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Sample records for epithelial ion transport

  1. Cholinergic regulation of epithelial ion transport in the mammalian intestine

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, C L; McKay, D M

    2006-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is critical in controlling epithelial ion transport and hence water movements for gut hydration. Here we review the mechanism of cholinergic control of epithelial ion transport across the mammalian intestine. The cholinergic nervous system affects basal ion flux and can evoke increased active ion transport events. Most studies rely on measuring increases in short-circuit current (ISC = active ion transport) evoked by adding ACh or cholinomimetics to intestinal tissue mounted in Ussing chambers. Despite subtle species and gut regional differences, most data indicate that, under normal circumstances, the effect of ACh on intestinal ion transport is mainly an increase in Cl- secretion due to interaction with epithelial M3 muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) and, to a lesser extent, neuronal M1 mAChRs; however, AChR pharmacology has been plagued by a lack of good receptor subtype-selective compounds. Mice lacking M3 mAChRs display intact cholinergically-mediated intestinal ion transport, suggesting a possible compensatory mechanism. Inflamed tissues often display perturbations in the enteric cholinergic system and reduced intestinal ion transport responses to cholinomimetics. The mechanism(s) underlying this hyporesponsiveness are not fully defined. Inflammation-evoked loss of mAChR-mediated control of epithelial ion transport in the mouse reveals a role for neuronal nicotinic AChRs, representing a hitherto unappreciated braking system to limit ACh-evoked Cl- secretion. We suggest that: i) pharmacological analyses should be supported by the use of more selective compounds and supplemented with molecular biology techniques targeting specific ACh receptors and signalling molecules, and ii) assessment of ion transport in normal tissue must be complemented with investigations of tissues from patients or animals with intestinal disease to reveal control mechanisms that may go undetected by focusing on healthy tissue only. PMID:16981004

  2. Effects of ozone on airway epithelial permeability and ion transport.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, P A; Ranga, V; Stutts, M J

    1991-12-01

    Ozone is a highly reactive form of oxygen produced in the atmosphere by photochemical reactions involving substrates emitted from automobile engines. Outdoor air concentrations as high as 0.4 parts per million (ppm) occur. The respiratory tract extracts about 90% of inhaled ozone. From the chemical reactivity of ozone, it is expected to attack organic molecules located on or near the respiratory surfaces. The airways are covered with a cohesive layer of epithelial cells that forms the boundary between the external environment and the respiratory tissues. One important role of this epithelial layer is its barrier function. Airborne particles that deposit (and dissolve) in the airway surface liquid are not readily absorbed, and soluble tissue components are excluded from the surface liquid. The epithelium also controls the volume and composition of the surface liquid. One important process in this regard is the absorption and secretion of ions and water. We have studied the effects of inhalation of ozone on the barrier function (permeability to dissolved molecules) and the ion transport activity of epithelium using both in vivo and in vitro techniques. All our experiments were performed with male Hartley strain guinea pigs. Conscious, unrestrained animals were exposed to a concentration of ozone of 1 ppm for three hours in controlled environmental chambers in the Health Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Research Triangle Park, NC. Such exposures caused a marked increase in the rate of appearance in blood of various water-soluble compounds instilled onto the surface of the trachea, indicating increased permeability of the airway epithelium. This interpretation was supported by electron microscopy, which showed that the tracer molecule horseradish peroxidase was present in the intercellular spaces of tracheal epithelium from ozone-exposed, but not air-exposed (control), animals. However, when the tracheas were excised after ozone

  3. NAD(P)H oxidase and renal epithelial ion transport

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental requirement for cellular vitality is the maintenance of plasma ion concentration within strict ranges. It is the function of the kidney to match urinary excretion of ions with daily ion intake and nonrenal losses to maintain a stable ionic milieu. NADPH oxidase is a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within many cell types, including the transporting renal epithelia. The focus of this review is to describe the role of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS toward local renal tubular ion transport in each nephron segment and to discuss how NADPH oxidase-derived ROS signaling within the nephron may mediate ion homeostasis. In each case, we will attempt to identify the various subunits of NADPH oxidase and reactive oxygen species involved and the ion transporters, which these affect. We will first review the role of NADPH oxidase on renal Na+ and K+ transport. Finally, we will review the relationship between tubular H+ efflux and NADPH oxidase activity. PMID:21270341

  4. Epithelial ion transport in rabbit corneas following myopic keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Swinger, C A; Candia, O A; Marcus, S; Barker, B A; Kornmehl, E W

    1986-08-01

    In isolated rabbit corneas that had undergone lamellar keratectomy or myopic keratomileusis, the stimulation of chloride transport by 10(-5) M epinephrine was completely inhibited at 1 week following surgery. At 28 days following surgery, both groups responded to 10(-7) M epinephrine. The response to 10(-5) M amphotericin B was normal both at 1 week and at 28 days following surgery. We conclude that, although the Na-K pump was not affected by the lamellar keratectomy and cryolathing, that either the epithelial beta receptors and/or the cAMP pathway were temporarily inhibited for at least 1 week following surgery. A lamellar keratectomy, therefore, can have an adverse effect on the epithelial transport system of the corneal epithelium even though the epithelium may appear normal clinically.

  5. Polystyrene nanoparticles activate ion transport in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, J; Gong, X; Nahirney, D; Duszyk, M; Radomski, MW

    2011-01-01

    Background Over the last decade, nanotechnology has provided researchers with new nanometer materials, such as nanoparticles, which have the potential to provide new therapies for many lung diseases. In this study, we investigated the acute effects of polystyrene nanoparticles on epithelial ion channel function. Methods Human submucosal Calu-3 cells that express cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and baby hamster kidney cells engineered to express the wild-type CFTR gene were used to investigate the actions of negatively charged 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles on short-circuit current in Calu-3 cells by Ussing chamber and single CFTR Clchannels alone and in the presence of known CFTR channel activators by using baby hamster kidney cell patches. Results Polystyrene nanoparticles caused sustained, repeatable, and concentration-dependent increases in short-circuit current. In turn, these short-circuit current responses were found to be biphasic in nature, ie, an initial peak followed by a plateau. EC50 values for peak and plateau short-circuit current responses were 1457 and 315.5 ng/mL, respectively. Short-circuit current was inhibited by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate, a CFTR Cl− channel blocker. Polystyrene nanoparticles activated basolateral K+ channels and affected Cl− and HCO3 − secretion. The mechanism of short-circuit current activation by polystyrene nanoparticles was found to be largely dependent on calcium-dependent and cyclic nucleotide-dependent phosphorylation of CFTR Cl− channels. Recordings from isolated inside-out patches using baby hamster kidney cells confirmed the direct activation of CFTR Cl− channels by the nanoparticles. Conclusion This is the first study to identify the activation of ion channels in airway cells after exposure to polystyrene-based nanomaterials. Thus, polystyrene nanoparticles cannot be considered as a simple neutral vehicle for drug delivery for the treatment of lung diseases, due to the fact

  6. Organic electrochemical transistor array for recording transepithelial ion transport of human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chunlei; Xie, Changyan; Lin, Peng; Yan, Feng; Huang, Pingbo; Hsing, I-Ming

    2013-12-03

    An organic electrochemical transistor array is integrated with human airway epithelial cells. This integration provides a novel method to couple transepithelial ion transport with electrical current. Activation and inhibition of transepithelial ion transport are readily detected with excellent time resolution. The organic electrochemical transistor array serves as a promising platform for physiological studies and drug testing. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Allergic airway inflammation induces a pro-secretory epithelial ion transport phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulou, P; Dai, L; Schatterny, J; Hirtz, S; Duerr, J; Mall, M A

    2010-12-01

    The airway epithelium is a central effector tissue in allergic inflammation and T-helper cell (Th) type 2-driven epithelial responses, such as mucus hypersecretion contribute to airflow obstruction in allergic airway disease. Previous in vitro studies demonstrated that Th2 cytokines also act as potent modulators of epithelial ion transport and fluid secretion, but the in vivo effect of allergic inflammation on airway ion transport remains unknown. We, therefore, induced allergic inflammation by intratracheal instillation of Aspergillus fumigatus extract or interleukin-13 in mice and determined effects on ion transport in native tracheal and bronchial tissues. We demonstrate that allergic inflammation enhanced basal Cl(-) secretion in both airway regions and inhibited epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC)-mediated Na(+) absorption and increased Ca²(+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion in bronchi. Allergen-induced alterations in bronchial ion transport were associated with reduced transcript levels of α-, β- and γENaC, and were largely abrogated in signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)6(-/-) mice. Our studies demonstrate that Th2-dependent airway inflammation produced a pro-secretory ion transport phenotype in vivo, which was largely Stat6-dependent. These results suggest that Th2-mediated fluid secretion may improve airway surface hydration and clearance of mucus that is hypersecreted in allergic airway diseases such as asthma, and identify epithelial Stat6 signalling as a potential therapeutic target to promote mucus hydration and airway clearance.

  8. Deleterious impact of hyperglycemia on cystic fibrosis airway ion transport and epithelial repair.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Claudia; Bardou, Olivier; Maillé, Émilie; Berthiaume, Yves; Brochiero, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF)-related diabetes (CFRD) is associated with faster pulmonary function decline. Thus, we evaluated the impact of hyperglycemia on airway epithelial repair and transepithelial ion transport, which are critical in maintaining lung integrity and function. Non-CF and CF airway epithelial cells were exposed to low (LG) or high (HG) glucose before ion current and wound repair rate measurements. CFTR and K+ currents decreased after HG treatments. HG also reduced the wound healing rates of non-CF and CF cell monolayers. Although CFTR correction with VRT-325 accelerated the healing rates of CF cells monolayers under LG conditions, this improvement was significantly abrogated under HG conditions. Our data highlights a deleterious impact of hyperglycemia on ion transport and epithelial repair functions, which could contribute to the deterioration in lung function in CFRD patients. HG may also interfere with the beneficial effects of CFTR rescue on airway epithelial repair. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mycoplasma pulmonis Inhibits Electrogenic Ion Transport across Murine Tracheal Epithelial Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Linda C.; Trummell, Hoa Q.; Singh, Ashvani; Cassell, Gail H.; Bridges, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Murine chronic respiratory disease is characterized by persistent colonization of tracheal and bronchial epithelial cell surfaces by Mycoplasma pulmonis, submucosal and intraluminal immune and inflammatory cells, and altered airway activity. To determine the direct effect of M. pulmonis upon transepithelial ion transport in the absence of immune and inflammatory cell responses, primary mouse tracheal epithelial cell monolayers (MTEs) were apically infected and assayed in Ussing chambers. M. pulmonis-infected MTEs, but not those infected with a nonmurine mycoplasma, demonstrated reductions in amiloride-sensitive Na+ absorption, cyclic AMP, and cholinergic-stimulated Cl− secretion and transepithelial resistance. These effects were shown to require interaction of viable organisms with the apical surface of the monolayer and to be dependent upon organism number and duration of infection. Altered transport due to M. pulmonis was not merely a result of epithelial cell death as evidenced by the following: (i) active transport of Na+ and Cl−, albeit at reduced rates; (ii) normal cell morphology, including intact tight junctions, as demonstrated by electron microscopy; (iii) maintenance of a mean transepithelial resistance of 440 Ω/cm2; and (iv) lack of leakage of fluid from the basolateral to the apical surface of the monolayer. Alteration in epithelial ion transport in vitro is consistent with impaired pulmonary clearance and altered airway function in M. pulmonis-infected animals. Furthermore, the ability of M. pulmonis to alter transport without killing the host cell may explain its successful parasitism and long-term persistence in the host. Further study of the MTE-M. pulmonis model should elucidate the molecular mechanisms which mediate this reduction in transepithelial ion transport. PMID:9423868

  10. Role for Ion Transport in Porcine Vocal Fold Epithelial Defense to Acid Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Erickson-Levendoski, Elizabeth; Sivasankar, M. Preeti

    2012-01-01

    Objective The vocal fold epithelium is routinely exposed to gastric contents, including acid and pepsin, during laryngopharyngeal reflux events. The epithelium may possess intrinsic defenses to reflux. The first objective of the current study was to examine whether vocal fold epithelial ion transport is one potential mechanism of defense to gastric contents. The second objective was to determine whether ion transport in response to gastric contents is associated with the secretion of bicarbonate. Study Design Prospective design in excised porcine larynges. Setting Laboratory. Subjects and Methods Porcine vocal folds (N = 56) were exposed on the luminal surface to acid, pepsin, or sham challenges. Ion transport at baseline and following challenge exposure was measured using electrophysiological techniques. To examine specific ion transport mechanisms, vocal folds were pretreated with either a sodium channel blocker or bicarbonate channel blocker. Results Within 60 seconds of acid but not pepsin exposure, there was a significant increase in ion transport. This rapid increase in ion transport was transient and related to bicarbonate secretion. Conclusion The current data suggest that porcine vocal folds immediately increase bicarbonate secretion following exposure to acid. Bicarbonate secretion may act to neutralize acid. These findings contribute to the identification of the mechanisms underlying vocal fold defense to reflux and offer implications for the development of treatments for reflux-induced vocal fold injury. PMID:22086905

  11. Role for ion transport in porcine vocal fold epithelial defense to acid challenge.

    PubMed

    Erickson-Levendoski, Elizabeth; Sivasankar, M Preeti

    2012-02-01

    The vocal fold epithelium is routinely exposed to gastric contents, including acid and pepsin, during laryngopharyngeal reflux events. The epithelium may possess intrinsic defenses to reflux. The first objective of the current study was to examine whether vocal fold epithelial ion transport is one potential mechanism of defense to gastric contents. The second objective was to determine whether ion transport in response to gastric contents is associated with the secretion of bicarbonate. Prospective design in excised porcine larynges. Laboratory. Porcine vocal folds (N = 56) were exposed on the luminal surface to acid, pepsin, or sham challenges. Ion transport at baseline and following challenge exposure was measured using electrophysiological techniques. To examine specific ion transport mechanisms, vocal folds were pretreated with either a sodium channel blocker or bicarbonate channel blocker. Within 60 seconds of acid but not pepsin exposure, there was a significant increase in ion transport. This rapid increase in ion transport was transient and related to bicarbonate secretion. The current data suggest that porcine vocal folds immediately increase bicarbonate secretion following exposure to acid. Bicarbonate secretion may act to neutralize acid. These findings contribute to the identification of the mechanisms underlying vocal fold defense to reflux and offer implications for the development of treatments for reflux-induced vocal fold injury.

  12. Colonic epithelial ion transport is not affected in patients with diverticulosis

    PubMed Central

    Osbak, Philip S; Bindslev, Niels; Poulsen, Steen S; Kaltoft, Nicolai; Tilotta, Maria C; Hansen, Mark B

    2007-01-01

    Background Colonic diverticular disease is a bothersome condition with an unresolved pathogenesis. It is unknown whether a neuroepithelial dysfunction is present. The aim of the study was two-fold; (1) to investigate colonic epithelial ion transport in patients with diverticulosis and (2) to adapt a miniaturized Modified Ussing Air-Suction (MUAS) chamber for colonic endoscopic biopsies. Methods Biopsies were obtained from the sigmoid part of the colon. 86 patients were included. All patients were referred for colonoscopy on suspicion of neoplasia and they were without pathological findings at colonoscopy (controls) except for diverticulosis in 22 (D-patients). Biopsies were mounted in MUAS chambers with an exposed area of 5 mm2. Electrical responses to various stimulators and inhibitors of ion transport were investigated together with histological examination. The MUAS chamber was easy to use and reproducible data were obtained. Results Median basal short circuit current (SCC) was 43.8 μA·cm-2 (0.8 – 199) for controls and 59.3 μA·cm-2 (3.0 – 177.2) for D-patients. Slope conductance was 77.0 mS·cm-2 (18.6 – 204.0) equal to 13 Ω·cm2 for controls and 96.6 mS·cm-2 (8.4 – 191.4) equal to 10.3 Ω·cm2 for D-patients. Stimulation with serotonin, theophylline, forskolin and carbachol induced increases in SCC in a range of 4.9 – 18.6 μA·cm-2, while inhibition with indomethacin, bumetanide, ouabain and amiloride decreased SCC in a range of 6.5 – 27.4 μA·cm-2, and all with no significant differences between controls and D-patients. Histological examinations showed intact epithelium and lamina propria before and after mounting for both types of patients. Conclusion We conclude that epithelial ion transport is not significantly altered in patients with diverticulosis and that the MUAS chamber can be adapted for studies of human colonic endoscopic biopsies. PMID:17888183

  13. Dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis perturbs muscarinic cholinergic control of colonic epithelial ion transport

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, Brooke; Lu, Jun; Green, Christina; Söderholm, Johan D; Akhtar, Mahmood; McKay, Derek M

    2002-01-01

    Neuronal cholinergic input is an important regulator of epithelial electrolyte transport and hence water movement in the gut. In this study, colitis was induced by treating mice with 4% (w v−1) dextran sodium-sulphate (DSS)-water for 5 days followed by 3 days of normal water. Mid-colonic segments were mounted in Ussing chambers and short-circuit current (Isc, indicates net ion movement) responses to the cholinergic agonist, carbachol (CCh; 10−4 M)±tetrodotoxin, atropine (ATR), hexamethonium (HEX), naloxone or phenoxybenzamine were assessed. Tissues from mice with DSS-induced colitis displayed a drop in Isc in response to CCh (−11.3±3.3 μA/cm2), while those from control mice showed a transient increase in Isc (76.3±13.0 μA/cm2). The ΔIsc in colon from DSS-treated mice was tetrodotoxin-sensitive, atropine-insensitive and was reversed by hexamethonium (HEX+CCh=16.7±7.8 μA/cm2), indicating involvement of a nicotinic receptor. CCh induced a drop in Isc in tissues from controls only when they were pretreated with the cholinergic muscarinic receptor blocker, atropine: ATR+CCh=−21.3±7.0 μA/cm2. Nicotine elicited a drop in Isc in Ussing-chambered colon from both control and DSS-treated mice that was TTX-sensitive. The drop in Isc evoked by CCh challenge of colonic tissue from DSS-treated mice or ATR+CCh challenge of control tissue was not significantly affected by blockade of opiate or α-adrenergic receptors by naloxone or phenoxybenzamine, respectively. The data indicate that DSS-colitis reveals a nicotinic receptor that becomes important in cholinergic regulation of ion transport. PMID:11934821

  14. Epithelial pH and ion transport regulation by proton pumps and exchangers.

    PubMed

    Harvey, B J; Ehrenfeld, J

    1988-01-01

    This study reports on the interaction between transepithelial Na+ transport and H+ secretory and intracellular pH (pHi) regulating mechanisms in the model 'tight' epithelium of frog skin. We have used 22Na isotope fluxes and fixed end-point titration to measure undirectional Na+ fluxes, net Na absorption (J(net)Na) and proton secretion (J(net)H), and electrophysiological techniques (double-barrelled ion-sensitive microelectrodes and cell membrane current--voltage relations) to determine intracellular activities of Na+, Cl- and H+ and the conductance of apical membranes to Na+ (gNa) and of basolateral membranes to K+ (gK). In dilute mucosal solutions or in the absence of a permeant anion (Cl-) or counter-current (open-circuit conditions) to accompany Na+ uptake, the J(net)Na is electrically coupled to J(net)H via an electrogenic apical H+-ATPase (located in mitochondria-rich cells). Both fluxes proceed via mitochondria-rich cells and are inhibited by blockers of carbonic anhydrase and H+-ATPase and stimulated by aldosterone and acid load. In high NaCl-containing mucosal solutions or in short-circuit conditions, the J(net)Na becomes uncoupled from J(net)H and proceeds mainly via the principal cells in the epithelium, in which pHi is regulated by basolateral Na+/H+ and Cl-/HCO3- exchangers. Under these conditions, J(net)Na, gNa and gK vary directly and in parallel with pHi, when pHi is changed by permeable weak acids or bases. There is also co-variance between gNa and pHi accompanying spontaneous variations in J(net)Na and when Na+ transport is stimulated by aldosterone or inhibited with ouabain. We conclude that the level of intracellular H+, modulated by H+ pump and Na+/H+ and Cl-/HCO3- exchangers provides an intrinsic regulation of epithelial Na+ transport.

  15. Nitric oxide regulation of colonic epithelial ion transport: a novel role for enteric glia in the myenteric plexus

    PubMed Central

    MacEachern, Sarah J; Patel, Bhavik A; McKay, Derek M; Sharkey, Keith A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Enteric glia are increasingly recognized as important in the regulation of a variety of gastrointestinal functions. Here we tested the hypothesis that nicotinic signalling in the myenteric plexus results in the release of nitric oxide (NO) from neurons and enteric glia to modulate epithelial ion transport. Ion transport was assessed using full-thickness or muscle-stripped segments of mouse colon mounted in Ussing chambers. The cell-permeant NO-sensitive dye DAR-4M AM and amperometry were utilized to identify the cellular sites of NO production within the myenteric plexus and the contributions from specific NOS isoforms. Nicotinic receptors were localized using immunohistochemistry. Nicotinic cholinergic stimulation of colonic segments resulted in NO-dependent changes in epithelial active electrogenic ion transport that were TTX sensitive and significantly altered in the absence of the myenteric plexus. Nicotinic stimulation of the myenteric plexus resulted in NO production and release from neurons and enteric glia, which was completely blocked in the presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) I and NOS II inhibitors. Using the NO scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO), neuronal and enteric glial components of NO production were demonstrated. Nicotinic receptors were identified on enteric neurons, which express NOS I, and enteric glia, which express NOS II. These data identify a unique pathway in the mouse colon whereby nicotinic cholinergic signalling in myenteric ganglia mobilizes NO from NOS II in enteric glia, which in coordinated activity with neurons in the myenteric plexus modulates epithelial ion transport, a key component of homeostasis and innate immunity. PMID:21558161

  16. Nitric oxide regulation of colonic epithelial ion transport: a novel role for enteric glia in the myenteric plexus.

    PubMed

    MacEachern, Sarah J; Patel, Bhavik A; McKay, Derek M; Sharkey, Keith A

    2011-07-01

    Enteric glia are increasingly recognized as important in the regulation of a variety of gastrointestinal functions.Here we tested the hypothesis that nicotinic signalling in the myenteric plexus results in the release of nitric oxide (NO) from neurons and enteric glia to modulate epithelial ion transport. Ion transport was assessed using full-thickness or muscle-stripped segments of mouse colon mounted in Ussing chambers. The cell-permeant NO-sensitive dye DAR-4M AM and amperometry were utilized to identify the cellular sites of NO production within the myenteric plexus and the contributions from specific NOS isoforms. Nicotinic receptors were localized using immunohistochemistry. Nicotinic cholinergic stimulation of colonic segments resulted in NO-dependent changes in epithelial active electrogenic ion transport that were TTX sensitive and significantly altered in the absence of the myenteric plexus. Nicotinic stimulation of the myenteric plexus resulted in NO production and release from neurons and enteric glia, which was completely blocked in the presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) I and NOS II inhibitors. Using the NO scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO), neuronal and enteric glial components of NO production were demonstrated. Nicotinic receptors were identified on enteric neurons, which express NOS I, and enteric glia, which express NOS II. These data identify a unique pathway in the mouse colon whereby nicotinic cholinergic signalling in myenteric ganglia mobilizes NO from NOS II in enteric glia, which in coordinated activity with neurons in the myenteric plexus modulates epithelial ion transport, a key component of homeostasis and innate immunity.

  17. Morphogenesis of the epithelial cell transporting phenotype: synthesis and distribution of ion channels.

    PubMed

    García-Villegas, M R; Valdés, J; Reyes, G; Moreno, J; Cortes, N; Contreras, R G; Cereijido, M

    1996-05-01

    The exchange of substances between higher organisms and the environment takes place across epithelia consisting of one or more cell layers. To perform this function, epithelial cells have two basic differentiated properties: 1) they form tight junctions (TJs) that seal the extracellular space, and 2) they are polarized into an apical and a basolateral domain, with entirely different structural, biochemical and physiological properties. Our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the expression of these properties has been greatly enhanced by the availability of epithelial cell lines that form TJs and polarize in vitro under conditions suitable for experimental control. In this article we summarize our studies on the synthesis and polarized expression of ion channels in epithelial cells. MDCK cells have four types of K+ channels in the apical domain, and a fifth one in the basolateral domain. The basolateral side also has a population of CI- channels. Each type of channel is absolutely polarized. Harvesting with trypsin-EDTA reduces the area of the plasma membrane by 50% and the channel population by 90%. Upon plating, these channels are recovered within a few hours. We describe here the main extracellular and intracellular mechanisms involved in these phenomena.

  18. Computational modeling of epithelial fluid and ion transport in the parotid duct after transfection of human aquaporin-1.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shelley; Chiorini, John A; Sneyd, James; Suresh, Vinod

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that localized delivery of the aquaporin-1 (AQP1) gene to the parotid duct can restore saliva flow in minipigs following irradiation-induced salivary hypofunction. The resulting flow rate and electrochemistry of secreted saliva contradicts current understanding of ductal fluid transport. We hypothesized that changes in expression of ion transport proteins have occurred following AQP1 transfection. We use a mathematical model of ion and fluid transport across the parotid duct epithelial cells to predict the expression profile of ion transporters that are consistent with the experimental measurements of saliva composition and secretion rates. Using a baseline set of parameters, the model reproduces the data for the irradiated, non-AQP1-transfected case. We propose three scenarios which may have occurred after transfection, which differ in the location of the AQP1 gene. The first scenario places AQP1 within nonsecretory cells, and requires that epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) expression is greatly reduced (1.3% of baseline), and ductal bicarbonate concentration is increased from 40.6 to 137.0 mM, to drive water secretion into the duct. The second scenario introduces the AQP1 gene into all ductal cells. The final scenario has AQP1 primarily in the proximal duct cells which secrete water under baseline conditions. We find the change in the remaining cells includes a 95.8% reduction in ENaC expression, enabling us to reproduce all experimental ionic concentrations within 9 mM. These findings provide a mechanistic basis for the observations and will guide the further development of gene transfer therapy for salivary hypofunction. Following transfection of aquaporin into the parotid ducts of minipigs with salivary hypofunction, the resulting increase in salivary flow rates contradicts current understanding of ductal fluid transport. We show that the change in saliva electrochemistry and flow rate can be explained by changes in expression of ion

  19. Differentiation of human bronchial epithelial cells: role of hydrocortisone in development of ion transport pathways involved in mucociliary clearance.

    PubMed

    Zaidman, Nathan A; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; O'Grady, Scott M

    2016-08-01

    Glucocorticoids strongly influence the mucosal-defense functions performed by the bronchial epithelium, and inhaled corticosteroids are critical in the treatment of patients with inflammatory airway diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis. A common pathology associated with these diseases is reduced mucociliary clearance, a defense mechanism involving the coordinated transport of salt, water, and mucus by the bronchial epithelium, ultimately leading to retention of pathogens and particles in the airways and to further disease progression. In the present study we investigated the role of hydrocortisone (HC) in differentiation and development of the ion transport phenotype of normal human bronchial epithelial cells under air-liquid interface conditions. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells differentiated in the absence of HC (HC0) showed significantly less benzamil-sensitive short-circuit current than controls, as well as a reduced response after stimulation with the selective β2-adrenergic receptor agonist salbutamol. Apical membrane localization of epithelial Na(+) channel α-subunits was similarly reduced in HC0 cells compared with controls, supporting a role of HC in the trafficking and density of Na(+) channels in the plasma membrane. Additionally, glucocorticoid exposure during differentiation regulated the transcription of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and β2-adrenergic receptor mRNAs and appeared to be necessary for the expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-dependent anion secretion in response to β2-agonists. HC had no significant effect on surface cell differentiation but did modulate the expression of mucin mRNAs. These findings indicate that glucocorticoids support mucosal defense by regulating critical transport pathways essential for effective mucociliary clearance. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Ion transport asymmetry and functional coupling in bovine pigmented and nonpigmented ciliary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Edelman, J L; Sachs, G; Adorante, J S

    1994-05-01

    The solute and water transport properties of the bovine ciliary epithelium were studied using isolated pigmented (PE) and nonpigmented (NPE) cells. It was shown that these cells were functionally coupled by demonstrating dye diffusion between paired PE and NPE cells after microinjection of lucifer yellow. Electronic cell sizing was used to measure cell volume changes of isolated PE and NPE cells in suspension after anisosmotic perturbations and after transport inhibition under isosmotic conditions. The PE cells showed the presence of a regulatory volume increase when subjected to osmotic shrinkage with NaCl, whereas the NPE cells did not demonstrate a regulatory volume increase under these conditions. In contrast, the NPE cells exhibited a regulatory volume decrease when subjected to osmotic swelling, whereas the PE cells did not recover from swelling. The regulatory volume decrease in NPE cells was inhibited by increased bath K or pretreatment with quinine (1 mM). The presence of a bumetanide-sensitive mechanism capable of moving measurable amounts of solute and water, probably Na-K-2Cl cotransport, was demonstrated in the PE cells but absent in the NPE cells. Bumetanide produced a dose-dependent shrinkage of PE cells at concentrations as low as 1 microM. Isosmotically reducing bath Cl, Na, or K concentration caused a rapid shrinkage of PE cells that was bumetanide inhibitable. The asymmetry of transport properties in PE and NPE cells supports a functional syncytium model of aqueous humor formation (39) across the two layers of the ciliary epithelium wherein ion uptake from the blood is carried out by the PE cells and ion extrusion by the NPE cells. Gap-junction coupling between the cells allows the ions taken up by the PE cells to move into the NPE cells. Extrusion of Na by the Na-K pump across the aqueous facing (basolateral) membranes of the NPE cells, most likely accompanied by Cl, determines the formation of the aqueous humor.

  1. The effect of varying tonicity on nasal epithelial ion transport in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael G; Geddes, Duncan M; Alton, Eric W F W

    2005-04-01

    There is reasonable evidence that the fluid layer of the airway epithelium is exposed to changes in tonicity. The inspiration of cool, dry air causes an increased tonicity, whereas this tonicity may be decreased by glandular secretions. We hypothesized that the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is involved in the responses to changes in tonicity and that these may be altered in cystic fibrosis (CF). Using nasal potential difference (PD) protocols in 8 subjects with CF and 10 subjects without CF, we investigated the effects of hyper- and hypotonicity on ion transport processes. We found significant differences between the two groups. In response to a hypertonic challenge (mannitol 500 mM), there was a decreased PD in both groups, suggesting decreased sodium absorption. However, after the prior inhibition of sodium transport using amiloride, there was an increased PD in the non-CF group alone, suggesting CFTR-mediated chloride secretion in response to luminal hypertonicity. For the hypotonic solution, we found that hypotonicity inhibited CFTR-mediated chloride secretion in the non-CF group. These data suggest that CFTR plays a role in the recognition and regulation of airway fluid tonicity.

  2. Simultaneous Exposure to Multiple Air Pollutants Influences Alveolar Epithelial Cell Ion Transport

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose. Air pollution sources generally release multiple pollutants simultaneously and yet, research has historically focused on the source-to-health linkages of individual air pollutants. We recently showed that exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to a combination of particul...

  3. Ion pump sorting in polarized renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Caplan, M J

    2001-08-01

    The plasma membranes of renal epithelial cells are divided into distinct apical and basolateral domains, which contain different inventories of ion transport proteins. Without this polarity vectorial ion and fluid transport would not be possible. Little is known of the signals and mechanisms that renal epithelial cells use to establish and maintain polarized distributions of their ion transport proteins. Analysis of ion pump sorting reveals that multiple complex signals participate in determining and regulating these proteins' subcellular localizations.

  4. An experimental, hands-on approach to epithelial ion transport: A simple technique for introducing students to ion transport in epithelia.

    PubMed

    Bagdadi, Andrea; Orona, Nadia; Fernández, Eugenio; Altamirano, Anibal; Amorena, Carlos

    2010-09-01

    We have realized that our Biology undergraduate students learn biological concepts as established truths without awareness of the body of experimental evidence supporting the emerging models as usually presented in handbooks and texts in general. Therefore, we have implemented a laboratory practice in our course of Physiology and Biophysics, aimed to introduce the students in the way the scientific models and theories are built, through the measurement of Na(+) transport in frog skin. Transepithelial Na(+) transport was assessed in the frog skin, with measurements of short circuit currents. The mucosal Na(+) and serosal K(+) concentrations were modified and the effects were recorded. These effects were reversible. Addition of a drug that blocks epithelial Na(+) channels (amiloride) to the mucosal side solution abolished the short circuit current. Sodium fluxes were calculated, and the results were adjusted to Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The impact of the proposed practice on the students is discussed.

  5. Altered ion transport in normal human bronchial epithelial cells following exposure to chemically distinct metal welding fume particles.

    PubMed

    Fedan, Jeffrey S; Thompson, Janet A; Meighan, Terence G; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Antonini, James M

    2017-07-01

    Welding fume inhalation causes pulmonary toxicity, including susceptibility to infection. We hypothesized that airway epithelial ion transport is a target of fume toxicity, and investigated the effects of fume particulates from manual metal arc-stainless steel (MMA-SS) and gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS) on ion transport in normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE) cultured in air-interface. MMA-SS particles, more soluble than GMA-MS particles, contain Cr, Ni, Fe and Mn; GMA-MS particles contain Fe and Mn. MMA-SS or GMA-MS particles (0.0167-166.7μg/cm(2)) were applied apically to NHBEs. After 18h transepithelial potential difference (Vt), resistance (Rt), and short circuit current (Isc) were measured. Particle effects on Na(+) and Cl¯ channels and the Na(+),K(+),2Cl¯-cotransporter were evaluated using amiloride (apical), 5-nitro-2-[(3-phenylpropyl)amino]benzoic acid (NPPB, apical), and bumetanide (basolateral), respectively. MMA-SS (0.0167-16.7μg/cm(2)) increased basal Vt. Only 16.7μg/cm(2) GMA-MS increased basal Vt significantly. MMA-SS or GMA-MS exposure potentiated Isc responses (decreases) to amiloride and bumetanide, while not affecting those to NPPB, GMA-MS to a lesser degree than MMA-SS. Variable effects on Rt were observed in response to amiloride, and bumetanide. Generally, MMA-SS was more potent in altering responses to amiloride and bumetanide than GMA-MS. Hyperpolarization occurred in the absence of LDH release, but decreases in Vt, Rt, and Isc at higher fume particulate doses accompanied LDH release, to a greater extent for MMA-SS. Thus, Na(+) transport and Na(+),K(+),2Cl¯-cotransport are affected by fume exposure; MMA-MS is more potent than GMA-MS. Enhanced Na(+) absorption and decreased airway surface liquid could compromise defenses against infection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Ion Channels in Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Lawrence G.

    Ion channels in epithelial cells serve to move ions, and in some cases fluid, between compartments of the body. This function of the transfer of material is fundamentally different from that of the transfer of information, which is the main job of most channels in excitable cells. Nevertheless the basic construction of the channels is similar in many respects in the two tissue types. This chapter reviews the nature of channels in epithelia and discusses how their functions have evolved to accomplish the basic tasks for which they are responsible. I will focus on three channel types: epithelial Na+ channels, inward-rectifier K+ channels, and CFTR Cl- channels.

  7. Interferon-γ alters downstream signaling originating from epidermal growth factor receptor in intestinal epithelial cells: functional consequences for ion transport.

    PubMed

    Paul, Gisela; Marchelletta, Ronald R; McCole, Declan F; Barrett, Kim E

    2012-01-13

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) regulates many cellular functions, such as proliferation, apoptosis, and ion transport. Our aim was to investigate whether long term treatment with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) modulates EGF activation of downstream signaling pathways in intestinal epithelial cells and if this contributes to dysregulation of epithelial ion transport in inflammation. Polarized monolayers of T(84) and HT29/cl.19A colonocytes were preincubated with IFN-γ prior to stimulation with EGF. Basolateral potassium transport was studied in Ussing chambers. We also studied inflamed colonic mucosae from C57BL/6 mice treated with dextran sulfate sodium or mdr1a knock-out mice and controls. IFN-γ increased intestinal epithelial EGFr expression without increasing its phosphorylation. Conversely, IFN-γ caused a significant decrease in EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of specific EGFr tyrosine residues and activation of ERK but not Akt-1. In IFNγ-pretreated cells, the inhibitory effect of EGF on carbachol-stimulated K(+) channel activity was lost. In inflamed colonic tissues, EGFr expression was significantly increased, whereas ERK phosphorylation was reduced. Thus, although it up-regulates EGFr expression, IFN-γ causes defective EGFr activation in colonic epithelial cells via reduced phosphorylation of specific EGFr tyrosine residues. This probably accounts for altered downstream signaling consequences. These observations were corroborated in the setting of colitis. IFN-γ also abrogates the ability of EGF to inhibit carbachol-stimulated basolateral K(+) currents. Our data suggest that, in the setting of inflammation, the biological effect of EGF, including the inhibitory effect of EGF on Ca(2+)-dependent ion transport, is altered, perhaps contributing to diarrheal and other symptoms in vivo.

  8. Diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione exposure of human cultured airway epithelial cells: Ion transport effects and metabolism of butter flavoring agents.

    PubMed

    Zaccone, Eric J; Goldsmith, W Travis; Shimko, Michael J; Wells, J R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Willard, Patsy A; Case, Shannon L; Thompson, Janet A; Fedan, Jeffrey S

    2015-12-15

    Inhalation of butter flavoring by workers in the microwave popcorn industry may result in “popcorn workers' lung.” In previous in vivo studies rats exposed for 6 h to vapor from the flavoring agents, diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione, acquired flavoring concentration-dependent damage of the upper airway epithelium and airway hyporeactivity to inhaled methacholine. Because ion transport is essential for lung fluid balance,we hypothesized that alterations in ion transport may be an early manifestation of butter flavoring-induced toxicity.We developed a system to expose cultured human bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells (NHBEs) to flavoring vapors. NHBEs were exposed for 6 h to diacetyl or 2,3-pentanedione vapors (25 or ≥ 60 ppm) and the effects on short circuit current and transepithelial resistance (Rt) were measured. Immediately after exposure to 25 ppm both flavorings reduced Na+ transport,without affecting Cl- transport or Na+,K+-pump activity. Rt was unaffected. Na+ transport recovered 18 h after exposure. Concentrations (100-360 ppm) of diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione reported earlier to give rise in vivo to epithelial damage, and 60 ppm, caused death of NHBEs 0 h post-exposure. Analysis of the basolateral medium indicated that NHBEs metabolize diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione to acetoin and 2-hydroxy-3-pentanone, respectively. The results indicate that ion transport is inhibited transiently in airway epithelial cells by lower concentrations of the flavorings than those that result in morphological changes of the cells in vivo or in vitro.

  9. Diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione exposure of human cultured airway epithelial cells: Ion transport effects and metabolism of butter flavoring agents

    PubMed Central

    Zaccone, Eric J.; Goldsmith, W. Travis; Shimko, Michael J.; Wells, J.R.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Willard, Patsy A.; Case, Shannon L.; Thompson, Janet A.; Fedan, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of butter flavoring by workers in the microwave popcorn industry may result in “popcorn workers' lung.” In previous in vivo studies rats exposed for 6 h to vapor from the flavoring agents, diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione, acquired flavoring concentration-dependent damage of the upper airway epithelium and airway hyporeactivity to inhaled methacholine. Because ion transport is essential for lung fluid balance, we hypothesized that alterations in ion transport may be an early manifestation of butter flavoring-induced toxicity. We developed a system to expose cultured human bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells (NHBEs) to flavoring vapors. NHBEs were exposed for 6 h to diacetyl or 2,3-pentanedione vapors (25 or ≥60 ppm) and the effects on short circuit current and transepithelial resistance (Rt) were measured. Immediately after exposure to 25 ppm both flavorings reduced Na+ transport, without affecting Cl− transport or Na+,K+-pump activity. Rt was unaffected. Na+ transport recovered 18 h after exposure. Concentrations (100–360 ppm) of diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione reported earlier to give rise in vivo to epithelial damage, and 60 ppm, caused death of NHBEs 0 h post-exposure. Analysis of the basolateral medium indicated that NHBEs metabolize diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione to acetoin and 2-hydroxy-3-pentanone, respectively. The results indicate that ion transport is inhibited transiently in airway epithelial cells by lower concentrations of the flavorings than those that result in morphological changes of the cells in vivo or in vitro. PMID:26454031

  10. Ion transport by pulmonary epithelia.

    PubMed

    Hollenhorst, Monika I; Richter, Katrin; Fronius, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The lung surface of air-breathing vertebrates is formed by a continuous epithelium that is covered by a fluid layer. In the airways, this epithelium is largely pseudostratified consisting of diverse cell types such as ciliated cells, goblet cells, and undifferentiated basal cells, whereas the alveolar epithelium consists of alveolar type I and alveolar type II cells. Regulation and maintenance of the volume and viscosity of the fluid layer covering the epithelium is one of the most important functions of the epithelial barrier that forms the outer surface area of the lungs. Therefore, the epithelial cells are equipped with a wide variety of ion transport proteins, among which Na⁺, Cl⁻, and K⁺ channels have been identified to play a role in the regulation of the fluid layer. Malfunctions of pulmonary epithelial ion transport processes and, thus, impairment of the liquid balance in our lungs is associated with severe diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and pulmonary oedema. Due to the important role of pulmonary epithelial ion transport processes for proper lung function, the present paper summarizes the recent findings about composition, function, and ion transport properties of the airway epithelium as well as of the alveolar epithelium.

  11. Ion Transport by Pulmonary Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Hollenhorst, Monika I.; Richter, Katrin; Fronius, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The lung surface of air-breathing vertebrates is formed by a continuous epithelium that is covered by a fluid layer. In the airways, this epithelium is largely pseudostratified consisting of diverse cell types such as ciliated cells, goblet cells, and undifferentiated basal cells, whereas the alveolar epithelium consists of alveolar type I and alveolar type II cells. Regulation and maintenance of the volume and viscosity of the fluid layer covering the epithelium is one of the most important functions of the epithelial barrier that forms the outer surface area of the lungs. Therefore, the epithelial cells are equipped with a wide variety of ion transport proteins, among which Na+, Cl−, and K+ channels have been identified to play a role in the regulation of the fluid layer. Malfunctions of pulmonary epithelial ion transport processes and, thus, impairment of the liquid balance in our lungs is associated with severe diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and pulmonary oedema. Due to the important role of pulmonary epithelial ion transport processes for proper lung function, the present paper summarizes the recent findings about composition, function, and ion transport properties of the airway epithelium as well as of the alveolar epithelium. PMID:22131798

  12. TGF-β directs trafficking of the epithelial sodium channel ENaC which has implications for ion and fluid transport in acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Dorothea M.; Vadász, István; Wujak, Łukasz; Wygrecka, Małgorzata; Olschewski, Andrea; Becker, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Papp, Rita; Mayer, Konstantin; Rummel, Sebastian; Brandes, Ralph P.; Günther, Andreas; Waldegger, Siegfried; Eickelberg, Oliver; Seeger, Werner; Morty, Rory E.

    2014-01-01

    TGF-β is a pathogenic factor in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a condition characterized by alveolar edema. A unique TGF-β pathway is described, which rapidly promoted internalization of the αβγ epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) complex from the alveolar epithelial cell surface, leading to persistence of pulmonary edema. TGF-β applied to the alveolar airspaces of live rabbits or isolated rabbit lungs blocked sodium transport and caused fluid retention, which—together with patch-clamp and flow cytometry studies—identified ENaC as the target of TGF-β. TGF-β rapidly and sequentially activated phospholipase D1, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase 1α, and NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) to produce reactive oxygen species, driving internalization of βENaC, the subunit responsible for cell-surface stability of the αβγENaC complex. ENaC internalization was dependent on oxidation of βENaC Cys43. Treatment of alveolar epithelial cells with bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from ARDS patients drove βENaC internalization, which was inhibited by a TGF-β neutralizing antibody and a Tgfbr1 inhibitor. Pharmacological inhibition of TGF-β signaling in vivo in mice, and genetic ablation of the nox4 gene in mice, protected against perturbed lung fluid balance in a bleomycin model of lung injury, highlighting a role for both proximal and distal components of this unique ENaC regulatory pathway in lung fluid balance. These data describe a unique TGF-β–dependent mechanism that regulates ion and fluid transport in the lung, which is not only relevant to the pathological mechanisms of ARDS, but might also represent a physiological means of acutely regulating ENaC activity in the lung and other organs. PMID:24324142

  13. Epithelial Anion Transport as Modulator of Chemokine Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schnúr, Andrea; Hegyi, Péter; Rousseau, Simon; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Veit, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The pivotal role of epithelial cells is to secrete and absorb ions and water in order to allow the formation of a luminal fluid compartment that is fundamental for the epithelial function as a barrier against environmental factors. Importantly, epithelial cells also take part in the innate immune system. As a first line of defense they detect pathogens and react by secreting and responding to chemokines and cytokines, thus aggravating immune responses or resolving inflammatory states. Loss of epithelial anion transport is well documented in a variety of diseases including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, pancreatitis, and cholestatic liver disease. Here we review the effect of aberrant anion secretion with focus on the release of inflammatory mediators by epithelial cells and discuss putative mechanisms linking these transport defects to the augmented epithelial release of chemokines and cytokines. These mechanisms may contribute to the excessive and persistent inflammation in many respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27382190

  14. Epithelial Anion Transport as Modulator of Chemokine Signaling.

    PubMed

    Schnúr, Andrea; Hegyi, Péter; Rousseau, Simon; Lukacs, Gergely L; Veit, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The pivotal role of epithelial cells is to secrete and absorb ions and water in order to allow the formation of a luminal fluid compartment that is fundamental for the epithelial function as a barrier against environmental factors. Importantly, epithelial cells also take part in the innate immune system. As a first line of defense they detect pathogens and react by secreting and responding to chemokines and cytokines, thus aggravating immune responses or resolving inflammatory states. Loss of epithelial anion transport is well documented in a variety of diseases including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, pancreatitis, and cholestatic liver disease. Here we review the effect of aberrant anion secretion with focus on the release of inflammatory mediators by epithelial cells and discuss putative mechanisms linking these transport defects to the augmented epithelial release of chemokines and cytokines. These mechanisms may contribute to the excessive and persistent inflammation in many respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases.

  15. Adrenergic regulation of ion transport across adult alveolar epithelial cells: effects on Cl- channel activation and transport function in cultures with an apical air interface.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X; Ingbar, D H; O'Grady, S M

    2001-06-01

    The effect of beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation on Cl- channel activation was investigated in alveolar epithelial cells grown in monolayer culture and in freshly isolated cells. Monolayers cultured under apical air interface conditions exhibited enhanced amiloride-sensitive Na+ transport compared to apical liquid interface monolayers. Amiloride or benzamil inhibited most (66%) of the basal short circuit current (Isc) with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.62 microm and 0.09 microm respectively. Basolateral addition of terbutaline (2 microm) produced a rapid decrease in Isc followed by a slow recovery that exceeded the basal Isc. When Cl- was replaced with methanesulfonate in either intact monolayers or basolateral membrane permeabilized monolayers, the response to terbutaline (2 microm) was completely inhibited. No effect of terbutaline on amiloride-sensitive Na+ current was detected. beta-Adrenergic agonists and 8-chlorothiophenyl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (8-ctp cAMP) directly stimulated a Cl- channel in freshly isolated alveolar epithelial cells. The current was blocked by glibenclamide (100 microm) and had a reversal potential of -22 mV. No increase in amiloride-sensitve current was detected in response to terbutaline or 8-cpt cAMP stimulation. These data support the conclusion that beta-adrenergic agonists produce acute activation of apical Cl- channels and that monolayers maintained under apical air interface conditions exhibit increased Na+ absorption.

  16. Changes in ion transport in inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Michael

    2006-03-29

    Ion transport is essential for maintenance of transmembranous and transcellular electric potential, fluid transport and cellular volume. Disturbance of ion transport has been associated with cellular dysfunction, intra and extracellular edema and abnormalities of epithelial surface liquid volume. There is increasing evidence that conditions characterized by an intense local or systemic inflammatory response are associated with abnormal ion transport. This abnormal ion transport has been involved in the pathogenesis of conditions like hypovolemia due to fluid losses, hyponatremia and hypokalemia in diarrhoeal diseases, electrolyte abnormalities in pyelonephritis of early infancy, septicemia induced pulmonary edema, and in hypersecretion and edema induced by inflammatory reactions of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract. Components of membranous ion transport systems, which have been shown to undergo a change in function during an inflammatory response include the sodium potassium ATPase, the epithelial sodium channel, the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator and calcium activated chloride channels and the sodium potassium chloride co-transporter. Inflammatory mediators, which influence ion transport are tumor necrosis factor, gamma interferon, interleukins, transforming growth factor, leukotrienes and bradykinin. They trigger the release of specific messengers like prostaglandins, nitric oxide and histamine which alter ion transport system function through specific receptors, intracellular second messengers and protein kinases. This review summarizes data on in vivo measurements of changes in ion transport in acute inflammatory conditions and in vitro studies, which have explored the underlying mechanisms. Potential interventions directed at a correction of the observed abnormalities are discussed.

  17. Changes in ion transport in inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhut, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Ion transport is essential for maintenance of transmembranous and transcellular electric potential, fluid transport and cellular volume. Disturbance of ion transport has been associated with cellular dysfunction, intra and extracellular edema and abnormalities of epithelial surface liquid volume. There is increasing evidence that conditions characterized by an intense local or systemic inflammatory response are associated with abnormal ion transport. This abnormal ion transport has been involved in the pathogenesis of conditions like hypovolemia due to fluid losses, hyponatremia and hypokalemia in diarrhoeal diseases, electrolyte abnormalites in pyelonephritis of early infancy, septicemia induced pulmonary edema, and in hypersecretion and edema induced by inflammatory reactions of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract. Components of membranous ion transport systems, which have been shown to undergo a change in function during an inflammatory response include the sodium potassium ATPase, the epithelial sodium channel, the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator and calcium activated chloride channels and the sodium potassium chloride co-transporter. Inflammatory mediators, which influence ion transport are tumor necrosis factor, gamma interferon, interleukins, transforming growth factor, leukotrienes and bradykinin. They trigger the release of specific messengers like prostaglandins, nitric oxide and histamine which alter ion transport system function through specific receptors, intracellular second messengers and protein kinases. This review summarizes data on in vivo measurements of changes in ion transport in acute inflammatory conditions and in vitro studies, which have explored the underlying mechanisms. Potential interventions directed at a correction of the observed abnormalities are discussed. PMID:16571116

  18. Molecular mechanisms of the epithelial transport of toxic metal ions. Final report, September 1, 1975-December 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, R.H.; Fullmer, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to examine the effects of various factors on the intestinal absorption of cadmium, zinc, arsenate and lead as well as the toxic effects of cadmium and lead on the intestinal transport of calcium. Intestinal cadmium absorption was influenced by many of the same factors which influence calcium transport, although there was no direct evidence for a common transport pathway. Cadmium inhibited the intestinal absorption of calcium, primarily at the intestinal level, since no effect on the cholecalciferol endocrine system was observed. Many similarities and differences were documented for intestinal lead and calcium transport, suggesting that these two cations share some of the same transport components. The effect of dietary lead was far more severe under conditions of dietary calcium restriction, effectively eliminating the adaptation response via the cholecalciferol endocrine system. This effect was attributed partially to lead inhibition of renal production of the active hormone, although direct inhibition, at the intestinal level, was also suggested. Several members of the troponin C family of calcium-binding proteins were shown to bind lead in preference to calcium, suggesting that many of the toxic manifestations of lead may be related to perturbation of calcium-mediated cellular processes. 110 refs.

  19. Transport properties of ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biolsi, Louis; Biolsi, David

    1987-01-01

    The strong long-range interactions between (among) charged species require the inclusion of higher order contributions to the transport properties (viscosity, thermal conductivity, diffusion) of ionized gases than are required for neutral gases. These higher order contributions have been rewritten so that they are given in terms of universal functions which can be tabulated. Tables which provide for the rapid calculation of some higher order contributions to the transport properties of both ions and electrons are given. Some results which are useful for calculating the higher order contributions to the transport properties of mixtures of ions are also given. These results are applied to the ionic species in air at high temperatures.

  20. Ion transport in pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W.; Oancea, Elena V.

    2014-01-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system,, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis. PMID:25034214

  1. Ion transport in pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Oancea, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of the epithelial transport of toxic metal ions, particularly mercury, cadmium, lead, arsenic, zinc and copper. Progress report, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, R H

    1980-01-01

    Investigations were continued to elucidate the mode of transepithelial transport of toxic metal ions across the gastrointestinal tract, as well as their interactions with biological processes and other metal ions. All experimental details that are either published, submitted for publication or in press during this report period are included in the Appendix. Primary attention for this report has been given to the intestinal absorption of lead and its interaction with other biological moieties.

  3. Epithelial Sodium and Acid-Sensing Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellenberger, Stephan

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are non-voltage-gated Na+ channels that form their own subfamilies within the ENaC/degenerin ion channel family. ASICs are sensors of extracellular pH, and ENaC, whose main function is trans-epithelial Na+ transport, can sense extra- and intra-cellular Na+. In aldosterone-responsive epithelial cells of the kidney, ENaC plays a critical role in the control of sodium balance, blood volume and blood pressure. In airway epithelia, ENaC has a distinct role in controlling fluid reabsorption at the air-liquid interface, thereby determining the rate of mucociliary transport. In taste receptor cells of the tongue, ENaC is involved in salt taste sensation. ASICs have emerged as key sensors for extracellular protons in central and peripheral neurons. Although not all of their physiological and pathological functions are firmly established yet, there is good evidence for a role of ASICs in the brain in learning, expression of fear, and in neurodegeneration after ischaemic stroke. In sensory neurons, ASICs are involved in nociception and mechanosensation. ENaC and ASIC subunits share substantial sequence homology and the conservation of several functional domains. This chapter summarises our current understanding of the physiological functions and of the mechanisms of ion permeation, gating and regulation of ENaC and ASICs.

  4. Ion Phase Space Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Daniel Peter

    1987-09-01

    Experimental measurements are presented of ion phase space evolution in a collisionless magnetoplasma utilizing nonperturbing laser induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostics. Ion configuration space and velocity space transport, and ion thermodynamic information were derived from the phase space diagrams for the following beam-plasma and obstacle-plasma systems:(UNFORMATTED TABLE OR EQUATION FOLLOWS) OBSTACLE & PLASMA SPECIES qquad disc & quad Ba ^+/e^ qquad disc & quad Ba^+/SF _6^-/e^ BEAM SPECIES & PLASMA SPECIES} qquad Ba^+ & quad Cs^+/e^ qquad Cs^+ & quad Ba^+/e^ qquad Ba^+ & quad Cs^+/SF_6 ^-/e^ qquad e^- & quad Ba^+ /e^ TABLE/EQUATION ENDS The ions were roughly mass symmetric. Plasma systems were reconstructed from multiple discrete Ba(II) ion velocity distributions with spatial, temporal, and velocity resolution of 1 mm^3, 2 musec, and 3 times 1010 cm ^3/sec^3 respectively. Phase space reconstructions indicated resonant ion response to the current-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron wave (EICW) in the case of an electron beam and to the ion cyclotron-cyclotron wave in the case of ion beams. Ion energization was observed in both systems. Local particle kinetic energy densities increase far above thermal levels in the presence of the EICW and ICCW. Time-resolved measurements of the EICW identified phase space particle bunching. The nonlinear evolution of f_{rm i}(x,v,t) was investigated for both beam systems. The near wake of conducting electrically floating disc obstacle was studied. Anomalous cross field diffusion (D_bot > 10 ^4 cm^2/sec) and ion energization were correlated with strong, low-frequency turbulence generated by the obstacle. Ion perpendicular kinetic energy densities doubled over thermal levels in the near wake. Upstream of the obstacle, l ~ 50 lambda_ {rm D}, a collisionless shock was indicated; far downstream, an ion flux peak was observed. Three negative ion plasma (NIP) sources were developed and characterized in the course of research: two

  5. Paracellular epithelial sodium transport maximizes energy efficiency in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Lei; Nguyen, Mien T.X.; Kamat, Nikhil; Magenheimer, Lynn; Zhuo, Min; Li, Jiahua; McDonough, Alicia A.; Fields, Timothy A.; Welch, William J.; Yu, Alan S.L.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient oxygen utilization in the kidney may be supported by paracellular epithelial transport, a form of passive diffusion that is driven by preexisting transepithelial electrochemical gradients. Claudins are tight-junction transmembrane proteins that act as paracellular ion channels in epithelial cells. In the proximal tubule (PT) of the kidney, claudin-2 mediates paracellular sodium reabsorption. Here, we used murine models to investigate the role of claudin-2 in maintaining energy efficiency in the kidney. We found that claudin-2–null mice conserve sodium to the same extent as WT mice, even during profound dietary sodium depletion, as a result of the upregulation of transcellular Na-K-2Cl transport activity in the thick ascending limb of Henle. We hypothesized that shifting sodium transport to transcellular pathways would lead to increased whole-kidney oxygen consumption. Indeed, compared with control animals, oxygen consumption in the kidneys of claudin-2–null mice was markedly increased, resulting in medullary hypoxia. Furthermore, tubular injury in kidneys subjected to bilateral renal ischemia-reperfusion injury was more severe in the absence of claudin-2. Our results indicate that paracellular transport in the PT is required for efficient utilization of oxygen in the service of sodium transport. We speculate that paracellular permeability may have evolved as a general strategy in epithelial tissues to maximize energy efficiency. PMID:27214555

  6. Physiology and pathophysiology of the epithelial barrier of the female reproductive tract: role of ion channels.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hsiao Chang; Chen, Hui; Ruan, Yechun; Sun, Tingting

    2012-01-01

    The epithelium lining the female reproductive tract forms a selectively permeable barrier that is responsible for creating an optimal luminal fluid microenvironment essential to the success of various reproductive events. The selective permeability of the epithelial barrier to various ions is provided by the gating of epithelial ion channels, which work together with an array of other ion transporters to drive fluid movement across the epithelium. Thus, the luminal fluid is fine-tuned by the selective barrier with tight regulation of the epithelial ion channels. This chapter discusses the role of epithelial ion channels in regulating the epithelial barrier function and thus the fluid volume and ionic composition of the female reproductive tract; physiological factors regulating the ion channels and the importance of the regulation in various reproductive events such as sperm transport and capacitation, embryo development and implantation. Disturbance of the fluid microenvironment due to defects or abnormal regulation of these ion channels and dysregulated epithelial barrier function in a number of pathological conditions, such as ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, hydrosalpinx and infertility, are also discussed.

  7. Epithelial Transport in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ghishan, Fayez K.; Kiela, Pawel R.

    2014-01-01

    The epithelium of the gastrointestinal tract is one of the most versatile tissues in the organism, responsible for providing a tight barrier between dietary and bacterial antigens and the mucosal and systemic immune system, while maintaining efficient digestive and absorptive processes to ensure adequate nutrient and energy supply. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD; Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis) are associated with a breakdown of both functions, which in some cases are clearly interrelated. In this updated literature review, we focus on the effects of intestinal inflammation and the associated immune mediators on selected aspects of the transepithelial transport of macro- and micronutrients. The mechanisms responsible for nutritional deficiencies are not always clear and could be related to decreased intake, malabsorption and excess losses. We summarize the known causes of nutrient deficiencies and the mechanism of IBD-associated diarrhea. We also overview the consequences of impaired epithelial transport, which infrequently transcend its primary purpose to affect the gut microbial ecology and epithelial integrity. While some of those regulatory mechanisms are relatively well established, more work needs to be done to determine how inflammatory cytokines can alter the transport process of nutrients across the gastrointestinal and renal epithelia. PMID:24691115

  8. Reduced Dynamic Models in Epithelial Transport

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Julio A.

    2013-01-01

    Most models developed to represent transport across epithelia assume that the cell interior constitutes a homogeneous compartment, characterized by a single concentration value of the transported species. This conception differs significantly from the current view, in which the cellular compartment is regarded as a highly crowded media of marked structural heterogeneity. Can the finding of relatively simple dynamic properties of transport processes in epithelia be compatible with this complex structural conception of the cell interior? The purpose of this work is to contribute with one simple theoretical approach to answer this question. For this, the techniques of model reduction are utilized to obtain a two-state reduced model from more complex linear models of transcellular transport with a larger number of intermediate states. In these complex models, each state corresponds to the solute concentration in an intermediate intracellular compartment. In addition, the numerical studies reveal that it is possible to approximate a general two-state model under conditions where strict reduction of the complex models cannot be performed. These results contribute with arguments to reconcile the current conception of the cell interior as a highly complex medium with the finding of relatively simple dynamic properties of transport across epithelial cells. PMID:23533397

  9. Ion transporters in brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Damin; Zhu, Wen; Kuo, John S.; Hu, Shaoshan; Sun, Dandan

    2015-01-01

    Ion transporters are important in regulation of ionic homeostasis, cell volume, and cellular signal transduction under physiological conditions. They have recently emerged as important players in cancer progression. In this review, we discussed two important ion transporter proteins, sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter isoform 1 (NKCC-1) and sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform 1 (NHE-1) in Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and other malignant tumors. NKCC-1 is a Na+-dependent Cl− transporter that mediates the movement of Na+, K+, and Cl− ions across the plasma membrane and maintains cell volume and intracellular K+ and Cl− homeostasis. NHE-1 is a ubiquitously expressed cell membrane protein which regulates intracellular pH (pHi) and extracellular microdomain pH (pHe) homeostasis and cell volume. Here, we summarized recent pre-clinical experimental studies on NKCC-1 and NHE-1 in GBM and other malignant tumors, such as breast cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and lung cancer. These studies illustrated that pharmacological inhibition or down-regulation of these ion transporter proteins reduces proliferation, increases apoptosis, and suppresses migration and invasion of cancer cells. These new findings reveal the potentials of these ion transporters as new targets for cancer diagnosis and/or treatment. PMID:25620102

  10. Sulfate transport mechanisms in epithelial systems.

    PubMed

    Gerencser, G A; Ahearn, G A; Zhang, J; Cattey, M A

    2001-04-01

    A novel invertebrate gastrointestinal transport mechanism has been shown to couple chloride-sulfate exchange in an electrogenic fashion. In the lobster, Homarus americanus, the hepatopancreas, or digestive gland, exists as an outpocketing of the digestive tract, representing a single cell layer separating the gut lumen and an open circulatory system composed of hemolymph. Investigations utilizing independently prepared brush border and basolateral membrane vesicles revealed discrete antiport systems which possess the capacity to bring about a transcellular secretion of sulfate. The luminal antiport system functions as a high-affinity, one-to-one chloride-sulfate exchanger that is stimulated by an increase in luminal hydrogen ion concentration. Such a system would take advantage of the high chloride concentration of ingested seawater as well as the high proton concentrations generated during digestion, which further suggests a potential regulation by resident sodium-proton exchangers. Exchange of one chloride for one divalent sulfate ion provides the driving force for electrogenic vectorial translocation. The basolateral antiport system was found to be electroneutral in nature, responsive to gradients of the dicarboxylic anion oxalate while lacking in proton stimulation. No evidence of sodium-sulfate co-transport, commonly reported for the brush border of vertebrate renal and intestinal epithelia, was observed in either membrane preparation. The two antiporters together can account for the low hemolymph to seawater sulfate levels previously described in decapod crustaceans. A secretory pathway for sulfate based upon electrogenic chloride-antiport may appear among invertebrates partly in response to digestion taking place in a seawater environment. J. Exp. Zool. 289:245-253, 2001. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. An Optimised Human Cell Culture Model for Alveolar Epithelial Transport.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hui; Birch, Nigel P; Suresh, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Robust and reproducible in vitro models are required for investigating the pathways involved in fluid homeostasis in the human alveolar epithelium. We performed functional and phenotypic characterisation of ion transport in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines NCI-H441 and A549 to determine their similarity to primary human alveolar type II cells. NCI-H441 cells exhibited high expression of junctional proteins ZO-1, and E-cadherin, seal-forming claudin-3, -4, -5 and Na+-K+-ATPase while A549 cells exhibited high expression of pore-forming claudin-2. Consistent with this phenotype NCI-H441, but not A549, cells formed a functional barrier with active ion transport characterised by higher electrical resistance (529 ± 178 Ω cm2 vs 28 ± 4 Ω cm2), lower paracellular permeability ((176 ± 42) ×10-8 cm/s vs (738 ± 190) ×10-8 cm/s) and higher transepithelial potential difference (11.9 ± 4 mV vs 0 mV). Phenotypic and functional properties of NCI-H441 cells were tuned by varying cell seeding density and supplement concentrations. The cells formed a polarised monolayer typical of in vivo epithelium at seeding densities of 100,000 cells per 12-well insert while higher densities resulted in multiple cell layers. Dexamethasone and insulin-transferrin-selenium supplements were required for the development of high levels of electrical resistance, potential difference and expression of claudin-3 and Na+-K+-ATPase. Treatment of NCI-H441 cells with inhibitors and agonists of sodium and chloride channels indicated sodium absorption through ENaC under baseline and forskolin-stimulated conditions. Chloride transport was not sensitive to inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) under either condition. Channels inhibited by 5-nitro-1-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) contributed to chloride secretion following forskolin stimulation, but not at baseline. These data precisely define experimental conditions for the application of NCI

  12. An Optimised Human Cell Culture Model for Alveolar Epithelial Transport

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Nigel P.; Suresh, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Robust and reproducible in vitro models are required for investigating the pathways involved in fluid homeostasis in the human alveolar epithelium. We performed functional and phenotypic characterisation of ion transport in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines NCI-H441 and A549 to determine their similarity to primary human alveolar type II cells. NCI-H441 cells exhibited high expression of junctional proteins ZO-1, and E-cadherin, seal-forming claudin-3, -4, -5 and Na+-K+-ATPase while A549 cells exhibited high expression of pore-forming claudin-2. Consistent with this phenotype NCI-H441, but not A549, cells formed a functional barrier with active ion transport characterised by higher electrical resistance (529 ± 178 Ω cm2 vs 28 ± 4 Ω cm2), lower paracellular permeability ((176 ± 42) ×10−8 cm/s vs (738 ± 190) ×10−8 cm/s) and higher transepithelial potential difference (11.9 ± 4 mV vs 0 mV). Phenotypic and functional properties of NCI-H441 cells were tuned by varying cell seeding density and supplement concentrations. The cells formed a polarised monolayer typical of in vivo epithelium at seeding densities of 100,000 cells per 12-well insert while higher densities resulted in multiple cell layers. Dexamethasone and insulin-transferrin-selenium supplements were required for the development of high levels of electrical resistance, potential difference and expression of claudin-3 and Na+-K+-ATPase. Treatment of NCI-H441 cells with inhibitors and agonists of sodium and chloride channels indicated sodium absorption through ENaC under baseline and forskolin-stimulated conditions. Chloride transport was not sensitive to inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) under either condition. Channels inhibited by 5-nitro-1-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) contributed to chloride secretion following forskolin stimulation, but not at baseline. These data precisely define experimental conditions for the application of NCI

  13. Mechanisms of ion transport across the choroid plexus

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Ernest M.

