghatan, Saadi

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to report outcomes of epilepsy surgery in 56 consecutive patients with autism spectrum disorder. METHODS Medical records of 56 consecutive patients with autism who underwent epilepsy surgery were reviewed with regard to clinical characteristics, surgical management, postoperative seizure control, and behavioral changes. RESULTS Of the 56 patients with autism, 39 were male, 45 were severely autistic, 27 had a history of clinically significant levels of aggression and other disruptive behaviors, and 30 were considered nonverbal at baseline. Etiology of the epilepsy was known in 32 cases, and included structural lesions, medical history, and developmental and genetic factors. Twenty-nine patients underwent resective treatments (in 8 cases combined with palliative procedures), 24 patients had only palliative treatments, and 3 patients had only subdural electroencephalography. Eighteen of the 56 patients had more than one operation. The mean age at surgery was 11 ± 6.5 years (range 1.5-35 years). At a mean follow-up of 47 ± 30 months (range 2-117 months), seizure outcomes included 20 Engel Class I, 12 Engel Class II, 18 Engel Class III, and 3 Engel Class IV cases. The age and follow-up times are stated as the mean ± SD. Three patients were able to discontinue all antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Aggression and other aberrant behaviors observed in the clinical setting improved in 24 patients. According to caregivers, most patients also experienced some degree of improvement in daily social and cognitive function. Three patients had no functional or behavioral changes associated with seizure reduction, and 2 patients experienced worsening of seizures and behavioral symptoms. CONCLUSIONS Epilepsy surgery in patients with autism is feasible, with no indication that the comorbidity of autism should preclude a good outcome. Resective and palliative treatments brought seizure freedom or seizure reduction to the majority of patients

  15. Sex, epilepsy, and epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Irfan A.; Mehler, Mark F.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders that are associated with a wide range of pathogenic mechanisms, seizure manifestations, comorbidity profiles, and therapeutic responses. These characteristics are all influenced quite significantly by sex. As with other conditions exhibiting such patterns, sex differences in epilepsy are thought to arise—at the most fundamental level—from the “organizational” and “activational” effects of sex hormones as well as from the direct actions of the sex chromosomes. However, our understanding of the specific molecular, cellular, and network level processes responsible for mediating sex differences in epilepsy remains limited. Because increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms are involved both in epilepsy and in brain sexual dimorphism, we make the case here that analyzing epigenetic regulation will provide novel insights into the basis for sex differences in epilepsy. PMID:24998474

  16. Epilepsy treatment and creativity.

    PubMed

    Zubkov, Sarah; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Creativity can be defined as the ability to understand, develop, and express, in a systematic fashion, novel orderly relationships. It is sometimes difficult to separate cognitive skills requisite for the creative process from the drive that generates unique new ideas and associations. Epilepsy itself may affect the creative process. The treatment of epilepsy and its comorbidities, by altering or disrupting the same neural networks through antiseizure drugs (ASDs), treatment of epilepsy comorbidities, ablative surgery, or neurostimulation may also affect creativity. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms by which treatment can influence the creative process and review the literature on the consequences of therapy on different aspects of creativity in people with epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity".

  17. Infections, inflammation and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Vezzani, Annamaria; Fujinami, Robert S.; White, H. Steve; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Blümcke, Ingmar; Sander, Josemir W.; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is the tendency to have unprovoked epileptic seizures. Anything causing structural or functional derangement of brain physiology may lead to seizures, and different conditions may express themselves solely by recurrent seizures and thus be labelled “epilepsy.” Worldwide, epilepsy is the most common serious neurological condition. The range of risk factors for the development of epilepsy varies with age and geographic location. Congenital, developmental and genetic conditions are mostly associated with the development of epilepsy in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood. Head trauma, infections of the central nervous system (CNS) and tumours may occur at any age and may lead to the development of epilepsy. Infections of the CNS are a major risk factor for epilepsy. The reported risk of unprovoked seizures in population-based cohorts of survivors of CNS infections from developed countries is between 6.8 and 8.3 %, and is much higher in resource-poor countries. In this review, the various viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic infectious diseases of the CNS which result in seizures and epilepsy are discussed. The pathogenesis of epilepsy due to brain infections, as well as the role of experimental models to study mechanisms of epileptogenesis induced by infectious agents, is reviewed. The sterile (non-infectious) inflammatory response that occurs following brain insults is also discussed, as well as its overlap with inflammation due to infections, and the potential role in epileptogenesis. Furthermore, autoimmune encephalitis as a cause of seizures is reviewed. Potential strategies to prevent epilepsy resulting from brain infections and non-infectious inflammation are also considered. PMID:26423537

  18. Epilepsy: Asia versus Africa.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Devender; Tchalla, Achille Edem; Marin, Benoît; Ngoungou, Edgard Brice; Tan, Chong Tin; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2014-09-01

    Is epilepsy truly an "African ailment"? We aimed to determine this, since international health agencies often refer to epilepsy as an African disease and the scientific literature has spoken the same tone. Various published materials, mainly reports, articles, were used to gather Asian and African evidence on various aspects of epilepsy and many of its risk and associated factors. Our results suggest that in no way can epilepsy be considered as an African ailment and such characterization is most likely based on popular beliefs rather than scientific evidence. In comparison to Africa, Asia has a 5.0% greater burden from all diseases, and is 17.0% more affected from neuropsychiatric disorders (that include epilepsy). Given that more countries in Asia are transitioning, there may be large demographic and lifestyle changes in the near future. However these changes are nowhere close to those expected in Africa. Moreover, 23 million Asians have epilepsy in comparison to 3.3 million Africans and 1.2 million sub-Saharan Africans. In comparison to Africa, Asia has more untreated patients, 55.0% more additional epilepsy cases every year, because of its larger population, with greater treatment cost and possibly higher premature mortality. Of several associated factors discussed herein, many have more importance for Asia than Africa. The current state of epilepsy in Asia is far less than ideal and there is an urgent need to recognize and accept the importance of epilepsy in Asia. In no way can epilepsy be considered as an African ailment. This is most likely based on popular beliefs rather than scientific evidence. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here.

  19. The impact of intolerance of uncertainty, worry and irritability on quality of life in persons with epilepsy: irritability as mediator.

    PubMed

    Barahmand, Usha; Haji, Afsar

    2014-10-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder afflicting many people in the world. The impact of epilepsy on the quality of life of those afflicted with epilepsy is greater than the limitations imposed by the seizures alone. Among the several psychological disorders found to be comorbid with epilepsy are anxiety and depression, both of which impair quality of life in epilepsy. Some studies have reported that the anxiety seen in epilepsy is characterized by worry while the depression seen is characterized by irritability. A concept common to both anxiety and depression is intolerance of uncertainty. Therefore, the study explores the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty, worry and irritability and their association to quality of life in epilepsy. A descriptive-correlational research method was used and the research sample comprised 60 consecutive referrals seeking outpatient neurological services for epilepsy at Alavi Hospital in Ardebil. Data were collected by administering the Penn State Worry Questionnaire, Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale, Irritability Questionnaire and Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory. Data were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficients and multivariate regression analysis. Mediation and moderation analyses were conducted. Findings indicated that intolerance of uncertainty, worry and irritability have unique significant effects on quality of life. The implications are that interventions aimed at improving the quality of life of patients with epilepsy should address their feelings of uncertainty, worry and irritability. Furthermore, irritability seems to mediate the impact of both intolerance of uncertainty and worry on quality of life of individuals with epilepsy. No significant moderation effects were noted. Results underscore the important role of irritability in the quality of life of persons with epilepsy. The findings are discussed with reference to the possibility of particular predisposing temperaments and add credence to

  20. Art and epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Hunter, Gary; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco

    2013-10-01

    The impact of health and disease has led many artists to depict these themes for thousands of years. Specifically, epilepsy has been the subject of many famous works, likely because of the dramatic and misunderstood nature of the clinical presentation. It often evokes religious and even mythical processes. Epilepsy surgical treatment has revolutionized the care of selected patients and is a relatively recent advance. Epilepsy surgery has been depicted in very few artistic works. The first portrait showing a potential surgical treatment for patients with epilepsy was painted in the 12th century. During the Renaissance, Bosch famously provided artistic commentary on traditional beliefs in "The stone of madness". Several of these works demonstrate a surgeon extracting a stone from a patient's head, at one time believed to be the source of all "folly", including epileptic seizures, psychosis, intellectual disability, depression, and a variety of other illnesses. There are some contemporary art pieces including themes around epilepsy surgery, all of them depicting ancient Inca Empire procedures such as trepanning. This article reviews the most relevant artistic works related with epilepsy surgery and also its historical context at the time the work was produced. We also present a painting from the Mexican artist Eduardo Urbano Merino that represents the patient's journey through refractory epilepsy, investigations, and ultimately recovery. Through this work, the artist intends to communicate hope and reassurance to patients going through this difficult process.

  1. Magnetoencephalography in pediatric epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hunmin; Chung, Chun Kee

    2013-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) records the magnetic field generated by electrical activity of cortical neurons. The signal is not distorted or attenuated, and it is contactless recording that can be performed comfortably even for longer than an hour. It has excellent and decent temporal resolution, especially when it is combined with the patient's own brain magnetic resonance imaging (magnetic source imaging). Data of MEG and electroencephalography are not mutually exclusive and it is recorded simultaneously and interpreted together. MEG has been shown to be useful in detecting the irritative zone in both lesional and nonlesional epilepsy surgery. It has provided valuable and additive information regarding the lesion that should be resected in epilepsy surgery. Better outcomes in epilepsy surgery were related to the localization of the irritative zone with MEG. The value of MEG in epilepsy surgery is recruiting more patients to epilepsy surgery and providing critical information for surgical planning. MEG cortical mapping is helpful in younger pediatric patients, especially when the epileptogenic zone is close to the eloquent cortex. MEG is also used in both basic and clinical research of epilepsy other than surgery. MEG is a valuable diagnostic modality for diagnosis and treatment, as well as research in epilepsy. PMID:24244211

  2. [Migraine and epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Migraine and epilepsy are both common episodic disorders that share many clinical features and underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. The comorbidity of these two conditions is well known. However, the temporal association between migraine and epilepsy is a controversial issue, since these two conditions may occur in numerous ways. Four types of association between headache and epileptic seizure are recognized: pre-ictal headache, headache as the expression of an epileptic manifestation, post-ictal headache, and inter-ictal headache. The classification of epilepsy by the International League Against Epilepsy did not refer to the epileptic headache. On the other hand, the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (ICHD-3) defines three entities: migraine aura-triggered seizure which sometimes referred to as migralepsy, hemicrania epileptica, and post-ictal headache. However, ICHD-3 mentions that there is a complex and bidirectional association between migraine and epilepsy. Most of the previous reports of migralepsy corresponded to occipital seizures that mimic migraine with aura. The term migralepsy has recently been criticized. Migraine and epilepsy share several pathophysiological mechanisms which involve neurotransmitters and iron channel dysfunctions. There is the hypothesis of a shared genetic susceptibility to migraine and epilepsy. Strong support of a shared genetic basis comes from familial hemiplegic migraine.

  3. Epilepsy is Dancing.

    PubMed

    Tuft, Mia; Gjelsvik, Bergljot; Nakken, Karl O

    2015-10-01

    In "Epilepsy is Dancing", in Antony and the Johnsons' album "The Crying Light"(2009), the lyrics and accompanying music video depicts an epileptic seizure in which the person is transferred to another beautiful and magical world. This may be called "enchanted epilepsy"; i.e., the experience of epilepsy as deeply nourishing and (positively) transforming, is conveyed not only in the lyrics but also the visual and auditory qualities of the video. The seizure in the video gives associations to Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's dream". If epilepsy appears in music lyrics, the focus is mostly on negative aspects of the illness, such as horror, fear and repulsive sexuality associated with the fits [1,2]. Contradictory to these lyrics, Anthony and the Johnsons' song is an example of a positive portrayal of epilepsy. It is open to a multitude of meanings, emotional valence and appraisal of epilepsy. By widening the experiential range associated with epileptic seizures, these lyrics highlight the inherently construed nature of epileptic experience. The song stands out in several ways. First, it describes epilepsy in positive terms, prioritising the euphoric, ecstatic, potentially empowering and enhancing aspects of epileptic seizures. Second, the lyrics and accompanying video point to divine experiences associated with epileptic seizures. Through the lyrics and the music video we are, as an audience, able to sense a snicket of an epileptic seizure, but also the universal experience of loosing control.

  4. Psychosocial aspects of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pravina

    2002-05-01

    Social attitudes towards epilepsy cause more distress to the patient and his/her near and dear ones, than the disease itself. The major psychosocial issues related to epilepsy are: Quality of medical management, overprotection, education, employment, marriage and pregnancy. Inadequate treatment is the major reason involved in psychosocial issues. Constant overprotection and pampering leads to behavioural pattern which makes epileptic patient dependent for ever. Education is hampered in epileptic persons. Teachers and students should have proper information regarding seizures. If seizures are well controlled, job opportunities increase. Employers and employees need to be educated about epilepsy. Self-employment is the best in epileptic patients. Regarding marriage, each patient is to be judged on individual merits and type of epilepsy. Society needs to be educated about the facts and consequences of epilepsy. Risk of anti-epileptic drug's usage is very insignificant compared to risk of seizures in pregnancy. So girls are advised to seek medical advice before pregnancy and during follow-up. With more and more support from the society, persons with epilepsy will have the courage and confidence to speak about themselves and their illness. It is only then that we will realise that persons with epilepsy are 'normal' or 'near-normal' and this will break the vicious cycle of stigma.

  5. The adverse effects profile of levetiracetam in epilepsy: a more detailed look.

    PubMed

    Mbizvo, Gashirai K; Dixon, Pete; Hutton, Jane L; Marson, Anthony G

    2014-09-01

    The adverse effects profile of levetiracetam in epilepsy is still being fully described. We recently published a Cochrane Review evaluating the effectiveness of levetiracetam, added on to usual care, in treating drug-resistant focal epilepsy. The five most common adverse effects were reported and analysed with no scope for reporting any less common adverse effects than those. Here, we report and analyse the remaining adverse effects (including the five most common). These were (in decreasing order of frequency) somnolence; headache; asthenia; accidental injury; dizziness; infection; pharyngitis; pain; rhinitis; abdominal pain; flu syndrome; vomiting; diarrhoea; convulsion; nausea; increased cough; anorexia; upper respiratory tract infection; hostility; personality disorder; urinary tract infection; nervousness; depression; aggression; back pain; agitation; emotional liability; psychomotor hyperactivity; pyrexia; rash; ECG abnormalities; decreased appetite; nasal congestion; irritability; abnormal behaviour; epistaxis; insomnia; altered mood; anxiety; bloody urine; diplopia; dissociation; memory impairment; pruritis; increased appetite; acne; and stomach discomfort. Only somnolence and infection were significantly associated with levetiracetam. When adverse effects pertaining to infection were combined, these affected 19.7% and 15.1% of participants on levetiracetam and placebo (relative risk 1.16, CI 0.89-1.50, Chi(2) heterogeneity p = 0.13). Somnolence and infection further retained significance in adults while no single adverse effect was significant in children. This review updates the adverse effects profile data on levetiracetam use by empirically reporting its common and uncommon adverse effects and analysing their relative importance statistically using data from a group of trials that possess low Risk of Bias and high Quality of Evidence GRADE scores.

  6. Predictors of health-related quality of life in patients with epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, Gregg H; Brown, Ian; Reuber, Markus

    2017-02-09

    Epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are associated with reduced health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The present study investigated the profile, relationship, and predictive power of illness perceptions, psychological distress (depression and anxiety), seizure activity, and demographic factors on HRQoL in these patient groups. Patients with epilepsy (n=62) and PNES (n=45) were recruited from a United Kingdom hospital and from membership-led organizations for individuals living with seizures. Patients completed a series of self-report questionnaires assessing: anxiety (GAD-7), depression (NDDI-E), illness perceptions (B-IPQ), HRQoL (NEWQOL-6D), and seizure frequency and severity (LSSS-3). Correlational and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted. Patients with epilepsy reported higher HRQoL and scored lower on measures of depression and anxiety. Patients with PNES perceived their condition as more threatening overall. In both conditions, HRQoL was negatively correlated with more severe illness perceptions and psychological distress. In epilepsy and PNES, psychological distress (epilepsy: 27%; PNES: 24.8%) and illness perceptions (epilepsy: 23.1%; PNES: 23.3%) accounted for the largest amount of variance in HRQoL. Clinical factors were found not to be significant predictors, while demographic factors predicted HRQoL in epilepsy (12.6%), but not in PNES. Our findings support the notion that psychological factors are a stronger predictor of HRQoL in epilepsy and PNES than condition-related and demographic variables. Prior research suggests that anxiety and depression are key predictors of HRQoL; this study demonstrates that the relationship between illness perceptions and HRQoL is similarly close. These findings highlight the importance of addressing patients' beliefs about their condition.

  7. Heautoscopy, epilepsy, and suicide.

    PubMed Central

    Brugger, P; Agosti, R; Regard, M; Wieser, H G; Landis, T

    1994-01-01

    Heautoscopy (the doppelgänger experience), epilepsy, and suicide is a triad primarily known from literary accounts. This paper reports a patient with complex partial seizures who tried to commit suicide during the experience of heautoscopy. PMID:8021672

  8. Heautoscopy, epilepsy, and suicide.

    PubMed

    Brugger, P; Agosti, R; Regard, M; Wieser, H G; Landis, T

    1994-07-01

    Heautoscopy (the doppelgänger experience), epilepsy, and suicide is a triad primarily known from literary accounts. This paper reports a patient with complex partial seizures who tried to commit suicide during the experience of heautoscopy.

  9. Employees with Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... systems to communicate with coworkers Provide 2-way radios with texting options Use alert systems to send ... a seizure. JAN suggested using a two‑way radio. A student with epilepsy used hedge-cutters and ...

  10. Surgical Treatment of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John W.; Hakimian, Shahin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article outlines indications for neurosurgical treatment of epilepsy, describes the presurgical workup, summarizes surgical approaches, and details expected risks and benefits. Recent Findings: There is class I evidence for the efficacy of temporal lobectomy in treating intractable seizures, and accumulating documentation that successful surgical treatment reverses much of the disability, morbidity, and excess mortality of chronic epilepsy. Summary: Chronic, uncontrolled focal epilepsy causes progressive disability and increased mortality, but these can be reversed with seizure control. Vigorous efforts to stop seizures are warranted. If two well-chosen and tolerated medication trials do not achieve seizure control, an early workup for epilepsy surgery should be arranged. If this workup definitively identifies the brain region from which the seizures arise, and this region can be removed with a low risk of disabling neurologic deficits, neurosurgery will have a much better chance of stopping seizures than further medication trials. PMID:23739107

  11. Epilepsy and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Knott, Sarah; Forty, Liz; Craddock, Nick; Thomas, Rhys H

    2015-11-01

    It is well recognized that mood disorders and epilepsy commonly co-occur. Despite this, our knowledge regarding the relationship between epilepsy and bipolar disorder is limited. Several shared features between the two disorders, such as their episodic nature and potential to run a chronic course, and the efficacy of some antiepileptic medications in the prophylaxis of both disorders, are often cited as evidence of possible shared underlying pathophysiology. The present paper aims to review the bidirectional associations between epilepsy and bipolar disorder, with a focus on epidemiological links, evidence for shared etiology, and the impact of these disorders on both the individual and wider society. Better recognition and understanding of these two complex disorders, along with an integrated clinical approach, are crucial for improved evaluation and management of comorbid epilepsy and mood disorders.

  12. Epilepsy - children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities include jogging, aerobics, moderate cross-country skiing, dancing, tennis, golf, hiking, and bowling. Games and playing ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 593. Read More Brain aneurysm repair Brain surgery Epilepsy - overview Seizures Stereotactic ...

  13. Mesial frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Unnwongse, Kanjana; Wehner, Tim; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2012-10-01

    Mesial frontal lobe epilepsies can be divided into epilepsies arising from the anterior cingulate gyrus and those of the supplementary sensorimotor area. They provide diagnostic challenges because they often lack lateralizing or localizing features on clinical semiology and interictal and ictal scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. A number of unique semiologic features have been described over the last decade in patients with mesial frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE). There are few reports of applying advanced neurophysiologic techniques such as electrical source imaging, magnetoencephalography, EEG/functional magnetic resonance imaging, or analysis of high-frequency oscillations in patients with mesial FLE. Despite these diagnostic challenges, it seems that patients with mesial FLE benefit from epilepsy surgery to the same extent or even better than patients with FLE do, as a whole.

  14. Genetics and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Steinlein, Ortrud K.

    2008-01-01

    The term “epilepsy” describes a heterogeneous group of disorders, most of them caused by interactions between several or even many genes and environmental factors. Much rarer are the genetic epilepsies that are due to single-gene mutations or defined structural chromosomal aberrations, such as microdeletions. The discovery of several of the genes underlying these rare genetic epilepsies has already considerably contributed to our understanding of the basic mechanisms epileptogenesis. The progress made in the last 15 years in the genetics of epilepsy is providing new possibilities for diagnosis and therapy. Here, different genetic epilepsies are reviewed as examples, to demonstrate the various pathways that can lead from genes to seizures. PMID:18472482

  15. Test Anxiety

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... Like other anxiety reactions, test anxiety affects the body and the mind. When you're under stress, your body releases ...

  16. Anxiety Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... making life feel overwhelming or out of control. Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). For a person with OCD , anxiety takes ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Social Phobia 5 Ways to Deal With Anxiety ...

  17. Multiplex families with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Afawi, Zaid; Oliver, Karen L.; Kivity, Sara; Mazarib, Aziz; Blatt, Ilan; Neufeld, Miriam Y.; Helbig, Katherine L.; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Misk, Adel J.; Straussberg, Rachel; Walid, Simri; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Kahana, Esther; Masalha, Rafik; Kramer, Uri; Ekstein, Dana; Shorer, Zamir; Wallace, Robyn H.; Mangelsdorf, Marie; MacPherson, James N.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Jackson, Graeme D.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie; Gecz, Jozef; Heron, Sarah E.; Corbett, Mark; Mulley, John C.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Korczyn, Amos D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical syndromes and inheritance patterns of multiplex families with epilepsy toward the ultimate aim of uncovering the underlying molecular genetic basis. Methods: Following the referral of families with 2 or more relatives with epilepsy, individuals were classified into epilepsy syndromes. Families were classified into syndromes where at least 2 family members had a specific diagnosis. Pedigrees were analyzed and molecular genetic studies were performed as appropriate. Results: A total of 211 families were ascertained over an 11-year period in Israel. A total of 169 were classified into broad familial epilepsy syndrome groups: 61 generalized, 22 focal, 24 febrile seizure syndromes, 33 special syndromes, and 29 mixed. A total of 42 families remained unclassified. Pathogenic variants were identified in 49/211 families (23%). The majority were found in established epilepsy genes (e.g., SCN1A, KCNQ2, CSTB), but in 11 families, this cohort contributed to the initial discovery (e.g., KCNT1, PCDH19, TBC1D24). We expand the phenotypic spectrum of established epilepsy genes by reporting a familial LAMC3 homozygous variant, where the predominant phenotype was epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures, and a pathogenic SCN1A variant in a family where in 5 siblings the phenotype was broadly consistent with Dravet syndrome, a disorder that usually occurs sporadically. Conclusion: A total of 80% of families were successfully classified, with pathogenic variants identified in 23%. The successful characterization of familial electroclinical and inheritance patterns has highlighted the value of studying multiplex families and their contribution towards uncovering the genetic basis of the epilepsies. PMID:26802095

  18. Advances in epilepsy surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nowell, Mark; Miserocchi, Anna; McEvoy, Andrew W; Duncan, John S

    2014-01-01

    This review summarises exciting recent and forthcoming advances that will impact on the surgical management of epilepsy in the near future. This does not cover the current accepted diagnostic methodologies or surgical treatments that are routinely practiced today. The content of this review was derived from a PubMed literature search, using the key words ‘Epilepsy Surgery’, ‘Neuromodulation’, ‘Neuroablation’, ‘Advances’, between 2010 and November 2013. PMID:24719180

  19. GEM THERAPY AND EPILEPSY

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, S.R.N.; Shenoy, Raghuram

    1990-01-01

    The authors present in this paper the status of treatment and cause of epilepsy. They propose further research to be undertaken to document the data and a study of human magnetic aura followed by blood spectral studies. They have suggested that based upon these studies it should be possible to determine the cause of epilepsy and its treatment by the physical application of suitable precious and semi-previous stones followed by administration of Ayurvedic formulation. PMID:22557696

  20. Epigenetics and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Roopra, Avtar; Dingledine, Raymond; Hsieh, Jenny

    2012-12-01

    Seizures can give rise to enduring changes that reflect alterations in gene-expression patterns, intracellular and intercellular signaling, and ultimately network alterations that are a hallmark of epilepsy. A growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with epilepsy are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure. One transcription factor in particular, repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST), has received a lot of attention due to the possibility that it may control fundamental transcription patterns that drive circuit excitability, seizures, and epilepsy. REST represses a suite of genes in the nervous system by utilizing nuclear protein complexes that were originally identified as mediators of epigenetic inheritance. Epigenetics has traditionally referred to mechanisms that allow a heritable change in gene expression in the absence of DNA mutation. However a more contemporaneous definition acknowledges that many of the mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are utilized by neurons to control activity-dependent gene expression. This review surveys what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in epilepsy. We discuss how REST controls gene expression to affect circuit excitability and neurogenesis in epilepsy. We also discuss how the repressor methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and activator cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) regulate neuronal activity and are themselves controlled by activity. Finally we highlight possible future directions in the field of epigenetics and epilepsy.

  1. Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Rachel G.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their high prevalence and their negative long-term consequences, child anxiety disorders have become an important focus of interest. Whether pathological anxiety and normal fear are similar processes continues to be controversial. Comparative studies of child anxiety disorders are scarce, but there is some support for the current…

  2. Comparing Mental Health of School-Age Children with and without Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    SHAMSAEI, Farshid; CHERAGHI, Fatemeh; ZAMANI, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mental health problems frequently occur in children with epilepsy but the diagnosis is frequently missed and therapeutic opportunities are often lost. The aim of this study was to compare mental health statues between school-aged children with epilepsy and the healthy group. Materials & Methods In this case, control study, 120 children aged 6 to 12 years with idiopathic epilepsy and 240 healthy control groups were followed up. Children with epilepsy were enrolled from Iranian Epilepsy Association in 2014. The parent version of Child Symptom Inventory-4 questionnaire was used. Mean comparisons were performed using Student’s t test while effect sizes were estimated by Cohen’s d coefficient. The Chi-Square test was used to assess the difference between frequency distribution of demographic variables in both groups. The significance level was considered less than 0.05. Results There were statistically significant differences between children with epilepsy and control group as for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, major depression, separation anxiety, social phobia, motor and vocal tics and oppositional defiant disorder. Conclusion The carefully evaluating and prospectively following the psychopathology symptom of children with epilepsy are critical for early identification, prevention and treatment. PMID:27375754

  3. 77 FR 59197 - Epilepsy Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Epilepsy Program AGENCY: Health Resources... to the Epilepsy Foundation of America. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration will be issuing noncompetitive supplemental funding under the Maternal and Child Health Bureau's...

  4. The role of aura in psychopathology and dissociative experiences in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Mula, Marco; Cavanna, Andrea; Collimedaglia, Laura; Barbagli, Davide; Magli, Elena; Monaco, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive auras seem to be associated with depression and anxiety, especially in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Dissociative symptoms may occur as an aura or in the context of psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety or schizophrenia. This is a cross-sectional study of 62 patients with TLE, using personality and dissociation measures to investigate their relationship with the presence of aura and its different subtypes. Our findings show no difference in psychopathology in patients with different types of aura and reveal that dissociative symptoms correlate with specific measures of anxiety, suggesting a possible link between these experiences and anxiety disorders.

  5. Alcohol and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Roland

    1994-01-01

    Reviews the acute effects of alcohol on aggressive responding. From experimental studies that use human subjects, it is concluded that a moderate dose of alcohol does not increase aggression if subjects are unprovoked. Under provocative situations, aggression is increased as a function of alcohol intoxication, provided that subjects are restricted…

  6. Epilepsy and the Sensory Systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The relations of epilepsy and the sensory systems are bidirectional. Epilepsy may act on sensory systems by producing sensory seizure symptoms, by altering sensory performance, and by epilepsy treatment causing sensory side effects. Sensory system activity may have an important role in both generation and inhibition of seizures. PMID:27857611

  7. Epilepsy and physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, José; Tojal, Raquel; Morgado, Joana

    2015-02-01

    Epilepsy is one of the commonest neurologic diseases and has always been associated with stigma. In the interest of safety, the activities of persons with epilepsy (PWE) are often restricted. In keeping with this, physical exercise has often been discouraged. The precise nature of a person's seizures (or whether seizures were provoked or unprovoked) may not have been considered. Although there has been a change in attitude over the last few decades, the exact role of exercise in inducing seizures or aggravating epilepsy still remains a matter of discussion among experts in the field. Based mainly on retrospective, but also on prospective, population and animal-based research, the hypothesis that physical exercise is prejudicial has been slowly replaced by the realization that physical exercise might actually be beneficial for PWE. The benefits are related to improvement of physical and mental health parameters and social integration and reduction in markers of stress, epileptiform activity and the number of seizures. Nowadays, the general consensus is that there should be no restrictions to the practice of physical exercise in people with controlled epilepsy, except for scuba diving, skydiving and other sports at heights. Whilst broader restrictions apply for patients with uncontrolled epilepsy, individual risk assessments taking into account the seizure types, frequency, patterns or triggers may allow PWE to enjoy a wide range of physical activities.

  8. Epidemiology of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Abramovici, S; Bagić, A

    2016-01-01

    Modern epidemiology of epilepsy maximizes the benefits of advanced diagnostic methods and sophisticated techniques for case ascertainment in order to increase the diagnostic accuracy and representativeness of the cases and cohorts studied, resulting in better comparability of similarly performed studies. Overall, these advanced epidemiologic methods are expected to yield a better understanding of diverse risk factors, high-risk populations, seizure triggers, multiple and poorly understood causes of epilepsy, including the increasing and complex role of genetics, and establish the natural course of treated and untreated epilepsy and syndromes - all of which form the foundation of an attempt to prevent epileptogenesis as the primary prophylaxis of epilepsy. Although data collection continues to improve, epidemiologists still need to overcome definition and coding variability, insufficient documentation, as well as the interplay of socioeconomic factors and stigma. As most of the 65-70 million people with epilepsy live outside of resource-rich countries, extensive underdiagnosis, misdiagnosis, and undertreatment are likely. Epidemiology will continue to provide the necessary information to the medical community, public, and regulators as the foundation for improved health policies, targeted education, and advanced measures of prevention and prognostication of the most common severe brain disorder.

  9. Longitudinal course of epilepsy in Rett syndrome and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Tarquinio, Daniel C; Hou, Wei; Berg, Anne; Kaufmann, Walter E; Lane, Jane B; Skinner, Steven A; Motil, Kathleen J; Neul, Jeffrey L; Percy, Alan K; Glaze, Daniel G

    2017-02-01

    Epilepsy is common in Rett syndrome, an X-linked dominant disorder caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene, and in Rett-related disorders, such as MECP2 duplication. However, neither the longitudinal course of epilepsy nor the patterns of seizure onset and remission have been described in Rett syndrome and related conditions. The present study summarizes the findings of the Rett syndrome Natural History study. Participants with clinical Rett syndrome and those with MECP2 mutations without the clinical syndrome were recruited through the Rett Natural History study from 2006 to 2015. Clinical details were collected, and cumulative lifetime prevalence of epilepsy was determined using the Kaplan-Meier estimator. Risk factors for epilepsy were assessed using Cox proportional hazards models. Of 1205 participants enrolled in the study, 922 had classic Rett syndrome, and 778 of these were followed longitudinally for 3939 person-years. The diagnosis of atypical Rett syndrome with a severe clinical phenotype was associated with higher prevalence of epilepsy than those with classic Rett syndrome. While point prevalence of active seizures ranged from 30% to 44%, the estimated cumulative lifetime prevalence of epilepsy using Kaplan-Meier approached 90%. Specific MECP2 mutations were not significantly associated with either seizure prevalence or seizure severity. In contrast, many clinical features were associated with seizure prevalence; frequency of hospitalizations, inability to walk, bradykinesia, scoliosis, gastrostomy feeding, age of seizure onset, and late age of diagnosis were independently associated with higher odds of an individual having epilepsy. Aggressive behaviour was associated with lower odds. Three distinct patterns of seizure prevalence emerged in classic Rett syndrome, including those who did not have seizures throughout the study, those who had frequent relapse and remission, and those who had relentless seizures. Although 248 of those with classic Rett

  10. Neuropeptide Y and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Colmers, William F.; El Bahh, Bouchaïb

    2003-01-01

    It is a central tenet of the epilepsy field that seizures result from the imbalance of excitation over inhibition 1. The bulk of excitation is mediated by the neurotransmitter glutamate, whereas inhibition results mainly from the actions of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In the neocortex and hippocampus, the intrinsic sources of GABA are the interneurons, which lately have come under intense scrutiny. It has become clear that a large number of distinct types of interneurons can be differentiated in part by the array of neuropeptides they coexpress (cf. 2). Evidence is emerging that the neuropeptide complement of interneurons plays important roles in the way that interneurons regulate excitability. Here we discuss what is known about the relation of one well-characterized neuropeptide, neuropeptide Y (NPY), and epilepsy in experimental animals and humans, and suggest possible roles for the receptors as targets for the control of excessive excitation in epilepsy. PMID:15309085

  11. [Antidepressants in epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Castaño-Monsalve, Beatriz

    2013-08-01

    Depression is a common condition in patients with epilepsy that entails a deterioration of the quality of life of this population and that, therefore, requires appropriate treatment. The potential risk of antidepressants in relation to the seizure threshold is overestimated by many professionals, and this has an influence when it comes to making the decision to treat them. It sometimes means that the patients do not receive antidepressant drugs. In this regard, the aim of this review is to present the current state of the art in terms of the safety of antidepressants in patients with epilepsy. A search of the medical literature was conducted and, following its analysis, the most significant results are presented. Current information indicates that most antidepressants are safe for epileptic patients at therapeutic doses and that the risk of seizures occurs mainly in cases of overdose. Preferred drugs for treating depression in epilepsy are serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Bupropion and tricyclic antidepressants must be avoided.

  12. Medical Marijuana for Epilepsy?

    PubMed Central

    Kolikonda, Murali K.; Srinivasan, Kavitha; Enja, Manasa; Sagi, Vishwanath

    2016-01-01

    Treatment-refractory epilepsy remains an important clinical problem. There is considerable recent interest by the public and physicians in using medical marijuana or its derivatives to treat seizures. The endocannabinoid system has a role in neuronal balance and ictal control. There is clinical evidence of success in diminishing seizure frequencies with cannabis derivatives, but also documentation about exacerbating epilepsy or of no discernible effect. There are lay indications and anecdotal reports of success in attenuating the severity of epilepsy, but without solid investigational corroboration. Marijuana remains largely illegal, and may induce adverse consequences. Clinical applications are not approved, thus are restricted and only recommended in selected treatment unresponsive cases, with appropriate monitoring. PMID:27354925

  13. Neuroimaging of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Cendes, Fernando; Theodore, William H.; Brinkmann, Benjamin H.; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cascino, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    Imaging is pivotal in the evaluation and management of patients with seizure disorders. Elegant structural neuroimaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may assist in determining the etiology of focal epilepsy and demonstrating the anatomical changes associated with seizure activity. The high diagnostic yield of MRI to identify the common pathological findings in individuals with focal seizures including mesial temporal sclerosis, vascular anomalies, low-grade glial neoplasms and malformations of cortical development has been demonstrated. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most commonly performed interictal functional neuroimaging technique that may reveal a focal hypometabolic region concordant with seizure onset. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies may assist performance of ictal neuroimaging in patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy being considered for neurosurgical treatment. This chapter highlights neuroimaging developments and innovations, and provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used to improve the care and management of people with epilepsy. PMID:27430454

  14. Computer modeling of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lytton, William W.

    2009-01-01

    Preface Epilepsy is a complex set of disorders that can involve many areas of cortex as well as underlying deep brain systems. The myriad manifestations of seizures, as varied as déjà vu and olfactory hallucination, can thereby give researchers insights into regional functions and relations. Epilepsy is also complex genetically and pathophysiologically, involving microscopic (ion channels, synaptic proteins), macroscopic (brain trauma and rewiring) and intermediate changes in a complex interplay of causality. It has long been recognized that computer modeling will be required to disentangle causality, to better understand seizure spread and to understand and eventually predict treatment efficacy. Over the past few years, substantial progress has been made modeling epilepsy at levels ranging from the molecular to the socioeconomic. We review these efforts and connect them to the medical goals of understanding and treating this disorder. PMID:18594562

  15. Hearing regulates Drosophila aggression.

    PubMed

    Versteven, Marijke; Vanden Broeck, Lies; Geurten, Bart; Zwarts, Liesbeth; Decraecker, Lisse; Beelen, Melissa; Göpfert, Martin C; Heinrich, Ralf; Callaerts, Patrick

    2017-02-21

    Aggression is a universal social behavior important for the acquisition of food, mates, territory, and social status. Aggression in Drosophila is context-dependent and can thus be expected to involve inputs from multiple sensory modalities. Here, we use mechanical disruption and genetic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify hearing as an important sensory modality in the context of intermale aggressive behavior. We demonstrate that neuronal silencing and targeted knockdown of hearing genes in the fly's auditory organ elicit abnormal aggression. Further, we show that exposure to courtship or aggression song has opposite effects on aggression. Our data define the importance of hearing in the control of Drosophila intermale aggression and open perspectives to decipher how hearing and other sensory modalities are integrated at the neural circuit level.

  16. Epilepsy in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, J J; McArdle, N S; Wilson, M H; Stassen, L F A

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological condition characterised by seizure activity. It has an approximate incidence of 1%. General dental practitioners will encounter these patients in practice. This article discusses the types of epilepsy, the medical management and considerations in dental management of epileptic patients. General recommendations are made, based on current evidence, with respect to prescribing of medications. The management of an epileptic seizure is discussed. Status epilepticus is a rare but serious complication of epileptic seizures. An easy-to-follow algorithm is provided to assist the practitioner in managing seizures.

  17. Behavior Problems: Differences among Intellectually Disabled Adults with Co-Morbid Autism Spectrum Disorders and Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kimberly R. M.; Matson, Johnny L.

    2010-01-01

    Behavior problems such as aggression, property destruction, stereotypy, self-injurious behavior, and other disruptive behavior are commonly observed among adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and epilepsy residing at state-run facilities. However, it is unknown how these populations differ on behavior…

  18. Epilepsy, behavior, and art (Epilepsy, Brain, and Mind, part 1).

    PubMed

    Rektor, Ivan; Schachter, Steven C; Arzy, Shahar; Baloyannis, Stavros J; Bazil, Carl; Brázdil, Milan; Engel, Jerome; Helmstaedter, Gerhard; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Jones-Gotman, Marilyn; Kesner, Ladislav; Komárek, Vladimír; Krämer, Günter; Leppik, Ilo E; Mann, Michael W; Mula, Marco; Risse, Gail L; Stoker, Guy W; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée G A; Trimble, Michael; Tyrliková, Ivana; Korczyn, Amos D

    2013-08-01

    Epilepsy is both a disease of the brain and the mind. Brain diseases, structural and/or functional, underlie the appearance of epilepsy, but the notion of epilepsy is larger and cannot be reduced exclusively to the brain. We can therefore look at epilepsy from two angles. The first perspective is intrinsic: the etiology and pathophysiology, problems of therapy, impact on the brain networks, and the "mind" aspects of brain functions - cognitive, emotional, and affective. The second perspective is extrinsic: the social interactions of the person with epilepsy, the influence of the surrounding environment, and the influences of epilepsy on society. All these aspects reaching far beyond the pure biological nature of epilepsy have been the topics of two International Congresses of Epilepsy, Brain, and Mind that were held in Prague, Czech Republic, in 2010 and 2012 (the third Congress will be held in Brno, Czech Republic on April 3-5, 2014; www.epilepsy-brain-mind2014.eu). Here, we present the first of two papers with extended summaries of selected presentations of the 2012 Congress that focused on epilepsy, behavior, and art.

