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Sample records for epithelial subpopulations identifies

  1. Transcriptome analysis of mammary epithelial subpopulations identifies novel determinants of lineage commitment and cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Kendrick, Howard; Regan, Joseph L; Magnay, Fiona-Ann; Grigoriadis, Anita; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Zvelebil, Marketa; Smalley, Matthew J

    2008-01-01

    Background Understanding the molecular control of cell lineages and fate determination in complex tissues is key to not only understanding the developmental biology and cellular homeostasis of such tissues but also for our understanding and interpretation of the molecular pathology of diseases such as cancer. The prerequisite for such an understanding is detailed knowledge of the cell types that make up such tissues, including their comprehensive molecular characterisation. In the mammary epithelium, the bulk of the tissue is composed of three cell lineages, namely the basal/myoepithelial, luminal epithelial estrogen receptor positive and luminal epithelial estrogen receptor negative cells. However, a detailed molecular characterisation of the transcriptomic differences between these three populations has not been carried out. Results A whole transcriptome analysis of basal/myoepithelial cells, luminal estrogen receptor negative cells and luminal estrogen receptor positive cells isolated from the virgin mouse mammary epithelium identified 861, 326 and 488 genes as highly differentially expressed in the three cell types, respectively. Network analysis of the transcriptomic data identified a subpopulation of luminal estrogen receptor negative cells with a novel potential role as non-professional immune cells. Analysis of the data for potential paracrine interacting factors showed that the basal/myoepithelial cells, remarkably, expressed over twice as many ligands and cell surface receptors as the other two populations combined. A number of transcriptional regulators were also identified that were differentially expressed between the cell lineages. One of these, Sox6, was specifically expressed in luminal estrogen receptor negative cells and functional assays confirmed that it maintained mammary epithelial cells in a differentiated luminal cell lineage. Conclusion The mouse mammary epithelium is composed of three main cell types with distinct gene expression patterns

  2. Combinations of differentiation markers distinguish subpopulations of alveolar epithelial cells in adult lung.

    PubMed

    Liebler, Janice M; Marconett, Crystal N; Juul, Nicholas; Wang, Hongjun; Liu, Yixin; Flodby, Per; Laird-Offringa, Ite A; Minoo, Parviz; Zhou, Beiyun

    2016-01-15

    Distal lung epithelium is maintained by proliferation of alveolar type II (AT2) cells and, for some daughter AT2 cells, transdifferentiation into alveolar type I (AT1) cells. We investigated if subpopulations of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) exist that represent various stages in transdifferentiation from AT2 to AT1 cell phenotypes in normal adult lung and if they can be identified using combinations of cell-specific markers. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that, in distal rat and mouse lungs, ∼ 20-30% of NKX2.1(+) (or thyroid transcription factor 1(+)) cells did not colocalize with pro-surfactant protein C (pro-SP-C), a highly specific AT2 cell marker. In distal rat lung, NKX2.1(+) cells coexpressed either pro-SP-C or the AT1 cell marker homeodomain only protein x (HOPX). Not all HOPX(+) cells colocalize with the AT1 cell marker aquaporin 5 (AQP5), and some AQP5(+) cells were NKX2.1(+). HOPX was expressed earlier than AQP5 during transdifferentiation in rat AEC primary culture, with robust expression of both by day 7. We speculate that NKX2.1 and pro-SP-C colocalize in AT2 cells, NKX2.1 and HOPX or AQP5 colocalize in intermediate or transitional cells, and HOPX and AQP5 are expressed without NKX2.1 in AT1 cells. These findings suggest marked heterogeneity among cells previously identified as exclusively AT1 or AT2 cells, implying the presence of subpopulations of intermediate or transitional AEC in normal adult lung. PMID:26545903

  3. Ensemble survival trees for identifying subpopulations in personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chuan; Chen, James J

    2016-09-01

    Recently, personalized medicine has received great attention to improve safety and effectiveness in drug development. Personalized medicine aims to provide medical treatment that is tailored to the patient's characteristics such as genomic biomarkers, disease history, etc., so that the benefit of treatment can be optimized. Subpopulations identification is to divide patients into several different subgroups where each subgroup corresponds to an optimal treatment. For two subgroups, traditionally the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model is fitted and used to calculate the risk score when outcome is survival time endpoint. Median is commonly chosen as the cutoff value to separate patients. However, using median as the cutoff value is quite subjective and sometimes may be inappropriate in situations where data are imbalanced. Here, we propose a novel tree-based method that adopts the algorithm of relative risk trees to identify subgroup patients. After growing a relative risk tree, we apply k-means clustering to group the terminal nodes based on the averaged covariates. We adopt an ensemble Bagging method to improve the performance of a single tree since it is well known that the performance of a single tree is quite unstable. A simulation study is conducted to compare the performance between our proposed method and the multivariate Cox model. The applications of our proposed method to two public cancer data sets are also conducted for illustration. PMID:27073016

  4. Human corneal epithelial subpopulations: oxygen dependent ex vivo expansion and transcriptional profiling.

    PubMed

    Bath, Chris

    2013-06-01

    Corneal epithelium is being regenerated throughout life by limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) believed to be located in histologically defined stem cell niches in corneal limbus. Defective or dysfunctional LESCs result in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) causing pain and decreased visual acuity. Since the first successful treatment of LSCD by transplantation of ex vivo expanded LESCs in 1997, many attempts have been carried out to optimize culture conditions to improve the outcome of surgery. To date, progress in this field of bioengineering is substantially hindered by both the lack of specific biomarkers of LESCs and the lack of a precise molecular characterization of in situ epithelial subpopulations. The aim of this dissertation was to optimize culture systems with regard to the environmental oxygen concentration for selective ex vivo expansion of LESCs and to analyse in situ subpopulations in human corneal epithelium using a combination of laser capture microdissection and RNA sequencing for global transcriptomic profiling. We compared dissociation cultures, using either expansion on γ-irradiated NIH/3T3 feeder cells in serum-rich medium or expansion directly on plastic in serum-free EpiLife medium, using a range of physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations (2%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%). Using immunocytochemistry and advanced fluorescence microscopy, cells were characterized regarding growth, cell cycle distribution, colony-forming efficiency (CFE), phenotypes and cytomorphometry. Limbal epithelial cells expanded in 2% O2 exhibited slow growth, low fraction of cells in S/G2 , high CFE, high expression of stem cell markers ABCG2 and p63α, and low fraction of differentiation marker CK3 resembling a LESC phenotype. The effect of hypoxia to maintain LESCs in culture was not dependent on the system used for propagation (Bath et al. 2013a). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate cellular subpopulations in situ from the spatially defined

  5. FSP1+ fibroblast subpopulation is essential for the maintenance and regeneration of medullary thymic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lina; Sun, Chenming; Liang, Zhanfeng; Li, Hongran; Chen, Lin; Luo, Haiying; Zhang, Hongmei; Ding, Pengbo; Sun, Xiaoning; Qin, Zhihai; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) form a 3-dimentional network supporting thymocyte development and maturation. Besides epithelium and thymocytes, heterogeneous fibroblasts are essential components in maintaining thymic microenvironments. However, thymic fibroblast characteristics, development and function remain to be determined. We herein found that thymic non-hematopoietic CD45-FSP1+ cells represent a unique Fibroblast specific protein 1 (FSP1)—fibroblast-derived cell subset. Deletion of these cells in FSP1-TK transgenic mice caused thymus atrophy due to the loss of TECs, especially mature medullary TECs (MHCIIhigh, CD80+ and Aire+). In a cyclophosphamide-induced thymus injury and regeneration model, lack of non-hematopoietic CD45-FSP1+ fibroblast subpopulation significantly delayed thymus regeneration. In fact, thymic FSP1+ fibroblasts released more IL-6, FGF7 and FSP1 in the culture medium than their FSP1- counterparts. Further experiments showed that the FSP1 protein could directly enhance the proliferation and maturation of TECs in the in vitro culture systems. FSP1 knockout mice had significantly smaller thymus size and less TECs than their control. Collectively, our studies reveal that thymic CD45-FSP1+ cells are a subpopulation of fibroblasts, which is crucial for the maintenance and regeneration of TECs especially medullary TECs through providing IL-6, FGF7 and FSP1. PMID:26445893

  6. Mathematical modelling of transcriptional heterogeneity identifies novel markers and subpopulations in complex tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Niya; Hoffman, Eric P.; Chen, Lulu; Chen, Li; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Chunyu; Yu, Guoqiang; Herrington, David M.; Clarke, Robert; Wang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Tissue heterogeneity is both a major confounding factor and an underexploited information source. While a handful of reports have demonstrated the potential of supervised computational methods to deconvolute tissue heterogeneity, these approaches require a priori information on the marker genes or composition of known subpopulations. To address the critical problem of the absence of validated marker genes for many (including novel) subpopulations, we describe convex analysis of mixtures (CAM), a fully unsupervised in silico method, for identifying subpopulation marker genes directly from the original mixed gene expressions in scatter space that can improve molecular analyses in many biological contexts. Validated with predesigned mixtures, CAM on the gene expression data from peripheral leukocytes, brain tissue, and yeast cell cycle, revealed novel marker genes that were otherwise undetectable using existing methods. Importantly, CAM requires no a priori information on the number, identity, or composition of the subpopulations present in mixed samples, and does not require the presence of pure subpopulations in sample space. This advantage is significant in that CAM can achieve all of its goals using only a small number of heterogeneous samples, and is more powerful to distinguish between phenotypically similar subpopulations. PMID:26739359

  7. Differential expression of living mammary epithelial cell subpopulations in milk during lactation in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Baratta, M; Volpe, M G; Nucera, D; Gabai, G; Guzzo, N; Fustini, M; Faustini, M; Martignani, E

    2015-10-01

    Epithelial cells are shed into milk during lactation, and although they generally reflect the cellular characteristics of terminally differentiated luminal cells, previously the detection of more primitive cells was described in human milk where a cell population of epithelial lineage was detected expressing markers typical of progenitor cells. In this investigation, we report the development of flow cytometry analysis to allow multiparametric assessment of mammary epithelial cells observed in milk. Cells collected from milk samples of 10 healthy dairy cows were directly analyzed for 6 different markers: CD45, CD49f, cytokeratin 14, cytokeratin 18, presence of nucleus, and cell viability. Milk samples were collected in 3 different periods of lactation: early lactation (EL=d 0-30), mid-lactation (ML=d 90-120), and late lactation (LL=210-250). Here we identify the differential expression of precursor or differentiated cell markers (or both) in mammary epithelial cells present in bovine milk. Myoepithelial cells, as indicated by cells staining positively for cytokeratin 14(+)/cytokeratin 18(-), were observed to increase from EL to LL with a high correlation with nuclear staining inferring potential proliferative activity. Furthermore, a significant increase in CD49f(+) and cytokeratin 14(+)/cytokeratin 18(+) positive cells was observed in LL. This assay is a sensitive approach for evaluating the variations in the frequency and features of living epithelial cells, whose reciprocal balance may be significant in understanding mammary gland cellular function throughout lactation. These observations suggest that mammary epithelial cell immunophenotypes could be investigated as biomarkers for mammary gland function in dairy cows.

  8. Identifying the relative priorities of subpopulations for containing infectious disease spread.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shang; Liu, Jiming; Cheung, William

    2013-01-01

    In response to the outbreak of an emerging infectious disease, e.g., H1N1 influenza, public health authorities will take timely and effective intervention measures to contain disease spread. However, due to the scarcity of required resources and the consequent social-economic impacts, interventions may be suggested to cover only certain subpopulations, e.g., immunizing vulnerable children and the elderly as well as closing schools or workplaces for social distancing. Here we are interested in addressing the question of how to identify the relative priorities of subpopulations for two measures of disease intervention, namely vaccination and contact reduction, especially when these measures are implemented together at the same time. We consider the measure of vaccination that immunizes susceptible individuals in different age subpopulations and the measure of contact reduction that cuts down individuals' effective contacts in different social settings, e.g., schools, households, workplaces, and general communities. In addition, we construct individuals' cross-age contact frequency matrix by inferring basic contact patterns respectively for different social settings from the socio-demographical census data. By doing so, we present a prioritization approach to identifying the target subpopulations that will lead to the greatest reduction in the number of disease transmissions. We calculate the relative priorities of subpopulations by considering the marginal effects of reducing the reproduction number for the cases of vaccine allocation by age and contact reduction by social setting. We examine the proposed approach by revisiting the real-world scenario of the 2009 Hong Kong H1N1 influenza epidemic and determine the relative priorities of subpopulations for age-specific vaccination and setting-specific contact reduction. We simulate the influenza-like disease spread under different settings of intervention. The results have shown that the proposed approach can improve

  9. Identifying vulnerable subpopulations for climate change health effects in the United States.

    PubMed

    Balbus, John M; Malina, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Climate change can be expected to have differential effects on different subpopulations. Biological sensitivity, socioeconomic factors, and geography may each contribute to heightened risk for climate-sensitive health outcomes, which include heat stress, air pollution health effects, extreme weather event health effects, water-, food-, and vector-borne illnesses. Particularly vulnerable subpopulations include children, pregnant women, older adults, impoverished populations, people with chronic conditions and mobility and cognitive constraints, outdoor workers, and those in coastal and low-lying riverine zones. For public health planning, it is critical to identify populations that may experience synergistic effects of multiple risk factors for health problems, both related to climate change and to other temporal trends, with specific geographic factors that convey climate-related risks.

  10. EGFR and mutant p53 expand esophageal cellular subpopulation capable of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition through ZEB transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Shinya; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Wong, Gabrielle S.; Michaylira, Carmen Z.; Grugan, Katharine D.; Stairs, Douglas B.; Kalabis, Jiri; Vega, Maria E.; Kalman, Ross A.; Nakagawa, Momo; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Herlyn, Meenhard; Diehl, J. Alan; Rustgi, Anil K.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β is a potent inducer of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, it remains elusive as to which molecular mechanisms determine the cellular capacity to undergo EMT in response to TGF-β. We have found that both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression and mutant p53 tumor suppressor genes contribute to enrichment of an EMT-competent cellular subpopulation amongst telomerase-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells during malignant transformation. EGFR overexpression triggers oncogene-induced senescence, accompanied by induction of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p15INK4B, p16INK4A and p21. Interestingly, a subpopulation of cells emerges by negating senescence without loss of EGFR overexpression. Such cell populations express increased levels of zinc finger E-box binding (ZEB) transcription factors ZEB1 and ZEB2, and undergo EMT upon TGF-β stimulation. Enrichment of EMT-competent cells was more evident in the presence of p53 mutation, which diminished EGFR-induced senescence. RNA interference directed against ZEB resulted in induction of p15INK4B and p16INK4A, reactivating the EGFR-dependent senescence program. Importantly, TGF-β-mediated EMT did not take place when cellular senescence programs were activated by either ZEB knockdown or activation of wild-type p53 function. Thus, senescence checkpoint functions activated by EGFR and p53 may be evaded through the induction of ZEB, thereby allowing expansion of an EMT-competent unique cellular subpopulation, providing novel mechanistic insights into the role of ZEB in esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:20424117

  11. Use of stable isotopes to identify dietary differences across subpopulations and sex for a free-ranging generalist herbivore.

    PubMed

    Walter, W David

    2014-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen isotopes in tissues can be used to understand plants consumed by various taxa, but can they provide additional information about consumers? Values of δ(13)C and δ(15)N were assessed from tissue of free-ranging elk (Cervus elaphus) occupying disparate habitats of mixed prairie-oak savannah that contained C3 agricultural crops in a C4-dominated landscape and in key plants consumed by elk. Muscle and hoof samples were collected from female and male elk in two subpopulations (forested land and grassland) from private land and one subpopulation from the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge (refuge) in 2001-2006. Previous research identified differences between mean muscle δ(13)C and δ(15)N and mean hoof δ(13)C and δ(15)N indicating that isotopes differed between tissues of varying metabolic activity. Mean δ(13)C in hoof of elk on forested land and grassland were lower than hoof δ(13)C from elk in the refuge indicating greater long-term consumption of C3 plants by elk on forested land and grassland subpopulations. The δ(15)N in hoof was greater for elk outside the refuge than that for elk in the refuge. Interaction of sex and subpopulation only occurred for hoof δ(15)N suggesting that factors such as tissue type, sex, and habitat need to be considered to understand free-ranging ecology of generalist herbivores using stable isotopes. Availability of C3 agricultural crops high in percent nitrogen on a nearly annual basis in a C4-dominated landscape was likely driving differences in tissue δ(13)C and δ(15)N among subpopulations of free-ranging elk. An increase in tissue δ(15)N resulted from an increase in the consumption of higher δ(15)N in forage for sexes and subpopulations of a free-ranging ungulate in North America but δ(15)N should be further evaluated as an index of nutrition for subpopulations of generalist herbivores. PMID:24450704

  12. A subpopulation of neurochemically-identified ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons is excited by intravenous cocaine.

    PubMed

    Mejias-Aponte, Carlos A; Ye, Changquan; Bonci, Antonello; Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Morales, Marisela

    2015-02-01

    Systemic administration of cocaine is thought to decrease the firing rates of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. However, this view is based on categorizations of recorded neurons as DA neurons using preselected electrophysiological characteristics lacking neurochemical confirmation. Without applying cellular preselection, we recorded the impulse activity of VTA neurons in response to cocaine administration in anesthetized adult rats. The phenotype of recorded neurons was determined by their juxtacellular labeling and immunohistochemical detection of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a DA marker. We found that intravenous cocaine altered firing rates in the majority of recorded VTA neurons. Within the cocaine-responsive neurons, half of the population was excited and the other half was inhibited. Both populations had similar discharge rates and firing regularities, and most neurons did not exhibit changes in burst firing. Inhibited neurons were more abundant in the posterior VTA, whereas excited neurons were distributed evenly throughout the VTA. Cocaine-excited neurons were more likely to be excited by footshock. Within the subpopulation of TH-positive neurons, 36% were excited by cocaine and 64% were inhibited. Within the subpopulation of TH-negative neurons, 44% were excited and 28% were inhibited. Contrary to the prevailing view that all DA neurons are inhibited by cocaine, we found a subset of confirmed VTA DA neurons that is excited by systemic administration of cocaine. We provide evidence indicating that DA neurons are heterogeneous in their response to cocaine and that VTA non-DA neurons play an active role in processing systemic cocaine. PMID:25653355

  13. A Subpopulation of Neurochemically-Identified Ventral Tegmental Area Dopamine Neurons Is Excited by Intravenous Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Mejias-Aponte, Carlos A.; Ye, Changquan; Bonci, Antonello; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic administration of cocaine is thought to decrease the firing rates of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. However, this view is based on categorizations of recorded neurons as DA neurons using preselected electrophysiological characteristics lacking neurochemical confirmation. Without applying cellular preselection, we recorded the impulse activity of VTA neurons in response to cocaine administration in anesthetized adult rats. The phenotype of recorded neurons was determined by their juxtacellular labeling and immunohistochemical detection of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a DA marker. We found that intravenous cocaine altered firing rates in the majority of recorded VTA neurons. Within the cocaine-responsive neurons, half of the population was excited and the other half was inhibited. Both populations had similar discharge rates and firing regularities, and most neurons did not exhibit changes in burst firing. Inhibited neurons were more abundant in the posterior VTA, whereas excited neurons were distributed evenly throughout the VTA. Cocaine-excited neurons were more likely to be excited by footshock. Within the subpopulation of TH-positive neurons, 36% were excited by cocaine and 64% were inhibited. Within the subpopulation of TH-negative neurons, 44% were excited and 28% were inhibited. Contrary to the prevailing view that all DA neurons are inhibited by cocaine, we found a subset of confirmed VTA DA neurons that is excited by systemic administration of cocaine. We provide evidence indicating that DA neurons are heterogeneous in their response to cocaine and that VTA non-DA neurons play an active role in processing systemic cocaine. PMID:25653355

  14. A subpopulation of neurochemically-identified ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons is excited by intravenous cocaine.

    PubMed

    Mejias-Aponte, Carlos A; Ye, Changquan; Bonci, Antonello; Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Morales, Marisela

    2015-02-01

    Systemic administration of cocaine is thought to decrease the firing rates of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. However, this view is based on categorizations of recorded neurons as DA neurons using preselected electrophysiological characteristics lacking neurochemical confirmation. Without applying cellular preselection, we recorded the impulse activity of VTA neurons in response to cocaine administration in anesthetized adult rats. The phenotype of recorded neurons was determined by their juxtacellular labeling and immunohistochemical detection of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a DA marker. We found that intravenous cocaine altered firing rates in the majority of recorded VTA neurons. Within the cocaine-responsive neurons, half of the population was excited and the other half was inhibited. Both populations had similar discharge rates and firing regularities, and most neurons did not exhibit changes in burst firing. Inhibited neurons were more abundant in the posterior VTA, whereas excited neurons were distributed evenly throughout the VTA. Cocaine-excited neurons were more likely to be excited by footshock. Within the subpopulation of TH-positive neurons, 36% were excited by cocaine and 64% were inhibited. Within the subpopulation of TH-negative neurons, 44% were excited and 28% were inhibited. Contrary to the prevailing view that all DA neurons are inhibited by cocaine, we found a subset of confirmed VTA DA neurons that is excited by systemic administration of cocaine. We provide evidence indicating that DA neurons are heterogeneous in their response to cocaine and that VTA non-DA neurons play an active role in processing systemic cocaine.

  15. Biophysical properties and responses to glutamate receptor agonists of identified subpopulations of rat geniculate ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    King, M S; Bradley, R M

    2000-06-01

    The goal of the current study was to evaluate the electrophysiological properties and responses to glutamate receptor agonists of rat geniculate ganglion (GG) neurons innervating the tongue. Subpopulations of GG neurons were labeled by injecting Fluoro-Gold (FG) or True Blue chloride into the anterior tongue and soft palate (AT and SP neurons) and applying FG crystals to the posterior auricular branch of the facial nerve (PA neurons). Three to 12 days later, the GG neurons were acutely isolated and patch clamped. Although many biophysical properties of the AT, SP and PA neurons were similar, significant differences were found among these groups in properties related to cell excitability. For example, the average amount of current necessary to elicit an action potential was 61 pA in AT neurons (n=55), 90 pA in SP neurons (n=41) and 189 pA in PA neurons (n=35, P<0.001). In addition, AT neurons tended to fire significantly more action potentials during depolarization as well as following hyperpolarizing pulses than SP or PA neuron types. Most GG neurons responded to application of glutamate receptor agonists. The neurons responded with a depolarization accompanied by a reduction in input resistance. These results suggest that subpopulations of neurons in the geniculate ganglion have distinct biophysical properties and express functional glutamate receptors. The differing biophysical properties of GG neurons is possibly related to their functional heterogeneity and glutaminergic neurotransmission may function in the processing of gustatory, and other sensory information, within the geniculate ganglion and its projections. PMID:10825499

  16. Annexin A8 Identifies a Subpopulation of Transiently Quiescent c-Kit Positive Luminal Progenitor Cells of the Ductal Mammary Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Juan Manuel; Cairney, Claire J.; Ferrier, Roderick K.; McDonald, Laura; Soady, Kelly; Kendrick, Howard; Pringle, Marie-Anne; Morgan, Reginald O.; Martin, Finian; Smalley, Matthew J.; Blyth, Karen; Stein, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that Annexin A8 (ANXA8) is strongly associated with the basal-like subgroup of breast cancers, including BRCA1-associated breast cancers, and poor prognosis; while in the mouse mammary gland AnxA8 mRNA is expressed in low-proliferative isolated pubertal mouse mammary ductal epithelium and after enforced involution, but not in isolated highly proliferative terminal end buds (TEB) or during pregnancy. To better understand ANXA8’s association with this breast cancer subgroup we established ANXA8’s cellular distribution in the mammary gland and ANXA8’s effect on cell proliferation. We show that ANXA8 expression in the mouse mammary gland was strong during pre-puberty before the expansion of the rudimentary ductal network and was limited to a distinct subpopulation of ductal luminal epithelial cells but was not detected in TEB or in alveoli during pregnancy. Similarly, during late involution its expression was found in the surviving ductal epithelium, but not in the apoptotic alveoli. Double-immunofluorescence (IF) showed that ANXA8 positive (+ve) cells were ER-alpha negative (−ve) and mostly quiescent, as defined by lack of Ki67 expression during puberty and mid-pregnancy, but not terminally differentiated with ∼15% of ANXA8 +ve cells re-entering the cell cycle at the start of pregnancy (day 4.5). RT-PCR on RNA from FACS-sorted cells and double-IF showed that ANXA8+ve cells were a subpopulation of c-kit +ve luminal progenitor cells, which have recently been identified as the cells of origin of basal-like breast cancers. Over expression of ANXA8 in the mammary epithelial cell line Kim-2 led to a G0/G1 arrest and suppressed Ki67 expression, indicating cell cycle exit. Our data therefore identify ANXA8 as a potential mediator of quiescence in the normal mouse mammary ductal epithelium, while its expression in basal-like breast cancers may be linked to ANXA8’s association with their specific cells of origin. PMID:25803307

  17. Low adherent cancer cell subpopulations are enriched in tumorigenic and metastatic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-induced cancer stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Morata-Tarifa, Cynthia; Jiménez, Gema; García, María A.; Entrena, José M.; Griñán-Lisón, Carmen; Aguilera, Margarita; Picon-Ruiz, Manuel; Marchal, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are responsible for tumor progression, metastasis, therapy resistance and cancer recurrence, doing their identification and isolation of special relevance. Here we show that low adherent breast and colon cancer cells subpopulations have stem-like properties. Our results demonstrate that trypsin-sensitive (TS) breast and colon cancer cells subpopulations show increased ALDH activity, higher ability to exclude Hoechst 33342, enlarged proportion of cells with a cancer stem-like cell phenotype and are enriched in sphere- and colony-forming cells in vitro. Further studies in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells reveal that TS subpopulation expresses higher levels of SLUG, SNAIL, VIMENTIN and N-CADHERIN while show a lack of expression of E-CADHERIN and CLAUDIN, being this profile characteristic of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The TS subpopulation shows CXCL10, BMI-1 and OCT4 upregulation, differing also in the expression of several miRNAs involved in EMT and/or cell self-renewal such as miR-34a-5p, miR-34c-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-93-5p and miR-100-5p. Furthermore, in vivo studies in immunocompromised mice demonstrate that MDA-MB-231 TS cells form more and bigger xenograft tumors with shorter latency and have higher metastatic potential. In conclusion, this work presents a new, non-aggressive, easy, inexpensive and reproducible methodology to isolate prospectively cancer stem-like cells for subsequent biological and preclinical studies. PMID:26752044

  18. Intermediate expression of CCRL1 reveals novel subpopulations of medullary thymic epithelial cells that emerge in the postnatal thymus.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana R; Meireles, Catarina; Rodrigues, Pedro M; Alves, Nuno L

    2014-10-01

    Cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells (cTECs and mTECs, respectively) provide inductive microenvironments for T-cell development and selection. The differentiation pathway of cTEC/mTEC lineages downstream of common bipotent progenitors at discrete stages of development remains unresolved. Using IL-7/CCRL1 dual reporter mice that identify specialized TEC subsets, we show that the stepwise acquisition of chemokine (C-C motif) receptor-like 1 (CCRL1) is a late determinant of cTEC differentiation. Although cTECs expressing high CCRL1 levels (CCRL1(hi) ) develop normally in immunocompetent and Rag2(-/-) thymi, their differentiation is partially blocked in Rag2(-/-) Il2rg(-/-) counterparts. These results unravel a novel checkpoint in cTEC maturation that is regulated by the cross-talk between TECs and immature thymocytes. Additionally, we identify new Ulex europaeus agglutinin 1 (UEA)(+) mTEC subtypes expressing intermediate CCRL1 levels (CCRL1(int) ) that conspicuously emerge in the postnatal thymus and differentially express Tnfrsf11a, Ccl21, and Aire. While rare in fetal and in Rag2(-/-) thymi, CCRL1(int) mTECs are restored in Rag2(-/-) Marilyn TCR-Tg mice, indicating that the appearance of postnatal-restricted mTECs is closely linked with T-cell selection. Our findings suggest that alternative temporally restricted routes of new mTEC differentiation contribute to the establishment of the medullary niche in the postnatal thymus.

  19. TaqMan Real-Time PCR Assays for Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Which Identify Francisella tularensis and Its Subspecies and Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Birdsell, Dawn N.; Vogler, Amy J.; Buchhagen, Jordan; Clare, Ashley; Kaufman, Emily; Naumann, Amber; Driebe, Elizabeth; Wagner, David M.; Keim, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the etiologic agent of tularemia and a Class A Select Agent, is divided into three subspecies and multiple subpopulations that differ in virulence and geographic distribution. Given these differences, there is a need to rapidly and accurately determine if a strain is F. tularensis and, if it is, assign it to subspecies and subpopulation. We designed TaqMan real-time PCR genotyping assays using eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were potentially specific to closely related groups within the genus Francisella, including numerous subpopulations within F. tularensis species. We performed extensive validation studies to test the specificity of these SNPs to particular populations by screening the assays across a set of 565 genetically and geographically diverse F. tularensis isolates and an additional 21 genetic near-neighbor (outgroup) isolates. All eleven assays correctly determined the genetic groups of all 565 F. tularensis isolates. One assay differentiates F. tularensis, F. novicida, and F. hispaniensis from the more genetically distant F. philomiragia and Francisella-like endosymbionts. Another assay differentiates F. tularensis isolates from near neighbors. The remaining nine assays classify F. tularensis-confirmed isolates into F. tularensis subspecies and subpopulations. The genotyping accuracy of these nine assays diminished when tested on outgroup isolates (i.e. non F. tularensis), therefore a hierarchical approach of assay usage is recommended wherein the F. tularensis-specific assay is used before the nine downstream assays. Among F. tularensis isolates, all eleven assays were highly sensitive, consistently amplifying very low concentrations of DNA. Altogether, these eleven TaqMan real-time PCR assays represent a highly accurate, rapid, and sensitive means of identifying the species, subspecies, and subpopulation of any F. tularensis isolate if used in a step-wise hierarchical scheme. These assays would be very

  20. Dietary suppression of the mammary CD29(hi)CD24(+) epithelial subpopulation and its cytokine/chemokine transcriptional signatures modifies mammary tumor risk in MMTV-Wnt1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Rahal, Omar M; Machado, Heather L; Montales, Maria Theresa E; Pabona, John Mark P; Heard, Melissa E; Nagarajan, Shanmugam; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2013-11-01

    Diet is highly linked to breast cancer risk, yet little is known about its influence on mammary epithelial populations with distinct regenerative and hence, tumorigenic potential. To investigate this, we evaluated the relative frequency of lineage-negative CD29(hi)CD24(+), CD29(lo)CD24(+) and CD29(hi)Thy1(+)CD24(+) epithelial subpopulations in pre-neoplastic mammary tissue of adult virgin MMTV-Wnt1-transgenic mice fed either control (Casein) or soy-based diets. We found that mammary epithelial cells exposed to soy diet exhibited a lower percentage of CD29(hi)CD24(+)Lin(-) population, decreased ability to form mammospheres in culture, lower mammary outgrowth potential when transplanted into cleared fat pads, and reduced appearance of tumor-initiating CD29(hi)Thy1(+)CD24(+) cells, than in those of control diet-fed mice. Diet had no comparable influence on the percentage of the CD29(lo)CD24(+)Lin(-) population. Global gene expression profiling of the CD29(hi)CD24(+)subpopulation revealed markedly altered expression of genes important to inflammation, cytokine and chemokine signaling, and proliferation. Soy-fed relative to casein-fed mice showed lower mammary tumor incidence, shorter tumor latency, and reduced systemic levels of estradiol 17-β, progesterone and interleukin-6. Our results provide evidence for the functional impact of diet on specific epithelial subpopulations that may relate to breast cancer risk and suggest that diet-regulated cues can be further explored for breast cancer risk assessment and prevention.

  1. High mitochondrial mass identifies a sub-population of stem-like cancer cells that are chemo-resistant

    PubMed Central

    Farnie, Gillian; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Chemo-resistance is a clinical barrier to more effective anti-cancer therapy. In this context, cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are thought to be chemo-resistant, resulting in tumor recurrence and distant metastasis. Our hypothesis is that chemo-resistance in CSCs is driven, in part, by enhanced mitochondrial function. Here, we used breast cell lines and metastatic breast cancer patient samples to begin to dissect the role of mitochondrial metabolism in conferring the CSC phenotype. More specifically, we employed fluorescent staining with MitoTracker (MT) to metabolically fractionate these cell lines into mito-high and mito-low sub-populations, by flow-cytometry. Interestingly, cells with high mitochondrial mass (mito-high) were specifically enriched in a number of known CSC markers, such as aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity, and they were ESA+/CD24-/low and formed mammospheres with higher efficiency. Large cell size is another independent characteristic of the stem cell phenotype; here, we observed a >2-fold increase in mitochondrial mass in large cells (>12-μm), relative to the smaller cell population (4–8-μm). Moreover, the mito-high cell population showed a 2.4-fold enrichment in tumor-initiating cell activity, based on limiting dilution assays in murine xenografts. Importantly, primary human breast CSCs isolated from patients with metastatic breast cancer or a patient derived xenograft (PDX) also showed the co-enrichment of ALDH activity and mitochondrial mass. Most significantly, our investigations demonstrated that mito-high cells were resistant to paclitaxel, resulting in little or no DNA damage, as measured using the comet assay. In summary, increased mitochondrial mass in a sub-population of breast cancer cells confers a stem-like phenotype and chemo-resistance. As such, our current findings have important clinical implications for over-coming drug resistance, by therapeutically targeting the mito-high CSC population. PMID:26421710

  2. Genetic screening test for psoriatic arthritis and UVB irradiation potential responders: A new tool to identify psoriasis subpopulation patients?

    PubMed

    Lotti, Torello; Tognetti, Linda; Galeone, Massimiliano; Bruscino, Nicola; Moretti, Silvia; Giorgini, Simonetta

    2011-07-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a psoriasis-associated inflammatory disease of the joints and enthuses. The occurrence of PsA is linked to the complex interplay of gene environment, and immune system. Genetic factors have long been recognized to play an important role in PsA. Genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region have been shown to be associated with PsA. These include genes coded in the HLA region, (especially Class I antigens) and non-HLA genes (i.e., MHC class I chain-related antigen A, MICA, and TNF-α genes). Association studies in PsA have also identified a number of genes outside MHC region, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene cluster, killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), and IL-23R genes. Established systemic treatments for moderate-severe psoriasis and PsA may be potentially dangerous and usually time consuming for the patient and often expensive for the National Health Systems. Tests which could predict which subset of psoriatic patients could develop the most severe forms of the disease (i.e., PsA) or will respond to well-established (UVB irradiation) or other systemic treatments are now required. The goal of genetic test screening is to rapidly and safely identify subjects for preventive or early treatment or extended surveillance prior to the onset of signs and symptoms. Genetic tests today represent a reliable investigation procedure which could rapidly and consistently improve the diagnostic ability of the dermatologist and contribute to the early and correct treatment of the different subsets of PsA.

  3. Genetic screening test for psoriatic arthritis and UVB irradiation potential responders: A new tool to identify psoriasis subpopulation patients?

    PubMed Central

    Lotti, Torello; Tognetti, Linda; Galeone, Massimiliano; Bruscino, Nicola; Moretti, Silvia; Giorgini, Simonetta

    2011-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a psoriasis-associated inflammatory disease of the joints and enthuses. The occurrence of PsA is linked to the complex interplay of gene environment, and immune system. Genetic factors have long been recognized to play an important role in PsA. Genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region have been shown to be associated with PsA. These include genes coded in the HLA region, (especially Class I antigens) and non-HLA genes (i.e., MHC class I chain-related antigen A, MICA, and TNF-α genes). Association studies in PsA have also identified a number of genes outside MHC region, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene cluster, killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), and IL-23R genes. Established systemic treatments for moderate-severe psoriasis and PsA may be potentially dangerous and usually time consuming for the patient and often expensive for the National Health Systems. Tests which could predict which subset of psoriatic patients could develop the most severe forms of the disease (i.e., PsA) or will respond to well-established (UVB irradiation) or other systemic treatments are now required. The goal of genetic test screening is to rapidly and safely identify subjects for preventive or early treatment or extended surveillance prior to the onset of signs and symptoms. Genetic tests today represent a reliable investigation procedure which could rapidly and consistently improve the diagnostic ability of the dermatologist and contribute to the early and correct treatment of the different subsets of PsA. PMID:23130225

  4. Identifying the cellular mechanisms of symbiont-induced epithelial morphogenesis in the squid-Vibrio association.

    PubMed

    Koropatnick, Tanya; Goodson, Michael S; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C; McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    2014-02-01

    The symbiotic association between the Hawaiian bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes and the luminous marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri provides a unique opportunity to study epithelial morphogenesis. Shortly after hatching, the squid host harvests bacteria from the seawater using currents created by two elaborate fields of ciliated epithelia on the surface of the juvenile light organ. After light organ colonization, the symbiont population signals the gradual loss of the ciliated epithelia through apoptosis of the cells, which culminates in the complete regression of these tissues. Whereas aspects of this process have been studied at the morphological, biochemical, and molecular levels, no in-depth analysis of the cellular events has been reported. Here we describe the cellular structure of the epithelial field and present evidence that the symbiosis-induced regression occurs in two steps. Using confocal microscopic analyses, we observed an initial epithelial remodeling, which serves to disable the function of the harvesting apparatus, followed by a protracted regression involving actin rearrangements and epithelial cell extrusion. We identified a metal-dependent gelatinolytic activity in the symbiont-induced morphogenic epithelial fields, suggesting the involvement of Zn-dependent matrix metalloproteinase(s) (MMP) in light organ morphogenesis. These data show that the bacterial symbionts not only induce apoptosis of the field, but also change the form, function, and biochemistry of the cells as part of the morphogenic program.

  5. Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 identifies a specific subpopulation of angiogenic blood vessels following contusive spinal cord injury in the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Benton, Richard L; Maddie, Melissa A; Minnillo, Danielle R; Hagg, Theo; Whittemore, Scott R

    2008-03-01

    After traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), disruption and plasticity of the microvasculature within injured spinal tissue contribute to the pathological cascades associated with the evolution of both primary and secondary injury. Conversely, preserved vascular function most likely results in tissue sparing and subsequent functional recovery. It has been difficult to identify subclasses of damaged or regenerating blood vessels at the cellular level. Here, adult mice received a single intravenous injection of the Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 (IB4) at 1-28 days following a moderate thoracic (T9) contusion. Vascular binding of IB4 was maximally observed 7 days following injury, a time associated with multiple pathologic aspects of the intrinsic adaptive angiogenesis, with numbers of IB4 vascular profiles decreasing by 21 days postinjury. Quantitative assessment of IB4 binding shows that it occurs within the evolving lesion epicenter, with affected vessels expressing a temporally specific dysfunctional tight junctional phenotype as assessed by occludin, claudin-5, and ZO-1 immunoreactivities. Taken together, these results demonstrate that intravascular lectin delivery following SCI is a useful approach not only for observing the functional status of neovascular formation but also for definitively identifying specific subpopulations of reactive spinal microvascular elements.

  6. Evaluation of a rat tracheal epithelial cell culture assay system to identify respiratory carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, V.E.; Arnold, J.T.; Arnold, J.V.; Mass, M.J. )

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate a short-term epithelial cell assay system to detect respiratory carcinogens, primary cultures of rat tracheal epithelial cells were exposed to a series of 17 compounds and scored for morphologically transformed cell colonies 28 days later. The test compounds included known carcinogens and noncarcinogens in volatile or liquid form. Tracheal epithelial cells were isolate from F344 rats, plated onto collagen-coated dishes, and exposed to the test compounds on day 1 for 24 hours. At day 30 the cultures were fixed, stained, and scored for colonies having a density greater than 1,300 cells/mm{sup 2}. With standardized protocols, such colonies are very infrequent in media and solvent control cultures. Concentration levels for each chemical were chosen over a range from nontoxic to toxic levels. Highly positive compounds in this assay included benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(l)aceanthrylene, 3-methylcholanthrene, and formaldehyde. Compounds which were negative in this assay included pyrene, benzo(e)pyrene, and 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide. Examining the concordance of in vitro results with whole animal carcinogenesis studies revealed an accuracy of 88% with one false-positive and one false-negative compound. The results of these studies indicate that the rat tracheal epithelial cell assay may be useful in identifying potential respiratory carcinogens in our environment.

  7. An epithelial marker promoter induction screen identifies histone deacetylase inhibitors to restore epithelial differentiation and abolishes anchorage independence growth in cancers.

    PubMed

    Tang, H M; Kuay, K T; Koh, P F; Asad, M; Tan, T Z; Chung, V Y; Lee, S C; Thiery, J P; Huang, Ry-J

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a crucial mechanism in development, mediates aggressiveness during carcinoma progression and therapeutic refractoriness. The reversibility of EMT makes it an attractive strategy in designing novel therapeutic approaches. Therefore, drug discovery pipelines for EMT reversal are in need to discover emerging classes of compounds. Here, we outline a pre-clinical drug screening platform for EMT reversal that consists of three phases of drug discovery and validation. From the Phase 1 epithelial marker promoter induction (EpI) screen on a library consisting of compounds being approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Vorinostat (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), is identified to exert EMT reversal effects by restoring the expression of an epithelial marker, E-cadherin. An expanded screen on 41 HDACi further identifies 28 compounds, such as class I-specific HDACi Mocetinosat, Entinostat and CI994, to restore E-cadherin and ErbB3 expressions in ovarian, pancreatic and bladder carcinoma cells. Mocetinostat is the most potent HDACi to restore epithelial differentiation with the lowest concentration required for 50% induction of epithelial promoter activity (EpIC-50).The HDACi exerts paradoxical effects on EMT transcriptional factors such as SNAI and ZEB family and the effects are context-dependent in epithelial- and mesenchymal-like cells. In vitro functional studies further show that HDACi induced significant increase in anoikis and decrease in spheroid formation in ovarian and bladder carcinoma cells with mesenchymal features. This study demonstrates a robust drug screening pipeline for the discovery of compounds capable of restoring epithelial differentiation that lead to significant functional lethality. PMID:27551531

  8. Exploratory analysis of a phase III trial of pirfenidone identifies a subpopulation of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as benefiting from treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A phase III trial in Japan showed that pirfenidone is effective for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). To find out which patients specifically benefit from pirfenidone, we analyzed in an exploratory manner the data from the phase III trial. Methods The patients in the phase III trial were stratified by baseline percentage predicted vital capacity (%VC), arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2), and the lowest oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO2) during the 6-minute steady-state exercise test (6MET). In the subpopulations, changes in VC and subjective symptoms (cough and dyspnea on the Fletcher, Hugh-Jones [F, H-J] Classification scale) were evaluated in patients treated with high-dose (1800 mg/day) pirfenidone, low-dose (1200 mg/day) pirfenidone, and placebo at week 52. Results Significant efficacy of pirfenidone in reducing the decline in VC could be seen in a subpopulation having %VC ≥ 70% and SpO2 < 90% at baseline. This favorable effect was accompanied by categorical change in VC and progression-free survival time. In the subpopulation, pirfenidone significantly suppressed cough and dyspnea. Conclusions IPF patients having %VC ≥ 70% and SpO2 < 90% at baseline will most likely benefit from pirfenidone when evaluated using changes in VC (and %VC), and cough and dyspnea symptoms. This subpopulation could expect to benefit most from pirfenidone treatment. Trial Registration This clinical trial was registered with the Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center (JAPIC) on September 13th, 2005 (Registration Number: JAPICCTI-050121). PMID:22035508

  9. Open chromatin mapping identifies transcriptional networks regulating human epididymis epithelial function

    PubMed Central

    Browne, James A.; Yang, Rui; Song, Lingyun; Crawford, Gregory E.; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Harris, Ann

    2014-01-01

    The epithelium lining the epididymis in the male reproductive tract maintains a luminal environment that promotes sperm cell maturation. This process is dependent on the coordinated expression of many genes that encode proteins with a role in epithelial transport. We previously generated genome-wide maps of open chromatin in primary human epididymis epithelial (HEE) cells to identify potential regulatory elements controlling coordinated gene expression in the epididymis epithelium. Subsequent in silico analysis identified transcription factor-binding sites (TFBS) that were over-represented in the HEE open chromatin, including the motif for paired box 2 (PAX2). PAX2 is a critical transcriptional regulator of urogenital tract development, which has been well studied in the kidney but is unexplored in the epididymis. Due to the limited lifespan of primary HEE cells in culture, we investigated the role of PAX2 in an immortalized HEE cell line (REP). First, REP cells were evaluated by DNase I digestion followed by high-throughput sequencing and the PAX2-binding motif was again identified as an over-represented TFBS within intergenic open chromatin, though on fewer chromosomes than in the primary HEE cells. To identify PAX2-target genes in REP cells, RNA-seq analysis was performed after siRNA-mediated depletion of PAX2 and compared with that with a non-targeting siRNA. In response to PAX2-represssion, 3135 transcripts were differentially expressed (1333 up-regulated and 1802 down-regulated). Novel PAX2 targets included multiple genes encoding proteins with predicted functions in the epididymis epithelium. PMID:25180270

  10. α-Amanitin Restrains Cancer Relapse from Drug-Tolerant Cell Subpopulations via TAF15

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Kohei; Ikeda, Miyuki; Miura, Sawako; Ito, Kohei; Sato, Kei A.; Ohmori, Yukimi; Endo, Fumitaka; Katagiri, Hirokatsu; Ishida, Kaoru; Ito, Chie; Iwaya, Takeshi; Nishizuka, Satoshi S.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer relapse occurs with substantial frequency even after treatment with curative intent. Here we studied drug-tolerant colonies (DTCs), which are subpopulations of cancer cells that survive in the presence of drugs. Proteomic characterization of DTCs identified stemness- and epithelial-dominant subpopulations, but functional screening suggested that DTC formation was regulated at the transcriptional level independent from protein expression patterns. We consistently found that α-amanitin, an RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) inhibitor, effectively inhibited DTCs by suppressing TAF15 expression, which binds to RNA to modulate transcription and RNA processing. Sequential administration of α-amanitin and cisplatin extended overall survival in a cancer-relapse mouse model, namely peritonitis carcinomatosa. Therefore, post-treatment cancer relapse may occur through non-distinct subpopulations and may be effectively prevented by α-amanitin to disrupt transcriptional machinery, including TAF15. PMID:27181033

  11. An epithelial marker promoter induction screen identifies histone deacetylase inhibitors to restore epithelial differentiation and abolishes anchorage independence growth in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Tang, H M; Kuay, K T; Koh, P F; Asad, M; Tan, T Z; Chung, V Y; Lee, S C; Thiery, J P; Huang, RY-J

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), a crucial mechanism in development, mediates aggressiveness during carcinoma progression and therapeutic refractoriness. The reversibility of EMT makes it an attractive strategy in designing novel therapeutic approaches. Therefore, drug discovery pipelines for EMT reversal are in need to discover emerging classes of compounds. Here, we outline a pre-clinical drug screening platform for EMT reversal that consists of three phases of drug discovery and validation. From the Phase 1 epithelial marker promoter induction (EpI) screen on a library consisting of compounds being approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Vorinostat (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), is identified to exert EMT reversal effects by restoring the expression of an epithelial marker, E-cadherin. An expanded screen on 41 HDACi further identifies 28 compounds, such as class I-specific HDACi Mocetinosat, Entinostat and CI994, to restore E-cadherin and ErbB3 expressions in ovarian, pancreatic and bladder carcinoma cells. Mocetinostat is the most potent HDACi to restore epithelial differentiation with the lowest concentration required for 50% induction of epithelial promoter activity (EpIC-50).The HDACi exerts paradoxical effects on EMT transcriptional factors such as SNAI and ZEB family and the effects are context-dependent in epithelial- and mesenchymal-like cells. In vitro functional studies further show that HDACi induced significant increase in anoikis and decrease in spheroid formation in ovarian and bladder carcinoma cells with mesenchymal features. This study demonstrates a robust drug screening pipeline for the discovery of compounds capable of restoring epithelial differentiation that lead to significant functional lethality. PMID:27551531

  12. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in a subpopulation of murine prostate luminal epithelial cells induces high grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Valkenburg, Kenneth C.; Yu, Xiuping; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Spiering, Tyler; Matusik, Robert J.; Williams, Bart O.

    2014-01-01

    Background Wnt/β-catenin signaling is important for prostate development and cancer in humans. Activation of this pathway in differentiated luminal cells of mice induces high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). Though the cell of origin of prostate cancer has yet to be conclusively identified, a castration-resistant Nkx3.1-expressing cell (CARN) may act as a cell of origin for prostate cancer. Methods To activate Wnt/β-catenin signaling in CARNs, we crossed mice carrying tamoxifen-inducible Nkx3.1-driven Cre to mice containing loxP sites in order to either conditionally knock out adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) or constitutively activate β-catenin directly. We then castrated and hormonally regenerated these mice to target the CARN population. Results Loss of Apc in hormonally normal mice induced HGPIN; however, after one or more rounds of castration and hormonal regeneration, Apc-null CARNs disappeared. Alternatively, when β-catenin was constitutively activated under the same conditions, HGPIN was apparent. Conclusion Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling via Apc deletion is sufficient to produce HGPIN in hormonally normal mice. Loss of Apc may destabilize the CARN population under regeneration conditions. When β-catenin is constitutively activated, HGPIN occurs in hormonally regenerated mice. A second genetic hit is likely required to cause progression to carcinoma and metastasis. PMID:25175604

  13. Proteomic analysis identifies interleukin 11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in human endometrial epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During the peri-implantation period, the embryo adheres to an adequately prepared or receptive endometrial surface epithelium. Abnormal embryo adhesion to the endometrium results in embryo implantation failure and infertility. Endometrial epithelial cell plasma membrane proteins critical in regulating adhesion may potentially be infertility biomarkers or targets for treating infertility. Interleukin (IL) 11 regulates human endometrial epithelial cells (hEEC) adhesion. Its production is abnormal in women with infertility. The objective of the study was to identify IL11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in hEEC in vitro using a proteomic approach. Methods Using a 2D-differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) electrophoresis combined with LCMS/MS mass spectrometry approach, we identified 20 unique plasma membrane proteins differentially regulated by IL11 in ECC-1 cells, a hEEC derived cell line. Two IL11 regulated proteins with known roles in cell adhesion, annexin A2 (ANXA2) and flotillin-1 (FLOT1), were validated by Western blot and immunocytochemistry in hEEC lines (ECC-1 and an additional cell line, Ishikawa) and primary hEEC. Flotilin-1 was further validated by immunohistochemistry in human endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle (n = 6-8/cycle). Results 2D-DIGE analysis identified 4 spots that were significantly different between control and IL11 treated group. Of these 4 spots, there were 20 proteins that were identified with LCMS/MS. Two proteins; ANXA2 and FLOT1 were chosen for further analyses and have found to be significantly up-regulated following IL11 treatment. Western blot analysis showed a 2-fold and a 2.5-fold increase of ANXA2 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. Similarly, a 1.8-fold and a 2.3/2.4-fold increase was also observed for FLOT1 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. In vitro, IL11 induced stronger ANXA2 expression on cell surface of primary hEEC and ECC-1 whilst

  14. Pretreatment biopsy analysis of DAB2IP identifies subpopulation of high-risk prostate cancer patients with worse survival following radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Corbin; Tumati, Vasu; Kapur, Payal; Yan, Jingsheng; Xie, Xian-Jin; Hannan, Raquibul; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Kim, Dong Wook Nathan; Saha, Debabrata

    2015-12-01

    Decreased expression of tumor suppressor DAB2IP is linked to aggressive cancer and radiation resistance in several malignancies, but clinical survival data is largely unknown. We hypothesized that pretreatment DAB2IP reduction would predict worse prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS). Immunohistochemistry of pretreatment biopsies was scored by an expert genitourinary pathologist. Other endpoints analyzed include freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), castration resistance-free survival (CRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). Seventy-nine patients with NCCN-defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy from 2005 to 2012 at our institution were evaluated. Twenty-eight percent (22/79) of pretreatment biopsies revealed DAB2IP-reduction. The median follow up times were 4.8 years and 5.3 years for patients in the DAB2IP-reduced group and DAB2IP-retained group, respectively. Patients with reduced DAB2IP demonstrated worse outcome compared to patients retaining DAB2IP, including FFBF (4-year: 34 vs. 92%; P < 0.0001), CRFS (4-year: 58 vs. 96%; P = 0.0039), DMFS (4-year: 58 vs. 100%; P = 0.0006), and PCSS (5-year: 83 vs. 100%; P = 0.0102). Univariate analysis showed T stage, N stage, and Gleason score were statistically significant variables. Pretreatment tumor DAB2IP status remained significant in multivariable analyses. This study suggests that about one-fourth of men with high-risk prostate cancer have decreased tumor expression of DAB2IP. This subpopulation with reduced DAB2IP has a suboptimal response and worse malignancy-specific survival following radiation therapy and androgen deprivation. DAB2IP loss may be a genetic explanation for the observed differences in aggressive tumor characteristics and radiation resistance. Further study into improving treatment response and survival in this subpopulation is warranted.

  15. In Vitro Model for Studying Esophageal Epithelial Differentiation and Allergic Inflammatory Responses Identifies Keratin Involvement in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    KC, Kiran; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Sherrill, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial differentiation is an essential physiological process that imparts mechanical strength and barrier function to squamous epithelia. Perturbation of this process can give rise to numerous human diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, in which antigenic stimuli can penetrate the weakened epithelial barrier to initiate the allergic inflammatory cascade. We recently described a simplified air-liquid interface (ALI) culture system that facilitates the study of differentiated squamous epithelia in vitro. Herein, we use RNA sequencing to define the genome-wide transcriptional changes that occur within the ALI system during epithelial differentiation and in response to allergic inflammation. We identified 2,191 and 781 genes that were significantly altered upon epithelial differentiation or dysregulated in the presence of interleukin 13 (IL-13), respectively. Notably, 286 genes that were modified by IL-13 in the ALI system overlapped with the gene signature present within the inflamed esophageal tissue from patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an allergic inflammatory disorder of the esophagus that is characterized by elevated IL-13 levels, altered epithelial differentiation, and pro-inflammatory gene expression. Pathway analysis of these overlapping genes indicated enrichment in keratin genes; for example, the gene encoding keratin 78, an uncharacterized type II keratin, was upregulated during epithelial differentiation (45-fold) yet downregulated in response to IL-13 and in inflamed esophageal tissue from patients. Thus, our findings delineate an in vitro experimental system that models epithelial differentiation that is dynamically regulated by IL-13. Using this system and analyses of patient tissues, we identify an altered expression profile of novel keratin differentiation markers in response to IL-13 and disease activity, substantiating the potential of this combined approach to identify relevant molecular processes that contribute to human allergic

  16. Functional differences between two morphologically distinct cell subpopulations within a human colorectal carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Solimene, A C; Carneiro, C R; Melati, I; Lopes, J D

    2001-05-01

    The LISP-I human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line was isolated from a hepatic metastasis at the Ludwig Institute, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. The objective of the present study was to isolate morphologically different subpopulations within the LISP-I cell line, and characterize some of their behavioral aspects such as adhesion to and migration towards extracellular matrix components, expression of intercellular adhesion molecules and tumorigenicity in vitro. Once isolated, the subpopulations were submitted to adhesion and migration assays on laminin and fibronectin (crucial proteins to invasion and metastasis), as well as to anchorage-independent growth. Two morphologically different subpopulations were isolated: LISP-A10 and LISP-E11. LISP-A10 presents a differentiated epithelial pattern, and LISP-E11 is fibroblastoid, suggesting a poorly differentiated pattern. LISP-A10 expressed the two intercellular adhesion molecules tested, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and desmoglein, while LISP-E11 expressed only low amounts of CEA. On the other hand, adhesion to laminin and fibronectin as well as migration towards these extracellular matrix proteins were higher in LISP-E11, as expected from its poorly differentiated phenotype. Both subpopulations showed anchorage-independent growth on a semi-solid substrate. These results raise the possibility that the heterogeneity found in the LISP-I cell line, which might have contributed to its ability to metastasize, was due to at least two different subpopulations herein identified. PMID:11323753

  17. Lineage tracing and cell ablation identify a post-Aire-expressing thymic epithelial cell population.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Todd C; Khan, Imran S; Gardner, James M; Mouchess, Maria L; Johannes, Kellsey P; Krawisz, Anna K; Skrzypczynska, Katarzyna M; Anderson, Mark S

    2013-10-17

    Thymic epithelial cells in the medulla (mTECs) play a critical role in enforcing central tolerance through expression and presentation of tissue-specific antigens (TSAs) and deletion of autoreactive thymocytes. TSA expression requires autoimmune regulator (Aire), a transcriptional activator present in a subset of mTECs characterized by high CD80 and major histocompatibility complex II expression and a lack of potential for differentiation or proliferation. Here, using an Aire-DTR transgenic line, we show that short-term ablation specifically targets Aire(+) mTECs, which quickly undergo RANK-dependent recovery. Repeated ablation also affects Aire(-) mTECs, and using an inducible Aire-Cre fate-mapping system, we find that this results from the loss of a subset of mTECs that showed prior expression of Aire, maintains intermediate TSA expression, and preferentially migrates toward the center of the medulla. These results clearly identify a distinct stage of mTEC development and underscore the diversity of mTECs that play a key role in maintaining tolerance.

  18. Development of an in vitro test to identify respiratory sensitizers in bronchial epithelial cells using gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Dik, Sander; Pennings, Jeroen L A; van Loveren, Henk; Ezendam, Janine

    2015-12-25

    Chemicals that induce asthma at the workplace are substances of concern. At present, there are no widely accepted methods to identify respiratory sensitizers, and classification of these substances is based on human occupational data. Several studies have contributed to understanding the mechanisms involved in respiratory sensitization, although uncertainties remain. One point of interest for respiratory sensitization is the reaction of the epithelial lung barrier to respiratory sensitizers. To elucidate potential molecular effects of exposure of the epithelial lung barrier, a gene expression profile was created based on a DNA microarray experiment using the bronchial epithelial cell line 16 HBE14o(-). The cells were exposed to 12 respiratory sensitizers and 10 non-sensitizers. For statistical analysis, we used a class prediction approach that combined three machine learning algorithms, leave-one-compound-out cross validation, and majority voting per tested compound. This approach allowed for a prediction accuracy of 95%. Identified predictive genes were mainly associated with the cytoskeleton and barrier function of the epithelial cell. Several of these genes were reported to be associated with asthma as well. Taken together, this indicates that pulmonary barrier function is an important target for respiratory sensitizers and associated genes can be used to predict the respiratory sensitization potential of chemicals.

  19. Surgical excision of pure flat epithelial atypia identified on core needle breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Prowler, Vanessa L; Joh, Jennifer E; Acs, Geza; Kiluk, John V; Laronga, Christine; Khakpour, Nazanin; Lee, M Catherine

    2014-08-01

    The biology of flat epithelial atypia (FEA) is still being investigated as its presence becomes more frequent on biopsy specimens. FEA is more commonly associated with malignancy when found in association with ADH, ALH or LCIS. Pure FEA is only upgraded to cancer in 3.2% of patients. Surgical excision of pure FEA found on core needle biopsy results in overtreatment in the vast majority of breast patients and may not be necessary.

  20. Alcohol Consumption in Demographic Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Delker, Erin; Brown, Qiana; Hasin, Deborah S.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is common across subpopulations in the United States. However, the health burden associated with alcohol consumption varies across groups, including those defined by demographic characteristics such as age, race/ethnicity, and gender. Large national surveys, such as the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions and the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, found that young adults ages 18–25 were at particularly high risk of alcohol use disorder and unintentional injury caused by drinking. These surveys furthermore identified significant variability in alcohol consumption and its consequences among racial/ethnic groups. White respondents reported the highest prevalence of current alcohol consumption, whereas alcohol abuse and dependence were most prevalent among Native Americans. Native Americans and Blacks also were most vulnerable to alcohol-related health consequences. Even within ethnic groups, there was variability between and among different subpopulations. With respect to gender, men reported more alcohol consumption and binge drinking than women, especially in older cohorts. Men also were at greater risk of alcohol abuse and dependence, liver cirrhosis, homicide after alcohol consumption, and drinking and driving. Systematic identification and measurement of the variability across demographics will guide prevention and intervention efforts, as well as future research. PMID:27159807

  1. Phenotypic chemical screening using a zebrafish neural crest EMT reporter identifies retinoic acid as an inhibitor of epithelial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Laura; Wang, Jindong; Morrison, Monique A; Whatcott, Clifford; Soh, Katherine K; Warner, Steven; Bearss, David; Jette, Cicely A; Stewart, Rodney A

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved morphogenetic program essential for embryogenesis, regeneration and cancer metastasis. In cancer cells, EMT also triggers cellular reprogramming and chemoresistance, which underlie disease relapse and decreased survival. Hence, identifying compounds that block EMT is essential to prevent or eradicate disseminated tumor cells. Here, we establish a whole-animal-based EMT reporter in zebrafish for rapid drug screening, calledTg(snai1b:GFP), which labels epithelial cells undergoing EMT to producesox10-positive neural crest (NC) cells. Time-lapse and lineage analysis ofTg(snai1b:GFP)embryos reveal that cranial NC cells delaminate from two regions: an early population delaminates adjacent to the neural plate, whereas a later population delaminates from within the dorsal neural tube. TreatingTg(snai1b:GFP)embryos with candidate small-molecule EMT-inhibiting compounds identified TP-0903, a multi-kinase inhibitor that blocked cranial NC cell delamination in both the lateral and medial populations. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis and chemical rescue experiments show that TP-0903 acts through stimulating retinoic acid (RA) biosynthesis and RA-dependent transcription. These studies identify TP-0903 as a new therapeutic for activating RAin vivoand raise the possibility that RA-dependent inhibition of EMT contributes to its prior success in eliminating disseminated cancer cells. PMID:26794130

  2. Phenotypic chemical screening using a zebrafish neural crest EMT reporter identifies retinoic acid as an inhibitor of epithelial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Laura; Wang, Jindong; Morrison, Monique A; Whatcott, Clifford; Soh, Katherine K; Warner, Steven; Bearss, David; Jette, Cicely A; Stewart, Rodney A

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved morphogenetic program essential for embryogenesis, regeneration and cancer metastasis. In cancer cells, EMT also triggers cellular reprogramming and chemoresistance, which underlie disease relapse and decreased survival. Hence, identifying compounds that block EMT is essential to prevent or eradicate disseminated tumor cells. Here, we establish a whole-animal-based EMT reporter in zebrafish for rapid drug screening, calledTg(snai1b:GFP), which labels epithelial cells undergoing EMT to producesox10-positive neural crest (NC) cells. Time-lapse and lineage analysis ofTg(snai1b:GFP)embryos reveal that cranial NC cells delaminate from two regions: an early population delaminates adjacent to the neural plate, whereas a later population delaminates from within the dorsal neural tube. TreatingTg(snai1b:GFP)embryos with candidate small-molecule EMT-inhibiting compounds identified TP-0903, a multi-kinase inhibitor that blocked cranial NC cell delamination in both the lateral and medial populations. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis and chemical rescue experiments show that TP-0903 acts through stimulating retinoic acid (RA) biosynthesis and RA-dependent transcription. These studies identify TP-0903 as a new therapeutic for activating RAin vivoand raise the possibility that RA-dependent inhibition of EMT contributes to its prior success in eliminating disseminated cancer cells.

  3. Phenotypic chemical screening using a zebrafish neural crest EMT reporter identifies retinoic acid as an inhibitor of epithelial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Laura; Wang, Jindong; Morrison, Monique A.; Whatcott, Clifford; Soh, Katherine K.; Warner, Steven; Bearss, David; Jette, Cicely A.; Stewart, Rodney A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved morphogenetic program essential for embryogenesis, regeneration and cancer metastasis. In cancer cells, EMT also triggers cellular reprogramming and chemoresistance, which underlie disease relapse and decreased survival. Hence, identifying compounds that block EMT is essential to prevent or eradicate disseminated tumor cells. Here, we establish a whole-animal-based EMT reporter in zebrafish for rapid drug screening, called Tg(snai1b:GFP), which labels epithelial cells undergoing EMT to produce sox10-positive neural crest (NC) cells. Time-lapse and lineage analysis of Tg(snai1b:GFP) embryos reveal that cranial NC cells delaminate from two regions: an early population delaminates adjacent to the neural plate, whereas a later population delaminates from within the dorsal neural tube. Treating Tg(snai1b:GFP) embryos with candidate small-molecule EMT-inhibiting compounds identified TP-0903, a multi-kinase inhibitor that blocked cranial NC cell delamination in both the lateral and medial populations. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis and chemical rescue experiments show that TP-0903 acts through stimulating retinoic acid (RA) biosynthesis and RA-dependent transcription. These studies identify TP-0903 as a new therapeutic for activating RA in vivo and raise the possibility that RA-dependent inhibition of EMT contributes to its prior success in eliminating disseminated cancer cells. PMID:26794130

  4. Changes in the Submandibular Salivary Gland Epithelial Cell Subpopulations During Progression of Sjögren's Syndrome-Like Disease in the NOD/ShiLtJ Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Elise M; Desantis, Kara A; Pagendarm, Nicholas; Nelson, Deirdre A; Enger, Tone; Skarstein, Kathrine; Liaaen Jensen, Janicke; Larsen, Melinda

    2015-09-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS), an autoimmune exocrinopathy, is associated with dysfunction of the secretory salivary gland epithelium, leading to xerostomia. The etiology of SS disease progression is poorly understood as it is typically not diagnosed until late stage. Since mouse models allow the study of disease progression, we investigated the NOD/ShiLtJ mouse to explore temporal changes to the salivary epithelium. In the NOD/ShiLtJ model, SS presents secondary to autoimmune diabetes, and SS disease is reportedly fully established by 20 weeks. We compared epithelial morphology in the submandibular salivary glands (SMG) of NOD/ShiLtJ mice with SMGs from the parental strain at 12, 18, and 22 weeks of age and used immunofluorescence to detect epithelial proteins, including the acinar marker, aquaporin 5, ductal cell marker, cytokeratin 7, myoepithelial cell marker, smooth muscle α-actin, and the basal cell marker, cytokeratin 5, while confirming immune infiltrates with CD45R. We also compared these proteins in the labial salivary glands of human SS patients with control tissues. In the NOD/ShiLtJ SMG, regions of lymphocytic infiltrates were not associated with widespread epithelial tissue degradation; however, there was a decrease in the area of the gland occupied by secretory epithelial cells in favor of ductal epithelial cells. We observed an expansion of cells expressing cytokeratin 5 within the ducts and within the smooth muscle α-actin(+) basal myoepithelial population. The altered acinar/ductal ratio within the NOD/ShiLtJ SMG likely contributes to salivary hypofunction, while the expansion of cytokeratin 5 positive-basal cells may reflect loss of function or indicate a regenerative response.

  5. Prenatal ontogeny of lymphocyte subpopulations in pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Sinkora, M; Sinkora, J; Reháková, Z; Splíchal, I; Yang, H; Parkhouse, R M; Trebichavsk, I

    1998-01-01

    Although porcine lymphocytes have been classified into numerous subpopulations in postnatal animals, little is known about the ontogeny of these complex cell subsets. Using double- and triple-colour flow cytometry (FCM), we investigated the surface phenotype of fetal lymphoid cells in the thymus, cord blood, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes at different stages of gestation. It was found that the major lymphocyte subpopulations started to appear at the beginning of the second third of the gestation period, with B cells being the earliest lymphocyte subpopulation to appear in the periphery. The T-cell receptor (TCR) gamma delta+ cells were the earliest detectable T-cell subset, developing first in the thymus and subsequently arriving in the periphery. Later in ontogeny, however, the number of TCRalpha beta+ lymphocytes rapidly increased, becoming the predominant T cells both in the thymus and in the periphery. Cells with the phenotype of adult natural killer cells were also identified in pig fetuses, though their nature and functional roles remain to be investigated. In addition, CD2 was expressed on most B cells whilst very few CD4+ TCRalpha beta+ cells or CD2+ TCRgamma delta+ cells expressed CD8, suggesting that the expression of CD2 and CD8 may reflect the functional status of the cells in postnatal animals. Taken together, this study has provided a systematic analysis of fetal porcine lymphocyte subpopulations and may provide the base for studies to establish the physiological roles of these lymphocyte subsets. PMID:9893051

  6. Analysis of thymic stromal cell subpopulations grown in vitro on extracellular matrix in defined medium. III. Growth conditions of human thymic epithelial cells and immunomodulatory activities in their culture supernatant.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, L; Eshel, I; Meilin, A; Sharabi, Y; Shoham, J

    1991-01-01

    We report here on a new approach to the cultivation of human thymic epithelial (HTE) cells, which apparently allows more faithful preservation of cell function. This approach, previously developed by us for mouse thymic epithelial (MTE) cells, is based on the use of culture plates coated with extracellular matrix (ECM), and on the use of serum-free, growth factor-supplemented medium. The nutritional requirements of HTE and MTE are somewhat different. Although both are critically dependent on ECM and insulin, they differ in their dependency on other growth factors: selenium and transferrin are much more important for HTE cells, whereas epidermal growth factor and hydrocortisone play a more essential role in MTE cultures. The epithelial nature of the cultured cells is indicated by positive staining with anti-keratin antibodies and by the presence of desmosomes and tonofilaments. The ultrastructural appearance of the cells further suggests high metabolic and secretory activities, not usually found in corresponding cell lines. The culture supernatant (CS) of HTE cells exhibited a strong enhancing effect on thymocyte response to Con A stimulation, as measured by cell proliferation and lymphokine production. The effect was observed on both human and mouse thymocytes, but was much stronger in the homologous combination. Thymic factors tested in parallel did not have such a differential effect. The dose-effect relationships were in the form of a bell-shaped curve, with fivefold enhancement of response at the peak and a measurable effect even with 1:1000 dilution, when human thymocytes were used. The responding thymocytes were those which do not bind peanut agglutinin and are resistant to hydrocortisone. The culture system described here may have advantages for the in vitro study of thymic stromal cell function. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1783421

  7. Characterization of circulating tumor cell aggregates identified in patients with epithelial tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Edward H.; Wendel, Marco; Luttgen, Madelyn; Yoshioka, Craig; Marrinucci, Dena; Lazar, Daniel; Schram, Ethan; Nieva, Jorge; Bazhenova, Lyudmila; Morgan, Alison; Ko, Andrew H.; Korn, W. Michael; Kolatkar, Anand; Bethel, Kelly; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been implicated as a population of cells that may seed metastasis and venous thromboembolism (VTE), two major causes of mortality in cancer patients. Thus far, existing CTC detection technologies have been unable to reproducibly detect CTC aggregates in order to address what contribution CTC aggregates may make to metastasis or VTE. We report here an enrichment-free immunofluorescence detection method that can reproducibly detect and enumerate homotypic CTC aggregates in patient samples. We identified CTC aggregates in 43% of 86 patient samples. The fraction of CTC aggregation was investigated in blood draws from 24 breast, 14 non-small cell lung, 18 pancreatic, 15 prostate stage IV cancer patients and 15 normal blood donors. Both single CTCs and CTC aggregates were measured to determine whether differences exist in the physical characteristics of these two populations. Cells contained in CTC aggregates had less area and length, on average, than single CTCs. Nuclear to cytoplasmic ratios between single CTCs and CTC aggregates were similar. This detection method may assist future studies in determining which population of cells is more physically likely to contribute to metastasis and VTE.

  8. Functional genomics identifies five distinct molecular subtypes with clinical relevance and pathways for growth control in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tuan Zea; Miow, Qing Hao; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju; Wong, Meng Kang; Ye, Jieru; Lau, Jieying Amelia; Wu, Meng Chu; Bin Abdul Hadi, Luqman Hakim; Soong, Richie; Choolani, Mahesh; Davidson, Ben; Nesland, Jahn M; Wang, Ling-Zhi; Matsumura, Noriomi; Mandai, Masaki; Konishi, Ikuo; Goh, Boon-Cher; Chang, Jeffrey T; Thiery, Jean Paul; Mori, Seiichi

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is hallmarked by a high degree of heterogeneity. To address this heterogeneity, a classification scheme was developed based on gene expression patterns of 1538 tumours. Five, biologically distinct subgroups — Epi-A, Epi-B, Mes, Stem-A and Stem-B — exhibited significantly distinct clinicopathological characteristics, deregulated pathways and patient prognoses, and were validated using independent datasets. To identify subtype-specific molecular targets, ovarian cancer cell lines representing these molecular subtypes were screened against a genome-wide shRNA library. Focusing on the poor-prognosis Stem-A subtype, we found that two genes involved in tubulin processing, TUBGCP4 and NAT10, were essential for cell growth, an observation supported by a pathway analysis that also predicted involvement of microtubule-related processes. Furthermore, we observed that Stem-A cell lines were indeed more sensitive to inhibitors of tubulin polymerization, vincristine and vinorelbine, than the other subtypes. This subtyping offers new insights into the development of novel diagnostic and personalized treatment for EOC patients. PMID:23666744

  9. Chemodynamic subpopulations of the Carina dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordopatis, G.; Amorisco, N. C.; Evans, N. W.; Gilmore, G.; Koposov, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    We study the chemodynamical properties of the Carina dwarf spheroidal by combining an intermediate spectroscopic resolution data set of more than 900 red giant and red clump stars, with high-precision photometry to derive the atmospheric parameters, metallicities and age estimates for our targets. Within the red giant branch population, we find evidence for the presence of three distinct stellar subpopulations with different metallicities, spatial distributions, kinematics and ages. As in the Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals, the subpopulation with the lowest average metallicity is more extended and kinematically hotter than all other populations. However, we identify an inversion in the parallel ordering of metallicity, kinematics and characteristic length-scale in the two most metal-rich subpopulations, which therefore do not contribute to a global negative chemical gradient. Contrary to common trends in the chemical properties with radius, the metal richest population is more extended and mildly kinematically hotter than the main component of intermediate metallicity. More investigations are required to ascertain the nature of this inversion, but we comment on the mechanisms that might have caused it.