    1972-01-01

    1. Mechanisms of ion transport across the choroidal epithelium were investigated using an in vitro preparation of the frog choroid plexus. 2. Sodium was actively transported across the plexus from the vascular to the ventricular surface by an ouabain sensitive electrically silent pump. As in other epithelial membranes the rate of sodium transport was stimulated by the presence of bicarbonate ions in the Ringer solutions. Chloride and bicarbonate ions accompany the net flux of sodium across this tissue. 3. Some experiments suggest that potassium is actively transported from the ventricular to the serosal surface, and that the rate of transport is a function of the extracellular potassium concentration. 4. No evidence was obtained to suggest that calcium is actively transported across this tissue in either direction. 5. Diamox, ethoxyzolamide, pitocin, pitressin, hydrocortisone, amiloride, spironolactone and anoxia all failed to influence sodium transport. 6. The sequence of passive ion permeation across the plexus was PRb ∼ PK > PCs ∼ PNa ∼ PCl ∼ PHCO3 > PLi as deduced from diffusion potential measurements. At least for Na, K and Cl there was a good correlation between the permeability coefficients derived from unidirectional flux measurements and from electrical parameters. This indicates that exchange diffusion is unimportant as a mechanism for passive ion transport. 7. The instantaneous current—voltage curves were linear in both symmetrical and asymmetrical salt solutions and the choroid plexus conductance was found to be directly proportional to the external salt concentration. These and other lines of evidence suggest that the major route of passive ion permeation across this epithelium is via the tight junction route and not through the cell interior. 8. These results are discussed in relation to the in vivo studies of c.s.f. secretion and the mechanisms of active and passive ion transport across other epithelial membranes such as the gall

  14. First evidence of epithelial transport in tardigrades: a comparative investigation of organic anion transport.

    PubMed

    Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin; Møbjerg, Nadja

    2012-02-01

    We investigated transport of the organic anion Chlorophenol Red (CPR) in the tardigrade Halobiotus crispae using a new method for quantifying non-fluorescent dyes. We compared the results acquired from the tardigrade with CPR transport data obtained from Malpighian tubules of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria. CPR accumulated in the midgut lumen of H. crispae, indicating that organic anion transport takes place here. Our results show that CPR transport is inhibited by the mitochondrial un-coupler DNP (1 mmol l(-1); 81% reduction), the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor ouabain (10 mmol l(-1); 21% reduction) and the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin (5 μmol l(-1); 21% reduction), and by the organic anions PAH (10 mmol l(-1); 44% reduction) and probenecid (10 mmol l(-1); 61% reduction, concentration-dependent inhibition). Transport by locust Malpighian tubules exhibits a similar pharmacological profile, albeit with markedly higher concentrations of CPR being reached in S. gregaria. Immunolocalization of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α-subunit in S. gregaria revealed that this transporter is abundantly expressed and localized to the basal cell membranes. Immunolocalization data could not be obtained from H. crispae. Our results indicate that organic anion secretion by the tardigrade midgut is transporter mediated with likely candidates for the basolateral entry step being members of the Oat and/or Oatp transporter families. From our results, we cautiously suggest that apical H(+) and possibly basal Na(+)/K(+) pumps provide the driving force for the transport; the exact coupling between electrochemical gradients generated by the pumps and transport of ions, as well as the nature of the apical exit step, are unknown. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to show active epithelial transport in tardigrades.

  15. Secondary ion collection and transport system for ion microprobe

    DOEpatents

    Ward, James W.; Schlanger, Herbert; McNulty, Jr., Hugh; Parker, Norman W.

    1985-01-01

    A secondary ion collection and transport system, for use with an ion microprobe, which is very compact and occupies only a small working distance, thereby enabling the primary ion beam to have a short focal length and high resolution. Ions sputtered from the target surface by the primary beam's impact are collected between two arcuate members having radii of curvature and applied voltages that cause only ions within a specified energy band to be collected. The collected ions are accelerated and focused in a transport section consisting of a plurality of spaced conductive members which are coaxial with and distributed along the desired ion path. Relatively high voltages are applied to alternate transport sections to produce accelerating electric fields sufficient to transport the ions through the section to an ion mass analyzer, while lower voltages are applied to the other transport sections to focus the ions and bring their velocity to a level compatible with the analyzing apparatus.

  16. Characteristics and pharmacological regulation of epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and epithelial Na+ transport.

    PubMed

    Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial Na(+) transport participates in control of various body functions and conditions: e.g., homeostasis of body fluid content influencing blood pressure, control of amounts of fluids covering the apical surface of alveolar epithelial cells at appropriate levels for normal gas exchange, and prevention of bacterial/viral infection. Epithelial Na(+) transport via the transcellular pathway is mediated by the entry step of Na(+) across the apical membrane via Epithelial Na(+) Channel (ENaC) located at the apical membrane, and the extrusion step of Na(+) across the basolateral membrane via the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase located at the basolateral membrane. The rate-limiting step of the epithelial Na(+) transport via the transcellular pathway is generally recognized to be the entry step of Na(+) across the apical membrane via ENaC. Thus, up-/down-regulation of ENaC essentially participates in regulatory systems of blood pressure and normal gas exchange. Amount of ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport is determined by the number of ENaCs located at the apical membrane, activity (open probability) of individual ENaC located at the apical membrane, single channel conductance of ENaC located at the apical membrane, and driving force for the Na(+) entry via ENaCs across the apical membrane. In the present review article, I discuss the characteristics of ENaC and how these factors are regulated.

  17. Targeting ion transport in cancer.

    PubMed

    Oosterwijk, E; Gillies, R J

    2014-03-19

    The metabolism of cancer cells differs substantially from normal cells, including ion transport. Although this phenomenon has been long recognized, ion transporters have not been viewed as suitable therapeutic targets. However, the acidic pH values present in tumours which are well outside of normal limits are now becoming recognized as an important therapeutic target. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is fundamental to tumour pH regulation. CAIX is commonly expressed in cancer, but lowly expressed in normal tissues and that presents an attractive target. Here, we discuss the possibilities of exploiting the acidic, hypoxic tumour environment as possible target for therapy. Additionally, clinical experience with CAIX targeting in cancer patients is discussed.

  18. Composite oxygen ion transport element

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Jack C.; Besecker, Charles J.; Chen, Hancun; Robinson, Earil T.

    2007-06-12

    A composite oxygen ion transport element that has a layered structure formed by a dense layer to transport oxygen ions and electrons and a porous support layer to provide mechanical support. The dense layer can be formed of a mixture of a mixed conductor, an ionic conductor, and a metal. The porous support layer can be fabricated from an oxide dispersion strengthened metal, a metal-reinforced intermetallic alloy, a boron-doped Mo.sub.5Si.sub.3-based intermetallic alloy or combinations thereof. The support layer can be provided with a network of non-interconnected pores and each of said pores communicates between opposite surfaces of said support layer. Such a support layer can be advantageously employed to reduce diffusion resistance in any type of element, including those using a different material makeup than that outlined above.

  19. Nerve growth factor reduces amiloride‐sensitive Na+ transport in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimko, Michael J.; Zaccone, Eric J.; Thompson, Janet A.; Schwegler‐Berry, Diane; Kashon, Michael L.; Fedan, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nerve growth factor (NGF) is overexpressed in patients with inflammatory lung diseases, including virus infections. Airway surface liquid (ASL), which is regulated by epithelial cell ion transport, is essential for normal lung function. No information is available regarding the effect of NGF on ion transport of airway epithelium. To investigate whether NGF can affect ion transport, human primary air‐interface cultured epithelial cells were placed in Ussing chambers to obtain transepithelial voltage (−7.1 ± 3.4 mV), short‐circuit current (Isc, 5.9 ± 1.0 μA), and transepithelial resistance (750 Ω·cm2), and to measure responses to ion transport inhibitors. Amiloride (apical, 3.5 × 10−5 mol/L) decreased Isc by 55.3%. Apically applied NGF (1 ng/mL) reduced Isc by 5.3% in 5 min; basolaterally applied NGF had no effect. The response to amiloride was reduced (41.6%) in the presence of NGF. K‐252a (10 nmol/L, apical) did not itself affect Na+ transport, but it attenuated the NGF‐induced reduction in Na+ transport, indicating the participation of the trkA receptor in the NGF‐induced reduction in Na+ transport. PD‐98059 (30 μmol/L, apical and basolateral) did not itself affect Na+ transport, but attenuated the NGF‐induced reduction in Na+ transport, indicating that trkA activated the Erk 1/2 signaling cascade. NGF stimulated phosphorylation of Erk 1/2 and the β‐subunit of ENaC. K‐252a and PD‐98059 inhibited these responses. NGF had no effect on Isc in the presence of apical nystatin (50 μmol/L). These results indicate that NGF inhibits Na+ transport through a trkA‐Erk 1/2‐activated signaling pathway linked to ENaC phosphorylation. PMID:25347857

  20. Hormonal regulation of ion and water transport in anuran amphibians.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Minoru; Konno, Norifumi

    2006-05-15

    Amphibians occupy a wide variety of ecological habitats, and their adaptation is made possible through the specialization of the epithelia of their osmoregulatory organs, such as the skin, kidney, and urinary bladder, which control the hydromineral and acid-base balance of their internal medium. Amphibians can change drastically plasma Na+, Cl-, and urea levels and excretion rates in response to environmental stimuli such as acute desiccation and changes in external salinity. Several hormones and the autonomic nervous system act to control osmoregulation. Several ion channels including an epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), a urea transporter (UT), and water channels (AQPs) are found in epithelial tissues of their osmoregulatory organs. This mini review examines the currents status of our knowledge about hormone receptors for arginine vasotocin, angiotensin II and aldosterone, and membrane ion channels and transporters, such as ENaC, UT, and AQPs in amphibians.

  1. Characterization of Rat Meibomian Gland Ion and Fluid Transport

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongfang; Davis, Richard M.; Aita, Megumi; Burns, Kimberlie A.; Clapp, Phillip W.; Gilmore, Rodney C.; Chua, Michael; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Schlegel, Richard; Randell, Scott H.; C. Boucher, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We establish novel primary rat meibomian gland (MG) cell culture systems and explore the ion transport activities of the rat MG. Methods Freshly excised rat MG tissues were characterized as follows: (1) mRNA expression of selected epithelial ion channels/transporters were measured by RT-PCR, (2) localization of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) mRNAs was performed by in situ hybridization, and (3) protein expression and localization of βENaC, the Na+/K+/Cl− cotransporter (NKCC), and the Na+/K+ ATPase were evaluated by immunofluorescence. Primary isolated rat MG cells were cocultured with 3T3 feeder cells and a Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y-27632) for expansion. Passaged rat MG cells were cultured as planar sheets under air-liquid interface (ALI) conditions for gene expression and electrophysiologic studies. Passaged rat MG cells also were cultured in matrigel matrices to form spheroids, which were examined ultrastructurally by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and functionally using swelling assays. Results Expression of multiple ion channel/transporter genes was detected in rat MG tissues. β-ENaC mRNA and protein were localized more to MG peripheral acinar cells than central acinar cells or ductular epithelial cells. Electrophysiologic studies of rat MG cell planar cultures demonstrated functional sodium, chloride, and potassium channels, and cotransporters activities. Transmission electron microscopic analyses of rat MG spheroids revealed highly differentiated MG cells with abundant lysosomal lamellar bodies. Rat MG spheroids culture-based measurements demonstrated active volume regulation by ion channels. Conclusions This study demonstrates the presence and function of ion channels and volume transport by rat MG. Two novel primary MG cell culture models that may be useful for MG research were established. PMID:27127933

  2. Nicotine transport in lung and non-lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takano, Mikihisa; Kamei, Hidetaka; Nagahiro, Machi; Kawami, Masashi; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2017-11-01

    Nicotine is rapidly absorbed from the lung alveoli into systemic circulation during cigarette smoking. However, mechanism underlying nicotine transport in alveolar epithelial cells is not well understood to date. In the present study, we characterized nicotine uptake in lung epithelial cell lines A549 and NCI-H441 and in non-lung epithelial cell lines HepG2 and MCF-7. Characteristics of [(3)H]nicotine uptake was studied using these cell lines. Nicotine uptake in A549 cells occurred in a time- and temperature-dependent manner and showed saturation kinetics, with a Km value of 0.31mM. Treatment with some organic cations such as diphenhydramine and pyrilamine inhibited nicotine uptake, whereas treatment with organic cations such as carnitine and tetraethylammonium did not affect nicotine uptake. Extracellular pH markedly affected nicotine uptake, with high nicotine uptake being observed at high pH up to 11.0. Modulation of intracellular pH with ammonium chloride also affected nicotine uptake. Treatment with valinomycin, a potassium ionophore, did not significantly affect nicotine uptake, indicating that nicotine uptake is an electroneutral process. For comparison, we assessed the characteristics of nicotine uptake in another lung epithelial cell line NCI-H441 and in non-lung epithelial cell lines HepG2 and MCF-7. Interestingly, these cell lines showed similar characteristics of nicotine uptake with respect to pH dependency and inhibition by various organic cations. The present findings suggest that a similar or the same pH-dependent transport system is involved in nicotine uptake in these cell lines. A novel molecular mechanism of nicotine transport is proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Computational modeling of ion transport through nanopores.

    PubMed

    Modi, Niraj; Winterhalter, Mathias; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2012-10-21

    Nanoscale pores are ubiquitous in biological systems while artificial nanopores are being fabricated for an increasing number of applications. Biological pores are responsible for the transport of various ions and substrates between the different compartments of biological systems separated by membranes while artificial pores are aimed at emulating such transport properties. As an experimental method, electrophysiology has proven to be an important nano-analytical tool for the study of substrate transport through nanopores utilizing ion current measurements as a probe for the detection. Independent of the pore type, i.e., biological or synthetic, and objective of the study, i.e., to model cellular processes of ion transport or electrophysiological experiments, it has become increasingly important to understand the dynamics of ions in nanoscale confinements. To this end, numerical simulations have established themselves as an indispensable tool to decipher ion transport processes through biological as well as artificial nanopores. This article provides an overview of different theoretical and computational methods to study ion transport in general and to calculate ion conductance in particular. Potential new improvements in the existing methods and their applications are highlighted wherever applicable. Moreover, representative examples are given describing the ion transport through biological and synthetic nanopores as well as the high selectivity of ion channels. Special emphasis is placed on the usage of molecular dynamics simulations which already have demonstrated their potential to unravel ion transport properties at an atomic level.

  4. Solenoid transport for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Edward

    2004-06-15

    Solenoid transport of high current, heavy ion beams is considered for several stages of a heavy ion fusion driver. In general this option is more efficient than magnetic quadrupole transport at sufficiently low kinetic energy and/or large e/m, and for this reason it has been employed in electron induction linacs. Ideally an ion beam would be transported in a state of Brillouin flow, i.e. cold in the transverse plane and spinning at one half the cyclotron frequency. The design of appropriate solenoids and the equilibrium and stability of transported ion beams are discussed. An outline of application to a fusion driver is also presented.

  5. Osmoregulation and epithelial water transport: lessons from the intestine of marine teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Whittamore, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    For teleost fish living in seawater, drinking the surrounding medium is necessary to avoid dehydration. This is a key component of their osmoregulatory strategy presenting the challenge of excreting excess salts while achieving a net retention of water. The intestine has an established role in osmoregulation, and its ability to effectively absorb fluid is crucial to compensating for water losses to the hyperosmotic environment. Despite this, the potential for the teleost intestine to serve as a comparative model for detailed, integrative experimental studies on epithelial water transport has so far gone largely untapped. The following review aims to present an assessment of the teleost intestine as a fluid-transporting epithelium. Beginning with a brief overview of marine teleost osmoregulation, emphasis shifts to the processing of ingested seawater by the gastrointestinal tract and the characteristics of intestinal ion and fluid transport. Particular attention is given to acid-base transfers by the intestine, specifically bicarbonate secretion, which creates the distinctly alkaline gut fluids responsible for the formation of solid calcium carbonate precipitates. The respective contributions of these unique features to intestinal fluid absorption, alongside other recognised ion transport processes, are then subsequently considered within the wider context of the classic physiological problem of epithelial water transport.

  6. Ion energy analyzer for measurement of ion turbulent transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V.; Sen, A. K.

    2012-10-01

    For local measurement of radial ion thermal transport, we developed a novel time-resolved gridded ion energy analyzer. The turbulent thermal flux is obtained by correlating fluctuations of ion temperature, plasma density and plasma velocity. The simultaneous measurement of the ion current fluctuations from an ion energy analyzer tilde I_{IEA} (t) and the fluctuation of ion saturation current from a conventional Langmuir probe tilde I_{LP} (t) allow us to determine local fluctuations of ion temperature tilde T_i (t). To reduce the effect of plasma potential fluctuations in the energy analyzer measurements, we use special a compensative circuit loop.

  7. Nanostructure-Mediated Transport of Biologics across Epithelial Tissue: Enhancing Permeability via Nanotopography

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Kimberly R.; Walsh, Laura A.; Bock, Suzanne M.; Koval, Michael; Fischer, Kathleen E.; Ross, Russell F.; Desai, Tejal A.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we demonstrate that nanotopographical cues can be utilized to enable biologics >66 kDa to be transported across epithelial monolayers. When placed in contact with epithelial monolayers, nanostructured thin films loosen the epithelial barrier and allow for significantly increased transport of FITC-albumin, FITC-IgG, and a model therapeutic, etanercept. Our work highlights the potential to use drug delivery systems which incorporate nanotopography to increase the transport of biologics across epithelial tissue. PMID:23186530

  8. Transepithelial Ion Transport is Suppressed in Hypoxic Sinonasal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Blount, Angela; Zhang, Shaoyan; Chestnut, Michael; Hixon, Brian; Skinner, Daniel; Sorscher, Eric J.; Woodworth, Bradford A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Sinonasal respiratory epithelial mucociliary clearance (MCC) is dependent on the transepithelial transport of ions such as Cl−. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the role of oxygen restriction in 1) Cl− transport across primary sinonasal epithelial monolayers, 2) expression of the apical Cl− channels CFTR and TMEM16A, and 3) the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Study Design In vitro investigation. Methods Murine nasal septal epithelial (MNSE, wild type) and human sinonasal epithelial (HSNE) cultures were incubated under hypoxic conditions (1% O2, 5% CO2). Cultures were mounted in Ussing chambers for ion transport measurements. CFTR and TMEM16A expression were measured using quantitative RT-PCR. Results The change in short-circuit current (ΔISC (µA/cm2) attributable to CFTR (forskolin-stimulated) was significantly decreased due to a 12 hour hypoxia exposure in both MNSE (13.55+/− 0.46 vs. 19.23+/−0.18) and HSNE (19.55+/−0.56 vs. 25.49+/−1.48 (control); p<0.05. TMEM16A (UTP-stimulated transport) was inhibited by 48 hours of hypoxic exposure in MNSE (15.92+/−2.87 vs. 51.44+/−3.71(control) p<0.05] and by 12 hours of hypoxic exposure in HSNE (16.75+/−0.68 vs. 24.15+/−1.35 (control). Quantitative RT-PCR (reported as relative mRNA levels+/−S.D.) demonstrated significant reductions in both CFTR and TMEM16A mRNA expression in MNSE and HSNE due to airway epithelial hypoxia. Conclusions Sinonasal epithelial CFTR and TMEM16A-mediated Cl− transport and mRNA expression were robustly decreased in an oxygen restricted environment. The findings in the present study indicate persistent hypoxia may lead to acquired defects in sinonasal Cl− transport in a fashion likely to confer mucociliary dysfunction in CRS. Level of Evidence 1b PMID:22024847

  9. Malnutrition causes a reduction in alveolar epithelial sodium and chloride transport which predisposes to death from lung injury.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Michael

    2007-01-01

    All forms of malnutrition have been associated with increased severity of pneumonia, an increased pneumonia associated mortality and an increased risk of pulmonary fluid overload. Malnutrition was found to be associated with increased sweat sodium and chloride concentrations. A reduction of systemic sodium and chloride transport reflected in sweat sodium and chloride levels has been linked to increased severity of pulmonary edema in children with septicemia. Malnutrition causes a reduction in alveolar epithelial sodium and chloride transport which predisposes to death from lung injury. SUPPORTING EVIDENCE FOR THE HYPOTHESIS: Malnutrition caused reduced pulmonary fluid clearance in the rat model. Amiloride insensitive pulmonary fluid clearance in malnourished rats was reduced. The reduction in fluid clearance was reversible by beta agonists which increases epithelial sodium and chloride transport. Reduction of alveolar ion and fluid transport capacity explains the predisposition to death from pulmonary edema associated with intravenous fluids and blood transfusions in inpatients with malnutrition. Reduced alveolar epithelial ion transport impairs absorption of intra-alveolar inflammatory exudate in pneumonia leading to a increased severity of respiratory compromise and increased mortality. MEANS TO TEST THE HYPOTHESIS: Nasal potential difference measurements could compare airway epithelial sodium and chloride transport in patients with and without malnutrition and malnutrition associated lung disease. Sweat sodium and chloride concentrations could be compared in patients with and without respiratory disease associated with malnutrition and correlated with the severity of respiratory compromise.

  10. Ion Move Brownian Dynamics (IMBD)--simulations of ion transport.

    PubMed

    Kurczynska, Monika; Kotulska, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of the computed characteristics and physiological measurement of ion transport through transmembrane proteins could be a useful method to assess the quality of protein structures. Simulations of ion transport should be detailed but also timeefficient. The most accurate method could be Molecular Dynamics (MD), which is very time-consuming, hence is not used for this purpose. The model which includes ion-ion interactions and reduces the simulation time by excluding water, protein and lipid molecules is Brownian Dynamics (BD). In this paper a new computer program for BD simulation of the ion transport is presented. We evaluate two methods for calculating the pore accessibility (round and irregular shape) and two representations of ion sizes (van der Waals diameter and one voxel). Ion Move Brownian Dynamics (IMBD) was tested with two nanopores: alpha-hemolysin and potassium channel KcsA. In both cases during the simulation an ion passed through the pore in less than 32 ns. Although two types of ions were in solution (potassium and chloride), only ions which agreed with the selectivity properties of the channels passed through the pores. IMBD is a new tool for the ion transport modelling, which can be used in the simulations of wide and narrow pores.

  11. Transport Mechanism of Nicotine in Primary Cultured Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Takano, Mikihisa; Nagahiro, Machi; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine is absorbed from the lungs into the systemic circulation during cigarette smoking. However, there is little information concerning the transport mechanism of nicotine in alveolar epithelial cells. In this study, we characterized the uptake of nicotine in rat primary cultured type II (TII) and transdifferentiated type I-like (TIL) epithelial cells. In both TIL and TII cells, [(3)H]nicotine uptake was time and temperature-dependent, and showed saturation kinetics. [(3)H]Nicotine uptake in these cells was not affected by Na(+), but was sensitive to extracellular and intracellular pH, suggesting the involvement of a nicotine/proton antiport system. The uptake of [(3)H]nicotine in these cells was potently inhibited by organic cations such as clonidine, diphenhydramine, and pyrilamine, but was not affected by substrates and/or inhibitors of known organic cation transporters such as carnitine, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, and tetraethylammonium. In addition, the uptake of [(3)H]nicotine in TIL cells was stimulated by preloading the cells with unlabeled nicotine, pyrilamine, and diphenhydramine, but not with tetraethylammonium. These results suggest that a novel proton-coupled antiporter is involved in the uptake of nicotine in alveolar epithelial cells and its absorption from the lungs into the systemic circulation.

  12. ION TRANSPORT IN NITELLOPSIS OBTUSA

    PubMed Central

    MacRobbie, Enid A. C.; Dainty, J.

    1958-01-01

    The distribution and rates of exchange of the ions sodium, potassium, and chloride in single internodal cells of the ecorticate characean, Nitellopsis obtusa, have been studied. In tracer experiments three kinetic compartments were found, the outermost "free space" of the cell, a compartment we have called "protoplasmic non-free space", and the cell sap. The concentrations in the vacuole were 54 mM Na+, 113 mM K+, and 206 mM Cl-. The steady state fluxes across the vacuolar membrane were 0.4 pmole Na+/cm.2 sec., 0.25 pmole K+/cm.2 sec., and 0.5 pmole Cl-/cm.2 sec. The protoplasmic Na/K ratio is equal to that in the vacuole but protoplasmic chloride is relatively much lower. Osmotic considerations suggest a layer 4 to 6 µ thick with sodium and potassium concentrations close to those in the vacuole. The fluxes between protoplasm and external solution were of the order of 8 pmoles Na+/cm.2 sec. and 4 pmoles K+/cm.2 sec. We suggest that the protoplasm is separated from the cell wall by an outer protoplasmic membrane at which an outward sodium transport maintains the high K/Na ratio of the cell interior, and from the vacuole by the tonoplast at which an inward chloride transport maintains the high vacuolar chloride. The tonoplast appears to be the site of the principal diffusion resistance of the cell, but the outer protoplasmic membrane probably of the main part of the potential. PMID:13587917

  13. Epidermal growth factor-mediated proliferation and sodium transport in normal and PKD epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheleznova, Nadezhda N.; Wilson, Patricia D.; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Members of the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-family bind to ErbB (EGFR)-family receptors which play an important role in the regulation of various fundamental cell processes including cell proliferation and differentiation. The normal rodent kidney has been shown to express at least three members of the ErbB receptor family and is a major site of EGF ligand synthesis. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a group of diseases caused by mutations in single genes and is characterized by enlarged kidneys due to the formation of multiple cysts in both kidneys. Tubule cells proliferate, causing segmental dilation, in association with the abnormal deposition of several proteins. One of the first abnormalities described in cell biological studies of PKD pathogenesis was the abnormal mislocalization of the EGFR in cyst lining epithelial cells. The kidney collecting duct (CD) is predominantly an absorptive epithelium where electrogenic Na+ entry is mediated by the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC). ENaC-mediated sodium absorption represents an important ion transport pathway in the CD that might be involved in the development of PKD. A role for EGF in the regulation of ENaC-mediated sodium absorption has been proposed. However, several investigations have reported contradictory results indicating opposite effects of EGF and its related factors on ENaC activity and sodium transport. Recent advances in understanding how proteins in the EGF-family regulate the proliferation and sodium transport in normal and PKD epithelial cells are discussed here. PMID:20959142

  14. Ca2+ channel blockade inhibits gallbladder ion transport.

    PubMed

    Saunders, K D; Cates, J A; Abedin, M Z; Kleinman, R; Roslyn, J J

    1990-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that cholesterol gallstone (GS) formation is characterized by altered gallbladder epithelial ion transport and increased gallbladder (GB) luminal Ca2+. Moreover, intracellular Ca2+ has been reported to be an important modulator of intestinal ion transport. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of Ca2+ channel inhibition on GB ion transport. Prairie dog GBs were mounted in a Ussing chamber and bathed in warm oxygenated Ringer's solution, and short-circuit current (Isc), transepithelial potential difference (Vms), and tissue resistance (Rt) were recorded. Following stabilization, the mucosal surfaces of the GBs were exposed to 1 or 0.1 mM verapamil (VER). Effects on Isc were apparent within 10 sec with nadir values reached in 5 +/- 1 min. Profound (76%) inhibition of Isc was seen with 1 mM verapamil exposure (26 +/- 6 microA.cm-2) as compared to baseline values (170 +/- 6 microA.cm-2) (P less than 0.001). Verapamil exposure (1 mM) also led to a marked inhibition of Vms (P less than 0.001, vs baseline) and a significant increase in Rt (P less than 0.05 vs baseline). Similar trends were seen using 0.1 mM verapamil (Isc nadir 133 +/- 13 microA.cm-2). Verapamil-induced effects on gallbladder electrophysiology were largely reversible (75-90% recovery of baseline Isc after tissue washing). These data suggest that (1) verapamil induces rapid but reversible inhibition of ion transport and (2) Ca2+ channel blockade inhibits ion transport in a dose-dependent fashion. We would propose that intracellular Ca2+ may be a regulator of GB ion transport.

  15. Faster Heavy Ion Transport for HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.

    2013-01-01

    The deterministic particle transport code HZETRN was developed to enable fast and accurate space radiation transport through materials. As more complex transport solutions are implemented for neutrons, light ions (Z < 2), mesons, and leptons, it is important to maintain overall computational efficiency. In this work, the heavy ion (Z > 2) transport algorithm in HZETRN is reviewed, and a simple modification is shown to provide an approximate 5x decrease in execution time for galactic cosmic ray transport. Convergence tests and other comparisons are carried out to verify that numerical accuracy is maintained in the new algorithm.

  16. Graphic modeling of epithelial transport system: causality of dissipation.

    PubMed

    Imai, Yusuke

    2003-06-01

    The epithelial transport system is a thermodynamic system which is composed of membranes and fluid compartments. The membranes are assumed to be dissipative subsystems in which power dissipates, and fluid compartments are capacitive subsystems in which power is stored. Each subsystem can be subdivided into elementary thermodynamic processes, and can be represented by generalized capacitors, power transducers and resistors in a bond graph. In the modeling of the dissipative subsystem, the causality of the dissipative process was taken into consideration and the representation of power coupling was developed. The dissipative subsystem can be represented by a combination of coupling modules and conductors. Phenomenological equations with parameters from the model were derived. This study shows that the behavior of transport systems can be simulated using these equations.

  17. Epithelial cell extrusion during fluid transport in canine small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S

    1977-04-01

    Epithelial cell extrusion during fluid transport was studied under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The rate of cell extrusion from the villus tips in vitro increased by about onefold in the villi with obstruction of lymph flow associated with the increase of lymph and tissue fluid pressure. When lymph pressure in the jejunal and ileal villi was increased to 6.4 +/- .2 and 12.3 +/- .5 mmHg, respectively, by injection of Ringer solution into the central lacteals, fluid leaked out of the villi and a shedding of epithelium occurred. Vigorous villus spasmodic contraction induced by cocaine or atropine also caused a shedding of epithelium. Cells always appeared in the lumen of intestine in vivo either during fluid absorption or secretion. A copious secretion of fluid, increase of cell loss, and congestion of blood in the villi occurred by the action of cholera toxin, MgSO4, and choline chloride. The rate of cell loss was highest during fluid secretion induced by an elevation of tissue fluid pressure such as at high venous pressure or during intra-arterial histamine infusion. It is thus concluded that elevated tissue fluid pressure is involved in epithelial cell extrusion during fluid transport.

  18. Ion channels and transporters in metastasis.

    PubMed

    Stock, Christian; Schwab, Albrecht

    2015-10-01

    An elaborate interplay between ion channels and transporters, components of the cytoskeleton, adhesion molecules, and signaling cascades provides the basis for each major step of the metastatic cascade. Ion channels and transporters contribute to cell motility by letting through or transporting ions essential for local Ca2+, pH and--in cooperation with water permeable aquaporins--volume homeostasis. Moreover, in addition to the actual ion transport they, or their auxiliary subunits, can display non-conducting activities. They can exert kinase activity in order to phosphorylate cytoskeletal constituents or their associates. They can become part of signaling processes by permeating Ca2+, by generating local pH-nanodomains or by being final downstream effectors. A number of channels and transporters are found at focal adhesions, interacting directly or indirectly with proteins of the extracellular matrix, with integrins or with components of the cytoskeleton. We also include the role of aquaporins in cell motility. They drive the outgrowth of lamellipodia/invadopodia or control the number of β1 integrins in the plasma membrane. The multitude of interacting ion channels and transporters (called transportome) including the associated signaling events holds great potential as therapeutic target(s) for anticancer agents that are aimed at preventing metastasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  19. Inhibiting Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Enteric Glia Restores Electrogenic Ion Transport in Mice With Colitis.

    PubMed

    MacEachern, Sarah J; Patel, Bhavik A; Keenan, Catherine M; Dicay, Michael; Chapman, Kevin; McCafferty, Donna-Marie; Savidge, Tor C; Beck, Paul L; MacNaughton, Wallace K; Sharkey, Keith A

    2015-08-01

    Disturbances in the control of ion transport lead to epithelial barrier dysfunction in patients with colitis. Enteric glia regulate intestinal barrier function and colonic ion transport. However, it is not clear whether enteric glia are involved in epithelial hyporesponsiveness. We investigated enteric glial regulation of ion transport in mice with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- or dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and in Il10(-/-) mice. Electrically evoked ion transport was measured in full-thickness segments of colon from CD1 and Il10(-/-) mice with or without colitis in Ussing chambers. Nitric oxide (NO) production was assessed using amperometry. Bacterial translocation was investigated in the liver, spleen, and blood of mice. Electrical stimulation of the colon evoked a tetrodotoxin-sensitive chloride secretion. In mice with colitis, ion transport almost completely disappeared. Inhibiting inducible NO synthase (NOS2), but not neuronal NOS (NOS1), partially restored the evoked secretory response. Blocking glial function with fluoroacetate, which is not a NOS2 inhibitor, also partially restored ion transport. Combined NOS2 inhibition and fluoroacetate administration fully restored secretion. Epithelial responsiveness to vasoactive intestinal peptide was increased after enteric glial function was blocked in mice with colitis. In colons of mice without colitis, NO was produced in the myenteric plexus almost completely via NOS1. NO production was increased in mice with colitis, compared with mice without colitis; a substantial proportion of NOS2 was blocked by fluoroacetate administration. Inhibition of enteric glial function in vivo reduced the severity of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis and associated bacterial translocation. Increased production of NOS2 in enteric glia contributes to the dysregulation of intestinal ion transport in mice with colitis. Blocking enteric glial function in these mice restores epithelial barrier function and reduces

  20. Inhibiting Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Enteric Glia Restores Electrogenic Ion Transport in Mice with Colitis

    PubMed Central

    MacEachern, Sarah J.; Patel, Bhavik A.; Keenan, Catherine M.; Dicay, Michael; Chapman, Kevin; McCafferty, Donna-Marie; Savidge, Tor C.; Beck, Paul L.; MacNaughton, Wallace K.; Sharkey, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Disturbances in the control of ion transport lead to epithelial barrier dysfunction in patients with colitis. Enteric glia regulate intestinal barrier function and colonic ion transport. However, it is not clear whether enteric glia are involved in the epithelial hypo-responsiveness. We investigated enteric glial regulation of ion transport in mice with trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid- or dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and in Il10−/− mice. Methods Electrically-evoked ion transport was measured in full-thickness segments of colon from CD1 and Il10−/− mice with or without colitis in Ussing chambers. Nitric oxide (NO) production was assessed using amperometry. Bacterial translocation was investigated in the liver, spleen and blood of mice. Results Electrical stimulation of the colon evoked a tetrodotoxin-sensitive chloride secretion. In mice with colitis, ion transport almost completely disappeared. Inhibiting inducible NO synthase (NOS2), but not neuronal NOS (NOS1), partially restored the evoked secretory response. Blocking glial function with fluoroacetate, which is not a NOS2 inhibitor, also partially restored ion transport. Combined NOS2 inhibition and fluoroacetate administration fully restored secretion. Epithelial responsiveness to vasoactive intestinal peptide was increased after enteric glial function was blocked in mice with colitis. In colons of mice without colitis, NO was produced in the myenteric plexus almost completely via NOS1. NO production was increased in mice with colitis, compared to mice without colitis; a substantial proportion of NOS2 was blocked by fluoroacetate administration. Inhibition of enteric glial function in vivo reduced the severity of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid -induced colitis and associated bacterial translocation. Conclusions Increased production of NOS2 in enteric glia contributes to the dysregulation of intestinal ion transport in mice with colitis. Blocking enteric glial function in these

  1. Ion transport its regulation in the endolymphatic sac: suggestions for clinical aspects of Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Mori, Nozomu; Miyashita, Takenori; Inamoto, Ryuhei; Matsubara, Ai; Mori, Terushige; Akiyama, Kosuke; Hoshikawa, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    Ion transport and its regulation in the endolymphatic sac (ES) are reviewed on the basis of recent lines of evidence. The morphological and physiological findings demonstrate that epithelial cells in the intermediate portion of the ES are more functional in ion transport than those in the other portions. Several ion channels, ion transporters, ion exchangers, and so on have been reported to be present in epithelial cells of ES intermediate portion. An imaging study has shown that mitochondria-rich cells in the ES intermediate portion have a higher activity of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and a higher Na(+) permeability than other type of cells, implying that molecules related to Na(+) transport, such as epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter 2 (NKCC2) and thiazide-sensitive Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC), may be present in mitochondria-rich cells. Accumulated lines of evidence suggests that Na(+) transport is most important in the ES, and that mitochondria-rich cells play crucial roles in Na(+) transport in the ES. Several lines of evidence support the hypothesis that aldosterone may regulate Na(+) transport in ES, resulting in endolymph volume regulation. The presence of molecules related to acid/base transport, such as H(+)-ATPase, Na(+)-H(+) exchanger (NHE), pendrin (SLC26A4), Cl(-)-HCO3(-) exchanger (SLC4A2), and carbonic anhydrase in ES epithelial cells, suggests that acid/base transport is another important one in the ES. Recent basic and clinical studies suggest that aldosterone may be involved in the effect of salt-reduced diet treatment in Meniere's disease.

  2. Dynamics of Ion Transport in Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alpha A; Kondrat, Svyatoslav; Vella, Dominic; Goriely, Alain

    2015-09-04

    A gap in understanding the link between continuum theories of ion transport in ionic liquids and the underlying microscopic dynamics has hindered the development of frameworks for transport phenomena in these concentrated electrolytes. Here, we construct a continuum theory for ion transport in ionic liquids by coarse graining a simple exclusion process of interacting particles on a lattice. The resulting dynamical equations can be written as a gradient flow with a mobility matrix that vanishes at high densities. This form of the mobility matrix gives rise to a charging behavior that is different to the one known for electrolytic solutions, but which agrees qualitatively with the phenomenology observed in experiments and simulations.

  3. Stanniocalcin-1 Controls Ion Regulation Functions of Ion-transporting Epithelium Other than Calcium Balance

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ming-Yi; Lin, Chia-Hao; Chao, Pei-Lin; Hung, Jo-Chi; Cruz, Shelly A.; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC-1) was first identified to involve in Ca2+ homeostasis in teleosts, and was thought to act as a hypocalcemic hormone in vertebrate. Recent studies suggested that STC-1 exhibits broad effects on ion balance, not confines to Ca2+, but the mechanism of this regulation process remains largely unknown. Here, we used zebrafish embryos as an alternative in vivo model to investigate how STC-1 regulates transepithelial ion transport function in ion-transporting epithelium. Expression of stc-1 mRNA in zebrafish embryos was increased in high-Ca2+ environments but decreased by acidic and ion-deficient treatments while overexpression of stc-1 impaired the hypotonic acclimation by decreasing whole body Ca2+, Na+, and Cl- contents and H+ secretion ability. Injection of STC-1 mRNA also down-regulated mRNA expressions of epithelial Ca2+ channel, H+-ATPase, and Na+-Cl- cotransporter, suggesting the roles of STC-1 in regulation of ions other than Ca2+. Knockdown of STC-1 caused an increase in ionocyte progenitors (foxi3a as the marker) and mature ionocytes (ion transporters as the markers), but did not affect epithelium stem cells (p63 as the marker) in the embryonic skin. Overexpression of STC-1 had the corresponding opposite effect on ionocyte progenitors, mature ionocytes in the embryonic skin. Taken together, STC-1 negatively regulates the number of ionocytes to reduce ionocyte functions. This process is important for body fluid ionic homeostasis, which is achieved by the regulation of ion transport functions in ionocytes. The present findings provide new insights into the broader functions of STC-1, a hypocalcemic hormone. PMID:25561895

  4. Regional differences in rat conjunctival ion transport activities

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongfang; Thelin, William R.; Rogers, Troy D.; Stutts, M. Jackson; Randell, Scott H.; Grubb, Barbara R.

    2012-01-01

    Active ion transport and coupled osmotic water flow are essential to maintain ocular surface health. We investigated regional differences in the ion transport activities of the rat conjunctivas and compared these activities with those of cornea and lacrimal gland. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), sodium/glucose cotransporter 1 (Slc5a1), transmembrane protein 16 (Tmem16a, b, f, and g), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr), and mucin (Muc4, 5ac, and 5b) mRNA expression was characterized by RT-PCR. ENaC proteins were measured by Western blot. Prespecified regions (palpebral, fornical, and bulbar) of freshly isolated conjunctival tissues and cell cultures were studied electrophysiologically with Ussing chambers. The transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) of the ocular surface was also measured in vivo. The effect of amiloride and UTP on the tear volume was evaluated in lacrimal gland excised rats. All selected genes were detected but with different expression patterns. We detected αENaC protein in all tissues, βENaC in palpebral and fornical conjunctiva, and γENaC in all tissues except lacrimal glands. Electrophysiological studies of conjunctival tissues and cell cultures identified functional ENaC, SLC5A1, CFTR, and TMEM16. Fornical conjunctiva exhibited the most active ion transport under basal conditions amongst conjunctival regions. PD measurements confirmed functional ENaC-mediated Na+ transport on the ocular surface. Amiloride and UTP increased tear volume in lacrimal gland excised rats. This study demonstrated that the different regions of the conjunctiva exhibited a spectrum of ion transport activities. Understanding the specific functions of distinct regions of the conjunctiva may foster a better understanding of the physiology maintaining hydration of the ocular surface. PMID:22814399

  5. Regional differences in rat conjunctival ion transport activities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dongfang; Thelin, William R; Rogers, Troy D; Stutts, M Jackson; Randell, Scott H; Grubb, Barbara R; Boucher, Richard C

    2012-10-01

    Active ion transport and coupled osmotic water flow are essential to maintain ocular surface health. We investigated regional differences in the ion transport activities of the rat conjunctivas and compared these activities with those of cornea and lacrimal gland. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), sodium/glucose cotransporter 1 (Slc5a1), transmembrane protein 16 (Tmem16a, b, f, and g), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr), and mucin (Muc4, 5ac, and 5b) mRNA expression was characterized by RT-PCR. ENaC proteins were measured by Western blot. Prespecified regions (palpebral, fornical, and bulbar) of freshly isolated conjunctival tissues and cell cultures were studied electrophysiologically with Ussing chambers. The transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) of the ocular surface was also measured in vivo. The effect of amiloride and UTP on the tear volume was evaluated in lacrimal gland excised rats. All selected genes were detected but with different expression patterns. We detected αENaC protein in all tissues, βENaC in palpebral and fornical conjunctiva, and γENaC in all tissues except lacrimal glands. Electrophysiological studies of conjunctival tissues and cell cultures identified functional ENaC, SLC5A1, CFTR, and TMEM16. Fornical conjunctiva exhibited the most active ion transport under basal conditions amongst conjunctival regions. PD measurements confirmed functional ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport on the ocular surface. Amiloride and UTP increased tear volume in lacrimal gland excised rats. This study demonstrated that the different regions of the conjunctiva exhibited a spectrum of ion transport activities. Understanding the specific functions of distinct regions of the conjunctiva may foster a better understanding of the physiology maintaining hydration of the ocular surface.

  6. Ion kinetic transport in TJ-II

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, J. L.; Tarancon, A.; Castejon, F.; Fernandez, L. A.; Martin-Mayor, V.

    2008-11-02

    The ion Drift Kinetic Equation (DKE) which describes the ion collisional transport is solved for the TJ-II device plasmas. This non-linear equation is computed by performing a mean field iterative calculation. In each step of the calculation, a Fokker-Planck equation is solved by means of the Langevin approach: one million particles are followed in a realistic TJ-II magnetic configuration, taking into account collisions and electric field. This allows to avoid the assumptions made in the usual neoclassical approach, namely considering radially narrow particle trajectories, diffusive transport, energy conservation and infinite parallel transport. As a consequence, global features of transport, not present in the customary neoclassical models, appear: non-diffusive transport and asymmetries on the magnetic surfaces.

  7. Ion transport during growth and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Venkatasubramanian, J; Sahi, J; Rao, M C

    2000-01-01

    The major function of the adult colon is to reabsorb fluid from the chyme. This ability to conserve salt and water is especially important in newborns, where reserves are small and diarrhea is frequent. Although much is known about regulation of Cl- transport in the adult colon, postnatal changes in electrolyte transport are not well characterized. We have established an in vitro model to study colonic epithelial cells (colonocytes) at different stages of development. Primary cultures were isolated from newborn, weanling, and adult rabbit colon and properties such as growth and Cl- transport characterized. The isolation procedure yielded a crypt-enriched population of cells, and the cell yield per gram mucosa increased with age. The colonocytes also showed an age-related decrease in attachment to extracellular matrix, with maximum attachment seen with Matrigel and collagen IV. The crypt enrichment was confirmed by demonstrating that the cell population was capable of transporting Cl-, which was stimulated by agents such as forskolin and phorbol esters at all ages. Agents that increased intracellular cGMP, however, did not increase Cl- transport at any age. It was interesting to observe that the secondary bile acid, taurodeoxycholate, stimulated Cl- transport only in the adult but not newborn or weanling distal colonocytes. We have demonstrated that rabbit distal colonocytes can be kept viable in culture and transport Cl- at all ages. However, the regulation of Cl- transport changes during ontogeny and depends on the signaling pathway.

  8. Control of mucus secretion and ion transport in airways.

    PubMed

    Nadel, J A; Davis, B; Phipps, R J

    1979-01-01

    The output of secretions from the airway submucosal glands is regulated by vagal efferent nerves. Stimulation of cough receptors increases mucus output reflexly via the vagus nerves. Adrenergic agonists increase submucosal gland secretions in some species, which indicates that adrenergic receptors are present in these cells. However, evidence for adrenergic nervous pathways to the glands is limited. Irritants and drugs stimulate secretion from epithelial cells by direct effects. There is also evidence that the secretion of epithelial cells can be stimulated by parasympathetic nervous pathways in birds but not in mammals. Active ion transport of Cl- toward the lumen and of Na+ toward the submucosa results in net ion movement toward the airway lumen in unstimulated tracheal epithelia. Drugs and mediators increase the net movement of ions toward the lumen. No agents have yet been found that increase net ion movement toward the submucosa. The link between ion transport and water secretion in airway epithelia, although speculative, seems likely in view of the evidence from other epithelia. Since airway epithelium is a "tight junction" epithelium, modification of the tight junction may alter the transepithelial movement of water and ions. We suggest that the depth and consistency of the periciliary layer of airway secretions determine the ability of the cilia to propel the mucoprotein gel and thereby modify mucociliary transport. To achieve this, secretion of mucus must be controlled separately from the secretion of water. Studies are needed to determine which of the specialized functions of the epithelial cells interact to regulate the clearance of secretions from the airway. Is the sol maintained by secretion and reabsorption of fluid across the epithelium? Does the sol move with the gel by ciliary action or does it remain stationary? Do changes in the epithelial tight junctions influence net water movement and thus indirectly alter the depth of the sol layer? To

  9. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate regulation of ion transport in porcine vocal fold mucosae.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Nofziger, Charity; Blazer-Yost, Bonnie

    2008-08-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an important biological molecule that regulates ion transport and inflammatory responses in epithelial tissue. The present study examined whether the adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, would increase cAMP concentration in porcine vocal fold mucosa and whether the effects of increased cAMP would be manifested as a functional increase in transepithelial ion transport. Additionally, changes in cAMP concentrations following exposure to an inflammatory mediator, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) were investigated. In vitro experimental design with matched treatment and control groups. Porcine vocal fold mucosae (N = 30) and tracheal mucosae (N = 20) were exposed to forskolin, TNFalpha, or vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide) treatment. cAMP concentrations were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Ion transport was measured using electrophysiological techniques. Thirty minute exposure to forskolin significantly increased cAMP concentration and ion transport in porcine vocal fold and tracheal mucosae. However, 30-minute and 2-hour exposure to TNFalpha did not significantly alter cAMP concentration. We demonstrate that forskolin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase is present in vocal fold mucosa, and further, that the product, cAMP increases vocal fold ion transport. The results presented here contribute to our understanding of the intracellular mechanisms underlying vocal fold ion transport. As ion transport is important for maintaining superficial vocal fold hydration, data demonstrating forskolin-stimulated ion transport in vocal fold mucosa suggest opportunities for developing pharmacological treatments that increase surface hydration.

  10. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  11. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2012-02-14

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  12. Liners for ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Miller, Christopher Francis

    2010-08-10

    Ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel comprising an interior, an exterior, an inlet, an inlet conduit, an outlet, and an outlet conduit; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein the inlet and the outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; (c) a gas manifold having an interior surface wherein the gas manifold is in flow communication with the interior region of each of the planar ion transport membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel; and (d) a liner disposed within any of the inlet conduit, the outlet conduit, and the interior surface of the gas manifold.

  13. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2007-02-20

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  14. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  15. Nonperturbative methods in HZE ion transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Costen, Robert C.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1993-01-01

    A nonperturbative analytic solution of the high charge and energy (HZE) Green's function is used to implement a computer code for laboratory ion beam transport. The code is established to operate on the Langley Research Center nuclear fragmentation model used in engineering applications. Computational procedures are established to generate linear energy transfer (LET) distributions for a specified ion beam and target for comparison with experimental measurements. The code is highly efficient and compares well with the perturbation approximations.

  16. A model of epithelial water transport. The corneal endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Liebovitch, L S; Weinbaum, S

    1981-01-01

    To try to understand how an epithelial tissue can transport water between bathing solutions of equal tonicity and how intracellular solute and protein concentration are related to the structural specialization of the cell membrane at its apical, basal, and lateral margins, we have formulated and solved, using approximate analytical techniques, a new model which combines the detailed transport of local osmotic flow in extracellular channel with the multicompartment approach of thermodynamic models requiring the overall conservation of water and solute for the entire cell layer. Thus, unlike most previous models, which dealt exclusively with either the average properties of the cell layer or the local transport in the extracellular channel, we are able to solve simultaneously for the interaction of the cell with its environments across its apical, basal, and lateral cell membranes as well as the detailed transport in the extracellular channel. The model is then applied to corneal endothelium to obtain new insight into the water flow movement in this tissue under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Then in vitro solution shows that the cell at 297 mosmol/liter is slightly hypotonic to the 300-mosmol/liter external bathing solutions which drive water equally out both the aqueous (apical) and stromal (basal) cell faces. This water is replaced from the extracellular channel. There is a net flow of water because more water enters the channel through its open stromal end than through the higher resistance tight junction. In vivo, the solution predicts that the stromal swelling pressure forces water through the tight junctions towards the stroma so that there is no net flow. The interesting new features of our solution are the water recirculation pattern and the role of the osmotically active proteins in making the cell hypertonic relative to the channel. PMID:7272441

  17. Purinergic P2Y receptors in airway epithelia: from ion transport to immune functions.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuan; Ko, Wing-hung

    2014-02-25

    The regulated transport of salt and water is essential to the integrated function of many organ systems, including the respiratory, reproductive, and digestive tracts. Airway epithelial fluid secretion is a passive process that is driven by osmotic forces, which are generated by ion transport. The main determinant of a luminally-directed osmotic gradient is the mucosal transport of chloride ions (Cl(-)) into the lumen. As with many epithelial cells, a number of classic signal transduction cascades are involved in the regulation of ion transport. There are two well-known intracellular signaling systems: an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and an increase in the rate of synthesis of cyclic nucleotides, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Therefore, Cl(-) secretion is primarily activated via the opening of apical Ca(2+)- or cAMP-dependent Cl(-) channels at the apical membrane. The opening of basolateral Ca(2+)- or cAMP-activated K(+) channels, which hyperpolarizes the cell to maintain the driving force for Cl(-) exit through apical Cl(-) channels that are constitutively open, is also important in regulating transepithelial ion transport. P2Y receptors are expressed in the apical and/or basolateral membranes of virtually all polarized epithelia to control the transport of fluid and electrolytes. Human airway epithelial cells express multiple nucleotide receptors. Extracellular nucleotides, such as UTP and ATP, are calcium-mobilizing secretagogues. They are released into the extracellular space from airway epithelial cells and act on the same cell in an autocrine fashion to stimulate transepithelial ion transport. In addition, recent data support the role of P2Y receptors in releasing inflammatory cytokines in the bronchial epithelium and other immune cells.

  18. [Ion transport in the colon].

    PubMed

    Caprilli, R; Frieri, G; Marchetti, G; Giambartolomei, S

    1995-12-01

    The large bowel daily absorbs passively 1500 ml of water down an osmotic gradient created by active electrolyte transports. The system is sustained by the enzyme Na(+)-K+ ATPase, the so called sodium-pump, present on the basolateral membrane of colonocytes. Some pathologic conditions may increase the amount of intraluminal water by inhibiting fluid absorbtion or enhancing fluid secretion. Diarrhoea represents the clinical counterpart of these alterations. Three forms of diarrhoea can be recognized on the basis of pathophysiological alterations. Diarrhoea is due to reduced ionic absorbtion, increased secretion or increased endoluminal osmolality. The drugs used to induce bowel actions or gut lavage increase also intraluminal water content by modifying transmural ionic transports. Laxatives or purges act by increasing either water secretion on endoluminal osmolality and therefore may produce systemic idro-electrolyte imbalance. To avoid this inconvenient an isosmotic electrolyte balanced polyethylene glicol solution (PEG-ELS) has been achieved. In addition orally administred PEG-ELS solution cleans the colon during its intestinal transit without producing relevant transmural water-ionic movements. Aim of this article was to describe the normal ionic transport, and its alterations in pathologic and pharmacologic conditions. Details on PEG-ELS were also given. This solution provides for an effective colon preparation for endoscopic or surgical procedures and resulted to be safe for patients with delicate fluid-electrolyte balance.

  19. Intracellular calcium modulates gallbladder ion transport.

    PubMed

    Cates, J A; Saunders, K D; Abedin, M Z; Roslyn, J J

    1991-06-01

    Although experimentally induced cholesterol gallstone formation has been associated with altered gallbladder (GB) absorption and increased biliary Ca2+, the relationship between these events remains unclear. Recent studies suggest that extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]ec) influences GB ion transport. Whether the effects of [Ca2+]ec are mediated by changes in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]ic) has not been determined. This study was designed to define the effects of altered [Ca2+]ic on GB ion transport. Prairie dog GBs were mounted in a Ussing chamber and short-circuit current (Isc), potential difference (Vms), and resistance (Rt) were recorded. Mucosal surfaces were exposed to either Dantrolene (Dt) or nickel (Ni2+). Dt "traps" [Ca2+]ic within intracellular organelles, thereby lowering cytosolic Ca2+; and Ni2+ prevents influx of [Ca2+]ec, presumably by binding Ca2+ channels. Although Dt reduced both Isc and Vms (P less than 0.01), these effects were transient. Transport recovery was probably due to increased [Ca2+]ec influx with restoration of [Ca2+]ic. Ni2+ resulted in sustained decreases in Isc and Vms (P less than 0.05) despite subsequent addition of 10 mM Ca2+. These findings are consistent with the prevention of [Ca2+]ec influx by Ni2+. We conclude that: (1) [Ca2+]ic may be a modulator of GB ion transport and (2) previously reported [Ca2+]ec effects on ion transport may be mediated through [Ca2+]ic concentration changes.

  20. Transport of Light Ions in Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Tai, H.; Shinn, J. L.; Chun, S. Y.; Tripathi, R. K.; Sihver, L.

    1998-01-01

    A recent set of light ion experiments are analyzed using the Green's function method of solving the Boltzmann equation for ions of high charge and energy (the GRNTRN transport code) and the NUCFRG2 fragmentation database generator code. Although the NUCFRG2 code reasonably represents the fragmentation of heavy ions, the effects of light ion fragmentation requires a more detailed nuclear model including shell structure and short range correlations appearing as tightly bound clusters in the light ion nucleus. The most recent NTJCFRG2 code is augmented with a quasielastic alpha knockout model and semiempirical adjustments (up to 30 percent in charge removal) in the fragmentation process allowing reasonable agreement with the experiments to be obtained. A final resolution of the appropriate cross sections must await the full development of a coupled channel reaction model in which shell structure and clustering can be accurately evaluated.

  1. Ions channels/transporters and chloroplast regulation.

    PubMed

    Finazzi, Giovanni; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Tomizioli, Martino; Flori, Serena; Sautron, Emeline; Villanova, Valeria; Rolland, Norbert; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné

    2015-07-01

    Ions play fundamental roles in all living cells and their gradients are often essential to fuel transports, to regulate enzyme activities and to transduce energy within and between cells. Their homeostasis is therefore an essential component of the cell metabolism. Ions must be imported from the extracellular matrix to their final subcellular compartments. Among them, the chloroplast is a particularly interesting example because there, ions not only modulate enzyme activities, but also mediate ATP synthesis and actively participate in the building of the photosynthetic structures by promoting membrane-membrane interaction. In this review, we first provide a comprehensive view of the different machineries involved in ion trafficking and homeostasis in the chloroplast, and then discuss peculiar functions exerted by ions in the frame of photochemical conversion of absorbed light energy.

  2. Ion transport in roots: measurement of fluxes using ion-selective microelectrodes to characterize transporter function.

    PubMed

    Newman, I A

    2001-01-01

    The transport of mineral ions into and out of tissues and cells is central to the life of plants. Ion transport and the plasma membrane transporters themselves have been studied using a variety of techniques. In the last 15 years, measurement of specific ion fluxes has contributed to the characterization of transport systems. Progress in molecular genetics is allowing gene identification and controlled expression of transporter molecules. However the molecular expression of transporter gene products must be characterized at the functional level. The ion-selective microelectrode technique to measure specific ion fluxes non-invasively is ideally suited to this purpose. This technique, its theory, its links with others and its application and prospects in plant science, are discussed. Ions studied include hydrogen, potassium, sodium, ammonium, calcium, chloride and nitrate. Applications discussed include: solute ion uptake by roots; gravitropism and other processes in the root cap, meristematic and elongation zones; Nod factor effect on root hairs; osmotic and salt stresses; oscillations; the effects of light and temperature. Studies have included intact roots, leaf mesophyll and other tissues, protoplasts and bacterial biofilms. A multi-ion capability of the technique will greatly assist functional genomics, particularly when coupled with imaging techniques, patch clamping and the use of suitable mutants.

  3. Renal sympathetic nerve, blood flow, and epithelial transport responses to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thad E

    2017-05-01

    Thermal stress is a profound sympathetic stress in humans; kidney responses involve altered renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), renal blood flow, and renal epithelial transport. During mild cold stress, RSNA spectral power but not total activity is altered, renal blood flow is maintained or decreased, and epithelial transport is altered consistent with a sympathetic stress coupled with central volume loaded state. Hypothermia decreases RSNA, renal blood flow, and epithelial transport. During mild heat stress, RSNA is increased, renal blood flow is decreased, and epithelial transport is increased consistent with a sympathetic stress coupled with a central volume unloaded state. Hyperthermia extends these directional changes, until heat illness results. Because kidney responses are very difficult to study in humans in vivo, this review describes and qualitatively evaluates an in vivo human skin model of sympathetically regulated epithelial tissue compared to that of the nephron. This model utilizes skin responses to thermal stress, involving 1) increased skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), decreased skin blood flow, and suppressed eccrine epithelial transport during cold stress; and 2) increased SSNA, skin blood flow, and eccrine epithelial transport during heat stress. This model appears to mimic aspects of the renal responses. Investigations of skin responses, which parallel certain renal responses, may aid understanding of epithelial-sympathetic nervous system interactions during cold and heat stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Chamber transport for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is given of research on chamber transport for HIF (heavy ion fusion) dating from the first HIF Workshop in 1976 to the present. Chamber transport modes are categorized into ballistic transport modes and channel-like modes. Four major HIF reactor studies are summarized (HIBALL-II, HYLIFE-II, Prometheus-H, OSIRIS), with emphasis on the chamber transport environment. In general, many beams are used to provide the required symmetry and to permit focusing to the required small spots. Target parameters are then discussed, with a summary of the individual heavy ion beam parameters required for HIF. The beam parameters are then classified as to their line charge density and perveance, with special emphasis on the perveance limits for radial space charge spreading, for the space charge limiting current, and for the magnetic (Alfven) limiting current. The major experiments on ballistic transport (SFFE, Sabre beamlets, GAMBLE II, NTX, NDCX) are summarized, with specific reference to the axial electron trapping limit for charge neutralization. The major experiments on channel-like transport (GAMBLE II channel, GAMBLE II self-pinch, LBNL channels, GSI channels) are discussed. The status of current research on HIF chamber transport is summarized, and the value of future NDCX-II transport experiments for the future of HIF is noted.

  5. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie; Belhi, Memdouh; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Mani Sarathy, S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model's predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018.

  6. Workshop on transport for a common ion driver

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.C.; Lee, E.; Langdon, B.

    1994-12-31

    This report contains research in the following areas related to beam transport for a common ion driver: multi-gap acceleration; neutralization with electrons; gas neutralization; self-pinched transport; HIF and LIF transport, and relevance to common ion driver; LIF and HIF reactor concepts and relevance to common ion driver; atomic physics for common ion driver; code capabilities and needed improvement.

  7. Metrology and Transport of Multiply Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Dhruva

    The transport and interaction of singly- and multiply-charged ions with matter has been studied. The experiments were performed in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The low- and hyperthermal-energy ion beamline was used as a source of singly charged ions, while the CUEBIT facility was used as a source of multiply charged ions. The kinetic energy of the ion beam obtained from the CUEBIT is offset from the nominal value expected from the applied electrostatic potentials. These offsets were studied by measuring the kinetic energy of the beam using a retarding field analyzer (RFA). The offset was attributed to the space charge of the electron beam that is used to create the multiply charged ions. The charge density of the electron beam was varied by changing operational parameters of the electron beam, namely the electron beam current and the energy of the electron beam. Ion beams of Ar4+ and Ar8+ were extracted from the source and the offsets observed in the kinetic energy were related to the variation in the space charge potential of the electron beam. Measurements of these offsets, ranging from 100 eV/Q to 300 eV/Q, are significant and important for experiments that aim to utilize the potential energy of slow multiply charged ions. The transport of ions using capillaries has been studied to investigate the viability of ion-guiding as a means for a novel ion delivery mechanism. Results on transport through large bore capillaries (macrocapillaries) that probe both the geometric and ionguided mechanisms are presented. The angle- and position-dependent transport properties were found to depend on the material of the capillary (specifically, whether metal or insulator) and the geometry of the capillary. Rb+ ions at a kinetic energy of 1 keV were transmitted through metal and glass capillaries that were a few centimeters in length and a few millimeters in diameter. Oscillations were observed in the capillaries made of glass which were absent in the metal capillaries

  8. Transport quantum logic gates for trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Leibfried, D.; Knill, E.; Ospelkaus, C.; Wineland, D. J.

    2007-09-15

    Many efforts are currently underway to build a device capable of large scale quantum information processing (QIP). Whereas QIP has been demonstrated for a few qubits in several systems, many technical difficulties must be overcome in order to construct a large-scale device. In one proposal for large-scale QIP, trapped ions are manipulated by precisely controlled light pulses and moved through and stored in multizone trap arrays. The technical overhead necessary to precisely control both the ion geometrical configurations and the laser interactions is demanding. Here we propose methods that significantly reduce the overhead on laser-beam control for performing single- and multiple-qubit operations on trapped ions. We show how a universal set of operations can be implemented by controlled transport of ions through stationary laser beams. At the same time, each laser beam can be used to perform many operations in parallel, potentially reducing the total laser power necessary to carry out QIP tasks. The overall setup necessary for implementing transport gates is simpler than for gates executed on stationary ions. We also suggest a transport-based two-qubit gate scheme utilizing microfabricated permanent magnets that can be executed without laser light.

  9. Supramolecular gating of ion transport in nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B V V S Pavan; Rao, K Venkata; Sampath, S; George, Subi J; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy

    2014-11-24

    Several covalent strategies towards surface charge-reversal in nanochannels have been reported with the purpose of manipulating ion transport. However, covalent routes lack dynamism, modularity and post-synthetic flexibility, and hence restrict their applicability in different environments. Here, we introduce a facile non-covalent approach towards charge-reversal in nanochannels (<10 nm) using strong charge-transfer interactions between dicationic viologen (acceptor) and trianionic pyranine (donor). The polarity of ion transport was switched from anion selective to ambipolar to cation selective by controlling the extent of viologen bound to the pyranine. We could also regulate the ion transport with respect to pH by selecting a donor with pH-responsive functional groups. The modularity of this approach further allows facile integration of various functional groups capable of responding to stimuli such as light and temperature to modulate the transport of ions as well as molecules. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Function and repair of dental enamel - Potential role of epithelial transport processes of ameloblasts.