  19. Genetics of human aggressive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Craig, Ian W; Halton, Kelly E

    2009-07-01

    A consideration of the evolutionary, physiological and anthropological aspects of aggression suggests that individual differences in such behaviour will have important genetic as well as environmental underpinning. Surveys of the likely pathways controlling the physiological and neuronal processes involved highlight, as obvious targets to investigate, genes implicated in sexual differentiation, anxiety, stress response and the serotonin neurotransmitter pathway. To date, however, association studies on single candidates have provided little evidence for any such loci with a major effect size. This may be because genes do not operate independently, but function against a background in which other genetic and environmental factors are crucial. Indeed, a series of recent studies, particularly concentrating on the serotonin and norepinephrine metabolising enzyme, monoamine oxidase A, has emphasised the necessity of examining gene by environmental interactions if the contributions of individual loci are to be understood. These findings will have major significance for the interpretation and analysis of data from detailed whole genome association studies. Functional imaging studies of genetic variants affecting serotonin pathways have also provided valuable insights into potential links between genes, brain and aggressive behaviour.

  20. Brain maturation and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dulac, Olivier; Milh, Mathieu; Holmes, Gregory L

    2013-01-01

    At full term, both glutamate and gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) are excitatory; cortical synapses are beginning to appear, there is little myelin in the cerebral hemispheres, and long tracts hardly start to develop. Neonatal myoclonic encephalopathy can result from premature activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) transmission. Benign neonatal seizures and migrating partial seizures in infancy could involve excessive or premature excitability of deep cortical layers. Benign rolandic epilepsy and continuous spike waves in slow sleep are consistent with an excess of both excitatory and inhibitory cortical synapses. West and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes express age-related diffuse cortical hyperexcitability, the pattern depending on the age of occurrence; synchronization of spikes is becoming possible with maturation of the myelin. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy is itself modulated by maturation that causes frontal hyperexcitability generating myoclonic-astatic seizures, between the ages of infantile and juvenile myoclonic epilepsies. Physiological delay of hippocampo-neocortical pathways maturation could account for the delayed occurrence of mesial temporal epilepsy following infantile damage, whereas premature maturation could contribute to fronto-temporal damage characteristic of fever-induced epileptic encephalopathy in school-age children, a dramatic school-age epileptic encephalopathy.

  1. Levetiracetam in Absence Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verrotti, Alberto; Cerminara, Caterina; Domizio, Sergio; Mohn, Angelika; Franzoni, Emilio; Coppola, Giangennaro; Zamponi, Nelia; Parisi, Pasquale; Iannetti, Paola; Curatolo, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of levetiracetam therapy in children and adolescents with absence epilepsy. Twenty-one participants (11 male, 10 female) with typical absence seizures were enrolled in this prospective study from seven centres in Italy. The mean age and age range at time of enrolment into…

  2. Anxiety Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Marilyn

    Anxiey, in general, helps one to cope. It rouses a person to action and gears one up to face a threatening situation. It makes students study harder for exams, and keeps presenters on their toes when making speeches. But an anxiety disorder can prevent one from coping and can disrupt daily life. Anxiety disorders are not just a case of…

  3. Writing Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolides, Nicholas J., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    The articles in this journal issue examine the characteristics of student writing apprehension, and teaching methods to alleviate it. The titles of the articles and their authors are as follows: (1) "Writing Anxiety: Reasons and Reduction Techniques" (Helen R. Heaton and Pauline M. Pray); (2) "Writing Anxiety and the Gifted Student…

  4. Treatment of human aggression with major tranquilizers, antidepressants, and newer psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Wadud, A

    1975-02-01

    Most of the drugs used in the treatment of aggressive syndromes have originally been developed for other clinical applications. Despite significant differences in the pathogenesis of various aggressive disorders, the frequently used "antiaggression" drugs are the major tranquilizers (neuroleptics). If the aggresstion is associated with psychosis, chlorpromazine or haloperidol are the drugs of choice. Aggressive disorders within the acute and chronic brain syndromes are best treated with pericyazine, thioridazine, and thiothixene. In aggressive symptoms of mentally retarded patients, particularly with epileptic syndromes, a new benzazepine (SCH12,679)was found to be very effective. Aggression associated with alcoholism or narcotic addiction showed best response to chlorpormazine and haloperidol. As a general rule, in aggressive patients with clinically known epilepsy, or with abnormal electroencephalographic findings, the major tranquilizers with potent sedative properties should be given with great caution.

  5. Time course evaluation of behavioral impairments in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Mark William; Lopes, Samantha Cristiane; Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Costa, Ana Paula; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; de Mello, Nelson; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Farina, Marcelo; Walz, Roger; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy

    2016-02-01

    Epilepsy is a brain function disorder characterized by unpredictable and recurrent seizures. The majority of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), which is the most common type of epilepsy, have to live not only with seizures but also with behavioral alterations, including anxiety, psychosis, depression, and impaired cognitive functioning. The pilocarpine model has been recognized as an animal model of TLE. However, there are few studies addressing behavioral alterations in the maturation phase when evaluating the time course of the epileptogenic process after pilocarpine administration. Therefore, the present work was designed to analyze the neurobehavioral impairments of male adult Wistar rats during maturation and chronic phases in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy. Behavioral tests included: open-field tasks, olfactory discrimination, social recognition, elevated plus maze, and the forced swimming test. The main behavioral alterations observed in both maturation and chronic phases of the pilocarpine model were olfactory and short-term social memory deficits and decrease in the immobility time in the forced swimming test. Moreover, increased anxiety-like responses were only observed in the maturation phase. These findings indicate that early behavioral impairments can be observed in the pilocarpine model during the maturation phase, and these behavioral deficits also occur during the acquired epilepsy (chronic phase). Several of the neurobehavioral impairments that are associated with epilepsy in humans were observed in the pilocarpine-treated rats, thus, rendering this animal model a useful tool to study neuroprotective strategies as well as neurobiological and psychopathological mechanisms associated with epileptogenesis.

  6. Violence and Aggression in Children and Youth. ERIC/OSEP Digest E572.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, Mary K.

    This digest discusses the need for troubled students to receive habilitative services instead of haphazard punishment, then outlines sources of frustration for aggressive students and stages of frustration (anxiety, stress, defensiveness, physical aggression, and tension reduction), and appropriate responses. Teachers are advised to prevent…

  7. Social Anxiety Mediates the Effect of Autism Spectrum Disorder Characteristics on Hostility in Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan Williams; Kreiser, Nicole L.; Pugliese, Cara; Scarpa, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Problems with social anxiety are frequently reported in people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). It is possible that social anxiety, when present, exacerbates the experience of hostility and other forms of aggression in relation to ASD symptoms. This study sought to determine if social anxiety symptoms mediate the relationship between features…

  8. Analysis of Genetically Complex Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Ottman, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    During the last decade, great progress has been made in the discovery of genes that influence risk for epilepsy. However, these gene discoveries have been in epilepsies with Mendelian modes of inheritance, which comprise only a tiny fraction of all epilepsy. Most people with epilepsy have no affected relatives, suggesting that the great majority of all epilepsies are genetically complex: multiple genes contribute to their etiology, none of which has a major effect on disease risk. Gene discovery in the genetically complex epilepsies is a formidable task. It is unclear which epilepsy phenotypes are most advantageous to study, and chromosomal localization and mutation detection are much more difficult than in Mendelian epilepsies. Association studies are very promising for the identification of complex epilepsy genes, but we are still in the earliest stages of their application in the epilepsies. Future studies should employ very large sample sizes to ensure adequate statistical power, clinical phenotyping methods of the highest quality, designs and analytic techniques that control for population stratification, and state-of-the-art molecular methods. Collaborative studies are essential to achieve these goals. PMID:16359464

  9. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000222.htm Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child To use ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has epilepsy. Children with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  10. Future directions in the neuropsychology of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Carrie R; Taylor, Joanne; Hamberger, Marla; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Hermann, Bruce P; Schefft, Bruce

    2011-09-01

    Two important themes for future clinical research in the neuropsychology of epilepsy are proposed: (1) the neurobiological abnormalities that underlie neuropsychological impairment in people with epilepsy, and (2) neuropsychological status of persons with new-onset epilepsy.

  11. The prognosis of primary intracerebral tumours presenting with epilepsy: the outcome of medical and surgical management.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D F; Hutton, J L; Sandemann, D; Foy, P M; Shaw, M D; Williams, I R; Chadwick, D W

    1991-01-01

    It is not known whether conservative or early aggressive (resective surgery with or without radiotherapy) management is better for tumours presenting with epilepsy. The prognosis of 560 patients with a clinical and CT diagnosis of intrinsic supratentorial tumour was examined retrospectively. Epilepsy was the first symptom in 164 patients. Histological confirmation of diagnosis was available in 391 (70%) of cases. Median survival was 37 months in the group presenting with epilepsy and six months in those presenting with other symptoms (p less than 0.0001). Patients presenting with epilepsy were more likely to have a normal clinical examination, a non-enhancing low density lesion on CT scan and a low grade tumour. From Cox's stepwise proportional hazards model, significant independent variables adversely affecting prognosis were increasing age, focal neurological signs and enhancing CT lesions at diagnosis, non-resective surgery and male sex. Of those presenting with epilepsy 80 patients had surgical treatment within two months of CT diagnosis. The Cox's model failed to identify any beneficial effects for either early resective surgery or radiotherapy. In primary intracerebral tumours with presentations other than epilepsy, resective surgery and radiotherapy were amongst the important factors associated with prolonged survival. Primary intracerebral tumours presenting with epilepsy are relatively benign and their outcome appears to be chiefly determined by clinical factors. PMID:1744647

  12. Classification of seizures and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Riviello, James J

    2003-07-01

    The management of seizures and epilepsy begins with forming a differential diagnosis, making the diagnosis, and then classifying seizure type and epileptic syndrome. Classification guides treatment, including ancillary testing, management, prognosis, and if needed, selection of the appropriate antiepileptic drug (AED). Many AEDs are available, and certain seizure types or epilepsy syndromes respond to specific AEDs. The identification of the genetics, molecular basis, and pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy has resulted from classification of specific epileptic syndromes. The classification system used by the International League Against Epilepsy is periodically revised. The proposed revision changes the classification emphasis from the anatomic origin of seizures (focal vs generalized) to seizure semiology (ie, the signs or clinical manifestations). Modified systems have been developed for specific circumstances (eg, neonatal seizures, infantile seizures, status epilepticus, and epilepsy surgery). This article reviews seizure and epilepsy classification, emphasizing new data.

  13. Molecular biology of epilepsy genes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Charles A; Battaglia, Agatino

    2013-06-01

    Multifactorial inheritance is the most important model accounting for the genetic behavior of the common epilepsies. Important to this model is the concept that many cumulative or synergistic risk genes ultimately lead to a threshold effect. Sophisticated molecular testing indicates that the common epilepsies are very polygenic without evidence of any single gene having even a mild-to-modest risk effect. However, enrichment of copy number variants in cohorts of individuals with epilepsy indicates that certain structural changes in the genome can confer significant risk for epilepsy. The mechanisms whereby copy number variants confer this effect are not yet known. The study of epilepsy due to single gene defects however has helped clarify certain seizure mechanisms. For example, discoveries using animal models of SCN1A or ARX mutations implicate a predominant role for interneurons due to disturbed GABAergic function. It is hoped that future genetic and neurobiological studies will provide better insight into how multiple genes contribute to the common epilepsies.

  14. Confronting the stigma of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sanjeev V.; Nair, Aparna

    2011-01-01

    Stigma and resultant psychosocial issues are major hurdles that people with epilepsy confront in their daily life. People with epilepsy, particularly women, living in economically weak countries are often ill equipped to handle the stigma that they experience at multiple levels. This paper offers a systematic review of the research on stigma from sociology and social psychology and details how stigma linked to epilepsy or similar conditions can result in stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination. We also briefly discuss the strategies that are most commonly utilized to mitigate stigma. Neurologists and other health care providers, social workers, support groups and policy makers working with epilepsy need to have a deep understanding of the social and cultural perceptions of epilepsy and the related stigma. It is necessary that societies establish unique determinants of stigma and set up appropriate strategies to mitigate stigma and facilitate the complete inclusion of people with epilepsy as well as mitigating any existing discrimination. PMID:22028525

  15. Exercise, diet, health behaviors, and risk factors among persons with epilepsy based on the California Health Interview Survey, 2005.

    PubMed

    Elliott, John O; Lu, Bo; Moore, J Layne; McAuley, James W; Long, Lucretia

    2008-08-01

    Based on the 2005 California Health Interview Survey, persons with a history of epilepsy report lower educational attainment, lower annual income, and poorer health status, similar to other state-based epidemiological surveys. Previous studies have found persons with epilepsy exercise less and smoke more than the nonepilepsy population. The medical literature has also shown that antiepileptic drugs may cause nutritional deficiencies. Persons with a history of epilepsy in the 2005 CHIS report they walk more for transportation, drink more soda, and eat less salad than the nonepilepsy population. Exercise and dietary behaviors at recommended levels have been found to reduce mortality from many comorbid conditions such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, depression, anxiety, and osteoporosis for which persons with epilepsy are at increased risk. Health professionals in the epilepsy field should step up their efforts to engage patients in health promotion, especially in the areas of exercise, diet, and smoking cessation.

  16. Testosterone and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    1994-01-01

    Studies comparing aggressive and nonaggressive prisoners show higher testosterone levels among the former. While there is limited evidence for a strong association between aggressiveness and testosterone during adolescence, other studies indicate that testosterone levels are responsive to influences from the social environment, particularly those…

  17. Social Aggression among Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.

    Noting recent interest in girls' social or "relational" aggression, this volume offers a balanced, scholarly analysis of scientific knowledge in this area. The book integrates current research on emotion regulation, gender, and peer relations, to examine how girls are socialized to experience and express anger and aggression from infancy…

  18. Neuropsychiatry of Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Scott D.; Kjome, Kimberly L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Aggression is a serious medical problem that can place both the patient and the health care provider at risk. Aggression can result from medical, neurologic and or psychiatric disorders. A comprehensive patient evaluation is needed. Treatment options include pharmacotherapy as well as non-pharmacologic interventions, both need to be individualized to the patient. PMID:21172570

  19. Humor, Aggression, and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrick, Ann Louise; And Others

    Although humor is an important phenomenon in human interactions, it has rarely been studied in the elderly. An understanding of responses to humor in aggressive cartoons as a function of advancing age would provide information regarding both the development of humor and the negative (aggressive) emotional experiences of the elderly. This study was…

  20. Serotonin and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Serena-Lynn; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Decreased serotonin function has consistently been shown to be highly correlated with impulsive aggression across a number of different experimental paradigms. Such lowered serotonergic indices appear to correlate with the dimension of aggression dyscontrol and/or impulsivity rather than with psychiatric diagnostic categories per se. Implications…

  1. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Son, Andre Y; Biagioni, Milton C; Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49-85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association.

  2. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49–85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association. PMID:27688919

  3. [Myoclonus and epilepsies in children].

    PubMed

    Fejerman, N

    1991-01-01

    The possible associations of myoclonic phenomena, progressive or non progressive encephalopathies and epileptic phenomena are reviewed with special emphasis on childhood. This leads to the following five groups of conditions: (1) myoclonus without encephalopathy and without epilepsy; (2) encephalopathies with non-epileptic myoclonus; (3) progressive encephalopathies with myoclonic seizures or epileptic syndromes (Progressive myoclonus epilepsies); (4) epileptic encephalopathies with myoclonic seizures; (5) myoclonic epilepsies. In the first group, which also includes physiological myoclonus, a more thorough description of "benign sleep myoclonus of newborn" and "benign myoclonus of early infancy" is given. Characteristic of group 2 are "Kinsbourne syndrome" and certain types of "Hyperekplexia" which pose interesting differential diagnosis problems with stimulus-sensitive epilepsies. In group 3, the concept of progressive encephalopathies is stressed, meaning that "Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsies" are always in fact progressive encephalopathies presenting with myoclonic types of seizures or epileptic syndromes among other neurologic and psychologic signs and symptoms. Major and rare causes are reviewed. The term major is applied to typical features or to frequency, whereas rare causes include not only those what are rarely seen, but also some myoclonic variants of diseases which usually have different symptoms. The fourth group refers to severe epilepsies, mainly in infancy and childhood, which lead to mental retardation irrespective of their cause. The assumption is that diffuse and persistent epileptic activity may interfere with normal development of the higher cerebral functions. "West syndrome" and "Lennox-Gastaut syndrome" are the more representative examples and may present with myoclonic type of seizures, but they are not dealt with in detail here. Group 5 comprises true myoclonic epilepsies, differentiating syndromes recognized as idiopathic, such as

  4. Modulation of autonomic activity in neurological conditions: Epilepsy and Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript considers the central but neglected role of the autonomic nervous system in the expression and control of seizures in epilepsy (small) and tics in Tourette Syndrome (TS). In epilepsy, consideration of autonomic involvement is typically confined to differential diagnoses (e.g., syncope), or in relation to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). Investigation is more limited in Tourette Syndrome. The role of the autonomic nervous system in the generation and prevention of epileptic seizures is largely overlooked. Emotional stimuli such as anxiety and stress are potent causes of seizures and tic activity in epilepsy and TS, respectively. This manuscript will describe a possible neural mechanism by which afferent autonomic projections linked to cognition and behavior influence central thalamo-cortical regulation, which appears to be an important means for controlling both seizure and tic activity. It also summarizes the link between the integrity of the default mode network and autonomic regulation in patients with epilepsy as well as the link between impaired motor control and autonomic regulation in patients with TS. Two neurological conditions; epilepsy and TS were chosen, as seizures and tics represent parameters that can be easily measured to investigate influences of autonomic functions. The EDA biofeedback approach is anticipated to gain a strong position within the next generation of treatment for epilepsy, as a non-invasive technique with minimal side effects. This approach also takes advantage of the current practical opportunity to utilize growing digital health technology. PMID:26441491

  5. Epilepsy and videogames.

    PubMed

    Bureau, Michelle; Hirsch, Edouard; Vigevano, Federico

    2004-01-01

    Since the first case of videogame (VG) epilepsy was reported in 1981, many cases of seizures triggered by VGs were reported, not only in photosensitive, but also in non-photosensitive children and adolescents with epilepsy. We provide an overview of the literature with overall conclusions and recommendations regarding VG playing. Specific preventive measures concerning the physical characteristics of images included in commercially available VGs (flash rate, choice of colors, patterns, and contrast) can lead in the future to a clear decrease of this problem. In addition to the positive effect of such measures, the collaborative studies performed in France and in the rest of Europe have stressed the importance of a safe distance to the screen of > or = 2 m, and the less provocative role of 100-Hz screens.

  6. [Biofeedback treatment for epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yoko

    2014-05-01

    Pharmacological treatment is the mainstay for the treatment of epilepsy. However concerns regarding long-term side effects of drugs are increasingly voiced. Behavioral treatments including biofeedback, represents an alternative management option for the control of epilepsy. Biofeedback is a non-invasive bio-behavioral procedure through which patients can learn to gain psychophysiological control over seizures. This article will first overview seizure precipitation from a psychological perspective, and then introduce three major biofeedback treatments. Sensory motor rhythm (SMR) and slow cortical potential(SCP) biofeedback uses electroencephalographic parameters and are categorized as neurofeedback. Electrodermal activity (EDA) biofeedback focuses on modulation of peripheral sympathetic tone. The neural mechanisms underlying biofeedback treatment will be discussed in relation to thalamo-cortical regulation(of neural excitability across brain networks).

  7. Anxiety Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... fearful to talk at all in certain situations. Panic attacks. These episodes of anxiety can occur for no apparent reason. During a panic attack, a child typically has sudden and intense physical ...

  8. Anxiety Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... making life feel overwhelming or out of control. Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) . For a person with OCD, anxiety takes ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Taking Your Child to a Therapist Posttraumatic Stress ...

  9. Tuberous Sclerosis with Epilepsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    50% of individuals with TS have learning difficulties that include autism , attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), behavioral issues...These findings of TS manifest themselves symptomatically as seizures, epilepsy, and learning disabilities including autism , ADHD, behavioral...molecular pathogenesis to rationale for treatment”. J Child Neurol 2005; 20:318 –325. 15) Chandra PS, Salamon N, Huang J, et al. “FDG-PET/MRI

  10. Photoacoustic Imaging of Epilepsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    NUMBER University of Florida Biomedical Sciences Building Gainesville, FL 32611 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S...however, 80% individuals with medication resistant epilepsy might be cured through surgery if one were able to precisely localize the seizure focus...6–15 (2001). 4. L. A. Kunyansky, “Explicit inversion formulae for the spherical mean radon transform,” Inverse Probl. 23(1), 373–383 (2007). 5. D

  11. Photoacoustic Imaging of Epilepsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    NeuroImage 66 (2013) 240–248( Bertram , 2009) and that current diagnostics methods frequently fall short of identifying such sites. Animal studies...indicate that the neu- rons involved in the epileptic circuitry have enhanced excitability throughout ( Bertram et al., 1998; Fountain et al., 1998; Mangan... Bertram , E.H., 2009. Temporal lobe epilepsy: where do the seizures really begin? Epi- lepsy Behav. 14, 32–37. Bertram , E.H., Zhang, D.X., Mangan, P

  12. Periventricular heterotopia and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Huttenlocher, P R; Taravath, S; Mojtahedi, S

    1994-01-01

    We report a family with nodular subependymal masses of heterotopic gray matter occurring in six members in four generations. Only female members of the family are affected, and there is a high rate of spontaneous abortion, consistent with X-linked dominant inheritance, and lack of viability in affected males. Both in this family and in sporadic cases of subependymal heterotopias there is a high frequency of convulsive disorders, suggesting that epilepsy may be the major clinical manifestation of this developmental defect.

  13. Epilepsy and chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many chromosomal abnormalities are associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) malformations and other neurological alterations, among which seizures and epilepsy. Some of these show a peculiar epileptic and EEG pattern. We describe some epileptic syndromes frequently reported in chromosomal disorders. Methods Detailed clinical assessment, electrophysiological studies, survey of the literature. Results In some of these congenital syndromes the clinical presentation and EEG anomalies seems to be quite typical, in others the manifestations appear aspecific and no strictly linked with the chromosomal imbalance. The onset of seizures is often during the neonatal period of the infancy. Conclusions A better characterization of the electro clinical patterns associated with specific chromosomal aberrations could give us a valuable key in the identification of epilepsy susceptibility of some chromosomal loci, using the new advances in molecular cytogenetics techniques - such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), subtelomeric analysis and CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) microarray. However further studies are needed to understand the mechanism of epilepsy associated with chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:20438626

  14. Progressive myoclonic epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Michelucci, Roberto; Canafoglia, Laura; Striano, Pasquale; Gambardella, Antonio; Magaudda, Adriana; Tinuper, Paolo; La Neve, Angela; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Visani, Elisa; Panzica, Ferruccio; Avanzini, Giuliano; Tassinari, Carlo Alberto; Bianchi, Amedeo; Zara, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To define the clinical spectrum and etiology of progressive myoclonic epilepsies (PMEs) in Italy using a database developed by the Genetics Commission of the Italian League against Epilepsy. Methods: We collected clinical and laboratory data from patients referred to 25 Italian epilepsy centers regardless of whether a positive causative factor was identified. PMEs of undetermined origins were grouped using 2-step cluster analysis. Results: We collected clinical data from 204 patients, including 77 with a diagnosis of Unverricht-Lundborg disease and 37 with a diagnosis of Lafora body disease; 31 patients had PMEs due to rarer genetic causes, mainly neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. Two more patients had celiac disease. Despite extensive investigation, we found no definitive etiology for 57 patients. Cluster analysis indicated that these patients could be grouped into 2 clusters defined by age at disease onset, age at myoclonus onset, previous psychomotor delay, seizure characteristics, photosensitivity, associated signs other than those included in the cardinal definition of PME, and pathologic MRI findings. Conclusions: Information concerning the distribution of different genetic causes of PMEs may provide a framework for an updated diagnostic workup. Phenotypes of the patients with PME of undetermined cause varied widely. The presence of separate clusters suggests that novel forms of PME are yet to be clinically and genetically characterized. PMID:24384641

  15. Dietary therapies for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kossoff, Eric H; Wang, Huei-Shyong

    2013-01-01

    Since their introduction in 1921, high-fat, low-carbohydrate "ketogenic" diets have been used worldwide for refractory childhood epilepsy. Approximately half of the children have at least half their seizures reduced, including 15% who are seizure free. The mechanisms of action of dietary therapies are under active investigation and appear to involve mitochondria. Once perceived as a last resort, modifications to initiation and maintenance, as well as the widespread use of pre-made ketogenic formulas have allowed dietary treatment to be used earlier in the course of epilepsy. For infantile spasms (West syndrome) specifically, the ketogenic diet is successful about 50% of the time as a first-line treatment. New "alternative" diets such as the modified Atkins diet were created in 2003 and can be started more easily and are less restrictive. They may have particular value for countries in Asia. Side effects include constipation, dyslipidemia, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones. Additionally, neurologists are studying ketogenic diets for conditions other than epilepsy, including Alzheimer's disease, autism, and brain tumors.

  16. [Monitoring and Care of Expectant Mothers with Epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masako; Honda, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Women with epilepsy are exposed to social stigma, and they have anxiety and lose self-confidence in their social role as a woman. Psychiatrists, especially female psychiatrists, are able to support them. Important considerations are: 1) Pre-pregnant counseling; Physicians give appropriate advice and guidance. We need to provide the latest information on the teratogenicity of AEDs, and replace them with a safer combination of AEDs BEFORE pregnancy. Folate supplementation is also recommended. 2) Management during pregnancy: Patients are advised to adhere to taking AEDs as instructed, which prevents not only seizures during pregnancy but also reduces the risk of miscarriage and premature delivery. Doses of AED are to be increased after the second trimester. 3) Collaborating with obstetricians at delivery: Obstetricians are also nervous when faced with women with epilepsy. Basically, patients can deliver spontaneously, and the correct way to deal with unexpected seizures during labor should be fully understood. 4) Parental care: women with epilepsy can breastfeed. Physicians advise other family members on how to bottle feed at night to help mothers avoid a lack of sleep due to breastfeeding. Childcare is one of the most precious experiences in life. Patients with epilepsy, especially women, have a lower self-esteem; however, once they experience delivery, they act positively and become even-tempered. Physicians should be aware that childcare fosters a profound insight into their lives, allowing them to mature as a person.

  17. Emerging surgical therapies in the treatment of pediatric epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Karsy, Michael; Guan, Jian; Ducis, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    In the approximately 1% of children affected by epilepsy, pharmacoresistance and early age of seizure onset are strongly correlated with poor cognitive outcomes, depression, anxiety, developmental delay, and impaired activities of daily living. These children often require multiple surgical procedures, including invasive diagnostic procedures with intracranial electrodes to identify the seizure-onset zone. The recent development of minimally invasive surgical techniques, including stereotactic electroencephalography (SEEG) and MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT), and new applications of neurostimulation, such as responsive neurostimulation (RNS), are quickly changing the landscape of the surgical management of pediatric epilepsy. In this review, the authors discuss these various technologies, their current applications, and limitations in the treatment of pediatric drug-resistant epilepsy, as well as areas for future research. The development of minimally invasive diagnostic and ablative surgical techniques together with new paradigms in neurostimulation hold vast potential to improve the efficacy and reduce the morbidity of the surgical management of children with drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:27186523

  18. Psychiatric Comorbidity, Social Aspects and Quality of Life in a Population-Based Cohort of Expecting Fathers with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Simone Frizell; Veiby, Gyri; Bjørk, Marte Helene; Engelsen, Bernt A.; Daltveit, Anne-Kjersti; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate psychiatric disorders, adverse social aspects and quality of life in men with epilepsy during partner’s pregnancy. Method We used data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, including 76,335 men with pregnant partners. Men with epilepsy were compared to men without epilepsy, and to men with non-neurological chronic diseases. Results Expecting fathers in 658 pregnancies (mean age 31.8 years) reported a history of epilepsy, 36.9% using antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) at the onset of pregnancy. Symptoms of anxiety or depression were increased in epilepsy (7.0% and 3.9%, respectively) vs. non-epilepsy (4.6% and 2.5%, respectively, p = 0.004 and 0.023), and so were new onset symptoms of depression (2.0% vs. 1.0%, p < 0.031) and anxiety (4.3% vs. 2.3%, p = 0.023). Low self-esteem (2.5%) and low satisfaction with life (1.7%) were more frequent among fathers with epilepsy compared to fathers without epilepsy (1.3% and 0.7%, respectively, p = 0.01 and 0.010). Adverse social aspects and life events were associated with epilepsy vs. both reference groups. Self-reported diagnoses of ADHD (2.2%) and bipolar disorder (1.8%) were more common in epilepsy vs. non-epilepsy (0.4% and 0.3%, respectively, p = 0.002 and 0.003) and non-neurological chronic disorders (0.5% and 0.5%, respectively, p = 0.004 and 0.018). A screening tool for ADHD symptoms revealed a higher rate compared to self-reported ADHD (9.5% vs. 2.2%, p < 0.001). Conclusion Expecting fathers with epilepsy are at high risk of depression and anxiety, adverse socioeconomic aspects, low self-esteem, and low satisfaction with life. Focus on mental health in fathers with epilepsy during and after pregnancy is important. The use of screening tools can be particularly useful to identify those at risk. PMID:26637130

  19. The extratemporal lobe epilepsies in the epilepsy monitoring unit

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Deepa; Tripathi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Extratemporal lobe epilepsies (ETLE) are characterized by the epileptogenic foci outside the temporal lobe. They have a wide spectrum of semiological presentation depending upon the site of origin. They can arise from frontal, parietal, occipital lobes and from hypothalamic hamartoma. We discuss in this review the semiology of different types of ETLE encountered in the epilepsy monitoring unit. PMID:24791090

  20. Understanding of Epilepsy by Children and Young People with Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Ann; Parsons, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    There is a striking dearth of studies focusing sensitively and in depth on the mainstream educational experiences of children with epilepsy, as viewed by those children themselves. The one-year project (2006-7) reported here addresses that gap. Children's perceptions about mainstream teachers' understanding of epilepsy and school-based needs are…

  1. The Effects of Aggression on Symptom Severity and Treatment Response in a Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cassiello-Robbins, Clair; Conklin, Laren R.; Anakwenze, Ujunwa; Gorman, Jack M.; Woods, Scott W.; Shear, M. Katherine; Barlow, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research suggests that patients with panic disorder exhibit higher levels of aggression than patients with other anxiety disorders. This aggression is associated with more severe symptomatology and interpersonal problems. However, few studies have examined whether higher levels of aggression are associated with a worse treatment response in this population. Methods The present study sought to examine the association of aggression with panic disorder symptom severity in a sample of 379 patients who participated in a trial examining long-term strategies for the treatment of panic disorder. Results We found that aggression was significantly associated with higher baseline levels of panic disorder symptoms, anxiety, depression, and functional impairment. Further, we found that patients higher in aggression did not achieve the same level of improvement in general anxiety symptoms during treatment compared to patients lower in aggression, even when controlling for baseline anxiety symptom severity. Conclusion These results suggest that more research is needed concerning patients with anxiety disorders with higher aggression, as they may be a group in need of additional treatment considerations. PMID:25987198

  2. Are adolescents with internet addiction prone to aggressive behavior? The mediating effect of clinical comorbidities on the predictability of aggression in adolescents with internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae-A; Gwak, Ah Reum; Park, Su Mi; Kwon, Jun-Gun; Lee, Jun-Young; Jung, Hee Yeon; Sohn, Bo Kyung; Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Dai Jin; Choi, Jung-Seok

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported associations between aggression and Internet addiction disorder (IAD), which has also been linked with anxiety, depression, and impulsiveness. However, the causal relationship between aggression and IAD has thus far not been clearly demonstrated. This study was designed to (a) examine the association between aggression and IAD and (b) investigate the mediating effects of anxiety, depression, and impulsivity in cases in which IAD predicts aggression or aggression predicts IAD. A total of 714 middle school students in Seoul, South Korea, were asked to provide demographic information and complete the Young's Internet Addiction Test (Y-IAT), the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Conners-Wells Adolescent Self-Report Scale. Three groups were identified based on the Y-IAT: the usual user group (n=487, 68.2%), the high-risk group (n=191, 26.8%), and the Internet addiction group (n=13, 1.8%). The data revealed a linear association between aggression and IAD such that one variable could be predicted by the other. According to the path analysis, the clinical scales (BAI, BDI, and CASS) had partial or full mediating effects on the ability of aggression to predict IAD, but the clinical scales had no mediating effect on the ability of IAD to predict aggression. The current findings suggest that adolescents with IAD seem to have more aggressive dispositions than do normal adolescents. If more aggressive individuals are clinically prone to Internet addiction, early psychiatric intervention may contribute to the prevention of IAD.

  3. Are Adolescents with Internet Addiction Prone to Aggressive Behavior? The Mediating Effect of Clinical Comorbidities on the Predictability of Aggression in Adolescents with Internet Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae-A; Gwak, Ah Reum; Park, Su Mi; Kwon, Jun-Gun; Lee, Jun-Young; Jung, Hee Yeon; Sohn, Bo Kyung; Kim, Jae-Won

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have reported associations between aggression and Internet addiction disorder (IAD), which has also been linked with anxiety, depression, and impulsiveness. However, the causal relationship between aggression and IAD has thus far not been clearly demonstrated. This study was designed to (a) examine the association between aggression and IAD and (b) investigate the mediating effects of anxiety, depression, and impulsivity in cases in which IAD predicts aggression or aggression predicts IAD. A total of 714 middle school students in Seoul, South Korea, were asked to provide demographic information and complete the Young's Internet Addiction Test (Y-IAT), the Buss–Perry Aggression Questionnaire, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, the State–Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Conners–Wells Adolescent Self-Report Scale. Three groups were identified based on the Y-IAT: the usual user group (n=487, 68.2%), the high-risk group (n=191, 26.8%), and the Internet addiction group (n=13, 1.8%). The data revealed a linear association between aggression and IAD such that one variable could be predicted by the other. According to the path analysis, the clinical scales (BAI, BDI, and CASS) had partial or full mediating effects on the ability of aggression to predict IAD, but the clinical scales had no mediating effect on the ability of IAD to predict aggression. The current findings suggest that adolescents with IAD seem to have more aggressive dispositions than do normal adolescents. If more aggressive individuals are clinically prone to Internet addiction, early psychiatric intervention may contribute to the prevention of IAD. PMID:25902276

  4. Aggression and sport.

    PubMed

    Burton, Robert W

    2005-10-01

    Viewing aggression in its healthy form, in contrast to its extreme and inappropriate versions, and sport as a health-promoting exercise in psychological development and maturation may allow participants and spectators alike to retain an interest in aggression and sport and derive further enjoyment from them. In addition, it will benefit all involved with sport to have a broader understanding of human aggression. Physicians, mental health professionals, and other health care providers can be influential in this process, and should be willing to get involved and speak out when issues and problems arise.

  5. The Music Student with Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Matthew C.; Morgan, Joseph A.; Laverghetta, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    The teacher-student relationship can afford the music educator an opportunity to be the first to identify behaviors associated with epilepsy. A case of a student with epilepsy, based on the authors' experience, is described in which the music educators were the first and only individuals to become aware of a change in the student's behavior, after…

  6. Epilepsy and vaccinations: Italian guidelines.

    PubMed

    Pruna, Dario; Balestri, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Grosso, Salvatore; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Romeo, Antonino; Franzoni, Emilio; Osti, Maria; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Longhi, Riccardo; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Reports of childhood epilepsies in temporal association with vaccination have had a great impact on the acceptance of vaccination programs by health care providers, but little is known about this possible temporal association and about the types of seizures following vaccinations. For these reasons the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE), in collaboration with other Italian scientific societies, has decided to generate Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy. The aim of Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy is to present recent unequivocal evidence from published reports on the possible relationship between vaccines and epilepsy in order to provide information about contraindications and risks of vaccinations in patients with epilepsy. The following main issues have been addressed: (1) whether contraindications to vaccinations exist in patients with febrile convulsions, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies; and (2) whether any vaccinations can cause febrile seizures, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies. Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination (MMR) increase significantly the risk of febrile seizures. Recent observations and data about the relationships between vaccination and epileptic encephalopathy show that some cases of apparent vaccine-induced encephalopathy could in fact be caused by an inherent genetic defect with no causal relationship with vaccination.

  7. Gelastic epilepsy: Beyond hypothalamic hamartomas.

    PubMed

    Uribe-San-Martin, Reinaldo; Ciampi, Ethel; Lawson-Peralta, Balduin; Acevedo-Gallinato, Keryma; Torrealba-Marchant, Gonzalo; Campos-Puebla, Manuel; Godoy-Fernández, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Gelastic epilepsy or laughing seizures have been historically related to children with hypothalamic hamartomas. We report three adult patients who had gelastic epilepsy, defined as the presence of seizures with a prominent laugh component, including brain imaging, surface/invasive electroencephalography, positron emission tomography, and medical/surgical outcomes. None of the patients had hamartoma or other hypothalamic lesion. Two patients were classified as having refractory epilepsy (one had biopsy-proven neurocysticercosis and the other one hippocampal sclerosis and temporal cortical dysplasia). The third patient had no lesion on MRI and had complete control with carbamazepine. Both lesional patients underwent resective surgery, one with complete seizure control and the other one with poor outcome. Although hypothalamic hamartomas should always be ruled out in patients with gelastic epilepsy, laughing seizures can also arise from frontal and temporal lobe foci, which can be surgically removed. In addition, we present the first case of gelastic epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis.

  8. The neurosurgical treatment of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tatum, W O; Benbadis, S R; Vale, F L

    2000-01-01

    Despite the new advancements in antiepileptic drug development, thousands of people with epilepsy will remain intractable to medication. For a considerable proportion of these people, epilepsy surgery is a consideration for better control of their seizures. Resective surgery is now standard practice for patients with medication-refractory epilepsy. Temporal lobectomy continues to be the most common surgery performed. Once patients fail 2 to 3 optimal trials of antiepileptic medication, further drug therapy offers a minimal number of patients freedom from seizures. In contrast, temporal lobectomy in carefully selected patients may result in seizure-free outcomes in more than 70% to 90% of patients with intractable seizures. As technology and drug availability increases in the new millennium, it is important for the primary care physician to be aware of epilepsy surgery as a means to treat patients with antiepileptic drug-refractory epilepsy. Arch Fam Med. 2000;9:1142-1147

  9. Genetic models of focal epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Boillot, Morgane; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2016-02-15

    Focal epilepsies were for a long time thought to be acquired disorders secondary to cerebral lesions. However, the important role of genetic factors in focal epilepsies is now well established. Several focal epilepsy syndromes are now proven to be monogenic disorders. While earlier genetic studies suggested a strong contribution of ion channel and neurotransmitter receptor genes, later work has revealed alternative pathways, among which the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signal transduction pathway with DEPDC5. In this article, we provide an update on the mutational spectrum of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor genes (CHRNA4, CHRNB2, CHRNA2) and KCNT1 causing autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE), and of LGI1 in autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features (ADEAF). We also emphasize, through a review of the current literature, the contribution of in vitro and in vivo models developed to unveil the pathogenic mechanisms underlying these two epileptic syndromes.