  10. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition can suppress major attributes of human epithelial tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Celià-Terrassa, Toni; Meca-Cortés, Óscar; Mateo, Francesca; Martínez de Paz, Alexia; Rubio, Nuria; Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Ell, Brian J.; Bermudo, Raquel; Díaz, Alba; Guerra-Rebollo, Marta; Lozano, Juan José; Estarás, Conchi; Ulloa, Catalina; ρlvarez-Simón, Daniel; Milà, Jordi; Vilella, Ramón; Paciucci, Rosanna; Martínez-Balbás, Marian; García de Herreros, Antonio; Gomis, Roger R.; Kang, Yibin; Blanco, Jerónimo; Fernández, Pedro L.; Thomson, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant progression in cancer requires populations of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) endowed with unlimited self renewal, survival under stress, and establishment of distant metastases. Additionally, the acquisition of invasive properties driven by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is critical for the evolution of neoplastic cells into fully metastatic populations. Here, we characterize 2 human cellular models derived from prostate and bladder cancer cell lines to better understand the relationship between TIC and EMT programs in local invasiveness and distant metastasis. The model tumor subpopulations that expressed a strong epithelial gene program were enriched in highly metastatic TICs, while a second subpopulation with stable mesenchymal traits was impoverished in TICs. Constitutive overexpression of the transcription factor Snai1 in the epithelial/TIC-enriched populations engaged a mesenchymal gene program and suppressed their self renewal and metastatic phenotypes. Conversely, knockdown of EMT factors in the mesenchymal-like prostate cancer cell subpopulation caused a gain in epithelial features and properties of TICs. Both tumor cell subpopulations cooperated so that the nonmetastatic mesenchymal-like prostate cancer subpopulation enhanced the in vitro invasiveness of the metastatic epithelial subpopulation and, in vivo, promoted the escape of the latter from primary implantation sites and accelerated their metastatic colonization. Our models provide new insights into how dynamic interactions among epithelial, self-renewal, and mesenchymal gene programs determine the plasticity of epithelial TICs. PMID:22505459

  11. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antzack, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J.; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication

  12. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antzack, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J; Guindani, Michele; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication networks

  13. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antzack, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J; Guindani, Michele; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication networks

  14. Next-Generation Sequencing Identifies TGF-β1-Associated Gene Expression Profiles in Renal Epithelial Cells Reiterated in Human Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Eoin P.; Morine, Melissa J.; Walsh, David W.; Roxburgh, Sarah A.; Lindenmeyer, Maja T.; Brazil, Derek P.; Gaora, Peadar Ó.; Roche, Helen M.; Sadlier, Denise M.; Cohen, Clemens D.; Godson, Catherine; Martin, Finian

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1) is implicated in the onset and progression of renal fibrosis and diabetic nephropathy (DN), leading to a loss of epithelial characteristics of tubular cells. The transcriptional profile of renal tubular epithelial cells stimulated with TGF-β1 was assessed using RNA-Seq, with 2027 differentially expressed genes identified. Promoter analysis of transcription factor binding sites in the TGF-β1 responsive gene set predicted activation of multiple transcriptional networks, including NFκB. Comparison of RNA-Seq with microarray data from identical experimental conditions identified low abundance transcripts exclusive to RNA-Seq data. We compared these findings to human disease by analyzing transcriptomic data from renal biopsies of patients with DN versus control groups, identifying a shared subset of 179 regulated genes. ARK5, encoding an AMP-related kinase, and TGFBI - encoding transforming growth factor, beta-induced protein were induced by TGF-β1 and also upregulated in human DN. Suppression of ARK5 attenuated fibrotic responses of renal epithelia to TGF-β1 exposure; and silencing of TGFBI induced expression of the epithelial cell marker – E-cadherin. We identified low abundance transcripts in sequence data and validated expression levels of several transcripts (ANKRD56, ENTPD8) in tubular enriched kidney biopsies of DN patients versus living donors. In conclusion, we have defined a TGF-β1-driven pro-fibrotic signal in renal epithelial cells that is also evident in the DN renal transcriptome. PMID:22266139

  15. Lipidome and Transcriptome Profiling of Pneumolysin Intoxication Identifies Networks Involved in Statin-Conferred Protection of Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Statt, Sarah; Ruan, Jhen-Wei; Huang, Chih-Ting; Wu, Reen; Kao, Cheng-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia remains one of the leading causes of death in both adults and children worldwide. Despite the adoption of a wide variety of therapeutics, the mortality from community-acquired pneumonia has remained relatively constant. Although viral and fungal acute airway infections can result in pneumonia, bacteria are the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia, with Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated in nearly 50% of cases. Pneumolysin is a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin or pore-forming toxin produced by Streptococcus pneumonia and has been shown to play a critical role in bacterial pathogenesis. Airway epithelium is the initial site of many bacterial contacts and its barrier and mucosal immunity functions are central to infectious lung diseases. In our studies, we have shown that the prior exposure to statins confers significant resistance of airway epithelial cells to the cytotoxicity of pneumolysin. We decided to take this study one step further, assessing changes in both the transcriptome and lipidome of human airway epithelial cells exposed to toxin, statin or both. Our current work provides the first global view in human airway epithelial cells of both the transcriptome and the lipid interactions that result in cellular protection from pneumolysin. PMID:26023727

  16. Demographic and traditional knowledge perspectives on the current status of Canadian polar bear subpopulations.

    PubMed

    York, Jordan; Dowsley, Martha; Cornwell, Adam; Kuc, Miroslaw; Taylor, Mitchell

    2016-05-01

    Subpopulation growth rates and the probability of decline at current harvest levels were determined for 13 subpopulations of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) that are within or shared with Canada based on mark-recapture estimates of population numbers and vital rates, and harvest statistics using population viability analyses (PVA). Aboriginal traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) on subpopulation trend agreed with the seven stable/increasing results and one of the declining results, but disagreed with PVA status of five other declining subpopulations. The decline in the Baffin Bay subpopulation appeared to be due to over-reporting of harvested numbers from outside Canada. The remaining four disputed subpopulations (Southern Beaufort Sea, Northern Beaufort Sea, Southern Hudson Bay, and Western Hudson Bay) were all incompletely mark-recapture (M-R) sampled, which may have biased their survival and subpopulation estimates. Three of the four incompletely sampled subpopulations were PVA identified as nonviable (i.e., declining even with zero harvest mortality). TEK disagreement was nonrandom with respect to M-R sampling protocols. Cluster analysis also grouped subpopulations with ambiguous demographic and harvest rate estimates separately from those with apparently reliable demographic estimates based on PVA probability of decline and unharvested subpopulation growth rate criteria. We suggest that the correspondence between TEK and scientific results can be used to improve the reliability of information on natural systems and thus improve resource management. Considering both TEK and scientific information, we suggest that the current status of Canadian polar bear subpopulations in 2013 was 12 stable/increasing and one declining (Kane Basin). We do not find support for the perspective that polar bears within or shared with Canada are currently in any sort of climate crisis. We suggest that monitoring the impacts of climate change (including sea ice decline) on polar bear

  17. Demographic and traditional knowledge perspectives on the current status of Canadian polar bear subpopulations.

    PubMed

    York, Jordan; Dowsley, Martha; Cornwell, Adam; Kuc, Miroslaw; Taylor, Mitchell

    2016-05-01

    Subpopulation growth rates and the probability of decline at current harvest levels were determined for 13 subpopulations of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) that are within or shared with Canada based on mark-recapture estimates of population numbers and vital rates, and harvest statistics using population viability analyses (PVA). Aboriginal traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) on subpopulation trend agreed with the seven stable/increasing results and one of the declining results, but disagreed with PVA status of five other declining subpopulations. The decline in the Baffin Bay subpopulation appeared to be due to over-reporting of harvested numbers from outside Canada. The remaining four disputed subpopulations (Southern Beaufort Sea, Northern Beaufort Sea, Southern Hudson Bay, and Western Hudson Bay) were all incompletely mark-recapture (M-R) sampled, which may have biased their survival and subpopulation estimates. Three of the four incompletely sampled subpopulations were PVA identified as nonviable (i.e., declining even with zero harvest mortality). TEK disagreement was nonrandom with respect to M-R sampling protocols. Cluster analysis also grouped subpopulations with ambiguous demographic and harvest rate estimates separately from those with apparently reliable demographic estimates based on PVA probability of decline and unharvested subpopulation growth rate criteria. We suggest that the correspondence between TEK and scientific results can be used to improve the reliability of information on natural systems and thus improve resource management. Considering both TEK and scientific information, we suggest that the current status of Canadian polar bear subpopulations in 2013 was 12 stable/increasing and one declining (Kane Basin). We do not find support for the perspective that polar bears within or shared with Canada are currently in any sort of climate crisis. We suggest that monitoring the impacts of climate change (including sea ice decline) on polar bear

  18. Integrated long non-coding RNA analyses identify novel regulators of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Chen, Junjie; Qian, Wenyi; Kang, Jiang; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Lei; Qiao, Li; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic fatal lung disease characterized by aberrant accumulation of fibroblast population and deposition of extra cellular matrix. Increasing evidence support that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of alveolar epithelial cells is a critical process in the pathogenesis of IPF. Although delivery of bleomycin to induce acute lung injury is the most well-studied animal model of pulmonary fibrosis, there is considerable interest to pursue other models to understand the common and/or specific pathological mechanisms. In this study, we established a mouse model of pulmonary injury and progressive interstitial fibrosis via intraperitoneal injection of paraquat, a widely used herbicide known to cause pulmonary fibrosis in human. Using transcriptome sequencing and microarray analysis, we profiled expression of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and identified 513 up-regulated and 204 down-regulated lncRNAs in paraquat-induced fibrotic lung tissues. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the differentially expressed lncRNAs are implicated in cell differentiation, epithelium morphogenesis and wound healing, pathways closely associated with EMT. Furthermore, we identified the evolutionally conserved target genes of two up-regulated lncRNAs, uc.77 and 2700086A05Rik, as Zeb2 and Hoxa3, respectively, both of which are important modulators of EMT. Consistently, overexpression of uc.77 or 2700086A05Rik in human lung epithelial cells induced EMT as demonstrated by changes in gene and protein expression of various EMT markers and cell morphology. Collectively, our results uncovered a crucial role of lncRNA in the regulation of EMT during lung fibrosis and provide potential avenues for the discovery of novel molecular markers and therapeutic targets for IPF. PMID:26824344

  19. Genetic differentiation of sockeye salmon subpopulations from a geologically young Alaskan lake system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burger, C.V.; Spearman, W.J.; Cronin, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Tustumena lake drainage in southcentral Alaska is glacially turbid and geologically young (<2,000 years old). Previous field studies identified at least three subpopulations of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka at Tustumena Lake, based on the distribution and timing of spawners. The subpopulations included early-run salmon that spawned in six clearwater tributaries of the lake (mid August), lake shoreline spawners (late August), and late-run fish that spawned in the lake's outlet, the Kasilof River (late September). Our objective was to determine the degree of genetic differentiation among these subpopulations based on restriction enzyme analyses of the cytochrome b gene of mitochondrial DNA and analyses of four polymorphic allozyme loci. Mitochondrial DNA haplotype frequencies for outlet-spawning sockeye salmon differed significantly from those of all other subpopulations. The most common (36%) haplotype in the outlet subpopulation did not occur elsewhere, thus suggesting little or no gene flow between outlet spawners and other spatially close subpopulations at Tustumena Lake. Allele frequencies at two allozyme loci also indicated a degree of differentiation of the outlet subpopulation from the shoreline and tributary subpopulations. Allele frequencies for three tributary subpopulations were temporally stable over approximately 20 years (based on a comparison to previously published results) despite initiation of a hatchery program in two of the tributaries during the intervening period. Collectively, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that significant genetic differentiation has occurred within the Tustumena Lake drainage since deglaciation approximately 2,000 years ago.

  20. Subpopulations in purified platelets adhering on glass.

    PubMed

    Donati, Alessia; Gupta, Swati; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how platelet activation is regulated is important in the context of cardiovascular disorders and their management with antiplatelet therapy. Recent evidence points to different platelet subpopulations performing different functions. In particular, procoagulant and aggregating subpopulations have been reported in the literature in platelets treated with the GPVI agonists. How the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation is regulated remains unclear. Here, it is shown that procoagulant and aggregating platelet subpopulations arise spontaneously upon adhesion of purified platelets on clean glass surfaces. Calcium ionophore treatment of the adhering platelets resulted in one platelet population expressing both the procoagulant and the adherent population markers phosphatidylserine and the activated form of GPIIb/IIIa, while all of the platelets expressed CD62P independently of the ionophore treatment. Therefore, all platelets have the capacity to express all three activation markers. It is concluded that platelet subpopulations observed in various studies reflect the dynamics of the platelet activation process. PMID:27338300

  1. Intestinal Epithelial Cell-Intrinsic Deletion of Setd7 Identifies Role for Developmental Pathways in Immunity to Helminth Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chenery, Alistair L.; Redpath, Stephen A.; Braam, Mitchell J.; Perona-Wright, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    The intestine is a common site for a variety of pathogenic infections. Helminth infections continue to be major causes of disease worldwide, and are a significant burden on health care systems. Lysine methyltransferases are part of a family of novel attractive targets for drug discovery. SETD7 is a member of the Suppressor of variegation 3-9-Enhancer of zeste-Trithorax (SET) domain-containing family of lysine methyltransferases, and has been shown to methylate and alter the function of a wide variety of proteins in vitro. A few of these putative methylation targets have been shown to be important in resistance against pathogens. We therefore sought to study the role of SETD7 during parasitic infections. We find that Setd7-/- mice display increased resistance to infection with the helminth Trichuris muris but not Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri. Resistance to T. muris relies on an appropriate type 2 immune response that in turn prompts intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) to alter differentiation and proliferation kinetics. Here we show that SETD7 does not affect immune cell responses during infection. Instead, we found that IEC-specific deletion of Setd7 renders mice resistant to T. muris by controlling IEC turnover, an important aspect of anti-helminth immune responses. We further show that SETD7 controls IEC turnover by modulating developmental signaling pathways such as Hippo/YAP and Wnt/β-Catenin. We show that the Hippo pathway specifically is relevant during T. muris infection as verteporfin (a YAP inhibitor) treated mice became susceptible to T. muris. We conclude that SETD7 plays an important role in IEC biology during infection. PMID:27598373

  2. Intestinal Epithelial Cell-Intrinsic Deletion of Setd7 Identifies Role for Developmental Pathways in Immunity to Helminth Infection.

    PubMed

    Oudhoff, Menno J; Antignano, Frann; Chenery, Alistair L; Burrows, Kyle; Redpath, Stephen A; Braam, Mitchell J; Perona-Wright, Georgia; Zaph, Colby

    2016-09-01

    The intestine is a common site for a variety of pathogenic infections. Helminth infections continue to be major causes of disease worldwide, and are a significant burden on health care systems. Lysine methyltransferases are part of a family of novel attractive targets for drug discovery. SETD7 is a member of the Suppressor of variegation 3-9-Enhancer of zeste-Trithorax (SET) domain-containing family of lysine methyltransferases, and has been shown to methylate and alter the function of a wide variety of proteins in vitro. A few of these putative methylation targets have been shown to be important in resistance against pathogens. We therefore sought to study the role of SETD7 during parasitic infections. We find that Setd7-/- mice display increased resistance to infection with the helminth Trichuris muris but not Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri. Resistance to T. muris relies on an appropriate type 2 immune response that in turn prompts intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) to alter differentiation and proliferation kinetics. Here we show that SETD7 does not affect immune cell responses during infection. Instead, we found that IEC-specific deletion of Setd7 renders mice resistant to T. muris by controlling IEC turnover, an important aspect of anti-helminth immune responses. We further show that SETD7 controls IEC turnover by modulating developmental signaling pathways such as Hippo/YAP and Wnt/β-Catenin. We show that the Hippo pathway specifically is relevant during T. muris infection as verteporfin (a YAP inhibitor) treated mice became susceptible to T. muris. We conclude that SETD7 plays an important role in IEC biology during infection. PMID:27598373

  3. EGFR-Based Immunoisolation as a Recovery Target for Low-EpCAM CTC Subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Ana; Abal, Miguel; Muinelo-Romay, Laura; Rodriguez-Abreu, Carlos; Rivas, José; López-López, Rafael; Costa, Clotilde

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) play a key role in the metastasis process, as they are responsible for micrometastasis and are a valuable tool for monitoring patients in real-time. Moreover, efforts to develop new strategies for CTCs isolation and characterisation, and the translation of CTCs into clinical practice needs to overcome the limitation associated with the sole use of Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) expression to purify this tumour cell subpopulation. CTCs are rare events in the blood of patients and are believed to represent the epithelial population from a primary tumour of epithelial origin, thus EpCAM immunoisolation is considered an appropriate strategy. The controversy stems from the impact that the more aggressive mesenchymal tumour phenotypes might have on the whole CTC population. In this work, we first characterised a panel of cell lines representative of tumour heterogeneity, confirming the existence of tumour cell subpopulations with restricted epithelial features and supporting the limitations of EpCAM-based technologies. We next developed customised polystyrene magnetic beads coated with antibodies to efficiently isolate the phenotypically different subpopulations of CTCs from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with metastatic cancer. Besides EpCAM, we propose Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) as an additional isolation marker for efficient CTCs detection. PMID:27711186

  4. Use of a genetic marker to examine genetic interaction among subpopulations of pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha).

    PubMed

    Gharrett, A J; Lane, S; McGregor, A J; Taylor, S G

    2001-01-01

    In 1979 and 1981, a genetic marker was bred into one of the five identifiable subpopulations of pink salmon [Oncorhynchus gorbuscha (Walbaum)] in the Auke Lake drainage in Southeast Alaska. As a result of the marking effort, the frequencies of two malate dehydrogenase (MDH-B1, 2*) alleles were changed in the marked subpopulation, but not in other subpopulations that spawn at different times or places. Between 1983 and 1989, the marker allele frequencies were monitored in many of these subpopulations and in early- and late-run pink salmon spawning in nearby Waydelich Creek, located approximately 1 km away. Changes in allele frequencies at MDH-B1, 2*, used to obtain direct estimates of average migration rates (m) from the marked to the unmarked subpopulations, revealed little or no introgression into early subpopulations or into nearby Waydelich Creek. Moreover, spatially distinct late-run Auke Creek subpopulations were not immediately overrun by the more abundant marked subpopulation. These observations suggest that genetic isolation exists between temporally distinct spawning runs and that small temporal and spatial (or ecological) differences contribute to population structure. These observations should be considered in taking actions that affect conservation and harvest management or extensive culture of salmonids.

  5. Highly variable cancer subpopulations that exhibit enhanced transcriptome variability and metastatic fitness

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Alexander; Yoshida, Mitsukuni; Goodarzi, Hani; Tavazoie, Sohail F.

    2016-01-01

    Individual cells within a tumour can exhibit distinct genetic and molecular features. The impact of such diversification on metastatic potential is unknown. Here we identify clonal human breast cancer subpopulations that display different levels of morphological and molecular diversity. Highly variable subpopulations are more proficient at metastatic colonization and chemotherapeutic survival. Through single-cell RNA-sequencing, inter-cell transcript expression variability is identified as a defining feature of the highly variable subpopulations that leads to protein-level variation. Furthermore, we identify high variability in the spliceosomal machinery gene set. Engineered variable expression of the spliceosomal gene SNRNP40 promotes metastasis, attributable to cells with low expression. Clinically, low SNRNP40 expression is associated with metastatic relapse. Our findings reveal transcriptomic variability generation as a mechanism by which cancer subpopulations can diversify gene expression states, which may allow for enhanced fitness under changing environmental pressures encountered during cancer progression. PMID:27138336

  6. Translocations in epithelial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chad Brenner, J.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2009-01-01

    Genomic translocations leading to the expression of chimeric transcripts characterize several hematologic, mesenchymal and epithelial malignancies. While several gene fusions have been linked to essential molecular events in hematologic malignancies, the identification and characterization of recurrent chimeric transcripts in epithelial cancers has been limited. However, the recent discovery of the recurrent gene fusions in prostate cancer has sparked a revitalization of the quest to identify novel rearrangements in epithelial malignancies. Here, the molecular mechanisms of gene fusions that drive several epithelial cancers and the recent technological advances that increase the speed and reliability of recurrent gene fusion discovery are explored. PMID:19406209

  7. Connectivity among subpopulations of Louisiana black bears as estimated by a step selection function

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Joseph D.; Jared S. Laufenberg,; Maria Davidson,; Jennifer L. Murrow,

    2015-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation is a fundamental cause of population decline and increased risk of extinction for many wildlife species; animals with large home ranges and small population sizes are particularly sensitive. The Louisiana black bear (Ursus americanus luteolus) exists only in small, isolated subpopulations as a result of land clearing for agriculture, but the relative potential for inter-subpopulation movement by Louisiana black bears has not been quantified, nor have characteristics of effective travel routes between habitat fragments been identified. We placed and monitored global positioning system (GPS) radio collars on 8 female and 23 male bears located in 4 subpopulations in Louisiana, which included a reintroduced subpopulation located between 2 of the remnant subpopulations. We compared characteristics of sequential radiolocations of bears (i.e., steps) with steps that were possible but not chosen by the bears to develop step selection function models based on conditional logistic regression. The probability of a step being selected by a bear increased as the distance to natural land cover and agriculture at the end of the step decreased and as distance from roads at the end of a step increased. To characterize connectivity among subpopulations, we used the step selection models to create 4,000 hypothetical correlated random walks for each subpopulation representing potential dispersal events to estimate the proportion that intersected adjacent subpopulations (hereafter referred to as successful dispersals). Based on the models, movement paths for males intersected all adjacent subpopulations but paths for females intersected only the most proximate subpopulations. Cross-validation and genetic and independent observation data supported our findings. Our models also revealed that successful dispersals were facilitated by a reintroduced population located between 2 distant subpopulations. Successful dispersals for males were dependent on natural land

  8. Identifying Metabolic Subpopulations from Population Level Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism underlies many important cellular decisions, such as the decisions to proliferate and differentiate, and defects in metabolic signaling can lead to disease and aging. In addition, metabolic heterogeneity can have biological consequences, such as differences in outcomes and drug susceptibilities in cancer and antibiotic treatments. Many approaches exist for characterizing the metabolic state of a population of cells, but technologies for measuring metabolism at the single cell level are in the preliminary stages and are limited. Here, we describe novel analysis methodologies that can be applied to established experimental methods to measure metabolic variability within a population. We use mass spectrometry to analyze amino acid composition in cells grown in a mixture of 12C- and 13C-labeled sugars; these measurements allow us to quantify the variability in sugar usage and thereby infer information about the behavior of cells within the population. The methodologies described here can be applied to a large range of metabolites and macromolecules and therefore have the potential for broad applications. PMID:26986964

  9. T and B Lymphocyte Subpopulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeger, Robert C.; Stiehm, E. Richard

    1975-01-01

    Reviewed are diagnostic tests of symphocyte subgroups which identify immuno deficiency disorders (such as DiGeorge's Syndrome) and malignant cells in lymphoproliferative disorders (such as lumphoid leukemia). (CL)

  10. Yeast one-hybrid screen of a thymus epithelial library identifies ZBTB7A as a regulator of thymic insulin expression

    PubMed Central

    ST-JEAN, Julien R.; OUNISSI-BENKALHA, Houria; POLYCHRONAKOS, Constantin

    2013-01-01

    Insulin self-tolerance is, to a large extent, assured by the expression of small quantities of insulin by medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). Regulation of thymic insulin expression differs from that in pancreas and its therapeutic manipulation could play an important role in the prevention of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Knowledge of the transcriptional regulators involved in the mTEC nuclear environment is essential for the development of such therapeutics. The yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) approach was used in order to identify such mTEC-specific nuclear proteins. We used a target composed of the human insulin gene promoter joined to the upstream class III VNTR allele, which is associated with both protection from T1D and higher thymic insulin expression, and a cDNA library from our insulin-producing mouse mTEC line. The Y1H screening allowed the identification of eleven proteins. An in vitro assay was used to confirm and quantify protein-DNA binding to the human insulin gene promoter alone or joined to a class I or class III VNTR allele, and identified the transcription factors ZBTB7A, JUN and EWSR1 as strong interacting partners. All three proteins could induce insulin expression in transfected HEK-293 cells, but ZBTB7A provided the most robust results especially in the presence of AIRE, with an additional 11-fold increase of the insulin mRNA levels from a co-transfected reporter driven by the class III VNTR allele. Thus, ZBTB7A is identified as a strong candidate for regulation of thymic insulin expression. PMID:23911422

  11. An epigenetically distinct breast cancer cell subpopulation promotes collective invasion.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Jill M; Prechtl, Amanda M; Maine, Erin A; Dang, Tuyen T; Esparza, Matthew A; Sun, Han; Zhou, Yunyun; Xie, Yang; Pearson, Gray W

    2015-05-01

    Tumor cells can engage in a process called collective invasion, in which cohesive groups of cells invade through interstitial tissue. Here, we identified an epigenetically distinct subpopulation of breast tumor cells that have an enhanced capacity to collectively invade. Analysis of spheroid invasion in an organotypic culture system revealed that these "trailblazer" cells are capable of initiating collective invasion and promote non-trailblazer cell invasion, indicating a commensal relationship among subpopulations within heterogenous tumors. Canonical mesenchymal markers were not sufficient to distinguish trailblazer cells from non-trailblazer cells, suggesting that defining the molecular underpinnings of the trailblazer phenotype could reveal collective invasion-specific mechanisms. Functional analysis determined that DOCK10, ITGA11, DAB2, PDFGRA, VASN, PPAP2B, and LPAR1 are highly expressed in trailblazer cells and required to initiate collective invasion, with DOCK10 essential for metastasis. In patients with triple-negative breast cancer, expression of these 7 genes correlated with poor outcome. Together, our results indicate that spontaneous conversion of the epigenetic state in a subpopulation of cells can promote a transition from in situ to invasive growth through induction of a cooperative form of collective invasion and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of trailblazer cell invasion may help prevent metastasis.

  12. An epigenetically distinct breast cancer cell subpopulation promotes collective invasion

    PubMed Central

    Westcott, Jill M.; Prechtl, Amanda M.; Maine, Erin A.; Dang, Tuyen T.; Esparza, Matthew A.; Sun, Han; Zhou, Yunyun; Xie, Yang; Pearson, Gray W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells can engage in a process called collective invasion, in which cohesive groups of cells invade through interstitial tissue. Here, we identified an epigenetically distinct subpopulation of breast tumor cells that have an enhanced capacity to collectively invade. Analysis of spheroid invasion in an organotypic culture system revealed that these “trailblazer” cells are capable of initiating collective invasion and promote non-trailblazer cell invasion, indicating a commensal relationship among subpopulations within heterogenous tumors. Canonical mesenchymal markers were not sufficient to distinguish trailblazer cells from non-trailblazer cells, suggesting that defining the molecular underpinnings of the trailblazer phenotype could reveal collective invasion-specific mechanisms. Functional analysis determined that DOCK10, ITGA11, DAB2, PDFGRA, VASN, PPAP2B, and LPAR1 are highly expressed in trailblazer cells and required to initiate collective invasion, with DOCK10 essential for metastasis. In patients with triple-negative breast cancer, expression of these 7 genes correlated with poor outcome. Together, our results indicate that spontaneous conversion of the epigenetic state in a subpopulation of cells can promote a transition from in situ to invasive growth through induction of a cooperative form of collective invasion and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of trailblazer cell invasion may help prevent metastasis. PMID:25844900

  13. CD44 variant 6 is correlated with peritoneal dissemination and poor prognosis in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Tjhay, Francisca; Motohara, Takeshi; Tayama, Shingo; Narantuya, Dashdemberel; Fujimoto, Koichi; Guo, Jianying; Sakaguchi, Isao; Honda, Ritsuo; Tashiro, Hironori; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2015-10-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) drive tumor initiation and metastasis in several types of human cancer. However, the contribution of ovarian CSCs to peritoneal metastasis remains unresolved. The cell adhesion molecule CD44 has been identified as a major marker for CSCs in solid tumors, including epithelial ovarian cancer. CD44 exists as a standard form (CD44s) and also as numerous variant isoforms (CD44v) generated by alternative mRNA splicing. Here we show that disseminated ovarian tumors in the pelvic peritoneum contain highly enriched CD44v6-positive cancer cells, which drive tumor metastasis and are responsible for tumor resistance to chemotherapy. Clinically, an increased number of CD44v6-positive cancer cells in primary tumors was associated with a shortened overall survival in stage III-IV ovarian cancer patients. Furthermore, a subpopulation of CD44v6-positive cancer cells manifested the ability to initiate tumor metastasis in the pelvic peritoneum in an in vivo mouse model, suggesting that CD44v6-positive cells show the potential to serve as metastasis-initiating cells. Thus, the peritoneal disseminated metastasis of epithelial ovarian cancer is initiated by the CD44v6-positive subpopulation, and CD44v6 expression is a biomarker for the clinical outcome of advanced ovarian cancer patients. Given that a distinct subpopulation of CD44v6-positive cancer cells plays a critical role in peritoneal metastasis, definitive treatment should target this subpopulation of CD44v6-positive cells in epithelial ovarian cancer.

  14. Identification of signal transduction pathways involved in the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation.

    PubMed

    Topalov, Nikolai N; Kotova, Yana N; Vasil'ev, Sergey A; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2012-04-01

    Platelets are formed elements of blood. Upon activation, they externalize phosphatidylserine, thus accelerating membrane-dependent reactions of blood coagulation. Activated platelets form two subpopulations, only one of which expresses phosphatidylserine. This study aimed to identify signalling pathways responsible for this segregation. Gel-filtered platelets, intact or loaded with calcium-sensitive dyes, were activated and labelled with annexin V and antibodies, followed by flow cytometric analysis. Calcium Green and Fura Red dyes were compared, and only the latter was able to detect calcium level differences in the platelet subpopulations. Phosphatidylserine-positive platelets produced by thrombin had stably high intracellular calcium level; addition of convulxin increased and stabilized calcium level in the phosphatidylserine-negative subpopulation. PAR1 agonist SFLLRN also induced calcium rise and subpopulation formation, but the resulting platelets were not coated with alpha-granule proteins. Adenylatecyclase activator forskolin inhibited phosphatidylserine-positive platelets formation several-fold, while its inhibitor SQ22536 had no effect. This suggests that adenylatecyclase inactivation is necessary, but not rate-limiting, for subpopulation segregation. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (U0126) and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (Monafram(®)) was without effect, whereas inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (wortmannin) and Src tyrosine kinase (PP2) decreased the procoagulant subpopulation threefold. These data identify the principal signalling pathways controlling platelet heterogeneity. PMID:23379894

  15. Injury induces direct lineage segregation of functionally distinct airway basal stem/progenitor cell subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Law, Brandon M; Tata, Purushothama Rao; Villoria, Jorge; Saez, Borja; Mou, Hongmei; Zhao, Rui; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-02-01

    Following injury, stem cells restore normal tissue architecture by producing the proper number and proportions of differentiated cells. Current models of airway epithelial regeneration propose that distinct cytokeratin 8-expressing progenitor cells, arising from p63(+) basal stem cells, subsequently differentiate into secretory and ciliated cell lineages. We now show that immediately following injury, discrete subpopulations of p63(+) airway basal stem/progenitor cells themselves express Notch pathway components associated with either secretory or ciliated cell fate commitment. One basal cell population displays intracellular Notch2 activation and directly generates secretory cells; the other expresses c-myb and directly yields ciliated cells. Furthermore, disrupting Notch ligand activity within the basal cell population at large disrupts the normal pattern of lineage segregation. These non-cell-autonomous effects demonstrate that effective airway epithelial regeneration requires intercellular communication within the broader basal stem/progenitor cell population. These findings have broad implications for understanding epithelial regeneration and stem cell heterogeneity.

  16. Morphologically and Functionally Distinct Lipid Droplet Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyan; Wang, Yang; Cui, Liujuan; Deng, Yaqin; Xu, Shimeng; Yu, Jinhai; Cichello, Simon; Serrero, Ginette; Ying, Yunshu; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplet (LD), a multi-functional organelle, is often found to associate with other cellular membranous structures and vary in size in a given cell, which may be related to their functional diversity. Here we established a method to separate LD subpopulations from isolated CHO K2 LDs into three different size categories. The subpopulation with smallest LDs was nearly free of ER and other membranous structures while those with larger LDs contained intact ER. These distinct subpopulations of LDs differed in their protein composition and ability to recruit proteins. This method was also applicable to LDs obtained from other sources, such as Huh7 cells, mouse liver and brown adipose tissue, et al. We developed an in vitro assay requiring only isolated LDs, Coenzyme A, and ATP to drive lipid synthesis. The LD subpopulation nearly depleted of ER was able to incorporate fatty acids into triacylglycerol and phospholipids. Together, our data demonstrate that LDs in a given cell are heterogeneous in size and function, and suggest that LDs are one of cellular lipid synthetic organelles. PMID:27386790

  17. Gain-of-function microRNA screens identify miR-193a regulating proliferation and apoptosis in epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Haruo; Yamada, Yoji; Miyazawa, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Tetsuo

    2013-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a small class of non‑coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression, and are considered as new therapeutic targets for treating cancer. In this study, we performed a gain-of-function screen using miRNA mimic library (319 miRNA species) to identify those affecting cell proliferation in human epithelial ovarian cancer cells (A2780). We discovered a number of miRNAs that increased or decreased the cell viability of A2780 cells. Pro-proliferative and anti-proliferative miRNAs include oncogenic miR-372 and miR-373, and tumor suppressive miR-124a, miR-7, miR-192 and miR-193a, respectively. We found that overexpression of miR-124a, miR-192, miR-193a and miR‑193b inhibited BrdU incorporation in A2780 cells, indicating that these miRNAs affected the cell cycle. Overexpression of miR‑193a and miR-193b induced an activation of caspase 3/7, and resulted in apoptotic cell death in A2780 cells. A genome‑wide gene expression analysis with miR-193a-transfected A2780 cells led to identification of ARHGAP19, CCND1, ERBB4, KRAS and MCL1 as potential miR-193a targets. We demonstrated that miR-193a decreased the amount of MCL1 protein by binding 3'UTR of its mRNA. Our study suggests the potential of miRNA screens to discover miRNAs as therapeutic tools to treat ovarian cancer.

  18. Differential detergent sensitivity of extracellular vesicle subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Sódar, Barbara; Németh, Andrea; Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Vukman, Krisztina V; Tamási, Viola; Balogh, Andrea; Kittel, Ágnes; Pállinger, Éva; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2015-10-14

    Extracellular vesicles (including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies) are currently attracting rapidly increasing attention from various fields of biology due to their ability to carry complex information and act as autocrine, paracrine and even endocrine intercellular messengers. In the present study we investigated the sensitivity of size-based subpopulations of extracellular vesicles to different concentrations of detergents including sodium dodecyl sulphate, Triton X-100, Tween 20 and deoxycholate. We determined the required detergent concentration that lysed each of the vesicle subpopulations secreted by Jurkat, THP-1, MiaPaCa and U937 human cell lines. We characterized the vesicles by tunable resistive pulse sensing, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy. Microvesicles and apoptotic bodies were found to be more sensitive to detergent lysis than exosomes. Furthermore, we found evidence that sodium dodecyl sulphate and Triton X-100 were more effective in vesicle lysis at low concentrations than deoxycholate or Tween 20. Taken together, our data suggest that a combination of differential detergent lysis with tunable resistive pulse sensing or flow cytometry may prove useful for simple and fast differentiation between exosomes and other extracellular vesicle subpopulations as well as between vesicular and non-vesicular structures.

  19. Sub-population analysis based on temporal features of high content images

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background High content screening techniques are increasingly used to understand the regulation and progression of cell motility. The demand of new platforms, coupled with availability of terabytes of data has challenged the traditional technique of identifying cell populations by manual methods and resulted in development of high-dimensional analytical methods. Results In this paper, we present sub-populations analysis of cells at the tissue level by using dynamic features of the cells. We used active contour without edges for segmentation of cells, which preserves the cell morphology, and autoregressive modeling to model cell trajectories. The sub-populations were obtained by clustering static, dynamic and a combination of both features. We were able to identify three unique sub-populations in combined clustering. Conclusion We report a novel method to identify sub-populations using kinetic features and demonstrate that these features improve sub-population analysis at the tissue level. These advances will facilitate the application of high content screening data analysis to new and complex biological problems. PMID:19958514

  20. Alcohol Consumption in Demographic Subpopulations: An Epidemiologic Overview.

    PubMed

    Delker, Erin; Brown, Qiana; Hasin, Deborah S

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is common across subpopulations in the United States. However, the health burden associated with alcohol consumption varies across groups, including those defined by demographic characteristics such as age, race/ ethnicity, and gender. Large national surveys, such as the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions and the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, found that young adults ages 18-25 were at particularly high risk of alcohol use disorder and unintentional injury caused by drinking. These surveys furthermore identified significant variability in alcohol consumption and its consequences among racial/ethnic groups. White respondents reported the highest prevalence of current alcohol consumption, whereas alcohol abuse and dependence were most prevalent among Native Americans. Native Americans and Blacks also were most vulnerable to alcohol-related health consequences. Even within ethnic groups, there was variability between and among different subpopulations. With respect to gender, men reported more alcohol consumption and binge drinking than women, especially in older cohorts. Men also were at greater risk of alcohol abuse and dependence, liver cirrhosis, homicide after alcohol consumption, and drinking and driving. Systematic identification and measurement of the variability across demographics will guide prevention and intervention efforts, as well as future research. PMID:27159807

  1. Redox subpopulations and the risk of cancer progression: a new method for characterizing redox heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He N.; Li, Lin Z.

    2016-02-01

    It has been shown that a malignant tumor is akin to a complex organ comprising of various cell populations including tumor cells that are genetically, metabolically and functionally different. Our redox imaging data have demonstrated intra-tumor redox heterogeneity in all mouse xenografts derived from human melanomas, breast, prostate, and colon cancers. Based on the signals of NADH and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp, including flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)) and their ratio, i.e., the redox ratio, which is an indicator of mitochondrial metabolic status, we have discovered several distinct redox subpopulations in xenografts of breast tumors potentially recapitulating functional/metabolic heterogeneity within the tumor. Furthermore, xenografts of breast tumors with higher metastatic potential tend to have a redox subpopulation whose redox ratio is significantly different from that of tumors with lower metastatic potential and usually have a bi-modal distribution of the redox ratio. The redox subpopulations from human breast cancer samples can also be very complex with multiple subpopulations as determined by fitting the redox ratio histograms with multi- Gaussian functions. In this report, we present a new method for identifying the redox subpopulations within individual breast tumor xenografts and human breast tissues, which may be used to differentiate between breast cancer and normal tissue and among breast cancer with different risks of progression.

  2. Elevated T cell subpopulations in dental students

    SciTech Connect

    Eedy, D.J.; Burrows, D.; Clifford, T.; Fay, A. )

    1990-05-01

    The absolute numbers of circulating white cells and lymphocyte subpopulations were studied in 25 final-year dental students and compared with a control group of 28 medical students. The total lymphocyte count, total T cell numbers (CD3), T helper/inducer (CD4), and T suppressor/cytotoxic (CD8) numbers were significantly elevated in the dental students as compared with the control group. There was no significant difference in the T helper/inducer to T suppressor/cytotoxic cell ratios or the circulating B cell (CD21) and natural killer cell (CD16) numbers between the study and control groups. Patch testing to mercury and mercuric compounds in both the study and control groups showed no evidence of cutaneous hypersensitivity to mercury. The reason for the observed elevations in T cell subpopulations in dental students is not clear. However, one possible explanation is the dental student's occupational exposure to mercury. Further work is underway to examine this possible relationship and it is suggested that dental personnel take adequate measures to reduce their exposure to mercury until the results of these studies are available.

  3. The Gulliver Effect: The Impact of Error in an Elephantine Subpopulation on Estimates for Lilliputian Subpopulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micceri, Theodore; Parasher, Pradnya; Waugh, Gordon W.; Herreid, Charlene

    2009-01-01

    An extensive review of the research literature and a study comparing over 36,000 survey responses with archival true scores indicated that one should expect a minimum of at least three percent random error for the least ambiguous of self-report measures. The Gulliver Effect occurs when a small proportion of error in a sizable subpopulation exerts…

  4. Improving removal-based estimates of abundance by sampling a population of spatially distinct subpopulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorazio, R.M.; Jelks, H.L.; Jordan, F.

    2005-01-01

     A statistical modeling framework is described for estimating the abundances of spatially distinct subpopulations of animals surveyed using removal sampling. To illustrate this framework, hierarchical models are developed using the Poisson and negative-binomial distributions to model variation in abundance among subpopulations and using the beta distribution to model variation in capture probabilities. These models are fitted to the removal counts observed in a survey of a federally endangered fish species. The resulting estimates of abundance have similar or better precision than those computed using the conventional approach of analyzing the removal counts of each subpopulation separately. Extension of the hierarchical models to include spatial covariates of abundance is straightforward and may be used to identify important features of an animal's habitat or to predict the abundance of animals at unsampled locations.

  5. Subpopulation triage: how to allocate conservation effort among populations.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Madden, Eve; Baxter, Peter W J; Possingham, Hugh P

    2008-06-01

    Threatened species often exist in a small number of isolated subpopulations. Given limitations on conservation spending, managers must choose from strategies that range from managing just one subpopulation and risking all other subpopulations to managing all subpopulations equally and poorly, thereby risking the loss of all subpopulations. We took an economic approach to this problem in an effort to discover a simple rule of thumb for optimally allocating conservation effort among subpopulations. This rule was derived by maximizing the expected number of extant subpopulations remaining given n subpopulations are actually managed. We also derived a spatiotemporally optimized strategy through stochastic dynamic programming. The rule of thumb suggested that more subpopulations should be managed if the budget increases or if the cost of reducing local extinction probabilities decreases. The rule performed well against the exact optimal strategy that was the result of the stochastic dynamic program and much better than other simple strategies (e.g., always manage one extant subpopulation or half of the remaining subpopulation). We applied our approach to the allocation of funds in 2 contrasting case studies: reduction of poaching of Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae) and habitat acquisition for San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica). For our estimated annual budget for Sumatran tiger management, the mean time to extinction was about 32 years. For our estimated annual management budget for kit foxes in the San Joaquin Valley, the mean time to extinction was approximately 24 years. Our framework allows managers to deal with the important question of how to allocate scarce conservation resources among subpopulations of any threatened species. PMID:18477029

  6. Quantifying landscape linkages among giant panda subpopulations in regional scale conservation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dunwu; Hu, Yibo; Gu, Xiaodong; Yang, Xuyi; Yang, Guang; Wei, Fuwen

    2012-06-01

    Understanding habitat requirements and identifying landscape linkages are essential for the survival of isolated populations of endangered species. Currently, some of the giant panda populations are isolated, which threatens their long-term survival, particularly in the Xiaoxiangling mountains. In the present study, we quantified niche requirements and then identified potential linkages of giant panda subpopulations in the most isolated region, using ecological niche factor analysis and a least-cost path model. Giant pandas preferred habitat with conifer forest and gentle slopes (>20 to ≤30°). Based on spatial distribution of suitable habitat, linkages were identified for the Yele subpopulation to 4 other subpopulations (Liziping, Matou, Xinmin and Wanba). Their lengths ranged from 15 to 54 km. The accumulated cost ranged from 693 to 3166 and conifer forest covered over 31%. However, a variety of features (e.g. major roads, human settlements and large unforested areas) might act as barriers along the linkages for giant panda dispersal. Our analysis quantified giant panda subpopulation connectivity to ensure long-term survival.

  7. Quantifying landscape linkages among giant panda subpopulations in regional scale conservation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dunwu; Hu, Yibo; Gu, Xiaodong; Yang, Xuyi; Yang, Guang; Wei, Fuwen

    2012-06-01

    Understanding habitat requirements and identifying landscape linkages are essential for the survival of isolated populations of endangered species. Currently, some of the giant panda populations are isolated, which threatens their long-term survival, particularly in the Xiaoxiangling mountains. In the present study, we quantified niche requirements and then identified potential linkages of giant panda subpopulations in the most isolated region, using ecological niche factor analysis and a least-cost path model. Giant pandas preferred habitat with conifer forest and gentle slopes (>20 to ≤30°). Based on spatial distribution of suitable habitat, linkages were identified for the Yele subpopulation to 4 other subpopulations (Liziping, Matou, Xinmin and Wanba). Their lengths ranged from 15 to 54 km. The accumulated cost ranged from 693 to 3166 and conifer forest covered over 31%. However, a variety of features (e.g. major roads, human settlements and large unforested areas) might act as barriers along the linkages for giant panda dispersal. Our analysis quantified giant panda subpopulation connectivity to ensure long-term survival. PMID:22691200

  8. Evaluation of candidate stromal epithelial cross-talk genes identifies association between risk of serous ovarian cancer and TERT, a cancer susceptibility "hot-spot".

    PubMed

    Johnatty, Sharon E; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Macgregor, Stuart; Duffy, David L; Spurdle, Amanda B; deFazio, Anna; Gava, Natalie; Webb, Penelope M; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Goodman, Marc T; Lurie, Galina; Thompson, Pamela J; Wilkens, Lynne R; Ness, Roberta B; Moysich, Kirsten B; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Hankinson, Susan E; Tworoger, Shelley S; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Yang, Hannah; Lissowska, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J; Pharoah, Paul D; Song, Honglin; Whitemore, Alice S; Pearce, Celeste L; Stram, Daniel O; Wu, Anna H; Pike, Malcolm C; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K; Hogdall, Claus; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Iversen, Edwin S; Moorman, Patricia G; Phelan, Catherine M; Sellers, Thomas A; Cunningham, Julie M; Vierkant, Robert A; Rider, David N; Goode, Ellen L; Haviv, Izhak; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2010-07-08

    We hypothesized that variants in genes expressed as a consequence of interactions between ovarian cancer cells and the host micro-environment could contribute to cancer susceptibility. We therefore used a two-stage approach to evaluate common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 173 genes involved in stromal epithelial interactions in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). In the discovery stage, cases with epithelial ovarian cancer (n=675) and controls (n=1,162) were genotyped at 1,536 SNPs using an Illumina GoldenGate assay. Based on Positive Predictive Value estimates, three SNPs-PODXL rs1013368, ITGA6 rs13027811, and MMP3 rs522616-were selected for replication using TaqMan genotyping in up to 3,059 serous invasive cases and 8,905 controls from 16 OCAC case-control studies. An additional 18 SNPs with Pper-allele<0.05 in the discovery stage were selected for replication in a subset of five OCAC studies (n=1,233 serous invasive cases; n=3,364 controls). The discovery stage associations in PODXL, ITGA6, and MMP3 were attenuated in the larger replication set (adj. Pper-allele>or=0.5). However genotypes at TERT rs7726159 were associated with ovarian cancer risk in the smaller, five-study replication study (Pper-allele=0.03). Combined analysis of the discovery and replication sets for this TERT SNP showed an increased risk of serous ovarian cancer among non-Hispanic whites [adj. ORper-allele 1.14 (1.04-1.24) p=0.003]. Our study adds to the growing evidence that, like the 8q24 locus, the telomerase reverse transcriptase locus at 5p15.33, is a general cancer susceptibility locus.

  9. Isolation and characterization of cutaneous epithelial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Uffe B.; Ghazizadeh, Soosan; Owens, David M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY During homeostasis, adult mammalian skin turnover is maintained by a number of multipotent and unipotent epithelial progenitors located either in the epidermis, hair follicle or sebaceous gland. Recent work has illustrated that these various progenitor populations reside in regionalized niches and are phenotypically distinct from one another. This degree of heterogeneity within the progenitor cell landscape in the cutaneous epithelium complicates our ability to target, purify and manipulate cutaneous epithelial stem cell subpopulations in adult skin. The techniques outlined in this chapter describe basic procedures for the isolation and purification of murine epithelial progenitors and assessing their capacity for ex vivo propagation. PMID:23483387

  10. Alterations in regulatory T cell subpopulations seen in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Angel A; Arbona-Ramirez, Ileana M; Ruiz, Rene; Llorens-Bonilla, Braulio J; Martinez-Lopez, Denise G; Funderburg, Nicholas; Dorsey, Morna J

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells are a population of CD4+ T cells that play a critical role in peripheral tolerance and control of immune responses to pathogens. The purpose of this study was to measure the percentages of two different regulatory T cells subpopulations, identified by the presence or absence of CD31 (Recent thymic emigrants and peripherally induced naïve regulatory T cells), in term and preterm infant cord blood. We report the association of prenatal factors, intrauterine exposure to lipopolysaccharide and inflammation and the percentages of these regulatory T cell subpopulations in term and preterm infants. Cord blood samples were collected from both term and preterm infants and mononuclear cells isolated over a Ficoll-Hypaque cushion. Cells were then stained with fluorochrome-labeled antibodies to characterize regulatory T cell populations and analyzed with multi-color flow cytometry. Cord blood plasma C-reactive protein, and lipopolysaccharide were also measured. Placental pathology was also examined. We report a gestational age-dependent difference in the percentage of total regulatory T cells, in which preterm infants of lower gestational ages have an increased percentage of regulatory T cells. We report the presence of two populations of regulatory T cells (CD31+ and CD31-) in cord blood of term and preterm infants and their association with different maternal and fetal characteristics. Factors associated with differences in the percentage of CD31- Tregs included the use of prenatal antibiotics, steroids and magnesium sulfate. In addition, the percentage of CD31- Tregs was significantly higher in cord blood of preterm pregnancies associated with inflammation and prenatal lipopolysaccharide exposure. The peripheral Treg pool of preterm infants could be altered by prenatal exposure to inflammation and chorioamnionitis; however, the clinical implications of this finding are not yet understood.

  11. CHILDREN AS A SENSITIVE SUBPOPULATION FOR THE RISK ASSESSMENT PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children as a sensitive subpopulation for the risk assessment process
    Abstract
    For cancer risk assessment purposes, it is necessary to consider how to incorporate sensitive subpopulations into the process to ensure that they are appropriately protected. Children represent o...

  12. Analysis of marker-defined HNSCC subpopulations reveals a dynamic regulation of tumor initiating properties.

    PubMed

    Bragado, Paloma; Estrada, Yeriel; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Cannan, David; Genden, Eric; Teng, Marita; Ranganathan, Aparna C; Wen, Huei-Chi; Kapoor, Avnish; Bernstein, Emily; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors carry dismal long-term prognosis and the role of tumor initiating cells (TICs) in this cancer is unclear. We investigated in HNSCC xenografts whether specific tumor subpopulations contributed to tumor growth. We used a CFSE-based label retentions assay, CD49f (α6-integrin) surface levels and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity to profile HNSCC subpopulations. The tumorigenic potential of marker-positive and -negative subpopulations was tested in nude (Balb/c nu/nu) and NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ) mice and chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Here we identified in HEp3, SQ20b and FaDu HNSCC xenografts a subpopulation of G0/G1-arrested slow-cycling CD49f(high)/ALDH1A1(high)/H3K4/K27me3(low) subpopulation (CD49f+) of tumor cells. A strikingly similar CD49f(high)/H3K27me3(low) subpopulation is also present in primary human HNSCC tumors and metastases. While only sorted CD49f(high)/ALDH(high), label retaining cells (LRC) proliferated immediately in vivo, with time the CD49f(low)/ALDH(low), non-LRC (NLRC) tumor cell subpopulations were also able to regain tumorigenic capacity; this was linked to restoration of CD49f(high)/ALDH(high), label retaining cells. In addition, CD49f is required for HEp3 cell tumorigenicity and to maintain low levels of H3K4/K27me3. CD49f+ cells also displayed reduced expression of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. This suggests that although transiently quiescent, their unique chromatin structure is poised for rapid transcriptional activation. CD49f- cells can "reprogram" and also achieve this state eventually. We propose that in HNSCC tumors, epigenetic mechanisms likely driven by CD49f signaling dynamically regulate HNSCC xenograft phenotypic heterogeneity. This allows multiple tumor cell subpopulations to drive tumor growth suggesting that their dynamic nature renders them a "moving target" and their eradication might

  13. Analysis of Marker-Defined HNSCC Subpopulations Reveals a Dynamic Regulation of Tumor Initiating Properties

    PubMed Central

    Bragado, Paloma; Estrada, Yeriel; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Cannan, David; Genden, Eric; Teng, Marita; Ranganathan, Aparna C.; Wen, Huei-Chi; Kapoor, Avnish; Bernstein, Emily; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors carry dismal long-term prognosis and the role of tumor initiating cells (TICs) in this cancer is unclear. We investigated in HNSCC xenografts whether specific tumor subpopulations contributed to tumor growth. We used a CFSE-based label retentions assay, CD49f (α6-integrin) surface levels and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity to profile HNSCC subpopulations. The tumorigenic potential of marker-positive and -negative subpopulations was tested in nude (Balb/c nu/nu) and NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ) mice and chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Here we identified in HEp3, SQ20b and FaDu HNSCC xenografts a subpopulation of G0/G1-arrested slow-cycling CD49fhigh/ALDH1A1high/H3K4/K27me3low subpopulation (CD49f+) of tumor cells. A strikingly similar CD49fhigh/H3K27me3low subpopulation is also present in primary human HNSCC tumors and metastases. While only sorted CD49fhigh/ALDHhigh, label retaining cells (LRC) proliferated immediately in vivo, with time the CD49flow/ALDHlow, non-LRC (NLRC) tumor cell subpopulations were also able to regain tumorigenic capacity; this was linked to restoration of CD49fhigh/ALDHhigh, label retaining cells. In addition, CD49f is required for HEp3 cell tumorigenicity and to maintain low levels of H3K4/K27me3. CD49f+ cells also displayed reduced expression of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2 and ERK1/2phosphorylation. This suggests that although transiently quiescent, their unique chromatin structure is poised for rapid transcriptional activation. CD49f− cells can “reprogram” and also achieve this state eventually. We propose that in HNSCC tumors, epigenetic mechanisms likely driven by CD49f signaling dynamically regulate HNSCC xenograft phenotypic heterogeneity. This allows multiple tumor cell subpopulations to drive tumor growth suggesting that their dynamic nature renders them a “moving target” and their eradication might require more

  14. A Multi-Omics Approach Identifies Key Hubs Associated with Cell Type-Specific Responses of Airway Epithelial Cells to Staphylococcal Alpha-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Harms, Manuela; Ventz, Katharina; Gierok, Philipp; Chilukoti, Ravi Kumar; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2015-01-01

    Responsiveness of cells to alpha-toxin (Hla) from Staphylococcus aureus appears to occur in a cell-type dependent manner. Here, we compare two human bronchial epithelial cell lines, i.e. Hla-susceptible 16HBE14o- and Hla-resistant S9 cells, by a quantitative multi-omics strategy for a better understanding of Hla-induced cellular programs. Phosphoproteomics revealed a substantial impact on phosphorylation-dependent signaling in both cell models and highlights alterations in signaling pathways associated with cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts as well as the actin cytoskeleton as key features of early rHla-induced effects. Along comparable changes in down-stream activity of major protein kinases significant differences between both models were found upon rHla-treatment including activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR and mitogen-activated protein kinases MAPK1/3 signaling in S9 and repression in 16HBE14o- cells. System-wide transcript and protein expression profiling indicate induction of an immediate early response in either model. In addition, EGFR and MAPK1/3-mediated changes in gene expression suggest cellular recovery and survival in S9 cells but cell death in 16HBE14o- cells. Strikingly, inhibition of the EGFR sensitized S9 cells to Hla indicating that the cellular capacity of activation of the EGFR is a major protective determinant against Hla-mediated cytotoxic effects. PMID:25816343

  15. Antibiotic failure mediated by a resistant subpopulation in Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed

    Band, Victor I; Crispell, Emily K; Napier, Brooke A; Herrera, Carmen M; Tharp, Greg K; Vavikolanu, Kranthi; Pohl, Jan; Read, Timothy D; Bosinger, Steven E; Trent, M Stephen; Burd, Eileen M; Weiss, David S

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major public health threat, further complicated by unexplained treatment failures caused by bacteria that appear antibiotic susceptible. We describe an Enterobacter cloacae isolate harbouring a minor subpopulation that is highly resistant to the last-line antibiotic colistin. This subpopulation was distinct from persisters, became predominant in colistin, returned to baseline after colistin removal and was dependent on the histidine kinase PhoQ. During murine infection, but in the absence of colistin, innate immune defences led to an increased frequency of the resistant subpopulation, leading to inefficacy of subsequent colistin therapy. An isolate with a lower-frequency colistin-resistant subpopulation similarly caused treatment failure but was misclassified as susceptible by current diagnostics once cultured outside the host. These data demonstrate the ability of low-frequency bacterial subpopulations to contribute to clinically relevant antibiotic resistance, elucidating an enigmatic cause of antibiotic treatment failure and highlighting the critical need for more sensitive diagnostics. PMID:27572838

  16. Transcriptional regulators transforming growth factor-β1 and estrogen-related receptor-α identified as putative mediators of calf rumen epithelial tissue development and function during weaning.

    PubMed

    Connor, E E; Baldwin, R L; Walker, M P; Ellis, S E; Li, C; Kahl, S; Chung, H; Li, R W

    2014-07-01

    Molecular mechanisms regulating rumen epithelial development remain largely unknown. To identify gene networks and regulatory factors controlling rumen development, Holstein bull calves (n=18) were fed milk replacer only (MRO) until 42 d of age. Three calves each were euthanized at 14 and 42 d of age for tissue collection to represent preweaning, and the remaining calves were provided diets of either milk replacer + orchard grass hay (MH; n=6) to initiate weaning without development of rumen papillae, or milk replacer + calf starter (MG; n=6) to initiate weaning and development of rumen papillae. At 56 and 70 d of age, 3 calves from the MH and MG groups were euthanized for collection of rumen epithelium. Total RNA and protein were extracted for microarray analysis and to validate detected changes in selected protein expression, respectively. As expected, calves fed MRO had no rumen papillae and development of papillae was greater in MG versus MH calves. Differentially expressed genes between the MRO diet at d 42 (preweaning) versus the MG or MH diets at d 56 (during weaning) were identified using permutation analysis of differential expression. Expression of 345 and 519 transcripts was uniquely responsive to MG and MH feeding, respectively. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (Qiagen, Redwood City, CA) indicated that the top-ranked biological function affected by the MG diet was the cell cycle, and TFGB1, FBOX01, and PPARA were identified as key transcriptional regulators of genes responsive to the MG diet and associated with development of rumen papillae. Increased expressions of TGFB1 mRNA and protein in response to the MG diet were confirmed by subsequent analyses. The top-ranking biological function affected by the MH diet was energy production. Receptors for IGF-1 and insulin, ESRRA, and PPARD were identified by ingenuity pathway analysis as transcriptional regulators of genes responsive to the MH diet. Further analysis of TGFB1 and ESRRA mRNA expression in rumen

  17. Transcriptional regulators transforming growth factor-β1 and estrogen-related receptor-α identified as putative mediators of calf rumen epithelial tissue development and function during weaning.

    PubMed

    Connor, E E; Baldwin, R L; Walker, M P; Ellis, S E; Li, C; Kahl, S; Chung, H; Li, R W

    2014-07-01

    Molecular mechanisms regulating rumen epithelial development remain largely unknown. To identify gene networks and regulatory factors controlling rumen development, Holstein bull calves (n=18) were fed milk replacer only (MRO) until 42 d of age. Three calves each were euthanized at 14 and 42 d of age for tissue collection to represent preweaning, and the remaining calves were provided diets of either milk replacer + orchard grass hay (MH; n=6) to initiate weaning without development of rumen papillae, or milk replacer + calf starter (MG; n=6) to initiate weaning and development of rumen papillae. At 56 and 70 d of age, 3 calves from the MH and MG groups were euthanized for collection of rumen epithelium. Total RNA and protein were extracted for microarray analysis and to validate detected changes in selected protein expression, respectively. As expected, calves fed MRO had no rumen papillae and development of papillae was greater in MG versus MH calves. Differentially expressed genes between the MRO diet at d 42 (preweaning) versus the MG or MH diets at d 56 (during weaning) were identified using permutation analysis of differential expression. Expression of 345 and 519 transcripts was uniquely responsive to MG and MH feeding, respectively. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (Qiagen, Redwood City, CA) indicated that the top-ranked biological function affected by the MG diet was the cell cycle, and TFGB1, FBOX01, and PPARA were identified as key transcriptional regulators of genes responsive to the MG diet and associated with development of rumen papillae. Increased expressions of TGFB1 mRNA and protein in response to the MG diet were confirmed by subsequent analyses. The top-ranking biological function affected by the MH diet was energy production. Receptors for IGF-1 and insulin, ESRRA, and PPARD were identified by ingenuity pathway analysis as transcriptional regulators of genes responsive to the MH diet. Further analysis of TGFB1 and ESRRA mRNA expression in rumen

  18. The Rotation of Subpopulations in ω Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancino, E.; Galfo, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Bellazzini, M.

    2007-06-01

    We present the first result of the Ital-FLAMES survey of red giant branch (RGB) stars in ω Cen. Radial velocities with a precision of ~0.5 km s-1 are presented for 650 members of ω Cen observed with FLAMES-GIRAFFE at the Very Large Telescope. We found that stars belonging to the metal-poor (RGB-MP), metal-intermediate (RGB-MInt), and metal-rich (RGB-a) subpopulations of ω Cen are all compatible with having the same rotational pattern. Our results appear to contradict past findings by Norris et al., who could not detect any rotational signature for metal-rich stars. The slightly higher precision of the present measurements and the much larger sample size, especially for the stars richer in metals, appear as the most likely explanations for this discrepancy. The result presented here weakens the body of evidence in favor of a merger event in the past history of ω Cen. Based on data obtained with the Giraffe-FLAMES facility of ESO Very Large Telescope during the Ital-FLAMES GTO program 71.D-0217(A). Also based on data from the VALD and GEISA databases.

  19. Transcriptome Sequencing of Tumor Subpopulations Reveals a Spectrum of Therapeutic Options for Squamous Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Christian L.; Schwab, Richard B.; Jung, HyunChul; Crain, Brian; Goff, Daniel J.; Jamieson, Catriona H. M.; Thistlethwaite, Patricia A.; Harismendy, Olivier; Carson, Dennis A.; Frazer, Kelly A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The only therapeutic options that exist for squamous cell lung carcinoma (SCC) are standard radiation and cytotoxic chemotherapy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are hypothesized to account for therapeutic resistance, suggesting that CSCs must be specifically targeted. Here, we analyze the transcriptome of CSC and non-CSC subpopulations by RNA-seq to identify new potential therapeutic strategies for SCC. Methods We sorted a SCC into CD133− and CD133+ subpopulations and then examined both by copy number analysis (CNA) and whole genome and transcriptome sequencing. We analyzed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) transcriptome data of 221 SCCs to determine the generality of our observations. Results Both subpopulations highly expressed numerous mRNA isoforms whose protein products are active drug targets for other cancers; 31 (25%) correspond to 18 genes under active investigation as mAb targets and an additional 4 (3%) are of therapeutic interest. Moreover, we found evidence that both subpopulations were proliferatively driven by very high levels of c-Myc and the TRAIL long isoform (TRAILL) and that normal apoptotic responses to high expression of these genes was prevented through high levels of Mcl-1L and Bcl-xL and c-FlipL—isoforms for which drugs are now in clinical development. SCC RNA-seq data (n = 221) from TCGA supported our findings. Our analysis is inconsistent with the CSC concept that most cells in a cancer have lost their proliferative potential. Furthermore, our study suggests how to target both the CSC and non-CSC subpopulations with one treatment strategy. Conclusions Our study is relevant to SCC in particular for it presents numerous potential options to standard therapy that target the entire tumor. In so doing, it demonstrates how transcriptome sequencing provides insights into the molecular underpinnings of cancer propagating cells that, importantly, can be leveraged to identify new potential therapeutic options for cancers beyond what is

  20. Disentangling subpopulations in single-molecule FRET and ALEX experiments with photon distribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Tomov, Toma E; Tsukanov, Roman; Masoud, Rula; Liber, Miran; Plavner, Noa; Nir, Eyal

    2012-03-01

    Among the advantages of the single-molecule approach when used to study biomolecular structural dynamics and interaction is its ability to distinguish between and independently observe minor subpopulations. In a single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and alternating laser excitation diffusion experiment, the various populations are apparent in the resultant histograms. However, because histograms are calculated based on the per-burst mean FRET and stoichiometry ratio and not on the internal photon distribution, much of the acquired information is lost, thereby reducing the capabilities of the method. Here we suggest what to our knowledge is a novel statistical analysis tool that significantly enhances these capabilities, and we use it to identify and isolate static and dynamic subpopulations. Based on a kernel density estimator and a proper photon distribution analysis, for each individual burst, we calculate scores that reflect properties of interest. Specifically, we determine the FRET efficiency and brightness ratio distributions and use them to reveal 1), the underlying structure of a two-state DNA-hairpin and a DNA hairpin that is bound to DNA origami; 2), a minor doubly labeled dsDNA subpopulation concealed in a larger singly labeled dsDNA; and 3), functioning DNA origami motors concealed within a larger subpopulation of defective motors. Altogether, these findings demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed approach. The method was developed and tested using simulations, its rationality is described, and a computer algorithm is provided.

  1. Bcl-xL mediates therapeutic resistance of a mesenchymal breast cancer cell subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Keitel, Ulrike; Scheel, Andreas; Thomale, Jürgen; Halpape, Rovena; Kaulfuß, Silke; Scheel, Christina; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The transition from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype (EMT) confers increased invasiveness and clonogenic potential to tumor cells. We used a breast epithelium-derived cell culture model to evaluate the impact of EMT on the cellular sensitivity towards chemotherapeutics and apoptotic stimuli. Cells that had passed through an EMT acquired resistance towards chemotherapeutics and death ligands. Mechanistically, we found that the levels of the apoptosis inhibitor Bcl-xL were strongly enhanced in mesenchymal versus epithelial cells, whereas the pro-apoptotic proteins Bim and Puma were diminished. Clinical samples from breast cancer showed enhanced Bcl-xL staining in cells that had dispersed into the desmoplastic stroma, as compared to cells that were part of large tumor cell aggregates, suggesting increased Bcl-xL expression when cells invade the stroma. Bcl-xL was necessary for apoptotic resistance in mesenchymal cells, and its expression was sufficient to confer such resistance to epithelial cells. To antagonize Bcl-xL, BH3-mimetics were used. They successfully interfered with the proliferation and survival of mesenchymal cells, and also inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors raised from the mesenchymal subpopulation. We conclude that enhanced Bcl-xL levels confer resistance to cells upon EMT, and that Bcl-xL represents a promising target for therapy directed against invasive cancer cells. PMID:25473892

  2. Distinct transcriptome profiles identified in normal human bronchial epithelial cells after exposure to γ-rays and different elemental particles of high Z and energy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ionizing radiation composed of accelerated ions of high atomic number (Z) and energy (HZE) deposits energy and creates damage in cells in a discrete manner as compared to the random deposition of energy and damage seen with low energy radiations such as γ- or x-rays. Such radiations can be highly effective at cell killing, transformation, and oncogenesis, all of which are concerns for the manned space program and for the burgeoning field of HZE particle radiotherapy for cancer. Furthermore, there are differences in the extent to which cells or tissues respond to such exposures that may be unrelated to absorbed dose. Therefore, we asked whether the energy deposition patterns produced by different radiation types would cause different molecular responses. We performed transcriptome profiling using human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) after exposure to γ-rays and to two different HZE particles (28Si and 56Fe) with different energy transfer properties to characterize the molecular response to HZE particles and γ-rays as a function of dose, energy deposition pattern, and time post-irradiation. Results Clonogenic assay indicated that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for 56Fe was 3.91 and for 28Si was 1.38 at 34% cell survival. Unsupervised clustering analysis of gene expression segregated samples according to the radiation species followed by the time after irradiation, whereas dose was not a significant parameter for segregation of radiation response. While a subset of genes associated with p53-signaling, such as CDKN1A, TRIM22 and BTG2 showed very similar responses to all radiation qualities, distinct expression changes were associated with the different radiation species. Gene enrichment analysis categorized the differentially expressed genes into functional groups related to cell death and cell cycle regulation for all radiation types, while gene pathway analysis revealed that the pro-inflammatory Acute Phase Response Signaling was

  3. Size-partitioning of an urban aerosol to identify particle determinants involved in the proinflammatory response induced in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramgolam, Kiran; Favez, Olivier; Cachier, Hélène; Gaudichet, Annie; Marano, Francelyne; Martinon, Laurent; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle

    2009-01-01

    Background The contribution of air particles in human cardio-respiratory diseases has been enlightened by several epidemiological studies. However the respective involvement of coarse, fine and ultrafine particles in health effects is still unclear. The aim of the present study is to determine which size fraction from a chemically characterized background aerosol has the most important short term biological effect and to decipher the determinants of such a behaviour. Results Ambient aerosols were collected at an urban background site in Paris using four 13-stage low pressure cascade impactors running in parallel (winter and summer 2005) in order to separate four size-classes (PM0.03–0.17 (defined here as ultrafine particles), PM0.17–1 (fine), PM1–2.5(intermediate) and PM2.5–10 (coarse)). Accordingly, their chemical composition and their pro-inflammatory potential on human airway epithelial cells were investigated. Considering isomass exposures (same particle concentrations for each size fractions) the pro-inflammatory response characterized by Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) release was found to decrease with aerosol size with no seasonal dependency. When cells were exposed to isovolume of particle suspensions in order to respect the particle proportions observed in ambient air, the GM-CSF release was maximal with the fine fraction. In presence of a recombinant endotoxin neutralizing protein, the GM-CSF release induced by particles is reduced for all size-fractions, with exception of the ultra-fine fraction which response is not modified. The different aerosol size-fractions were found to display important chemical differences related to the various contributing primary and secondary sources and aerosol age. The GM-CSF release was correlated to the organic component of the aerosols and especially its water soluble fraction. Finally, Cytochrome P450 1A1 activity that reflects PAH bioavailability varied as a function of the season

  4. Simultaneous and selective isolation of multiple subpopulations of rare cells from peripheral blood using ensemble-decision aliquot ranking (eDAR).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mengxia; Wei, Bingchuan; Nelson, Wyatt C; Schiro, Perry G; Chiu, Daniel T

    2015-08-21

    Rare cells, such as circulating tumor cells (CTCs), can be heterogeneous. The isolation and identification of rare cells with different phenotypes is desirable, for clinical and biological applications. However, CTCs exist in a complex biological environment, which complicates the isolation and identification of particular subtypes. To address this need, we re-designed our ensemble-decision aliquot ranking (eDAR) system to detect, isolate, and study two subpopulations of rare cells in the same microchip. With this dual-capture eDAR device, we simultaneously and selectively isolated two subsets of CTCs from the same blood sample: One set expressed epithelial markers and the other had mesenchymal characteristics. We could apply other selection schemes with different sorting logics to isolate the two subpopulations on demand. The average recovery rate for each subpopulation was higher than 88% with a nearly 100% selectivity of the targeted cells; the throughput was 50 μL min(-1). PMID:26160592

  5. Electronic Sorting of Immune Cell Subpopulations Based on Highly Plastic Genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pingzhang; Han, Wenling; Ma, Dalong

    2016-07-15

    Immune cells are highly heterogeneous and plastic with regard to gene expression and cell phenotype. In this study, we categorized genes into those with low and high gene plasticity, and those categories revealed different functions and applications. We proposed that highly plastic genes could be suited for the labeling of immune cell subpopulations; thus, novel immune cell subpopulations could be identified by gene plasticity analysis. For this purpose, we systematically analyzed highly plastic genes in human and mouse immune cells. In total, 1,379 human and 883 mouse genes were identified as being extremely plastic. We also expanded our previous immunoinformatic method, electronic sorting, which surveys big data to perform virtual analysis. This approach used correlation analysis and took dosage changes into account, which allowed us to identify the differentially expressed genes. A test with human CD4(+) T cells supported the method's feasibility, effectiveness, and predictability. For example, with the use of human nonregulatory T cells, we found that FOXP3(hi)CD4(+) T cells were highly expressive of certain known molecules, such as CD25 and CTLA4, and that this process of investigation did not require isolating or inducing these immune cells in vitro. Therefore, the sorting process helped us to discover the potential signature genes or marker molecules and to conduct functional evaluations for immune cell subpopulations. Finally, in human CD4(+) T cells, 747 potential immune cell subpopulations and their candidate signature genes were identified, which provides a useful resource for big data-driven knowledge discoveries. PMID:27288532

  6. Statistical identification of subpopulations for flow cytometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Jean E.; Bartels, Peter H.

    1990-07-01

    Identification of cell subpopulations is of interest in the context of both flow cytometry and image analysis. Flow cytometry makes it possible to examine very large cell populations rapidly and to record a measurement vector for each cell. Thus flow cytometry, as a methodology, is ideally suited to the identification of small subpopulations of cells, which is particularly of interest in analyzing lymphoid cell populations.

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Subpopulations: Application for Orthopedic Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Morales, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Research on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) continues to progress rapidly. Nevertheless, the field faces several challenges, such as inherent cell heterogeneity and the absence of unique MSCs markers. Due to MSCs' ability to differentiate into multiple tissues, these cells represent a promising tool for new cell-based therapies. However, for tissue engineering applications, it is critical to start with a well-defined cell population. Additionally, evidence that MSCs subpopulations may also feature distinct characteristics and regeneration potential has arisen. In this report, we present an overview of the identification of MSCs based on the expression of several surface markers and their current tissue sources. We review the use of MSCs subpopulations in recent years and the main methodologies that have addressed their isolation, and we emphasize the most-used surface markers for selection, isolation, and characterization. Next, we discuss the osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation from MSCs subpopulations. We conclude that MSCs subpopulation selection is not a minor concern because each subpopulation has particular potential for promoting the differentiation into osteoblasts and chondrocytes. The accurate selection of the subpopulation advances possibilities suitable for preclinical and clinical studies and determines the safest and most efficacious regeneration process. PMID:27725838

  8. Expression of stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4) defines spontaneous loss of epithelial phenotype in human solid tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramaniyan, Kavitha; Harichandan, Abhishek; Schilbach, Karin; Mack, Andreas F; Bedke, Jens; Stenzl, Arnulf; Kanz, Lothar; Niederfellner, Gerhard; Bühring, Hans-Jörg

    2015-08-01

    Stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4) is a glycosphingolipid, which is overexpressed in some cancers and has been linked to disease progression. However, little is known about the functions of SSEA-4 and the characteristics of SSEA-4 expressing tumor cells. Our studies identified SSEA-4 expression on a subpopulation of cells in many solid tumor cell lines but not in leukemic cell lines. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting-sorted SSEA-4(+) prostate cancer cells formed fibroblast-like colonies with limited cell-cell contacts, whereas SSEA-4(-) cells formed cobblestone-like epithelial colonies. Only colonies derived from SSEA-4(+) cells were enriched for pluripotent embryonic stem cell markers. Moreover, major epithelial cell-associated markers Claudin-7, E-cadherin, ESRP1 and GRHL2 were down-regulated in the SSEA-4(+) fraction of DU145 and HCT-116 cells. Similar to cell lines, SSEA-4(+) primary prostate tumor cells also showed down-regulation of epithelial cell-associated markers. In addition, they showed up-regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition as well as mesenchymal markers. Furthermore, SSEA-4(+) cells escape from adhesive colonies spontaneously and form invadopodia-like migratory structures, in which SSEA-4, cortactin as well as active pPI3K, pAkt and pSrc are enriched and colocalized. Finally, SSEA-4(+) cells displayed strong tumorigenic ability and stable knockdown of SSEA-4 synthesis resulted in decreased cellular adhesion to different extracellular matrices. In conclusion, we introduce SSEA-4 as a novel marker to identify heterogeneous, invasive subpopulations of tumor cells. Moreover, increased cell-surface SSEA-4 expression is associated with the loss of cell-cell interactions and the gain of a migratory phenotype, suggesting an important role of SSEA-4 in cancer invasion by influencing cellular adhesion to the extracellular matrix.