    PubMed

    Varga, Gábor; Kerémi, Beáta; Bori, Erzsébet; Földes, Anna

    2015-07-01

    The hardest mammalian tissue, dental enamel is produced by ameloblasts, which are electrolyte-transporting epithelial cells. Although the end product is very different, they show many similarities to transporting epithelia of the pancreas, salivary glands and kidney. Enamel is produced in a multi-step epithelial secretory process that features biomineralization which is an interplay of secreted ameloblast specific proteins and the time-specific transport of minerals, protons and bicarbonate. First, "secretory" ameloblasts form the entire thickness of the enamel layer, but with low mineral content. Then they differentiate into "maturation" ameloblasts, which remove organic matrix from the enamel and in turn further build up hydroxyapatite crystals. The protons generated by hydroxyapatite formation need to be buffered, otherwise enamel will not attain full mineralization. Buffering requires a tight pH regulation and secretion of bicarbonate by ameloblasts. The whole process has been the focus of many immunohistochemical and gene knock-out studies, but, perhaps surprisingly, no functional data existed for mineral ion transport by ameloblasts. However, recent studies including ours provided a better insight for molecular mechanism of mineral formation. The secretory regulation is not completely known as yet, but its significance is crucial. Impairing regulation retards or prevents completion of enamel mineralization and results in the development of hypomineralized enamel that easily erodes after dental eruption. Factors that impair this function are fluoride and disruption of pH regulators. Revealing these factors may eventually lead to the treatment of enamel hypomineralization related to genetic or environmentally induced malformation. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The gasotransmitter hydrogen sulphide decreases Na+ transport across pulmonary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Althaus, M; Urness, KD; Clauss, WG; Baines, DL; Fronius, M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The transepithelial absorption of Na+ in the lungs is crucial for the maintenance of the volume and composition of epithelial lining fluid. The regulation of Na+ transport is essential, because hypo- or hyperabsorption of Na+ is associated with lung diseases such as pulmonary oedema or cystic fibrosis. This study investigated the effects of the gaseous signalling molecule hydrogen sulphide (H2S) on Na+ absorption across pulmonary epithelial cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Ion transport processes were electrophysiologically assessed in Ussing chambers on H441 cells grown on permeable supports at air/liquid interface and on native tracheal preparations of pigs and mice. The effects of H2S were further investigated on Na+ channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes and Na+/K+-ATPase activity in vitro. Membrane abundance of Na+/K+-ATPase was determined by surface biotinylation and Western blot. Cellular ATP concentrations were measured colorimetrically, and cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations were measured with Fura-2. KEY RESULTS H2S rapidly and reversibly inhibited Na+ transport in all the models employed. H2S had no effect on Na+ channels, whereas it decreased Na+/K+-ATPase currents. H2S did not affect the membrane abundance of Na+/K+-ATPase, its metabolic or calcium-dependent regulation, or its direct activity. However, H2S inhibited basolateral calcium-dependent K+ channels, which consequently decreased Na+ absorption by H441 monolayers. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS H2S impairs pulmonary transepithelial Na+ absorption, mainly by inhibiting basolateral Ca2+-dependent K+ channels. These data suggest that the H2S signalling system might represent a novel pharmacological target for modifying pulmonary transepithelial Na+ transport. PMID:22352810

  12. Ion Transport in 2-D Graphene Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Quan; Foo, Elbert; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    Graphene membranes have recently attracted wide attention due to its great potential in water desalination and selective molecular sieving. Further developments of these membranes, including enhancing their mass transport rate and/or molecular selectivity, rely on the understanding of fundamental transport mechanisms through graphene membranes, which has not been studied experimentally before due to fabrication and measurement difficulties. Herein we report the fabrication of the basic constituent of graphene membranes, i.e. 2-D single graphene nanochannels (GNCs) and the study of ion transport in these channels. A modified bonding technique was developed to form GNCs with well-defined geometry and uniform channel height. Ion transport in such GNCs was studied using DC conductance measurement. Our preliminary results showed that the ion transport in GNCs is still governed by surface charge at low concentrations (10-6M to 10-4M). However, GNCs exhibits much higher ionic conductances than silica nanochannels with the same geometries in the surface-charge-governed regime. This conductance enhancement can be attributed to the pre-accumulation of charges on graphene surfaces. The work is supported by the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  13. Features of ion transport in perfluorinated ion-exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Timashev, S.F.

    1986-02-01

    The conditions for functioning for various systems and devices electrolyzers for ''chlorate'' electrolysis, current sources, etc.) with perfluorinated ion-exchange membranes and septums are determined to a considerable degree by the physicochemical properties of the perfluorinated materials. In this work, on the basis of concepts developed in streaming theory as to the topology of the ''infinite clusters'' (ICs), the author defines more precisely the form of the preexponential dependence of ion transport coefficients and draws conclusions on the character of heat evolution in a perfluorinated membrane when an electric current is passed through the membrane.

  14. Polarized protein transport and lumen formation during epithelial tissue morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Blasky, Alex J; Mangan, Anthony; Prekeris, Rytis

    2015-01-01

    One of the major challenges in biology is to explain how complex tissues and organs arise from the collective action of individual polarized cells. The best-studied model of this process is the cross talk between individual epithelial cells during their polarization to form the multicellular epithelial lumen during tissue morphogenesis. Multiple mechanisms of apical lumen formation have been proposed. Some epithelial lumens form from preexisting polarized epithelial structures. However, de novo lumen formation from nonpolarized cells has recently emerged as an important driver of epithelial tissue morphogenesis, especially during the formation of small epithelial tubule networks. In this review, we discuss the latest findings regarding the mechanisms and regulation of de novo lumen formation in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Polarized Protein Transport and Lumen Formation During Epithelial Tissue Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Blasky, Alex J.; Mangan, Anthony; Prekeris, Rytis

    2015-01-01

    One of the major challenges in biology is to explain how complex tissues and organs arise from the collective action of individual polarized cells. The best-studied model of this process is the cross talk between individual epithelial cells during their polarization to form the multicellular epithelial lumen during tissue morphogenesis. Multiple mechanisms of apical lumen formation have been proposed. Some epithelial lumens form from preexisting polarized epithelial structures. However, de novo lumen formation from nonpolarized cells has recently emerged as an important driver of epithelial tissue morphogenesis, especially during the formation of small epithelial tubule networks. In this review, we discuss the latest findings regarding the mechanisms and regulation of de novo lumen formation in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26359775

  16. Mechanisms of gentamicin transport in kidney epithelial cell line (LLC-PK1).

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Inui, K; Hori, R

    1986-09-01

    The characteristics of gentamicin transport have been studied by using cultured kidney epithelial cell line LLC-PK1. The uptake of gentamicin by the LLC-PK1 cells appeared to be linear for 30 min and reached the equilibrium at day 1. Marked stimulation of gentamicin uptake was observed on the development of a confluent cell density, accompanied by the increases of marker enzyme activities and Na+-dependent D-glucose transport in the apical membranes. Gentamicin uptake was inhibited by metabolic inhibitors such as rotenone and 2,4-dinitrophenol, and was inhibited competitively in the presence of other aminoglycosides. Depending on the external calcium concentration, calcium ionophore A23187 stimulated gentamicin uptake, whereas ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)N,N1-tetraacetic acid, a calcium chelator, inhibited gentamicin uptake. These results suggest that gentamicin uptake by the LLC-PK1 cells may be mediated via specialized transport system, and calcium ion movement may play an important role as a regulatory factor for this transport system.

  17. Epithelial Electrolyte Transport Physiology and the Gasotransmitter Hydrogen Sulfide.

    PubMed

    Pouokam, Ervice; Althaus, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a well-known environmental chemical threat with an unpleasant smell of rotten eggs. Aside from the established toxic effects of high-dose H2S, research over the past decade revealed that cells endogenously produce small amounts of H2S with physiological functions. H2S has therefore been classified as a "gasotransmitter." A major challenge for cells and tissues is the maintenance of low physiological concentrations of H2S in order to prevent potential toxicity. Epithelia of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract are especially faced with this problem, since these barriers are predominantly exposed to exogenous H2S from environmental sources or sulfur-metabolising microbiota. In this paper, we review the cellular mechanisms by which epithelial cells maintain physiological, endogenous H2S concentrations. Furthermore, we suggest a concept by which epithelia use their electrolyte and liquid transport machinery as defence mechanisms in order to eliminate exogenous sources for potentially harmful H2S concentrations.

  18. Epithelial Electrolyte Transport Physiology and the Gasotransmitter Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Pouokam, Ervice; Althaus, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a well-known environmental chemical threat with an unpleasant smell of rotten eggs. Aside from the established toxic effects of high-dose H2S, research over the past decade revealed that cells endogenously produce small amounts of H2S with physiological functions. H2S has therefore been classified as a “gasotransmitter.” A major challenge for cells and tissues is the maintenance of low physiological concentrations of H2S in order to prevent potential toxicity. Epithelia of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract are especially faced with this problem, since these barriers are predominantly exposed to exogenous H2S from environmental sources or sulfur-metabolising microbiota. In this paper, we review the cellular mechanisms by which epithelial cells maintain physiological, endogenous H2S concentrations. Furthermore, we suggest a concept by which epithelia use their electrolyte and liquid transport machinery as defence mechanisms in order to eliminate exogenous sources for potentially harmful H2S concentrations. PMID:26904165

  19. Mutation of EpCAM leads to intestinal barrier and ion transport dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kozan, Philip A; McGeough, Matthew D; Peña, Carla A; Mueller, James L; Barrett, Kim E; Marchelletta, Ronald R; Sivagnanam, Mamata

    2015-05-01

    Congenital tufting enteropathy (CTE) is a devastating diarrheal disease seen in infancy that is typically associated with villous changes and the appearance of epithelial tufts. We previously found mutations in epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) to be causative in CTE. We developed a knock-down cell model of CTE through transfection of an EpCAM shRNA construct into T84 colonic epithelial cells to elucidate the in vitro role of EpCAM in barrier function and ion transport. Cells with EpCAM deficiency exhibited decreased electrical resistance, increased permeability, and decreased ion transport. Based on mutations in CTE patients, an in vivo mouse model was developed, with tamoxifen-inducible deletion of exon 4 in Epcam resulting in mutant protein with decreased expression. Tamoxifen treatment of Epcam (Δ4/Δ4) mice resulted in pathological features of villous atrophy and epithelial tufts, similar to those in human CTE patients, within 4 days post induction. Epcam (Δ4/Δ4) mice also showed decreased expression of tight junctional proteins, increased permeability, and decreased ion transport in the intestines. Taken together, these findings reveal mechanisms that may underlie disease in CTE. Knock-down EpCAM cell model of congenital tufting enteropathy was developed. In vivo inducible mouse model was developed resulting in mutant EpCAM protein. Cells with EpCAM deficiency demonstrated barrier and ion transport dysfunction. Tamoxifen-treated Epcam (Δ4/Δ4) mice demonstrated pathological features. Epcam (Δ4/Δ4) mice showed improper barrier function and ion transport.

  20. Potassium ion fluxes in corneal epithelial cells exposed to UVB

    PubMed Central

    Ubels, John L.; Van Dyken, Rachel E.; Louters, Julienne R.; Schotanus, Mark P.; Haarsma, Loren D.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the efflux of K+ from human corneal limbal epithelial cells (HCLE) exposed to ambient levels of UVB, which is known to cause apoptosis, and to examine the effect of K+ channel blockers on loss of potassium induced by UVB. HCLE cells were exposed to 100–200 mJ/cm2 UVB, followed by incubation in culture media with 5.5 – 100 mM K+, BDS-1, Ba2+ or ouabain. To measure intracellular cations, cells were washed in 280 mM sucrose and lysed in DI water. K+ and Na+ levels in lysates were measured by ion chromatography. HCLE cells showed maximal loss of [K+]i 10 minutes after exposure to UVB and 5.5 mM K+ media, with recovery of normal K+ levels after 90 minutes. Treatment with 1 µM BDS-1 following UVB exposure reduced the loss of [K+]i retained by HCLE cells. Exposure to 0.1–5 mM Ba2+ inhibited UVB-induced K+ loss in a time and dose dependent manner. These results confirm that blocking K+ channels in HCLE cells exposed to UVB prevents efflux of K+, confirming that UVB activates K+ channels in these cells. Electrophysiology data shows that K+ channels remain highly active at least 90 minutes after UVB exposure. HCLE cells exposed to UVB and incubated 0.01–1µM ouabain did not recover from UVB-induced K+ loss. These data suggest that the Na/K pump may act to restore [K+]i to control levels in HCLE cells following UVB exposure and that the pump is not damaged by exposure to UVB. Incubation of HCLE cells exposed to UVB in medium with 25–100mM K+ media prevented K+ efflux at extracellular concentrations as low as 25mM (the concentration in tear fluid), maintaining control levels of [K+]i. In all experiments inward fluxes and intracelluar Na+ levels mirrored K+ changes, albeit at the expected lower concentrations. The prevention of UVB-induced K+i loss by 25 mM K+o is consistent with the possible contribution of the relatively high K+ concentration in tears to protection of the corneal epithelium from ambient UVB. PMID:21377460

  1. Evaluation of water and electrolyte transport of tubular epithelial cells under osmotic and hydraulic pressure for development of bioartificial tubules.

    PubMed

    Terashima, M; Fujita, Y; Sugano, K; Asano, M; Kagiwada, N; Sheng, Y; Nakamura, S; Hasegawa, A; Kakuta, T; Saito, A

    2001-03-01

    Our aim was to develop bioartificial tubules using tubular epithelial cells and artificial membranes and evaluate the function of water and electrolyte transport by various tubular epithelial cells. The cells were cultivated onto extracellular matrix (ProNectin F) coating polycarbonate membrane. Water transport from the apical to the basolateral site of cells was examined using a modified Ussing chamber module. Water transport under colloidal osmotic pressure on the apical site and hydraulic pressure on the basolateral site were higher in JTC-12, LLC-PK1 cells than in MDCK cells. Water transport under osmotic plus hydraulic pressure was highest in LLC-PK1 cells. We made bioartificial tubules using LLC-PK1 cells and polysulfone hollow fiber cartridges. Water and Na ion transport function was high, and BUN and creatinine passage was recognized in these bioartificial tubules. BUN and creatinine concentrations of reabsorption fluid in these bioartificial tubules were significantly lower than those concentrations of control media and of noncell attached polysulfone hollow fiber cartridges. Though LLC-PK1 cells were more preferable cells for the use of bioartificial tubules in terms of water and electrolyte transport, the passage of BUN and creatinine was not appropriate for clinical use. To select more preferable cells for bioartificial tubules which transport water and electrolytes and do not induce passage of uremic toxins is necessary.

  2. Novel aspects of cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Sandra; Diener, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic receptors are not only expressed by excitable tissues, but have been identified in various epithelia. One aim of this study was to investigate the expression of nicotinic receptors and their involvement in the regulation of ion transport across colonic epithelium. Ussing chamber experiments with putative nicotinic agonists and antagonists were performed at rat colon combined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection of nicotinic receptor subunits within the epithelium. Dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) and nicotine induced a tetrodotoxin-resistant anion secretion leading to an increase in short-circuit current (Isc) across colonic mucosa. The response was suppressed by the nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamethonium. RT-PCR experiments revealed the expression of α2, α4, α5, α6, α7, α10, and β4 nicotinic receptor subunits in colonic epithelium. Choline, the product of acetylcholine hydrolysis, is known for its affinity to several nicotinic receptor subtypes. As a strong acetylcholinesterase activity was found in colonic epithelium, the effect of choline on Isc was examined. Choline induced a concentration-dependent, tetrodotoxin-resistant chloride secretion which was, however, resistant against hexamethonium, but was inhibited by atropine. Experiments with inhibitors of muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors revealed that choline-evoked secretion was mainly due to a stimulation of epithelial M3 receptors. Although choline proved to be only a partial agonist, it concentration-dependently desensitized the response to acetylcholine, suggesting that it might act as a modulator of cholinergically induced anion secretion. Thus the cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport – up to now solely explained by cholinergic submucosal neurons stimulating epithelial muscarinic receptors – is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:26236483

  3. Transport pathways of solid lipid nanoparticles across Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Chai, Gui-Hong; Hu, Fu-Qiang; Sun, Jihong; Du, Yong-Zhong; You, Jian; Yuan, Hong

    2014-10-06

    An understanding of drug delivery system transport across epithelial cell monolayer is very important for improving the absorption and bioavailability of the drug payload. The mechanisms of epithelial cell monolayer transport for various nanocarriers may differ significantly due to their variable components, surface properties, or diameter. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), conventionally formed by lipid materials, have gained increasing attention in recent years due to their excellent biocompatibility and high oral bioavailability. However, there have been few reports about the mechanisms of SLNs transport across epithelial cell monolayer. In this study, the molecular mechanisms utilized by SLNs of approximately 100 nm in diameter crossing intestinal epithelial monolayer were carefully studied using a simulative intestinal epithelial monolayer formed by Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells. The results demonstrated that SLNs transportation did not induce a significant change on tight junction structure. We found that the endocytosis of SLNs into the epithelial cells was energy-dependent and was significantly greater than nanoparticle exocytosis. The endocytosis of SLNs was found to be rarely mediated via macropinocytosis, as confirmed by the addition of 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride (EIPA) as an inhibitory agent, and mainly depended on lipid raft/caveolae- and clathrin-mediated pathways. After SLNs was internalized into MDCK cells, lysosome was one of the main destinations for these nanoparticles. The exocytosis study indicated that the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complex, and microtubules played important roles in the transport of SLNs out of MDCK cells. The transcytosis study indicated that only approximately 2.5% of the total SLNs was transported from the apical side to the basolateral side. For SLNs transportation in MDCK cell monolayer, greater transport (approximately 4-fold) was observed to the apical side than to the basolateral side. Our

  4. High energy H- ion transport and stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    During the Proton Driver design study based on an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac, a major concern is the feasibility of transport and injection of high energy H{sup -} ions because the energy of H{sup -} beam would be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This paper will focus on two key technical issues: (1) stripping losses during transport (including stripping by blackbody radiation, magnetic field and residual gases); (2) stripping efficiency of carbon foil during injection.

  5. Cigarette smoke inhibition of ion transport in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, M.J.

    1983-06-01

    To determine the effect of cigarette smoke on airway epithelial ion transport, the electrical properties and transepithelial Na and Cl fluxes were measured in canine tracheal epithelium. In vivo, the inhalation of the smoke from one cigarette acutely and reversibly decreased the electrical potential difference across the tracheal epithelium. In vitro, exposure of the mucosal surface of the epithelium to cigarette smoke decreased the short circuit current and transepithelial resistance. The decrease in short circuit current was due to an inhibition of the rate of Cl secretion with minimal effect on the rate of Na absorption. The effect of cigarette smoke was reversible, was not observed upon exposure of the submucosal surface to smoke, and was most pronounced when secretion was stimulated. The particulate phase of smoke was largely responsible for the inhibitory effect, since filtering the smoke minimized the effect. The effect of cigarette smoke was not prevented by addition of antioxidants to the bathing solutions, suggesting that the inhibition of Cl secretion cannot be entirely attributed to an oxidant mechanism. These results indicate that cigarette smoke acutely inhibits active ion transport by tracheal epithelium, both in vivo and in vitro. This effect may explain, in part, both the abnormal mucociliary clearance and the airway disease observed in cigarette smokers.

  6. Bradykinin regulates human colonic ion transport in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Baird, A W; Skelly, M M; O'Donoghue, D P; Barrett, K E; Keely, S J

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Kinins are acknowledged as important regulators of intestinal function during inflammation; however, their effects on human intestinal ion transport have not been reported. Here, we used muscle-stripped human colonic tissue and cultured T84-cell monolayers to study bradykinin (BK) actions on human intestinal ion transport. Experimental approach: Ion transport was measured as changes in short-circuit current (Isc) across colonic epithelia mounted in Ussing chambers. Key results: In intact tissue, there was a distinct polarity to BK-elicited Isc responses. Whereas basolateral BK stimulated sustained responses (EC50=0.5±0.1 μM), those to apical BK were more rapid and transient (EC50=4.1±1.2 nM). In T84 cells, responses to both apical and basolateral BK were similar to those seen upon apical addition to intact tissues. Cross-desensitization between apical and basolateral domains was not observed. BK-induced responses were largely due to Cl− secretion as shown by their sensitivity to bumetanide and removal of Cl− from the bathing solution. Studies using selective agonists and antagonists indicate responses to BK are mediated by B2 receptors. Finally, responses to basolateral BK in intact tissues were inhibited by tetrodotoxin (1 μM), atropine (1 μM), capsaicin (100 μM) and piroxicam (10 μM). BK-stimulated prostaglandin (PG)E2 release from colonic tissue. Conclusions: BK stimulates human colonic Cl− secretion by activation of apical and basolateral B2 receptors. Responses to apical BK reflect a direct action on epithelial cells, whereas those to basolateral BK are amplified by stimulation of enteric nerves and PG synthesis. PMID:18604228

  7. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  8. Ion transport through a graphene nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guohui; Mao, Mao; Ghosal, Sandip

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is utilized to investigate the ionic transport of NaCl in solution through a graphene nanopore under an applied electric field. Results show the formation of concentration polarization layers in the vicinity of the graphene sheet. The nonuniformity of the ion distribution gives rise to an electric pressure which drives vortical motions in the fluid if the electric field is sufficiently strong to overcome the influence of viscosity and thermal fluctuations. The relative importance of hydrodynamic transport and thermal fluctuations in determining the pore conductivity is investigated. A second important effect that is observed is the mass transport of water through the nanopore, with an average velocity proportional to the applied voltage and independent of the pore diameter. The flux arises as a consequence of the asymmetry in the ion distribution which can be attributed to differing mobilities of the sodium and chlorine ions, and, to the polarity of water molecules. The accumulation of liquid molecules in the vicinity of the nanopore due to reorientation of the water dipoles by the local electric field is seen to result in a local increase in the liquid density. Results confirm that the electric conductance is proportional to the nanopore diameter for the parameter regimes that we simulated. The occurrence of fluid vortices is found to result in an increase in the effective electrical conductance. PMID:22962262

  9. Actuation and ion transportation of polyelectrolyte gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wei; Wang, Xiao

    2010-04-01

    Consisting of charged network swollen with ionic solution, polyelectrolyte gels are known for their salient characters including ion exchange and stimuli responsiveness. The active properties of polyelectrolyte gels are mostly due to the migration of solvent molecules and solute ions, and their interactions with the fixed charges on the network. In this paper, we extend the recently developed nonlinear field theory of polyelectrolyte gels by assuming that the kinetic process is limited by the rate of the transportation of mobile species. To study the coupled mechanical deformation, ion migration, and electric field, we further specialize the model to the case of a laterally constrained gel sheet. By solving the field equations in two limiting cases: the equilibrium state and the steady state, we calculate the mechanical responses of the gel to the applied electric field, and study the dependency on various parameters. The results recover the behavior observed in experiments in which polyelectrolyte gels are used as actuators, such as the ionic polymer metal composite. In addition, the model reveals the mechanism of the selectivity in ion transportation. Although by assuming specific material laws, the reduced system resembles those in most existing models in the literature, the theory can be easily generalized by using more realistic free-energy functions and kinetic laws. The adaptability of the theory makes it suitable for studying many similar material systems and phenomena.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide scavenger, catalase, alleviates ion transport dysfunction in murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Kim E; McCole, Declan F

    2016-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) contribute to epithelial damage and ion transport dysfunction (key events in inflammatory diarrhoea) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to identify if H2 O2 mediates suppression of colonic ion transport function in the murine dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis model by using the H2 O2 degrading enzyme, catalase. Colitis was induced by administering DSS (4%) in drinking water for 5 days followed by 3 days on normal H2 O. Mice were administered either pegylated catalase or saline at day -1, 0 and +1 of DSS treatment. Ion transport responses to the Ca(2+) -dependent agonist, carbachol (CCh), or the cAMP-dependent agonist, forskolin, were measured across distal colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers. Parameters of DSS-induced inflammation (loss in body weight, decreased colon length, altered stool consistency), were only partially alleviated by catalase while histology was only minimally improved. However, catalase significantly reversed the DSS-induced reduction in baseline ion transport as well as colonic Isc responses to CCh. However, ion transport responses to forskolin were not significantly restored. Catalase also reduced activation of ERK MAP kinase in the setting of colitis, and increased expression of the Na(+) -K(+) -2Cl(-) cotransporter, NKCC1, consistent with restoration of ion transport function. Ex vivo treatment of inflamed colonic mucosae with catalase also partially restored ion transport function. Therefore, catalase partially prevents, and rescues, the loss of ion transport properties in DSS colitis even in the setting of unresolved tissue inflammation. These findings indicate a prominent role for ROS in ion transport dysfunction in colitis and may suggest novel strategies for the treatment of inflammatory diarrhoea. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Insight toward epithelial Na+ channel mechanism revealed by the acid-sensing ion channel 1 structure.

    PubMed

    Stockand, James D; Staruschenko, Alexander; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Booth, Rachell E; Silverthorn, Dee U

    2008-09-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel/degenerin (ENaC/DEG) protein family includes a diverse group of ion channels, including nonvoltage-gated Na(+) channels of epithelia and neurons, and the acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1). In mammalian epithelia, ENaC helps regulate Na(+) and associated water transport, making it a critical determinant of systemic blood pressure and pulmonary mucosal fluidity. In the nervous system, ENaC/DEG proteins are related to sensory transduction. While the importance and physiological function of these ion channels are established, less is known about their structure. One hallmark of the ENaC/DEG channel family is that each channel subunit has only two transmembrane domains connected by an exceedingly large extracellular loop. This subunit structure was recently confirmed when Jasti and colleagues determined the crystal structure of chicken ASIC1, a neuronal acid-sensing ENaC/DEG channel. By mapping ENaC to the structural coordinates of cASIC1, as we do here, we hope to provide insight toward ENaC structure. ENaC, like ASIC1, appears to be a trimeric channel containing 1alpha, 1beta, and 1gamma subunit. Heterotrimeric ENaC and monomeric ENaC subunits within the trimer possibly contain many of the major secondary, tertiary, and quaternary features identified in cASIC1 with a few subtle but critical differences. These differences are expected to have profound effects on channel behavior. In particular, they may contribute to ENaC insensitivity to acid and to its constitutive activity in the absence of time- and ligand-dependent inactivation. Experiments resulting from this comparison of cASIC1 and ENaC may help clarify unresolved issues related to ENaC architecture, and may help identify secondary structures and residues critical to ENaC function.

  12. Effects of extracellular purines on ion transport across the integument of Hirudo medicinalis.

    PubMed

    Schnizler, Mikael; Buss, Mirjam; Clauss, Wolfgang

    2002-09-01

    Little is known about the long-term regulation of epithelial ion transport in invertebrates and the specific mediators involved. For some years, we have been investigating the short-term regulation of transepithelial ion transport across the dorsal integument of the leech Hirudo medicinalis, and we have established a model of Na+ uptake. In the present study, we investigated the effect of long-term acclimation on transintegumental ion transport by adapting leeches to high-salinity conditions. We dissected segments of dorsal integument and measured ion currents in Ussing chamber experiments. Electrophysiological variables, such as transepithelial potential (V(T)) and short-circuit-current (I(sc)), were profoundly affected by adaptation to high-salinity conditions. The total transepithelial Na+ current (I(Na)) decreased from 7.66+/-0.82 to 4.6+/-0.54 microA cm(-2) in preparations adapted to high salinity. The involvement of epithelial Na+ channels was determined as current inhibition (I(ami)) by apical application of amiloride; Na+ channels were equally active in control epithelia and epithelia from leeches adapted to high salinity. Removal of Ca2+ from the apical solutions, which is believed to reduce intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, equalized transepithelial variables between high-salt-adapted integuments and control integuments. Extracellular purines regulate transepithelial Cl- secretion and Na+ absorption. In a variety of tissues we tested ATP and adenosine for their effects on epithelial transport. Examination of integuments from pondwater- and high-salinity-adapted leeches revealed different sensitivities for these purines. Apical and basolateral application of ATP both stimulated transepithelial Na+ uptake and I(ami). Adenosine upregulated non-Na+ currents and acted from the basolateral side only. Apical Ca2+-free conditions attenuated these effects of purines on transepithelial currents. Extracellular UTP had no effect on ion transport.

  13. Transport coefficients of He+ ions in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Rainer; Viehland, Larry; Gray, Benjamin; Wright, Timothy

    2016-09-01

    New experimental mobilities of 4He+ in 4He at 298.7 K, as a function of E/N, have been determined. Uncertainties in the mobilities were reduced to about 1% by using a shuttered drift tube. Comparison with previously measured values show that only one set of previous data is reliable. We demonstrate that the mobilities and diffusion coeffcients of 4He+ in 4He can be calculated over wide ranges of E/N with high precision if accurate potential energy curves are available for the X2Σu+ and A2Σg+ states, and if one takes into account resonant charge transfer and corrects for quantum-mechanical effects. Potentials, obtained by extrapolation of results from d-aug-cc-pVXZ (X =6,7) basis sets using the CASSCF +MRCISD approach were found to be in exceptionally close agreement with the best potentials available (separately) and with experiment, and those were subsequently used in a new computer program to determine semi-classical phase shifts and transport cross sections, from which the gaseous ion transport coefficients are determined. A new set of data for the mobilities of alpha particles (He2+) ions was obtained as a byproduct of the experiment, but the transport theory has not yet been completed.

  14. Ion transport of Fr nuclear reaction products

    SciTech Connect

    Behr, J.A.; Cahn, S.B.; Dutta, S.B.

    1993-04-01

    Experiments planned for fundamental studies of radioactive atoms in magneto-optic traps require efficient deceleration and transport of nuclear reaction products to energies and locations where they can be trapped. The authors have built a low-energy ion transport system for Francium and other alkalis. A thick Au target is held on a W rod at 45{degrees} to the accelerator beam direction. The heavy-ion fusion reaction 115 MeV {sup 18}O + {sup 197}Au produces {sup 211,210,209}Fr recoil products which are stopped in the target. The target is heated to close to the melting point of Au to allow the Fr to diffuse to the surface, where it is ionized due to Au`s high work function, and is directly extracted by an electrode at 90{degrees} to the accelerator beam direction. The Fr is transported by electrostatic optics {approximately}1 m to a catcher viewed by an {alpha} detector: {ge}15% of the Fr produced in the target reaches the catcher. 2{times}10{sup 5} Fr/sec have been produced at the catcher, yielding at equilibrium a sample of 3x10{sup 7}Fr nuclei. This scheme physically decouples the target diffusion from the surface neutralization process, which can occur at a lower temperature more compatible with the neutral-atom trap.

  15. Glycobiology of ion transport in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nowycky, Martha C; Wu, Gusheng; Ledeen, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    The nervous system is richly endowed with large transmembrane proteins that mediate ion transport, including gated ion channels as well as energy-consuming pumps and transporters. Transport proteins undergo N-linked glycosylation which can affect expression, location, stability, and function. The N-linked glycans of ion channels are large, contributing between 5 and 50 % of their molecular weight. Many contain a high density of negatively charged sialic acid residues which modulate voltage-dependent gating of ion channels. Changes in the size and chemical composition of glycans are responsible for developmental and cell-specific variability in the biophysical and functional properties of many ion channels. Glycolipids, principally gangliosides, exert considerable influence on some forms of ion transport, either through direct association with ion transport proteins or indirectly through association with proteins that activate transport through appropriate signaling. Examples of both pumps and ion channels have been revealed which depend on ganglioside regulation. While some of these processes are localized in the plasma membrane, ganglioside-regulated ion transport can also occur at various loci within the cell including the nucleus. This chapter will describe ion channel and ion pump structures with a focus on the functional effects of glycosylation on ion channel availability and function, and effects of alterations in glycosylation on nervous system function. It will also summarize highlights of the research on glycolipid/ganglioside-mediated regulation of ion transport.

  16. WNK Kinases, Renal Ion Transport and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    San-Cristobal, Pedro; de los Heros, Paola; Ponce-Coria, José; Moreno, Erika; Gamba, Gerardo

    2008-01-01

    Two members of a recently discovered family of protein kinases are the cause of an inherited disease known as pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII). These patients exhibit arterial hypertension together with hyperkalemia and metabolic acidosis. This is a mirror image of Gitelman disease that is due to inactivating mutations of the SLC12A3 gene that encodes the thiazide-sensitive Na+: Cl− cotransporter. The uncovered genes causing PHAII encode for serine/threonine kinases known as WNK1 and WNK4. Physiological and biochemical studies have revealed that WNK1 and WNK4 modulate the activity of several transport pathways of the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron, thus increasing our understanding of how diverse renal ion transport proteins are coordinated to regulate normal blood pressure levels. Observations discussed in the present work place WNK1 and WNK4 as genes involved in the genesis of essential hypertension and as potential targets for the development of antihypertensive drugs. PMID:18547946

  17. Transport coefficients of He+ ions in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viehland, Larry A.; Johnsen, Rainer; Gray, Benjamin R.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2016-02-01

    This paper demonstrates that the transport coefficients of 4He+ in 4He can be calculated over wide ranges of E/N, the ratio of the electrostatic field strength to the gas number density, with the same level of precision as can be obtained experimentally if sufficiently accurate potential energy curves are available for the X2Σu+ and A2Σg+ states and one takes into account resonant charge transfer. We start by computing new potential energy curves for these states and testing their accuracy by calculating spectroscopic values for the separate states. It is established that the potentials obtained by extrapolation of results from d-aug-cc-pVXZ (X = 6, 7) basis sets using the CASSCF+MRCISD approach are each in exceptionally close agreement with the best potentials available and with experiment. The potentials are then used in a new computer program to determine the semi-classical phase shifts and the transport cross sections, and from these the gaseous ion transport coefficients are determined. In addition, new experimental values are reported for the mobilities of 4He+ in 4He at 298.7 K, as a function of E/N, where careful consideration is given to minimizing various sources of uncertainty. Comparison with previously measured values establishes that only one set of previous data is reliable. Finally, the experimental and theoretical ion transport coefficients are shown to be in very good to excellent agreement, once corrections are applied to account for quantum-mechanical effects.

  18. Transport coefficients of He(+) ions in helium.

    PubMed

    Viehland, Larry A; Johnsen, Rainer; Gray, Benjamin R; Wright, Timothy G

    2016-02-21

    This paper demonstrates that the transport coefficients of (4)He(+) in (4)He can be calculated over wide ranges of E/N, the ratio of the electrostatic field strength to the gas number density, with the same level of precision as can be obtained experimentally if sufficiently accurate potential energy curves are available for the X(2)Σu (+) and A(2)Σg (+) states and one takes into account resonant charge transfer. We start by computing new potential energy curves for these states and testing their accuracy by calculating spectroscopic values for the separate states. It is established that the potentials obtained by extrapolation of results from d-aug-cc-pVXZ (X = 6, 7) basis sets using the CASSCF+MRCISD approach are each in exceptionally close agreement with the best potentials available and with experiment. The potentials are then used in a new computer program to determine the semi-classical phase shifts and the transport cross sections, and from these the gaseous ion transport coefficients are determined. In addition, new experimental values are reported for the mobilities of (4)He(+) in (4)He at 298.7 K, as a function of E/N, where careful consideration is given to minimizing various sources of uncertainty. Comparison with previously measured values establishes that only one set of previous data is reliable. Finally, the experimental and theoretical ion transport coefficients are shown to be in very good to excellent agreement, once corrections are applied to account for quantum-mechanical effects.

  19. Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Regulation of Ion Transport in Porcine Vocal Fold Mucosae

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Nofziger, Charity; Blazer-Yost, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an important biological molecule that regulates ion transport and inflammatory responses in epithelial tissue. The present study examined whether the adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, would increase cAMP concentration in porcine vocal fold mucosa and whether the effects of increased cAMP would be manifested as a functional increase in transepithelial ion transport. Additionally, changes in cAMP concentrations following exposure to an inflammatory mediator, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) were investigated. Study Design In vitro experimental design with matched treatment and control groups. Methods Porcine vocal fold mucosae (N = 30) and tracheal mucosae (N = 20) were exposed to forskolin, TNFα, or vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide) treatment. cAMP concentrations were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Ion transport was measured using electrophysiological techniques. Results Thirty minute exposure to forskolin significantly increased cAMP concentration and ion transport in porcine vocal fold and tracheal mucosae. However, 30-minute and 2-hour exposure to TNFα did not significantly alter cAMP concentration. Conclusions We demonstrate that forskolin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase is present in vocal fold mucosa, and further, that the product, cAMP increases vocal fold ion transport. The results presented here contribute to our understanding of the intracellular mechanisms underlying vocal fold ion transport. As ion transport is important for maintaining superficial vocal fold hydration, data demonstrating forskolin-stimulated ion transport in vocal fold mucosa suggest opportunities for developing pharmacological treatments that increase surface hydration. PMID:18596479

  20. Ion age transport: developing devices beyond electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2014-03-01

    There is more to current devices than conventional electronics. Increasingly research into the controlled movement of ions and molecules is enabling a range of new technologies. For example, as Weihua Guan, Sylvia Xin Li and Mark Reed at Yale University explain, 'It offers a unique opportunity to integrate wet ionics with dry electronics seamlessly'. In this issue they provide an overview of voltage-gated ion and molecule transport in engineered nanochannels. They cover the theory governing these systems and fabrication techniques, as well as applications, including biological and chemical analysis, and energy conversion [1]. Studying the movement of particles in nanochannels is not new. The transport of materials in rock pores led Klinkenberg to describe an analogy between diffusion and electrical conductivity in porous rocks back in 1951 [2]. And already in 1940, Harold Abramson and Manuel Gorin noted that 'When an electric current is applied across the living human skin, the skin may be considered to act like a system of pores through which transfer of substances like ragweed pollen extract may be achieved both by electrophoretic and by diffusion phenomena' [3]. Transport in living systems through pore structures on a much smaller scale has attracted a great deal of research in recent years as well. The selective transport of ions and small organic molecules across the cell membrane facilitates a number of functions including communication between cells, nerve conduction and signal transmission. Understanding these processes may benefit a wide range of potential applications such as selective separation, biochemical sensing, and controlled release and drug delivery processes. In Germany researchers have successfully demonstrated controlled ionic transport through nanopores functionalized with amine-terminated polymer brushes [4]. The polymer nanobrushes swell and shrink in response to changes in temperature, thus opening and closing the nanopore passage to ionic

  1. Effects of luminal thymol on epithelial transport in human and rat colon.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Izumi; Karaki, Shin-ichiro; Kuwahara, Atsukazu

    2011-06-01

    Gut lumen is continually exposed to a great variety of agents, including noxious compounds. Chemical receptors that detect the luminal environment are thought to play an important role as sensors and to modulate gastrointestinal functions. Recently, it has been reported that odorant receptors (ORs) are expressed in the small intestinal mucosa and that odorants stimulate serotonin secretion. However, ion transport in the responses to odorants has rarely been discussed, particularly in relation to the large intestine. In the present study, we examined the effects of the OR ligand thymol on ion transport in human and rat colonic epithelia using an Ussing chamber. In the mucosal-submucosal preparations, the mucosal addition of thymol evoked anion secretion concentration dependently. In addition, dextran (4 kDa) permeability was enhanced by the mucosal treatment with thymol. The response to thymol was not affected by tetrodotoxin (TTX) or piroxicam treatments in human or rat colon. Thymol-evoked electrogenic anion secretion was abolished under Ca(2+)-free conditions or mucosal treatment with transient receptor potential (TRP) A1 blocker (HC-030031). Pretreatment of thymol did not affect electrical field stimulation-evoked anion secretion but significantly attenuated short-chain fatty acid-evoked secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. OR1G1 and TRPA1 expression was investigated in isolated colonic mucosa by RT-PCR. The present results provide evidence that the OR ligand thymol modulates epithelial permeability and electrogenic anion secretion in human and rat colon. The anion secretion by luminal thymol is most likely mediated by direct activation of TRPA1 channel. We suggest that the sensing and responding to odorants in the colon also plays a role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis.

  2. Loss of Ca2+-mediated ion transport during colitis correlates with reduced ion transport responses to a Ca2+-activated K+ channel opener

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, Christina L; McKay, Derek M

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Epithelial surface hydration is critical for proper gut function. However, colonic tissues from individuals with inflammatory bowel disease or animals with colitis are hyporesponsive to Cl− secretagogues. The Cl− secretory responses to the muscarinic receptor agonist bethanechol are virtually absent in colons of mice with dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colitis. Our aim was to define the mechanism underlying this cholinergic hyporesponsiveness. Experimental approach: Colitis was induced by 4% DSS water, given orally. Epithelial ion transport was measured in Ussing chambers. Colonic crypts were isolated and processed for mRNA expression via RT-PCR and protein expression via immunoblotting and immunolocalization. Key results: Expression of muscarinic M3 receptors in colonic epithelium was not decreased during colitis. Short-circuit current (ISC) responses to other Ca2+-dependent secretagogues (histamine, thapsigargin, cyclopiazonic acid and calcium ionophore) were either absent or severely attenuated in colonic tissue from DSS-treated mice. mRNA levels of several ion transport molecules (a Ca2+-regulated Cl− channel, the intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the Na+/K+-ATPase pump or the Na+/K+/2Cl− co-transporter) were not reduced in colonic crypts from DSS-treated mice. However, protein expression of Na+/K+-ATPase α1 subunits was decreased twofold during colitis. Activation of Ca2+-activated K+ channels increased ISC significantly less in DSS colons compared with control, as did the protein kinase C activator, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Conclusions and implications: Decreased Na+/K+-ATPase expression probably contributes to overall epithelial hyporesponsiveness during colitis, while dysfunctional K+ channels may account, at least partially, for lack of epithelial secretory responses to Ca2+-mediated secretagogues. PMID:19298254

  3. Quantitative description of ion transport in Donnan ion exchange membrane systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, W.E.; Baker, B.L.

    1980-05-01

    Presented are simplified mass transfer techniques describing the transfer of ions in continuous ion selective membrane systems in which the resistance to ion transport through the membrane is small in relation to the resistance to ion transport in the solution phase. Methods are developed through the application of the transfer unit concept to the Donnan equilibrium. This equilibrium describes the equilibrium ion concentration on either side of an ion selective membrane. Data from one cation selection system is presented as evidence of the validity of these methods. Further techniques are shown that will allow the determination of ion transport given only equipment parameters and solution diffusivities. Supporting data are shown.

  4. Sex-specific effects of sex steroids on alveolar epithelial Na(+) transport.

    PubMed

    Haase, Melanie; Laube, Mandy; Thome, Ulrich H

    2017-03-01

    Alveolar fluid clearance mediates perinatal lung transition to air breathing in newborn infants, which is accomplished by epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC) and Na-K-ATPase. Male sex represents a major risk factor for developing respiratory distress, especially in preterm infants. We previously showed that male sex is associated with reduced epithelial Na(+) transport, possibly contributing to the sexual dimorphism in newborn respiratory distress. This study aimed to determine sex-specific effects of sex steroids on epithelial Na(+) transport. The effects of testosterone, 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), estradiol, and progesterone on Na(+) transport and Na(+) channel expression were determined in fetal distal lung epithelial (FDLE) cells of male and female rat fetuses by Ussing chamber and mRNA expression analyses. DHT showed a minor effect only in male FDLE cells by decreasing epithelial Na(+) transport. However, flutamide, an androgen receptor antagonist, did not abolish the gender imbalance, and testosterone lacked any effect on Na(+) transport in male and female FDLE cells. In contrast, estradiol and progesterone increased Na(+) transport and Na(+) channel expression especially in females, and prevented the inhibiting effect of DHT in males. Estrogen receptor inhibition decreased Na(+) channel expression and eliminated the sex differences. In conclusion, female sex steroids stimulate Na(+) transport especially in females and prevent the inhibitory effect of DHT in males. The ineffectiveness of testosterone suggests that Na(+) transport is largely unaffected by androgens. Thus, the higher responsiveness of female cells to female sex steroids explains the higher Na(+) transport activity, possibly leading to a functional advantage in females. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Transport of Ions Across the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, R. E.

    2004-06-02

    The technical report outlines the results of nine years of research on how ions cross the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. The ions include protons, nitrite, calcium and ferrous iron. Bicarbonate transport was also studied.

  6. Fundamental Aspects of Ion Transport in Solid Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Narayanan, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    Solid electrolytes (also termed as superionic solids or fast ion conductors) are characterized by high electrical conductivity, comparable to concentrated liquid electrolytes or even molten salt electrolytes, made possible by rapid transport of ions in the crystalline lattice.

  7. Functional expression of nicotine influx transporter in A549 human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tega, Yuma; Yuzurihara, Chihiro; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Hosoya, Ken-ichi

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine is a potent addictive alkaloid, and is rapidly absorbed through the alveoli of the lung. However, the transport mechanism of nicotine at the human alveolar epithelial barrier has not been investigated in great detail. In the present study, the transport mechanism of nicotine across alveolar epithelium was investigated in vitro using A549 cells, a human adenocarcinoma-derived cell line with an alveolar epithelial cell like phenotype. Nicotine uptake by A549 cells exhibited time-, temperature-, and concentration-dependence with a Km of 50.4 μM. These results suggest that a carrier-mediated transport process is involved in nicotine transport in human alveolar epithelial cells. Nicotine uptake by A549 cells was insensitive to change in extracellular pH. Moreover, nicotine uptake by A549 cells could be inhibited by organic cations such as verapamil and pyrilamine, but not typical substrates of organic cation transporters and β2-agonist. These results suggest that a novel, not yet molecularly identified, organic cation transporter plays a role in nicotine transport which is unlikely to interact with β2-agonist transport. This nicotine influx transporter in human alveolar epithelium might have implications for the rapid absorption of nicotine into the systemic circulation.

  8. Transport line for beam generated by ITEP Bernas ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Petrenko, S.V.; Kropachev, G.N.; Kuibeda, R.P.; Kulevoy, T.V.; Pershin, V.I.; Masunov, E.S.; Polozov, S.M.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B.M.; Poole, H.J.

    2006-03-15

    A joint research and development program is underway to investigate beam transport systems for intense steady-state ion sources for ion implanters. Two energy extremes of MeV and hundreds of eV are investigated using a modified Bernas ion source with an indirectly heated cathode. Results are presented for simulations of electrostatic systems performed to investigate the transportation of ion beams over a wide mass range: boron to decaborane.

  9. Ion Transport by Ameloblasts during Amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bronckers, A L J J

    2017-03-01

    Hypomineralization of developing enamel is associated with changes in ameloblast modulation during the maturation stage. Modulation (or pH cycling) involves the cyclic transformation of ruffle-ended (RE) ameloblasts facing slightly acidic enamel into smooth-ended (SE) ameloblasts near pH-neutral enamel. The mechanism of ameloblast modulation is not clear. Failure of ameloblasts of Cftr-null and anion exchanger 2 ( Ae2)-null mice to transport Cl(-) into enamel acidifies enamel, prevents modulation, and reduces mineralization. It suggests that pH regulation is critical for modulation and for completion of enamel mineralization. This report presents a review of the major types of transmembrane molecules that ameloblasts express to transport calcium to form crystals and bicarbonates to regulate pH. The type of transporter depends on the developmental stage. Modulation is proposed to be driven by the pH of enamel fluid and the compositional and/or physicochemical changes that result from increased acidity, which may turn RE ameloblasts into SE mode. Amelogenins delay outgrowth of crystals and keep the intercrystalline space open for diffusion of mineral ions into complete depth of enamel. Modulation enables stepwise removal of amelogenins from the crystal surface, their degradation, and removal from the enamel. Removal of matrix allows slow expansion of crystals. Modulation also reduces the stress that ameloblasts experience when exposed to high acid levels generated by mineral formation or by increased intracellular Ca(2+). By cyclically interrupting Ca(2+) transport by RE ameloblasts and their transformation into SE ameloblasts, proton production ceases shortly and enables the ameloblasts to recover. Modulation also improves enamel crystal quality by selectively dissolving immature Ca(2+)-poor crystals, removing impurities as Mg(2+) and carbonates, and recrystallizing into more acid-resistant crystals.

  10. Fabrication of catalyzed ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Kibby, Charles Leonard

    2013-06-04

    Process for fabricating a catalyzed ion transport membrane (ITM). In one embodiment, an uncatalyzed ITM is (a) contacted with a non-reducing gaseous stream while heating to a temperature and for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM possessing anion mobility; (b) contacted with a reducing gaseous stream for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM having anion mobility and essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry; (c) cooled while contacting the ITM with the reducing gaseous stream to provide an ITM having essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry and no anion mobility; and (d) treated by applying catalyst to at least one of (1) a porous mixed conducting multicomponent metallic oxide (MCMO) layer contiguous with a first side of a dense layer of MCMO and (2) a second side of the dense MCMO layer. In another embodiment, these steps are carried out in the alternative order of (a), (d), (b), and (c).

  11. Analysis of the theory of high energy ion transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures for the approximation of the transport of high-energy ions are discussed on the basis of available data on ion nuclear reactions. A straightahead approximation appears appropriate for space applications. The assumption that the secondary-ion-fragment velocity is equal to that of the fragmenting nucleus is inferior to straightahead theory but is of sufficient accuracy if the primary ions display a broad energy spectrum. An iterative scheme for the solution of the inhomogenous integral transport equations holds promise for practical calculation. A model calculation shows that multiple charged ion fragments penetrate to greater depths in comparison with the free path of a primary heavy ion.

  12. Influence of ion streaming instabilities on transport near plasma boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott D.

    2016-04-01

    Plasma boundary layers are susceptible to electrostatic instabilities driven by ion flows in presheaths and, when present, these instabilities can influence transport. In plasmas with a single species of positive ion, ion-acoustic instabilities are expected under conditions of low pressure and large electron-to-ion temperature ratio ({{T}e}/{{T}i}\\gg 1 ). In plasmas with two species of positive ions, ion-ion two-stream instabilities can also be excited. The stability phase-space is characterized using the Penrose criterion and approximate linear dispersion relations. Predictions for how these instabilities affect ion and electron transport in presheaths, including rapid thermalization due to instability-enhanced collisions and an instability-enhanced ion-ion friction force, are briefly reviewed. Recent experimental tests of these predictions are discussed along with research needs required for further validation. The calculated stability boundaries provide a guide to determine the experimental conditions at which these effects can be expected.

  13. Muscarinic receptor subtypes in cilia-driven transport and airway epithelial development

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Maike K.; Haberberger, Rainer V.; Hartmann, Petra; Faulhammer, Petra; Lips, Katrin S.; Krain, Benjamin; Wess, Jürgen; Kummer, Wolfgang; König, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary beating of airway epithelial cells drives the removal of mucus and particles from the airways. Mucociliary transport and possibly airway epithelial development are governed by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors but the precise roles of the subtypes involved are unknown. This issue was addressed by determining cilia-driven particle transport, ciliary beat frequency, and the composition and ultrastructural morphology of the tracheal epithelium in M1–M5 muscarinic receptor gene-deficient mice. Knockout of M3 muscarinic receptors prevented an increase in particle transport speed and ciliary beat frequency in response to muscarine. Furthermore, the ATP response after application of muscarine was blunted. Pretreatment with atropine before application of muscarine restored the response to ATP. Additional knockout of the M2 receptor in these mice partially restored the muscarine effect most likely through the M1 receptor and normalized the ATP response. M1, M4, and M5 receptor deficient mice exhibited normal responses to muscarine. None of the investigated mutant mouse strains had any impairment of epithelial cellular structure or composition. In conclusion, M3 receptors stimulate whereas M2 receptors inhibit cilia-driven particle transport. The M1 receptor increases cilia-driven particle transport if the M3 and M2 receptor are missing. None of the receptors is necessary for epithelial development. PMID:19213795

  14. Membrane transport of several ions during peritoneal dialysis: mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Galach, Magda; Waniewski, Jacek

    2012-09-01

    Peritoneal dialysis utilizes a complex mass exchange device created by natural permselective membranes of the visceral and abdominal muscle tissues. In mathematical modeling of solute transport during peritoneal dialysis, each solute is typically considered as a neutral, independent particle. However, such mathematical models cannot predict transport parameters for small ions. Therefore, the impact of the electrostatic interactions between ions on the estimated transport parameters needs to be investigated. In this study, transport of sodium, chloride, and a third ion through a permselective membrane with characteristics of the peritoneal transport barrier was described using two models: a model with the Nernst-Planck (NP) equations for a set of interacting ions and a model with combined diffusive and convective transport of each ion separately (DC). Transport parameters for the NP model were calculated using the pore theory, while the parameters for the DC model were estimated by fitting the model to the predictions from the NP model. Solute concentration profiles in the membrane obtained by computer simulations based on these two models were similar, whereas the transport parameters (diffusive mass transport parameters and sieving coefficients) were generally different. The presence of the third ion could substantially modify the values of diffusive mass parameter for sodium and chloride ions estimated using the DC model compared with those predicted by NP. The extent of this modification depended on the molecular mass and concentration of the third ion, and the rate of volumetric flow. Closed formulas for the transport parameters of the DC model in terms of the NP model parameters, ion concentration profiles in the membrane, and volumetric flow across the membrane were derived. Their reliable approximations, which include only boundary ion concentrations instead of spatial intramembrane concentration profiles, were formulated. The precision of this approximation

  15. Ion transport in graphene nanofluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Xie, Quan; Xin, Fang; Park, Hyung Gyu; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanofluidic structures made of carbon nanotubes or graphene/graphene oxide have shown great promise in energy and environment applications due to the newly discovered fast and selective mass transport. However, they have yet to be utilized in nanofluidic devices for lab-on-a-chip applications because of great challenges in their fabrication and integration. Herein we report the fabrication of two-dimensional planar graphene nanochannel devices and the study of ion transport inside a graphene nanochannel array. A MEMS fabrication process that includes controlled nanochannel etching, graphene wet transfer, and vacuum anodic bonding is developed to fabricate graphene nanochannels where graphene conformally coats the channel surfaces. We observe higher ionic conductance inside the graphene nanochannels compared with silica nanochannels with the same geometries at low electrolyte concentrations (10(-6) M-10(-2) M). Enhanced electroosmotic flow due to the boundary slip at graphene surfaces is attributed to the measured higher conductance in the graphene nanochannels. Our results also suggest that the surface charge on the graphene surface, originating from the dissociation of oxygen-containing functional groups, is crucial to the enhanced electroosmotic flow inside the nanochannels.

  16. Ontogenesis of epithelial phosphate transport systems in goats.

    PubMed

    Huber, Korinna; Roesler, Uta; Muscher, Alexandra; Hansen, Kathrin; Widiyono, Irkham; Pfeffer, Ernst; Breves, Gerhard

    2003-02-01

    The rapid development of precocial goats in the first weeks after birth requires an adequate adaptation of phosphate transport systems to maintain the P homeostasis at each developmental stage. Here we examined the age-related development of Na+-Pi transport systems in small intestines, kidneys, and parotid glands of goats. Kinetic parameters were determined by brush-border membrane vesicle uptake studies, and relative expression of NaPi type II mRNA and protein was recorded by molecular biological methods. High intestinal Pi transport capacity was already present on the first day of life. Within the first 3 wk of life there seemed to be a change in the type of Na+-dependent Pi transporter, and NaPi IIb was expressed increasingly up to the fifth month of life. Renal Na+-Pi transport capacity was also high at birth, and this was associated with high expression levels of NaPi IIa mRNA, indicating the important role of this transporter for renal Pi reabsorption. At weaning an increase in both intestinal and renal Na+-Pi transport balanced the increasing requirements for Pi to establish the endogenous Pi cycle. Salivary Pi concentration and parotid NaPi II mRNA rose markedly to guarantee an adequate Pi supply for rumen microbes. We concluded that the high demand for Pi in young goats was assured by high basal Na+-Pi transport capacity of small intestines and kidney expressed continuously during ontogenesis.

  17. Biological effects of cobalt-chromium nanoparticles and ions on dural fibroblasts and dural epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Behl, Bharat; Papageorgiou, Iraklis; Brown, Christopher; Hall, Richard; Tipper, Joanne L; Fisher, John; Ingham, Eileen

    2013-05-01

    The introduction of metal-on-metal total disc replacements motivated studies to evaluate the effects of cobalt-chromium (CoCr) nanoparticles on cells of the dura mater. Porcine fibroblasts and epithelial cells isolated from the dura mater were cultured with clinically-relevant CoCr nanoparticles and the ions, generated by the particles over 24 h, at doses up to 121 μm(3)per cell. Cell viability and production of proinflammatory cytokines was assessed over 4 days. The capacity of the particles to induce oxidative stress in the cells was evaluated at 24 h. The CoCr particles and their ions significantly reduced the viability of the dural epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner but not the fibroblasts. Both cell types secreted IL-8 in response to particle exposure at doses of 60.5 μm(3) (epithelial cells) and 121 μm(3) (fibroblasts, epithelial cells) per cell. No significant release of IL-6 was observed in both cell types at any dose. Reactive oxygen species were induced in both cell types at 50 μm(3) per cell after 24 h exposure. The data suggested novel differences in the resistance of the dural epithelial cells and fibroblasts to CoCr nanoparticle/ion toxicity and demonstrated the inflammatory potential of the particles. The data contributes to a greater understanding of the potential biological consequences of the use of metal-on-metal total disc prostheses.

  18. Living with a leaky skin: upregulation of ion transport proteins during sloughing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nicholas C; Cramp, Rebecca L; Franklin, Craig E

    2017-06-01

    Amphibian skin is a multifunctional organ providing protection from the external environment and facilitating the physiological exchange of gases, water and salts with the environment. In order to maintain these functions, the outer layer of skin is regularly replaced in a process called sloughing. During sloughing, the outermost layer of the skin is removed in its entirety, which has the potential to interfere with skin permeability and ion transport, disrupting homeostasis. In this study, we measured, in vivo, the effects of sloughing on the cutaneous efflux of ions in toads Rhinella marina kept in freshwater conditions. We also measured transepithelial potential, cutaneous resistance, active ion transport and the distribution, abundance and gene expression of the key ion transport proteins sodium-potassium ATPase (NKA) and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) during sloughing. We hypothesised that the increase in transepithelial efflux of ions during sloughing is a consequence of increased permeability and/or a reduction in the abundance or expression of cutaneous ion transport proteins, resulting in disruption of internal ion homeostasis. There was a significant increase in sodium and chloride efflux during sloughing in R. marina However, although in vitro skin resistance decreased after sloughing, active sodium transport increased commensurate with an increase in NKA and ENaC protein abundance in the skin. These changes in skin function associated with sloughing did not affect the maintenance of internal electrolyte homeostasis. These results suggest that during sloughing, amphibians actively maintain internal homeostasis by increasing cutaneous rates of ion uptake. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. 78 FR 19024 - Lithium Ion Batteries in Transportation Public Forum

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... SAFETY BOARD Lithium Ion Batteries in Transportation Public Forum On Thursday and Friday, April 11-12... Batteries in Transportation.'' The forum will begin at 9:00 a.m. on both days and is open to all. Attendance... Inquiry. The forum is organized into three topic areas: Lithium ion battery design, development, and use...

  20. Ion transport in a pH-regulated nanopore.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Li-Hsien; Zhang, Mingkan; Qian, Shizhi

    2013-08-06

    Fundamental understanding of ion transport phenomena in nanopores is crucial for designing the next-generation nanofluidic devices. Due to surface reactions of dissociable functional groups on the nanopore wall, the surface charge density highly depends upon the proton concentration on the nanopore wall, which in turn affects the electrokinetic transport of ions, fluid, and particles within the nanopore. Electrokinetic ion transport in a pH-regulated nanopore, taking into account both multiple ionic species and charge regulation on the nanopore wall, is theoretically investigated for the first time. The model is verified by the experimental data of nanopore conductance available in the literature. The results demonstrate that the spatial distribution of the surface charge density at the nanopore wall and the resulting ion transport phenomena, such as ion concentration polarization (ICP), ion selectivity, and conductance, are significantly affected by the background solution properties, such as the pH and salt concentration.

  1. Coupled ion Binding and Structural Transitions Along the Transport Cycle of Glutamate Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Verdon, Gregory; Oh, SeCheol; Serio, Ryan N.; Boudker, Olga

    2014-05-19

    Membrane transporters that clear the neurotransmitter glutamate from synapses are driven by symport of sodium ions and counter-transport of a potassium ion. Previous crystal structures of a homologous archaeal sodium and aspartate symporter showed that a dedicated transport domain carries the substrate and ions across the membrane. We report new crystal structures of this homologue in ligand-free and ions-only bound outward- and inward-facing conformations. We then show that after ligand release, the apo transport domain adopts a compact and occluded conformation that can traverse the membrane, completing the transport cycle. Sodium binding primes the transport domain to accept its substrate and triggers extracellular gate opening, which prevents inward domain translocation until substrate binding takes place. Moreover, we describe a new cation-binding site ideally suited to bind a counter-transported ion. We suggest that potassium binding at this site stabilizes the translocation-competent conformation of the unloaded transport domain in mammalian homologues.

  2. Ion transport through electrolyte/polyelectrolyte multi-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Femmer, Robert; Mani, Ali; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    Ion transport of multi-ionic solutions through layered electrolyte and polyelectrolyte structures are relevant in a large variety of technical systems such as micro and nanofluidic devices, sensors, batteries and large desalination process systems. We report a new direct numerical simulation model coined EnPEn: it allows to solve a set of first principle equations to predict for multiple ions their concentration and electrical potential profiles in electro-chemically complex architectures of n layered electrolytes E and n polyelectrolytes PE. EnPEn can robustly capture ion transport in sub-millimeter architectures with submicron polyelectrolyte layers. We proof the strength of EnPEn for three yet unsolved architectures: (a) selective Na over Ca transport in surface modified ion selective membranes, (b) ion transport and water splitting in bipolar membranes and (c) transport of weak electrolytes.

  3. Ion transport through electrolyte/polyelectrolyte multi-layers

    PubMed Central

    Femmer, Robert; Mani, Ali; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport of multi-ionic solutions through layered electrolyte and polyelectrolyte structures are relevant in a large variety of technical systems such as micro and nanofluidic devices, sensors, batteries and large desalination process systems. We report a new direct numerical simulation model coined EnPEn: it allows to solve a set of first principle equations to predict for multiple ions their concentration and electrical potential profiles in electro-chemically complex architectures of n layered electrolytes E and n polyelectrolytes PE. EnPEn can robustly capture ion transport in sub-millimeter architectures with submicron polyelectrolyte layers. We proof the strength of EnPEn for three yet unsolved architectures: (a) selective Na over Ca transport in surface modified ion selective membranes, (b) ion transport and water splitting in bipolar membranes and (c) transport of weak electrolytes. PMID:26111456

  4. EAAT3 promotes amino acid transport and proliferation of porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jin-Ling; Gao, Chun-Qi; Li, Xiang-Guang; Jin, Cheng-Long; Wang, Dan; Shu, Gang; Wang, Wen-Ce; Kong, Xiang-Feng; Yao, Kang; Yan, Hui-Chao; Wang, Xiu-Qi

    2016-06-21

    Excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3, encoded by SLC1A1) is an epithelial type high-affinity anionic amino acid transporter, and glutamate is the major oxidative fuel for intestinal epithelial cells. This study investigated the effects of EAAT3 on amino acid transport and cell proliferation through activation of the mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in porcine jejunal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2). Anionic amino acid and cystine (Cys) transport were increased (P<0.05) by EAAT3 overexpression and decreased (P<0.05) by EAAT3 knockdown rather than other amino acids. MTT and cell counting assays suggested that IPEC-J2 cell proliferation increased (P<0.05) with EAAT3 overexpression. Phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2448), ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1 (S6K1, Thr389) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein-1 (4EBP1, Thr70) was increased by EAAT3 overexpression and decreased by EAAT3 knockdown (P<0.05), as were levels of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and cystine/glutamate antiporter (xCT) (P<0.05). Our results demonstrate for the first time that EAAT3 facilitates anionic amino acid transport and activates the mTOR pathway, promoting Cys transport and IPEC-J2 cell proliferation.

  5. EAAT3 promotes amino acid transport and proliferation of porcine intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Cheng-long; Wang, Dan; Shu, Gang; Wang, Wen-ce; Kong, Xiang-feng; Yao, Kang; Yan, Hui-chao; Wang, Xiu-qi

    2016-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3, encoded by SLC1A1) is an epithelial type high-affinity anionic amino acid transporter, and glutamate is the major oxidative fuel for intestinal epithelial cells. This study investigated the effects of EAAT3 on amino acid transport and cell proliferation through activation of the mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in porcine jejunal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2). Anionic amino acid and cystine (Cys) transport were increased (P<0.05) by EAAT3 overexpression and decreased (P<0.05) by EAAT3 knockdown rather than other amino acids. MTT and cell counting assays suggested that IPEC-J2 cell proliferation increased (P<0.05) with EAAT3 overexpression. Phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2448), ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1 (S6K1, Thr389) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein-1 (4EBP1, Thr70) was increased by EAAT3 overexpression and decreased by EAAT3 knockdown (P<0.05), as were levels of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and cystine/glutamate antiporter (xCT) (P<0.05). Our results demonstrate for the first time that EAAT3 facilitates anionic amino acid transport and activates the mTOR pathway, promoting Cys transport and IPEC-J2 cell proliferation. PMID:27231847

  6. Plasma Transport in a Magnetic Multicusp Negative Hydrogen Ion Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    1 :15 AFIT/DS/ENP/91 -02 exic PLASMA TRANSPORT IN A MAGNETIC MULTICUSP NEGATIVE HYDROGEN ION kc.esioii Fo- SOURCE DISSERTATION P-1 TA~3 Ricky G. Jones... MULTICUSP NEGATIVE HYDROGEN ION SOURCE DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology Air...Approved for public release; distributio, unlimited AFIT/DS/ENP/91-02 PLASMA TRANSPORT IN A MAGNETIC MULTICUSP NEGATIVE HYDROGEN ION SOURCE Hicky G. Jones

  7. Free Energy Wells and Barriers to Ion Transport Across Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempe, Susan

    2014-03-01

    The flow of ions across cellular membranes is essential to many biological processes. Ion transport is also important in synthetic materials used as battery electrolytes. Transport often involves specific ions and fast conduction. To achieve those properties, ion conduction pathways must solvate specific ions by just the ``right amount.'' The right amount of solvation avoids ion traps due to deep free energy wells, and avoids ion block due to high free energy barriers. Ion channel proteins in cellular membranes demonstrate this subtle balance in solvation of specific ions. Using ab initio molecular simulations, we have interrogated the link between binding site structure and ion solvation free energies in biological ion binding sites. Our results emphasize the surprisingly important role of the environment that surrounds ion-binding sites for fast transport of specific ions. We acknowledge support from Sandia's LDRD program. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the US DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Genotoxic effects of 1 GeV/amu Fe ions in mouse kidney epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, A.; Gauny, S. S.; Connolly, L.; Turker, M.