  10. Aggression in Pretend Play and Aggressive Behavior in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehr, Karla K.; Russ, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Pretend play is an essential part of child development and adjustment. However, parents, teachers, and researchers debate the function of aggression in pretend play. Different models of aggression predict that the expression of aggression in play could either increase or decrease actual aggressive behavior. The current study…

  11. Therapeutic Devices for Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic devices provide new options for treating drug-resistant epilepsy. These devices act by a variety of mechanisms to modulate neuronal activity. Only vagus nerve stimulation, which continues to develop new technology, is approved for use in the United States. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of anterior thalamus for partial epilepsy recently was approved in Europe and several other countries. Responsive neurostimulation, which delivers stimuli to one or two seizure foci in response to a detected seizure, recently completed a successful multicenter trial. Several other trials of brain stimulation are in planning or underway. Transcutaneous magnetic stimulation (TMS) may provide a noninvasive method to stimulate cortex. Controlled studies of TMS split on efficacy, and may depend on whether a seizure focus is near a possible region for stimulation. Seizure detection devices in the form of “shake” detectors via portable accelerometers can provide notification of an ongoing tonic-clonic seizure, or peace of mind in the absence of notification. Prediction of seizures from various aspects of EEG is in early stages. Prediction appears to be possible in a subpopulation of people with refractory seizures and a clinical trial of an implantable prediction device is underway. Cooling of neocortex or hippocampus reversibly can attenuate epileptiform EEG activity and seizures, but engineering problems remain in its implementation. Optogenetics is a new technique that can control excitability of specific populations of neurons with light. Inhibition of epileptiform activity has been demonstrated in hippocampal slices, but use in humans will require more work. In general, devices provide useful palliation for otherwise uncontrollable seizures, but with a different risk profile than with most drugs. Optimizing the place of devices in therapy for epilepsy will require further development and clinical experience. PMID:22367987

  12. Treatment of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Allan A.

    1963-01-01

    The main clinical types of epilepsy and their treatment are described. The treatment of choice in petit mal epilepsy is trimethadione (Trimedone) 0.3 g., three to six times a day, or acetazolamide (Diamox) 125-250 mg., three to four times a day. Phenobarbital is usually given as well to prevent grand mal seizures. Diphenylhydantoin sodium (Dilantin Sodium), 100 mg., and/or phenobarbital, 30-100 mg., three to four times a day, is recommended in patients with focal and grand mal epilepsy. Psychomotor automatisms are a form of focal seizure. Primidone (Mysoline), in doses of 125-250 mg. two to three times a day, is a very useful anticonvulsant in patients with myoclonic features, psychomotor automatisms and grand mal seizures. Primidone should be started in small doses. Drug reactions, especially cerebellar ataxia in the case of diphenylhydantoin and blood dyscrasias in the case of some drugs, should be recognized. Excessive drowsiness can be avoided by proper dosage and proper timing of drug administration. Patients should be seen regularly at least two to three times a year. The objective of treatment is to achieve optimum control of seizures by using the appropriate drug in adequate dosage. Social adaptation is good in the majority of patients, who should be encouraged to carry on their life independently, usually free to marry and have children. Attention to special occupational hazards has to be considered. Education of employers and employees is often necessary. Special work arrangements are occasionally indicated for selected patients. Patients should be seizure-free for two to three years before permission is given to drive an automobile. PMID:13969008

  13. Reactions of the immune system in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    COJOCARU, Inimioara Mihaela; COJOCARU, Manole

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epilepsy may present as a symptom of many neurological disorders and often an etiological explanation cannot be identified. There is growing evidence that autoimmune mechanisms might have a role in some patients. The evidence for immunological mechanisms in epilepsy can be examined within the following three main areas: the childhood epilepsy syndromes, epilepsy associated with other immunologically mediated diseases, and the more common unselected groups of patients with epilepsy. Autoimmunity was recently suspected to be involved in the pathology of certain human epilepsies. This includes numerous reports of the detection of theoretically relevant serum autoantibodies, experimental data showing that antibodies can be epileptogenic, and a response of some epilepsy syndromes to immunomodulation. The high prevalence of epilepsies in specific immune diseases suggests that immune system may play a role in the pathogenesis of epilepsy or might be associated with it. There is some evidence that immune mechanisms play a role in the pathogenesis of some epilepsy syndromes. PMID:21977153

  14. Differential diagnosis and management of human-directed aggression in dogs.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Ilana R

    2003-03-01

    Canine aggression directed to human beings is a common presenting complaint and requires attention to safety issues and behavior modification to minimize the risks of future aggression. Dogs may bite familiar people, including family members, or unfamiliar people for a variety of reasons. Anxiety plays an important role in aggression regardless of its target or circumstances. Effective management of aggression may include education and safety counseling for owners, lifestyle changes for dogs and owners, avoidance of provocations when possible, and behavior modification to minimize the risk of future bites. Drug therapy may be indicated to facilitate behavior modification or to reduce reactivity in the dog.

  15. Epilepsy in Dante's poetry.

    PubMed

    Mula, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Dante Alighieri is the greatest Italian poet and one of the most important writers in Western literature. He is best known for the epic poem "Commedia", later named "La Divina Commedia" that has profoundly influenced not only poetic imagination but also all subsequent allegorical creations of imaginary worlds in literature. This paper examines the poetic description of some episodes of loss of consciousness in Dante's poetry discussing how and why typical elements of epileptic seizures have been used. On the 750th anniversary of Dante's birth, his poetry still remains to be an inspiring source of debate and reflection. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity".

  16. Epilepsy Surgery: An Evidence Summary

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Medical Advisory Secretariat, the predecessor of Health Quality Ontario, published an evidence-based analysis on functional brain imaging. This analysis highlighted the low uptake of epilepsy surgery in Ontario and internationally. Objective The objective of this analysis was to review the effectiveness of epilepsy surgery at reducing seizure frequency, as well as the safety of epilepsy surgery. Data Sources The literature search included studies published between January 1995 and March 2012. Search terms included epilepsy, surgery, resection, safety, and complications. Review Methods Studies were eligible for inclusion if they included at least 20 patients undergoing surgery; had a comparison group of patients with epilepsy who were not undergoing surgery; and reported follow-up periods of at least 1 year. Outcomes of interest included seizure frequency and complications associated with surgery. Results Six systematic reviews reported pooled seizure-free rates that ranged from 43% to 75%. Two randomized controlled trials compared the effectiveness of epilepsy surgery with no surgery in patients with drug-refractory epilepsy. Both trials reported significant improvements in the seizure frequency in the surgery group compared with the nonsurgery group. Eight retrospective cohort studies reported on the safety of epilepsy surgery. Of the 2,725 patients included in these studies, there were 3 deaths reportedly related to surgery. Other complications included hemiparesis, infection, and visual field defects. The studies had long follow-up periods ranging from a mean of 2 to 7 years. Limitations The most recent randomized controlled trial was stopped early due to slow enrolment rates. Thus results need to be interpreted with caution. Conclusions There is high quality evidence that epilepsy surgery is effective at reducing seizure frequency. Two randomized controlled trials compared surgery to no surgery in patients with drug-refractory epilepsy. Both

  17. Maternal phobic anxiety and child anxiety.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Gail A; Layne, Ann E; Egan, Elizabeth A; Nelson, Lara P

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the relation between maternal anxiety symptoms and child anxiety symptoms and evaluated whether a reporting bias is associated with maternal anxiety. Fifty-seven mother-child pairs participated. All children had features or diagnoses of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), generalized anxiety disorder, and/or social phobia. Measures of maternal symptomatology and child anxiety were administered. Higher levels of maternal phobic anxiety on the Brief Symptom Inventory were significantly associated with higher levels of separation anxiety in children. After controlling for clinician rating of SAD severity, maternal phobic anxiety emerged as a significant predictor of maternal ratings of child separation anxiety, accounting for 19% of the variance. Phobic mothers endorsed levels of separation anxiety in their children that exceeded levels endorsed by clinicians, suggesting maternal overreporting.

  18. Recognizing and preventing epilepsy-related mortality

    PubMed Central

    Spruill, Tanya; Thurman, David; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is associated with a high rate of premature mortality from direct and indirect effects of seizures, epilepsy, and antiseizure therapies. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the second leading neurologic cause of total lost potential life-years after stroke, yet SUDEP may account for less than half of all epilepsy-related deaths. Some epilepsy groups are especially vulnerable: individuals from low socioeconomic status groups and those with comorbid psychiatric illness die more often than controls. Despite clear evidence of an important public health problem, efforts to assess and prevent epilepsy-related deaths remain inadequate. We discuss factors contributing to the underestimation of SUDEP and other epilepsy-related causes of death. We suggest the need for a systematic classification of deaths directly due to epilepsy (e.g., SUDEP, drowning), due to acute symptomatic seizures, and indirectly due to epilepsy (e.g., suicide, chronic effects of antiseizure medications). Accurately estimating the frequency of epilepsy-related mortality is essential to support the development and assessment of preventive interventions. We propose that educational interventions and public health campaigns targeting medication adherence, psychiatric comorbidity, and other modifiable risk factors may reduce epilepsy-related mortality. Educational campaigns regarding sudden infant death syndrome and fires, which kill far fewer Americans than epilepsy, have been widely implemented. We have done too little to prevent epilepsy-related deaths. Everyone with epilepsy and everyone who treats people with epilepsy need to know that controlling seizures will save lives. PMID:26674330

  19. Treatment of epilepsy in adults.

    PubMed

    Burakgazi, Evren; French, Jacqueline A

    2016-09-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder in adults and requires treatment with antiepileptic medication. While the majority of patients with epilepsy can be treated with medication, about one third will fail on medical treatment. Therefore, other treatment options such as surgery, devices, and the ketogenic diet are other options to consider, in addition to medical treatment. The treatment of epilepsy requires many other factors to be taken into consideration, and these include, but are not limited to, age, gender, coexistent medical conditions, and the use of concomitant medications. The goal of treatment is to provide optimal seizure control while using the least possible number of medications, particularly for young females at reproductive age or the elderly who may suffer from other medical diseases and receive other concomitant medications. Certain conditions may co-exist with epilepsy, such as migraine, mood disorder, and memory disturbances, therefore the decision to choose the most appropriate medication for epilepsy patients should also involve treatment of these conditions. Here, we review current clinical practice in epilepsy and focus on the most common problems and conditions that clinicians face on a daily basis to treat adult patients with epilepsy. Side effect profiles, spectrum of efficacy and optimal choices per predominant type of seizures are summarized and can be used for educational purposes.

  20. The Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg model of absence epilepsy exhibits alterations in fear conditioning and latent inhibition consistent with psychiatric comorbidities in humans.

    PubMed

    Marks, Wendie N; Cavanagh, Mary E; Greba, Quentin; Cain, Stuart M; Snutch, Terrance P; Howland, John G

    2016-01-01

    Behavioural, neurological, and genetic similarities exist in epilepsies, their psychiatric comorbidities, and various psychiatric illnesses, suggesting common aetiological factors. Rodent models of epilepsy are used to characterize the comorbid symptoms apparent in epilepsy and their neurobiological mechanisms. The present study was designed to assess Pavlovian fear conditioning and latent inhibition in a polygenetic rat model of absence epilepsy, i.e. Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) and the non-epileptic control (NEC) strain. Electrophysiological recordings confirmed the presence of spike-wave discharges in young adult GAERS but not NEC rats. A series of behavioural tests designed to assess anxiety-like behaviour (elevated plus maze, open field, acoustic startle response) and cognition (Pavlovian conditioning and latent inhibition) was subsequently conducted on male and female offspring. Results showed that GAERS exhibited significantly higher anxiety-like behaviour, a characteristic reported previously. In addition, using two protocols that differed in shock intensity, we found that both sexes of GAERS displayed exaggerated cued and contextual Pavlovian fear conditioning and impaired fear extinction. Fear reinstatement to the conditioned stimuli following unsignalled footshocks did not differ between the strains. Male GAERS also showed impaired latent inhibition in a paradigm using Pavlovian fear conditioning, suggesting that they may have altered attention, particularly related to previously irrelevant stimuli in the environment. Neither the female GAERS nor NEC rats showed evidence of latent inhibition in our paradigm. Together, the results suggest that GAERS may be a particularly useful model for assessing therapeutics designed to improve the emotional and cognitive disturbances associated with absence epilepsy.

  1. Natural approaches to epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gaby, Alan R

    2007-03-01

    This article reviews research on the use of diet, nutritional supplements, and hormones in the treatment of epilepsy. Potentially beneficial dietary interventions include identifying and treating blood glucose dysregulation, identifying and avoiding allergenic foods, and avoiding suspected triggering agents such as alcohol, aspartame, and monosodium glutamate. The ketogenic diet may be considered for severe, treatment-resistant cases. The Atkins diet (very low in carbohydrates) is a less restrictive type of ketogenic diet that may be effective in some cases. Nutrients that may reduce seizure frequency include vitamin B6, magnesium, vitamin E, manganese, taurine, dimethylglycine, and omega-3 fatty acids. Administration of thiamine may improve cognitive function in patients with epilepsy. Supplementation with folic acid, vitamin B6, biotin, vitamin D, and L-carnitine may be needed to prevent or treat deficiencies resulting from the use of anticonvulsant drugs. Vitamin K1 has been recommended near the end of pregnancy for women taking anticonvulsants. Melatonin may reduce seizure frequency in some cases, and progesterone may be useful for women with cyclic exacerbations of seizures. In most cases, nutritional therapy is not a substitute for anticonvulsant medications. However, in selected cases, depending on the effectiveness of the interventions, dosage reductions or discontinuation of medications may be possible.

  2. Managing epilepsy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sanjeev V

    2011-01-01

    There are close to one and half million women with epilepsy (WWE) in reproductive age group in India. WWE have several unique gender-specific problems in the biological and social domains. Women experience more social stigma from epilepsy and have more difficulty with education and employment. They have more difficulty to get married and sustain successful family life. Reproductive hormones like estrogen and progesterone have opposing effect on seizure threshold. WWE have increased risk of infertility. About 10% of their babies may have major congenital malformations. Most of the adverse biological outcomes for WWE are related to adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Traditional AEDs like phenobarbitone and sodium valproate are probably associated with increased risk of fetal malformations or other adverse fetal outcomes. Polytherapy and use of high dose of any AED is associated with higher risk fetal complications. It is very important that all WWE have a preconception evaluation done by a neurologist, when the need to continue AEDs or possibility of reducing AED load could be assessed. All WWE need to take folic acid 5 mg daily during preconception period and pregnancy. They should undergo a detailed screening for fetal malformations between 12 and 18 weeks of pregnancy. The neurologist, gynecologist, imageologist and pediatrician need to work as a team while managing pregnancy in WWE. It is important to reassure WWE and their relatives that pregnancy is safe in WWE and their children are healthy in more than 90% instances.

  3. Phenotype definition in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Winawer, Melodie R

    2006-05-01

    Phenotype definition consists of the use of epidemiologic, biological, molecular, or computational methods to systematically select features of a disorder that might result from distinct genetic influences. By carefully defining the target phenotype, or dividing the sample by phenotypic characteristics, we can hope to narrow the range of genes that influence risk for the trait in the study population, thereby increasing the likelihood of finding them. In this article, fundamental issues that arise in phenotyping in epilepsy and other disorders are reviewed, and factors complicating genotype-phenotype correlation are discussed. Methods of data collection, analysis, and interpretation are addressed, focusing on epidemiologic studies. With this foundation in place, the epilepsy subtypes and clinical features that appear to have a genetic basis are described, and the epidemiologic studies that have provided evidence for the heritability of these phenotypic characteristics, supporting their use in future genetic investigations, are reviewed. Finally, several molecular approaches to phenotype definition are discussed, in which the molecular defect, rather than the clinical phenotype, is used as a starting point.

  4. Sexual dysfunction in partial epilepsy: a deficit in physiologic sexual arousal.

    PubMed

    Morrell, M J; Sperling, M R; Stecker, M; Dichter, M A

    1994-02-01

    Men and women with epilepsy frequently complain of sexual dysfunction. We studied the sexual response in men and women with partial epilepsy of temporal lobe origin (TLE) by measuring genital blood flow (GBF) during sexual arousal. Nine women and eight men with TLE and 12 women and seven men as controls completed inventories for symptoms of depression, sexual experience, and sexual attitude and underwent measurement of digital pulse and GBF during alternating segments of sexually neutral and erotic videotape. Subjective ratings of arousal to the videotape were obtained. We calculated digital pulse and GBF response as the percentage increase in pulse amplitude during the erotic compared with the preceding sexually neutral film. No subject group reported symptoms of significant depression on the inventory. However, men and women with epilepsy had fewer sexual experiences than subjects without epilepsy, and women with epilepsy imagined specific sexual activities to be more anxiety-producing and less arousing than did women without epilepsy. Men and women with TLE had a diminished GBF response. The mean increase in GBF in men with TLE was 184% versus 660% for controls (p = 0.01). Women with TLE had a mean increase of 117% versus 161% for controls (p < 0.01). Digital pulse did not vary across stimulus conditions. Subjective ratings for all groups indicated moderate sexual arousal. We conclude that there is a diminution in one aspect of physiologic sexual arousal in some men and women with TLE.

  5. [Images of epilepsy in Shakespeare].

    PubMed

    Breuer, Horst

    2002-01-01

    Epilepsy and the "falling sickness" are mentioned three times in Shakespeare, in Julius Caesar, I.ii, Othello, IV.i., and figuratively in King Lear, II.ii. The present article surveys these passages in the context of modern research findings, literary as well as medico-historical. It adds further material from Renaissance texts and concludes that epilepsy is an omnibus term for a variety of symptoms and pathological conditions, and that Shakespeare's idea of epilepsy is closer to popular stereotypes than has hitherto been assumed.

  6. Talking about epilepsy: Challenges parents face when communicating with their child about epilepsy and epilepsy-related issues.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Stephanie; Lambert, Veronica; Gallagher, Pamela; Shahwan, Amre; Austin, Joan K

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the challenges that parents of children with epilepsy experienced when engaging in dialog with their child about epilepsy and epilepsy-related issues. Using a qualitative exploratory approach, interviews were conducted with 34 parents of children with epilepsy (aged 6-16 years), consisting of 27 mothers and 7 fathers. Data were transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed. Findings revealed five main themes: normalizing epilepsy, the invisibility of epilepsy, information concealment, fear of misinforming the child, and difficulty in discussing particular epilepsy-related issues. Many of the communicative challenges experienced by parents impacted on their ability to engage openly in parent-child dialog about epilepsy in the home. Parents face specific challenges when choosing to communicate with their child about epilepsy, relating to creating a sense of normality, reducing fear of causing their child worry, and having a lack of epilepsy-related knowledge. Healthcare professionals who work closely with families living with epilepsy should remain mindful of the importance of discussing family communication surrounding epilepsy and the challenges parents of children with epilepsy face when talking about epilepsy within the home.

  7. Health Anxiety, Hypochondriasis, and the Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramowitz, Jonathan S.; Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Deacon, Brett J.

    2007-01-01

    Although clinical observations suggest that health-related anxiety is present, to some extent, in a number of anxiety disorders, this relationship has not been examined empirically. The present study therefore utilized the Short Health Anxiety Inventory (SHAI) to elucidate the structure of such symptoms among patients with anxiety disorders and to…

  8. Anxiety in adolescence. Can we prevent it?

    PubMed Central

    Malonda, Elisabeth; Samper, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Background Emotions are potent modulators and motivators of the behaviour that the individual displays in the different situations they have to live and they can act as a protection factor or vulnerability of the adapted or maladaptive behaviour. This study focuses on anxiety in adolescence. Objectives. The objective is, through a longitudinal study, to analyse the psychological processes and emotions that facilitate the symptoms of anxiety and those which protect the adolescent from these symptoms. Material and Methods 417 adolescents (192 boys and 225 girls) participated in a three-wave longitudinal study in Valencia, Spain. In the first wave, adolescents were either in the third year of secondary school (81 boys and 85 girls) or the fourth year of secondary school (111 boys and 140 girls). The mean age was 14.70 (SD = 0.68; range = 13-17 years). This study monitored participating adolescents for three years. Results The results indicate a differential profile in the evaluated emotions according to sex, with the girls being the ones to experiment more anxiety and more empathy, while the boys show more emotional instability and aggression. Conclusions It is concluded that the best predictors for anxiety are anger state, aggressive behaviour, empathic concern together with the lack of coping mechanisms focused on problem solving and the perception of stress as a threat. Key words:Adolescence, anxiety, emotions, coping, stress. PMID:27988785

  9. Pediatric seizure-related posttraumatic stress and anxiety symptoms treated with EMDR: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Dautovic, Elmedina; de Roos, Carlijn; van Rood, Yanda; Dommerholt, Agnes; Rodenburg, Roos

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the potential effects of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) in children with epilepsy-related posttraumatic stress and/or anxiety symptoms, using a case series design. Methods Five children (aged 8–18) with epilepsy identified for seizure-related posttraumatic stress and/or anxiety symptoms were treated with EMDR. To examine potential treatment effects, posttraumatic stress and anxiety symptoms were assessed (CRTI and SCARED) pre- and post-EMDR and at 3-month follow-up. Normative deviation scores were calculated to examine the severity of seizure-related posttraumatic stress and anxiety symptoms over time. The reliable change index was calculated for pre- to posttreatment change of seizure-related posttraumatic stress and/or anxiety symptoms. Results Before EMDR, overall or subscale scores indicated that all children had (sub)clinical seizure-related posttraumatic stress symptoms and/or anxiety symptoms. Directly after EMDR, most children showed significant and/or clinical individual improvement, and these beneficial effects were maintained or reached at follow-up. The mean number of sessions was 2 (range 1–3, 45 min per session). Conclusions In case of seizure-related posttraumatic stress and/or anxiety, this study indicates that EMDR is a potentially successful quick and safe psychological treatment for children with epilepsy. Highlights of the article The first study to examine the potential effects of EMDR to reduce clinical seizure-related posttraumatic stress symptoms and/or anxiety symptoms in children with epilepsy. After 1–3 EMDR (45 min) sessions, positive treatment effects were found on a range of seizure-related PTSD symptoms and/or anxiety symptoms. During treatment, no seizures, absences, or any other adverse events were observed; the seizure diaries showed that none of the children experienced more seizures (or an unusual pattern) after treatment. At the reevaluation of EMDR, all children and parents

  10. Current standards of neuropsychological assessment in epilepsy surgery centers across Europe.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Viola Lara; Äikiä, Marja; Del Barrio, Antonio; Boon, Paul; Borbély, Csaba; Bran, Ema; Braun, Kees; Carette, Evelien; Clark, Maria; Cross, Judith Helen; Dimova, Petia; Fabo, Daniel; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Francione, Stefano; Gersamia, Anna; Gil-Nagel, Antonio; Guekht, Alla; Harrison, Sue; Hecimovic, Hrvoje; Heminghyt, Einar; Hirsch, Edouard; Javurkova, Alena; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Kavan, Nicole; Kelemen, Anna; Kimiskidis, Vasilios K; Kirschner, Margarita; Kleitz, Catherine; Kobulashvili, Teia; Kosmidis, Mary H; Kurtish, Selin Yagci; Lesourd, Mathieu; Ljunggren, Sofia; Lossius, Morten Ingvar; Malmgren, Kristina; Mameniskiené, Ruta; Martin-Sanfilippo, Patricia; Marusic, Petr; Miatton, Marijke; Özkara, Çiğdem; Pelle, Federica; Rubboli, Guido; Rudebeck, Sarah; Ryvlin, Philippe; van Schooneveld, Monique; Schmid, Elisabeth; Schmidt, Pia-Magdalena; Seeck, Margitta; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Shavel-Jessop, Sara; Tarta-Arsene, Oana; Trinka, Eugen; Viggedal, Gerd; Wendling, Anne-Sophie; Witt, Juri-Alexander; Helmstaedter, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    We explored the current practice with respect to the neuropsychological assessment of surgical epilepsy patients in European epilepsy centers, with the aim of harmonizing and establishing common standards. Twenty-six epilepsy centers and members of "E-PILEPSY" (a European pilot network of reference centers in refractory epilepsy and epilepsy surgery), were asked to report the status of neuropsychological assessment in adults and children via two different surveys. There was a consensus among these centers regarding the role of neuropsychology in the presurgical workup. Strong agreement was found on indications (localization, epileptic dysfunctions, adverse drugs effects, and postoperative monitoring) and the domains to be evaluated (memory, attention, executive functions, language, visuospatial skills, intelligence, depression, anxiety, and quality of life). Although 186 different tests are in use throughout these European centers, a core group of tests reflecting a moderate level of agreement could be discerned. Variability exists with regard to indications, protocols, and paradigms for the assessment of hemispheric language dominance. For the tests in use, little published evidence of clinical validity in epilepsy was provided. Participants in the survey reported a need for improvement concerning the validity of the tests, tools for the assessment of everyday functioning and accelerated forgetting, national norms, and test co-normalization. Based on the present survey, we documented a consensus regarding the indications and principles of neuropsychological testing. Despite the variety of tests in use, the survey indicated that there may be a core set of tests chosen based on experience, as well as on published evidence. By combining these findings with the results of an ongoing systematic literature review, we aim for a battery that can be recommended for the use across epilepsy surgical centers in Europe.

  11. Epilepsy Imaging Study Guideline Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, William D; Cross, J Helen; Duncan, John S; Stefan, Hermann; Theodore, William H

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of limited economic resources, as well as potential adverse effects of ‘over testing,’ has increased interest in ‘evidence-based’ assessment of new medical technology. This creates a particular problem for evaluation and treatment of epilepsy, increasingly dependent on advanced imaging and electrophysiology, since there is a marked paucity of epilepsy diagnostic and prognostic studies that meet rigorous standards for evidence classification. The lack of high quality data reflects fundamental weaknesses in many imaging studies but also limitations in the assumptions underlying evidence classification schemes as they relate to epilepsy, and to the practicalities of conducting adequately powered studies of rapidly evolving technologies. We review the limitations of current guidelines and propose elements for imaging studies that can contribute meaningfully to the epilepsy literature. PMID:21740417

  12. Pleiotropic contributions of nitric oxide to aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Randy J; Trainor, Brian C; Chiavegatto, Silvana; Demas, Gregory E

    2006-01-01

    Male mice with targeted deletion of the genes encoding the neuronal (NOS-1-/- or nNOS-/-) isoform of nitric oxide synthase display altered aggressive behaviors. Male nNOS-1-/- mice are more aggressive than wild-type (WT) mice in all testing paradigms. Testosterone is necessary, but not sufficient, for evoking the persistent aggression, and that serotonin (5-HT) metabolism is altered in male nNOS-1-/- mice. The specific deletion of the nNOS-1 gene not only results in a lack of nNOS-1 protein, but in common with many genes, affects several 'down-stream' processes. In this review, we address whether the elevated aggression in male nNOS-1-/- mice reflects pleiotropic effects of the nNOS-1 gene on pain sensitivity, 'anxiety-like', or 'depressive-like' behaviors. For example, male nNOS-1-/- mice display increased sensitivity to painful stimuli, which may prolong aggressive interactions. Despite elevated corticosterone concentrations, nNOS-1 knockout mice appear to be less 'anxious' or fearful than WT mice. Male nNOS-1-/- mice display longer latencies to right themselves on an inverted platform and spend more time in the center of an open field than WT mice. Because of reduced serotonin turnover, the excessive aggressiveness displayed by nNOS-1-/- mice may be symptomatic of a depressive-like syndrome. However, nNOS-1-/- mice rarely display behavioral 'despair' when assessed with the Porsolt forced swim test; rather, nNOS-1-/- mice show vigorous swimming throughout the assessment suggesting that the aggressive behavior does not represent depressive-like behavior. Importantly, aggressive behavior is not a unitary process, but is the result of complex interactions among several physiological, motivational, and behavioral systems, with contributions from the social as well as the physical environment. Lastly, the multiple, and often unanticipated, effects of targeted gene disruption on aggressive behavior are considered.

  13. [Modern aspects of epilepsy treatment].

    PubMed

    Alajbegović, Azra; Kantardzić, Dzelaludin; Suljić, Enra; Alajbegović, Salem

    2003-01-01

    It is a general rule today, after a relevant diagnostics of an epilepsy, to start a monotherapy treatment, depending on a kind of a seizure, a life age and a general health condition. First line of monotherapy epilepsy drugs remain carbamazapine and sodium valproat. New drugs that are being introduced are: felbamat, gabapentin, lamotrigin, oxcarbazepin, tiagabin, topiramat, vigabatin and zanisamid. These are commonly used as add-on therapy, or as an addition for previously used antiepileptic. Their indicated areas are complex resistant partial seizures with or without generalization. Attention should be paid on proper dosage, interactions and toxicity. Regardless on the new epileptic era, according to reports of International League against epilepsy, most of the patients do not receive the drug that is the most appropriate for them concerning the price (cost-benefit). Neurosurgical methods in epilepsy treatment are: selective amygdalo-hyppocampotomy, temporal lobotomy, subpial resection, hemispherectomy, corpus callosotomy, removal of lesions like tumors or cysts provide encouraging results in reduction of epileptic seizures that can be followed by reduction of drug therapy. N. vagus stimulation is being wider introduced in resident epileptics. Treatment of epilepsy in women requires an approach to sexuality, conception, pregnancy, introduction of medicaments, antiepileptic terratogenity, contraception, motherhood and menopause. A special significance of modern approach to epilepsy is in treatment of elderly who have cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disease as a cause of seizures. A complex treatment of epilepsy using pharmacological and neurosurgical approach requires supportive psychotherapy, socio-therapy, the work with a family, education about epilepsy and living a life with more quality having one.

  14. Video material and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Harding, G F; Jeavons, P M; Edson, A S

    1994-01-01

    Nine patients who had epileptic attacks while playing computer games were studied in the laboratory. Patients had an EEG recorded as well as their response to intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) at flash rates of 1-60 fps. In addition, pattern sensitivity was assessed in all patients by a gratings pattern. Only 2 patients had no previous history of convulsions, and only 2 had a normal basic EEG. All but 1 were sensitive to IPS, and all but 1 were pattern sensitive. Most patients were male, but although this appears to conflict with previously published literature results regarding the sex ratio in photosensitivity, it was due to the male predominance of video game usage. We compared our results with those reported in the literature. Diagnosing video game epilepsy requires performing an EEG with IPS and pattern stimulation. We propose a standard method of testing.

  15. The role of violence exposure and negative affect in understanding child and adolescent aggression.

    PubMed

    Ebesutani, Chad; Kim, Eunha; Young, John

    2014-12-01

    Aggressive behaviors in youth tend to be relatively stable across the lifespan and are associated with maladaptive functioning later in life. Researchers have recently identified that both violence exposure and negative affective experiences are related to the development of aggressive behaviors. Children exposed to violence also often experience negative affect (NA) in the form of anxiety and depression. Bringing these findings together, the current study used a clinical sample of youth (N = 199; ages 7-17 years) referred to a psychiatric residential treatment facility to examine the specific contributions of NA and exposure to violence on the development of aggressive behaviors in youth. Using structural equation modeling, both NA and recent exposure to violence significantly predicted aggressive behaviors. More importantly, negative affect partially mediated the relationship between exposure to violence and aggression. Implications of these findings from a clinical perspective and future directions for research on aggression are discussed.

  16. The Managing Epilepsy Well Network:: Advancing Epilepsy Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Sajatovic, Martha; Jobst, Barbara C; Shegog, Ross; Bamps, Yvan A; Begley, Charles E; Fraser, Robert T; Johnson, Erica K; Pandey, Dilip K; Quarells, Rakale C; Scal, Peter; Spruill, Tanya M; Thompson, Nancy J; Kobau, Rosemarie

    2017-03-01

    Epilepsy, a complex spectrum of disorders, affects about 2.9 million people in the U.S. Similar to other chronic disorders, people with epilepsy face challenges related to management of the disorder, its treatment, co-occurring depression, disability, social disadvantages, and stigma. Two national conferences on public health and epilepsy (1997, 2003) and a 2012 IOM report on the public health dimensions of epilepsy highlighted important knowledge gaps and emphasized the need for evidence-based, scalable epilepsy self-management programs. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention translated recommendations on self-management research and dissemination into an applied research program through the Prevention Research Centers Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network. MEW Network objectives are to advance epilepsy self-management research by developing effective interventions that can be broadly disseminated for use in people's homes, healthcare providers' offices, or in community settings. The aim of this report is to provide an update on the MEW Network research pipeline, which spans efficacy, effectiveness, and dissemination. Many of the interventions use e-health strategies to eliminate barriers to care (e.g., lack of transportation, functional limitations, and stigma). Strengths of this mature research network are the culture of collaboration, community-based partnerships, e-health methods, and its portfolio of prevention activities, which range from efficacy studies engaging hard-to-reach groups, to initiatives focused on provider training and knowledge translation. The MEW Network works with organizations across the country to expand its capacity, help leverage funding and other resources, and enhance the development, dissemination, and sustainability of MEW Network programs and tools. Guided by national initiatives targeting chronic disease or epilepsy burden since 2007, the MEW Network has been responsible for more than 43 scientific journal articles, two

  17. Why epilepsy challenges social life.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Bettina K; Jokeit, Hennric

    2017-01-01

    Social bonds are at the center of our daily living and are an essential determinant of our quality of life. In people with epilepsy, numerous factors can impede cognitive and affective functions necessary for smooth social interactions. Psychological and psychiatric complications are common in epilepsy and may hinder the processing of social information. In addition, neuropsychological deficits such as slowed processing speed, memory loss or attentional difficulties may interfere with enjoyable reciprocity of social interactions. We consider societal, psychological, and neuropsychological aspects of social life with particular emphasis on socio-cognitive functions in temporal lobe epilepsy. Deficits in emotion recognition and theory of mind, two main aspects of social cognition, are frequently observed in individuals with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Results from behavioural studies targeting these functions will be presented with a focus on their relevance for patients' daily life. Furthermore, we will broach the issue of pitfalls in current diagnostic tools and potential directions for future research. By giving a broad overview of individual and interpersonal determinants of social functioning in epilepsy, we hope to provide a basis for future research to establish social cognition as a key component in the comprehensive assessment and care of those with epilepsy.

  18. Stability of Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eron, Leonard D.; Huesmann, L. Rowell

    As indicated by multiple measures (including overt criminal behavior), stability of aggressive behavior was investigated across 22 years for males and females in a variety of situations. Originally, subjects included the entire population enrolled in the third grade in a semi-rural county in New York State. The sample included approximately 870…

  19. Aggressiveness and Disobedience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaaland, Grete Sorensen; Idsoe, Thormod; Roland, Erling

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to conceptualize disobedient pupil behavior within the more general framework of antisocial behavior and to reveal how two forms of aggressiveness are related to disobedience. Disobedience, in the context of this article, covers disruptive pupil behavior or discipline problems when the pupil is aware of breaking a standard set by…

  20. Intellectual Competence and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huesmann, L. Rowell; Yarmel, Patty Warnick

    Using data from a broader longitudinal study, this investigation explores within-subject and cross-generational stability of intellectual competence and the relationship of such stability to aggressive behavior. Data were gathered three times (when subjects' modal age was 8, 19, and 30 years). Initially, subjects included the entire population…

  1. Relational Aggression among Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Nelson, David A.; Hottle, America B.; Warburton, Brittney; Young, Bryan K.

    2011-01-01

    "Relational aggression" refers to harm within relationships caused by covert bullying or manipulative behavior. Examples include isolating a youth from his or her group of friends (social exclusion), threatening to stop talking to a friend (the silent treatment), or spreading gossip and rumors by email. This type of bullying tends to be…

  2. Neuroimaging and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Shari; Raine, Adrian

    1994-01-01

    Brain imaging research allows direct assessment of structural and functional brain abnormalities, and thereby provides an improved methodology for studying neurobiological factors predisposing to violent and aggressive behavior. This paper reviews 20 brain imaging studies using four different types of neuroimaging techniques that were conducted in…

  3. Human Aggression and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gerald L.; Goodwin, Frederick K

    1986-01-01

    The central nervous system transmitter serontonin may be altered in aggressive/impulsive and suicidal behaviors in humans. These reports are largely consistent with animal data, and constitute one of the most highly replicated set of findings in biological psychiatry. Suggests that some suicidal behavior may be a special kind of aggressive…

  4. [Neuro-psychiatric comorbidity among children and adolescents who suffer from epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Doron, Yariv; Epstein, Orna; Heyman, Eli; Lahat, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is quite a common disorder in the child and adolescent population, and it has been studied for many years. Recently, a better understanding has been achieved regarding the comorbidities in epilepsy, including: major depression, anxiety, learning disabilities, etc.. The comorbidities are extensive and affect many aspects in the life of the patient, and his family members, including: psychological development, learning abilities, independence, etc.. Several mechanisms take part in these comorbidities, starting in the cell and ending with a broadened psychological effect. A better understanding of these mechanisms may assist the physicians in diagnosing their patients and tailoring a wide-approach treatment plan, thereby improving the patient's clinical status and his quality of life (and that of his family). The objective of this article is to describe some of the common comorbidities that are present in epilepsy, and outline the multi-disciplinary approach in treating the epileptic child and his/her family.

  5. The contribution of spirituality to quality of life in focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Giovagnoli, Anna R; Meneses, Rute F; da Silva, Antonio Martins

    2006-08-01

    People with epilepsy of comparable severity may differ widely in quality of life (QOL), suggesting a role for unexplored individual aspects. This study considered the possible role of spirituality. Thirty-two patients with focal epilepsy completed scales for QOL (World Heath Organization QOL, WHOQOL 100), spirituality (WHO Spirituality, Religiousness, and Personal Beliefs), depression, anxiety, and cognitive efficiency, as well as neuropsychological testing. The QOL and spirituality scales exhibited satisfactory internal consistency. Factor analyses of the scale and test scores yielded separate spiritual (Personal Meaning, Inner Energy, Awe and Transcendence, and Openness), affective (Mood), and cognitive (Cognition, Memory, and Perceived Cognitive Efficiency) factors. The total WHOQOL 100 score was significantly predicted by the Awe and Transcendence and Mood factors. The spiritual, Mood, and Cognition factors significantly predicted single QOL domains. These preliminary results highlight the contribution of spirituality to QOL in epilepsy, encouraging future studies. This could influence the conceptualization and assessment of QOL in these patients.

  6. Thoughts, emotions, and dissociative features differentiate patients with epilepsy from patients with psychogenic nonepileptic spells (PNESs).

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Rick; Popescu, Alexandra; Ghearing, Gena; Bagic, Anto

    2015-10-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic spells (PNESs) are often very difficult to treat, which may be, in part, related to the limited information known about what a person experiences while having PNESs. For this retrospective study, thoughts, emotions, and dissociative features during a spell were evaluated in 351 patients diagnosed with PNESs (N=223) or epilepsy (N=128). We found that a statistically higher number of thoughts, emotions, and dissociative symptoms were endorsed by patients with PNESs versus patients with epilepsy. Patients with PNESs reported significantly more anxiety and frustration, but not depression, compared with those with epilepsy. Emotions and dissociations, but not thoughts, and a history of any type of abuse were endorsed significantly more often by patients with PNESs. Patients with PNESs are prone to having poor outcomes, and interventions focusing on their actual experiences may be helpful for treatment planning.

  7. Parents' Aggressive Influences and Children's Aggressive Problem Solutions with Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duman, Sarah; Margolin, Gayla

    2007-01-01

    This study examined children's aggressive and assertive solutions to hypothetical peer scenarios in relation to parents' responses to similar hypothetical social scenarios and parents' actual marital aggression. The study included 118 children ages 9 to 10 years old and their mothers and fathers. Children's aggressive solutions correlated with…

  8. Relational Aggression and Physical Aggression among Adolescent Cook Islands Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Angela; Smith, Lisa F.

    2016-01-01

    Both physical and relational aggression are characterised by the intent to harm another. Physical aggression includes direct behaviours such as hitting or kicking; relational aggression involves behaviours designed to damage relationships, such as excluding others, spreading rumours, and delivering threats and verbal abuse. This study extended…

  9. Epilepsy in children with trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Tomohiro; Maihara, Toshiro; Higuchi, Yoshihisa; Nishida, Yoshinobu; Taniguchi, Yoshihiro; Fujii, Tatsuya

    2013-04-01

    Although the reported incidence of epilepsy associated with trisomy 18 is 25-50%, there have been no detailed descriptions of the characteristics of trisomy 18-related epilepsy. We investigated the characteristics of epilepsy in children with trisomy 18 who remained alive for over 1 year by sending questionnaires to pediatric neurologists belonging to the Kyoto Multi-institutional Study Group of Pediatric Neurology. Eleven patients with trisomy 18 were enrolled (age at the study, from 15 to 134 months; median, 43 months), of whom seven (64%) had epilepsy. The age at seizure onset ranged from 1 to 42 months (median: 11 months). Among the seven patients with epilepsy, two had focal epilepsy, four had generalized epilepsy including infantile spasms in three, and the remaining one had an unclassified type. Seizure seminology included complex partial seizures in both the patients with focal epilepsy. At the time of the investigation, three children with generalized epilepsy still had daily seizures, while the remaining four were seizure-free. In conclusion, the characteristics of epilepsy in patients with trisomy 18 were as follows: over half of the children developed epilepsy during infancy or early childhood; infantile spasms might be one of the common epileptic syndromes; the epilepsy was intractable in half of the children, especially in those with generalized epilepsy.

  10. [Myoclonus and myoclonic epilepsies in childhood].