  9. Dynamic actin cycling through mitochondrial subpopulations locally regulates the fission–fusion balance within mitochondrial networks

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Andrew S.; Wong, Yvette C.; Simpson, Cory L.; Holzbaur, Erika L. F.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria form interconnected networks that dynamically remodel in response to cellular needs. Using live-cell imaging, we investigate the role of the actin cytoskeleton in regulating mitochondrial fission and fusion. We identify cycling of actin filaments onto and off of subsets of cellular mitochondria. The association of actin filaments with mitochondrial subpopulations is transient; actin quickly disassembles, then reassembles around a distinct subpopulation, efficiently cycling through all cellular mitochondria within 14 min. The focal assembly of actin induces local, Drp1-dependent fragmentation of the mitochondrial network. On actin disassembly, fragmented mitochondria undergo rapid fusion, leading to regional recovery of the tubular mitochondrial network. Cycling requires dynamic actin polymerization and is blocked by inhibitors of both Arp2/3 and formins. We propose that cyclic assembly of actin onto mitochondria modulates the fission/fusion balance, promotes network remodelling and content mixing, and thus may serve as an essential mechanism regulating mitochondrial network homeostasis. PMID:27686185

  10. Expressions of machismo in colorectal cancer screening among New Mexico Hispanic subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Getrich, Christina M; Sussman, Andrew L; Helitzer, Deborah L; Hoffman, Richard M; Warner, Teddy D; Sánchez, Victoria; Solares, Angélica; Rhyne, Robert L

    2012-04-01

    Although national colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rates have steadily decreased, the rate for New Mexico Hispanics has been increasing, and screening rates are low. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study to determine barriers to CRC screening for New Mexico Hispanics. We found that machismo served as a dynamic influence on men's health-seeking behaviors; however, it was conceptualized differently by two distinct Hispanic subpopulations, and therefore appeared to play a different role in shaping their screening attitudes and behaviors. Machismo emerged as more of an influence for Mexican men, who expressed concern over colonoscopies being potentially transformative and/or stigmatizing, but was not as salient for Hispanos, who viewed the colonoscopy as "strictly medical," and were more concerned with discomfort and pain. Findings from the study highlight the importance of identifying varying characteristics among subpopulations to better understand screening barriers and provide optimal CRC screening counseling in primary care settings.

  11. Expressions of Machismo in Colorectal Cancer Screening Among New Mexico Hispanic Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Getrich, Christina M.; Sussman, Andrew L.; Helitzer, Deborah L.; Hoffman, Richard M.; Warner, Teddy D.; Sánchez, Victoria; Solares, Angélica; Rhyne, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Although national colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rates have steadily decreased, the rate for New Mexico Hispanics has been increasing and screening rates are low. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study to determine barriers to CRC screening for New Mexico Hispanics. We found that machismo served as a dynamic influence on men’s health seeking behaviors; however, it was conceptualized differently by two distinct Hispanic subpopulations and therefore appeared to play a different role in shaping their screening attitudes and behaviors. Machismo emerged as more of an influence for Mexican men, who expressed concern over colonoscopies being potentially transformative and/or stigmatizing, but was not as salient for Hispanos, who viewed the colonoscopy as “strictly medical” and were more concerned with discomfort and pain. This study highlights the importance of identifying varying characteristics among subpopulations to better understand screening barriers and provide optimal CRC screening counseling in primary care settings. PMID:22138258

  12. Regulatory T Cells in Melanoma Revisited by a Computational Clustering of FOXP3+ T Cell Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Hiroko; Josse, Julie; Tanioka, Miki; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Husson, François

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cells that express the transcription factor FOXP3 (FOXP3+ T cells) are commonly regarded as immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs). FOXP3+ T cells are reported to be increased in tumor-bearing patients or animals and are considered to suppress antitumor immunity, but the evidence is often contradictory. In addition, accumulating evidence indicates that FOXP3 is induced by antigenic stimulation and that some non-Treg FOXP3+ T cells, especially memory-phenotype FOXP3low cells, produce proinflammatory cytokines. Accordingly, the subclassification of FOXP3+ T cells is fundamental for revealing the significance of FOXP3+ T cells in tumor immunity, but the arbitrariness and complexity of manual gating have complicated the issue. In this article, we report a computational method to automatically identify and classify FOXP3+ T cells into subsets using clustering algorithms. By analyzing flow cytometric data of melanoma patients, the proposed method showed that the FOXP3+ subpopulation that had relatively high FOXP3, CD45RO, and CD25 expressions was increased in melanoma patients, whereas manual gating did not produce significant results on the FOXP3+ subpopulations. Interestingly, the computationally identified FOXP3+ subpopulation included not only classical FOXP3high Tregs, but also memory-phenotype FOXP3low cells by manual gating. Furthermore, the proposed method successfully analyzed an independent data set, showing that the same FOXP3+ subpopulation was increased in melanoma patients, validating the method. Collectively, the proposed method successfully captured an important feature of melanoma without relying on the existing criteria of FOXP3+ T cells, revealing a hidden association between the T cell profile and melanoma, and providing new insights into FOXP3+ T cells and Tregs. PMID:26864030

  13. Drosophila Wnt and STAT Define Apoptosis-Resistant Epithelial Cells for Tissue Regeneration after Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Shilpi; Su, Tin Tin

    2016-09-01

    Drosophila melanogaster larvae irradiated with doses of ionizing radiation (IR) that kill about half of the cells in larval imaginal discs still develop into viable adults. How surviving cells compensate for IR-induced cell death to produce organs of normal size and appearance remains an active area of investigation. We have identified a subpopulation of cells within the continuous epithelium of Drosophila larval wing discs that shows intrinsic resistance to IR- and drug-induced apoptosis. These cells reside in domains of high Wingless (Wg, Drosophila Wnt-1) and STAT92E (sole Drosophila signal transducer and activator of transcription [STAT] homolog) activity and would normally form the hinge in the adult fly. Resistance to IR-induced apoptosis requires STAT and Wg and is mediated by transcriptional repression of the pro-apoptotic gene reaper. Lineage tracing experiments show that, following irradiation, apoptosis-resistant cells lose their identity and translocate to areas of the wing disc that suffered abundant cell death. Our findings provide a new paradigm for regeneration in which it is unnecessary to invoke special damage-resistant cell types such as stem cells. Instead, differences in gene expression within a population of genetically identical epithelial cells can create a subpopulation with greater resistance, which, following damage, survive, alter their fate, and help regenerate the tissue. PMID:27584613

  14. Drosophila Wnt and STAT Define Apoptosis-Resistant Epithelial Cells for Tissue Regeneration after Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tin Tin

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster larvae irradiated with doses of ionizing radiation (IR) that kill about half of the cells in larval imaginal discs still develop into viable adults. How surviving cells compensate for IR-induced cell death to produce organs of normal size and appearance remains an active area of investigation. We have identified a subpopulation of cells within the continuous epithelium of Drosophila larval wing discs that shows intrinsic resistance to IR- and drug-induced apoptosis. These cells reside in domains of high Wingless (Wg, Drosophila Wnt-1) and STAT92E (sole Drosophila signal transducer and activator of transcription [STAT] homolog) activity and would normally form the hinge in the adult fly. Resistance to IR-induced apoptosis requires STAT and Wg and is mediated by transcriptional repression of the pro-apoptotic gene reaper. Lineage tracing experiments show that, following irradiation, apoptosis-resistant cells lose their identity and translocate to areas of the wing disc that suffered abundant cell death. Our findings provide a new paradigm for regeneration in which it is unnecessary to invoke special damage-resistant cell types such as stem cells. Instead, differences in gene expression within a population of genetically identical epithelial cells can create a subpopulation with greater resistance, which, following damage, survive, alter their fate, and help regenerate the tissue. PMID:27584613

  15. Immature oocyte quality and maturational competence of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Gabriel Martin; Dalvit, Gabriel Carlos; Achi, María Verónica; Miguez, Marcelo Sergio; Cetica, Pablo Daniel

    2009-12-01

    Porcine immature oocyte quality (i.e., that of live oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage) was evaluated according to features of the surrounding cumulus, aiming to establish maturational competence of different subpopulations of such cumulus-oocyte complexes. Six subpopulations were identified: A1 (with a dense cumulus), A2 (with a translucent cumulus), B1 (with the corona radiata), B2 (partly naked oocytes), C (naked oocytes), D (with a dark cumulus). The percent incidence of live oocyte in these subpopulations changed significantly as related to cumulus features, however the occurrence of oocytes in the germinal vesicle stage was lower in class D only. Similar metaphase II rates achieved in A1, A2, B1 and B2 classes after in vitro maturation suggest that the nucleus may in fact mature in vitro, in spite of the different accompanying cumulus features which are typical of these classes. In contrast, a higher cytoplasmic maturation rate obtained in class A may indicate a stronger dependence of this variable upon cumulus features than that shown by nuclear maturation. When different types of cumulus expansion after in vitro maturation were considered (i.e., fully expanded cumulus, partly expanded cumulus, and partly naked oocyte), no differences were found in the percent of oocytes reaching metaphase II or cytoplasmic maturation. It is concluded that morphological features of the collected porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (rather than cumulus behavior during culture) may be useful for selection of potentially competent oocytes for in vitro fertilization and embryo production. PMID:20067032

  16. Particle Backtracking Improves Breeding Subpopulation Discrimination and Natal-Source Identification in Mixed Populations

    PubMed Central

    Fraker, Michael E.; Anderson, Eric J.; Brodnik, Reed M.; Carreon-Martinez, Lucia; DeVanna, Kristen M.; Fryer, Brian J.; Heath, Daniel D.; Reichert, Julie M.; Ludsin, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a novel method to improve the use of natural tagging approaches for subpopulation discrimination and source-origin identification in aquatic and terrestrial animals with a passive dispersive phase. Our method integrates observed site-referenced biological information on individuals in mixed populations with a particle-tracking model to retrace likely dispersal histories prior to capture (i.e., particle backtracking). To illustrate and test our approach, we focus on western Lake Erie’s yellow perch (Perca flavescens) population during 2006–2007, using microsatellite DNA and otolith microchemistry from larvae and juveniles as natural tags. Particle backtracking showed that not all larvae collected near a presumed hatching location may have originated there, owing to passive drift during the larval stage that was influenced by strong river- and wind-driven water circulation. Re-assigning larvae to their most probable hatching site (based on probabilistic dispersal trajectories from the particle backtracking model) improved the use of genetics and otolith microchemistry to discriminate among local breeding subpopulations. This enhancement, in turn, altered (and likely improved) the estimated contributions of each breeding subpopulation to the mixed population of juvenile recruits. Our findings indicate that particle backtracking can complement existing tools used to identify the origin of individuals in mixed populations, especially in flow-dominated systems. PMID:25799555

  17. Characterization of the T-cell subpopulations in the granulation tissues of chronic suppurative otitis media

    PubMed Central

    WANG, BING; CHENG, YING; XU, MIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the potential involvement of specific T-cell subpopulations in granulation tissue formation in chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). Fifteen patients with CSOM were enrolled in this study. Granulation tissues were obtained from the middle ear cavity. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for histopathological observation, and different T-cell subpopulations were characterized by immunohistochemistry. No evident association was identified between granulation tissue formation and disease course. The number of cluster of differentiation 8+ (CD8+) T cells, forkhead box P3+ (FOXP3+) regulatory T (Treg) cells and OX40+ T cells were significantly higher in granulation tissues from patients with ear discharge within the last 6 months compared to those without (P<0.05). Fresh granulation tissues had more CD8+ T cells and FOXP3+ Treg cells compared to the mature granulation tissues (P<0.05). There was a differential abundance of specific T-cell subpopulations in the granulation tissues in CSOM with different disease courses or with ear discharge, suggesting that T cell-mediated cellular immunity is involved in lesion formation of CSOM. PMID:27313854

  18. Time-dependent release of extracellular vesicle subpopulations in tumor CABA I cells.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Ilaria; Di Francesco, Marianna; Cantone, Laura; D'Ascenzo, Sandra; Bollati, Valentina; Carta, Gaspare; Dolo, Vincenza

    2015-11-01

    Investigations into extracellular vesicles (EVs) have significantly increased since their role in physiological and pathological processes has become more clearly understood. Furthermore, it has become increasingly clear that several subpopulations of EVs exist, such as exosomes (EXOs) and microvesicles (MVs). Various methods and techniques used to identify and isolate the specific EVs subpopulations exist. However, these methods should be further elucidated. A deep understanding of the different factors that affect the EVs release may therefore be useful for the standardization of protocols and to establish guidelines for a more adequate analysis and correct inter‑laboratory comparison. In the present study, we investigated whether composition and molecular features of EVs altered over time following a trigger stimulus. Starved CABA I cells were stimulated with FBS and conditioned medium was collected after different time intervals (30 min and 4, 8 and 18 h). The dynamic of EVs release was time-dependent, as shown by the results of scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, the time elapsed from the stimulus affected the size distribution (as highlighted by transmission electron microscopy and NanoSight assay), amount (in terms of the number of particles and protein amount) and molecular composition (CD63, HLA, Ago-2, gelatinases, and plasminogen activators) suggesting that, different EVs subpopulations were released at different time intervals following cell stimulation. Collectively, the results suggested that, parameters useful to standardize procedures for EVs isolation, including stimulation time should be considered. PMID:26323210

  19. Identification of geographically distributed sub-populations of Leishmania (Leishmania) major by microsatellite analysis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Leishmania (Leishmania) major, one of the agents causing cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in humans, is widely distributed in the Old World where different species of wild rodent and phlebotomine sand fly serve as animal reservoir hosts and vectors, respectively. Despite this, strains of L. (L.) major isolated from many different sources over many years have proved to be relatively uniform. To investigate the population structure of the species highly polymorphic microsatellite markers were employed for greater discrimination among it's otherwise closely related strains, an approach applied successfully to other species of Leishmania. Results Multilocus Microsatellite Typing (MLMT) based on 10 different microsatellite markers was applied to 106 strains of L. (L.) major from different regions where it is endemic. On applying a Bayesian model-based approach, three main populations were identified, corresponding to three separate geographical regions: Central Asia (CA); the Middle East (ME); and Africa (AF). This was congruent with phylogenetic reconstructions based on genetic distances. Re-analysis separated each of the populations into two sub-populations. The two African sub-populations did not correlate well with strains' geographical origin. Strains falling into the sub-populations CA and ME did mostly group according to their place of isolation although some anomalies were seen, probably, owing to human migration. Conclusion The model- and distance-based analyses of the microsatellite data exposed three main populations of L. (L.) major, Central Asia, the Middle East and Africa, each of which separated into two sub-populations. This probably correlates with the different species of rodent host. PMID:18577226

  20. [Study of interaction of wild soybean subpopulations (Glycine soja) in the valley of the Tsukanovka river in the south of Far East of Russia].

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, A V; Martynov, V V; Dorokhov, D B

    2011-01-01

    A comparative study of the genetic structure of natural and anthropogenic populations of G. soja gives significant information about formation of different populations, and allows developing measures for preservation of unique natural gene bank of wild soybean, the species closely related to cultivated soybean. In this study, ISSR markers were used to carry out a comparative analysis of genetic structure of natural and anthropogenic subpopulations of G. soja for studying possible mutual influence of subpopulations of anthropogenic and natural phytocenosis on the formation of their genetic diversity and to study genetic structure of natural subpopulations of wild soybean in the contact places between the two types ofcenoses. As a result, the characteristics that describe the genetic diversity of studied populations have been identified and the important role of an interaction between subpopulations of different phytocenoses on formation of the spatial genetic structure of population in the valley of Tsukanovka river has been demonstrated.

  1. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Delgado, Yolanda; Torrelo, Antonio; Colmenero, Isabel; Zambrano, Antonio

    2005-12-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is a benign proliferation of the oral mucosa with well defined clinical and histological characteristics. It has been associated with infection of the oral mucosa by types 13 and 32 of the human papillomavirus (HPV), and to a lesser extent, with other types. Its clinical course is variable, although it usually persists for months or years; cases with spontaneous resolution have been described, as have others with prolonged persistence. We present the case of an Ecuadorian boy whose visit was motivated by lesions in the oral mucosa consistent with a diagnosis of FEH, which were confirmed in the histological study, and in which HPV type 13 DNA was identified.

  2. Recognition of a CD4+ mouse medullary thymocyte subpopulation by Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Lascurain, R; Chávez, R; Gorocica, P; Pérez, A; Montaño, L F; Zenteno, E

    1994-01-01

    We have used the Gal beta(1-->3)GalNAc-specific Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin to isolate a thymus cell subpopulation which is different from that sorted with Arachis hypogaea lectin. The cells recognized by A. leucocarpus lectin were predominantly CD4+, whereas a minor proportion of CD8+ cells (approximately 11%) were also identified. The A. leucocarpus-positive cells were located in the thymus medulla and the cortico-medullary junction. The cortex was negative for A. leucocarpus cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7835965

  3. An analysis of glucocorticoid receptor-mediated gene expression in BEAS-2B human airway epithelial cells identifies distinct, ligand-directed, transcription profiles with implications for asthma therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, T; Johnson, M; Newton, R; Giembycz, M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose International asthma guidelines recommend that inhaled glucocorticoids be used as a monotherapy in all patients with mild to moderate disease because of their ability to suppress airways inflammation. Current evidence suggests that the therapeutic benefit of glucocorticoids is due to the transactivation and transrepression of anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory genes respectively. However, the extent to which clinically relevant glucocorticoids are equivalent in their ability to modulate gene expression is unclear. Experimental Approach A pharmacodynamics investigation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated gene transactivation in BEAS-2B human airway epithelial cells was performed using a glucocorticoid response element luciferase reporter coupled with an analysis of glucocorticoid-inducible genes encoding proteins with anti-inflammatory and adverse-effect potential. Key Results Using transactivation as a functionally relevant output, a given glucocorticoid displayed a unique, gene expression ‘fingerprint’ where intrinsic efficacy and GR density were essential determinants. We showed that depending on the gene selected for analysis, a given glucocorticoid can behave as an antagonist, partial agonist, full agonist or even ‘super agonist’. In the likely event that different, tissue-dependent gene expression profiles are reproduced in vivo, then the anti-inflammatory and adverse-effect potential of many glucocorticoids currently available as asthma therapeutics may not be equivalent. Conclusions and Implications The generation of gene expression ‘fingerprints’ in target and off-target human tissues could assist the rational design of GR agonists with improved therapeutic ratios. This approach could identify compounds that are useful in the management of severe asthma and other inflammatory disorders where systemic exposure is desirable. PMID:25393397

  4. Immunohistochemical Characterization of Leukocytic Subpopulations in Chronic Endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Venuti, Susan; Brown, Sharla; Collins, Julie

    1996-01-01

    Objective: We analyzed the histologic and immunohistochemical changes in the endometrial leukocytic subpopulations to determine which of them are characteristic of chronic endometritis. Results: Endometrial biopsies from 25 cases of chronic endometritis and 35 controls were studied. Characteristic morphologic findings included the presence of a plasma cell infiltrate, and a prominent, albeit non-specific, lymphocytic infiltrate in all patients with endometritis. A neutrophilic infiltrate was also noted in 90% of the patients. Other non-specific histologic findings included occasional prominent lymphoid aggregates, stromal edema, hemorrhage, and necrosis and cystic dilation of some glands in endometria of patients with chronic endometritis. Endometrial immune cells were investigated immunohistochemically using antibodies to CD3 (pan-T), CD20 (pan-B, L26), and Ham-56 (macrophage). In control patients, endometrial immune cells were predominantly composed of CD3 and Ham-56 positive cells. CD20 positive cells comprised <2% of immune cells in control patients [mean: <2 cells/high power field (HPF)]. Large numbers of CD20 and CD3 lymphocytes were seen in endometria of patients with chronic endometritis. A semiquantitative analysis showed that the numbers of CD20 and CD3 positive cells in patients with chronic endometritis were increased 50- and 3-fold, respectively, when compared to those of control patients (mean B cells: 49 vs. 2 cells/HPF; mean T cells: 149 vs. 45 cells/HPF). CD20 positive cells were predominantly seen in subepithelial and periglandular aggregates. CD3 positive cells had a predominant stromal distribution and an occasional intra- or subepithelial localization. There was no difference in the number and distribution of Ham-56 positive cells in patients with or without endometritis. Conclusions: These findings suggest that CD20 cells may have a significant role in the pathogenesis of chronic endometritis and that immunostaining for B and T lymphocytes

  5. A modified neural network model of tumor cell interactions and subpopulation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Prideaux, J A; Mikulecky, D C; Clarke, A M; Ware, J L

    1993-01-01

    Tumors consist of phenotypically heterogeneous subpopulations of cells which are frequently affected by both autocrine and paracrine factors. Applying concepts from neural network theory, we have developed a computer model of chemical communication among hypothetical tumor cells, which simulates some of the complex epigenetic behavior of real tumors. Deletion of subpopulations often destabilized the whole population. The impact of deletion of specific subpopulations was affected by (a) which subpopulation was deleted, and (b) the timing of the deletion during tumor progression.

  6. A dysbiotic subpopulation of alcohol-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    de Timary, Philippe; Leclercq, Sophie; Stärkel, Peter; Delzenne, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of studies that assessed the importance of biological factors for the development of psychiatric disorders focused on processes occurring at the brain level. Alcohol-dependence is a very frequent psychiatric disorder where psycho-pharmacological interventions are only of moderate efficacy. Our laboratory has recently described that a subpopulation of alcohol-dependent subjects, that accounted for approximately 40% of individuals tested, presented with an increased intestinal permeability, with a dysbiosis, with alterations in the metabolomic content of faeces--that could play a role in the increased permeability--and finally with a more severe profile of alcohol-dependence than the other non-dysbiotic subpopulation. In this addendum, we discuss the implications of our observations for the pathophysiology of alcohol dependence where we try to discriminate which addiction dimensions are likely related to the gut microbiota alterations and whether these alterations are the cause or the consequence of drinking habits. PMID:26727422

  7. Cancerous Epithelial Cell Lines Shed Extracellular Vesicles With a Bimodal Size Distribution that is Sensitive to Glutamine Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Steven Michael; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles (ESVs) facilitate a unique mode of cell cell communication wherein vesicle uptake can induce a change in the recipient cell’s state. Despite the intensity of ESV research, currently reported data represent bulk characterization of concentrated vesicle samples with little attention paid to heterogeneity. ESV populations likely represent diversity in mechanisms of formation, cargo, and size. To better understand ESV subpopulations and the signaling cascades implicated in their formation, we characterize ESV size distributions to identify subpopulations in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. We discovered that cancer cells exhibit bimodal ESV distributions, one small-diameter and another large-diameter population, suggesting that two mechanisms may govern ESV formation, an exosome population and a cancer-specific microvesicle population. Altered glutamine metabolism in cancer is thought to fuel cancer growth but may also support metastatic niche formation through microvesicle production. We describe the role of a glutaminase inhibitor, compound 968, in ESV production. We discovered that inhibiting glutamine metabolism significantly impairs large-diameter microvesicle production in cancer cells. PMID:25426818

  8. Cancerous epithelial cell lines shed extracellular vesicles with a bimodal size distribution that is sensitive to glutamine inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Steven Michael; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles (ESVs) facilitate a unique mode of cell-cell communication wherein vesicle uptake can induce a change in the recipient cell's state. Despite the intensity of ESV research, currently reported data represent the bulk characterization of concentrated vesicle samples with little attention paid to heterogeneity. ESV populations likely represent diversity in mechanisms of formation, cargo and size. To better understand ESV subpopulations and the signaling cascades implicated in their formation, we characterize ESV size distributions to identify subpopulations in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. We have discovered that cancer cells exhibit bimodal ESV distributions, one small-diameter and another large-diameter population, suggesting that two mechanisms may govern ESV formation, an exosome population and a cancer-specific microvesicle population. Altered glutamine metabolism in cancer is thought to fuel cancer growth but may also support metastatic niche formation through microvesicle production. We describe the role of a glutaminase inhibitor, compound 968, in ESV production. We have discovered that inhibiting glutamine metabolism significantly impairs large-diameter microvesicle production in cancer cells.

  9. Emergence of a large pore subpopulation during electroporating pulses.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle C; Son, Reuben S; Gowrishankar, T R; Weaver, James C

    2014-12-01

    Electroporation increases ionic and molecular transport through cell membranes by creating transient aqueous pores. These pores cannot be directly observed experimentally, but cell system modeling with dynamic electroporation predicts pore populations that produce cellular responses consistent with experiments. We show a cell system model's response that illustrates the life cycle of a pore population in response to a widely used 1 kV/cm, 100 μs trapezoidal pulse. Rapid pore creation occurs early in the pulse, followed by the gradual emergence of a subpopulation of large pores reaching ~30 nm radius. After the pulse, pores rapidly contract to form a single thermally broadened distribution of small pores (~1 nm radius) that slowly decays. We also show the response of the same model to pulses of 100 ns to 1 ms duration, each with an applied field strength adjusted such that a total of 10,000±100 pores are created. As pulse duration is increased, the pore size distributions vary dramatically and a distinct subpopulation of large pores emerges for pulses of microsecond and longer duration. This subpopulation of transient large pores is relevant to understanding rapid transport of macromolecules into and out of cells during a pulse. PMID:24290730

  10. Differential distribution of sperm subpopulations and incidence of pleiomorphisms in ejaculates of captive howling monkeys ( Alouatta caraya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, R. R.; Carvalho, F. M.; Muniz, J. A. P. C.; Leal, C. L. V.; García-Herreros, M.

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an objective method to determine the incidence of pleiomorphisms and its influence on the distribution of sperm morphometric subpopulations in ejaculates of howling monkeys ( Alouatta caraya) by using a combination of computerized analysis system (ASMA) and principal component analysis (PCA) methods. Ejaculates were collected by electroejaculation methods on a regular basis from five individuals maintained under identical captive environmental, nutritional, and management conditions. Each sperm head was measured for dimensional parameters (Area [ A, (square micrometers)], Perimeter [ P, (micrometers)], Length [ L, (micrometers)], and Width [ W, (micrometers)]) and shape-derived parameters (Ellipticity [( L/ W)], Elongation [( L - W)/( L + W)], and Rugosity [(4л A/ P 2)]). PCA revealed two principal components explaining more than the 96 % of the variance. Clustering methods and discriminant analyzes were performed and seven separate subpopulations were identified. There were differences ( P < 0.001) in the distribution of the seven subpopulations as well as in the incidence of abnormal pleiomorphisms (58.6 %, 49.8 %, 35.1 %, 66.4 %, and 55.1 %, P < 0.05) among the five donors tested. Our results indicated that differences among individuals related to the incidence of pleiomorphisms, and sperm subpopulational structure was not related to the captivity conditions or the sperm collection method, since all individuals were studied under identical conditions. In conclusion, the combination of ASMA and PCA is a useful clinical diagnostic resource for detecting deficiencies in sperm morphology and sperm subpopulations in A. caraya ejaculates that could be used in ex situ conservation programs of threatened species in Alouatta genus or even other endangered neotropical primate species.

  11. Simple Epithelial Keratins.

    PubMed

    Strnad, Pavel; Guldiken, Nurdan; Helenius, Terhi O; Misiorek, Julia O; Nyström, Joel H; Lähdeniemi, Iris A K; Silvander, Jonas S G; Kuscuoglu, Deniz; Toivola, Diana M

    2016-01-01

    Simple epithelial keratins (SEKs) are the cytoplasmic intermediate filament proteins of single-layered and glandular epithelial cells as found in the liver, pancreas, intestine, and lung. SEKs have broad cytoprotective functions, which are facilitated by dynamic posttranslational modifications and interaction with associated proteins. SEK filaments are composed of obligate heteropolymers of type II (K7, K8) and type I (K18-K20, K23) keratins. The multifaceted roles of SEKs are increasingly appreciated due to findings obtained from transgenic mouse models and human studies that identified SEK variants in several digestive diseases. Reorganization of the SEK network into aggregates called Mallory-Denk bodies (MDBs) is characteristic for specific liver disorders such as alcoholic and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. To spur further research on SEKs, we here review the methods and potential caveats of their isolation as well as possibilities to study them in cell culture. The existing transgenic SEK mouse models, their advantages and potential drawbacks are discussed. The tools to induce MDBs, ways of their visualization and quantification, as well as the possibilities to detect SEK variants in humans are summarized.

  12. Novel flow cytometric approach for the detection of adipocyte subpopulations during adipogenesis[S

    PubMed Central

    Durandt, Chrisna; van Vollenstee, Fiona A.; Dessels, Carla; Kallmeyer, Karlien; de Villiers, Danielle; Murdoch, Candice; Potgieter, Marnie; Pepper, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to differentiate into adipocytes provides a cellular model of human origin to study adipogenesis in vitro. One of the major challenges in studying adipogenesis is the lack of tools to identify and monitor the differentiation of various subpopulations within the heterogeneous pool of MSCs. Cluster of differentiation (CD)36 plays an important role in the formation of intracellular lipid droplets, a key characteristic of adipocyte differentiation/maturation. The objective of this study was to develop a reproducible quantitative method to study adipocyte differentiation by comparing two lipophilic dyes [Nile Red (NR) and Bodipy 493/503] in combination with CD36 surface marker staining. We identified a subpopulation of adipose-derived stromal cells that express CD36 at intermediate/high levels and show that combining CD36 cell surface staining with neutral lipid-specific staining allows us to monitor differentiation of adipose-derived stromal cells that express CD36intermediate/high during adipocyte differentiation in vitro. The gradual increase of CD36intermediate/high/NRpositive cells during the 21 day adipogenesis induction period correlated with upregulation of adipogenesis-associated gene expression. PMID:26830859

  13. Dioxins and dibenzofurans in adipose tissue of the general US population and selected subpopulations.

    PubMed Central

    Orban, J E; Stanley, J S; Schwemberger, J G; Remmers, J C

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The Environmental Protection Agency's National Human Adipose Tissue Survey (NHATS) was conducted in fiscal year (FY) 1987 to (1) estimate average concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in the adipose tissue of humans in the US population, (2) identify differences in average concentrations among subpopulations, and (3) compare average concentrations with those from the FY 1982 NHATS. METHODS. Population estimates of the average levels of PCDDs and PCDFs were established on the basis of 865 human adipose tissue specimens collected in FY 1987. Average levels among subpopulations were compared. RESULTS. The average concentration of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in the adipose tissue of the US population was 5.38 pg/g, increasing from 1.98 pg/g in children under 14 years of age to 9.40 pg/g in adults over 45. The effect of age was significant for nine compounds. Regional differences in the levels of 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorinated dibenzofurans were statistically significant, but there were no significant differences associated with sex or race. CONCLUSIONS. The survey provides a baseline of average levels of PCDDs and PCDFs in the adipose tissue of humans in the US population. PMID:8129062

  14. An Aggressive Hypoxia Related Subpopulation of Melanoma Cells is TRP-2 Negative.

    PubMed

    Lenggenhager, Daniela; Curioni-Fontecedro, Alessandra; Storz, Martina; Shakhova, Olga; Sommer, Lukas; Widmer, Daniel S; Seifert, Burkhardt; Moch, Holger; Dummer, Reinhard; Mihic-Probst, Daniela

    2014-04-01

    Despite existing vaccination strategies targeting TRP-2, its function is not yet fully understood. TRP-2 is an enzyme involved in melanin biosynthesis and therefore discussed as a differentiation antigen. However, in mice Trp-2 was shown to be expressed in melanocyte stem cells of the hair follicle and therefore also considered as an indicator of stemness. A proper understanding of the TRP-2 function is crucial, considering a vaccination targeting cells with stemness properties would be highly effective in contrast to a therapy targeting differentiated melanoma cells. Analysing over 200 melanomas including primaries, partly matched metastases and patients' cell cultures we show that TRP-2 is correlated with Melan A expression and decreases with tumor progression. In mice it is expressed in differentiated melanocytes as well as in stem cells. Furthermore, we identify a TRP-2 negative, proliferative, hypoxia related cell subpopulation which is significantly associated with tumor thickness and diseases progression. Patients with a higher percentage of those cells have a less favourable tumor specific survival. Our findings underline that TRP-2 is a differentiation antigen, highlighting the importance to combine TRP-2 vaccination with other strategies targeting the aggressive undifferentiated hypoxia related subpopulation. PMID:24746711

  15. A novel subpopulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells presents in major burn patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin; Ding, Jie; Ma, Zengshuan; Zhu, Zhenshen; Shankowsky, Heather A; Tredget, Edward E

    2015-08-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS) are generally believed to result from proliferation and activation of resident connective tissue fibroblasts after burns. To demonstrate a potential role of blood-borne cells, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and the effect of PBMCs on dermal fibroblast behavior was investigated. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the surface and intracellular protein expression of PBMCs and fibroblasts. Transwell migration assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to assess fibroblast functions. We identified a novel subpopulation of PBMCs in burn patients in vivo that appears at an early stage following major thermal injuries, which primarily express procollagen 1, leukocyte specific protein 1, CD204, toll-like receptor 4 and stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) receptor CXCR4. In vitro, the conditioned media from burn patient PBMCs up-regulated the expression of fibrotic growth factors and extracellular matrix molecules, down-regulated antifibrotic factor decorin, enhanced cell chemotaxis and promoted cell differentiation into contractile myofibroblasts in dermal fibroblasts. After thermal injury, this novel subpopulation of PBMCs is systemically triggered and attracted to the wounds under SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling where they appear to modulate the functions of resident connective tissue cells and thus contribute to the development of HTS. PMID:25683215

  16. Characterization of two distinct liver progenitor cell subpopulations of hematopoietic and hepatic origins

    SciTech Connect

    Corcelle, V.; Stieger, B.; Gjinovci, A.; Wollheim, C.B.; Gauthier, B.R. . E-mail: Benoit.Gauthier@medecine.unige.ch

    2006-09-10

    Despite extensive studies, the hematopoietic versus hepatic origin of liver progenitor oval cells remains controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the origin of such cells after liver injury and to establish an oval cell line. Rat liver injury was induced by subcutaneous insertion of 2-AAF pellets for 7 days with subsequent injection of CCl{sub 4}. Livers were removed 9 to 13 days post-CCl{sub 4} treatment. Immunohistochemistry was performed using anti-c-kit, OV6, Thy1, CK19, AFP, vWF and Rab3b. Isolated non-parenchymal cells were grown on mouse embryonic fibroblast, and their gene expression profile was characterized by RT-PCR. We identified a subpopulation of OV6/CK19/Rab3b-expressing cells that was activated in the periportal region of traumatized livers. We also characterized a second subpopulation that expressed the HSCs marker c-kit but not Thy1. Although we successfully isolated both cell types, OV6/CK19/Rab3b{sup +} cells fail to propagate while c-kit {sup +}-HSCs appeared to proliferate for up to 7 weeks. Cells formed clusters which expressed c-kit, Thy1 and albumin. Our results indicate that a bona fide oval progenitor cell population resides within the liver and is distinct from c-kit {sup +}-HSCs. Oval cells require the hepatic niche to proliferate, while cells mobilized from the circulation proliferate and transdifferentiate into hepatocytes without evidence of cell fusion.

  17. Resistance to chemotherapy: short-term drug tolerance and stem cell-like subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Basile, Kevin J; Aplin, Andrew E

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine in cancer treatment has been a major goal for decades. Recently, the development of several therapies that specifically target key genetic alterations in different malignancies has dramatically improved patient outcome and brought the goal of personalized medicine closer to practicality. Despite the improved specificity of these treatment options, resistance to targeted therapy is common and remains a major obstacle to long-term management of a patient's disease. Often patient relapse is a result of the positive selection of cells with certain genetic alterations that result in a bypass of the therapeutic intervention. Once this occurs, patient relapse is inevitable and further treatment options are limited. The time to relapse is often quite rapid indicating that cancer cells may be primed for adapting to cytotoxic stimuli. Recently, it has been suggested that small subpopulations of cells allow resistance to occur more rapidly. It is thought that these cells are capable of surviving strong apoptotic stimuli until more permanent mechanisms of long-term resistance are developed. In order to decrease the rate of patient relapse, more studies are required in order to identify these subpopulations of cells, understand the mechanisms underlying their drug tolerance, and develop strategies to prevent them from evading treatment.

  18. Single exosome study reveals subpopulations distributed among cell lines with variability related to membrane content

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary J.; Lee, Changwon; Rojalin, Tatu; Carney, Randy P.; Hazari, Sidhartha; Knudson, Alisha; Lam, Kit; Saari, Heikki; Ibañez, Elisa Lazaro; Viitala, Tapani; Laaksonen, Timo; Yliperttula, Marjo; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Current analysis of exosomes focuses primarily on bulk analysis, where exosome-to-exosome variability cannot be assessed. In this study, we used Raman spectroscopy to study the chemical composition of single exosomes. We measured spectra of individual exosomes from 8 cell lines. Cell-line-averaged spectra varied considerably, reflecting the variation in total exosomal protein, lipid, genetic, and cytosolic content. Unexpectedly, single exosomes isolated from the same cell type also exhibited high spectral variability. Subsequent spectral analysis revealed clustering of single exosomes into 4 distinct groups that were not cell-line specific. Each group contained exosomes from multiple cell lines, and most cell lines had exosomes in multiple groups. The differences between these groups are related to chemical differences primarily due to differing membrane composition. Through a principal components analysis, we identified that the major sources of spectral variation among the exosomes were in cholesterol content, relative expression of phospholipids to cholesterol, and surface protein expression. For example, exosomes derived from cancerous versus non-cancerous cell lines can be largely separated based on their relative expression of cholesterol and phospholipids. We are the first to indicate that exosome subpopulations are shared among cell types, suggesting distributed exosome functionality. The origins of these differences are likely related to the specific role of extracellular vesicle subpopulations in both normal cell function and carcinogenesis, and they may provide diagnostic potential at the single exosome level. PMID:26649679

  19. Breast cancer without axillary metastases. Are there high-risk biologic subpopulations?

    PubMed

    Sears, H F; Janus, C; Levy, W; Hopson, R; Creech, R; Grotzinger, P

    1982-11-01

    Two hundred seventy-five patients with breast cancer and no axillary metastases had mastectomies and axillary node dissection performed during the period between 1970 and 1979 at The Fox Chase Cancer Center. They had a mean age of 60 years (range, 21-91) and 38 (14%) patients have had recurrence to date. Poor histologic differentiation and skin involvement were related to a high risk of recurrence. Those patients with skin infiltration by tumor or a poorly differentiated tumor had a 53 +/- 9% expected five-year tumor-free survival, whereas patients without these had a 90 +/- 2% expected five-year tumor-free survival. Tumor involvement of the lymphatic vessels within the breast and estrogen receptor protein positivity or negativity were not helpful for identifying a subpopulation at increased risk of recurrence. Large tumor size was not a poor prognostic indicator for a patient subpopulation. These factors should be considered as indicators for inclusion in clinical trials and adjuvant therapy and used as stratification points for the analysis of the data developed in these trials.

  20. Raman spectroscopy of single extracellular vesicles reveals subpopulations with varying membrane content (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Zachary J.; Lee, Changwon; Rojalin, Tatu; Carney, Randy P.; Hazari, Sidhartha; Knudson, Alisha; Lam, Kit S.; Saari, Heikki; Lazaro Ibañez, Elisa; Viitala, Tapani; Laaksonen, Timo; Yliperttula, Marjo; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Exosomes are small (~100nm) membrane bound vesicles excreted by cells as part of their normal biological processes. These extracellular vesicles are currently an area of intense research, since they were recently found to carry functional mRNA that allows transfer of proteins and other cellular instructions between cells. Exosomes have been implicated in a wide range of diseases, including cancer. Cancer cells are known to have increased exosome production, and may use those exosomes to prepare remote environments for metastasis. Therefore, there is a strong need to develop characterization methods to help understand the structure and function of these vesicles. However, current techniques, such as proteomics and genomics technologies, rely on aggregating a large amount of exosome material and reporting on chemical content that is averaged over many millions of exosomes. Here we report on the use of laser-tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) to probe individual vesicles, discovering distinct heterogeneity among exosomes both within a cell line, as well as between different cell lines. Through principal components analysis followed by hierarchical clustering, we have identified four "subpopulations" of exosomes shared across seven cell lines. The key chemical differences between these subpopulations, as determined by spectral analysis of the principal component loadings, are primarily related to membrane composition. Specifically, the differences can be ascribed to cholesterol content, cholesterol to phospholipid ratio, and surface protein expression. Thus, we have shown LTRS to be a powerful method to probe the chemical content of single extracellular vesicles.

  1. Compartmentalized calcium signaling triggers subpopulation formation upon platelet activation through PAR1.

    PubMed

    Sveshnikova, Anastasia N; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2015-04-01

    Blood platelets need to undergo activation to carry out their function of stopping bleeding. Different activation degrees lead to a stepped hierarchy of responses: ability to aggregate, granule release, and, in a fraction of platelets, phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure. This suggests the existence of decision-making mechanisms in the platelet intracellular signaling network. To identify and investigate them, we developed a computational model of PAR1-stimulated platelet signal transduction that included a minimal set of major players in the calcium signaling network. The model comprised three intracellular compartments: cytosol, dense tubular system (DTS) and mitochondria and extracellular space. Computer simulations showed that the stable resting state of platelets is maintained via a balance between calcium pumps and leaks through the DTS and plasma membranes. Stimulation of PAR1 induced oscillations in the cytosolic calcium concentrations, in good agreement with experimental observations. Further increase in the agonist level activated the mitochondrial uniporter leading to calcium uptake by mitochondria, which caused the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential in a fraction of platelets leading to the PS exposure. The formation of this subpopulation was shown to be a stochastic process determined by the small number of activated PAR1 receptors and by heterogeneity in the number of ion pumps. These results demonstrate how a gradual increase of the activation degree can be converted into a stepped response hierarchy ultimately leading to formation of two distinct subpopulations from an initially homogeneous population. PMID:25627921

  2. Ganglioside GD2 identifies breast cancer stem cells and promotes tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Battula, Venkata Lokesh; Shi, Yuexi; Evans, Kurt W.; Wang, Rui-Yu; Spaeth, Erika L.; Jacamo, Rodrigo O.; Guerra, Rudy; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Marini, Frank C.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel; Mani, Sendurai A.; Andreeff, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subpopulation of cancer cells that have increased resistance to conventional therapies and are capable of establishing metastasis. However, only a few biomarkers of CSCs have been identified. Here, we report that ganglioside GD2 (a glycosphingolipid) identifies a small fraction of cells in human breast cancer cell lines and patient samples that are capable of forming mammospheres and initiating tumors with as few as 10 GD2+ cells. In addition, the majority of GD2+ cells are also CD44hiCD24lo, the previously established CSC-associated cell surface phenotype. Gene expression analysis revealed that GD3 synthase (GD3S) is highly expressed in GD2+ as well as in CD44hiCD24lo cells and that interference with GD3S expression, either by shRNA or using a pharmacological inhibitor, reduced the CSC population and CSC-associated properties. GD3S knockdown completely abrogated tumor formation in vivo. Also, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in transformed human mammary epithelial cells (HMLER cells) dramatically increased GD2 as well as GD3S expression in these cells, suggesting a role of EMT in the origin of GD2+ breast CSCs. In summary, we identified GD2 as a new CSC-specific cell surface marker and GD3S as a potential therapeutic target for CSCs, with the possibility of improving survival and cure rates in patients with breast cancer. PMID:22585577

  3. Estimation of death rates in US states with small subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Voulgaraki, Anastasia; Wei, Rong; Kedem, Benjamin

    2015-05-20

    In US states with small subpopulations, the observed mortality rates are often zero, particularly among young ages. Because in life tables, death rates are reported mostly on a log scale, zero mortality rates are problematic. To overcome the observed zero death rates problem, appropriate probability models are used. Using these models, observed zero mortality rates are replaced by the corresponding expected values. This enables logarithmic transformations and, in some cases, the fitting of the eight-parameter Heligman-Pollard model to produce mortality estimates for ages 0-130 years, a procedure illustrated in terms of mortality data from several states.

  4. Trace element concentrations in two subpopulations of lesser snow geese from Wrangel Island, Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hui, A.; Takekawa, J.Y.; Baranyuk, Vasily V.; Litvin, K.V.

    1998-01-01

    Lesser snow geese (Anser c. caerulescens) from the Wrangel Island, Russia breeding colony spend the winter in two widely separated areas: the northern subpopulation in southern British Columbia and northern Washington and the southern subpopulation in the Central Valley of California. We examined 19 trace elements in the eggs and livers of geese from these two subpopulations to examine whether geese from the different wintering areas have similar trace element burdens. Eggs collected at the breeding colony from geese of the southern subpopulation had slightly higher levels of manganese, an element that can cause neurological damage and behavioral changes in chicks, than geese of the northern subpopulation. Livers from adult geese collected on the two wintering areas showed significant differences in trace elements including copper, iron, magnesium, molybdenum, and zinc. Copper concentrations in the livers of geese from the southern subpopulation were much higher than those from the northern subpopulation (x?? = 116 vs. 46 ppm; dry weight). Elevated levels of copper may induce anemia in birds. The differences in trace element concentrations of these two subpopulations may be related to farming practices in their wintering areas. Geese from the northern subpopulation feed in pastures and coastal marshes and migrate along the coast, but geese from the southern subpopulation feed predominantly in rice fields and migrate over farm land. Copper and manganese are major components of fertilizers and fungicides commonly applied during rice cultivation.

  5. Trace Element Concentrations in Two Subpopulations of Lesser Snow Geese from Wrangel Island, Russia

    PubMed

    Hui; Takekawa; Baranyuk; Litvin

    1998-02-01

    Lesser snow geese (Anser c. caerulescens) from the Wrangel Island, Russia breeding colony spend the winter in two widely separated areas: the northern subpopulation in southern British Columbia and northern Washington and the southern subpopulation in the Central Valley of California. We examined 19 trace elements in the eggs and livers of geese from these two subpopulations to examine whether geese from the different wintering areas have similar trace element burdens. Eggs collected at the breeding colony from geese of the southern subpopulation had slightly higher levels of manganese, an element that can cause neurological damage and behavioral changes in chicks, than geese of the northern subpopulation. Livers from adult geese collected on the two wintering areas showed significant differences in trace elements including copper, iron, magnesium, molybdenum, and zinc. Copper concentrations in the livers of geese from the southern subpopulation were much higher than those from the northern subpopulation (&xmacr; = 116 vs. 46 ppm; dry weight). Elevated levels of copper may induce anemia in birds. The differences in trace element concentrations of these two subpopulations may be related to farming practices in their wintering areas. Geese from the northern subpopulation feed in pastures and coastal marshes and migrate along the coast, but geese from the southern subpopulation feed predominantly in rice fields and migrate over farm land. Copper and manganese are major components of fertilizers and fungicides commonly applied during rice cultivation. PMID:9469862

  6. Bionomics of Aedes aegypti subpopulations (Diptera: Culicidae) from Misiones Province, northeastern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Tejerina, Edmundo Fabricio; Almeida, Francisco Felipe Ludueña; Almirón, Walter Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Life statistics of four Aedes aegypti subpopulations from the subtropical province of Misiones were studied during autumn and winter, under semi-natural conditions, coming from the localities of Posadas (SW), San Javier (SE), Bernardo de Irigoyen (NE) and Puerto Libertad (NW). The eastern subpopulations are geographically separated by the central mountain system of the province from the western subpopulations. High percentages of larval and pupal survival (97-100%) were recorded, and no significant differences were detected among the four subpopulations. Larvae and pupae lasted approximately 8 days to complete their development, no significant differences being detected among the four subpopulations studied. Sex ratio recorded did not differ significantly from 1:1. Male longevity did not show difference among the different subpopulations, but female longevity was remarkably different among the four subpopulations (F=16.27; d.f.=(3;8); P=0.0009), ranging among 11.45 days for San Javier and 57.87 days for Posadas. Fecundity also varied considerably among subpopulations, the greatest number (307.44 eggs/female) being recorded for Posadas (F=4.13; d.f.=(3;8); P=0.04). Ae. aegypti females of the western subpopulations lived longer than the eastern subpopulations studied, therefore, the risk of dengue outbreak would be greater on the Misiones Province border with Paraguay.

  7. Identification and Characterization of Two Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cell Subpopulations with Different Functions in Dying Cell Clearance and Different Patterns of Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Amir; Tabib, Adi; Atallah, Mizhir; Krispin, Alon; Mevorach, Dror

    2016-01-01

    Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDCs) are versatile cells that are used widely for research and experimental therapies. Although different culture conditions can affect their characteristics, there are no known subpopulations. Since monocytes differentiate into dendritic cells (DCs) in a variety of tissues and contexts, we asked whether they can give rise to different subpopulations. In this work we set out to characterize two human mdDC subpopulations that we identified and termed small (DC-S) and large (DC-L). Morphologically, DC-L are larger, more granular and have a more complex cell membrane. Phenotypically, DC-L show higher expression of a wide panel of surface molecules and stronger responses to maturation stimuli. Transcriptomic analysis confirmed their separate identities and findings were consistent with the phenotypes observed. Although they show similar apoptotic cell uptake, DC-L have different capabilities for phagocytosis, demonstrate better antigen processing, and have significantly better necrotic cell uptake. These subpopulations also have different patterns of cell death, with DC-L presenting an inflammatory, “dangerous” phenotype while DC-S mostly downregulate their surface markers upon cell death. Apoptotic cells induce an immune-suppressed phenotype, which becomes more pronounced among DC-L, especially after the addition of lipopolysaccharide. We propose that these two subpopulations correspond to inflammatory (DC-L) and steady-state (DC-S) DC classes that have been previously described in mice and humans. PMID:27690130

  8. Emergence of Bursting Activity in Connected Neuronal Sub-Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pasquale, Valentina; Berdondini, Luca; Chiappalone, Michela

    2014-01-01

    Uniform and modular primary hippocampal cultures from embryonic rats were grown on commercially available micro-electrode arrays to investigate network activity with respect to development and integration of different neuronal populations. Modular networks consisting of two confined active and inter-connected sub-populations of neurons were realized by means of bi-compartmental polydimethylsiloxane structures. Spontaneous activity in both uniform and modular cultures was periodically monitored, from three up to eight weeks after plating. Compared to uniform cultures and despite lower cellular density, modular networks interestingly showed higher firing rates at earlier developmental stages, and network-wide firing and bursting statistics were less variable over time. Although globally less correlated than uniform cultures, modular networks exhibited also higher intra-cluster than inter-cluster correlations, thus demonstrating that segregation and integration of activity coexisted in this simple yet powerful in vitro model. Finally, the peculiar synchronized bursting activity shown by confined modular networks preferentially propagated within one of the two compartments (‘dominant’), even in cases of perfect balance of firing rate between the two sub-populations. This dominance was generally maintained during the entire monitored developmental frame, thus suggesting that the implementation of this hierarchy arose from early network development. PMID:25250616

  9. Emergent patterns in interacting neuronal sub-populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Neeraj Kumar; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2015-05-01

    We investigate an ensemble of coupled model neurons, consisting of groups of varying sizes and intrinsic dynamics, ranging from periodic to chaotic, where the inter-group coupling interaction is effectively like a dynamic signal from a different sub-population. We observe that the minority group can significantly influence the majority group. For instance, when a small chaotic group is coupled to a large periodic group, the chaotic group de-synchronizes. However, counter-intuitively, when a small periodic group couples strongly to a large chaotic group, it leads to complete synchronization in the majority chaotic population, which also spikes at the frequency of the small periodic group. It then appears that the small group of periodic neurons can act like a pacemaker for the whole network. Further, we report the existence of varied clustering patterns, ranging from sets of synchronized clusters to anti-phase clusters, governed by the interplay of the relative sizes and dynamics of the sub-populations. So these results have relevance in understanding how a group can influence the synchrony of another group of dynamically different elements, reminiscent of event-related synchronization/de-synchronization in complex networks.

  10. Cleft lip and palate in a Brazilian subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Cuozzo, Fernanda Dornelles Martins; Espinosa, Mariano Martínez; da Silva, Katia Tavares Serafim; de Barros, Yolanda Benedita Abadia Martins; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fabio; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci

    2013-01-01

    Background: This work aimed to access the profile of cleft lip and palate patients of a sub-population in Mid-West Brazil. Materials & Methods: Research was carried out through a cross-sectional study at the Craniofacial Rehabilitation Center of the University General Hospital of the University of Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, Brazil. Variables related to oral cleft type, gender, race, age and presence or absence of associated congenital anomalies or syndromes were analyzed. Results: 313 patients treated at the institution from 2004 to 2007 were recruited. There were 54% male and 46% female patients with the mean age of 11.4 years. Cleft lip and palate was the most prevalent alteration in 49.6% of cases. Caucasians were the most affected in 54.6% of cases. 6.4% of patients had other anomalies or syndromes associated with cleft. Conclusion: More comprehensive surveys should be conducted in order to supply the lack of data on the occurrence and determinants of oral clefts in this region. How to cite this article:Cuozzo FD, Espinosa MM, Serafim da Silva KT, Martins de Barros YB, Bandeca MC, Aranha AM, Borges AH, Volpato LE. Cleft lip and palate in a Brazilian subpopulation. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(4):15-20. PMID:24155614

  11. Hypolactasia in Saami subpopulations of Russia and Finland.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, A; Lisitsyn, D

    1997-12-01

    Primary hypolactasia is a gene attributed condition of the inability of adult individuals to consume whole milk. Subpopulations of the Russia (Kildin) and Finland Saami are characterized by a large variability of the LAC*R (lactase restriction) gene frequencies (0.50-0.77). The distribution of primary hypolactasia among the Saami is ranging from 25% to 60%. The intensive reindeer breeding was developed by the Saami only 300-400 years ago. Reindeer milk is poor in lactose (2.4%) and is consumed by the Saami in small amounts. Thus, "milk behaviour" connected with reindeer breeding could not have influenced the trait evolution too much. The large between-group differences of the LAC*R gene frequencies in the Saami seem to reflect the level of genetic influence of neighbouring non-Saami populations. The role of gene inflow in reducing the level of primary hypolactasia in various Saami subpopulations is confirmed by historic data of various ethnoterritorial groups as well as by the reduction of the number of traditional family name bearers and the change of the AB0 blood group gene frequencies among the Kildin Saami in the last 30 years.

  12. Alteration in T lymphocyte subpopulations in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Victorino, R M; Hodgson, H J

    1980-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from thirty-one patients with inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) were analysed for the proportions and absolute numbers of total T cells, and for the T cell subpopulations carrying Fc receptors for either IgM (Tmu cells) or IgG (T gamma cells). Twenty-six control subjects were studied simultaneously. Total T cell numbers were normal in patients with inflammatory bowel disease but there was a marked reduction in the proportion and absolute numbers of Tmu cells in patients, whether their disease was active or in remission. T gamma cells were normal. Simultaneous assessment of lymphocyte response to mitogens in vitro was performed in a group of patients. Responses to phytohaemagglutinin, concanavalin A and pokeweed mitogen were decreased and a positive correlation was found between the number of circulating Tmu cells and the responses to mitogens in vitro. These studies demonstrate that despite the presence of normal numbers of total T cells in inflammatory bowel disease, there is a marked imbalance in T cell subpopulations that correlates with mitogen responsiveness. This imbalance provides a possible cellular basis for the defect in cell-mediated immunity seen in these patients. PMID:6969150

  13. Hypolactasia in Saami subpopulations of Russia and Finland.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, A; Lisitsyn, D

    1997-12-01

    Primary hypolactasia is a gene attributed condition of the inability of adult individuals to consume whole milk. Subpopulations of the Russia (Kildin) and Finland Saami are characterized by a large variability of the LAC*R (lactase restriction) gene frequencies (0.50-0.77). The distribution of primary hypolactasia among the Saami is ranging from 25% to 60%. The intensive reindeer breeding was developed by the Saami only 300-400 years ago. Reindeer milk is poor in lactose (2.4%) and is consumed by the Saami in small amounts. Thus, "milk behaviour" connected with reindeer breeding could not have influenced the trait evolution too much. The large between-group differences of the LAC*R gene frequencies in the Saami seem to reflect the level of genetic influence of neighbouring non-Saami populations. The role of gene inflow in reducing the level of primary hypolactasia in various Saami subpopulations is confirmed by historic data of various ethnoterritorial groups as well as by the reduction of the number of traditional family name bearers and the change of the AB0 blood group gene frequencies among the Kildin Saami in the last 30 years. PMID:9468755

  14. Characterization of the phosphatidylserine-exposing subpopulation of sickle cells.

    PubMed

    de Jong, K; Larkin, S K; Styles, L A; Bookchin, R M; Kuypers, F A

    2001-08-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS), exclusively present in the inner monolayer of the normal red blood cell (RBC) membrane, is exposed in subpopulations of sickle cells. PS-exposing RBCs were found predominantly among the densest and the very light sickle cells. Within the light RBC fraction, PS exposure was found on reticulocytes, transferrin receptor-expressing reticulocytes, and mature RBCs. The last subset contained low-density valinomycin-resistant RBCs, previously shown to have high Na(+) and low K(+) content. This subpopulation contained the highest percentage of PS-exposing cells. The PS-exposing sickle cells did not show the sustained high cytosolic Ca(++) levels that have been shown to activate scramblase activity. Data from this study indicate that PS exposure can occur at different stages in the life of the sickle RBC and that it correlates with the loss of aminophospholipid translocase activity, the only common denominator of the PS-exposing cells. The additional requirement of scramblase activation may occur during transient increases in cytosolic Ca(++). (Blood. 2001;98:860-867)

  15. The Identification of Mitogen Responding Subpopulations of Human Lymphocytes by Flow Polarimeter Fluorescence Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Sandra Lynn

    I have developed a method to identify the mitogen responding subpopulation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes. This method employs a flow polarimeter to measure the distribution of the intensity and the polarization of intracellular fluorescein fluorescence in suspensions of mononuclear cells isolated on density gradients from the peripheral blood of donors. I have used the change in the fluorescence of cells exposed to the mitogens PHA and Con A to identify the responding cells and to quantitate this number. I have found that for most donors, the responding cells constitute about 20-40% of the lymphocyte population. The percent of responding cells decreases to zero in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (2 patients) and chronic lymphocyte leukemia (10 patients). For a variety of patients with other types of cancer, the responding fraction was not significantly different from healthy controls. Moreover, the number of responding cells does not appear to be age dependent in the age range of 20-80 years. I also found that the change in fluorescence polarization correlated strongly with changes in fluorescence intensity induced by mitogens--the number of responding cells, therefore can be estimated either from the intensity or polarization distributions. The shapes of fluorescence distributions depend strongly on a number of variables including the composition and density of the lymphocyte isolating medium, the mitogen and dye concentrations, the length of incubation with mitogen or dye, and the potassium, calcium, and magnesium concentrations in the medium. In the case of fluorescein, I have worked out a methodology that allows a consistent estimate of the responding lymphocyte number. I have also investigated the use of the dye carbocyanine for the same purpose. This dye presumably identifies the mitogen responding lymphocytes on the basis of changes in membrane potential. The results with carbocyanine were found to depend on a number of variables and I could

  16. Coevolution of neoplastic epithelial cells and multilineage stroma via polyploid giant cells during immortalization and transformation of mullerian epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiwu; Mercado-Uribe, Imelda; Sood, Anil; Bast, Robert C.; Liu, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells are generally considered to be derived primarily from the host's normal mesenchymal stromal cells or bone marrow. However, the origins of stromal cells have been quite controversial. To determine the role of polyploidy in tumor development, we examined the fate of normal mullerian epithelial cells during the immortalization and transformation process by tracing the expression of SV40 large T antigen. Here we show that immortalized or HRAS-transformed mullerian epithelial cells contain a subpopulation of polyploid giant cells that grow as multicellular spheroids expressing hematopoietic markers in response to treatment with CoCl2. The immortalized or transformed epithelial cells can transdifferentiate into stromal cells when transplanted into nude mice. Immunofluorescent staining revealed expression of stem cell factors OCT4, Nanog, and SOX-2 in spheroid, whereas expression of embryonic stem cell marker SSEA1 was increased in HRAS-transformed cells compared with their immortalized isogenic counterparts. These results suggest that normal mullerian epithelial cells are intrinsically highly plastic, via the formation of polyploid giant cells and activation of embryonic stem-like program, which work together to promote the coevolution of neoplastic epithelial cells and multiple lineage stromal cells. PMID:27382431

  17. Coevolution of neoplastic epithelial cells and multilineage stroma via polyploid giant cells during immortalization and transformation of mullerian epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiwu; Mercado-Uribe, Imelda; Sood, Anil; Bast, Robert C; Liu, Jinsong

    2016-03-01

    Stromal cells are generally considered to be derived primarily from the host's normal mesenchymal stromal cells or bone marrow. However, the origins of stromal cells have been quite controversial. To determine the role of polyploidy in tumor development, we examined the fate of normal mullerian epithelial cells during the immortalization and transformation process by tracing the expression of SV40 large T antigen. Here we show that immortalized or HRAS-transformed mullerian epithelial cells contain a subpopulation of polyploid giant cells that grow as multicellular spheroids expressing hematopoietic markers in response to treatment with CoCl2. The immortalized or transformed epithelial cells can transdifferentiate into stromal cells when transplanted into nude mice. Immunofluorescent staining revealed expression of stem cell factors OCT4, Nanog, and SOX-2 in spheroid, whereas expression of embryonic stem cell marker SSEA1 was increased in HRAS-transformed cells compared with their immortalized isogenic counterparts. These results suggest that normal mullerian epithelial cells are intrinsically highly plastic, via the formation of polyploid giant cells and activation of embryonic stem-like program, which work together to promote the coevolution of neoplastic epithelial cells and multiple lineage stromal cells. PMID:27382431

  18. Identifying mechanistic indicators of childhood asthma from blood gene expression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthmatic individuals have been identified as a susceptible subpopulation for air pollutants. However, asthma represents a syndrome with multiple probable etiologies, and the identification of these asthma endotypes is critical to accurately define the most susceptible subpopula...

  19. Growth of corneal epithelial cells over in situ therapeutic contact lens after simple limbal epithelial transplantation (SLET)

    PubMed Central

    Bhalekar, Swapnil; Sangwan, Virender S; Basu, Sayan

    2013-01-01

    An 11-year-old boy underwent simple limbal epithelial transplantation (SLET) from the healthy right eye to his left eye for total limbal stem cell deficiency. One month later, corneal surface epithelialised and whitish plaques overlying the transplants were seen inferiorly. Those plaques were adherent to the surface of the contact lens and underlying corneal surface had smooth elevations. Similar findings were noted in a 23-year man following cyanoacrylate glue application for corneal perforation. On histological and immunohistochemical analysis, cells lining the contact lenses were identified as corneal epithelial cells. These cases illustrate epithelial cell growth on the contact lens and epithelial hyperplasia on corresponding surface of the cornea. Exorbitant proliferation of the epithelial cells may be owing to young age; therefore, early contact lens removal after SLET in young age, can possibly avoid epithelial hyperplasia. This also reiterates the possibility of using contact lens as a scaffold to grow epithelial cells. PMID:23814196

  20. Flow cytometry studies on the Macrobrachium rosenbergii hemocytes sub-populations and immune responses to novel pathogen spiroplasma MR-1008.

    PubMed

    Du, Jie; Zhu, Huanxi; Ren, Qian; Liu, Peng; Chen, Jing; Xiu, Yunji; Yao, Wei; Meng, Qingguo; Gu, Wei; Wang, Wen

    2012-10-01

    Flow cytometry provides rapid and reproducible methods for analyzing crustacean cellular immune responses to pathogens. We used this method to investigate the hemocytes sub-populations of freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii and their immune responses to a novel pathogen spiroplasma MR-1008. M. rosenbergii inoculated with 100 μl spiroplasma strain MR-1008 in logarithmic phase (10(8) spiroplasmas ml(-1)) were examined for total hemocytes count (THC) and changes in differential involvement of hemocytes sub-populations during 1-28 d after inoculation. The results showed that THC was dramatically lowered 1 d after inoculation, and it obviously increased at the 5 d after inoculation; thereafter, a high level of THC was maintained to 15 d. Three morphologically distinct hemocytes sub-populations including granular cells (GC), semigranular cells (SGC) and hyaline cells (HC) could be identified by flow cytometry, and the proportions of the 3 kinds of cell categories varied obviously during the infection of spiroplasma suggesting differential involvement according to the pathogen. The flow cytometry used in this study confirmed that the semigranular cells were the main hemocytes involved in the cellular defense against spiroplasma in the M. rosenbergii.

  1. DNA damage in different Eisenia andrei coelomocytes sub-populations after in vitro exposure to hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Mincarelli, Laura; Vischetti, Costantino; Craft, John; Tiano, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Earthworms play an essential role in providing soil fertility and may represent an important soil contamination bio-indicator. They are able to ingest soil particles, adsorb substances throughout the intestinal epithelium into the coelomic cavity, where chemicals can come in direct contact with coelomic fluid. Earthworm coelomic fluid shelters leucocytes (coelomocytes) that differ significantly both structurally and functionally. Cellular variability could lead to different susceptibility towards contaminants possibly present in soil ecosystem. In order to define population specific dose response to chemicals and to identify a homogeneous cell population to be used as a relevant biomarker, we investigated different coelomocytes subpopulation, obtained by Percoll density gradient centrifugation (5-35 %), exposed ex vivo to H2O2 in the range of concentration 15-120 µM. DNA damage levels were assessed by the comet assay on unseparated coelomocytes and on three enriched cellular fractions (light, medium and heavy density subpopulations). All tested samples showed a dose-response genotoxic effect following H2O2 exposure. Moreover, light density sub-population appeared more susceptible to oxidative insult highlighted by a significant increase in DNA damage indexes at lower concentrations of H2O2. Present data suggested that in these experimental condition coelomocytes light fraction may represent a more sensitive biomarker of genotoxic insult. PMID:27064673

  2. Specific polar subpopulations of astral microtubules control spindle orientation and symmetric neural stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is crucial for symmetric vs asymmetric cell division and depends on astral microtubules. Here, we show that distinct subpopulations of astral microtubules exist, which have differential functions in regulating spindle orientation and division symmetry. Specifically, in polarized stem cells of developing mouse neocortex, astral microtubules reaching the apical and basal cell cortex, but not those reaching the central cell cortex, are more abundant in symmetrically than asymmetrically dividing cells and reduce spindle orientation variability. This promotes symmetric divisions by maintaining an apico-basal cleavage plane. The greater abundance of apical/basal astrals depends on a higher concentration, at the basal cell cortex, of LGN, a known spindle-cell cortex linker. Furthermore, newly developed specific microtubule perturbations that selectively decrease apical/basal astrals recapitulate the symmetric-to-asymmetric division switch and suffice to increase neurogenesis in vivo. Thus, our study identifies a novel link between cell polarity, astral microtubules, and spindle orientation in morphogenesis. PMID:24996848

  3. Effects of radiation therapy on T-lymphocyte subpopulations in patients with head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.C.; Chretien, P.B.; Suter, C.M.; Revie, D.R.; Tomazic, V.T.; Blanchard, C.L.; Aygun, C.; Amornmarn, R.; Ordonez, J.V.

    1985-10-01

    Cellular immunity was assessed in 85 patients with head and neck cancer with monoclonal antibodies to lymphocyte surface antigens that identify total T cells, helper cells, and suppressor cells. The control group consisted of 22 healthy volunteers. Nine patients who had surgical procedures for benign diseases were also studied. Compared with the controls, the patients with cancer who received radiation therapy had a significant decrease in total lymphocytes, T cells, helper cells, suppressor cells, and decreased helper/suppressor cell ratio. Significant decreases in lymphocyte subpopulations were not detected in patients tested before treatment or in patients treated with surgery alone. The immune deficits observed were prolonged in duration, with some present in the patients studied up to 11 years after radiation therapy. This long-lasting immune depression may have relevance to tumor recurrences and second primaries in patients with head and neck cancer treated by radiation therapy and to attempts at increasing cure rates with adjuvant agents that improve immune reactivity.

  4. Single-cell ChIP-seq reveals cell subpopulations defined by chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Rotem, Assaf; Ram, Oren; Shoresh, Noam; Sperling, Ralph A.; Goren, Alon; Weitz, David A.; Bernstein, Bradley E.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin profiling provides a versatile means to investigate functional genomic elements and their regulation. However, current methods yield ensemble profiles that are insensitive to cell-to-cell variation. Here we combine microfluidics, DNA barcoding and sequencing to collect chromatin data at single-cell resolution. We demonstrate the utility of the technology by assaying thousands of individual cells, and using the data to deconvolute a mixture of ES cells, fibroblasts and hematopoietic progenitors into high-quality chromatin state maps for each cell type. The data from each single cell is sparse, comprising on the order of 1000 unique reads. However, by assaying thousands of ES cells, we identify a spectrum of sub-populations defined by differences in chromatin signatures of pluripotency and differentiation priming. We corroborate these findings by comparison to orthogonal single-cell gene expression data. Our method for single-cell analysis reveals aspects of epigenetic heterogeneity not captured by transcriptional analysis alone. PMID:26458175

  5. The secretome of alginate-encapsulated limbal epithelial stem cells modulates corneal epithelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Bernice; Hopkinson, Andrew; Leyland, Martin; Connon, Che J

    2013-01-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cells may ameliorate limbal stem cell deficiency through secretion of therapeutic proteins, delivered to the cornea in a controlled manner using hydrogels. In the present study the secretome of alginate-encapsulated limbal epithelial stem cells is investigated. Conditioned medium was generated from limbal epithelial stem cells encapsulated in 1.2% (w/v) calcium alginate gels. Conditioned medium proteins separated by 1-D gel electrophoresis were visualized by silver staining. Proteins of interest including secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, profilin-1, and galectin-1 were identified by immunoblotting. The effect of conditioned medium (from alginate-encapsulated limbal epithelial stem cells) on corneal epithelial cell proliferation was quantified and shown to significantly inhibit (P≤0.05) their growth. As secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine was previously reported to attenuate proliferation of epithelial cells, this protein may be responsible, at least in part, for inhibition of corneal epithelial cell proliferation. We conclude that limbal epithelial stem cells encapsulated in alginate gels may regulate corneal epithelialisation through secretion of inhibitory proteins.

  6. Epimorphin Functions as a Key Morphoregulator for Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, H.; Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Koshida, S.; Niwa, S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-10-13

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and EGF have been reported to promote branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial cells. We now show that it is epimorphin that is primarily responsible for this phenomenon. In vivo, epimorphin was detected in the stromal compartment but not in lumenal epithelial cells of the mammary gland; in culture, however, a subpopulation of mammary epithelial cells produced significant amounts of epimorphin. When epimorphin-expressing epithelial cell clones were cultured in collagen gels they displayed branching morphogenesis in the presence of HGF, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, or fibroblast growth factor, a process that was inhibited by anti-epimorphin but not anti-HGF antibodies. The branch length, however, was roughly proportional to the ability of the factors to induce growth. Accordingly, epimorphin-negative epithelial cells simply grew in a cluster in response to the growth factors and failed to branch. When recombinant epimorphin was added to these collagen gels, epimorphin-negative cells underwent branching morphogenesis. The mode of action of epimorphin on morphogenesis of the gland, however, was dependent on how it was presented to the mammary cells. If epimorphin was overexpressed in epimorphin-negative epithelial cells under regulation of an inducible promoter or was allowed to coat the surface of each epithelial cell in a nonpolar fashion, the cells formed globular, alveoli-like structures with a large central lumen instead of branching ducts. This process was enhanced also by addition of HGF, EGF, or other growth factors and was inhibited by epimorphin antibodies. These results suggest that epimorphin is the primary morphogen in the mammary gland but that growth factors are necessary to achieve the appropriate cell numbers for the resulting morphogenesis to be visualized.

  7. Expected Shannon Entropy and Shannon Differentiation between Subpopulations for Neutral Genes under the Finite Island Model

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Anne; Jost, Lou; Hsieh, T. C.; Ma, K. H.; Sherwin, William B.; Rollins, Lee Ann

    2015-01-01

    Shannon entropy H and related measures are increasingly used in molecular ecology and population genetics because (1) unlike measures based on heterozygosity or allele number, these measures weigh alleles in proportion to their population fraction, thus capturing a previously-ignored aspect of allele frequency distributions that may be important in many applications; (2) these measures connect directly to the rich predictive mathematics of information theory; (3) Shannon entropy is completely additive and has an explicitly hierarchical nature; and (4) Shannon entropy-based differentiation measures obey strong monotonicity properties that heterozygosity-based measures lack. We derive simple new expressions for the expected values of the Shannon entropy of the equilibrium allele distribution at a neutral locus in a single isolated population under two models of mutation: the infinite allele model and the stepwise mutation model. Surprisingly, this complex stochastic system for each model has an entropy expressable as a simple combination of well-known mathematical functions. Moreover, entropy- and heterozygosity-based measures for each model are linked by simple relationships that are shown by simulations to be approximately valid even far from equilibrium. We also identify a bridge between the two models of mutation. We apply our approach to subdivided populations which follow the finite island model, obtaining the Shannon entropy of the equilibrium allele distributions of the subpopulations and of the total population. We also derive the expected mutual information and normalized mutual information (“Shannon differentiation”) between subpopulations at equilibrium, and identify the model parameters that determine them. We apply our measures to data from the common starling (Sturnus vulgaris) in Australia. Our measures provide a test for neutrality that is robust to violations of equilibrium assumptions, as verified on real world data from starlings. PMID

  8. Expected Shannon Entropy and Shannon Differentiation between Subpopulations for Neutral Genes under the Finite Island Model.

    PubMed

    Chao, Anne; Jost, Lou; Hsieh, T C; Ma, K H; Sherwin, William B; Rollins, Lee Ann

    2015-01-01

    Shannon entropy H and related measures are increasingly used in molecular ecology and population genetics because (1) unlike measures based on heterozygosity or allele number, these measures weigh alleles in proportion to their population fraction, thus capturing a previously-ignored aspect of allele frequency distributions that may be important in many applications; (2) these measures connect directly to the rich predictive mathematics of information theory; (3) Shannon entropy is completely additive and has an explicitly hierarchical nature; and (4) Shannon entropy-based differentiation measures obey strong monotonicity properties that heterozygosity-based measures lack. We derive simple new expressions for the expected values of the Shannon entropy of the equilibrium allele distribution at a neutral locus in a single isolated population under two models of mutation: the infinite allele model and the stepwise mutation model. Surprisingly, this complex stochastic system for each model has an entropy expressable as a simple combination of well-known mathematical functions. Moreover, entropy- and heterozygosity-based measures for each model are linked by simple relationships that are shown by simulations to be approximately valid even far from equilibrium. We also identify a bridge between the two models of mutation. We apply our approach to subdivided populations which follow the finite island model, obtaining the Shannon entropy of the equilibrium allele distributions of the subpopulations and of the total population. We also derive the expected mutual information and normalized mutual information ("Shannon differentiation") between subpopulations at equilibrium, and identify the model parameters that determine them. We apply our measures to data from the common starling (Sturnus vulgaris) in Australia. Our measures provide a test for neutrality that is robust to violations of equilibrium assumptions, as verified on real world data from starlings.