    Human exploration of space places individuals in environments where they are exposed to charged particle radiation. The goal of our studies is to assess the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of high energy Fe ions (1 GeV/amu) in kidney epithelial cells of the mouse irradiated either in vitro or in vivo. The initial study focused on establishing the toxicity of these heavy ions (LET=159 keV/micron) in two Aprt heterozygous kidney epithelial cell lines: K06 cells derived from a C57BL6/129Sv animal, and clone 4a cells derived from a C57BL6/DBA2 animal. Cells were exposed in vitro to graded doses of Fe ions (0-300 cGy) and the toxicity of the treatment was established using colony forming assays. Experiments were performed in triplicate at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The results indicate that Fe ions are toxic to mouse kidney epithelial cells and that no shoulder is observed on the survival curve for cells from either genetic background. The clone 4a cells were more sensitive to Fe ion exposures than the K06 cells. The D(37) for clone 4a cells was 92 cGy and the D(10) was 212 cGy. The more resistant K06 cells had a D(37) of 192 cGy and an estimated D(10) of 388 cGy. Parallel experiments are underway to establish the RBE's for cell killing for these two cell lines. Supported by NASA grant T-403X to A. Kronenberg

  9. Regulation of potassium transport in human lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lauf, Peter K; Warwar, Ronald; Brown, Thomas L; Adragna, Norma C

    2006-01-01

    The major K influx pathways and their response to thiol modification by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and protein kinase and phosphatase inhibitors were characterized in human lens epithelial B3 (HLE-B3) cells with Rb as K congener. Ouabain (0.1 mM) and bumetanide (5 microM) discriminated between the Na/K pump ( approximately 35% of total Rb influx) and Na-K-2Cl cotransport (NKCC) ( approximately 50%). Cl-replacement with nitrate or sulfamate revealed <10% residual [ouabain+bumetanide]-insensitive K-Cl cotransport (KCC). At 0.3-0.5 mM, NEM stimulated the Na/K pump by 2-fold independent of external Na, KCC between 2 and 4-fold, and abolished approximately 90% of NKCC. Calyculin-A, a serine/threonine protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor, did not affect NKCC but inhibited KCC, whereas 10 microM staurosporine, a serine/threonine kinase inhibitor, abolished NKCC, and stimulated KCC only when followed by NEM treatment. The tyrosine-kinase inhibitor genistein, at concentrations >100 microM, activated the Na/K pump and abolished NKCC but did not affect KCC. The data suggest at least partial inverse regulation of KCC and NKCC in HLE-B3 cells by signaling cascades involving serine, threonine and tyrosine phosphorylation/dephosphorylation equilibria.

  10. P-glycoprotein-mediated transport of moxifloxacin in a Calu-3 lung epithelial cell model.

    PubMed

    Brillault, Julien; De Castro, Whocely Victor; Harnois, Thomas; Kitzis, Alain; Olivier, Jean-Christophe; Couet, William

    2009-04-01

    Moxifloxacin (MXF) is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic that is effective against respiratory infections. However, the mechanisms of MXF lung diffusion are unknown. Active transport in other tissues has been suggested for several members of the fluoroquinolone family. In this study, transport of MXF was systematically investigated across a Calu-3 lung epithelial cell model. MXF showed polarized transport, with the secretory permeability being twice as high as the absorptive permeability. The secretory permeability was concentration dependent (apparent P(max) = 13.6 x 10(-6) cm x s(-1); apparent K(m) = 147 microM), suggesting saturated transport at concentrations higher than 350 microg/ml. The P-glycoprotein inhibitor PSC-833 inhibited MXF transport in both directions, whereas probenecid, a multidrug resistance-related protein inhibitor, appeared to have no effect in the Calu-3 model. Moreover, rifampin, a known inducer of efflux transport proteins, upregulated the expression of P-glycoprotein in Calu-3 cells and enhanced MXF active transport. In conclusion, this study clearly indicates that MXF is subject to P-glycoprotein-mediated active transport in the Calu-3 model. This P-glycoprotein-dependent secretion may lead to higher MXF epithelial lining fluid concentrations than those in plasma. Furthermore, drug-drug interactions may be expected when MXF is combined with other P-glycoprotein substrates or modulators.

  11. Nondiffusive transport regimes for suprathermal ions in turbulent plasmas.

    PubMed

    Bovet, A; Fasoli, A; Ricci, P; Furno, I; Gustafson, K

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of the transport of suprathermal ions in the presence of turbulence is important for fusion plasmas in the burning regime that will characterize reactors, and for space plasmas to understand the physics of particle acceleration. Here, three-dimensional measurements of a suprathermal ion beam in the toroidal plasma device TORPEX are presented. These measurements demonstrate, in a turbulent plasma, the existence of subdiffusive and superdiffusive transport of suprathermal ions, depending on their energy. This result stems from the unprecedented combination of uniquely resolved measurements and first-principles numerical simulations that reveal the mechanisms responsible for the nondiffusive transport. The transport regime is determined by the interaction of the suprathermal ion orbits with the turbulent plasma dynamics, and is strongly affected by the ratio of the suprathermal ion energy to the background plasma temperature.

  12. Thermodynamic consistent transport theory of Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latz, A.; Zausch, J.

    2011-03-01

    Most Li ion insertion batteries consist of a porous cathode, a separator filled with electrolyte and an anode, which very often also has some porous structure. The solid part especially in the cathode is usually produced by mixing a powder of the actual active particles, in which Li ions will be intercalated, binder and carbon black to enhance the electronic conductivity of the electrode. As a result the porous structure of the electrodes is very complex, leading to complex potential, ion and temperature distributions within the electrodes. The intercalation and deintercalation of ions cannot be expected to be homogeneously distributed over the electrode due to the different transport properties of electrolyte and active particles in the electrode and the complex three-dimensional pore structure of the electrode. The influence of the final microstructure on the distribution of temperature, electric potential and ions within the electrodes is not known in detail, but may influence strongly the onset of degradation mechanisms. For being able to numerically simulate the transport phenomena, the equations and interface conditions for ion, charge and heat transport within the complex structure of the electrodes and through the electrolyte filled separator are needed. We will present a rigorous derivation of these equations based exclusively on general principles of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The theory is thermodynamically consistent i.e. it guarantees strictly positive entropy production. The irreversible and reversible sources of heat are derived within the theory. Especially the various contribution to the Peltier heat due to the intercalation of ions are obtained as a result of the theory. Research highlights▶ Thermodynamic consistent transport theory for Li ion batteries ▶ Derivation of all irreversible and reversible heat sources in Li ion batteries ▶ Closed set of equations for ion, charge and heat transport in Li ion batteries ▶ Theory of Peltier

  13. A 3-D Model of Signaling and Transport Pathways in Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Quong, A A; Westbrook, C K

    2005-04-01

    A 3-dimensional computer model was developed to simulate the spatial and chemical evolution of calcium ions inside an array of human epithelial kidney cells. This is a prototype model, intended to develop a methodology to incorporate much more complex interactions of metabolic and other processes within many types of cells and lead to increased ability to predict cellular responses to disease as well as to chemical and biological warfare situations. Preliminary tests of the model are described.

  14. Characteristics of hydrogen ion transport in urinary bladder of water turtle.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, P R

    1967-10-01

    The mechanism of acidification by the urinary bladder of the water turtle was studied in an in vitro system which permitted control and measurement of electrical and concentration driving forces. The rate of hydrogen ion secretion was measured by means of a pH stat technique in the absence of exogenous carbon dioxide and bicarbonate. Transport of hydrogen ion into the solution bathing the mucosal surface of the bladder was associated with the appearance of alkali in the serosal compartment. The mean rate of hydrogen ion secretion in the absence of electrical and concentration gradients across the bladder was 0.96 mumole/hr. The secretion rate was only slightly greater in the presence of the spontaneous potential difference. The maximal hydrogen ion gradient that could be generated by the bladder was 3.33 pH units in the presence of the spontaneous voltage and 3.02 pH units in the short-circuited state. Hydrogen ion secretion was markedly reduced by acetazolamide and anaerobiosis, which indicated that under our experimental conditions acidification depended on the production and enzymatic hydration of metabolic carbon dioxide. On the basis of the stoichiometry of the pH changes across the membrane under different conditions, it is suggested that the active transport mechanism for hydrogen ion is located near the mucosal surface of the epithelial cell and that the alkali generated in back of the pump moves passively into the serosal fluid along an electrochemical gradient.

  15. Monocarboxylate 4 mediated butyrate transport in a rat intestinal epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Kekuda, Ramesh; Manoharan, Palanikumar; Baseler, Walter; Sundaram, Uma

    2013-03-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) are absorbed by carrier mediated uptake in the small intestine by pH-dependent SCFA/HCO3 (-) exchangers on the apical membrane of epithelial cells. Conventional assumption is that MCT1 mediates SCFA/HCO3 (-) exchange in the intestine. Further, due to the presence of multiple such anion exchangers, the identity of the intestinal SCFA/HCO3 (-) has been controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the identities of the butyrate transporter in the intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-18). IEC-18 cells were treated with specific siRNAs for MCT1 and MCT4, and butyrate and lactate uptake studies were performed. Alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid inhibited lactate uptake but not butyrate uptake in IEC-18 cells, indicating that these two substrates are transported via two different transporter systems. MCT1 siRNA treatment abolished both MCT1 mRNA by more than 95 % and protein expression by 83 % as evidenced by RTQ-PCR and western blotting experiments. However, MCT1 siRNA treatment inhibited butyrate uptake upto 24 %, whereas it inhibited lactate uptake significantly by 70 %. Treatment with MCT4 siRNA inhibited MCT4 mRNA expression by 75 % and protein expression by 85 % in these cells. MCT4 siRNA inhibited butyrate uptake by 40 %. Further, several non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are transported by the butyrate transporter. Finally, MCT4 siRNA inhibited salicylate uptake by 27 % indicating direct evidence for the transport of salicylate by MCT4. These data indicate that MCT1 is the high affinity lactate transporter and MCT4 is the high affinity butyrate transporter in the intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-18.

  16. A novel sorbitol transport mechanism in cultured renal papillary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Siebens, A.W.; Spring, K.R. )

    1989-12-01

    The renal papillary epithelial cell line, GRB-PAP1, accumulates sorbitol when grown in a hypertonic (500 mosmol/kgH2O) bathing medium. When the cells are returned to a 300 mosmol/kgH2O medium, they lose their sorbitol rapidly to the bath. Sorbitol movement across the membranes of these cells was investigated by studying the uptake of radioactive sorbitol and related compounds. Sorbitol uptake increased 71-fold when cells grown in 500 mosmol/kgH2O medium were exposed to a 300 mosmol/kgH2O test solution. The magnitude of the permeability increase was proportional to the size of the change in the osmolality of the bathing medium and not the absolute osmolality. Sorbitol uptake was a linear function of medium sorbitol concentration with no sign of saturation at sorbitol concentrations up to 315 mM. Although the permeability of other polyols was increased when the osmolality was reduced, competition between sorbitol and related sugars and polyols could not be demonstrated. Both the increased sorbitol uptake after a decrease in medium osmolality and the decrease to control permeability after return to the original osmolality were complete within 30 s. A wide variety of transport inhibitors and ion substitutions failed to alter the magnitude of the sorbitol permeability increase. The most effective inhibitor was quinidine, 1 mM reducing sorbitol uptake by 73%. The sorbitol permeability increase could also be blocked by reducing the temperature to 0 degrees C. Nonspecific uptake of sorbitol, such as endocytosis, was shown to be of only minor significance. The large increase in sorbitol permeability and subsequent sorbitol efflux enables these cells to withstand large decreases in osmolality without excessive swelling and consequent damage. A similar compensatory mechanism may operate in vivo in the renal papilla during the onset of diuresis.

  17. Effect of COPD treatments on MRP1-mediated transport in bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    van der Deen, Margaretha; Homan, Sandra; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Scheper, Rik J; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S; de Vries, Elisabeth G

    2008-01-01

    Background Smoking is the principle risk factor for development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) is known to protect against toxic compounds and oxidative stress, and might play a role in protection against smoke-induced disease progression. We questioned whether MRP1-mediated transport is influenced by pulmonary drugs that are commonly prescribed in COPD. Methods The immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE14o− was used to analyze direct in vitro effects of budesonide, formoterol, ipratropium bromide and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on MRP1-mediated transport. Carboxyfluorescein (CF) was used as a model MRP1 substrate and was measured with functional flow cytometry. Results Formoterol had a minor effect, whereas budesonide concentration-dependently decreased CF transport by MRP1. Remarkably, addition of formoterol to the highest concentration of budesonide increased CF transport. Ipratropium bromide inhibited CF transport at low concentrations and tended to increase CF transport at higher levels. NAC increased CF transport by MRP1 in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusions Our data suggest that, besides their positive effects on respiratory symptoms, budesonide, formoterol, ipratropium bromide, and NAC modulate MRP1 activity in bronchial epithelial cells. Further studies are required to assess whether stimulation of MRP1 activity is beneficial for long-term treatment of COPD. PMID:18990976

  18. Ciprofloxacin Is Actively Transported across Bronchial Lung Epithelial Cells Using a Calu-3 Air Interface Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Hui Xin; Traini, Daniela; Bebawy, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is a well-established broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic that penetrates well into the lung tissues; still, the mechanisms of its transepithelial transport are unknown. The contributions of specific transporters, including multidrug efflux transporters, organic cation transporters, and organic anion-transporting polypeptide transporters, to the uptake of ciprofloxacin were investigated in vitro using an air interface bronchial epithelial model. Our results demonstrate that ciprofloxacin is subject to predominantly active influx and a slight efflux component. PMID:23507281

  19. K+ channel openers restore verapamil-inhibited lung fluid resolution and transepithelial ion transport

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Lung epithelial Na+ channels (ENaC) are regulated by cell Ca2+ signal, which may contribute to calcium antagonist-induced noncardiogenic lung edema. Although K+ channel modulators regulate ENaC activity in normal lungs, the therapeutical relevance and the underlying mechanisms have not been completely explored. We hypothesized that K+ channel openers may restore calcium channel blocker-inhibited alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) by up-regulating both apical and basolateral ion transport. Methods Verapamil-induced depression of heterologously expressed human αβγ ENaC in Xenopus oocytes, apical and basolateral ion transport in monolayers of human lung epithelial cells (H441), and in vivo alveolar fluid clearance were measured, respectively, using the two-electrode voltage clamp, Ussing chamber, and BSA protein assays. Ca2+ signal in H441 cells was analyzed using Fluo 4AM. Results The rate of in vivo AFC was reduced significantly (40.6 ± 6.3% of control, P < 0.05, n = 12) in mice intratracheally administrated verapamil. KCa3.1 (1-EBIO) and KATP (minoxidil) channel openers significantly recovered AFC. In addition to short-circuit current (Isc) in intact H441 monolayers, both apical and basolateral Isc levels were reduced by verapamil in permeabilized monolayers. Moreover, verapamil significantly altered Ca2+ signal evoked by ionomycin in H441 cells. Depletion of cytosolic Ca2+ in αβγ ENaC-expressing oocytes completely abolished verapamil-induced inhibition. Intriguingly, KV (pyrithione-Na), K Ca3.1 (1-EBIO), and KATP (minoxidil) channel openers almost completely restored the verapamil-induced decrease in Isc levels by diversely up-regulating apical and basolateral Na+ and K+ transport pathways. Conclusions Our observations demonstrate that K+ channel openers are capable of rescuing reduced vectorial Na+ transport across lung epithelial cells with impaired Ca2+ signal. PMID:20507598

  20. The Transport of Ions Across Plant Cell Membranes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Presented is one of a series of articles designed to help science teachers keep current on ideas in specific areas of biology. This article provides information about ion transport in plant cells. (PB)

  1. The Transport of Ions Across Plant Cell Membranes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Presented is one of a series of articles designed to help science teachers keep current on ideas in specific areas of biology. This article provides information about ion transport in plant cells. (PB)

  2. Energetic ion transport by microturbulence is insignificant in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Staebler, G. M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Waltz, R. E.; Austin, M. E.; Bass, E. M.; Budny, R. V.; Gorelenkova, M.; Grierson, B. A.; McCune, D. C.; Yuan, X.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Muscatello, C. M.; Zhu, Y. B.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Wang, G.; Holcomb, C. T.; McKee, G. R.; and others

    2013-05-15

    Energetic ion transport due to microturbulence is investigated in magnetohydrodynamic-quiescent plasmas by way of neutral beam injection in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)]. A range of on-axis and off-axis beam injection scenarios are employed to vary relevant parameters such as the character of the background microturbulence and the value of E{sub b}/T{sub e}, where E{sub b} is the energetic ion energy and T{sub e} the electron temperature. In all cases, it is found that any transport enhancement due to microturbulence is too small to observe experimentally. These transport effects are modeled using numerical and analytic expectations that calculate the energetic ion diffusivity due to microturbulence. It is determined that energetic ion transport due to coherent fluctuations (e.g., Alfvén eigenmodes) is a considerably larger effect and should therefore be considered more important for ITER.

  3. Functional and cytometric examination of different human lung epithelial cell types as drug transport barriers

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Rosania, Gus R.; Kim, Chong-Kook; Shin, Meong Cheol

    2016-01-01

    To develop inhaled medications, various cell culture models have been used to examine the transcellular transport or cellular uptake properties of small molecules. For the reproducible high throughput screening of the inhaled drug candidates, a further verification of cell architectures as drug transport barriers can contribute to establishing appropriate in vitro cell models. In the present study, side-by-side experiments were performed to compare the structure and transport function of three lung epithelial cells (Calu-3, normal human bronchial primary cells (NHBE), and NL-20). The cells were cultured on the nucleopore membranes in the air-liquid interface (ALI) culture conditions, with cell culture medium in the basolateral side only, starting from day 1. In transport assays, paracellular transport across all three types of cells appeared to be markedly different with the NHBE or Calu-3 cells, showing low paracellular permeability and high TEER values, while the NL-20 cells showed high paracellular permeability and low TEER. Quantitative image analysis of the confocal microscope sections further confirmed that the Calu-3 cells formed intact cell monolayers in contrast to the NHBE and NL-20 cells with multilayers. Among three lung epithelial cell types, the Calu-3 cell cultures under the ALI condition showed optimal cytometric features for mimicking the biophysical characteristics of in vivo airway epithelium. Therefore, the Calu-3 cell monolayers could be used as functional cell barriers for the lung-targeted drug transport studies. PMID:26746641

  4. Ion sampling and transport in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, Paul B.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative accuracy and high sensitivity in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) depend on consistent and efficient extraction and transport of analyte ions from an inductively coupled plasma to a mass analyzer, where they are sorted and detected. In this review we examine the fundamental physical processes that control ion sampling and transport in ICP-MS and compare the results of theory and computerized models with experimental efforts to characterize the flow of ions through plasma mass spectrometers' vacuum interfaces. We trace the flow of ions from their generation in the plasma, into the sampling cone, through the supersonic expansion in the first vacuum stage, through the skimmer, and into the ion optics that deliver the ions to the mass analyzer. At each stage we consider idealized behavior and departures from ideal behavior that affect the performance of ICP-MS as an analytical tool.

  5. Regulation of ion transport by microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Elvira-Matelot, Emilie; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Hadchouel, Juliette

    2011-09-01

    This review aims to describe the recent findings obtained on the regulation of ion transport by microRNAs in physiological and pathological situations in different organs and organisms. The number of ion channels or transporters can be regulated by increasing or decreasing the transcription and/or translation of the corresponding genes. In this context, a new class of regulators of gene expression has emerged as an important modulator of ion transport. microRNAs are short noncoding RNAs which inhibit gene expression by enhancing the degradation or inhibiting the translation of their targets. Most of the studies published so far describe their roles during embryonic development and tumorigenesis. However, recent studies have started to unravel how microRNA-mediated modulation of ion transport could contribute not only to the development of pathological states, such as heart disease, but also to the osmotic regulation of various organisms. The contribution of microRNAs to the regulation of ion transport has only begun to be unraveled, mostly in cardiomyocytes. Only a few studies have focused on the kidney but they strongly suggest that microRNAs could play an important role in the regulation of renal ion transport in response to variation in daily food intake.

  6. Boltzmann-Langevin transport model for heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ayik, S. |

    1994-06-01

    Heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies exhibit catastrophic phenomena which requires descriptions based on stochastic transport models. First, the Boltzmann-Langevin model, which provides an example of such stochastic approaches, is briefly described. Then, a projection method for obtaining numerical solutions of the Boltzmann-Langevin equation is discussed. Finally, some applications of the model to heavy-ion collisions are presented.

  7. The effect of ambroxol on chloride transport, CFTR and ENaC in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Varelogianni, Georgia; Hussain, Rashida; Strid, Hilja; Oliynyk, Igor; Roomans, Godfried M; Johannesson, Marie

    2013-11-01

    Ambroxol, a mucokinetic anti-inflammatory drug, has been used for treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF). The respiratory epithelium is covered by the airway surface liquid (ASL), the thickness and composition of which is determined by Cl(-) efflux via the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and Na(+) influx via the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC). In cells expressing wt-CFTR, ambroxol increased the Cl(-) conductance, but not the bicarbonate conductance of the CFTR channels. We investigated whether treatment with ambroxol enhances chloride transport and/or CFTR and ENaC expression in CF airway epithelial cells (CFBE) cells. CFBE cells were treated with 100 µM ambroxol for 2, 4 or 8 h. mRNA expression for CFTR and ENaC subunits was analysed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR); protein expression was measured by Western blot. The effect of ambroxol on Cl(-) transport was measured by Cl(-) efflux measurements with a fluorescent chloride probe. Ambroxol significantly stimulated Cl(-) efflux from CFBE cells (a sixfold increase after 8 h treatment), and enhanced the expression of the mRNA of CFTR and α-ENaC, and of the CFTR protein. No significant difference was observed in β-ENaC after exposure to ambroxol, whereas mRNA expression of γ-ENaC was reduced. No significant effects of ambroxol on the ENaC subunits were observed by Western blot. Ambroxol did not significantly affect the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Upregulation of CFTR and enhanced Cl(-) efflux after ambroxol treatment should promote transepithelial ion and water transport, which may improve hydration of the mucus, and therefore be beneficial to CF-patients. © 2013 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  8. Brownian Dynamics Simulations of Ion Transport through the VDAC

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Il; Rui, Huan; Pastor, Richard W.; Im, Wonpil

    2011-01-01

    It is important to gain a physical understanding of ion transport through the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) because this channel provides primary permeation pathways for metabolites and electrolytes between the cytosol and mitochondria. We performed grand canonical Monte Carlo/Brownian dynamics (GCMC/BD) simulations to explore the ion transport properties of human VDAC isoform 1 (hVDAC1; PDB:2K4T) embedded in an implicit membrane. When the MD-derived, space-dependent diffusion constant was used in the GCMC/BD simulations, the current-voltage characteristics and ion number profiles inside the pore showed excellent agreement with those calculated from all-atom molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations, thereby validating the GCMC/BD approach. Of the 20 NMR models of hVDAC1 currently available, the third one (NMR03) best reproduces both experimental single-channel conductance and ion selectivity (i.e., the reversal potential). In addition, detailed analyses of the ion trajectories, one-dimensional multi-ion potential of mean force, and protein charge distribution reveal that electrostatic interactions play an important role in the channel structure and ion transport relationship. Finally, the GCMC/BD simulations of various mutants based on NMR03 show good agreement with experimental ion selectivity. The difference in ion selectivity between the wild-type and the mutants is the result of altered potential of mean force profiles that are dominated by the electrostatic interactions. PMID:21281575

  9. Bio-inspired smart single asymmetric hourglass nanochannels for continuous shape and ion transport control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huacheng; Hou, Xu; Yang, Zhe; Yan, Dadong; Li, Lin; Tian, Ye; Wang, Huanting; Jiang, Lei

    2015-02-18

    Inspired by biological asymmetric ion channels, new shape-tunable and pH-responsive asymmetric hourglass single nanochannel systems demonstrate unique ion-transport properties. It is found that the change in shape and pH cooperatively control the ion transport within the nanochannel ranging from asymmetric shape with asymmetric ion transport, to asymmetric shape with symmetric ion transport and symmetric shape with symmetric ion transport. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Regulation of epithelial calcium transport by prolactin: from fish to mammals.

    PubMed

    Wongdee, Kannikar; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2013-01-15

    Among the reported ∼300 biological actions, the established role of prolactin (PRL) is to act as a vertebrate hypercalcemic hormone that regulates epithelial calcium transport in several organs, such as the gills, intestine, and kidney. In fish, PRL stimulates the branchial calcium transport by increasing the activity of Ca(2+)-ATPase. Although this calciotropic hormone also induces hypercalcemia in amphibians, reptiles and birds, little has been known regarding the underlying mechanism. In contrast, the effects of PRL on the epithelial calcium transport in mammals are well documented. In rodents, PRL has been shown to stimulate the renal tubular calcium reabsorption and intestinal calcium absorption, the latter of which is mediated by the PRL-induced upregulation of calcium transporter gene expression and activities. Recently, we demonstrated that the duodenal calcium absorption in lactating rats was markedly enhanced by the suckling-induced PRL surge, presumably to provide calcium for milk production. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of the PRL-stimulated calcium transport in mammals have been elaborated in this review. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Extracellular Microenvironment Explains Variations in Passive Drug Transport across Different Airway Epithelial Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Talattof, Arjang; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Stringer, Kathleen A.; Yu, Jing-yu; Lim, Dong Hyun; Rosania, Gus R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We sought to identify key variables in cellular architecture and physiology that might explain observed differences in the passive transport properties of small molecule drugs across different airway epithelial cell types. Methods Propranolol (PR) was selected as a weakly basic, model compound to compare the transport properties of primary (NHBE) vs. tumor-derived (Calu-3) cells. Differentiated on Transwell™ inserts, the architecture of pure vs. mixed cell co-cultures was studied with confocal microscopy followed by quantitative morphometric analysis. Cellular pharmacokinetic modeling was used to identify parameters that differentially affect PR uptake and transport across these two cell types. Results Pure Calu-3 and NHBE cells possessed different structural and functional properties. Nevertheless, mixed Calu-3 and NHBE cell co-cultures differentiated as stable cell monolayers. After measuring the total mass of PR, the fractional areas covered by Calu-3 and NHBE cells allowed deconvoluting the transport properties of each cell type. Based on the apparent thickness of the unstirred, cell surface aqueous layer, local differences in extracellular microenvironment explained the measured variations in passive PR uptake and permeation between Calu-3 and NHBE cells. Conclusion Mixed cell co-cultures can be used to compare the local effects of the extracellular microenvironment on drug uptake and transport across two epithelial cell types. PMID:23708857

  12. Computer Simulations of Ion Transport in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes.

    PubMed

    Mogurampelly, Santosh; Borodin, Oleg; Ganesan, Venkat

    2016-06-07

    Understanding the mechanisms and optimizing ion transport in polymer membranes have been the subject of active research for more than three decades. We present an overview of the progress and challenges involved with the modeling and simulation aspects of the ion transport properties of polymer membranes. We are concerned mainly with atomistic and coarser level simulation studies and discuss some salient work in the context of pure binary and single ion conducting polymer electrolytes, polymer nanocomposites, block copolymers, and ionic liquid-based hybrid electrolytes. We conclude with an outlook highlighting future directions.

  13. Benchmarking of Neutron Production of Heavy-Ion Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, Igor; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of radiation fields generated by heavy ion interactions is important in medical applications, space missions, and in design and operation of rare isotope research facilities. In recent years, several well-established computer codes in widespread use for particle and radiation transport calculations have been equipped with the capability to simulate heavy ion transport and interactions. To assess and validate these capabilities, we performed simulations of a series of benchmark-quality heavy ion experiments with the computer codes FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS. We focus on the comparisons of secondary neutron production. Results are encouraging; however, further improvements in models and codes and additional benchmarking are required.

  14. Continuous mucociliary transport by primary human airway epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Patrick R.; Yin, Wei-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance (MCC) is an important innate defense mechanism that continuously removes inhaled pathogens and particulates from the airways. Normal MCC is essential for maintaining a healthy respiratory system, and impaired MCC is a feature of many airway diseases, including both genetic (cystic fibrosis, primary ciliary dyskinesia) and acquired (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis) disorders. Research into the fundamental processes controlling MCC, therefore, has direct clinical application, but has been limited in part due to the difficulty of studying this complex multicomponent system in vitro. In this study, we have characterized a novel method that allows human airway epithelial cells to differentiate into a mucociliary epithelium that transports mucus in a continuous circular track. The mucociliary transport device allows the measurement and manipulation of all features of mucociliary transport in a controlled in vitro system. In this initial study, the effect of ciliary beat frequency and mucus concentration on the speed of mucociliary transport was investigated. PMID:25979076

  15. FcRn-mediated antibody transport across epithelial cells revealed by electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    He, Wanzhong; Ladinsky, Mark S.; Huey-Tubman, Kathryn E.; Jensen, Grant J.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Björkman, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) transports maternal IgG across epithelial barriers1,2, thereby providing the fetus or newborn with humoral immunity before its immune system is fully functional. In newborn rodents, FcRn transfers IgG from milk to blood by apical-to-basolateral transcytosis across intestinal epithelial cells. The pH difference between the apical (pH 6.0-6.5) and basolateral (pH 7.4) sides of intestinal epithelial cells facilitates efficient unidirectional transport of IgG, since FcRn binds IgG at pH 6.0-6.5 but not pH ≥7 1,2. As milk passes through the neonatal intestine, maternal IgG is removed by FcRn-expressing cells in the proximal small intestine (duodenum, jejunum); remaining proteins are absorbed and degraded by FcRn-negative cells in the distal small intestine (ileum)3-6. We used electron tomography to directly visualize jejunal transcytosis in space and time, developing new labeling and detection methods to map individual nanogold-labeled Fc within transport vesicles7 and to simultaneously characterize these vesicles by immunolabeling. Combining electron tomography with a non-perturbing endocytic label allowed us to conclusively identify receptor-bound ligands, resolve interconnecting vesicles, determine if a vesicle was microtubule-associated, and accurately trace FcRn-mediated transport of IgG. Our results present a complex picture in which Fc moved through networks of entangled tubular and irregular vesicles, only some of which were microtubule-associated, as it migrated to the basolateral surface. New features of transcytosis were elucidated, including transport involving multivesicular body inner vesicles/tubules and exocytosis via clathrin-coated pits. Markers for early, late, and recycling endosomes each labeled vesicles in different and overlapping morphological classes, revealing unexpected spatial complexity in endo-lysosomal trafficking. PMID:18818657

  16. An ion-transporting ATPase encodes multiple apical localization signals

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Epithelial cells accumulate distinct populations of membrane proteins at their two plasmalemmal domains. We have examined the molecular signals which specify the differential subcellular distributions of two closely related ion pumps. The Na,K-ATPase is normally restricted to the basolateral membranes of numerous epithelial cell types, whereas the H,K-ATPase is a component of the apical surfaces of the parietal cells of the gastric epithelium. We have expressed full length and chimeric H,K-ATPase/Na,K-ATPase cDNAs in polarized renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (LLC-PK1). We find that both the alpha and beta subunits of the H,K-ATPase encode independent signals that specify apical localization. Furthermore, the H,K-ATPase beta-subunit possesses a sequence which mediates its participation in the endocytic pathway. The interrelationship between epithelial sorting and endocytosis signals suggested by these studies supports the redefinition of apical and basolateral as functional, rather than simply topographic domains. PMID:8385670

  17. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael; Lyons, Larry R.; Gorney, David J.

    1993-01-01

    A dynamical guiding-center simulation model is used to study the stormtime ion transport which leads to the formation of the ring current and diffusion in the radiation belts. Representative ions guiding-center motion in response to model storm-associated impulses in the convection electric field is traced for a range of ion mu values. The present numerical results are compared with previously formulated limiting idealization of particle transport in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For ions having drift periods that exceed the duration of the main phase of the storm, their inward transport to form the stormtime ring current is appropriately described as direct convective access. For ions having drift periods comparable to the duration of the main phase of the storm, there is a transition between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. Lower-energy ring-current ions at L of about 3 are freshly injected there from open adiabatic trajectories, whereas the higher-energy ring-current population consists of a mixture of freshly injected and previously trapped ions.

  18. Ion transport controlled by nanoparticle-functionalized membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Edward; McBride, Sean P.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Lin, Xiao-Min

    2014-12-01

    From proton exchange membranes in fuel cells to ion channels in biological membranes, the well-specified control of ionic interactions in confined geometries profoundly influences the transport and selectivity of porous materials. Here we outline a versatile new approach to control a membrane’s electrostatic interactions with ions by depositing ligand-coated nanoparticles around the pore entrances. Leveraging the flexibility and control by which ligated nanoparticles can be synthesized, we demonstrate how ligand terminal groups such as methyl, carboxyl and amine can be used to tune the membrane charge density and control ion transport. Further functionality, exploiting the ligands as binding sites, is demonstrated for sulfonate groups resulting in an enhancement of the membrane charge density. We then extend these results to smaller dimensions by systematically varying the underlying pore diameter. As a whole, these results outline a previously unexplored method for the nanoparticle functionalization of membranes using ligated nanoparticles to control ion transport.

  19. Ion transport controlled by nanoparticle-functionalized membranes.

    PubMed

    Barry, Edward; McBride, Sean P; Jaeger, Heinrich M; Lin, Xiao-Min

    2014-12-17

    From proton exchange membranes in fuel cells to ion channels in biological membranes, the well-specified control of ionic interactions in confined geometries profoundly influences the transport and selectivity of porous materials. Here we outline a versatile new approach to control a membrane's electrostatic interactions with ions by depositing ligand-coated nanoparticles around the pore entrances. Leveraging the flexibility and control by which ligated nanoparticles can be synthesized, we demonstrate how ligand terminal groups such as methyl, carboxyl and amine can be used to tune the membrane charge density and control ion transport. Further functionality, exploiting the ligands as binding sites, is demonstrated for sulfonate groups resulting in an enhancement of the membrane charge density. We then extend these results to smaller dimensions by systematically varying the underlying pore diameter. As a whole, these results outline a previously unexplored method for the nanoparticle functionalization of membranes using ligated nanoparticles to control ion transport.

  20. Ambipolarity and transport with resonant ion diffusion in EBT

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, E.F.; Hedrick, C.L.; Hastings, D.E.; Tolliver, J.S.

    1983-10-01

    Using recently derived analytic expressions for resonant and nonresonant neoclassical transport coefficients in EBT, we calculate the ambipolar potential required to maintain quasi-charge neutrality in the presence of a high-energy ion tail produced by nonclassical heating. The electric field obeys a differential rather than an algebraic equation. Solution of this equation gives a potential proportional to the local magnetic field strength and thus a rigid rotation of low-energy ions near the magnetic axis. Radial-transport calculations using this potential give improved agreement with experimental data for neutral density and particle lifetime. However, high-energy ion orbits in the calculated potential exhibit banana widths larger than assumed in the resonant transport theory. The required density of high-energy ions is therefore larger than would be expected if realistic banana widths could be included.

  1. Atomic transport in ion mixed Pd/Co bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. H.; Jang, H. G.; Song, J. H.; Woo, J. J.; Choi, B. S.; Jeong, K.; Whang, C. N.

    1993-06-01

    Isotropic and anisotropic atomic transport in an ion beam mixed Pd/Co bilayer have been studied from the shifts of a marker layer in Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. A thin layer of Au (1 nm) was embedded as a marker at the interface between Pd and Co layers. 80 keV Ar + was used to irradiate the marker sample at 90K. The Pd/Co system shows near isotropic atomic transport ( JPd/ JCo = 0.86) due to the thermal spike effect. We present a simple relationship between the ration of atomic fluxes induced by ion mixing and the activation energies for the normal impurity diffusion of constituents in a bilayer to describe quantitatively the isotropic and anisotropic atomic transport in thermal spike induced ion mixing. Thermal spike induced atomic transport is closely related with the activation energy for normal impurity diffusion.

  2. Heterogeneous processes affecting metal ion transport in the presence of organic ligands: Reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantar, Cetin

    2007-04-01

    The development of models to accurately simulate metal ion transport through saturated systems under variable chemical conditions, e.g., in systems containing organic ligands (L) such as natural organic matter (NOM), has two essential aspects: (1) establishing the ability to simulate metal ion sorption to aquifer solids over a range of metal/ligand ratios; and (2) to incorporate this ability to simulate metal speciation over a range in chemical conditions (e.g., pH, ligand activity) into mass transport models. Modeling approaches to evaluate metal ion sorption and transport in the presence of NOM include: (1) isotherm-based transport models, and (2) multicomponent (MC) transport models. The accuracy of transport models depends on how well the chemical interactions affecting metal ion transport in the presence of organic ligands (e.g., metal/ligand complexation) are described in transport equations. The isotherm-based transport models often fail to accurately describe metal ion transport in the presence of NOM since these models treat NOM as a single solute despite the fact that NOM is a multicomponent mixture of subcomponents with different chemical and polyfunctional behavior. On the other hand, the calculations presented in this study suggest that a multicomponent reactive transport model, in conjunction with a mechanistic modeling approach for the description of metal ion binding by NOM in a manner conducive to the application of surface complexation modeling (SCM), can effectively be used as an important predictive tool in simulating metal ion sorption and transport under variable chemical conditions in the presence of NOM.

  3. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of macromolecules and strategy to enhance their transport in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takano, Mikihisa; Kawami, Masashi; Aoki, Ayako; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary delivery is an attractive administration route for therapeutic proteins and peptides. In this context, endocytosis/transcytosis at the distal lung epithelial barrier is an important process in the pulmonary absorption of therapeutic macromolecules. The alveolar epithelium is comprised of type I and type II cells. Understanding the transport mechanisms in these cells is essential for the development of efficient pulmonary delivery systems of therapeutic macromolecules. Endocytic pathways for albumin and insulin in alveolar epithelial cells and possible receptors for the endocytosis are discussed. Strategies to enhance the endocytosis and pulmonary absorption of macromolecules are also discussed, by focusing on the effects of cationic poly(amino acid)s. Although the surface area occupied by type II cells in alveoli is much smaller than that covered by type I cells, type II cells may significantly contribute to the endocytosis/transcytosis of macromolecules such as albumin. Identification of the receptors involved in the cellular uptake of each macromolecule is prerequisite for the understanding and regulation of its transport into and across alveolar epithelial cells. Establishment of novel in-vitro culture cell models of type I and type II cells would be a great help for the future advance of this research field.

  4. Prolactin stimulates sodium and chloride ion channels in A6 renal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee, Megan M.; Mitzelfelt, Jeremiah D.; Duke, Billie Jeanne; Al-Khalili, Otor; Bao, Hui-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Many hormonal pathways contribute to the regulation of renal epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) function, a key process for maintaining blood volume and controlling blood pressure. In the present study, we examined whether the peptide hormone prolactin (PRL) regulates ENaC function in renal epithelial cells (A6). Basolateral application of several different concentrations of PRL dramatically stimulated the transepithelial current in A6 cells, increasing both amiloride-sensitive (ENaC) and amiloride-insensitive currents. Using cell-attached patch clamp, we determined that PRL increased both the number (N) and open probability (Po) of ENaC present in the apical membrane. Inhibition of PKA with H-89 abolished the effect of PRL on amiloride-sensitive and insensitive transepithelial currents and eliminated the increase in ENaC NPo with PRL exposure. PRL also increased cAMP in A6 cells, consistent with signaling through the cAMP-dependent PKA pathway. We also identified that PRL induced activity of a 2-pS anion channel with outward rectification, electrophysiological properties consistent with ClC4 or ClC5. RT-PCR only detected ClC4, but not ClC5 transcripts. Here, we show for the first time that PRL activates sodium and chloride transport in renal epithelial cells via ENaC and ClC4. PMID:25587116

  5. Microsecond simulations of DNA and ion transport in nanopores with novel ion-ion and ion-nucleotides effective potentials.

    PubMed

    De Biase, Pablo M; Markosyan, Suren; Noskov, Sergei

    2014-04-05

    We developed a novel scheme based on the grand-canonical Monte Carlo/Brownian dynamics simulations and have extended it to studies of ion currents across three nanopores with the potential for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) sequencing: solid-state nanopore Si₃N₄, α-hemolysin, and E111N/M113Y/K147N mutant. To describe nucleotide-specific ion dynamics compatible with ssDNA coarse-grained model, we used the inverse Monte Carlo protocol, which maps the relevant ion-nucleotide distribution functions from all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Combined with the previously developed simulation platform for Brownian dynamics simulations of ion transport, it allows for microsecond- and millisecond-long simulations of ssDNA dynamics in the nanopore with a conductance computation accuracy that equals or exceeds that of all-atom MD simulations. In spite of the simplifications, the protocol produces results that agree with the results of previous studies on ion conductance across open channels and provide direct correlations with experimentally measured blockade currents and ion conductances that have been estimated from all-atom MD simulations.

  6. New advances in the pathophysiology of intestinal ion transport and barrier function in diarrhea and the impact on therapy.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Kazi Mirajul; Chakraborty, Subhra; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Woodward, Owen M

    2012-06-01

    Diarrhea remains a continuous threat to human health worldwide. Scaling up the best practices for diarrhea prevention requires improved therapies. Diarrhea results from dysregulation of normal intestinal ion transport functions. Host-microbe contact is a key determinant of this response. Underlying mechanisms in the disease state are regulated by intracellular signals that modulate the activity of individual transport proteins responsible for ion transport and barrier function. Similarly, virulence factors of pathogens and their complex interaction with the host has shed light on the mechanism of enteric infection. Great advances in our understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of epithelial transport, and host-microbe interaction have been made in recent years. Application of these new advances may represent strategies to decrease pathogen attachment, enhance intestinal cation absorption, decrease anion secretion and repair barrier function. This review highlights the new advances and better understanding in the pathophysiology of diarrheal diseases and their impact on therapy.

  7. Sodium Ion Production, Acceleration and Transport in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, D. J.; Schriver, D.; Travnicek, P. M.; Hellinger, P.; Richard, R. L.; Raines, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Observations made by the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit around Mercury have shown that sodium ions can form a significant portion of the plasma population in the magnetosphere, in particular in the dayside cusp and the nightside magnetotail plasma sheet. The sodium ions, as well as other heavy ions observed in and around Mercury, are of planetary origin and can be created by a number of different processes, including photo stimulated desorption (PSD), electron stimulated desorption (ESD), solar wind sputtering (SWS) and micro-meteorite impact vaporization (MIV). For all of these possible source mechanisms, sodium ions are born cold, with eV energies at most, yet when the sodium ions are observed in Mercury's magnetosphere they tend to have much higher energies, i.e., 10-10000 eV. Using global kinetic simulations, the origin, acceleration, transport and loss of sodium ions is examined for the different source mechanisms. In general it is found that PSD is a major contributor of sodium ions with energies of order 10-100 eV to the dayside regions of Mercury's magnetosphere, while ESD-created sodium ions generally gain higher energies (1-10 keV) and tend primarily to populate the magnetotail plasma sheet. The acceleration mechanisms and general transport properties of sodium ions will be discussed along with comparisons with MESSENGER observations.

  8. Expression of the thyroid hormone transporters monocarboxylate transporter-8 (SLC16A2) and organic ion transporter-14 (SLCO1C1) at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lori M; Woodford, Kathleen; Zhou, Mei; Black, Deborah S; Haggerty, Jill E; Tate, Emily H; Grindstaff, Kent K; Mengesha, Wondwessen; Raman, Chandrasekaran; Zerangue, Noa

    2008-12-01

    Thyroid hormones require transport across cell membranes to carry out their biological functions. The importance of transport for thyroid hormone signaling was highlighted by the discovery that inactivating mutations in the human monocarboxylate transporter-8 (MCT8) (SLC16A2) cause severe psychomotor retardation due to thyroid hormone deficiency in the central nervous system. It has been reported that Mct8 expression in the mouse brain is restricted to neurons, leading to the model that organic ion transporter polypeptide-14 (OATP14, also known as OATP1C1/SLCO1C1) is the primary thyroid hormone transporter at the blood-brain barrier, whereas MCT8 mediates thyroid hormone uptake into neurons. In contrast to these reports, we report here that in addition to neuronal expression, MCT8 mRNA and protein are expressed in cerebral microvessels in human, mouse, and rat. In addition, OATP14 mRNA and protein are strongly enriched in mouse and rat cerebral microvessels but not in human microvessels. In rat, Mct8 and Oatp14 proteins localize to both the luminal and abluminal microvessel membranes. In human and rodent choroid plexus epithelial cells, MCT8 is concentrated on the epithelial cell apical surface and OATP14 localizes primarily to the basal-lateral surface. Mct8 and Oatp14 expression was also observed in mouse and rat tanycytes, which are thought to form a barrier between hypothalamic blood vessels and brain. These results raise the possibility that reduced thyroid hormone transport across the blood-brain barrier contributes to the neurological deficits observed in affected patients with MCT8 mutations. The high microvessel expression of OATP14 in rodent compared with human brain may contribute to the relatively mild phenotype observed in Mct8-null mice, in contrast to humans lacking functional MCT8.

  9. Epithelial cells supply Sonic Hedgehog to the perinatal dentate gyrus via transport by platelets.

    PubMed

    Choe, Youngshik; Huynh, Trung; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2015-10-12

    Dentate neural stem cells produce neurons throughout life in mammals. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is critical for maintenance of these cells; however, the perinatal source of Shh is enigmatic. In the present study, we examined the role of Shh expressed by hair follicles (HFs) that expand perinatally in temporal concordance with the proliferation of Shh-responding dentate stem cells. Specific inhibition of Shh from HFs or from epithelial sources in general hindered development of Shh-responding dentate stem cells. We also found that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of the perinatal dentate gyrus (DG) is leaky with stem cells in the dentate exposed to blood-born factors. In attempting to identify how Shh might be transported in blood, we found that platelets contain epithelial Shh, provide Shh to the perinatal DG and that inhibition of platelet generation reduced hedgehog-responsive dentate stem cells.

  10. Immunoreactivity of glucose transporter 8 is localized in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and in ependymal cells.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Ryuta; Chiba, Yoichi; Tsuboi, Kazuhito; Matsumoto, Koichi; Kawauchi, Machi; Fujihara, Ryuji; Mashima, Masato; Kanenishi, Kenji; Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Ueno, Masaki

    2016-08-01

    High fructose intake is known to be associated with increased plasma triglyceride concentration, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, and high blood pressure. In addition, excess fructose intake is also thought to be a risk factor for dementia. Previous immunohistochemical studies have shown the presence of glucose transporter 5 (GLUT5), a major transporter of fructose, in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and ependymal cells in the brains of humans, rats, and mice, while GLUT2, a minor transporter of fructose, was localized in the ependymal cells of rat brain. In this study, immunoreactivity for the fructose transporter GLUT8 was observed in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells in the choroid plexus and in the ependymal cells of the brains of humans and mice. These structures were not immunoreactive for GLUT7, GLUT11, and GLUT12. Our findings support the hypothesis of the transport of intravascular fructose through the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and the ependymal cells.

  11. Prostaglandin D2 regulates human colonic ion transport via the DP1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Medani, M; Collins, D; Mohan, H M; Walsh, E; Winter, D C; Baird, A W

    2015-02-01

    Prostaglandin D2 is released by mast cells and is important in allergies. Its role in gastrointestinal function is not clearly defined. This study aimed to determine the effect of exogenous PGD2 on ion transport in ex vivo normal human colonic mucosa. Mucosal sheets were mounted in Ussing chambers and voltage clamped to zero electric potential. Ion transport was quantified as changes in short-circuit current. In separate experiments epithelial monolayers or colonic crypts, isolated by calcium chelation, were treated with PGD2 and cAMP levels determined by ELISA or calcium levels were determined by fluorimetry. PGD2 caused a sustained, concentration-dependent rise in short-circuit current by increasing chloride secretion (EC50=376nM). This effect of PGD2 is mediated by the DP1 receptor, as the selective DP1 receptor antagonist BW A686C inhibited PGD2-induced but not PGE2-induced rise in short-circuit current. PGD2 also increased intracellular cAMP in isolated colonic crypts with no measurable influence on cytosolic calcium. PGD2 induces chloride secretion in isolated human colonic mucosa in a concentration-dependent manner with concomitant elevation of cytoplasmic cAMP in epithelial cells. The involvement of DP2 receptor subtypes has not previously been considered in regulation of ion transport in human intestine. Since inflammatory stimuli may induce production of eicosanoids, selective regulation of these pathways may be pivotal in determining therapeutic strategies and in understanding disease. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Phylogeny and cloning of ion transporters in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Pullikuth, Ashok K; Filippov, Valeri; Gill, Sarjeet S

    2003-11-01

    Membrane transport in insect epithelia appears to be energized through proton-motive force generated by the vacuolar type proton ATPase (V-ATPase). However, secondary transport mechanisms that are coupled to V-ATPase activity have not been fully elucidated. Following a blood meal, the female mosquito regulates fluid and ion homeostasis through a series of characteristic behaviors that require brain-derived factors to regulate ion secretion. Despite the knowledge on the behaviors of the mosquito, little is known of the targets of several factors that have been implicated in cellular changes following a blood meal. This review discusses current models of membrane transport in insects and specific data on mosquito ion regulation together with the molecular aspects of membrane transport systems that are potentially linked to V-ATPase activity, which collectively determine the functioning of mosquito midgut and Malpighian tubules. Ion transport mechanisms will be discussed from a comparative physiology perspective to gain appreciation of the exquisite mechanisms of mosquito ion regulation.

  13. Ion mixing, hydration, and transport in aqueous ionic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tse, Ying-Lung Steve; Voth, Gregory A.; Witten, Thomas A.

    2015-05-14

    The enhancement effect on the ion mobility of fluoride (and that of chloride) in a polycationic system, as the chloride content increases, is shown to also exist in other more simple ionic systems with cations such as the cesium ion and an organic ammonium ion. As the chloride content increases, in addition to the finding that there is more unbound water associated with the cation, we also observe that the average lifetime of a hydrogen bond decreases. This change to the hydrogen bonds is correlated to significant changes to both the structural and dynamical properties of water. The more disordered water structure and faster water dynamics are hypothesized to be also responsible for the enhanced ion mobilities. Furthermore, when either the chloride content or hydration level is changed, the self-diffusion constant of each co-ion changes by almost the same factor, implying the existence of a single universal transport mechanism that determines ion mobilities.

  14. Front-runners for pharmacotherapeutic correction of the airway ion transport defect in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Clunes, Mark T; Boucher, Richard C

    2008-06-01

    Although cystic fibrosis (CF) patients display multiorgan dysfunction (e.g. pancreas, gut, and lung) it is lung disease that is the leading cause of premature death in these patients. CF lung disease is characterized by persistent pulmonary infection and mucus plugging of the airways initiated by the failure of solute transport across the airway epithelium. Many drug therapies aim to alleviate the secondary characteristics of CF lung disease; however, new therapies in development are targeted at correcting the ion transport deficiency of CF. The goal is to hydrate airway surfaces by stimulating secretion (through activation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator and calcium-activated chloride channels), and/or inhibiting absorption (through the epithelial sodium channel) thereby stimulating healthy mucociliary clearance. If mucociliary clearance can be stimulated sufficiently from an early age, then there is the possibility that secondary lung infection may be eradicated from the syndrome of CF disease.

  15. Front-Runners for pharmacotherapeutic correction of the airway ion transport defect in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Clunes, Mark T.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Although cystic fibrosis patients display multi organ dysfunction (e.g. pancreas, gut, lung) it is lung disease that is the leading cause of premature death in these patients. Cystic fibrosis lung disease is characterized by persistent pulmonary infection and mucus plugging of the airways initiated by failure of solute transport across the airway epithelium. Many drug therapies aim to alleviate the secondary characteristics of CF lung disease, however, new therapies in development are targeted at correcting the ion transport deficiency of CF. The goal is to hydrate airway surfaces by stimulating secretion (through activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and calcium activated chloride channels), and/or inhibiting absorption (through the epithelial sodium channel) thereby stimulating healthy mucociliary clearance. If mucociliary clearance can be stimulated sufficiently from an early age then there is the possibility that secondary lung infection may be eradicated from the syndrome of CF disease. PMID:18468487

  16. Physiological significance of taurine and the taurine transporter in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, M; Satsu, H

    2000-01-01

    Taurine transport in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells was down-regulated by culturing the cells in taurine-containing media and was up-regulated in a taurine-free medium. This adaptive regulation was associated with changes in both the Vmax and Km values of taurine transport. A change in the mRNA level of the taurine transporter (TAUT) in this regulation was also observed. The presence of such a regulatory mechanism for maintaining the intracellular taurine content at a certain level suggests that taurine plays an important role in the intestinal cell functions. The intracellular taurine content was increased when Caco-2 cells were exposed to a hypertonic stress. TAUT was up-regulated via the increased expression of TAUT mRNA in the hypertonic cells, suggesting that taurine serves as an osmolyte and protects the cells from osmotic stress. Similar up-regulation of TAUT was observed in the small intestine of water-deprived rats.

  17. Transport of lipid nano-droplets through MDCK epithelial cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Pulkit; Shao, Jun

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to investigate the transport of lipid nano-droplets through MDCK epithelial cell monolayer. Nanoemulsions of self-nano-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) labeled with radioactive C18 triglyceride were developed. The effect of droplet size and lipid composition on the transport was investigated. The results showed that the lipid nano-droplet transport through MDCK cell monolayer was as high as 2.5%. The transport of lipid nano-droplets was higher for nanoemulsions of medium chain glycerides than the long chain glycerides. The transport was reduced by more than half when the average lipid nano-droplet size increased from 38nm to 261nm. The droplet size measurement verified the existence of lipid nano-droplets in the receiver chamber only when the nanoemulsions were added to the donor chamber but not when the surfactant or saline solution was added. Cryo-TEM images confirmed the presence of lipid nano-droplets in both donor and receiver chamber at the end of transport study. In conclusion, lipid nano-droplets can be transported through the cell monolayer. This finding may help to further explore the oral and other non-invasive delivery of macromolecules loaded inside SNEDDS.

  18. Ion transport in circulatory and/or septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Sayeed, M.M.

    1987-05-01

    This review surveys investigations of membrane ion transport in animals in hemorrhagic, endotoxic, or bacteremic shock. The focus of the review is on ion transport studies in the skeletal muscle and liver. Skeletal muscle Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ transport alterations have been shown during the induction of shock via hemorrhage, endotoxin, or live Gram-negative bacteria in the rodent, canine, and primate species. These alterations include impairment of active cellular K/sup +/ accumulation, increased permeability to /sup 24/Na/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/, and membrane depolarization. The ion transport alterations in the skeletal muscle are compatible with movement of extracellular fluid into the intracellular compartment. Such fluid movements can potentially lead to decreases in circulating plasma volume and thus to circulatory deficits in shock. Studies in the liver of rats subjected to hemorrhagic or endotoxic shock indicated the failure of electrogenic Na/sup +/ pump. Although the hepatic cellular membrane permeability to Na/sup +/ relative to permeability to K/sup +/ appeared unaltered in hemorrhagic shock, endotoxic shock caused an increase in permeability to Na/sup +/. Hepatic cellular /sup 45/Ca/sup +/ regulation also appeared to be adversely affected during endotoxic shock. Alterations in hepatic Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ transport and Ca/sup +/ regulation could contribute to impairment in hepatic glucose production during shock. Although mechanisms of altered membrane ion transport during shock states remain unknown, such changes could occur prior to any substantial loss of cellular metabolic energy.

  19. Transport and uptake effects of marine complex lipid liposomes in small intestinal epithelial cell models.

    PubMed

    Du, Lei; Yang, Yu-Hong; Xu, Jie; Wang, Yu-Ming; Xue, Chang-Hu; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, marine complex lipids, including starfish phospholipids (SFP) and cerebrosides (SFC) separated from Asterias amurensis as well as sea cucumber phospholipids (SCP) and cerebrosides (SCC) isolated from Cucumaria frondosa, have received much attention because of their potent biological activities. However, little information is known on the transport and uptake of these lipids in liposome forms in small intestinal cells. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of these complex lipid liposomes on transport and uptake in Caco-2 and M cell monolayer models. The results revealed that SFP and SCP contained 42% and 47.9% eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), respectively. The average particle sizes of liposomes prepared in this study were from 169 to 189 nm. We found that the transport of the liposomes across the M cell monolayer model was much higher than the Caco-2 cell monolayer model. The liposomes consisting of SFP or SCP showed significantly higher transport and uptake than soy phospholipid (soy-PL) liposomes in both Caco-2 and M cell monolayer models. Our results also exhibited that treatment with 1 mM liposomes composed of SFP or SCP for 3 h tended to increase the EPA content in phospholipid fractions of both differentiated Caco-2 and M cells. Moreover, it was also found that the hybrid liposomes consisting of SFP/SFC/cholesterol (Chol) revealed higher transport and uptake across the M cell monolayer in comparison with other liposomes. Furthermore, treatment with SFP/SFC/Chol liposomes could notably decrease the trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) values of Caco-2 and M cell monolayers. The present data also showed that the cell viability of differentiated Caco-2 and M cells was not affected after the treatment with marine complex lipids or soy-PL liposomes. Based on the data in this study, it was suggested that marine complex lipid liposomes exhibit prominent transport and uptake in small intestinal epithelial cell models.

  20. Membrane ion transport in non-excitable tissues.

    PubMed

    Nehrke, Keith

    2014-12-23

    The facilitated movement of ions across cell membranes can be characterized as occurring through active (ATP-dependent), secondary active (coupled), or passive transport processes. Each of these processes is mediated by a diverse group of membrane proteins. Over the past fifteen years, studies of membrane transport in C. elegans have benefited from the fact that worms are anatomically simple, easily and economically cultured, and genetically tractable. These experimental advantages have been instrumental in defining how membrane transport processes contribute to whole organism physiology. The focus of this review is to survey the recent advances in our understanding of membrane transport that have arisen from integrative physiological approaches in the nematode C. elegans.

  1. Cell volume regulation in epithelial physiology and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Stine F.; Hoffmann, Else K.; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    The physiological function of epithelia is transport of ions, nutrients, and fluid either in secretory or absorptive direction. All of these processes are closely related to cell volume changes, which are thus an integrated part of epithelial function. Transepithelial transport and cell volume regulation both rely on the spatially and temporally coordinated function of ion channels and transporters. In healthy epithelia, specific ion channels/transporters localize to the luminal and basolateral membranes, contributing to functional epithelial polarity. In pathophysiological processes such as cancer, transepithelial and cell volume regulatory ion transport are dys-regulated. Furthermore, epithelial architecture and coordinated ion transport function are lost, cell survival/death balance is altered, and new interactions with the stroma arise, all contributing to drug resistance. Since altered expression of ion transporters and channels is now recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer, it is timely to consider this especially for epithelia. Epithelial cells are highly proliferative and epithelial cancers, carcinomas, account for about 90% of all cancers. In this review we will focus on ion transporters and channels with key physiological functions in epithelia and known roles in the development of cancer in these tissues. Their roles in cell survival, cell cycle progression, and development of drug resistance in epithelial cancers will be discussed. PMID:24009588

  2. Fast Ion Transport in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonofiglo, P. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Kim, J.; Sears, S. H.; Egedal, J.

    2016-10-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) provides a unique environment to study fast ion confinement and transport. The magnetic topology of the RFP establishes guiding center drifts along flux surfaces, resulting in naturally well-confined fast ions. Past experiments reveal reduced confinement and a redistribution of fast ions with beam-driven instabilities or transition to a 3D equilibrium state. A fast ion transport model characterized by a temporally and spatially dependent diffusion profile describes the fast ion evolution. The diffusion coefficient varies as the square of the measured mode amplitude, and the width is inferred from comparison with correlated density fluctuations. In studying multiple interacting modes, the model reproduces the dynamic NPA-measured 20 % drop in core fast ion concentration. In the case of long-lived frequency chirping modes, there is a consistent time evolution of the fast ion distribution and measured mode frequency on a spatially varying Alfven continuum. Additional studies probe the dynamics of energetic particle modes (EPMs) during the growth of the core-localized kink mode and the rapid loss of fast ion confinement as a transition to a 3D equilibrium occurs. This research is supported by US DOE.

  3. Gyrokinetic simulations of ion and impurity transport

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R.E.

    2005-02-01

    A systematic study of turbulent particle and energy transport in both pure and multicomponent plasmas is presented. In this study, gyrokinetic results from the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] are supplemented with those from the GLF23 [R. E. Waltz, G. M. Staebler, W. Dorland et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2482 (1997)] transport model, as well as from quasilinear theory. Various results are obtained. The production of a particle pinch driven by temperature gradients (a thermal pinch) is demonstrated, and further shown to be weakened by finite electron collisionality. Helium transport and the effects of helium density gradient and concentration in a deuterium plasma are examined. Interestingly, it is found that the simple D-v (diffusion versus convective velocity) model of impurity flow is consistent with results obtained from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Also studied is the transport in a 50-50 deuterium-tritium plasma, where a symmetry breaking is observed indicating the potential for fuel separation in a burning plasma. Quasilinear theory together with linear simulations shows that the symmetry breaking which enhances the tritium confinement arises largely from finite-Larmor-radius effects. To justify the numerical methods used in the paper, a variety of linear benchmarks and nonlinear grid refinement studies are detailed.

  4. Gyrokinetic simulations of ion and impurity transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2005-02-01

    A systematic study of turbulent particle and energy transport in both pure and multicomponent plasmas is presented. In this study, gyrokinetic results from the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] are supplemented with those from the GLF23 [R. E. Waltz, G. M. Staebler, W. Dorland et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2482 (1997)] transport model, as well as from quasilinear theory. Various results are obtained. The production of a particle pinch driven by temperature gradients (a thermal pinch) is demonstrated, and further shown to be weakened by finite electron collisionality. Helium transport and the effects of helium density gradient and concentration in a deuterium plasma are examined. Interestingly, it is found that the simple D-v (diffusion versus convective velocity) model of impurity flow is consistent with results obtained from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Also studied is the transport in a 50-50 deuterium-tritium plasma, where a symmetry breaking is observed indicating the potential for fuel separation in a burning plasma. Quasilinear theory together with linear simulations shows that the symmetry breaking which enhances the tritium confinement arises largely from finite-Larmor-radius effects. To justify the numerical methods used in the paper, a variety of linear benchmarks and nonlinear grid refinement studies are detailed.

  5. Neoclassical electron and ion transport in toroidally rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, H.; Horton, W.

    1997-06-01

    Neoclassical transport processes of electrons and ions are investigated in detail for toroidally rotating axisymmetric plasmas with large flow velocities on the order of the ion thermal speed. The Onsager relations for the flow-dependent neoclassical transport coefficients are derived from the symmetry properties of the drift kinetic equation with the self-adjoint collision operator. The complete neoclassical transport matrix with the Onsager symmetry is obtained for the rotating plasma consisting of electrons and single-species ions in the Pfirsch{endash}Schl{umlt u}ter and banana regimes. It is found that the inward banana fluxes of particles and toroidal momentum are driven by the parallel electric field, which are phenomena coupled through the Onsager symmetric off-diagonal coefficients to the parallel currents caused by the radial thermodynamic forces conjugate to the inward fluxes, respectively. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Nonlinear ion transport in liquid and solid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roling, B.; Patro, L. N.; Burghaus, O.; Gräf, M.

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes nonlinear ion transport properties of liquid and solid electrolytes. Typically, the relation between ionic current density and electric field becomes nonlinear at electric fields above 50-100 kV/cm. We review the 1st and 2nd Wien effect found in classical strong and weak electrolyte solutions as well as the strong nonlinear ion transport effects observed for inorganic glasses and for polymer electrolytes. Furthermore, we give an overview over models describing nonlinear ion transport in electrolyte solutions, in glasses and in polymers. Recent results are presented for the nonlinear ionic conductivity of supercooled ionic liquids. We show that supercooled ionic liquids exhibit anomalous Wien effects, which are clearly distinct from the classical Wien effects. We also discuss the frequency dependence of higher-order conductivity and permittivity spectra of these liquids.

  7. Ion channels and transporters in tumour cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Albrecht; Stock, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is a central component of the metastatic cascade requiring a concerted action of ion channels and transporters (migration-associated transportome), cytoskeletal elements and signalling cascades. Ion transport proteins and aquaporins contribute to tumour cell migration and invasion among other things by inducing local volume changes and/or by modulating Ca2+ and H+ signalling. Targeting cell migration therapeutically bears great clinical potential, because it is a prerequisite for metastasis. Ion transport proteins appear to be attractive candidate target proteins for this purpose because they are easily accessible as membrane proteins and often overexpressed or activated in cancer. Importantly, a number of clinically widely used drugs are available whose anticipated efficacy as anti-tumour drugs, however, has now only begun to be evaluated. PMID:24493750

  8. Engineering Heteromaterials to Control Lithium Ion Transport Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Vishniakou, Siarhei; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-12-21

    Safe and efficient operation of lithium ion batteries requires precisely directed flow of lithium ions and electrons to control the first directional volume changes in anode and cathode materials. Understanding and controlling the lithium ion transport in battery electrodes becomes crucial to the design of high performance and durable batteries. Recent work revealed that the chemical potential barriers encountered at the surfaces of heteromaterials play an important role in directing lithium ion transport at nanoscale. Here, we utilize in situ transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that we can switch lithiation pathways from radial to axial to grain-by-grain lithiation through the systematic creation of heteromaterial combinations in the Si-Ge nanowire system. Lastly, our systematic studies show that engineered materials at nanoscale can overcome the intrinsic orientation-dependent lithiation, and open new pathways to aid in the development of compact, safe, and efficient batteries.

  9. Engineering Heteromaterials to Control Lithium Ion Transport Pathways

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yang; Vishniakou, Siarhei; Yoo, Jinkyoung; ...

    2015-12-21

    Safe and efficient operation of lithium ion batteries requires precisely directed flow of lithium ions and electrons to control the first directional volume changes in anode and cathode materials. Understanding and controlling the lithium ion transport in battery electrodes becomes crucial to the design of high performance and durable batteries. Recent work revealed that the chemical potential barriers encountered at the surfaces of heteromaterials play an important role in directing lithium ion transport at nanoscale. Here, we utilize in situ transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that we can switch lithiation pathways from radial to axial to grain-by-grain lithiation through themore » systematic creation of heteromaterial combinations in the Si-Ge nanowire system. Lastly, our systematic studies show that engineered materials at nanoscale can overcome the intrinsic orientation-dependent lithiation, and open new pathways to aid in the development of compact, safe, and efficient batteries.« less

  10. Dust particle diffusion in ion beam transport region

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, N.; Okajima, Y.; Romero, C. F.; Kuwata, Y.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-15

    Dust particles of μm size produced by a monoplasmatron ion source are observed by a laser light scattering. The scattered light signal from an incident laser at 532 nm wavelength indicates when and where a particle passes through the ion beam transport region. As the result, dusts with the size more than 10 μm are found to be distributed in the center of the ion beam, while dusts with the size less than 10 μm size are distributed along the edge of the ion beam. Floating potential and electron temperature at beam transport region are measured by an electrostatic probe. This observation can be explained by a charge up model of the dust in the plasma boundary region.

  11. Engineering Heteromaterials to Control Lithium Ion Transport Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Vishniakou, Siarhei; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-12-21

    Safe and efficient operation of lithium ion batteries requires precisely directed flow of lithium ions and electrons to control the first directional volume changes in anode and cathode materials. Understanding and controlling the lithium ion transport in battery electrodes becomes crucial to the design of high performance and durable batteries. Some recent work revealed that the chemical potential barriers encountered at the surfaces of heteromaterials play an important role in directing lithium ion transport at nanoscale. We utilize in situ transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that we can switch lithiation pathways from radial to axial to grain-by-grain lithiation through the systematic creation of heteromaterial combinations in the Si-Ge nanowire system. Furthermore, our systematic studies show that engineered materials at nanoscale can overcome the intrinsic orientation-dependent lithiation, and open new pathways to aid in the development of compact, safe, and efficient batteries.