    PubMed

    Nieto-Barrera, M

    Myoclonic jerks occur in a number of different syndromes. There is many classifications of myoclonus. It is preferred the Fejerman classification, slightly modified that present the following five groups: 1. Myoclonus without encephalopathy and without epilepsy, which includes physiological myoclonus; 2. Encephalopathies with non epileptic myoclonus, which includes Kinsbourne syndrome and certain types of hyperekplexia which pose differential diagnosis problems with reflex myoclonic epilepsy; 3. Progressive encephalopathies with myoclonic seizures which includes typical and atypical progressive myoclonus epilepsies; 4. Epilepsies and epileptic encephalopathies with myoclonic seizures, which includes severe epilepsies which leads to mental retardation, as Otahara syndrome, West syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and other epilepsies which present sometimes myoclonic seizures, as Landau-Kleffner syndrome, 5. Comprises true myoclonic epilepsies, differentiating syndromes recognized as idiopathic, -benign myoclonic epilepsy of infancy, reflex form of benign myoclonic epilepsy in infancy, eyelid myoclonic with absences, perioral myoclonic with absences and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy-, cryptogenic-severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy, myoclonic-astatic epilepsy and epilepsy with myoclonic absences-, and symptomatic as the generalized myoclonus in children with static encephalopathies. The epileptic syndromes of the last group are described. Despite this classification, apparently clear, there is still a great deal of confusion and in clinical practice, many cases are difficult to classify.

  11. Tourette syndrome is associated with insecure attachment and higher aggression.

    PubMed

    Dehning, Sandra; Burger, Max B; Krause, Daniela; Jobst, Andrea; Yundina, Elena; Müller, Norbert; Meyer, Sebastian; Zill, Peter; Buchheim, Anna

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the degree to which adult patients with Tourette syndrome (TS) exhibit particular attachment styles and the possible association between the underlying attachment dimensions and forms of aggression. Fifty-three TS patients (ages 17-72 years) and 54 matched healthy controls completed the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised Scale (ECR-R) and the Aggression Questionnaire (AQ). The data were analysed with ANOVA F-tests, t-tests, and Pearson's correlation coefficient. TS patients showed significantly higher scores in relationship anxiety ( p < 0.001) and relationship avoidance ( p = 0.001) in the ECR-R and significantly higher aggression scores in the AQ ( p < 0.001). The total AQ score correlated significantly with the ECR-R dimension anxiety ( p < 0.001). These are the first findings on TS patients' attachment styles and anger symptoms. It remains unclear whether attachment anxiety and avoidance are risk factors for TS or whether the disorder itself induces attachment disorders. Prospective studies with detailed attachment interviews would help to explore this issue.

  12. Are Absence Epilepsy and Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy System Epilepsies of the Sleep/Wake System?

    PubMed Central

    Halász, Péter

    2015-01-01

    System epilepsy is an emerging concept interpreting major nonlesional epilepsies as epileptic dysfunctions of physiological systems. I extend here the concept of reflex epilepsy to epilepsies linked to input dependent physiological systems. Experimental and clinical reseach data were collected to create a coherent explanation of underlying pathomechanism in AE and NFLE. We propose that AE should be interpreted as epilepsy linked to the corticothalamic burst-firing mode of NREM sleep, released by evoked vigilance level oscillations characterized by reactive slow wave response. In the genetic variation of NFLE the ascending cholinergic arousal system plays an essential role being in strong relationship with a gain mutation of the nicotinic acethylcholin receptors, rendering the arousal system hyperexcitable. I try to provide a more unitary interpretation for the variable seizure manifestation integrating them as different degree of pathological arosuals and alarm reactions. As a supporting hypothesis the similarity between arousal parasomnias and FNLE is shown, underpinned by overlaping pathomechanism and shared familiarity, but without epileptic features. Lastly we propose that both AE and NFLE are system epilepsies of the sleep-wake system representing epileptic disorders of the antagonistic sleep/arousal network. This interpretation may throw new light on the pathomechanism of AE and NFLE. PMID:26175547

  13. Personalized medicine approaches in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Walker, L E; Mirza, N; Yip, V L M; Marson, A G; Pirmohamed, M

    2015-02-01

    Epilepsy affects 50 million persons worldwide, a third of whom continue to experience debilitating seizures despite optimum anti-epileptic drug (AED) treatment. Twelve-month remission from seizures is less likely in female patients, individuals aged 11-36 years and those with neurological insults and shorter time between first seizure and starting treatment. It has been found that the presence of multiple seizures prior to diagnosis is a risk factor for pharmacoresistance and is correlated with epilepsy type as well as intrinsic severity. The key role of neuroinflammation in the pathophysiology of resistant epilepsy is becoming clear. Our work in this area suggests that high-mobility group box 1 isoforms may be candidate biomarkers for treatment stratification and novel drug targets in epilepsy. Furthermore, transporter polymorphisms contributing to the intrinsic severity of epilepsy are providing robust neurobiological evidence on an emerging theory of drug resistance, which may also provide new insights into disease stratification. Some of the rare genetic epilepsies enable treatment stratification through testing for the causal mutation, for example SCN1A mutations in patients with Dravet's syndrome. Up to 50% of patients develop adverse reactions to AEDs which in turn affects tolerability and compliance. Immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to AED therapy, such as toxic epidermal necrolysis, are the most serious adverse reactions and have been associated with polymorphisms in the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) complex. Pharmacogenetic screening for HLA-B*15:02 in Asian populations can prevent carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome. We have identified HLA-A*31:01 as a potential risk marker for all phenotypes of carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity with applicability in European and other populations. In this review, we explore the currently available key stratification approaches to address the therapeutic challenges in epilepsy.

  14. Serotonin and Aggressiveness in Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin (5-HT) regulates aggressive behavior in animals. This study examined if 5-HT regulation of aggressiveness is gene-dependent. Chickens from two divergently selected lines KGB and MBB (Kind Gentle Birds and Mean Bad Birds displaying low and high aggressiveness, respectively) and DXL (Dekalb ...

  15. Separation Anxiety (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Separation Anxiety KidsHealth > For Parents > Separation Anxiety Print A ... help both of you get through it. About Separation Anxiety Babies adapt pretty well to other caregivers. ...

  16. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Evidence-based Guideline for PATIENTS and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you understand how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American ...

  17. The relational context of aggression in borderline personality disorder: using adult attachment style to predict forms of hostility.

    PubMed

    Critchfield, Kenneth L; Levy, Kenneth N; Clarkin, John F; Kernberg, Otto F

    2008-01-01

    Attachment theory provides a framework for understanding and predicting critical aspects of aggression in the personality disorders. An association between borderline personality disorder (BPD) and insecure forms of adult attachment marked by high relationship anxiety has been repeatedly observed in the empirical literature. Aggression also has been linked to insecure attachment. The present study extends previous work by exploring the degree to which the underlying attachment dimensions of relationship anxiety and avoidance are associated in BPD with the following forms of hostility: (a) direct aggression (verbal or physical) initiated towards others, (b) expectation/perception of aggression from others (including "reactive" counteraggression when/if provoked), (c) aggression directed towards the self in the form of suicidality or parasuicidality, and (d) affective experience of irritability or anger. The issue was studied in a sample of 92 patients diagnosed with BPD. Results show significant association between more fearful forms of attachment (simultaneous presence of relationship anxiety and avoidance) and the more reactive form of aggression involving expectation of hostility from others. Self-harm was significantly associated only with relational avoidance while anger and irritability were associated only with relational anxiety. Implications for understanding relational aspects of BPD aggression in research and clinical work are discussed.

  18. PET studies in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-01-01

    Various PET studies, such as measurements of glucose, serotonin and oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood flow and receptor bindings are availabe for epilepsy. 18Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging of brain glucose metabolism is a well established and widely available technique. Studies have demonstrated that the sensitivity of interictal FDG-PET is higher than interictal SPECT and similar to ictal SPECT for the lateralization and localization of epileptogenic foci in presurgical patients refractory to medical treatments who have noncontributory EEG and MRI. In addition to localizing epileptogenic focus, FDG-PET provide additional important information on the functional status of the rest of the brain. The main limitation of interictal FDG-PET is that it cannot precisely define the surgical margin as the area of hypometabolism usually extends beyond the epileptogenic zone. Various neurotransmitters (GABA, glutamate, opiates, serotonin, dopamine, acethylcholine, and adenosine) and receptor subtypes are involved in epilepsy. PET receptor imaging studies performed in limited centers help to understand the role of neurotransmitters in epileptogenesis, identify epileptic foci and investigate new treatment approaches. PET receptor imaging studies have demonstrated reduced 11C-flumazenil (GABAA-cBDZ) and 18F-MPPF (5-HT1A serotonin) and increased 11C-cerfentanil (mu opiate) and 11C-MeNTI (delta opiate) bindings in the area of seizure. 11C-flumazenil has been reported to be more sensitive than FDG-PET for identifying epileptic foci. The area of abnormality on GABAAcBDZ and opiate receptor images is usually smaller and more circumscribed than the area of hypometabolism on FDG images. Studies have demonstrated that 11C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan PET (to study synthesis of serotonin) can detect the epileptic focus within malformations of cortical development and helps in differentiating epileptogenic from non-epileptogenic tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

  19. PET studies in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-01-01

    Various PET studies, such as measurements of glucose, serotonin and oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood flow and receptor bindings are availabe for epilepsy. (18)Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET imaging of brain glucose metabolism is a well established and widely available technique. Studies have demonstrated that the sensitivity of interictal FDG-PET is higher than interictal SPECT and similar to ictal SPECT for the lateralization and localization of epileptogenic foci in presurgical patients refractory to medical treatments who have noncontributory EEG and MRI. In addition to localizing epileptogenic focus, FDG-PET provide additional important information on the functional status of the rest of the brain. The main limitation of interictal FDG-PET is that it cannot precisely define the surgical margin as the area of hypometabolism usually extends beyond the epileptogenic zone. Various neurotransmitters (GABA, glutamate, opiates, serotonin, dopamine, acethylcholine, and adenosine) and receptor subtypes are involved in epilepsy. PET receptor imaging studies performed in limited centers help to understand the role of neurotransmitters in epileptogenesis, identify epileptic foci and investigate new treatment approaches. PET receptor imaging studies have demonstrated reduced (11)C-flumazenil (GABAA-cBDZ) and (18)F-MPPF (5-HT1A serotonin) and increased (11)C-cerfentanil (mu opiate) and (11)C-MeNTI (delta opiate) bindings in the area of seizure. (11)C-flumazenil has been reported to be more sensitive than FDG-PET for identifying epileptic foci. The area of abnormality on GABAAcBDZ and opiate receptor images is usually smaller and more circumscribed than the area of hypometabolism on FDG images. Studies have demonstrated that (11)C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan PET (to study synthesis of serotonin) can detect the epileptic focus within malformations of cortical development and helps in differentiating epileptogenic from non-epileptogenic tubers in patients with tuberous

  20. Impact of epilepsy on children and parents in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Ibinga, Euloge; Ngoungou, Edgard Brice; Olliac, Bertrand; Hounsossou, Cocou Hubert; Dalmay, François; Mouangue, Gertrude; Ategbo, Simon Jonas; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Druet-Cabanac, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Children with epilepsy and their parents face many social and psychological difficulties that remain insufficiently studied in sub-Saharan Africa. The aim here was to assess the quality of life of children with epilepsy and their parents. A community-based cross-sectional survey was conducted in two urban areas and four rural areas of Gabon. Children were screened through key informants, medical sources, and a door-to-door survey. They were clinically selected based on their medical history and a clinical exam conducted by the investigating physician. Electroencephalography had not been carried out because of a lack of material and financial resources. The quality of life of children and their parents was assessed by a structured interview of parents using a questionnaire. Of 317 suspected cases on screening, 83 children with epilepsy were identified. Their mean age was 11.9±4.4years. Twelve percent of the children had neurosensory abnormalities on clinical exam. Sixty-three percent of them attended school; factors associated with schooling were higher score on the sociability subscale, specialized medical advice, and antiepileptic drug treatment. Sociability difficulties, anxiety, cognitive impairment, and behavioral disorders were suspected in 39.8%, 45.8%, 49.4%, and 42.2% of children, respectively. A total of 48.2% of parents expressed a poor quality of life related to their children's illness. A higher score on the cognition subscale, urban residence, specialized medical advice, and a stable income in the household were predictive of poor parental quality of life. Epilepsy influences many aspects of a child's life and the life of the child's parents. Care should incorporate a cognitive assessment of the child and emphasize information for patients and their relatives.

  1. Bathing Epilepsy: Report of Three Caucasian Cases

    PubMed Central

    Dashi, Florian; Seferi, Arsen; Rroji, Arben; Enesi, Eugen; Petrela, Mentor

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bathing epilepsy is a specific type of reflex epilepsy triggered by domestic bathing in water. It is a geographically specific epilepsy syndrome that is more prevalent in India Cases in Caucasian population are very rarely reported. These cases share many similar clinical features and a similar prognosis to the Indian cases. Case report: We describe three cases of bathing epilepsy in Albanian population; two cases with well controlled seizures and one with drug-resistant seizures. PMID:26005279

  2. Epilepsy services in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alfayez, Saud M.; Aljafen, Bandar N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the epilepsy services and identify the challenges in hospitals without epilepsy monitoring units (EMUs). In addition, comparisons between governmental and private sectors, as well as between regions, are to be performed. Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted using an online questionnaire distributed to the secondary and tertiary hospitals without EMUs throughout the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The study was conducted from September 2013 to September 2015 and regular updates from all respondents were constantly made. Items in the questionnaire included the region of the institution, the number of pediatric and adult neurologists and neurosurgeons along with their subspecialties, the number of beds in the Neurology Department, whether they provide educational services and have epilepsy clinics and if they refer patients to an EMU or intend to establish one in the future. Results: Forty-three institutions throughout the Kingdom responded, representing a response rate of 54%. The majority of hospitals (58.1%) had no adult epileptologists. A complete lack of pediatric epileptologists was observed in 72.1% of hospitals. Around 39.5% were utilizing beds from internal medicine. Hospitals with an epilepsy clinic represented 34.9% across all regions and sectors. Hospitals with no intention of establishing an EMU represented 53.5%. Hospitals that did not refer their epileptic patients to an EMU represented 30.2%. Conclusions: Epilepsy services in KSA hospitals without EMUs are underdeveloped. PMID:27744461

  3. Mobile EEG in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Askamp, Jessica; van Putten, Michel J A M

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of routine EEG recordings for interictal epileptiform discharges in epilepsy is limited. In some patients, inpatient video-EEG may be performed to increase the likelihood of finding abnormalities. Although many agree that home EEG recordings may provide a cost-effective alternative to these recordings, their use is still not introduced everywhere. We surveyed Dutch neurologists and patients and evaluated a novel mobile EEG device (Mobita, TMSi). Key specifications were compared with three other current mobile EEG devices. We shortly discuss algorithms to assist in the review process. Thirty percent (33 out of 109) of Dutch neurologists reported that home EEG recordings are used in their hospital. The majority of neurologists think that mobile EEG can have additional value in investigation of unclear paroxysms, but not in the initial diagnosis after a first seizure. Poor electrode contacts and signal quality, limited recording time and absence of software for reliable and effective assistance in the interpretation of EEGs have been important constraints for usage, but in recent devices discussed here, many of these problems have been solved. The majority of our patients were satisfied with the home EEG procedure and did not think that our EEG device was uncomfortable to wear, but they did feel uneasy wearing it in public.

  4. Reactive/proactive aggression and the development of internalizing problems in males: the moderating effect of parent and peer relationships.

    PubMed

    Fite, Paula J; Rubens, Sonia L; Preddy, Teresa M; Raine, Adrian; Pardini, Dustin A

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined whether reactive and/or proactive aggression in adolescent males prospectively predicted increased levels of internalizing symptoms (depression and anxiety) in late adolescence. It was postulated that reactive aggression would be robustly related to later internalizing problems, but only among adolescent males who had problematic family or peer social relationships. Participants were a racially diverse group of 289 adolescent males (Mean age = 16). Measures of reactive and proactive aggression, peer rejection, and poor parent-adolescent communication were examined as predictors of both depression and anxiety symptoms assessed approximately 3 years later. The interactive effects between the two facets of aggression and measures of peer rejection and poor parent-adolescent communication in predicting internalizing problems was also examined. Adolescents with high levels of reactive aggression were more likely to exhibit elevated internalizing problems during late adolescence, even when controlling for pre-existing levels of anxiety/depression. However, this association only emerged for adolescents who had high levels of peer rejection and/or poor communication with their parent. Consistent with expectations, proactive aggression was unrelated to internalizing symptoms regardless of social relationship quality. Adolescent reactive, but not proactive, aggression is a risk factor for the development of internalizing problems. However, the findings suggest that interventions designed to foster positive social relationships among reactively aggressive youth may help protect them from developing significant internalizing problems over time.

  5. Motives in Sexual Aggression: The Chinese Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Catherine So-Kum; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared sexual and aggressive motives for sexual aggression in Chinese college students. Male undergraduates (N=146) completed self-report measures. Results suggest that sex guilt and aggressive guilt acted as inhibitors for their respective drives and sexual aggression resulted from aggressive, rather than sexual, motives. Sexual aggression may…

  6. [Possibilities of psychoprophylaxis in epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Bilikiewicz, A

    1976-01-01

    The psychiatrist should be given also their share in the prevetion of epilepsy by means of raising the psychiatric culture of the society and teaching the population the principles of mental hygiene and psychoprophylaxia. The possibilities of psychiatry in prophylactic management of patients with developed epilepsy include: 1. Energetic measures for controlling attacks which has many psychoprophylactic aspects. 2. Prevention of psychotraumatizing situations leading to secondary neurotic, psychotic and other reactions and behaviour disorders of the type of homilopathy and sociopathy, 3. Counteracting the development of mental and social disability in epileptics. Treatment of epilepsy should be conducted from its very beginning in cooperation with psychiatrists and therapeutic psychologists. The probems of prophylaxis cannot be separated from prophylactic treatment, psychotherapy sociotherapy and rehabilitation.

  7. Epilepsy and music: practical notes.

    PubMed

    Maguire, M

    2017-04-01

    Music processing occurs via a complex network of activity far beyond the auditory cortices. This network may become sensitised to music or may be recruited as part of a temporal lobe seizure, manifesting as either musicogenic epilepsy or ictal musical phenomena. The idea that sound waves may directly affect brain waves has led researchers to explore music as therapy for epilepsy. There is limited and low quality evidence of an antiepileptic effect with the Mozart Sonata K.448. We do not have a pathophysiological explanation for the apparent dichotomous effect of music on seizures. However, clinicians should consider musicality when treating patients with antiepileptic medication or preparing patients for epilepsy surgery. Carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine each may cause a reversible altered appreciation of pitch. Surgical cohort studies suggest that musical memory and perception may be affected, particularly following right temporal lobe surgery, and discussion of this risk should form part of presurgical counselling.

  8. Epilepsy and metaphors in literature.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Peter

    2016-04-01

    This topic has two different aspects: seizures and epilepsy used as metaphors and seizures described in metaphors. Whereas some metaphors are unique and have high literary value, others can be categorized in prototypical groups. These include sexual metaphors; metaphors of strong emotions, of life crises and breakdown, and also of exultation; religious metaphors; and metaphors of weakness which mostly belong to older literature. Writers with epilepsy, in their literary texts, rarely talk about seizures in metaphors. Authors who do this sometimes seem to use reports that they have received from afflicted persons. The most common metaphors for seizures belong to the realms of dreams and of strong sensory impressions (visual, auditory). More rarely, storm and whirlwind are used as literary metaphors for seizures. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity".

  9. The Relation of Insecure Attachment States of Mind and Romantic Attachment Styles to Adolescent Aggression in Romantic Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Miga, Erin M.; Hare, Amanda; Allen, Joseph P.; Manning, Nell

    2010-01-01

    The relation of attachment states of mind and self reported attachment relationship styles to romantic partner aggression was examined in a community sample of 93 adolescents. Higher levels of insecure-preoccupied and insecure-dismissing states of mind, as assessed by the Adolescent Attachment Interview at age 14, were predictive, respectively, of perpetration and victimization of psychological aggression in romantic relationships four years later. Partners’ romantic attachment anxiety was linked to both psychological and physical aggression perpetration in romantic relationships. Results are interpreted as suggesting the value of assessing aggression in adolescent romantic relationships in the context of broader patterns of regulation of affect and behavior via the attachment system. PMID:20730640

  10. Parenting stress and children's problem behavior in China: the mediating role of parental psychological aggression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Wang, Meifang

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the mediating effect of parents' psychological aggression in the relationship between parenting stress and children's internalizing (anxiety/depression, withdrawal) and externalizing (aggression, delinquency) problem behaviors 1 year later. Using a sample of 311 intact 2-parent Chinese families with preschoolers, findings revealed that maternal parenting stress had direct effects on children's internalizing and externalizing problem behavior and indirect effects through maternal psychological aggression. However, neither direct nor indirect effects of fathers' parenting stress on children's internalizing and externalizing problem behavior were found. The findings highlight the importance of simultaneously studying the effects of both mothers' and fathers' parenting on their children within a family systems framework.

  11. Treatment algorithms in refractory partial epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jobst, Barbara C

    2009-09-01

    An algorithm is a "step-by-step procedure for solving a problem or accomplishing some end....in a finite number of steps." (Merriam-Webster, 2009). Medical algorithms are decision trees to help with diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. For the treatment of epilepsy there is no generally accepted treatment algorithm, as individual epilepsy centers follow different diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines. This article presents two algorithms to guide decisions in the treatment of refractory partial epilepsy. The treatment algorithm describes a stepwise diagnostic and therapeutic approach to intractable medial temporal and neocortical epilepsy. The surgical algorithm guides decisions in the surgical treatment of neocortical epilepsy.

  12. Alternative approaches to epilepsy treatment.

    PubMed

    McElroy-Cox, Caitlin

    2009-07-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a diverse group of health care practices and products that fall outside the realm of traditional Western medical theory and practice and that are used to complement or replace conventional medical therapies. The use of CAM has increased over the past two decades, and surveys have shown that up to 44% of patients with epilepsy are using some form of CAM treatment. This article reviews the CAM modalities of meditation, yoga, relaxation techniques, biofeedback, nutritional and herbal supplements, dietary measures, chiropractic care, acupuncture, Reiki, and homeopathy and what is known about their potential efficacy in patients with epilepsy.

  13. Ictal Asystole in Focal Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sarwal, Aarti

    2015-01-01

    Ictal bradyarrhythmias are rare episodes occurring in patients with or without a past cardiac history. These episodes go unnoticed unless the patient is monitored on simultaneous video-electroencephalogram and 1-lead electrocardiogram. Recognizing ictal bradyarrhythmias is important, since episodes may predispose patients to sudden, unexplained death in epilepsy. We present 2 cases of ictal asystole in patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy. The first patient had seizures refractory to medical therapy and received a pacemaker. The seizures in the second patient responded well to antiepileptic medication, and a pacemaker was deferred. These cases highlight the differing cardiovascular treatment options for ictal asystole. PMID:26425256

  14. Spirituality and religion in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Devinsky, Orrin; Lai, George

    2008-05-01

    Revered in some cultures but persecuted by most others, epilepsy patients have, throughout history, been linked with the divine, demonic, and supernatural. Clinical observations during the past 150 years support an association between religious experiences during (ictal), after (postictal), and in between (interictal) seizures. In addition, epileptic seizures may increase, alter, or decrease religious experience especially in a small group of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Literature surveys have revealed that between .4% and 3.1% of partial epilepsy patients had ictal religious experiences; higher frequencies are found in systematic questionnaires versus spontaneous patient reports. Religious premonitory symptoms or auras were reported by 3.9% of epilepsy patients. Among patients with ictal religious experiences, there is a predominance of patients with right TLE. Postictal and interictal religious experiences occur most often in TLE patients with bilateral seizure foci. Postictal religious experiences occurred in 1.3% of all epilepsy patients and 2.2% of TLE patients. Many of the epilepsy-related religious conversion experiences occurred postictally. Interictal religiosity is more controversial with less consensus among studies. Patients with postictal psychosis may also experience interictal hyper-religiosity, supporting a "pathological" increase in interictal religiosity in some patients. Although psychologic and social factors such as stigma may contribute to religious experiences with epilepsy, a neurologic mechanism most likely plays a large role. The limbic system is also often suggested as the critical site of religious experience due to the association with temporal lobe epilepsy and the emotional nature of the experiences. Neocortical areas also may be involved, suggested by the presence of visual and auditory hallucinations, complex ideation during many religious experiences, and the large expanse of temporal neocortex. In contrast to the

  15. Are cannabinoids effective for epilepsy?

    PubMed

    Peña, Javier; Rada, Gabriel

    2017-01-13

    Several beneficial effects have been proposed for cannabinoids in different clinical conditions, including epilepsy. However, their clinical role is controversial. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases, we identified five systematic reviews including four randomized trials addressing the question of this article. We extracted data and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded it is not clear whether cannabinoids reduce the frequency of seizures in epilepsy because the certainty of the evidence is very low, and they probably increase adverse effects.

  16. [Insular epilepsy: The Montreal experience].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D K; Surbeck, W; Weil, A G; Villemure, J-G; Bouthillier, A

    2009-10-01

    In this article, we review recently published data on the role of the insula in refractory partial epilepsy and summarize our own experience in the investigation and treatment of this entity. Case studies and evoked responses obtained from insular cortical stimulation reveal a wide array of clinical manifestations which may mimic temporal, frontal or parietal lobe seizures. Clinicians should hence lower their threshold to sample the insula with intracerebral electrodes. Lack of recognition of insular seizures may explain part of epilepsy surgery failures. Advances in microneurosurgery open the way to safer insular resection.

  17. Dopamine abnormalities in the neocortex of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Luisa; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Mújica, Mario; Cisneros-Franco, José Miguel; López-Gómez, Mario; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Frías-Soria, Christian Lizette; Segovia-Vila, José; Borsodi, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate different variables of the dopaminergic system in the temporal cortex of surgically treated patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) associated with mesial sclerosis (MTLE, n=12) or with cerebral tumor or lesion (n=8). In addition, we sought to identify dopaminergic abnormalities in those patients with epilepsy that had comorbid anxiety and depression. Specifically, we investigated changes in dopamine and its metabolites, D1 and D2 receptors, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter. Results obtained from patients with epilepsy were compared with those found in experiments using autopsy material. The neocortex of patients with MTLE demonstrated high D1 expression (1680%, p<0.05) and binding (layers I-II, 31%, p<0.05; layers V-VI, 28%, p<0.05), and decreased D2 expression (77%, p<0.05). The neocortex of patients with TLE secondary to cerebral tumor or lesion showed high expression of D1 receptors (1100%, p<0.05), and D2-like induced activation of G proteins (layers I-II, 503%; layers III-IV, 557%; layers V-VI, 964%, p<0.05). Both epileptic groups presented elevated binding to the dopamine transporter and low tissue content of dopamine and its metabolites. Analysis revealed the following correlations: a) D1 receptor binding correlated negatively with seizure onset age and seizure frequency, and positively with duration of epilepsy; b) D2 receptor binding correlated positively with age of seizure onset and negatively with duration of epilepsy; c) dopamine transporter binding correlated positively with duration of epilepsy and frequency of seizures; d) D2-like induced activation of G proteins correlated positively with the age of patients. When compared with autopsies and patients with anxiety and depression, patients without neuropsychiatric disorders showed high D2-like induced activation of G proteins, an effect that correlated positively with age of patient and seizure onset age, and negatively with duration of

  18. Pediatric Epilepsy: Neurology, Functional Imaging, and Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Mountz, James M; Patterson, Christina M; Tamber, Mandeep S

    2017-03-01

    In this chapter we provide a comprehensive review of the current role that functional imaging can have in the care of the pediatric epilepsy patient from the perspective of the epilepsy neurologist and the epilepsy neurosurgeon. In the neurology section, the diagnosis and classification of epilepsy adapted by the International League Against Epilepsy as well as the etiology and incidence of the disease is presented. The neuroimaging section describes how advanced nuclear medicine imaging methods can be synergized to provide a maximum opportunity to localize an epileptogenic focus. This section described the value of FDG-PET and regional cerebral blood flow SPECT in the identification of an epileptogenic focus. The imaging section also emphasizes the importance on developing a dedicated epilepsy management team, comprised of an epilepsy imaging specialist, epilepsy neurologist and epilepsy neurosurgeon, to provide the maximum benefit to each child with epilepsy. An emphasis is placed on preparation for ictal SPECT injection procedures, including the critical role of an automated injector well as the use of state-of-the-art dedicated nuclear medicine imaging and analysis protocols to correctly localize the epileptogenic focus location. In the final section, surgical options, approaches and expected outcomes for the different classes of epilepsy is presented.

  19. The relevance of kindling for human epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Kindling is one of the most widely used models of seizures and epilepsy, and it has been used in its more than three decade history to provide many key insights into seizures and epilepsy. It remains a mainstay of epilepsy related research, but the question remains how the results from kindling experiments further our understanding of the underlying neurobiology of human epilepsy. In this article we compare the basic features of kindling and human epilepsy, especially human limbic or temporal lobe epilepsy. In this review we focus on a limited number of topics that may show areas in which kindling has been often cited as a tool for better understanding of human epilepsy. These areas include the underlying circuits, the importance of seizure spontaneity, the associated neuropathology, the contribution of genetics, seizure susceptibility, and the underlying pathophysiology of epilepsy. In the course of this article we will show that there are many features that kindling can teach us by direct comparison or implication about human temporal epilepsy. We will also see that not all findings associated with kindling may be applicable to the human condition. Ultimately we wish to encourage critical thinking about kindling and the similarities that it shares and does not share with the human epilepsy so the results from studies using this model are applied rationally to further our insights the mechanisms of human epilepsy.

  20. Charles Dickens (1812-1870) and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Larner, A J

    2012-08-01

    To coincide with the bicentenary of the birth of Charles Dickens (1812-1870), accounts of epilepsy found in his novels and journalism have been collated and analyzed. From these, it may be inferred that Dickens was clearly aware of the difference between epilepsy and syncope and recognized different types of epilepsy and that seizures could be fatal. Speculations that Dickens himself suffered from epilepsy are not corroborated. Dickens's novelistic construction of epilepsy as a marker of criminality, as in the characters of Monks in Oliver Twist and Bradley Headstone in Our Mutual Friend, and perhaps of mental abnormality, was in keeping with conventional contemporary views of epilepsy, but his journalistic descriptions of individuals with epilepsy confined in the workhouse system indicate an awareness of the inadequacy of their care.

  1. You Smell Dangerous: Communicating Fight Responses Through Human Chemosignals of Aggression.

    PubMed

    Mutic, Smiljana; Parma, Valentina; Brünner, Yvonne F; Freiherr, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect conspecifics that represent a potential harm for an individual represents a high survival benefit. Humans communicate socially relevant information using all sensory modalities, including the chemosensory systems. In study 1, we investigated whether the body odor of a stranger with the intention to harm serves as a chemosignal of aggression. Sixteen healthy male participants donated their body odor while engaging in a boxing session characterized by aggression-induction methods (chemosignal of aggression) and while performing an ergometer session (exercise chemosignal). Self-reports on aggression-related physical activity, motivation to harm and angry emotions selectively increased after aggression induction. In study 2, we examined whether receivers smelling such chemosignals experience emotional contagion (e.g., anger) or emotional reciprocity (e.g., anxiety). The aggression and exercise chemosignals were therefore presented to 22 healthy normosmic participants in a double-blind, randomized exposure during which affective/cognitive processing was examined (i.e., emotion recognition task, emotional stroop task). Behavioral results indicate that chemosignals of aggression induce an affective/cognitive modulation compatible with an anxiety reaction in the recipients. These findings are discussed in light of mechanisms of emotional reciprocity as a way to convey not only affective but also motivational information via chemosensory signals in humans.

  2. Influence of Marital Status on the Quality of Life of Chinese Adult Patients with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu-Li; Gu, Xiang-Min; Hao, Bao-Yun; Wang, Shan; Chen, Ze-Jie; Ding, Cheng-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is a chronic disorder characterized by recurrent seizures and has significant psychological and social consequence for everyday living. Epilepsy affects various aspects of ones’ social life. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of marital status on the quality of life of adult Chinese patients with epilepsy. Methods: This study surveyed 805 Chinese adults who have been clinically diagnosed with epilepsy for longer than 1 year in 11 hospitals in Beijing. In this survey, 532 (66.1%) participants were married. All of them completed the case report form with enquiries on demographic data, social factors, and illness. The marriage status of adult epileptic quality of life was the dependent variable, and demographic data and clinical data were independent variables, analyzed through the multiple linear regression analysis methods. The patients’ quality of life was assessed using the Quality of Life in patients with Epilepsy-31 items (QOLIE-31) questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 items (PHQ-9), and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 items (GAD-7). Results: The PHQ-9 and GAD-7 scores in the unmarried group (PHQ-9 = 6.0 and GAD-7 = 5.0) were significantly higher than that of the married group (PHQ-9 = 4.0 and GAD-7 =3.0). The scores of married adult patients with epilepsy on QOLIE (61.8 ± 15.3) and social function (70.9 ± 22.7) were higher than the scores of the unmarried patients aged between 20 and 44 years. The scores of married adult epileptics on the QOLIE (58.4 ± 14.6) and the energy/fatigue (62.1 ± 20.4) were higher than the scores of the unmarried patients (QOLIE = 58.4 ± 14.6 and the energy/fatigue = 62.1 ± 20.4) aged between 45 and 59 years. For the adult epilepsy patients, depression, anxiety, seizures within the last year, disease course, medical expense category, and marriage* age are negatively correlated with the quality of life. Occupation, educational level, and average monthly income are closely

  3. Transperineal aggressive angiomyxoma.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Pedro; Melo Abreu, Elisa; Cunha, Teresa Margarida; Rolim, Inês

    2017-04-11

    A 45-year-old woman with a history of total hysterectomy with adnexal preservation for uterine leiomyomas presented to our hospital with a right gluteal palpable mass, which she first noticed 6 months before and had progressively enlarged since then.Radiological studies revealed a 14 cm lesion with translevator growth that displaced rather than invaded adjacent structures, with a peculiar whorled pattern on T2-weighted MRI, which enhanced following gadolinium administration. CT-guided biopsy was performed, and in conjunction with imaging features the diagnosis of an aggressive angiomyxoma was assumed and confirmed following surgical excision.

  4. Behavioral Interventions for Anger, Irritability, and Aggression in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephanie D.; McCauley, Spencer A.; Ibrahim, Karim; Piasecka, Justyna B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Anger, irritability, and aggression are among the most common reasons for child mental health referrals. This review is focused on two forms of behavioral interventions for these behavioral problems: Parent management training (PMT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Methods: First, we provide an overview of anger/irritability and aggression as the treatment targets of behavioral interventions, followed by a discussion of the general principles and techniques of these treatment modalities. Then we discuss our current work concerning the transdiagnostic approach to CBT for anger, irritability, and aggression. Results: PMT is aimed at improving aversive patterns of family interactions that engender children's disruptive behavior. CBT targets deficits in emotion regulation and social problem-solving that are associated with aggressive behavior. Both forms of treatment have received extensive support in randomized controlled trials. Given that anger/irritability and aggressive behavior are common in children with a variety of psychiatric diagnoses, a transdiagnostic approach to CBT for anger and aggression is described in detail. Conclusions: PMT and CBT have been well studied in randomized controlled trials in children with disruptive behavior disorders, and studies of transdiagnostic approaches to CBT for anger and aggression are currently underway. More work is needed to develop treatments for other types of aggressive behavior (e.g., relational aggression) that have been relatively neglected in clinical research. The role of callous-unemotional traits in response to behavioral interventions and treatment of irritability in children with anxiety and mood disorders also warrants further investigation. PMID:26745682

  5. The nature of human aggression.

    PubMed

    Archer, John

    2009-01-01

    Human aggression is viewed from four explanatory perspectives, derived from the ethological tradition. The first consists of its adaptive value, which can be seen throughout the animal kingdom, involving resource competition and protection of the self and offspring, which has been viewed from a cost-benefit perspective. The second concerns the phylogenetic origin of aggression, which in humans involves brain mechanisms that are associated with anger and inhibition, the emotional expression of anger, and how aggressive actions are manifest. The third concerns the origin of aggression in development and its subsequent modification through experience. An evolutionary approach to development yields conclusions that are contrary to the influential social learning perspective, notably that physical aggression occurs early in life, and its subsequent development is characterized by learned inhibition. The fourth explanation concerns the motivational mechanisms controlling aggression: approached from an evolutionary background, these mechanisms range from the inflexible reflex-like responses to those incorporating rational decision-making.

  6. Aggression can be contagious: Longitudinal associations between proactive aggression and reactive aggression among young twins.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Daniel J; Richmond, Ashley D; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Laursen, Brett; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined sibling influence over reactive and proactive aggression in a sample of 452 same-sex twins (113 male dyads, 113 female dyads). Between and within siblings influence processes were examined as a function of relative levels of parental coercion and hostility to test the hypothesis that aggression contagion between twins occurs only among dyads who experience parental coerciveness. Teacher reports of reactive and proactive aggression were collected for each twin in kindergarten (M = 6.04 years; SD = 0.27) and in first grade (M = 7.08 years; SD = 0.27). Families were divided into relatively low, average, and relatively high parental coercion-hostility groups on the basis of maternal reports collected when the children were 5 years old. In families with relatively high levels of parental coercion-hostility, there was evidence of between-sibling influence, such that one twin's reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin's reactive aggression from ages 6 to 7, and one twin's proactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin's proactive aggression from ages 6 to 7. There was also evidence of within-sibling influence such that a child's level of reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the same child's proactive aggression at age 7, regardless of parental coercion-hostility. The findings provide new information about the etiology of reactive and proactive aggression and individual differences in their developmental interplay.

  7. Sleep Disorders, Epilepsy, and Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malow, Beth A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this review article is to describe the clinical data linking autism with sleep and epilepsy and to discuss the impact of treating sleep disorders in children with autism either with or without coexisting epileptic seizures. Studies are presented to support the view that sleep is abnormal in individuals with autistic spectrum…

  8. The Physiopathogenesis of the Epilepsies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gastaut, Henri; And Others

    Material is discussed in articles by 40 contributors. Concerning physiopathogenesis of epilepsies there are introductory notes, two articles on genetics, one on neurophysiological and metabolic mechanisms, two on renal failure, a discussion of convulsive seizure and water intoxication, three articles on hypoglycemia, one on electroclinical…

  9. Epilepsy in Adults with TSC

    MedlinePlus

    ... have epilepsy is to achieve the best seizure control possible while maintaining the best quality of life. If individuals with TSC experience an ... be the advocate to achieve the best seizure control possible while also optimizing the ... quality of life. Health care providers should remember that ...

  10. Television viewing, aggression, and ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Harris, M B

    1992-02-01

    For 416 college students, questioned about their experiences with aggression and television viewing, only very weak correlations between preference for violent shows and aggression were observed. Black males watched significantly more television than other respondents. These findings suggest that the frequently reported correlation between viewing televised violence and aggression may not appear when sex, ethnicity, and education are controlled in a sample of young adults.

  11. Cyber Victimization and Perceived Stress: Linkages to Late Adolescents' Cyber Aggression and Psychological Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Michelle F.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined multiple sources of strain, particular cyber victimization, and perceived stress from parents, peers, and academics, in relation to late adolescents' (ages 16-18; N = 423) cyber aggression, anxiety, and depression, each assessed 1 year later (Time 2). Three-way interactions revealed that the relationship between Time 1…

  12. Family enhancement of cognitive style in anxious and aggressive children.

    PubMed

    Barrett, P M; Rapee, R M; Dadds, M M; Ryan, S M

    1996-04-01

    Previous research has shown that anxious adults provide more threat interpretations of ambiguous stimuli than other clinic and nonclinic persons. We were interested in investigating if the same bias occurs in anxious children and how family processes impact on these children's interpretations of ambiguity. Anxious, oppositional, and nonclinical children and their parents were asked separately to interpret and provide plans of action to ambiguous scenarios. Afterwards, each family was asked to discuss two of these situations as a family and for the child to provide a final response. The results showed that anxious and oppositional children were both more likely to interpret ambiguous scenarios in a threatening manner. However, the two clinic groups differed in that the anxious children predominantly chose avoidant solutions whereas the oppositional children chose aggressive solutions. After family discussions, both the anxious children's avoidant plans of action and the oppositional children's aggressive plans increased. Thus, this study provides the first evidence of family enhancement of avoidant and aggressive responses in children. These results support a model of anxiety that emphasizes the development of an anxious cognitive style in the context of anxiety-supporting family processes.