  9. Chronic stress, leukocyte subpopulations, and humoral response to latent viruses

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, W.; Weisse, C.S.; Reynolds, C.P.; Bowles, C.A.; Baum, A. )

    1989-01-01

    Psychological stress has been shown to affect immune system status and function, but most studies of this relationship have focused on acute stress and/or laboratory situations. The present study compared total numbers of leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations (determined by flow cytometry) and antibody titers to latent and nonlatent viruses among a group of chronically stressed individuals living near the damaged Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant with those of a demographically comparable control group. Urinary catecholamine and cortisol levels were also examined. Residents of the TMI area exhibited greater numbers of neutrophils, which were positively correlated with epinephrine levels. The TMI group also exhibited fewer B lymphocytes, T-suppressor/cytotoxic lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. Antibody titers to herpes simplex were significantly different across groups as well, whereas titers to nonlatent rubella virus as well as IgG and IgM levels were comparable.

  10. Chronic stress, leukocyte subpopulations, and humoral response to latent viruses.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, W; Weisse, C S; Reynolds, C P; Bowles, C A; Baum, A

    1989-01-01

    Psychological stress has been shown to affect immune system status and function, but most studies of this relationship have focused on acute stress and/or laboratory situations. The present study compared total numbers of leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations (determined by flow cytometry) and antibody titers to latent and nonlatent viruses among a group of chronically stressed individuals living near the damaged Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant with those of a demographically comparable control group. Urinary catecholamine and cortisol levels were also examined. Residents of the TMI area exhibited greater numbers of neutrophils, which were positively correlated with epinephrine levels. The TMI group also exhibited fewer B lymphocytes, T-suppressor/cytotoxic lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. Antibody titers to herpes simplex were significantly different across groups as well, whereas titers to nonlatent rubella virus as well as IgG and IgM levels were comparable. PMID:2555149

  11. Osteogenic potential of sorted equine mesenchymal stem cell subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Radtke, Catherine L; Nino-Fong, Rodolfo; Rodriguez-Lecompte, Juan Carlos; Esparza Gonzalez, Blanca P; Stryhn, Henrik; McDuffee, Laurie A

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to use non-equilibrium gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF), an immunotag-less method of sorting mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), to sort equine muscle tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MMSCs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) into subpopulations and to carry out assays in order to compare their osteogenic capabilities. Cells from 1 young adult horse were isolated from left semitendinosus muscle tissue and from bone marrow aspirates of the fourth and fifth sternebrae. Aliquots of 800 × 10(3) MSCs from each tissue source were sorted into 5 fractions using non-equilibrium GrFFF (GrFFF proprietary system). Pooled fractions were cultured and expanded for use in osteogenic assays, including flow cytometry, histochemistry, bone nodule assays, and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for gene expression of osteocalcin (OCN), RUNX2, and osterix. Equine MMSCs and BMSCs were consistently sorted into 5 fractions that remained viable for use in further osteogenic assays. Statistical analysis confirmed strongly significant upregulation of OCN, RUNX2, and osterix for the BMSC fraction 4 with P < 0.00001. Flow cytometry revealed different cell size and granularity for BMSC fraction 4 and MMSC fraction 2 compared to unsorted controls and other fractions. Histochemisty and bone nodule assays revealed positive staining nodules without differences in average nodule area, perimeter, or stain intensity between tissues or fractions. As there are different subpopulations of MSCs with different osteogenic capacities within equine muscle- and bone marrow-derived sources, these differences must be taken into account when using equine stem cell therapy to induce bone healing in veterinary medicine.

  12. Two subpopulations of stem cells for T cell lineage

    SciTech Connect

    Katsura, Y.; Amagai, T.; Kina, T.; Sado, T.; Nishikawa, S.

    1985-11-01

    An assay system for the stem cell that colonizes the thymus and differentiates into T cells was developed, and by using this assay system the existence of two subpopulations of stem cells for T cell lineage was clarified. Part-body-shielded and 900-R-irradiated C57BL/6 (H-2b, Thy-1.2) recipient mice, which do not require the transfer of pluripotent stem cells for their survival, were transferred with cells from B10 X Thy-1.1 (H-2b, Thy-1.1) donor mice. The reconstitution of the recipient's thymus lymphocytes was accomplished by stem cells in the donor cells and those spared in the shielded portion of the recipient that competitively colonize the thymus. Thus, the stem cell activity of donor cells can be evaluated by determining the proportion of donor-type (Thy-1.1+) cells in the recipient's thymus. Bone marrow cells were the most potent source of stem cells. By contrast, when the stem cell activity was compared between spleen and bone marrow cells of whole-body-irradiated (800 R) C57BL/6 mice reconstituted with B10 X Thy-1.1 bone marrow cells by assaying in part-body-shielded and irradiated C57BL/6 mice, the activity of these two organs showed quite a different time course of development. The results strongly suggest that the stem cells for T cell lineage in the bone marrow comprise at least two subpopulations, spleen-seeking and bone marrow-seeking cells.

  13. Osteogenic potential of sorted equine mesenchymal stem cell subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Radtke, Catherine L.; Nino-Fong, Rodolfo; Rodriguez-Lecompte, Juan Carlos; Esparza Gonzalez, Blanca P.; Stryhn, Henrik; McDuffee, Laurie A.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to use non-equilibrium gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF), an immunotag-less method of sorting mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), to sort equine muscle tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MMSCs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) into subpopulations and to carry out assays in order to compare their osteogenic capabilities. Cells from 1 young adult horse were isolated from left semitendinosus muscle tissue and from bone marrow aspirates of the fourth and fifth sternebrae. Aliquots of 800 × 103 MSCs from each tissue source were sorted into 5 fractions using non-equilibrium GrFFF (GrFFF proprietary system). Pooled fractions were cultured and expanded for use in osteogenic assays, including flow cytometry, histochemistry, bone nodule assays, and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for gene expression of osteocalcin (OCN), RUNX2, and osterix. Equine MMSCs and BMSCs were consistently sorted into 5 fractions that remained viable for use in further osteogenic assays. Statistical analysis confirmed strongly significant upregulation of OCN, RUNX2, and osterix for the BMSC fraction 4 with P < 0.00001. Flow cytometry revealed different cell size and granularity for BMSC fraction 4 and MMSC fraction 2 compared to unsorted controls and other fractions. Histochemisty and bone nodule assays revealed positive staining nodules without differences in average nodule area, perimeter, or stain intensity between tissues or fractions. As there are different subpopulations of MSCs with different osteogenic capacities within equine muscle- and bone marrow-derived sources, these differences must be taken into account when using equine stem cell therapy to induce bone healing in veterinary medicine. PMID:25852225

  14. Characterization of Distinct Macrophage Subpopulations during Nitrogen Mustard-Induced Lung Injury and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Venosa, Alessandro; Malaviya, Rama; Choi, Hyejeong; Gow, Andrew J; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is an alkylating agent known to cause extensive pulmonary injury progressing to fibrosis. This is accompanied by a persistent macrophage inflammatory response. In these studies, we characterized the phenotype of macrophages accumulating in the lung over time following NM exposure. Treatment of rats with NM (0.125 mg/kg, intratracheally) resulted in an increase in CD11b(+) macrophages in histologic sections. These cells consisted of inducible nitric oxide synthase(+) (iNOS) proinflammatory M1 macrophages, and CD68(+), CD163(+), CD206(+), YM-1(+), and arginase-II(+)antiinflammatory M2 macrophages. Although M1 macrophages were prominent 1-3 days after NM, M2 macrophages were most notable at 28 days. At this time, they were enlarged and vacuolated, consistent with a profibrotic phenotype. Flow cytometric analysis of isolated lung macrophages identified three phenotypically distinct subpopulations: mature CD11b(-), CD43(-), and CD68(+) resident macrophages, which decreased in numbers after NM; and two infiltrating (CD11b(+)) macrophage subsets: immature CD43(+) M1 macrophages and mature CD43(-) M2 macrophages, which increased sequentially. Time-related increases in M1 (iNOS, IL-12α, COX-2, TNF-α, matrix metalloproteinase-9, matrix metalloproteinase-10) and M2 (IL-10, pentraxin-2, connective tissue growth factor, ApoE) genes, as well as chemokines/chemokine receptors associated with trafficking of M1 (CCR2, CCR5, CCL2, CCL5) and M2 (CX3CR1, fractalkine) macrophages to sites of injury, were also noted in macrophages isolated from the lung after NM. The appearance of M1 and M2 macrophages in the lung correlated with NM-induced acute injury and the development of fibrosis, suggesting a potential role of these macrophage subpopulations in the pathogenic response to NM.

  15. A possible mechanism for the attainment of out-of-phase periodic dynamics in two chaotic subpopulations coupled at low dispersal rate.

    PubMed

    Dey, Snigdhadip; Goswami, Bedartha; Joshi, Amitabh

    2015-02-21

    Much research in metapopulation dynamics has concentrated on identifying factors that affect coherence in spatially structured systems. In this regard, conditions for the attainment of out-of-phase dynamics have received considerable attention, due to the stabilizing effect of asynchrony on global dynamics. At low to moderate rates of dispersal, two coupled subpopulations with intrinsically chaotic dynamics tend to go out-of-phase with one another and also become periodic in their dynamics. The onset of out-of-phase dynamics and periodicity typically coincide. Here, we propose a possible mechanism for the onset of out-of-phase dynamics, and also the stabilization of chaos to periodicity, in two coupled subpopulations with intrinsically chaotic dynamics. We suggest that the onset of out-of-phase dynamics is due to the propensity of chaotic subpopulations governed by a steep, single-humped one-dimensional population growth model to repeatedly reach low subpopulation sizes that are close to a value Nt = A (A ≠ equilibrium population size, K) for which Nt( + 1) = K. Subpopulations with very similar low sizes, but on opposite sides of A, will become out-of-phase in the next generation, as they will end up at sizes on opposite sides of K, resulting in positive growth for one subpopulation and negative growth for the other. The key to the stabilization of out-of-phase periodic dynamics in this mechanism is the net effect of dispersal placing upper and lower bounds to subpopulation size in the two coupled subpopulations, once they have become out-of-phase. We tested various components of this proposed mechanism by simulations using the Ricker model, and the results of the simulations are consistent with predictions from the hypothesized mechanism. Similar results were also obtained using the logistic and Hassell models, and with the Ricker model incorporating the possibility of extinction, suggesting that the proposed mechanism could be key to the attainment and

  16. TH-E-BRF-08: Subpopulations of Similarly-Responding Lesions in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C; Harmon, S; Perk, T; Jeraj, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In patients with multiple lesions, resistance to cancer treatments and subsequent disease recurrence may be due to heterogeneity of response across lesions. This study aims to identify subpopulations of similarly-responding metastatic prostate cancer lesions in bone using quantitative PET metrics. Methods: Seven metastatic prostate cancer patients treated with AR-directed therapy received pre-treatment and mid-treatment [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Images were registered using an articulated CT registration algorithm and transformations were applied to PET segmentations. Midtreatment response was calculated on PET-based texture features. Hierarchical agglomerative clustering was used to form groups of similarly-responding lesions, with the number of natural clusters (K) determined by the inconsistency coefficient. Lesion clustering was performed within each patient, and for the pooled population. The cophenetic coefficient (C) quantified how well the data was clustered. The Jaccard Index (JI) assessed similarity of cluster assignments from patient clustering and from population clustering. Results: 188 lesions in seven patients were identified for analysis (between 6 to 53 lesions per patient). Lesion response was defined as percent change relative to pre-treatment for 23 uncorrelated PET-based feature identifiers. . High response heterogeneity was found across all lesions (i.e. range ΔSUVmax =−95.98% to 775.00%). For intra-patient clustering, K ranged from 1–20. Population-based clustering resulted in 75 clusters, of 1-6 lesions each. Intra-patient clustering resulted in higher quality clusters than population clustering (mean C=0.95, range=0.89 to 1.00). For all patients, cluster assignments from population clustering showed good agreement to intra-patient clustering (mean JI=0.87, range=0.68 to 1.00). Conclusion: Subpopulations of similarly-responding lesions were identified in patients with multiple metastatic lesions. Good agreement was found between

  17. Children as a sensitive subpopulation for the risk assessment process.

    PubMed

    Preston, R Julian

    2004-09-01

    For cancer risk assessment purposes, it is necessary to consider how to incorporate sensitive subpopulations into the process to ensure that they are appropriately protected. Children represent one such potentially sensitive subpopulation that is of quite considerable magnitude. The data needs include sensitivity to the induction of childhood cancers compared to adult cancers and relative sensitivity of early-life exposures for the formation of tumors in adults. These needs as far as human data are concerned are best met for ionizing radiations, for which it has been shown in the atomic bomb survivors that early-life exposures are more effective at inducing cancers later in life. The risk assessment approach for ionizing radiations, however, is based on tumor data itself for total population exposures so that there is no requirement to consider specifically the impact of early-life exposures. In the case of environmental chemicals, the majority of the tumor data used for risk assessments are from rodent bioassays. There is a paucity of data that allow for a comparison of the response to early-life exposures compared to that for adult-only exposures. This presents a fairly difficult challenge to the identification of a general sensitivity factor or a chemical-specific sensitivity factor for early-life exposures. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not, until recently, incorporated a general adjustment for early-life exposure to carcinogens into its risk assessment guidelines. The Agency has relied on the fact that, in the absence of specific data to the contrary, the linear extrapolation for rodent tumor data provided appropriate protection. When specific data are available, then an adjustment can be calculated. In its most recent draft guidelines, however, a general adjustment has been proposed for mutagenic chemicals. A 10-fold risk adjustment is recommended for the first 2 years of life, a 3-fold adjustment for years 3-15, and no adjustment for

  18. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-19

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic theMYCamplification andPTENloss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:27044116

  19. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-19

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic theMYCamplification andPTENloss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics.

  20. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K.; Phillips, John W.; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N.

    2016-01-01

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic the MYC amplification and PTEN loss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1–transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1–transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:27044116

  1. Conversion to stem-cell state in response to microenvironmental cues is regulated by balance between epithelial and mesenchymal features in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Andriani, Francesca; Bertolini, Giulia; Facchinetti, Federica; Baldoli, Erika; Moro, Massimo; Casalini, Patrizia; Caserini, Roberto; Milione, Massimo; Leone, Giorgia; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Pastorino, Ugo; Sozzi, Gabriella; Roz, Luca

    2016-02-01

    Cancer cells within a tumor are functionally heterogeneous and specific subpopulations, defined as cancer initiating cells (CICs), are endowed with higher tumor forming potential. The CIC state, however, is not hierarchically stable and conversion of non-CICs to CICs under microenvironment signals might represent a determinant of tumor aggressiveness. How plasticity is regulated at the cellular level is however poorly understood. To identify determinants of plasticity in lung cancer we exposed eight different cell lines to TGFβ1 to induce EMT and stimulate modulation of CD133(+) CICs. We show that response to TGFβ1 treatment is heterogeneous with some cells readily switching to stem cell state (1.5-2 fold CICs increase) and others being unresponsive to stimulation. This response is unrelated to original CICs content or extent of EMT engagement but is tightly dependent on balance between epithelial and mesenchymal features as measured by the ratio of expression of CDH1 (E-cadherin) to SNAI2. Epigenetic modulation of this balance can restore sensitivity of unresponsive models to microenvironmental stimuli, including those elicited by cancer-associated fibroblasts both in vitro and in vivo. In particular, tumors with increased prevalence of cells with features of partial EMT (hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype) are endowed with the highest plasticity and specific patterns of expression of SNAI2 and CDH1 markers identify a subset of tumors with worse prognosis. In conclusion, here we describe a connection between a hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype and conversion to stem-cell state in response to external stimuli. These findings have implications for current endeavors to identify tumors with increased plasticity.

  2. Focal epithelial hyperplasia in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Axéll, T; Hammarström, L; Larsson, A

    1981-01-01

    A prevalence of 0.11% of focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) was found among 20,333 adult Swedes. There was no sex difference, the lesion was most prevalent in age groups above 45 years and the lesion was most frequent on the tongue. The frequency of FEH in 15,132 consecutive routine biopsies was 0.26%. Four FEH-cells were ultrastructurally examined. They exhibited a clear cytoplasm with scattered ribosomes, a peripheral condensation of tonofilaments, a central aggregation of chromatin clumps with loss of nuclear membrane and an accumulation of desmosome fragments. No viral particles could be identified in these FEH-cells.

  3. Lymphocyte subpopulation in healthy and diseased gingival tissue

    PubMed Central

    Amunulla, Aniz; Venkatesan, Remya; Ramakrishnan, Hemalatha; Arun, K. V.; Sudarshan, Subitha; Talwar, Avaneendra

    2008-01-01

    In this study, infiltrating lymphocytes subpopulation in gingival sections of healthy, inflamed, and periodontitis lesions was investigated. A set of cluster of differentiation (CD) antigen specific monoclonal/polyclonal antibodies to detect different cell types within the tissues was used. These included anti-CD3 (pan T-cell), anti-CD45RO (memory T-cell), anti-CD20 (B-cell), and kappa light chain (plasma cells). Biopsies of gingival tissue were obtained from 17 patients who had clinically healthy gingiva, from 18 patients with gingivitis, and 17 patients with periodontitis. A significantly greater proportion of T-cells (P < 0.00) was observed in healthy gingival and gingivitis tissue samples compared to periodontitis tissue samples. In addition, a greater proportion of B-cells was observed in periodontitis lesions than in the gingival lesions (P < 0.00). The memory T-cells and the kappa light-chain plasma cells were present in both healthy and diseased tissues, suggestive of previous activation by periodontal pathogenic microorganisms. In conclusion, these differences in the relative proportions of B- and T-cells may reflect a difference in the immunopathology of periodontitis and gingivitis lesions. PMID:20142944

  4. Prevalence of impacted teeth in a Brazilian subpopulation.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Fabio Luis Miranda; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Marques, Alessandro Tadeu Corrêa; Borba, Alexandre Meirelles; Musis, Carlo Ralph de; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of impacted teeth in a subpopulation of Brazilian patients based on the retrospective analysis of panoramic radiographs obtained at an oral radiology clinic. Out of 1,977 panoramic radiographs, 1,352 fulfilled inclusion criteria, and 22,984 teeth were assessed. Data were statistically analyzed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov's and Levene's tests; significance was set at 5%. The number of impacted teeth was assessed using analysis of variance and Tukey's post-hoc test. Our results showed significant differences for tooth type and patient age when analyzed separately (p < 0.05); gender did not show significant results (p > 0.05). Correlations between age and gender showed significant differences (p < 0.05), as did the correlations between age, gender and tooth type (p < 0.05). Mandibular molars were the teeth most frequently affected (p < 0.05), followed by maxillary molars (p < 0.05). Other tooth types did not present significant differences among themselves (p > 0.05). Patients aged 22 years or younger were the most frequent ones (p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed between age groups 37 and 51 years and 52+ (p > 0.05). According to the methodology here employed, gender did not affect tooth impaction, whereas age (22-36 years) and tooth type (mandibular third molars) strongly influenced results. PMID:25095845

  5. Estimating the Number of Subpopulations (K) in Structured Populations.

    PubMed

    Verity, Robert; Nichols, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    A key quantity in the analysis of structured populations is the parameter K, which describes the number of subpopulations that make up the total population. Inference of K ideally proceeds via the model evidence, which is equivalent to the likelihood of the model. However, the evidence in favor of a particular value of K cannot usually be computed exactly, and instead programs such as Structure make use of heuristic estimators to approximate this quantity. We show-using simulated data sets small enough that the true evidence can be computed exactly-that these heuristics often fail to estimate the true evidence and that this can lead to incorrect conclusions about K Our proposed solution is to use thermodynamic integration (TI) to estimate the model evidence. After outlining the TI methodology we demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach, using a range of simulated data sets. We find that TI can be used to obtain estimates of the model evidence that are more accurate and precise than those based on heuristics. Furthermore, estimates of K based on these values are found to be more reliable than those based on a suite of model comparison statistics. Finally, we test our solution in a reanalysis of a white-footed mouse data set. The TI methodology is implemented for models both with and without admixture in the software MavericK1.0. PMID:27317680

  6. Mutation accumulation and fitness in mutator subpopulations of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Maharjan, Ram P; Liu, Bin; Li, Yang; Reeves, Peter R; Wang, Lei; Ferenci, Thomas

    2013-02-23

    Bacterial populations in clinical and laboratory settings contain a significant proportion of mutants with elevated mutation rates (mutators). Mutators have a particular advantage when multiple beneficial mutations are needed for fitness, as in antibiotic resistance. Nevertheless, high mutation rates potentially lead to increasing numbers of deleterious mutations and subsequently to the decreased fitness of mutators. To test how fitness changed with mutation accumulation, genome sequencing and fitness assays of nine Escherichia coli mutY mutators were undertaken in an evolving chemostat population at three time points. Unexpectedly, the fitness in members of the mutator subpopulation became constant despite a growing number of mutations over time. To test if the accumulated mutations affected fitness, we replaced each of the known beneficial mutations with wild-type alleles in a mutator isolate. We found that the other 25 accumulated mutations were not deleterious. Our results suggest that isolates with deleterious mutations are eliminated by competition in a continuous culture, leaving mutators with mostly neutral mutations. Interestingly, the mutator-non-mutator balance in the population reversed after the fitness plateau of mutators was reached, suggesting that the mutator-non-mutator ratio in populations has more to do with competition between members of the population than the accumulation of deleterious mutations.

  7. Origins and determinants of HDL populations and their subpopulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A.V.; Gong, E.L.

    1990-06-01

    This paper describes the origins and determinants of High Density Lipoproteins (HDL) populations and their subpopulations. Our survey of compositional properties of small HDL particles indicates considerable variation in core lipid content reflecting in large part the origins of such particles. Whether small HDL particles of different core content and apolipoprotein composition differ in their metabolic properties and function in reverse cholesterol transport remains to be established. Our studies demonstrate that lipolysis-derived products can facilitate formation in vitro of small Apolipoprotein (AI) particles with properties approximating those of plasma pre-{beta} HDL. Of particular interest is our observation that small AI particles are an exclusive reassembly product in mixtures containing POPE and FFA. This observation may be relevant to the physiologic origins of PE in lipoprotein structure and its role in metabolism and secretion of nascent HDL. Lastly our observations on the reactivity of small AI particles, containing FFA, with LCAT and LDL suggest further linkages between triglyceride and HDL metabolism. 19 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Population genomic analysis reveals differential evolutionary histories and patterns of diversity across subgenomes and subpopulations of Brassica napus L.

    DOE PAGES

    Gazave, Elodie; Tassone, Erica E.; Ilut, Daniel C.; Wingerson, Megan; Datema, Erwin; Witsenboer, Hanneke M. A.; Davis, James B.; Grant, David; Dyer, John M.; Jenks, Matthew A.; et al

    2016-04-21

    Here, the allotetraploid species Brassica napus L. is a global crop of major economic importance, providing canola oil (seed) and vegetables for human consumption and fodder and meal for livestock feed. Characterizing the genetic diversity present in the extant germplasm pool of B. napus is fundamental to better conserve, manage and utilize the genetic resources of this species. We used sequence-based genotyping to identify and genotype 30,881 SNPs in a diversity panel of 782 B. napus accessions, representing samples of winter and spring growth habits originating from 33 countries across Europe, Asia, and America. We detected strong population structure broadlymore » concordant with growth habit and geography, and identified three major genetic groups: spring (SP), winter Europe (WE), and winter Asia (WA). Subpopulation-specific polymorphism patterns suggest enriched genetic diversity within the WA group and a smaller effective breeding population for the SP group compared to WE. Interestingly, the two subgenomes of B. napus appear to have different geographic origins, with phylogenetic analysis placing WE and WA as basal clades for the other subpopulations in the C and A subgenomes, respectively. Finally, we identified 16 genomic regions where the patterns of diversity differed markedly from the genome-wide average, several of which are suggestive of genomic inversions. The results obtained in this study constitute a valuable resource for worldwide breeding efforts and the genetic dissection and prediction of complex B. napus traits.« less

  9. Population Genomic Analysis Reveals Differential Evolutionary Histories and Patterns of Diversity across Subgenomes and Subpopulations of Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Gazave, Elodie; Tassone, Erica E; Ilut, Daniel C; Wingerson, Megan; Datema, Erwin; Witsenboer, Hanneke M A; Davis, James B; Grant, David; Dyer, John M; Jenks, Matthew A; Brown, Jack; Gore, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The allotetraploid species Brassica napus L. is a global crop of major economic importance, providing canola oil (seed) and vegetables for human consumption and fodder and meal for livestock feed. Characterizing the genetic diversity present in the extant germplasm pool of B. napus is fundamental to better conserve, manage and utilize the genetic resources of this species. We used sequence-based genotyping to identify and genotype 30,881 SNPs in a diversity panel of 782 B. napus accessions, representing samples of winter and spring growth habits originating from 33 countries across Europe, Asia, and America. We detected strong population structure broadly concordant with growth habit and geography, and identified three major genetic groups: spring (SP), winter Europe (WE), and winter Asia (WA). Subpopulation-specific polymorphism patterns suggest enriched genetic diversity within the WA group and a smaller effective breeding population for the SP group compared to WE. Interestingly, the two subgenomes of B. napus appear to have different geographic origins, with phylogenetic analysis placing WE and WA as basal clades for the other subpopulations in the C and A subgenomes, respectively. Finally, we identified 16 genomic regions where the patterns of diversity differed markedly from the genome-wide average, several of which are suggestive of genomic inversions. The results obtained in this study constitute a valuable resource for worldwide breeding efforts and the genetic dissection and prediction of complex B. napus traits.

  10. Population Genomic Analysis Reveals Differential Evolutionary Histories and Patterns of Diversity across Subgenomes and Subpopulations of Brassica napus L.

    PubMed Central

    Gazave, Elodie; Tassone, Erica E.; Ilut, Daniel C.; Wingerson, Megan; Datema, Erwin; Witsenboer, Hanneke M. A.; Davis, James B.; Grant, David; Dyer, John M.; Jenks, Matthew A.; Brown, Jack; Gore, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    The allotetraploid species Brassica napus L. is a global crop of major economic importance, providing canola oil (seed) and vegetables for human consumption and fodder and meal for livestock feed. Characterizing the genetic diversity present in the extant germplasm pool of B. napus is fundamental to better conserve, manage and utilize the genetic resources of this species. We used sequence-based genotyping to identify and genotype 30,881 SNPs in a diversity panel of 782 B. napus accessions, representing samples of winter and spring growth habits originating from 33 countries across Europe, Asia, and America. We detected strong population structure broadly concordant with growth habit and geography, and identified three major genetic groups: spring (SP), winter Europe (WE), and winter Asia (WA). Subpopulation-specific polymorphism patterns suggest enriched genetic diversity within the WA group and a smaller effective breeding population for the SP group compared to WE. Interestingly, the two subgenomes of B. napus appear to have different geographic origins, with phylogenetic analysis placing WE and WA as basal clades for the other subpopulations in the C and A subgenomes, respectively. Finally, we identified 16 genomic regions where the patterns of diversity differed markedly from the genome-wide average, several of which are suggestive of genomic inversions. The results obtained in this study constitute a valuable resource for worldwide breeding efforts and the genetic dissection and prediction of complex B. napus traits. PMID:27148342

  11. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2004-07-14

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

  12. Estimates of vital rates for a declining loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) subpopulation: implications for management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamont, Margaret M.; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Carthy, Raymond R.

    2014-01-01

    Because subpopulations can differ geographically, genetically and/or phenotypically, using data from one subpopulation to derive vital rates for another, while often unavoidable, is not optimal. We used a two-state open robust design model to analyze a 14-year dataset (1998–2011) from the St. Joseph Peninsula, Florida (USA; 29.748°, −85.400°) which is the densest loggerhead (Caretta caretta) nesting beach in the Northern Gulf of Mexico subpopulation. For these analyses, 433 individuals were marked of which only 7.2 % were observed re-nesting in the study area in subsequent years during the study period. Survival was estimated at 0.86 and is among the highest estimates for all subpopulations in the Northwest Atlantic population. The robust model estimated a nesting assemblage size that ranged from 32 to 230 individuals each year with an annual average of 110. The model estimates indicated an overall population decline of 17 %. The results presented here for this nesting group represent the first estimates for this subpopulation. These data provide managers with information specific to this subpopulation that can be used to develop recovery plans and conduct subpopulation-specific modeling exercises explicit to the challenges faced by turtles nesting in this region.

  13. Optimal allocation of conservation effort among subpopulations of a threatened species: how important is patch quality?

    PubMed

    Chauvenet, Aliénor L M; Baxter, Peter W J; McDonald-Madden, Eve; Possingham, Hugh P

    2010-04-01

    Money is often a limiting factor in conservation, and attempting to conserve endangered species can be costly. Consequently, a framework for optimizing fiscally constrained conservation decisions for a single species is needed. In this paper we find the optimal budget allocation among isolated subpopulations of a threatened species to minimize local extinction probability. We solve the problem using stochastic dynamic programming, derive a useful and simple alternative guideline for allocating funds, and test its performance using forward simulation. The model considers subpopulations that persist in habitat patches of differing quality, which in our model is reflected in different relationships between money invested and extinction risk. We discover that, in most cases, subpopulations that are less efficient to manage should receive more money than those that are more efficient to manage, due to higher investment needed to reduce extinction risk. Our simple investment guideline performs almost as well as the exact optimal strategy. We illustrate our approach with a case study of the management of the Sumatran tiger, Panthera tigris sumatrae, in Kerinci Seblat National Park (KSNP), Indonesia. We find that different budgets should be allocated to the separate tiger subpopulations in KSNP. The subpopulation that is not at risk of extinction does not require any management investment. Based on the combination of risks of extinction and habitat quality, the optimal allocation for these particular tiger subpopulations is an unusual case: subpopulations that occur in higher-quality habitat (more efficient to manage) should receive more funds than the remaining subpopulation that is in lower-quality habitat. Because the yearly budget allocated to the KSNP for tiger conservation is small, to guarantee the persistence of all the subpopulations that are currently under threat we need to prioritize those that are easier to save. When allocating resources among subpopulations

  14. Optimal allocation of conservation effort among subpopulations of a threatened species: how important is patch quality?

    PubMed

    Chauvenet, Aliénor L M; Baxter, Peter W J; McDonald-Madden, Eve; Possingham, Hugh P

    2010-04-01

    Money is often a limiting factor in conservation, and attempting to conserve endangered species can be costly. Consequently, a framework for optimizing fiscally constrained conservation decisions for a single species is needed. In this paper we find the optimal budget allocation among isolated subpopulations of a threatened species to minimize local extinction probability. We solve the problem using stochastic dynamic programming, derive a useful and simple alternative guideline for allocating funds, and test its performance using forward simulation. The model considers subpopulations that persist in habitat patches of differing quality, which in our model is reflected in different relationships between money invested and extinction risk. We discover that, in most cases, subpopulations that are less efficient to manage should receive more money than those that are more efficient to manage, due to higher investment needed to reduce extinction risk. Our simple investment guideline performs almost as well as the exact optimal strategy. We illustrate our approach with a case study of the management of the Sumatran tiger, Panthera tigris sumatrae, in Kerinci Seblat National Park (KSNP), Indonesia. We find that different budgets should be allocated to the separate tiger subpopulations in KSNP. The subpopulation that is not at risk of extinction does not require any management investment. Based on the combination of risks of extinction and habitat quality, the optimal allocation for these particular tiger subpopulations is an unusual case: subpopulations that occur in higher-quality habitat (more efficient to manage) should receive more funds than the remaining subpopulation that is in lower-quality habitat. Because the yearly budget allocated to the KSNP for tiger conservation is small, to guarantee the persistence of all the subpopulations that are currently under threat we need to prioritize those that are easier to save. When allocating resources among subpopulations

  15. Characterisation of the green turtle's leukocyte subpopulations by flow cytometry and evaluation of their phagocytic activity.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, F A; Franco-Noguez, S Y; Gonzalez-Ballesteros, E; Negrete-Philippe, A C; Flores-Romo, L

    2014-06-01

    Phagocytosis is a fundamental aspect of innate immunity that is conserved across many species making it a potentially useful health-assessment tool for wildlife. In non-mammalian vertebrates, heterophils, monocytes, macrophages, melanomacrophages, and thrombocytes all have phagocytic properties. Recently, B lymphocytes from fish, amphibians, and aquatic turtles have also showed phagocytic capacity. Phagocytes can be studied by flow cytometry; however, the use of this tool is complicated in reptiles partly because nucleated erythrocytes complicate the procedure. We separated green turtle leukocytes by density gradient centrifugation and identified subpopulations by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Additionally, we assessed their ability to phagocytize Fluorspheres and Ovoalbumin-Alexa. We found that heterophils and lymphocytes but not monocytes could be easily identified by flow cytometry. While heterophils from adults and juvenile turtles were equally able to phagocytize fluorspheres, adults had significantly more phagocytic ability for OVA-Alexa. Lymphocytes had a mild phagocytic activity with fluorospheres (27-38 %; 39-45 %) and OVA-Alexa (35-46 %; 14-22 %) in juvenile and adult green turtles, respectively. Confocal microscopy confirmed phagocytosis of fluorospheres in both heterophils and lymphocytes. This provides the first evidence that green turtle lymphocytes have phagocytic activity and that this assay could potentially be useful to measure one aspect of innate immunity in this species. PMID:24570347

  16. Genomewide Identification of Genes Under Directional Selection: Gene Transcription QST Scan in Diverging Atlantic Salmon Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Roberge, C.; Guderley, H.; Bernatchez, L.

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary genomics has benefited from methods that allow identifying evolutionarily important genomic regions on a genomewide scale, including genome scans and QTL mapping. Recently, genomewide scanning by means of microarrays has permitted assessing gene transcription differences among species or populations. However, the identification of differentially transcribed genes does not in itself suffice to measure the role of selection in driving evolutionary changes in gene transcription. Here, we propose and apply a “transcriptome scan” approach to investigating the role of selection in shaping differential profiles of gene transcription among populations. We compared the genomewide transcription levels between two Atlantic salmon subpopulations that have been diverging for only six generations. Following assessment of normality and unimodality on a gene-per-gene basis, the additive genetic basis of gene transcription was estimated using the animal model. Gene transcription h2 estimates were significant for 1044 (16%) of all detected cDNA clones. In an approach analogous to that of genome scans, we used the distribution of the QST values estimated from intra- and intersubpopulation additive genetic components of the transcription profiles to identify 16 outlier genes (average QST estimate = 0.11) whose transcription levels are likely to have evolved under the influence of directional selection within six generations only. Overall, this study contributes both empirically and methodologically to the quantitative genetic exploration of gene transcription data. PMID:17720934

  17. Newcastle disease virus passage in MDBK cells as an aid in detection of a virulent subpopulation.

    PubMed

    King, D J

    1993-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus strains (NDV) La Sota, Texas GB (GB), and mixtures of the two strains were serially passaged in embryonated chicken eggs or the MDBK cell line, a more restrictive culture system than eggs for NDV. The two culture systems were compared by evaluating culture harvests for pathogenicity in inoculated chickens; the harvests were identified by hemagglutination-inhibition tests against monoclonal antibodies that can differentiate La Sota and GB cultures. Both viruses, inoculated alone or as mixtures, were propagated by passage in chicken eggs. La Sota strain failed to propagate by continuous passage in MDBK cells, and only GB was identified in culture harvests propagated in MDBK cells that had been inoculated with GB or mixtures of GB and La Sota. The results indicate that the MDBK cell line is a more selective substrate than chicken eggs and suggest that passage in MDBK cells may aid in selecting for more virulent subpopulations of NDV in a mixed culture. Other reference NDV strains, pigeon NDV isolates, and recent lentogenic NDV isolates from chickens were also passaged in MDBK cells; all strains except those that are classified as lentogens like La Sota could be serially propagated in MDBK cells.

  18. Detection of Bone Marrow Derived Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kassmer, Susannah H.; Krause, Diane S.

    2010-01-01

    Studies on the ability of bone marrow derived cells to adopt the morphology and protein expression of epithelial cells in vivo have expanded rapidly over the last decade, and hundreds of publications report that bone marrow derived cells can become epithelial cells of multiple organs including lung, liver, GI tract, skin, pancreas and others. In this review, we critically evaluate the literature related to engraftment of bone marrow derived cells as epithelial cells in the lung. Over 40 manuscripts focused on whether bone marrow cells can differentiate into lung epithelial cells have been published, nearly all of which claim to identify marrow derived epithelial cells. A few investigations have concluded that no such cells are present and that the phenomenon of marrow derived epithelial cells is based on detection artifacts. Here we discuss the problems that exist in published papers identifying marrow derived epithelial cells, and propose standards for detection methods that provide the most definitive data. Identification of BM derived epithelial cells requires reliable and sensitive techniques for their detection, which must include cell identification based on the presence of an epithelial marker and the absence of blood cell markers as well as a marker for donor BM origin. In order for these studies to be rigorous, they must also use approaches to rule out cell overlap by microscopy or single cell isolation. Once these stringent criteria for identification of marrow derived epithelial cells are used universally, then the field can move forward to address the critical questions regarding which bone marrow derived cells are responsible for engraftment as epithelial cells, the mechanisms by which this occurs, whether these cells play a role in normal tissue repair, and whether specific cell subsets can be used for therapeutic benefit. PMID:20447442

  19. Identification of cancer stem cell subpopulations of CD34(+) PLC/PRF/5 that result in three types of human liver carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Park, Su Cheol; Nguyen, Ngoc Tue; Eun, Jong Ryeol; Zhang, Yanling; Jung, Yong Jin; Tschudy-Seney, Benjamin; Trotsyuk, Artem; Lam, Alexander; Ramsamooj, Rajendra; Zhang, Yanghong; Theise, Neil D; Zern, Mark A; Duan, Yuyou

    2015-04-15

    CD34(+) stem cells play an important role during liver development and regeneration. Thus, we hypothesized that some human liver carcinomas (HLCs) might be derived from transformed CD34(+) stem cells. Here, we determined that a population of CD34(+) cells isolated from PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells (PLC) appears to function as liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs) by forming HLCs in immunodeficient mice with as few as 100 cells. Moreover, the CD34(+) PLC subpopulation cells had an advantage over CD34(-) PLCs at initiating tumors. Three types of HLCs were generated from CD34(+) PLC: hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs); cholangiocarcinomas (CC); and combined hepatocellular cholangiocarcinomas (CHCs). Tumors formed in mice transplanted with 12 subpopulations and 6 progeny subpopulations of CD34(+) PLC cells. Interestingly, progenies with certain surface antigens (CD133, CD44, CD90, or EPCAM) predominantly yielded HCCs. CD34(+) PLCs that also expressed OV6 and their progeny OV6(+) cells primarily produced CHC and CC. This represents the first experiment to demonstrate that the OV6(+) antigen is associated with human CHC and CC. CD34(+) PLCs that also expressed CD31 and their progeny CD31(+) cells formed CHCs. Gene expression patterns and tumor cell populations from all xenografts exhibited diverse patterns, indicating that tumor-initiating cells (TICs) with distinct antigenic profiles contribute to cancer cell heterogeneity. Therefore, we identified CD34(+) PLC cells functioning as LCSCs generating three types of HLCs. Eighteen subpopulations from one origin had the capacity independently to initiate tumors, thus functioning as TICs. This finding has broad implications for better understanding of the multistep model of tumor initiation and progression. Our finding also indicates that CD34(+) PLCs that also express OV6 or CD31 result in types of HLCs. This is the first report that PLC/PRF/5 subpopulations expressing CD34 in combination with particular antigens defines categories of

  20. Biomarkers for epithelial-mesenchymal transitions

    PubMed Central

    Zeisberg, Michael; Neilson, Eric G.

    2009-01-01

    Somatic cells that change from one mature phenotype to another exhibit the property of plasticity. It is increasingly clear that epithelial and endothelial cells enjoy some of this plasticity, which is easily demonstrated by studying the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Published reports from the literature typically rely on ad hoc criteria for determining EMT events; consequently, there is some uncertainty as to whether the same process occurs under different experimental conditions. As we discuss in this Personal Perspective, we believe that context and various changes in plasticity biomarkers can help identify at least three types of EMT and that using a collection of criteria for EMT increases the likelihood that everyone is studying the same phenomenon — namely, the transition of epithelial and endothelial cells to a motile phenotype. PMID:19487819

  1. Scattering attenuation microscopy of oral epithelial dysplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlins, Pete H.; Adegun, Oluyori; Hagi-Pavli, Eleni; Piper, Kim; Bader, Dan; Fortune, Farida

    2010-11-01

    We present a new method for quantitative visualization of premalignant oral epithelium called scattering attenuation microscopy (SAM). Using low-coherence interferometry, SAM projects measurements of epithelial optical attenuation onto an image of the tissue surface as a color map. The measured attenuation is dominated by optical scattering that provides a metric of the severity of oral epithelial dysplasia (OED). Scattering is sensitive to the changes in size and distribution of nuclear material that are characteristic of OED, a condition recognized by the occurrence of basal-cell-like features throughout the epithelial depth. SAM measures the axial intensity change of light backscattered from epithelial tissue. Scattering measurements are obtained from sequential axial scans of a 3-D tissue volume and displayed as a 2-D SAM image. A novel segmentation method is used to confine scattering measurement to epithelial tissue. This is applied to oral biopsy samples obtained from 19 patients. Our results show that imaging of tissue scattering can be used to discriminate between different dysplastic severities and furthermore presents a powerful tool for identifying the most representative tissue site for biopsy.

  2. Bovine myocardial epithelial inclusions.

    PubMed

    Baker, D C; Schmidt, S P; Langheinrich, K A; Cannon, L; Smart, R A

    1993-01-01

    Light microscopic, histochemical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural methods were used to examine myocardial epithelial masses in the hearts of ten cattle. The tissues consisted of paraffin-embedded or formalin-fixed samples from eight hearts that were being inspected in slaughter houses and from two hearts from calves that died of septicemia. The ages of the cattle ranged from 4 days to 12 years; the breeds were unspecified for all but one Hereford female and the two Holstein calves; and there were three males, four females, and three steers. The masses in these cases were compared with similar appearing lesions found in other animal species. The lesions in the bovine hearts were single to multiple, well circumscribed, found in the left ventricle wall, and composed of squamous to cuboidal epithelial cells that formed tubular, ductular, and acinar structures with lumens that were void or filled with amorphous protein globules. Electron microscopic examination revealed epithelial cells that had sparse apical microvilli, tight apical intercellular junctions, perinuclear bundles of filaments, and rare cilia. Almost half of the bovine epithelial masses (4/9) had occasional diastase-resistant periodic acid-Schiff-positive granules in their cytoplasm, and few had hyaluronidase-resistant alcian blue-positive granules (2/9) or colloidal iron-positive granules (1/9). All myocardial masses had abundant collagen surrounding the tubular and acinar structures, and 2/9 had elastin fibers as well. None of the myocardial masses had Churukian-Schenk or Fontana Masson's silver staining granules in epithelial cells. Immunohistochemically, all bovine myocardial tumors stained positively for cytokeratin (8/8), and occasional masses stained positively for vimentin (3/8) or carcinoembryonic antigen (3/8). None of the masses stained positively for desmin. The myocardial epithelial tumors most likely represent endodermal rests of tissue misplaced during organogenesis.

  3. Sensory neuron subpopulation-specific dysregulation of intracellular calcium in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, E; Gold, MS

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the prediction that the unique manifestation of chemotherapeutic-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) would be reflected in a specific pattern of changes in the regulation of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in subpopulations of cutaneous neurons. To test this prediction, we characterized the pattern of changes in mechanical nociceptive threshold associated with paclitaxel administration (2 mg/kg, iv, every other day for four days), as well as the impact of target of innervation and paclitaxel treatment on the regulation of [Ca2+]i in subpopulations of putative nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons. Neurons innervating the glabrous and hairy skin of the hindpaw as well as the thigh were identified with retrograde tracers, and fura-2 was used to assess changes in [Ca2+]i. Paclitaxel was associated with a persistent decrease in mechanical nociceptive threshold in response to stimuli applied to the glabrous skin of the hindpaw, but not the hairy skin of the hindpaw or the thigh. However, in both putative nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons, resting [Ca2+]i was significantly lower in neurons innervating the thigh after treatment. The magnitude of the depolarization-evoked Ca2+ transient was also lower in putative non-nociceptive thigh neurons. More interestingly, while paclitaxel had no detectable influence on either resting or depolarization-evoked Ca2+ transients in putative non-nociceptive neurons, in putative nociceptive neurons there was a subpopulation- specific decrease in the duration of the evoked Ca2+ transient that was largely restricted to neurons innervating the glabrous skin. These results suggest that peripheral nerve length alone, does not account for the selective distribution of CIPN symptoms. Rather, they suggest the symptoms of CIPN reflect an interaction between the toxic actions of the therapeutic and unique properties of the neurons deleteriously impacted. PMID:25982563

  4. Neuron Subpopulations with Different Elongation Rates and DCC Dynamics Exhibit Distinct Responses to Isolated Netrin-1 Treatment.

    PubMed

    Blasiak, Agata; Lee, Gil U; Kilinc, Devrim

    2015-09-16

    Correct wiring of the nervous system requires guidance cues, diffusible or substrate-bound proteins that steer elongating axons to their target tissues. Netrin-1, the best characterized member of the Netrins family of guidance molecules, is known to induce axon turning and modulate axon elongation rate; however, the factors regulating the axonal response to Netrin-1 are not fully understood. Using microfluidics, we treated fluidically isolated axons of mouse primary cortical neurons with Netrin-1 and characterized axon elongation rates, as well as the membrane localization of deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), a well-established receptor of Netrin-1. The capacity to stimulate and observe a large number of individual axons allowed us to conduct distribution analyses, through which we identified two distinct neuron subpopulations based on different elongation behavior and different DCC membrane dynamics. Netrin-1 reduced the elongation rates in both subpopulations, where the effect was more pronounced in the slow growing subpopulation. Both the source of Ca(2+) influx and the basal cytosolic Ca(2+) levels regulated the effect of Netrin-1, for example, Ca(2+) efflux from the endoplasmic reticulum due to the activation of Ryanodine channels blocked Netrin-1-induced axon slowdown. Netrin-1 treatment resulted in a rapid membrane insertion of DCC, followed by a gradual internalization. DCC membrane dynamics were different in the central regions of the growth cones compared to filopodia and axon shafts, highlighting the temporal and spatial heterogeneity in the signaling events downstream of Netrin-1. Cumulatively, these results demonstrate the power of microfluidic compartmentalization and distribution analysis in describing the complex axonal Netrin-1 response. PMID:26190161

  5. Porcine mononuclear phagocyte subpopulations in the lung, blood and bone marrow: dynamics during inflammation induced by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Ondrackova, Petra; Nechvatalova, Katerina; Kucerova, Zdenka; Leva, Lenka; Dominguez, Javier; Faldyna, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (MP) are cells of nonspecific immunity, playing an essential role in defense against bacterial pathogens. Although various MP subpopulations have been described in the pig, relations among these populations in vivo are unknown to date. The present study was aimed at describing porcine MP subpopulations infiltrating inflamed tissue of pigs under in vivo conditions. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP) infection was used to induce an inflammatory response. CD172α, CD14, CD163, MHCII and CD203α cell surface molecules were used to identify MP by flow cytometry. Changes in MP subpopulations in the peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) compartments along with the analysis of MP appearing in the inflamed lungs were assessed to elucidate the possible origin and maturation stages of the infiltrating MP. The MP population migrating to the inflamed lungs was phenotype CD14+ CD163+ CD203α+/− MHCII+/−. Concomitantly, after APP infection there was an increase in the PB MP CD14+ CD163+ CD203α− MHC II− population, suggesting that these cells give rise to inflammatory monocytes/macrophages. The CD203α and MHCII molecules appear on these cells after leaving the PB. In healthy animals, the BM MP precursors were represented by CD14− CD163− cells maturing directly into CD14+ CD163− that were then released into the PB. After infection, an altered maturation pathway of MP precursors appeared, represented by CD14− CD163− CD203α− MHCII− MP directly switching into CD14+ CD163+ CD203α− MHCII− MP. In conclusion, two different MP maturation pathways were suggested in pigs. The use of these pathways differs under inflammatory and noninflammatory conditions. PMID:20519113

  6. A Novel Subpopulation of B-1 Cells Is Enriched With Autoreactivity in Normal and Lupus-Prone Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xuemei; Lau, Stanley; Bai, Chunyan; Degauque, Nicolas; Holodick, Nichol E.; Steven, Scott J.; Tumang, Joseph; Gao, Wenda; Rothstein, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective B-1 cells have long been suggested to play an important role in lupus. However, reports to date have been controversial regarding their pathogenic or protective roles in different animal models. We undertook this study to investigate a novel subpopulation of B-1 cells and its roles in murine lupus. Methods Lymphocyte phenotypes were assessed by flow cytometry. Autoantibody secretion was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, autoantigen proteome array, and antinuclear antibody assay. Cell proliferation was measured by thymidine incorporation and 5,6-carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester dilution. B cell Ig isotype switching was measured by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. Results Anti–double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) autoantibodies were preferentially secreted by a subpopulation of CD5+ B-1 cells that expressed programmed death ligand 2 (termed L2pB1 cells). A substantial proportion of hybridoma clones generated from L2pB1 cells reacted to dsDNA. Moreover, these clones were highly cross-reactive with other lupus-related autoantigens. L2pB1 cells were potent antigen-presenting cells and promoted Th17 cell differentiation in vitro. A dramatic increase of circulating L2pB1 cells in lupus-prone BXSB mice was correlated with elevated serum titers of anti-dsDNA antibodies. A significant number of L2pB1 cells preferentially switched to IgG1 and IgG2b when stimulated with interleukin-21. Conclusion Our findings identify a novel subpopulation of B-1 cells that is enriched for autoreactive specificities, undergoes isotype switch, manifests enhanced antigen presentation, promotes Th17 cell differentiation, and is preferentially associated with the development of lupus in a murine model. Together, these findings suggest that L2pB1 cells have the potential to initiate autoimmunity through serologic and T cell–mediated mechanisms. PMID:19950285

  7. Meta-STEPP: subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot for individual patient data meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin Victoria; Cole, Bernard; Bonetti, Marco; Gelber, Richard D

    2016-09-20

    We have developed a method, called Meta-STEPP (subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot for meta-analysis), to explore treatment effect heterogeneity across covariate values in the meta-analysis setting for time-to-event data when the covariate of interest is continuous. Meta-STEPP forms overlapping subpopulations from individual patient data containing similar numbers of events with increasing covariate values, estimates subpopulation treatment effects using standard fixed-effects meta-analysis methodology, displays the estimated subpopulation treatment effect as a function of the covariate values, and provides a statistical test to detect possibly complex treatment-covariate interactions. Simulation studies show that this test has adequate type-I error rate recovery as well as power when reasonable window sizes are chosen. When applied to eight breast cancer trials, Meta-STEPP suggests that chemotherapy is less effective for tumors with high estrogen receptor expression compared with those with low expression. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Epithelial Dysplasia in Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Samaneh; Kargahi, Neda; Razavi, Sayed Mohammad; Homayoni, Solmaz

    2014-01-01

    Among oral lesions, we encounter a series of malignant epithelial lesions that go through clinical and histopathologic processes in order to be diagnosed. Identifying these processes along with the etiology knowledge of these lesions is very important in prevention and early treatments. Dysplasia is the step preceding the formation of squamous cell carcinoma in lesions which have the potential to undergo dysplasia. Identification of etiological factors, clinical and histopathologic methods has been the topic of many articles. This article, reviews various articles presenting oral cavity dysplasia, new clinical methods of identifying lesions, and the immunohistochemical research which proposes various markers for providing more precise identification of such lesions. This article also briefly analyzes new treatment methods such as tissue engineering. PMID:25242838

  9. Male and Female Subpopulations of Salix viminalis Present High Genetic Diversity and High Long-Term Migration Rates between Them

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Feifei; Mao, Jinmei; Liu, Junxiang; Peng, Xiangyong; Han, Lei; Sun, Zhenyuan

    2016-01-01

    Dioecy distributed in 157 flowering plant families and 959 flowering plant genera. Morphological and physiological differences between male and female plants have been studied extensively, but studies of sex-specific genetic diversity are relatively scarce in dioecious plants. In this study, 20 SSR loci were employed to examine the genetic variance of male subpopulations and female subpopulations in Salix viminalis. The results showed that all of the markers were polymorphic (Na = 14.15, He = 0.7566) and workable to reveal the genetic diversity of S. viminalis. No statistically significant difference was detected between male and female subpopulations, but the average genetic diversity of male subpopulations (Na = 7.12, He = 0.7071) and female subpopulations (Na = 7.31, He = 0.7226) were high. Under unfavorable environments (West Liao basin), the genetic diversity between male and female subpopulations was still not significantly different, but the genetic diversity of sexual subpopulations were lower. The differentiation of the ten subpopulations in S. viminalis was moderate (FST = 0.0858), which was conformed by AMOVA that most of genetic variance (94%) existed within subpopulations. Pairwise FST indicated no differentiation between sexual subpopulations, which was accompanied by high long-term migrate between them (M = 0.73~1.26). However, little recent migration was found between sexual subpopulations. Therefore, artificial crossing or/and transplantation by cutting propagation should be carried out so as to increase the migration during the process of ex situ conservation. PMID:27047511

  10. Male and Female Subpopulations of Salix viminalis Present High Genetic Diversity and High Long-Term Migration Rates between Them.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Feifei; Mao, Jinmei; Liu, Junxiang; Peng, Xiangyong; Han, Lei; Sun, Zhenyuan

    2016-01-01

    Dioecy distributed in 157 flowering plant families and 959 flowering plant genera. Morphological and physiological differences between male and female plants have been studied extensively, but studies of sex-specific genetic diversity are relatively scarce in dioecious plants. In this study, 20 SSR loci were employed to examine the genetic variance of male subpopulations and female subpopulations in Salix viminalis. The results showed that all of the markers were polymorphic (Na = 14.15, He = 0.7566) and workable to reveal the genetic diversity of S. viminalis. No statistically significant difference was detected between male and female subpopulations, but the average genetic diversity of male subpopulations (Na = 7.12, He = 0.7071) and female subpopulations (Na = 7.31, He = 0.7226) were high. Under unfavorable environments (West Liao basin), the genetic diversity between male and female subpopulations was still not significantly different, but the genetic diversity of sexual subpopulations were lower. The differentiation of the ten subpopulations in S. viminalis was moderate (FST = 0.0858), which was conformed by AMOVA that most of genetic variance (94%) existed within subpopulations. Pairwise FST indicated no differentiation between sexual subpopulations, which was accompanied by high long-term migrate between them (M = 0.73~1.26). However, little recent migration was found between sexual subpopulations. Therefore, artificial crossing or/and transplantation by cutting propagation should be carried out so as to increase the migration during the process of ex situ conservation.

  11. Heterogeneity within geniohyoid motor unit subpopulations in firing patterns during breathing.

    PubMed

    van Lunteren, E; Dick, T E

    2001-01-01

    Respiratory motor units (MU) segregate into subpopulations, which differ in firing patterns during resting and stimulated breathing. For phrenic/diaphragm MUs, diversity also exists within subpopulations, and is greater for late than early-onset MUs. The present study characterized the extent of diversity within upper airway respiratory MU subpopulations by recording geniohyoid MUs in anesthetized cats. Inspiratory MUs (I-MU, n=21) had a wide range of firing durations (coefficient of variation (CV)=42%). In contrast, inspiratory-expiratory MUs (I/E-MU, n=19) had a narrow range of firing durations during inspiration (CV=13%), but a wide range of firing durations during expiration (CV=36%). Mean firing frequency had similar degrees of diversity among units for I-MU and I/E-MU (CV=31-40%). For I-MU firing duration correlated with mean firing frequency, whereas no such relationship was apparent for I/E-MU. Single-breath end-expiratory airway occlusion decreased heterogeneity in firing duration during inspiration and increased it during expiration, whereas end-inspiratory airway occlusion decreased heterogeneity during expiration. In conclusion, (a) there is considerable diversity within geniohyoid MU subpopulations receiving respiratory drive; (b) the degree of diversity within subpopulations differs for I-MU and I/E-MU; and (c) diversity within subpopulations in timing of activity is modulated by single-breath airway occlusion.

  12. Epithelial plasticity in urothelial carcinoma: Current advancements and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Minal

    2016-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is characterized by high recurrence rate where a subset of these cells undergoes transition to deadly muscle invasive disease and later metastasizes. Urothelial cancer stem cells (UroCSCs), a tumor subpopulation derived from transformation of urothelial stem cells, are responsible for heterogeneous tumor formation and resistance to systemic treatment in UC of the bladder. Although the precise reason for pathophysiologic spread of tumor is not clear, transcriptome analysis of microdissected cancer cells expressing multiple progenitor/stem cell markers validates the upregulation of genes that derive epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Experimental studies on human bladder cancer xenografts describe the mechanistic functions and regulation of epithelial plasticity for its cancer-restraining effects. It has been further examined to be associated with the recruitment of a pool of UroCSCs into cell division in response to damages induced by adjuvant therapies. This paper also discusses the various probable therapeutic approaches to attenuate the progressive manifestation of chemoresistance by co-administration of inhibitors of epithelial plasticity and chemotherapeutic drugs by abrogating the early tumor repopulation as well as killing differentiated cancer cells. PMID:27621760

  13. Epithelial plasticity in urothelial carcinoma: Current advancements and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Minal

    2016-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is characterized by high recurrence rate where a subset of these cells undergoes transition to deadly muscle invasive disease and later metastasizes. Urothelial cancer stem cells (UroCSCs), a tumor subpopulation derived from transformation of urothelial stem cells, are responsible for heterogeneous tumor formation and resistance to systemic treatment in UC of the bladder. Although the precise reason for pathophysiologic spread of tumor is not clear, transcriptome analysis of microdissected cancer cells expressing multiple progenitor/stem cell markers validates the upregulation of genes that derive epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Experimental studies on human bladder cancer xenografts describe the mechanistic functions and regulation of epithelial plasticity for its cancer-restraining effects. It has been further examined to be associated with the recruitment of a pool of UroCSCs into cell division in response to damages induced by adjuvant therapies. This paper also discusses the various probable therapeutic approaches to attenuate the progressive manifestation of chemoresistance by co-administration of inhibitors of epithelial plasticity and chemotherapeutic drugs by abrogating the early tumor repopulation as well as killing differentiated cancer cells.

  14. Epithelial plasticity in urothelial carcinoma: Current advancements and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Garg, Minal

    2016-08-26

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is characterized by high recurrence rate where a subset of these cells undergoes transition to deadly muscle invasive disease and later metastasizes. Urothelial cancer stem cells (UroCSCs), a tumor subpopulation derived from transformation of urothelial stem cells, are responsible for heterogeneous tumor formation and resistance to systemic treatment in UC of the bladder. Although the precise reason for pathophysiologic spread of tumor is not clear, transcriptome analysis of microdissected cancer cells expressing multiple progenitor/stem cell markers validates the upregulation of genes that derive epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Experimental studies on human bladder cancer xenografts describe the mechanistic functions and regulation of epithelial plasticity for its cancer-restraining effects. It has been further examined to be associated with the recruitment of a pool of UroCSCs into cell division in response to damages induced by adjuvant therapies. This paper also discusses the various probable therapeutic approaches to attenuate the progressive manifestation of chemoresistance by co-administration of inhibitors of epithelial plasticity and chemotherapeutic drugs by abrogating the early tumor repopulation as well as killing differentiated cancer cells. PMID:27621760

  15. CXCR4+CD45− BMMNC subpopulation is superior to unfractionated BMMNCs for protection after ischemic stroke in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianping; Liu, Xi; Lu, Hong; Jiang, Chao; Cui, Xiaobing; Yu, Lie; Fu, Xiaojie; Li, Qian; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is considered to be a promising therapeutic strategy for stroke treatment. Although unfractionated bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) have been tried in both preclinical and clinical trials, the effective subpopulations need to be identified. In this study, we used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to harvest the CXCR4+CD45+ and CXCR4+CD45− BMMNC subpopulations from transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein. We then allogeneically grafted unfractionated BMMNCs or a subpopulation into mice subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) and compared the effects on stroke outcomes. We found that CXCR4+CD45− BMMNCs, but not CXCR4+CD45+ BMMNCs, more effectively reduced infarction volume and neurologic deficits than did unfractionated BMMNCs. Brain tissue from the ischemic hemisphere of mice treated with CXCR4+CD45− BMMNCs had higher levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and lower levels of TNF-α than did tissue from mice treated with unfractionated BMMNCs. In contrast, CXCR4+CD45+ BMMNCs showed an increase in TNF-α. Additionally, CXCR4+CD45+ and CXCR4+CD45− populations exhibited more robust migration into the lesion areas and were better able to express cell-specific markers of different linages than were the unfractionated BMMNCs. Endothelial and astrocyte cell markers did not colocalize with eGFP+ cells in the brains of tMCAO mice that received CXCR4+CD45+ BMMNCs. In vitro, the CXCR4+CD45− BMMNCs expressed significantly more Oct-4 and Nanog mRNA than did the unfractionated BMMNCs. However, we did not detect gene expression of these two pluripotent markers in CXCR4+CD45+ BMMNCs. Taken together, our study shows for the first time that the CXCR4+CD45− BMMNC subpopulation is superior to unfractionated BMMNCs in ameliorating cerebral damage in a mouse model of tMCAO and could represent a new therapeutic approach for stroke treatment. PMID:25526817

  16. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bassioukas, K; Danielides, V; Georgiou, I; Photos, E; Zagorianakou, P; Skevas, A

    2000-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) or Heck disease, is a rare viral infection of the oral mucosa caused by HPV 13 or HPV 32. In Caucasians there have been only a few cases reported. We present the first case in Greece in a young Caucasian girl in which HPV 13 was detected with PCR analysis. The patient was successfully treated with CO2 laser.

  17. Identification of two subpopulations of thyroid lysosomes: relation to the thyroglobulin proteolytic pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Selmi, S; Rousset, B

    1988-01-01

    Using a combination of differential centrifugation and isopycnic centrifugation in Percoll gradients, we obtained a highly purified preparation of thyroid lysosomes [Alquier, Guenin, Munari-Silem, Audebet & Rousset (1985) Biochem. J. 232, 529-537] in which we identified thyroglobulin. From this observation, we postulated that the isolated lysosome population could be composed of primary lysosomes and of secondary lysosomes resulting from the fusion of lysosomes with thyroglobulin-containing vesicles. In the present study, we have tried to characterize these lysosome populations by (a) subfractionation of purified lysosomes using iterative centrifugation on Percoll gradients and (b) by functional studies on cultured thyroid cells. Thyroglobulin analysed by soluble phase radioimmunoassay, Western blotting or immunoprecipitation was used as a marker of secondary lysosomes. The total lysosome population separated from other cell organelles on a first gradient was centrifuged on a second Percoll gradient. Resedimented lysosomes were recovered as a slightly asymmetrical peak under which the distribution patterns of acid hydrolase activities and immunoreactive thyroglobulin did not superimpose. This lysosomal material (L) was separated into two fractions: a light (thyroglobulin-enriched) fraction (L2) and a dense fraction (L1). L1 and L2 subfractions centrifuged on a third series of Percoll gradients were recovered as symmetrical peaks at buoyant densities of 1.12-1.13 and 1.08 g/ml, respectively. In each case, protein and acid hydrolase activities were superimposable. The specific activity of acid phosphatase was slightly lower in L2 than in L1. In contrast, the immunoassayable thyroglobulin content of L2 was about 4-fold higher than that of L1. The overall polypeptide composition of L, L1 and L2 analysed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis was very similar, except for thyroglobulin which was more abundant in L2 than in either L or L1. The functional relationship

  18. Functional features of hemocyte subpopulations of the invasive mollusk species Dreissena polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Evariste, Lauris; Auffret, Michel; Audonnet, Sandra; Geffard, Alain; David, Elise; Brousseau, Pauline; Fournier, Michel; Betoulle, Stéphane

    2016-09-01

    Dreissena polymorpha is a mussel species that invaded many lotic and lentic inland waters in Western Europe and North America. Its positive or negative interactions with biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems are numerous, making this bivalve the subject of numerous studies in ecology, ecophysiology and ecotoxicology. In these contexts, the functional characterization of the zebra mussel hemocytes is of particular interest, as hemocytes are central cells involved in vital functions (immunity, growth, reproduction) of molluscan physiology. Dreissena polymorpha circulating hemocytes populations were characterized by a combination of structural and functional analysis. Assessments were performed during two contrasted physiological periods for mussels (gametogenesis and spawning). Three hemocyte types were identified as hyalinocytes and blast-like cells for agranular hemocytes and one granulocyte population. Flow cytometry analysis of hemocytes functionalities indicated that blast-like cells had low oxidative and mitochondrial activities and low lysosomal content. Hyalinocytes and granulocytes are fully equipped to perform innate immune response. Hyalinocytes exhibit higher oxidative activity than granulocytes. Such observation is not common since numerous studies show that granulocytes are usually cells that have the highest cellular activities. This result demonstrates the significant functional variability of hemocyte subpopulations. Moreover, our findings reveal that spawning period of Dreissena polymorpha was associated with an increase of hyalinocyte percentage in relation to low levels of biological activities in hemocytes. This reduction in hemocyte activity would reflect the important physiological changes associated with the spawning period of this invasive species known for its high reproductive potential. PMID:27374433

  19. Functional features of hemocyte subpopulations of the invasive mollusk species Dreissena polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Evariste, Lauris; Auffret, Michel; Audonnet, Sandra; Geffard, Alain; David, Elise; Brousseau, Pauline; Fournier, Michel; Betoulle, Stéphane

    2016-09-01

    Dreissena polymorpha is a mussel species that invaded many lotic and lentic inland waters in Western Europe and North America. Its positive or negative interactions with biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems are numerous, making this bivalve the subject of numerous studies in ecology, ecophysiology and ecotoxicology. In these contexts, the functional characterization of the zebra mussel hemocytes is of particular interest, as hemocytes are central cells involved in vital functions (immunity, growth, reproduction) of molluscan physiology. Dreissena polymorpha circulating hemocytes populations were characterized by a combination of structural and functional analysis. Assessments were performed during two contrasted physiological periods for mussels (gametogenesis and spawning). Three hemocyte types were identified as hyalinocytes and blast-like cells for agranular hemocytes and one granulocyte population. Flow cytometry analysis of hemocytes functionalities indicated that blast-like cells had low oxidative and mitochondrial activities and low lysosomal content. Hyalinocytes and granulocytes are fully equipped to perform innate immune response. Hyalinocytes exhibit higher oxidative activity than granulocytes. Such observation is not common since numerous studies show that granulocytes are usually cells that have the highest cellular activities. This result demonstrates the significant functional variability of hemocyte subpopulations. Moreover, our findings reveal that spawning period of Dreissena polymorpha was associated with an increase of hyalinocyte percentage in relation to low levels of biological activities in hemocytes. This reduction in hemocyte activity would reflect the important physiological changes associated with the spawning period of this invasive species known for its high reproductive potential.

  20. Allele frequency data for 15 autosomal STR loci in eight Indonesian subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Venables, Samantha J; Daniel, Runa; Sarre, Stephen D; Soedarsono, Nurtami; Sudoyo, Herawati; Suryadi, Helena; van Oorschot, Roland A H; Walsh, Simon J; Widodo, Putut T; McNevin, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary and cultural history can affect the genetic characteristics of a population and influences the frequency of different variants at a particular genetic marker (allele frequency). These characteristics directly influence the strength of forensic DNA evidence and make the availability of suitable allele frequency information for every discrete country or jurisdiction highly relevant. Population sub-structure within Indonesia has not been well characterised but should be expected given the complex geographical, linguistic and cultural architecture of the Indonesian population. Here we use forensic short tandem repeat (STR) markers to identify a number of distinct genetic subpopulations within Indonesia and calculate appropriate population sub-structure correction factors. This data represents the most comprehensive investigation of population sub-structure within Indonesia to date using these markers. The results demonstrate that significant sub-structure is present within the Indonesian population and must be accounted for using island specific allele frequencies and corresponding sub-structure correction factors in the calculation of forensic DNA match statistics.

  1. Mouse adipose tissue stromal cells give rise to skeletal and cardiomyogenic cell sub-populations.

    PubMed

    Dromard, Cécile; Barreau, Corinne; André, Mireille; Berger-Müller, Sandra; Casteilla, Louis; Planat-Benard, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that adipose tissue could generate cardiomyocyte-like cells from crude stromal vascular fraction (SVF) in vitro that improved cardiac function in a myocardial infarction context. However, it is not clear whether these adipose-derived cardiomyogenic cells (AD-CMG) constitute a homogenous population and if AD-CMG progenitors could be isolated as a pure population from the SVF of adipose tissue. This study aims to characterize the different cell types that constitute myogenic clusters and identify the earliest AD-CMG progenitors in vitro for establishing a complete phenotype and use it to sort AD-CMG progenitors from crude SVF. Here, we report cell heterogeneity among adipose-derived clusters during their course of maturation and highlighted sub-populations that exhibit original mixed cardiac/skeletal muscle phenotypes with a progressive loss of cardiac phenotype with time in liquid culture conditions. Moreover, we completed the phenotype of AD-CMG progenitors but we failed to sort them from the SVF. We demonstrated that micro-environment is required for the maturation of myogenic phenotype by co-culture experiments. These findings bring complementary data on AD-CMG and suggest that their emergence results from in vitro events.

  2. Characterization of mesenchymal stem cell subpopulations from human amniotic membrane with dissimilar osteoblastic potential.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Leyva, Margarita; Barrera, Lourdes; López-Camarillo, César; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Orozco-Hoyuela, Gabriel; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Calderón-Pérez, Jaime; López-Díaz, Annia; Hernandez-Aguilar, Felipe; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Kawa, Simón; Chimal-Monroy, Jesús; Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth

    2013-04-15

    Human fetal mesenchymal stem cells can be isolated from the amniotic membrane (AM-hMSCs) by enzymatic digestion. The biological properties of this cell population have been characterized; however, few studies have focused on the presence of stem cell subpopulations and their differentiation potential. The aim of the present study was to isolate homogeneous AM-hMSC subpopulations based on the coexpression of surface markers. In addition, we aimed to characterize stem cell subpopulations through the detection of typical stem cell markers and its differentiation potential. In this study, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) was used to positively select for the surface markers CD44, CD73, and CD105. Two subpopulations were isolated: CD44+ / CD73+ / CD105+ (CD105+), and CD44+ / CD73+ / CD105- (CD105-). To characterize the cell subpopulations, the expression of pluripotency-associated markers was analyzed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence. Our results showed positive expression of SOX2, SOX3, PAX6, OCT3/4, and NANOG in the CD105+ and CD105(-) cell subpopulations. In contrast, we did not detect expression of SSEA4 or FOXD3 in either subpopulation. Immunophenotypes, such as mesenchymal and hematopoietic markers, were studied by FACS analyses. Our data revealed the expression of the CD49a, CD49d, CD29, integrin α9β1, CD44, CD73, and CD105 antigens in both subpopulations. In contrast, CD90, CD45, CD34, CD14, and HLA-DR expression was not detected. The ability of both subpopulations to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes was evidenced using Alizarin red, Oil-Red, and Alcian blue staining, respectively. Furthermore, neuronal differentiation was demonstrated by the expression of GFAP and NEURO-D. Interestingly, we observed a dissimilar osteoblastic differentiation potential between the subpopulations. CD105- cells showed stronger expression of secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) and

  3. Limiting glutamate transmission in a Vglut2-expressing subpopulation of the subthalamic nucleus is sufficient to cause hyperlocomotion

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Nadine; Pupe, Stéfano; Arvidsson, Emma; Nordenankar, Karin; Smith-Anttila, Casey J. A.; Mahmoudi, Souha; Andrén, Anna; Dumas, Sylvie; Rajagopalan, Aparna; Lévesque, Daniel; Leão, Richardson N.; Wallén-Mackenzie, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a key area of the basal ganglia circuitry regulating movement. We identified a subpopulation of neurons within this structure that coexpresses Vglut2 and Pitx2, and by conditional targeting of this subpopulation we reduced Vglut2 expression levels in the STN by 40%, leaving Pitx2 expression intact. This reduction diminished, yet did not eliminate, glutamatergic transmission in the substantia nigra pars reticulata and entopeduncular nucleus, two major targets of the STN. The knockout mice displayed hyperlocomotion and decreased latency in the initiation of movement while preserving normal gait and balance. Spatial cognition, social function, and level of impulsive choice also remained undisturbed. Furthermore, these mice showed reduced dopamine transporter binding and slower dopamine clearance in vivo, suggesting that Vglut2-expressing cells in the STN regulate dopaminergic transmission. Our results demonstrate that altering the contribution of a limited population within the STN is sufficient to achieve results similar to STN lesions and high-frequency stimulation, but with fewer side effects. PMID:24821804

  4. Heteroresistance to colistin in Klebsiella pneumoniae is triggered by small colony variants sub-populations within biofilms.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana; Sousa, Ana Margarida; Alves, Diana; Lourenço, Anália; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2016-07-01

    The emergence of Klebsiella pneumoniae multidrug-resistant strains paves the way to the re-introduction of colistin as a salvage therapy. However, recent planktonic studies have reported several cases of heteroresistance to this antimicrobial agent. The aim of this present work was to gain better understanding about the response of K. pneumoniae biofilms to colistin antibiotherapy and inspect the occurrence of heteroresistance in biofilm-derived cells. Biofilm formation and its susceptibility to colistin were evaluated through the determination of biofilm-cells viability. The profiling of planktonic and biofilm cell populations was conducted to assess the occurrence of heteroresistance. Colony morphology was further characterized in order to inspect the potential role of colistin in K. pneumoniae phenotypic differentiation. Results show that K. pneumoniae was susceptible to colistin in its planktonic form, but biofilms presented enhanced resistance. Population analysis profiles pointed out that K. pneumoniae manifest heteroresistance to colistin only when grown in biofilm arrangements, and it was possible to identify a resistant sub-population presenting a small colony morphology (diameter around 5 mm). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report linking heteroresistance to biofilm formation and a morphological distinctive sub-population. Moreover, this is the first evidence that biofilm formation can trigger the emergence of heteroresistance in an apparently susceptible strain. PMID:27140200

  5. Heteroresistance to colistin in Klebsiella pneumoniae is triggered by small colony variants sub-populations within biofilms.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana; Sousa, Ana Margarida; Alves, Diana; Lourenço, Anália; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2016-07-01

    The emergence of Klebsiella pneumoniae multidrug-resistant strains paves the way to the re-introduction of colistin as a salvage therapy. However, recent planktonic studies have reported several cases of heteroresistance to this antimicrobial agent. The aim of this present work was to gain better understanding about the response of K. pneumoniae biofilms to colistin antibiotherapy and inspect the occurrence of heteroresistance in biofilm-derived cells. Biofilm formation and its susceptibility to colistin were evaluated through the determination of biofilm-cells viability. The profiling of planktonic and biofilm cell populations was conducted to assess the occurrence of heteroresistance. Colony morphology was further characterized in order to inspect the potential role of colistin in K. pneumoniae phenotypic differentiation. Results show that K. pneumoniae was susceptible to colistin in its planktonic form, but biofilms presented enhanced resistance. Population analysis profiles pointed out that K. pneumoniae manifest heteroresistance to colistin only when grown in biofilm arrangements, and it was possible to identify a resistant sub-population presenting a small colony morphology (diameter around 5 mm). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report linking heteroresistance to biofilm formation and a morphological distinctive sub-population. Moreover, this is the first evidence that biofilm formation can trigger the emergence of heteroresistance in an apparently susceptible strain.