  12. Engineering Heteromaterials to Control Lithium Ion Transport Pathways

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yang; Vishniakou, Siarhei; Yoo, Jinkyoung; ...

    2015-12-21

    Safe and efficient operation of lithium ion batteries requires precisely directed flow of lithium ions and electrons to control the first directional volume changes in anode and cathode materials. Understanding and controlling the lithium ion transport in battery electrodes becomes crucial to the design of high performance and durable batteries. Some recent work revealed that the chemical potential barriers encountered at the surfaces of heteromaterials play an important role in directing lithium ion transport at nanoscale. We utilize in situ transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that we can switch lithiation pathways from radial to axial to grain-by-grain lithiation through themore » systematic creation of heteromaterial combinations in the Si-Ge nanowire system. Furthermore, our systematic studies show that engineered materials at nanoscale can overcome the intrinsic orientation-dependent lithiation, and open new pathways to aid in the development of compact, safe, and efficient batteries.« less

  13. Transport of secondary electrons and reactive species in ion tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2015-08-01

    The transport of reactive species brought about by ions traversing tissue-like medium is analysed analytically. Secondary electrons ejected by ions are capable of ionizing other molecules; the transport of these generations of electrons is studied using the random walk approximation until these electrons remain ballistic. Then, the distribution of solvated electrons produced as a result of interaction of low-energy electrons with water molecules is obtained. The radial distribution of energy loss by ions and secondary electrons to the medium yields the initial radial dose distribution, which can be used as initial conditions for the predicted shock waves. The formation, diffusion, and chemical evolution of hydroxyl radicals in liquid water are studied as well. COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy.

  14. Engineering Heteromaterials to Control Lithium Ion Transport Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Vishniakou, Siarhei; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-01-01

    Safe and efficient operation of lithium ion batteries requires precisely directed flow of lithium ions and electrons to control the first directional volume changes in anode and cathode materials. Understanding and controlling the lithium ion transport in battery electrodes becomes crucial to the design of high performance and durable batteries. Recent work revealed that the chemical potential barriers encountered at the surfaces of heteromaterials play an important role in directing lithium ion transport at nanoscale. Here, we utilize in situ transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that we can switch lithiation pathways from radial to axial to grain-by-grain lithiation through the systematic creation of heteromaterial combinations in the Si-Ge nanowire system. Our systematic studies show that engineered materials at nanoscale can overcome the intrinsic orientation-dependent lithiation, and open new pathways to aid in the development of compact, safe, and efficient batteries. PMID:26686655

  15. Ion transport in porous media studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    Pel, L; Huinink, H P; Kopinga, K; Rijniers, L A; Kaasschieter, E F

    2001-01-01

    Moisture and salt transport in masonry can give rise to damages. Therefore a detailed knowledge of the moisture and salt transport is essential for understanding the durability of masonry. A special NMR apparatus has been made allowing quasi-simultaneous measurements of both moisture and Na profiles in porous building materials. Using this apparatus both the absorption of a 4 M NaCl solution in a calcium silicate brick and the drying of a 3 M NaCl capillary saturated fired-clay brick have been studied. It was found that during the absorption process the Na ions clearly stay behind, which this is caused by adsorption of these ions to the pore surface. For the drying it was found that at the beginning of the drying process the ions accumulate near the surface. As the drying rate decreases, diffusion becomes dominant and the ion profile levels off again.

  16. Transport Properties of Negative Ions in HBR Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojanovic, Vladimir; Ivanovic, Nenad; Radmilovic-Radjenovic, Marija; Raspopovic, Zoran; Bojarov, Aleksandar; Petrovic, Zoran

    2014-10-01

    Low temperature plasma in halogenated gases is standard environment for dry etching of semiconductors. Amount of negative ions in HBr plasmas determines electronegativity so modeling etching devices requires data for anion transport properties. In this work we present cross section set for Br- ions in HBr assembled by using Denpoh-Nanbu theory. The threshold energy values were calculated by known heats of formation. The calculated total cross section accounts for ion-induced-dipole and ion-permanent-dipole interaction by using the local-dipole model. The total cross section was corrected to fit the reduced mobility obtained by SACM (Statistical Adiabatic Channel Model) approximation. Existing cross section measurements were used to scale calculated cross sections. Finally, we used Monte Carlo method to determine transport parameters for Br- as a function of reduced electric fields that can be used in fluid and hybrid plasma models.

  17. The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Spädtke, Peter

    2014-02-15

    Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation.

  18. Realistic modeling of chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Grote, D.P.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.

    2003-05-01

    Transport of intense heavy-ion beams to an inertial-fusion target after final focus is simulated here using a realistic computer model. It is found that passing the beam through a rarefied plasma layer before it enters the fusion chamber can largely neutralize the beam space charge and lead to a usable focal spot for a range of ion species and input conditions.

  19. Transepithelial ion transport across duct cells of the salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Ohana, E

    2015-10-01

    Fluid and electrolyte secretions are vital for all epithelia and when aberrant lead to numerous pathophysiological conditions. Electrolyte transport across epithelia generates the osmotic force for fluid movement and is mediated by several membrane proteins expressed on both apical and basolateral poles of epithelial cells. Sodium and chloride are crucial for regulation of fluid secretion, thus regulating salivary volume. Bicarbonate (HCO3-), on the other hand, is the major pH buffer; hence, aberrant HCO3- secretion is a major factor in diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF) causing altered mucin hydration and solubilization. Here, the structure-function mechanisms of the major membrane transporters involved in salivary duct electrolyte transport are reviewed focusing on transepithelial movement of Cl(-) and HCO3-.

  20. Enhancing effect of borneol and muscone on geniposide transport across the human nasal epithelial cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenzhen; Gong, Xin; Lu, Yang; Du, Shouying; Yang, Zhihui; Bai, Jie; Li, Pengyue; Wu, Huichao

    2014-01-01

    Geniposide is widely used in the treatment of cerebral ischemic stroke and cerebrovascular diseases for its anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects. Recent studies demonstrated that geniposide could be absorbed promptly and thoroughly by intranasal administration in mice and basically transported into the brain. Here, we explored its transport mechanism and the effect of borneol and muscone on its transport by human nasal epithelial cell (HNEC) monolayer. The cytotoxicity of geniposide, borneol, muscone and their combinations on HNECs was evaluated by the MTT assay. Transcellular transport of geniposide and the influence of borneol and muscone were studied using the HNEC monolayer. Immunostaining and transepithelial electrical resistance were measured to assess the integrity of the monolayer. The membrane fluidity of HNEC was evaluated by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Geniposide showed relatively poor absorption in the HNEC monolayer and it was not a P-gp substrate. Geniposide transport in both directions significantly increased when co-administrated with increasing concentrations of borneol and muscone. The enhancing effect of borneol and muscone on geniposide transport across the HNEC may be attributed to the significant enhancement on cell membrane fluidity, disassembly effect on tight junction integrity and the process was reversible. These results indicated that intranasal administration has good potential to treat cerebrovascular diseases.

  1. Enhancing Effect of Borneol and Muscone on Geniposide Transport across the Human Nasal Epithelial Cell Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenzhen; Gong, Xin; Lu, Yang; Du, Shouying; Yang, Zhihui; Bai, Jie; Li, Pengyue; Wu, Huichao

    2014-01-01

    Geniposide is widely used in the treatment of cerebral ischemic stroke and cerebrovascular diseases for its anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects. Recent studies demonstrated that geniposide could be absorbed promptly and thoroughly by intranasal administration in mice and basically transported into the brain. Here, we explored its transport mechanism and the effect of borneol and muscone on its transport by human nasal epithelial cell (HNEC) monolayer. The cytotoxicity of geniposide, borneol, muscone and their combinations on HNECs was evaluated by the MTT assay. Transcellular transport of geniposide and the influence of borneol and muscone were studied using the HNEC monolayer. Immunostaining and transepithelial electrical resistance were measured to assess the integrity of the monolayer. The membrane fluidity of HNEC was evaluated by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Geniposide showed relatively poor absorption in the HNEC monolayer and it was not a P-gp substrate. Geniposide transport in both directions significantly increased when co-administrated with increasing concentrations of borneol and muscone. The enhancing effect of borneol and muscone on geniposide transport across the HNEC may be attributed to the significant enhancement on cell membrane fluidity, disassembly effect on tight junction integrity and the process was reversible. These results indicated that intranasal administration has good potential to treat cerebrovascular diseases. PMID:24992195

  2. Alkali ion transport of primycin modified erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Blaskó, K; Györgyi, S

    1981-01-01

    The effects of the antibiotic primycin on alkali cation transport of human erythrocytes were investigated. Primycin selectively increases the permeability of erythrocytes to alkali-cations according to the sequence: Cs+ greater than Rb+ approximately K+ greater than Na+. The time course of the cation effluxes depends on the antibiotic concentration and can be altered by negatively charged SDS. Some evidence is given for the mechanism of primycin-membrane interaction.

  3. Constraints on Transportable Ion Beam Power.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-12

    17. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of the abstract ent*,od in Block 20, It dlffo-ent from Report) 10. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES *Present address: JAYCOR, Inc., 205...loss Transport System studyStability, \\ 20. ABSTRACT (Continue or reverse side If neceesry and Identify by block number) . A ’Constraints on...be replaced by a much more complicated expressione because of the more complex chemistry and radiation processes in higher atomic number gases. The

  4. Salvinorin A inhibits colonic transit and neurogenic ion transport in mice by activating kappa-opioid and cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Fichna, J; Schicho, R; Andrews, C N; Bashashati, M; Klompus, M; McKay, D M; Sharkey, K A; Zjawiony, J K; Janecka, A; Storr, M A

    2009-12-01

    The major active ingredient of the plant Salvia divinorum, salvinorin A (SA) has been used to treat gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. As the action of SA on the regulation of colonic function is unknown, our aim was to examine the effects of SA on mouse colonic motility and secretion in vitro and in vivo. The effects of SA on GI motility were studied using isolated preparations of colon, which were compared with preparations from stomach and ileum. Colonic epithelial ion transport was evaluated using Ussing chambers. Additionally, we studied GI motility in vivo by measuring colonic propulsion, gastric emptying, and upper GI transit. Salvinorin A inhibited contractions of the mouse colon, stomach, and ileum in vitro, prolonged colonic propulsion and slowed upper GI transit in vivo. Salvinorin A had no effect on gastric emptying in vivo. Salvinorin A reduced veratridine-, but not forskolin-induced epithelial ion transport. The effects of SA on colonic motility in vitro were mediated by kappa-opioid receptors (KORs) and cannabinoid (CB) receptors, as they were inhibited by the antagonists nor-binaltorphimine (KOR), AM 251 (CB(1) receptor) and AM 630 (CB(2) receptor). However, in the colon in vivo, the effects were largely mediated by KORs. The effects of SA on veratridine-mediated epithelial ion transport were inhibited by nor-binaltorphimine and AM 630. Salvinorin A slows colonic motility in vitro and in vivo and influences neurogenic ion transport. Due to its specific regional action, SA or its derivatives may be useful drugs in the treatment of lower GI disorders associated with increased GI transit and diarrhoea.

  5. The biology of zinc transport in mammary epithelial cells: implications for mammary gland development, lactation, and involution.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Nicholas H; Hennigar, Stephen R; Kiselyov, Kirill; Kelleher, Shannon L

    2014-03-01

    Zinc plays a critical role in a vast array of cellular functions including gene transcription, protein translation, cell proliferation, differentiation, bioenergetics, and programmed cell death. The mammary gland depends upon tight coordination of these processes during development and reproduction for optimal expansion, differentiation, and involution. For example, zinc is required for activation of matrix metalloproteinases, intracellular signaling cascades such as MAPK and PKC, and the activation of both mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and lysosomal-mediated cell death. In addition to functional needs, during lactation the mammary gland must balance providing optimal zinc for cellular requirements with the need to secrete a substantial amount of zinc into milk to meet the requirements of the developing neonate. Finally, the mammary gland exhibits the most profound example of programmed cell death, which is driven by both apoptotic and lysosomal-mediated cell death. Two families of zinc-specific transporters regulate zinc delivery for these diverse functions. Members of the ZIP family of zinc transporters (ZIP1-14) import zinc into the cytoplasm from outside the cell or from subcellular organelles, while members of the ZnT family (ZnT1-10) export zinc from the cytoplasm. Recently, the ion channel transient receptor potential mucolipin 1 (TRPML1) has also been implicated in zinc transport. Herein, we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms through which mammary epithelial cells utilize zinc with a focus on the transport of zinc into discrete subcellular organelles for specific cellular functions during mammary gland development, lactation, and involution.

  6. Male Sex is Associated with a Reduced Alveolar Epithelial Sodium Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kaltofen, Till; Haase, Melanie; Thome, Ulrich H.; Laube, Mandy

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the most frequent pulmonary complication in preterm infants. RDS incidence differs between genders, which has been called the male disadvantage. Besides maturation of the surfactant system, Na+ transport driven alveolar fluid clearance is crucial for the prevention of RDS. Na+ transport is mediated by the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and the Na,K-ATPase, therefore potential differences in their expression or activity possibly contribute to the gender imbalance observed in RDS. Fetal distal lung epithelial (FDLE) cells of rat fetuses were separated by sex and analyzed regarding expression and activity of the Na+ transporters. Ussing chamber experiments showed a higher baseline short-circuit current (ISC) and amiloride-sensitive ΔISC in FDLE cells of female origin. In addition, maximal amiloride-sensitive ΔISC and maximal ouabain-sensitive ΔISC of female cells were higher when measured in the presence of a permeabilized basolateral or apical membrane, respectively. The number of FDLE cells per fetus recoverable during cell isolation was also significantly higher in females. In addition, lung wet-to-dry weight ratio was lower in fetal and newborn female pups. Female derived FDLE cells had higher mRNA levels of the ENaC- and Na,K-ATPase subunits. Furthermore, estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) mRNA levels were higher in female cells, which might render female cells more responsive, while concentrations of placenta-derived sex steroids do not differ between both genders during fetal life. Inhibition of ER-β abolished the sex differences in Na+ transport and female cells were more responsive to estradiol stimulation. In conclusion, a higher alveolar Na+ transport, possibly attributable to a higher expression of hormone receptors in female FDLE cells, provides an explanation for the well known sex-related difference in RDS occurrence and outcome. PMID:26291531

  7. Nicotine-induced activation of soluble adenylyl cyclase participates in ion transport regulation in mouse tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hollenhorst, Monika I; Lips, Katrin S; Kummer, Wolfgang; Fronius, Martin

    2012-11-27

    Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) have been identified in airway epithelia and their location in the apical and basolateral membrane makes them targets for acetylcholine released from neuronal and non-neuronal sources. One function of nAChR in airway epithelia is their involvement in the regulation of transepithelial ion transport by activation of chloride and potassium channels. However, the mechanisms underlying this nicotine-induced activation of ion transport are not fully elucidated. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of adenylyl cyclases in the nicotine-induced ion current in mouse tracheal epithelium. To evaluate the nicotine-mediated changes of transepithelial ion transport processes electrophysiological Ussing chamber measurements were applied and nicotine-induced ion currents were recorded in the absence and presence of adenylyl cyclase inhibitors. The ion current changes induced by nicotine (100 μM, apical) were not altered in the presence of high doses of atropine (25 μM, apical and basolateral), underlining the involvement of nAChR. Experiments with the transmembrane adenylyl cyclase inhibitor 2'5'-dideoxyadenosine (50 μM, apical and basolateral) and the soluble adenylyl cyclase inhibitor KH7 (10 μM, apical and basolateral) both reduced the nicotine-mediated ion current to a similar extent. Yet, a statistically significant reduction was obtained only in the experiments with KH7. This study indicates that nicotine binding to nAChR in mouse tracheal epithelium activates transepithelial ion transport involving adenylyl cyclase activity. This might be important for novel therapeutic strategies targeting epithelial ion transport mediated by the non-neuronal cholinergic system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mechanism of electrodialytic ion transport through solvent extraction membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Moskvin, L.N.; Shmatko, A.G.; Krasnoperov, V.M.

    1987-02-01

    The authors construct a mathematical model for electrodialysis and solvent extraction via an ion-selective ion exchange membrane and accounts for the electrochemical, ion exchange, and diffusional behavior of the processes including their dependence on component concentration and current and voltage. The model is tested against experimental data for the electrodialytic transport of anionic platinum complexes of chlorides from hydrochloric acid solution through tributylphosphate membranes. The platinum concentration in the aqueous solution was determined by gamma spectroscopy obtained via platinum 191 as a radiotracer.

  9. Electrokinetic ion transport in confined micro-nanochannel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junyao; Liu, Chong; Xu, Zheng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a confined micronanochannel is presented to concentrate ions in a restricted zone. A general model exploiting the Poisson-Nernst-Plank equations coupled with the Navier-Stokes equation is employed to simulate the electrokinetic ion transport. The influences of the micronanochannel dimension and the surface charge density on the potential distribution, the ion concentration, and the fluid flow are investigated. The numerical results show that the potential drop depends mainly on the nanochannel, instead of the confined channel. Both decreasing the width and increasing the length enhance the ion enrichment performance. For a given nanochannel, ultimate value of ion concentration may be determined by the potential at the center point of the nanochannel. The study also shows that the enrichment stability can be improved by increasing the micronanochannel width, decreasing the micronanochannel length and reducing the surface charge density.

  10. Membrane Assembly and Ion Transport Ability of a Fluorinated Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Godbout, Raphaël; Légaré, Sébastien; Auger, Maud; Carpentier, Claudia; Otis, François; Auger, Michèle; Lagüe, Patrick; Voyer, Normand

    2016-01-01

    A novel 21-residue peptide incorporating six fluorinated amino acids was prepared. It was designed to fold into an amphiphilic alpha helical structure of nanoscale length with one hydrophobic face and one fluorinated face. The formation of a fluorous interface serves as the main vector for the formation of a superstructure in a bilayer membrane. Fluorescence assays showed this ion channel's ability to facilitate the translocation of alkali metal ions through a phospholipid membrane, with selectivity for sodium ions. Computational studies showed that a tetramer structure is the most probable and stable supramolecular assembly for the active ion channel structure. The results illustrate the possibility of exploiting multiple Fδ-:M+ interactions for ion transport and using fluorous interfaces to create functional nanostructures. PMID:27835700

  11. Ion transport through macrocapillaries - Oscillations due to charge patch formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, D. D.; Lyle, L. A. M.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2016-09-01

    We present results on ion transport through large bore capillaries (macrocapillaries) that probe both the geometric and ion-guided aspects of this ion delivery mechanism. We have demonstrated that guiding in macrocapillaries exhibits position- and angle-dependent transmission properties which are directly related to the capillary material (either metal or insulator) and geometry. Specifically, we have passed 1 keV Rb+ ions through glass and metal macrocapillaries, and have observed oscillations for the transmitted ion current passing through the insulating capillaries. Straightforward calculations show that these oscillations can be attributed to beam deflections from charge patches that form on the interior walls of the capillary. The absence of these oscillations in the metal capillary data serve as further confirmation of the role of charge patch formation.

  12. Membrane Assembly and Ion Transport Ability of a Fluorinated Nanopore.

    PubMed

    Godbout, Raphaël; Légaré, Sébastien; Auger, Maud; Carpentier, Claudia; Otis, François; Auger, Michèle; Lagüe, Patrick; Voyer, Normand

    2016-01-01

    A novel 21-residue peptide incorporating six fluorinated amino acids was prepared. It was designed to fold into an amphiphilic alpha helical structure of nanoscale length with one hydrophobic face and one fluorinated face. The formation of a fluorous interface serves as the main vector for the formation of a superstructure in a bilayer membrane. Fluorescence assays showed this ion channel's ability to facilitate the translocation of alkali metal ions through a phospholipid membrane, with selectivity for sodium ions. Computational studies showed that a tetramer structure is the most probable and stable supramolecular assembly for the active ion channel structure. The results illustrate the possibility of exploiting multiple Fδ-:M+ interactions for ion transport and using fluorous interfaces to create functional nanostructures.

  13. Origins and Transport of Ions during Magnetospheric Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; El-Alaoui, Mostafa; Peroomian, Vahe; Raeder, Joachim; Walker, Ray J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the origins and the transport of ions observed in the near-Earth plasma sheet during the growth and expansion phases of a magnetospheric substorm that occurred on November 24, 1996. Ions observed at Geotail were traced backward in time in time-dependent magnetic and electric fields to determine their origins and the acceleration mechanisms responsible for their energization. Results from this investigation indicate that, during the growth phase of the substorm, most of the ions reaching Geotail had origins in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) and had alread@, entered the magnetosphere when the growth phase began. Late in the growth phase and in the expansion phase a higher proportion of the ions reaching Geotail had their origin in the plasma mantle. Indeed, during the expansion phase more than 90% of the ions seen by Geotail were from the mantle. The ions were accelerated enroute to the spacecraft; however, most of the ions' energy gain was achieved by non-adiabatic acceleration while crossing the equatorial current sheet just prior to their detection by Geotail. In general, the plasma mantle from both southern and northern hemispheres supplied non-adiabatic ions to Geotail, whereas the LLBL supplied mostly adiabatic ions to the distributions measured by the spacecraft.

  14. Hall transport of divalent metal ion modified DNA lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Lee, Keun Woo; Yoo, Sanghyun; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Bashar, Saima; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Si Joon; Jung, Joohye; Jung, Tae Soo; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2015-06-29

    We investigate the Hall transport characteristics of double-crossover divalent metal ion (Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+})-modified DNA (M-DNA) lattices grown on silica via substrate-assisted growth. The electronic characteristics of the M-DNA lattices are investigated by varying the concentration of the metal ions and then conducting Hall measurements, including resistivity, Hall mobility, carrier concentration, and magneto resistance. The tendency of the resistivity and Hall mobility was to initially decrease as the ion concentration increased, until reaching the saturation concentration (C{sub s}) of each metal ion, and then to increase as the ion concentration increased further. On the other hand, the carrier concentration revealed the opposite tendency as the resistivity and Hall mobility. The specific binding (≤C{sub s}) and the nonspecific aggregates (>C{sub s}) of the ions into the DNA lattices were significantly affected by the Hall characteristics. The numerical ranges of the Hall parameters revealed that the M-DNA lattices with metal ions had semiconductor-like characteristics. Consequently, the distinct characteristics of the electrical transport through M-DNA lattices will provide useful information on the practical use of such structures in physical devices and chemical sensors.

  15. Ion transport in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, Myung E.; Aluru, N. R.

    2014-02-28

    Graphene nanopore is a promising device for single molecule sensing, including DNA bases, as its single atom thickness provides high spatial resolution. To attain high sensitivity, the size of the molecule should be comparable to the pore diameter. However, when the pore diameter approaches the size of the molecule, ion properties and dynamics may deviate from the bulk values and continuum analysis may not be accurate. In this paper, we investigate the static and dynamic properties of ions with and without an external voltage drop in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores using molecular dynamics simulations. Ion concentration in graphene nanopores sharply drops from the bulk concentration when the pore radius is smaller than 0.9 nm. Ion mobility in the pore is also smaller than bulk ion mobility due to the layered liquid structure in the pore-axial direction. Our results show that a continuum analysis can be appropriate when the pore radius is larger than 0.9 nm if pore conductivity is properly defined. Since many applications of graphene nanopores, such as DNA and protein sensing, involve ion transport, the results presented here will be useful not only in understanding the behavior of ion transport but also in designing bio-molecular sensors.

  16. Epithelial K⁺ channels: driving force generation and K⁺ recycling for epithelial transport with physiological and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Markus; Shan, Qi-Xian

    2007-08-25

    K(+) channels form a large family of membrane proteins that are expressed in a polarized fashion in any epithelial cell. Based on the transmembrane gradient for K(+) that is maintained by the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, these channels serve two principal functions for transepithelial transport: generation of membrane voltage and recycling of K(+). In this brief review, we will outline the importance of this ancient principle by examples of epithelial transport in the renal proximal tubule and gastric parietal cells. In both tissues, K(+) channel activity is rate-limiting for transport processes across the epithelial cells and essential for cell volume regulation. Recent experimental data using pharmacological tools and genetically modified animals have confirmed the original physiological concepts and specified the knowledge down to the molecular level. The development of highly active and tissue selective small molecule therapeutics has been impeded by two typical features of K(+) channels: their molecular architecture challenges the design of molecules with high affinity binding and they are expressed in a variety of tissues at the same time. Nevertheless, new insights into pathophysiology, e.g. that K(+) channel inhibition can block gastric acid secretion, render the clinical use of K(+) channel drugs in gastric disease and as kidney transport inhibitors highly attractive.

  17. Ion acceleration and transport mechanisms in the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yeh-Kai

    This thesis examines the role of ion transport and acceleration in the earth's magnetosphere in two important areas: (1) the entry of solar wind ions in the cusp region on the dayside, and (2) the outflow of ions in the form of ion conics from the pre-midnight aurora. On November 15, 1996, the Polar and FAST satellites were in magnetic conjunction in the cusp region near magnetic local noon. The ion data show that the solar wind plasma injections were bursty in time, but were spatially coherent for 5 hours of magnetic local time. Ion sensors on the two satellites measured particle populations of different energies, but a time-of-flight analysis indicated that Polar and FAST were observing the same bursts of plasma injections from the reconnection region. A convection model was used to estimate the size of the plasma bursts observed. A plasma width of 2412 km was mapped out to the magnetopause to obtain a reconnection injection region latitudinal width of 1.4 to 1.5 RE. On the nightside, the FAST satellite has observed large ion outflow fluxes (>108 cm-2 s-1) in the form of auroral ion conics adjacent to the polar cap boundary. A statistical study was performed to quantify the occurrence of the ion conics in magnetic local time, the relation of the ion conics to substorms, and the total contribution of the ion conics to the plasma sheet. The ion conics occur near magnetic midnight and are associated with substorm expansion phase but not exclusively. Furthermore, using Polar UVI images to estimate the width of the ion conics in local time and FAST ion data to determine the outflow fluxes and latitudinal extent, an estimate of 1022 to 1024 ions/sec is calculated for the outflow. When this outflow is assumed to persist over the duration of a 1000 sec substorm, the total contribution of 1025 to 1027 ions is only 0.01% to 0.1% of the plasma sheet ion number 1030 ions. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  18. Ammonia inhibits cAMP-regulated intestinal Cl- transport. Asymmetric effects of apical and basolateral exposure and implications for epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, M; Smith, J A; Resnick, A; Awtrey, C S; Hrnjez, B J; Matthews, J B

    1995-01-01

    The colon, unlike most organs, is normally exposed to high concentrations of ammonia, a weak base which exerts profound and diverse biological effects on mammalian cells. The impact of ammonia on intestinal cell function is largely unknown despite its concentration of 4-70 mM in the colonic lumen. The human intestinal epithelial cell line T84 was used to model electrogenic Cl- secretion, the transport event which hydrates mucosal surfaces and accounts for secretory diarrhea. Transepithelial transport and isotopic flux analysis indicated that physiologically-relevant concentrations of ammonia (as NH4Cl) markedly inhibit cyclic nucleotide-regulated Cl- secretion but not the response to the Ca2+ agonist carbachol. Inhibition by ammonia was 25-fold more potent with basolateral compared to apical exposure. Ion substitution indicated that the effect of NH4Cl was not due to altered cation composition or membrane potential. The site of action of ammonia is distal to cAMP generation and is not due simply to cytoplasmic alkalization. The results support a novel role for ammonia as an inhibitory modulator of intestinal epithelial Cl- secretion. Secretory responsiveness may be dampened in pathological conditions associated with increased mucosal permeability due to enhanced access of lumenal ammonia to the basolateral epithelial compartment. Images PMID:7593599

  19. Electrochemical control of ion transport through a mesoporous carbon membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Surwade, Sumedh P; Chai, Songhai; Choi, Jai-Pil; Wang, Xiqing; Lee, Jeseung; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The transport of fluids through nanometer scale channels typically on the order of 1 -100 nm often exhibit unique properties compared to the bulk fluid. These phenomena occur because the channel dimensions and molecular size become comparable to the range of several important forces including electrostatic and van der Waals forces. Small changes in properties such as the electric double layer or surface charge can significantly affect molecular transport through the channels. Based on these emerging properties, a variety of nanofluidic devices such as nanofluidic transistors, nanofluidic diodes or lab-on-a-chip devices have been developed3-7 with a diverse range of applications including water purification, biomolecular sensing, DNA separation, and rectified ion transport. Nanofluidic devices are typically fabricated using expensive lithography techniques or sacrificial templates. Here we report a carbon-based, three-dimensional nanofluidic transport membrane that enables gated, or on/off, control of the transport of organic molecular species and metal ions using an applied electrical potential. In the absence of an applied potential, both cationic and anionic molecules freely diffuse across the membrane via a concentration gradient. However, when an electrochemical potential is applied, the transport of ions through the membrane is inhibited.

  20. Chloride ion transport and overexpression of TMEM16A in a guinea-pig asthma model.

    PubMed

    Kondo, M; Tsuji, M; Hara, K; Arimura, K; Yagi, O; Tagaya, E; Takeyama, K; Tamaoki, J

    2017-06-01

    TMEM16A, a Ca-activated Cl channel, regulates various physiological functions such as mucin secretion. However, the role of TMEM16A in hyper-secretion in asthma is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to evaluate Cl ion transport via TMEM16A and determine the localization of TMEM16A in a guinea-pig asthma model. Guinea-pigs were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) i.p. on Days 1 and 8. On Day 22, we assessed OVA challenge-induced Cl ion transport in the sensitized tracheas ex vivo in an Ussing chamber, compared with the non-sensitized tracheas. We then examined the effect of T16Ainh-A01, a TMEM16A inhibitor, on the increase in Cl ion transport. The tracheal epithelium was immunostained with an anti-TMEM16A antibody. Epithelial cells from guinea-pig tracheas were cultured at the air-liquid interface in the presence of IL-13 for in vitro study. We studied the effect of TMEM16A inhibitors on Ca-dependent agonist, uridine triphosphate (UTP)-induced increases in Cl ion transport in the cultured cells. The cells were immunostained with an anti-TMEM16A antibody, an anti-MUC5AC antibody and an anti-α-tubulin antibody. OVA challenge induced an increase in short circuit current within 1 min in the OVA-sensitized tracheas but not in the non-sensitized tracheas, which was inhibited by pretreatment of T16Ainh-A01. Sensitized tracheas showed goblet cell metaplasia with more positive TMEM16A immunostaining, particularly in the apical portion compared with the non-sensitized tracheas. The in vitro UTP-induced increase in Cl ion transport was strongly inhibited by pretreatment with T16Ainh-A01, benzbromarone, and niflumic acid. TMEM16A was positively immunostained at the apical portion and in the MUC5AC-positive area in IL-13-induced goblet cell metaplasia. Antigen challenge and Ca-dependent agonist treatment increased Cl ion transport via the overexpression of TMEM16A in goblet cell metaplasia in a guinea-pig asthma model. TMEM16A inhibitors may be useful for the treatment

  1. Sugar-activated ion transport in canine lingual epithelium. Implications for sugar taste transduction

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    There is good evidence indicating that ion-transport pathways in the apical regions of lingual epithelial cells, including taste bud cells, may play a role in salt taste reception. In this article, we present evidence that, in the case of the dog, there also exists a sugar- activated ion-transport pathway that is linked to sugar taste transduction. Evidence was drawn from two parallel lines of experiments: (a) ion-transport studies on the isolated canine lingual epithelium, and (b) recordings from the canine chorda tympani. The results in vitro showed that both mono- and disaccharides in the mucosal bath stimulate a dose-dependent increase in the short-circuit current over the concentration range coincident with mammalian sugar taste responses. Transepithelial current evoked by glucose, fructose, or sucrose in either 30 mM NaCl or in Krebs-Henseleit buffer (K-H) was partially blocked by amiloride. Among current carriers activated by saccharides, the current response was greater with Na than with K. Ion flux measurements in K-H during stimulation with 3-O-methylglucose showed that the sugar-evoked current was due to an increase in the Na influx. Ouabain or amiloride reduced the sugar-evoked Na influx without effect on sugar transport as measured with tritiated 3-O-methylglucose. Amiloride inhibited the canine chorda tympani response to 0.5 M NaCl by 70-80% and the response to 0.5 M KCl by approximately 40%. This agreed with the percent inhibition by amiloride of the short-circuit current supported in vitro by NaCl and KCl. Amiloride also partially inhibited the chorda tympani responses to sucrose and to fructose. The results indicate that in the dog: (a) the ion transporter subserving Na taste also subserves part of the response to K, and (b) a sugar-activated, Na- preferring ion-transport system is one mechanism mediating sugar taste transduction. Results in the literature indicate a similar sweet taste mechanism for humans. PMID:3171536

  2. Roles of ion transport in control of cell motility.

    PubMed

    Stock, Christian; Ludwig, Florian T; Hanley, Peter J; Schwab, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    Cell motility is an essential feature of life. It is essential for reproduction, propagation, embryonic development, and healing processes such as wound closure and a successful immune defense. If out of control, cell motility can become life-threatening as, for example, in metastasis or autoimmune diseases. Regardless of whether ciliary/flagellar or amoeboid movement, controlled motility always requires a concerted action of ion channels and transporters, cytoskeletal elements, and signaling cascades. Ion transport across the plasma membrane contributes to cell motility by affecting the membrane potential and voltage-sensitive ion channels, by inducing local volume changes with the help of aquaporins and by modulating cytosolic Ca(2+) and H(+) concentrations. Voltage-sensitive ion channels serve as voltage detectors in electric fields thus enabling galvanotaxis; local swelling facilitates the outgrowth of protrusions at the leading edge while local shrinkage accompanies the retraction of the cell rear; the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration exerts its main effect on cytoskeletal dynamics via motor proteins such as myosin or dynein; and both, the intracellular and the extracellular H(+) concentration modulate cell migration and adhesion by tuning the activity of enzymes and signaling molecules in the cytosol as well as the activation state of adhesion molecules at the cell surface. In addition to the actual process of ion transport, both, channels and transporters contribute to cell migration by being part of focal adhesion complexes and/or physically interacting with components of the cytoskeleton. The present article provides an overview of how the numerous ion-transport mechanisms contribute to the various modes of cell motility.

  3. Ion transport through block copolymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, Scott; Panday, Ashoutosh; Balsara, Nitash

    2009-03-01

    Poly(styrene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (SEO) is a candidate material for electrolytes for rechargeable lithium metal batteries. The PS phase suppresses lithium dendrite growth on the anode during recharge, and the PEO phase solvates lithium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (LiTFSI) salt to form conducting pathways. Complete electrochemical characterization of PEO/LiTFSI mixtures requires measurement of conductivity, salt diffusion coefficient, and lithium ion transference number. The present study covers SEO copolymers that exhibit lamellar and cylindrical morphologies in the absence of salt. The addition of salt affects morphology but the relationships between morphology and electrochemical characteristics have not yet been clarified. Some aspects of these relationships will be presented.

  4. Regulation of Intestinal Glucose Absorption by Ion Channels and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lihong; Tuo, Biguang; Dong, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The absorption of glucose is electrogenic in the small intestinal epithelium. The major route for the transport of dietary glucose from intestinal lumen into enterocytes is the Na+/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1), although glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT2) may also play a role. The membrane potential of small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is important to regulate the activity of SGLT1. The maintenance of membrane potential mainly depends on the activities of cation channels and transporters. While the importance of SGLT1 in glucose absorption has been systemically studied in detail, little is currently known about the regulation of SGLT1 activity by cation channels and transporters. A growing line of evidence suggests that cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) can regulate the absorption of glucose by adjusting GLUT2 and SGLT1. Moreover, the absorption of glucose and homeostasis of Ca2+ in IEC are regulated by cation channels and transporters, such as Ca2+ channels, K+ channels, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers, and Na+/H+ exchangers. In this review, we consider the involvement of these cation channels and transporters in the regulation of glucose uptake in the small intestine. Modulation of them may be a potential strategy for the management of obesity and diabetes. PMID:26784222

  5. Description of glucose transport in isolated bovine mammary epithelial cells by a three-compartment model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Changting; Quinton, V Margaret; Cant, John P

    2004-04-01

    Initial rates of glucose entry into isolated bovine mammary epithelial cells display moderate degrees of asymmetry and cooperative interactions between export and import sites. The present study examined the hypothesis that these kinetic features are due to compartmentalization of intracellular glucose. Net uptake of 3-O-methyl-d-[1-(3)H]glucose (3-OMG) by isolated bovine mammary epithelial cells was measured at 37 degrees C. The time course of 3-OMG net uptake was better fitted by a double-exponential equation than by a single- or triple-exponential equation. Compartmental analysis of the time course curve suggested that translocated 3-OMG is distributed into two compartments with fractional volumes of 32.6 +/- 5.7% and 67.4 +/- 5.7%, respectively. The results support the view that glucose transport in bovine mammary epithelial cells is a multistep process consisting of two serial steps: fast, carrier-mediated, symmetric translocation of sugar across the cell plasma membrane into a small compartment and subsequent slow exchange of posttranslocated sugar between two intracellular compartments. A three-compartment model of this system successfully simulated the observed time course of 3-OMG net uptake and the observed dependence of unidirectional entry rates on intra- and extracellular 3-OMG concentrations. Simulations indicated that backflux of radiolabeled sugar from the small compartment to extracellular space during 15 s of incubation gives rise to the apparent asymmetry, trans-stimulation, and cooperativity of mammary glucose transport kinetics. The fixed-site carrier model overestimated the rate of glucose accumulation in cells, and its features can be accounted for by the compartmentalization of intracellular sugar.

  6. Hormonal modulation of Na+ transport in rat fetal distal lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramminger, S J; Inglis, S K; Olver, R E; Wilson, S M

    2002-01-01

    Isolated rat fetal distal lung epithelial (FDLE) cells were cultured (≈48 h) on permeable supports in medium devoid of hormones and growth factors whilst PO2 was maintained at the level found in either the fetal (23 mmHg) or the postnatal (100 mmHg) alveolar regions. The cells became incorporated into epithelial layers that generated a basal short-circuit current (ISC) attributable to spontaneous Na+ absorption. Cells at neonatal PO2 generated larger currents than did cells at fetal PO2, indicating that this Na+ transport process is oxygen sensitive. Irrespective of PO2, isoprenaline failed to elicit a discernible change in ISC, demonstrating that β-adrenoceptor agonists do not stimulate Na+ transport under these conditions. However, isoprenaline did elicit cAMP accumulation in these cells, indicating that functionally coupled β-adrenoceptors are present. Further experiments showed that isoprenaline did increase ISC in cells treated (24 h) with a combination of tri-iodothyronine (T3, 10 nm) and dexamethasone (200 nm). Studies of basolaterally permeabilised cells showed that these hormones are essential for the isoprenaline-evoked increase in the apical membrane's Na+ conductance (GNa), whereas isoprenaline-evoked changes in apical Cl− conductance (GCl) can occur in both control and hormone-treated cells. Irrespective of their hormonal status, FDLE cells thus express β-adrenoceptors that are functionally coupled to adenylate cyclase, and allow β-adrenoceptor agonists to modulate the apical membrane's anion conductance. However, T3 and dexamethasone are needed if these receptors are to exert control over GNa. These hormones may thus play an important role in the functional maturation of the lung by allowing β-adrenoceptor-mediated control over epithelial Na+ channels in the apical plasma membrane. PMID:12381827

  7. Transport of 3-fluoro-L-α-methyl-tyrosine (FAMT) by organic ion transporters explains renal background in [(18)F]FAMT positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ling; Tominaga, Hideyuki; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Hagiwara, Kohei; Okuda, Suguru; Kaira, Kyoichi; Kato, Yukio; Oriuchi, Noboru; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2016-02-01

    A PET tracer for tumor imaging, 3-(18)F-l-α-methyl-tyrosine ([(18)F]FAMT), has advantages of high cancer-specificity and low physiological background. In clinical studies, FAMT-PET has been proved useful for the detection of malignant tumors and their differentiation from inflammation and benign lesions. The tumor specific uptake of FAMT is due to its high-selectivity to cancer-type amino acid transporter LAT1 among amino acid transporters. In [(18)F]FAMT PET, kidney is the only organ that shows high physiological background. To reveal transporters involved in renal accumulation of FAMT, we have examined [(14)C]FAMT uptake on the organic ion transporters responsible for the uptake into tubular epithelial cells. We have found that OAT1, OAT10 and OCTN2 transport [(14)C]FAMT. The [(14)C]FAMT uptake was inhibited by probenecid, furosemide and ethacrynic acid, consistent with the properties of the transporters. The amino acid uptake inhibitor, 2-amino-2-norbornanecarboxylic acid (BCH), also inhibited the [(14)C]FAMT uptake, whereas OCTN2-mediated [(14)C]FAMT uptake was Na(+)-dependent. We propose that FAMT uptake by OAT1, OAT10 and OCTN2 into tubular epithelial cells could contribute to the renal accumulation of FAMT. The results from this study would provide clues to the treatments to reduce renal background and enhance tumor uptake as well as to designing PET tracers with less renal accumulation.

  8. Planar microdevices enhance transport of large molecular weight molecules across retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wade, Jennifer S; Desai, Tejal A

    2014-08-01

    Large molecular weight drug delivery to the posterior eye is challenging due to cellular barriers that hinder drug transport. Understanding how to enhance transport across the retinal barrier is important for the design of new drug delivery systems. A novel mechanism to enhance drug transport is the use of geometric properties, which has not been extensively explored in the retina. Planar SU-8/Poly(ethyleneglycol)dimethacrylate microdevices were constructed using photolithography to deliver FITC dextran across an in vitro retinal model. The model consists of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown to confluence on transwell inserts, which provides an environment to investigate the influence of geometry on paracellular and transcellular delivery of encapsulated large molecules. Planar microdevices enhanced transport of large molecular weight dextrans across different models of RPE in a size dependent fashion. Increased drug permeation across the RPE was observed with the addition of microdevices as compared to a traditional bolus of FITC dextran. This phenomena was initiated by a non-toxic interaction between the microdevices and the retinal tight junction proteins. Suggesting that increased drug transport occurs via a paracellular pathway. These experiments provide evidence to support the future use of planar unidirectional microdevices for delivery of biologics in ocular applications.

  9. Planar Microdevices Enhance Transport of Large Molecular Weight Molecules Across Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Jennifer S.; Desai, Tejal A.

    2014-01-01

    Large molecular weight drug delivery to the posterior eye is challenging due to cellular barriers that hinder drug transport. Understanding how to enhance transport across the retinal barrier is important for the design of new drug delivery systems. A novel mechanism to enhance drug transport is the use of geometric properties, which has not been extensively explored in the retina. Planar SU-8/ Poly(ethyleneglycol)dimethacrylate microdevices were constructed using photolithography to deliver FITC dextran across an in vitro retinal model. The model consists of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown to confluence on transwell inserts, which provides an environment to investigate the influence of geometry on paracellular and transcellular delivery of encapsulated large molecules. Planar microdevices enhanced transport of large molecular weight dextrans across different models of RPE in a size dependent fashion. Increased drug permeation across the RPE was observed with the addition of microdevices as compared to a traditional bolus of FITC dextran. This phenomena was initiated by a non-toxic interaction between the microdevices and the retinal tight junction proteins. Suggesting that increased drug transport occurs via a paracellular pathway. These experiments provide evidence to support the future use of planar unidirectional microdevices for delivery of biologics in ocular applications. PMID:24789225

  10. Human proximal tubule epithelial cells cultured on hollow fibers: living membranes that actively transport organic cations.

    PubMed

    Jansen, J; De Napoli, I E; Fedecostante, M; Schophuizen, C M S; Chevtchik, N V; Wilmer, M J; van Asbeck, A H; Croes, H J; Pertijs, J C; Wetzels, J F M; Hilbrands, L B; van den Heuvel, L P; Hoenderop, J G; Stamatialis, D; Masereeuw, R

    2015-11-16

    The bioartificial kidney (BAK) aims at improving dialysis by developing 'living membranes' for cells-aided removal of uremic metabolites. Here, unique human conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cell (ciPTEC) monolayers were cultured on biofunctionalized MicroPES (polyethersulfone) hollow fiber membranes (HFM) and functionally tested using microfluidics. Tight monolayer formation was demonstrated by abundant zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) protein expression along the tight junctions of matured ciPTEC on HFM. A clear barrier function of the monolayer was confirmed by limited diffusion of FITC-inulin. The activity of the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) in ciPTEC was evaluated in real-time using a perfusion system by confocal microscopy using 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)) as a fluorescent substrate. Initial ASP(+) uptake was inhibited by a cationic uremic metabolites mixture and by the histamine H2-receptor antagonist, cimetidine. In conclusion, a 'living membrane' of renal epithelial cells on MicroPES HFM with demonstrated active organic cation transport was successfully established as a first step in BAK engineering.

  11. Vesicular nucleotide transporter regulates the nucleotide content in airway epithelial mucin granules

    PubMed Central

    Sesma, Juliana I.; Kreda, Silvia M.; Okada, Seiko F.; van Heusden, Catharina; Moussa, Lama; Jones, Lisa C.; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Togawa, Natsuko; Hiasa, Miki; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotides within the airway surface liquid promote fluid secretion via activation of airway epithelial purinergic receptors. ATP is stored within and released from mucin granules as co-cargo with mucins, but the mechanism by which ATP, and potentially other nucleotides, enter the lumen of mucin granules is not known. We assessed the contribution of the recently identified SLC17A9 vesicle nucleotide transporter (VNUT) to the nucleotide availability within isolated mucin granules and further examined the involvement of VNUT in mucin granule secretion-associated nucleotide release. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses indicated that VNUT is abundantly expressed in airway epithelial goblet-like Calu-3 cells, migrating as a duplex with apparent mobility of 55 and 60 kDa. Subcellular fractionation studies indicated that VNUT55 was associated with high-density mucin granules, whereas VNUT60 was associated with low-density organelles. Immunofluorescence studies showed that recombinant VNUT localized to mucin granules and other organelles. Mucin granules isolated from VNUT short hairpin RNA-expressing cells exhibited a marked reduction of ATP, ADP, AMP, and UTP levels within granules. Ca2+-regulated vesicular ATP release was markedly reduced in these cells, but mucin secretion was not affected. These results suggest that VNUT is the relevant nucleotide transporter responsible for the uptake of cytosolic nucleotides into mucin granules. By controlling the entry of nucleotides into mucin granules, VNUT contributes to the release of purinergic signaling molecules necessary for the proper hydration of co-released mucins. PMID:23467297

  12. Vesicular nucleotide transporter regulates the nucleotide content in airway epithelial mucin granules.

    PubMed

    Sesma, Juliana I; Kreda, Silvia M; Okada, Seiko F; van Heusden, Catharina; Moussa, Lama; Jones, Lisa C; O'Neal, Wanda K; Togawa, Natsuko; Hiasa, Miki; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Lazarowski, Eduardo R

    2013-05-15

    Nucleotides within the airway surface liquid promote fluid secretion via activation of airway epithelial purinergic receptors. ATP is stored within and released from mucin granules as co-cargo with mucins, but the mechanism by which ATP, and potentially other nucleotides, enter the lumen of mucin granules is not known. We assessed the contribution of the recently identified SLC17A9 vesicle nucleotide transporter (VNUT) to the nucleotide availability within isolated mucin granules and further examined the involvement of VNUT in mucin granule secretion-associated nucleotide release. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses indicated that VNUT is abundantly expressed in airway epithelial goblet-like Calu-3 cells, migrating as a duplex with apparent mobility of 55 and 60 kDa. Subcellular fractionation studies indicated that VNUT55 was associated with high-density mucin granules, whereas VNUT60 was associated with low-density organelles. Immunofluorescence studies showed that recombinant VNUT localized to mucin granules and other organelles. Mucin granules isolated from VNUT short hairpin RNA-expressing cells exhibited a marked reduction of ATP, ADP, AMP, and UTP levels within granules. Ca(2+)-regulated vesicular ATP release was markedly reduced in these cells, but mucin secretion was not affected. These results suggest that VNUT is the relevant nucleotide transporter responsible for the uptake of cytosolic nucleotides into mucin granules. By controlling the entry of nucleotides into mucin granules, VNUT contributes to the release of purinergic signaling molecules necessary for the proper hydration of co-released mucins.

  13. Human proximal tubule epithelial cells cultured on hollow fibers: living membranes that actively transport organic cations

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, J.; De Napoli, I. E; Fedecostante, M.; Schophuizen, C. M. S.; Chevtchik, N. V.; Wilmer, M. J.; van Asbeck, A. H.; Croes, H. J.; Pertijs, J. C.; Wetzels, J. F. M.; Hilbrands, L. B.; van den Heuvel, L. P.; Hoenderop, J. G.; Stamatialis, D.; Masereeuw, R.

    2015-01-01

    The bioartificial kidney (BAK) aims at improving dialysis by developing ‘living membranes’ for cells-aided removal of uremic metabolites. Here, unique human conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cell (ciPTEC) monolayers were cultured on biofunctionalized MicroPES (polyethersulfone) hollow fiber membranes (HFM) and functionally tested using microfluidics. Tight monolayer formation was demonstrated by abundant zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) protein expression along the tight junctions of matured ciPTEC on HFM. A clear barrier function of the monolayer was confirmed by limited diffusion of FITC-inulin. The activity of the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) in ciPTEC was evaluated in real-time using a perfusion system by confocal microscopy using 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP+) as a fluorescent substrate. Initial ASP+ uptake was inhibited by a cationic uremic metabolites mixture and by the histamine H2-receptor antagonist, cimetidine. In conclusion, a ‘living membrane’ of renal epithelial cells on MicroPES HFM with demonstrated active organic cation transport was successfully established as a first step in BAK engineering. PMID:26567716

  14. Role of epithelial HCO3− transport in mucin secretion: lessons from cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The invitation to present the 2010 Hans Ussing lecture for the Epithelial Transport Group of the American Physiological Society offered me a unique, special, and very surprising opportunity to join in saluting a man whom I met only once, but whose work was the basis, not only for my career, but also for finding the molecular defect in the inherited disease cystic fibrosis (CF). In this context, I will venture to make the tribute with a new explanation of why a mutation in a single gene that codes for an anion channel can cause devastation of multiple epithelial systems with pathogenic mucus. In so doing, I hope to raise awareness of a new role for that peculiar anion around which so much physiology revolves, HCO3−. I begin by introducing CF pathology as I question the name of the disease as well as the prevalent view of the basis of its pathology by considering: 1) mucus, 2) salt, and 3) HCO3−. I then present recent data showing that HCO3− is required for normal mucus discharge, and I will close with conjecture as to how HCO3− may support mucus discharge and why the failure to transport this electrolyte is pathogenic in CF. PMID:20926781

  15. Numerical analysis of H(-) ion transport processes in Cs-seeded negative ion sources.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, D; Takado, N; Hatayama, A; Inoue, T

    2008-02-01

    The H(-) ion transport processes are numerically simulated to understand the extraction process of surface-produced H(-) ions. The three-dimensional transport code using Monte Carlo method has been applied to calculate the H(-) ion extraction probabilities in the model geometry of the JAEA 10 ampere negative ion source. The roles of (1) filter magnetic field and (2) collisions with neutrals (H(0) atoms and H(2) molecules) on the H(-) ion extraction are systematically studied. The results show that H(-) ions are extracted mainly by the filter magnetic field under the low gas pressure condition. The simulation results of extracted H(-) ion beam intensity in the JAEA 10 ampere negative ion source without the magnetic filter tend to be smaller than the experimental results, especially under the low pressure condition. Further model improvements, e.g., modeling and implementation of the effects of the electric field near the extraction aperture, will be required to understand the extraction process of the H(-) ions under the low gas pressure condition.

  16. Regulation of airway surface liquid volume and mucus transport by active ion transport.

    PubMed

    Tarran, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Mucus clearance is an important component of the lung's innate defense against disease, and the ability of the airways to clear mucus is strongly dependent on the volume of liquid on airway surfaces. Whether airway surface liquid (ASL) volume is maintained by passive surface forces or by active ion transport is controversial yet crucial to the understanding of how this system operates in both health and disease. In support of active ion transport being the major determinant of ASL volume, we have demonstrated that normal airway epithelia sense and autoregulate ASL height (volume) by adjusting the rates of Na+ absorption and Cl- secretion to maintain mucus transport.

  17. Alpha characterization inside pipes using ion-transport technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, S. P.; Rawool-Sullivan, M. W.; Williams, K. G.; Vaccarella, J. A.

    Many DOE facilities have several miles of waste pipe systems that are internally contaminated with various and often undetermined radio nuclides. Unfortunately, currently acceptable alpha detection technologies are inefficient, time consuming, and do not address the problems presented by small diameter or curved pipes. In general, the problem of detecting alpha contamination on the inside surface of pipes is complicated by the fact that alphas do not penetrate the pipe walls. Unlike their conventional counterparts, alpha detectors based on ion transport technology sense alpha particles by collecting the ions created in ambient air as the particle loses its kinetic energy. The ions inside the pipe are transported by a fan-generated air current to an electrode inside the detector, which is attached to one end of the pipe. The collected charge at the electrode is proportional to the number of ions created inside the pipe, which in turn is proportional to the number of alphas emitted. Typically, monitoring for alpha contamination inside pipes or ductwork involves disrupting the operation to access as much surface area as possible for standard alpha monitoring. The detector based on ion transport technology effectively minimizes such disruption and in many circumstances will allow for in situ monitoring of a system that might otherwise not be practically accessible to standard methods.

  18. Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Richard Paul [Allentown, PA; Makitka, III, Alexander; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA

    2012-04-03

    An oxygen ion transport membrane process wherein a heated oxygen-containing gas having one or more contaminants is contacted with a reactive solid material to remove the one or more contaminants. The reactive solid material is provided as a deposit on a support. The one or more contaminant compounds in the heated oxygen-containing gas react with the reactive solid material. The contaminant-depleted oxygen-containing gas is contacted with a membrane, and oxygen is transported through the membrane to provide transported oxygen.

  19. Ion transport barriers triggered by plasma polarization in gyrokinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugarek, A.; Sarazin, Y.; Zarzoso, D.; Abiteboul, J.; Brun, A. S.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Passeron, C.; Thomine, O.

    2013-07-01

    The creation of ion transport barriers by externally induced sheared E × B flows is investigated with the global, full-f and flux-driven gyrokinetic code GYSELA. A gyrokinetic source of vorticity is designed and proves to be efficient in polarizing the plasma. Induced sheared electric fields develop in the turbulent core and are accompanied by the creation of a transport barrier. The barrier and the sheared flow relax quasi-periodically because of zonal flow activity and a destabilizing temperature anisotropy induced by the vorticity source. A new cyclic mechanism leading to the relaxation of transport barriers in tokamaks is discovered.

  20. Protease-activated receptor-2 stimulates intestinal epithelial chloride transport through activation of PLC and selective PKC isoforms.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Jacques Q; Moreau, France; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2009-06-01

    Serine proteases play important physiological roles through their activity at G protein-coupled protease-activated receptors (PARs). We examined the roles that specific phospholipase (PL) C and protein kinase (PK) C (PKC) isoforms play in the regulation of PAR(2)-stimulated chloride secretion in intestinal epithelial cells. Confluent SCBN epithelial monolayers were grown on Snapwell supports and mounted in modified Ussing chambers. Short-circuit current (I(sc)) responses to basolateral application of the selective PAR(2) activating peptide, SLIGRL-NH(2), were monitored as a measure of net electrogenic ion transport caused by PAR(2) activation. SLIGRL-NH(2) induced a transient I(sc) response that was significantly reduced by inhibitors of PLC (U73122), phosphoinositol-PLC (ET-18), phosphatidylcholine-PLC (D609), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K; LY294002). Immunoblot analysis revealed the phosphorylation of both PLCbeta and PLCgamma following PAR(2) activation. Pretreatment of the cells with inhibitors of PKC (GF 109203X), PKCalpha/betaI (Gö6976), and PKCdelta (rottlerin), but not PKCzeta (selective pseudosubstrate inhibitor), also attenuated this response. Cellular fractionation and immunoblot analysis, as well as confocal immunocytochemistry, revealed increases of PKCbetaI, PKCdelta, and PKCepsilon, but not PKCalpha or PKCzeta, in membrane fractions following PAR(2) activation. Pretreatment of the cells with U73122, ET-18, or D609 inhibited PKC activation. Inhibition of PI3K activity only prevented PKCdelta translocation. Immunoblots revealed that PAR(2) activation induced phosphorylation of both cRaf and ERK1/2 via PKCdelta. Inhibition of PKCbetaI and PI3K had only a partial effect on this response. We conclude that basolateral PAR(2)-induced chloride secretion involves activation of PKCbetaI and PKCdelta via a PLC-dependent mechanism resulting in the stimulation of cRaf and ERK1/2 signaling.

  1. Facilitated Ion Transport in Smectic Ordered Ionic Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hong; Han, Kee Sung; Lee, Je Seung; Lee, Albert S; Park, Seo Kyung; Hong, Sung Yun; Lee, Jong-Chan; Mueller, Karl T; Hong, Soon Man; Koo, Chong Min

    2016-11-01

    A novel ionic mixture of an imidazolium-based room-temperature ionic liquid containing ethylene-oxide-functionalized phosphite anions is fabricated, which, when doped with lithium salt, self-assembles into a smectic-ordered ionic liquid crystal through Coulombic interactions between the ion species. Interestingly, the smectic order in the ionic-liquid-crystal ionogel facilitates ionic transport.

  2. Magnetic and Transport Properties of Mn-ion implanted Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preisler, V.; Ogawa, M.; Han, X.; Wang, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic and transport properties of Mn-ion implanted Si. Both temperature dependent and field dependent measurements of the samples using a SQUID magnometer reveal ferromagnetic properties at room temperature. Magnetotransport measurements show a large positive magnetoresistance up to 4.5 T with no signs of saturation.

  3. Turbulent transport of fast ions due to magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiwisch, Adam

    The transport of fast ions in magnetic flux ropes in a laboratory plasma is studied. Strong perturbing flux ropes (deltaE ~175 V/m, deltaB ~7 G) are generated by secondary cathode-anode pair at the upgraded LArge Plasma Device (LAPD). A 500-1000 eV lithium ion test beam is passed through the turbulent region and recollected by a gridded collimated analyzer, revealing enhanced fast ion broadening attributable to flux rope perturbations. The broadening is observed to be well in excess of Coulomb scattering levels. Monte Carlo simulation is performed with model electrostatic and magnetic fields, revealing negligible spreading as a result of the magnetic perturbations. Modeled electrostatic perturbations are observed to broaden the beam by 3.0 mm2 at the closest recollection plane, increasing as the transit time squared further downstream. Transport attributed to electrostatic fluctuations has been shown to decrease with energy while magnetic transport does not. Enhanced fast ion transport observed during the flux rope off phase is presently unexplained.

  4. Physics of gas breakdown for ion beam transport in gas

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.L.; Poukey, J.W.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Rose, D.V.; Hubbard, R.F.; Lampe, M.; Neri, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F.; Slinker, S.P.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Young, F.C.; Welch, D.R.

    1993-06-01

    Detailed analysis, experiments, and computer simulations are producing a new understanding of gas breakdown during intense ion beam transport in neutral gas. Charge neutralization of beam micro clumps is shown to limit the net clump potentials to a non-zero value {phi}{sub min}, which can lead to divergence growth and axial energy spreading. At pressures {approx_gt} 1 Torr, plasma shielding should substantially reduce this effect. Current neutralization has been studied in experiments on the GAMBLE II accelerator. The importance of fast electrons (knockons and runaways) has been established in IPROP simulations, which are in agreement with the experiments. For light ion fusion parameters with pressures {approx_gt} 1 Torr, very small net current fractions ({much_lt} 1%) appear feasible, permitting ballistic transport in gas. Self-pinched transport requires higher net current fractions ({ge} 2%) and preliminary IPROP code results indicate that this appears achievable for small-radius intense beams in lower pressure gases ({approx_lt}Torr). Several self-pinched transport concepts look promising. The importance of these results for both light ion fusion and heavy ion fusion is discussed.

  5. Excess surface area in bioelectrochemical systems causes ion transport limitations

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Davenport, Emily K.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    We investigated ion transport limitations on 3D graphite felt electrodes by growing Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms with advection to eliminate external mass transfer limitations. We characterized ion transport limitations by: 1) showing that serially increasing NaCl concentration up to 200 mM increased current linearly up to a total of +273% vs. 0 mM NaCl under advective conditions, 2) growing the biofilm with a starting concentration of 200 mM NaCl, which led to a maximum current increase of 400% vs. current generation without NaCl, and 3) showing that un-colonized surface area remained even after steady-state current was reached. After accounting for iR effects, we confirmed that the excess surface area existed despite a non-zero overpotential at the electrode surface. The fact that the biofilm was constrained from colonizing and producing further current under these conditions confirmed the biofilms under study here were ion transport-limited. Our work demonstrates that the use of high surface area electrodes may not increase current density when the system design allows ion transport limitations to become dominant. PMID:25421463

  6. Excess surface area in bioelectrochemical systems causes ion transport limitations.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Timothy D; Babauta, Jerome T; Davenport, Emily K; Renslow, Ryan S; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-05-01

    We investigated ion transport limitations on 3D graphite felt electrodes by growing Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms with advection to eliminate external mass transfer limitations. We characterized ion transport limitations by: (i) showing that serially increasing NaCl concentration up to 200 mM increased current linearly up to a total of +273% vs. 0 mM NaCl under advective conditions; (ii) growing the biofilm with a starting concentration of 200 mM NaCl, which led to a maximum current increase of 400% vs. current generation without NaCl, and (iii) showing that un-colonized surface area remained even after steady-state current was reached. After accounting for iR effects, we confirmed that the excess surface area existed despite a non-zero overpotential. The fact that the biofilm was constrained from colonizing and producing further current under these conditions confirmed the biofilms under study here were ion transport-limited. Our work demonstrates that the use of high surface area electrodes may not increase current density when the system design allows ion transport limitations to become dominant. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Excess Surface Area in Bioelectrochemical Systems Causes ion Transport Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Davenport, Emily K.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-05-01

    We investigated ion transport limitations on 3D graphite felt electrodes by growing Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms with advection to eliminate external mass transfer limitations. We characterized ion transport limitations by: (i) showing that serially increasing NaCl concentration up to 200mM increased current linearly up to a total of þ273% vs. 0mM NaCl under advective conditions; (ii) growing the biofilm with a starting concentration of 200mM NaCl, which led to a maximum current increase of 400% vs. current generation without NaCl, and (iii) showing that un-colonized surface area remained even after steadystate current was reached. After accounting for iR effects, we confirmed that the excess surface area existed despite a non-zero overpotential. The fact that the biofilm was constrained from colonizing and producing further current under these conditions confirmed the biofilms under study here were ion transport-limited. Our work demonstrates that the use of high surface area electrodes may not increase current density when the system design allows ion transport limitations to become dominant.

  8. Suppression by Trypanosoma brucei of anaphylaxis-mediated ion transport in the small intestine of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gould, S S; Castro, G A

    1994-01-01

    The hypothesis that failure of hosts infected with Trypanosoma brucei to express type 1 hypersensitivity is related to this parasite's ability to down-regulate IgE production, and not to an innate lack of allergenicity of T. brucei antigens, was tested by studying anaphylaxis-induced changes in net epithelial ion transport in rats. Transport changes were quantified electrophysiologically in vitro, as a change in transmural short-circuit current when sensitized intestine was challenged with homologous antigen. Rats injected parenterally with trypanosome antigen elicited intestinal anaphylaxis in response to antigenic challenge, whereas the intestine of rats infected with T. brucei failed to respond. Infection with T. brucei also suppressed the anaphylactic response in rats sensitized to and challenged with ovalbumin and T. spiralis-derived antigens. In these cases suppression was related to the ability of T. brucei to block production of IgE, and not to the physiological failure of the epithelial response. However, in rats sensitized by infection with T. spiralis, neither the anaphylactic response nor IgE production were inhibited by T. brucei. Furthermore, intestinal mastocytosis normally associated with trichinosis was unaffected by the trypanosome infection. Results support the conclusion that the failure to express anaphylaxis in T. brucei-infected rats is due to the inhibition of IgE production and not to the lack of allergenicity of trypanosome antigens. PMID:8206518

  9. Tight junctions and paracellular fluid and ion transport in salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo H; Wu, Li Ling; Yu, Guang Yan

    2013-01-01

    Primary saliva is formed by salivary epithelial endpieces through two pathways, the transcellular and the paracellular pathways. While the mechanisms of ion transport through the transcellular pathway have been well studied, our understanding of fluid and electrolyte transport through the paracellular pathway remains rudimentary. Increasing evidence indicates that the tight junction (TJ) proteins form and regulate the paracellular pathway, although other intercellular junctions are probably involved. The structure of the TJ is complex and has not been well characterised. A functioning TJ is formed by multiple proteins, including membrane, cytoplasmic scaffolding, and signalling proteins. Paracellular fluid and electrolyte flow is mediated by high-capacity, charge- and size-restrictive small pores with a radius of 4 to 6 Å, whereas macromolecules pass through low-capacity, nonrestrictive large pores. Although the characteristics of these pores need to be further delineated, it is clear that they are under the regulation of the autonomic nervous system, endocrine, paracrine and autocrine systems, and various pathological factors. To date, the majority of the evidence for paracellular fluid and ion transport is accumulated from the studies using various epithelia other than salivary glands. Further investigations to explore the structure, function, and regulation of the paracellular pathway in salivary epithelia are needed to better understand the mechanism of saliva secretion.

  10. Reduced Fast Ion Transport Model For The Tokamak Transport Code TRANSP

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta,, Mario; Gorelenkova, Marina; White, Roscoe

    2014-02-28

    Fast ion transport models presently implemented in the tokamak transport code TRANSP [R. J. Hawryluk, in Physics of Plasmas Close to Thermonuclear Conditions, CEC Brussels, 1 , 19 (1980)] are not capturing important aspects of the physics associated with resonant transport caused by instabilities such as Toroidal Alfv en Eigenmodes (TAEs). This work describes the implementation of a fast ion transport model consistent with the basic mechanisms of resonant mode-particle interaction. The model is formulated in terms of a probability distribution function for the particle's steps in phase space, which is consistent with the MonteCarlo approach used in TRANSP. The proposed model is based on the analysis of fast ion response to TAE modes through the ORBIT code [R. B. White et al., Phys. Fluids 27 , 2455 (1984)], but it can be generalized to higher frequency modes (e.g. Compressional and Global Alfv en Eigenmodes) and to other numerical codes or theories.