  13. Aggression: the dominant psychological response in children with malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Kvist, S B; Rajantie, J; Kvist, M; Siimes, M A

    1991-06-01

    During the 11-yr. period of 1976 to 1986 leukemia or lymphoma treatment at the Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki was electively discontinued for the children in 90 different families. Of the 53 (59%) patients (mean age 6.4 yr. at diagnosis and 12.8 yr. at completion of questionnaires) who agreed to participate in the present study, 48 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and five nonHodgkin lymphoma. Patients' and parents' impressions of the patients' psychological reactions during patients' prior chemotherapy were evaluated on parental and self-ratings. Also, knowledge of and presumed causes of the malignancy were studied. Patients' reactions of aggression, depression, eating disorders, hypersensitivity, phobic anxiety, death anxiety, and night terror were examined using factor analysis. Aggression, in the form of irritation and anger, was displayed more often by girls than by boys. Patients of families suffering from stress were prone to exhibit aggression in the form of mood changes, irritation, and anger. Patients with disease-related knowledge, as opposed to those less well informed, were less depressed. Discrepancies between parents' and patients' thoughts about the origin of the malignancy were noted.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy is a condition that involves seizures beginning soon ...

  15. Reduction of Aggressive Behavior in the School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petermann, Ulrike

    1988-01-01

    Discusses what may be considered aggressive behavior, what motivates aggressive students, and possible teacher responses to aggressive behavior. Describes four points on which teachers can focus to diminish the attractiveness of aggression and ensure that it is not rewarded. Identifies learning activities which provide aggressive students with the…

  16. The Effects of Pornography on Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacy, Lauri L.

    This document reviews existing empirical research on the effect of pornography on aggressive behavior. Two types of pornography are distinguished: aggressive pornography and non-aggressive pornography. Conclusions drawn from the research review are presented, including: (1) aggressive pornograpy consistently increases aggressive attitudes and…

  17. Epilepsy, cognition, and neuropsychiatry (Epilepsy, Brain, and Mind, part 2)

    PubMed Central

    Korczyn, Amos D.; Schachter, Steven C.; Brodie, Martin J.; Dalal, Sarang S.; Engel, Jerome; Guekht, Alla; Hecimovic, Hrvoje; Jerbi, Karim; Kanner, Andres M.; Landmark, Cecilie Johannessen; Mares, Pavel; Marusic, Petr; Meletti, Stefano; Mula, Marco; Patsalos, Philip N.; Reuber, Markus; Ryvlin, Philippe; Štillová, Klára; Tuchman, Roberto; Rektor, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is, of course, not one disease but rather a huge number of disorders that can present with seizures. In common, they all reflect brain dysfunction. Moreover, they can affect the mind and, of course, behavior. While animals too may suffer from epilepsy, as far as we know, the electrical discharges are less likely to affect the mind and behavior, which is not surprising. While the epileptic seizures themselves are episodic, the mental and behavioral changes continue, in many cases, interictally. The episodic mental and behavioral manifestations are more dramatic, while the interictal ones are easier to study with anatomical and functional studies. The following extended summaries complement those presented in Part 1. PMID:23764496

  18. Lunar Influences on Human Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Gordon W.; Dua, Manjula

    1983-01-01

    Used league records of all Canadian hockey games (N=426) played during a season to test a lunar-aggression hypothesis. Despite the use of multiple measures of lunar phase and interpersonal aggression, support for lunar influence was not forthcoming. Supplemental data revealed that beliefs in lunar influence are fairly common. (JAC)

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laurence

    1994-01-01

    Persons who have suffered traumatic injury to the brain may subsequently display aggressive behavior. Three main syndromes of aggression following traumatic brain injury are described: (1) episodic dyscontrol; (2) frontal lobe disinhibition; and (3) exacerbation of premorbid antisociality. The neuropsychological substrates of these syndromes are…

  20. Self and informant report ratings of psychopathology in genetic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Loughman, Amy; Bowden, Stephen C; D'Souza, Wendyl J

    2017-02-01

    The psychological sequelae of genetic generalized epilepsies (GGE) is of growing research interest, with up to a third of all adults with GGE experiencing significant psychiatric comorbidity according to a recent systematic review. A number of unexplored questions remain. Firstly, there is insufficient evidence to determine relative prevalence of psychopathology between GGE syndromes. Secondly, the degree to which self-report and informant-report questionnaires accord in adults with epilepsy is unknown. Finally, while epilepsy severity is one likely predictor of worse psychopathology in GGE, evidence regarding other possible contributing factors such as epilepsy duration and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) has been equivocal. The potential impact of subclinical epileptiform discharges remains unexplored. Self-report psychopathology symptoms across six DSM-Oriented Subscales were prospectively measured in 60 adults with GGE, with informant-report provided for a subset of 47. We assessed the burden of symptoms from both self- and informant-report, and the relationship between clinical epilepsy variables and self-reported symptoms. Results showed elevated symptoms in almost half of the sample overall. Depression and anxiety were the most commonly reported types of symptoms. There was a trend towards greater symptoms endorsement by self-report, and relatively modest interrater agreement. Symptoms of ADHD were significantly positively associated with number of AEDs currently prescribed. Other psychopathology symptoms were not significantly predicted by epilepsy duration, seizure-free duration or total duration of epileptiform discharges over a 24-hour period. The high prevalence of psychological needs suggests that routine screening of psychopathology and provision of psychoeducation may be essential to improving patient care and outcomes. Further investigation is required to better understand predictive and causal factors for psychopathology in GGE.

  1. [Epilepsy And Driving Ability: The New Guideline].

    PubMed

    Kurthen, Martin

    2015-10-28

    The Swiss Guideline concerning epilepsy and driving has recently been revised. Recommendations have changed significantly in several respects. Some modifications arise indirectly from a change in the overall concept of epilepsy. As a consequence of the application of the new ILAE definition and diagnostic criteria for epilepsy, there are now cases in which the diagnosis of epilepsy is established even after one single seizure. Furthermore, a concept of imminent epilepsy was introduced to identify patients without seizures, but with a high risk of a first seizure within twelve months. On the other hand, the concept of a "resolved epilepsy" was established to loosen driving regulations for longterm seizure-free patients. In addition, the new guideline provides differential recommendations for provoked vs. unprovoked seizures in several clinical constellations.

  2. History of neuropsychology through epilepsy eyes.

    PubMed

    Loring, David W

    2010-06-01

    In the 19th century, Hughlings Jackson relied on clinical history, seizure semiology, and the neurologic examination as methods for seizure localization to inform the first epilepsy surgeries. In the 20th century, psychological and neuropsychological tests were first employed as both diagnostic and prognostic measures. The contemporary practice of epilepsy evaluation and management includes neuropsychology as a critical component of epilepsy care and research, and epilepsy and neuropsychology have enjoyed a very special and synergistic relationship. This paper reviews how epilepsy has shaped the practice of neuropsychology as a clinical service by asking critical questions that only neuropsychologists were in a position to answer, and how clinical care of epilepsy patients has been significantly improved based on neuropsychology's unique contributions.

  3. History of Neuropsychology Through Epilepsy Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Loring, David W.

    2010-01-01

    In the 19th century, Hughlings Jackson relied on clinical history, seizure semiology, and the neurologic examination as methods for seizure localization to inform the first epilepsy surgeries. In the 20th century, psychological and neuropsychological tests were first employed as both diagnostic and prognostic measures. The contemporary practice of epilepsy evaluation and management includes neuropsychology as a critical component of epilepsy care and research, and epilepsy and neuropsychology have enjoyed a very special and synergistic relationship. This paper reviews how epilepsy has shaped the practice of neuropsychology as a clinical service by asking critical questions that only neuropsychologists were in a position to answer, and how clinical care of epilepsy patients has been significantly improved based on neuropsychology's unique contributions. PMID:20395259

  4. The Neurobiology of Impulsive Aggression.

    PubMed

    Blair, Robert J R

    2016-02-01

    This selective review provides a model of the neurobiology of impulsive aggression from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. It is argued that prototypical cases of impulsive aggression, those associated with anger, involve the recruitment of the acute threat response system structures; that is, the amygdala, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray. It is argued that whether the recruitment of these structures results in impulsive aggression or not reflects the functional roles of ventromedial frontal cortex and dorsomedial frontal and anterior insula cortex in response selection. It is also argued that impulsive aggression may occur because of impaired decision making. The aggression may not be accompanied by anger, but it will reflect disrupted evaluation of the rewards/benefits of the action.

  5. The Neurobiology of Impulsive Aggression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This selective review provides a model of the neurobiology of impulsive aggression from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. It is argued that prototypical cases of impulsive aggression, those associated with anger, involve the recruitment of the acute threat response system structures; that is, the amygdala, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray. It is argued that whether the recruitment of these structures results in impulsive aggression or not reflects the functional roles of ventromedial frontal cortex and dorsomedial frontal and anterior insula cortex in response selection. It is also argued that impulsive aggression may occur because of impaired decision making. The aggression may not be accompanied by anger, but it will reflect disrupted evaluation of the rewards/benefits of the action. PMID:26465707

  6. False memories for aggressive acts.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Takarangi, Melanie K T

    2013-06-01

    Can people develop false memories for committing aggressive acts? How does this process compare to developing false memories for victimhood? In the current research we used a simple false feedback procedure to implant false memories for committing aggressive acts (causing a black eye or spreading malicious gossip) or for victimhood (receiving a black eye). We then compared these false memories to other subjects' true memories for equivalent events. False aggressive memories were all too easy to implant, particularly in the minds of individuals with a proclivity towards aggression. Once implanted, the false memories were indistinguishable from true memories for the same events, on several dimensions, including emotional content. Implications for aggression-related memory more generally as well as false confessions are discussed.

  7. Genetics of Epilepsy in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Genetics should now be part of everyday clinical epilepsy practice. Good data exist to provide empiric risks based on epilepsy syndrome diagnosis. Investigation of the molecular basis of some epilepsies is now a practical clinical task and is of clear value to the patient and family. In some cases, specific therapeutic decisions can now be made based on genetic findings, and this scenario of precision therapy is likely to increase in the coming years. PMID:26316866

  8. Epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Prevett, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Over 10 million people in Africa have epilepsy of which most have no access to appropriate treatment. Epilepsy in Africa is different- the incidence is higher, and the causes and cultural attitudes towards it differ. This article examines the epidemiology, causes and treatment of epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa and looks at the challenges to improve access to treatment and potential solutions and the implications for neurologists in more developed countries.

  9. Women and epilepsy in the Mediterranean cultures.

    PubMed

    Vanzan Paladin, A

    1997-08-01

    Women and epilepsy have been sharing many prejudices since the beginning of human history. Epileptic seizures have been often mistaken for hysteria and hysteria is mainly a disease of women: in the past, the physicians even proclaimed the existence of a form of epilepsy originated from the uterus. This paper briefly examines the relation women-epilepsy in the Mediterranean cultures through historical and literary examples.

  10. Ian Curtis: Punk rock, epilepsy, and suicide.

    PubMed

    Tuft, Mia; Gjelsvik, Bergljot; Nakken, Karl O

    2015-11-01

    Ian Curtis was the front man of the post-punk band Joy Division. He suffered from epilepsy and actively incorporated his experiences of the disease in his lyrics. Curtis had frequent epileptic seizures, both on and off stage. After dying from suicide in 1980, he became a legend in the post-punk milieu. The impact which the epilepsy, the epilepsy treatment, and comorbid depression had on his artistic life and premature death is not well known.

  11. Beliefs about aggression moderate alcohol's effects on aggression.

    PubMed

    Levinson, Cheri A; Giancola, Peter R; Parrott, Dominic J

    2011-02-01

    The goal of this investigation was to determine whether permissive beliefs about aggression moderate the relation between acute alcohol intoxication and aggression in two large experiments. Participants in Study 1 were 328 (163 men and 165 women) social drinkers and those in Study 2 were 518 (252 men and 266 women) social drinkers. Beliefs about aggression were assessed using a well-validated self-report measure. Following the consumption of either an alcohol or a placebo beverage, participants were tested on a laboratory task in which electric shocks were received from, and administered to, a fictitious opponent under the guise of a competitive reaction-time task. Aggression was operationalized as the combined mean responses for shock intensity and duration across all trials. Our central finding was that alcohol increased aggression in persons with more approving beliefs about aggression than in those who did not hold such beliefs. Our results are discussed within the context of Huesmann's (1988) cognitive script model of aggression. Suggestions for violence prevention efforts are put forth as well.

  12. Microsensors and wireless system for monitoring epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Ashok, B. H.; Kumaar, Raman V.; Sarukesi, K.; Jose, K. A.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2003-07-01

    Epilepsy is a form of brain disorder caused by abnormal discharges of neurons. The most common manifestations of epilepsy are seizures which could affect visual, aural and motor abilities of a person. Absence epilepsy is a form of epilepsy common mostly in children. The most common manifestations of absence epilepsy are staring and transient loss of responsiveness. Also, subtle motor activities may occur. Due to the subtle nature of these symptoms, episodes of absence epilepsy may often go unrecognized for long periods of time or be mistakenly attributed to attention deficit disorder or daydreaming. Spells of absence epilepsy may last about 10 seconds and occur hundreds of times each day. Patients have no recollections of the events occurred during those seizures and will resume normal activity without any postictal symptoms. The EEG during such episodes of Absence epilepsy shows intermittent activity of 3 Hz generalized spike and wave complexes. As EEG is the only way of detecting such symptoms, it is required to monitor the EEG of the patient for a long time, usually the whole day. This requires that the patient be connected to the EEG recorder all the time and thus remain only in the bed. So, effectively the EEG is being monitored only when the patient is stationary. The wireless monitoring system described in this paper aims at eliminating this constraint and enables the physician to monitor the EEG when the patient resumes his normal activities. This approach could even help the doctor identify possible triggers of absence epilepsy.

  13. Public awareness, understanding & attitudes toward epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gambhir, S K; Kumar, V; Singhi, P D; Goel, R C

    1995-07-01

    The public awareness, understanding and attitudes towards epilepsy were evaluated in a north Indian population in 1992 by personal interview method. The study revealed that 92 per cent of the respondents had read or heard about epilepsy. More than 55 per cent knew someone and had seen a case of seizure. Eighty five per cent of the respondents were not aware of the cause of epilepsy or had wrong beliefs. Eighteen and 15 per cent thought epilepsy to be a hereditary disorder and a form of insanity respectively. About 40 per cent of the respondents felt that children with epilepsy should not be sent to school and also objected to their children's contact with epileptics at school or at play. Two-thirds of the respondents objected to their children marrying a person who had ever had epilepsy. Twenty per cent were ignorant about the manifestation of epilepsy and an equal number were unable to recommend any therapy in case their relatives or friends had epilepsy. Fifty seven per cent did not know what kind of first aid should be given during the epileptic attack. Although the awareness of epilepsy among Indian people was comparable to that of individuals in Western countries, the attitudes of the Indians were much more negative. Better educated people belonging to higher occupational groups were less prejudiced against social contact and schooling of their children with epileptic children compared to low educational and occupational groups.

  14. Surgical strategies for pediatric epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jian; Karsy, Michael; Ducis, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric epilepsy is a debilitating condition that impacts millions of patients throughout the world. Approximately 20–30% of children with recurrent seizures have drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE). For these patients, surgery offers the possibility of not just seizure freedom but significantly improved neurocognitive and behavioral outcomes. The spectrum of surgical options is vast, ranging from outpatient procedures such as vagus nerve stimulation to radical interventions including hemispherectomy. The thread connecting all of these interventions is a common goal—seizure freedom, an outcome that can be achieved safely and durably in a large proportion of patients. In this review, we discuss many of the most commonly performed surgical interventions and describe the indications, complications, and outcomes specific to each. PMID:27186522

  15. Metabolic treatments for intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Sarah A; Hartman, Adam L

    2011-09-01

    When a child on anticonvulsant medications continues to have seizures, what other options should be considered? Over the past 100 years, dietary therapies for the treatment of intractable epilepsy have become more widely recognized, and their use has continued to expand throughout the world. An increasing number of studies has shown efficacy of these metabolic treatments in improving seizure control. Currently, 4 types of dietary therapy are available in the clinic: the classic long chain fatty acid "ketogenic" diet, the medium chain triglyceride diet, the modified Atkins diet, and the low glycemic index treatment. These therapies should be considered earlier in the treatment of intractable epilepsy because they offer a different approach to treatment that has proven efficacious, tolerable, and cost-effective.

  16. Aggressive Erotica and Violence against Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnerstein, Edward

    1980-01-01

    Examines the effects of aggressive-erotic stimuli on male aggression toward females. Male subjects' deliveries of electric shocks to males or females after viewing either a neutral, erotic, or aggressive-erotic film were measured. (Author/SS)

  17. Generalized anxiety disorder - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007687.htm Generalized anxiety disorder - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a mental disorder in which a ...

  18. Generalized anxiety disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000917.htm Generalized anxiety disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a mental disorder in which a ...

  19. Separation anxiety in children

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001542.htm Separation anxiety in children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Separation anxiety in children is a developmental stage in ...

  20. Illness anxiety disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001236.htm Illness anxiety disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Illness anxiety disorder (IAD) is a preoccupation that physical symptoms ...

  1. Clinical Genetic Testing in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    New technologies for mutation detection in the human genome have greatly increased our understanding of epilepsy genetics. Application of genomic technologies in the clinical setting allows for more efficient genetic diagnosis in some patients; therefore, it is important to understand the types of tests available and the types of mutations that can be detected. Making a genetic diagnosis improves overall patient care by enhancing prognosis and recurrence risk counseling and informing treatment decisions. PMID:26316867

  2. [Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Maiken; Uldall, Peter

    2014-12-22

    Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome is a rare consequence of a status epilepticus in the course of a febrile illness in children under the age of four years. Various degrees of hemiplegia and within a variable interval, subsequent epilepsia follows. Neuroimaging show unilateral cytotoxic oedema at the initial convulsive state, followed by severe chronic atrophy of the affected hemisphere. The aetiology remains unclear. Several mechanisms may contribute to this condition. To improve the outcome, further studies are needed and early diagnosis is essential.

  3. Soundoff: My Anxieties about Math Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Jay

    1984-01-01

    Math anxiety affects both sexes, and is not the cause of imbalance in mathematical professions. Attempts to broaden perceptions of mathematics deal only with the symptoms of math anxiety. The principal cause is the methodology used to teach mathematics. Problem-solving processes must be employed. (MNS)

  4. [The effect of media violence on aggression: is aggressive behavior mediated by aggressive cognitions and emotions?].

    PubMed

    Yukawa, S; Yoshida, F

    1999-06-01

    This study investigated whether cognitions and emotions elicited by media violence mediate aggressive behavior. Eighty undergraduates, 40 men and 40 women, participated in the experiment. First, subjects were exposed to one of four violent videos which varied in levels of violence and entertainment. Subjects' heart rate and eyeblink rate were continuously recorded while they watched the video. After watching it, subjects described their thoughts which occurred while watching it and rated their affective reactions to it. Finally, their aggressive behavior was measured. Results showed that (1) videos high in violence elicited more aggressive thoughts, more thoughts of negative affect, stronger negative affects, and stronger empty-powerless affects, whereas videos high in entertainment elicited stronger positive affects; (2) no significant differences were found among the videos in terms of physiological reactions and aggressive behavior; and (3) cognitions and emotions elicited by media violence did not mediate aggressive behavior.

  5. Epilepsy as a Neurodevelopmental Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bozzi, Yuri; Casarosa, Simona; Caleo, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures and comprises a diverse group of syndromes with different etiologies. Epileptogenesis refers to the process whereby the brain becomes epileptic and can be related to several factors, such as acquired structural brain lesions, inborn brain malformations, alterations in neuronal signaling, and defects in maturation and plasticity of neuronal networks. In this review, we will focus on alterations of brain development that lead to an hyperexcitability phenotype in adulthood, providing examples from both animal and human studies. Malformations of cortical development (including focal cortical dysplasia, lissencephaly, heterotopia, and polymicrogyria) are frequently epileptogenic and result from defects in cell proliferation in the germinal zone and/or impaired neuronal migration and differentiation. Delayed or reduced arrival of inhibitory interneurons into the cortical plate is another possible cause of epileptogenesis. GABAergic neurons are generated during early development in the ganglionic eminences, and failure to pursue migration toward the cortex alters the excitatory/inhibitory balance resulting in aberrant network hyperexcitability. More subtle defects in the developmental assembly of excitatory and inhibitory synapses are also involved in epilepsy. For example, mutations in the presynaptic proteins synapsins and SNAP-25 cause derangements of synaptic transmission and plasticity which underlie appearance of an epileptic phenotype. Finally, there is evidence that defects in synapse elimination and remodeling during early “critical periods” can trigger hyperexcitability later in life. Further clarification of the developmental pathways to epilepsy has important implications for disease prevention and therapy. PMID:22457654

  6. Aggression Can be Contagious: Longitudinal Associations between Proactive Aggression and Reactive Aggression Among Young Twins

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Daniel J.; Richmond, Ashley; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Laursen, Brett; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined sibling influence over reactive and proactive aggression in a sample of 452 same-sex twins (113 male dyads, 113 female dyads). Between and within siblings influence processes were examined as a function of relative levels of parental coercion and hostility to test the hypothesis that aggression contagion between twins occurs only among dyads who experience parental coerciveness. Teacher reports of reactive and proactive aggression were collected for each twin in kindergarten (M = 6.04 years; SD = 0.27) and in first grade (M = 7.08 years; SD = 0.27). Families were divided into relatively low, average, and relatively high parental coercion-hostility groups on the basis of maternal reports collected when the children were 5 years old. In families with relatively high levels of parental coercion-hostility, there was evidence of between-sibling influence, such that one twin’s reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin’s reactive aggression from ages 6 to 7, and one twin’s proactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin’s proactive aggression from ages 6 to 7. There was also evidence of within-sibling influence such that a child’s level of reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the same child’s proactive aggression at age 7, regardless of parental coercion-hostility. The findings provide new information about the etiology of reactive and proactive aggression and individual differences in their developmental interplay. PMID:25683448

  7. Foreign Language Reading Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Yoshiko; Horwitz, Elaine K.; Garza, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of anxiety in response to foreign- or second-language reading. Introduces the construct of foreign-language reading anxiety, offers a scale for its measurement, and reports on a preliminary study of reading anxiety in 30 intact first-semester classes of Spanish, Russian, and Japanese. (VWL)

  8. Deconstructing Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putwain, David William

    2008-01-01

    Recent changes to educational policy which have focused attention on the use of high stakes testing as performance and accountability measures have renewed interest in test anxiety both in the UK and the USA. The aim of this paper is to provide a critical examination of the test anxiety construct, and explore the ways in which test anxiety is…

  9. Anxiety Management Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suinn, Richard M.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.

    1988-01-01

    Provides detailed information on anxiety management training, a relaxation-based, self-control therapy for the treatment of generalized anxiety, phobias, anger, and other stress-related disorders. Describes in detail the specific procedures of anxiety management training, summarizes research findings, and outlines means for deciding on proper use…

  10. Test and Performance Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the most basic human emotions and occurs in every person at some time, most often when someone is apprehensive about uncertain outcomes of an event or set of circumstances. Anxiety can serve an adaptive function, however, and is also a marker for typical development. In the school setting, anxiety is experienced often by students…

  11. Death anxiety as a function of aging anxiety.

    PubMed

    Benton, Jeremy P; Christopher, Andrew N; Walter, Mark I

    2007-04-01

    To assess how different facets of aging anxiety contributed to the prediction of tangible and existential death anxiety, 167 Americans of various Christian denominations completed a battery of questionnaires. Multiple regression analyses, controlling for demographic variables and previously demonstrated predictors of death anxiety, revealed that the aging anxiety dimensions of physical appearance concern and fear of losses each positively predicted tangible death anxiety. In addition, the aging anxiety dimension of fear of losses predicted existential death anxiety. Results are discussed with respect to the multifaceted nature of death anxiety and how different forms of aging anxiety contribute to anxieties about death.

  12. Prevalence of depression, anxiety, stress, and anger in Turkish prisoners.

    PubMed

    Unver, Yener; Yuce, Mehmet; Bayram, Nuran; Bilgel, Nazan

    2013-09-01

    In Turkey, prison studies are rare and the mental health status of prisoners has not received proper attention. The purpose of this cross-sectional and descriptive study was to assess the prevalence of depression, anxiety, stress, and anger among a group of Turkish prisoners. Two self-reporting instruments (the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-42 and Multidimensional Anger Scale) were filled out by 685 prisoners. Prisoners in the study group were found to be depressive, anxious, and stressed. Anger symptoms and aggressive behaviors were found to be at a moderate level. Prisoners with a history of being subjected to domestic violence in childhood had higher depression, anxiety, and stress scores than those without such a history. Young prisoners, those who had been previously imprisoned, with substance dependency and higher stress and anxiety levels reported more anger symptoms than others. Psychological support, together with stress and anger management programs, seems to be essential.

  13. Understanding Death in Children With Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Donner, Elizabeth J; Camfield, Peter; Brooks, Linda; Buchhalter, Jeffrey; Camfield, Carol; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Wirrell, Elaine

    2017-01-31

    Death in children with epilepsy is profoundly disturbing, with lasting effects on the family, community, and health care providers. The overall risk of death for children with epilepsy is about ten times that of the general population. However, the risk of premature death for children without associated neurological comorbidities is similar to that of the general population, and most deaths are related to the cause of the epilepsy or associated neurologic disability, not seizures. The most common cause of seizure-related death in children with epilepsy is sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). SUDEP is relatively uncommon in childhood, but the risk increases if epilepsy persists into adulthood. Although the direct cause of SUDEP remains unknown, most often death follows a generalized convulsive seizure and the risk of SUDEP is strongly related to drug-resistant epilepsy and frequent generalized tonic-clonic seizures. The most effective SUDEP prevention strategy is to reduce the frequency of seizures, although a number of seizure detection devices are under development and in the future may prove to be useful for seizure detection for those at particularly high risk. There are distinct benefits for health care professionals to discuss mortality with the family soon after the diagnosis of epilepsy. An individual approach is appropriate. When a child with epilepsy dies, particularly if the death was unexpected, family grief may be profound. Physicians and other health care professionals have a critical role in supporting families that lose a child to epilepsy. This review will provide health care providers with information needed to discuss the risk of death in children with epilepsy and support families following a loss.

  14. An Aggressive Retroperitoneal Fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Campara, Zoran; Spasic, Aleksandar; Aleksic, Predrag; Milev, Bosko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) is a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal tumors that have locally infiltrative growth and a tendency to relapse. The clinical picture is often conditioned by the obstruction of the ureter or small intestine. Diagnosis is based on clinical, radiological and histological parameters. A case report: We report a case of male patient, aged 35 years, with the retroperitoneal fibromatosis. He reported to the physician because of frequent urination with the feeling of pressure and pain. Computed tomography revealed the tumor mass on the front wall of the bladder with diameter of 70mm with signs of infiltration of the musculature of the anterior abdominal wall. Endoscopic transurethral biopsy showed proliferative lesion binders by type of fibromatosis. The tumor was surgically removed in a classical way. The patient feels well and has no recurrence thirty-six months after the operative procedure. Conclusion: The complete tumor resection is the therapeutic choice for the primary tumor as well as for a relapse. PMID:27147794

  15. From aggressiveness to creativity.

    PubMed

    Mrevlje, Gorazd V

    2004-02-01

    Psychology has a long tradition of considering human creativity as a distinct human characteristic and a special kind of human activity. After explaining the key motives for such an attitude, the author discusses those forms of healthy aggressiveness that stand out as necessary and constitutive elements of the creative process. Taking the well-known statement of C. G. Jung's 'The person who does not build (create), will demolish and destroy' as a starting point, the author compares the basic premises for understanding the process of human creativity, at the same time drawing on Freud's psychology of the individual and Jung's principle of the collective unconscious as well as his notion of 'complexes'. In doing so, the author somewhat boldly paraphrases Jung's dictum: 'In order to be creative, rather than just constructive, one must occasionally also destroy'. With reference to Wallas, Taylor and Neumann (Wallas 1926; Taylor 1959;;Neumann 2001), the author goes on to explore those concepts which help us to investigate the phenomenon of human creativity, drawing distinctions between emergent, expressive, productive, inventive and innovative creativity. The second part of the article discusses the importance of intelligence, originality, nonconformity, subversiveness and free-mindedness for the creative process of human beings. The author concludes with a further explanation of Erich Neumann's argument that human creativity cannot be understood solely as a result of sociogenetic factors, and argues that it is only by taking into consideration Jung's perception of creativity that a global ontological understanding of these processes can be achieved.

  16. More aggressive cartoons are funnier.

    PubMed

    McCauley, C; Woods, K; Coolidge, C; Kulick, W

    1983-04-01

    Independent rankings of humor and aggressiveness were obtained for sets of cartoons drawn randomly from two different magazines. The correlation of median humor and median aggressiveness rankings ranged from .49 to .90 in six studies involving six different sets of cartoons and six different groups of subjects, including children and adults, high and low socioeconomic status (SES) individuals, and native- and foreign-born individuals. This correlation is consistent with Freudian, arousal, and superiority theories of humor. Another prediction of Freudian theory, that high-SES subjects should be more appreciative of aggressive humor than low-SES subjects, was not supported.

  17. Predicting workplace aggression and violence.

    PubMed

    Barling, Julian; Dupré, Kathryne E; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Consistent with the relative recency of research on workplace aggression and the considerable media attention given to high-profile incidents, numerous myths about the nature of workplace aggression have emerged. In this review, we examine these myths from an evidence-based perspective, bringing greater clarity to our understanding of the predictors of workplace aggression. We conclude by pointing to the need for more research focusing on construct validity and prevention issues as well as for methodologies that minimize the likelihood of mono-method bias and that strengthen the ability to make causal inferences.

  18. Community perceptions of developmental and behavioral problems experienced by children living with epilepsy on the Kenyan coast: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Abubakar, Amina; Kariuki, Symon M; Tumaini, Judith Dzombo; Gona, Joseph; Katana, Khamis; Owen, Jacqueline A Phillips; Newton, Charles R

    2015-04-01

    Childhood epilepsy is common in Africa. However, there are little data on the developmental and behavioral problems experienced by children living with epilepsy, especially qualitative data that capture community perceptions of the challenges faced by these children. Identifying these perceptions using qualitative approaches is important not only to help design appropriate interventions but also to help adapt behavioral tools that are culturally appropriate. We documented the description of these problems as perceived by parents and teachers of children with or without epilepsy. The study involved 70 participants. Data were collected using in-depth interviews and focus group discussions and were analyzed using NVIVO to identify major themes. Our analysis identified four major areas that are perceived to be adversely affected among children with epilepsy. These included internalizing and externalizing problems such as aggression, temper tantrums, and excessive crying. Additionally, developmental delay, especially cognitive deficits and academic underachievement, was also identified as a major problematic area. There is a need to supplement these findings with quantitative estimates and to develop psychosocial and educational interventions to rehabilitate children with epilepsy who have these difficulties.

  19. [Pathophysiology of aggressive behavior: evaluation and management of pathological aggression].

    PubMed

    Pompili, E; Carlone, C; Silvestrini, C; Nicolò, G

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to define the aggression in all its forms, with notes on management and rapid tranquilization. The pathological aggression is described as a non-homogeneous phenomenon, it is variable in according to social, psychological and biological agents. The distinction of violence between affective aggression and predatory aggression can be functional to the prediction of outcome of any treatment. In general, a pattern of predatory violence tend to match with patients unresponsive and not compliant to treatment, a low probability to predict future violence and, therefore, a difficulty in managing risk. The affective aggressor, however, shows increased probability of treatment response, with more predictability of violent actions in reaction to situations perceived as threatening and, therefore, greater management of future violence risk. Those who act affective violence tend to show a wide range of emotional and cognitive problems, while those who act with predatory patterns show greater inclination to aggression and antisocial behavior. Aggression that occurs in psychiatry mostly appears to be affective, therefore susceptible to modulation through treatments.

  20. The Role of Parenting Styles in the Relation Between Functions of Aggression and Internalizing Symptoms in a Child Psychiatric Inpatient Population.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Casey A; Rathert, Jamie L; Fite, Paula J; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani

    2016-10-01

    Psychiatric inpatient hospitalization is a costly intervention for youth. With rates of hospitalization rising, efforts to refine prevention and intervention are necessary. Aggression often precedes severe internalizing behaviors, and proactive and reactive functions of aggression are differentially associated with internalizing symptomatology. Thus, further understanding of the links between functions of aggression and internalizing symptomatology could aid in the improvement of interventions for hospitalized youth. The current study examined parenting styles, gender, and age as potential moderators of the relations between proactive and reactive aggression and internalizing symptoms. Participants included 392 children, 6-12 years of age admitted consecutively to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Reactive aggression was uniquely associated with anxiety symptoms. However, proactive aggression was associated with internalizing problems only when specific parenting styles and demographic factors were present. Although both proactive and reactive subtypes of aggression were associated with internalizing symptoms, differential associations were evident. Implications of findings are discussed.

  1. Empathy, target distress, and neurohormone genes interact to predict aggression for others-even without provocation.

    PubMed

    Buffone, Anneke E K; Poulin, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    Can empathy for others motivate aggression on their behalf? This research examined potential predictors of empathy-linked aggression including the emotional state of empathy, an empathy target's distress state, and the function of the social anxiety-modulating neuropeptides oxytocin and vasopressin. In Study 1 (N = 69), self-reported empathy combined with threat to a close other and individual differences in genes for the vasopressin receptor (AVPR1a rs3) and oxytocin receptor (OXTR rs53576) to predict self-reported aggression against a person who threatened a close other. In Study 2 (N = 162), induced empathy for a person combined with OXTR variation or with that person's distress and AVPR1a variation led to increased amount of hot sauce assigned to that person's competitor. Empathy uniquely predicts aggression and may do so by way of aspects of the human caregiving system in the form of oxytocin and vasopressin.

  2. Interparental Aggression and Adolescent Adjustment: The Role of Emotional Insecurity and Adrenocortical Activity.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Kathleen N; Cummings, E Mark; Davies, Patrick T

    2014-10-01

    Adolescents exposed to interparental aggression are at increased risk for developing adjustment problems. The present study explored intervening variables in these pathways in a community sample that included 266 adolescents between 12 and 16 years old (M = 13.82; 52.5% boys, 47.5% girls). A moderated mediation model examined the moderating role of adrenocortical reactivity on the meditational capacity of their emotional insecurity in this context. Information from multiple reporters and adolescents' adrenocortical response to conflict were obtained during laboratory sessions attended by mothers, fathers and their adolescent child. A direct relationship was found between marital aggression and adolescents' internalizing behavior problems. Adolescents' emotional insecurity mediated the relationship between marital aggression and adolescents' depression and anxiety. Adrenocortical reactivity moderated the pathway between emotional insecurity and adolescent adjustment. The implications for further understanding the psychological and physiological effects of adolescents' exposure to interparental aggression and violence are discussed.

  3. The representation of epilepsy in popular music.

    PubMed

    Baxendale, Sallie

    2008-01-01

    Much can be learned about the contemporary stereotypes associated with epilepsy by studying the representation of the disorder in paintings, literature, and movies. Popular music is arguably the most accessible and ubiquitous of the creative art forms, touching most of us on a daily basis. Reviewed here are the ways in which epilepsy and seizures are used in the lyrics of musicians from a wide variety of musical genres, from hip-hop to rhythm and blues. Many of the ancient associations of epilepsy with madness, horror, and lunacy can be found in these lyrics. However, the language of epilepsy has also been appropriated by some musical artists to represent a state of sexual ecstasy and dance euphoria. The references to these states as "epilepsy" or a "seizure" in numerous songs suggest that this shorthand is widely recognized within some subcultures. Although epilepsy has frequently been associated with female sexual availability in other creative art forms, this novel use of the language of epilepsy represents a contemporary departure in the artistic application of epilepsy-related images and associations in the 21st century.

  4. FORCED NORMALIZATION: Epilepsy and Psychosis Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Loganathan, Muruga A.; Enja, Manasa

    2015-01-01

    Forced normalization is the emergence of psychoses following the establishment of seizure control in an uncontrolled epilepsy patient. Two illustrative clinical vignettes are provided about people with epilepsy that was newly controlled and followed by emergence of a psychosis; symptoms appeared only after attaining ictal control. For recognition and differential diagnosis purposes, understanding forced normalization is important in clinical practice. PMID:26155377

  5. Serotonin in Autism and Pediatric Epilepsies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chugani, Diane C.

    2004-01-01

    Serotonergic abnormalities have been reported in both autism and epilepsy. This association may provide insights into underlying mechanisms of these disorders because serotonin plays an important neurotrophic role during brain development--and there is evidence for abnormal cortical development in both autism and some forms of epilepsy. This…

  6. Stem cell therapy for treatment of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Parisa; Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Soleimani, Masoud; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Mohamadi-Jahani, Fereshteh; Jahangiri, Sharareh; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hasan; Larijani, Bagher; Arjmand, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy as one of the most common neurological disorders affects more than 50 million people worldwide with a higher prevalence rate in low-income countries. Excessive electrical discharges in neurons following neural cell damage or loss cause recurrent seizures. One of the most common and difficult to treat types of epilepsy is temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) which results from hippocampal sclerosis. Nowadays, similar to other diseases, epilepsy also is a candidate for treatment with different types of stem cells. Various stem cell types were used for treatment of epilepsy in basic and experimental researches. Two major roles of stem cell therapy in epilepsy are prophylaxis against chronic epilepsy and amelioration cognitive function after the occurrence of TLE. Several animal studies have supported the use of these cells for treating drug-resistant TLE. Although stem cell therapy seems like a promising approach for treatment of epilepsy in the future however, there are some serious safety and ethical concerns that are needed to be eliminated before clinical application.

  7. Pragmatic Communication Deficits in Children with Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broeders, Mark; Geurts, Hilde; Jennekens-Schinkel, Aag

    2010-01-01

    Background: Various psychiatric and neurological disorders including epilepsy have been associated with language deficits. Pragmatic language deficits, however, have seldom been the focus of earlier studies in children with epilepsy. Moreover, it is unknown whether these pragmatic deficits are related to general intellectual functioning. Both…

  8. Epilepsy and Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oguni, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    The co-occurrence of epilepsy in people with intellectual disabilities (ID) and other developmental disabilities (DD) has received attention because it has a significant negative impact on health, well-being, and quality of life. The current research investigating the frequency and form of epilepsy in children with ID and DD is reviewed, with…

  9. Living with Epilepsy--Not around It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview on Kevin Eggers, a 19-year-old college student from Seattle, Washington, who was diagnosed with epilepsy but had not let it prevent him from accomplishing his goals. As an Epilepsy Advocate, Kevin helps other teens and young adults realize that having a disability does not mean not living a normal and fulfilling…

  10. Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy: Possible Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Epilepsy (PACE) practice guideline for the long-term management of the http://www.paceusa.org child with ... on Quality Improvement and tensen J. The long-term risk of epilepsy after febrile seizures in Management SboFSAAoP. Febrile seizures: clinical susceptible subgroups. Am J ...

  11. Quantifying Aggressive Behavior in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Teles, Magda C; Oliveira, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    Aggression is a complex behavior that influences social relationships and can be seen as adaptive or maladaptive depending on the context and intensity of expression. A model organism suitable for genetic dissection of the underlying neural mechanisms of aggressive behavior is still needed. Zebrafish has already proven to be a powerful vertebrate model organism for the study of normal and pathological brain function. Despite the fact that zebrafish is a gregarious species that forms shoals, when allowed to interact in pairs, both males and females express aggressive behavior and establish dominance hierarchies. Here, we describe two protocols that can be used to quantify aggressive behavior in zebrafish, using two different paradigms: (1) staged fights between real opponents and (2) mirror-elicited fights. We also discuss the methodology for the behavior analysis, the expected results for both paradigms, and the advantages and disadvantages of each paradigm in face of the specific goals of the study.