  6. CUX1/Wnt signaling regulates Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition in EBV infected epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Malizia, Andrea P.; Lacey, Noreen; Walls, Dermot; Egan, Jim J.; Doran, Peter P.

    2009-07-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a refractory and lethal interstitial lung disease characterized by alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis, fibroblast proliferation and extra-cellular matrix protein deposition. EBV, localised to alveolar epithelial cells of pulmonary fibrosis patients is associated with a poor prognosis. A strategy based on microarray-differential gene expression analysis to identify molecular drivers of EBV-associated lung fibrosis was utilized. Alveolar epithelial cells were infected with EBV to identify genes whose expression was altered following TGF{beta}1-mediated lytic phase. EBV lytic reactivation by TGF{beta}1 drives a selective alteration in CUX1 variant (a) (NCBI accession number NM{sub 1}81552) expression, inducing activation of non-canonical Wnt pathway mediators, implicating it in Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), the molecular event underpinning scar production in tissue fibrosis. The role of EBV in EMT can be attenuated by antiviral strategies and inhibition of Wnt signaling by using All-Trans Retinoic Acids (ATRA). Activation of non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway by EBV in epithelial cells suggests a novel mechanism of EMT via CUX1 signaling. These data present a framework for further description of the link between infectious agents and fibrosis, a significant disease burden.

  7. Delineation of multiple subpopulations of natural killer cells in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Ramothea L; Johnson, R Paul

    2005-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells in rhesus macaques have been variably defined as CD3− CD16+ or CD3− CD8+, although only limited efforts have been made to validate these definitions rigorously. To better understand the role of NK cells in macaque disease models, we undertook a multiparameter analysis of macaque NK cells employing four-colour flow cytometry and a panel of lineage-specific and non-lineage-specific lymphocyte markers. Using this approach, we identified two distinct populations of candidate NK cells: a major CD8bright CD16+ population and a minor CD8bright CD16− population. Further analysis of the major and minor NK cell populations revealed the expression of multiple markers characteristic of NK cells, including CD2, CD7, CD16, CD161, NKG2A and granzyme B. In addition, a CD56+ subset of cells within the minor rhesus NK population was identified which expressed chemokine and lymph node homing receptors similar to those expressed by the CD56bright NK cell population identified in humans. Cytolytic assays confirmed that the phenotypically defined rhesus NK cells lysed NK-susceptible target cells. Our observations support the existence of several distinct subpopulations of rhesus macaque NK cells, which have significant phenotypic and functional similarities to their human counterparts. These improved immunophenotypic definitions of macaque NK cells should facilitate future analysis of innate immune responses in rhesus macaques and the role of NK cells in AIDS pathogenesis in Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques. PMID:15885126

  8. Are cementoblasts a subpopulation of osteoblasts or a unique phenotype?

    PubMed

    Bosshardt, D D

    2005-05-01

    Experimental studies have shown a great potential for periodontal regeneration. The limitations of periodontal regeneration largely depend on the regenerative potential at the root surface. Cellular intrinsic fiber cementum (CIFC), so-called bone-like tissue, may form instead of the desired acellular extrinsic fiber cementum (AEFC), and the interfacial tissue bonding may be weak. The periodontal ligament harbors progenitor cells that can differentiate into periodontal ligament fibroblasts, osteoblasts, and cementoblasts, but their precise location is unknown. It is also not known whether osteoblasts and cementoblasts arise from a common precursor cell line, or whether distinct precursor cell lines exist. Thus, there is limited knowledge about how cell diversity evolves in the space between the developing root and the alveolar bone. This review supports the hypothesis that AEFC is a unique tissue, while CIFC and bone share some similarities. Morphologically, functionally, and biochemically, however, CIFC is distinctly different from any bone type. There are several lines of evidence to propose that cementoblasts that produce both AEFC and CIFC are unique phenotypes that are unrelated to osteoblasts. Cementum attachment protein appears to be cementum-specific, and the expression of two proteoglycans, fibromodulin and lumican, appears to be stronger in CIFC than in bone. A theory is presented that may help explain how cell diversity evolves in the periodontal ligament. It proposes that Hertwig's epithelial root sheath and cells derived from it play an essential role in the development and maintenance of the periodontium. The role of enamel matrix proteins in cementoblast and osteoblast differentiation and their potential use for tissue engineering are discussed. PMID:15840773

  9. Detection of Circulating Tumor Cell Subpopulations in Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Patrick; Nel, Ivonne; Hassenkamp, Philipp; Gauler, Thomas; Schlueter, Anke; Lang, Stephan; Dountsop, Paulette; Hoffmann, Andreas-Claudius; Lehnerdt, Götz

    2014-01-01

    Background Since image based diagnostic tools fail to detect early metastasis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) it is crucial to develop minimal invasive diagnostic methods. A promising approach is to identify and characterize circulating tumor cells (CTC) in the peripheral blood of HNSCC patients. In this pilot study, we assessed which non-hematopoietic cell types are identifiable and whether their numbers differ in pre- and postoperative blood samples. Methods 20 ml citrated peripheral blood was taken from 10 HNSCC patients before and after curative resection. CTC were enriched using density gradient centrifugation. CTC presence was verified by multi-immunofluorescence staining against cytokeratin (CK; epithelial), N-cadherin (mesenchymal); CD133 (stem-cell), CD45 (hematopoietic) and DAPI (nucleus). Individual cell type profiles were analyzed. Results We were able to detect cells with epithelial properties like CK+/N-cadherin−/CD45− and CK+/CD133−/CD45− as well as cells with mesenchymal features such as N-cadherin+/CK−/CD45− and cells with both characteristics like N-cadherin+/CK+/CD45−. We also observed cells showing stem cell-like features like CD133+/CK−/CD45− and cells with both epithelial and stem cell-like features such as CD133+/CK+/CD45−. The number of CK positive cells (p = 0.002), N-cadherin positive cells (p = 0.002) and CD133 positive cells (p = 0.01) decreased significantly after resection. Kaplan-Meier test showed that the survival was significantly shorter when N-cadherin+ cells were present after resection (p = 0.04; 474 vs. 235 days; [HR] = 3.1). Conclusions This is - to the best of our knowledge- the first pilot study identifying different CTC populations in peripheral blood of HNSCC patients and showing that these individual cell type profiles may have distinct clinical implications. PMID:25479539

  10. Angiomyolipoma With Epithelial Cysts.

    PubMed

    LeRoy, Michael A; Rao, Priya

    2016-06-01

    Angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts is a rare mesenchymal tumor of the kidney that enters in the differential diagnosis of adult cystic renal neoplasms. These tumors demonstrate a slight female predominance and can present either incidentally or with symptoms, commonly flank pain and hematuria. Unlike conventional angiomyolipoma, this variant is characterized grossly by both solid and cystic areas, and histologically by the presence of single or multiple cysts lined by epithelial cells, a subepithelial "cambium-like" layer of small stromal cells with a prominent capillary vasculature, and a thick exterior wall composed of poorly formed fascicles of smooth muscle and thick-walled dysplastic blood vessels. Tumors show a distinct immunohistochemical profile and are often reactive for melanocytic markers (HMB-45 and Melan-A), as well as estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor. These tumors have an indolent clinical course, with no reports of progression or metastasis in reported cases thus far.

  11. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    López-Jornet, Pía; Camacho-Alonso, Fabio; Berdugo, Lucero

    2010-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is a benign, asymptomatic disease. It appears as papules, principally on the lower lip, although it can also be found on the retro-commissural mucosa and tongue and, less frequently, on the upper lip, gingiva and palate. FEH is caused by human papillomavirus subtype 13 or 32. The condition occurs in many populations and ethnic groups. We present the clinical case of a 31-year-old male with lesions that clinically and histologically corresponded to FEH.

  12. Escape from Lethal Bacterial Competition through Coupled Activation of Antibiotic Resistance and a Mobilized Subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Stubbendieck, Reed M.; Straight, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have diverse mechanisms for competition that include biosynthesis of extracellular enzymes and antibiotic metabolites, as well as changes in community physiology, such as biofilm formation or motility. Considered collectively, networks of competitive functions for any organism determine success or failure in competition. How bacteria integrate different mechanisms to optimize competitive fitness is not well studied. Here we study a model competitive interaction between two soil bacteria: Bacillus subtilis and Streptomyces sp. Mg1 (S. Mg1). On an agar surface, colonies of B. subtilis suffer cellular lysis and progressive degradation caused by S. Mg1 cultured at a distance. We identify the lytic and degradative activity (LDA) as linearmycins, which are produced by S. Mg1 and are sufficient to cause lysis of B. subtilis. We obtained B. subtilis mutants spontaneously resistant to LDA (LDAR) that have visibly distinctive morphology and spread across the agar surface. Every LDAR mutant identified had a missense mutation in yfiJK, which encodes a previously uncharacterized two-component signaling system. We confirmed that gain-of-function alleles in yfiJK cause a combination of LDAR, changes in colony morphology, and motility. Downstream of yfiJK are the yfiLMN genes, which encode an ATP-binding cassette transporter. We show that yfiLMN genes are necessary for LDA resistance. The developmental phenotypes of LDAR mutants are genetically separable from LDA resistance, suggesting that the two competitive functions are distinct, but regulated by a single two-component system. Our findings suggest that a subpopulation of B. subtilis activate an array of defensive responses to counter lytic stress imposed by competition. Coordinated regulation of development and antibiotic resistance is a streamlined mechanism to promote competitive fitness of bacteria. PMID:26647299

  13. Catfish consumption as a contributor to elevated PCB levels in a non-Hispanic black subpopulation.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Max; Birnbaum, Linda S

    2008-07-01

    The human body burden of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) sharply declined after production was banned in the US in 1979. For the 10% of the US population that remains most exposed to PCBs, fish consumption is the primary source. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data indicates that the highest remaining PCB levels exist in a non-Hispanic black subpopulation. Our review suggests that catfish consumption may be a significant PCB source for the one million non-Hispanic black anglers who fish for catfish. In comparison to non-Hispanic white anglers, non-Hispanic black anglers consume more catfish, are more likely to eat the whole fish rather than just the fillets that contain less PCBs, and are more likely to fish in watersheds with high PCB contamination. Efforts to diminish potential racial disparities in PCB exposure are challenged by geographic, economic, cultural, and educational barriers. In response, we propose that a fish consumption survey be performed that identifies the extent of subsistence fishing by non-Hispanic black anglers for catfish in watersheds with PCB contamination, the type and quantity of catfish subsistence fishing provides, and what actions would help moderate PCB exposure due to subsistence fishing for catfish in such areas. Understanding the contamination and consumption factors that contribute to higher PCB body burdens will help identify and offer solutions to racial disparities in exposure to PCBs due to subsistence fishing while providing a model to prevent similar disparities in exposure to toxics ranging from mercury to polybrominated diphenyl ethers. PMID:18407261

  14. Tissue Factor Induced by Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Triggers a Procoagulant State That Drives Metastasis of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Bourcy, Morgane; Suarez-Carmona, Meggy; Lambert, Justine; Francart, Marie-Emilie; Schroeder, Hélène; Delierneux, Céline; Skrypek, Nicolas; Thompson, Erik W; Jérusalem, Guy; Berx, Geert; Thiry, Marc; Blacher, Silvia; Hollier, Brett G; Noël, Agnès; Oury, Cécile; Polette, Myriam; Gilles, Christine

    2016-07-15

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is prominent in circulating tumor cells (CTC), but how it influences metastatic spread in this setting is obscure. Insofar as blood provides a specific microenvironment for tumor cells, we explored a potential link between EMT and coagulation that may provide EMT-positive CTCs with enhanced colonizing properties. Here we report that EMT induces tissue factor (TF), a major cell-associated initiator of coagulation and related procoagulant properties in the blood. TF blockade by antibody or shRNA diminished the procoagulant activity of EMT-positive cells, confirming a functional role for TF in these processes. Silencing the EMT transcription factor ZEB1 inhibited both EMT-associated TF expression and coagulant activity, further strengthening the link between EMT and coagulation. Accordingly, EMT-positive cells exhibited a higher persistance/survival in the lungs of mice colonized after intravenous injection, a feature diminished by TF or ZEB1 silencing. In tumor cells with limited metastatic capability, enforcing expression of the EMT transcription factor Snail increased TF, coagulant properties, and early metastasis. Clinically, we identified a subpopulation of CTC expressing vimentin and TF in the blood of metastatic breast cancer patients consistent with our observations. Overall, our findings define a novel EMT-TF regulatory axis that triggers local activation of coagulation pathways to support metastatic colonization of EMT-positive CTCs. Cancer Res; 76(14); 4270-82. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27221703

  15. Depth sensitive oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy of oral epithelial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Maria K.; Lam, Sylvia; Poh, Catherine; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2014-05-01

    Identifying depth-dependent alterations associated with epithelial cancerous lesions can be challenging in the oral cavity where variable epithelial thicknesses and troublesome keratin growths are prominent. Spectroscopic methods with enhanced depth resolution would immensely aid in isolating optical properties associated with malignant transformation. Combining multiple beveled fibers, oblique collection geometry, and polarization gating, oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy (OPRS) achieves depth sensitive detection. We report promising results from a clinical trial of patients with oral lesions suspected of dysplasia or carcinoma demonstrating the potential of OPRS for the analysis of morphological and architectural changes in the context of multilayer, epithelial oral tissue.

  16. Plasma amino acid profiles in healthy East Asian subpopulations living in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nishikata, Natsumi; Kawai, Nobuhiro; Imaizumi, Akira; Miyano, Hiroshi; Mori, Maiko; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Profiles of plasma free amino acids (PFAAs) have been utilized as biomarkers to detect various diseases. However, few studies have investigated whether ethnicity or specific subpopulations within East Asia influence PFAA concentrations. Methods A total of 95 healthy volunteers living in Japan, including 31 Japanese individuals, 36 Korean individuals and 28 Chinese individuals, were enrolled. Participants’ PFAA levels were measured by high‐performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, and the effects of factors such as sex, age, body mass index (BMI) and subpopulation on PFAA profiles were analyzed. Results With the exception of glutamine and α‐aminobutyric acid, there were no significant differences among the three examined subpopulations with respect to either the means or the distributions of PFAA concentrations. A multiple regression analysis revealed that most of the PFAA concentrations were significantly related to sex. Ornithine concentrations, glutamate concentrations, and glutamine and α‐aminobutyric acid concentrations were significantly associated with age, BMI, and Chinese subpopulation, respectively. Conclusion The study results indicate that the contributions of subpopulation within East Asia to PFAA profiles are small, particularly relative to the contributions provided by sex. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 28:236–239, 2016. © 2015 The Authors American Journal of Human Biology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26407660

  17. Subpopulations of MCF7 cells separate by Percoll gradient centrifugation: a model to analyze the heterogeneity of human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Resnicoff, M.; Medrano, E.E.; Podhajcer, O.L.; Bravo, A.I.; Bover, L.; Mordoh, J.

    1987-10-01

    Exponentially growing MCF7 human breast cancer cells were separated in Percoll gradients into six different fractions of increasing density (A to F). These fractions could be subcultured and were found to contain different cellular subpopulations as defined by the following criteria: ability to generate other cellular subpopulations; growth rate; DNA synthesis; and expression of estrogen receptors, ras oncogene-encoded protein p21, and carcinoembryonic antigen. One of the minor fractions (E), which contained about 5% of the total cell number, appeared to contain the stem cells, on the basis of the following criteria: (i) its ability to reproduce the other cellular subpopulations, (ii) its high rate of growth and DNA synthesis, and (iii) the inability of the other subpopulations to generate it. The most differentiated subpopulation appeared to be the densest one (F), since it was the slowest growing and appeared to be the end point of the other subpopulations.

  18. Platelet activation attracts a subpopulation of effector monocytes to sites of Leishmania major infection.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Ricardo; Zhang, Xia; Cohen, Heather; Debrabant, Alain; Mosser, David M

    2011-06-01

    Leishmania species trigger a brisk inflammatory response and efficiently induce cell-mediated immunity. We examined the mechanisms whereby leukocytes were recruited into lesions after Leishmania major infection of mice. We found that a subpopulation of effector monocytes expressing the granulocyte marker GR1 (Ly6C) is rapidly recruited into lesions, and these monocytes efficiently kill L. major parasites. The recruitment of this subpopulation of monocytes depends on the chemokine receptor CCR2 and the activation of platelets. Activated platelets secrete platelet-derived growth factor, which induces the rapid release of CCL2 from leukocytes and mesenchymal cells. This work points to a new role for platelets in host defense involving the selective recruitment of a subpopulation of effector monocytes from the blood to efficiently kill this intracellular parasite.

  19. Intracellular calcium regulation among subpopulations of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shao-Gang; Zhang, Xiulin; Gold, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    Primary afferent neurons are functionally heterogeneous. To determine whether this functional heterogeneity reflects, in part, heterogeneity in the regulation of the concentration of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), the magnitude and decay of evoked Ca2+ transients were assessed in subpopulations of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with voltage clamp and fura-2 ratiometric imaging. To determine whether differences in evoked Ca2+ transients among subpopulations of DRG neurons reflected differences in the contribution of Ca2+ regulatory mechanisms, pharmacological techniques were employed to assess the contribution of influx, efflux, release and uptake pathways. Subpopulations of DRG neurons were defined by cell body size, binding of the plant lectin IB4 and responsiveness to the algogenic compound capsaicin (CAP). Ca2+ transients were evoked with 30 mm K+ or voltage steps to 0 mV. There were marked differences between subpopulations of neurons with respect to both the magnitude and decay of the Ca2+ transient, with the largest and most slowly decaying Ca2+ transients in small-diameter, IB4-positive, CAP-responsive neurons. The smallest and most rapidly decaying transients were in large-diameter, IB4-negative and CAP-unresponsive DRG neurons. These differences were not due to a differential distribution of voltage-gated Ca2+ currents. However, these differences did appear to reflect a differential contribution of other influx, efflux, release and uptake mechanisms between subpopulations of neurons. These results suggest that electrical activity in subpopulations of DRG neurons will have a differential influence on Ca2+-regulated phenomena such as spike adaptation, transmitter release and gene transcription. Significantly more activity should be required in large-diameter non-nociceptive afferents than in small-diameter nociceptive afferents to have a comparable influence on these processes. PMID:16945973

  20. Sheep, wolf, or werewolf: cancer stem cells and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jeffrey T; Mani, Sendurai A

    2013-11-28

    Multiple cancers contain subpopulations that exhibit characteristics of cancer stem cells (CSCs), the ability to self-renew and seed heterogeneous tumors. Recent evidence suggests two potentially overlapping models for these phenotypes: one where stem cells arise from multipotent progenitor cells, and another where they are created via an epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Unraveling this issue is critical, as it underlies phenomena such as metastasis and therapeutic resistance. Therefore, there is intense interest in understanding these two types of CSSs, how they differ from differentiated cancer cells, the mechanisms that drive their phenotypes, and how that knowledge can be incorporated into therapeutics.

  1. Ara h 2: crystal structure and IgE binding distinguish two sub-populations of peanut allergic patients by epitope diversity

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Geoffrey A.; Gosavi, Rajendrakumar A.; Pomés, Anna; Wünschmann, Sabina; Moon, Andrea F.; London, Robert E.; Pedersen, Lars C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Peanut allergy affects 1% of the population and causes the most fatal food-related anaphylactic reactions. The protein Ara h 2 is the most potent peanut allergen recognized by 80–90% of peanut allergic patients. Methods The crystal structure of the major peanut allergen Ara h 2 was determined for the first time at 2.7 Å resolution using a customized MBP-fusion system. IgE antibody binding to the MBP fusion construct versus the natural allergen was compared by ELISA using sera from peanut allergic patients. Results The structure of Ara h 2 is a five helix bundle held together by four disulfide bonds and related to the prolamin protein superfamily. The fold is most similar to other amylase and trypsin inhibitors. The MBP-Ara h 2 fusion construct was positively recognized by IgE from 76% of allergic patients (25/33). Two populations of patients could be identified. Sub-population 1 (n=14) showed an excellent correlation of IgE antibody binding to natural versus recombinant Ara h 2. Sub-population 2 (n=15) showed significantly reduced IgE binding to the MBP fusion protein. Interestingly, about 20% of the IgE binding in sub-population 2 could be recovered by increasing the distance between MBP and Ara h 2 in a second construct. Discussion The reduced IgE binding to the MBP-Ara h 2 of sub-population 2 indicates that the MBP molecule protects an immunodominant epitope region near the first helix of Ara h 2. Residues involved in the epitope(s) are suggested by the crystal structure. The MBP-Ara h 2 fusion constructs will be useful to further elucidate the relevance of certain epitopes to peanut allergy. PMID:21255036

  2. Evidence for functionally distinct subpopulations of steroidogenic cells in the domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, J F; Lamm, E T; McIlroy, P J; Scanes, C G; Carsia, R V

    1995-04-01

    A body of histological and functional evidence supports the hypothesis that there are functionally distinct subpopulations of steroidogenic cells comprising the avian adrenal gland. In the present study, we tested this hypothesis by evaluating the steroidogenic responses of density-dependent subpopulations of adrenal steroidogenic cells isolated from domestic turkeys fed either a high-normal (control) sodium diet (0.4% Na+) or a Na(+)-restricted diet (0.04% Na+) for 8 days, the latter to stimulate the activity or appearance of possible zona glomerulosa-like cells. Subpopulations were visually yet reproducibly determined by their density-dependent separation on a continuous density gradient of Percoll (45%). The subpopulations were arbitrarily ascribed as being either low-density or high-density adrenal steroidogenic cells [LDAC (p = 1.0350-1.0585 g/ml) and HDAC (p = 1.0590-1.0720 g/ml), respectively]. LDAC and HDAC comprised 95.2 and 4.8%, respectively, of the total number of adrenal steroidogenic cells isolated. The LDAC was further subdivided into three visually distinct subpopulations. The functional differences between the LDAC subpopulations is discussed but was less dramatic than the functional distinction between the HDAC subpopulation and the pooled LDAC subpopulations. Basal aldosterone production values between control LDAC and HDAC were equivalent. In addition, there were no differences in maximal aldosterone production between control LDAC and HDAC in response to [Ile5]angiotensin II (AII), the avian equivalent, [Val5]AII, K+ (as KCl), and that supported by exogenous corticosterone. However, maximal aldosterone production in response to human ACTH-(1-39) (ACTH) of the LDAC was 32% greater than that of the HDAC. Na+ restriction enhanced basal aldosterone production of the LDAC by 84% over the control LDAC. In addition, it enhanced maximal aldosterone production of the LDAC in response to AII peptides, K+, ACTH and that supported by corticosterone by 54

  3. Subpopulations of Helicobacter pylori Are Responsible for Discrepancies in the Outcome of Nitroimidazole Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    van der Wouden, E. J.; de Jong, A.; Thijs, J. C.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; van Zwet, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    Metronidazole susceptibility testing by E test was compared to that by disk diffusion for 263 Helicobacter pylori isolates and to that by breakpoint agar dilution for 90 H. pylori isolates. In 5% and 6% of the cases, respectively, results were discrepant. For each of 52 clinical isolates an E test was performed on 10 separate colonies. Subpopulations of resistant and susceptible bacteria were found in five cases. From three isolates, each colony was subcultured and tested up to 10 times. All but 1 of 292 tests showed the same result. We conclude that the E test is reliable and that subpopulations are responsible for discordant results. PMID:10348776

  4. Protons sensitize epithelial cells to mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minli; Hada, Megumi; Saha, Janapriya; Sridharan, Deepa M; Pluth, Janice M; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2012-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy has gained more favor among oncologists as a treatment option for localized and deep-seated tumors. In addition, protons are a major constituent of the space radiation astronauts receive during space flights. The potential for these exposures to lead to, or enhance cancer risk has not been well studied. Our objective is to study the biological effects of low energy protons on epithelial cells and its propensity to enhance transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1)-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process occurring during tumor progression and critical for invasion and metastasis. Non-transformed mink lung epithelial cells (Mv1Lu) and hTERT- immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells (EPC) were used in this study. EMT was identified by alterations in cell morphology, EMT-related gene expression changes determined using real-time PCR, and EMT changes in specific cellular markers detected by immunostaining and western blotting. Although TGFβ1 treatment alone is able to induce EMT in both Mv1Lu and EPC cells, low energy protons (5 MeV) at doses as low as 0.1 Gy can enhance TGFβ1 induced EMT. Protons alone can also induce a mild induction of EMT. SD208, a potent TGFβ Receptor 1 (TGFβR1) kinase inhibitor, can efficiently block TGFβ1/Smad signaling and attenuate EMT induction. We suggest a model for EMT after proton irradiation in normal and cancerous tissue based on our results that showed that low and high doses of protons can sensitize normal human epithelial cells to mesenchymal transition, more prominently in the presence of TGFβ1, but also in the absence of TGFβ1.

  5. Protons Sensitize Epithelial Cells to Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minli; Hada, Megumi; Saha, Janapriya; Sridharan, Deepa M.; Pluth, Janice M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2012-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy has gained more favor among oncologists as a treatment option for localized and deep-seated tumors. In addition, protons are a major constituent of the space radiation astronauts receive during space flights. The potential for these exposures to lead to, or enhance cancer risk has not been well studied. Our objective is to study the biological effects of low energy protons on epithelial cells and its propensity to enhance transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1)-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process occurring during tumor progression and critical for invasion and metastasis. Non-transformed mink lung epithelial cells (Mv1Lu) and hTERT- immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells (EPC) were used in this study. EMT was identified by alterations in cell morphology, EMT-related gene expression changes determined using real-time PCR, and EMT changes in specific cellular markers detected by immunostaining and western blotting. Although TGFβ1 treatment alone is able to induce EMT in both Mv1Lu and EPC cells, low energy protons (5 MeV) at doses as low as 0.1 Gy can enhance TGFβ1 induced EMT. Protons alone can also induce a mild induction of EMT. SD208, a potent TGFβ Receptor 1 (TGFβR1) kinase inhibitor, can efficiently block TGFβ1/Smad signaling and attenuate EMT induction. We suggest a model for EMT after proton irradiation in normal and cancerous tissue based on our results that showed that low and high doses of protons can sensitize normal human epithelial cells to mesenchymal transition, more prominently in the presence of TGFβ1, but also in the absence of TGFβ1. PMID:22844446

  6. Identification and Characterization of CD133pos Subpopulation Cells From a Human Laryngeal Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hai-ou; Wang, Huifang; Che, Na; Li, Dong; Mao, Yong; Zeng, Qiao; Ge, Rongming

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent research indicates that CD133 are expressed in several kinds of stem cells, among which, its high expression in laryngeal carcinoma has caused wide concern. To further explore efficaciously targeting drugs to laryngeal carcinoma stem cells (CSCs), we transplanted a solid tumor from CSCs into abdominal subcutaneous tissue of nude mice, and then compared the biological characteristics of laryngeal solid tumors with or without cisplatin intervention. Material/Methods In this study, the expression of CD133 was detected in the Hep-2 cell line by flow cytometry. By applying magnetic cell sorting (MACS) technology, we reported the results of purifying CD133-positive cells from a Hep-2 cell line. Cell proliferation, colony formation, and tumor-forming ability were examined in vitro and in vivo to identify the marker of CSCs in Hep-2 cell line. Results Upon flow cytometry analysis, CD133 was expressed constantly on 40.12±1.32% in Hep-2 cell line. Cell proliferation and colony formation ability were higher in CD133-positive cells compared to CD133-negative cells, and the in vivo tumorigenesis experiment showed the same results as in vitro assay. The 2 subpopulations cells were both sensitive to DDP, among which, the effect of DPP on proliferation ability and tumor-forming ability of CD133-positive cells was obviously greater than that of CD133-negative cells. Conclusions Above all, our study revealed that CD133-positive cells have properties of higher proliferation, colony formation, and tumorigenesis in Hep-2 cell line, indicating that CD133 could be a marker to characterize laryngeal cancer stem cells. PMID:27049928

  7. Cytokeratins mediate epithelial innate defense through their antimicrobial properties

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Connie; Mun, James J.; Evans, David J.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial cells express antimicrobial proteins in response to invading pathogens, although little is known regarding epithelial defense mechanisms during healthy conditions. Here we report that epithelial cytokeratins have innate defense properties because they constitutively produce cytoprotective antimicrobial peptides. Glycine-rich C-terminal fragments derived from human cytokeratin 6A were identified in bactericidal lysate fractions of human corneal epithelial cells. Structural analysis revealed that these keratin-derived antimicrobial peptides (KDAMPs) exhibited coil structures with low α-helical content. Synthetic analogs of these KDAMPS showed rapid bactericidal activity against multiple pathogens and protected epithelial cells against bacterial virulence mechanisms, while a scrambled peptide showed no bactericidal activity. However, the bactericidal activity of a specific KDAMP was somewhat reduced by glycine-alanine substitutions. KDAMP activity involved bacterial binding and permeabilization, but the activity was unaffected by peptide charge or physiological salt concentration. Knockdown of cytokeratin 6A markedly reduced the bactericidal activity of epithelial cell lysates in vitro and increased the susceptibility of murine corneas to bacterial adherence in vivo. These data suggest that epithelial cytokeratins function as endogenous antimicrobial peptides in the host defense against infection and that keratin-derived antimicrobials may serve as effective therapeutic agents. PMID:23006328

  8. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Carlino, P; Di Felice, R; Fiore-Donno, G; Samson, J

    1991-05-01

    Five cases of "focal epithelial hyperplasia" (FEH) of the oral mucosa observed in Switzerland are reported. The patients were of Turkish and North African extraction. The lesions of FEH were multiple, painless, located at various sites of the oral mucosa including the tongue in the form of either soft papules or hard nodules. Evidence of a human papilloma virus origin was ascertained. Among the 1067 cases reported in the literature and reviewed for this study, this condition has been described to occur among American Indians, Eskimos and North African, also in Israeli and European cases the disorder was often reported in individuals of Turkish or North African extraction.

  9. Embryological pigment epithelial dystrophies.

    PubMed

    François, J

    1976-01-01

    The embryological pigment epithelial dystrophies may be due, although rather rarely, to chemical factors, such as antibiotics and thalidomide, to ionizing radiation and to infectious factors, syphilis or viral infections, such as mumps, measles, varicella, or cytomegalovirus. The most frequent and the most typical dystrophy is, nevertheless, the rubella epitheliopathy with its widespread scattered black pigment deposits, found predominantly in the posterior pole, and its unaffected visual functions. The macular dystrophy associated with deaf-mutism is also often due to a maternal rubella infection.

  10. Profiling lymphocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood under efalizumab treatment of psoriasis by multi epitope ligand cartography (MELC) robot microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bonnekoh, Bernd; Malykh, Yanina; Böckelmann, Raik; Bartsch, Sebastian; Pommer, Ansgar J; Gollnick, Harald

    2006-01-01

    CD11a-blocking efalizumab has recently been approved as a systemic treatment of moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis. When treating 6 psoriasis patients with efalizumab over 12 weeks in the present study, we observed an overall good tolerability and 5 treatment responders characterized by a decrease of PASI from 21.3 +/- 5.4 to 3.9 +/- 0.6. The accompanying significant increase of peripheral blood lymphocytes from 1.9 +/- 0.7 to 4.3 +/- 1.0 x 10(9)/L (p < 0.05) was analyzed by multi epitope ligand cartography (MELC) robot microscopy. Thereby a high-dimension simultaneous multiplex immunophenotyping was pursued using 39 fluorophore-labeled antibodies including labeled efalizumab and 3 other affinity reagents such as lectins. Due to efalizumab treatment there was a substantial decrease of the cellular expression of CD11a (detected by mab clone 25.3.1) and efalizumab binding sites (EfaBSs). This was paralleled by an increase of the number of EfaBS- and EfaBS+ lymphocytes by a factor of 2.4x and 2.2x, respectively. The latter effect was mainly derived from a subpopulation showing a low degree of EfaBS expression. Efalizumab treatment led furthermore to an increase of the numbers of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD44+, CD45+, CD45R0+, CD45 RA+, CD52+, CD58+, CD247+, HLA-DR+ and Sambucus nigra lectin-reactive lymphocytes (by factors from 2.0 to 3.3x). In terms of a combinatorial molecular phenotype we identified a CD3+/CD4+/CD44+/CD52+ lymphocyte subpopulation which accumulated most predominantly from 0.824 +/- 0.270 x 10(9)/L up to 1.616 +/- 0.152 x 10(9)/L under efalizumab treatment (p < 0.01). Thus, the current study extends the knowledge of efalizumab-dependent perturbations of recirculating blood lymphocyte subpopulations in psoriasis patients.

  11. Markers of epidermal stem cell subpopulations in adult mammalian skin.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Watt, Fiona M

    2014-10-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of mammalian skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. As in other epithelia, adult stem cells within the epidermis maintain tissue homeostasis and contribute to repair of tissue damage. The bulge of hair follicles, where DNA-label-retaining cells reside, was traditionally regarded as the sole epidermal stem cell compartment. However, in recent years multiple stem cell populations have been identified. In this review, we discuss the different stem cell compartments of adult murine and human epidermis, the markers that they express, and the assays that are used to characterize epidermal stem cell properties.

  12. Vimentin contributes to human mammary epithelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Gilles, C; Polette, M; Zahm, J M; Tournier, J M; Volders, L; Foidart, J M; Birembaut, P

    1999-12-01

    Vimentin expression in human mammary epithelial MCF10A cells was examined as a function of their migratory status using an in vitro wound-healing model. Analysis of the trajectories of the cells and their migratory speeds by time lapse-video microscopy revealed that vimentin mRNA and protein expression were exclusively induced in cells at the wound's edge which were actively migrating towards the center of the lesion. Actin labeling showed the reorganization of actin filaments in cells at the wound's edge which confirmed the migratory phenotype of this cell subpopulation. Moreover, the vimentin protein disappeared when the cells became stationary after wound closure. Using cells transfected with the vimentin promoter controlling the green fluorescent protein gene, we also demonstrated the specific activation of the vimentin promoter in the migratory cells at the wound's edge. Transfection of the antisense vimentin cDNA into MCF10A cells clearly reduced both their ability to express vimentin and their migratory speed. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that vimentin is transiently associated with, and could be functionally involved in, the migratory status of human epithelial cells.

  13. Circulating Melanoma Cell Subpopulations: Their Heterogeneity and Differential Responses to Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gray, Elin S; Reid, Anna L; Bowyer, Samantha; Calapre, Leslie; Siew, Kelvin; Pearce, Robert; Cowell, Lester; Frank, Markus H; Millward, Michael; Ziman, Mel

    2015-08-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a highly heterogeneous tumor; thus, methods to analyze tumor-derived cells circulating in blood should address this diversity. Taking this into account, we analyzed, using multiparametric flow cytometry, the co-expression of the melanoma markers melanoma cell adhesion molecule and melanoma-associated chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan and the tumor-initiating markers ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 5 (ABCB5), CD271, and receptor activator of NF-κβ (RANK) in individual circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from 40 late-stage (III-IV) and 16 early-stage (I-II) melanoma patients. CTCs were heterogeneous within and between patients, with limited co-expression between the five markers analyzed. Analysis of patient matched blood and metastatic tumors revealed that ABCB5 and RANK subpopulations are more common among CTCs than in the solid tumors, suggesting a preferential selection for these cells in circulation. Pairwise comparison of CTC subpopulations longitudinally before and 6-13 weeks after treatment initiation showed that the percentage of RANK(+) CTCs significantly increased in the patients undergoing targeted therapy (N=16, P<0.01). Moreover, the presence of ⩾5 RANK(+) CTCs in the blood of patients undergoing targeted therapies was prognostic of shorter progression-free survival (hazards ratio 8.73, 95% confidence interval 1.82-41.75, P<0.01). Taken together, our results provide evidence of the heterogeneity among CTC subpopulations in melanoma and the differential response of these subpopulations to targeted therapy.

  14. Immunophenotyping of chicken peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations: individual variability and repeatability.

    PubMed

    Fair, Jeanne M; Taylor-McCabe, Kirsten J; Shou, Yulin; Marrone, Babetta L

    2008-10-15

    T-cell lymphocyte populations can be delineated into subsets based on expression of cell surface proteins that can be measured in peripheral blood by monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry percentages of the lymphocyte subpopulations. In order to accurately assess immunocompetence in birds, natural variability in both avian immune function and the methodology must be understood. Our objectives were to (1) further develop flow cytometry for estimating subpopulations of lymphocytes in peripheral blood from poultry, (2) estimate repeatability and variability in the methodology with respect to poultry in a free-range and environmentally diverse situation, and (3) estimate the best antibody and cell marker combination for estimating lymphocyte subpopulations. This work demonstrated the repeatability of using flow cytometry for measurements of peripheral blood in chickens using anti-chicken antibodies for lymphocyte subpopulations. Immunofluorescence staining of cells isolated from peripheral blood revealed that the CD3(+) antibodies reacted with an average of approximately 12-24% of the lymphoid cells in the blood, depending on the fluorescence type. The CD4(+) and CD8(+) molecules were expressed in a range of 4-31% and 1-10% of the lymphoid cells in the blood, respectively. Both fluorescence label and antibody company contribute to the variability of results and should be considered in future flow cytometry studies in poultry.

  15. State-Dependent Propagation of Neuronal Sub-Population in Spontaneous Synchronized Bursts

    PubMed Central

    Yada, Yuichiro; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Repeating stable spatiotemporal patterns emerge in synchronized spontaneous activity in neuronal networks. The repertoire of such patterns can serve as memory, or a reservoir of information, in a neuronal network; moreover, the variety of patterns may represent the network memory capacity. However, a neuronal substrate for producing a repertoire of patterns in synchronization remains elusive. We herein hypothesize that state-dependent propagation of a neuronal sub-population is the key mechanism. By combining high-resolution measurement with a 4096-channel complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microelectrode array (MEA) and dimensionality reduction with non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), we investigated synchronized bursts of dissociated rat cortical neurons at approximately 3 weeks in vitro. We found that bursts had a repertoire of repeating spatiotemporal patterns, and different patterns shared a partially similar sequence of sub-population, supporting the idea of sequential structure of neuronal sub-populations during synchronized activity. We additionally found that similar spatiotemporal patterns tended to appear successively and periodically, suggesting a state-dependent fluctuation of propagation, which has been overlooked in existing literature. Thus, such a state-dependent property within the sequential sub-population structure is a plausible neural substrate for performing a repertoire of stable patterns during synchronized activity. PMID:27065820

  16. Temporally matched subpopulations of selectively interconnected principal neurons in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Yuichi; Donato, Flavio; Galimberti, Ivan; Cabuy, Erik; Caroni, Pico

    2011-04-01

    The extent to which individual neurons are interconnected selectively within brain circuits is an unresolved problem in neuroscience. Neurons can be organized into preferentially interconnected microcircuits, but whether this reflects genetically defined subpopulations is unclear. We found that the principal neurons in the main subdivisions of the hippocampus consist of distinct subpopulations that are generated during distinct time windows and that interconnect selectively across subdivisions. In two mouse lines in which transgene expression was driven by the neuron-specific Thy1 promoter, transgene expression allowed us to visualize distinct populations of principal neurons with unique and matched patterns of gene expression, shared distinct neurogenesis and synaptogenesis time windows, and selective connectivity at dentate gyrus-CA3 and CA3-CA1 synapses. Matched subpopulation marker genes and neuronal subtype markers mapped near clusters of olfactory receptor genes. The nonoverlapping matched timings of synaptogenesis accounted for the selective connectivities of these neurons in CA3. Therefore, the hippocampus contains parallel connectivity channels assembled from distinct principal neuron subpopulations through matched schedules of synaptogenesis.

  17. A temporarily distinct subpopulation of slow-cycling melanoma cells is required for continuous tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Alexander; Fukunaga-Kalabis, Mizuho; Schmidt, Elizabeth C.; Zabierowski, Susan E.; Brafford, Patricia A.; Vultur, Adina; Basu, Devraj; Gimotty, Phyllis; Vogt, Thomas; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2010-01-01

    Summary Melanomas are highly heterogeneous tumors, but the biological significance of their different subpopulations is not clear. Using the H3K4 demethylase JARID1B (KDM5B/PLU-1/RBP2-H1) as a biomarker, we have characterized a small subpopulation of slow-cycling melanoma cells that cycle with doubling times of >4 weeks within the rapidly proliferating main population. Isolated JARID1B-positive melanoma cells give rise to a highly proliferative progeny. Knock-down of JARID1B leads to an initial acceleration of tumor growth followed by exhaustion which suggests that the JARID1B-positive subpopulation is essential for continuous tumor growth. Expression of JARID1B is dynamically regulated and does not follow a hierarchical cancer stem cell model because JARID1B-negative cells can become positive and even single melanoma cells irrespective of selection are tumorigenic. These results suggest a new understanding of melanoma heterogeneity with tumor maintenance as a dynamic process mediated by a temporarily distinct subpopulation. PMID:20478252

  18. Nuclear degraded sperm subpopulation is affected by poor chromatin compaction and nuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Ribas-Maynou, J; García-Peiró, A; Martínez-Heredia, J; Fernández-Encinas, A; Abad, C; Amengual, M J; Navarro, J; Benet, J

    2015-04-01

    There is an interest in the nuclear degraded sperm subpopulation because, although it is present in a low percentage in all semen samples, patient groups such as varicocele and rearranged genome carriers show high levels of these degraded spermatozoa. This study is designed with two objectives in mind: first, incubations of H2 O2 and nuclease on DTT-treated and untreated samples to show the aetiology of this subpopulation and second, assessment of the correlation between the protamine ratio and nuclear degraded spermatozoa. A very high increase in the nuclear degraded subpopulation has been found with nuclease incubation, and it is even higher when it has been merged with nuclear decompaction using DTT. Alternatively, incubation with H2 O2 with and without DTT did not show such a significant increase in nuclear degraded spermatozoa. The protamine ratio correlated with this subpopulation, showing, in patients, that poor nuclear compaction would turn the sperm susceptible to degradation. Then, the assessment of nuclear degraded spermatozoa might not be only a measure of DNA degradation but also an indicator of chromatin compaction in the spermatozoa. Different patient groups would fit this model for sperm nuclear degradation, such as varicocele patients, who show a high percentage of immature spermatozoa and nuclear degraded spermatozoa, and reorganised genome carriers, where reorganisation might also cause poor chromatin compaction on the sperm nucleus.

  19. Separation of the largest eigenvalues in eigenanalysis of genotype data from discrete subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Bryc, Katarzyna; Bryc, Wlodek; Silverstein, Jack W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a mathematical model, and the corresponding mathematical analysis, that justifies and quantifies the use of principal component analysis of biallelic genetic marker data for a set of individuals to detect the number of subpopulations represented in the data. We indicate that the power of the technique relies more on the number of individuals genotyped than on the number of markers. PMID:23973732

  20. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching

    PubMed Central

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells’ cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression maneuvers. After pressure equilibration cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics. PMID:25664452

  1. Markers of Epidermal Stem Cell Subpopulations in Adult Mammalian Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Watt, Fiona M.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of mammalian skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. As in other epithelia, adult stem cells within the epidermis maintain tissue homeostasis and contribute to repair of tissue damage. The bulge of hair follicles, where DNA-label-retaining cells reside, was traditionally regarded as the sole epidermal stem cell compartment. However, in recent years multiple stem cell populations have been identified. In this review, we discuss the different stem cell compartments of adult murine and human epidermis, the markers that they express, and the assays that are used to characterize epidermal stem cell properties. PMID:24993676

  2. Plasma levels of HDL subpopulations and remnant lipoproteins predict the extent of angiographically defined disease in post-menopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The association of coronary heart disease (CHD) with subpopulations of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) is established in men, but has not been well characterized in women. Plasma HDL subpopulation concentrations, quantified by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis...

  3. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 defines and protects a nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuron subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoxiang; Yu, Jia; Ding, Jinhui; Xie, Chengsong; Sun, Lixin; Rudenko, Iakov; Zheng, Wang; Sastry, Namratha; Luo, Jing; Rudow, Gay; Troncoso, Juan C.; Cai, Huaibin

    2014-01-01

    Subpopulations of dopaminergic (DA) neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) display a differential vulnerability to loss in Parkinson’s disease (PD); however, it is not clear why these subsets are preferentially selected in PD-associated neurodegeneration. In rodent SNpc, DA neurons can be divided into two subpopulations based on the expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1A1). Here, we have shown that, in α-synuclein transgenic mice, a murine model of PD-related disease, DA neurodegeneration occurs mainly in a dorsomedial ALDH1A1-negative subpopulation that is also prone to cytotoxic aggregation of α-synuclein. Notably, the topographic ALDH1A1 pattern observed in α-synuclein transgenic mice was conserved in human SNpc. Postmortem evaluation of brains of patients with PD revealed a severe reduction of ALDH1A1 expression and neurodegeneration in the ventral ALDH1A1-positive DA subpopulations. ALDH1A1 expression was also suppressed in α-synuclein transgenic mice. Deletion of Aldh1a1 exacerbated α-synuclein–mediated DA neurodegeneration and α-synuclein aggregation, whereas Aldh1a1-null and control DA neurons were comparably susceptible to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium–, glutamate-, or camptothecin-induced cell death. ALDH1A1 overexpression appeared to preferentially protect against α-synuclein–mediated DA neurodegeneration but did not rescue α-synuclein–induced loss of cortical neurons. Together, our findings suggest that ALDH1A1 protects subpopulations of SNpc DA neurons by preventing the accumulation of dopamine aldehyde intermediates and formation of cytotoxic α-synuclein oligomers. PMID:24865427

  4. Awareness assessment in Turkish subpopulation with chronic oral mucosal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Okumus, Ozlem; Kalkan, Sevda; Keser, Gaye; Pekiner, Filiz Namdar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the awareness of group Turkish patients with chronic oral mucosal diseases by chronic oral mucosal diseases questionnaires (COMDQ). Materials and Methods: Eighty patients with chronic oral mucosal diseases were participated in the study. A detailed medical history of each patient was taken, and all the COMDQ questions, which were translated from English version, were filled out. The data were analyzed with the IBM Statistical Package for Social Sciences Statistics 22.0. Results: The mean ages of patients were 48.91 ± 13.36 years. Of the total 80 cases of chronic oral mucosal diseases identified 52 (65%) were female and 28 (35%) male. The standardized mean scores for COMDQ were 1.72 ± 1.11 for “pain and functional limitation,” 1.09 ± 0.94 for “medication and treatment,” 2.31 ± 1.06 for “social and emotional,” and 2.27 ± 0.83 for “patient support,” respectively. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that the Turkish version of the COMDQ has the profitable psychometric peculiarity and comfortable to patients with chronic oral mucosal diseases in Turkey. PMID:26929697

  5. The forkhead transcription factors, Foxp1 and Foxp2, identify different subpopulations of projection neurons in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Hisaoka, T; Nakamura, Y; Senba, E; Morikawa, Y

    2010-03-17

    Foxp1 and Foxp2, which belong to the forkhead transcription factor family, are expressed in the developing and adult mouse brain, including the striatum, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. Recent reports suggest that FOXP1 and FOXP2 are involved in the development of speech and language in humans. Although both Foxp1 and Foxp2 are expressed in the neural circuits that mediate speech and language, including the corticostriatal circuit, the functions of Foxp1 and Foxp2 in the cerebral cortex remain unclear. To gain insight into the functions of Foxp1 and Foxp2 in the cerebral cortex, we characterized Foxp1- and Foxp2-expressing cells in postnatal and adult mice using immunohistochemistry. In adult mice, Foxp1 was expressed in neurons of layers III-VIa in the neocortex, whereas the expression of Foxp2 was restricted to dopamine and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein, 32 kDa (DARPP-32)(+) neurons of layer VI. In addition, Foxp2 was weakly expressed in the neurons of layer V of the motor cortex and hindlimb and forelimb regions of the primary somatosensory cortex. Both Foxp1 and Foxp2 were expressed in the ionotropic glutamate receptor (GluR) 2/3(+) neurons, and colocalized with none of GluR1, gamma-aminobutyric acid, calbindin, and parvalbumin, indicating that expression of Foxp1 and Foxp2 is restricted to projection neurons. During the postnatal stages, Foxp1 was predominantly expressed in Satb2(+)/Ctip2(-) corticocortical projection neurons of layers III-V and in Tbr1(+) corticothalamic projection neurons of layer VIa. Although Foxp2 was also expressed in Tbr1(+) corticothalamic projection neurons of layer VI, no colocalization of Foxp1 with Foxp2 was observed from postnatal day (P) 0 to P7. These findings suggest that Foxp1 and Foxp2 may be involved in the development of different cortical projection neurons during the early postnatal stages in addition to the establishment and maintenance of different cortical circuits from the late postnatal stage to adulthood.

  6. Induced pluripotency of human prostatic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongjuan; Sun, Ning; Young, Sarah R; Nolley, Rosalie; Santos, Jennifer; Wu, Joseph C; Peehl, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a valuable resource for discovery of epigenetic changes critical to cell type-specific differentiation. Although iPS cells have been generated from other terminally differentiated cells, the reprogramming of normal adult human basal prostatic epithelial (E-PZ) cells to a pluripotent state has not been reported. Here, we attempted to reprogram E-PZ cells by forced expression of Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4 using lentiviral vectors and obtained embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like colonies at a frequency of 0.01%. These E-PZ-iPS-like cells with normal karyotype gained expression of pluripotent genes typical of iPS cells (Tra-1-81, SSEA-3, Nanog, Sox2, and Oct4) and lost gene expression characteristic of basal prostatic epithelial cells (CK5, CK14, and p63). E-PZ-iPS-like cells demonstrated pluripotency by differentiating into ectodermal, mesodermal, and endodermal cells in vitro, although lack of teratoma formation in vivo and incomplete demethylation of pluripotency genes suggested only partial reprogramming. Importantly, E-PZ-iPS-like cells re-expressed basal epithelial cell markers (CD44, p63, MAO-A) in response to prostate-specific medium in spheroid culture. Androgen induced expression of androgen receptor (AR), and co-culture with rat urogenital sinus further induced expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a hallmark of secretory cells, suggesting that E-PZ-iPS-like cells have the capacity to differentiate into prostatic basal and secretory epithelial cells. Finally, when injected into mice, E-PZ-iPS-like cells expressed basal epithelial cell markers including CD44 and p63. When co-injected with rat urogenital mesenchyme, E-PZ-iPS-like cells expressed AR and expression of p63 and CD44 was repressed. DNA methylation profiling identified epigenetic changes in key pathways and genes involved in prostatic differentiation as E-PZ-iPS-like cells converted to differentiated AR- and PSA-expressing cells. Our results suggest that

  7. Retinal pigment epithelial cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Sally

    2015-01-01

    The human retinal pigment epithelium forms early in development and subsequently remains dormant, undergoing minimal proliferation throughout normal life. Retinal pigment epithelium proliferation, however, can be activated in disease states or by removing retinal pigment epithelial cells into culture. We review the conditions that control retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in culture, in animal models and in human disease and interpret retinal pigment epithelium proliferation in context of the recently discovered retinal pigment epithelium stem cell that is responsible for most in vitro retinal pigment epithelial proliferation. Retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated wound repair that occurs in selected macular diseases is contrasted with retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated fibroblastic scar formation that underlies proliferative vitreoretinopathy. We discuss the role of retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in age-related macular degeneration which is reparative in some cases and destructive in others. Macular retinal pigment epithelium wound repair and regression of choroidal neovascularization are more pronounced in younger than older patients. We discuss the possibility that the limited retinal pigment epithelial proliferation and latent wound repair in older age-related macular degeneration patients can be stimulated to promote disease regression in age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26041390

  8. Serum-Induced Differentiation of Human Meibomian Gland Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David A.; Liu, Yang; Kam, Wendy R.; Ding, Juan; Green, Karin M.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Hatton, Mark P.; Liu, Shaohui

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We hypothesize that culturing immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells in serum-containing medium will induce their differentiation. The purpose of this investigation was to begin to test our hypothesis, and explore the impact of serum on gene expression and lipid accumulation in human meibomian gland epithelial cells. Methods. Immortalized and primary human meibomian gland epithelial cells were cultured in the presence or absence of serum. Cells were evaluated for lysosome and lipid accumulation, polar and neutral lipid profiles, and gene expression. Results. Our results support our hypothesis that serum stimulates the differentiation of human meibomian gland epithelial cells. This serum-induced effect is associated with a significant increase in the expression of genes linked to cell differentiation, epithelium development, the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, vesicles, and lysosomes, and a significant decrease in gene activity related to the cell cycle, mitochondria, ribosomes, and translation. These cellular responses are accompanied by an accumulation of lipids within lysosomes, as well as alterations in the fatty acid content of polar and nonpolar lipids. Of particular importance, our results show that the molecular and biochemical changes of immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells during differentiation are analogous to those of primary cells. Conclusions. Overall, our findings indicate that immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells may serve as an ideal preclinical model to identify factors that control cellular differentiation in the meibomian gland. PMID:24867579

  9. Fibronectin Expression Modulates Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation during Acinar Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Courtney M.; Engler, Adam J.; Slone, R. Daniel; Galante, Leontine L.; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2009-01-01

    The mammary gland consists of a polarized epithelium surrounded by a basement membrane matrix that forms a series of branching ducts ending in hollow, sphere-like acini. Essential roles for the epithelial basement membrane during acinar differentiation, in particular laminin and its integrin receptors, have been identified using mammary epithelial cells cultured on a reconstituted basement membrane. Contributions from fibronectin, which is abundant in the mammary gland during development and tumorigenesis, have not been fully examined. Here, we show that fibronectin expression by mammary epithelial cells is dynamically regulated during the morphogenic process. Experiments with synthetic polyacrylamide gel substrates implicate both specific extracellular matrix components, including fibronectin itself, and matrix rigidity in this regulation. Alterations in fibronectin levels perturbed acinar organization. During acinar development, increased fibronectin levels resulted in overproliferation of mammary epithelial cells and increased acinar size. Addition of fibronectin to differentiated acini stimulated proliferation and reversed growth arrest of mammary epithelial cells negatively affecting maintenance of proper acinar morphology. These results show that expression of fibronectin creates a permissive environment for cell growth that antagonizes the differentiation signals from the basement membrane. These effects suggest a link between fibronectin expression and epithelial cell growth during development and oncogenesis in the mammary gland. PMID:18451144

  10. Radiation-Induced Reprogramming of Pre-Senescent Mammary Epithelial Cells Enriches Putative CD44+/CD24−/low Stem Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xuefeng; Sishc, Brock J.; Nelson, Christopher B.; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Bailey, Susan M.; Hlatky, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    The enrichment of putative CD44+/CD24−/low breast stem cell populations following exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) has been ascribed to their inherent radioresistance and an elevated frequency of symmetric division during repopulation. However, recent studies demonstrating radiation-induced phenotypic reprogramming (the transition of non-CD44+/CD24−/low cells into the CD44+/CD24−/low phenotype) as a potential mechanism of CD44+/CD24−/low cell enrichment have raised the question of whether a higher survival and increased self-renewal of existing CD44+/CD24−/low cells or induced reprogramming is an additional mode of enrichment. To investigate this question, we combined a cellular automata model with in vitro experimental data using both MCF-10A non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells and MCF-7 breast cancer cells, with the goal of identifying the mechanistic basis of CD44+/CD24−/low stem cell enrichment in the context of radiation-induced cellular senescence. Quantitative modeling revealed that incomplete phenotypic reprogramming of pre-senescent non-stem cells (reprogramming whereby the CD44+/CD24−/low phenotype is conveyed, along with the short-term proliferation capacity of the original cell) could be an additional mode of enriching the CD44+/CD24−/low subpopulation. Furthermore, stem cell enrichment in MCF-7 cells occurs both at lower doses and earlier time points, and has longer persistence, than that observed in MCF-10A cells, suggesting that phenotypic plasticity appears to be less regulated in breast cancer cells. Taken together, these results suggest that reprogramming of pre-senescent non-stem cells may play a significant role in both cancer and non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial populations following exposure to IR, a finding with important implications for both radiation therapy and radiation carcinogenesis. PMID:27379202

  11. Characterization of different CTC subpopulations in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hanssen, Annkathrin; Wagner, Jenny; Gorges, Tobias M.; Taenzer, Aline; Uzunoglu, Faik G.; Driemel, Christiane; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Knoefel, Wolfram T.; Angenendt, Sebastian; Hauch, Siegfried; Atanackovic, Djordje; Loges, Sonja; Riethdorf, Sabine; Pantel, Klaus; Wikman, Harriet

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) serve as valuable biomarkers. However, EpCAM positive CTCs are less frequently detected in NSCLC patients compared to other epithelial tumours. First, EpCAM protein expression was analysed in primary and metastatic lung cancer tissue. In both groups 21% of the samples were EpCAM negative. Second, the CellSearch system identified 15% of patients (n = 48) as CTC positive whereas a multiplex RT-PCR for PIK3CA, AKT2, TWIST, and ALDH1 following EGFR, HER2 and EpCAM based enrichment detected CTCs in 29% of the patients. Interestingly, 86% of CTC positive patients were found to express ALDH1. Only 11% of the patients were CTC-positive by both techniques. CTC positivity was associated with patient disease state when assessed by the multiplex RT-PCR assay (p = 0.015). Patients harbouring tumours with an altered EGFR genotype were more frequently CTC-positive compared to patients with EGFR wildtype tumours. In subsets of patients, CTCs were found to express genes involved in resistance to therapy such as HER3 and MET. In conclusion, using multiple targets for CTC capture and identification increases the sensitivity of CTC detection in NSCLC patients, which can be explained by the presence of different CTC subtypes with distinct molecular features. PMID:27302574

  12. Protocol for Determination of the Persister Subpopulation in Candida Albicans Biofilms.

    PubMed

    De Brucker, Katrijn; De Cremer, Kaat; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to planktonic cultures of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, C. albicans biofilms can contain a persister subpopulation that is tolerant to high concentrations of currently used antifungals. In this chapter, the method to determine the persister fraction in a C. albicans biofilm treated with an antifungal compound is described. To this end, a mature biofilm is developed and subsequently treated with a concentration series of the antifungal compound of interest. Upon incubation, the fraction of surviving biofilm cells is determined by plating and plotted versus the used concentrations of the antifungal compound. If a persister subpopulation in the biofilm is present, the dose-dependent killing of the biofilm cells results in a biphasic killing pattern.

  13. Early- and late-born parvalbumin basket cell subpopulations exhibiting distinct regulation and roles in learning.

    PubMed

    Donato, Flavio; Chowdhury, Ananya; Lahr, Maria; Caroni, Pico

    2015-02-18

    Brain networks can support learning by promoting acquisition of task-relevant information or by adhering to validated rules, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Upon learning, local inhibitory parvalbumin (PV)-expressing Basket cell networks can switch to opposite configurations that either favor or interfere with further learning, but how this opposite plasticity is induced and relates to distinct learning requirements has remained unclear. Here, we show that PV Basket cells consist of hitherto unrecognized subpopulations, with distinct schedules of neurogenesis, input connectivities, output target neurons, and roles in learning. Plasticity of hippocampal early-born PV neurons was recruited in rule consolidation, whereas plasticity of late-born PV neurons was recruited in new information acquisition. This involved regulation of early-born neuron plasticity specifically through excitation, and of late-born neuron plasticity specifically through inhibition. Therefore, opposite learning requirements are implemented by distinct local networks involving PV Basket cell subpopulations specifically regulated through inhibition or excitation.

  14. T lymphocytes in rat germinal centres belong to an ER3+ subpopulation of CD4+ cells.

    PubMed Central

    Vonderheide, R H; Hunt, S V

    1990-01-01

    Two-colour immunofluorescence histochemistry showed directly that greater than 90% of CD4+ germinal centre T cells in rat spleen or lymph node examined 7 days after immunization bear the antigen recognized by the monoclonal antibody (mAb) ER3. By contrast, only 30-40% of all thoracic duct or lymph node CD4+ cells were ER3+, as determined by two-colour flow cytometry. CD8+ cells were ER3+, but nearly all B cells were ER3-. Thus, germinal centre T cells belong to a subpopulation of CD4+ cells. Because only 25-30% of CD4+ cells that lack higher molecular weight forms of CD45 (i.e. mAb MRC OX32 cells, equivalent to MRC OX22 cells) express ER3, the CD4+ subpopulations defined by ER3 are neither identical nor complementary to the subsets defined by restricted expression of CD45 epitopes. Images Figure 1 PMID:1970805

  15. Volumetric imaging of oral epithelial neoplasia by MPM-SHGM: epithelial connective tissue interface (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Rahul; Yang, Jinping; Qiu, Suimin; Resto, Vicente; McCammon, Susan; Vargas, Gracie

    2016-03-01

    The majority of oral cancers are comprised of oral squamous cell carcinoma in which neoplastic epithelial cells invade across the epithelial connective tissue interface (ECTI). Invasion is preceded by a multi-component process including epithelial hyperproliferation, loss of cell polarity, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Multiphoton Autofluorescence Microscopy (MPAM) and Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy (SHGM) show promise for revealing indicators of neoplasia. In particular, volumetric imaging by these methods can reveal aspects of the 3D microstructure that are not possible by other methods and which could both further our understanding of neoplastic transformation and be explored for development of diagnostic approaches in this disease having only 55% 5-year survival rate. MPAM-SHG were applied to reveal the 3D structure of the critical ECTI interface that plays an integral part toward invasion. Epithelial dysplasia was induced in an established hamster model. MPAM-SHGM was applied to lesion sites, using 780 nm excitation (450-600nm emission) for autofluroescence of cellular and extracellular components; 840 nm using 420 nm bandpass filter for SHG. The ECTI surface was identified as the interface at which SHG signal began following the epithelium and was modeled as a 3D surface using Matlab. ECTI surface area and cell features at sites of epithelial expansion where ECTI was altered were measured; Imaged sites were biopsied and processed for histology. ROC analysis using ECTI image metrics indicated the ability to delineate normal from neoplasia with high sensitivity and specificity and it is noteworthy that inflammation did not significantly alter diagnostic potential of MPAM-SHGM .

  16. Human amniotic epithelial cells induce localized cell-mediated immune privilege in vitro: implications for pancreatic islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Khalid M; Oliver, Robert J; Paget, Michelle B; Murray, Hilary E; Bailey, Clifford J; Downing, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Chronic systemic immunosuppression in cell replacement therapy restricts its clinical application. This study sought to explore the potential of cell-based immune modulation as an alternative to immunosuppressive drug therapy in the context of pancreatic islet transplantation. Human amniotic epithelial cells (AEC) possess innate anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties that were utilized to create localized immune privilege in an in vitro islet cell culture system. Cellular constructs composed of human islets and AEC (islet/AEC) were bioengineered under defined rotational cell culture conditions. Insulin secretory capacity was validated by glucose challenge and immunomodulatory potential characterized using a peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) proliferation assay. Results were compared to control constructs composed of islets or AEC cultured alone. Studies employing AEC-conditioned medium examined the role of soluble factors, and fluorescence immunocytochemistry was used to identify putative mediators of the immunosuppressive response in isolated AEC monocultures. Sustained, physiologically appropriate insulin secretion was observed in both islets and islet/AEC constructs. Activation of resting PBL proliferation occurred on exposure to human islets alone but this response was significantly (p < 0.05) attenuated by the presence of AEC and AEC-conditioned medium. Mitogen (phytohaemagglutinin, 5 μg/ml)-induced PBL proliferation was sustained on contact with isolated islets but abrogated by AEC, conditioned medium, and the islet/AEC constructs. Immunocytochemical analysis of AEC monocultures identified a subpopulation of cells that expressed the proapoptosis protein Fas ligand. This study demonstrates that human islet/AEC constructs exhibit localized immunosuppressive properties with no impairment of β-cell function. The data suggest that transplanted islets may benefit from the immune privilege status conferred on them as a consequence of their close

  17. Heritability of Susceptibility to Ionizing Radiation-Induced Apoptosis of Human Lymphocyte Subpopulations

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Annette; Dechamps, Nathalie; Goldin, Lynn; Thomas, Gilles

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the heritability of intrinsic radiosensitivity, the induction of apoptosis in lymphocyte subpopulations was determined on samples from related individuals belonging to large kindred families. Methods and Materials: Quiescent lymphocytes from 334 healthy individuals were gamma-irradiated in vitro. Apoptosis was determined 18 h after irradiation by eight-color flow cytometry. Radiosensitivity was quantified from dose-effect curves. Intrafamilial correlations and heritability were computed for 199 father-mother-offspring trios using the programs SOLAR (Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines) and SAGE (Statistical Analysis for Genetic Epidemiology). Segregation analyses were conducted using SAGE. Results: Marked differential susceptibility of naive and memory T lymphocytes was demonstrated. Also, although age and gender were significant covariates, their effects only accounted for a minor part of the inter-individual variation. Parent-offspring and sib-sib correlations were significant for the radiosensitivity of B cells, T4, and T8 and of effector memory T4 and T8 subpopulations. In the T4-effector memory subpopulation, the phenotype showed correlations most consistent with dominant or additive genetic effects, and the results of the segregation analysis were consistent with the contribution of a bi-allelic dominant locus. Conclusions: Heritability was demonstrated for the susceptibility to ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis of lymphocyte populations, and the segregation of the T4-effector memory radiosensitivity phenotype was consistent with a simple mendelian transmission model involving one major gene.

  18. ODE constrained mixture modelling: a method for unraveling subpopulation structures and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hasenauer, Jan; Hasenauer, Christine; Hucho, Tim; Theis, Fabian J

    2014-07-01

    Functional cell-to-cell variability is ubiquitous in multicellular organisms as well as bacterial populations. Even genetically identical cells of the same cell type can respond differently to identical stimuli. Methods have been developed to analyse heterogeneous populations, e.g., mixture models and stochastic population models. The available methods are, however, either incapable of simultaneously analysing different experimental conditions or are computationally demanding and difficult to apply. Furthermore, they do not account for biological information available in the literature. To overcome disadvantages of existing methods, we combine mixture models and ordinary differential equation (ODE) models. The ODE models provide a mechanistic description of the underlying processes while mixture models provide an easy way to capture variability. In a simulation study, we show that the class of ODE constrained mixture models can unravel the subpopulation structure and determine the sources of cell-to-cell variability. In addition, the method provides reliable estimates for kinetic rates and subpopulation characteristics. We use ODE constrained mixture modelling to study NGF-induced Erk1/2 phosphorylation in primary sensory neurones, a process relevant in inflammatory and neuropathic pain. We propose a mechanistic pathway model for this process and reconstructed static and dynamical subpopulation characteristics across experimental conditions. We validate the model predictions experimentally, which verifies the capabilities of ODE constrained mixture models. These results illustrate that ODE constrained mixture models can reveal novel mechanistic insights and possess a high sensitivity. PMID:24992156

  19. Pulmonary and thoracic macrophage subpopulations and clearance of particles from the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, B E

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary macrophages consist of several subpopulations that can be defined by their anatomical locations as well as by other criteria. In addition to the well-known alveolar macrophages that reside on the alveolar surface, pulmonary macrophages also occur in the conducting airways, in various pulmonary interstitial regions, and, in some mammalian species, in the lung's intravascular compartment. Other thoracic macrophages of relevance to pulmonary defense and some lung disease processes are the pleural macrophages resident in the pleural space and macrophages present in regional lymph nodes that receive lymphatic drainage from the lung. Of the above subpopulations of pulmonary and thoracic macrophages, the alveolar macrophages have received the most experimental attention in the context of the pulmonary clearance and retention of deposited particles. Accordingly, less information is currently available regarding the roles other pulmonary and thoracic populations of macrophages may play in the removal of particles from the lower respiratory tract and associated tissue compartments. This report provides an overview of the various subpopulations of pulmonary and thoracic macrophages, as defined by their anatomical locations. The known and postulated roles of macrophages in the pulmonary clearance and retention of particles are reviewed, with particular emphasis on macrophage-associated processes involved in the pulmonary clearance of relatively insoluble particles. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 14. FIGURE 15. FIGURE 16. FIGURE 17. FIGURE 18. FIGURE 19. A FIGURE 19. B FIGURE 21. FIGURE 22. PMID:1396454

  20. A Specific Subpopulation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Carriers Overrides Melanoma Resistance to an Oncolytic Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Bolontrade, Marcela F.; Sganga, Leonardo; Piaggio, Eduardo; Viale, Diego L.; Sorrentino, Miguel A.; Robinson, Aníbal; Sevlever, Gustavo; García, Mariana G.; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    The homing properties of mesenchymal stromal c´ells (MSCs) toward tumors turn them into attractive tools for combining cell and gene therapy. The aim of this study was to select in a feasible way a human bone marrow-derived MSC subpopulation that might exhibit a selective ability to target the tumor mass. Using differential in vitro adhesive capacities during cells isolation, we selected a specific MSC subpopulation (termed MO-MSCs) that exhibited enhanced multipotent capacity and increased cell surface expression of specific integrins (integrins α2, α3, and α5), which correlated with an enhanced MO-MSCs adhesiveness toward their specific ligands. Moreover, MO-MSCs exhibited a higher migration toward conditioned media from different cancer cell lines and fresh human breast cancer samples in the presence or not of a human microendothelium monolayer. Further in vivo studies demonstrated increased tumor homing of MO-MSCs toward established 578T and MD-MBA-231 breast cancer and A375N melanoma tumor xenografts. Tumor penetration by MO-MSCs was highly dependent on metallopeptidases production as it was inhibited by the specific inhibitor 1,10 phenantroline. Finally, systemically administered MO-MSCs preloaded with an oncolytic adenovirus significantly inhibited tumor growth in mice harboring established A375N melanomas, overcoming the natural resistance of the tumor to in situ administration of the oncolytic adenovirus. In summary, this work characterizes a novel MSC subpopulation with increased tumor homing capacity that can be used to transport therapeutic compounds. PMID:22462538

  1. Protein characterization of intracellular target-sorted, formalin-fixed cell subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Sadick, Jessica S.; Boutin, Molly E.; Hoffman-Kim, Diane; Darling, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular heterogeneity is inherent in most human tissues, making the investigation of specific cell types challenging. Here, we describe a novel, fixation/intracellular target-based sorting and protein extraction method to provide accurate protein characterization for cell subpopulations. Validation and feasibility tests were conducted using homogeneous, neural cell lines and heterogeneous, rat brain cells, respectively. Intracellular proteins of interest were labeled with fluorescent antibodies for fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Reproducible protein extraction from fresh and fixed samples required lysis buffer with high concentrations of Tris-HCl and sodium dodecyl sulfate as well as exposure to high heat. No deterioration in protein amount or quality was observed for fixed, sorted samples. For the feasibility experiment, a primary rat subpopulation of neuronal cells was selected for based on high, intracellular β-III tubulin signal. These cells showed distinct protein expression differences from the unsorted population for specific (phosphorylated tau) and non-specific (total tau) protein targets. Our approach allows for determining more accurate protein profiles directly from cell types of interest and provides a platform technology in which any cell subpopulation can be biochemically investigated. PMID:27666089

  2. Deconvolution of Ensemble Chromatin Interaction Data Reveals the Latent Mixing Structures in Cell Subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Sefer, Emre; Duggal, Geet; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-06-01

    Chromosome conformation capture (3C) experiments provide a window into the spatial packing of a genome in three dimensions within the cell. This structure has been shown to be correlated with gene regulation, cancer mutations, and other genomic functions. However, 3C provides mixed measurements on a population of typically millions of cells, each with a different genome structure due to the fluidity of the genome and differing cell states. Here, we present several algorithms to deconvolve these measured 3C matrices into estimations of the contact matrices for each subpopulation of cells and relative densities of each subpopulation. We formulate the problem as that of choosing matrices and densities that minimize the Frobenius distance between the observed 3C matrix and the weighted sum of the estimated subpopulation matrices. Results on HeLa 5C and mouse and bacteria Hi-C data demonstrate the methods' effectiveness. We also show that domain boundaries from deconvolved matrices are often more enriched or depleted for regulatory chromatin markers when compared to boundaries from convolved matrices.