  11. Facilitated Ion Transport in Smectic Ordered Ionic Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin Hong; Han, Kee Sung; Lee, Je Seung; Lee, Albert S.; Park, Seo Kyung; Hong, Sung Yun; Lee, Jong-Chan; Mueller, Karl T.; Hong, Soon Man; Koo, Chong Min

    2016-09-08

    We investigated a novel ionic mixture of an imidazolium-based room temperature IL containing ethylene oxide functionalized phosphite anion and a lithium salt that self-assembles into a smectic-ordered IL crystal. The two key features in this work are the unique origin of the smectic order of the ionic mixtures and the facilitated ion transport behavior in the smectic ordered IL crystal. In fact, the IL crystals are self-assembled through Coulombic interactions between ion species, not through the hydrophilic-phobic interactions between charged ion heads and hydrophobic long alkyl pendants or the steric interaction between mesogenic moieties. Furthermore, the smectic order in the IL crystal ionogel facilitates exceptional and remarkable ionic transport. Large ionic conductivity, viscoelastic robustness, and additional electrochemical stability of the IL crystal ionogels provide promising opportunities for future electrochemical applications.

  12. Water, proton, and ion transport: from nanotubes to proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummer, Gerhard

    Remarkably, protein channels transporting polar substances such as water, protons, and ions are often lined by predominantly non-polar residues. The unique structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties of water and ions in molecular confinement help explain this puzzling observation. Computer simulations of solvated nanotubes and proteins show that weakly polar cavities can be filled by water at equilibrium, but such filling is highly sensitive to small variations in the polarity of the cavity. In the filled state, water forms wires and clusters held together by tight hydrogen bonds. Simulations on quantum energy surfaces also show that 1D water wires in hydrophobic environments facilitate rapid proton motion. The unique properties of water in weakly polar channels help explain the rapid flow of water through molecular pores, the controlled proton flow in enzymes, the gating of ion transport through membrane channels, and the function of mitochondrial proton pumps.

  13. Homology modeling of transporter proteins (carriers and ion channels).

    PubMed

    Ravna, Aina Westrheim; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2012-01-01

    Transporter proteins are divided into channels and carriers and constitute families of membrane proteins of physiological and pharmacological importance. These proteins are targeted by several currently prescribed drugs, and they have a large potential as targets for new drug development. Ion channels and carriers are difficult to express and purify in amounts for X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, and few carrier and ion channel structures are deposited in the PDB database. The scarcity of atomic resolution 3D structures of carriers and channels is a problem for understanding their molecular mechanisms of action and for designing new compounds with therapeutic potentials. The homology modeling approach is a valuable approach for obtaining structural information about carriers and ion channels when no crystal structure of the protein of interest is available. In this chapter, computational approaches for constructing homology models of carriers and transporters are reviewed.

  14. Isothermal titration calorimetry of ion-coupled membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Boudker, Olga; Oh, SeCheol

    2015-04-01

    Binding of ligands, ranging from proteins to ions, to membrane proteins is associated with absorption or release of heat that can be detected by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Such measurements not only provide binding affinities but also afford direct access to thermodynamic parameters of binding--enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity. These parameters can be interpreted in a structural context, allow discrimination between different binding mechanisms and guide drug design. In this review, we introduce advantages and limitations of ITC as a methodology to study molecular interactions of membrane proteins. We further describe case studies where ITC was used to analyze thermodynamic linkage between ions and substrates in ion-coupled transporters. Similar type of linkage analysis will likely be applicable to a wide range of transporters, channels, and receptors.

  15. Radial transport of storm time ring current ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, A.T.Y. )

    1993-01-01

    Radial transport of energetic ions for the development of the main phase of geomagnetic storms is investigated with data from the medium energy particle analyzer (MEPA) on the Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft, which monitored protons (E[sub p] > 56 keV), helium ions (E[sub He] > 72 keV), and the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen group, which is mostly dominated by oxygen ions (E[sub O] > 137 keV). From a study of four geomagnetic storms, we show that the flux increase of these ions in the inner ring current region (L [approx lt] 5) can be accounted for by an inward displacement of the ring current population by [approximately]0.5 to 3.5 R[sub E]. There is a general trend that a larger inward displacement occurs at higher L shells than at lower ones. These results are in agreement with previous findings. The radially injected population consists of the prestorm population modified by substorm injections which occur on a much shorter rime scale than that of a storm main phase. It is also found that the inward displacement is relatively independent of ion mass and energy, suggesting that the radial transport of these energetic ions is effected primarily by convective motion from a large electric field or by diffusion resulting from magnetic field fluctuations. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Ion and water transport in charge-modified graphene nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ying-Hua; Li, Kun; Chen, Wei-Yu; Si, Wei; Tan, Qi-Yan; Chen, Yun-Fei

    2015-10-01

    Porous graphene has a high mechanical strength and an atomic-layer thickness that makes it a promising material for material separation and biomolecule sensing. Electrostatic interactions between charges in aqueous solutions are a type of strong long-range interaction that may greatly influence fluid transport through nanopores. In this study, molecular dynamic simulations were conducted to investigate ion and water transport through 1.05-nm diameter monolayer graphene nanopores, with their edges charge-modified. Our results indicated that these nanopores are selective to counterions when they are charged. As the charge amount increases, the total ionic currents show an increase-decrease profile while the co-ion currents monotonically decrease. The co-ion rejection can reach 76.5% and 90.2% when the nanopores are negatively and positively charged, respectively. The Cl- ion current increases and reaches a plateau, and the Na+ current decreases as the charge amount increases in systems in which Na+ ions act as counterions. In addition, charge modification can enhance water transport through nanopores. This is mainly due to the ion selectivity of the nanopores. Notably, positive charges on the pore edges facilitate water transport much more strongly than negative charges. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB707601 and 2011CB707605), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 50925519), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, Funding of Jiangsu Provincial Innovation Program for Graduate Education, China (Grant No. CXZZ13_0087), and the Scientific Research Foundation of Graduate School of Southeast University (Grant No. YBJJ 1322).

  17. Ionizing radiation, ion transports, and radioresistance of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Stephan M.; Butz, Lena; Stegen, Benjamin; Klumpp, Dominik; Braun, Norbert; Ruth, Peter; Eckert, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    The standard treatment of many tumor entities comprises fractionated radiation therapy which applies ionizing radiation to the tumor-bearing target volume. Ionizing radiation causes double-strand breaks in the DNA backbone that result in cell death if the number of DNA double-strand breaks exceeds the DNA repair capacity of the tumor cell. Ionizing radiation reportedly does not only act on the DNA in the nucleus but also on the plasma membrane. In particular, ionizing radiation-induced modifications of ion channels and transporters have been reported. Importantly, these altered transports seem to contribute to the survival of the irradiated tumor cells. The present review article summarizes our current knowledge on the underlying mechanisms and introduces strategies to radiosensitize tumor cells by targeting plasma membrane ion transports. PMID:23966948

  18. Genomic instability and tumorigenic induction in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, T. K.; Piao, C. Q.; Wu, L. J.; Willey, J. C.; Hall, E. J.

    1998-11-01

    Carcinogenesis is postulated to be a progressive multistage process characterized by an increase in genomic instability and clonal selection with each mutational event endowing a selective growth advantage. Genomic instability as manifested by the amplification of specific gene fragments is common among tumor and transformed cells. In the present study, immortalized human bronchial (BEP2D) cells were irradiated with graded doses of either 1GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions or 150 keV/μm alpha particles. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming tumorigenic in nude mice. Tumorigenic cells showed neither ras mutations nor deletion in the p16 tumor suppressor gene. In contrast, they harbored mutations in the p53 gene and over-expressed cyclin D1. Genomic instability among transformed cells at various stage of the carcinogenic process was examined based on frequencies of PALA resistance. Incidence of genomic instability was highest among established tumor cell lines relative to transformed, non-tumorigenic and control cell lines. Treatment of BEP2D cells with a 4 mM dose of the aminothiol WR-1065 significantly reduced their neoplastic transforming response to 56Fe particles. This model provides an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in malignant transformation of human epithelial cells by heavy ions.

  19. Functional activity of L-carnitine transporters in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ingoglia, Filippo; Visigalli, Rossana; Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Barilli, Amelia; Riccardi, Benedetta; Puccini, Paola; Dall'Asta, Valeria

    2016-02-01

    Carnitine plays a physiologically important role in the β-oxidation of fatty acids, facilitating the transport of long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Distribution of carnitine within the body tissues is mainly performed by novel organic cation transporter (OCTN) family, including the isoforms OCTN1 (SLC22A4) and OCTN2 (SLC22A5) expressed in human. We performed here a characterization of carnitine transport in human airway epithelial cells A549, Calu-3, NCl-H441, and BEAS-2B, by means of an integrated approach combining data of mRNA/protein expression with the kinetic and inhibition analyses of L-[(3)H]carnitine transport. Carnitine uptake was strictly Na(+)-dependent in all cell models. In A549 and BEAS-2B cells, carnitine uptake was mediated by one high-affinity component (Km<2 μM) identifiable with OCTN2. In both these cell models, indeed, carnitine uptake was maximally inhibited by betaine and strongly reduced by SLC22A5/OCTN2 silencing. Conversely, Calu-3 and NCl-H441 exhibited both a high (Km~20 μM) and a low affinity (Km>1 mM) transport component. While the high affinity component is identifiable with OCTN2, the low affinity uptake is mediated by ATB(0,+), a Na(+), and Cl(-)-coupled transport system for neutral and cationic amino acids, as demonstrated by the inhibition by leucine and arginine, as well as by SLC6A14/ATB(0,+) silencing. The presence of this transporter leads to a massive accumulation of carnitine inside the cells and may be of peculiar relevance in pathologic conditions of carnitine deficiency, such as those associated to OCTN2 defects.

  20. Ion channels and transporters in the electroreceptive ampullary epithelium from skates.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, J; Fishman, H M

    1995-01-01

    Two ampullary epithelial properties necessary for electroreception were used to identify the types of ion channels and transporters found in apical and basal membranes of ampullary receptor cells of skates and to assess their individual role under voltage-clamp conditions. The two essential properties are (1) a steady-state negative conductance generated in apical membranes and (2) a small, spontaneous current oscillation originating in basal membranes (Lu and Fishman, 1995). The effects of pharmacological agents and ion substitutions on these properties were evaluated from transorgan or transepithelial complex admittance determinations in the frequency range 0.125 to 50 Hz measured in individual, isolated ampullary organs. In apical membranes, L-type Ca channels were found to be responsible for generation of the steady-state negative conductance. In basal membranes, K and Ca-dependent Cl (Cl(Ca)) channels were demonstrated to contribute to a net positive membrane conductance. L-type Ca channels were also evident in basal membranes and are thought to function in synaptic transmission from the electroreceptive epithelium to the primary afferent nerve. In addition to ion channels in basal membranes, two transporters (Na+/K+ pump and Na(+)-Ca+ exchanger) were apparent. Rapid (minutes) cessation of the current oscillation after blockage of any of the basal ion channels (Ca, Cl(Ca), K) suggests critical involvement of each of these channel types in the generation of the oscillation. Suppression of either Na+/K+ transport or Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange also eliminated the oscillation but at a slower rate, indicating an indirect effect. PMID:8599653

  1. Percolating ion transport in binary mixtures with high dielectric loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brohede, U.; Strømme, M.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate the ion transport percolation properties of a binary system of an ion conductor (NaCl) and an insulator (ethyl cellulose) for which the ac component of the conductivity is non-negligible over the entire measured frequency range. We find that the dc conductivity, extracted from a well-defined range of frequencies, can be described by a low percolation threshold, ϕc=0.06 three-dimensional conducting network. The low ϕc was explained by the water-layer-assisted ion conduction in micrometer-sized ethyl cellulose channels between NaCl grains. The present findings provide valuable knowledge for the analysis and design of a broad class of ion conducting functional materials.

  2. Puerarin transport across rat nasal epithelial cells and the influence of compatibility with peoniflorin and menthol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Du, Shou-Ying; Lu, Yang; Liu, Chang; Wu, Hui-Chao; Tian, Zhi-Hao; Wang, Min; Yang, Chang

    2017-01-01

    Nose-to-brain transport can provide an excellent pathway for drugs of the central nervous system. Consequently, how to make full use of this pathway in practical applications has become a focus of drug design. However, many aspects affecting drug delivery from the nose to the brain remain unclear. This study aimed to more deeply investigate the transport of puerarin and to explore the mechanism underlying the influence of compatible drugs on puerarin permeability in a primary cell model simulating the nasal mucosa. In this research, based on rat nasal epithelial cells (RNECs) cultured in vitro and cytotoxicity assays, the bidirectional transport of puerarin across RNEC monolayers and the effect of its compatibility with peoniflorin and menthol were analyzed. The apparent permeability coefficient was <1.5×10(-6) cm/s, and the efflux ratio of puerarin was <2, indicating that puerarin had poor absorption and that menthol but not peoniflorin significantly improved puerarin transport. Simultaneously, through experiments, such as immunofluorescence staining, transepithelial electrical resistance measurement, rhodamine 123 efflux evaluation, the cell membrane fluorescence recovery after photobleaching test, and ATPase activity determination, the permeability promoting mechanism of menthol was confirmed to be closely related to disruption of the tight junction protein structure, to the P-glycoprotein inhibitory effect, to increased membrane fluidity, and to the promotion of enzyme activity. These results provide reliable data on nasal administration of the studied drugs and lay the foundation for a deeper investigation of the nose-brain pathway and nasal administration.

  3. Functions of Ion Transport Peptide and Ion Transport Peptide-Like in the Red Flour Beetle Tribolium castaneum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ion transport peptide (ITP) and ITP-like (ITPL) are highly conserved neuropeptides in insects and crustaceans. We investigated the alternatively spliced variants of ITP/ITPL in Tribolium castaneum to understand their functions. We identified three alternatively spliced transcripts named itp, itpl-...

  4. Synthetic ion transporters can induce apoptosis by facilitating chloride anion transport into cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sung-Kyun; Kim, Sung Kuk; Share, Andrew; Lynch, Vincent M; Park, Jinhong; Namkung, Wan; Van Rossom, Wim; Busschaert, Nathalie; Gale, Philip A; Sessler, Jonathan L; Shin, Injae

    2014-10-01

    Anion transporters based on small molecules have received attention as therapeutic agents because of their potential to disrupt cellular ion homeostasis. However, a direct correlation between a change in cellular chloride anion concentration and cytotoxicity has not been established for synthetic ion carriers. Here we show that two pyridine diamide-strapped calix[4]pyrroles induce coupled chloride anion and sodium cation transport in both liposomal models and cells, and promote cell death by increasing intracellular chloride and sodium ion concentrations. Removing either ion from the extracellular media or blocking natural sodium channels with amiloride prevents this effect. Cell experiments show that the ion transporters induce the sodium chloride influx, which leads to an increased concentration of reactive oxygen species, release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria and apoptosis via caspase activation. However, they do not activate the caspase-independent apoptotic pathway associated with the apoptosis-inducing factor. Ion transporters, therefore, represent an attractive approach for regulating cellular processes that are normally controlled tightly by homeostasis.

  5. Synthetic ion transporters can induce apoptosis by facilitating chloride anion transport into cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Sung-Kyun; Kim, Sung Kuk; Share, Andrew; Lynch, Vincent M.; Park, Jinhong; Namkung, Wan; van Rossom, Wim; Busschaert, Nathalie; Gale, Philip A.; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Shin, Injae

    2014-10-01

    Anion transporters based on small molecules have received attention as therapeutic agents because of their potential to disrupt cellular ion homeostasis. However, a direct correlation between a change in cellular chloride anion concentration and cytotoxicity has not been established for synthetic ion carriers. Here we show that two pyridine diamide-strapped calix[4]pyrroles induce coupled chloride anion and sodium cation transport in both liposomal models and cells, and promote cell death by increasing intracellular chloride and sodium ion concentrations. Removing either ion from the extracellular media or blocking natural sodium channels with amiloride prevents this effect. Cell experiments show that the ion transporters induce the sodium chloride influx, which leads to an increased concentration of reactive oxygen species, release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria and apoptosis via caspase activation. However, they do not activate the caspase-independent apoptotic pathway associated with the apoptosis-inducing factor. Ion transporters, therefore, represent an attractive approach for regulating cellular processes that are normally controlled tightly by homeostasis.

  6. Constitutive expression of hZnT4 zinc transporter in human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Michalczyk, Agnes A; Allen, Justin; Blomeley, Rachael C; Ackland, M Leigh

    2002-05-15

    Zinc is an essential trace element required by all living organisms. An adequate supply of zinc is particularly important in the neonatal period. Zinc is a significant component of breast milk, which is transported across the maternal epithelia during lactation. The mechanisms by which zinc becomes a constituent of breast milk have not been elucidated. The function of the zinc transporter ZnT4 in the transport of zinc into milk during lactation was previously demonstrated by studies of a mouse mutant, the 'lethal milk' mouse, where a mutation in the ZnT4 gene decreased the transport of zinc into milk. In the present study, we have investigated the expression of the human orthologue of ZnT4 (hZnT4) in the human breast. We detected hZnT4 mRNA expression in the tissue from the resting and lactating human breast, using reverse-transcriptase PCR. Western-blot analysis using antibodies to peptide sequences of hZnT4 detected a major band of the predicted size of 47 kDa and a minor band of 77 kDa, in extracts from the resting and lactating breast tissues. There was no difference in the hZnT4 expression levels between lactating and resting breasts. The hZnT4 protein was present in the luminal cells of the ducts and alveoli where it had a granular distribution. A cultured human breast epithelial cell line PMC42 was used to investigate the subcellular distribution of hZnT4 and this showed a granular label throughout the cytoplasm, consistent with a vesicular localization. The presence of zinc-containing intracellular vesicles was demonstrated by using the zinc-specific fluorphore Zinquin (ethyl-[2-methyl-8-p-toluenesulphonamido-6-quinolyloxy]acetate). Double labelling indicated that there was no obvious overlap between Zinquin and the hZnT4 protein, suggesting that hZnT4 was not directly involved in the transport of zinc into vesicles. We detected expression of two other members of the hZnT family, hZnT1 and hZnT3, in human breast epithelial cells. We conclude that hZnT4 is

  7. Role of Alfven instabilities in energetic ion transport

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabei, S.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Budny, R.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Hosea, J. C.; Majeski, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Wilson, J. R.

    1999-09-20

    Experiments with plasma heating by waves at the ion cyclotron resonance of a minority species have shown that the heating efficiency degrades above a certain power threshold. It is found that this threshold is due to the destabilization of shear Alfven waves, which causes loss of fast ions. There are two distinct regimes characterized by low q{sub a} and high q{sub a}. In the first case, the fast ion distribution created by ICRF, lies entirely inside r{sub q=1}, away from the location of global TAE. This situation leads to the formation of a very strong fast ion population which stabilizes the sawteeth, but also excites Energetic Particle Modes (EPM), which transport fast ions outside r{sub q=1} causing the giant crash. At higher q{sub a}, the widening of the Alfven gap due to the steeper q profile, brings the global TAE ''in contact'' with the fast ion distribution. This results in an immediate and continuous depletion of fast ions from the core, which prevents the formation of the monster sawtooth and the excitation of EPM. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Transport of ions injected by AMPTE magnetotail releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cladis, J. B.; Francis, W. E.

    1989-01-01

    The BA and Li ions released in the magnetotail by the AMPTE IRM satellite were not observed in the inner magnetosphere with the AMPTE CCE satellite. In an effort to understand these results, Cladis and Francis (1988) modeled the expansion and ionization of the released atoms and computed several hundred guiding-center trajectories of the ions to sample the motion of each ion cloud. Here, the transport calculations are improved, principally by computing the full gyration motion of the ions in a more realistic model of the geomagnetic tail. The results indicate that the Ba(+) ions were convected inward along a narrow corridor, which was at least 2 earth radii away from the satellite in the case of the first Ba release and at least 3 earth radii away in the case of the second Ba release. Even if the ions had reached the satellite, their energies would have been too low to be detected. The Li(+) ions from both releases drifted inward over broad regions which overlapped the satellite in space and time. However, their fluxes at the satellite were somewhat too low to be detected.

  9. Mechanism of unassisted ion transport across membrane bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1996-01-01

    To establish how charged species move from water to the nonpolar membrane interior and to determine the energetic and structural effects accompanying this process, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the transport of Na+ and Cl- across a lipid bilayer located between two water lamellae. The total length of molecular dynamics trajectories generated for each ion was 10 ns. Our simulations demonstrate that permeation of ions into the membrane is accompanied by the formation of deep, asymmetric thinning defects in the bilayer, whereby polar lipid head groups and water penetrate the nonpolar membrane interior. Once the ion crosses the midplane of the bilayer the deformation "switches sides"; the initial defect slowly relaxes, and a defect forms in the outgoing side of the bilayer. As a result, the ion remains well solvated during the process; the total number of oxygen atoms from water and lipid head groups in the first solvation shell remains constant. A similar membrane deformation is formed when the ion is instantaneously inserted into the interior of the bilayer. The formation of defects considerably lowers the free energy barrier to transfer of the ion across the bilayer and, consequently, increases the permeabilities of the membrane to ions, compared to the rigid, planar structure, by approximately 14 orders of magnitude. Our results have implications for drug delivery using liposomes and peptide insertion into membranes.

  10. Mechanism of unassisted ion transport across membrane bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1996-01-01

    To establish how charged species move from water to the nonpolar membrane interior and to determine the energetic and structural effects accompanying this process, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the transport of Na+ and Cl- across a lipid bilayer located between two water lamellae. The total length of molecular dynamics trajectories generated for each ion was 10 ns. Our simulations demonstrate that permeation of ions into the membrane is accompanied by the formation of deep, asymmetric thinning defects in the bilayer, whereby polar lipid head groups and water penetrate the nonpolar membrane interior. Once the ion crosses the midplane of the bilayer the deformation "switches sides"; the initial defect slowly relaxes, and a defect forms in the outgoing side of the bilayer. As a result, the ion remains well solvated during the process; the total number of oxygen atoms from water and lipid head groups in the first solvation shell remains constant. A similar membrane deformation is formed when the ion is instantaneously inserted into the interior of the bilayer. The formation of defects considerably lowers the free energy barrier to transfer of the ion across the bilayer and, consequently, increases the permeabilities of the membrane to ions, compared to the rigid, planar structure, by approximately 14 orders of magnitude. Our results have implications for drug delivery using liposomes and peptide insertion into membranes.

  11. Visualizing ion relaxation in the transport of short DNA fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, S A; Wang, H; Laue, T M; Wilson, T J; Wooll, J O

    1999-01-01

    Ion relaxation plays an important role in a wide range of phenomena involving the transport of charged biomolecules. Ion relaxation is responsible for reducing sedimentation and diffusion constants, reducing electrophoretic mobilities, increasing intrinsic viscosities, and, for biomolecules that lack a permanent electric dipole moment, provides a mechanism for orienting them in an external electric field. Recently, a numerical boundary element method was developed to solve the coupled Navier-Stokes, Poisson, and ion transport equations for a polyion modeled as a rigid body of arbitrary size, shape, and charge distribution. This method has subsequently been used to compute the electrophoretic mobilities and intrinsic viscosities of a number of model proteins and DNA fragments. The primary purpose of the present work is to examine the effect of ion relaxation on the ion density and fluid velocity fields around short DNA fragments (20 and 40 bp). Contour density as well as vector field diagrams of the various scalar and vector fields are presented and discussed at monovalent salt concentrations of 0.03 and 0.11 M. In addition, the net charge current fluxes in the vicinity of the DNA fragments at low and high salt concentrations are briefly examined and discussed. PMID:10233066

  12. Transportation behavior of alkali ions through a cell membrane ion channel. A quantum chemical description of a simplified isolated model.

    PubMed

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans

    2012-08-01

    Quantum chemical model calculations were carried out for modeling the ion transport through an isolated ion channel of a cell membrane. An isolated part of a natural ion channel was modeled. The model channel was a calixarene derivative, hydrated sodium and potassium ions were the models of the transported ion. The electrostatic potential of the channel and the energy of the channel-ion system were calculated as a function of the alkali ion position. Both attractive and repulsive ion-channel interactions were found. The calculations - namely the dependence of the system energy and the atomic charges of the water molecules with respect to the position of the alkali ion in the channel - revealed the molecular-structural background of the potassium selectivity of this artificial ion channel. It was concluded that the studied ion channel mimics real biological ion channel quite well.

  13. Noise-induced transport in the motion of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormick, Cecilia; Schmiegelow, Christian T.

    2016-11-01

    The interplay of noise and quantum coherence in transport gives rise to rich dynamics relevant for a variety of systems. In this work, we put forward a proposal for an experiment testing noise-induced transport in the vibrational modes of a chain of trapped ions. We focus on the case of transverse modes, considering multiple-isotope chains and an "angle trap," where the transverse trapping varies along the chain. This variation induces localization of the motional modes and therefore suppresses transport. By suitably choosing the action of laser fields that couple to the internal and external degrees of freedom of the ions, we show how to implement effective local dephasing on the modes, broadening the vibrational resonances. This leads to an overlap of the local mode frequencies, giving rise to a pronounced increase in the transport of excitations along the chain. We propose an implementation and measurement scheme which require neither ground-state cooling nor low heating rates, and we illustrate our results with a simulation of the dynamics for a chain of three ions.

  14. Light-induced modification of plant plasma membrane ion transport.

    PubMed

    Marten, I; Deeken, R; Hedrich, R; Roelfsema, M R G

    2010-09-01

    Light is not only the driving force for electron and ion transport in the thylakoid membrane, but also regulates ion transport in various other membranes of plant cells. Light-dependent changes in ion transport at the plasma membrane and associated membrane potential changes have been studied intensively over the last century. These studies, with various species and cell types, revealed that apart from regulation by chloroplasts, plasma membrane transport can be controlled by phytochromes, phototropins or channel rhodopsins. In this review, we compare light-dependent plasma membrane responses of unicellular algae (Eremosphaera and Chlamydomonas), with those of a multicellular alga (Chara), liverworts (Conocephalum), mosses (Physcomitrella) and several angiosperm cell types. Light-dependent plasma membrane responses of Eremosphaera and Chara are characterised by the dominant role of K(+) channels during membrane potential changes. In most other species, the Ca(2+)-dependent activation of plasma membrane anion channels represents a general light-triggered event. Cell type-specific responses are likely to have evolved by modification of this general response or through the development of additional light-dependent signalling pathways. Future research to elucidate these light-activated signalling chains is likely to benefit from the recent identification of S-type anion channel genes and proteins capable of regulating these channels.

  15. Substrate Profile and Metal-ion Selectivity of Human Divalent Metal-ion Transporter-1*

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Anthony C.; Shawki, Ali; Cunningham, Christopher L.; Mackenzie, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1) is a H+-coupled metal-ion transporter that plays essential roles in iron homeostasis. DMT1 exhibits reactivity (based on evoked currents) with a broad range of metal ions; however, direct measurement of transport is lacking for many of its potential substrates. We performed a comprehensive substrate-profile analysis for human DMT1 expressed in RNA-injected Xenopus oocytes by using radiotracer assays and the continuous measurement of transport by fluorescence with the metal-sensitive PhenGreen SK fluorophore. We provide validation for the use of PhenGreen SK fluorescence quenching as a reporter of cellular metal-ion uptake. We determined metal-ion selectivity under fixed conditions using the voltage clamp. Radiotracer and continuous measurement of transport by fluorescence assays revealed that DMT1 mediates the transport of several metal ions that were ranked in selectivity by using the ratio Imax/K0.5 (determined from evoked currents at −70 mV): Cd2+ > Fe2+ > Co2+, Mn2+ ≫ Zn2+, Ni2+, VO2+. DMT1 expression did not stimulate the transport of Cr2+, Cr3+, Cu+, Cu2+, Fe3+, Ga3+, Hg2+, or VO+. 55Fe2+ transport was competitively inhibited by Co2+ and Mn2+. Zn2+ only weakly inhibited 55Fe2+ transport. Our data reveal that DMT1 selects Fe2+ over its other physiological substrates and provides a basis for predicting the contribution of DMT1 to intestinal, nasal, and pulmonary absorption of metal ions and their cellular uptake in other tissues. Whereas DMT1 is a likely route of entry for the toxic heavy metal cadmium, and may serve the metabolism of cobalt, manganese, and vanadium, we predict that DMT1 should contribute little if at all to the absorption or uptake of zinc. The conclusion in previous reports that copper is a substrate of DMT1 is not supported. PMID:22736759

  16. Polysiloxane-graft-PEG/Phosphonium Ionomer Morphology and Ion Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Michael; Liang, Siwei; Bartels, Joshua; Runt, James; Colby, Ralph; Winey, Karen

    2013-03-01

    A series of random polysiloxane-based copolymer single ion conductors with phosphonium and polyethylene glycol side chains have been synthesized at various compositions and counterions. Morphology is investigated via X-ray scattering, and reveals microphase separation on extremely small length scales. Despite the low molecular weight of the PEG side chain, polysiloxane and PEG assemble into microdomains with covalently bound phosphonium cations at the interface. Exceptionally low glass transition temperatures in these microphase separated ionomers allow for high ionic mobility for both bulky, charge delocalized counterions as well as small, electronegative counterions. Morphology interpretation is complemented by measurement of ion transport properties via dielectric relaxation spectroscopy.

  17. Internal Transport Barrier Driven by Redistribution of Energetic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    K.L. Wong; W.W. Heidbrink; E. Ruskov; C.C. Petty; C.M. Greenfield; R. Nazikian; R. Budny

    2004-11-12

    Alfven instabilities excited by energetic ions are used as a means to reduce the central magnetic shear in a tokamak via redistribution of energetic ions. When the central magnetic shear is low enough, ballooning modes become stable for any plasma pressure gradient and an internal transport barrier (ITB) with a steep pressure gradient can exist. This mechanism can sustain a steady-state ITB as demonstrated by experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. It can also produce a shear in toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. Possible application of this technique to use the energetic alpha particles for improvement of burning plasma performance is discussed.

  18. Transport of stearic acid-based solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) into human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rohan M; Rajasekaran, Dhivya; Ludford-Menting, Mandy; Eldridge, Daniel S; Palombo, Enzo A; Harding, Ian H

    2016-04-01

    Development of drug delivery systems, as much as the drug molecule itself, is an important consideration for improving drug absorption and bioavailability. The mechanisms by which drug carriers enter target cells can differ depending on their size, surface properties and components. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have gained an increased attention in recent years and are the drug carriers of interest in this paper. They are known to breach the cell-membrane barrier and have been actively sought to transport biomolecules. Previous studies by our group, and also other groups, provided an extensive characterization of SLNs. However, few studies have investigated the uptake of SLNs and these have had limited mechanistic focus. The aim of this work was to investigate the pathway of uptake of SLNs by human epithelial cells i.e., lung A549 and cervical HeLa cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is first study that investigates the cellular uptake of SLNs by human epithelial cells. The mechanism of cellular uptake was deciphered using pharmacologic inhibitors (sucrose, potassium-free buffer, filipin and cytochalasin B). Imaging techniques and flow assisted cell sorting (FACS) were used to assess the cellular uptake of SLNs loaded with rhodamine 123 as a fluorescent probe. This study provided evidence that the cellular uptake of SLNs was energy-dependent, and the endocytosis of SLNs was mainly dependent on clathrin-mediated mechanisms. The establishment of entry mechanism of SLNs is of fundamental importance for future facilitation of SLNs as biological or drug carriers.

  19. Enkephalin affects ion transport via the enteric nervous system in guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Schulzke, J D; Fromm, M; Riecken, E O; Reutter, W

    1990-04-01

    The endogenous opioid enkephalin drives ion transport towards absorption. To determine the site and mechanism of this effect, fractionated stripping of guinea-pig ileum was carried out. The muscularis propria, including myenteric plexus, was removed by partial stripping. The submucosa, including the submucosal plexus, plus the muscularis mucosae were removed by total stripping. For binding studies, epithelial cells were removed by the method of Weiser leaving the lamina propria mucosae with the mucosal plexus. Radio-receptor-assay with (3H)2-D-ala-5-D-leu-enkephalin revealed enkephalin binding sites in the submucosa plus muscularis mucosae (KD = 3.6 nmol l-1; Vmax = 7.3 fmol mg-1) and in the lamina propria mucosae (KD = 4.2 nmol l-1; Vmax = 5.1 fmol mg-1. The binding was stereospecific in both layers. No binding was detected on epithelial cells. In the Ussing chamber, partially stripped ileum exhibited spontaneous ISC which was abolished by addition of tetrodotoxin (TTX) or by total stripping indicating that this ISC was neuronally stimulated by the submucosal plexus. Electrogenic chloride secretion was identified as contributing to this ISC, since the TTX-sensitive part of ISC in the partially stripped ileum was lacking in Cl- and HCO3-free medium, reappeared after addition of Cl consistent with Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km = 19 nmol l-1) and was reversed by serosal addition of bumetanide. In addition, enkephalin increased electroneutral NaCl-absorption as obtained by Na- and Cl-flux measurements. Enkephalin decreased this spontaneous neuronally stimulated electrogenic Cl-secretion in the partially stripped ileum, but had no effect in totally stripped ileum if ISC was stimulated at the cellular level by theophylline or PGE1. We conclude that ganglia located in the submucosal plexus regulate intestinal ion transport. Enkephalin acts by presynaptic inhibition via receptors on these neurons in the submucosa and/or via receptors on their neurites in the lamina

  20. Transport induced by ion cyclotron range of frequencies waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Debing Xu, Yingfeng; Wang, Shaojie

    2014-11-15

    The Vlasov equation, which includes the effect of the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves, can be written as the Fokker-Planck equation which describes the quasilinear transport in phase space by using the Lie-transform method. The radial transport fluxes of particle, energy and parallel momentum driven by ICRF waves in the slab geometry have been derived. The results show that the ICRF-induced radial redistributions of particle, energy and parallel momentum are driven by the inhomogeneity in energy of the equilibrium distribution function, and related to the correlation between the excursion in the real space and the excursion in energy. For the case with strong asymmetry of k{sub y} spectrum, the ICRF-induced radial transport driven by the energy inhomogeneity dominates the ICRF-induced radial transport driven by the spatial inhomogeneity.

  1. Ornithine transport via cationic amino acid transporter-1 is involved in ornithine cytotoxicity in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Shiho; Ando, Akira; Okuda-Ashitaka, Emiko; Maeda, Masahide; Furuta, Kyoji; Suzuki, Masaaki; Matsumura, Miyo; Ito, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    A prior report showed ornithine cytotoxicity in ornithine-delta-aminotransferase (OAT)-deficient human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in an in vitro model of gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina. This study was intended to clarify the mechanism of ornithine cytotoxicity and to determine the responsible amino acid transporters. The mRNA expression of amino acid transporters in human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-RPE cells was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Northern blot analysis. Carrier-mediated ornithine transport via the L-type amino acid transporter (LAT)1, LAT2, cationic amino acid transporter (CAT)-1, and y(+)LAT2 systems was evaluated by short interfering (si)RNA-mediated gene silencing. The cytoprotective effect of CAT-1-specific siRNA on ornithine cytotoxicity was measured using quantitative analysis of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) at 24 hours after treatment with ornithine in OAT-deficient RPE cells. LAT1, LAT2, CAT-1, and y(+)LAT2 mRNA expression was detected by Northern blot analysis, whereas RT-PCR revealed that LAT1, LAT2, y(+)LAT1, y(+)LAT2, CAT-1, and b(0,+)AT mRNAs were expressed together with the heterodimeric glycoproteins 4F2hc and rBAT in hTERT-RPE cells. l-[(14)C]ornithine uptake in hTERT-RPE cells was decreased by 46.6% and 22.0% by CAT-1 and y(+)LAT2 siRNA, respectively, whereas LAT1 and LAT2 siRNA had no significant effect. Further, CAT-1 silencing by siRNA reduced ornithine cytotoxicity in OAT-deficient RPE cells. The results suggest that ornithine transport via CAT-1 may play a crucial role in ornithine cytotoxicity in hTERT-RPE cells. Reduction of the ornithine transport via CAT-1 may be a new target for treatment of gyrate atrophy.

  2. Shear flow effects on ion thermal transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Horton, W.; Dong, J.Q.; Kishimoto, Y.

    1995-03-01

    From various laboratory and numerical experiments, there is clear evidence that under certain conditions the presence of sheared flows in a tokamak plasma can significantly reduce the ion thermal transport. In the presence of plasma fluctuations driven by the ion temperature gradient, the flows of energy and momentum parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field are coupled with each other. This coupling manifests itself as significant off-diagonal coupling coefficients that give rise to new terms for anomalous transport. The authors derive from the gyrokinetic equation a set of velocity moment equations that describe the interaction among plasma turbulent fluctuations, the temperature gradient, the toroidal velocity shear, and the poloidal flow in a tokamak plasma. Four coupled equations for the amplitudes of the state variables radially extended over the transport region by toroidicity induced coupling are derived. The equations show bifurcations from the low confinement mode without sheared flows to high confinement mode with substantially reduced transport due to strong shear flows. Also discussed is the reduced version with three state variables. In the presence of sheared flows, the radially extended coupled toroidal modes driven by the ion temperature gradient disintegrate into smaller, less elongated vortices. Such a transition to smaller spatial correlation lengths changes the transport from Bohm-like to gyrobohm-like. The properties of these equations are analyzed. The conditions for the improved confined regime are obtained as a function of the momentum-energy deposition rates and profiles. The appearance of a transport barrier is a consequence of the present theory.

  3. Overexpression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) predicts poor prognosis in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hanbyoul; Lee, You Sun; Kim, Julie; Chung, Joon-Yong; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2013-11-01

    Illumina microarray was used to identify differentially expressed genes in three epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells. To validate the microarray data, mRNA and protein level of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) was examined. GLUT-1 had an EOC/normal cells ratio of 5.51 based on microarray. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that GLUT-1 expression was significantly increased in EOC (p = .029 and p < .001, respectively). On survival analysis, GLUT-1 overexpression (HR = 4.80, p = .027) and lymph node metastases (HR = 8.35, p = .016) conferred a significantly worse overall survival. In conclusion, GLUT-1 expression is remarkably upregulated in EOC and predicts a poor overall survival.

  4. Effect of guaifenesin on mucin production, rheology, and mucociliary transport in differentiated human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Seagrave, JeanClare; Albrecht, Helmut; Park, Yong Sung; Rubin, Bruce; Solomon, Gail; Kim, K Chul

    2011-12-01

    Guaifenesin is widely used to alleviate symptoms of excessive mucus accumulation in the respiratory tract. However, its mechanism of action is poorly understood. The authors hypothesized that guaifenesin improves mucociliary clearance in humans by reducing mucin release, by decreasing mucus viscoelasticity, and by increasing mucociliary transport. To test these hypotheses, human differentiated airway epithelial cells, cultured at an air-liquid interface, were treated with clinically relevant concentrations of guaifenesin by addition to the basolateral medium. To evaluate the effect on mucin secretion, the authors used an anzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure the amounts of MUC5AC protein in apical surface fluid and cell lysates. To measure mucociliary transportability, additional cultures were treated for 1 or 6 hours with guaifenesin, and the movement of cell debris was measured from video data. Further, the authors measured mucus dynamic viscoelasticity using a micro cone and plate rheometer with nondestructive creep transformation. Guaifenesin suppressed mucin production in a dose-dependent manner at clinically relevant concentrations. The reduced mucin production was associated with increased mucociliary transport and decreased viscoelasticity of the mucus. Viability of the cultures was not significantly affected. These results suggest that guaifenesin could improve mucociliary clearance in humans by reducing the release and/or production of mucins, thereby altering mucus rheology.

  5. Cultured Mammary epithelial Monolayers (BME-UV) Express Functional Organic Anion and Cation Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bataineh, Mohammad M.; Merwe, Deon van der; Schultz, Bruce D.; Gehring, Ronette

    2009-01-01

    There is ongoing concern about the potential adverse effects of xenobiotic residues in cows' milk to the human consumer. Although drugs that are intentionally administered to lactating dairy cattle are rigorously regulated to prevent harmful residues, there are numerous other potential sources of exposure that are not as easily controlled. For example, cattle may be exposed to mycotoxins, pesticides and/or persistent organic pollutants through feed, water and inhalation of polluted air. Accurate estimates of the rate and extent of excretion of these compounds into milk is important to assess the risk of exposure through cows' milk. In the present study, the expression of carrier mediated transport processes in cultured mono layers of an immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME-UV*) was determined using a flow-through diffusion cell system, selective substrates and inhibitors of organic cation transporters (OCT†) and organic anion transporters (OAT‡). The basal to apical (BL-to-Ap§) flux of tetraethylammonium (TEA**) and estrone sulfate (ES††) significantly exceeded their flux in the opposite direction. The addition of selective inhibitors to the donor compartment significantly decreased the BL-to-Ap flux of either selective substrate. These results suggest that both OCT and OAT are functionally expressed by BME-UV cells. PMID:19754907

  6. Epithelial tethering of MUC5AC-rich mucus impairs mucociliary transport in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Bonser, Luke R.; Zlock, Lorna; Finkbeiner, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The development of pathologic mucus, which is not readily cleared from the airways, is an important contributor to the morbidity and mortality associated with asthma. It is not clear how the major airway mucins MUC5AC and MUC5B are organized within the mucus gel or how this gel contributes to airway obstruction in asthma. Here, we demonstrated that mucus plugs from individuals with fatal asthma are heterogeneous gels with distinct MUC5AC- and MUC5B-containing domains. Stimulation of cultured human bronchial epithelial cells with IL-13, a key mediator in asthma, induced the formation of heterogeneous mucus gels and dramatically impaired mucociliary transport. Impaired transport was not associated with defects in ciliary function but instead was related to tethering of MUC5AC-containing mucus gel domains to mucus-producing cells in the epithelium. Replacement of tethered mucus with untethered mucus restored mucociliary transport. Together, our results indicate that tethering of MUC5AC-containing domains to the epithelium causes mucostasis and likely represents a major cause of mucus plugging in asthma. PMID:27183390

  7. Epithelial tethering of MUC5AC-rich mucus impairs mucociliary transport in asthma.

    PubMed

    Bonser, Luke R; Zlock, Lorna; Finkbeiner, Walter; Erle, David J

    2016-06-01

    The development of pathologic mucus, which is not readily cleared from the airways, is an important contributor to the morbidity and mortality associated with asthma. It is not clear how the major airway mucins MUC5AC and MUC5B are organized within the mucus gel or how this gel contributes to airway obstruction in asthma. Here, we demonstrated that mucus plugs from individuals with fatal asthma are heterogeneous gels with distinct MUC5AC- and MUC5B-containing domains. Stimulation of cultured human bronchial epithelial cells with IL-13, a key mediator in asthma, induced the formation of heterogeneous mucus gels and dramatically impaired mucociliary transport. Impaired transport was not associated with defects in ciliary function but instead was related to tethering of MUC5AC-containing mucus gel domains to mucus-producing cells in the epithelium. Replacement of tethered mucus with untethered mucus restored mucociliary transport. Together, our results indicate that tethering of MUC5AC-containing domains to the epithelium causes mucostasis and likely represents a major cause of mucus plugging in asthma.

  8. STOPPING AND BARYON TRANSPORT IN HEAVY ION REACTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    VIDEBAEK, F.

    2005-02-05

    In this report I will give an experimental overview on nuclear stopping in hadron collisions, and relate observations to understanding of baryon transport. Baryon number transport is not only evidenced via net-proton distributions but also by the enhancement of strange baryons near mid-rapidity. Although the focus is on high-energy data obtained from pp and heavy ions from RHIC, relevant data from SPS and ISR will be considered. A discussion how the available data at higher energy relates and gives information on baryon junction, quark-diquark breaking will be made.

  9. Modeling of negative ion transport in a plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riz, David; Paméla, Jérôme

    1998-08-01

    A code called NIETZSCHE has been developed to simulate the negative ion transport in a plasma source, from their birth place to the extraction holes. The ion trajectory is calculated by numerically solving the 3-D motion equation, while the atomic processes of destruction, of elastic collision H-/H+ and of charge exchange H-/H0 are handled at each time step by a Monte-Carlo procedure. This code can be used to calculate the extraction probability of a negative ion produced at any location inside the source. Calculations performed with NIETZSCHE have allowed to explain, either quantitatively or qualitatively, several phenomena observed in negative ion sources, such as the isotopic H-/D- effect, and the influence of the plasma grid bias or of the magnetic filter on the negative ion extraction. The code has also shown that in the type of sources contemplated for ITER, which operate at large arc power densities (>1 W cm-3), negative ions can reach the extraction region provided if they are produced at a distance lower than 2 cm from the plasma grid in the case of «volume production» (dissociative attachment processes), or if they are produced at the plasma grid surface, in the vicinity of the extraction holes.

  10. Establishment of an in vitro brain barrier epithelial transport system for pharmacological and toxicological study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lewis Zhichang; Zheng, Wei

    2005-09-28

    An immortalized Z310 murine choroidal epithelial cell line was recently established in this laboratory. The purposes of this study were (1) to investigate the presence of tight junction (TJ) proteins in Z310 cells and (2) to develop a Z310 cell-based in vitro brain barrier transport model. Real-time RT-PCR studies revealed that Z310 cells possess mRNAs encoding ZO-1, -2, and -3, claudin-1, -2, -4, and -8, occludin, and connexin-32. Confocal microscopic analyses confirmed the presence of claudin-1 and ZO-1 in Z310 cells at cell-cell contact sites. When Z310 cells were grown on a two-chamber Transwell device, the [14C]sucrose permeability coefficient and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) across the cell monolayer were 6 x 10(-4) cm/min and 61 omega-cm2, respectively. To improve the tightness of Z310 barrier, the cells were cultured in astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM), or in the presence of eicosapentaenoic acids (EPA, 10 microM), epidermal growth factor (EGF, 100 ng/mL), or dexamethasone (1 microM) in the growth medium. Treatment with ACM, EPA, EGF and dexamethasone significantly increased the TEER by 33%, 38%, 40%, and 50% above controls, respectively. However, only dexamethasone significantly reduced [14C]sucrose paracellular permeability (-231% of controls). These data suggest that Z310 cells possess the TJ proteins. The presence of dexamethasone in the growth medium improves the tightness of Z310 cell monolayer to the level better than that of the primary culture of choroidal epithelial cells. The Z310 cell-based in vitro model appears to be suitable for transepithelial transport study of drugs and toxicants.

  11. Transport of radioactive ions in soil by electrokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, M.F.; Surma, J.E.; Virden, J.W.

    1994-10-01

    An electrokinetic approach is being evaluated for in situ soil remediation at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This approach uses an applied electric field to induce transport of both radioactive and hazardous waste ions in soil. The work discussed in this paper involves the development of a new method to monitor the movement of the radioactive ions within the soil during the electrokinetic process. A closed cell and a gamma counter were used to provide iii situ measurements of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co movement in Hanford soil. Preliminary results show that for an applied potential of 200 V over approximately 200 hr, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}60 were transported a distance of 4 to 5 in. The monitoring technique demonstrated the feasibility of using electrokinetics for soil separation applications.

  12. Feed gas contaminant control in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Minford, Eric; Waldron, William Emil

    2009-07-07

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising an enclosure having an interior and an interior surface, inlet piping having an internal surface and adapted to introduce a heated feed gas into the interior of the enclosure, and outlet piping adapted to withdraw a product gas from the interior of the enclosure; one or more planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the enclosure, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide material; and a preheater adapted to heat a feed gas to provide the heated feed gas to the inlet piping, wherein the preheater comprises an interior surface. Any of the interior surfaces of the enclosure, the inlet piping, and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining. Alternatively, any of the interior surfaces of the inlet piping and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining and the enclosure may comprise copper.

  13. A comparison of linaclotide and lubiprostone dosing regimens on ion transport responses in human colonic mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang Bum; Marchelletta, Ronald R; Penrose, Harrison; Docherty, Michael J; McCole, Declan F

    2015-01-01

    Linaclotide, a synthetic guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) agonist, and the prostone analog, Lubiprostone, are approved to manage chronic idiopathic constipation and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Lubiprostone also protects intestinal mucosal barrier function in ischemia. GC-C signaling regulates local fluid balance and other components of intestinal mucosal homeostasis including epithelial barrier function. The aim of this study was to compare if select dosing regimens differentially affect linaclotide and lubiprostone modulation of ion transport and barrier properties of normal human colonic mucosa. Normal sigmoid colon biopsies from healthy subjects were mounted in Ussing chambers. Tissues were treated with linaclotide, lubiprostone, or vehicle to determine effects on short-circuit current (Isc). Subsequent Isc responses to the cAMP agonist, forskolin, and the calcium agonist, carbachol, were also measured to assess if either drug caused desensitization. Barrier properties were assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance. Isc responses to linaclotide and lubiprostone were significantly higher than vehicle control when administered bilaterally or to the mucosal side only. Single versus cumulative concentrations of linaclotide showed differences in efficacy while cumulative but not single dosing caused desensitization to forskolin. Lubiprostone reduced forskolin responses under all conditions. Linaclotide and lubiprostone exerted a positive effect on TER that was dependent on the dosing regimen. Linaclotide and lubiprostone increase ion transport responses across normal human colon but linaclotide displays increased sensitivity to the dosing regimen used. These findings may have implications for dosing protocols of these agents in patients with constipation. PMID:26038704

  14. A comparison of linaclotide and lubiprostone dosing regimens on ion transport responses in human colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sang Bum; Marchelletta, Ronald R; Penrose, Harrison; Docherty, Michael J; McCole, Declan F

    2015-03-01

    Linaclotide, a synthetic guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) agonist, and the prostone analog, Lubiprostone, are approved to manage chronic idiopathic constipation and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Lubiprostone also protects intestinal mucosal barrier function in ischemia. GC-C signaling regulates local fluid balance and other components of intestinal mucosal homeostasis including epithelial barrier function. The aim of this study was to compare if select dosing regimens differentially affect linaclotide and lubiprostone modulation of ion transport and barrier properties of normal human colonic mucosa. Normal sigmoid colon biopsies from healthy subjects were mounted in Ussing chambers. Tissues were treated with linaclotide, lubiprostone, or vehicle to determine effects on short-circuit current (I sc). Subsequent I sc responses to the cAMP agonist, forskolin, and the calcium agonist, carbachol, were also measured to assess if either drug caused desensitization. Barrier properties were assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance. I sc responses to linaclotide and lubiprostone were significantly higher than vehicle control when administered bilaterally or to the mucosal side only. Single versus cumulative concentrations of linaclotide showed differences in efficacy while cumulative but not single dosing caused desensitization to forskolin. Lubiprostone reduced forskolin responses under all conditions. Linaclotide and lubiprostone exerted a positive effect on TER that was dependent on the dosing regimen. Linaclotide and lubiprostone increase ion transport responses across normal human colon but linaclotide displays increased sensitivity to the dosing regimen used. These findings may have implications for dosing protocols of these agents in patients with constipation.

  15. Predicting Carbonate Ion Transport in Alkaline Anion Exchange Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Schematic of the permeation cell experiment used to measure transient CO2 flux across the polymer electrolyte membrane. Experimental result vs. model trend...Microstructure on Charge Transfer, Mass Transfer, and Electrochemical Reactions in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells ; Part 2. Ion and Water Transport in Alkaline Anion...through the use of the Fuel Cell Technologies Test Station such as the relative humidity and flow rate of the feed gases, the cell temperature, and the

  16. Ion transport in porous electrodes with mixed conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebova, N. V.; Krasnova, A. O.; Tomasov, A. A.; Zelenina, N. K.; Nechitailov, A. A.

    2017-06-01

    A method for studying dc ion transport in porous mixed-conductivity electrodes in the course of the electrochemical reaction taking place in them has been suggested. The dependences of the proton conductivity of porous electrodes used in direct electrochemical energy converters (electrolyzers, fuel cells) on their composition and structure have been presented. These data are of practical importance and can be used to analyze ohmic losses in the electrodes and membrane electrode assembly and also to devise novel electrode materials.

  17. Temperature Modulates the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Intestinal Ion Transport in Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Hu, Marian Y; Michael, Katharina; Kreiss, Cornelia M; Stumpp, Meike; Dupont, Sam; Tseng, Yung-Che; Lucassen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    CO2-driven seawater acidification has been demonstrated to enhance intestinal bicarbonate secretion rates in teleosts, leading to an increased release of CaCO3 under simulated ocean acidification scenarios. In this study, we investigated if increasing CO2 levels stimulate the intestinal acid-base regulatory machinery of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and whether temperatures at the upper limit of thermal tolerance stimulate or counteract ion regulatory capacities. Juvenile G. morhua were acclimated for 4 weeks to three CO2 levels (550, 1200, and 2200 μatm) covering present and near-future natural variability, at optimum (10°C) and summer maximum temperature (18°C), respectively. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the subcellular localization of ion transporters, including Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA), Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger 3 (NHE3), Na(+)/[Formula: see text] cotransporter (NBC1), pendrin-like Cl(-)/[Formula: see text] exchanger (SLC26a6), V-type H(+)-ATPase subunit a (VHA), and Cl(-) channel 3 (CLC3) in epithelial cells of the anterior intestine. At 10°C, proteins and mRNA were generally up-regulated for most transporters in the intestinal epithelium after acclimation to higher CO2 levels. This supports recent findings demonstrating increased intestinal [Formula: see text] secretion rates in response to CO2 induced seawater acidification. At 18°C, mRNA expression and protein concentrations of most ion transporters remained unchanged or were even decreased, suggesting thermal compensation. This response may be energetically favorable to retain blood [Formula: see text] levels to stabilize pHe, but may negatively affect intestinal salt and water resorption of marine teleosts in future oceans.

  18. Temperature Modulates the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Intestinal Ion Transport in Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Marian Y.; Michael, Katharina; Kreiss, Cornelia M.; Stumpp, Meike; Dupont, Sam; Tseng, Yung-Che; Lucassen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    CO2-driven seawater acidification has been demonstrated to enhance intestinal bicarbonate secretion rates in teleosts, leading to an increased release of CaCO3 under simulated ocean acidification scenarios. In this study, we investigated if increasing CO2 levels stimulate the intestinal acid–base regulatory machinery of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and whether temperatures at the upper limit of thermal tolerance stimulate or counteract ion regulatory capacities. Juvenile G. morhua were acclimated for 4 weeks to three CO2 levels (550, 1200, and 2200 μatm) covering present and near-future natural variability, at optimum (10°C) and summer maximum temperature (18°C), respectively. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the subcellular localization of ion transporters, including Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA), Na+/H+-exchanger 3 (NHE3), Na+/HCO3− cotransporter (NBC1), pendrin-like Cl−/HCO3− exchanger (SLC26a6), V-type H+-ATPase subunit a (VHA), and Cl− channel 3 (CLC3) in epithelial cells of the anterior intestine. At 10°C, proteins and mRNA were generally up-regulated for most transporters in the intestinal epithelium after acclimation to higher CO2 levels. This supports recent findings demonstrating increased intestinal HCO3− secretion rates in response to CO2 induced seawater acidification. At 18°C, mRNA expression and protein concentrations of most ion transporters remained unchanged or were even decreased, suggesting thermal compensation. This response may be energetically favorable to retain blood HCO3− levels to stabilize pHe, but may negatively affect intestinal salt and water resorption of marine teleosts in future oceans. PMID:27313538

  19. Fast ion transport induced by saturated infernal mode

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, V. S.

    2014-05-15

    Tokamak discharges with extended weak-shear central core are known to suffer from infernal modes when the core safety factor approaches the mode ratio. These modes can cause an outward convection of the well-passing energetic ions deposited in the core by fusion reactions and/or neutral beam injection. Convection mechanism consists in collisional slowing down of energetic ions trapped in the Doppler-precession resonance with a finite-amplitude infernal mode. Convection velocity can reach a few m/s in modern spherical tori. Possible relation of this transport with the enhanced fast ion losses in the presence of “long lived modes” in the MAST tokamak [I. T. Chapman et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 045007 (2010)] is discussed.

  20. Bivalent ion transport through graphene/PET nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huijun; Cheng, Yaxiong; Zeng, Jian; Mo, Dan; Duan, Jinglai; Liu, Jiande; Zhai, Pengfei; Sun, Youmei; Liu, Jie

    2016-05-01

    The PET suspended single graphene nanopore (G/PET) was produced by heavy ion irradiation and asymmetric chemical etching. The solutions of NiSO4, NiCl2, CuSO4 and CuCl2 with different concentration were adopted to study the transport properties of bivalent ion in single G/PET nanopore by measuring the I-V curves. The perfect "diode effect" and excellent rectification effect of G/PET nanopore were observed, and the huge rectification ratio up to 43.3 was obtained in NiSO4 solution. The great solution selectivity and ion current magnification effect of graphene/PET nanopore were also confirmed in our study.

  1. Regulation of lysosomal ion homeostasis by channels and transporters.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jian; Zhu, Michael X

    2016-08-01

    Lysosomes are the major organelles that carry out degradation functions. They integrate and digest materials compartmentalized by endocytosis, phagocytosis or autophagy. In addition to more than 60 hydrolases residing in the lysosomes, there are also ion channels and transporters that mediate the flux or transport of H(+), Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) across the lysosomal membranes. Defects in ionic exchange can lead to abnormal lysosome morphology, defective vesicle trafficking, impaired autophagy, and diseases such as neurodegeneration and lysosomal storage disorders. The latter are characterized by incomplete lysosomal digestion and accumulation of toxic materials inside enlarged intracellular vacuoles. In addition to degradation, recent studies have revealed the roles of lysosomes in metabolic pathways through kinases such as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transcriptional regulation through calcium signaling molecules such as transcription factor EB (TFEB) and calcineurin. Owing to the development of new approaches including genetically encoded fluorescence probes and whole endolysosomal patch clamp recording techniques, studies on lysosomal ion channels have made remarkable progress in recent years. In this review, we will focus on the current knowledge of lysosome-resident ion channels and transporters, discuss their roles in maintaining lysosomal function, and evaluate how their dysfunction can result in disease.

  2. Ion Transport in Polymerized Ionic Liquid Block and Random Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elabd, Yossef; Ye, Yuesheng; Choi, Jae-Hong; Winey, Karen

    2012-02-01

    Polymerized ionic liquid (PIL) block copolymers, a new type of solid-state polymer electrolyte, are of interest for energy conversion and storage devices, such as fuel cells, batteries, supercapacitors, and solar cells. In this study, a series of PIL diblock and random copolymers with various PIL compositions were synthesized. These consisted of an IL monomer and a non-ionic monomer, 1-[(2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-3-butylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (MEBIm-TFSI) and methyl methacrylate (MMA), and 1-[(2-acryloyloxy)ethyl]-3-butylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (AEBIm-TFSI) and styrene (S), respectively, were synthesized. The anion conductivity (ion transport) and morphology were measured in all of the polymers with EIS, SAXS/WAXS, and TEM. Ion transport in block copolymers are significantly higher than random copolymers at the same PIL composition and are highly dependent on the block copolymer nanostructure. The relationship between ion transport mechanisms and the phase behavior of these materials will be discussed.

  3. Ion transport and rectification in a charged nanoscale cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Li; Mao, Qian; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    The possibility of rectification for ion transport in nanofluidic systems offers a potential route for developing a nanofluidic diode that mimics a semiconductor diode or captures some features of a biological ion channel. The rectification phenomenon, in which a solution would be enriched in one ion, results from asymmetric effects in ionic transport that can be realized by discontinuities in surface charge, concentration differences across a pore, or an asymmetric pore shape such as a cone. In this paper, we focus on the latter two effects and seek to capture the rectification effect in simple terms with a non-dimensional model representative of the many systems studied to date. Specifically, we analyze the rectification phenomenon in a charged nanoscale cone with a concentration difference and/or an electrical potential difference across the pore. Based on the Poisson-Nernst-Planck model and the assumption of one-dimensional transport, we derive a model based on two coupled ordinary differential equations to determine significant parameters such as ionic current. We identify several dimensionless parameters that have not been recognized previously and study the influence of the dimensionless parameters on the rectification. The authors would like to thank The Center for Combustion Energy (CCE) of Tsinghua University for supporting this project.

  4. Regulation of lysosomal ion homeostasis by channels and transporters

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jian; Zhu, Michael X.

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are the major organelles that carry out degradation functions. They integrate and digest materials compartmentalized by endocytosis, phagocytosis or autophagy. In addition to more than 60 hydrolases residing in the lysosomes, there are also ion channels and transporters that mediate the flux or transport of H+, Ca2+, Na+, K+, and Cl− across the lysosomal membranes. Defects in ionic exchange can lead to abnormal lysosome morphology, defective vesicle trafficking, impaired autophagy, and diseases such as neurodegeneration and lysosomal storage disorders. The latter are characterized by incomplete lysosomal digestion and accumulation of toxic materials inside enlarged intracellular vacuoles. In addition to degradation, recent studies have revealed the roles of lysosomes in metabolic pathways through kinases such as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transcriptional regulation through calcium signaling molecules such as transcription factor EB (TFEB) and calcineurin. Owing to the development of new approaches including genetically encoded fluorescence probes and whole endolysosomal patch clamp recording techniques, studies on lysosomal ion channels have made remarkable progress in recent years. In this review, we will focus on the current knowledge of lysosome-resident ion channels and transporters, discuss their roles in maintaining lysosomal function, and evaluate how their dysfunction can result in disease. PMID:27430889

  5. Glial Na(+) -dependent ion transporters in pathophysiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Boscia, Francesca; Begum, Gulnaz; Pignataro, Giuseppe; Sirabella, Rossana; Cuomo, Ornella; Casamassa, Antonella; Sun, Dandan; Annunziato, Lucio

    2016-10-01

    Sodium dynamics are essential for regulating functional processes in glial cells. Indeed, glial Na(+) signaling influences and regulates important glial activities, and plays a role in neuron-glia interaction under physiological conditions or in response to injury of the central nervous system (CNS). Emerging studies indicate that Na(+) pumps and Na(+) -dependent ion transporters in astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes regulate Na(+) homeostasis and play a fundamental role in modulating glial activities in neurological diseases. In this review, we first briefly introduced the emerging roles of each glial cell type in the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia, Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, and myelin diseases. Then, we discussed the current knowledge on the main roles played by the different glial Na(+) -dependent ion transporters, including Na(+) /K(+) ATPase, Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchangers, Na(+) /H(+) exchangers, Na(+) -K(+) -Cl(-) cotransporters, and Na(+) - HCO3- cotransporter in the pathophysiology of the diverse CNS diseases. We highlighted their contributions in cell survival, synaptic pathology, gliotransmission, pH homeostasis, and their role in glial activation, migration, gliosis, inflammation, and tissue repair processes. Therefore, this review summarizes the foundation work for targeting Na(+) -dependent ion transporters in glia as a novel strategy to control important glial activities associated with Na(+) dynamics in different neurological disorders. GLIA 2016;64:1677-1697. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Lithium-ion transport in inorganic solid state electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Gao; Yu-Sheng, Zhao; Si-Qi, Shi; Hong, Li

    2016-01-01

    An overview of ion transport in lithium-ion inorganic solid state electrolytes is presented, aimed at exploring and designing better electrolyte materials. Ionic conductivity is one of the most important indices of the performance of inorganic solid state electrolytes. The general definition of solid state electrolytes is presented in terms of their role in a working cell (to convey ions while isolate electrons), and the history of solid electrolyte development is briefly summarized. Ways of using the available theoretical models and experimental methods to characterize lithium-ion transport in solid state electrolytes are systematically introduced. Then the various factors that affect ionic conductivity are itemized, including mainly structural disorder, composite materials and interface effects between a solid electrolyte and an electrode. Finally, strategies for future material systems, for synthesis and characterization methods, and for theory and calculation are proposed, aiming to help accelerate the design and development of new solid electrolytes. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51372228), the Shanghai Pujiang Program, China (Grant No. 14PJ1403900), and the Shanghai Institute of Materials Genome from the Shanghai Municipal Science and Technology Commission, China (Grant No. 14DZ2261200).

  7. Validation of Heavy Ion Transport Capabilities in PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronningen, Reginald M.

    2007-03-01

    The performance of the Monte Carlo code system PHITS is validated for heavy ion transport capabilities by performing simulations and comparing results against experimental data from heavy ion reactions of benchmark quality. These data are from measurements of secondary neutron production cross sections in reactions of Xe at 400 MeV/u with lithium and lead targets, measurements of neutrons outside of thick concrete and iron shields, and measurements of isotope yields produced in the fragmentation of a 140 MeV/u 48Ca beam on a beryllium target and on a tantalum target. A practical example that tests magnetic field capabilities is shown for a simulated 48Ca beam at 500 MeV/u striking a lithium target to produce the rare isotope 44Si, with ion transport through a fragmentation-reaction magnetic pre-separator. The results of this study show that PHITS performs reliably for the simulation of radiation fields that is necessary for designing safe, reliable and cost effective future high-powered heavy-ion accelerators in rare isotope beam facilities.

  8. An improved Green's function for ion beam transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.; Wilson, J. W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2004-01-01

    Ion beam transport theory allows testing of material transmission properties in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators. This is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are the main emphasis of the present work. In consequence, an analytic solution of the linear Boltzmann equation is pursued in the form of a Green's function allowing flexibility in application to a broad range of boundary value problems. It has been established that simple solutions can be found for high charge and energy (HZE) ions by ignoring nuclear energy downshifts and dispersion. Such solutions were found to be supported by experimental evidence with HZE ion beams when multiple scattering was added. Lacking from the prior solutions were range and energy straggling and energy downshift with dispersion associated with nuclear events. Recently, we have found global solutions including these effects providing a broader class of HZE ion solutions. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An improved Green's function for ion beam transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.; Wilson, J. W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2004-01-01

    Ion beam transport theory allows testing of material transmission properties in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators. This is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are the main emphasis of the present work. In consequence, an analytic solution of the linear Boltzmann equation is pursued in the form of a Green's function allowing flexibility in application to a broad range of boundary value problems. It has been established that simple solutions can be found for high charge and energy (HZE) ions by ignoring nuclear energy downshifts and dispersion. Such solutions were found to be supported by experimental evidence with HZE ion beams when multiple scattering was added. Lacking from the prior solutions were range and energy straggling and energy downshift with dispersion associated with nuclear events. Recently, we have found global solutions including these effects providing a broader class of HZE ion solutions. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ion transport in broad bean leaf mesophyll under saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Percey, William J; Shabala, Lana; Breadmore, Michael C; Guijt, Rosanne M; Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-10-01

    Salt stress reduces the ability of mesophyll tissue to respond to light. Potassium outward rectifying channels are responsible for 84 % of Na (+) induced potassium efflux from mesophyll cells. Modulation in ion transport of broad bean (Vicia faba L.) mesophyll to light under increased apoplastic salinity stress was investigated using vibrating ion-selective microelectrodes (the MIFE technique). Increased apoplastic Na(+) significantly affected mesophyll cells ability to respond to light by modulating ion transport across their membranes. Elevated apoplastic Na(+) also induced a significant K(+) efflux from mesophyll tissue. This efflux was mediated predominately by potassium outward rectifying channels (84 %) and the remainder of the efflux was through non-selective cation channels. NaCl treatment resulted in a reduction in photosystem II efficiency in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In particular, reductions in Fv'/Fm' were linked to K(+) homeostasis in the mesophyll tissue. Increased apoplastic Na(+) concentrations induced vanadate-sensitive net H(+) efflux, presumably mediated by the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. It is concluded that the observed pump's activation is essential for the maintenance of membrane potential and ion homeostasis in the cytoplasm of mesophyll under salt stress.