  12. Vasopressin/oxytocin and aggression.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Craig F

    2005-01-01

    Vasopressin/oxytocin and related peptides comprise a phylogenetically old superfamily of chemical signals in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Each peptide isoform has its own distinct receptor subtype and specific cellular action. The conservation and dispersion of vasopressin/oxytocin signalling systems across the animal kingdom attests to their functional significance in evolution. Indeed, they are involved in the physiology of fluid balance, carbohydrate metabolism, thermoregulation, immunity and reproduction. In addition, these peptides evolved a role in social behaviours related to aggression and affiliation. The focus of this chapter is the role of vasopressin/oxytocin as chemical signals in the brain altering aggressive responding in a context- and species-dependent manner. There is compelling evidence from several mammalian species including humans that vasopressin enhances aggression. The activity of the vasopressin appears linked to the serotonin system providing a mechanism for enhancing and suppressing aggressive behaviour.

  13. Environmental factors and aggressive behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.C.

    1982-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews some of the research areas which indicate a correlation between environmental factors and initiation of aggressive behavior. Environmental factors including lunar influences, month of birth, climate and the effects of crowding and certain chemicals are discussed.

  14. Neuroimaging in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Engel, Kirsten; Bandelow, Borwin; Gruber, Oliver; Wedekind, Dirk

    2009-06-01

    Neuroimaging studies have gained increasing importance in validating neurobiological network hypotheses for anxiety disorders. Functional imaging procedures and radioligand binding studies in healthy subjects and in patients with anxiety disorders provide growing evidence of the existence of a complex anxiety network, including limbic, brainstem, temporal, and prefrontal cortical regions. Obviously, "normal anxiety" does not equal "pathological anxiety" although many phenomena are evident in healthy subjects, however to a lower extent. Differential effects of distinct brain regions and lateralization phenomena in different anxiety disorders are mentioned. An overview of neuroimaging investigations in anxiety disorders is given after a brief summary of results from healthy volunteers. Concluding implications for future research are made by the authors.

  15. Cognitive and somatic anxiety.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, A; Kearsley, N

    1990-01-01

    Three hundred and forty adults (including sports players, recreational exercisers, mediators and sedentary controls) completed three inventories purporting to measure cognitive and somatic aspects of anxiety. These were the Cognitive-Somatic Anxiety Questionnaire (CSAQ) devised by Schwartz, Davidson & Goleman (Psychosomatic Medicine, 40, 321-328, 1978), the Worry-Emotionality Scale (WES, Morris, Davis & Hutchens, Journal of Educational Psychology, 73, 541-555, 1981) and the Lehrer-Woolfolk (1982) Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (LWASQ). Factor analysis of the CSAQ and WES identified distinct cognitive and somatic anxiety factors in both inventories. Higher somatic than cognitive ratings were recorded on the CSAQ and WES, while the pattern was reversed on the LWASQ. The CSAQ can tentatively be recommended as a useful measure of these two anxiety components. We were unable to confirm an observation made previously in the literature that practice of meditation is associated with reduced cognitive anxiety, or that exercise is linked with lower somatic anxiety.

  16. Anxiety: an evolutionary approach.

    PubMed

    Bateson, Melissa; Brilot, Ben; Nettle, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common mental illnesses, with huge attendant suffering. Current treatments are not universally effective, suggesting that a deeper understanding of the causes of anxiety is needed. To understand anxiety disorders better, it is first necessary to understand the normal anxiety response. This entails considering its evolutionary function as well as the mechanisms underlying it. We argue that the function of the human anxiety response, and homologues in other species, is to prepare the individual to detect and deal with threats. We use a signal detection framework to show that the threshold for expressing the anxiety response ought to vary with the probability of threats occurring, and the individual's vulnerability to them if they do occur. These predictions are consistent with major patterns in the epidemiology of anxiety. Implications for research and treatment are discussed.

  17. [Eponyms and epilepsy (history of Eastern civilizations)].

    PubMed

    Janković, S M; Sokić, D V; Lević, Z M; Susić, V; Drulović, J; Stojsavljević, N; Veskov, R; Ivanus, J

    1996-01-01

    The history of eponyms for epilepsy in the lands of the Eastern globe present the portrait of the attitudes of both the laymen and skilled people towards the disease and patient, as well as to the Nature itself. As opposed to the West which during the Middle ages changed its concepts of epilepsy as the organic brain disease for the sublime 'alchemic' position, the people of the East were more prone to consider from the beginning of their civilization till the XIX century that epilepsy is the consequence of the evanescent spiritual and extracorporal forces which by themselves were out of their reach. As compared to the western civilization, the historical resources are, often as a consequence of a linguistic barriers, more scarce-as consequently is the number of eponyms, but are nevertheless picturesque. The medical science from Babylonian period presumed that epileptic manifestations are the consequence of the demonic or ill spiritual actions. There existed an attitude that at the beginning of an epileptic attack the patient was possessed by a demon (the Akkadic, i.e., Babylonian verb "sibtu" denoting epilepsy, had the meaning "to seize" or "to be obsessed"); at the end of the clonic phase the demon departed from the body. Different demons were responsible for different forms of epilepsy such as nocturnal and children epilepsy, absence epilepsy and pure convulsions, simple and complex automatisms, and gelastic epilepsy. Thus, the doctors from the period of Babylon aside from making primordial classification of epilepsies, knew about their clinical picture (prodromal symptoms and aura, Jackson's epilepsy. Todd's paralysis), postictal phenomena and intericatl emotional instability; provocative factors were also known (sleep deprivation, emotions, as well as alcohol, albeit in a negative sense-as a cure for epilepsy). There is no doubt than in the period of Babylon the clinical picture of serial fits and its progress to status epilepticus were clearly recognized and

  18. Video electroencephalogram telemetry in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Jayanti

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most commonly encountered medically refractory epilepsy. It is also the substrate of refractory epilepsy that gives the most gratifying results in any epilepsy surgery program, with a minimum use of resources. Correlation of clinical behavior and the ictal patterns during ictal behavior is mandatory for success at epilepsy surgery. Video electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry achieves this goal and hence plays a pivotal role in pre-surgical assessment. The role of telemetry is continuously evolving with the advent of digital EEG technology, of high-resolution volumetric magnetic resonance imaging and other functional imaging techniques. Most of surgical selection in patients with TLE can be done with a scalp video EEG monitoring. However, the limitations of the scalp EEG technique demand invasive recordings in a selected group of TLE patients. This subset of the patients can be a challenge to the epileptologist. PMID:24791089

  19. Social competence of preschool children with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rantanen, K; Timonen, S; Hagström, K; Hämäläinen, P; Eriksson, K; Nieminen, P

    2009-02-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the social competence of 3- to 6-year-old children with epilepsy (n=26) compared with that of age- and gender-matched healthy controls (n=26). Social competence was assessed with the Vineland Social Maturity Scale, Conners' Parent Rating Scales-Revised, and the Child Behavior Checklist. The results indicate that the children with epilepsy, especially with complicated epilepsy, had fewer age-appropriate social skills and more attention and behavior problems than the healthy children, as reported by parents. It is possible that the lack of age-appropriate social skills and the presence of attention problems predispose to behavioral problems. Also, epilepsy-related factors impaired the achievement of social competence. This study shows that the preschool children with complicated, early-onset epilepsy are at increased risk of difficulties in social competence.

  20. Acupuncture for Refractory Epilepsy: Role of Thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuping; Wang, Shubin; Rong, Peijing; Liu, Junling; Zhang, Hongqi; Zhang, Jianliang

    2014-01-01

    Neurostimulation procedures like vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) and deep brain stimulation have been used to treat refractory epilepsy and other neurological disorders. While holding promise, they are invasive interventions with serious complications and adverse effects. Moreover, their efficacies are modest with less seizure free. Acupuncture is a simple, safe, and effective traditional healing modality for a wide range of diseases including pain and epilepsy. Thalamus takes critical role in sensory transmission and is highly involved in epilepsy genesis particularly the absence epilepsy. Considering thalamus serves as a convergent structure for both acupuncture and VNS and the thalamic neuronal activities can be modulated by acupuncture, we propose that acupuncture could be a promising therapy or at least a screening tool to select suitable candidates for those invasive modalities in the management of refractory epilepsy. PMID:25548594

  1. Epilepsy during pregnancy: focus on management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Borgelt, Laura M; Hart, Felecia M; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn L

    2016-01-01

    In the US, more than one million women with epilepsy are of childbearing age and have over 20,000 babies each year. Patients with epilepsy who become pregnant are at risk of complications, including changes in seizure frequency, maternal morbidity and mortality, and congenital anomalies due to antiepileptic drug exposure. Appropriate management of epilepsy during pregnancy may involve frequent monitoring of antiepileptic drug serum concentrations, potential preconception switching of antiepileptic medications, making dose adjustments, minimizing peak drug concentration with more frequent dosing, and avoiding potentially teratogenic medications. Ideally, preconception planning will be done to minimize risks to both the mother and fetus during pregnancy. It is important to recognize benefits and risks of current and emerging therapies, especially with revised pregnancy labeling in prescription drug product information. This review will outline risks for epilepsy during pregnancy, review various recommendations from leading organizations, and provide an evidence-based approach for managing patients with epilepsy before, during, and after pregnancy. PMID:27703396

  2. [Biology of aggression in dogs].

    PubMed

    Feddersen-Petersen, D U

    2001-03-01

    The science of ethology is concerned with the way external stimuli and internal events cause animals to fight in a particular way. The classification of dog breeds with respect to their relative danger to humans makes no sense, as both, the complex antecedent conditions in which aggressive behaviour occurs, and its ramifying consequences in the individual dog's ecological and social environment, are not considered. From a biological point of view, environmental and learning effects are always superimposed upon genetic influences. Based on the recent developments in the study of ethology, aggression of wolves (Canis lupus L.) and domesticated dogs (Canis lupus f. familiaris) was put into context with respect to other aspects of the lifestyle of wild and domestic canids. Aggressive behaviour does not occur in a biological vacuum. This is also true for domestic dogs and their relationship to human partners. Individual dogs can become highly aggressive and dangerous. Their development and social situation will be presented and discussed in case studies. Finally, there is the question about defining "normal aggression" versus symptoms for maladaptive aggression resp. danger to humans as conspecifics. It is possible to protect the safety of the public and at the the same time practise animal care. Effective animal control legislation must focus on responsible ownership and socialisation of pups f.e. Problems are not unique to some breeds.

  3. Music, Substance Use, and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng-Jinn; Miller, Brenda A.; Grube, Joel W.; Waiters, Elizabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigated whether young people’s substance use and aggressive behaviors are related to their listening to music containing messages of substance use and violence. Method Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires and from a sample of community college students aged 15-25 (N = 1056; 43% male). A structural equation modeling method was used to simultaneously assess the associations between listening to various genres of music, alcohol use, illicit drug use, and aggressive behaviors, taking into account respondents’ age, gender, race/ethnicity, and level of sensation seeking. Results Listening to rap music was significantly and positively associated with alcohol use, problematic alcohol use, illicit drug use, and aggressive behaviors when all other variables were controlled. Additionally, alcohol and illicit drug use were positively associated with listening to musical genres of techno and reggae. Control variables such as sensation seeking, age, gender and race/ethnicity were significantly related to substance use and aggressive behaviors. Conclusion The findings suggest that young people’s substance use and aggressive behaviors may be related to their frequent exposure to music containing references to substance use and violence. Conversely, music listening preference may reflect some personal predispositions or lifestyle preferences. Alternatively, substance use, aggression and music preference are independent constructs, but share common “third factors.” PMID:16608146

  4. Driver irritation and aggressive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Gunilla M

    2008-05-01

    A sample of 98 drivers responded to a Swedish version of the UK Driving Anger Scale [UK DAS; [Lajunen, T., Parker, D., Stradling, S.G., 1998. Dimensions of driver anger, aggressive and highway code violations and their mediation by safety orientation in UK drivers. Transport. Res. Part F 1, 107-121]. The results indicated that the Swedish version, like the British original, measures three sources of driver irritation: "progress impeded", "reckless driving", and "direct hostility". Structural equation modelling was used to investigate the relationships between the three sources of self-reported driver irritation, aggressive actions, speed, sex, age, and annual mileage. The models suggested a positive relationship between the amount of driver irritation and frequency of aggressive actions for all three sources of irritation. Female drivers tended to become more irritated than male drivers, while the male drivers tended to act aggressively more often. Surprisingly, drivers who reported that they enjoy fast speeds did not become more irritated than slower drivers when obstructed. The important conclusions are that experienced irritation often leads to openly aggressively actions, and that expression of aggressive behaviours may be a cause of other drivers' feeling of irritation.

  5. When Should Genetic Testing Be Performed in Epilepsy Patients?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This review is a summary of a talk presented at the 2015 American Epilepsy Society Annual Meeting. Its purposes are 1) to review developments in epilepsy genetics, 2) to discuss which groups of patients with epilepsy might benefit from genetic testing, and 3) to present a rational approach to genetic testing in epilepsy in the rapidly evolving era of genomic medicine. PMID:28331464

  6. Benign myoclonic epilepsy: long-term follow-up of 11 new cases.

    PubMed

    Rossi, P G; Parmeggiani, A; Posar, A; Santi, A; Santucci, M

    1997-11-01

    The authors report a long-term follow-up of 11 new subjects with benign myoclonic epilepsy. There were some unusual clinical features such as the need for dual therapy in 45.5% of subjects, and the presence of non-epileptic myoclonus in 54.5%, neither of which influenced the prognosis. Neuropsychological and behavioral evolution was less favorable in 45.5% of patients (mental retardation, school learning problems, attention deficit disorder, hyperkinesia, aggressiveness, irritability, negativism). The less favorable neuropsychological outcome might be related to additional interacting factors such as personal antecedents, seizure onset and antiepileptic treatment.

  7. Normative beliefs about aggression and cyber aggression among young adults: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michelle F; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined normative beliefs about aggression (e.g., face-to-face, cyber) in relation to the engagement in cyber aggression 6 months later among 126 (69 women) young adults. Participants completed electronically administered measures assessing their normative beliefs, face-to-face and cyber aggression at Time 1, and cyber aggression 6 months later (Time 2). We found that men reported more cyber relational and verbal aggression when compared to women. After controlling for each other, Time 1 face-to-face relational aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression, whereas Time 1 face-to-face verbal aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber verbal aggression. Normative beliefs regarding cyber aggression was positively related to both forms of cyber aggression 6 months later, after controlling for normative beliefs about face-to-face aggression. Furthermore, a significant two-way interaction between Time 1 cyber relational aggression and normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression was found. Follow-up analysis showed that Time 1 cyber relational aggression was more strongly related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression when young adults held higher normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression. A similar two-way interaction was found for cyber verbal aggression such that the association between Time 1 and Time 2 cyber verbal aggression was stronger at higher levels of normative beliefs about cyber verbal aggression. Results are discussed in terms of the social cognitive and behavioral mechanisms associated with the engagement of cyber aggression.

  8. Intellectual Disability and Epilepsy in Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    BARCA, Diana; TARTA-ARSENE, Oana; DICA, Alice; ILIESCU, Catrinel; BUDISTEANU, Magdalena; MOTOESCU, Cristina; BUTOIANU, Niculina; CRAIU, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of mental retardation, with a reported frequency of epilepsy between 1.4-17% (1). There is a paucity of data in the literature regarding epilepsy in Down syndrome and its relation to intellectual disability. Objectives: The purpose of this article is to analyze the association of epilepsy in children with DS - frequency and type of seizures, treatment, outcome and to compare cognitive impairment of children with DS and epilepsy and DS without epilepsy from our cohort. Methods: A four years systematic retrospective analysis of the database of the Pediatric Neurology Clinic (January 2010 - December 2013) identified a cohort of 39 pediatric cases with DS and neurological symptoms, 9 of them (23%) associating epileptic seizures. Following data were analysed: clinical and neurological examination, type/s of seizures, electroencephalography (EEG), cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), psychological examination, psychiatric evaluation in selected cases, electrocardiography (ECG), cardiac ultrasonography, ophthalmologic examination. Results: 23% (9 patients) of the children with DS of our cohort presented epilepsy. Five patients had epileptic spasms (56%), one of these further developed astatic seizures. Focal seizures were observed in three patients (33%) and absence with eyelid myoclonias in one patient (11%). Two of the nine patients with DS and epilepsy had generalized seizures, both with very good response to levetiracetam (LEV). EEG was abnormal at seizure onset, and was improved after treatment. Of the nine children with DS and epilepsy, two (22%) presented mild mental retardation and seven (78%) had moderate to severe cognitive delay. Of the 30 children with DS and without epilepsy, 21 (70%) had mild mental retardation and 9 (30%) had moderate to severe cognitive impairment. Conclusions: The most frequent epileptic syndrome associated with DS is West syndrome, with good response to specific antiepileptics

  9. Do Teachers Misbehave? Aggression in School Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben Sasson, Dvora; Somech, Anit

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Despite growing research on school aggression, significant gaps remain in the authors' knowledge of team aggression, since most studies have mainly explored aggression on the part of students. The purpose of this paper is to focus on understanding the phenomenon of workplace aggression in school teams. Specifically, the purpose of the…

  10. Medicosocial aspect of people with epilepsy in Japan--a survey from standpoint of epilepsy center.

    PubMed

    Higashi, T; Ishihara, O; Wada, T

    1979-01-01

    Medicosocial aspects of 2,000 patients with epilepsy were outlined on the basis of international classification of epilepsies and epileptic seizures. 1. The incidence of secondary generalized epilepsy was higher compared with that reported previously. It was possible that we have been dealing with rather intractable epilepsy. Non-convulsive epileptic seizures should be treated as intensively as convulsive attacks. 2. Contrary to primary generalized epilepsy, secondary generalized epilepsy and partial epilepsy, a part of which was complex partial seizures, were more prone to be associated with psychological difficulties. 3. The rate of normal mentality was apparently proportional to the actual ease of employment among adult patients. Fortunately, the general attitude of education toward younger people with epilepsy was seemingly generous. However, the marital status of both sexes was far from satisfactory. The stigma might have been felt more by adult patients than younger ones. 4. It appeared to be conceivable that two-thirds of the people with epilepsy are treatable to a certain extent by adequate regimens while one-tenth are obliged to stay in residential centers for a lengthy period of time. Thus, various rehabilitation activities are indicated for one-fourth of the patient population. Actual strategy for rehabilitation of epileptics should be individually designed in accordance with the natural history of each epilepsy.

  11. Familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: a benign epilepsy syndrome showing complex inheritance.

    PubMed

    Crompton, Douglas E; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Taylor, Isabella; Cook, Mark J; McKelvie, Penelope A; Vears, Danya F; Lawrence, Kate M; McMahon, Jacinta M; Grinton, Bronwyn E; McIntosh, Anne M; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2010-11-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is the commonest partial epilepsy of adulthood. Although generally perceived as an acquired disorder, several forms of familial temporal lobe epilepsy, with mesial or lateral seizure semiology, have been described. Descriptions of familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy have varied widely from a benign epilepsy syndrome with prominent déjà vu and without antecedent febrile seizures or magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities, to heterogeneous, but generally more refractory epilepsies, often with a history of febrile seizures and with frequent hippocampal atrophy and high T₂ signal on magnetic resonance imaging. Compelling evidence of a genetic aetiology (rather than chance aggregation) in familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy has come from twin studies. Dominant inheritance has been reported in two large families, though the usual mode of inheritance is not known. Here, we describe clinical and neurophysiological features of 20 new mesial temporal lobe epilepsy families including 51 affected individuals. The epilepsies in these families were generally benign, and febrile seizure history was infrequent (9.8%). No evidence of hippocampal sclerosis or dysplasia was present on brain imaging. A single individual underwent anterior temporal lobectomy, with subsequent seizure freedom and histopathological evidence of hippocampal sclerosis was not found. Inheritance patterns in probands' relatives were analysed in these families, together with 19 other temporal lobe epilepsy families previously reported by us. Observed frequencies of epilepsies in relatives were lower than predicted by dominant Mendelian models, while only a minority (8/39) of families could be compatible with recessive inheritance. These findings strongly suggest that complex inheritance, similar to that widely accepted in the idiopathic generalized epilepsies, is the usual mode of inheritance in familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. This disorder, which appears to be

  12. Spotlight on levetiracetam in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A

    2011-10-01

    Levetiracetam (Keppra®, E Keppra®) is an established second-generation antiepileptic drug (AED). Worldwide, levetiracetam is most commonly approved as adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalization; other approved indications include monotherapy treatment of partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalization, and adjunctive treatment of myoclonic seizures associated with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and primary generalized tonic-clonic (GTC) seizures associated with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Levetiracetam has a novel structure and unique mechanisms of action. Unlike other AEDs, the mechanisms of action of levetiracetam appear to involve neuronal binding to synaptic vesicle protein 2A, inhibiting calcium release from intraneuronal stores, opposing the activity of negative modulators of GABA- and glycin-gated currents and inhibiting excessive synchronized activity between neurons. In addition, levetiracetam inhibits N-type calcium channels. Levetiracetam is associated with rapid and complete absorption, high oral bioavailability, minimal metabolism that consists of hydrolysis of the acetamide group and primarily renal elimination. It lacks cytochrome P450 isoenzyme-inducing potential and is not associated with clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs, including other AEDs. The efficacy of oral immediate-release levetiracetam in controlling seizures has been established in numerous randomized, double-blind, controlled, multicentre trials in patients with epilepsy. Adjunctive levetiracetam reduced the frequency of seizures in paediatric and adult patients with refractory partial-onset seizures to a significantly greater extent than placebo. Monotherapy with levetiracetam was noninferior to that with carbamazepine controlled release in controlling seizures in patients with newly diagnosed partial-onset seizures. Levetiracetam also provided seizure control relative to placebo as

  13. Cardiovascular manifestations of autonomic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Roy

    2006-02-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic manifestations of seizures occur frequently in the epileptic population. Common manifestations include alterations in heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure, ECG changes and chest pain. The neuroanatomical and neurophysiological underpinnings of these autonomic manifestations are not been fully elucidated. Diagnostic confusion may arise when ictal symptoms are confined to the autonomic nervous system; conversely, such symptoms in association with convulsions or altered consciousness are more readily recognized as concomitant ictal features. Awareness of the diverse autonomic manifestations of epilepsy will enhance diagnosis and lead to more effective therapy of these patients.

  14. Anxiety and Death Anxiety in Egyptian and Spanish Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M.; Tomas-Sabado, Joaquin

    2005-01-01

    Two samples of female nursing undergraduates from Egypt (n=132) and Spain (n=126) responded to the Arabic Scale of Death Anxiety, the Spanish Death Anxiety Inventory, the Templer's Death Anxiety Scale, the Kuwait University Anxiety Scale, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait Subscale. Each sample answered the scales in their native…

  15. Antiepileptic drugs in non-epilepsy disorders: relations between mechanisms of action and clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Johannessen Landmark, Cecilie

    2008-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used extensively to treat multiple non-epilepsy disorders, both in neurology and psychiatry. This article provides a review of the clinical efficacy of AEDs in non-epilepsy disorders based on recently published preclinical and clinical studies, and attempts to relate this efficacy to the mechanism of action of AEDs and pathophysiological processes associated with the disorders. Some newer indications for AEDs have been established, while others are under investigation. The disorders where AEDs have been demonstrated to be of clinical importance include neurological disorders, such as essential tremor, neuropathic pain and migraine, and psychiatric disorders, including anxiety, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Many of the AEDs have various targets of action in the synapse and have several proposed relevant mechanisms of action in epilepsy and in other disorders. Pathophysiological processes disturb neuronal excitability by modulating ion channels, receptors and intracellular signalling pathways, and these are targets for the pharmacological action of various AEDs. Attention is focused on the glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses. In psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, AEDs such as valproate, carbamazepine and lamotrigine appear to have clear roles based on their effect on intracellular pathways. On the other hand, some AEDs, e.g. topiramate, have efficacy for nonpsychiatric disorders including migraine, possibly by enhancing GABAergic and reducing glutamatergic neurotransmission. AEDs that seem to enhance GABAergic neurotransmission, e.g. tiagabine, valproate, gabapentin and possibly levetiracetam, may have a role in treating neurological disorders such as essential tremor, or anxiety disorders. AEDs with effects on voltage-gated sodium or calcium channels may be advantageous in treating neuropathic pain, e.g. gabapentin, pregabalin, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine and valproate. Co

  16. Temporal plus epilepsy: Anatomo-electroclinical subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Machado, René; Benjumea-Cuartas, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a remediable epileptic syndrome. About 40% of patients continue to have seizures after standard temporal lobectomy. It has been suggested that some of these patients could actually suffer from a more complex epileptogenic network. Because a few papers have been dedicated to this topic, we decided to write an article updating this theme. Methods: We performed a literature search using the following terminology: “temporal plus epilepsy and networks,” “temporal plus epilepsy,” “orbito-temporal epilepsy,” “temporo-insular epilepsy,” “temporo-parieto-occipital (TPO) epilepsy,” “parieto-temporal epilepsy,” “intracortical evoked potential and temporal plus epilepsy,” “temporal lobe connectivity and epilepsy,” “intracortical evoked potential and epilepsy surgery,” “role of extratemporal structures in TLE,” “surgical failure after temporal lobectomy,” “Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and temporal epilepsy,” and “positron emission tomography (PET) in temporal plus lobe epilepsy” in the existing PubMed databases. We searched only English and Spanish literature. Only papers that fit with the above-mentioned descriptors were included as part of the evidence. Other articles were used to reference some aspects of the temporal plus epilepsy. Results: A total of 48 papers from 2334 were revised. The most frequently reported auras in these groups of patients are gustatory hallucinations, vestibular illusions, laryngeal and throat constriction, atypical distribution of somatosensory symptoms (perioral and hands, bilaterally hands paresthesias, trunk and other). The most common signs are tonic posturing, hemifacial twist, and frequent bilateral clonic movements. Interictal electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns exhibit regional and frequently bilateral spikes and/or slow waves. The first ictal electrographic change is mostly regional. It is important to note that the evidence is

  17. Musical and poetic creativity and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hesdorffer, Dale C; Trimble, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Associations between epilepsy and musical or poetic composition have received little attention. We reviewed the literature on links between poetic and musical skills and epilepsy, limiting this to the Western canon. While several composers were said to have had epilepsy, John Hughes concluded that none of the major classical composers thought to have had epilepsy actually had it. The only composer with epilepsy that we could find was the contemporary composer, Hikari Oe, who has autism and developed epilepsy at age 15years. In his childhood years, his mother found that he had an ability to identify bird sound and keys of songs and began teaching him piano. Hikari is able to compose in his head when his seizures are not severe, but when his seizures worsen, his creativity is lost. Music critics have commented on the simplicity of his musical composition and its monotonous sound. Our failure to find evidence of musical composers with epilepsy finds parallels with poetry where there are virtually no established poets with epilepsy. Those with seizures include Lord George Byron in the setting of terminal illness, Algernon Swinburne who had alcohol-related seizures, Charles Lloyd who had seizures and psychosis, Edward Lear who had childhood onset seizures, and Vachel Lindsay. The possibility that Emily Dickinson had epilepsy is also discussed. It has not been possible to identify great talents with epilepsy who excel in poetic or musical composition. There are few published poets with epilepsy and no great composers. Why is this? Similarities between music and poetry include meter, tone, stress, rhythm, and form, and much poetry is sung with music. It is likely that great musical and poetic compositions demand a greater degree of concentration and memory than is possible in epilepsy, resulting in problems retaining a musical and mathematical structure over time. The lack of association between recognizable neuropsychiatric disorders and these skills is a gateway to

  18. Cannabidiol: pharmacology and potential therapeutic role in epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Devinsky, Orrin; Cilio, Maria Roberta; Cross, Helen; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier; French, Jacqueline; Hill, Charlotte; Katz, Russell; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Notcutt, William George; Martinez-Orgado, Jose; Robson, Philip J; Rohrback, Brian G; Thiele, Elizabeth; Whalley, Benjamin; Friedman, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    To present a summary of current scientific evidence about the cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD) with regard to its relevance to epilepsy and other selected neuropsychiatric disorders. We summarize the presentations from a conference in which invited participants reviewed relevant aspects of the physiology, mechanisms of action, pharmacology, and data from studies with animal models and human subjects. Cannabis has been used to treat disease since ancient times. Δ(9) -Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9) -THC) is the major psychoactive ingredient and CBD is the major nonpsychoactive ingredient in cannabis. Cannabis and Δ(9) -THC are anticonvulsant in most animal models but can be proconvulsant in some healthy animals. The psychotropic effects of Δ(9) -THC limit tolerability. CBD is anticonvulsant in many acute animal models, but there are limited data in chronic models. The antiepileptic mechanisms of CBD are not known, but may include effects on the equilibrative nucleoside transporter; the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor GPR55; the transient receptor potential of vanilloid type-1 channel; the 5-HT1a receptor; and the α3 and α1 glycine receptors. CBD has neuroprotective and antiinflammatory effects, and it appears to be well tolerated in humans, but small and methodologically limited studies of CBD in human epilepsy have been inconclusive. More recent anecdotal reports of high-ratio CBD:Δ(9) -THC medical marijuana have claimed efficacy, but studies were not controlled. CBD bears investigation in epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric disorders, including anxiety, schizophrenia, addiction, and neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. However, we lack data from well-powered double-blind randomized, controlled studies on the efficacy of pure CBD for any disorder. Initial dose-tolerability and double-blind randomized, controlled studies focusing on target intractable epilepsy populations such as patients with Dravet and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes are being planned. Trials in

  19. Self-Esteem, Social Phobia and Depression Status in Patients with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    KUTLU, Ayşe; GÖKÇE, Gökçen; BÜYÜKBURGAZ, Ülkü; SELEKLER, Macit; KOMŞUOğLU, Sezer

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The increased risk for psychiatric disorders in epilepsy can be related to a number of clinical, psychosocial and biological factors. Due to the unpredictability of seizures and the possibility that they may occur at any time and in any place, patients with epilepsy may develop social phobia and may have feelings of worthlessness and stigma. These factors decrease their psychosocial function, self-efficacy, and quality of life and even increase the suicide rate. Considering the above-mentioned scientific data, the present study was designed to investigate phobia, self-esteem and depression status in patients with epilepsy. Methods One hundred thirty-two patients (aged 21–52 years) and age- and gender-matched control group of 61 subjects (aged 25–60 years) were included in this study. All patients in both groups were administered the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (CSEI), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results The mean ages of the patient group and the healthy controls were 29.66±11.3 and 32.16±7.99, respectively. There was no statistical significance between the two groups in terms of age and sex (p>0.05). BDI, LSAS and CSEI scores in the patient group were statistically significantly different than in the control group (p<0.05). Discussion Our results showed that social phobia, lower self-esteem and depression are important comorbid conditions in epileptic patients. Psychiatric disorders are usually underrecognized and undertreated in patients with epilepsy. Therefore, it is very important to identify and treat the psychiatric comorbid conditions in epilepsy because of their significant burden on patients’ quality of life.

  20. Kindergarten Children's Genetic Vulnerabilities Interact with Friends' Aggression to Promote Children's Own Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Lier, Pol; Boivin, Michel; Dionne, Ginette; Vitaro, Frank; Brendgen, Mara; Koot, Hans; Tremblay, Richard E.; Perusse, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether kindergarten children's genetic liability to physically aggress moderates the contribution of friends' aggression to their aggressive behaviors. Method: Teacher and peer reports of aggression were available for 359 6-year-old twin pairs (145 MZ, 212 DZ) as well as teacher and peer reports of aggression of the two best…

  1. Epilepsy priorities in Europe: A report of the ILAE-IBE Epilepsy Advocacy Europe Task Force.

    PubMed

    Baulac, Michel; de Boer, Hanneke; Elger, Christian; Glynn, Mike; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Little, Ann; Mifsud, Janet; Perucca, Emilio; Pitkänen, Asla; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The European Forum on Epilepsy Research (ERF2013), which took place in Dublin, Ireland, on May 26-29, 2013, was designed to appraise epilepsy research priorities in Europe through consultation with clinical and basic scientists as well as representatives of lay organizations and health care providers. The ultimate goal was to provide a platform to improve the lives of persons with epilepsy by influencing the political agenda of the EU. The Forum highlighted the epidemiologic, medical, and social importance of epilepsy in Europe, and addressed three separate but closely related concepts. First, possibilities were explored as to how the stigma and social burden associated with epilepsy could be reduced through targeted initiatives at EU national and regional levels. Second, ways to ensure optimal standards of care throughout Europe were specifically discussed. Finally, a need for further funding in epilepsy research within the European Horizon 2020 funding programme was communicated to politicians and policymakers participating to the forum. Research topics discussed specifically included (1) epilepsy in the developing brain; (2) novel targets for innovative diagnostics and treatment of epilepsy; (3) what is required for prevention and cure of epilepsy; and (4) epilepsy and comorbidities, with a special focus on aging and mental health. This report provides a summary of recommendations that emerged at ERF2013 about how to (1) strengthen epilepsy research, (2) reduce the treatment gap, and (3) reduce the burden and stigma associated with epilepsy. Half of the 6 million European citizens with epilepsy feel stigmatized and experience social exclusion, stressing the need for funding trans-European awareness campaigns and monitoring their impact on stigma, in line with the global commitment of the European Commission and with the recommendations made in the 2011 Written Declaration on Epilepsy. Epilepsy care has high rates of misdiagnosis and considerable variability in

  2. Westside Test Anxiety Scale Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Westside Test Anxiety Scale is a brief, ten item instrument designed to identify students with anxiety impairments who could benefit from an anxiety-reduction intervention. The scale items cover self-assessed anxiety impairment and cognitions which can impair performance. Correlations between anxiety-reduction as measured by the scale and…

  3. Study on expression of laminin in patients with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuan; Feng, Yun; Pang, Jia-Rong; Tang, Mei; Liu, Xiu-Ying; Li, Jia-Quan; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examined differences in serum laminin expression in patients with intractable epilepsy. Our results suggest that elevated laminin may contribute to the pathogenesis of intractable epilepsy. ELISA and western blots were used to measure laminin in the serum of 30 intractable epilepsy patients, 46 nonintractable epilepsy patients, and 20 normal subjects. By ELISA, serum laminin levels were greater in intractable epilepsy patients (177.396 +/- 30.602) and nonintractable epilepsy patients (121.915 +/- 35.215) than in normal control subjects (67.474 +/- 7.197); laminin was significantly greater in the intractable epilepsy group than in the nonintractable epilepsy group. In western blots, the optical density ratio of laminin to ss-actin was 0.871 +/- 0.032 for the intractable epilepsy group, 0.686 +/- 0.017 for the nonintractable epilepsy group, and 0.385 +/- 0.024 for the normal control group. The optical density ratios of the intractable and nonintractable epilepsy groups were higher than those for the normal control group, and the intractable epilepsy group was even greater than the nonintractable epilepsy group. Thus, laminin is significantly increased in epilepsy patients, and this increase is more profound in intractable epilepsy patients.

  4. Oxidative stress and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Rammal, Hassan; Soulimani, Rachid

    2009-01-01

    High O2 consumption, modest antioxidant defenses and a lipid-rich constitution make the brain highly vulnerable to redox imbalances. Oxidative damage in the brain causes nervous system impairment. Recently, oxidative stress has also been implicated in depression, anxiety disorders and high anxiety levels. The findings which establish a link between oxidative stress and pathological anxiety have inspired a number of other recent studies focusing on the link between oxidative status and normal anxiety and also on a possible causal relationship between cellular oxidative stress and emotional stress. This review examines the recent discoveries made on the link between oxidative status and normal anxiety levels and the putative role of oxidative stress in genesis of anxiety. We discuss the different opinions and questions that exist in the field and review the methodological approaches that are being used to determine a causal relationship between oxidative and emotional stress. PMID:20357926

  5. In vivo experimental models of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Carmen; Rubio-Osornio, Moises; Retana-Márquez, Socorro; Verónica Custodio, Marisol López; Paz, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    This study reviews the different in vivo experimental models that have been used for the study of epileptogenesis. In this review we will focus on how to replicate the different models that have led to the study of partial seizures, as well as generalized seizures and the status epilepticus. The main characteristics that participate in the processes that generate and modulate the manifestations of different models of epileptogenesis are described. The development of several models of experimental epilepsy in animals has clearly helped the study of specific brain areas capable of causing convulsions. The experimental models of epilepsy also have helped in the study the mechanisms and actions of epilepsy drugs. In order to develop experimental animal models of epilepsy, animals are generally chosen according to the kind of epilepsy that can be developed and studied. It is currently known that animal species can have epileptic seizures similar to those in humans. However, it is important to keep in mind that it has not been possible to entirely evaluate all manifestations of human epilepsy. Notwithstanding, these experimental models of epilepsy have allowed a partial understanding of most of the underlying mechanisms of this disease.

  6. Levetiracetam in the treatment of childhood epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wheless, James W

    2007-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common pediatric neurologic disorder that is difficult to manage in a substantial portion of children. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a novel antiepileptic drug (AED) that has recently been approved as add-on treatment for various seizure types in epilepsy populations that include children: for refractory partial seizures in epilepsy patients ≥4 years old, for myoclonic seizures in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy patients ≥12 years old, and for primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy patients (≥6 years old with FDA approval; ≥12 years old with EMEA approval). A review of published pediatric studies indicates that the efficacy of LEV is best established for partial seizures; however, results from recent double-blind and open-label trials indicate that adjunctive LEV also controls generalized seizures – particularly myoclonic and generalized tonic-clonic – in children and adolescents with primary generalized epilepsy. LEV was well-tolerated in pediatric studies. The most common adverse events (AEs) reported were sedation related. Behavioral AEs were among the most commonly reported events in some trials; conversely, improvements in behavior and cognition were also frequently reported. LEV appears to be a safe and effective AED with unique characteristics that benefit the treatment of children with epilepsy. PMID:19300570

  7. Development of the Observation Scale for Aggressive Behavior (OSAB) for Dutch forensic psychiatric inpatients with an antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Hornsveld, Ruud H J; Nijman, Henk L I; Hollin, Clive R; Kraaimaat, Floor W

    2007-01-01

    The Observation Scale for Aggressive Behavior (OSAB) has been developed to evaluate inpatient treatment programs designed to reduce aggressive behavior in Dutch forensic psychiatric patients with an antisocial personality disorder, who are "placed at the disposal of the government". The scale should have the sensitivity to measure changes in the possible determinants of aggressive behavior, such as limited control of displayed negative emotions (irritation, anger or rage) and a general deficiency of social skills. In developing the OSAB 40 items were selected from a pool of 82 and distributed among the following a priori scales: Irritation/anger, Anxiety/gloominess, Aggressive behavior, Antecedent (to aggressive behavior), Sanction (for aggressive behavior) and Social behavior. The internal consistency of these subscales was good, the inter-rater reliability was moderate to good, and the test-retest reliability over a two to three week period was moderate to good. The correlation between the subscales Irritation/anger, Anxiety/gloominess, Aggressive behavior, Antecedent, Sanction was substantial and significant, but the anticipated negative correlation between these subscales and the Social behavior subscale could not be shown. Relationships between the corresponding subscales of the OSAB and the FIOS, used to calculate concurrent validity, yielded relatively high correlations. The validity of the various OSAB subscales could be further supported by significant correlations with the PCL-R and by significant but weak correlations with corresponding subscales of the self-report questionnaires. The Observation Scale for Aggressive Behavior (OSAB) seems to measure aggressive behavior in Dutch forensic psychiatric inpatients with an antisocial personality disorder reliably and validly. Contrary to expectations, a negative relationship was not found between aggressive and social behavior in either the OSAB or FIOS, which were used for calculating concurrent validity.

  8. Towards the development of integrated epilepsy services: an audit of documented epilepsy care.

    PubMed

    Varley, J; O'Connor, R; Delanty, N; O'Riordan, D; Kenny, A; Barry, N; Quigney, M; Normand, C; Fitzsimons, M

    2011-01-01

    Effective chronic disease management (CDM) requires the ready availability and communication of accurate, clinical disease specific information. Using epilepsy as a probe into CDM, we report on the availability and reliability of clinical information in the primary care records of people with epilepsy (PWE). The medical records of 374 PWE from 53 general practices in the Mid-West region of Ireland were examined. Confirmation of an epilepsy diagnosis by a neurologist was documented for 132 (35%) patients. 282 (75%) patients had no documented evidence of receiving specialist neurology review while 149 (40%) had not been reviewed by their GP in the previous two years for their epilepsy. Significant variation in documentation of epilepsy specific information together with an inadequacy and inconsistency of existing epilepsy services was highlighted.