  3. Genomewide identification of genes under directional selection: gene transcription Q(ST) scan in diverging Atlantic salmon subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Roberge, C; Guderley, H; Bernatchez, L

    2007-10-01

    Evolutionary genomics has benefited from methods that allow identifying evolutionarily important genomic regions on a genomewide scale, including genome scans and QTL mapping. Recently, genomewide scanning by means of microarrays has permitted assessing gene transcription differences among species or populations. However, the identification of differentially transcribed genes does not in itself suffice to measure the role of selection in driving evolutionary changes in gene transcription. Here, we propose and apply a "transcriptome scan" approach to investigating the role of selection in shaping differential profiles of gene transcription among populations. We compared the genomewide transcription levels between two Atlantic salmon subpopulations that have been diverging for only six generations. Following assessment of normality and unimodality on a gene-per-gene basis, the additive genetic basis of gene transcription was estimated using the animal model. Gene transcription h(2) estimates were significant for 1044 (16%) of all detected cDNA clones. In an approach analogous to that of genome scans, we used the distribution of the Q(ST) values estimated from intra- and intersubpopulation additive genetic components of the transcription profiles to identify 16 outlier genes (average Q(ST) estimate = 0.11) whose transcription levels are likely to have evolved under the influence of directional selection within six generations only. Overall, this study contributes both empirically and methodologically to the quantitative genetic exploration of gene transcription data. PMID:17720934

  4. Epithelial Sodium Channels in Pulmonary Epithelial Progenitor and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Jiang, Bi-Jie; Zhao, Run-Zhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of the epithelium of mammalian lungs is essential for restoring normal function following injury, and various cells and mechanisms contribute to this regeneration and repair. Club cells, bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs), and alveolar type II epithelial cells (ATII) are dominant stem/progenitor cells for maintaining epithelial turnover and repair. Epithelial Na+ channels (ENaC), a critical pathway for transapical salt and fluid transport, are expressed in lung epithelial progenitors, including club and ATII cells. Since ENaC activity and expression are development- and differentiation-dependent, apically located ENaC activity has therefore been used as a functional biomarker of lung injury repair. ENaC activity may be involved in the migration and differentiation of local and circulating stem/progenitor cells with diverse functions, eventually benefiting stem cells spreading to re-epithelialize injured lungs. This review summarizes the potential roles of ENaC expressed in native progenitor and stem cells in the development and regeneration of the respiratory epithelium. PMID:27570489

  5. Epithelial Sodium Channels in Pulmonary Epithelial Progenitor and Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Jiang, Bi-Jie; Zhao, Run-Zhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of the epithelium of mammalian lungs is essential for restoring normal function following injury, and various cells and mechanisms contribute to this regeneration and repair. Club cells, bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs), and alveolar type II epithelial cells (ATII) are dominant stem/progenitor cells for maintaining epithelial turnover and repair. Epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC), a critical pathway for transapical salt and fluid transport, are expressed in lung epithelial progenitors, including club and ATII cells. Since ENaC activity and expression are development- and differentiation-dependent, apically located ENaC activity has therefore been used as a functional biomarker of lung injury repair. ENaC activity may be involved in the migration and differentiation of local and circulating stem/progenitor cells with diverse functions, eventually benefiting stem cells spreading to re-epithelialize injured lungs. This review summarizes the potential roles of ENaC expressed in native progenitor and stem cells in the development and regeneration of the respiratory epithelium. PMID:27570489

  6. Intestinal epithelial dysplasia (tufting enteropathy).

    PubMed

    Goulet, Olivier; Salomon, Julie; Ruemmele, Frank; de Serres, Natacha Patey-Mariaud; Brousse, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED), also known as tufting enteropathy, is a congenital enteropathy presenting with early-onset severe intractable diarrhea causing sometimes irreversible intestinal failure. To date, no epidemiological data are available, however, the prevalence can be estimated at around 1/50,000-100,000 live births in Western Europe. The prevalence seems higher in areas with high degree of consanguinity and in patients of Arabic origin. Infants develop within the first days after birth a watery diarrhea persistent in spite of bowel rest and parenteral nutrition. Some infants are reported to have associated choanal rectal or esophageal atresia. IED is thought to be related to abnormal enterocytes development and/or differentiation. Nonspecific punctuated keratitis was reported in more than 60% of patients. Histology shows various degree of villous atrophy, with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria but specific histological abnormalities involving the epithelium with disorganization of surface enterocytes with focal crowding, resembling tufts. Several associated specific features were reported, including abnormal deposition of laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) in the basement membrane, increased expression of desmoglein and ultrastructural changes in the desmosomes, and abnormal distribution of alpha2beta1 integrin adhesion molecules. One model of transgenic mice in which the gene encoding the transcription factor Elf3 is disrupted have morphologic features resembling IED. Parental consanguinity and/or affected siblings suggest an autosomal recessive transmission but the causative gene(s) have not been yet identified making prenatal diagnosis unavailable. Some infants have a milder phenotype than others but in most patients, the severity of the intestinal malabsorption even with enteral feeding make them totally dependent on daily long-term parenteral nutrition with a subsequent risk of complications

  7. Integrins and epithelial cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jessica L.; Streuli, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell polarity is characterised by differences in structure, composition and function between at least two poles of a cell. In epithelial cells, these spatial differences allow for the formation of defined apical and basal membranes. It has been increasingly recognised that cell–matrix interactions and integrins play an essential role in creating epithelial cell polarity, although key gaps in our knowledge remain. This Commentary will discuss the mounting evidence for the role of integrins in polarising epithelial cells. We build a model in which both inside-out signals to polarise basement membrane assembly at the basal surface, and outside-in signals to control microtubule apical–basal orientation and vesicular trafficking are required for establishing and maintaining the orientation of epithelial cell polarity. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the basal integrin polarity axis to cancer. This article is part of a Minifocus on Establishing polarity. For further reading, please see related articles: ‘ERM proteins at a glance’ by Andrea McClatchey (J. Cell Sci. 127, 3199–3204). ‘Establishment of epithelial polarity – GEF who's minding the GAP?’ by Siu Ngok et al. (J. Cell Sci. 127, 3205–3215). PMID:24994933

  8. LIM Homeobox Domain 2 Is Required for Corneal Epithelial Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Sartaj, Rachel; Chee, Ru‐ik; Yang, Jing; Wan, Pengxia; Liu, Aihong; Guaiquil, Victor; Fuchs, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cornea requires constant epithelial renewal to maintain clarity for appropriate vision. A subset of stem cells residing at the limbus is primarily responsible for maintaining corneal epithelium homeostasis. Trauma and disease may lead to stem cell deficiency and therapeutic targeting to replenish the stemness capacity has been stalled by the lack of reliable corneal epithelial stem cell markers. Here we identified the location of Lhx2 in mice (mLhx2) cornea and conjunctival tissue using an Lhx2eGFP reporter model and in human tissues (hLHX2). Lhx2 localized to the basal cells of central cornea, the conjunctiva and the entire limbal epithelium in humans and mice. To ascribe a functional role we generated Lhx2 conditional knockout (cKO) mice and the phenotypic effects in corneas were analyzed by slit lamp microscopy, in cell‐based assays and in a model of corneal epithelium debridement. Immunodetection on corneal sections were used to visualize conjunctivalization, a sign of limbal barrier failure. Lhx2cKO mice produced reduced body hair and spontaneous epithelial defects in the cornea that included neovascularization, perforation with formation of scar tissue and opacification. Cell based assays showed that Lhx2cKO derived corneal epithelial cells have a significantly lower capacity to form colonies over time and delayed wound‐healing recovery when compared to wildtype cells. Repeated corneal epithelial wounding resulted in decreased re‐epithelialization and multiple cornea lesions in Lhx2cKO mice compared to normal recovery seen in wildtype mice. We conclude that Lhx2 is required for maintenance of the corneal epithelial cell compartment and the limbal barrier. Stem Cells 2016;34:493–503 PMID:26661907

  9. Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pechoux, Christine; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J; Petersen, Ole

    1999-02-01

    The origin of the epithelial and myoepithelial cells in the human breast has not been delineated. In this study we have addressed whether luminal epithelial cells and myoepithelial cells are vertically connected, i.e., whether one is the precursor for the other. We used a primary culture assay allowing preservation of basic phenotypic traits of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in culture. The two cell types were then separated immunomagnetically using antibodies directed against lineage-specific cell surface antigens into at best 100% purity. The cellular identity was ascertained by cytochemistry, immunoblotting, and 2-D gel electrophoresis. Luminal epithelial cells were identified by strong expression of cytokeratins 18 and 19 while myoepithelial cells were recognized by expression of vimentin and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin. We used a previously devised culture medium (CDM4) that allows vigorous expansion of proliferative myoepithelial cells and also devised a medium (CDM6) that allowed sufficient expansion of differentiated luminal epithelial cells based on addition of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. The two different culture media supported each lineage for at least five passages without signs of interconversion. We used parallel cultures where we switched culture media, thus testing the ability of each lineage to convert to the other. Whereas the myoepithelial lineage showed no signs of interconversion, a subset of luminal epithelial cells, gradually, but distinctly, converted to myoepithelial cells. We propose that in the mature human breast, it is the luminal epithelial cell compartment that gives rise to myoepithelial cells rather than the other way around.

  10. Evolutionary divergence of adult body size and juvenile growth in sympatric subpopulations of a top predator in aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Tibblin, Petter; Forsman, Anders; Koch-Schmidt, Per; Nordahl, Oscar; Johannessen, Peter; Nilsson, Jonas; Larsson, Per

    2015-07-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that different selective regimes may contribute to divergent evolution of body size and growth rate among populations, but most studies have focused on allopatric populations. Here, we studied five sympatric subpopulations of anadromous northern pike (Esox lucius) in the Baltic Sea subjected to allopatric habitats for a short period of their life cycle due to homing behavior. We report differences in adult body size among subpopulations that were in part due to variation in growth rate. Body size of emigrating juveniles also differed among subpopulations, and differences remained when individuals were reared in a common environment, thus indicating evolutionary divergence among subpopulations. Furthermore, a QST-FST comparison indicated that differences had evolved due to divergent selection rather than genetic drift, possibly in response to differences in selective mortality among spawning habitats during the allopatric life stage. Adult and juvenile size were negatively correlated across subpopulations, and reconstruction of growth trajectories of adult fishes suggested that body size differences developed gradually and became accentuated throughout the first years of life. These results represent rare evidence that sympatric subpopulations can evolve differences in key life-history traits despite being subjected to allopatric habitats during only a very short fraction of their life.

  11. Epigenetic biomarkers in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gloss, Brian S; Samimi, Goli

    2014-01-28

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy and the 5th leading cause of cancer death in women. Women with ovarian cancer are typically diagnosed at late stage, when the cancer has spread into the peritoneal cavity and complete surgical removal is difficult. The 5-year survival time for patients diagnosed at this stage is 30%, in contrast to a 5-year survival of 90% for patients diagnosed at early stage. Cancer screening and early detection have the potential to greatly decrease the mortality and morbidity from cancer. The emerging field of epigenetics offers a valuable opportunity to identify cancer-specific DNA methylation changes that can be used in the clinic to improve early-stage diagnosis and better predict response in treated patients. To date, numerous DNA methylation aberrations have been identified in epithelial ovarian cancer; here we review some candidate genes and pathways with potential clinical utility as biomarkers for diagnosis and/or prognosis. It has become clear that even with the great promise of DNA methylation biomarkers in epithelial ovarian cancer, the identification of highly specific, sensitive and robust panels of markers and the standardization of analysis techniques are still required in order to improve detection, treatment and thus patient outcome.

  12. Neurofilament protein is differentially distributed in subpopulations of corticocortical projection neurons in the macaque monkey visual pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hof, P. R.; Ungerleider, L. G.; Webster, M. J.; Gattass, R.; Adams, M. M.; Sailstad, C. A.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies of the primate cerebral cortex have shown that neurofilament protein is present in pyramidal neuron subpopulations displaying specific regional and laminar distribution patterns. In order to characterize further the neurochemical phenotype of the neurons furnishing feedforward and feedback pathways in the visual cortex of the macaque monkey, we performed an analysis of the distribution of neurofilament protein in corticocortical projection neurons in areas V1, V2, V3, V3A, V4, and MT. Injections of the retrogradely transported dyes Fast Blue and Diamidino Yellow were placed within areas V4 and MT, or in areas V1 and V2, in 14 adult rhesus monkeys, and the brains of these animals were processed for immunohistochemistry with an antibody to nonphosphorylated epitopes of the medium and heavy molecular weight subunits of the neurofilament protein. Overall, there was a higher proportion of neurons projecting from areas V1, V2, V3, and V3A to area MT that were neurofilament protein-immunoreactive (57-100%), than to area V4 (25-36%). In contrast, feedback projections from areas MT, V4, and V3 exhibited a more consistent proportion of neurofilament protein-containing neurons (70-80%), regardless of their target areas (V1 or V2). In addition, the vast majority of feedback neurons projecting to areas V1 and V2 were located in layers V and VI in areas V4 and MT, while they were observed in both supragranular and infragranular layers in area V3. The laminar distribution of feedforward projecting neurons was heterogeneous. In area V1, Meynert and layer IVB cells were found to project to area MT, while neurons projecting to area V4 were particularly dense in layer III within the foveal representation. In area V2, almost all neurons projecting to areas MT or V4 were located in layer III, whereas they were found in both layers II-III and V-VI in areas V3 and V3A. These results suggest that neurofilament protein identifies particular subpopulations of

  13. Porphyromonas gingivalis genes isolated by screening for epithelial cell attachment.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, M J; Emory, S A; Almira, E C

    1996-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is associated with chronic and severe periodontitis in adults. P. gingivalis and the other periodontal pathogens colonize and interact with gingival epithelial cells, but the genes and molecular mechanisms involved are unknown. To dissect the first steps in these interactions, a P. gingivalis expression library was screened for clones which bound human oral epithelial cells. Insert DNA from the recombinant clones did not contain homology to the P. gingivalis fimA gene, encoding fimbrillin, the subunit protein of fimbriae, but showed various degrees of homology to certain cysteine protease-hemagglutinin genes. The DNA sequence of one insert revealed three putative open reading frames which appeared to be in an operon. The relationship between P. gingivalis attachment to epithelial cells and the activities identified by the screen is discussed. PMID:8751909

  14. Emergence of an Apical Epithelial Cell Surface In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Sedzinski, Jakub; Hannezo, Edouard; Tu, Fan; Biro, Maté; Wallingford, John B

    2016-01-11

    Epithelial sheets are crucial components of all metazoan animals, enclosing organs and protecting the animal from its environment. Epithelial homeostasis poses unique challenges, as addition of new cells and loss of old cells must be achieved without disrupting the fluid-tight barrier and apicobasal polarity of the epithelium. Several studies have identified cell biological mechanisms underlying extrusion of cells from epithelia, but far less is known of the converse mechanism by which new cells are added. Here, we combine molecular, pharmacological, and laser-dissection experiments with theoretical modeling to characterize forces driving emergence of an apical surface as single nascent cells are added to a vertebrate epithelium in vivo. We find that this process involves the interplay between cell-autonomous actin-generated pushing forces in the emerging cell and mechanical properties of neighboring cells. Our findings define the forces driving this cell behavior, contributing to a more comprehensive understanding of epithelial homeostasis.

  15. Lingual Epithelial Stem Cells and Organoid Culture of Them.

    PubMed

    Hisha, Hiroko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Ueno, Hiroo

    2016-01-28

    As tongue cancer is one of the major malignant cancers in the world, understanding the mechanism of maintenance of lingual epithelial tissue, which is known to be the origin of tongue cancer, is unquestionably important. However, the actual stem cells that are responsible for the long-term maintenance of the lingual epithelium have not been identified. Moreover, a simple and convenient culture method for lingual epithelial stem cells has not yet been established. Recently, we have shown that Bmi1-positive cells, residing at the second or third layer of the epithelial cell layer at the base of the interpapillary pit (IPP), were slow-cycling and could supply keratinized epithelial cells for over one year, indicating that Bmi1-positive cells are long-term lingual epithelial stem cells. In addition, we have developed a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Here, we discuss current progress in the identification of lingual stem cells and future applications of the lingual culture system for studying the regulatory mechanisms of the lingual epithelium and for regenerative medicine.

  16. NME genes in epithelial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The NME family of genes encodes highly conserved multifunctional proteins that have been shown to participate in nucleic acid metabolism, energy homeostasis, cell signaling, and cancer progression. Some family members, particularly isoforms 1 and 2, have attracted extensive interests because of their potential anti-metastasis activity. Unfortunately, there have been few consensus mechanistic explanations for this critical function because of the numerous molecular functions ascribed to these proteins, including nucleoside diphosphate kinase, protein kinase, nuclease, transcription factor, growth factor, among others. In addition, different studies showed contradictory prognostic correlations between NME expression levels and tumor progression in clinical samples. Thus, analyses using pliable in vivo systems have become critical for unraveling at least some aspects of the complex functions of this family of genes. Recent works using the Drosophila genetic system have suggested a role for NME in regulating epithelial cell motility and morphogenesis, which has also been demonstrated in mammalian epithelial cell culture. This function is mediated by promoting internalization of growth factor receptors in motile epithelial cells, and the adherens junction components such as E-cadherin and β-catenin in epithelia that form the tissue linings. Interestingly, NME genes in epithelial cells appear to function in a defined range of expression levels. Either down-regulation or over-expression can perturb epithelial integrity, resulting in different aspects of epithelial abnormality. Such biphasic functions provide a plausible explanation for the documented anti-metastatic activity and the suspected oncogenic function. This review summarizes these recent findings and discusses their implications. PMID:21336542

  17. Ion Channels in Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Lawrence G.

    Ion channels in epithelial cells serve to move ions, and in some cases fluid, between compartments of the body. This function of the transfer of material is fundamentally different from that of the transfer of information, which is the main job of most channels in excitable cells. Nevertheless the basic construction of the channels is similar in many respects in the two tissue types. This chapter reviews the nature of channels in epithelia and discusses how their functions have evolved to accomplish the basic tasks for which they are responsible. I will focus on three channel types: epithelial Na+ channels, inward-rectifier K+ channels, and CFTR Cl- channels.

  18. Characterization of discrete equine intestinal epithelial cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Liara M.; Kinnin, Leslie A.; Blikslager, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize epithelial cells of the small intestine and colon in horses without clinical gastrointestinal abnormalities with an emphasis on the stem cell niche constituents. SAMPLE Mucosal biopsy specimens from small and large intestines obtained from 12 horses euthanized for reasons unrelated to gastrointestinal disease or systemic disease. PROCEDURES Intestinal biopsy specimens were collected by sharp dissection immediately following euthanasia. Specimens were prepared for immunohistochemical, immunofluorescence, and transmission electron microscopic imaging to detect and characterize each epithelial cell type. Antibodies against protein biomarkers for cellular identification were selected on the basis of expression in other mammalian species. RESULTS Intestinal epithelial cell types were identified by means of immunostaining and morphological characterization with transmission electron microscopy. Some differences in biomarker expression and antibody cross-reactivity were identified in equine tissue, compared with other species. However, each known type of mucosal epithelial cell was identified in equine tissue. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The methodology used can enhance detection of stem cells and progenitor cells as well as postmitotic cell lineages in equine intestinal tissues. Results may have relevance to regenerative potential of intestinal mucosa and survival in horses with colic. PMID:25815577

  19. Sperm characterization and identification of sperm sub-populations in ejaculates from pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus).

    PubMed

    Beracochea, F; Gil, J; Sestelo, A; Garde, J J; Santiago-Moreno, J; Fumagalli, F; Ungerfeld, R

    2014-10-01

    Pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus) is a native endangered species. Knowledge of the basic spermiogram characteristics and the morphometric descriptors is necessary to effectively develop sperm cryopreservation. In other species, sperm sub-population is related to sperm cryo-resistance. The objective was to provide a general description of the sperm, including sperm head morphometric descriptors, its repeatability, and the existence of sperm sub-populations. Sperm were obtained from adult males by electroejaculation during the breeding season. The motility score was 3.4 ± 0.2 (mean ± SEM) and progressive motility was 59.4 ± 3.7%. Ejaculated volume was 413.9 ± 51.0 μl, the total number of sperm ejaculated was 321.2 ± 55.4 × 10(6). Also, 63.3 ± 3.1% of the sperm were morphologically abnormal and 23.7 ± 2.3% had acrosome damage. The sperm head length was 7.6 ± 0.01 μm, width 4.4 ± 0.01 μm, area 28.1 ± 0.07 μm(2) and the perimeter was 21.9 ± 0.04 μm. There was a positive relationship among morphometric descriptors and the motility score, overall motility and progressive motility. Also length (P=0.011), width (P=0.003), area (P=0.006) and perimeter (P=0.009) of sperm head obtained in two different collections were positively related. Overall, the low concentration, volume, overall quality and abnormal morphology, and wide variation of these variables may be a limitation for the development of sperm cryopreserved banks. There were three sperm sub-populations with different morphometric characteristics. The morphometric descriptors are maintained similarly among different collections. PMID:25104472

  20. Variability in subpopulation formation propagates into biocatalytic variability of engineered Pseudomonas putida strains

    PubMed Central

    Lindmeyer, Martin; Jahn, Michael; Vorpahl, Carsten; Müller, Susann; Schmid, Andreas; Bühler, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Pivotal challenges in industrial biotechnology are the identification and overcoming of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in microbial processes. While the development of subpopulations of isogenic cells in bioprocesses is well described (intra-population variability), a possible variability between genetically identical cultures growing under macroscopically identical conditions (clonal variability) is not. A high such clonal variability has been found for the recombinant expression of the styrene monooxygenase genes styAB from Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120 in solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E using the alk-regulatory system from P. putida GPo1. In this study, the oxygenase subunit StyA fused to eGFP was used as readout tool to characterize the population structure in P. putida DOT-T1E regarding recombinant protein content. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that in individual cultures, at least two subpopulations with highly differing recombinant StyA-eGFP protein contents appeared (intra-population variability). Interestingly, subpopulation sizes varied from culture-to-culture correlating with the specific styrene epoxidation activity of cells derived from respective cultures (clonal variability). In addition, flow cytometric cell sorting coupled to plasmid copy number (PCN) determination revealed that detected clonal variations cannot be correlated to the PCN, but depend on the combination of the regulatory system and the host strain employed. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first work reporting that intra-population variability (with differing protein contents in the presented case study) causes clonal variability of genetically identical cultures. Respective impacts on bioprocess reliability and performance and strategies to overcome respective reliability issues are discussed. PMID:26483771

  1. Incorporating population variability and susceptible subpopulations into dosimetry for high-throughput toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, Barbara A; Allen, Brittany; Clewell, Harvey J; Parker, Timothy; Wambaugh, John F; Almond, Lisa M; Sochaski, Mark A; Thomas, Russell S

    2014-11-01

    Momentum is growing worldwide to use in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) to evaluate human health effects of chemicals. However, the integration of dosimetry into HTS assays and incorporation of population variability will be essential before its application in a risk assessment context. Previously, we employed in vitro hepatic metabolic clearance and plasma protein binding data with in vitro in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) modeling to estimate oral equivalent doses, or daily oral chemical doses required to achieve steady-state blood concentrations (Css) equivalent to media concentrations having a defined effect in an in vitro HTS assay. In this study, hepatic clearance rates of selected ToxCast chemicals were measured in vitro for 13 cytochrome P450 and five uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronysyltransferase isozymes using recombinantly expressed enzymes. The isozyme-specific clearance rates were then incorporated into an IVIVE model that captures known differences in isozyme expression across several life stages and ethnic populations. Comparison of the median Css for a healthy population against the median or the upper 95th percentile for more sensitive populations revealed differences of 1.3- to 4.3-fold or 3.1- to 13.1-fold, respectively. Such values may be used to derive chemical-specific human toxicokinetic adjustment factors. The IVIVE model was also used to estimate subpopulation-specific oral equivalent doses that were directly compared with subpopulation-specific exposure estimates. This study successfully combines isozyme and physiologic differences to quantitate subpopulation pharmacokinetic variability. Incorporation of these values with dosimetry and in vitro bioactivities provides a viable approach that could be employed within a high-throughput risk assessment framework. PMID:25145659

  2. AMP-18 Targets p21 to Maintain Epithelial Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peili; Li, Yan Chun; Toback, F Gary

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated homeostasis of epithelial cells resulting in disruption of mucosal barrier function is an important pathogenic mechanism in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). We have characterized a novel gastric protein, Antrum Mucosal Protein (AMP)-18, that has pleiotropic properties; it is mitogenic, anti-apoptotic and can stimulate formation of tight junctions. A 21-mer synthetic peptide derived from AMP-18 exhibits the same biological functions as the full-length protein and is an effective therapeutic agent in mouse models of IBD. In this study we set out to characterize therapeutic mechanisms and identify molecular targets by which AMP-18 maintains and restores disrupted epithelial homeostasis in cultured intestinal epithelial cells and a mouse model of IBD. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, a pro-inflammatory cytokine known to mediate gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal injury in IBD, was used to induce intestinal epithelial cell injury, and study the effects of AMP-18 on apoptosis and the cell cycle. An apoptosis array used to search for targets of AMP-18 in cells exposed to TNF-α identified the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 WAF1/CIP1. Treatment with AMP-18 blunted increases in p21 expression and apoptosis, while reversing disturbed cell cycle kinetics induced by TNF-α. AMP-18 appears to act through PI3K/AKT pathways to increase p21 phosphorylation, thereby reducing its nuclear accumulation to overcome the antiproliferative effects of TNF-α. In vitamin D receptor-deficient mice with TNBS-induced IBD, the observed increase in p21 expression in colonic epithelial cells was suppressed by treatment with AMP peptide. The results indicate that AMP-18 can maintain and/or restore the homeostatic balance between proliferation and apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells to protect and repair mucosal barrier homeostasis and function, suggesting a therapeutic role in IBD.

  3. IL-15Rα deficiency in skeletal muscle alters respiratory function and the proteome of mitochondrial subpopulations independent of changes to the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Grant C; Nichols, Cody; Guo, Ge; Croston, Tara L; Thapa, Dharendra; Hollander, John M; Pistilli, Emidio E

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin-15 receptor alpha knockout (IL15RαKO) mice exhibit a greater skeletal muscle mitochondrial density with an altered mitochondrial morphology. However, the mechanism and functional impact of these changes have not been determined. In this study, we characterized the functional, proteomic, and genomic alterations in mitochondrial subpopulations isolated from the skeletal muscles of IL15RαKO mice and B6129 background control mice. State 3 respiration was greater in interfibrillar mitochondria and whole muscle ATP levels were greater in IL15RαKO mice supporting the increases in respiration rate. However, the state 3/state 4 ratio was lower, suggesting some degree of respiratory uncoupling. Proteomic analyses identified several markers independently in mitochondrial subpopulations that are associated with these functional alterations. Next Generation Sequencing of mtDNA revealed a high degree of similarity between the mitochondrial genomes of IL15RαKO mice and controls in terms of copy number, consensus coding and the presence of minor alleles, suggesting that the functional and proteomic alterations we observed occurred independent of alterations to the mitochondrial genome. These data provide additional evidence to implicate IL-15Rα as a regulator of skeletal muscle phenotypes through effects on the mitochondrion, and suggest these effects are driven by alterations to the mitochondrial proteome.

  4. Human T cells expressing BEND3 on their surface represent a novel subpopulation that preferentially produces IL-6 and IL-8.

    PubMed

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Kitagori, Koji; Sasaki, Chiyomi; Kobayashi, Shio; Aoyama, Takane; Urata, Kozue; Oku, Takuma; Hirayama, Yoshitaka; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Hikida, Masaki; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Watanabe, Takeshi; Shimizu, Jun

    2014-06-01

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has no transmembrane region, is localized in the cytoplasm, and is involved in chromatin function and transcription. We here identified a novel subpopulation of human T cells that expressed BEND3 on their cell surface (BEND3(+) T cells). BEND3(+) T cells consisted of approximately 3% of T cells in the peripheral blood, were present in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and were also observed in cord blood. The stimulation of BEND3(+) T cells through the TCR/CD3 complex led to the production of various kinds of cytokines; however, the levels of IL-6 and IL-8 produced by BEND3(+) T cells were higher than those by BEND3(-) T cells. The proportion of BEND3(+) T cells was also increased in some patients with inflammatory diseases. Taken together, these results indicate that BEND3(+) T cells are a new subpopulation of T cells in terms of their cytokine profile. Further analyses on BEND3(+) T cells may be of importance and useful in understanding human T cell immunology.

  5. Human T cells expressing BEND3 on their surface represent a novel subpopulation that preferentially produces IL-6 and IL-8

    PubMed Central

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Kitagori, Koji; Sasaki, Chiyomi; Kobayashi, Shio; Aoyama, Takane; Urata, Kozue; Oku, Takuma; Hirayama, Yoshitaka; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Hikida, Masaki; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Watanabe, Takeshi; Shimizu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has no transmembrane region, is localized in the cytoplasm, and is involved in chromatin function and transcription. We here identified a novel subpopulation of human T cells that expressed BEND3 on their cell surface (BEND3+ T cells). BEND3+ T cells consisted of approximately 3% of T cells in the peripheral blood, were present in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and were also observed in cord blood. The stimulation of BEND3+ T cells through the TCR/CD3 complex led to the production of various kinds of cytokines; however, the levels of IL-6 and IL-8 produced by BEND3+ T cells were higher than those by BEND3− T cells. The proportion of BEND3+ T cells was also increased in some patients with inflammatory diseases. Taken together, these results indicate that BEND3+ T cells are a new subpopulation of T cells in terms of their cytokine profile. Further analyses on BEND3+ T cells may be of importance and useful in understanding human T cell immunology. PMID:25400923

  6. Human T cells expressing BEND3 on their surface represent a novel subpopulation that preferentially produces IL-6 and IL-8.

    PubMed

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Kitagori, Koji; Sasaki, Chiyomi; Kobayashi, Shio; Aoyama, Takane; Urata, Kozue; Oku, Takuma; Hirayama, Yoshitaka; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Hikida, Masaki; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Watanabe, Takeshi; Shimizu, Jun

    2014-06-01

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has no transmembrane region, is localized in the cytoplasm, and is involved in chromatin function and transcription. We here identified a novel subpopulation of human T cells that expressed BEND3 on their cell surface (BEND3(+) T cells). BEND3(+) T cells consisted of approximately 3% of T cells in the peripheral blood, were present in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and were also observed in cord blood. The stimulation of BEND3(+) T cells through the TCR/CD3 complex led to the production of various kinds of cytokines; however, the levels of IL-6 and IL-8 produced by BEND3(+) T cells were higher than those by BEND3(-) T cells. The proportion of BEND3(+) T cells was also increased in some patients with inflammatory diseases. Taken together, these results indicate that BEND3(+) T cells are a new subpopulation of T cells in terms of their cytokine profile. Further analyses on BEND3(+) T cells may be of importance and useful in understanding human T cell immunology. PMID:25400923

  7. Connective Tissue Growth Factor reporter mice label a subpopulation of mesenchymal progenitor cells that reside in the trabecular bone region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Strecker, Sara; Liu, Yaling; Wang, Liping; Assanah, Fayekah; Smith, Spenser; Maye, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Few gene markers selectively identify mesenchymal progenitor cells inside the bone marrow. We have investigated a cell population located in the mouse bone marrow labeled by Connective Tissue Growth Factor reporter expression (CTGF-EGFP). Bone marrow flushed from CTGF reporter mice yielded an EGFP+ stromal cell population. Interestingly, the percentage of stromal cells retaining CTGF reporter expression decreased with age in vivo and was half the frequency in females compared to males. In culture, CTGF reporter expression and endogenous CTGF expression marked the same cell types as those labeled using Twist2-Cre and Osterix-Cre fate mapping approaches, which previously had been shown to identify mesenchymal progenitors in vitro. Consistent with this past work, sorted CTGF+ cells displayed an ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes in vitro and into osteoblast, adipocyte, and stromal cell lineages after transplantation into a parietal bone defect. In vivo examination of CTGF reporter expression in bone tissue sections revealed that it marked cells highly localized to the trabecular bone region and was not expressed in the perichondrium or periosteum. Mesenchymal cells retaining high CTGF reporter expression were adjacent to, but distinct from mature osteoblasts lining bone surfaces and endothelial cells forming the vascular sinuses. Comparison of CTGF and Osterix reporter expression in bone tissue sections indicated an inverse correlation between the strength of CTGF expression and osteoblast maturation. Down-regulation of CTGF reporter expression also occurred during in vitro osteogenic differentiation. Collectively, our studies indicate that CTGF reporter mice selectively identify a subpopulation of bone marrow mesenchymal progenitor cells that reside in the trabecular bone region.

  8. Alterations in the T-lymphocyte subpopulation in patients with rhinoscleroma.

    PubMed Central

    Berron, P; Berron, R; Ortiz-Ortiz, L

    1988-01-01

    T-lymphocyte subpopulations were studied in a group of patients with rhinoscleroma due to Klebsiella rhinoscleromatis. The data demonstrated that these patients had a significantly greater number of T-suppressor/cytotoxic lymphocytes than did clinically healthy individuals. This finding correlated with a diminished response to the T-cell mitogen concanavalin A. The evidence indicated that the T-cell response of these patients was decreased and may reflect the host's response to the bacterial invader, thus explaining the chronicity of the disease. PMID:2968362

  9. Alix-mediated assembly of the actomyosin–tight junction polarity complex preserves epithelial polarity and epithelial barrier

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Yvan; Qiu, Xiaohui; Gomero, Elida; Wakefield, Randall; Horner, Linda; Brutkowski, Wojciech; Han, Young-Goo; Solecki, David; Frase, Sharon; Bongiovanni, Antonella; d'Azzo, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of epithelial cell polarity and epithelial barrier relies on the spatial organization of the actin cytoskeleton and proper positioning/assembly of intercellular junctions. However, how these processes are regulated is poorly understood. Here we reveal a key role for the multifunctional protein Alix in both processes. In a knockout mouse model of Alix, we identified overt structural changes in the epithelium of the choroid plexus and in the ependyma, such as asymmetrical cell shape and size, misplacement and abnormal beating of cilia, blebbing of the microvilli. These defects culminate in excessive cell extrusion, enlargement of the lateral ventricles and hydrocephalus. Mechanistically, we find that by interacting with F-actin, the Par complex and ZO-1, Alix ensures the formation and maintenance of the apically restricted actomyosin–tight junction complex. We propose that in this capacity Alix plays a role in the establishment of apical–basal polarity and in the maintenance of the epithelial barrier. PMID:27336173

  10. Immunohistochemical localization of WT1 in epithelial salivary tumors.

    PubMed

    Leader, Ross; Deol-Poonia, Ranjeev Kaur; Sheard, Jon; Triantafyllou, Asterios

    2014-11-01

    The subcellular localization of WT1 is controversial and has received little attention in the epithelial tumors of salivary glands. Paraffin-embedded, surgical specimens from 80 salivary tumors were investigated by immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal, anti-WT1 antibody (6F-H2, Dako). Immunostaining was seen in 14/14 pleomorphic adenomas (PAs), 6/6 myoepitheliomas, 4/4 basal cell adenomas, 4/4 canalicular adenomas, 0/7 Warthin tumors, 0/1 oncocytoma, 1/6 acinic cell carcinomas (Cas), 0/11 mucoepidemoid Cas, 1/11 adenoid cystic Cas, 11/12 polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas (PLGAs), 1/2 Ca ex PA, 0/1 salivary duct Ca and 0/1 clear cell adenocarcinoma. Stained-cell subpopulations up to 90% were not uncommon in the benign tumors. Up to 80% of cells in PLGA could be stained. Staining was weak to intense and confined to the cytoplasm of preferentially non-luminal or adjacent to stroma cells. One adenoid cystic Ca showed nuclear staining. The results suggest that WT1 is often highly expressed in benign non-oncocytic salivary tumors whereas the malignant tumors show decreased expression, the exception being PLGA. The expression is usually cytoplasmic and associated with non-luminal cells. PLGA immunoreactivities could be useful in histological differential diagnosis.

  11. Gastrointestinal epithelial neoplasia: Vienna revisited.

    PubMed

    Dixon, M F

    2002-07-01

    International consensus meetings in Padova and Vienna have attempted to rationalise the grading and classification of gastrointestinal epithelial neoplasia (GEN). With its minor adjustments, the Vienna classification of GEN seeks to be more closely in tune with patient management and it is hoped that it is not seen as fiddling around with terms but as a genuine contribution to patient care.

  12. Assessment of lymphocyte subpopulations and cytokine secretion in children exposed to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Soto-Peña, Gerson A; Luna, Ana L; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor; Conde, Patricia; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Cebrián, Mariano E; Bastida, Mariana; Calderón-Aranda, Emma S; Vega, Libia

    2006-04-01

    Exposure of several human populations to arsenic has been associated with a high incidence of detrimental dermatological and carcinogenic effects. To date, studies examining the immunotoxic effects of arsenic in humans, and specifically in children, are lacking. Therefore, we evaluated several parameters of immunological status in a group of children exposed to arsenic through their drinking water. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 90 children (6 to 10 years old) were collected. Proportions of lymphocyte subpopulations, PBMC mitogenic proliferative response, and urinary arsenic levels were evaluated. Increased urine arsenic levels were associated with a reduced proliferative response to phytohemaglutinin (PHA) stimulation (P=0.005), CD4 subpopulation proportion (P=0.092), CD4/CD8 ratio (P=0.056), and IL-2 secretion levels (P=0.003). Increased arsenic exposure was also associated with an increase in GM-CSF secretion by mononucleated cells (P=0.000). We did not observe changes in CD8, B, or NK cell proportions, nor did we observe changes in the secretion of IL-4, IL-10, or IFN-gamma by PHA-activated PBMCs. These data indicate that arsenic exposure could alter the activation processes of T cells, such that an immunosuppression status that favors opportunistic infections and carcinogenesis is produced together with increased GM-CSF secretion that may be associated with chronic inflammation.

  13. Circadian variations of cortisol, melatonin and lymphocyte subpopulations in geriatric age.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, G; Vendemiale, G; La Viola, M; De Cata, A; Carughi, S; Greco, A; Balzanelli, M; Tarquini, R

    2010-01-01

    A number of age-related changes in the 24-hour hormonal and non-hormonal rhythms have been found in older human beings. Lymphocyte subpopulations present circadian variation of some of their subsets and this variation may influence magnitude and expression of the immune responses. Numerous interactions exist among the nervous, endocrine and immune systems, mediated by neurotransmitters, hormones and cytokines. The aim of this study is to evaluate circadian variations of some endocrine and immune factors in older adults. Cortisol and melatonin serum levels were measured and lymphocyte subpopulation analyses were performed on blood samples collected every four hours for 24 hours from ten healthy young and middle-aged subjects and from ten healthy elderly subjects. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups in the observed values of CD20 (higher in young and middle-aged subjects) and CD25 and DR+ T cells (higher in elderly subjects). In the group of young and middle-aged subjects a clear circadian rhythm was validated for the time-qualified changes of all the factors studied. In the group of elderly subjects a number of rhythms were absent or altered. The results of the current study show that aging is associated with enhanced responsiveness of T cell compartment and alterations of circadian rhythmicity.

  14. Characterizing Subpopulations within the near-Earth Objects with NEOWISE: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; McMillan, R. S.; Giorgini, J.; Spahr, T.; Cutri, R. M.; Tholen, D. J.; Jedicke, R.; Walker, R.; Wright, E.; Nugent, C. R.

    2012-06-01

    We present the preliminary results of an analysis of the sub-populations within the near-Earth asteroids, including the Atens, Apollos, Amors, and those that are considered potentially hazardous using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). In order to extrapolate the sample of objects detected by WISE to the greater population, we determined the survey biases for asteroids detected by the project's automated moving object processing system (known as NEOWISE) as a function of diameter, visible albedo, and orbital elements. Using this technique, we are able to place constraints on the number of potentially hazardous asteroids larger than 100 m and find that there are ~4700 ± 1450 such objects. As expected, the Atens, Apollos, and Amors are revealed by WISE to have somewhat different albedo distributions, with the Atens being brighter than the Amors. The cumulative size distributions of the various near-Earth object (NEO) subgroups vary slightly between 100 m and 1 km. A comparison of the observed orbital elements of the various sub-populations of the NEOs with the current best model is shown.

  15. Identification of Distinct Tumor Subpopulations in Lung Adenocarcinoma via Single-Cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Min, Jae-Woong; Kim, Woo Jin; Han, Jeong A; Jung, Yu-Jin; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Park, Woong-Yang; Lee, Hae-Ock; Choi, Sun Shim

    2015-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing, which is used to detect clinically important tumor subpopulations, is necessary for understanding tumor heterogeneity. Here, we analyzed transcriptomic data obtained from 34 single cells from human lung adenocarcinoma (LADC) patient-derived xenografts (PDXs). To focus on the intrinsic transcriptomic signatures of these tumors, we filtered out genes that displayed extensive expression changes following xenografting and cell culture. Then, we performed clustering analysis using co-regulated gene modules rather than individual genes to minimize read drop-out errors associated with single-cell sequencing. This combined approach revealed two distinct intra-tumoral subgroups that were primarily distinguished by the gene module G64. The G64 module was predominantly composed of cell-cycle genes. E2F1 was found to be the transcription factor that most likely mediates the expression of the G64 module in single LADC cells. Interestingly, the G64 module also indicated inter-tumoral heterogeneity based on its association with patient survival and other clinical variables such as smoking status and tumor stage. Taken together, these results demonstrate the feasibility of single-cell RNA sequencing and the strength of our analytical pipeline for the identification of tumor subpopulations. PMID:26305796

  16. CHARACTERIZING SUBPOPULATIONS WITHIN THE NEAR-EARTH OBJECTS WITH NEOWISE: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Giorgini, J.; Grav, T.; McMillan, R. S.; Spahr, T.; Cutri, R. M.; Tholen, D. J.; Jedicke, R.; Walker, R.; Wright, E.; Nugent, C. R.

    2012-06-20

    We present the preliminary results of an analysis of the sub-populations within the near-Earth asteroids, including the Atens, Apollos, Amors, and those that are considered potentially hazardous using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). In order to extrapolate the sample of objects detected by WISE to the greater population, we determined the survey biases for asteroids detected by the project's automated moving object processing system (known as NEOWISE) as a function of diameter, visible albedo, and orbital elements. Using this technique, we are able to place constraints on the number of potentially hazardous asteroids larger than 100 m and find that there are {approx}4700 {+-} 1450 such objects. As expected, the Atens, Apollos, and Amors are revealed by WISE to have somewhat different albedo distributions, with the Atens being brighter than the Amors. The cumulative size distributions of the various near-Earth object (NEO) subgroups vary slightly between 100 m and 1 km. A comparison of the observed orbital elements of the various sub-populations of the NEOs with the current best model is shown.

  17. PAX4 Defines an Expandable β-Cell Subpopulation in the Adult Pancreatic Islet

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Petra I.; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Brun, Thierry; Cobo-Vuilleumier, Nadia; Jimenez-Moreno, Carmen María; G. Herrera Gomez, Irene; López Noriega, Livia; Mellado-Gil, José Manuel; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Soria, Bernat; Gauthier, Benoit R.

    2015-01-01

    PAX4 is a key regulator of pancreatic islet development whilst in adult acute overexpression protects β-cells against stress-induced apoptosis and stimulates proliferation. Nonetheless, sustained PAX4 expression promotes β-cell dedifferentiation and hyperglycemia, mimicking β-cell failure in diabetic patients. Herein, we study mechanisms that allow stringent PAX4 regulation endowing favorable β-cell adaptation in response to changing environment without loss of identity. To this end, PAX4 expression was monitored using a mouse bearing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) and cre recombinase construct under the control of the islet specific pax4 promoter. GFP was detected in 30% of islet cells predominantly composed of PAX4-enriched β-cells that responded to glucose-induced insulin secretion. Lineage tracing demonstrated that all islet cells were derived from PAX4+ progenitor cells but that GFP expression was confined to a subpopulation at birth which declined with age correlating with reduced replication. However, this GFP+ subpopulation expanded during pregnancy, a state of active β-cell replication. Accordingly, enhanced proliferation was exclusively detected in GFP+ cells consistent with cell cycle genes being stimulated in PAX4-overexpressing islets. Under stress conditions, GFP+ cells were more resistant to apoptosis than their GFP- counterparts. Our data suggest PAX4 defines an expandable β-cell sub population within adult islets. PMID:26503027

  18. Root canal anatomy of mandibular first premolars in an Emirati subpopulation: A laboratory study

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sheela Balu; Gopinath, Vellore Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the root canal anatomy of mandibular first premolar teeth in an Emirati subpopulation using a decalcification and clearing method. Materials and Methods: One hundred permanent mandibular first premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes from an Emirati subpopulation from the United Arab Emirates were used for this study. They were subjected to decalcification and clearing. The tooth length, the canal orifice shape, mesial invagination, canal pattern, the location of apex, presence of lateral canals, and intercanal communications were determined. Results: The most common canal pattern was the Vertucci Type I (65%) followed by Type V (14%) and Type IV (13%). The most common type of canal orifice seen was the oval shape (36%) followed by the round shape (25%). Mesial invaginations were seen in 44% of the teeth. The mean tooth length was 19.9 mm, and apical deltas were seen in 24% of teeth. Conclusion: The Vertucci Type I canal pattern was the most prevalent in the mandibular first premolars while the occurrence of multiple canals was noted in 35% of this population. PMID:26929684

  19. Identification of Distinct Tumor Subpopulations in Lung Adenocarcinoma via Single-Cell RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jae-Woong; Kim, Woo Jin; Han, Jeong A.; Jung, Yu-Jin; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Park, Woong-Yang; Lee, Hae-Ock; Choi, Sun Shim

    2015-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing, which is used to detect clinically important tumor subpopulations, is necessary for understanding tumor heterogeneity. Here, we analyzed transcriptomic data obtained from 34 single cells from human lung adenocarcinoma (LADC) patient-derived xenografts (PDXs). To focus on the intrinsic transcriptomic signatures of these tumors, we filtered out genes that displayed extensive expression changes following xenografting and cell culture. Then, we performed clustering analysis using co-regulated gene modules rather than individual genes to minimize read drop-out errors associated with single-cell sequencing. This combined approach revealed two distinct intra-tumoral subgroups that were primarily distinguished by the gene module G64. The G64 module was predominantly composed of cell-cycle genes. E2F1 was found to be the transcription factor that most likely mediates the expression of the G64 module in single LADC cells. Interestingly, the G64 module also indicated inter-tumoral heterogeneity based on its association with patient survival and other clinical variables such as smoking status and tumor stage. Taken together, these results demonstrate the feasibility of single-cell RNA sequencing and the strength of our analytical pipeline for the identification of tumor subpopulations. PMID:26305796

  20. CD36 is expressed in a defined subpopulation of neurons in the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, André Machado; Ludwig, Raissa Guimarães; Nagai, Maíra Harume; de Almeida, Tiago Jonas; Watanabe, Hebe Mizuno; Hirata, Marcio Yukio; Rosenstock, Tatiana Rosado; Papes, Fabio; Malnic, Bettina; Glezer, Isaias

    2016-01-01

    The sensory neurons in the olfactory epithelium (OSNs) are equipped with a large repertoire of olfactory receptors and the associated signal transduction machinery. In addition to the canonical OSNs, which express odorant receptors (ORs), the epithelium contains specialized subpopulations of sensory neurons that can detect specific information from environmental cues and relay it to relevant neuronal circuitries. Here we describe a subpopulation of mature OSNs in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) which expresses CD36, a multifunctional receptor involved in a series of biological processes, including sensory perception of lipid ligands. The Cd36 expressing neurons coexpress markers of mature OSNs and are dispersed throughout the MOE. Unlike several ORs analyzed in our study, we found frequent coexpression of the OR Olfr287 in these neurons, suggesting that only a specific set of ORs may be coexpressed with CD36 in OSNs. We also show that CD36 is expressed in the cilia of OSNs, indicating a possible role in odorant detection. CD36-deficient mice display no signs of gross changes in the organization of the olfactory epithelium, but show impaired preference for a lipid mixture odor. Our results show that CD36-expressing neurons represent a distinct population of OSNs, which may have specific functions in olfaction. PMID:27145700

  1. Surface-Micromachined Microfiltration Membranes for Efficient Isolation and Functional Immunophenotyping of Subpopulations of Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Boram; Lam, Raymond H. W.; Fan, Rong; Cornell, Timothy T.; Shanley, Thomas P.; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Fu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    An accurate measurement of the immune status in patients with immune system disorders is critical in evaluating the stage of diseases and tailoring drug treatments. The functional cellular immunity test is a promising method to establish the diagnosis of immune dysfunctions. The conventional functional cellular immunity test involves measurements of the capacity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines when stimulated ex vivo. However, this “bulk” assay measures the overall reactivity of a population of lymphocytes and monocytes, making it difficult to pinpoint the phenotype or real identity of the reactive immune cells involved. In this research, we develop a large surface micromachined polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfiltration membrane (PMM) with high porosity, which is integrated in a microfluidic microfiltration platform. Using the PMM with functionalized microbeads conjugated with antibodies against specific cell surface proteins, we demonstrated rapid, efficient and high-throughput on-chip isolation, enrichment, and stimulation of subpopulations of immune cells from blood specimens. Furthermore, the PMM-integrated microfiltration platform, coupled with a no-wash homogeneous chemiluminescence assay (“AlphaLISA”), enables us to demonstrate rapid and sensitive on-chip immunophenotyping assays for subpopulations of immune cells isolated directly from minute quantities of blood samples. PMID:23335389

  2. Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease Does Not Affect Circulating Monocyte Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Krzanowski, Marek; Malinowski, Krzysztof P.; Nizankowski, Rafal

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes are mononuclear cells characterized by distinct morphology and expression of CD14 and CD16 surface receptors. Classical, quiescent monocytes are positive for CD14 (lipopolysaccharide receptor) but do not express Fc gamma receptor III (CD16). Intermediate monocytes coexpress CD16 and CD14. Nonclassical monocytes with low expression of CD14 represent mature macrophage-like monocytes. Monocyte behavior in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and during vessel wall directed treatment is not well defined. This observation study aimed at monitoring of acute changes in monocyte subpopulations during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in PAD patients. Patients with Rutherford 3 and 4 PAD with no signs of inflammatory process underwent PTA of iliac, femoral, or popliteal segments. Flow cytometry for CD14, CD16, HLA-DR, CD11b, CD11c, and CD45RA antigens allowed characterization of monocyte subpopulations in blood sampled before and after PTA (direct angioplasty catheter sampling). Patients were clinically followed up for 12 months. All 61 enrolled patients completed 12-month follow-up. Target vessel failure occurred in 12 patients. While absolute counts of monocyte were significantly lower after PTA, only subtle monocyte activation after PTA (CD45RA and β-integrins) occurred. None of the monocyte parameters correlated with long-term adverse clinical outcome. Changes in absolute monocyte counts and subtle changes towards an activation phenotype after PTA may reflect local cell adhesion phenomenon in patients with Rutherford 3 or 4 peripheral arterial disease.

  3. Epithelial decision-makers : in search of the “epimmunome”

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Mahima; Jamora, Colin; Havran, Wendy; Hayday, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Frequent microbial and non-microbial challenges to epithelial cells trigger discrete pathways, promoting molecular changes, such as the secretion of specific cytokines and chemokines, and alterations to molecules displayed at the epithelial cell surface. In combination, these molecules impose major decisions on innate and adaptive immune cells. Depending on context, those decisions can be as diverse as those imposed by professional antigen presenting cells, benefitting the host by balancing immune competence with the avoidance of immunopathology. Nonetheless, this potency of epithelial cells is also consistent with the causal contribution of epithelial dysregulation to myriad inflammatory diseases. This pathogenic axis provides an attractive target for tissue-specific clinical manipulation. In this context, a research goal should be to identify all molecules used by epithelial cells to instruct immune cells. We term this the epimmunome. PMID:20644571

  4. Differential influences of local subpopulations on regional diversity and differentiation for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus).

    PubMed

    Row, Jeffrey R; Oyler-McCance, Sara J; Fedy, Bradley C

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of spatial genetic variation across a region can shape evolutionary dynamics and impact population persistence. Local population dynamics and among-population dispersal rates are strong drivers of this spatial genetic variation, yet for many species we lack a clear understanding of how these population processes interact in space to shape within-species genetic variation. Here, we used extensive genetic and demographic data from 10 subpopulations of greater sage-grouse to parameterize a simulated approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) model and (i) test for regional differences in population density and dispersal rates for greater sage-grouse subpopulations in Wyoming, and (ii) quantify how these differences impact subpopulation regional influence on genetic variation. We found a close match between observed and simulated data under our parameterized model and strong variation in density and dispersal rates across Wyoming. Sensitivity analyses suggested that changes in dispersal (via landscape resistance) had a greater influence on regional differentiation, whereas changes in density had a greater influence on mean diversity across all subpopulations. Local subpopulations, however, varied in their regional influence on genetic variation. Decreases in the size and dispersal rates of central populations with low overall and net immigration (i.e. population sources) had the greatest negative impact on genetic variation. Overall, our results provide insight into the interactions among demography, dispersal and genetic variation and highlight the potential of ABC to disentangle the complexity of regional population dynamics and project the genetic impact of changing conditions.

  5. Differential influences of local subpopulations on regional diversity and differentiation for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus).

    PubMed

    Row, Jeffrey R; Oyler-McCance, Sara J; Fedy, Bradley C

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of spatial genetic variation across a region can shape evolutionary dynamics and impact population persistence. Local population dynamics and among-population dispersal rates are strong drivers of this spatial genetic variation, yet for many species we lack a clear understanding of how these population processes interact in space to shape within-species genetic variation. Here, we used extensive genetic and demographic data from 10 subpopulations of greater sage-grouse to parameterize a simulated approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) model and (i) test for regional differences in population density and dispersal rates for greater sage-grouse subpopulations in Wyoming, and (ii) quantify how these differences impact subpopulation regional influence on genetic variation. We found a close match between observed and simulated data under our parameterized model and strong variation in density and dispersal rates across Wyoming. Sensitivity analyses suggested that changes in dispersal (via landscape resistance) had a greater influence on regional differentiation, whereas changes in density had a greater influence on mean diversity across all subpopulations. Local subpopulations, however, varied in their regional influence on genetic variation. Decreases in the size and dispersal rates of central populations with low overall and net immigration (i.e. population sources) had the greatest negative impact on genetic variation. Overall, our results provide insight into the interactions among demography, dispersal and genetic variation and highlight the potential of ABC to disentangle the complexity of regional population dynamics and project the genetic impact of changing conditions. PMID:27483196

  6. MicroRNAs and Epithelial Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Drescher, Kristen M.; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs are required for development and maintenance of the epithelial barrier. It is hypothesized that microRNAs are involved in regulating epithelial anti-microbial defenses by targeting key epithelial effector molecules and/or influencing intracellular signaling pathways. Additionally, aberrant microRNA expression has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases at the skin and mucosa. Increased understanding of the role of microRNAs in epithelial immunoregulation and identification of microRNAs of pathogenetic significance will enhance our understanding of epithelial immunobiology and immunopathology. PMID:19811319

  7. [Isolation, purification and identification of epithelial cells derived from fetal islet-like cell clusters].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Hai; Zhao, Ting; Wang, Yun; Yang, Chun-Rong; Xiao, Mei; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this article is to provide methods for the isolation and identification of pancreatic stem cells and cell source for research and therapy of diabetes. ICCs were isolated by collagenase IV digesting and then cultured; epithelial cells were purified from monolayer cultured ICCs. The growth curve of the epithelial cells was measured by MTT. The expression of molecular markers in the cells was identified by immunohistochemical staining. The surface markers in the epithelial cells were analyzed by FACS. Epithelial cells were purified from isolated human fetal ICCs and passaged 40 times, and 10(6) - 10(8) cells were cryopreservated per passage. The growth curve demonstrated that the epithelial cells proliferated rapidly. The epithelial cells expressed PDX-1, PCNA, CK-7, CK-19, Nestin, Glut2, and Vimentin, but Insulin was undetected. The cells expressed CD29, CD44, and CD166, but did not express CD11a, CD14, CD34, CD45, CD90, CD105, and CD117. Taken together, these results indicate that self-renewable epithelial cells can be isolated and purified from human fetal pancreas. These also show that the epithelial cells originate from ducts and have the characteristics of pancreatic stem cells. PMID:17460896

  8. [Isolation, purification and identification of epithelial cells derived from fetal islet-like cell clusters].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Hai; Zhao, Ting; Wang, Yun; Yang, Chun-Rong; Xiao, Mei; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this article is to provide methods for the isolation and identification of pancreatic stem cells and cell source for research and therapy of diabetes. ICCs were isolated by collagenase IV digesting and then cultured; epithelial cells were purified from monolayer cultured ICCs. The growth curve of the epithelial cells was measured by MTT. The expression of molecular markers in the cells was identified by immunohistochemical staining. The surface markers in the epithelial cells were analyzed by FACS. Epithelial cells were purified from isolated human fetal ICCs and passaged 40 times, and 10(6) - 10(8) cells were cryopreservated per passage. The growth curve demonstrated that the epithelial cells proliferated rapidly. The epithelial cells expressed PDX-1, PCNA, CK-7, CK-19, Nestin, Glut2, and Vimentin, but Insulin was undetected. The cells expressed CD29, CD44, and CD166, but did not express CD11a, CD14, CD34, CD45, CD90, CD105, and CD117. Taken together, these results indicate that self-renewable epithelial cells can be isolated and purified from human fetal pancreas. These also show that the epithelial cells originate from ducts and have the characteristics of pancreatic stem cells.

  9. Kindlin-2 inhibits serous epithelial ovarian cancer peritoneal dissemination and predicts patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Caixia; Du, Juan; Xi, Chenguang; Yu, Yu; Hu, Ajin; Zhan, Jun; Guo, Hongyan; Fang, Weigang; Liu, Congrong; Zhang, Hongquan

    2014-03-28

    Kindlin-2 has been known to promote most cancer progression through regulation of multiple signaling pathways. However, a novel tumor suppressive role of Kindlin-2 was identified in serous epithelial ovarian cancer progression, which sharply contrasts to the tumor promoting roles for Kindlin-2 in most other cancers. While we demonstrated that Kindlin-2 was highly expressed in control tissues, a drastic low expression of Kindlin-2 was found in the tumor tissues of serous epithelial ovarian cancer, especially in the high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer. Importantly, Kindlin-2 inhibited serous epithelial ovarian cancer cell peritoneal dissemination in a mouse model. For clinical relevance, low Kindlin-2 expression correlated with higher tumor grade and older patients. Intriguingly, decreased Kindlin-2 expression predicts poor overall and progression-free survivals in serous epithelial ovarian cancer patients. Mechanistically, Kindlin-2 induced a mesenchymal to epithelial transition in serous epithelial ovarian cancer cells, at least in part, by up-regulation of estrogen receptor α which was recruited to the promoter of E-cadherin and thereby enhanced the transcription of E-cadherin. Collectively, we concluded that inadequate Kindlin-2 is an independent risk factor for serous epithelial ovarian cancer patients.

  10. Neutrophil Interactions with Epithelial Expressed ICAM-1 Enhances Intestinal Mucosal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Sumagin, R; Brazil, JC; Nava, P; Nishio, H; Alam, A; Luissint, AC; Weber, DA; Neish, AS; Nusrat, A; Parkos, CA

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of gastrointestinal tract inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, is polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) transepithelial migration (TEM) and accumulation in the gut lumen. PMN accumulation within the intestinal mucosa contributes to tissue injury. While epithelial infiltration by large numbers of PMNs results in mucosal injury, we found that PMN interactions with luminal epithelial membrane receptors may also play a role in wound healing. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a PMN ligand that is upregulated on apical surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells under inflammatory conditions. In our study, increased expression of ICAM-1 resulted in enhanced PMN binding to the apical epithelium, which was associated with reduced PMN apoptosis. Following TEM, PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 resulted in activation of Akt and β-catenin signaling, increased epithelial-cell proliferation, and wound healing. Such responses were ICAM-1 dependent as engagement of epithelial ICAM-1 by antibody-mediated cross-linking yielded similar results. Furthermore, using an in-vivo biopsy-based, colonic-mucosal-injury model, we demonstrated epithelial ICAM-1 plays an important role in activation of epithelial Akt and β-catenin signaling and wound healing. These findings suggest that post-migrated PMNs within the intestinal lumen can regulate epithelial homeostasis, thereby identifying ICAM-1 as a potential therapeutic target for promoting mucosal wound healing. PMID:26732677

  11. Progress Towards Drosophila Epithelial Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila epithelial research is at the forefront of the field; however, there are no well-characterized epithelial cell lines that could provide a complementary in vitro model for studies conducted in vivo. Here, a protocol is described that produces epithelial cell lines. The method uses genetic manipulation of oncogenes or tumor suppressors to induce embryonic primary culture cells to rapidly progress to permanent cell lines. It is, however, a general method and the type of cells that comprise a given line is not controlled experimentally. Indeed, only a small fraction of the lines produced are epithelial in character. For this reason, additional work needs to be done to develop a more robust epithelial cell-specific protocol. It is expected that Drosophila epithelial cell lines will have great utility for in vitro analysis of epithelial biology, particularly high-throughput analyses such as RNAi screens. PMID:23097097

  12. MICAL2 is a novel human cancer gene controlling mesenchymal to epithelial transition involved in cancer growth and invasion.

    PubMed

    Mariotti, Sara; Barravecchia, Ivana; Vindigni, Carla; Pucci, Angela; Balsamo, Michele; Libro, Rosaliana; Senchenko, Vera; Dmitriev, Alexey; Jacchetti, Emanuela; Cecchini, Marco; Roviello, Franco; Lai, Michele; Broccoli, Vania; Andreazzoli, Massimiliano; Mazzanti, Chiara M; Angeloni, Debora

    2016-01-12

    The MICAL (Molecules Interacting with CasL) proteins catalyze actin oxidation-reduction reactions destabilizing F-actin in cytoskeletal dynamics. Here we show for the first time that MICAL2 mRNA is significantly over-expressed in aggressive, poorly differentiated/undifferentiated, primary human epithelial cancers (gastric and renal). Immunohistochemistry showed MICAL2-positive cells on the cancer invasive front and in metastasizing cancer cells inside emboli, but not at sites of metastasis, suggesting MICAL2 expression was 'on' in a subpopulation of primary cancer cells seemingly detaching from the tissue of origin, enter emboli and travel to distant sites, and was turned 'off' upon homing at metastatic sites. In vitro, MICAL2 knock-down resulted in mesenchymal to epithelial transition, reduction of viability, and loss of motility and invasion properties of human cancer cells. Moreover, expression of MICAL2 cDNA in MICAL2-depleted cells induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Altogether our data indicate that MICAL2 over-expression is associated with cancer progression and metastatic disease. MICAL2 might be an important regulator of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and therefore a promising target for anti-metastatic therapy. PMID:26689989

  13. MICAL2 is a novel human cancer gene controlling mesenchymal to epithelial transition involved in cancer growth and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Vindigni, Carla; Pucci, Angela; Balsamo, Michele; Libro, Rosaliana; Senchenko, Vera; Dmitriev, Alexey; Jacchetti, Emanuela; Cecchini, Marco; Roviello, Franco; Lai, Michele; Broccoli, Vania; Andreazzoli, Massimiliano; Mazzanti, Chiara M.; Angeloni, Debora

    2016-01-01

    The MICAL (Molecules Interacting with CasL) proteins catalyze actin oxidation-reduction reactions destabilizing F-actin in cytoskeletal dynamics. Here we show for the first time that MICAL2 mRNA is significantly over-expressed in aggressive, poorly differentiated/undifferentiated, primary human epithelial cancers (gastric and renal). Immunohistochemistry showed MICAL2-positive cells on the cancer invasive front and in metastasizing cancer cells inside emboli, but not at sites of metastasis, suggesting MICAL2 expression was 'on' in a subpopulation of primary cancer cells seemingly detaching from the tissue of origin, enter emboli and travel to distant sites, and was turned 'off' upon homing at metastatic sites. In vitro, MICAL2 knock-down resulted in mesenchymal to epithelial transition, reduction of viability, and loss of motility and invasion properties of human cancer cells. Moreover, expression of MICAL2 cDNA in MICAL2-depleted cells induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Altogether our data indicate that MICAL2 over-expression is associated with cancer progression and metastatic disease. MICAL2 might be an important regulator of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and therefore a promising target for anti-metastatic therapy. PMID:26689989

  14. MICAL2 is a novel human cancer gene controlling mesenchymal to epithelial transition involved in cancer growth and invasion.

    PubMed

    Mariotti, Sara; Barravecchia, Ivana; Vindigni, Carla; Pucci, Angela; Balsamo, Michele; Libro, Rosaliana; Senchenko, Vera; Dmitriev, Alexey; Jacchetti, Emanuela; Cecchini, Marco; Roviello, Franco; Lai, Michele; Broccoli, Vania; Andreazzoli, Massimiliano; Mazzanti, Chiara M; Angeloni, Debora

    2016-01-12

    The MICAL (Molecules Interacting with CasL) proteins catalyze actin oxidation-reduction reactions destabilizing F-actin in cytoskeletal dynamics. Here we show for the first time that MICAL2 mRNA is significantly over-expressed in aggressive, poorly differentiated/undifferentiated, primary human epithelial cancers (gastric and renal). Immunohistochemistry showed MICAL2-positive cells on the cancer invasive front and in metastasizing cancer cells inside emboli, but not at sites of metastasis, suggesting MICAL2 expression was 'on' in a subpopulation of primary cancer cells seemingly detaching from the tissue of origin, enter emboli and travel to distant sites, and was turned 'off' upon homing at metastatic sites. In vitro, MICAL2 knock-down resulted in mesenchymal to epithelial transition, reduction of viability, and loss of motility and invasion properties of human cancer cells. Moreover, expression of MICAL2 cDNA in MICAL2-depleted cells induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Altogether our data indicate that MICAL2 over-expression is associated with cancer progression and metastatic disease. MICAL2 might be an important regulator of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and therefore a promising target for anti-metastatic therapy.

  15. Particle size-density relationships in pyroclastic deposits: using component subpopulations to elucidate depositional conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackaman-Lofland, C. A.; Brand, B. D.; Taddeucci, J.

    2012-12-01

    Pyroclastic Density Currents (PDCs) are ground-hugging currents of hot gas, ash, and rock that travel at velocities up to 150 m/s down the flanks of volcanoes. PDCs are the most dangerous hazard associated with explosive volcanic eruptions, but because of current opacity and the risk inherent to observing PDCs in real time, their processes are poorly understood. Geologists rely on depositional relationships to lend insight into PDC transport and depositional processes. Outcrop exposure is typically incomplete, however, and the extent to which outcrop-scale depositional characteristics are representative of the parent current is still uncertain. The May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens (MSH) produced multiple PDCs, burying the area north of the crater under 10s of meters of PDC deposits. Deep drainage erosion over the past 30 years has exposed these deposits in three dimensions, allowing a detailed study of deposit structures to be conducted for a variety of locations and depositional regimes with distance from source. We examine the grain size distribution and density characteristics of the discrete component subpopulations that make up the solids fraction of PDC deposits, focusing on changes associated with lateral facies variation, distance from source, and degree of topographic roughness. We analyze the grain size and density relationships of the component subpopulations using sequential fragmentation / transport theory (SFT), and use crystal morphoscopy to determine how different regional transport systems effect feldspar and hornblende crystal shape following the methods of Taddeucci and Palladino ((2002) Particle size-density relationships in pyroclastic deposits: inferences for emplacement processes. Bull Volcanol 64:273-284). Calculations of representative proximal and distal samples indicate juvenile pumice densities of ~1.3g/mL, accidental lithic densities of ~2.7g/mL, and crystal densities of ~2.6g/mL. We observe a general decrease in grain size and

  16. Phagocytic activity of monocytes, their subpopulations and granulocytes during post-transplant adverse events after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Döring, Michaela; Cabanillas Stanchi, Karin Melanie; Erbacher, Annika; Haufe, Susanne; Schwarze, Carl Philipp; Handgretinger, Rupert; Hofbeck, Michael; Kerst, Gunter

    2015-05-01

    Phagocytosis of granulocytes and monocytes presents a major mechanism that contributes to the clearance of pathogens and cell debris. We analyzed the phagocytic activity of the peripheral blood cell monocytes, three monocyte subpopulations and granulocytes before and up to one year after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, as well as during transplant-related adverse events. 25 pediatric patients and young adults (median age of 11.0 years) with hemato-oncological malignancies and non malignancies were enrolled in the prospective study. Ingestion of fluorescence-labeled Escherichia coli bacteria was used to assess the phagocytic activity of monocytes and their subpopulations and granulocytes by means of flow cytometry in the patient group as well as in a control group (n=36). During sepsis, a significant increase of phagocytic activity of monocytes (P=0.0003) and a significant decrease of the phagocytic activity of granulocytes (P=0.0003) and the CD14+ CD16++ monocyte subpopulation (P=0.0020) occurred. At the onset of a veno-occlusive disease, a significant increase of phagocytic activity in the CD14++ CD16+ monocyte subpopulation (P=0.001) and a significant decrease in the phagocytic activity of the CD14++ CD16- monocyte subpopulation (P=0.0048) were observed. In conclusion, the phagocytic activity of monocytes, their subpopulations and granulocytes might be a useful and easy determinable parameter that enables identification of post-transplant complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The alterations of phagocytic activity contribute to the altered immune response that accompanies adverse events after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  17. Pre-existing Epithelial Diversity in Normal Human Livers: A Tissue-tethered Cytometric Analysis in Portal/Periportal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Isse, Kumiko; Lesniak, Andrew; Grama, Kedar; Maier, John; Specht, Susan; Castillo-Rama, Marcela; Lunz, John; Roysam, Badrinath; Michalopoulos, George; Demetris, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Routine light microscopy identifies two distinct epithelial cell populations in normal human livers: hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells (BEC). Considerable epithelial diversity, however, arises during disease states when a variety of hepatocyte-BEC hybrid cells appear. This has been attributed to activation and differentiation of putative hepatic progenitor cells (HPC) residing in the Canals of Hering and/or metaplasia of pre-existing mature epithelial cells. A novel analytic approach consisting of multiplex labeling, high resolution whole slide imaging (WSI), and automated image analysis was used to determine if more complex epithelial cell phenotypes pre-existed in normal adult human livers, which might provide an alternative explanation for disease-induced epithelial diversity. “Virtually digested” WSI enabled quantitative cytometric analyses of individual cells displayed in a variety of formats (e.g. scatter plots) while still tethered to the WSI and tissue structure. We employed biomarkers specifically-associated with mature epithelial forms (HNF4α for hepatocytes, CK19 and HNF1β for BEC) and explored for the presence of cells with hybrid biomarker phenotypes. Results showed abundant hybrid cells in portal bile duct BEC, canals of Hering, and immediate periportal hepatocytes. These bi-potential cells likely serve as a reservoir for the epithelial diversity of ductular reactions, appearance of hepatocytes in bile ducts, and the rapid and fluid transition of BEC to hepatocytes, and vice versa. Conclusion Novel imaging and computational tools enable increased information extraction from tissue samples and quantify the considerable pre-existent hybrid epithelial diversity in normal human liver. This computationally-enabled tissue analysis approach offers much broader potential beyond the results presented here. PMID:23150208

  18. Vertex Models of Epithelial Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Alexander G.; Osterfield, Miriam; Baker, Ruth E.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of epithelial cell sheets plays a central role during numerous developmental processes. Genetic and imaging studies of epithelial morphogenesis in a wide range of organisms have led to increasingly detailed mechanisms of cell sheet dynamics. Computational models offer a useful means by which to investigate and test these mechanisms, and have played a key role in the study of cell-cell interactions. A variety of modeling approaches can be used to simulate the balance of forces within an epithelial sheet. Vertex models are a class of such models that consider cells as individual objects, approximated by two-dimensional polygons representing cellular interfaces, in which each vertex moves in response to forces due to growth, interfacial tension, and pressure within each cell. Vertex models are used to study cellular processes within epithelia, including cell motility, adhesion, mitosis, and delamination. This review summarizes how vertex models have been used to provide insight into developmental processes and highlights current challenges in this area, including progressing these models from two to three dimensions and developing new tools for model validation. PMID:24896108

  19. Multiple risk factors for lead poisoning in Hispanic sub-populations: a review.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ray W; Longoria, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    As a result of recent media attention to lead (Pb) in consumer products, Pb exposure and toxicity to children has been placed back on the national agenda. This review presents the current literature on sources of Pb in Hispanic sub-populations in the broader context of national lead poisoning trends, sources, and exposure pathways. Pb poisoning among Hispanics is a multi-dimensional issue that is far more complex than for the general population in terms of environmental, cultural, and social dimensions. As a result, a higher percentage of Hispanic children have elevated blood lead levels compared to the general population. Given the additional risks that Hispanics face, all Hispanic children should be defined as "at risk" for lead exposure and included in targeted screening programs. This review concludes with specific public policy recommendations that directly address the increased risk of Pb poisoning to Hispanic children so that Pb will poison fewer children in the future.

  20. Oligopeptides as biomarkers of cyanobacterial subpopulations. Toward an understanding of their biological role.

    PubMed

    Agha, Ramsy; Quesada, Antonio

    2014-06-23

    Cyanobacterial oligopeptides comprise a wide range of bioactive and/or toxic compounds. While current research is strongly focused on exploring new oligopeptide variants and their bioactive properties, the biological role of these compounds remains elusive. Oligopeptides production abilities show a remarkably patchy distribution among conspecific strains. This observation has prompted alternative approaches to unveil their adaptive value, based on the use of cellular oligopeptide compositions as biomarkers of intraspecific subpopulations or chemotypes in freshwater cyanobacteria. Studies addressing the diversity, distribution, and dynamics of chemotypes in natural systems have provided important insights into the structure and ecology of cyanobacterial populations and the adaptive value of oligopeptides. This review presents an overview of the fundamentals of this emerging approach and its most relevant findings, and discusses our current understanding of the role of oligopeptides in the ecology of cyanobacteria.

  1. KRT14 marks a subpopulation of bladder basal cells with pivotal role in regeneration and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Papafotiou, George; Paraskevopoulou, Varvara; Vasilaki, Eleni; Kanaki, Zoi; Paschalidis, Nikolaos; Klinakis, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    The urothelium is a specialized epithelium that lines the urinary tract. It consists of three different cell types, namely, basal, intermediate and superficial cells arranged in relatively distinct cell layers. Normally, quiescent, it regenerates fast upon injury, but the regeneration process is not fully understood. Although several reports have indicated the existence of progenitors, their identity and exact topology, as well as their role in key processes such as tissue regeneration and carcinogenesis have not been clarified. Here we show that a minor subpopulation of basal cells, characterized by the expression of keratin 14, possesses self-renewal capacity and also gives rise to all cell types of the urothelium during natural and injury-induced regeneration. Moreover, these cells represent cells of origin of urothelial cancer. Our findings support the hypothesis of basally located progenitors with profound roles in urothelial homoeostasis. PMID:27320313

  2. Lymphocyte subpopulations and the expression of intercellular adhesion molecules in chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Cindrić, Gordan; Aurer, Andrej; Plancak, Darije; Ljerka, Jindra; Girotto, Miljena

    2004-12-01

    Immunological responses to invading bacteria play a major role in the course of inflammatory periodontal diseases, such as CP. It was suggested that one of the major elements in determining the course of the disease is the expression of cellular adhesion molecules. We therefore investigated the expression of cellular adhesion molecules, ICAM-1 and beta-1 integrins, capillary density and lymphocyte subpopulations in gingival biopsies obtained from 20 patients with CP who responded and 21 patient who failed to respond to initial treatment using immunohistochemical methods. We found no differences between the two groups in capillary density, ICAM-1 and beta-1 integrin expression. Patients who responded to treatment had a lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate consisting predominantly of T cells, while those who failed to respond had an approximately equal number of T and B cells. Our findings support the role of host immunological mechanisms in determining the outcome of CP and argue against a major role of differential cellular adhesion molecule expression.

  3. Oligopeptides as Biomarkers of Cyanobacterial Subpopulations. Toward an Understanding of Their Biological Role

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Ramsy; Quesada, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial oligopeptides comprise a wide range of bioactive and/or toxic compounds. While current research is strongly focused on exploring new oligopeptide variants and their bioactive properties, the biological role of these compounds remains elusive. Oligopeptides production abilities show a remarkably patchy distribution among conspecific strains. This observation has prompted alternative approaches to unveil their adaptive value, based on the use of cellular oligopeptide compositions as biomarkers of intraspecific subpopulations or chemotypes in freshwater cyanobacteria. Studies addressing the diversity, distribution, and dynamics of chemotypes in natural systems have provided important insights into the structure and ecology of cyanobacterial populations and the adaptive value of oligopeptides. This review presents an overview of the fundamentals of this emerging approach and its most relevant findings, and discusses our current understanding of the role of oligopeptides in the ecology of cyanobacteria. PMID:24960202

  4. A Framework for Inferring Unobserved Multistrain Epidemic Subpopulations Using Synchronization Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Forgoston, Eric; Shaw, Leah B; Schwartz, Ira B

    2015-07-01

    A new method is proposed to infer unobserved epidemic subpopulations by exploiting the synchronization properties of multistrain epidemic models. A model for dengue fever is driven by simulated data from secondary infective populations. Primary infective populations in the driven system synchronize to the correct values from the driver system. Most hospital cases of dengue are secondary infections, so this method provides a way to deduce unobserved primary infection levels. We derive center manifold equations that relate the driven system to the driver system and thus motivate the use of synchronization to predict unobserved primary infectives. Synchronization stability between primary and secondary infections is demonstrated through numerical measurements of conditional Lyapunov exponents and through time series simulations.

  5. Topographical investigations of human ovarian-carcinoma polymorphic epithelial mucin by scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, C J; Sekowski, M; Davies, M C; Jackson, D E; Price, M R; Tendler, S J

    1992-01-01

    Human polymorphic epithelial mucin is a high-molecular-mass glycoprotein that associates to provide protection to the epithelial-cell surface and may afford the malignant cell a selective advantage for growth. The scanning-tunnelling-microscopy micrographs obtained in the present study identify the purified human ovarian-carcinoma polymorphic epithelial mucin glycoproteins as rod-shaped molecules of mixed length. The dimensions of the individual molecules range from 25 to 45 nm in length and are 3-4 nm in width. The images further suggest that lateral association of the rods occurs. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:1567366

  6. Unequivocal Identification of Subpopulations in Putative Multiclonal Trypanosoma cruzi Strains by FACs Single Cell Sorting and Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Valadares, Helder Magno Silva; Pimenta, Juliana Ramos; Segatto, Marcela; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia; Chiari, Egler; Gollob, Kenneth John; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; de Lana, Marta; Franco, Glória Regina; Machado, Carlos Renato; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho; Macedo, Andréa Mara

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, is a polymorphic species. Evidence suggests that the majority of the T. cruzi populations isolated from afflicted humans, reservoir animals, or vectors are multiclonal. However, the extent and the complexity of multiclonality remain to be established, since aneuploidy cannot be excluded and current conventional cloning methods cannot identify all the representative clones in an infection. To answer this question, we adapted a methodology originally described for analyzing single spermatozoids, to isolate and study single T. cruzi parasites. Accordingly, the cloning apparatus of a Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorter (FACS) was used to sort single T. cruzi cells directly into 96-wells microplates. Cells were then genotyped using two polymorphic genomic markers and four microsatellite loci. We validated this methodology by testing four T. cruzi populations: one control artificial mixture composed of two monoclonal populations – Silvio X10 cl1 (TcI) and Esmeraldo cl3 (TcII) – and three naturally occurring strains, one isolated from a vector (A316A R7) and two others derived from the first reported human case of Chagas disease. Using this innovative approach, we were able to successfully describe the whole complexity of these natural strains, revealing their multiclonal status. In addition, our results demonstrate that these T. cruzi populations are formed of more clones than originally expected. The method also permitted estimating of the proportion of each subpopulation of the tested strains. The single-cell genotyping approach allowed analysis of intrapopulation diversity at a level of detail not achieved previously, and may thus improve our comprehension of population structure and dynamics of T. cruzi. Finally, this methodology is capable to settle once and for all controversies on the issue of multiclonality. PMID:22802979

  7. Emergence of a novel subpopulation of CC398 Staphylococcus aureus infecting animals is a serious hazard for humans.

    PubMed

    van der Mee-Marquet, Nathalie L; Corvaglia, Anna; Haenni, Marisa; Bertrand, Xavier; Franck, Jean-Baptiste; Kluytmans, Jan; Girard, Myriam; Quentin, Roland; François, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, Staphylococcus aureus from clonal complex (CC)398 were mostly described as colonizing asymptomatic raised pigs and pig-farmers. Currently, the epidemiology of the CC398 lineage is becoming more complex. CC398 human-adapted isolates are increasingly being identified in bloodstream infections in humans living in animal-free environments. In addition, CC398 isolates are increasingly responsible for invasive infections in various animals. CC398 isolates that colonize asymptomatic pigs and the isolates that infect humans living in animal-free environments (human-adapted isolates) both lack several clinically important S. aureus-associated virulence factors but differ on the basis of their prophage content. Recent findings have provided insight into the influence of a φMR11-like helper prophage on the ability of CC398 isolates to infect humans. To assess the recent spread of the CC398 lineage to various animal species and to investigate the links between the φMR11-like prophage and the emergence of CC398 isolates infecting animals, we studied 277 isolates causing infections in unrelated animals. The prevalence of CC398 isolates increased significantly between 2007 and 2013 (p < 0.001); 31.8% of the animal isolates harbored the φMR11-like prophage. High-density DNA microarray experiments with 37 representative infected-animal isolates positive for φMR11-like DNA established that most infected-animal isolates carried many genetic elements related to antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes, and a φ3 prophage encoding immune-modulating proteins and associated with animal-to-human jumps. Our findings suggest recent clonal expansion and dissemination of a new subpopulation of CC398 isolates, responsible for invasive infections in various animals, with a considerable potential to colonize and infect humans, probably greater than that of human-adapted CC398 isolates, justifying active surveillance.

  8. Tendon progenitor cells in injured tendons have strong chondrogenic potential: the CD105-negative subpopulation induces chondrogenic degeneration.

    PubMed

    Asai, Shuji; Otsuru, Satoru; Candela, Maria Elena; Cantley, Leslie; Uchibe, Kenta; Hofmann, Ted J; Zhang, Kairui; Wapner, Keith L; Soslowsky, Louis J; Horwitz, Edwin M; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-12-01

    To study the cellular mechanism of the tendon repair process, we used a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to focus on the cells recruited to the injured site. The cells isolated from injured tendon 1 week after the surgery and uninjured tendons contained the connective tissue progenitor populations as determined by colony-forming capacity, cell surface markers, and multipotency. When the injured tendon-derived progenitor cells (inTPCs) were transplanted into injured Achilles tendons, they were not only integrated in the regenerating area expressing tenogenic phenotype but also trans-differentiated into chondrogenic cells in the degenerative lesion that underwent ectopic endochondral ossification. Surprisingly, the micromass culture of the inTPCs rapidly underwent chondrogenic differentiation even in the absence of exogenous bone morphogenetic proteins or TGFβs. The cells isolated from human ruptured tendon tissues also showed connective tissue progenitor properties and exhibited stronger chondrogenic ability than bone marrow stromal cells. The mouse inTPCs contained two subpopulations one positive and one negative for CD105, a coreceptor of the TGFβ superfamily. The CD105-negative cells showed superior chondrogenic potential in vitro and induced larger chondroid degenerative lesions in mice as compared to the CD105-positive cells. These findings indicate that tendon progenitor cells are recruited to the injured site of tendons and have a strong chondrogenic potential and that the CD105-negative population of these cells would be the cause for chondroid degeneration in injured tendons. The newly identified cells recruited to the injured tendon may provide novel targets to develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate tendon repair.

  9. Differences in lymphocyte subpopulations and cell counts before and after experimentally induced swine dysentery.

    PubMed

    Jonasson, Robert; Johannisson, Anders; Jacobson, Magdalena; Fellström, Claes; Jensen-Waern, Marianne

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the levels of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations before and immediately after experimentally induced swine dysentery. Twenty-one healthy crossbred pigs (approximately 22 kg) were orally inoculated with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. Blood was sampled before inoculation and when clinical signs of swine dysentery occurred. Pigs that remained healthy were sampled when killed. Total and differential white blood cell counts were performed, and lymphocyte subpopulations were analysed using flow cytometry. Following a mean incubation period of 13 days, 12 pigs developed swine dysentery, whereas nine remained healthy throughout the study. Before inoculation, pigs that subsequently developed swine dysentery displayed higher levels of circulating gamma delta T cells (mean +/- se; 30.7 +/- 3.5 %) compared with pigs that remained healthy (14.9 +/- 1.4 %). Sick animals also displayed lower levels of CD8 cells (24.6 +/- 1.5 %), cytotoxic/suppressor T cells (10.9 +/- 1.3 %) and CD4 CD8 T cells (8.1 +/- 1.0 %) than the pigs that remained healthy (34.9 +/- 3.1 %; 17.6 +/- 2.0 %; 13.6 +/- 2.3 %). No difference was observed in leukocyte counts before inoculation. At onset of swine dysentery, there was an increase in monocytes (from 1.5 +/- 0.2 x 10 to 3.8 +/- 0.5 x 10 l) and CD4 CD8 T cells (from 5.8 +/- 0.9 to 8.9 +/- 0.7 %). In conclusion, gamma delta T cells and CD8 cells may be associated with susceptibility to experimentally induced swine dysentery, whereas monocytes and CD4 CD8 T cells appear to be the major responding leukocytes during the disease.

  10. Estimating the abundance of the Southern Hudson Bay polar bear subpopulation with aerial surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obbard, Martyn E.; Stapleton, Seth P.; Middel, Kevin R.; Thibault, Isabelle; Brodeur, Vincent; Jutras, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Southern Hudson Bay (SH) polar bear subpopulation occurs at the southern extent of the species’ range. Although capture–recapture studies indicate abundance was likely unchanged between 1986 and 2005, declines in body condition and survival occurred during the period, possibly foreshadowing a future decrease in abundance. To obtain a current estimate of abundance, we conducted a comprehensive line transect aerial survey of SH during 2011–2012. We stratified the study site by anticipated densities and flew coastal contour transects and systematically spaced inland transects in Ontario and on Akimiski Island and large offshore islands in 2011. Data were collected with double-observer and distance sampling protocols. We surveyed small islands in James Bay and eastern Hudson Bay and flew a comprehensive transect along the Québec coastline in 2012. We observed 667 bears in Ontario and on Akimiski Island and nearby islands in 2011, and we sighted 80 bears on offshore islands during 2012. Mark–recapture distance sampling and sight–resight models yielded an estimate of 860 (SE = 174) for the 2011 study area. Our estimate of abundance for the entire SH subpopulation (943; SE = 174) suggests that abundance is unlikely to have changed significantly since 1986. However, this result should be interpreted cautiously because of the methodological differences between historical studies (physical capture–recapture) and this survey. A conservative management approach is warranted given previous increases in duration of the ice-free season, which are predicted to continue in the future, and previously documented declines in body condition and vital rates.

  11. Estimating abundance of the Southern Hudson Bay polar bear subpopulation using aerial surveys, 2011 and 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obbard, Martyn E.; Middel, Kevin R.; Stapleton, Seth P.; Thibault, Isabelle; Brodeur, Vincent; Jutras, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The Southern Hudson Bay (SH) polar bear subpopulation occurs at the southern extent of the species’ range. Although capture-recapture studies indicate that abundance remained stable between 1986 and 2005, declines in body condition and survival were documented during the period, possibly foreshadowing a future decrease in abundance. To obtain a current estimate of abundance, we conducted a comprehensive line transect aerial survey of SH during 2011–2012. We stratified the study site by anticipated densities and flew coastal contour transects and systematically spaced inland transects in Ontario and on Akimiski Island and large offshore islands in 2011. Data were collected with double observer and distance sampling protocols. We also surveyed small islands in Hudson Bay and James Bay and flew a comprehensive transect along the Québec coastline in 2012. We observed 667 bears in Ontario and on Akimiski Island and nearby islands in 2011, and we sighted 80 bears on offshore islands during 2012. Mark-recapture distance sampling and sightresight models yielded a model-averaged estimate of 868 (SE: 177) for the 2011 study area. Our estimate of abundance for the entire SH subpopulation (951; SE: 177) suggests that abundance has remained unchanged. However, this result should be interpreted cautiously because of the methodological differences between historical studies (physical capture) and this survey. A conservative management approach is warranted given the previous increases in the duration of the ice-free season, which are predicted to continue in the future, and previously documented declines in body condition and vital rates.

  12. Population-level differences in revascularization treatment and outcomes among various United States subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Graham, Garth; Xiao, Yang-Yu Karen; Rappoport, Dan; Siddiqi, Saima

    2016-01-26

    Despite recent general improvements in health care, significant disparities persist in the cardiovascular care of women and racial/ethnic minorities. This is true even when income, education level, and site of care are taken into consideration. Possible explanations for these disparities include socioeconomic considerations, elements of discrimination and racism that affect socioeconomic status, and access to adequate medical care. Coronary revascularization has become the accepted and recommended treatment for myocardial infarction (MI) today and is one of the most common major medical interventions in the United States, with more than 1 million procedures each year. This review discusses recent data on disparities in co-morbidities and presentation symptoms, care and access to medical resources, and outcomes in revascularization as treatment for acute coronary syndrome, looking especially at women and minority populations in the United States. The data show that revascularization is used less in both female and minority patients. We summarize recent data on disparities in co-morbidities and presentation symptoms related to MI; access to care, medical resources, and treatments; and outcomes in women, blacks, and Hispanics. The picture is complicated among the last group by the many Hispanic/Latino subgroups in the United States. Some differences in outcomes are partially explained by presentation symptoms and co-morbidities and external conditions such as local hospital capacity. Of particular note is the striking differential in both presentation co-morbidities and mortality rates seen in women, compared to men, especially in women ≤ 55 years of age. Surveillance data on other groups in the United States such as American Indians/Alaska Natives and the many Asian subpopulations show disparities in risk factors and co-morbidities, but revascularization as treatment for MI in these populations has not been adequately studied. Significant research is required to

  13. Divergence Effect at Alaska's Treelines a Result of Sub-Population Behavior?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmking, M.; Singh, J.

    2007-12-01

    The "divergence effect" (off-set between tree-ring based temperature reconstruction and measured temperatures) in northern forest poses a serious question to tree-ring based climate reconstructions, since it seems to violate the uniformitarian principle of dendroclimatology. Several possible reasons emerge, among them false assumptions about 1) climate data (e.g. which climate parameter can be modeled most effectively), 2) tree-ring data (e.g. shift in climate sensitivity of tree growth) or 3) a truly new and unprecedented phenomenon (e.g. rapid climate warming exceeding the adaptive capacity of trees). Here we test, if undetected emergent sub-population behavior at Alaska's treelines might result in a divergence effect. We reanalyzed seven data sets spanning the entire northern treeline in the Brooks Range, Alaska, which showed populations of trees responding positively, non-significant and negatively to recent warming. There is no effect of standardization (i.e. conventional versus RCS) technique on the grouping and we thus used RCS for the following analysis. Without grouping into sub- populations, a clear divergence between tree-ring based temperature reconstruction and actual climate data emerged. However, if only those trees were used for the climate reconstruction, which showed a consistent positive response to the target temperatures (June/July), tree growth modeled climate data extremely well following the rise in temperature during the last decades (actual climate data 0.53°/decade versus tree-ring based reconstruction 0.44°/decade over 1970-2000 period). This result hints at the possibility that some of the reported divergence might be eliminated (at least at Alaska's treelines) through careful test of sub-population behavior.

  14. Growth of Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms Alters Peptide Signaling at the Sub-population Level

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Robert C.; Burne, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans activates multiple cellular processes in response to the formation of a complex between comX-inducing peptide (XIP) and the ComR transcriptional regulator. Bulk phase and microfluidic experiments previously revealed that ComR-dependent activation of comX is altered by pH and by carbohydrate source. Biofilm formation is a major factor in bacterial survival and virulence in the oral cavity. Here, we sought to determine the response of S. mutans biofilm cells to XIP during different stages of biofilm maturation. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we showed that exogenous addition of XIP to early biofilms resulted in robust comX activation. However, as the biofilms matured, increasing amounts of XIP were required to activate comX expression. Single-cell analysis demonstrated that the entire population was responding to XIP with activation of comX in early biofilms, but only a sub-population was responding in mature biofilms. The sub-population response of mature biofilms was retained when the cells were dispersed and then treated with XIP. The proportion and intensity of the bi-modal response of mature biofilm cells was altered in mutants lacking the Type II toxins MazF and RelE, or in a strain lacking the (p)ppGpp synthase/hydrolase RelA. Thus, competence signaling is markedly altered in cells growing in mature biofilms, and pathways that control cell death and growth/survival decisions modulate activation of comX expression in these sessile populations. PMID:27471495

  15. Population-level differences in revascularization treatment and outcomes among various United States subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Garth; Xiao, Yang-Yu Karen; Rappoport, Dan; Siddiqi, Saima

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent general improvements in health care, significant disparities persist in the cardiovascular care of women and racial/ethnic minorities. This is true even when income, education level, and site of care are taken into consideration. Possible explanations for these disparities include socioeconomic considerations, elements of discrimination and racism that affect socioeconomic status, and access to adequate medical care. Coronary revascularization has become the accepted and recommended treatment for myocardial infarction (MI) today and is one of the most common major medical interventions in the United States, with more than 1 million procedures each year. This review discusses recent data on disparities in co-morbidities and presentation symptoms, care and access to medical resources, and outcomes in revascularization as treatment for acute coronary syndrome, looking especially at women and minority populations in the United States. The data show that revascularization is used less in both female and minority patients. We summarize recent data on disparities in co-morbidities and presentation symptoms related to MI; access to care, medical resources, and treatments; and outcomes in women, blacks, and Hispanics. The picture is complicated among the last group by the many Hispanic/Latino subgroups in the United States. Some differences in outcomes are partially explained by presentation symptoms and co-morbidities and external conditions such as local hospital capacity. Of particular note is the striking differential in both presentation co-morbidities and mortality rates seen in women, compared to men, especially in women ≤ 55 years of age. Surveillance data on other groups in the United States such as American Indians/Alaska Natives and the many Asian subpopulations show disparities in risk factors and co-morbidities, but revascularization as treatment for MI in these populations has not been adequately studied. Significant research is required to

  16. Effects of competition on acute phase proteins and lymphocyte subpopulations - oxidative stress markers in eventing horses.

    PubMed

    Valle, E; Zanatta, R; Odetti, P; Traverso, N; Furfaro, A; Bergero, D; Badino, P; Girardi, C; Miniscalco, B; Bergagna, S; Tarantola, M; Intorre, L; Odore, R

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate markers of the acute phase response (APR) in eventing horses by measuring acute phase proteins (APP) (haptoglobin, Hp, and serum amyloid A, SAA), lysozyme, protein adducts such as pentosidine-like adducts (PENT), malondialdehyde adducts (MDA), hydroxynonenal adducts (HNE) and total advanced glycation/glycoxidation end products (AGEs), complete blood count and lymphocyte subpopulations (CD4+, CD8+ and CD21+) both at rest and at the end of an eventing competition. Blood samples were collected from eight Warmblood horses (medium age 10 ± 3) during an official national 2-day event competition at rest (R) and 10 min after the arrival of the cross-country test on the second day. Exercise caused a significant increase in red blood cell number, haemoglobin, packed cell volume, neutrophils, white blood cell and lymphocyte number; however, these values remained within the normal range. The CD4+ and CD8+ cells significantly increased, whereas the CD21+ lymphocytes decreased; a significant increase in serum SAA, lysozyme and protein carbonyl derivates was also observed. Two-day event causes significant changes in APR markers such as lysozyme, protein carbonyl derivates (HNE, AGEs, PENT) and lymphocyte subpopulations. The data support the hypothesis that 2-day event may alter significantly APR markers. Limitations of the study were the relatively small sample size and sampling time conditioned by the official regulations of the event. Therefore, further studies are needed to investigate the time required for recovery to basal values in order to define the possible effects on the immune function of the athlete horse.

  17. TTC7A mutations disrupt intestinal epithelial apicobasal polarity

    PubMed Central

    Bigorgne, Amélie E.; Farin, Henner F.; Lemoine, Roxane; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Lambert, Nathalie; Gil, Marine; Schulz, Ansgar; Philippet, Pierre; Schlesser, Patrick; Abrahamsen, Tore G.; Oymar, Knut; Davies, E. Graham; Ellingsen, Christian Lycke; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Moreau-Massart, Brigitte; Berrebi, Dominique; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nischke, Patrick; Brousse, Nicole; Fischer, Alain; Clevers, Hans; de Saint Basile, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    Multiple intestinal atresia (MIA) is a rare cause of bowel obstruction that is sometimes associated with a combined immunodeficiency (CID), leading to increased susceptibility to infections. The factors underlying this rare disease are poorly understood. We characterized the immunological and intestinal features of 6 unrelated MIA-CID patients. All patients displayed a profound, generalized lymphocytopenia, with few lymphocytes present in the lymph nodes. The thymus was hypoplastic and exhibited an abnormal distribution of epithelial cells. Patients also had profound disruption of the epithelial barrier along the entire gastrointestinal tract. Using linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing, we identified 10 mutations in tetratricopeptide repeat domain–7A (TTC7A), all of which potentially abrogate TTC7A expression. Intestinal organoid cultures from patient biopsies displayed an inversion of apicobasal polarity of the epithelial cells that was normalized by pharmacological inhibition of Rho kinase. Our data indicate that TTC7A deficiency results in increased Rho kinase activity, which disrupts polarity, growth, and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells, and which impairs immune cell homeostasis, thereby promoting MIA-CID development. PMID:24292712

  18. CaMKII regulates the strength of the epithelial barrier

    PubMed Central

    Shiomi, Ryo; Shigetomi, Kenta; Inai, Tetsuichiro; Sakai, Masami; Ikenouchi, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cells define the boundary between the outside and the inside of our body by constructing the diffusion barrier. Tight junctions (TJs) of epithelial cells function as barriers against invasion of harmful microorganisms into the human body and free diffusion of water or ions from the body. Therefore, formation of TJs has to be strictly controlled in epithelial cells. However, the molecular mechanisms governing this regulation are largely unknown. In this study, we identified Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) as a regulator of the barrier function of TJs. CaMKII inhibition led to enlargement of TJ-areas and up-regulation of the barrier function. CaMKII inhibition induced excess TJ formation in part by the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and subsequent phosphorylation of claudin-1. As up-regulation of epithelial barriers is essential for the prevention of chronic inflammatory diseases, the identification of CaMKII as a modulator of TJ function paves the way for the development of new drugs to treat these diseases. PMID:26281891

  19. Epithelial junctions and Rho family GTPases: the zonular signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Citi, Sandra; Guerrera, Diego; Spadaro, Domenica; Shah, Jimit

    2014-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of epithelial cell-cell junctions is crucially important to regulate adhesion, apico-basal polarity and motility of epithelial cells, and ultimately controls the architecture and physiology of epithelial organs. Junctions are supported, shaped and regulated by cytoskeletal filaments, whose dynamic organization and contractility are finely tuned by GTPases of the Rho family, primarily RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42. Recent research has identified new molecular mechanisms underlying the cross-talk between these GTPases and epithelial junctions. Here we briefly summarize the current knowledge about the organization, molecular evolution and cytoskeletal anchoring of cell-cell junctions, and we comment on the most recent advances in the characterization of the interactions between Rho GTPases and junctional proteins, and their consequences with regards to junction assembly and regulation of cell behavior in vertebrate model systems. The concept of “zonular signalosome” is proposed, which highlights the close functional relationship between proteins of zonular junctions (zonulae occludentes and adhaerentes) and the control of cytoskeletal organization and signaling through Rho GTPases, transcription factors, and their effectors. PMID:25483301

  20. Epithelial junctions and Rho family GTPases: the zonular signalosome.

    PubMed

    Citi, Sandra; Guerrera, Diego; Spadaro, Domenica; Shah, Jimit

    2014-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of epithelial cell-cell junctions is crucially important to regulate adhesion, apico-basal polarity and motility of epithelial cells, and ultimately controls the architecture and physiology of epithelial organs. Junctions are supported, shaped and regulated by cytoskeletal filaments, whose dynamic organization and contractility are finely tuned by GTPases of the Rho family, primarily RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42. Recent research has identified new molecular mechanisms underlying the cross-talk between these GTPases and epithelial junctions. Here we briefly summarize the current knowledge about the organization, molecular evolution and cytoskeletal anchoring of cell-cell junctions, and we comment on the most recent advances in the characterization of the interactions between Rho GTPases and junctional proteins, and their consequences with regards to junction assembly and regulation of cell behavior in vertebrate model systems. The concept of "zonular signalosome" is proposed, which highlights the close functional relationship between proteins of zonular junctions (zonulae occludentes and adhaerentes) and the control of cytoskeletal organization and signaling through Rho GTPases, transcription factors, and their effectors.

  1. An innate antiviral pathway acting before interferons at epithelial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Marie B; Reinert, Line S; Thomsen, Martin K; Bagdonaite, Ieva; Nandakumar, Ramya; Cheshenko, Natalia; Prabakaran, Thaneas; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Krzyzowska, Malgosha; Kratholm, Sine K; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Petersen, Steen V; Goriely, Stanislas; Bibby, Bo Martin; Eriksson, Kristina; Ruland, Jürgen; Thomsen, Allan R; Herold, Betsy C; Wandall, Hans H; Frische, Sebastian; Holm, Christian K; Paludan, Søren R

    2016-02-01

    Mucosal surfaces are exposed to environmental substances and represent a major portal of entry for microorganisms. The innate immune system is responsible for early defense against infections and it is believed that the interferons (IFNs) constitute the first line of defense against viruses. Here we identify an innate antiviral pathway that works at epithelial surfaces before the IFNs. The pathway is activated independently of known innate sensors of viral infections through a mechanism dependent on viral O-linked glycans, which induce CXCR3 chemokines and stimulate antiviral activity in a manner dependent on neutrophils. This study therefore identifies a previously unknown layer of antiviral defense that exerts its action on epithelial surfaces before the classical IFN response is operative.

  2. Changes in the structures of motile sperm subpopulations in dog spermatozoa after both cryopreservation and centrifugation on PureSperm(®) gradient.

    PubMed

    Dorado, J; Alcaráz, L; Duarte, N; Portero, J M; Acha, D; Hidalgo, M

    2011-05-01

    The aims of the present study were to: (1) determine if discrete motile sperm subpopulations exist and their incidence in fresh dog ejaculates, (2) evaluate the effects of cryopreservation on the distribution of spermatozoa within the different subpopulations, and (3) determine the effect of the discontinuous PureSperm(®) gradient on the sperm subpopulation structure of frozen-thawed dog spermatozoa. Semen from 5 dogs were collected and cryopreserved following a standard protocol. After thawing, semen samples were selected by centrifugation on PureSperm(®). Sperm motility (assessed by computerized-assisted semen analysis, CASA) was assessed before freezing, just after thawing and after preparation on the PureSperm(®) gradients. Cryopreservation had a significant (P<0.001) effect on CASA-derived parameters. PureSperm(®) centrifugation yielded sperm suspensions with improved motility (P<0.01). A multivariate clustering procedure separated 19414 motile spermatozoa into four subpopulations: Subpopulation 1 consisting of poorly active and non-progressive spermatozoa (20.97%), Subpopulation 2 consisting of slow and low-linear spermatozoa (18.24%), Subpopulation 3 consisting of highly active but non-progressive spermatozoa (20.75%), and Subpopulation 4 consisting of high speed and progressive spermatozoa (40.03%). Although, cryopreservation had a significant (P<0.001) effect on both the frequency distribution of spermatozoa within subpopulations and the motion characteristics of each subpopulation, the sperm subpopulation structure was perfectly maintained after freezing and thawing. The selected sperm samples was enrich in Subpopulation 4, reaching a proportion of 31.9% of the present spermatozoa, in contrast with the unselected sperm samples, where this sperm subpopulation accounted for 24.9% of the total. From these results, we concluded that four well-defined motile sperm subpopulations were present either in fresh semen, in unselected sperm samples or in selected

  3. Epithelial cells and Von Gierke's disease.

    PubMed

    Negishi, H; Benke, P J

    1977-08-01

    Epithelial cells and not fibroblasts from human liver and amniotic fluid contain inducible glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) activity. The diagnosis of Von Gierke's disease has been made in a patient with hepatomegaly utilizing cultured epithelial cells grown from a liver biopsy. G-6-Pase activity in epithelial cells from this patient could not be induced by dibutyryl cyclic AMP and theophylline. This is the first use of epithelial cells for diagnosis of a metabolic disease. G-6-Pase activity in cloned epithelial cells from amniotic fluid increases 2- to 3-fold after 24-hr exposure to dibutyryl cyclic AMP and theophylline. The prenatal diagnosis of Von Gierke's disease may be possible in a laboratory experienced with these techniques if epithelial cell growth is obtained from amniotic fluid. PMID:196249

  4. Secretory component: a glandular epithelial cell marker.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. P.; South, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Secretory component (SC) has been demonstrated to be produced by both normal and malignantly transformed glandular epithelial cells. By an indirect immunofluorescent technique, this study surveys tumors of varied cellular origin in order to determine the reliability of SC as a marker for tumor cells derived from glandular epithelium. Both primary and metastatic tumors of glandular epithelial origin demonstrated SC fluorescence, while nonglandular epithelial tumors did not. This observation was extended to live single-cell preparations, which demonstrated intense cell-surface fluorescence only when glandular epithelial tumors cells were examined. Additionally, fixed, cytocentrifuged, single-cell preparations of glandular epithelial tumors demonstrated cytoplasmic SC fluorescence. When breast carcinoma was examined, all cases demonstrated SC, regardless of the degree of differentiation. This assay appears to have useful clinical application in that the finding of SC provides indication of the glandular epithelial origin of a malignantly transformed cell. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6271014

  5. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Gene Variants and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) Risk.

    PubMed

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie T; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Y Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana M; Edwards, Robert P; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Jim, Heather; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Schernhammer, Eva; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Thomsen, Lotte; Tangen, Ingvild L; Tworoger, Shelley S; van Altena, Anne M; Vierkant, Robert A; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wu, Anna H; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Kelemen, Linda E; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Ramus, Susan J; Goode, Ellen L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Gayther, Simon A; Narod, Steven A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sellers, Thomas A; Phelan, Catherine M

    2015-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process whereby epithelial cells assume mesenchymal characteristics to facilitate cancer metastasis. However, EMT also contributes to the initiation and development of primary tumors. Prior studies that explored the hypothesis that EMT gene variants contribute to epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) risk have been based on small sample sizes and none have sought replication in an independent population. We screened 15,816 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 296 genes in a discovery phase using data from a genome-wide association study of EOC among women of European ancestry (1,947 cases and 2,009 controls) and identified 793 variants in 278 EMT-related genes that were nominally (P < 0.05) associated with invasive EOC. These SNPs were then genotyped in a larger study of 14,525 invasive-cancer patients and 23,447 controls. A P-value <0.05 and a false discovery rate (FDR) <0.2 were considered statistically significant. In the larger dataset, GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 was associated with the endometrioid subtype among Caucasians (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.07-1.25, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.19), whereas F8 rs7053448 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), F8 rs7058826 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), and CAPN13 rs1983383 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.69-0.90, P = 0.0005, FDR = 0.12) were associated with combined invasive EOC among Asians. In silico functional analyses revealed that GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 coincided with DNA regulatory elements. These results suggest that EMT gene variants do not appear to play a significant role in the susceptibility to EOC.

  6. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Gene Variants and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) Risk.

    PubMed

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie T; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Y Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana M; Edwards, Robert P; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Jim, Heather; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Schernhammer, Eva; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Thomsen, Lotte; Tangen, Ingvild L; Tworoger, Shelley S; van Altena, Anne M; Vierkant, Robert A; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wu, Anna H; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Kelemen, Linda E; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Ramus, Susan J; Goode, Ellen L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Gayther, Simon A; Narod, Steven A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sellers, Thomas A; Phelan, Catherine M

    2015-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process whereby epithelial cells assume mesenchymal characteristics to facilitate cancer metastasis. However, EMT also contributes to the initiation and development of primary tumors. Prior studies that explored the hypothesis that EMT gene variants contribute to epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) risk have been based on small sample sizes and none have sought replication in an independent population. We screened 15,816 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 296 genes in a discovery phase using data from a genome-wide association study of EOC among women of European ancestry (1,947 cases and 2,009 controls) and identified 793 variants in 278 EMT-related genes that were nominally (P < 0.05) associated with invasive EOC. These SNPs were then genotyped in a larger study of 14,525 invasive-cancer patients and 23,447 controls. A P-value <0.05 and a false discovery rate (FDR) <0.2 were considered statistically significant. In the larger dataset, GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 was associated with the endometrioid subtype among Caucasians (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.07-1.25, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.19), whereas F8 rs7053448 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), F8 rs7058826 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), and CAPN13 rs1983383 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.69-0.90, P = 0.0005, FDR = 0.12) were associated with combined invasive EOC among Asians. In silico functional analyses revealed that GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 coincided with DNA regulatory elements. These results suggest that EMT gene variants do not appear to play a significant role in the susceptibility to EOC. PMID:26399219

  7. High-content imaging characterization of cell cycle therapeutics through in vitro and in vivo subpopulation analysis.

    PubMed

    Low, Jonathan; Huang, Shuguang; Blosser, Wayne; Dowless, Michele; Burch, John; Neubauer, Blake; Stancato, Louis

    2008-08-01

    Although the cycling of eukaryotic cells has long been a primary focus for cancer therapeutics, recent advances in imaging and data analysis allow even further definition of cellular events as they occur in individual cells and cellular subpopulations in response to treatment. High-content imaging (HCI) has been an effective tool to elucidate cellular responses to a variety of agents; however, these data were most frequently observed as averages of the entire captured population, unnecessarily decreasing the resolution of each assay. Here, we dissect the eukaryotic cell cycle into individual cellular subpopulations using HCI in conjunction with unsupervised K-means clustering. We generate distinct phenotypic fingerprints for each major cell cycle and mitotic compartment and use those fingerprints to screen a library of 310 commercially available chemotherapeutic agents. We determine that the cell cycle arrest phenotypes caused by these agents are similar to, although distinct from, those found in untreated cells and that these distinctions frequently suggest the mechanism of action. We then show via subpopulation analysis that these arrest phenotypes are similar in both mouse models and in culture. HCI analysis of cell cycle using data obtained from individual cells under a broad range of research conditions and grouped into cellular subpopulations represents a powerful method to discern both cellular events and treatment effects. In particular, this technique allows for a more accurate means of assessing compound selectivity and leads to more meaningful comparisons between so-called targeted therapeutics.

  8. Determining the Anchor Composition for a Mixed-Format Test: Evaluation of Subpopulation Invariance of Linking Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sooyeon; Walker, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the appropriateness of the anchor composition in a mixed-format test, which includes both multiple-choice (MC) and constructed-response (CR) items, using subpopulation invariance indices. Linking functions were derived in the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design using two types of anchor sets: (a) MC only and (b)…

  9. A Comparative Analysis of Base Expectancy Tables for Selected Subpopulations of California Youth Authority Wards. Research Report No. 55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beverly, Robert F.

    Base expectancy tables developed by the California Youth Authority apply to total population of male wards released on parole by the state. Subpopulations of relatively homogeneous make-up offered the possibility of developing base expectancy tables of greater predictive ability. Multiple regression analysis showed the overall advantages and…

  10. Genetic analysis of scattered populations of the Indian eri silkworm, Samia cynthia ricini Donovan: Differentiation of subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Appukuttannair R; Jingade, Anuradha H; Singh, Choba K; Awasthi, Aravind K; Kumar, Vikas; Rao, Guruprasad C; Prakash, N B Vijaya

    2011-07-01

    Deforestation and exploitation has led to the fragmentation of habitats and scattering of populations of the economically important eri silkworm, Samia cynthia ricini, in north-east India. Genetic analysis of 15 eri populations, using ISSR markers, showed 98% inter-population, and 23% to 58% intra-population polymorphism. Nei's genetic distance between populations increased significantly with altitude (R(2) = 0.71) and geographic distance (R(2) = 0.78). On the dendrogram, the lower and upper Assam populations were clustered separately, with intermediate grouping of those from Barpathar and Chuchuyimlang, consistent with geographical distribution. The Nei's gene diversity index was 0.350 in total populations and 0.121 in subpopulations. The genetic differentiation estimate (Gst) was 0.276 among scattered populations. Neutrality tests showed deviation of 118 loci from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The number of loci that deviated from neutrality increased with altitude (R(2) = 0.63). Test of linkage disequilibrium showed greater contribution of variance among eri subpopulations to total variance. D('2)IS exceeded D('2)ST, showed significant contribution of random genetic drift to the increase in variance of disequilibrium in subpopulations. In the Lakhimpur population, the peripheral part was separated from the core by a genetic distance of 0.260. Patchy habitats promoted low genetic variability, high linkage disequilibrium and colonization by new subpopulations. Increased gene flow and habitat-area expansion are required to maintain higher genetic variability and conservation of the original S. c. ricini gene pool. PMID:21931526

  11. PREDICTIVE ORGANOPHOSPHORUS (OP) PESTICIDE QSARS AND PBPK/PD MODELS FOR RISK ASSESSMENT OF SUSCEPTIBLE SUB-POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Successful use of the Exposure Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) in risk assessment of susceptible human sub-populations, e.g., infants and children, requires input of quality experimental data. In the clear absence of quality data, PBPK models can be developed and possibl...

  12. Circulating immune cell subpopulations in pestivirus persistently infected calves and non-infected calves varying in immune status.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circulating immune cell subpopulations in cattle representing varying stages of immune status categorized as; colostrum deprived (CD), receiving colostrum (COL), colostrum plus vaccination (VAC) and persistently infected with a pestivirus (PI) were compared. The PI calves were infected with a HoBi-...

  13. Circulating immune cell subpopulations in pestivirus persistently infected calves and non-infected calves varying in immune status [Abstract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The circulating immune cell subpopulations in cattle representing varying stages of immune status categorized as; colostrum deprived (CD), receiving colostrum (COL), colostrum plus vaccination (VAC) and persistently infected with a pestivirus (PI) were compared. The PI calves were infected with a H...

  14. The impact of monochloramine on the diversity and dynamics of Legionella pneumophila subpopulations in a nuclear power plant cooling circuit.

    PubMed

    Jakubek, Delphine; Le Brun, Matthieu; Leblon, Gerard; DuBow, Michael; Binet, Marie

    2013-08-01

    Members of the pathogenic Legionella genus encounter suitable growth conditions in nuclear power plant cooling circuits. To limit its proliferation and ensure that levels remain below regulatory thresholds, chemical treatment with monochloramine can be used in continuous or sequential conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of monochloramine on L. pneumophila subpopulations in the cooling circuits of a nuclear power plant. The chosen procedure involved monitoring the diversity and dynamics of L. pneumophila subpopulations every month over the course of a year in a nuclear power plant cooling circuit, which was treated for 2 months during the period under study. This study confirmed the effectiveness of monochloramine to limit L. pneumophila concentrations in cooling circuits. The culturable L. pneumophila community was strongly affected by the injection of monochloramine. Several subpopulations persisted during treatment at low concentrations (below the detection limit of standard methods), suggesting that the susceptibility of L. pneumophila is strain dependent. Although the composition of the subpopulations was not similar, the resilience of the community structure was observed. Indeed, the community eventually returned to its initial structure and presented a similar pattern of richness, diversity and uniformity to that seen before treatment.

  15. Structural Equation Analyses of Clinical Subpopulation Differences and Comparative Treatment Outcomes: Characterizing the Daily Lives of Drug Addicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Leona S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Used structural equation modeling for comparative treatment outcome research conducted with heterogeneous clinical subpopulations within large multimodality treatment settings. Evaluated effect of early period of treatment on daily lives of 486 clients in 2 drug abuse treatment modalities (methadone maintenance and outpatient counseling).…

  16. Intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and loss of barrier function in the setting of altered microbiota with enteral nutrient deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Demehri, Farokh R.; Barrett, Meredith; Ralls, Matthew W.; Miyasaka, Eiichi A.; Feng, Yongjia; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2013-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN), a commonly used treatment for patients who cannot receive enteral nutrition, is associated with significant septic complications due in part to a loss of epithelial barrier function (EBF). While the underlying mechanisms of TPN-related epithelial changes are poorly understood, a mouse model of TPN-dependence has helped identify several contributing factors. Enteral deprivation leads to a shift in intestinal microbiota to predominantly Gram-negative Proteobacteria. This is associated with an increase in expression of proinflammatory cytokines within the mucosa, including interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. A concomitant loss of epithelial growth factors leads to a decrease in epithelial cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. The resulting loss of epithelial tight junction proteins contributes to EBF dysfunction. These mechanisms identify potential strategies of protecting against TPN-related complications, such as modification of luminal bacteria, blockade of proinflammatory cytokines, or growth factor replacement. PMID:24392360

  17. Henipavirus Pathogenesis in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Carmical, J. Russ; Prusak, Deborah; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are deadly zoonotic viruses for which no vaccines or therapeutics are licensed for human use. Henipavirus infection causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis. Although the exact route of transmission in human is unknown, epidemiological studies and in vivo studies suggest that the respiratory tract is important for virus replication. However, the target cells in the respiratory tract are unknown, as are the mechanisms by which henipaviruses can cause disease. In this study, we characterized henipavirus pathogenesis using primary cells derived from the human respiratory tract. The growth kinetics of NiV-Malaysia, NiV-Bangladesh, and HeV were determined in bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells (NHBE) and small airway epithelial cells (SAEC). In addition, host responses to infection were assessed by gene expression analysis and immunoassays. Viruses replicated efficiently in both cell types and induced large syncytia. The host response to henipavirus infection in NHBE and SAEC highlighted a difference in the inflammatory response between HeV and NiV strains as well as intrinsic differences in the ability to mount an inflammatory response between NHBE and SAEC. These responses were highest during HeV infection in SAEC, as characterized by the levels of key cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-8, IL-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], and colony-stimulating factors) responsible for immune cell recruitment. Finally, we identified virus strain-dependent variability in type I interferon antagonism in NHBE and SAEC: NiV-Malaysia counteracted this pathway more efficiently than NiV-Bangladesh and HeV. These results provide crucial new information in the understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis in the human respiratory tract at an early stage of infection. PMID:23302882

  18. Energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along the crypt-villus axis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huansheng; Wang, Xiaocheng; Xiong, Xia; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells continuously migrate and mature along crypt-villus axis (CVA), while the changes in energy metabolism during maturation are unclear in neonates. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells would be changed during maturation along CVA in neonates. Eight 21-day-old suckling piglets were used. Intestinal epithelial cells were isolated sequentially along CVA, and proteomics was used to analyze the changes in proteins expression in epithelial cells along CVA. The identified differentially expressed proteins were mainly involved in cellular process, metabolic process, biological regulation, pigmentation, multicellular organizational process and so on. The energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells of piglets was increased from the bottom of crypt to the top of villi. Moreover, the expression of proteins related to the metabolism of glucose, most of amino acids, and fatty acids was increased in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA, while the expression of proteins related to glutamine metabolism was decreased from crypt to villus tip. The expression of proteins involved in citrate cycle was also increased intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA. Moreover, dietary supplementation with different energy sources had different effects on intestinal structure of weaned piglets. PMID:27558220

  19. Topical Administration of Acylated Homoserine Lactone Improves Epithelialization of Cutaneous Wounds in Hyperglycaemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Aya; Quinetti, Paes C.; Nakagami, Gojiro; Mugita, Yuko; Oe, Makoto; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Mori, Taketoshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians often experience delayed epithelialization in diabetic patients, for which a high glucose condition is one of the causes. However, the mechanisms underlying delayed wound closure have not been fully elucidated, and effective treatments to enhance epithelialization in patients with hyperglycaemia have not been established. Here we propose a new reagent, acylated homoserine lactone (AHL), to improve the delayed epithelialization due to the disordered formation of a basement membrane of epidermis in hyperglycaemic rats. Acute hyperglycaemia was induced by streptozotocin injection in this experiment. Full thickness wounds were created on the flanks of hyperglycaemic or control rats. Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to identify hyperglycaemia-specific abnormalities in epidermal regeneration by comparison between groups. We then examined the effects of AHL on delayed epithelialization in hyperglycaemic rats. Histological analysis showed the significantly shorter epithelializing tissue (P < 0.05), abnormal structure of basement membrane (fragmentation and immaturity), and hypo- and hyperproliferation of basal keratinocytes in hyperglycaemic rats. Treating the wound with AHL resulted in the decreased abnormalities of basement membrane, normal distribution of proliferating epidermal keratinocytes, and significantly promoted epithelialization (P < 0.05) in hyperglycemic rats, suggesting the improving effects of AHL on abnormal epithelialization due to hyperglycemia. PMID:27404587

  20. Energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along the crypt-villus axis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huansheng; Wang, Xiaocheng; Xiong, Xia; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells continuously migrate and mature along crypt-villus axis (CVA), while the changes in energy metabolism during maturation are unclear in neonates. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells would be changed during maturation along CVA in neonates. Eight 21-day-old suckling piglets were used. Intestinal epithelial cells were isolated sequentially along CVA, and proteomics was used to analyze the changes in proteins expression in epithelial cells along CVA. The identified differentially expressed proteins were mainly involved in cellular process, metabolic process, biological regulation, pigmentation, multicellular organizational process and so on. The energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells of piglets was increased from the bottom of crypt to the top of villi. Moreover, the expression of proteins related to the metabolism of glucose, most of amino acids, and fatty acids was increased in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA, while the expression of proteins related to glutamine metabolism was decreased from crypt to villus tip. The expression of proteins involved in citrate cycle was also increased intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA. Moreover, dietary supplementation with different energy sources had different effects on intestinal structure of weaned piglets. PMID:27558220

  1. Quantitative-Trait Loci on Chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 11, 12, and 18 Control Variation in Levels of T and B Lymphocyte Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Hall, M. A.; Norman, P. J.; Thiel, B.; Tiwari, H.; Peiffer, A.; Vaughan, R. W.; Prescott, S.; Leppert, M.; Schork, N. J.; Lanchbury, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Lymphocyte subpopulation levels are used for prognosis and monitoring of a variety of human diseases, especially those with an infectious etiology. As a primary step to defining the major gene variation underlying these phenotypes, we conducted the first whole-genome screen for quantitative variation in lymphocyte count, CD4 T cell, CD8 T cell, B cell, and natural killer cell numbers, as well as CD4:CD8 ratio. The screen was performed in 15 of the CEPH families that form the main human genome genetic project mapping resource. Quantitative-trait loci (QTLs) that account for significant proportions of the phenotypic variance of lymphocyte subpopulations were detected on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 11, 12, and 18. The most significant QTL found was for CD4 levels on chromosome 8 (empirical P=.00005). Two regions of chromosome 4 showed significant linkage to CD4:CD8 ratio (empirical P=.00007 and P=.003). A QTL for the highly correlated measures of CD4 and CD19 levels colocalized at 18q21 (both P=.003). Similarly, a shared region of chromosome 1 was linked to CD8 and CD19 levels (P=.0001 and P=.002, respectively). Several of the identified chromosome regions are likely to harbor polymorphic candidate genes responsible for these important human phenotypes. Their discovery has important implications for understanding the generation of the immune repertoire and understanding immune-system homeostasis. More generally, these data show the power of an integrated human gene–mapping approach for heritable molecular phenotypes, using large pedigrees that have been extensively genotyped. PMID:11951176

  2. Elimination of the chemotherapy resistant subpopulation of 4T1 mouse breast cancer by haploidentical NK cells cures the vast majority of mice.

    PubMed

    Frings, Peter W H; Van Elssen, Catharina H M J; Wieten, Lotte; Matos, Catarina; Hupperets, Pierre S J G; Schouten, Harry C; Bos, Gerard M J; van Gelder, Michel

    2011-12-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is currently incurable despite initial responsiveness, assumingly due to the presence of chemoresistant subpopulations that can be characterized as label retaining cells (LRC). In the 4T1 mouse breast cancer model, we previously achieved cure after Cyclophosphamide and Total Body Irradiation (CY + TBI) followed by haploidentical bone marrow and spleen transplantation (BMSPLT). CY + TBI without transplantation induced only transient impaired tumor growth indicating a critical role of donor immune cells. As it remained unknown if the 4T1 model resembles human disease with respect to the presence of subpopulations of chemoresistant LRC, we now demonstrate this is indeed the case. Chemoresistance of 4T1 LRC was demonstrated by in vitro co-incubation of fluorescently labeled 4T1 cells in limiting dilution with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin or cisplatinum, after which only LRC containing colonies remained. LRC also remain in vivo after treatment with CY + TBI. Succeeding experiments set up to identify the haploidentical effector cell responsible for cure and, therefore, for the elimination of chemoresistant LRC designate donor NK cells crucial for the anti-tumor effect. NK cell depletion of the haploidentical graft fully abrogated the anti-tumor effect. Increased disease-free survival retained after transplantation of haploidentical bone marrow and NK cell-enriched spleen cell grafts, even in the absence of donor T-cells or of donor bone marrow. Tumor growth analysis indicates the anti-tumor effect being immediate (days). Based on these data, it is worthwhile to explore alloreactive adoptive NK cell therapy as consolidation for patients with metastasized breast cancer. PMID:21274621

  3. Identification of Bone Marrow Cell Subpopulations Associated With Improved Functional Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Left Ventricular Dysfunction: An Embedded Cohort Evaluation of the FOCUS-CCTRN Trial

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Doris A.; Perin, Emerson C.; Willerson, James T.; Zierold, Claudia; Resende, Micheline; Carlson, Marjorie; Nestor, Belinda; Wise, Elizabeth; Orozco, Aaron; Pepine, Carl J.; Henry, Timothy D.; Ellis, Stephen G.; Zhao, David X. M.; Traverse, Jay H.; Cooke, John P.; Schutt, Robert C.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Grant, Maria B.; Lai, Dejian; Johnstone, Brian H.; Sayre, Shelly L.; Moyé, Lem; Ebert, Ray F.; Bolli, Roberto; Simari, Robert D.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we sought to identify bone marrow-derived mononuclear cell (BM-MNC) subpopulations associated with a combined improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV), and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) in patients with chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy 6 months after receiving transendocardial injections of autologous BM-MNCs or placebo. For this prospectively planned analysis, we conducted an embedded cohort study comprising 78 patients from the FOCUS-Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN) trial. Baseline BM-MNC immunophenotypes and progenitor cell activity were determined by flow cytometry and colony-forming assays, respectively. Previously stable patients who demonstrated improvement in LVEF, LVESV, and VO2 max during the 6-month course of the FOCUS-CCTRN study (group 1, n = 17) were compared to those who showed no change or worsened in one to three of these endpoints (group 2, n = 61) and to a subset of patients from group 2 who declined in all three functional endpoints (group 2A, n = 11). Group 1 had higher frequencies of B-cell and CXCR4+ BM-MNC subpopulations at study baseline than group 2 or 2A. Furthermore, patients in group 1 had fewer endothelial colony-forming cells and monocytes/macrophages in their bone marrow than those in group 2A. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, certain bone marrow-derived cell subsets are associated with improvement in LVEF, LVESV, and VO2 max at 6 months. These results suggest that the presence of both progenitor and immune cell populations in the bone marrow may influence the natural history of chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy—even in stable patients. Thus, it may be important to consider the bone marrow composition and associated regenerative capacity of patients when assigning them to treatment groups and evaluating the results of cell therapy trials. PMID:26590374

  4. Focal epithelial hyperplasia: Heck disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, P R; Hebert, A A; Adler-Storthz, K

    1993-09-01

    Two sisters of Mexican ancestry had focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH). The lesions on the oral mucosa of the older child were initially misinterpreted as representing sexual abuse. Microscopic evaluation of a hematoxylin and eosin-stained section from a lower lip papule demonstrated the histologic features of FEH. Although human papillomavirus (HPV) type 13 and HPV32 have been most consistently present in FEH lesions, types 6, 11, 13, and 32 were not detected in the paraffin-embedded tissue specimen of our patient using an in situ hybridization technique. The lesions persisted or recurred during management using destructive modalities; subsequently, they completely resolved spontaneously.

  5. Undulation Instability of Epithelial Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basan, Markus; Joanny, Jean-François; Prost, Jacques; Risler, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Treating the epithelium as an incompressible fluid adjacent to a viscoelastic stroma, we find a novel hydrodynamic instability that leads to the formation of protrusions of the epithelium into the stroma. This instability is a candidate for epithelial fingering observed in vivo. It occurs for sufficiently large viscosity, cell-division rate and thickness of the dividing region in the epithelium. Our work provides physical insight into a potential mechanism by which interfaces between epithelia and stromas undulate and potentially by which tissue dysplasia leads to cancerous invasion.

  6. Testing for Local Adaptation to Spawning Habitat in Sympatric Subpopulations of Pike by Reciprocal Translocation of Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Berggren, Hanna; Nordahl, Oscar; Tibblin, Petter; Larsson, Per

    2016-01-01

    We tested for local adaption in early life-history traits by performing a reciprocal translocation experiment with approximately 2,500 embryos of pike (Esox lucius) divided in paired split-family batches. The experiment indicated local adaptation in one of the two subpopulations manifested as enhanced hatching success of eggs in the native habitat, both when compared to siblings transferred to a non-native habitat, and when compared to immigrant genotypes from the other subpopulation. Gene-by-environment effects on viability of eggs and larvae were evident in both subpopulations, showing that there existed genetic variation allowing for evolutionary responses to divergent selection, and indicating a capacity for plastic responses to environmental change. Next, we tested for differences in female life-history traits. Results uncovered that females from one population invested more resources into reproduction and also produced more (but smaller) eggs in relation to their body size compared to females from the other population. We suggest that these females have adjusted their reproductive strategies as a counter-adaptation because a high amount of sedimentation on the eggs in that subpopulations spawning habitat might benefit smaller eggs. Collectively, our findings point to adaptive divergence among sympatric subpopulations that are physically separated only for a short period during reproduction and early development—which is rare. These results illustrate how combinations of translocation experiments and field studies of life-history traits might infer about local adaptation and evolutionary divergence among populations. Local adaptations in subdivided populations are important to consider in management and conservation of biodiversity, because they may otherwise be negatively affected by harvesting, supplementation, and reintroduction efforts targeted at endangered populations. PMID:27139695

  7. Cholinergic epithelial cell with chemosensory traits in murine thymic medulla.

    PubMed

    Panneck, Alexandra Regina; Rafiq, Amir; Schütz, Burkhard; Soultanova, Aichurek; Deckmann, Klaus; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Weihe, Eberhard; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Grau, Veronika; del Rey, Adriana; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Specialized epithelial cells with a tuft of apical microvilli ("brush cells") sense luminal content and initiate protective reflexes in response to potentially harmful substances. They utilize the canonical taste transduction cascade to detect "bitter" substances such as bacterial quorum-sensing molecules. In the respiratory tract, most of these cells are cholinergic and are approached by cholinoceptive sensory nerve fibers. Utilizing two different reporter mouse strains for the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), we observed intense labeling of a subset of thymic medullary cells. ChAT expression was confirmed by in situ hybridization. These cells showed expression of villin, a brush cell marker protein, and ultrastructurally exhibited lateral microvilli. They did not express neuroendocrine (chromogranin A, PGP9.5) or thymocyte (CD3) markers but rather thymic epithelial (CK8, CK18) markers and were immunoreactive for components of the taste transduction cascade such as Gα-gustducin, transient receptor potential melastatin-like subtype 5 channel (TRPM5), and phospholipase Cβ2. Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction confirmed the expression of Gα-gustducin, TRPM5, and phospholipase Cβ2. Thymic "cholinergic chemosensory cells" were often in direct contact with medullary epithelial cells expressing the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit α3. These cells have recently been identified as terminally differentiated epithelial cells (Hassall's corpuscle-like structures in mice). Contacts with nerve fibers (identified by PGP9.5 and CGRP antibodies), however, were not observed. Our data identify, in the thymus, a previously unrecognized presumptive chemosensitive cell that probably utilizes acetylcholine for paracrine signaling. This cell might participate in intrathymic infection-sensing mechanisms.

  8. Changes in natural killer cell subpopulations over a winter training season in elite swimmers.

    PubMed

    Rama, Luís; Teixeira, Ana Maria; Matos, Alice; Borges, Grasiely; Henriques, Ana; Gleeson, Michael; Pedreiro, Susana; Filaire, Edith; Alves, Francisco; Paiva, Artur

    2013-04-01

    Immune changes and increased susceptibility to infection are often reported in elite athletes. Infectious episodes can often impair training and performance with consequences for health and sporting success. This study monitored the occurrence of episodes of upper respiratory symptoms (URS) and the variation in circulating NK cells, CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells subpopulations, over a winter swimming season. Nineteen national elite swimmers and 11 non-athlete controls participated in this study. URS episodes were monitored using daily log books. Blood samples were taken at rest at four time points during the season: before the start of the season (t1--middle September), after 7 weeks of an initial period of gradually increasing training load (t2--early November), after 6 weeks of an intense training cycle (t3--late February) and 48 h after the main competition (t4--early April) and from the controls at three similar time points (t1--early November; t2--late February; t3--early April). In the swimmers, the occurrence of URS clustered around the periods of elevated training load (67 %). No URS were reported at equivalent time points in the non-athletes. Athletes showed a decrease in the percentage (t2 = 21 %; t3 = 27 %; t4 = 17 %) and absolute counts of circulating NK cells (t2 = 35 %; t3 = 22 %; t4 = 22 %), coinciding with the periods of increased training load, never recovering to the initial values observed at the start of the season. The reduction in the CD56(dim) and an increase in the CD56(bright) NK cell subpopulations were significant at t2 and t3 (p < 0.05). Concomitant with the fall in values of NK cells, in athletes that shown more than three URS episodes, a moderate correlation (r = 0.493; p = 0.036) was found between CD56(bright)/CD56(dim) ratio and the number of URS episodes after the more demanding training phase (t3). At t3, a lower value of CD56 cell counts was found in the group who reported three or more URS episodes (t = 2.239; p = 0.032). A

  9. The treatment of herpes simplex virus epithelial keratitis.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmus, K R

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Epithelial keratitis is the most common presentation of ocular infection by herpes simplex virus (HSV). Quantitative assessment of available therapy is needed to guide evidence-based ophthalmology. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of various treatments for dendritic or geographic HSV epithelial keratitis and to evaluate the role of various clinical characteristics on epithelial healing. METHODS: Following a systematic review of the literature, information from clinical trials of HSV dendritic or geographic epithelial keratitis was extracted, and the methodological quality of each study was scored. Methods of epithelial cauterization and curettage were grouped as relatively equivalent physicochemical therapy, and solution and ointment formulations of a given topical antiviral agent were combined. The proportion healed with 1 week of therapy, a scheduled follow-up day that approximated the average time of resolution with antiviral therapy, was selected as the primary outcome based on a masked evaluation of maximum treatment differences in published healing curves. The proportion healed at 14 days was recorded as supplemental information. Fixed-effects and random-effects meta-analysis models were used to obtain summary estimates by pooling results from comparative treatment trials. Hypotheses about which prognostic factors might affect epithelial healing during antiviral therapy were developed by multivariate analysis of the Herpetic Eye Disease Study dataset. RESULTS: After excluding 48 duplicate reports, 14 nonrandomized studies, 15 studies with outdated or similar treatments, and 29 trials lacking sufficient data on healing or accessibility, 76 primary reports were identified. These reports involved 4,251 patients allocated to 93 treatment comparisons of dendritic epithelial keratitis in 28 categories and 9 comparisons of geographic epithelial keratitis in 6 categories. For dendritic keratitis, idoxuridine was better than placebo at 7 days

  10. Expression of CD11a in lymphocyte subpopulation in immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Xia; Zhang, Feng; Yao, Qing-Min; Yuan, Ting; Xu, Jian; Zhu, Xiao-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Recent research demonstrates that the underlying mechanism in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is very complex. Lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) plays important roles in autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of CD11a on lymphocytes and explore its possible role in ITP. The expression of CD11a on lymphocyte subpopulations (CD3+ T cells, CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD3+CD4- T cells, CD4+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells and CD19+ B cells) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Specific anti-platelet GPIIb/IIIa and/or GPIb/IX autoantibodies were assayed by modified monoclonal antibody specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA). The mean fluorescence intensity of CD11a on CD3+ T, CD3+CD4- T and CD19+ B lymphocytes were increased in ITP patients compared to healthy controls. No significant difference of CD11a expression on CD3+CD4+ T cells or CD4+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells was found between ITP patients and controls. Our data indicates the possible role of CD11a in the pathogenesis of ITP. PMID:26884833

  11. Expression of CD11a in lymphocyte subpopulation in immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Xia; Zhang, Feng; Yao, Qing-Min; Yuan, Ting; Xu, Jian; Zhu, Xiao-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Recent research demonstrates that the underlying mechanism in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is very complex. Lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) plays important roles in autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of CD11a on lymphocytes and explore its possible role in ITP. The expression of CD11a on lymphocyte subpopulations (CD3(+) T cells, CD3(+)CD4(+) T cells, CD3(+)CD4(-) T cells, CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells and CD19(+) B cells) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Specific anti-platelet GPIIb/IIIa and/or GPIb/IX autoantibodies were assayed by modified monoclonal antibody specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA). The mean fluorescence intensity of CD11a on CD3(+) T, CD3(+)CD4(-) T and CD19(+) B lymphocytes were increased in ITP patients compared to healthy controls. No significant difference of CD11a expression on CD3(+)CD4(+) T cells or CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells was found between ITP patients and controls. Our data indicates the possible role of CD11a in the pathogenesis of ITP. PMID:26884833

  12. Functional characterization of human thymocyte subpopulations separated by density gradient centrifugation.

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, H M; Lee, J W; Cohen, A; Gelfand, E W

    1984-01-01

    A bovine serum albumin gradient was used to separate two populations of human thymocytes--a minority population (8%) of large thymocytes (LT) and a majority population (92%) of small thymocytes (ST). Fifty per cent of LT cells were in the S, G2 or M phases of the cell cycle compared to 5% of ST cells and 15% of unfractionated thymocytes. LT cells proliferated in response to T cell mitogens and included all of the T colony precursor cells (TCPC). In contrast, ST cells proliferated with mitogens only in the presence of added T cell growth factors and contained none of the thymocyte TCPC. ST cells neither helped nor suppressed the function of LT cells in any assay. This separation technique has provided a rapid method for isolating functionally distinct thymic lymphocyte subpopulations and permitted a further definition of the TCPC in the human thymus. Furthermore it should prove useful in studies of thymocytes at different stages of the cell cycle. PMID:6607793

  13. Hypotonic resistance of boar spermatozoa: sperm subpopulations and relationship with epididymal maturation and fertility.

    PubMed

    Druart, Xavier; Gatti, Jean-Luc; Huet, Sylvie; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Humblot, Patrice

    2009-02-01

    Hypotonic resistance of boar spermatozoa was investigated by measuring the ratio of live/dead spermatozoa (SYBR-14/propidium iodide) by flow cytometry after hypotonic stress. The survival rate of ejaculated spermatozoa incubated in hypotonic solutions ranging from 3 to 330 mmol/kg followed a sigmoid curve that fitted a simple logistic model. The critical osmolality value (Osm(crit)) at which 50% of spermatozoa died was determined with this model. Hypotonic resistance of spermatozoa increased with temperature between 15 and 39 degrees C and decreased after hydrogen superoxide treatment, but was not modified during 8 days of preservation in Beltsville thawing solution. Hypotonic resistance markedly decreased during epididymal maturation and after ejaculation as Osm(crit) at 15 degrees C was 54.7+/-3.2, 68.5+/-10.6, 116.7+/-2.1 and 194.3+/-3.7 mmol/kg for the caput, corpus, cauda and ejaculated spermatozoa respectively. Hypo-osmotic stress of 100 mmol/kg revealed a sperm subpopulation exhibiting increased hypotonic resistance compared with the whole ejaculate (Osm(crit)=67.8+/-2.1 mmol/kg). Consistent differences were observed between lean and standard breeds (Pietrain versus Large White) and between boars within the same breed. According to data collected by artificial insemination centers during a large-scale field trial, hypotonic resistance of ejaculates was found to be positively correlated with in vivo fertility. PMID:18996973

  14. Distinct subpopulations of FOXD1 stroma-derived cells regulate renal erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingdu; Binns, Thomas C.; Davidoff, Olena; Kapitsinou, Pinelopi P.; Pfaff, Andrew S.; Olauson, Hannes; Fogo, Agnes B.; Fong, Guo-Hua; Gross, Kenneth W.

    2016-01-01

    Renal peritubular interstitial fibroblast-like cells are critical for adult erythropoiesis, as they are the main source of erythropoietin (EPO). Hypoxia-inducible factor 2 (HIF-2) controls EPO synthesis in the kidney and liver and is regulated by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD) dioxygenases PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3, which function as cellular oxygen sensors. Renal interstitial cells with EPO-producing capacity are poorly characterized, and the role of the PHD/HIF-2 axis in renal EPO-producing cell (REPC) plasticity is unclear. Here we targeted the PHD/HIF-2/EPO axis in FOXD1 stroma-derived renal interstitial cells and examined the role of individual PHDs in REPC pool size regulation and renal EPO output. Renal interstitial cells with EPO-producing capacity were entirely derived from FOXD1-expressing stroma, and Phd2 inactivation alone induced renal Epo in a limited number of renal interstitial cells. EPO induction was submaximal, as hypoxia or pharmacologic PHD inhibition further increased the REPC fraction among Phd2–/– renal interstitial cells. Moreover, Phd1 and Phd3 were differentially expressed in renal interstitium, and heterozygous deficiency for Phd1 and Phd3 increased REPC numbers in Phd2–/– mice. We propose that FOXD1 lineage renal interstitial cells consist of distinct subpopulations that differ in their responsiveness to Phd2 inactivation and thus regulation of HIF-2 activity and EPO production under hypoxia or conditions of pharmacologic or genetic PHD inactivation. PMID:27088801

  15. Characteristics of the rat cardiac sphingolipid pool in two mitochondrial subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Monette, Jeffrey S; Gómez, Luis A; Moreau, Régis F; Bemer, Brett A; Taylor, Alan W; Hagen, Tory M

    2010-07-23

    Mitochondrial sphingolipids play a diverse role in normal cardiac function and diseases, yet a precise quantification of cardiac mitochondrial sphingolipids has never been performed. Therefore, rat heart interfibrillary mitochondria (IFM) and subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) were isolated, lipids extracted, and sphingolipids quantified by LC-tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed that sphingomyelin (approximately 10,000 pmol/mg protein) was the predominant sphingolipid regardless of mitochondrial subpopulation, and measurable amounts of ceramide (approximately 70 pmol/mg protein) sphingosine, and sphinganine were also found in IFM and SSM. Both mitochondrial populations contained similar quantities of sphingolipids except for ceramide which was much higher in SSM. Analysis of sphingolipid isoforms revealed ten different sphingomyelins and six ceramides that differed from 16- to 24-carbon units in their acyl side chains. Sub-fractionation experiments further showed that sphingolipids are a constituent part of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, inner membrane ceramide levels were 32% lower versus whole mitochondria (45 pmol/mg protein). Three ceramide isotypes (C20-, C22-, and C24-ceramide) accounted for the lower amounts. The concentrations of the ceramides present in the inner membranes of SSM and IFM differed greatly. Overall, mitochondrial sphingolipid content reflected levels seen in cardiac tissue, but the specific ceramide distribution distinguished IFM and SSM from each other.

  16. Characteristics of the Rat Cardiac Sphingolipid Pool in Two Mitochondrial Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Monette, Jeffrey S.; Gómez, Luis A.; Moreau, Régis F.; Bemer, Brett A.; Taylor, Alan W.; Hagen, Tory M.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial sphingolipids play a diverse role in normal cardiac function and diseases, yet a precise quantification of cardiac mitochondrial sphingolipids has never been performed. Therefore, rat heart interfibrillary (IFM) and subsarcolemmal (SSM) mitochondria were isolated, lipids extracted, and sphingolipids quantified by LC-tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed that sphingomyelin (~10,000 pmols/mg protein) was the predominant sphingolipid regardless of mitochondrial subpopulation, and measurable amounts of ceramide (~70 pmols/mg protein) sphingosine, and sphinganine were also found in IFM and SSM. Both mitochondrial populations contained similar quantities of sphingolipids except for ceramide which was much higher in SSM. Analysis of sphingolipid isoforms revealed ten different sphingomyelins and six ceramides that differed from 16 to 24 carbon units in their acyl side-chains. Sub-fractionation experiments further showed that sphingolipids are a constituent part of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, inner membrane ceramide levels were 32% lower versus whole mitochondria (45 pmols/mg protein). Three ceramide isotypes (C20-, C22-, and C24-ceramide) accounted for the lower amounts. The concentrations of the ceramides present in the inner membranes of SSM and IFM differed greatly. Overall, mitochondrial sphingolipid content reflected levels seen in cardiac tissue, but the specific ceramide distribution distinguished IFM and SSM from each other. PMID:20599536

  17. Dyslipidemia-associated alterations in B cell subpopulation frequency and phenotype during experimental atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rincón-Arévalo, Héctor; Castaño, Diana; Villa-Pulgarín, Janny; Rojas, Mauricio; Vásquez, Gloria; Correa, Luis A; Ramírez-Pineda, José R; Yassin, Lina M

    2016-04-01

    Lymphocytes, the cellular effectors of adaptive immunity, are involved in the chronic inflammatory process known as atherosclerosis. Proatherogenic and atheroprotective properties have been ascribed to B cells. However, information regarding the role of B cells during atherosclerosis is scarce. Both the frequency and the phenotype of B cell subpopulations were studied by flow cytometry in wild type and apolipoprotein-E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice fed a high-fat (HFD) or control diet. Whereas the proportion of follicular cells was decreased, transitional 1-like cells were increased in mice with advanced atherosclerotic lesions (apoE(-/-) HFD). B cells in atherosclerotic mice were more activated, indicated by their higher surface expression of CD80, CD86, CD40 and CD95 and increased serum IgG1 levels. In the aorta, a decreased frequency of B cells was observed in mice with advanced atherosclerosis. Low expression of CD19 was observed on B cells from the spleen, aorta and lymph nodes of apoE(-/-) HFD mice. This alteration correlated with serum levels of IgG1 and cholesterol. A reduction in CD19 expression was induced in splenic cells from young apoE(-/-) mice cultured with lipemic serum. These results show that mice with advanced atherosclerosis display a variety of alterations in the frequency and phenotype of B lymphocytes, most of which are associated with dyslipidemia.

  18. Selective Migration of Subpopulations of Bone Marrow Cells along an SDF-1α and ATP Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Laupheimer, Michael; Skorska, Anna; Große, Jana; Tiedemann, Gudrun; Steinhoff, Gustav; David, Robert; Lux, Cornelia A.

    2014-01-01

    Both stem cell chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) and extracellular nucleotides such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) are increased in ischemic myocardium. Since ATP has been reported to influence cell migration, we analysed the migratory response of bone marrow cells towards a combination of SDF-1 and ATP. Total nucleated cells (BM-TNCs) were isolated from bone marrow of cardiac surgery patients. Migration assays were performed in vitro. Subsequently, migrated cells were subjected to multicolor flow cytometric analysis of CD133, CD34, CD117, CD184, CD309, and CD14 expression. BM-TNCs migrated significantly towards a combination of SDF-1 and ATP. The proportions of CD34+ cells as well as subpopulations coexpressing multiple stem cell markers were selectively enhanced after migration towards SDF-1 or SDF-1 + ATP. After spontaneous migration, significantly fewer stem cells and CD184+ cells were detected. Direct incubation with SDF-1 led to a reduction of CD184+ but not stem cell marker-positive cells, while incubation with ATP significantly increased CD14+ percentage. In summary, we found that while a combination of SDF-1 and ATP elicited strong migration of BM-TNCs in vitro, only SDF-1 was responsible for selective attraction of hematopoietic stem cells. Meanwhile, spontaneous migration of stem cells was lower compared to BM-TNCs or monocytes. PMID:25610653

  19. Increased radiosensitivity of a subpopulation of T-lymphocyte progenitors from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, S.J.; Wilson, F.D.; Greenberg, B.R.; Shifrine, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Reeves, J.D.; Misra, H.

    1981-06-01

    In vitro radiation survival of peripheral blood T lymphocytes was studied in 15 clinically normal adults and 4 patients with Fanconi's anemia. Tritiated thymidine incorporation in a whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) and a newly developed whole blood T-lymphocyte colony assay were used to measure lymphocyte blastogenesis and colony formation in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulation. Lymphocyte colony formation was found to be consistently more sensitive than the LST for detection of low-level radiation effects using both normal cells and lymphocytes from Fanconi's anemia patients. Lymphocytes from patients with Fanconi's anemia were significantly more sensitive to in vitro x irradiation than lymphocytes from clinically normal individuals as measured by their ability to divide when stimulated by PHA in the LST and colony formation assay. No significant difference in the radiosensitivity of the Con-A response was observed between the two groups. The PHA-responsive T-lymphocyte subpopulation in Fanconi's anemia patients appears to be intrinsically defective. The nature of this defect, significance in the disease process, and relevancy of these findings to the establishment of radiation protection standards are discussed.

  20. Increased radiosensitivity of a subpopulation ot T-lymphocyte progenitors from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, S.J.; Wilson, F.D.; Greenberg, B.R.; Shifrine, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Reeves, J.D.; Misra, H.

    1981-06-01

    In vitro radiation survival of peripheral blood T lymphocytes was studied in 15 clinically normal adults and 4 patients with Fanconi's anemia. Tritiated thymidine incorporation in a whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) and a newly developed whole blood T-lymphocyte colony assay were used to measure lymphocyte blastogenesis and colony formation in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulation. Lymphocyte colony formation was found to be consistently more sensitive than the LST for detection of low-level radiation effects using both normal cells and lymphocytes from Fanconi's anemia patients. Lymphocytes from patients with Fanconi's anemia were significantly more sensitive to in vitro x-irradiation than lymphocytes from clinically normal individuals as measured by their ability to divide when stimulated by PHA in the LST (patients, D37 . 198 R; normals, D37 . 309 R, p . 0.057) and colony formation assay (patients, D37 . 53 R; normals, D37 . 109 R, p . 0.016). No significant difference in the radiosensitivity of the Con-A response was observed between the two groups. The PHA-responsive T-lymphocyte subpopulation in Fanconi's anemia patients appears to be intrinsically defective. The nature of this defect, significance in the disease process, and relevancy of these findings to the establishment of radiation protection standards are discussed.

  1. Histamine neurons in the tuberomamillary nucleus: a whole center or distinct subpopulations?

    PubMed Central

    Blandina, Patrizio; Munari, Leonardo; Provensi, Gustavo; Passani, Maria B.

    2012-01-01

    Histamine axons originate from a single source, the tuberomamillary nucleus (TMN) of the posterior hypothalamus, to innervate almost all central nervous system (CNS) regions. This feature, a compact cell group with widely distributed fibers, resembles that of other amine systems, such as noradrenaline or serotonin, and is consistent with a function for histamine over a host of physiological processes, including the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle, appetite, endocrine homeostasis, body temperature, pain perception, learning, memory, and emotion. An important question is whether these diverse physiological roles are served by different histamine neuronal subpopulation. While the histamine system is generally regarded as one single functional unit that provides histamine throughout the brain, evidence is beginning to accumulate in favor of heterogeneity of histamine neurons. The aim of this review is to summarize experimental evidence demonstrating that histamine neurons are heterogeneous, organized into functionally distinct circuits, impinging on different brain regions, and displaying selective control mechanisms. This could imply independent functions of subsets of histamine neurons according to their respective origin and terminal projections. PMID:22586376

  2. Infectibility of separated peripheral blood mononuclear cell subpopulations by varicella-zoster virus (VZV).

    PubMed

    Koenig, Andreas; Wolff, Manfred H

    2003-01-01

    Varicella zoster-virus (VZV) is a humanpathogenic alpha-Herpesvirus that causes chickenpox after primary infection. The virus spreads by aerosol or direct contact with infectious vesical fluids, it enters the body via the respiratory tract. In a first viremic stage it replicates in local lymph nodes, followed by a secondary viremic stage. In the course it spreads through the body to endothelial cells in the periphery. During acute viremia of chickenpox viral DNA can be detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by PCR and in situ hybridization. Recently published results quantified the viral DNA load in PBMC and subpopulations by real-time PCR. In the animal SCID-hu mouse model system VZV showed a tropism for T-lymphocytes. The aim of this work was the investigation of viral ability to infect and to replicate in purified primary subtypes of PBMC, i.e., T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, and monocytes. These cells were isolated from whole peripheral blood or tonsils and infected with cell-free VZV for different time periods. In all cell types, transcriptional activity was shown by amplification and detection of immediate early (IE) and late (L) viral mRNA by NASBA or RT-PCR. Expression of viral glycoproteins was analyzed and proved in lymphocytes by immunofluorescence microscopy. PMID:12627490

  3. Distinct subpopulations of FOXD1 stroma-derived cells regulate renal erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hanako; Liu, Qingdu; Binns, Thomas C; Urrutia, Andres A; Davidoff, Olena; Kapitsinou, Pinelopi P; Pfaff, Andrew S; Olauson, Hannes; Wernerson, Annika; Fogo, Agnes B; Fong, Guo-Hua; Gross, Kenneth W; Haase, Volker H

    2016-05-01

    Renal peritubular interstitial fibroblast-like cells are critical for adult erythropoiesis, as they are the main source of erythropoietin (EPO). Hypoxia-inducible factor 2 (HIF-2) controls EPO synthesis in the kidney and liver and is regulated by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD) dioxygenases PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3, which function as cellular oxygen sensors. Renal interstitial cells with EPO-producing capacity are poorly characterized, and the role of the PHD/HIF-2 axis in renal EPO-producing cell (REPC) plasticity is unclear. Here we targeted the PHD/HIF-2/EPO axis in FOXD1 stroma-derived renal interstitial cells and examined the role of individual PHDs in REPC pool size regulation and renal EPO output. Renal interstitial cells with EPO-producing capacity were entirely derived from FOXD1-expressing stroma, and Phd2 inactivation alone induced renal Epo in a limited number of renal interstitial cells. EPO induction was submaximal, as hypoxia or pharmacologic PHD inhibition further increased the REPC fraction among Phd2-/- renal interstitial cells. Moreover, Phd1 and Phd3 were differentially expressed in renal interstitium, and heterozygous deficiency for Phd1 and Phd3 increased REPC numbers in Phd2-/- mice. We propose that FOXD1 lineage renal interstitial cells consist of distinct subpopulations that differ in their responsiveness to Phd2 inactivation and thus regulation of HIF-2 activity and EPO production under hypoxia or conditions of pharmacologic or genetic PHD inactivation. PMID:27088801

  4. Patients' knowledge and awareness of dental implants in a Turkish subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Özçakır Tomruk, Ceyda; Şençift, Kemal

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patients' knowledge on dental implants in a Turkish subpopulation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Five hundred twenty seven Turkish adults referred to Yeditepe University Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul, Turkey, were presented with a questionnaire including 20 questions regarding the level of information and awareness about the dental implants. The data were collected and statistical analyses were performed with Chi square test to compare the descriptive data. RESULTS Among 527 subjects, 54% were female and 46% were male with a mean age of 42.2 years. The rate of patients' implant awareness was 27.7%. When the patients were questioned about the treatment options for rehabilitation of tooth missing, 60.9% of patients were informed about fixed partial denture, followed by conventional complete denture (32.5%) and removable partial denture (24.9%). Six percent reported that they were very well informed about the dental implants whereas 48.2% were poorly informed. The information sources of the implants were from the dentist (44.5%), printed media (31.6%) and friends and acquaintances (17.3%), respectively. Sixteen percent of the population believed that their implants would last forever. CONCLUSION The dentists should give more detailed information to the patients about dental implants and tooth-supported fixed partial dentures in the future. PMID:24843399

  5. Characteristics of the rat cardiac sphingolipid pool in two mitochondrial subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Monette, Jeffrey S; Gómez, Luis A; Moreau, Régis F; Bemer, Brett A; Taylor, Alan W; Hagen, Tory M

    2010-07-23

    Mitochondrial sphingolipids play a diverse role in normal cardiac function and diseases, yet a precise quantification of cardiac mitochondrial sphingolipids has never been performed. Therefore, rat heart interfibrillary mitochondria (IFM) and subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) were isolated, lipids extracted, and sphingolipids quantified by LC-tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed that sphingomyelin (approximately 10,000 pmol/mg protein) was the predominant sphingolipid regardless of mitochondrial subpopulation, and measurable amounts of ceramide (approximately 70 pmol/mg protein) sphingosine, and sphinganine were also found in IFM and SSM. Both mitochondrial populations contained similar quantities of sphingolipids except for ceramide which was much higher in SSM. Analysis of sphingolipid isoforms revealed ten different sphingomyelins and six ceramides that differed from 16- to 24-carbon units in their acyl side chains. Sub-fractionation experiments further showed that sphingolipids are a constituent part of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, inner membrane ceramide levels were 32% lower versus whole mitochondria (45 pmol/mg protein). Three ceramide isotypes (C20-, C22-, and C24-ceramide) accounted for the lower amounts. The concentrations of the ceramides present in the inner membranes of SSM and IFM differed greatly. Overall, mitochondrial sphingolipid content reflected levels seen in cardiac tissue, but the specific ceramide distribution distinguished IFM and SSM from each other. PMID:20599536

  6. [Recent studies on corneal epithelial barrier function].

    PubMed

    Liu, F F; Li, W; Liu, Z G; Chen, W S

    2016-08-01

    Corneal epithelium, the outermost layer of eyeball, is the main route for foreign materials to enter the eye. Under physiological conditions, the corneal epithelial superficial cells form a functionally selective permeability barrier. Integral corneal epithelial barrier function not only ensures the enrolling of nutrients which is required for regular metabolism, but also prevents foreign bodies, or disease-causing microorganism invasion. Recently, a large number of clinical and experimental studies have shown that abnormal corneal epithelial barrier function is the pathological basis for many ocular diseases. In addition, some study found that corneal epithelial barrier constitutes a variety of proteins involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and a series of physiological and pathological processes. This paper reviewed recent studies specifically on the corneal epithelial barrier, highlights of its structure, function and influence factors. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 631-635). PMID:27562284

  7. Hypoxia tolerance is conserved across genetically distinct sub-populations of an iconic, tropical Australian teleost (Lates calcarifer)

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Geoffrey M.; Clark, Timothy D.; Rummer, Jodie L.; Carton, Alexander G.

    2013-01-01

    Tropical coastal systems are particularly prone to periods of environmental hypoxia, which can result from organismal respiration as well as thermal stratification, and may be further exacerbated by anthropogenic disturbances. In this study, we used five genetically distinct sub-populations of Australian barramundi (Lates calcarifer) to examine the extent of intraspecific variability in hypoxia tolerance. Fish were maintained at two temperatures (26 or 36°C), representing the seasonal thermal range for this species across its tropical distribution in Australia. All fish maintained a constant oxygen consumption rate as air saturation of the water decreased from 100% down to a critical oxygen saturation ([O2]crit) of 15.44 ± 3.20 and 21.07 ± 3.92% (means ± SD) at 26 and 36°C, respectively. Mean [O2]crit, used as a performance measure of hypoxia tolerance, did not differ between sub-populations. No differences were found for resting between sub-populations at 26°C, but modest differences were detected between two sub-populations at 36°C (3.36 ± 0.62 and 2.83 ± 0.27 mg O2 kg−1 min−1 for Gladstone and Broome sub-populations, respectively). Resting was lower for sub-populations at 26°C (1.46 ± 0.26 mg O2 kg−1 min−1) than at 36°C (3.10 ± 0.43 mg O2 kg−1 min−1), with a temperature coefficient (Q10) of 2.12 ± 0.30. We conclude that both hypoxia tolerance and resting are conserved across the distribution of barramundi in Australia, which reflects the capacity of this species to cope in environments with large fluctuations in both temperature and dissolved oxygen. PMID:27293613

  8. Stability of the hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Mooney, Steven M.; Celiktas, Muge; Hanash, Samir M.; Mani, Sendurai A.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and its reverse – Mesenchymal to Epithelial Transition (MET) – are hallmarks of cellular plasticity during embryonic development and cancer metastasis. During EMT, epithelial cells lose cell-cell adhesion and gain migratory and invasive traits either partially or completely, leading to a hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (hybrid E/M) or a mesenchymal phenotype respectively. Mesenchymal cells move individually, but hybrid E/M cells migrate collectively as observed during gastrulation, wound healing, and the formation of tumor clusters detected as Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs). Typically, the hybrid E/M phenotype has largely been tacitly assumed to be transient and ‘metastable’. Here, we identify certain ‘phenotypic stability factors’ (PSFs) such as GRHL2 that couple to the core EMT decision-making circuit (miR-200/ZEB) and stabilize hybrid E/M phenotype. Further, we show that H1975 lung cancer cells can display a stable hybrid E/M phenotype and migrate collectively, a behavior that is impaired by knockdown of GRHL2 and another previously identified PSF - OVOL. In addition, our computational model predicts that GRHL2 can also associate hybrid E/M phenotype with high tumor-initiating potential, a prediction strengthened by the observation that the higher levels of these PSFs may be predictive of poor patient outcome. Finally, based on these specific examples, we deduce certain network motifs that can stabilize the hybrid E/M phenotype. Our results suggest that partial EMT, i.e. a hybrid E/M phenotype, need not be ‘metastable’, and strengthen the emerging notion that partial EMT, but not necessarily a complete EMT, is associated with aggressive tumor progression. PMID:27008704

  9. Sex difference in physical activity, energy expenditure and obesity driven by a subpopulation of hypothalamic POMC neurons

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Luke K.; Doslikova, Barbora; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Greenwald-Yarnell, Megan; Georgescu, Teodora; Chianese, Raffaella; Martinez de Morentin, Pablo B.; Ogunnowo-Bada, Emmanuel; Cansell, Celine; Valencia-Torres, Lourdes; Garfield, Alastair S.; Apergis-Schoute, John; Lam, Daniel D.; Speakman, John R.; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Low, Malcolm J.; Rochford, Justin J.; Myers, Martin G.; Evans, Mark L.; Heisler, Lora K.

    2016-01-01

    expressing neurons is sufficient to regulate energy intake and insulin sensitivity in male and female mice. However, an unexpected sex difference in the function of this subset of POMC neurons was identified with regard to energy expenditure. We reveal that a large sex difference in physical activity, energy expenditure and the development of obesity is driven by this subpopulation, which constitutes approximately 40% of all POMC neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. This may have broad implications for strategies utilized to combat obesity, which at present largely ignore the sex of the obese individual. PMID:26977396

  10. Microfluidic single-cell transcriptional analysis rationally identifies novel surface marker profiles to enhance cell-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Rennert, Robert C; Januszyk, Michael; Sorkin, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Maan, Zeshaan N; Duscher, Dominik; Whittam, Alexander J; Kosaraju, Revanth; Chung, Michael T; Paik, Kevin; Li, Alexander Y; Findlay, Michael; Glotzbach, Jason P; Butte, Atul J; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2016-01-01

    Current progenitor cell therapies have only modest efficacy, which has limited their clinical adoption. This may be the result of a cellular heterogeneity that decreases the number of functional progenitors delivered to diseased tissue, and prevents correction of underlying pathologic cell population disruptions. Here, we develop a high-resolution method of identifying phenotypically distinct progenitor cell subpopulations via single-cell transcriptional analysis and advanced bioinformatics. When combined with high-throughput cell surface marker screening, this approach facilitates the rational selection of surface markers for prospective isolation of cell subpopulations with desired transcriptional profiles. We establish the usefulness of this platform in costly and highly morbid diabetic wounds by identifying a subpopulation of progenitor cells that is dysfunctional in the diabetic state, and normalizes diabetic wound healing rates following allogeneic application. We believe this work presents a logical framework for the development of targeted cell therapies that can be customized to any clinical application. PMID:27324848

  11. Microfluidic single-cell transcriptional analysis rationally identifies novel surface marker profiles to enhance cell-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Rennert, Robert C; Januszyk, Michael; Sorkin, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Maan, Zeshaan N; Duscher, Dominik; Whittam, Alexander J; Kosaraju, Revanth; Chung, Michael T; Paik, Kevin; Li, Alexander Y; Findlay, Michael; Glotzbach, Jason P; Butte, Atul J; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2016-06-21

    Current progenitor cell therapies have only modest efficacy, which has limited their clinical adoption. This may be the result of a cellular heterogeneity that decreases the number of functional progenitors delivered to diseased tissue, and prevents correction of underlying pathologic cell population disruptions. Here, we develop a high-resolution method of identifying phenotypically distinct progenitor cell subpopulations via single-cell transcriptional analysis and advanced bioinformatics. When combined with high-throughput cell surface marker screening, this approach facilitates the rational selection of surface markers for prospective isolation of cell subpopulations with desired transcriptional profiles. We establish the usefulness of this platform in costly and highly morbid diabetic wounds by identifying a subpopulation of progenitor cells that is dysfunctional in the diabetic state, and normalizes diabetic wound healing rates following allogeneic application. We believe this work presents a logical framework for the development of targeted cell therapies that can be customized to any clinical application.

  12. Focal epithelial hyperplasia - an update.

    PubMed

    Said, Ahmed K; Leao, Jair C; Fedele, Stefano; Porter, Stephen R

    2013-07-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is an asymptomatic benign mucosal disease, which is mostly observed in specific groups in certain geographical regions. FEH is usually a disease of childhood and adolescence and is generally associated with people who live in poverty and of low socioeconomic status. Clinically, FEH is typically characterized by multiple, painless, soft, sessile papules, plaques or nodules, which may coalesce to give rise to larger lesions. Human papillomavirus (HPV), especially genotypes 13 and 32, have been associated and detected in the majority of FEH lesions. The clinical examination and social history often allow diagnosis, but histopathological examination of lesional tissue is usually required to confirm the exact diagnosis. FEH sometimes resolves spontaneously however, treatment is often indicated as a consequence of aesthetic effects or any interference with occlusion. There remains no specific therapy for FEH, although surgical removal, laser excision or possibly topical antiviral agents may be of benefit. There remains no evidence that FEH is potentially malignant.

  13. Differential regulation of amyloid-. beta. -protein mRNA expression within hippocampal neuronal subpopulations in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, G.A.; Lewis, D.A.; Bahmanyar, S.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Young, W.G.; Morrison, J.H.; Wilson, M.C.

    1988-02-01

    The authors have mapped the neuroanatomical distribution of amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA within neuronal subpopulations of the hippocampal formation in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), normal aged human, and patients with Alzheimer disease. Amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA appears to be expressed in all hippocampal neurons, but at different levels of abundance. In the central nervous system of monkey and normal aged human, image analysis shows that neurons of the dentate gyrus and cornu Ammonis fields contain a 2.5-times-greater hybridization signal than is present in neurons of the subiculum and entorhinal cortex. In contrast, in the Alzheimer disease hippocampal formation, the levels of amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA in the cornu Ammonis field 3 and parasubiculum are equivalent. These findings suggest that within certain neuronal subpopulations cell type-specific regulation of amyloid-..beta..-protein gene expression may be altered in Alzheimer disease.

  14. Presence of a dynorphin-like peptide in a restricted subpopulation of catecholaminergic neurons in rat nucleus tractus solitarii.

    PubMed

    Ceccatelli, S; Seroogy, K B; Millhorn, D E; Terenius, L

    1992-09-01

    Immunofluorescence colocalization techniques were used to examine the extent of coexistence of the endogenous opioid peptide dynorphin with catecholamines and the related opioid peptide enkephalin within neurons of the rat medulla oblongata. Immunoreactivities for dynorphin and the catecholamine-synthesizing enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase were found to coexist within a limited subpopulation of A2 catecholamine cells, localized to the medial nucleus of the nucleus tractus solitarii. Colocalization of the two opioid peptides was found mainly within perikarya situated in the medial and ventrolateral nuclei of the nucleus tractus solitarii. Triple-labeling studies revealed only rare cases of catecholamine/dynorphin/enkephalin coexistence. These data demonstrate that dynorphin is present within a restricted subpopulation of catecholamine neurons in the dorsal medulla oblongata. In addition, the content of either of the opioids enkephalin or dynorphin appears to distinguish subsets of medullary catecholamine neurons. PMID:1356595

  15. Genetic divergence between subpopulations of the eastern Pacific goose barnacle Pollicipes elegans: mitochondrial cytochrome c subunit 1 nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed

    Van Syoc, R J

    1994-12-01

    Nucleotide sequence data derived from polymerase chain reaction products from the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 gene of mitochondrial DNA provide evidence for interrupted gene flow and subsequent genetic divergence between geographically separate subpopulations of the edible goose barnacle, Pollicipes elegans, with a 4400-km latitudinal distribution in the eastern Pacific Ocean. The amphitropical subpopulations of Pollicipes elegans have a net nucleotide sequence divergence of about 1.2%. A range of mutation rates are applied to calculate estimates for the timing of this divergence. The earliest estimated time of divergence agrees with a Pliocene time of general warming in the eastern Pacific. The latest estimated times coincide with the Pleistocene epoch and periods of cooling and warming that could have allowed for a series of expansions and contractions of P. elegans populations in the eastern tropical Pacific. These expansions and contractions may, therefore, represent alternating periods of genetic exchange and isolation of the two populations.

  16. Modeling Alveolar Epithelial Cell Behavior In Spatially Designed Hydrogel Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Katherine Jean Reeder

    . Aggregate formation in these microwells motivated us to develop a templating technique to create hollow cyst-like epithelial structures within PEG hydrogels. Photodegradable microspheres were used to form spherical epithelial layers, which were then encapsulated in a PEG hydrogel followed by template erosion with cytocompatible light. With these model alveoli, we investigated the interplay between the epithelium and mesenchyme by co-encapsulating healthy and diseased pulmonary fibroblasts with healthy and diseased epithelial cysts and measuring important cellular behaviors (i.e. proliferation, migration, and protein expression). This model of alveolar tissue represents a significant advance in culture platforms available to researchers interested in identifying the mechanisms involved in disease progression and for testing potential therapeutics in a controlled, tissue-appropriate setting.

  17. Esophageal epithelial cells acquire functional characteristics of activated myofibroblasts after undergoing an epithelial to mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Amanda B.; Dods, Kara; Noah, Yuli; Toltzis, Sarit; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna Modayur; Lee, Anna; Benitez, Alain; Bedenbaugh, Adam; Falk, Gary W.; Wells, Rebecca G.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Wang, Mei-Lun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic inflammatory disease that leads to esophageal fibrosis and stricture. We have recently shown that in EoE, esophageal epithelial cells undergo an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), characterized by gain of mesenchymal markers and loss of epithelial gene expression. Whether epithelial cells exposed to profibrotic cytokines can also acquire the functional characteristics of activated myofibroblasts, including migration, contraction, and extracellular matrix deposition, is relevant to our understanding and treatment of EoE-associated fibrogenesis. In the current study, we characterize cell migration, contraction, and collagen production by esophageal epithelial cells that have undergone cytokine-induced EMT in vitro. Methods and Results Stimulation of human non-transformed immortalized esophageal epithelial cells (EPC2-hTERT) with profibrotic cytokines TNFα, TGFβ, and IL1β for three weeks led to acquisition of mesenchymal αSMA and vimentin, and loss of epithelial E-cadherin expression. Upon removal of the profibrotic stimulus, epithelial characteristics were partially rescued. TGFβ stimulation had a robust effect upon epithelial collagen production. Surprisingly, TNFα stimulation had the most potent effect upon cell migration and contraction, exceeding the effects of the prototypical profibrotic cytokine TGFβ. IL1β stimulation alone had minimal effect upon esophageal epithelial migration, contraction, and collagen production. Conclusions Esophageal epithelial cells that have undergone EMT acquire functional characteristics of activated myofibroblasts in vitro. Profibrotic cytokines exert differential effects upon esophageal epithelial cells, underscoring complexities of fibrogenesis in EoE, and implicating esophageal epithelial cells as effector cells in EoE-associated fibrogenesis. PMID:25183431

  18. Spanish flu and early 20th-century expansion of a coronary heart disease-prone subpopulation.

    PubMed

    Azambuja, Maria Inês Reinert

    2004-01-01

    According to Stephen Jay Gould, "we have a strong preference for seeing trends as entities moving somewhere." However, trends may instead be the product of relative expansions and contractions of different subpopulations constituting the system. Variation in attributes of coronary heart disease cases during the decline in coronary heart disease mortality suggests a change in the primary source-subpopulation of cases over time. It is proposed that an early 20th-century expansion of a coronary heart disease-prone subpopulation, characterized by high serum-cholesterol phenotype and high case-fatality--which contributed to most of the coronary heart disease cases and deaths during the 1960s--may have been a late result of the 1918 influenza pandemic. The same unusual immune response to infection that in 1918 killed preferentially men, whites, and those born from 1880 to 1900 (20-40 years old) may have "primed" survivors of those birth cohorts to late coronary heart disease mortality. Ecologic evidence in favor of a birth cohort and geographic association between both epidemics is presented. Cross-reactive auto-immune response upon reinfection could explain the excess coronary heart disease deaths reported during influenza epidemics from the late 1920s onward. Mimicry between the viral hemagglutinin and the apolipoprotein B or the low-density lipoprotein receptor could be the link between infection and hypercholesterolemia. The extinction of those birth cohorts would result in a relative increase in cases coming from a 2nd subpopulation, which was characterized by insulin resistance and chronic expression of low-grade inflammation markers and was comparatively less vulnerable to die acutely from coronary heart disease.

  19. Airway epithelial cell responses to ozone injury

    SciTech Connect

    Leikauf, G.D.; Simpson, L.G.; Zhao, Qiyu

    1995-03-01

    The airway epithelial cell is an important target in ozone injury. Once activated, the airway epithelium responds in three phases. The initial, or immediate phase, involves activation of constitutive cells, often through direct covalent interactions including the formation of secondary ozonolysis products-hydroxyhydroperoxides, aldehydes, and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we found hydroxyhydroperoxides to be potent agonists; of bioactive eicosanoid formation by human airway epithelial cells in culture. Other probable immediate events include activation and inactivation of enzymes present on the epithelial surface (e.g., neutral endopeptidase). During the next 2 to 24 hr, or early phase, epithelial cells respond by synthesis and release of chemotactic factors, including chemokines-macrophage inflammatory protein-2, RANTES, and interleukin-8. Infiltrating leukocytes during this period also release elastase, an important agonist of epithelial cell mucus secretion and additional chemokine formation. The third (late) phase of ozone injury is characterized by eosinophil or monocyte infiltration. Cytokine expression leads to alteration of structural protein synthesis, with increases in fibronectin evident by in situ hybridization. Synthesis of epithelial antiproteases, e.g., secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor, may also increase locally 24 to 48 hr after elastase concentrations become excessive. Thus, the epithelium is not merely a passive barrier to ozone injury but has a dynamic role in directing the migration, activating, and then counteracting inflammatory cells. Through these complex interactions, epithelial cells can be viewed as the initiators (alpha) and the receptors (omega) of ozone-induced airway disease. 51 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Registered report: A chromatin-mediated reversible drug-tolerant state in cancer cell subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Haven, Babette; Heilig, Elysia; Donham, Cristine; Settles, Michael; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Owen, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a substantial number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of experiments from "A chromatin-mediated reversible drug-tolerant state in cancer cell subpopulations" by Sharma and colleagues, published in Cell in 2010 (Sharma et al., 2010). Sharma and colleagues demonstrated that prolonged exposure of cancer cells to TKIs give rise to small populations of "drug tolerant persisters" (DTPs) (Figure 1B-C) that were reversed during subsequent maintenance under drug-free conditions (Figures 1E, 2B and 2E). DTPs exhibited reduced histone acetylation and sensitivity to HDAC inhibitors (HDIs) (Figure 4A-B). Drug sensitivity was restored with co-treatment of either HDIs or an IGF-1R inhibitor, in combination with TKIs (Figure 5A-B). Inhibition of IGF-1R activation also led to decreased KDM5A expression and restoration of H3K4 methylation, suggesting a direct link between the IGF-1R signaling pathway and KDM5A function (Figure 7A, 7C, and 7I). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange and the results of the replications will be published in eLife. PMID:26905833

  1. Blood lymphocyte subpopulations, neutrophil phagocytosis and proteinogram during late pregnancy and postpartum in mares.

    PubMed

    Agrícola, R; Carvalho, H; Barbosa, M; Pereira, M; Medeiros, J A S; Ferreira-Dias, G

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations, neutrophil phagocytic capacity and proteinogram characteristics in mares, during the last trimester of pregnancy and in postpartum. Measurement of phagocytosis and quantification of T-lymphocyte subsets were done by flow cytometry. Quantification of T-lymphocyte subsets was performed with monoclonal antibodies specific for CD2, CD3, CD4 and CD8 cell markers. Natural killer and B-cell counts were estimated mathematically. Serum proteinogram was obtained by electrophoresis. No significant differences were observed between gestation and postpartum on CD4(+), CD8(+) and NK(+) lymphocyte subsets, CD4 : CD8 ratio and phagocytosis. The percentage of cells expressing CD3 (64.2 +/- 1.8) and CD2 (68.4 +/- 1.7) (Mean +/- SEM) was reduced during gestation vs postpartum (69.7 +/- 1.5 and 73.8 +/- 1.4 respectively) (p < 0.05). During pregnancy, CD19(+) (31.6 +/- 1.7) was higher than in postpartum (26.2 +/- 1.4) (p < 0.05). Total T cells (2911 +/- 227 cells/mul), T helper cells (2144 +/- 169 cells/mul) and T-cytotoxic cells (767 +/- 68 cells/mul) were depressed in pregnancy, when compared with postpartum (4093 +/- 337 cells/mul; 3004 +/- 276 cells/mul; 1089 +/- 94 cells/mul respectively) (p < 0.01). Total white blood cell count was reduced during pregnancy (8815 +/- 427 cells/mul) with respect to postpartum (10742 +/- 446 cells/mul) (p < 0.01), while neutrophil count did not change. Total proteins, albumin, alpha(1),alpha(2),beta(1), beta(2), gamma globulins and albumin : globulin did not differ. Our results suggest that the physiological immune depression occurring in mares, during gestation might be due to T-helper and T-cytotoxic lymphocytes reduction.

  2. Prevalence and morphometric analysis of three-rooted mandibular first molars in a Brazilian subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Clarissa Teles; de Oliveira-Santos, Christiano; Bernardineli, Norberti; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Minotti-Bonfante, Paloma Gagliardi; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The knowledge of the internal anatomy of three-rooted mandibular molars may help clinicians to diagnose and plan the root canal treatment in order to provide adequate therapy when this variation is present. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of three-rooted mandibular molars in a Brazilian population using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and to analyze the anatomy of mandibular first molars with three roots through micro-CT. Material and Methods: CBCT images of 116 patients were reviewed to determine the prevalence of three-rooted first mandibular molars in a Brazilian subpopulation. Furthermore, with the use of micro-CT, 55 extracted three-rooted mandibular first molars were scanned and reconstructed to assess root length, distance between canal orifices, apical diameter, Vertucci's classification, presence of apical delta, number of foramina and furcations, lateral and accessory canals. The distance between the orifice on the pulp chamber floor and the beginning of the curvature and the angle of canal curvature were analyzed in the distolingual root. Data were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Results: The prevalence of three-rooted mandibular first molars was of 2.58%. Mesial roots showed complex distribution of the root canal system in comparison to the distal roots. The median of major diameters of mesiobuccal, mesiolingual and single mesial canals were: 0.34, 0.41 and 0.60 mm, respectively. The higher values of major diameters were found in the distobuccal canals (0.56 mm) and the lower diameters in the distolingual canals (0.29 mm). The lowest orifice distance was found between the mesial canals (MB-ML) and the highest distance between the distal root canals (DB-DL). Almost all distal roots had one root canal and one apical foramen with few accessory canals. Conclusions: Distolingual root generally has short length, severe curvature and a single root canal with low apical diameter.

  3. [Diminished zinc plasma concentrations and alterations in the number of lymphocyte subpopulations in Down's syndrome patients].

    PubMed

    Soto-Quintana, Marisol; Alvarez-Nava, Francisco; Rojas-Atencio, Alicia; Granadillo, Victor; Fernández, Denny; Ocando, Ana; López, Ealys; Fulcado, Waleska

    2003-03-01

    Alterations of plasma levels of zinc and in the immune system in Down's syndrome (DS) have been reported. These alterations have been associated with a high rate of infectious diseases, which represent the main cause of mortality in affected individuals. The objectives of this study were to determine plasma zinc levels and to evaluate the immune system in DS patients. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 43 DS patients examined at the Unidad de Genética Médica, Universidad del Zulia in Maracaibo, Venezuela. Their mean age (+/- SD) was 2.3 +/- 2.0 years. As control group, 40 healthy children were studied (mean +/- SD 2.3 +/- 2.0 years). Karyotypes by a standard technique, the determination of plasma levels of zinc by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and the evaluation of the immune system by flow cytometry were carried out in the study groups. All DS patients had free trisomy 21. Significantly disminished zinc plasma levels, helper T lymphocyte (CD4) percentage, helper/cytotoxic (CD4/CD8) ratio and B-cells (CD19) were found in DS patients by matching with control group. An increase in CD8 was also found. No significative difference in the lymphocyte subpopulations between DS patients with disminished plasma levels of zinc and DS patients with normal zinc were found. These findings suggest that zinc deficiency is not the sole etiology involved in the disorders of immune system seen in DS patients. Other factors, such as thymic alterations and molecular abnormalities due to gene overexpression of loci located on chromosome 21 could be involved. Although, zinc supplementation is recommended in these patients with zinc deficiency, further studies with a double-blind, placebo versus zinc design are needed to evaluate the potentially beneficial effects of zinc treatment in DS patients.

  4. Quantifying subpopulation synergy for antibiotic combinations via mechanism-based modeling and a sequential dosing design.

    PubMed

    Landersdorfer, Cornelia B; Ly, Neang S; Xu, Hongmei; Tsuji, Brian T; Bulitta, Jürgen B

    2013-05-01

    Quantitative modeling of combination therapy can describe the effects of each antibiotic against multiple bacterial populations. Our aim was to develop an efficient experimental and modeling strategy that evaluates different synergy mechanisms using a rapidly killing peptide antibiotic (nisin) combined with amikacin or linezolid as probe drugs. Serial viable counts over 48 h were obtained in time-kill experiments with all three antibiotics in monotherapy against a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 strain (inoculum, 10(8) CFU/ml). A sequential design (initial dosing of 8 or 32 mg/liter nisin, switched to amikacin or linezolid at 1.5 h) assessed the rate of killing by amikacin and linezolid against nisin-intermediate and nisin-resistant populations. Simultaneous combinations were additionally studied and all viable count profiles comodeled in S-ADAPT and NONMEM. A mechanism-based model with six populations (three for nisin times two for amikacin) yielded unbiased and precise (r = 0.99, slope = 1.00; S-ADAPT) individual fits. The second-order killing rate constants for nisin against the three populations were 5.67, 0.0664, and 0.00691 liter/(mg · h). For amikacin, the maximum killing rate constants were 10.1 h(-1) against its susceptible and 0.771 h(-1) against its less-susceptible populations, with 14.7 mg/liter amikacin causing half-maximal killing. After incorporating the effects of nisin and amikacin against each population, no additional synergy function was needed. Linezolid inhibited successful bacterial replication but did not efficiently kill populations less susceptible to nisin. Nisin plus amikacin achieved subpopulation synergy. The proposed sequential and simultaneous dosing design offers an efficient approach to quantitatively characterize antibiotic synergy over time and prospectively evaluate antibiotic combination dosing strategies. PMID:23478962

  5. Abnormal T-cell subpopulations in hemophilic patients receiving factor VIII concentrates from voluntary donors.

    PubMed

    Wearne, A; Joshua, D E; Rickard, K A; Kronenberg, H

    1984-04-01

    Recently, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has been reported in hemophiliacs in the USA, Canada and Spain, and this has caused considerable concern amongst hemophiliacs regarding the use of factor VIII concentrates. The aim of this study was to determine whether hemophiliacs in Australia have T-lymphocyte subpopulation changes similar to those observed in patients with AIDS. Factor VIII produced in Australia is derived from a totally volunteer blood donor system and none of the hemophiliacs in this study had received commercial blood products. For the hemophiliacs, the T-helper cell to T-suppressor cell ratio was 1.1 +/- 0.6 (mean +/- SD) which was significantly less (p less than 0.001) than that of the normal age and sex-matched controls. There was a significant relative (p less than 0.001) and absolute (p less than 0.05) reduction of the helper cell subsets and a significant relative (p less than 0.001) and absolute (p less than 0.05) increase of the suppressor cell subsets, in the hemophiliacs compared to the normal controls. There appears to be no correlation between the amount of factor VIII therapy received during the last three years and the T-cell subset changes. All patients with Christmas disease had T-cell subsets within the normal range. All patients were negative for the hepatitis B virus antigen, but all were positive for the antibody, indicating that there had been exposure to the hepatitis virus in all cases. Cytomegalovirus titres were uniformly low and immunoglobulin levels were normal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Allelic frequencies and association with carcass traits of six genes in local subpopulations of Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Nishimaki, Takahiro; Ibi, Takayuki; Siqintuya; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Matsuhashi, Tamako; Akiyama, Takayuki; Yoshida, Emi; Imai, Kazumi; Matsui, Mayu; Uemura, Keiichi; Eto, Hisayoshi; Watanabe, Naoto; Fujita, Tatsuo; Saito, Yosuke; Komatsu, Tomohiko; Hoshiba, Hiroshi; Mannen, Hideyuki; Sasazaki, Shinji; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    Marker-assisted selection (MAS) is expected to accelerate the genetic improvement of Japanese Black cattle. However, verification of the effects of the genes for MAS in different subpopulations is required prior to the application of MAS. In this study, we investigated the allelic frequencies and genotypic effects for carcass traits of six genes, which can be used in MAS, in eight local subpopulations. These genes are SCD, FASN and SREBP1, which are associated with the fatty acid composition of meat, and NCAPG, MC1R and F11, which are associated with carcass weight, coat color and blood coagulation abnormality, respectively. The frequencies of desirable alleles of SCD and FASN were relatively high and that of NCAPG was relatively low, and NCAPG was significantly associated with several carcass traits, including carcass weight. The proportions of genotypic variance explained by NCAPG to phenotypic variance were 4.83 for carcass weight. We thus confirmed that NCAPG is a useful marker for selection of carcass traits in these subpopulations. In addition, we found that the desirable alleles of six genes showed no negative effects on carcass traits. Therefore, selection using these genes to improve target traits should not have negative impacts on carcass traits.

  7. Viral Transmission Dynamics at Single-Cell Resolution Reveal Transiently Immune Subpopulations Caused by a Carrier State Association

    PubMed Central

    Cenens, William; Makumi, Angela; Govers, Sander K.; Lavigne, Rob; Aertsen, Abram

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the complex transmission dynamics of a bacterial virus (temperate phage P22) throughout a population of its host (Salmonella Typhimurium) at single cell resolution revealed the unexpected existence of a transiently immune subpopulation of host cells that emerged from peculiarities preceding the process of lysogenization. More specifically, an infection event ultimately leading to a lysogen first yielded a phage carrier cell harboring a polarly tethered P22 episome. Upon subsequent division, the daughter cell inheriting this episome became lysogenized by an integration event yielding a prophage, while the other daughter cell became P22-free. However, since the phage carrier cell was shown to overproduce immunity factors that are cytoplasmically inherited by the P22-free daughter cell and further passed down to its siblings, a transiently resistant subpopulation was generated that upon dilution of these immunity factors again became susceptible to P22 infection. The iterative emergence and infection of transiently resistant subpopulations suggests a new bet-hedging strategy by which viruses could manage to sustain both vertical and horizontal transmission routes throughout an infected population without compromising a stable co-existence with their host. PMID:26720743

  8. Clonal Evolution of Enterocytozoon bieneusi Populations in Swine and Genetic Differentiation in Subpopulations between Isolates from Swine and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qiang; Xiao, Lihua; Zhang, Xichen; Li, Yijing; Lu, Yixin; Song, Mingxin

    2016-01-01

    Enterocytozoon bieneusi is a widespread parasite with high genetic diversity among hosts. Its natural reservoir remains elusive and data on population structure are available only in isolates from primates. Here we describe a population genetic study of 101 E. bieneusi isolates from pigs using sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and four mini- and microsatellite markers. The presence of strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) and limited genetic recombination indicated a clonal structure for the population. Bayesian inference of phylogeny, structural analysis, and principal coordinates analysis separated the overall population into three subpopulations (SP3 to SP5) with genetic segregation of the isolates at some geographic level. Comparative analysis showed the differentiation of SP3 to SP5 from the two known E. bieneusi subpopulations (SP1 and SP2) from primates. The placement of a human E. bieneusi isolate in pig subpopulation SP4 supported the zoonotic potential of some E. bieneusi isolates. Network analysis showed directed evolution of SP5 to SP3/SP4 and SP1 to SP2. The high LD and low number of inferred recombination events are consistent with the possibility of host adaptation in SP2, SP3, and SP4. In contrast, the reduced LD and high genetic diversity in SP1 and SP5 might be results of broad host range and adaptation to new host environment. The data provide evidence of the potential occurrence of host adaptation in some of E. bieneusi isolates that belong to the zoonotic ITS Group 1. PMID:27563718

  9. Clonal Evolution of Enterocytozoon bieneusi Populations in Swine and Genetic Differentiation in Subpopulations between Isolates from Swine and Humans.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qiang; Xiao, Lihua; Zhang, Xichen; Li, Yijing; Lu, Yixin; Song, Mingxin; Li, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Enterocytozoon bieneusi is a widespread parasite with high genetic diversity among hosts. Its natural reservoir remains elusive and data on population structure are available only in isolates from primates. Here we describe a population genetic study of 101 E. bieneusi isolates from pigs using sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and four mini- and microsatellite markers. The presence of strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) and limited genetic recombination indicated a clonal structure for the population. Bayesian inference of phylogeny, structural analysis, and principal coordinates analysis separated the overall population into three subpopulations (SP3 to SP5) with genetic segregation of the isolates at some geographic level. Comparative analysis showed the differentiation of SP3 to SP5 from the two known E. bieneusi subpopulations (SP1 and SP2) from primates. The placement of a human E. bieneusi isolate in pig subpopulation SP4 supported the zoonotic potential of some E. bieneusi isolates. Network analysis showed directed evolution of SP5 to SP3/SP4 and SP1 to SP2. The high LD and low number of inferred recombination events are consistent with the possibility of host adaptation in SP2, SP3, and SP4. In contrast, the reduced LD and high genetic diversity in SP1 and SP5 might be results of broad host range and adaptation to new host environment. The data provide evidence of the potential occurrence of host adaptation in some of E. bieneusi isolates that belong to the zoonotic ITS Group 1. PMID:27563718

  10. Bistable expression of virulence genes in salmonella leads to the formation of an antibiotic-tolerant subpopulation.

    PubMed

    Arnoldini, Markus; Vizcarra, Ima Avalos; Peña-Miller, Rafael; Stocker, Nicolas; Diard, Médéric; Vogel, Viola; Beardmore, Robert E; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Ackermann, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity can confer clonal groups of organisms with new functionality. A paradigmatic example is the bistable expression of virulence genes in Salmonella typhimurium, which leads to phenotypically virulent and phenotypically avirulent subpopulations. The two subpopulations have been shown to divide labor during S. typhimurium infections. Here, we show that heterogeneous virulence gene expression in this organism also promotes survival against exposure to antibiotics through a bet-hedging mechanism. Using microfluidic devices in combination with fluorescence time-lapse microscopy and quantitative image analysis, we analyzed the expression of virulence genes at the single cell level and related it to survival when exposed to antibiotics. We found that, across different types of antibiotics and under concentrations that are clinically relevant, the subpopulation of bacterial cells that express virulence genes shows increased survival after exposure to antibiotics. Intriguingly, there is an interplay between the two consequences of phenotypic heterogeneity. The bet-hedging effect that arises through heterogeneity in virulence gene expression can protect clonal populations against avirulent mutants that exploit and subvert the division of labor within these populations. We conclude that bet-hedging and the division of labor can arise through variation in a single trait and interact with each other. This reveals a new degree of functional complexity of phenotypic heterogeneity. In addition, our results suggest a general principle of how pathogens can evade antibiotics: Expression of virulence factors often entails metabolic costs and the resulting growth retardation could generally increase tolerance against antibiotics and thus compromise treatment.

  11. Not all sperm are equal: functional mitochondria characterize a subpopulation of human sperm with better fertilization potential.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana Paula; Amaral, Alexandra; Baptista, Marta; Tavares, Renata; Caballero Campo, Pedro; Caballero Peregrín, Pedro; Freitas, Albertina; Paiva, Artur; Almeida-Santos, Teresa; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2011-03-23

    Human sperm samples are very heterogeneous and include a low amount of truly functional gametes. Distinct strategies have been developed to characterize and isolate this specific subpopulation. In this study we have used fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting to determine if mitochondrial function, as assessed using mitochondrial-sensitive probes, could be employed as a criterion to obtain more functional sperm from a given ejaculate. We first determined that mitochondrial activity correlated with the quality of distinct human samples, from healthy donors to patients with decreased semen quality. Furthermore, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting to separate sperm with active and inactive mitochondria we found that this was also true within samples. Indeed, sperm with active mitochondria defined a more functional subpopulation, which contained more capacitated and acrosome intact cells, sperm with lower chromatin damage, and, crucially, sperm more able to decondense and participate in early development using both chemical induction and injection into mature bovine oocytes. Furthermore, cell sorting using mitochondrial activity produced a more functional sperm subpopulation than classic swim-up, both in terms of improvement in a variety of functional sperm parameters and in statistical significance. In conclusion, whatever the true biological role of sperm mitochondria in fertilization, mitochondrial activity is a clear hallmark of human sperm functionality.

  12. A Simple Flow Cytometric Method to Measure Glucose Uptake and Glucose Transporter Expression for Monocyte Subpopulations in Whole Blood.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Clovis S; Anzinger, Joshua J; Butterfield, Tiffany R; McCune, Joseph M; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes are innate immune cells that can be activated by pathogens and inflammation associated with certain chronic inflammatory diseases. Activation of monocytes induces effector functions and a concomitant shift from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism that is accompanied by increased glucose transporter expression. This increased glycolytic metabolism is also observed for trained immunity of monocytes, a form of innate immunological memory. Although in vitro protocols examining glucose transporter expression and glucose uptake by monocytes have been described, none have been examined by multi-parametric flow cytometry in whole blood. We describe a multi-parametric flow cytometric protocol for the measurement of fluorescent glucose analog 2-NBDG uptake in whole blood by total monocytes and the classical (CD14(++)CD16(-)), intermediate (CD14(++)CD16(+)) and non-classical (CD14(+)CD16(++)) monocyte subpopulations. This method can be used to examine glucose transporter expression and glucose uptake for total monocytes and monocyte subpopulations during homeostasis and inflammatory disease, and can be easily modified to examine glucose uptake for other leukocytes and leukocyte subpopulations within blood. PMID:27584036

  13. The Ets Transcription Factor EHF as a Regulator of Cornea Epithelial Cell Identity*

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Denise N.; Klein, Rachel Herndon; Salmans, Michael L.; Gordon, William; Ho, Hsiang; Andersen, Bogi

    2013-01-01

    The cornea is the clear, outermost portion of the eye composed of three layers: an epithelium that provides a protective barrier while allowing transmission of light into the eye, a collagen-rich stroma, and an endothelium monolayer. How cornea development and aging is controlled is poorly understood. Here we characterize the mouse cornea transcriptome from early embryogenesis through aging and compare it with transcriptomes of other epithelial tissues, identifying cornea-enriched genes, pathways, and transcriptional regulators. Additionally, we profiled cornea epithelium and stroma, defining genes enriched in these layers. Over 10,000 genes are differentially regulated in the mouse cornea across the time course, showing dynamic expression during development and modest expression changes in fewer genes during aging. A striking transition time point for gene expression between postnatal days 14 and 28 corresponds with completion of cornea development at the transcriptional level. Clustering classifies co-expressed, and potentially co-regulated, genes into biologically informative categories, including groups that exhibit epithelial or stromal enriched expression. Based on these findings, and through loss of function studies and ChIP-seq, we show that the Ets transcription factor EHF promotes cornea epithelial fate through complementary gene activating and repressing activities. Furthermore, we identify potential interactions between EHF, KLF4, and KLF5 in promoting cornea epithelial differentiation. These data provide insights into the mechanisms underlying epithelial development and aging, identifying EHF as a regulator of cornea epithelial identity and pointing to interactions between Ets and KLF factors in promoting epithelial fate. Furthermore, this comprehensive gene expression data set for the cornea is a powerful tool for discovery of novel cornea regulators and pathways. PMID:24142692

  14. The Ets transcription factor EHF as a regulator of cornea epithelial cell identity.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Denise N; Klein, Rachel Herndon; Salmans, Michael L; Gordon, William; Ho, Hsiang; Andersen, Bogi

    2013-11-29

    The cornea is the clear, outermost portion of the eye composed of three layers: an epithelium that provides a protective barrier while allowing transmission of light into the eye, a collagen-rich stroma, and an endothelium monolayer. How cornea development and aging is controlled is poorly understood. Here we characterize the mouse cornea transcriptome from early embryogenesis through aging and compare it with transcriptomes of other epithelial tissues, identifying cornea-enriched genes, pathways, and transcriptional regulators. Additionally, we profiled cornea epithelium and stroma, defining genes enriched in these layers. Over 10,000 genes are differentially regulated in the mouse cornea across the time course, showing dynamic expression during development and modest expression changes in fewer genes during aging. A striking transition time point for gene expression between postnatal days 14 and 28 corresponds with completion of cornea development at the transcriptional level. Clustering classifies co-expressed, and potentially co-regulated, genes into biologically informative categories, including groups that exhibit epithelial or stromal enriched expression. Based on these findings, and through loss of function studies and ChIP-seq, we show that the Ets transcription factor EHF promotes cornea epithelial fate through complementary gene activating and repressing activities. Furthermore, we identify potential interactions between EHF, KLF4, and KLF5 in promoting cornea epithelial differentiation. These data provide insights into the mechanisms underlying epithelial development and aging, identifying EHF as a regulator of cornea epithelial identity and pointing to interactions between Ets and KLF factors in promoting epithelial fate. Furthermore, this comprehensive gene expression data set for the cornea is a powerful tool for discovery of novel cornea regulators and pathways.

  15. Emergence of an Apical Epithelial Cell Surface In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Sedzinski, Jakub; Hannezo, Edouard; Tu, Fan; Biro, Maté; Wallingford, John B

    2016-01-11

    Epithelial sheets are crucial components of all metazoan animals, enclosing organs and protecting the animal from its environment. Epithelial homeostasis poses unique challenges, as addition of new cells and loss of old cells must be achieved without disrupting the fluid-tight barrier and apicobasal polarity of the epithelium. Several studies have identified cell biological mechanisms underlying extrusion of cells from epithelia, but far less is known of the converse mechanism by which new cells are added. Here, we combine molecular, pharmacological, and laser-dissection experiments with theoretical modeling to characterize forces driving emergence of an apical surface as single nascent cells are added to a vertebrate epithelium in vivo. We find that this process involves the interplay between cell-autonomous actin-generated pushing forces in the emerging cell and mechanical properties of neighboring cells. Our findings define the forces driving this cell behavior, contributing to a more comprehensive understanding of epithelial homeostasis. PMID:26766441

  16. Renal epithelial cells can release ATP by vesicular fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bjaelde, Randi G.; Arnadottir, Sigrid S.; Overgaard, Morten T.; Leipziger, Jens; Praetorius, Helle A.

    2013-01-01

    Renal epithelial cells have the ability to release nucleotides as paracrine factors. In the intercalated cells of the collecting duct, ATP is released by connexin30 (cx30), which is selectively expressed in this cell type. However, ATP is released by virtually all renal epithelia and the aim of the present study was to identify possible alternative nucleotide release pathways in a renal epithelial cell model. We used MDCK (type1) cells to screen for various potential ATP release pathways. In these cells, inhibition of the vesicular H+-ATPases (bafilomycin) reduced both the spontaneous and hypotonically (80%)-induced nucleotide release. Interference with vesicular fusion using N-ethylamide markedly reduced the spontaneous nucleotide release, as did interference with trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus (brefeldin A1) and vesicular transport (nocodazole). These findings were substantiated using a siRNA directed against SNAP-23, which significantly reduced spontaneous ATP release. Inhibition of pannexin and connexins did not affect the spontaneous ATP release in this cell type, which consists of ~90% principal cells. TIRF-microscopy of either fluorescently-labeled ATP (MANT-ATP) or quinacrine-loaded vesicles, revealed that spontaneous release of single vesicles could be promoted by either hypoosmolality (50%) or ionomycin. This vesicular release decreased the overall cellular fluorescence by 5.8 and 7.6% respectively. In summary, this study supports the notion that spontaneous and induced ATP release can occur via exocytosis in renal epithelial cells. PMID:24065923

  17. Crumbs3 Is Essential for Proper Epithelial Development and Viability

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, Eileen L.; Fan, Shuling; Harder, Jennifer L.; Walton, Katherine D.; Liu, Chia-Jen; Soofi, Abdul; Fogg, Vanessa C.; Hershenson, Marc B.; Dressler, Gregory R.; Deutsch, Gail H.; Gumucio, Deborah L.

    2014-01-01

    First identified in Drosophila, the Crumbs (Crb) proteins are important in epithelial polarity, apical membrane formation, and tight junction (TJ) assembly. The conserved Crb intracellular region includes a FERM (band 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin) binding domain (FBD) whose mammalian binding partners are not well understood and a PDZ binding motif that interacts with mammalian Pals1 (protein associated with lin seven) (also known as MPP5). Pals1 binds Patj (Pals1-associated tight-junction protein), a multi-PDZ-domain protein that associates with many tight junction proteins. The Crb complex also binds the conserved Par3/Par6/atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) polarity cassette that restricts migration of basolateral proteins through phosphorylation. Here, we describe a Crb3 knockout mouse that demonstrates extensive defects in epithelial morphogenesis. The mice die shortly after birth, with cystic kidneys and proteinaceous debris throughout the lungs. The intestines display villus fusion, apical membrane blebs, and disrupted microvilli. These intestinal defects phenocopy those of Ezrin knockout mice, and we demonstrate an interaction between Crumbs3 and ezrin. Taken together, our data indicate that Crumbs3 is crucial for epithelial morphogenesis and plays a role in linking the apical membrane to the underlying ezrin-containing cytoskeleton. PMID:24164893

  18. A distinct molecular profile associated with mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heinzelmann-Schwarz, V A; Gardiner-Garden, M; Henshall, S M; Scurry, J P; Scolyer, R A; Smith, A N; Bali, A; Bergh, P Vanden; Baron-Hay, S; Scott, C; Fink, D; Hacker, N F; Sutherland, R L; O'Brien, P M

    2006-01-01

    Mucinous epithelial ovarian cancers (MOC) are clinically and morphologically distinct from the other histological subtypes of ovarian cancer. To determine the genetic basis of MOC and to identify potential tumour markers, gene expression profiling of 49 primary ovarian cancers of different histological subtypes was performed using a customised oligonucleotide microarray containing >59 000 probesets. The results show that MOC express a genetic profile that both differs and overlaps with other subtypes of epithelial ovarian cancer. Concordant with its histological phenotype, MOC express genes characteristic of mucinous carcinomas of varying epithelial origin, including intestinal carcinomas. Differences in gene expression between MOC and other histological subtypes of ovarian cancer were confirmed by RT–PCR and/or immunohistochemistry. In particular, galectin 4 (LGALS4) was highly and specifically expressed in MOC, but expressed at lower levels in benign mucinous cysts and borderline (atypical proliferative) tumours, supporting a malignant progression model of MOC. Hence LGALS4 may have application as an early and differential diagnostic marker of MOC. PMID:16508639

  19. Epithelial Sodium and Chloride Channels and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To focus on the asthmatic pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)/chlorine ion channel. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were the English articles from 1980 to 2015 from journal databases, primarily PubMed and Google Scholar. The terms used in the literature search were: (1) ENaCs; cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR); asthma/asthmatic, (2) ENaC/sodium salt; CF; asthma/asthmatic, (3) CFTR/chlorine ion channels; asthma/asthmatic, (4) ENaC/sodium channel/scnn1a/scnn1b/scnn1g/scnn1d/amiloride-sensitive/amiloride-inhibtable sodium channels/sodium salt; asthma/asthmatic, lung/pulmonary/respiratory/tracheal/alveolar, and (5) CFTR; CF; asthma/asthmatic (ti). Study Selection: These studies included randomized controlled trials or studies covering asthma pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to ENaC/chlorine ion channels within the last 25 years (from 1990 to 2015). The data involving chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and CF obtained from individual studies were also reviewed by the authors. Results: Airway surface liquid dehydration can cause airway inflammation and obstruction. ENaC and CFTR are closely related to the airway mucociliary clearance. Ion transporters may play a critical role in pathogenesis of asthmatic exacerbations. Conclusions: Ion channels have been the center of many studies aiming to understand asthmatic pathophysiological mechanisms or to identify therapeutic targets for better control of the disease. PMID:26265620

  20. Epithelial and stromal-specific immune pathway activation in the murine endometrium post-coitum.

    PubMed

    Field, S L; Cummings, M; Orsi, N M

    2015-08-01

    The endometrium is a dynamic tissue, demonstrating cyclical growth/remodelling in preparation for implantation. In mice, seminal constituents trigger mechanisms to prepare the endometrium, a process dubbed 'seminal priming' that modifies immune system components and mediates endometrial remodelling in preparation for pregnancy. An array of cytokines has been reported to mediate this interaction, although much of the literature relates to in vitro studies on isolated endometrial epithelial cells. This study measured changes in immune-related gene expression in endometrial epithelial and stromal cells in vivo following natural mating. CD1 mice were naturally mated and sacrificed over the first 4 days post-coitum (n=3 each day). Endometrial epithelial and stromal compartments were isolated by laser capture microdissection. Labelled cRNA was generated and hybridised to genome-wide expression microarrays. Pathway analysis identified several immune-related pathways active within epithelial and stromal compartments, in particular relating to cytokine networks, matrix metalloproteinases and prostaglandin synthesis. Cluster analysis demonstrated that the expression of factors involved in immunomodulation/endometrial remodelling differed between the epithelial and stromal compartments in a temporal fashion. This study is the first to examine the disparate responses of the endometrial epithelial and stromal compartments to seminal plasma in vivo in mice, and demonstrates the complexity of the interactions between these two compartments needed to create a permissive environment for implantation. PMID:26015594

  1. Invasion of Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates into lung epithelial cells involves glycolipid receptors.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Tracy; Callaghan, Máire; McClean, Siobhán

    2010-12-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of opportunistic cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens that invade lung epithelial cells. The mechanisms of invasion are poorly understood, in particular, the receptors utilised by this bacterium in the invasion process have not been identified. The aim of this study was to investigate the epithelial receptors involved in the invasion of Bcc isolates. We confirmed that invasion into two lung epithelial cell lines (16HBE14o- and CFBE41o-) which have a non-CF and CF phenotype, respectively, is receptor mediated and showed that pre-treatment of these epithelial cell lines with α- or β-galactosidase reduced invasion of isolates of two species of Bcc, Burkholderia multivorans and Burkholderia cenocepacia. In contrast, removal of mucin had no significant effect. Biotinylated Bcc strains were shown to bind to purified glycolipids separated by thin layer chromatography, albeit different patterns of binding were associated with different strains. Invasion of CF lung epithelial cells (CFBE41o-) by all three Bcc strains examined was significantly reduced by treatment of cells with inhibitors of glycolipid biosynthesis. Although the specific glycolipid involved in each case has not been elucidated, it is apparent that invasion of lung epithelial cells is mediated via binding to glycosphingolipid receptors.

  2. Oscarella lobularis (Homoscleromorpha, Porifera) Regeneration: Epithelial Morphogenesis and Metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Ereskovsky, Alexander V; Borisenko, Ilya E; Lapébie, Pascal; Gazave, Eve; Tokina, Daria B; Borchiellini, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Sponges are known to possess remarkable reconstitutive and regenerative abilities ranging from common wounding or body part regeneration to more impressive re-building of a functional body from dissociated cells. Among the four sponge classes, Homoscleromorpha is notably the only sponge group to possess morphologically distinct basement membrane and specialized cell-junctions, and is therefore considered to possess true epithelia. The consequence of this peculiar organization is the predominance of epithelial morphogenesis during ontogenesis of these sponges. In this work we reveal the underlying cellular mechanisms used during morphogenesis accompanying ectosome regeneration in the homoscleromorph sponge model: Oscarella lobularis. We identified three main sources of novel exopinacoderm during the processes of its regeneration and the restoration of functional peripheral parts of the aquiferous system in O. lobularis: (1) intact exopinacoderm surrounding the wound surface, (2) the endopinacoderm from peripheral exhalant and inhalant canals, and (3) the intact choanoderm found on the wound surface. The basic morphogenetic processes during regeneration are the spreading and fusion of epithelial sheets that merge into one continuous epithelium. Transdifferentiation of choanocytes into exopinacocytes is also present. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is absent during regeneration. Moreover, we cannot reveal any other morphologically distinct pluripotent cells. In Oscarella, neither blastema formation nor local dedifferentiation and proliferation have been detected, which is probably due to the high morphogenetic plasticity of the tissue. Regeneration in O. lobularis goes through cell transdifferentiation and through the processes, when lost body parts are replaced by the remodeling of the remaining tissue. Morphogenesis during ectosome regeneration in O. lobularis is correlated with its true epithelial organization. Knowledge of the morphological basis of

  3. Oscarella lobularis (Homoscleromorpha, Porifera) Regeneration: Epithelial Morphogenesis and Metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ereskovsky, Alexander V.; Borisenko, Ilya E.; Lapébie, Pascal; Gazave, Eve; Tokina, Daria B.; Borchiellini, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Sponges are known to possess remarkable reconstitutive and regenerative abilities ranging from common wounding or body part regeneration to more impressive re-building of a functional body from dissociated cells. Among the four sponge classes, Homoscleromorpha is notably the only sponge group to possess morphologically distinct basement membrane and specialized cell-junctions, and is therefore considered to possess true epithelia. The consequence of this peculiar organization is the predominance of epithelial morphogenesis during ontogenesis of these sponges. In this work we reveal the underlying cellular mechanisms used during morphogenesis accompanying ectosome regeneration in the homoscleromorph sponge model: Oscarella lobularis. We identified three main sources of novel exopinacoderm during the processes of its regeneration and the restoration of functional peripheral parts of the aquiferous system in O. lobularis: (1) intact exopinacoderm surrounding the wound surface, (2) the endopinacoderm from peripheral exhalant and inhalant canals, and (3) the intact choanoderm found on the wound surface. The basic morphogenetic processes during regeneration are the spreading and fusion of epithelial sheets that merge into one continuous epithelium. Transdifferentiation of choanocytes into exopinacocytes is also present. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is absent during regeneration. Moreover, we cannot reveal any other morphologically distinct pluripotent cells. In Oscarella, neither blastema formation nor local dedifferentiation and proliferation have been detected, which is probably due to the high morphogenetic plasticity of the tissue. Regeneration in O. lobularis goes through cell transdifferentiation and through the processes, when lost body parts are replaced by the remodeling of the remaining tissue. Morphogenesis during ectosome regeneration in O. lobularis is correlated with its true epithelial organization. Knowledge of the morphological basis of

  4. Characterization of foamy epithelial surface cells in the canine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Bartel, C; Tichy, A; Walter, I

    2014-06-01

    In mature bitches, endometrial epithelial surface cells modify function and corresponding morphology during the oestrous cycle. During late metoestrous, endometrial epithelial surface cells frequently accumulate fat and thereby adopt a foamy morphology. This cyclic appearance of foamy endometrial epithelial cells (fEECs) seems to be physiological in the dog, whereas in other species, it indicates pathological changes. Function of these fEECs has not been identified until now. Therefore, the aim of the study was to characterize the fEECs by means of transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Different manifestations of fEECs were observed and analysed with regard to proliferative activity and presence of different epithelial adhesion molecules including PLEKHA7, β-catenin and E-cadherin. PLEKHA7 was restricted to the apical regions of the fEECs, whereas E-cadherin and β-catenin were demonstrated basolateral. The immunohistochemical detection of steroid hormone receptors demonstrated the responsiveness of the fEECs to steroid hormones. Intense progesterone receptor expression was observed in the fEECs indicating a high responsiveness to this hormone. Considering a potential function of the fEECs, we hypothesized that leptin, a hormone produced by other lipid-accumulating cells and described to be involved in reproduction, in particular during implantation, might also originate from the fEECs which was confirmed by immunohistochemical methods. Moreover, leptin receptor was found in fEECs indicating the fEECs as both, source and target for leptin. Therefore, we conclude that fEECs in the canine uterus have a potential role in early pregnancy events and that the different observed manifestations might simply reflect the variations of signs of pseudopregnancy among bitches.

  5. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang Zhang, Yi

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. •Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. •Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. •The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients.

  6. Identification of Epithelial Ovarian Tumor-Specific Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Benedetto, Gregory; Hamp, Timothy J.; Wesselman, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is often diagnosed in late stages with few treatment options and poor long-term prognosis. New clinical tools for early detection of ovarian malignancies will significantly help reduce mortality and improve current long-term survival rates. The objective of this work was to identify ovarian tumor-specific single-stranded DNA aptamers that bind to malignant ovarian tumor cells and internalize with high affinity and specificity. Aptamers can identify unique tumor biomarkers, can aid in early detection and diagnosis of neoplastic disorders, and can be functionalized by conjugation to small molecules. To identify aptamers from random single-stranded DNA pools (60 bases long), we used whole Cell-SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) to enrich and isolate tumor-specific aptamers that bind to tumor-specific receptors in their native state on the cell surface. Next-Generation sequencing identified seven novel aptamers and detailed analyses of three are described. Aptamers bound to, and were internalized by, target Caov-3 cell populations, but not nontarget nonmalignant ovarian epithelial HOSE 6-3 cells or multiple other epithelial tumor cell lines. Furthermore, aptamers showed unique binding affinities with apparent dissociation constants (Kd) measuring in the submicromolar range supporting their physiological relevance and potential use in clinical applications. PMID:25894736

  7. Identification of Human Fibroblast Cell Lines as a Feeder Layer for Human Corneal Epithelial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Rong; Bian, Fang; Lin, Jing; Su, Zhitao; Qu, Yangluowa; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Li, De-Quan

    2012-01-01

    There is a great interest in using epithelium generated in vitro for tissue bioengineering. Mouse 3T3 fibroblasts have been used as a feeder layer to cultivate human epithelia including corneal epithelial cells for more than 3 decades. To avoid the use of xeno-components, we evaluated human fibroblasts as an alternative feeder supporting human corneal epithelial regeneration. Five human fibroblast cell lines were used for evaluation with mouse 3T3 fibroblasts as a control. Human epithelial cells isolated from fresh corneal limbal tissue were seeded on these feeders. Colony forming efficiency (CFE) and cell growth capacity were evaluated on days 5–14. The phenotype of the regenerated epithelia was evaluated by morphology and immunostaining with epithelial markers. cDNA microarray was used to analyze the gene expression profile of the supportive human fibroblasts. Among 5 strains of human fibroblasts evaluated, two newborn foreskin fibroblast cell lines, Hs68 and CCD1112Sk, were identified to strongly support human corneal epithelial growth. Tested for 10 passages, these fibroblasts continually showed a comparative efficiency to the 3T3 feeder layer for CFE and growth capacity of human corneal epithelial cells. Limbal epithelial cells seeded at 1×104 in a 35-mm dish (9.6 cm2) grew to confluence (about 1.87–2.41×106 cells) in 12–14 days, representing 187–241 fold expansion with over 7–8 doublings on these human feeders. The regenerated epithelia expressed K3, K12, connexin 43, p63, EGFR and integrin β1, resembling the phenotype of human corneal epithelium. DNA microarray revealed 3 up-regulated and 10 down-regulated genes, which may be involved in the functions of human fibroblast feeders. These findings demonstrate that commercial human fibroblast cell lines support human corneal epithelial regeneration, and have potential use in tissue bioengineering for corneal reconstruction. PMID:22723892

  8. Epithelial progesterone receptor exhibits pleiotropic roles in uterine development and function

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Heather L.; Rubel, Cory A.; Large, Michael J.; Wetendorf, Margeaux; Fernandez-Valdivia, Rodrigo; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Spencer, Thomas E.; Behringer, Richard R.; Lydon, John P.; DeMayo, Francesco J.

    2012-01-01

    The ovarian steroid progesterone, acting through the progesterone receptor (PR), coordinates endometrial epithelial-stromal cell communication, which is critical for its development and function. PR expression in these cellular compartments is under tight temporal and endocrine control. Although ex vivo studies demonstrated the importance of stromal PR expression, they failed to show a role for epithelial PR in uterine function. Here, the in vivo role of PR in the uterine epithelium is defined using floxed PR (PRf/f) mice crossed to Wnt7a-Cre mice. Progesterone was unable to stimulate the expression of its epithelial target genes, including Ihh, in the Wnt7a-Cre+PRf/− mice. Analysis was conducted on Ihh to determine whether PR directly regulates epithelial gene transcription. ChIP-on-chip analysis identified PR binding sites in the 5′-flanking region of Ihh. Cotransfection of the proximal Ihh promoter with PR demonstrated that PR directly regulates Ihh transcription. Female Wnt7a-Cre+PRf/− mice are infertile due to defects in embryo attachment, stromal cell decidualization, and the inability to cease estrogen-induced epithelial cell proliferation. Finally, progesterone was unable to inhibit neonatal endometrial glandular development in Wnt7a-Cre+PRf/− mice. Thus, epithelial PR is necessary for the regulation of progesterone epithelial target gene expression, as well as uterine function and development.—Franco, H. L., Rubel, C. A., Large, M. J., Wetendorf, M., Fernandez-Valdivia, R., Jeong, J.-W., Spencer, T. E., Behringer, R. R., Lydon, J. P., DeMayo, F. J. Epithelial progesterone receptor exhibits pleiotropic roles in uterine development and function. PMID:22155565

  9. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1β Induces Redifferentiation of Dedifferentiated Tubular Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Omata, Mitsugu; Doke, Yukiko; Yamada, Chikaomi; Kawashima, Kayoko; Sho, Rumiko; Enomoto, Kei; Furuya, Mayumi; Inomata, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Tubular epithelial cells (TECs) can be dedifferentiated by repetitive insults, which activate scar-producing cells generated from interstitial cells such as fibroblasts, leading to the accumulation and deposition of extracellular matrix molecules. The dedifferentiated TECs play a crucial role in the development of renal fibrosis. Therefore, renal fibrosis may be attenuated if dedifferentiated TECs are converted back to their normal state (re-epithelialization). However, the mechanism underlying the re-epithelialization remains to be elucidated. In the present study, TGF-β1, a profibrotic cytokine, induced dedifferentiation of cultured TECs, and the dedifferentiated TECs were re-epithelialized by the removal of TGF-β1 stimulation. In the re-epithelialization process, transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1, beta (HNF-1β) was identified as a candidate molecule involved in inducing re-epithelialization by means of DNA microarray and biological network analysis. In functional validation studies, the re-epithelialization by TGF-β1 removal was abolished by HNF-1β knockdown. Furthermore, the ectopic expression of HNF-1β in the dedifferentiated TECs induced the re-epithelialization without the inhibition of TGF-β/Smad signaling, even in the presence of TGF-β1 stimulation. In mouse renal fibrosis model, unilateral ureteral obstruction model, HNF-1β expression in the TECs of the kidney was suppressed with fibrosis progression. Furthermore, the HNF-1β downregulated TECs resulted in dedifferentiation, which was characterized by expression of nestin. In conclusion, HNF-1β suppression in TECs is a crucial event for the dedifferentiation of TECs, and the upregulation of HNF-1β in TECs has a potential to restore the dedifferentiated TECs into their normal state, leading to the attenuation of renal fibrosis. PMID:27196561

  10. Establishing a food list for a Total Diet Study: how does food consumption of specific subpopulations need to be considered?

    PubMed

    Akhandaf, Y; De Henauw, S; Dofkova, M; Ruprich, J; Papadopoulos, A; Sirot, V; Kennedy, M C; Pinchen, H; Blume, K; Lindtner, O; Brantsaeter, A L; Meltzer, H M; Sioen, I

    2015-01-01

    A Total Diet Study (TDS) consists of selecting, collecting and analysing commonly consumed foods to obtain concentration data of different chemical compounds in foods as eaten. A TDS food list summarises the most consumed foods and represents the dietary habits of the general population of the country under study. The work reported here investigated whether TDS food lists that were initially designed for the whole population of the country under study also sufficiently cover the dietary pattern of specific subpopulations that are extra vulnerable for certain contaminants. The work was performed using data of three European countries: the Czech Republic, France and the UK. Each national food consumption database was combined with the corresponding national TDS food list (containing 336, 212 and 119 food items for the Czech Republic, France and the UK, respectively). The data were aggregated on the highest level of hierarchy of FoodEx-1, a pan-European food classification system, including 20 main FoodEx-1 groups. For the group 'milk and dairy products', the coverage of the consumption by the food list was investigated for more refined subgroups. For each food group or subgroup and country, the average percentage of coverage of the diet by the national TDS food list was calculated for different subpopulations, including children versus adults, women versus men, vegetarians versus non-vegetarians, and women of child-bearing age versus older women. The average diet of the different subpopulations was sufficiently covered by the food list of the Czech Republic and France. For the UK the average coverage was low due to a different food-coding approach and because food lists were not derived directly from national food consumption data. At the level of the 20 main food groups, differences between the subpopulations with respect to the average coverage of consumption by the TDS food list were minimal. The differences were more pronounced when looking in detail at the

  11. Tumor Cell Heterogeneity in Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC): Phenotypical and Functional Differences Associated with Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and DNA Methylation Changes

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Arzu; Plönes, Till; Wehrle, Julius; Taromi, Sanaz; Wollner, Stefan; Follo, Marie; Brabletz, Thomas; Mani, Sendurai A.; Claus, Rainer; Hackanson, Björn; Burger, Meike

    2014-01-01

    Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) is a specific subtype of lung cancer presenting as highly metastatic disease with extremely poor prognosis. Despite responding initially well to chemo- or radiotherapy, SCLC almost invariably relapses and develops resistance to chemotherapy. This is suspected to be related to tumor cell subpopulations with different characteristics resembling stem cells. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is known to play a key role in metastatic processes and in developing drug resistance. This is also true for NSCLC, but there is very little information on EMT processes in SCLC so far. SCLC, in contrast to NSCLC cell lines, grow mainly in floating cell clusters and a minor part as adherent cells. We compared these morphologically different subpopulations of SCLC cell lines for EMT and epigenetic features, detecting significant differences in the adherent subpopulations with high levels of mesenchymal markers such as Vimentin and Fibronectin and very low levels of epithelial markers like E-cadherin and Zona Occludens 1. In addition, expression of EMT-related transcription factors such as Snail/Snai1, Slug/Snai2, and Zeb1, DNA methylation patterns of the EMT hallmark genes, functional responses like migration, invasion, matrix metalloproteases secretion, and resistance to chemotherapeutic drug treatment all differed significantly between the sublines. This phenotypic variability might reflect tumor cell heterogeneity and EMT during metastasis in vivo, accompanied by the development of refractory disease in relapse. We propose that epigenetic regulation plays a key role during phenotypical and functional changes in tumor cells and might therefore provide new treatment options for SCLC patients. PMID:24959847

  12. Transient Low Doses of DNA Demethylating Agents Exert Durable Anti-tumor Effects on Hematological and Epithelial Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsing-Chen; Li, Huili; Van Neste, Leander; Cai, Yi; Robert, Carine; Rassool, Feyruz V.; Shin, James J.; Harbom, Kirsten M.; Beaty, Robert; Pappou, Emmanouil; Harris, James; Yen, Ray-Whay Chiu; Ahuja, Nita; Brock, Malcolm V.; Stearns, Vered; Feller-Kopman, David; Yarmus, Lonny B.; Lin, Yi-Chun; Welm, Alana L.; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Minn, Il; Matsui, William; Jang, Yoon-Young; Sharkis, Saul J.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Zahnow, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Reversal of promoter DNA hypermethylation and associated gene silencing is an attractive cancer therapy approach. The DNA methylation inhibitors decitabine and azacitidine are efficacious for hematological neoplasms at lower, less toxic, doses. Experimentally, high doses induce rapid DNA damage and cytotoxicity, which do not explain the prolonged response observed in patients. We show that transient exposure of cultured and primary leukemic and epithelial tumor cells to clinically-relevant nanomolar doses, without causing immediate cytotoxicity, produce an anti-tumor “memory” response, including inhibition of subpopulations of cancer stem-like cells. These effects are accompanied by sustained decreases in genome-wide promoter DNA methylation, gene re-expression, and anti-tumor changes in key cellular regulatory pathways. Low dose decitabine and azacitidine may have broad applicability for cancer management. PMID:22439938

  13. General Information about Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary Peritoneal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  14. Respiratory epithelial cysts of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Goh, Rachel L Z; Hardy, Thomas G; Williams, Richard A; McNab, Alan A

    2016-10-01

    To describe post-traumatic and congenital respiratory epithelial cysts in the orbit, which are rare lesions with only 5 and 13 published cases, respectively. We reviewed all cases of respiratory epithelial cysts diagnosed at three institutions (two tertiary referral hospitals, one private clinic) between 1995 and 2015. We describe 10 cases of post-traumatic respiratory epithelial cyst (age range 23 - 82), presenting a mean of 17.4 years after their original trauma; and 3 congenital cases (age range 17-34). All but one case underwent surgical excision of the cyst and its lining, along with any surgical implant within the cyst. Two were recurrent after incomplete excision. Three presented with acute infection within the cyst. Respiratory epithelial orbital cysts are probably commoner than the paucity of published reports would suggest. Post-traumatic cysts often present many years after trauma, and may become secondarily infected. Complete surgical removal is recommended to prevent future recurrence. PMID:27468088

  15. [Gingivo-epithelial attachment in dental alloimplants].

    PubMed

    Ermenc, B

    1989-01-01

    In this article the structure of gingivo-epithelial tissue and survey of research about its attachment to the tooth neck are presented. Some further research themes in this important and delicate field of stomatologic implantology are also discussed.

  16. Respiratory epithelial cysts of the orbit.

    PubMed<