  11. Plasma Channel Transport for Heavy Ion Fusion: Investigation of Beam Transport, Channel Initiation and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauschwitz, Andreas; Niemann, Christoph; Penache, Dan; Birkner, Richard; Hoffmann, Dieter H. H.; Kobloch, Renate; Neff, Stefan; Presura, Radu; Ponce, Dave; Rosmej, Frank; Yu, Simon

    2002-12-01

    For final beam transport in an IFE reactor three alternatives are mainly discussed. These are neutralized ballistic transport, self-pinched transport, and plasma channel transport. Discharge plasma channels were investigated in the recent years at GSI Darmstadt and at LBNL Berkeley in a number of experiments. Different initiation mechanisms for gas discharges of up to 60 kA were studied and compared. In the Berkeley experiments laser ionization of organic vapors in a buffer gas was used to initiate and direct the discharge while at GSI laser gas heating and ion beam induced gas ionization were tested as initiation mechanisms. Measurements of temperature, electron density, gas density, and magnetic field distribution in the channels are compared with results of beam transport experiments at the GSI UNILAC accelerator and with MHD simulations of the 1D-fluidcode CYCLOPS, which was developed in Berkeley. Good agreement between plasma diagnostics results, measured ion optical properties and MHD simulations was found. Parameters that are required for a reactor application are a discharge current of 50 kA, a channel diameter below 1 cm, a pointing stability better than 500 μm, and MHD stability for more than 10 μs. These parameters have been demonstrated in the recent experiments. The results imply that transport channels work with sufficient stability, reproducibility and ion optical properties in a wide pressure range and for various discharge gases.

  12. Transport of intense beams of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, M.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Spadtke, P.; Tinschert, K.

    2005-10-01

    The new generation of ion sources delivers beams with intensities of several mA. This requires a careful design of the analysing system and the low-energy beam transport (LEBT) from the source to the subsequent systems. At INFN-LNS, high intensity proton sources (TRIPS [L. Celona, G. Ciavola, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1423 (2004)], PM-TRIPS [G. Ciavola, L. Celona, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1453 (2004)]) as well as ECR ion sources for the production of highly charged high-intensity heavy ion beams are developed (SERSE [S. Gammino, G. Ciavola, L. Celona et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72(11) 4090 (2001), and references therein], GyroSERSE [S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1637 (2004)], MS-ECRIS [G. Ciavola et al ., (2005), 11th Int. Conf. on Ion Sources, Caen, (in press)]). In this paper, we present ion-optical design studies of various LEBT systems for ion-sources devoted to the production of intense beams. Calculations were performed using the computer codes GIOS [H. Wollnik, J. Brezina and M. Berz, NIM A 258 (1987)], GICO [M. Berz, H.C. Hoffmann, and H. Wollnik, NIM A 258 (1987)], and TRANSPORT [K.L. Brown, F. Rothacker and D.C. Carey, SLAC-R-95-462, Fermilab-Pub-95/069, UC-414 (1995)]. Simulations take into account the expected phase space growth of the beam emittance due to space-charge effects and image aberrations introduced by the magnetic elements.

  13. Mechanism Exploration of Ion Transport in Nanocomposite Cation Exchange Membranes.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Zhang, Bopeng; Fan, Yilin; Chen, Yongsheng

    2017-04-19

    The origin of property enhancement of nanocomposite ion exchange membranes (IEMs) is far from being fully understood. By combining experimental work and computational modeling analysis, we could determine the influence of nanomaterials on the ion transport properties of nanocomposite cation exchange membranes (CEMs). We synthesized and characterized a series of nanocomposite CEMs by using SPPO as polymer materials and silica nanoparticles (NPs) (unsulfonated or sulfonated) as nanomaterials. We found that with the increase of NP loading, measured CEM permselectivity and swelling degree first increased and then decreased. We also found the ion exchange capacity (IEC) and ionic resistance of nanocomposite CEMs tend to be the same, regardless what type of NPs are incorporated into the membrane. Modeling analysis suggests that the change of membrane properties is related to the change in membrane microstructure. With the addition of silica NPs, membrane porosity (volume fraction of intergel phase) increases so that membranes can absorb more water. Also, volume fraction of sulfonated polymer segments increases, which can allow membranes to retain more counterions, causing membrane IEC to increase. By calculating the effective ion diffusion coefficients and membrane tortuosity factors of all the silica-NP-based CEMs synthesized in this study, along with nanocomposite CEMs from previous studies, we conclude that membrane ion transport efficiency tends to increase with the incorporation of nanomaterials. In addition, this paper presents a simulation model, which explains how the membrane property changes upon nanomaterial aggregation; the simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data. Simulation results indicate that membrane properties are related to nanomaterial number concentration in the membrane matrices; thus, a plateau is reached for membrane ion diffusion coefficients due to the severe influence of aggregation on the increase of nanomaterial

  14. Karyotyping of Chromosomes in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Transformed by High Energy Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zhang, Ye; Park, Seongmi; Story, Michael T.; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer induced from exposure to space radiation is believed to be one of the most significant health risks for long-term space travels. In a previous study, normal human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs), immortalized through the expression of Cdk4 and hTERT, were exposed to gamma rays and high energy Fe ions for the selection of transformed clones induced by low- and high-LET radiation. In this research, we analyzed chromosome aberrations in these selected clones for genomic instability using the multi-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (mFISH), as well as the multi-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) techniques. In most of the clones, we found chromosomal aberrations involving translocations between different chromosomes, with several of the breaks occurred in the q-arm of chromosome 3. We also identified copy number variations between the transformed clones and the parental HBEC cells regardless of the exposure condition. Our results indicated that the chromosomal aberrations in low- and high radiation-induced transformed clones are inadequately different from spontaneous soft agar growth. Further analysis is underway to reveal the genomic instability in more transformed clones

  15. Karyotyping of Chromosomes in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Transformed by High Energy Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zhang, Ye; Park, Seongmi; Story, Michael D.; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer induced from exposures to space radiation is one of the most significant health risks for long-term space travels. Evidences show that low- and high- Linear energy transfer (LET)-induced transformation of normal human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) that are immortalized through the expression of Cdk4 and hTERT. The cells were exposed to gamma rays and high-energy Fe ions for the selection of transformed clones. Transformed HBEC are identified and analyzed chromosome aberrations (i.e. genomic instability) using the multi-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (mFISH), as well as the multi-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) techniques. Our results show chromosomal translocations between different chromosomes and several of the breaks occurred in the q-arm of chromosome 3. We also identified copy number variations between the transformed and the parental HBEC regardless of the exposure conditions. We observed chromosomal aberrations in the lowand high-LET radiation-induced transformed clones and they are imperfectly different from clones obtain in spontaneous soft agar growth.

  16. Establishment and transformation of telomerase-immortalized human small airway epithelial cells by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. L.; Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.

    Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a number of causally linked genes including the novel tumor suppressor Betaig-h3 that were differentially expressed in radiation induced tumorigenic BEP2D cells. To extend these studies using a genomically more stable bronchial cell line, we show here that ectopic expression of the catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT) in primary human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells resulted in the generation of several clonal cell lines that have been continuously in culture for more than 250 population doublings and are considered immortal. Comparably-treated control SAE cells infected with only the viral vector senesced after less than 10 population doublings. The immortalized clones demonstrated anchorage dependent growth and are non-tumorigenic in nude mice. These cells show no alteration in the p53 gene but a decrease in p16 expression. Exponentially growing SAEh cells were exposed to graded doses of 1 GeV/nucleon of 56Fe ions accelerated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Irradiated cells underwent gradual phenotypic alterations after extensive in vitro cultivation. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming anchorage independent in semisolid medium. These findings indicate that hTERT-immortalized cells, being diploid and chromosomal stable, should be a useful model in assessing mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis.

  17. Biophysical Model of Ion Transport across Human Respiratory Epithelia Allows Quantification of Ion Permeabilities

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Guilherme J.M.; Boucher, Richard C.; Elston, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Lung health and normal mucus clearance depend on adequate hydration of airway surfaces. Because transepithelial osmotic gradients drive water flows, sufficient hydration of the airway surface liquid depends on a balance between ion secretion and absorption by respiratory epithelia. In vitro experiments using cultures of primary human nasal epithelia and human bronchial epithelia have established many of the biophysical processes involved in airway surface liquid homeostasis. Most experimental studies, however, have focused on the apical membrane, despite the fact that ion transport across respiratory epithelia involves both cellular and paracellular pathways. In fact, the ion permeabilities of the basolateral membrane and paracellular pathway remain largely unknown. Here we use a biophysical model for water and ion transport to quantify ion permeabilities of all pathways (apical, basolateral, paracellular) in human nasal epithelia cultures using experimental (Ussing Chamber and microelectrode) data reported in the literature. We derive analytical formulas for the steady-state short-circuit current and membrane potential, which are for polarized epithelia the equivalent of the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation for single isolated cells. These relations allow parameter estimation to be performed efficiently. By providing a method to quantify all the ion permeabilities of respiratory epithelia, the model may aid us in understanding the physiology that regulates normal airway surface hydration. PMID:23442922

  18. Biophysical model of ion transport across human respiratory epithelia allows quantification of ion permeabilities.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Guilherme J M; Boucher, Richard C; Elston, Timothy C

    2013-02-05

    Lung health and normal mucus clearance depend on adequate hydration of airway surfaces. Because transepithelial osmotic gradients drive water flows, sufficient hydration of the airway surface liquid depends on a balance between ion secretion and absorption by respiratory epithelia. In vitro experiments using cultures of primary human nasal epithelia and human bronchial epithelia have established many of the biophysical processes involved in airway surface liquid homeostasis. Most experimental studies, however, have focused on the apical membrane, despite the fact that ion transport across respiratory epithelia involves both cellular and paracellular pathways. In fact, the ion permeabilities of the basolateral membrane and paracellular pathway remain largely unknown. Here we use a biophysical model for water and ion transport to quantify ion permeabilities of all pathways (apical, basolateral, paracellular) in human nasal epithelia cultures using experimental (Ussing Chamber and microelectrode) data reported in the literature. We derive analytical formulas for the steady-state short-circuit current and membrane potential, which are for polarized epithelia the equivalent of the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation for single isolated cells. These relations allow parameter estimation to be performed efficiently. By providing a method to quantify all the ion permeabilities of respiratory epithelia, the model may aid us in understanding the physiology that regulates normal airway surface hydration. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of electrolytes on ion transport in Chitosan membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupiasih, N. N.

    2016-11-01

    Recently, charged polymer membranes are widely used for water purification applications involving control of water and ion transport, such as reverse osmosis and electrodialysis. In this study, we have explored the effects of electrolyte solutions on ion transport properties of chitosan synthetic membranes via concentration gradient driven transport. Also, the water uptake of those membranes, before (control) as well used membranes have studied. The membrane used was chitosan membrane 2%. The electrolyte solutions used were HCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2 and AlCl3, with various concentrations of 0.1 mM, 1 mM, 10 mM, 100 mM and 1000 mM. Ion transport experiments were carried out in a cell membrane model which composed of two compartments and the potential difference of membrane was measured using Ag/AgCl calomel electrodes. Those measurements were conducted at ambient temperature 28.8 °C. The results showed that the current density (J) increased with increased in concentration gradient of solution. The current density was higher in electrolyte solution which has higher molar conductivity than those of a solution with a small molar conductivity. Meanwhile the current density was smaller in electrolyte solution which has larger Stokes radii than those of a solution with small Stokes radii. Except membrane which has been used in HCl solution, the water uptakes of the used membranes were greater than the control membrane. These results can develop and validate a common framework to interpret data of concentration gradient driven transport in chitosan synthetic membranes and to use it to design of membranes with improved performance.

  20. The high current transport experiment for heavy ion inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Baca, D.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Morse, E.

    2004-05-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is part of the US program to explore heavy-ion beam transport at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linac driver for fusion energy production. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge-dominated heavy-ion beams at high intensity (line charge density {approx} 0.2 {micro}C/m) over long pulse durations (4 {micro}s) in alternating gradient focusing lattices of electrostatic or magnetic quadrupoles. This experiment is testing transport issues resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and steering, envelope matching, image charges and focusing field nonlinearities, halo and, electron and gas cloud effects. We present the results for a coasting 1 MeV K{sup +} ion beam transported through ten electrostatic quadrupoles. The measurements cover two different fill factor studies (60% and 80% of the clear aperture radius) for which the transverse phase-space of the beam was characterized in detail, along with beam energy measurements and the first halo measurements. Electrostatic quadrupole transport at high beam fill factor ({approx}80%) is achieved with acceptable emittance growth and beam loss, even though the initial beam distribution is not ideal (but the emittance is low) nor in thermal equilibrium. We achieved good envelope control, and rematching may only be needed every ten lattice periods (at 80% fill factor) in a longer lattice of similar design. We also show that understanding and controlling the time dependence of the envelope parameters is critical to achieving high fill factors, notably because of the injector and matching section dynamics.

  1. Final Report - Ion Production and Transport in Atmospheric Pressure Ion Source Mass Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, Paul B.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2014-05-14

    This document is the final report on a project that focused in the general theme of atmospheric-pressure ion production and transport for mass spectrometry. Within that general theme there were two main projects: the fundamental study of the transport of elemental ions through the vacuum interface of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS), and fundamental studies of the ionization mechanisms in ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) sources for molecular mass spectrometry. In both cases the goal was to generate fundamental understanding of key instrumental processes that would lead to the development of instruments that were more sensitive and more consistent in their performance. The emphasis on consistency derives from the need for instruments that have the same sensitivity, regardless of sample type. In the jargon of analytical chemistry, such instruments are said to be free from matrix effects. In the ICPMS work each stage of ion production and of ion transport from the atmospheric pressure to the high-vacuum mass analyzer was studied. Factors controlling ion transport efficiency and consistency were identified at each stage of pressure reduction. In the ADI work the interactions between an electrospray plume and a fluorescent sample on a surface were examined microscopically. A new mechanism for analyte ion production in desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) was proposed. Optical spectroscopy was used to track the production of reactive species in plasmas used as ADI sources. Experiments with mixed-gas plasmas demonstrated that the addition of a small amount of hydrogen to a helium ADI plasma could boost the sensitivity for some analytes by over an order of magnitude.

  2. Pulmonary edema in meningococcal septicemia associated with reduced epithelial chloride transport.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Michael; Wallace, Helen; Barton, Paul; Gaillard, Erol; Newland, Paul; Diver, Michael; Southern, Kevin W

    2006-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that meningococcal septicemia-related pulmonary edema is associated with a systemic abnormality of epithelial sodium and chloride transport and to investigate an association with hormones regulating Na transport. Prospective observational study. The 24-bed pediatric intensive care unit and pediatric wards of Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital. Consecutive children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit and pediatric wards with a diagnosis of meningococcal septicemia and children (controls) with noninfectious critical illness receiving ventilatory support in the pediatric intensive care unit. We measured sweat and saliva electrolytes, renal electrolyte excretion, nasal potential difference, and aldosterone, thyroxine, and cortisol levels. Pulmonary edema was diagnosed by chest radiography and its severity quantified by calculation of ventilation index at admission and duration of mechanical ventilation. We recruited 17 patients with severe meningococcal septicemia (nine patients with pulmonary edema), 14 patients with mild meningococcal septicemia, and 20 controls. Sweat and saliva Na and Cl concentrations and renal Na excretion were significantly (p < .05) higher in patients with pulmonary edema compared with controls. Nasal potential difference and amiloride response in patients with pulmonary edema were not significantly different to controls, but response to a low Cl solution was reduced in the nasal airway of patients with pulmonary edema (p < .05). Sweat and saliva chloride concentrations correlated significantly and better with ventilation index and duration of ventilation than sodium concentrations. Aldosterone, thyroxine, and cortisol levels were not significantly different between groups. We have confirmed that meningococcal septicemia-related pulmonary edema is associated with reduced systemic sodium and chloride transport. Features of reduced Cl transport were most closely associated with markers of respiratory compromise

  3. Modeling plasmalemma ion transport of the aquatic plant Egeria densa.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, P; Sack, H; Köhler, A E; Dahse, I

    1996-11-01

    Fresh-water plants generate extraordinarily high electric potential differences at the plasma membrane. For a deeper understanding of the underlying transport processes a mathematical model of the electrogenic plasmalemma ion transport was developed based on experimental data mainly obtained from Egeria densa. The model uses a general nonlinear network approach and assumes coupling of the transporters via membrane potential. A proton pump, an outward-rectifying K+ channel, an inward-rectifying K+ channel, a Cl- channel and a (2H-Cl)+ symporter are considered to be elements of the system. The model takes into consideration the effects of light, external pH and ionic content of the bath medium on ion transport. As a result it does not only satisfactorily describe the membrane potential as a function of these external physiological factors but also succeeds in simulating the effects of specific inhibitors as well as I-V-curves obtained with the patch-clamp technique in the whole cell mode. The quality of the model was checked by stability and sensitivity analyses.

  4. A Green's function method for heavy ion beam transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Schimmerling, W.; Shavers, M. R.; Miller, J.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Badavi, F. F.

    1995-01-01

    The use of Green's function has played a fundamental role in transport calculations for high-charge high-energy (HZE) ions. Two recent developments have greatly advanced the practical aspects of implementation of these methods. The first was the formulation of a closed-form solution as a multiple fragmentation perturbation series. The second was the effective summation of the closed-form solution through nonperturbative techniques. The nonperturbative methods have been recently extended to an inhomogeneous, two-layer transport media to simulate the lead scattering foil present in the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL) biomedical beam line used for cancer therapy. Such inhomogeneous codes are necessary for astronaut shielding in space. The transport codes utilize the Langley Research Center atomic and nuclear database. Transport code and database evaluation are performed by comparison with experiments performed at the LBL Bevalac facility using 670 A MeV 20Ne and 600 A MeV 56Fe ion beams. The comparison with a time-of-flight and delta E detector measurement for the 20Ne beam and the plastic nuclear track detectors for 56Fe show agreement up to 35%-40% in water and aluminium targets, respectively.

  5. A Green's function method for heavy ion beam transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Schimmerling, W.; Shavers, M. R.; Miller, J.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Badavi, F. F.

    1995-01-01

    The use of Green's function has played a fundamental role in transport calculations for high-charge high-energy (HZE) ions. Two recent developments have greatly advanced the practical aspects of implementation of these methods. The first was the formulation of a closed-form solution as a multiple fragmentation perturbation series. The second was the effective summation of the closed-form solution through nonperturbative techniques. The nonperturbative methods have been recently extended to an inhomogeneous, two-layer transport media to simulate the lead scattering foil present in the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL) biomedical beam line used for cancer therapy. Such inhomogeneous codes are necessary for astronaut shielding in space. The transport codes utilize the Langley Research Center atomic and nuclear database. Transport code and database evaluation are performed by comparison with experiments performed at the LBL Bevalac facility using 670 A MeV 20Ne and 600 A MeV 56Fe ion beams. The comparison with a time-of-flight and delta E detector measurement for the 20Ne beam and the plastic nuclear track detectors for 56Fe show agreement up to 35%-40% in water and aluminium targets, respectively.

  6. ABCA Transporter Gene Expression and Poor Outcome in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hedditch, Ellen L.; Gao, Bo; Russell, Amanda J.; Lu, Yi; Emmanuel, Catherine; Beesley, Jonathan; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Harnett, Paul; George, Joshy; Williams, Rebekka T.; Flemming, Claudia; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Karlan, Beth; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Walsh, Christine; Fasching, Peter; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Nakanishi, Toru; Yatabe, Yasushi; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Heitz, Florian; Harter, Philipp; du Bois, Andreas; Schwaab, Ira; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susan K.; Jensen, Allan; Hogdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Brown, Bob; Flanagan, James; Metcalf, Michelle D; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sellers, Thomas; Fridley, Brooke; Cunningham, Julie; Schildkraut, Joellen; Iversen, Ed; Weber, Rachel P.; Berchuck, Andrew; Goode, Ellen; Bowtell, David D.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; deFazio, Anna; Norris, Murray D.; MacGregor, Stuart; Haber, Michelle; Henderson, Michelle J.

    2014-01-01

    Background ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play various roles in cancer biology and drug resistance, but their association with outcomes in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is unknown. Methods The relationship between clinical outcomes and ABC transporter gene expression in two independent cohorts of high-grade serous EOC tumors was assessed with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, analysis of expression microarray data, and immunohistochemistry. Associations between clinical outcomes and ABCA transporter gene single nucleotide polymorphisms were tested in a genome-wide association study. Impact of short interfering RNA–mediated gene suppression was determined by colony forming and migration assays. Association with survival was assessed with Kaplan–Meier analysis and log-rank tests. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Associations with outcome were observed with ABC transporters of the “A” subfamily, but not with multidrug transporters. High-level expression of ABCA1, ABCA6, ABCA8, and ABCA9 in primary tumors was statistically significantly associated with reduced survival in serous ovarian cancer patients. Low levels of ABCA5 and the C-allele of rs536009 were associated with shorter overall survival (hazard ratio for death = 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.26 to 1.79; P = 6.5e−6). The combined expression pattern of ABCA1, ABCA5, and either ABCA8 or ABCA9 was associated with particularly poor outcome (mean overall survival in group with adverse ABCA1, ABCA5 and ABCA9 gene expression = 33.2 months, 95% CI = 26.4 to 40.1; vs 55.3 months in the group with favorable ABCA gene expression, 95% CI = 49.8 to 60.8; P = .001), independently of tumor stage or surgical debulking status. Suppression of cholesterol transporter ABCA1 inhibited ovarian cancer cell growth and migration in vitro, and statin treatment reduced ovarian cancer cell migration. Conclusions Expression of ABCA transporters was associated with poor

  7. ABCA transporter gene expression and poor outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hedditch, Ellen L; Gao, Bo; Russell, Amanda J; Lu, Yi; Emmanuel, Catherine; Beesley, Jonathan; Johnatty, Sharon E; Chen, Xiaoqing; Harnett, Paul; George, Joshy; Williams, Rebekka T; Flemming, Claudia; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Karlan, Beth; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Walsh, Christine; Fasching, Peter; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hein, Alexander; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Nakanishi, Toru; Yatabe, Yasushi; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Heitz, Florian; Harter, Philipp; du Bois, Andreas; Schwaab, Ira; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susan K; Jensen, Allan; Hogdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Brown, Bob; Flanagan, James; Metcalf, Michelle D; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sellers, Thomas; Fridley, Brooke; Cunningham, Julie; Schildkraut, Joellen; Iversen, Ed; Weber, Rachel P; Berchuck, Andrew; Goode, Ellen; Bowtell, David D; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; deFazio, Anna; Norris, Murray D; MacGregor, Stuart; Haber, Michelle; Henderson, Michelle J

    2014-07-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play various roles in cancer biology and drug resistance, but their association with outcomes in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is unknown. The relationship between clinical outcomes and ABC transporter gene expression in two independent cohorts of high-grade serous EOC tumors was assessed with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, analysis of expression microarray data, and immunohistochemistry. Associations between clinical outcomes and ABCA transporter gene single nucleotide polymorphisms were tested in a genome-wide association study. Impact of short interfering RNA-mediated gene suppression was determined by colony forming and migration assays. Association with survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank tests. All statistical tests were two-sided. Associations with outcome were observed with ABC transporters of the "A" subfamily, but not with multidrug transporters. High-level expression of ABCA1, ABCA6, ABCA8, and ABCA9 in primary tumors was statistically significantly associated with reduced survival in serous ovarian cancer patients. Low levels of ABCA5 and the C-allele of rs536009 were associated with shorter overall survival (hazard ratio for death = 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.26 to 1.79; P = 6.5e-6). The combined expression pattern of ABCA1, ABCA5, and either ABCA8 or ABCA9 was associated with particularly poor outcome (mean overall survival in group with adverse ABCA1, ABCA5 and ABCA9 gene expression = 33.2 months, 95% CI = 26.4 to 40.1; vs 55.3 months in the group with favorable ABCA gene expression, 95% CI = 49.8 to 60.8; P = .001), independently of tumor stage or surgical debulking status. Suppression of cholesterol transporter ABCA1 inhibited ovarian cancer cell growth and migration in vitro, and statin treatment reduced ovarian cancer cell migration. Expression of ABCA transporters was associated with poor outcome in serous ovarian cancer, implicating lipid

  8. Ion Transport Dynamics in Acid Variable Charge Subsoils

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nik; Sumner, Malcolm E.; Toma, Mitsuru

    2005-06-06

    This is a mini-review of the research work conducted by the authors with the objective of studying ion transport in variable charge subsoils collected from different areas around the world. An attempt is made in these studies to relate the unique behavior manifested during ionic transport in these subsoils with their mineralogical, physical and chemical properties, which are markedly different from those in soils from temperate regions. The variable charge subsoils have a relatively high salt sorption capacity and anion exchange capacity (AEC) that retards anions downward movement. The AEC correlates closely with the anion retardation coefficients. Ca2+ applied with gypsum in topsoil may be transported to the subsoil and may improve the subsoil chemical properties. These results may help in developing appropriate management strategies under a range of mineralogical, physical, and chemical conditions.

  9. Ionic requirements of proximal tubular sodium transport. II. Hydrogen ion.

    PubMed

    Green, R; Giebisch, G

    1975-11-01

    Simultaneous perfusion to proximal convoluted tubules and peritubular capillaries was used to study the effects of different perfusion fluids on sodium reabsorption and hydrogen secretion, which was calculated as bicarbonate reabsorption and titratable acid. Results show that sodium reabsorption was not tightly coupled to hydrogen secretion. Bicarbonate stimulates both sodium reabsorption and hydrogen secretion, but Tris stimulates only sodium reabsorption. Imposing an adverse chloride gradient across the proximal tubule (C1- peritubular greater than C1- luminal) decreased sodium reabsorption but did not diminish hydrogen secretion. Diamox inhibited both net sodium and hydrogen transport. It is concluded that there is not firm linkage between sodium reabsorption and hydrogen secretion and that bicarbonate probably stimulates sodium transport by a number of mechanisms, including an effect on the sodium transport unrelated to its ability to increase hydrogen ion secretion.

  10. Test particle study of ion transport in drift type turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.

    2013-12-15

    Ion transport regimes in drift type turbulence are determined in the frame of a realistic model for the turbulence spectrum based on numerical simulations. The model includes the drift of the potential with the effective diamagnetic velocity, turbulence anisotropy, and dominant waves. The effects of the zonal flow modes are also analyzed. A semi-analytical method that is able to describe trajectory stochastic trapping or eddying is used for obtaining the transport coefficients as function of the parameters of the turbulence. Analytical approximations of the transport coefficients are derived from the results. They show the transition from Bohm to gyro-Bohm scaling as plasma size increases in very good agreement with the numerical simulations.

  11. Modeling of negative ion transport in a plasma source (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riz, David; Paméla, Jérôme

    1998-02-01

    A code called NIETZSCHE has been developed to simulate the negative ion transport in a plasma source, from their birth place to the extraction holes. The H-/D- trajectory is calculated by numerically solving the 3D motion equation, while the atomic processes of destruction, of elastic collision with H+/D+ and of charge exchange with H0/D0 are handled at each time step by a Monte Carlo procedure. This code can be used to calculate the extraction probability of a negative ion produced at any location inside the source. Calculations performed with NIETZSCHE have been allowed to explain, either quantitatively or qualitatively, several phenomena observed in negative ion sources, such as the isotopic H-/D- effect, and the influence of the plasma grid bias or of the magnetic filter on the negative ion extraction. The code has also shown that, in the type of sources contemplated for ITER, which operate at large arc power densities (>1 W cm-3), negative ions can reach the extraction region provided they are produced at a distance lower than 2 cm from the plasma grid in the case of volume production (dissociative attachment processes), or if they are produced at the plasma grid surface, in the vicinity of the extraction holes.

  12. Transport of energetic ions by low-n magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.

    1992-10-01

    The stochastic transport of MeV ions induced by low-n magnetic perturbations is studied, focussing chiefly on the stochastic mechanism operative for passing particles in low frequency perturbations. Beginning with a single-harmonic form for the perturbing field, it iii first shown numerically and analytically that the stochastic threshold of energetic particles can be much lower than that of the magnetic field, contrary to earlier expectations, so that MHD perturbations could cause appreciable loss of energetic ions without destroying the bulk confinement. The analytic theory is then extended in a number of directions, to darity the relation of the present stochaistic mechanism to instances already found, to allow for more complex perturbations, and to consider the more general relationship between the stochasticity of magnetic fields, and that of particles of differing energies (and pitch angles) moving in those fields. It is shown that the stochastic threshold is in general a nonmonotonic function of energy, whose form can to some extent be tailored to achieve desired goals (e.g., burn control or ash removal) by a judicious choice of the perturbation. Illustrative perturbations are exhibited which are stochastic for low but not for high-energy ions, for high but not for low-energy ions, and for intermediate-energy ions, but not for low or high energy. The second possibility is the behavior needed for burn control; the third provides a possible mechanism for ash removal.

  13. Transport of energetic ions by low-n magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.

    1992-10-01

    The stochastic transport of MeV ions induced by low-n magnetic perturbations is studied, focussing chiefly on the stochastic mechanism operative for passing particles in low frequency perturbations. Beginning with a single-harmonic form for the perturbing field, it iii first shown numerically and analytically that the stochastic threshold of energetic particles can be much lower than that of the magnetic field, contrary to earlier expectations, so that MHD perturbations could cause appreciable loss of energetic ions without destroying the bulk confinement. The analytic theory is then extended in a number of directions, to darity the relation of the present stochaistic mechanism to instances already found, to allow for more complex perturbations, and to consider the more general relationship between the stochasticity of magnetic fields, and that of particles of differing energies (and pitch angles) moving in those fields. It is shown that the stochastic threshold is in general a nonmonotonic function of energy, whose form can to some extent be tailored to achieve desired goals (e.g., burn control or ash removal) by a judicious choice of the perturbation. Illustrative perturbations are exhibited which are stochastic for low but not for high-energy ions, for high but not for low-energy ions, and for intermediate-energy ions, but not for low or high energy. The second possibility is the behavior needed for burn control; the third provides a possible mechanism for ash removal.

  14. Comparison of autosomal mutations in mouse kidney epithelial cells exposed to iron ions in situ or in culture.

    PubMed

    Turker, Mitchell S; Connolly, Lanelle; Dan, Cristian; Lasarev, Michael; Gauny, Stacey; Kwoh, Ely; Kronenberg, Amy

    2009-11-01

    Exposure to accelerated iron ions represents a significant health risk in the deep space environment because it induces mutations that can cause cancer. A mutation assay was used to determine the full spectrum of autosomal mutations induced by exposure to 2 Gy of 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions in intact kidney epithelium, and the results were compared with mutations induced in cells of a kidney epithelial cell line exposed in vitro. A molecular analysis for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for polymorphic loci on chromosome 8, which harbors Aprt, demonstrated iron-ion induction of mitotic recombination, interstitial deletion, and discontinuous LOH events. Iron-ion-induced deletions were detected more readily with the in vitro assay, whereas discontinuous LOH was detected more readily in the intact kidney. The specific induction of discontinuous LOH in vivo suggests that this mutation pattern may serve as an indicator of genomic instability. Interestingly, the frequency of small intragenic events increased as a function of time after exposure, suggesting non-targeted effects. In total, the results demonstrate that 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions can elicit a variety of autosomal mutations and that the cellular microenvironment and the sampling time after exposure can influence the distribution of these mutations in epithelial cell populations.

  15. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael; Lyons, L. R.; Gorney, David J.

    1993-01-01

    This is an investigation of stormtime particle transport that leads to formation of the ring current. Our method is to trace the guiding-center motion of representative ions (having selected first adiabatic invariants mu) in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field. We compare our simulation results qualitatively with existing analytically tractable idealizations of particle transport (direct convective access and radial diffusion) in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For mu approximately less than 10 MeV/G (E approximately less than 10 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period on the final (ring-current) drift shell of interest (L equivalent to 3) exceeds the duration of the main phase of our model storm, and we find that the transport of ions to this drift shell is appropriately idealized as direct convective access, typically from open drift paths. Ion transport to a final closed drift path from an open (plasma-sheet) drift trajectory is possible for those portions of that drift path that lie outside the mean stormtime separatrix between closed and open drift trajectories, For mu approximately 10-25 MeV/G (110 keV approximately less than E approximately less than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the drift period at L equivalent to 3 is comparable to the postulated 3-hr duration of the storm, and the mode of transport is transitional between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. (This particle population is transitional between the ring current and radiation belt). For mu approximately greater than 25 MeV/G (radiation-belt ions having E approximately greater than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period is considerably shorter than the main phase of a typical storm, and ions gain access to the ring-current region essentially via radial diffusion. By computing the mean and mean-square cumulative changes in 1/L among (in this case) 12 representative

  16. Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Glucose Transporter Type 1 in Epithelial Dysplasia and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; Feitosa, Sthefane Gomes; Lima, Ana Thayssa Tomaz; Luna, Ealber Carvalho Macedo; Cavalcante, Roberta Barroso; de Lima, Kenio Costa; Chaves, Filipe Nobre; Costa, Fábio Wildson Gurgel

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignancy of the oral cavity and some of these have been documented in association or preceded by oral epithelial dysplasia (OED). Aggressive cancers with fast growth have demonstrated overexpression of some glucose transporters (GLUTs). Thus, the aim of this study was to analyze the immunohistochemical expression of the glucose transporter, GLUT-1, in OEDs and OSCCs, seeking to better elucidate the biological behavior of neoplasias. Fifteen cases were selected this research of both lesions. Five areas were analyzed from each case by counting the percentage of positive cells at 400x magnification. Immunoreactivity of GLUT-1 was observed in 100% of the samples ranging from 54.2% to 86.2% for the OSCC and 73.9% to 97.4% for the OED. Statistical test revealed that there was greater overexpression of GLUT-1 in OED than the OSCC (p=0.01). It is believed the high expression of GLUT-1 may reflect the involvement of GLUT-1 in early stages of oral carcinogenesis.

  17. Effect of ultraviolet A exposure on transport of compatible organic osmolytes in human lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, D Y; Zhang, J S

    2015-05-18

    Compatible organic osmolytes, such as betaine, myoinositol, and taurine, are involved in antioxidant defense, protein stabilization, and stress responses. This osmolyte strategy requires the expression of specific osmolyte transporters such as betaine (BGT-1), myoinositol (SMIT), and taurine (TAUT). In contrast to the kidney, keratinocytes, and neural cells, few studies have examined osmolytes in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs). We examined the expression of mRNA specific for BGT-1, SMIT, and TAUT in HLECs. In comparison to normoosmotic (305 mOsM) controls, there was a 3-5-fold time-dependent reaction of BGT-1, SMIT, and TAUT mRNA levels in HLECs exposed to hyperosmotic stress (405 mOsM). Maximal responses were obtained for BGT-1, SMIT, and TAUT mRNA expression after 3, 24 and 9 h of hyperosmotic exposure, respectively. This expression was correlated with increased osmolyte uptake. In contrast, hypoosmotic (205 mOsM) stimulation led to a significant efflux of osmolytes. Exposure to ultraviolet A (340-400 nm) radiation significantly stimulated osmolyte uptake. Increased osmolyte uptake was associated with upregulation of mRNA steady-state levels for osmolyte transporters in irradiated cells. These results demonstrate that ultraviolet A radiation leads to the accumulation of compatible organic osmolytes in HLECs as hyperosmotic pressure, which can maintain cellular environmental homeostasis.

  18. Evidence for ion transport and molecular ion dominance in the Venus ionotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Brace, L. H.; Cloutier, P. A.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Hartle, R. E.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Knudsen, W. C.; Strangeway, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    We present analyses from the five Pioneer Venus Orbiter plasma experiments and the plasma wave experiment when a patch of plasma with enhanced densities was encountered in the near-Venus ionotail during atmospheric entry at an altitude of approximately 1100 km in the nightside ionosphere. Our analyses of the thermal and superthermal ion measurements in this plasma feature provides the first evidence that at times molecular ions in the 28-32 amu mass range are dominant over atomic mass species thus yielding evidence for a transport mechanism that reaches into the lower ionosphere. Analysis of plasma analyzer (OPA) observations at this time indicates the presence of ions measured in the rest frame of the spacecraft at approximately 27 and 37 volt energy per unit charge steps. In the rest frame of the planet these superthermal ions are flowing from the dawn direction at speeds (assuming they are O2(+)) of approximately 8 km/s and with a flow component downward (perpendicular to the ecliptic plane) at speeds of approximately 2 km/s. OPA analyses also determine the ion number flux, energy, flow angles, and angular distributions. Plasma wave bursts appear to indicate that plasma density decreases within and on the equatorward edge of the patch of enhanced plasma densities are associated with ion acoustic waves and relative ion streaming.

  19. Evidence for ion transport and molecular ion dominance in the Venus ionotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Brace, L. H.; Cloutier, P. A.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Hartle, R. E.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Knudsen, W. C.; Strangeway, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    We present analyses from the five Pioneer Venus Orbiter plasma experiments and the plasma wave experiment when a patch of plasma with enhanced densities was encountered in the near-Venus ionotail during atmospheric entry at an altitude of approximately 1100 km in the nightside ionosphere. Our analyses of the thermal and superthermal ion measurements in this plasma feature provides the first evidence that at times molecular ions in the 28-32 amu mass range are dominant over atomic mass species thus yielding evidence for a transport mechanism that reaches into the lower ionosphere. Analysis of plasma analyzer (OPA) observations at this time indicates the presence of ions measured in the rest frame of the spacecraft at approximately 27 and 37 volt energy per unit charge steps. In the rest frame of the planet these superthermal ions are flowing from the dawn direction at speeds (assuming they are O2(+)) of approximately 8 km/s and with a flow component downward (perpendicular to the ecliptic plane) at speeds of approximately 2 km/s. OPA analyses also determine the ion number flux, energy, flow angles, and angular distributions. Plasma wave bursts appear to indicate that plasma density decreases within and on the equatorward edge of the patch of enhanced plasma densities are associated with ion acoustic waves and relative ion streaming.

  20. Zinc Transporter SLC39A7/ZIP7 Promotes Intestinal Epithelial Self-Renewal by Resolving ER Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Wakana; Kimura, Shunsuke; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Furusawa, Yukihiro; Irié, Tarou; Izumi, Hironori; Watanabe, Takashi; Hara, Takafumi; Ohara, Osamu; Koseki, Haruhiko; Sato, Toshiro; Robine, Sylvie; Mori, Hisashi; Hattori, Yuichi; Mishima, Kenji; Ohno, Hiroshi; Hase, Koji; Fukada, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Zinc transporters play a critical role in spatiotemporal regulation of zinc homeostasis. Although disruption of zinc homeostasis has been implicated in disorders such as intestinal inflammation and aberrant epithelial morphology, it is largely unknown which zinc transporters are responsible for the intestinal epithelial homeostasis. Here, we show that Zrt-Irt-like protein (ZIP) transporter ZIP7, which is highly expressed in the intestinal crypt, is essential for intestinal epithelial proliferation. Mice lacking Zip7 in intestinal epithelium triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in proliferative progenitor cells, leading to significant cell death of progenitor cells. Zip7 deficiency led to the loss of Olfm4+ intestinal stem cells and the degeneration of post-mitotic Paneth cells, indicating a fundamental requirement for Zip7 in homeostatic intestinal regeneration. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for the importance of ZIP7 in maintenance of intestinal epithelial homeostasis through the regulation of ER function in proliferative progenitor cells and maintenance of intestinal stem cells. Therapeutic targeting of ZIP7 could lead to effective treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:27736879

  1. Chemosensory function of amphibian skin: integrating epithelial transport, capillary blood flow and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Hillyard, S D; Willumsen, N J

    2011-07-01

    Terrestrial anuran amphibians absorb water across specialized regions of skin on the posterioventral region of their bodies. Rapid water absorption is mediated by the insertion of aquaporins into the apical membrane of the outermost cell layer. Water moves out of the epithelium via aquaglyceroporins in the basolateral membrane and into the circulation in conjunction with increased capillary blood flow to the skin and aquaporins in the capillary endothelial cells. These physiological responses are activated by intrinsic stimuli relating to the animals' hydration status and extrinsic stimuli relating to the detection of osmotically available water. The integration of these processes has been studied using behavioural observations in conjunction with neurophysiological recordings and studies of epithelial transport. These studies have identified plasma volume and urinary bladder stores as intrinsic stimuli that activate the formation of angiotensin II (AII) to stimulate water absorption behaviour. The coordinated increase in water permeability and capillary blood flow appears to be mediated primarily by sympathetic stimulation of beta adrenergic receptors, although the neurohypopyseal hormone arginine vasotocin (AVT) may also play a role. Extrinsic stimuli relate primarily to the ionic and osmotic properties of hydration sources. Toads avoid NaCl solutions that have been shown to be harmful in acute exposure, approx. 200-250 mm. The avoidance is partially attenuated by amiloride raising the hypothesis that the mechanism for salt detection by toads resembles that for salt taste in mammals that take in water by mouth. In this model, depolarization of the basolateral membrane of taste cells is coupled to afferent neural stimulation. In toad skin we have identified innervation of skin epithelial cells by branches of spinal nerves and measured neural responses to NaCl solutions that elicit behavioural avoidance. These same concentrations produce depolarization of the

  2. Asymmetric ion transport through ion-channel-mimetic solid-state nanopores.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Lei

    2013-12-17

    Both scientists and engineers are interested in the design and fabrication of synthetic nanofluidic architectures that mimic the gating functions of biological ion channels. The effort to build such structures requires interdisciplinary efforts at the intersection of chemistry, materials science, and nanotechnology. Biological ion channels and synthetic nanofluidic devices have some structural and chemical similarities, and therefore, they share some common features in regulating the traverse ionic flow. In the past decade, researchers have identified two asymmetric ion transport phenomena in synthetic nanofluidic structures, the rectified ionic current and the net diffusion current. The rectified ionic current is a diode-like current-voltage response that occurs when switching the voltage bias. This phenomenon indicates a preferential direction of transport in the nanofluidic system. The net diffusion current occurs as a direct product of charge selectivity and is generated from the asymmetric diffusion through charged nanofluidic channels. These new ion transport phenomena and the elaborate structures that occur in biology have inspired us to build functional nanofluidic devices for both fundamental research and practical applications. In this Account, we review our recent progress in the design and fabrication of biomimetic solid-state nanofluidic devices with asymmetric ion transport behavior. We demonstrate the origin of the rectified ionic current and the net diffusion current. We also identify several influential factors and discuss how to build these asymmetric features into nanofluidic systems by controlling (1) nanopore geometry, (2) surface charge distribution, (3) chemical composition, (4) channel wall wettability, (5) environmental pH, (6) electrolyte concentration gradient, and (7) ion mobility. In the case of the first four features, we build these asymmetric features directly into the nanofluidic structures. With the final three, we construct

  3. The verapamil transporter expressed in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) does not interact with β2-receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Johanna J; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2014-01-01

      Affinity of different organs for verapamil is highly variable and organ-specific. For example, the drug exhibits high levels of accumulation in lung tissues. A transporter recognising verapamil as a substrate has previously been identified in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and in rat retinal capillary endothelial (TR-iBRB2) cells. This transporter is distinct from any of the cloned organic cation transporters. Therefore, we hypothesised that the verapamil transporter is also functionally expressed in the human respiratory mucosa. Moreover, we tested the hypothesis that this transporter interacts with pulmonary administered cationic drugs such as β2-agonists. The uptake of [(3)H]verapamil was studied in A549 human alveolar epithelial cell monolayers at different times and concentrations. The influence of extracellular proton concentration and various organic cations on verapamil uptake was determined. Verapamil uptake into A549 cells was time- and concentration-dependent, sensitive to pH and had a Km value of 39.8 ± 8.2 µM. Verapamil uptake was also sensitive to inhibition by amantadine, quinidine and pyrilamine, but insensitive to other typical modulators of organic cation and choline transporters. Whilst we demonstrated functional activity of the elusive verapamil transporter at the lung epithelium, our data suggest that this transporter does not interact with β2-agonists at therapeutic concentrations.

  4. Self-pinched chamber transport of heavy ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.; Oliver, B. V.; Yu, S. S.; Olson, C. L.

    2001-10-01

    Self-pinched heavy ion beams are being examined as a chamber transport scheme for heavy-ion-driven inertial confinement fusion. In this scheme, beam-impact-ionization of a low-density background gas provides neutralizing electrons. For certain ranges of background gas pressures the beam is essentially charge-neutralized but incomplete current-neutralization allows the self-magnetic field of the beam to act as a pinch force, confining the beam divergence. Equilibrium transport modes for a Pb^+65 ion beam propagating through low density Xe gas are being studied with particle-in-cell simulations using the LSP code [1]. Time dependent evolution of the beam net current and pinched beam radius as a function of Xe chamber pressure from the simulations is examined. [1] T. P. Hughes, R. E. Clark, and S. S. Yu, Phys. Rev. ST-AB 2, 110401 (1999); D. R. Welch, D. V. Rose, B. V. Oliver, and R. E. Clark, Nucl. Inst. Meth. Phys. Res. A 242, 134 (2001).

  5. An Improved Green's Function for Ion Beam Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.; Wilson, J. W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2003-01-01

    Ion beam transport theory allows testing of material transmission properties in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators. This is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are the main emphasis of the present work. In consequence, an analytic solution of the linear Boltzmann equation is pursued in the form of a Green's function allowing flexibility in application to a broad range of boundary value problems. It has been established that simple solutions can be found for the high charge and energy (HZE) by ignoring nuclear energy downshifts and dispersion. Such solutions were found to be supported by experimental evidence with HZE ion beams when multiple scattering was added. Lacking from the prior solutions were range and energy straggling and energy downshift with dispersion associated with nuclear events. Recently, we have found global solutions including these effects providing a broader class of HZE ion solutions.

  6. Regulation of the creatine transporter by AMP-activated protein kinase in kidney epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Thali, Ramon F.; Smolak, Christy; Gong, Fan; Alzamora, Rodrigo; Wallimann, Theo; Scholz, Roland; Pastor-Soler, Núria M.; Neumann, Dietbert

    2010-01-01

    The metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates several transport proteins, potentially coupling transport activity to cellular stress and energy levels. The creatine transporter (CRT; SLC6A8) mediates creatine uptake into several cell types, including kidney epithelial cells, where it has been proposed that CRT is important for reclamation of filtered creatine, a process critical for total body creatine homeostasis. Creatine and phosphocreatine provide an intracellular, high-energy phosphate-buffering system essential for maintaining ATP supply in tissues with high energy demands. To test our hypothesis that CRT is regulated by AMPK in the kidney, we examined CRT and AMPK distribution in the kidney and the regulation of CRT by AMPK in cells. By immunofluorescence staining, we detected CRT at the apical pole in a polarized mouse S3 proximal tubule cell line and in native rat kidney proximal tubules, a distribution overlapping with AMPK. Two-electrode voltage-clamp (TEV) measurements of Na+-dependent creatine uptake into CRT-expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes demonstrated that AMPK inhibited CRT via a reduction in its Michaelis-Menten Vmax parameter. [14C]creatine uptake and apical surface biotinylation measurements in polarized S3 cells demonstrated parallel reductions in creatine influx and CRT apical membrane expression after AMPK activation with the AMP-mimetic compound 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside. In oocyte TEV experiments, rapamycin and the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl 5′-monophosphate (ZMP) inhibited CRT currents, but there was no additive inhibition of CRT by ZMP, suggesting that AMPK may inhibit CRT indirectly via the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. We conclude that AMPK inhibits apical membrane CRT expression in kidney proximal tubule cells, which could be important in reducing cellular energy expenditure and unnecessary creatine reabsorption under conditions of local

  7. Pathophysiology of metabolic alkalosis: a new classification based on the centrality of stimulated collecting duct ion transport.

    PubMed

    Gennari, F John

    2011-10-01

    Metabolic alkalosis is a unique acid-base disorder because it can be induced and sustained by functional alterations in renal ion transport. This review summarizes more than 50 years of research into the pathophysiologic processes causing this disorder. The evidence reviewed supports the hypothesis that virtually all forms of metabolic alkalosis are sustained by enhanced collecting duct hydrogen ion secretion, induced by stimulation of sodium uptake through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Enhanced collecting duct hydrogen ion secretion in metabolic alkalosis occurs most commonly secondary to changes in ion transport earlier along the nephron, but also can occur as the result of primary stimulation of ENaC. In both these settings, potassium secretion is stimulated, and abnormal potassium losses cause depletion of body potassium stores. Potassium depletion has a key role in sustaining metabolic alkalosis by stimulating renal hydrogen ion secretion, enhancing renal ammonium production and excretion, and downregulating sodium reabsorption in the loop of Henle and early distal tubule. A new classification of the causes of metabolic alkalosis is proposed based on these pathophysiologic events rather than response to treatment.

  8. Overview of Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji; Matsuda, Norihiro; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Furuta, Takuya; Noda, Shusaku; Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Fukahori, Tokio; Okumura, Keisuke; Kai, Tetsuya; Chiba, Satoshi; Sihver, Lembit

    2014-06-01

    A general purpose Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS, is being developed through the collaboration of several institutes in Japan and Europe. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency is responsible for managing the entire project. PHITS can deal with the transport of nearly all particles, including neutrons, protons, heavy ions, photons, and electrons, over wide energy ranges using various nuclear reaction models and data libraries. It is written in Fortran language and can be executed on almost all computers. All components of PHITS such as its source, executable and data-library files are assembled in one package and then distributed to many countries via the Research organization for Information Science and Technology, the Data Bank of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency, and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center. More than 1,000 researchers have been registered as PHITS users, and they apply the code to various research and development fields such as nuclear technology, accelerator design, medical physics, and cosmic-ray research. This paper briefly summarizes the physics models implemented in PHITS, and introduces some important functions useful for specific applications, such as an event generator mode and beam transport functions.

  9. Ion transport and softening in a polymerized ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Bocharova, Vera; Strelcov, Evgheni; Tselev, Alexander; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Berdzinski, Stefan; Strehmel, Veronika; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Minutolo, Joseph A; Sangoro, Joshua R; Agapov, Alexander L; Sokolov, Alexei P; Kalinin, Sergei V; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2015-01-21

    Polymerized ionic liquids (PolyILs) are promising materials for various solid state electronic applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells, lithium batteries, actuators, field-effect transistors, light emitting electrochemical cells, and electrochromic devices. However, fundamental understanding of interconnection between ionic transport and mechanical properties in PolyILs is far from complete. In this work, local charge transport and structural changes in films of a PolyIL are studied using an integrated experiment-theory based approach. Experimental data for the kinetics of charging and steady state current-voltage relations can be explained by taking into account the dissociation of ions under an applied electric field (known as the Wien effect). Onsager's theory of the Wien effect coupled with the Poisson-Nernst-Planck formalism for the charge transport is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The agreement between the theory and experiments allows us to predict structural properties of the PolyIL films. We have observed significant softening of the PolyIL films beyond certain threshold voltages and formation of holes under a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tip, through which an electric field was applied. The observed softening is explained by the theory of depression in glass transition temperature resulting from enhanced dissociation of ions with an increase in applied electric field.

  10. Regulation of gallbladder ion transport: role of biliary lipids.

    PubMed

    Roslyn, J J; Abedin, M Z; Strichartz, S D; Abdou, M S; Palant, C E

    1989-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that biliary lipids influence in vivo gallbladder absorption and solute-coupled water flow. To clarify the electrophysiologic effects that underlie this phenomenon, prairie dog gallbladders were mounted in an Ussing-type chamber, and the influence of bile acids and varying ratios of bile acids and biliary phospholipids on transepithelial potential difference (Vms), resistance (Rt), and short-circuit current (Isc) was examined. Exposure to 5 mmol/L taurodeoxycholate (TDC) resulted in inhibition of Vms (p less than 0.01) and Isc (p less than 0.01) and an increase (p less than 0.05) in Rt. Subsequent perfusion with bile acids and phospholipids (5 mmol/L TDC + 0.3 mmol/L phosphatidylcholine [PC]) led to continued inhibition of ion transport. In contrast, exposure to 5 mmol/L TDC + 1.7 mmol/L PC resulted in a significant increase in transport, as manifested by an increase in Vms (p less than 0.02) and Isc (p less than 0.01) and a decrease in Rt (p less than 0.05) compared with bile acids. These results indicate that the ratio of phospholipids to bile salts modulates ion transport across prairie dog gallbladder and that this ratio may be an important determinant of gallbladder absorption in health and disease.

  11. Study of negative ion transport phenomena in a plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riz, D.; Paméla, J.

    1996-07-01

    NIETZSCHE (Negative Ions Extraction and Transport ZSimulation Code for HydrogEn species) is a negative ion (NI) transport code developed at Cadarache. This code calculates NI trajectories using a 3D Monte-Carlo technique, taking into account the main destruction processes, as well as elastic collisions (H-/H+) and charge exchanges (H-/H0). It determines the extraction probability of a NI created at a given position. According to the simulations, we have seen that in the case of volume production, only NI produced close to the plasma grid (PG) can be extracted. Concerning the surface production, we have studied how NI produced on the PG and accelerated by the plasma sheath backward into the source could be extracted. We demonstrate that elastic collisions and charge exchanges play an important role, which in some conditions dominates the magnetic filter effect, which acts as a magnetic mirror. NI transport in various conditions will be discussed: volume/surface production, high/low plasmas density, tent filter/transverse filter.

  12. Osmoregulation in zebrafish: ion transport mechanisms and functional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Guh, Ying-Jey; Lin, Chia-Hao; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    Fish, like mammals, have to maintain their body fluid ionic and osmotic homeostasis through sophisticated iono-/osmoregulation mechanisms, which are conducted mainly by ionocytes of the gill (the skin in embryonic stages), instead of the renal tubular cells in mammals. Given the advantages in terms of genetic database availability and manipulation, zebrafish is an emerging model for research into regulatory and integrative physiology. At least five types of ionocytes, HR, NaR, NCC, SLC26, and KS cells, have been identified to carry out Na+ uptake/H+ secretion/NH4+ excretion, Ca2+ uptake, Na+/Cl- uptake, K+ secretion, and Cl- uptake/HCO3- secretion, respectively, through distinct sets of transporters. Several hormones, namely isotocin, prolactin, cortisol, stanniocalcin-1, calcitonin, endothelin-1, vitamin D, parathyorid hormone 1, catecholamines, and the renin-angiotensin-system, have been demonstrated to positively or negatively regulate ion transport through specific receptors at different ionocytes stages, at either the transcriptional/translational or posttranslational level. The knowledge obtained using zebrafish answered many long-term contentious or unknown issues in the field of fish iono-/osmoregulation. The homology of ion transport pathways and hormone systems also means that the zebrafish model informs studies on mammals or other animal species, thereby providing insights into related fields. PMID:26600749

  13. Ion transport and softening in a polymerized ionic liquid

    DOE PAGES

    Kumar, Rajeev; Bocharova, Vera; Strelcov, Evgheni; ...

    2014-11-13

    Polymerized ionic liquids (PolyILs) are promising materials for various solid state electronic applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells, lithium batteries, actuators, field-effect transistors, light emitting electrochemical cells, and electrochromic devices. However, fundamental understanding of interconnection between ionic transport and mechanical properties in PolyILs is far from complete. In this paper, local charge transport and structural changes in films of a PolyIL are studied using an integrated experiment-theory based approach. Experimental data for the kinetics of charging and steady state current–voltage relations can be explained by taking into account the dissociation of ions under an applied electric field (known as themore » Wien effect). Onsager's theory of the Wien effect coupled with the Poisson–Nernst–Planck formalism for the charge transport is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The agreement between the theory and experiments allows us to predict structural properties of the PolyIL films. We have observed significant softening of the PolyIL films beyond certain threshold voltages and formation of holes under a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tip, through which an electric field was applied. Finally, the observed softening is explained by the theory of depression in glass transition temperature resulting from enhanced dissociation of ions with an increase in applied electric field.« less

  14. Ion transport and softening in a polymerized ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajeev; Bocharova, Vera; Strelcov, Evgheni; Tselev, Alexander; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Berdzinski, Stefan; Strehmel, Veronika; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Minutolo, Joseph A.; Sangoro, Joshua R.; Agapov, Alexander L.; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    2014-11-13

    Polymerized ionic liquids (PolyILs) are promising materials for various solid state electronic applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells, lithium batteries, actuators, field-effect transistors, light emitting electrochemical cells, and electrochromic devices. However, fundamental understanding of interconnection between ionic transport and mechanical properties in PolyILs is far from complete. In this paper, local charge transport and structural changes in films of a PolyIL are studied using an integrated experiment-theory based approach. Experimental data for the kinetics of charging and steady state current–voltage relations can be explained by taking into account the dissociation of ions under an applied electric field (known as the Wien effect). Onsager's theory of the Wien effect coupled with the Poisson–Nernst–Planck formalism for the charge transport is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The agreement between the theory and experiments allows us to predict structural properties of the PolyIL films. We have observed significant softening of the PolyIL films beyond certain threshold voltages and formation of holes under a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tip, through which an electric field was applied. Finally, the observed softening is explained by the theory of depression in glass transition temperature resulting from enhanced dissociation of ions with an increase in applied electric field.

  15. Identification of uterine ion transporters for mineralisation precursors of the avian eggshell

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Gallus gallus, eggshell formation takes place daily in the hen uterus and requires large amounts of the ionic precursors for calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Both elements (Ca2+, HCO3-) are supplied by the blood via trans-epithelial transport. Our aims were to identify genes coding for ion transporters that are upregulated in the uterine portion of the oviduct during eggshell calcification, compared to other tissues and other physiological states, and incorporate these proteins into a general model for mineral transfer across the tubular gland cells during eggshell formation. Results A total of 37 candidate ion transport genes were selected from our database of overexpressed uterine genes associated with eggshell calcification, and by analogy with mammalian transporters. Their uterine expression was compared by qRTPCR in the presence and absence of eggshell formation, and with relative expression levels in magnum (low Ca2+/HCO3- movement) and duodenum (high rates of Ca2+/HCO3- trans-epithelial transfer). We identified overexpression of eleven genes related to calcium movement: the TRPV6 Ca2+ channel (basolateral uptake of Ca2+), 28 kDa calbindin (intracellular Ca2+ buffering), the endoplasmic reticulum type 2 and 3 Ca2+ pumps (ER uptake), and the inositol trisphosphate receptors type 1, 2 and 3 (ER release). Ca2+ movement across the apical membrane likely involves membrane Ca2+ pumps and Ca2+/Na+ exchangers. Our data suggests that Na+ transport involved the SCNN1 channel and the Na+/Ca2+ exchangers SLC8A1, 3 for cell uptake, the Na+/K+ ATPase for cell output. K+ uptake resulted from the Na+/K+ ATPase, and its output from the K+ channels (KCNJ2, 15, 16 and KCNMA1). We propose that the HCO3- is mainly produced from CO2 by the carbonic anhydrase 2 (CA2) and that HCO3- is secreted through the HCO3-/Cl- exchanger SLC26A9. HCO3- synthesis and precipitation with Ca2+ produce two H+. Protons are absorbed via the membrane’s Ca2+ pumps ATP2B1, 2 in the apical

  16. Differential localization of ion transporters suggests distinct cellular mechanisms for calcification and photosynthesis between two coral species.

    PubMed

    Barott, Katie L; Perez, Sidney O; Linsmayer, Lauren B; Tresguerres, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Ion transport is fundamental for multiple physiological processes, including but not limited to pH regulation, calcification, and photosynthesis. Here, we investigated ion-transporting processes in tissues from the corals Acropora yongei and Stylophora pistillata, representatives of the complex and robust clades that diverged over 250 million years ago. Antibodies against complex IV revealed that mitochondria, an essential source of ATP for energetically costly ion transporters, were abundant throughout the tissues of A. yongei. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy revealed septate junctions in all cell layers of A. yongei, as previously reported for S. pistillata, as well as evidence for transcellular vesicular transport in calicoblastic cells. Antibodies against the alpha subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) immunolabeled cells in the calicoblastic epithelium of both species, suggesting conserved roles in calcification. However, NKA was abundant in the apical membrane of the oral epithelium in A. yongei but not S. pistillata, while PMCA was abundant in the gastroderm of S. pistillata but not A. yongei. These differences indicate that these two coral species utilize distinct pathways to deliver ions to the sites of calcification and photosynthesis. Finally, antibodies against mammalian sodium bicarbonate cotransporters (NBC; SLC4 family) resulted in strong immunostaining in the apical membrane of oral epithelial cells and in calicoblastic cells in A. yongei, a pattern identical to NKA. Characterization of ion transport mechanisms is an essential step toward understanding the cellular mechanisms of coral physiology and will help predict how different coral species respond to environmental stress. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl⁻ channel: a versatile engine for transepithelial ion transport.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Cai, Zhiwei; Chen, Jeng-Haur; Ju, Min; Xu, Zhe; Sheppard, David N

    2007-08-25

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a unique member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that forms a Cl(-) channel with complex regulation. CFTR is composed of five domains: two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs), two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) and a unique regulatory domain (RD). The MSDs assemble to form a low conductance (6-10 pS) anion-selective pore with deep intracellular and shallow extracellular vestibules separated by a selectivity filter. The NBDs form a head-to-tail dimer with two ATP-binding sites (termed sites 1 and 2) located at the dimer interface. Anion flow through CFTR is gated by the interaction of ATP with sites 1 and 2 powering cycles of NBD dimer association and dissociation and hence, conformational changes in the MSDs that open and close the channel pore. The RD is an unstructured domain with multiple consensus phosphorylation sites, phosphorylation of which stimulates CFTR function by enhancing the interaction of ATP with the NBDs. Tight spatial and temporal control of CFTR activity is achieved by macromolecular signalling complexes in which scaffolding proteins colocalise CFTR and plasma membrane receptors with protein kinases and phosphatases. Moreover, a macromolecular complex composed of CFTR and metabolic enzymes (a CFTR metabolon) permits CFTR activity to be coupled tightly to metabolic pathways within cells so that CFTR inhibition conserves vital energy stores. CFTR is expressed in epithelial tissues throughout the body, lining ducts and tubes. It functions to control the quantity and composition of epithelial secretions by driving either the absorption or secretion of salt and water. Of note, in the respiratory airways CFTR plays an additional important role in host defence. Malfunction of CFTR disrupts transepithelial ion transport leading to a wide spectrum of human disease.

  18. IUPAP Award: Ion transport in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wenzhong

    Intercalation in 2D materials drastically influences both physical and chemical properties, which leads to a new degree of freedom for fundamental studies and expands the potential applications of 2D materials. In this talk, I will discuss our work in the past two years related to ion intercalation of 2D materials, including insertion of Li and Na ions in graphene and MoS2. We focused on both fundamental mechanism and potential application, e.g. we measured in-situ optical transmittance spectra and electrical transport properties of few-layer graphene (FLG) nanostructures upon electrochemical lithiation/delithiation. By observing a simultaneous increase of both optical transmittance and DC conductivity, strikingly different from other materials, we proposed its application as a next generation transparent electrode.

  19. Ion transport through a T-intersection of nanofluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Daiguji, Hirofumi; Adachi, Takuma; Tatsumi, Naoya

    2008-08-01

    Ion transport through a T-intersection of two silica nanochannels (a main channel, 5-mum long and 30-nm wide, and a subchannel, 5-microm long and 15-nm wide) with a surface charge distribution was investigated based on continuum dynamics calculations. The surface charge within 250 nm of the intersection in the main channel and the entire subchannel was positive and that in the main channel outside this intersection region was negative. This nanofluidic system is analogous to a p-n-p transistor. The calculation results revealed that, by adjusting the electric potentials at the ends of the nanochannels, the ionic current could be (1) cut off, (2) regulated in the main channel, (3) diverged into the main and subchannels, (4) turned from the main channel to the subchannel, and (5) merged into the subchannel. A series connection of this nanofluidic system can therefore be used in biotechnological applications for electrophoretic separation and for sorting of ions and biomolecules.

  20. Auxin effects on ion transport in Chara corallina.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suyun; de Boer, Albertus H; van Duijn, Bert

    2016-04-01

    The plant hormone auxin has been widely studied with regard to synthesis, transport, signaling and functions among the land plants while there is still a lack of knowledge about the possible role for auxin regulation mechanisms in algae with "plant-like" structures. Here we use the alga Chara corallina as a model to study aspects of auxin signaling. In this respect we measured auxin on membrane potential changes and different ion fluxes (K(+), H(+)) through the plasma membrane. Results showed that auxin, mainly IAA, could hyperpolarize the membrane potential of C. corallina internodal cells. Ion flux measurements showed that the auxin-induced membrane potential change may be based on the change of K(+) permeability and/or channel activity rather than through the activation of proton pumps as known in land plants.

  1. Energetic O+ and H+ Ions in the Plasma Sheet: Implications for the Transport of Ionospheric Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtani, S.; Nose, M.; Christon, S. P.; Lui, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    The present study statistically examines the characteristics of energetic ions in the plasma sheet using the Geotail/Energetic Particle and Ion Composition data. An emphasis is placed on the O+ ions, and the characteristics of the H+ ions are used as references. The following is a summary of the results. (1) The average O+ energy is lower during solar maximum and higher during solar minimum. A similar tendency is also found for the average H+ energy, but only for geomagnetically active times; (2) The O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities are several times higher during solar maximum than during solar minimum; (3) The average H+ and O+ energies and the O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities all increase with geomagnetic activity. The differences among different solar phases not only persist but also increase with increasing geomagnetic activity; (4) Whereas the average H+ energy increases toward Earth, the average O+ energy decreases toward Earth. The average energy increases toward dusk for both the H+ and O+ ions; (5) The O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities increase toward Earth during all solar phases, but most clearly during solar maximum. These results suggest that the solar illumination enhances the ionospheric outflow more effectively with increasing geomagnetic activity and that a significant portion of the O+ ions is transported directly from the ionosphere to the near ]Earth region rather than through the distant tail.

  2. Energetic O+ and H+ Ions in the Plasma Sheet: Implications for the Transport of Ionospheric Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtani, S.; Nose, M.; Christon, S. P.; Lui, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    The present study statistically examines the characteristics of energetic ions in the plasma sheet using the Geotail/Energetic Particle and Ion Composition data. An emphasis is placed on the O+ ions, and the characteristics of the H+ ions are used as references. The following is a summary of the results. (1) The average O+ energy is lower during solar maximum and higher during solar minimum. A similar tendency is also found for the average H+ energy, but only for geomagnetically active times; (2) The O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities are several times higher during solar maximum than during solar minimum; (3) The average H+ and O+ energies and the O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities all increase with geomagnetic activity. The differences among different solar phases not only persist but also increase with increasing geomagnetic activity; (4) Whereas the average H+ energy increases toward Earth, the average O+ energy decreases toward Earth. The average energy increases toward dusk for both the H+ and O+ ions; (5) The O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities increase toward Earth during all solar phases, but most clearly during solar maximum. These results suggest that the solar illumination enhances the ionospheric outflow more effectively with increasing geomagnetic activity and that a significant portion of the O+ ions is transported directly from the ionosphere to the near ]Earth region rather than through the distant tail.

  3. Ion transport mechanisms linked to bicarbonate secretion in the esophageal submucosal glands

    PubMed Central

    Nakhoul, Hani N.; Kalliny, Medhat I.; Gyftopoulos, Alex; Rabon, Edd; Doetjes, Rienk; Brown, Karen; Nakhoul, Nazih L.

    2011-01-01

    The esophageal submucosal glands (SMG) secrete HCO3− and mucus into the esophageal lumen, where they contribute to acid clearance and epithelial protection. This study characterized the ion transport mechanisms linked to HCO3− secretion in SMG. We localized ion transporters using immunofluorescence, and we examined their expression by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. We measured HCO3− secretion by using pH stat and the isolated perfused esophagus. Using double labeling with Na+-K+-ATPase as a marker, we localized Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NBCe1) and Cl−-HCO3− exchanger (SLC4A2/AE2) to the basolateral membrane of duct cells. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator channel (CFTR) was confirmed by immunofluorescence, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization. We identified anion exchanger SLC26A6 at the ducts' luminal membrane and Na+-K+-2Cl− (NKCC1) at the basolateral membrane of mucous and duct cells. pH stat experiments showed that elevations in cAMP induced by forskolin or IBMX increased HCO3− secretion. Genistein, an activator of CFTR, which does not increase intracellular cAMP, also stimulated HCO3− secretion, whereas glibenclamide, a Cl− channel blocker, and bumetanide, a Na+-K+-2Cl− blocker, decreased it. CFTRinh-172, a specific CFTR channel blocker, inhibited basal HCO3− secretion as well as stimulation of HCO3− secretion by IBMX. This is the first report on the presence of CFTR channels in the esophagus. The role of CFTR in manifestations of esophageal disease in cystic fibrosis patients remains to be determined. PMID:21474426

  4. Ion transport mechanisms linked to bicarbonate secretion in the esophageal submucosal glands.

    PubMed

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange; Nakhoul, Hani N; Kalliny, Medhat I; Gyftopoulos, Alex; Rabon, Edd; Doetjes, Rienk; Brown, Karen; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2011-07-01

    The esophageal submucosal glands (SMG) secrete HCO(3)(-) and mucus into the esophageal lumen, where they contribute to acid clearance and epithelial protection. This study characterized the ion transport mechanisms linked to HCO(3)(-) secretion in SMG. We localized ion transporters using immunofluorescence, and we examined their expression by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. We measured HCO(3)(-) secretion by using pH stat and the isolated perfused esophagus. Using double labeling with Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase as a marker, we localized Na(+)-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NBCe1) and Cl(-)-HCO(3)(-) exchanger (SLC4A2/AE2) to the basolateral membrane of duct cells. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator channel (CFTR) was confirmed by immunofluorescence, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization. We identified anion exchanger SLC26A6 at the ducts' luminal membrane and Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) (NKCC1) at the basolateral membrane of mucous and duct cells. pH stat experiments showed that elevations in cAMP induced by forskolin or IBMX increased HCO(3)(-) secretion. Genistein, an activator of CFTR, which does not increase intracellular cAMP, also stimulated HCO(3)(-) secretion, whereas glibenclamide, a Cl(-) channel blocker, and bumetanide, a Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) blocker, decreased it. CFTR(inh)-172, a specific CFTR channel blocker, inhibited basal HCO(3)(-) secretion as well as stimulation of HCO(3)(-) secretion by IBMX. This is the first report on the presence of CFTR channels in the esophagus. The role of CFTR in manifestations of esophageal disease in cystic fibrosis patients remains to be determined.

  5. What's new in ion transports in the cochlea?

    PubMed

    Couloigner, Vincent; Sterkers, Olivier; Ferrary, Evelyne

    2006-10-01

    Recent advances in the field of the physiology of inner ear fluids permitted the characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved in critical processes such as the absorption of K(+) through cochlear sensory hair cells (mechanoelectrical transduction) or the secretion of K(+) by marginal cells of the stria vascularis. In addition, new pathways for ion circulations were evidenced. Mutations of transporters involved in some of these pathways, especially in K(+) recycling through gap junction systems, and in local pH regulation, are among the most frequent etiologies of genetic deafness in humans.

  6. 8 GeV H- ions: Transport and injection

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Bryant, H.; Drozhdin, A.; Hill, C.; Kostin, M.; Macek, R.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Rees, G.H.; Tang, Z.; Yoon, P.; /Fermilab /New Mexico U. /Los Alamos /Rutherford /Rochester U.

    2005-05-01

    Fermilab is working on the design of an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac called the Proton Driver. The energy of H{sup -} beam will be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This brings up a number of technical challenges to transport and injection of H{sup -} ions. This paper will focus on the subjects of stripping losses (including stripping by blackbody radiation, field and residual gas) and carbon foil stripping efficiency, along with a brief discussion on other issues such as Stark states lifetime of hydrogen atoms, single and multiple Coulomb scattering, foil heating and stress, radiation activation, collimation and jitter correction, etc.

  7. Ion plateau transport near the tokamak magnetic axis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Hazeltine, R.D.

    1998-04-01

    Conventional neoclassical transport theory does not pertain near the magnetic axis, where orbital variation of the minor radius and the poloidal field markedly change the nature of guiding-center trajectories. Instead of the conventional tokamak banana-shaped trajectories, near-axis orbits, called potato orbits, are radially wider and lead to distinctive kinetic considerations. Here it is shown that there is a plateau regime for the near-axis case; the corresponding potato-plateau ion thermal conductivity is computed. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Charge transport studies of proton and ion conducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versek, Craig Wm

    The development of a high-throughput impedance spectroscopy instrumentation platform for conductivity characterization of ion transport materials is outlined. Collaborative studies using this system are summarized. Charge conduction mechanisms and conductivity data for small molecule proton conducting liquids, pyrazole, imidazole, 1,2,3-triazole, 1,2,4-triazole, and select mixtures of these compounds are documented. Furthermore, proton diffusivity measurements using a Pulse Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (PFG NMR) technique for imidazole and 1,2,3-triazole binary mixtures are compared. Studies of azole functionalized discotic and linear mesogens with conductivity, structural, and thermal characterizations are detailed.

  9. Measuring ion transport activities in Xenopus oocytes using the ion-trap technique.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Maxime G; Longpré, Jean-Philippe; Wallendorff, Bernadette; Lapointe, Jean-Yves

    2008-11-01

    The ion-trap technique is an experimental approach allowing measurement of changes in ionic concentrations within a restricted space (the trap) comprised of a large-diameter ion-selective electrode apposed to a voltage-clamped Xenopus laevis oocyte. The technique is demonstrated with oocytes expressing the Na(+)/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) using Na(+)- and H(+)-selective electrodes and with the electroneutral H(+)/monocarboxylate transporter (MCT1). In SGLT1-expressing oocytes, bath substrate diffused into the trap within 20 s, stimulating Na(+)/glucose influx, which generated a measurable decrease in the trap Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)](T)) by 0.080 +/- 0.009 mM. Membrane hyperpolarization produced a further decrease in [Na(+)](T), which was proportional to the increased cotransport current. In a Na(+)-free, weakly buffered solution (pH 5.5), H(+) drives glucose transport through SGLT1, and this was monitored with a H(+)-selective electrode. Proton movements can also be clearly detected on adding lactate to an oocyte expressing MCT1 (pH 6.5). For SGLT1, time-dependent changes in [Na(+)](T) or [H(+)](T) were also detected during a membrane potential pulse (150 ms) in the presence of substrate. In the absence of substrate, hyperpolarization triggered rapid reorientation of SGLT1 cation binding sites, accompanied by cation capture from the trap. The resulting change in [Na(+)](T) or [H(+)](T) is proportional to the pre-steady-state charge movement. The ion-trap technique can thus be used to measure steady-state and pre-steady-state transport activities and provides new opportunities for studying electrogenic and electroneutral ion transport mechanisms.

  10. Immunoreactivity of glucose transporter 5 is located in epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and ependymal cells.

    PubMed

    Ueno, M; Nishi, N; Nakagawa, T; Chiba, Y; Tsukamoto, I; Kusaka, T; Miki, T; Sakamoto, H; Yamaguchi, F; Tokuda, M

    2014-02-28

    High fructose intake is associated with increased plasma triglyceride concentration, hepatic steatosis, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, and high blood pressure. In addition, increased fructose intake has recently been supposed to be a risk factor for dementia. However, direct effects of fructose on the brain function remain to be clarified. The localization of glucose transporter 5 (Glut5), a representative transporter of fructose, was immunohistochemically examined in the brains of humans, rats, and mice to clarify whether fructose was transported from the blood into the brain. Glut5 immunoreactivity was demonstrated to be located in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and the ependymal cells in the brains of humans and rats using commercial antibodies for Glut5. In addition, mRNA expression of mouse Glut5 was confirmed in the brains of mice. Immunohistochemical examination using a custom-made antibody against two regions of amino acid sequences of mouse Glut5 revealed that Glut5 immunoreactivity was also seen in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and the ependymal cells in the brains of mice. These findings show that Glut5 immunoreactivity is located in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and the ependymal cells, suggesting the possibility of the direct transportation of intravascular fructose into the brain parenchyma.

  11. Ion radial transport induced by ICRF waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Vaclavik, J.; Hammett, G.W.

    1987-05-01

    The wave-induced fluxes of energetic-trapped ions during ICRF heating of tokamak plasmas are calculated using quasilinear equations. A simple single particle model of this transport mechanism is also given. Both a convective flux proportional to k/sub phi/vertical bar E/sub +/vertical bar/sup 2/ and a diffusive flux proportional to k/sub phi//sup 2/vertical bar E/sub +/vertical bar/sup 2/ are found. Here, k/sub phi/ is the toroidal wave number and E/sub +/ is the left-hand polarized wave field. The convective flux may become significant for large k/sub phi/ if the wave spectrum is asymmetric in k/sub phi/. But for the conditions of most previous experiments, these calculations indicate that radial transport driven directly by the ICRF wave is unimportant.

  12. Altered Expression and Localization of Ion Transporters Contribute to Diarrhea in Mice With Salmonella-Induced Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    MARCHELLETTA, RONALD R.; GAREAU, MELANIE G.; MCCOLE, DECLAN F.; OKAMOTO, SHARON; ROEL, ELISE; KLINKENBERG, RACHEL; GUINEY, DONALD G.; FIERER, JOSHUA; BARRETT, KIM E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an enteropathogen that causes self-limiting diarrhea in healthy individuals, but poses a significant health threat to vulnerable populations. Our understanding of the pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced diarrhea has been hampered by the lack of a suitable mouse model. After a dose of oral kanamycin, Salmonella-infected congenic BALB/c.D2NrampG169 mice, which carry a wild-type Nramp1 gene, develop clear manifestations of diarrhea. We used this model to elucidate the pathophysiology of Salmonella-induced diarrhea. METHODS BALB /c.D2NrampG169 mice were treated with kanamycin and then infected with wild-type or mutant Salmonella by oral gavage. Colon tissues were isolated and Ussing chambers, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunoblot, and confocal microscopy analyses were used to study function and expression of ion transporters and cell proliferation. RESULTS Studies with Ussing chambers demonstrated reduced basal and/or adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate–mediated electrogenic ion transport in infected colonic tissues, attributable to changes in chloride or sodium transport, depending on the segment studied. The effects of infection were mediated, at least in part, by effector proteins secreted by the bacterial Salmonella pathogenicity island 1– and Salmonella pathogenicity island-2–encoded virulence systems. Infected tissue showed reduced expression of the chloride–bicarbonate exchanger down-regulated in adenoma in surface colonic epithelial cells. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator was internalized in colonic crypt epithelial cells without a change in overall expression levels. Confocal analyses, densitometry, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that expression of epithelial sodium channel β was reduced in distal colons of Salmonella-infected mice. The changes in transporter expression, localization, and/or function were accompanied by crypt

  13. Efflux Transporter of Siderophore Staphyloferrin A in Staphylococcus aureus Contributes to Bacterial Fitness in Abscesses and Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Chen, Chunhui; Truong-Bolduc, Que Chi; Kim, Eu Suk; Wang, Yin; Hooper, David C

    2017-08-01

    The siderophores staphyloferrin A (SA) and staphyloferrin B (SB) of Staphylococcus aureus are essential for iron acquisition in the iron-restricted environment of the host, such as in subcutaneous abscesses. SA and SB are secreted by SfaA and SbnD transporters, respectively. To assess the further function of SfaA and SbnD in S. aureus fitness, we tested its effect on murine abscess models and intracellular replication in epithelial cells. Bacterial fitness in abscesses and in epithelial cells was studied, by comparing the parental strains RN6390 and MW2 and their ΔsfaA and ΔsbnD mutants using competition assays in a murine abscess model and invasion and replication assays with human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. In the murine abscess model using equal inocula of a ΔsfaA or ΔsbnD mutant and the wild-type RN6390 strain, the ΔsfaA mutant exhibited growth defects of 2.2-fold. Additionally, replication of the ΔsfaA mutant within A549 cells was decreased 3.0-fold. In complementation experiments, the ΔsfaA mutant carrying plasmid-borne sfaA restored the growth fitness in abscesses and epithelial cells. The ΔsbnD mutant, in contrast, showed no growth defect in either abscesses or epithelial cells. Our findings demonstrate that the efflux transporter of the siderophore SA contributes to the ability of S. aureus to replicate in abscesses and epithelial cells. Furthermore, fitness of S. aureus in these sites of replication is not compromised by the absence of transporter SbnD. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Ion Transport in Isolated Protoplasts from Tobacco Suspension Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mettler, Irvin J.; Leonard, Robert T.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was conducted into the feasibility of using enzymically isolated protoplasts from suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana glutinosa L. to study ion transport. Transport of K+ (86Rb), 36Cl−, H232PO4− and 45Ca2+ from 1 millimolar salt solutions was determined after separation of intact protoplasts from nonabsorbed tracers by centrifugation through a Ficoll step gradient. Influx of K+, Cl−, and H2PO4− measured over a 30-minute period was reduced (up to 99%) by respiratory inhibitors such as 5 micrograms per milliliter oligomycin, 0.1 millimolar dinitrophenol, 0.1 millimolar cyanide, or N2 gas. In contrast, Ca2+ influx was not tightly coupled to respiratory energy production. The influx of K+ was highest between pH 6.5 and 7.5 whereas the influx of H2PO4− and Cl− was greatest between pH 4.5 and 5.5. Influx of K+ and Cl− was maximal at 35 and 45 C, respectively, and was almost completely inhibited below 10 C. Fusicoccin (0.01 millimolar) stimulated K+ influx by more than 200% but had no effect on the influx of either Cl− or H2PO4−. Apparent H+ efflux, as measured by decrease in solution pH, was enhanced by K+, stimulated further by 0.01 millimolar fusicoccin, and inhibited by 0.1 millimolar dinitrophenol or 5 micrograms per milliliter oligomycin. The measured ionic fluxes into protoplasts were similar to those obtained with intact cultured cells. The results indicate that enzymic removal of the cell wall produced no significant alteration in the transport properties of the protoplast, and that it is feasible to use isolated protoplasts for studies on ion transport. Images PMID:16660675

  15. Herpes simplex virus gE/gI extracellular domains promote axonal transport and spread from neurons to epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Howard, Paul W; Wright, Catherine C; Howard, Tiffani; Johnson, David C

    2014-10-01

    Following reactivation from latency, there are two distinct steps in the spread of herpes simplex virus (HSV) from infected neurons to epithelial cells: (i) anterograde axonal transport of virus particles from neuron bodies to axon tips and (ii) exocytosis and spread of extracellular virions across cell junctions into adjacent epithelial cells. The HSV heterodimeric glycoprotein gE/gI is important for anterograde axonal transport, and gE/gI cytoplasmic domains play important roles in sorting of virus particles into axons. However, the roles of the large (∼400-residue) gE/gI extracellular (ET) domains in both axonal transport and neuron-to-epithelial cell spread have not been characterized. Two gE mutants, gE-277 and gE-348, contain small insertions in the gE ET domain, fold normally, form gE/gI heterodimers, and are incorporated into virions. Both gE-277 and gE-348 did not function in anterograde axonal transport; there were markedly reduced numbers of viral capsids and glycoproteins compared with wild-type HSV. The defects in axonal transport were manifest in neuronal cell bodies, involving missorting of HSV capsids before entry into proximal axons. Although there were diminished numbers of mutant gE-348 capsids and glycoproteins in distal axons, there was efficient spread to adjacent epithelial cells, similar to wild-type HSV. In contrast, virus particles produced by HSV gE-277 spread poorly to epithelial cells, despite numbers of virus particles similar to those for HSV gE-348. These results genetically separate the two steps in HSV spread from neurons to epithelial cells and demonstrate that the gE/gI ET domains function in both processes. An essential phase of the life cycle of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and other alphaherpesviruses is the capacity to reactivate from latency and then spread from infected neurons to epithelial tissues. This spread involves at least two steps: (i) anterograde transport to axon tips followed by (ii) exocytosis and extracellular

  16. Ion transport in a model gramicidin channel. Structure and thermodynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Roux, B; Karplus, M

    1991-01-01

    The potential of mean force for Na+ and K+ ions as a function of position in the interior of a periodic poly(L,D)-alanine model for the gramicidin beta-helix is calculated with a detailed atomic model and realistic interactions. The calculated free energy barriers are 4.5 kcal/mol for Na+ and 1.0 kcal/mol for K+. A decomposition of the free energy demonstrates that the water molecules make a significant contribution to the free energy of activation. There is an increase in entropy at the transition state associated with greater fluctuations. Analysis reveals that the free energy profile of ions in the periodic channel is controlled not by the large interaction energy involving the ion but rather by the weaker water-water, water-peptide and peptide-peptide hydrogen bond interactions. The interior of the channel retains much of the solvation properties of a liquid in its interactions with the cations. Of particular importance is the flexibility of the helix, which permits it to respond to the presence of an ion in a fluidlike manner. The distortion of the helix is local (limited to a few carbonyls) because the structure is too flexible to transmit a perturbation to large distances. The plasticity of the structure (i.e., the property to deform without generating a large energy stress) appears to be an essential factor in the transport of ions, suggesting that a rigid helix model would be inappropriate. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 10 PMID:1714305

  17. Ion transport and softening in a polymerized ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Bocharova, Vera; Strelcov, Evgheni; Tselev, Alexander; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Berdzinski, Stefan; Strehmel, Veronika; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Minutolo, Joseph A.; Sangoro, Joshua R.; Agapov, Alexander L.; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    2014-12-01

    Polymerized ionic liquids (PolyILs) are promising materials for various solid state electronic applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells, lithium batteries, actuators, field-effect transistors, light emitting electrochemical cells, and electrochromic devices. However, fundamental understanding of interconnection between ionic transport and mechanical properties in PolyILs is far from complete. In this work, local charge transport and structural changes in films of a PolyIL are studied using an integrated experiment-theory based approach. Experimental data for the kinetics of charging and steady state current-voltage relations can be explained by taking into account the dissociation of ions under an applied electric field (known as the Wien effect). Onsager's theory of the Wien effect coupled with the Poisson-Nernst-Planck formalism for the charge transport is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The agreement between the theory and experiments allows us to predict structural properties of the PolyIL films. We have observed significant softening of the PolyIL films beyond certain threshold voltages and formation of holes under a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tip, through which an electric field was applied. The observed softening is explained by the theory of depression in glass transition temperature resulting from enhanced dissociation of ions with an increase in applied electric field.Polymerized ionic liquids (PolyILs) are promising materials for various solid state electronic applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells, lithium batteries, actuators, field-effect transistors, light emitting electrochemical cells, and electrochromic devices. However, fundamental understanding of interconnection between ionic transport and mechanical properties in PolyILs is far from complete. In this work, local charge transport and structural changes in films of a PolyIL are studied using an integrated experiment-theory based approach

  18. Ion and solute transport by Prestin in Drosophila and Anopheles.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Taku; Czapar, Anna; Brin, Lauren; Haritonova, Alyona; Bondeson, Daniel P; Linser, Paul; Cabrero, Pablo; Thompson, James; Dow, Julian A T; Romero, Michael F

    2012-04-01

    The gut and Malpighian tubules of insects are the primary sites of active solute and water transport for controlling hemolymph and urine composition, pH, and osmolarity. These processes depend on ATPase (pumps), channels and solute carriers (Slc proteins). Maturation of genomic databases enables us to identify the putative molecular players for these processes. Anion transporters of the Slc4 family, AE1 and NDAE1, have been reported as HCO(3)(-) transporters, but are only part of the story. Here we report Dipteran (Drosophila melanogaster (d) and Anopheles gambiae (Ag)) anion exchangers, belonging to the Slc26 family, which are multi-functional anion exchangers. One Drosophila and two Ag homologues of mammalian Slc26a5 (Prestin) and Slc26a6 (aka, PAT1, CFEX) were identified and designated dPrestin, AgPrestinA and AgPrestinB. dPrestin and AgPrestinB show electrogenic anion exchange (Cl(-)/nHCO(3)(-), Cl(-)/SO(4)(2-) and Cl(-)/oxalate(2-)) in an oocyte expression system. Since these transporters are the only Dipteran Slc26 proteins whose transport is similar to mammalian Slc26a6, we submit that Dipteran Prestin are functional and even molecular orthologues of mammalian Slc26a6. OSR1 kinase increases dPrestin ion transport, implying another set of physiological processes controlled by WNK/SPAK signaling in epithelia. All of these mRNAs are highly expressed in the gut and Malpighian tubules. Dipteran Prestin proteins appear suited for central roles in bicarbonate, sulfate and oxalate metabolism including generating the high pH conditions measured in the Dipteran midgut lumen. Finally, we present and discuss Drosophila genetic models that integrate these processes.

  19. Ion and solute transport by prestin in Drosophila and Anopheles

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Taku; Czapar, Anna; Brin, Lauren R.; Haritonova, Alyona; Bondeson, Daniel P.; Linser, Paul J.; Cabrero, Pablo; Dow, Julian A. T.; Romero, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    The gut and Malpighian tubules of insects are the primary sites of active solute and water transport for controlling hemolymph and urine composition, pH, and osmolarity. These processes depend on ATPase (pumps), channels and solute carriers (Slc proteins). Maturation of genomic databases enables us to identify the putative molecular players for these processes. Anion transporters of the Slc4 family, AE1 and NDAE1, have been reported as HCO3− transporters, but are only part of the story. Here we report Dipteran (Drosophila melanogaster (d) and Anopheles gambiae (Ag)) anion exchangers, belonging to the Slc26 family, which are multi-functional anion exchangers. One Drosophila and two Ag homologues of mammalian Slc26a5 (prestin) and Slc26a6 (aka, PAT1, CFEX) were identified and designated dPrestin, AgPrestinA and AgPrestinB. dPrestin and AgPrestinB show electrogenic anion exchange (Cl−/nHCO3−, Cl−/SO42− and Cl−/oxalate2−) in an oocyte expression system. Since these transporters are the only Dipteran Slc26 proteins whose transport is similar to mammalian Slc26a6, we submit that Dipteran Prestin are functional and even molecular orthologues of mammalian Slc26a6. OSR1 kinase increases dPrestin ion transport, implying another set of physiological processes controlled by WNK/SPAK signaling in epithelia. All of these mRNAs are highly expressed in the gut and Malpighian tubules. Dipteran Prestin proteins appear suited for central roles in bicarbonate, sulfate and oxalate metabolism including generating the high pH conditions measured in the Dipteran midgut lumen. Finally, we present and discuss Drosophila genetic models that integrate these processes. PMID:22321763

  20. Common Genetic Variation In Cellular Transport Genes and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) Risk

    PubMed Central

    Chornokur, Ganna; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Amankwah, Ernest K.; Qu, Xiaotao; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Jim, Heather S. L.; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Ann Y.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Aben, Katja KH.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie T.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H.; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Edwards, Robert P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K.; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kellar, Mellissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schernhammer, Eva; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Thomsen, Lotte; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wu, Anna H.; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Hasmad, Hanis N.; Berchuck, Andrew; Iversen, Edwin S.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Goode, Ellen L.; Monteiro, Alvaro N. A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Narod, Steven A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Defective cellular transport processes can lead to aberrant accumulation of trace elements, iron, small molecules and hormones in the cell, which in turn may promote the formation of reactive oxygen species, promoting DNA damage and aberrant expression of key regulatory cancer genes. As DNA damage and uncontrolled proliferation are hallmarks of cancer, including epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), we hypothesized that inherited variation in the cellular transport genes contributes to EOC risk. Methods In total, DNA samples were obtained from 14,525 case subjects with invasive EOC and from 23,447 controls from 43 sites in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). Two hundred seventy nine SNPs, representing 131 genes, were genotyped using an Illumina Infinium iSelect BeadChip as part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNP analyses were conducted using unconditional logistic regression under a log-additive model, and the FDR q<0.2 was applied to adjust for multiple comparisons. Results The most significant evidence of an association for all invasive cancers combined and for the serous subtype was observed for SNP rs17216603 in the iron transporter gene HEPH (invasive: OR = 0.85, P = 0.00026; serous: OR = 0.81, P = 0.00020); this SNP was also associated with the borderline/low malignant potential (LMP) tumors (P = 0.021). Other genes significantly associated with EOC histological subtypes (p<0.05) included the UGT1A (endometrioid), SLC25A45 (mucinous), SLC39A11 (low malignant potential), and SERPINA7 (clear cell carcinoma). In addition, 1785 SNPs in six genes (HEPH, MGST1, SERPINA, SLC25A45, SLC39A11 and UGT1A) were imputed from the 1000 Genomes Project and examined for association with INV EOC in white-European subjects. The most significant imputed SNP was rs117729793 in SLC39A11 (per allele, OR = 2.55, 95% CI = 1.5-4.35, p = 5.66x10-4). Conclusion These results, generated on a large cohort of women, revealed associations

  1. Common Genetic Variation In Cellular Transport Genes and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) Risk.

    PubMed

    Chornokur, Ganna; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Amankwah, Ernest K; Qu, Xiaotao; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Jim, Heather S L; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Ann Y; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie T; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana M; Edwards, Robert P; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Kelemen, Linda E; Kellar, Mellissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Schernhammer, Eva; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Thomsen, Lotte; Tangen, Ingvild L; Tworoger, Shelley S; van Altena, Anne M; Vierkant, Robert A; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wu, Anna H; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Hasmad, Hanis N; Berchuck, Andrew; Iversen, Edwin S; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Ramus, Susan J; Goode, Ellen L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Gayther, Simon A; Narod, Steven A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sellers, Thomas A; Phelan, Catherine M

    2015-01-01

    Defective cellular transport processes can lead to aberrant accumulation of trace elements, iron, small molecules and hormones in the cell, which in turn may promote the formation of reactive oxygen species, promoting DNA damage and aberrant expression of key regulatory cancer genes. As DNA damage and uncontrolled proliferation are hallmarks of cancer, including epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), we hypothesized that inherited variation in the cellular transport genes contributes to EOC risk. In total, DNA samples were obtained from 14,525 case subjects with invasive EOC and from 23,447 controls from 43 sites in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). Two hundred seventy nine SNPs, representing 131 genes, were genotyped using an Illumina Infinium iSelect BeadChip as part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNP analyses were conducted using unconditional logistic regression under a log-additive model, and the FDR q<0.2 was applied to adjust for multiple comparisons. The most significant evidence of an association for all invasive cancers combined and for the serous subtype was observed for SNP rs17216603 in the iron transporter gene HEPH (invasive: OR = 0.85, P = 0.00026; serous: OR = 0.81, P = 0.00020); this SNP was also associated with the borderline/low malignant potential (LMP) tumors (P = 0.021). Other genes significantly associated with EOC histological subtypes (p<0.05) included the UGT1A (endometrioid), SLC25A45 (mucinous), SLC39A11 (low malignant potential), and SERPINA7 (clear cell carcinoma). In addition, 1785 SNPs in six genes (HEPH, MGST1, SERPINA, SLC25A45, SLC39A11 and UGT1A) were imputed from the 1000 Genomes Project and examined for association with INV EOC in white-European subjects. The most significant imputed SNP was rs117729793 in SLC39A11 (per allele, OR = 2.55, 95% CI = 1.5-4.35, p = 5.66x10-4). These results, generated on a large cohort of women, revealed associations between inherited cellular transport

  2. Characterization of the dopamine transporter gene expression and binding sites in cultured human amniotic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Elwan, Mohamed A; Ishii, Takashi; Sakuragawa, Norio

    2003-05-15

    In this study we sought to investigate whether the dopamine transporter, DAT, and its binding sites are expressed in the human amniotic epithelial cells (HAEC) using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and radioligand binding studies, respectively. The RT-PCR findings showed that HAEC expressed DAT mRNA with 100% homology to the human brain DAT. Saturation binding studies using [3H]mazindol showed a high affinity DAT binding site with K(D) and B(max) values of 12.32+/-1.67 nM and 82.7+/-9.74 fmol/mg protein, respectively. Competition experiments showed that selective DAT blockers are potent displacers of [3H]mazindol binding. The rank order of potency of the competing drugs is consistent with the pharmacology of the DAT. The present results provide compelling evidence that HAEC natively express the DAT mRNA and binding sites. More importantly, these results may suggest that HAEC is an appropriate human cell model for studying dopamine release and uptake processes and potential ligands at these sites.

  3. Endo-Lysosomal Dysfunction in Human Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cells Deficient for Lysosomal Cystine Transporter Cystinosin

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Heuvel, Lambertus; Pastore, Anna; Dijkman, Henry; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Levtchenko, Elena N.

    2015-01-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the CTNS gene encoding cystine transporter cystinosin that results in accumulation of amino acid cystine in the lysosomes throughout the body and especially affects kidneys. Early manifestations of the disease include renal Fanconi syndrome, a generalized proximal tubular dysfunction. Current therapy of cystinosis is based on cystine-lowering drug cysteamine that postpones the disease progression but offers no cure for the Fanconi syndrome. We studied the mechanisms of impaired reabsorption in human proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC) deficient for cystinosin and investigated the endo-lysosomal compartments of cystinosin-deficient PTEC by means of light and electron microscopy. We demonstrate that cystinosin-deficient cells had abnormal shape and distribution of the endo-lysosomal compartments and impaired endocytosis, with decreased surface expression of multiligand receptors and delayed lysosomal cargo processing. Treatment with cysteamine improved surface expression and lysosomal cargo processing but did not lead to a complete restoration and had no effect on the abnormal morphology of endo-lysosomal compartments. The obtained results improve our understanding of the mechanism of proximal tubular dysfunction in cystinosis and indicate that impaired protein reabsorption can, at least partially, be explained by abnormal trafficking of endosomal vesicles. PMID:25811383

  4. Intestinal-fatty acid binding protein and lipid transport in human intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montoudis, Alain; Delvin, Edgard; Menard, Daniel

    2006-01-06

    Intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a 14-15 kDa cytoplasmic molecule highly expressed in the enterocyte. Although different functions have been proposed for various FABP family members, the specific function of I-FABP in human intestine remains unclear. Here, we studied the role of I-FABP in molecularly modified normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC-6). cDNA transfection resulted in 90-fold I-FABP overexpression compared to cells treated with empty pQCXIP vector. The high-resolution immunogold technique revealed labeling mainly in the cytosol and confirmed the marked phenotype abundance of I-FABP in cDNA transfected cells. I-FABP overexpression was not associated with alterations in cell proliferation and viability. Studies using these transfected cells cultured with [{sup 14}C]oleic acid did not reveal higher efficiency in de novo synthesis or secretion of triglycerides, phospholipids, and cholesteryl esters compared to cells treated with empty pQCXIP vector only. Similarly, the incubation with [{sup 35}S]methionine did not disclose a superiority in the biogenesis of apolipoproteins (apo) A-I, A-IV, B-48, and B-100. Finally, cells transfected with I-FABP did not exhibit an increased production of chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, and HDL. Our observations establish that I-FABP overexpression in normal HIEC-6 is not related to cell proliferation, lipid esterification, apo synthesis, and lipoprotein assembly, and, therefore, exclude its role in intestinal fat transport.

  5. Endothelin-1 inhibits pre-stimulated tracheal submucosal gland secretion and epithelial albumin transport.

    PubMed Central

    Yurdakos, E.; Webber, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    1. Endothelin-1 potently contracts smooth muscle, including that in the airways. However, its effect on airway mucosal function has not so far been studied. 2. We have used the ferret whole trachea in vitro to examine the effect of endothelin-1 on tracheal smooth muscle tone, transepithelial potential difference (p.d.), submucosal gland secretion (including lysozyme secretion from serous cells) and active epithelial albumin transport. In addition we have examined the effects of endothelin on submucosal gland secretion and albumin transport pre-stimulated with the muscarinic agonist methacholine and the alpha-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. The effects of the Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine on the responses to endothelin have also been assessed. 3. Endothelin (0.1-100 nM) produced concentration-dependent increases in intraluminal tracheal pressure indicating smooth muscle contraction, and in the negativity of the transepithelial p.d. These effects were partially inhibited by nifedipine (10 microM). 4. Endothelin (0.01-100 nM) had no significant effect on baseline rates of mucus, lysozyme or albumin outputs, but produced concentration-dependent reductions in maintained methacholine- and phenylephrine-induced mucus, lysozyme and albumin outputs. In general endothelin was more potent against methacholine-induced effects. All of the concentration-response curves for endothelin were shallow and some appeared to be biphasic, suggesting the possibility of more than one mechanism of action of endothelin. 5. The effects of endothelin (at concentrations greater than 1 nM) on phenylephrine-induced mucus volume, lysozyme and albumin outputs were significantly inhibited by nifedipine. Similarly the effect of endothelin (greater than 1 nM) on methacholine-induced mucus volume and albumin outputs (but not lysozyme output) was attenuated by nifedipine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1810592

  6. Anterograde microtubule transport drives microtubule bending in LLC-PK1 epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bicek, Andrew D; Tüzel, Erkan; Demtchouk, Aleksey; Uppalapati, Maruti; Hancock, William O; Kroll, Daniel M; Odde, David J

    2009-06-01

    Microtubules (MTs) have been proposed to act mechanically as compressive struts that resist both actomyosin contractile forces and their own polymerization forces to mechanically stabilize cell shape. To identify the origin of MT bending, we directly observed MT bending and F-actin transport dynamics in the periphery of LLC-PK1 epithelial cells. We found that F-actin is nearly stationary in these cells even as MTs are deformed, demonstrating that MT bending is not driven by actomyosin contractility. Furthermore, the inhibition of myosin II activity through the use of blebbistatin results in microtubules that are still dynamically bending. In addition, as determined by fluorescent speckle microscopy, MT polymerization rarely results, if ever, in bending. We suppressed dynamic instability using nocodazole, and we observed no qualitative change in the MT bending dynamics. Bending most often results from anterograde transport of proximal portions of the MT toward a nearly stationary distal tip. Interestingly, we found that in an in vitro kinesin-MT gliding assay, MTs buckle in a similar manner. To make quantitative comparisons, we measured curvature distributions of observed MTs and found that the in vivo and in vitro curvature distributions agree quantitatively. In addition, the measured MT curvature distribution is not Gaussian, as expected for a thermally driven semiflexible polymer, indicating that thermal forces play a minor role in MT bending. We conclude that many of the known mechanisms of MT deformation, such as polymerization and acto-myosin contractility, play an inconsequential role in mediating MT bending in LLC-PK1 cells and that MT-based molecular motors likely generate most of the strain energy stored in the MT lattice. The results argue against models in which MTs play a major mechanical role in LLC-PK1 cells and instead favor a model in which mechanical forces control the spatial distribution of the MT array.

  7. Evolution of osmoregulatory patterns and gill ion transport mechanisms in the decapod Crustacea: a review.

    PubMed

    McNamara, John Campbell; Faria, Samuel Coelho

    2012-12-01

    Decapod crustaceans exhibit a wide range of osmoregulatory patterns and capabilities from marine osmoconformers to brackish and freshwater hyperregulators to terrestrial hyporegulators. The principal gill salt transport mechanisms proposed to underlie the ability of the better-known taxa to occupy these specific habitats are examined here. Traditional thinking suggests that a graduated series of successively stronger adaptive mechanisms may have driven the occupation of ever more dilute osmotic niches, culminating in the conquest of freshwater and dry land. However, when habitat and osmoregulatory parameters are analyzed quantitatively against the phylogenies of the taxa examined, as illustrated here using a palaemonid shrimp clade, their association becomes questionable and may hold true only in specific cases. We also propose a putative evolution for gill epithelial ion pump and transporter arrangement in a eubrachyuran crab clade whose lineages occupy distinct osmotic niches. By including the systematics of these selected groups, this review incorporates the notion of a protracted time scale, here termed 'phylophysiology', into decapod osmoregulation, allowing the examination of putative physiological transformations and their underlying evolutionary processes. This approach assumes that species are temporally linked, a factor that can impart phylogenetic structuring, which must be considered in comparative studies. Future experimental models in decapod osmoregulatory physiology should contemplate the phylogenetic relationships among the taxa chosen to better allow comprehension of the transformations arising during their evolution.

  8. Shortcuts to Adiabaticity in Transport of a Single Trapped Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Shuoming; Lv, Dingshun; Campo, Adolfo Del; Kim, Kihwan

    2015-05-01

    We report an experimental study on shortcuts to adiabaticity in the transport of a single 171Yb+ ion trapped in a harmonic potential. In these driving schemes, the application of a force induces a nonadiabatic dynamics in which excitations are tailored so as to preserve the ion motional state in the ground state upon completion of the process. We experimentally apply the laser induced force and realize three different protocols: (1) a transitionless driving with a counterdiabatic term out of phase with the displacement force, (2) a classical protocol assisted by counterdiabatic fields in phase with the main force, (3) and an engineered transport protocol based on the Fourier transform of the trap acceleration. We experimentally compare and discuss the robustness of these protocols under given experimental limitations such as trap frequency drifts. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China under Grants No. 2011CBA00300 (No. 2011CBA00301), the National Natural Science Foundation of China 11374178, and the University of Massachusetts Boston (No. P20150000029279).

  9. Modeling Fast Ion Transport in TAE Avalanches in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E D; Bell, R E; Darrow, D; Gorelenkov, N N; Kramer, G; Kubota, S; Levinton, F M; Liu, D; Medley, S S; Podesta, M; Tritz, K

    2009-08-17

    Experiments on the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557 ] have found strong bursts of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) activity correlated with abrupt drops in the neutron rate. A fairly complete data set offers the opportunity to benchmark the NOVA [C. Z. Cheng, Phys. Reports 211, 1-51 (1992)] and ORBIT [R. B. White and M. S. Chance, Phys. Fluids 27, 2455 (1984)] codes in the low aspect ratio tokamak (ST) geometry. The internal structure of TAE were modeled with NOVA and good agreement is found with measurements made with an array of five fixed-frequency reflectometers. The fast-ion transport resulting from these bursts of multiple TAE were then modeled with the ORBIT code. The simulations are reasonably consistent with the observed drop in neutron rate. While these results represent our best attempts to find agreement, we believe that further refinements in both the simulation of the TAE structure and in the modeling of the fast ion transport are needed. Benchmarking stability codes against present experiments is an important step in developing the predictive capability needed to plan future experiments.

  10. Distribution, Molecular Structure and Functional Analysis of Carnitine Transporter (SLC22A5) in Canine Lens Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    OCHIAI, Hideharu; KANEMAKI, Nobuyuki; SATO, Reiichiro; ONDA, Ken

    2014-01-01

    While carnitine has been reported to have an anti-oxidative role on the ocular surface, there has been no report on the existence of a carnitine transporter (SLC22A5) in the lens. Therefore, we investigated the carnitine transport activity of canine lens epithelial cells (LEC) and determined the molecular structure of canine SLC22A5. The carnitine transport activity was 7.16 ± 0.48 pmol/mg protein/30 min. Butyrobetaine, the analogue of carnitine, reduced 30% of the activity at 50 µM. A coding sequence of canine carnitine transporter was 1694 bp long and was predicted to encode 557 amino acid polypeptides. The deduced amino acid sequence of canine carnitine transporter showed >80% similarity to that of mouse and human. Western blot analysis detected the band at 60 kDa in the membrane of lens epithelial cells. The high content of carnitine in the lens is possibly transported from aqueous humor by SLC22A5. PMID:25048262

  11. Activation of ion transport systems during cell volume regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Eveloff, J.L.; Warnock, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    This review discusses the activation of transport pathways during volume regulation, including their characteristics, the possible biochemical pathways that may mediate the activation of transport pathways, and the relations between volume regulation and transepithelial transport in renal cells. Many cells regulate their volume when exposed to an anisotonic medium. The changes in cell volume are caused by activation of ion transport pathways, plus the accompanying osmotically driven water movement such that cell volume returns toward normal levels. The swelling of hypertonically shrunken cells is termed regulatory volume increase (RVI) and involves an influx of NaCl into the cell via either activation of Na-Cl, Na-K-2Cl cotransport systems, or Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ exchangers. The reshrinking of hypotonically swollen cells is termed regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and involves an efflux of KCl and water from the cell by activation of either separate K/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/ conductances, a K-Cl cotransport system, or parallel K/sup +/-H/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ exchangers. The biochemical mechanisms involved in the activation of transport systems are largely unknown, however, the phosphoinositide pathway may be implicated in RVI; phorbol esters, cGMP, and Ca/sup 2 +/ affect the process of volume regulation. Renal tubular cells, as well as the blood cells that transverse the medulla, are subjected to increasing osmotic gradients from the corticomedullary junction to the papillary tip, as well as changing interstitial and tubule fluid osmolarity, depending on the diuretic state of the animal. Medullary cells from the loop of Henle and the papilla can volume regulate by activating Na-K-2Cl cotransport or Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ exchange systems.

  12. The ion transport mechanism of lithium polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongli

    Lithium polymer electrolytes are of great interest for use in polymer-electrolyte rechargeable batteries. However, the lithium transport mechanism in the polymer electrolyte has not been fully understood, due partly to the lack of a means to characterize a key lithium transport property, the transference number, correctly and efficiently. This research pioneered the use of the electrophoretic nuclear magnetic resonance technique to measure the lithium transference number (TsbLi) of polymer electrolytes. The development of this technique is described. It is shown that the technique is strictly valid regardless of the degree of dissociation of the electrolyte and the measurement protocol is relatively straightforward. As a result, the accuracy of the technique is high compared to existing techniques. The lithium transport mechanism in polymer gel electrolytes are investigated systematically with complementary techniques including vibrational spectroscopy (Raman scattering), nuclear magnetic resonance, and a.c. impedance spectroscopy. The characteristic lithium transport behavior as a function of the temperature, the salt concentration, the anion type, and the polymer matrices is established. Perfluoroimide and perfluoromethide lithium salts always lead to a larger lithium transference number compared to conventional lithium salts. In poly(vinylidene fluororide-hexfloropropylene) based gel electrolytes, the perfluoroimide anion, (CFsb3SOsb3)sb2Nsp-, results in a nearly invariant TsbLi over a wide salt concentration range. In contrast, the CFsb3SOsb3sp- anion results in TsbLi decreasing monotonically with increasing salt concentration. In poly(acrylonitrile), which binds with Lisp+, the TsbLi versus LiCFsb3SOsb3 concentration curve is nearly parabolic. A qualitative model is proposed which defines the important molecular interactions underlying the lithium transport behavior and extends the Fuoss and Onsager theory to systems with extensive ion complexation.

  13. Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions generated by ion-cyclotron resonance heating in tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.S. . Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences); Hammett, G.W.; Goldston, R.J. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions, which are generated by high powered electromagnetic waves of the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) at the fundamental harmonic resonance, is studied analytically in tokamak geometry. The effect of Coulomb collisions on the tail ion transport is investigated in the present work. The total tail ion transport will be the sum of the present collision-driven transport and the wave-driven transport, which is due to the ICRF-wave scattering of the tail particles as reported in the literature. The transport coefficients have been calculated kinetically, and it is found that the large tail ion viscosity, driven by the localized ICRF-heating and Coulomb slowing-down collisions, induces purely convective particle transport of the tail species, while the energy transport is both convective and diffusive. The rate of radial particle transport is shown to be usually small, but the rate of radial energy transport is larger and may not be negligible compared to the Coulomb slowing-down rate. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Association of TM4SF4 with the human thiamine transporter-2 in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Nabokina, Svetlana M.; Said, Hamid M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The human thiamine transporter-2 (hTHTR-2) is involved in the intestinal absorption of thiamine. Recent studies with membrane transporters of other nutrients/substrates have shown that they have associated proteins that affect different aspects of their physiology and cell biology. Nothing is known about protein(s) that interact with hTHTR-2 in intestinal epithelial cells and influence its physiological function and/or its cell biology. Aims The aim of this study was to identify protein partner(s) that interacts with hTHTR-2 in human intestinal cells and determine the physiological/biological consequence of that interaction. Methods The yeast split-ubiquitin two-hybrid approach was used to screen a human intestinal cDNA library. GST-pull-down and cellular co-localization approaches were used to confirm the interaction between hTHTR-2 and the associated protein(s). The effect of such an interaction on hTHTR-2 function was examined by 3H-thiamine uptake assays. Results Our screening results identified the human TransMembrane 4 SuperFamily 4 (TM4SF4) as a potential interactor with hTHTR-2. This interaction was confirmed by an in vitro GST-pull-down assay, and by live-cell confocal imaging of HuTu-80 cells co-expressing hTHTR-2-GFP and mCherry-TM4SF4 (the latter displayed a significant overlap of these two proteins in intracellular vesicles and at the cell membrane). Co-expression of hTHTR-2 with TM4SF4 in HuTu-80 cells led to a significant induction in thiamine uptake. In contrast, silencing TM4SF4 with gene-specific siRNA led to a significant decrease in thiamine uptake. Conclusions These results show for the first time that the accessory protein TM4SF4 interacts with hTHTR-2 and influences the physiological function of the thiamine transporter. PMID:24282057

  15. Identification of intestinal ion transport defects in microvillus inclusion disease.

    PubMed

    Kravtsov, Dmitri V; Ahsan, Md Kaimul; Kumari, Vandana; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C D; Reyes-Mugica, Miguel; Kumar, Anoop; Gujral, Tarunmeet; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Ameen, Nadia A

    2016-07-01

    Loss of function mutations in the actin motor myosin Vb (Myo5b) lead to microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) and death in newborns and children. MVID results in secretory diarrhea, brush border (BB) defects, villus atrophy, and microvillus inclusions (MVIs) in enterocytes. How loss of Myo5b results in increased stool loss of chloride (Cl(-)) and sodium (Na(+)) is unknown. The present study used Myo5b loss-of-function human MVID intestine, polarized intestinal cell models of secretory crypt (T84) and villus resembling (CaCo2BBe, C2BBe) enterocytes lacking Myo5b in conjunction with immunofluorescence confocal stimulated emission depletion (gSTED) imaging, immunohistochemical staining, transmission electron microscopy, shRNA silencing, immunoblots, and electrophysiological approaches to examine the distribution, expression, and function of the major BB ion transporters NHE3 (Na(+)), CFTR (Cl(-)), and SLC26A3 (DRA) (Cl(-)/HCO3 (-)) that control intestinal fluid transport. We hypothesized that enterocyte maturation defects lead villus atrophy with immature secretory cryptlike enterocytes in the MVID epithelium. We investigated the role of Myo5b in enterocyte maturation. NHE3 and DRA localization and function were markedly reduced on the BB membrane of human MVID enterocytes and Myo5bKD C2BBe cells, while CFTR localization was preserved. Forskolin-stimulated CFTR ion transport in Myo5bKD T84 cells resembled that of control. Loss of Myo5b led to YAP1 nuclear retention, retarded enterocyte maturation, and a cryptlike phenotype. We conclude that preservation of functional CFTR in immature enterocytes, reduced functional expression of NHE3, and DRA contribute to Cl(-) and Na(+) stool loss in MVID diarrhea.

  16. Radiation protection considerations along a radioactive ion beam transport line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarchiapone, Lucia; Zafiropoulos, Demetre

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the SPES project is to produce accelerated radioactive ion beams for Physics studies at “Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro” (INFN, Italy). This accelerator complex is scheduled to be built by 2016 for an effective operation in 2017. Radioactive species are produced in a uranium carbide target, by the interaction of 200 μA of protons at 40 MeV. All of the ionized species in the 1+ state come out of the target (ISOL method), and pass through a Wien filter for a first selection and an HMRS (high mass resolution spectrometer). Then they are transported by an electrostatic beam line toward a charge state breeder (where the 1+ to n+ multi-ionization takes place) before selection and reacceleration at the already existing superconducting linac. The work concerning dose evaluations, activation calculation, and radiation protection constraints related to the transport of the radioactive ion beam (RIB) from the target to the mass separator will be described in this paper. The FLUKA code has been used as tool for those calculations needing Monte Carlo simulations, in particular for the evaluation of the dose rate due to the presence of the radioactive beam in the selection/interaction points. The time evolution of a radionuclide inventory can be computed online with FLUKA for arbitrary irradiation profiles and decay times. The activity evolution is analytically evaluated through the implementation of the Bateman equations. Furthermore, the generation and transport of decay radiation (limited to gamma, beta- and beta+ emissions) is possible, referring to a dedicated database of decay emissions using mostly information obtained from NNDC, sometimes supplemented with other data and checked for consistency. When the use of Monte Carlo simulations was not feasible, the Bateman equations, or possible simplifications, have been used directly.

  17. [A comparison of three different needles used for spinal anesthesia in terms of squamous epithelial cell transport risk].

    PubMed

    Çiğdem, Ünal Kantekin; Sevinç, Şahin; Esef, Bolat; Süreyya, Öztürk; Muzaffer, Gencer; Akif, Demirel

    To investigate the differences in the number of squamous epithelial cells carried to the spinal canal by three different types of spinal needle tip of the same size. Patients were allocated into three groups (Group I, Group II, Group III). Spinal anesthesia was administered to Group I (n=50) using a 25G Quincke needle, to Group II (n=50) using a 25G pencil point spinal needle, and to Group III (n=50) using a non-cutting atraumatic needle with special bending. The first and third drops of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) samples were taken from each patient and each drop was placed on a slide for cytological examination. Nucleated and non-nucleated squamous epithelial cells on the smear preparations were counted. There was statistically significant difference between the groups in respect to the number of squamous epithelial cells in the first drop (p<0.05). Group III had lower number of squamous epithelial cells in the first drop compared to that of Group I and Group II. Mean while Group I had higher number of squamous epithelial cells in the third drop compared to the other groups. The number of squamous epithelial cells in the first and third drops was statistically similar in each group respectively (p>0.05 for each group). In this study of different needle tips, it was seen that with atraumatic needle with special bending a significantly smaller number of cells were transported when compared to the Quincke tip needles, and with pencil point needles. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Neutron Transport Models and Methods for HZETRN and Coupling to Low Energy Light Ion Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, S.R.; Slaba, T.C.; Heinbockel, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure estimates inside space vehicles, surface habitats, and high altitude aircraft exposed to space radiation are highly influenced by secondary neutron production. The deterministic transport code HZETRN has been identified as a reliable and efficient tool for such studies, but improvements to the underlying transport models and numerical methods are still necessary. In this paper, the forward-backward (FB) and directionally coupled forward-backward (DC) neutron transport models are derived, numerical methods for the FB model are reviewed, and a computationally efficient numerical solution is presented for the DC model. Both models are compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETCHEDS and FLUKA, and the DC model is shown to agree closely with the Monte Carlo results. Finally, it is found in the development of either model that the decoupling of low energy neutrons from the light ion (A<4) transport procedure adversely affects low energy light ion fluence spectra and exposure quantities. A first order correction is presented to resolve the problem, and it is shown to be both accurate and efficient.

  19. Neutron Transport Models and Methods for HZETRN and Coupling to Low Energy Light Ion Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, S.R.; Slaba, T.C.; Heinbockel, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure estimates inside space vehicles, surface habitats, and high altitude aircraft exposed to space radiation are highly influenced by secondary neutron production. The deterministic transport code HZETRN has been identified as a reliable and efficient tool for such studies, but improvements to the underlying transport models and numerical methods are still necessary. In this paper, the forward-backward (FB) and directionally coupled forward-backward (DC) neutron transport models are derived, numerical methods for the FB model are reviewed, and a computationally efficient numerical solution is presented for the DC model. Both models are compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETCHEDS and FLUKA, and the DC model is shown to agree closely with the Monte Carlo results. Finally, it is found in the development of either model that the decoupling of low energy neutrons from the light ion (A<4) transport procedure adversely affects low energy light ion fluence spectra and exposure quantities. A first order correction is presented to resolve the problem, and it is shown to be both accurate and efficient.

  20. Modulation Effects of Curcumin on Erythrocyte Ion-Transporter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin ((1E,6E)-1,7-Bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione), the yellow biphenolic pigment isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa), has various medicinal benefits through antioxidation, anti-inflammation, cardiovascular protection, immunomodulation, enhancing of the apoptotic process, and antiangiogenic property. We explored the effects of curcumin in vitro (10−5 M to 10−8 M) and in vivo (340 and 170 mg/kg b.w., oral) on Na+/K+ ATPase (NKA), Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE) activity, and membrane lipid hydroperoxides (ROOH) in control and experimental oxidative stress erythrocytes of Wistar rats. As a result, we found that curcumin potently modulated the membrane transporters activity with protecting membrane lipids against hydro-peroxidation in control as well as oxidatively challenged erythrocytes evidenced by stimulation of NKA, downregulation of NHE, and reduction of ROOH in the membrane. The observed results corroborate membrane transporters activity with susceptibility of erythrocyte membrane towards oxidative damage. Results explain the protective mechanism of curcumin against oxidative stress mediated impairment in ions-transporters activity and health beneficial effects. PMID:26421014

  1. Intestinal calcium transport: An ion microscopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Fullmer, C.S.; Chandra, S.; Smith, C.A.; Morrison, G.H.; Wasserman, R.H. )

    1990-02-26

    Ion microscopy is a direct imaging mass spectrometry technique which reveals elemental (mass) distribution in relation to tissue morphology. The influence of vitamin D on intestinal Ca transport was examined in parallel experiments by injecting either {sup 47}Ca or {sup 44}Ca into the duodenal lumen of vitamin D-deficient ({minus}D) and vitamin D-replete (+D) chicks for varying periods of time. {sup 47}Ca data provided a quantitative index of tissue retention and absorption, whereas {sup 44}Ca imaging allowed visual localization of Ca specifically in transit from the lumen versus ambient tissue {sup 40}Ca which was also imaged. Luminally-administered Ca rapidly (2.5 minutes) entered the intestinal cells in both the {minus}D and +D chicks, localizing primarily in the area subjacent to the limiting membrane. For the +D chicks, the concentration of {sup 44}Ca in this region dissipated with time, leading to a more homogeneous intracellular distribution as transport proceeded. In contrast, {sup 44}Ca continued to accumulate in the apical cell region in the {minus}D chicks for up to 20 minutes, although a slight inwardly-directed gradient developed. These approaches provide unique information concerning the sequential localization of Ca during intestinal transport and the dynamics of the action of vitamin D thereon.

  2. Polaronic Transport in Phosphate Glasses Containing Transition Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Mark

    The goal of this dissertation is to characterize the basic transport properties of phosphate glasses containing various amounts of TIs and to identify and explain any electronic phase transitions which may occur. The P2 O5-V2O5-WO3 (PVW) glass system will be analyzed to find the effect of TI concentration on conduction. In addition, the effect of the relative concentrations of network forming ions (SiO2 and P2O5) on transport will be studied in the P2O5-SiO2-Fe2O 3 (PSF) system. Also presented is a numerical study on a tight-binding model adapted for the purposes of modelling Gaussian traps, mimicking TI's, which are arranged in an extended network. The results of this project will contribute to the development of fundamental theories on the electronic transport in glasses containing mixtures of transition oxides as well as those containing multiple network formers without discernible phase separation. The present study on the PVW follows up on previous investigation into the effect on mixed transition ions in oxide glasses. Past research has focused on glasses containing transition metal ions from the 3d row. The inclusion of tungsten, a 5d transition metal, adds a layer of complexity through the mismatch of the energies of the orbitals contributing to localized states. The data have indicated that a transition reminiscent of a metal-insulator transition (MIT) occurs in this system as the concentration of tungsten increases. As opposed to some other MIT-like transitions found in phosphate glass systems, there seems to be no polaron to bipolaron conversion. Instead, the individual localization parameter for tungsten noticeably decreases dramatically at the transition point as well as the adiabaticity. Another distinctive feature of this project is the study of the PSF system, which contains two true network formers, phosphorous pentoxide (P2O 5) and silicon dioxide (SiO2). It is not usually possible to do a reliable investigation of the conduction properties of

  3. Epithelial fluid transport: protruding macromolecules and space charges can bring about electro-osmotic coupling at the tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Rubashkin, A; Iserovich, P; Hernández, J A; Fischbarg, J

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of the present work is to investigate whether the idea of epithelial fluid transport based on electro-osmotic coupling at the level of the leaky tight junction (TJ) can be further supported by a plausible theoretical model. We develop a model for fluid transport across epithelial layers based on electro-osmotic coupling at leaky tight junctions (TJ) possessing protruding macromolecules and fixed electrical charges. The model embodies systems of electro-hydrodynamic equations for the intercellular pathway, namely the Brinkman and the Poisson-Boltzmann differential equations applied to the TJ. We obtain analytical solutions for a system of these two equations, and are able to derive expressions for the fluid velocity profile and the electrostatic potential. We illustrate the model by employing geometrical parameters and experimental data from the corneal endothelium, for which we have previously reported evidence for a central role for electro-osmosis in translayer fluid transport. Our results suggest that electro-osmotic coupling at the TJ can account for fluid transport by the corneal endothelium. We conclude that electro-osmotic coupling at the tight junctions could represent one of the basic mechanisms driving fluid transport across some leaky epithelia, a process that remains unexplained.

  4. Involvement of Concentrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 in Intestinal Absorption of Trifluridine Using Human Small Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Koichi; Yoshisue, Kunihiro; Chiba, Masato; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2015-09-01

    TAS-102, which is effective for refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, is a combination drug of anticancer trifluridine (FTD; which is derived from pyrimidine nucleoside) and FTD-metabolizing enzyme inhibitor tipiracil hydrochloride (TPI) at a molecular ratio of 1:0.5. To evaluate the intestinal absorption mechanism of FTD, the uptake and transcellular transport of FTD by human small intestinal epithelial cell (HIEC) monolayer as a model of human intestinal epithelial cells was investigated. The uptake and membrane permeability of FTD by HIEC monolayers were saturable, Na(+) -dependent, and inhibited by nucleosides. These transport characteristics are mostly comparable with those of concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNTs). Moreover, the uptake of FTD by CNT1-expressing Xenopus oocytes was the highest among human CNT transporters. The obtained Km and Vmax values of FTD by CNT1 were 69.0 μM and 516 pmol/oocyte/30 min, respectively. The transcellular transport of FTD by Caco-2 cells, where CNT1 is heterologously expressed, from apical to basolateral side was greater than that by Mock cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that FTD exhibits high oral absorption by the contribution of human CNT1. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  5. Electron/Ion Transport Enhancer in High Capacity Li-Ion Battery Anodes

    DOE PAGES

    Kwon, Yo Han; Minnici, Krysten; Huie, Matthew M.; ...

    2016-08-30

    In this paper, magnetite (Fe3O4) was used as a model high capacity metal oxide active material to demonstrate advantages derived from consideration of both electron and ion transport in the design of composite battery electrodes. The conjugated polymer, poly[3-(potassium-4-butanoate) thiophene] (PPBT), was introduced as a binder component, while polyethylene glycol (PEG) was coated onto the surface of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The introduction of PEG reduced aggregate size, enabled effective dispersion of the active materials and facilitated ionic conduction. As a binder for the composite electrode, PPBT underwent electrochemical doping which enabled the formation of effective electrical bridges between the carbon andmore » Fe3O4 components, allowing for more efficient electron transport. Additionally, the PPBT carboxylic moieties effect a porous structure, and stable electrode performance. Finally, the methodical consideration of both enhanced electron and ion transport by introducing a carboxylated PPBT binder and PEG surface treatment leads to effectively reduced electrode resistance, which improved cycle life performance and rate capabilities.« less

  6. Electron/Ion Transport Enhancer in High Capacity Li-Ion Battery Anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Yo Han; Minnici, Krysten; Huie, Matthew M.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Takeuchi, Esther S.; Marschilok, Amy C.; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2016-08-30

    In this paper, magnetite (Fe3O4) was used as a model high capacity metal oxide active material to demonstrate advantages derived from consideration of both electron and ion transport in the design of composite battery electrodes. The conjugated polymer, poly[3-(potassium-4-butanoate) thiophene] (PPBT), was introduced as a binder component, while polyethylene glycol (PEG) was coated onto the surface of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The introduction of PEG reduced aggregate size, enabled effective dispersion of the active materials and facilitated ionic conduction. As a binder for the composite electrode, PPBT underwent electrochemical doping which enabled the formation of effective electrical bridges between the carbon and Fe3O4 components, allowing for more efficient electron transport. Additionally, the PPBT carboxylic moieties effect a porous structure, and stable electrode performance. Finally, the methodical consideration of both enhanced electron and ion transport by introducing a carboxylated PPBT binder and PEG surface treatment leads to effectively reduced electrode resistance, which improved cycle life performance and rate capabilities.

  7. Electron/Ion Transport Enhancer in High Capacity Li-Ion Battery Anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Yo Han; Minnici, Krysten; Huie, Matthew M.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Takeuchi, Esther S.; Marschilok, Amy C.; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2016-08-30

    In this paper, magnetite (Fe3O4) was used as a model high capacity metal oxide active material to demonstrate advantages derived from consideration of both electron and ion transport in the design of composite battery electrodes. The conjugated polymer, poly[3-(potassium-4-butanoate) thiophene] (PPBT), was introduced as a binder component, while polyethylene glycol (PEG) was coated onto the surface of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The introduction of PEG reduced aggregate size, enabled effective dispersion of the active materials and facilitated ionic conduction. As a binder for the composite electrode, PPBT underwent electrochemical doping which enabled the formation of effective electrical bridges between the carbon and Fe3O4 components, allowing for more efficient electron transport. Additionally, the PPBT carboxylic moieties effect a porous structure, and stable electrode performance. Finally, the methodical consideration of both enhanced electron and ion transport by introducing a carboxylated PPBT binder and PEG surface treatment leads to effectively reduced electrode resistance, which improved cycle life performance and rate capabilities.

  8. A parallel finite element simulator for ion transport through three-dimensional ion channel systems.

    PubMed

    Tu, Bin; Chen, Minxin; Xie, Yan; Zhang, Linbo; Eisenberg, Bob; Lu, Benzhuo

    2013-09-15

    A parallel finite element simulator, ichannel, is developed for ion transport through three-dimensional ion channel systems that consist of protein and membrane. The coordinates of heavy atoms of the protein are taken from the Protein Data Bank and the membrane is represented as a slab. The simulator contains two components: a parallel adaptive finite element solver for a set of Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations that describe the electrodiffusion process of ion transport, and a mesh generation tool chain for ion channel systems, which is an essential component for the finite element computations. The finite element method has advantages in modeling irregular geometries and complex boundary conditions. We have built a tool chain to get the surface and volume mesh for ion channel systems, which consists of a set of mesh generation tools. The adaptive finite element solver in our simulator is implemented using the parallel adaptive finite element package Parallel Hierarchical Grid (PHG) developed by one of the authors, which provides the capability of doing large scale parallel computations with high parallel efficiency and the flexibility of choosing high order elements to achieve high order accuracy. The simulator is applied to a real transmembrane protein, the gramicidin A (gA) channel protein, to calculate the electrostatic potential, ion concentrations and I - V curve, with which both primitive and transformed PNP equations are studied and their numerical performances are compared. To further validate the method, we also apply the simulator to two other ion channel systems, the voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC) and α-Hemolysin (α-HL). The simulation results agree well with Brownian dynamics (BD) simulation results and experimental results. Moreover, because ionic finite size effects can be included in PNP model now, we also perform simulations using a size-modified PNP (SMPNP) model on VDAC and α-HL. It is shown that the size effects in SMPNP can

  9. A New Poisson-Nernst-Planck Model with Ion-Water Interactions for Charge Transport in Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duan

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we propose a new Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) model with ion-water interactions for biological charge transport in ion channels. Due to narrow geometries of these membrane proteins, ion-water interaction is critical for both dielectric property of water molecules in channel pore and transport dynamics of mobile ions. We model the ion-water interaction energy based on realistic experimental observations in an efficient mean-field approach. Variation of a total energy functional of the biological system yields a new PNP-type continuum model. Numerical simulations show that the proposed model with ion-water interaction energy has the new features that quantitatively describe dielectric properties of water molecules in narrow pores and are possible to model the selectivity of some ion channels.