  9. Neuroimaging evaluation in refractory epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Granados, Ana M; Orejuela, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the application of neuroimaging analysis, compared to neuropsychological tests and video-electroencephalogram, for the evaluation of refractory epilepsy in a reference centre in Cali, Colombia. Methods Between March 2013 and November 2014, 29 patients, 19 men and 10 women, aged 9–65 years and with refractory epilepsy, were assessed by structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing tasks related to language, verbal and non-verbal memory. Also, volumetric evaluation was performed. A 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner was used in all cases. Results Neuroimaging evaluation identified 13 patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. The remaining patients were classified as: 10 patients with neoplastic masses, two patients with cortical atrophy, two patients with scarring lesions and two patients with non-structural aetiology. Among patients with mesial temporal sclerosis, comparison between techniques for lateralising the epileptogenic foci was made; the κ index between functional magnetic resonance imaging and hippocampi volumetry was κ = 1.00, agreement between neuroimaging and video-electroencephalogram was good (κ = 0.78) and comparison with a neuropsychological test was mild (κ = 0.24). Conclusions Neuroimaging studies allow the assessment of functional and structural damage related to epileptogenic lesions and foci, and are helpful to select surgical treatment, conduct intraoperative neuronavigation techniques, predict surgical deficits and evaluate patient recovery. PMID:26427897

  10. Brain Tumor-Related Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Maschio, Marta

    2012-01-01

    In patients with brain tumor (BT), seizures are the onset symptom in 20-40% of patients, while a further 20-45% of patients will present them during the course of the disease. These patients present a complex therapeutic profile and require a unique and multidisciplinary approach. The choice of antiepileptic drugs is challenging for this particular patient population because brain tumor-related epilepsy (BTRE) is often drug-resistant, has a strong impact on the quality of life and weighs heavily on public health expenditures. In BT patients, the presence of epilepsy is considered the most important risk factor for long-term disability. For this reason, the problem of the proper administration of medications and their potential side effects is of great importance, because good seizure control can significantly improve the patient’s psychological and relational sphere. In these patients, new generation drugs such as gabapentin, lacosamide, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin, topiramate, zonisamide are preferred because they have fewer drug interactions and cause fewer side effects. Among the recently marketed drugs, lacosamide has demonstrated promising results and should be considered a possible treatment option. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a customized treatment plan for each individual patient with BTRE. This requires a vision of patient management concerned not only with medical therapies (pharmacological, surgical, radiological, etc.) but also with emotional and psychological support for the individual as well as his or her family throughout all stages of the illness. PMID:23204982

  11. Associations between trait anxiety and psychopathological characteristics of children at high risk for severe antisocial development.

    PubMed

    Polier, Georg G; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Matthias, Kristine; Konrad, Kerstin; Vloet, Timo D

    2010-12-01

    It is thought that among children at a high risk for antisocial personality disorder, the level of individual anxiety might constitute an important marker with respect to symptomatology and prognosis. The aim of the present study was to examine whether associations between anxiety and subtypes of aggression (proactive and reactive) exist in boys with early-onset subtype of conduct disorder (CD) and co-morbid attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A detailed psychometric characterization of boys with ADHD and the early-onset subtype of CD (n = 33) compared to healthy controls (n = 33) was performed. The assessment included trait anxiety, internalizing and externalizing problems, symptoms of psychopathy and temperament traits, as well as subtypes of aggressive behavior. Descriptive statistics, correlation analyses, and group comparisons were calculated. The clinical group was characterized by higher levels of externalizing and internalizing symptoms. Individual anxiety was positively associated with harm avoidance, symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and by trend with reactive aggression. In contrast, boys with reduced levels of anxiety exhibited more callous-unemotional traits. Our results indicate that children with the early-onset subtype of CD and ADHD constitute a psychopathological heterogeneous group. The associations between individual levels of trait anxiety, temperament traits, and subtypes of aggressive behavior in children with ADHD and severe antisocial behavior emphasize the impact of anxiety as a potential key factor that might also be crucial for improvement in therapeutic strategies and outcome measures. Anxiety should be considered carefully in children with ADHD and the early-onset subtype of CD in order to optimize current therapeutic interventions.

  12. [Therapeutic Aggressiveness and Liquid Oncology].

    PubMed

    Barón Duarte, F J; Rodríguez Calvo, M S; Amor Pan, J R

    2017-01-01

    Aggressiveness criteria proposed in the scientific literature a decade ago provide a quality judgment and are a reference in the care of patients with advanced cancer, but their use is not generalized in the evaluation of Oncology Services. In this paper we analyze the therapeutic aggressiveness, according to standard criteria, in 1.001 patients with advanced cancer who died in our Institution between 2010 and 2013. The results seem to show that aggressiveness at the end of life is present more frequently than experts recommend. About 25% of patients fulfill at least one criterion of aggressiveness. This result could be explained by a liquid Oncology which does not prioritize the patient as a moral subject in the clinical appointment. Medical care is oriented to necessities and must be articulated in a model focused on dignity and communication. Its implementation through Advanced Care Planning, consideration of patient's values and preferences, and Limitation of therapeutic effort are ways to reduce aggressiveness and improve clinical practice at the end of life. We need to encourage synergic and proactive attitudes, adding the best of cancer research with the best clinical care for the benefit of human being, moral subject and main goal of Medicine.

  13. Scratching around mating: factors affecting anxiety in wild Lemur catta.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Valentina; Norscia, Ivan; Antonacci, Daniela; Palagi, Elisabetta

    2012-07-01

    Scratching has been successfully used to detect anxiety, a proxy for stress, in primates, from strepsirrhines to Homo sapiens. Here, we investigated the fluctuation of scratching in Lemur catta during the mating season. In particular we evaluated whether scratching (1) varied according to sex and rank differences, (2) increased in the period of maximum stress (around the mating days), and (3) was reduced by grooming. At Berenty (South Madagascar), we followed two lemur groups (23 adult/subadult individuals) and gathered data on self-scratching, aggression, and grooming. Based on perineal area features, we recognized two periods: low swelling (LS), with no estrus female, and high swelling (HS), when at least one female was in estrus. We predicted that aggressive behaviors and anxiety-related scratching would covary. Indeed, scratching peaked in HS, when aggression was also highest. In agreement with previous literature, this result suggests that conflicts around estrus days may raise anxiety levels in the social group. We expected scratching levels to be highest in males because they aggressively compete for females and are subject to mate choice and repeated attacks by dominant females. Instead, the scratching rates were similar in males and females, probably because the high competition, which involves both sexes, dampened intersexual differences. In contrast to our prediction, scratching was not rank dependent, probably because animal ranking positions changed from LS to HS. Finally, we showed that, in ring-tailed lemurs, as well as in other primates, scratching decreases after reciprocal grooming in both periods. This finding provides the first evidence that grooming could assist in reducing anxiety in strepsirrhines.

  14. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus report on epilepsy definition, classification and terminology in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Berendt, Mette; Farquhar, Robyn G; Mandigers, Paul J J; Pakozdy, Akos; Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Fischer, Andrea; Long, Sam; Matiasek, Kaspar; Muñana, Karen; Patterson, Edward E; Penderis, Jacques; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Pumarola, Martí Batlle; Rusbridge, Clare; Stein, Veronika M; Tipold, Andrea; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    Dogs with epilepsy are among the commonest neurological patients in veterinary practice and therefore have historically attracted much attention with regard to definitions, clinical approach and management. A number of classification proposals for canine epilepsy have been published during the years reflecting always in parts the current proposals coming from the human epilepsy organisation the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). It has however not been possible to gain agreed consensus, "a common language", for the classification and terminology used between veterinary and human neurologists and neuroscientists, practitioners, neuropharmacologists and neuropathologists. This has led to an unfortunate situation where different veterinary publications and textbook chapters on epilepsy merely reflect individual author preferences with respect to terminology, which can be confusing to the readers and influence the definition and diagnosis of epilepsy in first line practice and research studies.In this document the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force (IVETF) discusses current understanding of canine epilepsy and presents our 2015 proposal for terminology and classification of epilepsy and epileptic seizures. We propose a classification system which reflects new thoughts from the human ILAE but also roots in former well accepted terminology. We think that this classification system can be used by all stakeholders.

  15. [Quality guidelines for presurgical epilepsy diagnosis and operative epilepsy therapy: 1st revised version].

    PubMed

    Rosenow, F; Bast, T; Czech, T; Hans, V; Helmstaedter, C; Huppertz, H-J; Seeck, M; Trinka, E; Wagner, K

    2014-06-01

    In patients with pharmacorefractory epilepsy, preoperative epilepsy evaluation and subsequent epilepsy surgery lead to a significant improvement of seizure control, proportion of seizure-free patients, quality of life and social participation. The aims of preoperative epilepsy evaluation are to define the chance of complete seizure freedom and the likelihood of inducing new neurological deficits in a given patient. As epilepsy surgery is an elective procedure quality standards are particularly high. As detailed in the first edition of these practice guidelines, quality control relates to seven different domains: (1) establishing centres with a sufficient number of sufficiently and specifically trained personnel, (2) minimum technical standards and equipment, (3) continuing medical education of employees, (4) surveillance by trained personnel during the video electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring (VEM), (5) systematic acquisition of clinical and outcome data, (6) the minimum number of preoperative evaluations and epilepsy surgery procedures and (7) cooperation of epilepsy centres. In the first edition of these practice guidelines published in 2000 it was defined which standards were desirable and that their implementation should be aimed for. These standards related especially to the certification required for different groups of medical doctors involved and to the minimum numbers of procedures required. In the subsequent decade quite a number of colleagues have been certified by the trinational Working Group (Arbeitsgemeinschaft, AG) for Presurgical Epilepsy Diagnosis and Operative Epilepsy Treatment (http://www.ag-epilepsiechirurgie.de) and therefore, on 8 May 2013 the executive board of the AG decided to now make these standards obligatory.

  16. Dissociative experiences in epilepsy: effects of epilepsy-related factors on pathological dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hara, Koichiro; Adachi, Naoto; Akanuma, Nozomi; Ito, Masumi; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi; Matsubara, Ryoji; Adachi, Takuya; Ishii, Ryouhei; Kanemoto, Kousuke; Matsuura, Masato; Hara, Eriko; Kato, Masaaki; Onuma, Teiichi

    2015-03-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs) in patients with epilepsy can be categorized as dissociative disorders. The prevalence of PNESs in patients with epilepsy appears to be much higher than that of dissociative experiences in nonclinical subjects. In order to clarify as to whether epilepsy-related factors were associated with pathological dissociation, we conducted a controlled study with 225 patients with epilepsy and 334 nonclinically matched individuals. All participants completed the Japanese version of the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES). There was no significant difference in the DES score (DES-S) between the group with epilepsy and the control group. The group with epilepsy showed a significantly higher DES taxon (DES-T; a subset of DES-S and an index of pathological dissociation) than the control group. Thirty-one out of the 225 patients with epilepsy (13.8%) had PNESs. Because of its strong association with the DES-S and DES-T, PNESs can be regarded as a symptom of dissociation. With multiple regression analysis, the patients with a shorter duration of epilepsy, higher seizure frequency, or shorter period in education tend to suffer from pathological dissociation. These findings demonstrate that patients with epilepsy are more prone to experiencing pathological dissociation when having certain clinical factors.

  17. Attitude toward epilepsy after media coverage of car accidents related to persons with epilepsy in Japan.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Akihisa; Nakazawa, Mika; Abe, Shinpei; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2013-04-01

    We compared the familiarity with and attitude toward epilepsy among nonmedical students before and after media coverage on car accidents related to persons with epilepsy in Japan. We have annually conducted a questionnaire survey on attitude toward epilepsy since 2008. We divided students into two groups: pre-accident era (years 2008-2010) and post-accident era (years 2011-2012). The rate of students who have read or heard about epilepsy was significantly higher in the post-accident era. Students in the post-accident era answered more frequently that they do not oppose the idea of their kids playing or attending school with children with epilepsy, they think that people with epilepsy should be hired in the same way as other people, and they do not oppose the idea of their children one day marrying a person with epilepsy. The results of our study show that media coverage of car accidents related to persons with epilepsy positively affected familiarity with and attitude toward epilepsy.

  18. Managing Epilepsy Well: Emerging e-Tools for epilepsy self-management.

    PubMed

    Shegog, Ross; Bamps, Yvan A; Patel, Archna; Kakacek, Jody; Escoffery, Cam; Johnson, Erica K; Ilozumba, Ukwuoma O

    2013-10-01

    The Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network was established in 2007 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Epilepsy Program to expand epilepsy self-management research. The network has employed collaborative research strategies to develop, test, and disseminate evidence-based, community-based, and e-Health interventions (e-Tools) for epilepsy self-management for people with epilepsy, caregivers, and health-care providers. Since its inception, MEW Network collaborators have conducted formative studies (n=7) investigating the potential of e-Health to support epilepsy self-management and intervention studies evaluating e-Tools (n=5). The MEW e-Tools (the MEW website, WebEase, UPLIFT, MINDSET, and PEARLS online training) and affiliated e-Tools (Texting 4 Control) are designed to complement self-management practices in each phase of the epilepsy care continuum. These tools exemplify a concerted research agenda, shared methodological principles and models for epilepsy self-management, and a communal knowledge base for implementing e-Health to improve quality of life for people with epilepsy.

  19. Explosive, Oppositional, and Aggressive Behavior in Children with Autism Compared to Other Clinical Disorders and Typical Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L.; Aggarwal, Richa; Baker, Courtney; Mathapati, Santoshkumar; Anderson, Robert; Petersen, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Maternal ratings of explosiveness, opposition, and aggression were analyzed in 1609 children 6-16 years of age. Behavior problems were common in autism, ADHD-Combined type, and depression, whereas children with ADHD-Inattentive type, anxiety disorder, and acquired brain injury did not differ from typical controls. More than 40% of children with…

  20. Aggression Questionnaire hostility scale predicts anger in response to mistreatment.

    PubMed

    Felsten, G; Hill, V

    1999-01-01

    We tested the hypotheses that the hostility and anger scales of the Buss and Perry (1992) [Buss, A. H. & Perry, M. (1992). The Aggression Questionnaire. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 63, 452-459.] Aggression Questionnaire would predict anger in college students in response to mistreatment. We found low and high hostility groups did not differ in anger at baseline or after completing a task without provocation, but the high hostility group reported greater anger than the low group after the onset of provocation, which required all students to redo completed tasks because some students (confederates) were observed cheating. Hostility also influenced anxiety and depression, but only anger was greater as a result of the provocation in the high than in the low hostility group. The anger scale did not predict anger in response to provocation, but anger was higher in the high than the low anger group before the provocation. These findings support the construct validity of the Aggression Questionnaire hostility scale as a measure of suspicion, resentment and sensitivity to mistreatment.

  1. 'Killing the angel in the house': creativity, femininity and aggression.

    PubMed

    Parker, R

    1998-08-01

    The author brings to bear an art historical perspective on the psychoanalytic understanding of creativity as an object relationship, proposing that the creative endeavour is determined by a wider, more complex network of internal and external object relationships than is usually assumed. The workings of tradition, language, contemporary practices, methods and materials are explored. Creative block is considered in the context of the determining relationships, with particular reference to the role of aggression. The position of the latter within psychoanalytic theories of creativity is surveyed and it is proposed that aggression has a pivotal place not primarily in instituting sublimation, reparation or reaction formation but simply because the processes of creativity demand it. Virginia Woolf's image of 'Killing the Angel in the House' is analysed and used to track the implications of gender, focusing on the concept of the muse. It is pointed out that traditionally, the fear, guilt and anxiety associated with aggressive creativity has been mediated by the muse, which is compared to the internal good object. Drawing on art history, artists' statements, and clinical material, the author illustrates the disparate means by which the presence of 'muse' can be internalised to infuse the relationships that constitute creativity.

  2. Parent-Rated Anxiety Symptoms in Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Frequency and Association with Core Autism Symptoms and Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Scahill, Lawrence; Gadow, Kenneth D.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Aman, Michael G.; McDougle, Christopher J.; McCracken, James T.; Tierney, Elaine; White, Susan Williams; Lecavalier, Luc; Vitiello, Benedetto

    2008-01-01

    Background: In addition to the core symptoms, children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD) often exhibit other problem behaviors such as aggression, hyperactivity, and anxiety, which can contribute to overall impairment and, therefore, become the focus of clinical attention. Limited data are available on the prevalence of anxiety in these…

  3. Hypocholesterolaemia in dogs with dominance aggression.

    PubMed

    Sentürk, S; Yalçin, E; Pentürk, S

    2003-09-01

    Serum lipids and lipoprotein concentrations have been associated with dominance aggression in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the link between serum lipids, including cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC) to HDL-C ratio and dominance aggression in dogs. Levels of serum TC, triglyceride and HDL-C were significantly lower in dogs with dominance aggression compared with non-aggressive dogs (P < 0.001). These results suggest that a relationship exists between serum lipid profile and dominance aggression in dogs, and hypocholesterolaemia exists in dogs with dominance aggression.

  4. Genetics and neurobiology of aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zwarts, Liesbeth; Versteven, Marijke; Callaerts, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is widely present throughout the animal kingdom and is crucial to ensure survival and reproduction. Aggressive actions serve to acquire territory, food, or mates and in defense against predators or rivals; while in some species these behaviors are involved in establishing a social hierarchy. Aggression is a complex behavior, influenced by a broad range of genetic and environmental factors. Recent studies in Drosophila provide insight into the genetic basis and control of aggression. The state of the art on aggression in Drosophila and the many opportunities provided by this model organism to unravel the genetic and neurobiological basis of aggression are reviewed. PMID:22513455

  5. [Epilepsy pharmacogenetics : science or fiction?].

    PubMed

    Depondt, Chantal

    2013-02-01

    Pharmacogenetics (PGX) is the study of how genetic variants influence individual responses to drugs. Although numerous candidate gene studies in epilepsy PGX have been published, to date only two validated associations exist: the association of the *2 and *3 alleles of CYP2C9 with phenytoin metabolism and the association of HLA-B*1502 with serious hypersensitivity reactions to carbamazepine. The advent of novel technologies such as genomewide association studies and next generation sequencing will likely lead to the identification of additional genetic biomarkers. The potential benefits of epilepsy PGX are multiple: epilepsy treatment in individual patients would become more rationalized, clinical trials could be stratified according to patients' genetic profiles and novel therapeutic pathways may be uncovered. Ultimately, it is hoped that PGX will improve the quality of life for people suffering from epilepsy worldwide.

  6. Pathogenesis of Epilepsy: Challenges in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Hui Yin, Yow; Ahmad, Nurulumi; Makmor-Bakry, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic disorders affecting individuals of all ages. A greater understanding of pathogenesis in epilepsy will likely provide the basis fundamental for development of new antiepileptic therapies that aim to prevent the epileptogenesis process or modify the progression of epilepsy in addition to treatment of epilepsy symptomatically. Therefore, several investigations have embarked on advancing knowledge of the mechanism underlying epileptogenesis, understanding in mechanism of pharmacoresistance and discovering antiepileptogenic or disease-modifying therapy. Animal models play a crucial and significant role in providing additional insight into mechanism of epileptogenesis. With the help of these models, epileptogenesis process has been demonstrated to be involved in various molecular and biological pathways or processes. Hence, this article will discuss the known and postulated mechanisms of epileptogenesis and challenges in using the animal models. PMID:24494063

  7. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - adult; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - adult; Seizure - what to ask your doctor ... or someone else, every time I have a seizure? What safety measures do I need to take ...

  8. [Epilepsy treatment in Serbian medieval monastery hospitals].

    PubMed

    Ilić-Tasić, Slobodanka; Pantović, Mihailo; Jović, Nebojsa; Ravanić, Dragan; Obradović, Dejan; Sretenović, Srdjan; Pantović, Maja; Pantović, Vesna

    2009-01-01

    Emperor John III Ducas Vatatzes (ruled from 1222-1254) and his son Theodore II Lascaris (ruled from 1254-1258) both suffered from epilepsy. On his journeys to Nicaea, St Sava visited emperors Theodore I Lascaris (ruled from 1204-1222) and John II Vatatzes, who richly rewarded him, which was probably of crucial importance for the foundation of hospitals in the Monastery of Hilandar and the Monastery of Studenica These hospitals had special departments for the treatment of patints with epilepsy. According to researches conducted up-to-date, these departments are considered to be the oldest institutions for epilepsy treatment. Monastery hospitals in the West served primarily as a shelter for the poor and patients with chronic incurable diseases. The development of Serbian monastery hospitals was a long process and it included institutions that lasted for a long time (for over two centuries) in which, among others, those affected by epilepsy were cured.

  9. Prolonged partial epilepsy: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.A.

    1980-11-01

    The case study of a patient with prolonged partial epilepsy is presented. There was a discrepancy between the extent of the abnormality seen on the radionuclide angiogram and that seen on the static brain scan.

  10. Numeracy and framing bias in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyunmi; Wong, John B; Mendiratta, Anil; Heiman, Gary A; Hamberger, Marla J

    2011-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy are frequently confronted with complex treatment decisions. Communicating treatment risks is often difficult because patients may have difficulty with basic statistical concepts (i.e., low numeracy) or might misconceive the statistical information based on the way information is presented, a phenomenon known as "framing bias." We assessed numeracy and framing bias in 95 adults with chronic epilepsy and explored cognitive correlates of framing bias. Compared with normal controls, patients with epilepsy had significantly poorer performance on the Numeracy scale (P=0.02), despite a higher level of education than normal controls (P<0.001). Compared with patients with higher numeracy, patients with lower numeracy were significantly more likely to exhibit framing bias. Abstract problem solving performance correlated with the degree of framing bias (r=0.631, P<0.0001), suggesting a relationship between aspects of executive functioning and framing bias. Poor numeracy and susceptibility framing bias place patients with epilepsy at risk for uninformed decisions.

  11. Reconceptualizing Anxiety as a Continuum That Ranges From High Calmness to High Anxiety: The Joint Importance of Reducing Distress and Increasing Well-Being.

    PubMed

    Siddaway, Andy P; Taylor, Peter J; Wood, Alex M

    2017-03-02

    We first replicate a study by Vautier and Pohl (2009), who used the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) to reexamine the structure of anxiety. Using two large samples (N = 4,138 and 1,824), we also find that state and trait anxiety measure continua that range from high calmness to high anxiety. We then significantly extend previous findings and make the clinical importance of this topic more explicit by characterizing the (linear or nonlinear) form of the relationship between the calmness-anxiety continuum and other psychiatric variables for the first time. This form is critical to understanding anxiety problems, as discontinuities in relationships with other psychological conditions could be used to define a natural boundary of problematic anxiety. Baseline levels on the calmness-anxiety continuum are found to have a near linear relationship with changes in depression, aggression, and substance misuse over time. Taken together, these results indicate the joint importance and usefulness of treating anxiety problems and promoting calmness, as doing so may promote resilience from developing other psychiatric conditions. Psychiatric and psychological interventions that are grounded in this continuum conceptualization would logically be stopped when an individual reports experiencing high levels of calmness. Our results point to the usefulness of early intervention and prevention (when people begin to move away from high calmness) and instilling resilience (by providing interventions to move people toward high calmness). (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. [A case of Legionella pneumophila pneumonia accompanied by acute respiratory distress syndrome and epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Saito, Nayuta; Shimizu, Kenichiro; Yoshii, Yutaka; Kojima, Jun; Ishikawa, Takeo; Saito, Keisuke; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2013-05-01

    A 32-year-old female with epilepsy presented at our hospital with high-grade fever, seizures, and unconsciousness. She was initially treated for aspiration pneumonia with ampicillin/sulbactam. Despite antibiotic therapy, her chest X-ray findings dramatically worsened, showing extension to the bilateral lung field. Her PaO2/FiO2 ratio decreased to 70.6. Rapid progression of hypoxia, unconsciousness, and hyponatremia led to the suspicion of Legionella pneumonia; however, it was difficult to make a definitive diagnosis because she had denied using a whirlpool spa and the initial urinary Legionella antigen test results were negative. Therefore, we repeated the Legionella urinary antigen test, which was positive. On the basis of these results, sputum polymerase chain reaction findings, and the four-fold elevation of paired antibodies, the patient was diagnosed as having Legionella pneumonia accompanied by acute respiratory distress syndrome. We considered administering fluoroquinolone antibiotics, that are recommended for severe Legionella pneumonia, although quinolones have a potential risk for causing convulsions. In this case, we carefully administered ciprofloxacin. The patient recovered consciousness after treatment without any relapse of epileptic seizures. We also administered a corticosteroid for severe pneumonia with the expectation of clinical improvement and to avoid intubation. We emphasize the importance of aggressive workup and empirical therapy for patients with Legionella pneumonia with rapidly worsening symptoms and clinical features such as unconsciousness, epilepsy, and hyponatremia and in whom fluoroquinolone and corticosteroid therapy are effective despite the presence of epilepsy.

  13. Cost of epilepsy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Strzelczyk, Adam; Reese, Jens Peter; Dodel, Richard; Hamer, Hajo M

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this review was to overview published cost-of-illness (COI) studies of epilepsy and their methodological approaches. Epilepsy imposes a substantial burden on individuals and society as a whole. The mean prevalence of epilepsy is estimated at 0.52% in Europe, 0.68% in the US, and peaks up to 1.5% in developing countries. Estimation of the economic burden of epilepsy is of pivotal relevance to enable a rational distribution of healthcare resources. This is especially so with the introduction of the newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the marketing of vagal-nerve stimulators and the resurgence of new surgical treatment options, which have the potential to considerably increase the costs of treating epilepsy.A systematic literature review was performed to identify studies that evaluated direct and indirect costs of epilepsy. Using a standardized assessment form, information on the study design, methodological framework and data sources were extracted from each publication and systematically reported. We identified 22 studies worldwide on costs of epilepsy. The majority of the studies reflected the costs of epilepsy in Europe (three studies each for the UK and Italy, one study each for Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, France and the EU) and the US (four studies), but studies were also available from India (two), Hong Kong, Oman, Burundi, Chile and Mexico. The studies utilized different frameworks to evaluate costs. All used a bottom-up approach; however, only 12 studies (55%) evaluated direct as well as indirect costs. The range for the mean annual direct costs lay between 40 International Dollar purchasing power parities (PPP-$) in rural Burundi and PPP-$4748 (adjusted to 2006 values) in a German epilepsy centre. Recent studies suggest AEDs are becoming the main contributor to direct costs. The mean indirect costs ranged between 12% and 85% of the total annual costs. Epilepsy is a cost-intensive disorder. A reliable comparison of the different COI

  14. Association Between Benzodiazepine Use and Epilepsy Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Harnod, Tomor; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We conducted a retrospective case–control study to evaluate the association between the risk of benzodiazepine (BZD) use and epilepsy occurrence by using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We recruited 1065 participants who ages 20 years or older and newly diagnosed with epilepsy (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification 345) between 2004 and 2011 and assigned them to the epilepsy group. We subsequently frequency-matched them with participants in a control group (n = 4260) according to sex, age, and index year at a 1:4 ratio. A logistic regression model was employed to calculate the odds ratio (OR) for association of epilepsy with BZD exposure. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted to estimate the dose–response relationship between BZD levels and epilepsy risk. The adjusted OR (aOR) for the association of epilepsy with BZD exposure was 2.02 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.68–2.42). The aOR for an average BZD dose increased to 1.26 for the participants on <0.01 defined daily dose (DDD), and increased to 4.32 for those on ≥1.50 DDD. On average, when the DDD of BZD exposure increased by 100 units, the epilepsy risk increase by 1.03-fold (95% CI = 1.01–1.04, P = 0.003). The annual BZD exposure day ranges were significantly associated with epilepsy (2–7 days: aOR = 1.67; 8–35 days: aOR = 3.16; and ≥35 days: aOR = 5.60). Whenever the annual BZD exposure increased by 30 days, the risk of epilepsy notably increased by 1.03-fold (95% CI = 1.01–1.04, P < 0.001). In addition, users who quit BZD for more than 6 months still exhibited a higher risk of epilepsy than did the non-BZD users. A considerable increase in epilepsy occurrence was observed in ones with BZD use, particularly in those with prolonged use, multiple exposure, and high-dose consumption. PMID:26376408

  15. Test and Performance Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Test and performance anxiety is not recognized easily in schools, in large part because adolescents rarely refer themselves for emotional concerns. Not wanting to risk teasing or public attention, anxious adolescents suffer in silence and under perform on school-related tasks. In school, anxiety is experienced often by students when being…

  16. Addressing Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salend, Spencer J.

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that between 25% to 40% of students experience test anxiety, with students with disabilities and those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds having higher prevalence rates. Since test anxiety impacts student well-being and the validity of the important educational decisions based on testing data, this article…

  17. [Anxiety in progressive disease].

    PubMed

    Hesse, Michaela; Heydweiller, Katrin; Mücke, Martin; Cuhls, Henning; Radbruch, Lukas

    2016-08-01

    Anxiety in terminally ill patients has a high impact on symptoms, trajectory and quality of life. There are different screening instruments for diagnosis. The holistic approach of palliative care considers the physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs and can improve the distress caused by anxiety. Early integration in palliative care decreases burden of symptoms and increases quality of life.

  18. Management of epilepsy during pregnancy: an update

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sima I.; Pennell, Page B.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical management of women with epilepsy on antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) during pregnancy presents unique challenges. The goal of treatment is optimal seizure control with minimal in utero fetal exposure to AEDs in an effort to reduce the risk of structural and neurodevelopmental teratogenic effects. This paper reviews the following key issues pertaining to women with epilepsy during pregnancy: AED pharmacokinetics; clinical management of AEDs; seizure frequency; major congenital malformation; neurodevelopmental outcomes; perinatal complications; and breast feeding. PMID:27006699

  19. Thalidomide for treatment of refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Palencia, Guadalupe; Martinez-Juarez, Iris E; Calderon, Alejandra; Artigas, Carol; Sotelo, Julio

    2010-12-01

    We have experimentally shown that thalidomide has strong anticonvulsant properties. In an open label study, eight male patients with refractory epilepsy received thalidomide at daily-doses of 200 mg during 1 year, frequency of seizures before and during treatment were compared. The mean number of seizures before thalidomide administration was 26 ± 4 per month; it decreased to 7 ± 1 along thalidomide therapy. Our results indicate that thalidomide has strong therapeutic effects in refractory epilepsy.

  20. [Social and cultural representations in epilepsy awareness].

    PubMed

    Arborio, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Representations relating to epilepsy have evolved over the centuries, but the manifestations of epilepsy awaken archaic images linked to death, violence and disgust. Indeed, the generalised epileptic seizure symbolises a rupture with the surrounding environment, "informs it", through the loss of social codes which it causes. The social and cultural context, as well as medical knowledge, influences the representations of the disease. As a result, popular knowledge is founded on the social and cultural representations of a given era, in a given society.

  1. Social cognition and epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Heidi E

    2006-02-01

    Human social behavior depends on a set of perceptive, mnemonic, and interpretive abilities that together may be termed social cognition. Lesion and functional imaging studies of social cognitive functions implicate the temporal lobes (in particular, the nondominant temporal lobe) and mesial temporal structures as critical at the front end of social cognitive processes. The frontal lobes, in turn, function to interpret and to modulate these processes via top-down control. Damage to frontal regions is associated with specific derangements in social behavior. Chronic focal-onset epilepsy and its surgical treatment commonly affect these neuroanatomic regions and might therefore impact social function. Postoperative social function helps determine quality of life for both patients and families. There is some evidence that resective seizure surgery affects social cognition, but there are significant weaknesses in our current knowledge that can be overcome with comprehensive longitudinal research.

  2. [The epilepsy of Guadalupe Victoria].

    PubMed

    Soto-Pérez-de-Celis, Enrique

    2008-01-01

    Guadalupe Victoria, the first President of Mexico, passed away in 1843 uictim of an ailment that, at the time, was diagnosed as epilepsy. The clinical data and the pathologic findings, however, suggest the possibility that Victoria had an underlying disease that was responsible for the seizures that affected him. In this article I propose that Guadalupe Victoria had in fact Chagas Disease, and that he was infected with this parasitic malady while he lived in the tropical jungles of Veracruz, in eastern Mexico. Even though there aren't many published works regarding seizures secondary to chronic Chagas Disease, there are good descriptions of epileptic syndromes in patients with this infection. At the same time, the cardiac findings in Victoria's autopsy support the idea that he had some kind of cardiac pathology; in this case Chagasic dilated cardiomyopathy, which ultimately led to his death.

  3. Advances in telecommunications concerning epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Elger, C E; Burr, W

    2000-01-01

    Telemedicine is a rapidly expanding discipline. Looking back on a long tradition of telemetric measurement and transmission of brain electrical data, one might ask how relevant telecommunication techniques have become for clinical work in epileptology. In principle, communication can be either between patient and doctor or between doctor and doctor. The former includes telephone reports on frequency and severity of seizures and on mental and physical state. Because of the special problems of patients with epilepsy, the need for traveling should be minimized. To maintain close contact, telemetric transmission of electroencephalograms (EEG), seizure video-registration, and monitoring of anti-epileptic drug (AED) blood levels from home are desirable, but the technical tools now available are not of sufficiently high performance for these applications. However, physicians and medical units can communicate using high-rate data transfer. There are major problems with this technology. Transfer rates using the internet are not fixed. Moreover, using six digital telephone lines simultaneously, good-quality transmission of a 3-min video may take more than 1 h, restricting interactivity. In contrast to imaging (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging), there is no generally accepted protocol for handling EEG/electrocorticography data. There are also legal problems relating to the responsibility for failures and safety of personal or medical data. Nevertheless, the expenses of installation and use of such equipment appear justified by the expected benefits, for the patients (avoiding travel and multiple investigations, checking diagnosis and therapy, amending quality of life), for the physician (sparing equipment and manpower, accelerating and improving diagnosis), for the epilepsy center (increased database for expert systems, improved logistic and data storage) and, finally, for insurance providers (reduced overall costs). When the neurosurgical procedure is remote from the place

  4. Knowledge about Epilepsy and Attitudes toward Students with Epilepsy among Middle and High School Teachers in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashemi, Eman; Ashkanani, Abdullatif; Al-Kabbani, Majd; Al-Juhaidli, Abdulaziz; Jaafar, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Attitudes toward students with epilepsy and epilepsy-related knowledge of teachers are crucial for child's safety in the school. The aim of this study was to evaluate teachers' knowledge and attitudes toward epilepsy. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 824 teachers from 24 randomly selected middle and high schools. Scale of Attitudes Toward Persons with Epilepsy (ATPE) was modified to assess teachers' knowledge about epilepsy and attitudes toward students with epilepsy. Results. Median knowledge score about epilepsy was 5 (out of 13), while median attitude score was 10 (out of 15). Both knowledge and attitude median scores were significantly higher in senior teachers with longer teaching experience and in respondents who dealt with a person with epilepsy. There was significant association between knowledge score and attitude score (p < 0.01). Logistic regression showed that significant variables, independently associated with poor knowledge after adjusting for possible confounders, were not having a family member with epilepsy (p = 0.009), unawareness of life circumstances of persons with epilepsy (p = 0.048), and a poor attitude score (p < 0.001). Conclusion. School teachers in Kuwait have relatively poor knowledge about epilepsy but have positive attitudes toward students with epilepsy. A number of historical and stigmatizing ideas about epilepsy still exist. It is recommended to provide teachers with information about handling seizures in the educational setting through development and implementation of epilepsy education programs. PMID:27403170

  5. Aggressive periodontitis: The unsolved mystery.

    PubMed

    Clark, Danielle; Febbraio, Maria; Levin, Liran

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive periodontal disease is an oral health mystery. Our current understanding of this disease is that specific bacteria invade the oral cavity and the host reacts with an inflammatory response leading to mass destruction of the alveolar bone. Aggressive periodontal disease is typically observed in a population under the age of 30 and occurs so rapidly that it is difficult to treat. Unfortunately, the consequence of this disease frequently involves tooth extractions. As a result, the aftermath is chewing disability and damage to self-esteem due to an altered self-image. Furthermore, patients are encumbered by frequent dental appointments which have an economic impact in regards to both personal financial strain and absent days in the workplace. Aggressive periodontal disease has a tremendous effect on patients' overall quality of life and needs to be investigated more extensively in order to develop methods for earlier definitive diagnosis and effective treatments. One of the mysteries of aggressive periodontal disease is the relatively nominal amount of plaque present on the tooth surface in relation to the large amount of bone loss. There seems to be a hidden factor that lies between the response by the patient's immune system and the bacterial threat that is present. A better mechanistic understanding of this disease is essential to provide meaningful care and better outcomes for patients.

  6. Risperidone and Explosive Aggressive Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horrigan, Joseph P.; Barnhill, L. Jarrett

    1997-01-01

    In this study, 11 males with autism and mental retardation were administered risperidone. Substantial clinical improvement was noted almost immediately; patients with aggression, self-injury, explosivity, and poor sleep hygiene were most improved. The modal dose for optimal response was 0.5 mg bid. Weight gain was a significant side effect.…

  7. School Athletics and Fan Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Clifford; Horton, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Several hypotheses are developed regarding fans and their behavior based upon a review of the literature. An exploratory study is then described, in which participant observers at a university sports arena observed cases of aggressive behavior among the spectators. Based upon the literature review and the findings of the study, four…

  8. Biochemistry and Aggression: Psychohematological Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Hilliard G., Jr.; Spitz, Reuben T.

    1994-01-01

    Examines biochemical measures in a population of forensic psychiatric inpatients. Regression equations utilizing chemical and biological variables were developed and evaluated to determine their value in predicting the severity and frequency of aggression. Findings strongly suggest the presence of specific biochemical alteration among those…

  9. Teachers' Reactions to Children's Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesdale, Drew; Pickering, Kaye

    2006-01-01

    Drawing on social schema theory (Fiske & Taylor, 1991) and social identity theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1979), this study examined the impact on teachers' reactions to children's aggression of three variables, two of which were related to the aggressors and one was related to the teachers. Experienced female elementary school teachers (N=90) each read…

  10. [Epilepsy guidelines: Japanese and international guidelines].

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2011-04-01

    Many guidelines for the management of epilepsy have been published since the introduction of evidence-based medicine. In Japan, the first clinical guideline for epilepsy management was published by the Japanese Society of Neurology (JSN) in 2002. The Japan Epilepsy Society (JES) has been publishing guidelines for several topics since 2005. However, owing to recent advances in epileptology and the accumulation of related knowledge, it has become necessary to revise these guidelines. Four medical societies-JSN, JES, the Japanese Society of Neurological Therapeutics, and the Japanese Society of Child Neurology-have together published new epilepsy-related clinical guidelines for practitioners. The guideline committee consists of 23 specialists representing the 4 societies. The guidelines primary target general practitioners treating epilepsy patients and are designed to be user friendly-in the form of 81 "clinical questions" (CQs). The CQs comprehensively cover various aspects of epilepsy management including those related to diagnosis, treatment, surgery, pregnancy, and social issues. Recommendations are concisely described with levels from A to D. The evidence level (I to IV) of the references is based on the literature review conducted by the committee. These guidelines were published in October 2010.

  11. Tlazolteotl, the Aztec goddess of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco

    2016-04-01

    Epilepsy has afflicted humanity during most of the extent of documented history. The Aztecs believed that illnesses were punishments that were sent from a furious goddess. In particular, epilepsy was considered in Aztec culture as a "sacred disease", and convulsions were traditionally associated with a deified woman who had died at childbirth. As the goddess Shiva and Apasmâra in ancient India and Saint Valentine in Germany, Tlazolteotl was considered able to bring about and send away epilepsy. We performed a comprehensive review to identify Tlazolteotl depictions and its historical context related with epilepsy. Tlazolteotl is one of the most endearing and complex goddesses of the Mesoamericans. She was the deity of the black fertile and fecund earth that gains its energy from death and in turn feeds life. Associated with purification, expiation, and regeneration, she embodied fertility and turned all garbage, physical and metaphysical, into rich life. This article reviews the most relevant artistic works related with Tlazolteotl. We also present a modern depiction of the Aztec goddess of epilepsy from the Mexican artist Eduardo Urbano Merino, displaying the supernatural view of epilepsy in America.

  12. Targeting BK (big potassium) Channels in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    N'Gouemo, Prosper

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Epilepsies are disorders of neuronal excitability characterized by spontaneous and recurrent seizures. Ion channels are critical for regulating neuronal excitability and, therefore, can contribute significantly to epilepsy pathophysiology. In particular, large conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channels play an important role in seizure etiology. These channels are activated by both membrane depolarization and increased intracellular Ca2+. This unique coupling of Ca2+ signaling to membrane depolarization is important in controlling neuronal hyperexcitability, as outward K+ current through BKCa channels hyperpolarizes neurons. Areas covered This review focuses on BKCa channel structure-function and discusses the role of these channels in epilepsy pathophysiology. Expert opinion Loss-of-function BKCa channels contribute neuronal hyperexcitability that can lead to temporal lobe epilepsy, tonic-clonic seizures and alcohol withdrawal seizures. Similarly, BKCa channel blockade can trigger seizures and status epilepticus. Paradoxically, some mutations in BKCa channel subunit can give rise to the channel gain-of-function that leads to development of idiopathic epilepsy (primarily absence epilepsy). Seizures themselves also enhance BKCa channel currents associated with neuronal hyperexcitability, and blocking BKCa channels suppresses generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Thus, both loss-of-function and gain-of-function BKCa channels might serve as molecular targets for drugs to suppress certain seizure phenotypes including temporal lobe seizures and absence seizures, respectively. PMID:21923633

  13. Cannabidiol and epilepsy: Rationale and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Leo, Antonio; Russo, Emilio; Elia, Maurizio

    2016-05-01

    Despite the introduction of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the quality of life and therapeutic response for patients with epilepsy remains still poor. Unfortunately, besides several advantages, these new AEDs have not satisfactorily reduced the number of refractory patients. Therefore, the need for different other therapeutic options to manage epilepsy is still a current issue. To this purpose, emphasis has been given to phytocannabinoids, which have been medicinally used since ancient time in the treatment of neurological disorders including epilepsy. In particular, the nonpsychoactive compound cannabidiol (CBD) has shown anticonvulsant properties, both in preclinical and clinical studies, with a yet not completely clarified mechanism of action. However, it should be made clear that most phytocannabinoids do not act on the endocannabinoid system as in the case of CBD. In in vivo preclinical studies, CBD has shown significant anticonvulsant effects mainly in acute animal models of seizures, whereas restricted data exist in chronic models of epilepsy as well as in animal models of epileptogenesis. Likewise, clinical evidence seems to indicate that CBD is able to manage epilepsy both in adults and children affected by refractory seizures, with a favourable side effect profile. However, to date, clinical trials are both qualitatively and numerically limited, thus yet inconsistent. Therefore, further preclinical and clinical studies are undoubtedly needed to better evaluate the potential therapeutic profile of CBD in epilepsy, although the actually available data is promising.

  14. Epilepsy in the tropics: Emerging etiologies.

    PubMed

    Carrizosa Moog, Jaime; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Tan, Chong Tin

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is considered by the World Health Organization a public health priority with more than 50 million human beings affected by the disease. More than 80% of persons with epilepsy live in low and middle income countries and most of them in tropical areas. Several emerging, re-emerging and neglected diseases are symptomatic etiologies that jointly contribute to the enormous global burden of epilepsy. Besides the clinical strengths to reduce diagnostic and treatment gaps, other strategies in social, economic, cultural, educational and health policies are needed to prevent and treat appropriately vulnerable and affected persons with epilepsy. From the public health point of view, several of those strategies could be more effective in reducing the incidence and burden of the disease than the clinical approach of diagnosis and treatment. Special attention has to be given to stigma reduction and promotion of human rights. Several aspects mentioned in this abstract slip away the scope of the article, but it is a remainder to approach epilepsy in an inter- and transdisciplinary manner, an integral and pertinent approach needed and requested in tropical counties. The article focuses only on emergent and re-emergent etiologies of epilepsy in the tropics like malaria, HIV, neurocysticercosis, viral encephalitis and traumatic brain injury.

  15. Neurostimulation for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    DeGiorgio, Christopher M.; Krahl, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review: The purpose of this review is to provide an evidence-based update on the neurostimulation options available for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy in the United States and in European countries. Recent Findings: The field of neurostimulation for epilepsy has grown dramatically since 1997, when vagus nerve stimulation became the first device to be approved for epilepsy by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). New data from recently completed randomized controlled trials are available for deep brain stimulation of the anterior thalamus, responsive neurostimulation, and trigeminal nerve stimulation. Although vagus nerve stimulation is the only device currently approved in the United States, deep brain stimulation and responsive neurostimulation devices are awaiting FDA approval. Deep brain stimulation, trigeminal nerve stimulation, and transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation are now approved for epilepsy in the European Union. In this article, the mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy of new neurostimulation devices are reviewed, and the key advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. Summary: The exponential growth of the field of neuromodulation for epilepsy is an exciting development; these new devices provide physicians with new options for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:23739108

  16. Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vikram R; Lowenstein, Daniel H

    2015-08-31

    Our cognitive abilities emerge from the coordinated activity of neurons in the brain. The average human brain contains 86 billion neurons that are richly interconnected through synapses, contact points for electrochemical communication. Patterns of synaptic connectivity create functional ensembles of neurons, called neural circuits, which mediate information processing in the brain. Neural circuits can be deconstructed further into basic motifs ('microcircuits') involving feedforward and feedback connections between different types of neurons that exert excitatory or inhibitory influence. At each level of neural circuitry, the opposing forces of excitation and inhibition are normally held in balance through a variety of homeostatic mechanisms.

  17. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in emotions, or to the senses (for example, hallucinations, numbness, tingling, or other changes to vision, taste, ... emotional changes, or changes in vision (such as hallucinations), smell (smelling an odor that isn't there), ...

  18. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... seem unaware of what's going on, make involuntary motions (movements the person has no control over, such ... stiffen, and the person might make sudden jerking motions, such as flinging the arms outward. He or ...

  19. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... org http://hopeforhh.org/ International RadioSurgery Association 2960 Green Street P.O. Box 5186 Harrisburg PA Harrisburg, ... org http://hopeforhh.org/ International RadioSurgery Association 2960 Green Street P.O. Box 5186 Harrisburg PA Harrisburg, ...

  20. Behavioral measures of anxiety during opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Grasing, K; Wang, A; Schlussman, S

    1996-10-01

    Heightened anxiety is a major component of the withdrawal syndromes associated with ethanol and sedative hypnotic medications. Because of similarities between the opiate and sedative-hypnotic withdrawal syndromes as well as data implicating heightened noradrenergic tone with opiate withdrawal, we investigated changes in anxiety measures identified by plus-maze and social interaction testing during opiate withdrawal. Because Sprague Dawley rats had very low levels of entry into plus-maze open arms, further studies were conducted using the Long-Evans strain. Long-Evans rats received continuous infusions of morphine sulfate at 44 mg/kg per day delivered by osmotic pump over 7 days while control animals received inert implants. During the first 3 days of withdrawal, the number and time of entries into open and closed arms of a plus-maze was recorded. Both social and aggressive behaviors were scored durings pairings of groups of two socially naive animals. Body weight was significantly reduced in morphine-treated animals prior to and during withdrawal. Both the number of entries into open plus-maze arms and the time spent in open areas increased over the 3 days of testing. However, no difference in plus-maze activity was detected between morphine-treated and control subjects. On the third day of withdrawal, social interaction time was greater in pairs of withdrawn and control subjects compared to pairs of two control subjects. In conclusion, behavioral measures of anxiety are not increased during opiate withdrawal.

  1. Personal standards for judging aggression by a relationship partner: How much aggression is too much?

    PubMed

    Arriaga, Ximena B; Capezza, Nicole M; Daly, Christine A

    2016-01-01

    What determines whether people tolerate partner aggression? This research examined how norms, relationship experiences, and commitment predict personal standards for judging aggressive acts by a partner. Studies 1a and 1b (n = 689) revealed that experiencing aggression in a current relationship and greater commitment predicted greater tolerance for common partner aggression. Study 2 longitudinally tracked individuals who had never experienced partner aggression (n = 52). Once aggression occurred, individuals adopted more tolerant standards, but only if they were highly committed. Study 3 involved experimentally manipulating the relevance of partner aggression among individuals who reported current partner aggression (n = 73); they were more tolerant of aggressive acts imagined to occur by their partner (vs. the same acts by a stranger), but only if they were highly committed. Personal standards for judging partner aggression are dynamic. They shift toward greater tolerance when committed people experience aggression in a current relationship.

  2. [Separation anxiety. Theoretical considerations].

    PubMed

    Blandin, N; Parquet, P J; Bailly, D

    1994-01-01

    The interest in separation anxiety is nowadays increasing: this disorder appearing during childhood may predispose to the occurrence of anxiety disorders (such as panic disorder and agoraphobia) and major depression into adulthood. Psychoanalytic theories differ on the nature of separation anxiety and its place in child development. For some authors, separation anxiety must be understood as resulting from the unconscious internal conflicts inherent in the individuation process and gradual attainment of autonomy. From this point of view, the fear of loss of mother by separation is not regarded as resulting from a real danger. However, Freud considers the primary experience of separation from protecting mother as the prototype situation of anxiety and compares the situations generating fear to separation experiences. For him, anxiety originates from two factors: the physiological fact is initiated at the time of birth but the primary traumatic situation is the separation from mother. This point of view may be compared with behavioral theories. Behavioral theories suggest that separation anxiety may be conditioned or learned from innate fears. In Freud's theory, the primary situation of anxiety resulting from the separation from mother plays a role comparable to innate fears. Grappling with the problem of separation anxiety, Bowlby emphasizes then the importance of the child's attachment to one person (mother or primary caregiver) and the fact that this attachment is instinctive. This point of view, based on the watch of infants, is akin to ethological theories on behaviour of non human primates. Bowlby especially shows that the reactions of infant separated from mother evolve on three stages: the phase of protestation which may constitute the prototype of adulthood anxiety, the phase of desperation which may be the prototype of depression, and the phase of detachment. He emphasizes so the role of early separations in the development of vulnerability to depression

  3. Pre-Post Tornado Effects on Aggressive Children's Psychological and Behavioral Adjustment Through One-Year Postdisaster.

    PubMed

    Lochman, John E; Vernberg, Eric; Powell, Nicole P; Boxmeyer, Caroline L; Jarrett, Matthew; McDonald, Kristina; Qu, Lixin; Hendrickson, Michelle; Kassing, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Using a risk-resilience framework, this study examined how varying levels of exposure to a natural disaster (EF-4 tornado) and children's characteristics (sex; anxiety) influenced the behavioral and psychological adjustment of children who shared a common risk factor predisaster (elevated aggression) prior to exposure through 1-year postdisaster. Participants included 360 children in Grades 4-6 (65% male; 78% African American) and their parents from predominantly low-income households who were already participating in a longitudinal study of indicated prevention effects for externalizing outcomes when the tornado occurred in 2011. Fourth-grade children who were screened for overt aggressive behavior were recruited in 3 annual cohorts (120 per year, beginning in 2009). Parent-rated aggression and internalizing problems were assessed prior to the tornado (Wave 1), within a half-year after the tornado (Wave 2), and at a 1-year follow-up (Wave 3). Children and parents rated their exposure to aspects of tornado-related traumatic experiences at Wave 3. Children displayed less reduction on aggression and internalizing problems if the children had experienced distress after the tornado or fears for their life, in combination with their pre-tornado level of anxiety. Higher levels of children's and parents' exposure to the tornado interacted with children's lower baseline child anxiety to predict less reduction in aggression and internalizing problems 1 year after the tornado. Higher levels of disaster exposure negatively affected at-risk children's level of improvement in aggression and internalizing problems, when life threat (parent- and child-reported) and child-reported distress after the tornado were moderated by baseline anxiety.

  4. Altered Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Amygdalar Neuronal Activity in Adult Mice with Repeated Experience of Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Smagin, Dmitry A.; Park, June-Hee; Michurina, Tatyana V.; Peunova, Natalia; Glass, Zachary; Sayed, Kasim; Bondar, Natalya P.; Kovalenko, Irina N.; Kudryavtseva, Natalia N.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2015-01-01

    Repeated experience of winning in a social conflict setting elevates levels of aggression and may lead to violent behavioral patterns. Here, we use a paradigm of repeated aggression and fighting deprivation to examine changes in behavior, neurogenesis, and neuronal activity in mice with positive fighting experience. We show that for males, repeated positive fighting experience induces persistent demonstration of aggression and stereotypic behaviors in daily agonistic interactions, enhances aggressive motivation, and elevates levels of anxiety. When winning males are deprived of opportunities to engage in further fights, they demonstrate increased levels of aggressiveness. Positive fighting experience results in increased levels of progenitor cell proliferation and production of young neurons in the hippocampus. This increase is not diminished after a fighting deprivation period. Furthermore, repeated winning experience decreases the number of activated (c-fos-positive) cells in the basolateral amygdala and increases the number of activated cells in the hippocampus; a subsequent no-fight period restores the number of c-fos-positive cells. Our results indicate that extended positive fighting experience in a social conflict heightens aggression, increases proliferation of neuronal progenitors and production of young neurons in the hippocampus, and decreases neuronal activity in the amygdala; these changes can be modified by depriving the winners of the opportunity for further fights. PMID:26648838

  5. Implicit cognitive aggression among young male prisoners: Association with dispositional and current aggression.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Jane L; Adams, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The current study explores associations between implicit and explicit aggression in young adult male prisoners, seeking to apply the Reflection-Impulsive Model and indicate parity with elements of the General Aggression Model and social cognition. Implicit cognitive aggressive processing is not an area that has been examined among prisoners. Two hundred and sixty two prisoners completed an implicit cognitive aggression measure (Puzzle Test) and explicit aggression measures, covering current behaviour (DIPC-R) and aggression disposition (AQ). It was predicted that dispositional aggression would be predicted by implicit cognitive aggression, and that implicit cognitive aggression would predict current engagement in aggressive behaviour. It was also predicted that more impulsive implicit cognitive processing would associate with aggressive behaviour whereas cognitively effortful implicit cognitive processing would not. Implicit aggressive cognitive processing was associated with increased dispositional aggression but not current reports of aggressive behaviour. Impulsive implicit cognitive processing of an aggressive nature predicted increased dispositional aggression whereas more cognitively effortful implicit cognitive aggression did not. The article concludes by outlining the importance of accounting for implicit cognitive processing among prisoners and the need to separate such processing into facets (i.e. impulsive vs. cognitively effortful). Implications for future research and practice in this novel area of study are indicated.

  6. A controlled trial of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Aihua, Liu; Lu, Song; Liping, Li; Xiuru, Wang; Hua, Lin; Yuping, Wang

    2014-10-01

    This study explored the efficacy and safety of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (t-VNS) in patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. A total of 60 patients were randomly divided into two groups based on the stimulation zone: the Ramsay-Hunt zone (treatment group) and the earlobe (control group). Before and after the 12-month treatment period, all patients completed the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), the Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale (LSSS), and the Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory (QOLIE-31). Seizure frequency was determined according to the patient's seizure diary. During our study, the antiepileptic drugs were maintained at a constant level in all subjects. After 12 months, the monthly seizure frequency was lower in the treatment group than in the control group (8.0 to 4.0; P=0.003). This reduction in seizure frequency was correlated with seizure frequency at baseline and duration of epilepsy (both P>0.05). Additionally, all patients showed improved SAS, SDS, LSSS, and QOLIE-31 scores that were not correlated with a reduction in seizure frequency. The side effects in the treatment group were dizziness (1 case) and daytime drowsiness (3 cases), which could be relieved by reducing the stimulation intensity. In the control group, compared with baseline, there were no significant changes in seizure frequency (P=0.397), SAS, SDS, LESS, or QOLIE-31. There were also no complications in this group.

  7. New ideas in epilepsy genetics: novel epilepsy genes, copy number alterations, and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, Christina A; Hedera, Peter

    2007-03-01

    The majority of genes associated with epilepsy syndromes to date are ion channel genes. Selection bias may have allowed us to establish their role in epilepsy based on a priori knowledge of the significance of these proteins in regulating neuronal excitability. There are, however, more than 3000 genes expressed at the synapse, as well as many other genes expressed nearby in supporting cells and glia that can likewise regulate excitability. Identification of new genes involved in epilepsy may arise from studying the targets of anticonvulsant medications, ascertainment of an epileptic phenotype in mice, or as a result of positional cloning efforts. There are several loci for idiopathic focal and generalized epilepsies that lie in chromosomal regions that are devoid of known ion channels; therefore, the number of novel genes involved in epilepsy is likely to increase. Establishing the role of these novel genes in the pathogenesis of epilepsy has not been an easy task compared with the relative ease with which ion channel mutations can be studied. This review will describe several novel epilepsy genes and will then discuss other genetic causes of epilepsy, including alterations of chromosomal copy number and gene regulatory elements.

  8. Epilepsy and Learning Disabilities: Part 1--Diagnosing and Solving School Learning Disabilities in Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittan, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    This is a six part article intended to give parents the information and strategies they need to cope with their child with epilepsy who may have school learning problems. Epilepsy and seizures affect the classroom in unique ways that can make the learning experience especially challenging for some kids. Fortunately, much can be done to give the…

  9. Epilepsy and Intellectual Disability: Does Epilepsy Increase the Likelihood of Co-Morbid Psychopathology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arshad, Saadia; Winterhalder, Robert; Underwood, Lisa; Kelesidi, Katerina; Chaplin, Eddie; Kravariti, Eugenia; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Bouras, Nick; McCarthy, Jane; Tsakanikos, Elias

    2011-01-01

    Although epilepsy is particularly common among people with intellectual disability (ID) it remains unclear whether it is associated with an increased likelihood of co-morbid psychopathology. We therefore investigated rates of mental health problems and other clinical characteristics in patients with ID and epilepsy (N=156) as compared to patients…

  10. Knowledge and beliefs about epilepsy among people with and without epilepsy in urban Suriname.

    PubMed

    Otte, Willem M; Meeuwesse, Eva; Kafiluddin, Erik; Peerdeman, Saskia M; Baaijen, Johannes C; Sander, Josemir W; van Eijsden, Pieter

    2013-10-01

    Reducing the burden of epilepsy in low- and middle-income countries requires understanding of the cultural aspects of epilepsy. This cross-sectional study among individuals attending a clinic in an urban setting in Paramaribo, Suriname aimed to obtain information on the knowledge of and attitudes towards epilepsy and epilepsy treatment, comparing people with epilepsy (PWE) to those without epilepsy. This study also explored the help-seeking behavior and experience of having epilepsy in PWE. While the results of interviews with 49 PWE and 33 controls compared favorably to studies conducted in similar countries, a significant minority of PWE still rely on traditional remedies. Prejudices regarding social roles, schooling, and occupational choices of PWE also remain prevalent. Currently, the major source of information for both groups is the media, but there could be opportunities for the local epilepsy association to play a larger role. These findings, despite some selection bias, could be useful in bringing conventional medical treatment strategies to more PWE in Suriname, as well as empower patient organizations in designing stigma-reducing interventions.

  11. Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Aggressive Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163824.html Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Aggressive Lymphoma Over one-third of patients appeared disease- ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental gene therapy for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma beat back more than a ...

  12. Predicting and preventing supervisory workplace aggression.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Kathryne E; Barling, Julian

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined factors that lead to and prevent aggression toward supervisors at work using two samples: doctoral students and correctional service guards. The results supported that perceived interpersonal injustice mediates the relationship between perceptions of supervisory control over work performance and psychological aggression directed at supervisors, and further that psychological aggression toward supervisors is positively associated with physical acts of aggression directed at supervisors, supporting the notion of an escalation of aggressive workplace behaviors. Moreover, employees' perceptions of organizational sanctions (i.e., negative consequences for disobeying organizational policies) against aggression appear to play an important role in the prevention of workplace aggression by moderating the relationship between injustice and aggression targeting supervisors.

  13. Statistics Anxiety, Trait Anxiety, Learning Behavior, and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macher, Daniel; Paechter, Manuela; Papousek, Ilona; Ruggeri, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between statistics anxiety, individual characteristics (e.g., trait anxiety and learning strategies), and academic performance. Students enrolled in a statistics course in psychology (N = 147) filled in a questionnaire on statistics anxiety, trait anxiety, interest in statistics, mathematical…

  14. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy following resective epilepsy surgery in two patients withdrawn from anticonvulsants.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Alireza; Alhadid, Kenda; Valiante, Taufik A

    2015-09-01

    We report sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) following resective epilepsy surgery in two patients who had been documented as seizure free. One patient had been weaned off of anticonvulsants and was leading a normal life. The other patient had discontinued only one anticonvulsant but had recently started working night shifts. Following resective epilepsy surgery, one of the major objectives among patients, caregivers, and the healthcare team is to safely wean patients off anticonvulsant medications. The main concern regarding anticonvulsant withdrawal is seizure recurrence. While SUDEP following surgical resection has been reported, to our knowledge, there have been no confirmed cases in patients who have been seizure free. Considering the patients reported here, and given that there are no concrete guidelines for the safe withdrawal of anticonvulsants following epilepsy surgery, the discontinuation of anticonvulsants should be considered carefully and must be accompanied by close monitoring and counseling of patients regarding activities that lower seizure threshold, even after successful epilepsy surgery.

  15. CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM IN ANXIETY AND ANXIETY DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Roy J.

    1994-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are some of the commonest psychiatric disorders and anxiety commonly co-exists with other psychiatric conditions. Anxiety can also be a normal emotion. Thus, study of the neurobiological effects of anxiety is of considerable significance. In the normal brain, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism (CMR) serve as indices of brain function. CBF/CMR research is expected to provide new insight into alterations in brain function in anxiety disorders and other psychiatric disorders. Possible associations between stress I anxiety I panic and cerebral ischemia I stroke give additional significance to the effects of anxiety on CBF. With the advent of non-invasive techniques, study of CBF/CMR in anxiety disorders became easier. A large numbers of research reports are available on the effects of stress, anxiety and panic on CBF/CMR in normals and anxiety disorder patients. This article reviews the available human research on this topic. PMID:21743685

  16. Betaxolol in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Swartz, C M

    1998-03-01

    Betaxolol, a long-acting beta-adrenergic blocker that enters the central nervous system, was examined for therapeutic effects on the persistent anxiety of anxiety disorders. Prior studies of beta-blockers examined only agents that were short-acting or did not enter the brain. Betaxolol was administered to 31 patients in open trials. Of 13 outpatients, 11 had generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and 2 had adjustment disorder with anxiety. Five with GAD had concurrent panic disorder. Of 18 inpatients, 16 had GAD and 2 had adjustment disorder with anxiety. Betaxolol doses were increased until the patient responded or declined further dosage. Severity was rated on a 4-point global scale. Before betaxolol, all were moderately or severely ill. In all patients with panic disorder panic attacks stopped within 2 days (p<0.001). Anxiety decreased to no more than marginally ill in 85% of outpatients (p<0.0001) and all inpatients (p<0.0001). Betaxolol doses were usually 5 mg once or twice daily; four inpatients took 10 to 20 mg twice daily. In sum, betaxolol administration was rapidly followed by improvements that were easily noticed by the doctor, even in patients with longstanding anxiety and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. Preliminary observations in posttraumatic stress disorder are similar.

  17. Aggressive digital papillary adenoma-adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Evangelos G; Miller, Gavin; Revelos, Kyriakos; Kitsanta, Panagiota; Page, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    Aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma and aggressive digital papillary adenoma are rare tumours of the sweat glands. They are most common in the most distal part of the fingers and are locally aggressive with a 50% local recurrence rate; 14% of tumours metastasize. We present two cases.

  18. Lunar Cycles and Human Aggression: A Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Gordon W.; de Graaf, Jane P.

    1985-01-01

    Tested lunar-aggression hypothesis using the aggressive penalties awarded in ice hockey over a season of competition. Interpersonal aggression was found to be unrelated to either the synodic or anomalistic cycles. Discussion centers on the persistence of lunar beliefs and their links to the literature on selective exposure and interpersonal…

  19. A pilot study of compassionate use of Levetiracetam in patients with generalised epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Suzanne; Beran, Roy G

    2004-09-01

    Levetiracetam (LEV) has proven effective for partial seizures, suggesting the need to trial it in generalised epilepsy. Ten patients with generalised epilepsy were given compassionate use of LEV as a pilot study, attending 7 visits with seizure count (using diary) and compliance checked (pill count) with option for long term use. Seizure frequency was compared to baseline mean of the last 2 months and mean of follow-up. Patients were commenced on 500 mg I b.d, and titrated to a maximum of 3 g/day. There were 10 patients (7 females), aged 28-48, of whom 6 had primary generalised epilepsy (PGE) and 4 Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS). At 7 month evaluation: 1 was seizure-free, 1 was 70% reduced, 3 were > or = 50% reduced, 2 were 30-35% reduced; 1 had no change; 1 was 10% increased and 1 was excluded because confounding pseudo seizures. Follow-up was 8-17 months (mean 13.8). The seizure-free patient became pregnant and had 2 seizures, but has been seizure-free for 2 months, at time of submission. A 16 months are three months seizure-free. One was 50% reduced at months 6 and 7, was 2 months seizure-free but then reverted to 50% per baseline. With respect to LGS, 1 withdrew due to aggression, 2 had 40% and 35% reduction at 13 and 15 months respectively and 1 had 25% increase (10% at 7 months). All patients were compliant. These data suggest that LEV may be effective for generalised epilepsy with a need for a larger clinical trial.

  20. Social Aggression on Television and Its Relationship to Children's Aggression in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Nicole; Wilson, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    A survey was conducted with over 500 children in grades K-5 to examine whether exposure to socially aggressive content was related to children's use of social aggression. The results of the survey revealed a significant relationship between exposure to televised social aggression and increased social aggression at school, but only for girls and…

  1. Examining the Mediating Effect of Self-Efficacy on Approval of Aggression and Proactive Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Jade; Mowbray, Tony; Jacobs, Nicky

    2017-01-01

    Proactive aggression (PA) is goal-directed, hostile social behavior that has been linked to detrimental outcomes. It has been theorized that adolescents who believe aggression is a normal and acceptable social response (approval of aggression) are more likely to show PA. Confidence in one's ability to behave aggressively (self-efficacy about…

  2. Foreign and Second Language Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwitz, Elaine K.

    2010-01-01

    The possibility that anxiety interferes with language learning has long interested scholars, language teachers, and language learners themselves. It is intuitive that anxiety would inhibit the learning and/or production of a second language (L2). The important term in the last sentence is "anxiety". The concept of anxiety is itself multi-faceted,…

  3. Predictors of Anxiety towards Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farina, F.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Relationships between anxiety toward computers and variables trait anxiety, anxiety toward mathematics, perceived impact of computers on society, and experience in using computers were studied in a sample of 81 male and 81 female university students. All of these variables were found to influence anxiety toward computers, and a significant…

  4. Read anything mean lately? associations between reading aggression in books and aggressive behavior in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Stockdale, Laura A; Coyne, Sarah M; Nelson, David A; Padilla-Walker, Laura M

    2013-01-01

    Although there have been hundreds of studies on media violence, few have focused on literature, with none examining novels. Accordingly, the aim of the current study was to examine whether reading physical and relational aggression in books was associated with aggressive behavior in adolescents. Participants consisted of 223 adolescents who completed a variety of measures detailing their media use and aggressive behavior. A non-recursive structural equation model revealed that reading aggression in books was positively associated with aggressive behavior, even after controlling for exposure to aggression in other forms of media. Associations were only found for congruent forms of aggression. Implications regarding books as a form of media are discussed.

  5. Diagnosing and treating depression in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Elger, Christian E; Johnston, Samantha A; Hoppe, Christian

    2017-01-01

    At least one third of patients with active epilepsy suffer from significant impairment of their emotional well-being. A targeted examination for possible depression (irrespective of any social, financial or personal burdens) can identify patients who may benefit from medical attention and therapeutic support. Reliable screening instruments such as the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E) are suitable for the timely identification of patients needing help. Neurologists should be capable of managing mild to moderate comorbid depression but referral to mental health specialists is mandatory in severe and difficult-to-treat depression, or if the patient is acutely suicidal. In terms of the therapeutic approach, it is essential first to optimize seizure control and minimize unwanted antiepileptic drug-related side effects. Psychotherapy for depression in epilepsy (including online self-treatment programs) is underutilized although it has proven effective in ten well-controlled trials. In contrast, the effectiveness of antidepressant drugs for depression in epilepsy is unknown. However, if modern antidepressants are used (e.g. SSRI, SNRI, NaSSA), concerns about an aggravation of seizures and or problematic interactions with antiepileptic drugs seem unwarranted. Epilepsy-related stress ("burden of epilepsy") explains depression in many patients but acute and temporary seizure-related states of depression or suicidality have also been reported. Limbic encephalitits may cause isolated mood alteration without any recognizable psychoetiological background indicating a possible role of neuroinflammation. This review will argue that, overall, a bio-psycho-social model best captures the currently available evidence relating to the etiology and treatment of depression as a comorbidity of epilepsy.

  6. Study Sheds Light on Safety of Driving with Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Study Sheds Light on Safety of Driving With Epilepsy Those who had longer seizures during driving tests ... SUNDAY, Dec. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with epilepsy who experienced longer seizures during a simulated driving ...

  7. Dural arteriovenous malformation: a rare cause of epilepsy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Caksen, H; Unal, O; Tombul, T; Cesur, Y; Abuhandan, M

    2001-09-01

    A 3 year and 6 month old girl with epilepsy associated with dural arteriovenous malformation (DAVM), diagnosed on the MRI, is presented to emphasise the importance of DAVM in the aetiology of childhood epilepsy.

  8. Epilepsy through the ages: An artistic point of view.

    PubMed

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Rizvi, Syed; Téllez-Zenteno, Jose Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The historical allure of epilepsy transcends academic circles and serves as fascinating critique of the state of the times-its values, judgments, mythos, and people. Immortalized and laid bare in artistic renderings of epilepsy are societal truths, at times both disparately grandiose and grotesque. During the middle ages and Renaissance, the European discourse on epilepsy assumed religious fervor. Epilepsy was considered a demonic machination and its cure an act of divine intercession. A similar theme is found in the artistic depiction of epilepsy from the Inca and Aztec civilizations of that time. After the 19th century drew to a close, the ascendency of empiricism coincided with waning creative interest in epilepsy, with few paintings or pieces to capture insightful perspectives on the illness. In this paper, we review the relationship between art and epilepsy and present two contemporary paintings that convey current western perceptions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity".

  9. Media and children's aggression, fear, and altruism.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Barbara J

    2008-01-01

    Noting that the social and emotional experiences of American children today often heavily involve electronic media, Barbara Wilson takes a close look at how exposure to screen media affects children's well-being and development. She concludes that media influence on children depends more on the type of content that children find attractive than on the sheer amount of time they spend in front of the screen. Wilson begins by reviewing evidence on the link between media and children's emotions. She points out that children can learn about the nature and causes of different emotions from watching the emotional experiences of media characters and that they often experience empathy with those characters. Although research on the long-term effects of media exposure on children's emotional skill development is limited, a good deal of evidence shows that media exposure can contribute to children's fears and anxieties. Both fictional and news programming can cause lasting emotional upset, though the themes that upset children differ according to a child's age. Wilson also explores how media exposure affects children's social development. Strong evidence shows that violent television programming contributes to children's aggressive behavior. And a growing body of work indicates that playing violent video games can have the same harmful effect. Yet if children spend time with educational programs and situation comedies targeted to youth, media exposure can have more prosocial effects by increasing children's altruism, cooperation, and even tolerance for others. Wilson also shows that children's susceptibility to media influence can vary according to their gender, their age, how realistic they perceive the media to be, and how much they identify with characters and people on the screen. She concludes with guidelines to help parents enhance the positive effects of the media while minimizing the risks associated with certain types of content.

  10. Teens with heavy prenatal cocaine exposure respond to experimental social provocation with escape not aggression.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, M K; Chiodo, L M; Hannigan, J H; Sokol, R J; Janisse, J; Delaney-Black, V

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical data show that, compared to no exposure, prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) has age-dependent effects on social interaction and aggression. The aim of this clinical study was to determine how heavy/persistent PCE--after controlling for other prenatal drug exposures, sex and postnatal factors--predicts behavioral sensitivity to provocation (i.e., reactive aggression) using a well-validated human laboratory model of aggression. African American teens (mean=14.2 years old) with histories of heavy/persistent PCE (maternal cocaine use ≥ 2 times/week during pregnancy, or positive maternal or infant urine/meconium test at delivery; n=86) or none/some exposure (NON: maternal cocaine use < 2 times/week during pregnancy; n=330) completed the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm. In this task, teens competed in a computer game against a fictitious opponent. There were three possible responses: (a) earn points, to exchange for money later; or (b) "aggress" against the fictitious opponent by subtracting their points; or (c) escape temporarily from point subtraction perpetrated by the fictitious opponent. The PCE group responded significantly more frequently on the escape option than the NON group, but did not differ in aggressive or money-earning responses. These data indicate that PCE-teens provoked with a social stressor exhibit a behavioral preference for escape (negative reinforcement) than for aggressive (retaliatory) or appetitive (point- or money-reinforced) responses. These findings are consistent with preclinical data showing that social provocation of adolescent or young adult offspring after PCE is associated with greater escape behavior, inferring greater submission, social withdrawal, or anxiety, as opposed to aggressive behavior.

  11. Orthodontic Management in Aggressive Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Rajesh; Bhattarai, Bhagabat

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is a type of periodontitis with early onset and rapid progression and mostly affecting young adults who occupy a large percentage of orthodontic patients. The role of the orthodontist is important in screening the disease, making a provisional diagnosis, and referring it to a periodontist for immediate treatment. The orthodontist should be aware of the disease not only before starting the appliance therapy, but also during and after the active mechanotherapy. The orthodontic treatment plan, biomechanics, and appliance system may need to be modified to deal with the teeth having reduced periodontal support. With proper force application and oral hygiene maintenance, orthodontic tooth movement is possible without any deleterious effect in the tooth with reduced bone support. With proper motivation and interdisciplinary approach, orthodontic treatment is possible in patients with controlled aggressive periodontitis.

  12. Orthodontic Management in Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Bhagabat

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is a type of periodontitis with early onset and rapid progression and mostly affecting young adults who occupy a large percentage of orthodontic patients. The role of the orthodontist is important in screening the disease, making a provisional diagnosis, and referring it to a periodontist for immediate treatment. The orthodontist should be aware of the disease not only before starting the appliance therapy, but also during and after the active mechanotherapy. The orthodontic treatment plan, biomechanics, and appliance system may need to be modified to deal with the teeth having reduced periodontal support. With proper force application and oral hygiene maintenance, orthodontic tooth movement is possible without any deleterious effect in the tooth with reduced bone support. With proper motivation and interdisciplinary approach, orthodontic treatment is possible in patients with controlled aggressive periodontitis. PMID:28299350

  13. Workplace aggression: beginning a dialogue.

    PubMed

    McLemore, Monica R

    2006-08-01

    The June 2005 Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing editorial titled "Communication: Whose Problem Is It?" (Griffin-Sobel, 2005) was written to begin a dialogue about a phenomenon frequently experienced yet rarely discussed: workplace aggression, also known as disruptive behavior. Prompted by a groundbreaking study published in the American Journal of Nursing by Rosenstein and O'Daniel (2005), the editorial challenged oncology nurses to begin to fix problems of communication. After reflecting on both of the articles and considering my own experience as a nurse manager, clinician, and scholar, I decided to explore the topic as it relates to nurse-to-nurse workplace aggression. The following is a summary of interviews with nurse managers, nurse practitioners, and nurse scientists about root causes and effective strategies to manage these sometimes complicated situations. This article is meant to continue the dialogue about the very sensitive issue. Confidentiality has been maintained, and I welcome your comments.

  14. Diagnostic Approach of Epilepsy in Childhood and Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    ILIESCU, Catrinel; CRAIU, Dana

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epilepsy diagnosis in childhood and adolescence should follow the general neurological principles of diagnostic approach. Latest advances in neuroimaging and genetics determined International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) to promote new terminologies and concepts for organization of seizures and epilepsies. This review presents the current approach to epilepsy diagnosis in childhood and adolescence using the five axis system and recent revisions proposed by ILAE. PMID:24371485

  15. Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain and Mind: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Korczyn, Amos D; Schachter, Steven C; Amlerova, Jana; Bialer, Meir; van Emde Boas, Walter; Brázdil, Milan; Brodtkorb, Eylert; Engel, Jerome; Gotman, Jean; Komárek, Vladmir; Leppik, Ilo E; Marusic, Petr; Meletti, Stefano; Metternich, Birgitta; Moulin, Chris J A; Muhlert, Nils; Mula, Marco; Nakken, Karl O; Picard, Fabienne; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Theodore, William; Wolf, Peter; Zeman, Adam; Rektor, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    Epilepsy is both a disease of the brain and the mind. Here, we present the first of two papers with extended summaries of selected presentations of the Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain and Mind (April 3-5, 2014; Brno, Czech Republic). Epilepsy in history and the arts and its relationships with religion were discussed, as were overviews of epilepsy and relevant aspects of social cognition, handedness, accelerated forgetting and autobiographical amnesia, and large-scale brain networks.

  16. Association between human cytomegalovirus and onset of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hong-Yan; Yang, Dai-Qun; Li, Yu-Xin; Wang, Li-Quan; Zheng, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the association between human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and epilepsy. Methods: Epilepsy patients (n = 112) in neurology clinic of our hospital during January 2012 and December 2014 were allocated to the case groups, including intractable epilepsy group (n = 96) and non-intractable epilepsy group (n = 16). Healthy individual (n = 120) who received physical examination during the same period were allocated to the control group. The expression of serum HCMV late gene pp67-RNA was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expressions of serum HCMV immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin M (IgM) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serum hypersensitive c-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was detected by latex-enhanced immunoturbidimetry. The electroencephalogram (EEG) of refractory epilepsy group, non-refractory epilepsy group and control group were recorded. Results: The expression of pp67-mRNA was significantly higher in intractable epilepsy group than non-intractable epilepsy group (P < 0.05) and control group (P < 0.001). The HCMV-IgG positive rate and HCMV-IgM positive rate were significantly higher in intractable epilepsy group than control group (both P < 0.001). The HCMV-IgM positive rate was significantly higher in intractable epilepsy group than non-intractable epilepsy group (P < 0.001). The HCMV-IgM positive rate was significantly higher in non-intractable epilepsy group than control group (P < 0.001). The hs-CRP and IL-6 levels presented descending trends respectively in intractable epilepsy group, non-intractable epilepsy group and control group (all P < 0.001). Conclusion: HCMV was prominently expressed in epilepsy and might contribute to the development of epilepsy. PMID:26884973

  17. AGGRESSIVE TREATMENT OF SPONTANEOUS PNEUMOTHORAX

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Sydney P.; Jamplis, Robert W.; Mitchell, Sidney P.

    1962-01-01

    In analysis of the results of treatment of 48 episodes of spontaneous pneumothorax, aggressive treatment by means of closed intercostal drainage with constant suction was found to achieve the aims of therapy more effectively than conservative measures of bed rest with or without needle aspiration. In general, full expansion of the lung was more quickly restored, recurrence was of lesser incidence, the period in hospital was shorter and the time away from work was reduced. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:13905846

  18. Rural neighborhoods and child aggression.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Natasha K; Wretman, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    Structural equation modeling with latent variables was used to evaluate the direct and mediated effects of a neighborhood risk factor (negative teen behaviors) on the parent-report aggressive behavior of 213 students in grades 3 through 5 attending a school in a low-income, rural community. Contagion and social control hypotheses were examined as well as hypotheses about whether the neighborhood served as a microsystem or exosystem for rural pre-adolescents. Analyses took into account the clustering of students and ordinal nature of the data. Findings suggest that rural neighborhoods may operate as both a microsystem and exosystem for children, with direct contagion effects on their aggressive behaviors as well as indirect social control effects through parenting practices. Direct effects on aggression were also found for parenting practices and child reports of friends' negative behaviors. Pre-adolescence may be a transitional stage, when influences of the neighborhood on child behavior begin to compete with influences of caregivers. Findings can inform the timing and targets of violence prevention in rural communities.

  19. Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... serve as an "alarm system," alerting you to danger. For example, imagine coming home and finding a ... extra spark to help you get out of danger. In more normal but busy situations, anxiety can ...

  20. Separation Anxiety (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 8- to 12-Month-Old Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias Childhood Stress Communication and Your 1- to 2- ... on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © ...