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Sample records for epitopes preferentially recognized

  1. Major role for carbohydrate epitopes preferentially recognized by chronically infected mice in the determination of Schistosoma mansoni schistosomulum surface antigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Omer-ali, P.; Magee, A.I.; Kelly, C.; Simpson, A.J.G.

    1986-12-01

    A radioimmunoassay that makes use of whole Schistosomula and /sup 125/I-labeled protein A has been used to characterize and to quantify the binding of antisera to the surface of 3 hr mechanically transformed schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni. This technique facilitates the determination of epitopes on the schistosomula in addition to those detected by surface labeling and immunoprecipitation. By using this technique, it has been demonstrated that there is a much greater binding to the parasite surface of antibodies from chronically infected mice (CMS) than of antibodies from mice infected with highly irradiated cercariae (VMS), and CMS recognizes epitopes that VMS does not. Treatment of the surface of the schistosomula with trifluoromethanesulphonic acid and sodium metaperiodate has suggested that the discrepancy of the binding between the two sera is due to the recognition of a large number of additional epitopes by CMS, which are carbohydrate in nature. Some of the carbohydrate epitopes are expressed on the previously described surface glycoprotein antigens of M/sub r/ 200,000, 38,000, and 17,000.

  2. Antibodies against HLA-DP recognize broadly expressed epitopes.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Daimon P; Kafetzi, Maria L; Wood, Isabelle; Macaskill, Peter C; Milford, Edgar L; Guleria, Indira

    2016-12-01

    HLA matching and avoidance of pre-transplant donor-specific antibodies are important in selection of donors for solid organ transplant. Solid phase testing with single antigen beads allows resolution of antibody reactivity to the level of the allele. Single antigen bead testing results at a large transplant center were reviewed to identify selective reactivity patterns of anti-HLA antibodies. Many HLA-DP antibodies were identified in the context of other HLA antibodies, but some sera had antibodies against only HLA-DP. B cell flow crossmatch testing was positive for 2 out of 9 sera with HLA-DP antibodies. Many patterns of reactivity corresponded to epitopes in hypervariable regions C and F of DPB1, but some matched epitopes in other regions or DPA1. Through analysis of single antigen bead testing from a large number of patients, we report that anti-HLA-DP antibodies predominantly recognize broadly cross-reactive epitopes. The United Network for Organ Sharing has mandated HLA-DP typing on all deceased kidney donors, and HLA-DP epitopes should be considered as the major antigens for avoidance of pre-transplant donor-specific antibodies.

  3. Characterization of epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies: experimental approaches supported by freely accessible bioinformatic tools.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Nicola; Mancini, Nicasio; Castelli, Matteo; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2013-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been used successfully both in research and for clinical purposes. The possible use of protective mAbs directed against different microbial pathogens is currently being considered. The fine definition of the epitope recognized by a protective mAb is an important aspect to be considered for possible development in epitope-based vaccinology. The most accurate approach to this is the X-ray resolution of mAb/antigen crystal complex. Unfortunately, this approach is not always feasible. Under this perspective, several surrogate epitope mapping strategies based on the use of bioinformatics have been developed. In this article, we review the most common, freely accessible, bioinformatic tools used for epitope characterization and provide some basic examples of molecular visualization, editing and computational analysis.

  4. Human monoclonal antibodies that recognize conserved epitopes in the core-lipid A region of lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, M; Raubitschek, A A; Larrick, J W

    1987-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed human B lymphocytes were fused with a murine-human heteromyeloma to produce stable hybrid cell lines that secreted human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of the IgM class that recognized conserved epitopes in the core-lipid A region of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Three of the mAbs reacted with epitopes on the lipid A moiety, while a fourth recognized a determinant in the core oligosaccharide. The lipid A-specific mAbs cross-reacted with heterologous rough LPS and with lipid As released by acid hydrolysis of different intact (smooth) LPS. Carbohydrate groups in the O-side chain and core oligosaccharide of isolated, smooth LPS restricted antibody access to antigenic sites on lipid A. Yet, one lipid A-reactive mAb recognized its epitope on the surfaces of a variety of intact bacteria. These findings confirm the presence of highly conserved epitopes in the core-lipid A complex and prove the existence of human B cell clones with the potential for secreting high avidity IgM antibodies that react with these widely shared determinants. Such human mAbs might provide protective activity against disease caused by diverse gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:2437155

  5. Epitopes recognized by human T lymphocytes in the ROP2 protein antigen of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, R; Becerril, M A; Dubeaux, C; Lippens, R; De Vos, M J; Hérion, P; Bollen, A

    1996-01-01

    The ROP2 protein of Toxoplasma gondii possesses immunological and biological properties which have led to its proposal as a vaccine candidate. To identify epitopes recognized by human T cells in the ROP2 antigen, we submitted the sequence of this protein to three reported T-cell epitope prediction algorithms. Three sequences that were predicted by all three methods were selected (sequences 197 to 216, 393 to 410, and 501 to 524), and the corresponding peptides were synthesized. The peptides were first tested in a proliferation assay with a DPw4-restricted, ROP2-specific human T-cell clone, and the peptide corresponding to residues 197 to 216 was shown to stimulate the T-cell clone. The three peptides were further tested in proliferation assays with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a panel of T. gondii-seropositive and -seronegative individuals. We found that cells from a high proportion of the seropositive donors (64%) recognized at least one of the three peptides. The most frequently recognized ones were peptides 197 to 216 (45%) and 501 to 524 (36%). None of the seronegative donors responded to any peptide. These results show that the ROP2 antigen of T. gondii contains T-cell epitopes recognized by a high percentage of the immune population and further strengthen its potential as a vaccine candidate. PMID:8751939

  6. Definition of epitopes and antigens recognized by vaccinia specific immune responses: their conservation in variola virus sequences, and use as a model system to study complex pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sette, Alessandro; Grey, Howard; Oseroff, Carla; Peters, Bjoern; Moutaftsi, Magdalini; Crotty, Shane; Assarsson, Erika; Greenbaum, Jay; Kim, Yohan; Kolla, Ravi; Tscharke, David; Koelle, David; Johnson, R Paul; Blum, Janice; Head, Steven; Sidney, John

    2009-12-30

    In the last few years, a wealth of information has become available relating to the targets of vaccinia virus (VACV)-specific CD4(+) T cell, CD8(+) T cell and antibody responses. Due to the large size of its genome, encoding more than 200 different proteins, VACV represents a useful model system to study immunity to complex pathogens. Our data demonstrate that both cellular and humoral responses target a large number of antigens and epitopes. This broad spectrum of targets is detected in both mice and humans. CD4(+) T cell responses target late and structural antigens, while CD8(+) T cells preferentially recognize early antigens. While both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses target different types of antigens, the antigens recognized by T(H) cells are highly correlated with those recognized by antibody responses. We further show that protein abundance and antibody recognition can be used to predict antigens recognized by CD4(+) T cell responses, while early expression at the mRNA level predicts antigens targeted by CD8(+) T cells. Finally, we find that the vast majority of VACV epitopes are conserved in variola virus (VARV), thus suggesting that the epitopes defined herein also have relevance for the efficacy of VACV as a smallpox vaccine.

  7. Selection of Peptide Mimics of HIV-1 Epitope Recognized by Neutralizing Antibody VRC01

    PubMed Central

    Chikaev, Anton N.; Bakulina, Anastasiya Yu.; Burdick, Ryan C.; Karpenko, Larisa I.; Pathak, Vinay K.; Ilyichev, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to induce anti-HIV-1 antibodies that can neutralize a broad spectrum of viral isolates from different subtypes seems to be a key requirement for development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. The epitopes recognized by the most potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that have been characterized are largely discontinuous. Mimetics of such conformational epitopes could be potentially used as components of a synthetic immunogen that can elicit neutralizing antibodies. Here we used phage display technology to identify peptide motifs that mimic the epitope recognized by monoclonal antibody VRC01, which is able to neutralize up to 91% of circulating primary isolates. Three rounds of biopanning were performed against 2 different phage peptide libraries for this purpose. The binding specificity of selected phage clones to monoclonal antibody VRC01 was estimated using dot blot analysis. The putative peptide mimics exposed on the surface of selected phages were analyzed for conformational and linear homology to the surface of HIV-1 gp120 fragment using computational analysis. Corresponding peptides were synthesized and checked for their ability to interfere with neutralization activity of VRC01 in a competitive inhibition assay. One of the most common peptides selected from 12-mer phage library was found to partially mimic a CD4-binding loop fragment, whereas none of the circular C7C-mer peptides was able to mimic any HIV-1 domains. However, peptides identified from both the 12-mer and C7C-mer peptide libraries showed rescue of HIV-1 infectivity in the competitive inhibition assay. The identification of epitope mimics may lead to novel immunogens capable of inducing broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies. PMID:25785734

  8. Comprehensive Mapping of Common Immunodominant Epitopes in the Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus E2 Protein Recognized by Avian Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, EnCheng; Zhao, Jing; Sun, Liang; Xu, QingYuan; Yang, Tao; Qin, YongLi; Wang, WenShi; Wei, Peng; Sun, Jing; Wu, DongLai

    2013-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is a mosquito-borne virus that can cause both human and equine encephalitis with high case fatality rates. EEEV can also be widespread among birds, including pheasants, ostriches, emu, turkeys, whooping cranes and chickens. The E2 protein of EEEV and other Alphaviruses is an important immunogenic protein that elicits antibodies of diagnostic value. While many therapeutic and diagnostic applications of E2 protein-specific antibodies have been reported, the specific epitopes on E2 protein recognized by the antibody responses of different susceptible hosts, including avian species, remain poorly defined. In the present study, the avian E2-reactive polyclonal antibody (PAb) response was mapped to linear peptide epitopes using PAbs elicited in chickens and ducks following immunization with recombinant EEEV E2 protein and a series of 42 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire EEEV E2 protein. We identified 12 and 13 peptides recognized by the chicken and duck PAb response, respectively. Six of these linear peptides were commonly recognized by PAbs elicited in both avian species. Among them five epitopes recognized by both avian, the epitopes located at amino acids 211–226 and 331–352 were conserved among the EEEV antigenic complex, but not other associated alphaviruses, whereas the epitopes at amino acids 11–26, 30–45 and 151–166 were specific to EEEV subtype I. The five common peptide epitopes were not recognized by avian PAbs against Avian Influenza Virus (AIV) and Duck Plague Virus (DPV). The identification and characterization of EEEV E2 antibody epitopes may be aid the development of diagnostic tools and facilitate the design of epitope-based vaccines for EEEV. These results also offer information with which to study the structure of EEEV E2 protein. PMID:23922704

  9. Comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant epitopes in the eastern equine encephalitis virus E2 protein recognized by avian antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Encheng; Zhao, Jing; Sun, Liang; Xu, Qingyuan; Yang, Tao; Qin, Yongli; Wang, Wenshi; Wei, Peng; Sun, Jing; Wu, Donglai

    2013-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is a mosquito-borne virus that can cause both human and equine encephalitis with high case fatality rates. EEEV can also be widespread among birds, including pheasants, ostriches, emu, turkeys, whooping cranes and chickens. The E2 protein of EEEV and other Alphaviruses is an important immunogenic protein that elicits antibodies of diagnostic value. While many therapeutic and diagnostic applications of E2 protein-specific antibodies have been reported, the specific epitopes on E2 protein recognized by the antibody responses of different susceptible hosts, including avian species, remain poorly defined. In the present study, the avian E2-reactive polyclonal antibody (PAb) response was mapped to linear peptide epitopes using PAbs elicited in chickens and ducks following immunization with recombinant EEEV E2 protein and a series of 42 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire EEEV E2 protein. We identified 12 and 13 peptides recognized by the chicken and duck PAb response, respectively. Six of these linear peptides were commonly recognized by PAbs elicited in both avian species. Among them five epitopes recognized by both avian, the epitopes located at amino acids 211-226 and 331-352 were conserved among the EEEV antigenic complex, but not other associated alphaviruses, whereas the epitopes at amino acids 11-26, 30-45 and 151-166 were specific to EEEV subtype I. The five common peptide epitopes were not recognized by avian PAbs against Avian Influenza Virus (AIV) and Duck Plague Virus (DPV). The identification and characterization of EEEV E2 antibody epitopes may be aid the development of diagnostic tools and facilitate the design of epitope-based vaccines for EEEV. These results also offer information with which to study the structure of EEEV E2 protein.

  10. Conformational Epitopes Recognized by Protective Anti-Neisserial Surface Protein A Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Victor C.; Moe, Gregory R.; Raad, Zyde; Wuorimaa, Tomi; Granoff, Dan M.

    2003-01-01

    NspA is a conserved membrane protein that elicits protective antibody responses in mice against Neisseria meningitidis. A recent crystallographic study showed that NspA adopts an eight-stranded β-barrel structure when reconstituted in detergent. In order to define the segments of NspA-containing epitopes recognized by protective murine anti-NspA antibodies, we studied the binding of two bactericidal and protective anti-NspA monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), AL12 and 14C7. Neither MAb binds to overlapping synthetic peptides (10-mers, 12-mers, and cyclic 12-mers) corresponding to the entire mature sequence of NspA, or to denatured recombinant NspA (rNspA), although binding to the protein can be restored by refolding in liposomes. Based on the ability of the two MAbs to bind to Escherichia coli microvesicles prepared from a set of rNspA variants created by site-specific mutagenesis, the most important contacts between the MAbs and NspA appear to be located within the LGG segment of loop 3. The conformation of loop 2 also appears to be an important determinant, as particular combinations of residues in this segment resulted in loss of antibody binding. Thus, the two anti-NspA MAbs recognize discontinuous conformational epitopes that result from the close proximity of loops 2 and 3 in the three-dimensional structure of NspA. The data suggest that optimally immunogenic vaccines using rNspA will require formulations that permit proper folding of the protein. PMID:14638771

  11. Unique epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies against HP-PRRSV: deep understanding of antigenic structure and virus-antibody interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Peng, Jinmei; Sun, Yan; Chen, Jiazeng; An, Tongqing; Leng, Chaoliang; Li, Lin; Zhao, Hongyuan; Guo, Xin; Ge, Xinna; Yang, Hanchun; Tian, Zhijun

    2014-01-01

    Highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) is a member of the genus Arterivirus within the family Arteriviridae. N and GP3 proteins are the immunodominance regions of the PRRSV viral proteins. To identify the B-cell linear antigenic epitopes within HP-PRRSV N and GP3 proteins, two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against N and GP3 proteins were generated and characterized, designated as 3D7 and 1F10 respectively. The mAb 3D7 recognized only HuN4-F112 not the corresponding virulent strain (HuN4-F5). It also recognized two other commercial vaccines (JXA1-R and TJM-F92), but not two other HP-PRRSV strains (HNZJJ-F1 and HLJMZ-F2). The B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb 3D7 was localized to N protein amino acids 7-33. Western blot showed that the only difference amino acid between HuN4-F112-N and HuN4-F5-N did not change the mAb 3D7 recognization to N protein. The epitope targeted by the mAb 1F10 was mapped by truncated proteins. We found a new epitope (68-76aa) can be recognized by the mAb. However, the epitope could not be recognized by the positive sera, suggesting the epitope could not induce antibody in pigs. These results should extend our understanding of the antigenic structure of the N protein and antigen-antibody reactions of the GP3 protein in different species.

  12. Antibodies from multiple sclerosis patients preferentially recognize hyperglucosylated adhesin of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Walvoort, Marthe T. C.; Testa, Chiara; Eilam, Raya; Aharoni, Rina; Nuti, Francesca; Rossi, Giada; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Lanzillo, Roberta; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo; Lolli, Francesco; Rovero, Paolo; Imperiali, Barbara; Papini, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    In autoimmune diseases, there have been proposals that exogenous “molecular triggers”, i.e., specific this should be ‘non-self antigens’ accompanying infectious agents, might disrupt control of the adaptive immune system resulting in serious pathologies. The etiology of the multiple sclerosis (MS) remains unclear. However, epidemiologic data suggest that exposure to infectious agents may be associated with increased MS risk and progression may be linked to exogenous, bacterially-derived, antigenic molecules, mimicking mammalian cell surface glycoconjugates triggering autoimmune responses. Previously, antibodies specific to a gluco-asparagine (N-Glc) glycopeptide, CSF114(N-Glc), were identified in sera of an MS patient subpopulation. Since the human glycoproteome repertoire lacks this uniquely modified amino acid, we turned our attention to bacteria, i.e., Haemophilus influenzae, expressing cell-surface adhesins including N-Glc, to establish a connection between H. influenzae infection and MS. We exploited the biosynthetic machinery from the opportunistic pathogen H. influenzae (and the homologous enzymes from A. pleuropneumoniae) to produce a unique set of defined glucosylated adhesin proteins. Interestingly we revealed that a hyperglucosylated protein domain, based on the cell-surface adhesin HMW1A, is preferentially recognized by antibodies from sera of an MS patient subpopulation. In conclusion the hyperglucosylated adhesin is the first example of an N-glucosylated native antigen that can be considered a relevant candidate for triggering pathogenic antibodies in MS. PMID:28008952

  13. Binding properties of monoclonal antibodies recognizing external epitopes of the human MDR1 P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Schinkel, A H; Arceci, R J; Smit, J J; Wagenaar, E; Baas, F; Dollé, M; Tsuruo, T; Mechetner, E B; Roninson, I B; Borst, P

    1993-09-30

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) recognizing external epitopes of the human MDR1 P-glycoprotein have been used both for the detection of multidrug-resistant cells and as specific inhibitors of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance. Using a panel of recently developed transfected or transgenic cell lines containing variants of the human MDR1 and MDR3 P-glycoproteins, we have compared the specificity and binding properties of the previously isolated MAbs MRK16, HYB-241, UIC2 and 4E3, and of the newly isolated MAb 7G4. The removal of 1, 2 or all 3 of the N-glycosylation sites present in the first extracellular loop of MDR1 P-glycoprotein did not significantly affect the binding of these MAbs. In contrast, 20 amino acid deletion in the first extracellular loop of MDR1 P-glycoprotein completely abolished binding of UIC2, whereas the binding of all other MAbs was hardly affected. None of the MAbs tested bound detectably to cell lines containing a high level of the human MDR3 P-glycoprotein. The differences in the binding specificity between UIC2 and the other tested antibodies parallel the reported functional differences in the ability of these antibodies to inhibit P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux.

  14. Common epitope on the lipopolysaccharide of Legionella pneumophila recognized by a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Barthe, C; Joly, J R; Ramsay, D; Boissinot, M; Benhamou, N

    1988-01-01

    Serogroup-specificity of Legionella pneumophila is related to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and few cross-reactions between serogroups have been observed with rabbit or monkey antisera. C57BL/6 mice were sequentially immunized with crude outer membrane fractions of L. pneumophila serogroups 1, 5, and 7, Legionella bozemanii, and Legionella micdadei. Spleen cells from these mice were then fused with the Sp2-0/Ag14 mouse myeloma cell line. Outer membrane-rich fractions and LPS were prepared from L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 8 and other Legionella and non-Legionella species. Immunoblots of these extracts were performed with monoclonal antibody obtained from these fusions. One of these monoclonal antibodies recognized an epitope common to all tested serogroups of L. pneumophila and attached to the major constituent of the outer membrane, LPS. This antibody did not react with other Legionella species and numerous gram-negative rods other than Pseudomonas fluorescens CDC93. This monoclonal antibody may be useful in preliminary identification of L. pneumophila as an alternative to direct fluorescent-antibody testing. Images PMID:2454935

  15. G196 epitope tag system: a novel monoclonal antibody, G196, recognizes the small, soluble peptide DLVPR with high affinity

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Kasumi; Sakashita, Gyosuke; Nariai, Yuko; Okazaki, Kosuke; Kato, Hiroaki; Obayashi, Eiji; Yoshida, Hisashi; Sugiyama, Kanako; Park, Sam-Yong; Sekine, Joji; Urano, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    The recognition specificity of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has made mAbs among the most frequently used tools in both basic science research and in clinical diagnosis and therapies. Precise determination of the epitope allows the development of epitope tag systems to be used with recombinant proteins for various purposes. Here we describe a new family of tag derived from the epitope recognized by a highly specific mAb G196. The minimal epitope was identified as the five amino acid sequence Asp-Leu-Val-Pro-Arg. Permutation analysis was used to characterize the binding requirements of mAb G196, and the variable regions of the mAb G196 were identified and structurally analyzed by X-ray crystallography. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed the high affinity (Kd = 1.25 nM) of the mAb G196/G196-epitope peptide interaction, and G196-tag was used to detect several recombinant cytosolic and nuclear proteins in human and yeast cells. mAb G196 is valuable for developing a new peptide tagging system for cell biology and biochemistry research. PMID:28266535

  16. Localization of key amino acid residues in the dominant conformational epitopes on thyroid peroxidase recognized by mouse monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Godlewska, Marlena; Czarnocka, Barbara; Gora, Monika

    2012-09-01

    Autoantibodies to thyroid peroxidase (TPO), the major target autoantigen in autoimmune thyroid diseases, recognize conformational epitopes limited to two immunodominant regions (IDRs) termed IDR-A and -B. The apparent restricted heterogeneity of TPO autoantibodies was discovered using TPO-specific mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and later confirmed by human recombinant Fabs. In earlier studies we identified key amino acids crucial for the interaction of human autoantibodies with TPO. Here we show the critical residues that participate in binding of five mAbs to the conformational epitopes on the TPO surface. Using ELISA we tested the reactivity of single and multiple TPO mutants expressed in CHO cells with a panel of mAbs specifically recognizing IDR-A (mAb 2 and 9) and IDR-B (mAb 15, 18, 64). We show that antibodies recognizing very similar regions on the TPO surface may interact with different sets of residues. We found that residues K713 and E716 contribute to the interaction between mAb 2 and TPO. The epitope for mAb 9 is critically dependent on residues R646 and E716. Moreover, we demonstrate that amino acids E604 and D630 are part of the functional epitope for mAb 15, and amino acids D624 and K627 for mAb 18. Finally, residues E604, D620, D624, K627, and D630 constitute the epitope for mAb 64. This is the first detailed study identifying the key resides for binding of mAbs 2, 9, 15, 18, and 64. Better understanding of those antibodies' specificity will be helpful in elucidating the properties of TPO as an antigen in autoimmune disorders.

  17. An epitope in hepatitis C virus core region recognized by cytotoxic T cells in mice and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, M; Okada, H; Nishioka, M; Akatsuka, T; Wychowski, C; Houghten, R; Pendleton, C D; Feinstone, S M; Berzofsky, J A

    1994-01-01

    Several cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes have been defined in hepatitis C virus (HCV) proteins. CTL may play an important role in the control of infection by HCV. Here, we identify a highly conserved antigenic site in the HCV core recognized by both murine and human CTL. Spleen cells from mice immunized with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the HCV core gene were restimulated in vitro with 11 peptides from the core protein. CTL from H-2d mice responded to a single 16-residue synthetic peptide (HCV 129-144). This conserved epitope was presented by a murine class I major histocompatibility molecule (H-2Dd) to conventional CD4- CD8+ CTL mapped by using transfectants expressing Dd, Ld, or Kd, but was not seen by CTL restricted by H-2b. The murine epitope was mapped to the decapeptide LMGYIPLVGA. The same 16-residue peptide was recognized by CTL from two HCV-seropositive patients but not by CTL from any seronegative donors. CTL from two HLA-A2-positive patients with acute and chronic hepatitides C recognized a 9-residue fragment (DLMGYIPLV) of the peptide presented by HLA-A2 and containing an HLA-A2-binding motif, extending only 1 residue beyond the murine epitope. Therefore, this conserved peptide, seen with murine CTL and human CTL with a very prevalent HLA class I molecule, may be a valuable component of an HCV vaccine against a broad range of HCV isolates. This study demonstrates that the screening for CTL epitopes in mice prior to human study may be useful. PMID:7512163

  18. Characterization of a Prefusion-Specific Antibody That Recognizes a Quaternary, Cleavage-Dependent Epitope on the RSV Fusion Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Morgan S. A.; Moin, Syed M.; Mas, Vicente; Chen, Man; Patel, Nita K.; Kramer, Kari; Zhu, Qing; Kabeche, Stephanie C.; Kumar, Azad; Palomo, Concepción; Beaumont, Tim; Baxa, Ulrich; Ulbrandt, Nancy D.; Melero, José A.; Graham, Barney S.; McLellan, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Prevention efforts for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) have been advanced due to the recent isolation and characterization of antibodies that specifically recognize the prefusion conformation of the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein. These potently neutralizing antibodies are in clinical development for passive prophylaxis and have also aided the design of vaccine antigens that display prefusion-specific epitopes. To date, prefusion-specific antibodies have been shown to target two antigenic sites on RSV F, but both of these sites are also present on monomeric forms of F. Here we present a structural and functional characterization of human antibody AM14, which potently neutralized laboratory strains and clinical isolates of RSV from both A and B subtypes. The crystal structure and location of escape mutations revealed that AM14 recognizes a quaternary epitope that spans two protomers and includes a region that undergoes extensive conformational changes in the pre- to postfusion F transition. Binding assays demonstrated that AM14 is unique in its specific recognition of trimeric furin-cleaved prefusion F, which is the mature form of F on infectious virions. These results demonstrate that the prefusion F trimer contains potent neutralizing epitopes not present on monomers and that AM14 should be particularly useful for characterizing the conformational state of RSV F-based vaccine antigens. PMID:26161532

  19. A lytic monoclonal antibody to Trypanosoma cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes which recognizes an epitope expressed in tissues affected in Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Zwirner, N W; Malchiodi, E L; Chiaramonte, M G; Fossati, C A

    1994-01-01

    It has been suggested that molecular mimicry between the antigens of Trypanosoma cruzi and the host could have a role in the onset of the chronic stage of Chagas' disease. In this article, we report on a monoclonal antibody (MAb), CAK20.12 (immunoglobulin G2b), which reacts with a polypeptidic epitope of a 150-kDa antigen expressed on the surface of several strains of T. cruzi. This MAb also causes lysis of bloodstream trypomastigotes. Serum samples from 30 of 30 patients with chronic and 11 of 13 patients with acute Chagas' disease present specific antibodies to this antigen. MAb CAK20.12 reacts, by indirect immunofluorescence, with human and syngeneic murine striated muscle tissue, with the smooth muscle layer of cardiac arteries, with the lamina muscularis mucosae and the external striated muscle layer of the esophagus, and with the smooth muscle cells of the colon from normal syngeneic mice. Reactivity with the small intestine was very weak, and no reactivity with ventricle or atrium tissue was detected. Adsorption with an antigenic fraction from normal murine striated muscle or from T. cruzi epimastigotes confirmed that MAb CAK20.12 recognizes a common epitope present in parasites and host tissues. MAb CAK20.12, lytic for the infective form of T. cruzi, recognizes an epitope expressed in striated and smooth muscle cells of the host tissues affected in the chronic stage of Chagas' disease. Images PMID:7514576

  20. Kinetics of HIV-1 CTL epitopes recognized by HLA I alleles in HIV-infected individuals at times near primary infection: the Provir/Latitude45 study.

    PubMed

    Papuchon, Jennifer; Pinson, Patricia; Guidicelli, Gwenda-Line; Bellecave, Pantxika; Thomas, Réjean; LeBlanc, Roger; Reigadas, Sandrine; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Baril, Jean Guy; Routy, Jean Pierre; Wainberg, Mark; Fleury, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    In patients responding successfully to ART, the next therapeutic step is viral cure. An interesting strategy is antiviral vaccination, particularly involving CD8 T cell epitopes. However, attempts at vaccination are dependent on the immunogenetic background of individuals. The Provir/Latitude 45 project aims to investigate which CTL epitopes in proviral HIV-1 will be recognized by the immune system when HLA alleles are taken into consideration. A prior study (Papuchon et al, PLoS ONE 2013) showed that chronically-infected patients under successful ART exhibited variations of proviral CTL epitopes compared to a reference viral strain (HXB2) and that a generic vaccine may not be efficient. Here, we investigated viral and/or proviral CTL epitopes at different time points in recently infected individuals of the Canadian primary HIV infection cohort and assessed the affinity of these epitopes for HLA alleles during the study period. An analysis of the results confirms that it is not possible to fully predict which epitopes will be recognized by the HLA alleles of the patients if the reference sequences and epitopes are taken as the basis of simulation. Epitopes may be seen to vary in circulating RNA and proviral DNA. Despite this confirmation, the overall variability of the epitopes was low in these patients who are temporally close to primary infection.

  1. Definition of human apolipoprotein A-I epitopes recognized by autoantibodies present in patients with cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Priscila Camillo; Ducret, Axel; Ferber, Philippe; Gaertner, Hubert; Hartley, Oliver; Pagano, Sabrina; Butterfield, Michelle; Langen, Hanno; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; Cutler, Paul

    2014-10-10

    Autoantibodies to apolipoprotein A-I (anti-apoA-I IgG) have been shown to be both markers and mediators of cardiovascular disease, promoting atherogenesis and unstable atherosclerotic plaque. Previous studies have shown that high levels of anti-apoA-I IgGs are independently associated with major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with myocardial infarction. Autoantibody responses to apoA-I can be polyclonal and it is likely that more than one epitope may exist. To identify the specific immunoreactive peptides in apoA-I, we have developed a set of methodologies and procedures to isolate, purify, and identify novel apoA-I endogenous epitopes. First, we generated high purity apoA-I from human plasma, using thiophilic interaction chromatography followed by enzymatic digestion specifically at lysine or arginine residues. Immunoreactivity to the different peptides generated was tested by ELISA using serum obtained from patients with acute myocardial infarction and high titers of autoantibodies to native apoA-I. The immunoreactive peptides were further sequenced by mass spectrometry. Our approach successfully identified two novel immunoreactive peptides, recognized by autoantibodies from patients suffering from myocardial infarction, who contain a high titer of anti-apoA-I IgG. The discovery of these epitopes may open innovative prognostic and therapeutic opportunities potentially suitable to improve current cardiovascular risk stratification.

  2. Epitopes rationally selected through computational analyses induce T-cell proliferation in mice and are recognized by serum from individuals infected with Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marcelo D; Oliveira, Flávio M; Coelho, Ivan E V; Passos, Maria J F; Alves, Clarice C; Taranto, Alex G; Júnior, Moacyr C; Santos, Luciana L; Fonseca, Cristina T; Villar, José A F P; Lopes, Débora O

    2017-04-03

    Schistosomiasis is the second leading cause of death due to parasitic diseases in the world. Seeking an alternative for the control of disease, the World Health Organization funded the genome sequencing of the major species related to schistosomiasis to identify potential vaccines and therapeutic targets. Therefore, the aim of this work was to select T and B-cell epitopes from Schistosoma mansoni through computational analyses and evaluate the immunological potential of epitopes in vitro. Extracellular regions of membrane proteins from the Schistosoma mansoni were used to predict promiscuous epitopes with affinity to different human Major Histocompatibility Class II (MHCII) molecules by bioinformatics analysis. The three-dimensional structure of selected epitopes was constructed and used in molecular docking to verify the interaction with murine MHCII H2-IA(b) . In this process, four epitopes were selected and synthesized to assess their ability to stimulate proliferation of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in mice splenocyte cultures. The results showed that Sm041370 and Sm168240 epitopes induced significant cell proliferation. Additionally, the four epitopes were used as antigens in the Indirect Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) to assess the recognition by serum from individuals infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Sm140560, Sm168240 and Sm041370 epitopes were recognized by infected individuals IgG antibodies. Therefore, Sm041370 and Sm168240 epitopes that stood out in in silico and in vitro analyses could be promising antigens in schistosomiasis vaccine development or diagnostic kits. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Distinction and temporal stability of conformational epitopes on myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein recognized by patients with different inflammatory central nervous system diseases.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Marie C; Breithaupt, Constanze; Reindl, Markus; Schanda, Kathrin; Rostásy, Kevin; Berger, Thomas; Dale, Russell C; Brilot, Fabienne; Olsson, Tomas; Jenne, Dieter; Pröbstel, Anne-Katrin; Dornmair, Klaus; Wekerle, Hartmut; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Banwell, Brenda; Bar-Or, Amit; Meinl, Edgar

    2013-10-01

    Autoantibodies targeting conformationally intact myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) are found in different inflammatory diseases of the CNS, but their antigenic epitopes have not been mapped. We expressed mutants of MOG on human HeLa cells and analyzed sera from 111 patients (104 children, 7 adults) who recognized cell-bound human MOG, but had different diseases, including acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), one episode of transverse myelitis or optic neuritis, multiple sclerosis (MS), anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4)-negative neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuritis (CRION). We obtained insight into the recognition of epitopes in 98 patients. All epitopes identified were located at loops connecting the β strands of MOG. The most frequently recognized MOG epitope was revealed by the P42S mutation positioned in the CC'-loop. Overall, we distinguished seven epitope patterns, including the one mainly recognized by mouse mAbs. In half of the patients, the anti-MOG response was directed to a single epitope. The epitope specificity was not linked to certain disease entities. Longitudinal analysis of 11 patients for up to 5 y indicated constant epitope recognition without evidence for intramolecular epitope spreading. Patients who rapidly lost their anti-MOG IgG still generated a long-lasting IgG response to vaccines, indicating that their loss of anti-MOG reactivity did not reflect a general lack of capacity for long-standing IgG responses. The majority of human anti-MOG Abs did not recognize rodent MOG, which has implications for animal studies. Our findings might assist in future detection of potential mimotopes and pave the way to Ag-specific depletion.

  4. A human PrM antibody that recognizes a novel cryptic epitope on dengue E glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Chan, Annie Hoi Yi; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Chow, Angelia Yee; Lim, Angeline Pei Chiew; Lok, Shee Mei; Moreland, Nicole J; Vasudevan, Subhash G; MacAry, Paul A; Ooi, Eng Eong; Hanson, Brendon J

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major mosquito-borne pathogen infecting up to 100 million people each year; so far no effective treatment or vaccines are available. Recently, highly cross-reactive and infection-enhancing pre-membrane (prM)-specific antibodies were found to dominate the anti-DENV immune response in humans, raising concern over vaccine candidates that contain native dengue prM sequences. In this study, we have isolated a broadly cross-reactive prM-specific antibody, D29, during a screen with a non-immunized human Fab-phage library against the four serotypes of DENV. The antibody is capable of restoring the infectivity of virtually non-infectious immature DENV (imDENV) in FcγR-bearing K562 cells. Remarkably, D29 also cross-reacted with a cryptic epitope on the envelope (E) protein located to the DI/DII junction as evidenced by site-directed mutagenesis. This cryptic epitope, while inaccessible to antibody binding in a native virus particle, may become exposed if E is not properly folded. These findings suggest that generation of anti-prM antibodies that enhance DENV infection may not be completely avoided even with immunization strategies employing E protein alone or subunits of E proteins.

  5. Identification of a dominant epitope of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-65) recognized by autoantibodies in stiff-man syndrome

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is the enzyme that synthesizes the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in neurons and in pancreatic beta cells. It is a major target of autoimmunity in Stiff- Man syndrome (SMS), a rare neurological disease, and in insulin- dependent diabetes mellitus. The two GAD isoforms, GAD-65 and GAD-67, are the products of two different genes. GAD-67 and GAD-65 are very similar to each other in amino acid sequence and differ substantially only at their NH2-terminal region. We have investigated the reactivity of autoantibodies of 30 Stiff-Man syndrome patients to GAD. All patient sera contained antibodies that recognize strongly GAD-65, but also GAD- 67, when tested by immunoprecipitation on brain extracts and by immunoprecipitation or immunocytochemistry on cells transfected with either the GAD-65 or the GAD-67 gene. When tested by Western blotting, all patient sera selectively recognized GAD-65. Western blot analysis of deletion mutants of GAD-65 demonstrated that autoantibodies are directed predominantly against two regions of the GAD-65 molecule. All SMS sera strongly recognized a fragment contained between amino acid 475 and the COOH terminus (amino acid 585). Within this region, amino acids 475-484 and 571-585 were required for reactivity. The requirement of these two discontinuous segments implies that the epitope is influenced by conformation. This reactivity is similar to that displayed by the monoclonal antibody GAD 6, suggesting the presence of a single immunodominant epitope (SMS-E1) in this region of GAD-65. In addition, most SMS sera recognized at least one epitope (SMS-E2) in the NH2-terminal domain of GAD-65 (amino acids 1-95). The demonstration in SMS patients of a strikingly homogeneous humoral autoimmune response against GAD and the identification of dominant autoreactive target regions may help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of GAD processing and presentation involved in GAD autoimmunity. Moreover, the

  6. Human self-reactive T cell clones expressing identical T cell receptor beta chains differ in their ability to recognize a cryptic self-epitope

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Recognition of self-antigens by T lymphocytes is a central event in autoimmunity. Understanding of the molecular interactions between T cell receptors (TCR) and self-epitopes may explain how T cells escape thymic education and initiate an autoimmune reaction. We have studied five human in vivo activated T cell clones specific for the region 535- 551 of human thyroid peroxidase (TPO) established from a Graves' patient. Three clones (37, 72, and 73) expressed identical TCR beta and alpha chains rearranging V beta 1.1 and V alpha 15.1, and were considered sister clones. Clone 43 differed from clone 37 and its sisters in the J alpha region only. Clone NP-7 expressed V beta 6.5 but rearranged two in-frame TCR alpha chain, both using the V alpha 22.1 segment. Fine epitope mapping using nested peptides showed that clones using identical TCR beta chains, identical V alpha, but a different J alpha recognized distinct, nonoverlapping epitopes in the TPO 535-551 region. This finding shows that a different J alpha region alone leads to a heterogeneous pattern of recognition. This indicates that the "restricted" TCR V region usage sometimes found in autoimmune diseases may not always correspond to identical epitope recognition. To confirm that clones 37 (and its sisters) and 43 recognize different epitopes, the T cell clones were stimulated with a TPO-transfected autologous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) cell line (TPO-EBV) that presents TPO epitopes afer endogenous processing. Only clone 37 and its sisters recognizes the TPO-EBV cell line, suggesting that the epitope recognized by clone 43 is not presented upon endogenous processing. We have shown that thyroid epithelial cells (TEC), the only cells that produce TPO, express HLA class II molecules in Graves' disease and can act as an antigen-presenting cells, presenting TPO after endogenous processing to autoantigen-reactive T cell clones. We tested, therefore, whether autologous TEC induced the same pattern of stimulation as TPO

  7. Structural and functional analysis of the B cell epitopes recognized by anti-receptor autoantibodies in patients with Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Elies, R; Ferrari, I; Wallukat, G; Lebesgue, D; Chiale, P; Elizari, M; Rosenbaum, M; Hoebeke, J; Levin, M J

    1996-11-01

    IgG fractions of patients were screened for autoantibodies against the beta1- and beta2-adrenoceptors and the M2 acetylcholine receptor by enzyme immunoassays and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using peptides corresponding to the second extracellular loop of these receptors. A high prevalence of anti-M2 acetylcholine receptor and, in decreasing order, of anti-beta1- and anti-beta2-adrenoceptor autoantibodies was shown. The enzyme immunoassays and the SPR studies on the anti-beta1 adrenoceptor and the M2 acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies were dependent on the ionic strength of the interaction buffer, suggesting the importance of electrostatic interactions in Ab recognition. IgG fractions showed chronotropic effects on neonatal rat cardiomyocytes in vitro. The positive chronotropic effect was enhanced in the presence of 1 microM of atropine, demonstrating a muscarinic stimulation by the IgG fractions in the presence of a beta-adrenergic stimulation, which was blocked by the use of 1 microM of the beta1-selective antagonist bisoprolol. The beta2-selective antagonist ICI 118,551 only partially inhibited the positive chronotropic effect induced by the IgG fractions, confirming the minor functional importance of autoantibodies against the beta2-adrenoceptor. Affinity-purified Abs confirmed that Abs against the beta1-adrenoceptors and the M2 muscarinic receptors exist together with an Ab population recognizing a cross-reactive epitope on both receptors. This epitope could be identified as a polyanionic stretch present in the second extracellular loop of both the beta1-adrenoceptor and the M2 acetylcholine receptor. This stretch corresponds to the previously determined cross-reactive epitope between the P0 ribosomal protein of Trypanosoma cruzi and the beta1-adrenoceptor.

  8. Identification of epitope mimics recognized by CTL reactive to the melanoma/melanocyte-derived peptide MART-1(27-35)

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    CTL reactivity to the epitope MART-1(27-35), of the melanoma (self) antigen MART-1/melan A is frequently observed in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and may be readily elicited from the peripheral blood of melanoma patients that express HLA-A*0201. Available data suggest that these observations contrast with those made for other HLA-A*0201- presented melanoma self antigens regarding the regularity of observed CTL responses. Based on preliminary findings, we hypothesized that the CTL response to MART-1 might be augmented in part by T cell encounters with peptides derived from sources other than MART-1, which show sequence similarity to MART-1(27-35). To test this idea, a protein database search for potential MART-1 epitope mimics was done using criteria developed from analyses of effector recognition of singly- substituted peptide analogues of MART-1(27-35). Synthetic peptides were made for a portion of the sequences retrieved; 12/40 peptides tested were able to sensitize target cells for lysis by one or more anti-MART- 1 effectors. The peptides recognized correspond to sequences occurring in a variety of proteins of viral, bacterial, and human (self) origin. One peptide derives from glycoprotein C of the common pathogen HSV-1; cells infected with recombinant vaccinia virus encoding native glycoprotein C were lysed by anti-MART-1 effectors. Our results overall indicate that sequences conforming to the A2.1 binding motif and possessing features essential to recognition by anti-MART-1 CTL occur frequently in proteins. These findings further suggest that T cells might encounter a variety of such sequences in vivo, and that epitope mimicry may play a role in modulating the CTL response to MART-1(27-35). PMID:8760818

  9. A human monoclonal antibody against HPV16 recognizes an immunodominant and neutralizing epitope partially overlapping with that of H16.V5

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Lin; Xian, Yangfei; Wang, Daning; Chen, Yuanzhi; Huang, Xiaofen; Bi, Xingjian; Yu, Hai; Fu, Zheng; Liu, Xinlin; Li, Shaowei; An, Zhiqiang; Luo, Wenxin; Zhao, Qinjian; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    The presence of neutralizing epitopes in human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) is the structural basis of prophylactic vaccines. An anti-HPV16 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (N-mAb) 26D1 was isolated from a memory B cell of a human vaccinee. The pre-binding of heparan sulfate to VLPs inhibited the binding of both N-mAbs to the antigen, indicating that the epitopes are critical for viral cell attachment/entry. Hybrid VLP binding with surface loop swapping between types indicated the essential roles of the DE and FG loops for both 26D1 (DEa in particular) and H16.V5 binding. Specifically, Tyr135 and Val141 on the DEa loop were shown to be critical residues for 26D1 binding via site-directed mutagenesis. Partially overlap between the epitopes between 26D1 and H16.V5 was shown using pairwise epitope mapping, and their binding difference is demonstrated to be predominantly in DE loop region. In addition, 26D1 epitope is immunodominant epitope recognized by both antibodies elicited by the authentic virus from infected individuals and polyclonal antibodies from vaccinees. Overall, a partially overlapping but distinct neutralizing epitope from that of H16.V5 was identified using a human N-mAb, shedding lights to the antibody arrays as part of human immune response to vaccination and infection. PMID:26750243

  10. Gluten-specific antibodies of celiac disease gut plasma cells recognize long proteolytic fragments that typically harbor T-cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Dørum, Siri; Steinsbø, Øyvind; Bergseng, Elin; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; de Souza, Gustavo A.; Sollid, Ludvig M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify proteolytic fragments of gluten proteins recognized by recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibodies generated from single IgA plasma cells of celiac disease lesions. Peptides bound by monoclonal antibodies in complex gut-enzyme digests of gluten treated with the deamidating enzyme transglutaminase 2, were identified by mass spectrometry after antibody pull-down with protein G beads. The antibody bound peptides were long deamidated peptide fragments that contained the substrate recognition sequence of transglutaminase 2. Characteristically, the fragments contained epitopes with the sequence QPEQPFP and variants thereof in multiple copies, and they typically also harbored many different gluten T-cell epitopes. In the pull-down setting where antibodies were immobilized on a solid phase, peptide fragments with multivalent display of epitopes were targeted. This scenario resembles the situation of the B-cell receptor on the surface of B cells. Conceivably, B cells of celiac disease patients select gluten epitopes that are repeated multiple times in long peptide fragments generated by gut digestive enzymes. As the fragments also contain many different T-cell epitopes, this will lead to generation of strong antibody responses by effective presentation of several distinct T-cell epitopes and establishment of T-cell help to B cells. PMID:27146306

  11. Cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs) from HIV-1 subtype C-infected Indian patients recognize CTL epitopes from a conserved immunodominant region of HIV-1 Gag and Nef.

    PubMed

    Thakar, Madhuri R; Bhonge, Leena S; Lakhashe, Samir K; Shankarkumar, U; Sane, Suvarna S; Kulkarni, Smita S; Mahajan, Bharati A; Paranjape, Ramesh S

    2005-09-01

    Analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes recognized by the targeted population is critical for HIV-1 vaccine design. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 47 Indian subjects at different stages of HIV-1 infection were tested for HIV-1 Gag-, Nef-, and Env-specific T cell responses by interferon (IFN)- gamma enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay, using pools of overlapping peptides. The Gag and Nef antigens were targeted by 83% and 36% of responders. Five immunodominant regions, 4 in Gag and 1 in Nef, were identified in the study; these regions are conserved across clades, including the African subtype C clade. Three antigenic regions were also found to be recognized by CTLs of the study participants. These regions were not identified as immunodominant regions in studies performed in Africa, which highlights the importance of differential clustering of responses within HIV-1 subtype C. Twenty-six putative epitopes--15 Gag (10 in p24 and 5 in p17), 10 Nef, and 1 Env (gp 41)--were predicted using a combination of peptide matrix ELISPOT assay and CTL epitope-prediction software. Ninety percent of the predicted epitopes were clustered in the conserved immunodominant regions of the Gag and Nef antigens. Of 26 predicted epitopes, 8 were promiscuous, 3 of which were highly conserved across clades. Three Gag and 4 Nef epitopes were novel. The identification of conserved epitopes will be important in the planning of an HIV-1 vaccine strategy for subtype C-affected regions.

  12. Mapping and comparison of the B-cell epitopes recognized on the Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite protein by immune Colombians and immunized Aotus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Arévalo-Herrera, M; Roggero, M A; Gonzalez, J M; Vergara, J; Corradin, G; López, J A; Herrera, S

    1998-07-01

    Plasma samples of individuals from two malaria-endemic villages on the Colombian Pacific coast and synthetic peptides representing different fragments of the central and flanking regions of the Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite protein (CSP) were used to perform a fine mapping of the B-cell epitopes on the whole CSP. In addition, the immunogenicity of long polypeptides corresponding to the amino (N) and carboxyl (C) regions was evaluated in Aotus monkeys. The epitopes recognized after natural infection of humans and after immunization of Aotus with these synthetic peptides were compared. Human samples more frequently contained specific antibodies to the central region. The type-I repeat region of the CSP was predominantly recognized by the human sera (by 68% of those from the village of Zacarías and 75% of those from Bajo Calima), a significantly smaller population reacting with the type-II repeat (20% and 11%, respectively). Most of the sera reacting with the type-I repeat recognized the minimal epitope AGDR. Although the N- and C-terminal polypeptides were both highly immunogenic in Aotus and induced long-lasting antibodies, titres of antibodies to the C-terminal polypeptide were higher than those of antibodies to the N-terminal. Competitive inhibition assays performed using human and monkey plasma allowed the identification of dominant B-cell epitopes on sequence 71-90 (p8) from the amino region and sequence 332-361 (p24/p25) from the carboxyl region. The high prevalence of naturally induced antibodies to the three epitopes, the possible functional role of the corresponding sequences, and the high immunogenicity of these epitopes in Aotus could be of great importance in the development of a malaria vaccine based on P. vivax CSP.

  13. The effect of dithiotreitol on thyroid peroxidase and microsomal antigen epitopes recognized by auto and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gardas, A; Domek, H; Czarnocka, B

    1990-01-01

    The effect of disulphide bridges reduction of the microsomal antigen (Mic-Ag) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) by dithiotreitol (DTT) has been investigated. The reaction of all 67 tested sera from untreated hyperthyroid Graves' and from 22 Hashimoto's patients with high microsomal antibodies (aAb) titer was diminished by 90-95% by DTT, at pH 9.6. The remaining 5-10% of the activity was not destroyed by DTT. The residual Mic-Ag after DTT reduction was able to inhibit the binding of all 45 Graves' and 22 Hashimoto's tested aAb's to the native microsomal antigen by 100% at high concentration. Reaction of affinity purified TPO with two monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were diminished by 80% to 95% by DTT pretreatment, while the reaction of one mAb with TPO was only slightly affected. The reaction of TPO and Mic-Ag with rabbit polyclonal anti-TPO serum (rabbit a TPO) was diminished by 60% by DTT pretreatment. The immunological reactivity of TPO with aAb's was diminished by 65% after DTT pretreatment. The microsomal antigen-aAb's complex was not destroyed by DTT. Results presented in this paper suggest conformational epitope structure of the Mic-Ag recognized by aAb's in patients with thyroid autoimmune disease (AITD).

  14. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize an HLA-A2-restricted epitope within the hepatitis B virus nucleocapsid antigen

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The absence of readily manipulable experimental systems to study the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response against hepatitis B virus (HBV) antigens has thus far precluded a definitive demonstration of the role played by this response in the pathogenesis of liver cell injury and viral clearance during HBV infection. To circumvent the problem that HBV infection of human cells in vitro for production of stimulator/target systems for CTL analysis is not feasible, a panel of 22 overlapping synthetic peptides covering the entire amino acid sequence of the HBV core (HBcAg) and e (HBeAg) antigens were used to induce and to analyze the HBV nucleocapsid-specific CTL response in nine patients with acute hepatitis B, six patients with chronic active hepatitis B, and eight normal controls. By using this approach, we have identified an HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope, located within the NH2- terminal region of the HBV core molecule, which is shared with the e antigen and is readily recognized by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with self-limited acute hepatitis B but less efficiently in chronic HBV infection. Our study provides the first direct evidence of HLA class I-restricted T cell cytotoxicity against HBV in humans. Furthermore, the different response in HBV-infected subjects who successfully clear the virus (acute patients) in comparison with patients who do not succeed (chronic patients) suggests a pathogenetic role for this CTL activity in the clearance of HBV infection. PMID:1720813

  15. MHC-I-restricted epitopes conserved among variola and other related orthopoxviruses are recognized by T cells 30 years after vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tang, S T; Wang, M; Lamberth, K; Harndahl, M; Dziegiel, M H; Claesson, M H; Buus, S; Lund, O

    2008-01-01

    It is many years since the general population has been vaccinated against smallpox virus. Here, we report that human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I restricted T cell epitopes can be recognized more than 30 years after vaccination. Using bioinformatic methods, we predicted 177 potential cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes. Eight epitopes were confirmed to stimulate IFN-gamma release by T cells in smallpox-vaccinated subjects. The epitopes were restricted by five supertypes (HLA-A1, -A2, -A24 -A26 and -B44). Significant T cell responses were detected against 8 of 45 peptides with an HLA class I affinity of K(D) less than or equal to 5 nM, whereas no T cell responses were detected against 60 peptides with an HLA affinity of K(D) more than 5 nM. All epitopes were fully conserved in seven variola, vaccinia and cowpox strains. Knowledge of the long-term response to smallpox vaccination may lead to a better understanding of poxvirus immunity and may aid in the development of new improved vaccines and diagnostic tools.

  16. Flavivirus-cross-reactive, HLA-DR15-restricted epitope on NS3 recognized by human CD4+ CD8- cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones.

    PubMed

    Kurane, I; Okamoto, Y; Dai, L C; Zeng, L L; Brinton, M A; Ennis, F A

    1995-09-01

    The role of flavivirus-cross-reactive T lymphocytes in recovery from and pathogenesis of flavivirus infections is not known. In the present paper, we have defined a flavivirus-cross-reactive epitope recognized by two CD4+ CD8- cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones, JK4 and JK43. The T cell clones were established from the peripheral blood T lymphocytes of a dengue-4-immune donor, using a limiting-dilution method with dengue-4 antigen. These two T cell clones were cross-reactive for dengue virus types 1, 2, 3 and 4, yellow fever virus and West Nile virus, and recognized NS3 protein. The smallest synthetic peptide recognized by these T cell clones was an identical 9 amino acid peptide which contains amino acids 146 to 154 (VIGLYGNGV) of dengue-4 NS3. HLA-DR15 was the restriction allele for recognition of this epitope by JK4 and JK43. JK4 and JK43 both used T cell receptor V alpha 8, but JK4 used V beta 8 and JK43 used V beta 2. This result indicates that this epitope is recognized by two flavivirus-cross-reactive CD4+ T cell clones which originated from different T cells in vivo.

  17. Computational identification of epitopes in the glycoproteins of novel bunyavirus (SFTS virus) recognized by a human monoclonal antibody (MAb 4-5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenshuai; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Li; Peng, Haiyan; Jiao, Yongjun; Zeng, Jun; Treutlein, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we have developed a new approach to predict the epitopes of antigens that are recognized by a specific antibody. Our method is based on the "multiple copy simultaneous search" (MCSS) approach which identifies optimal locations of small chemical functional groups on the surfaces of the antibody, and identifying sequence patterns of peptides that can bind to the surface of the antibody. The identified sequence patterns are then used to search the amino-acid sequence of the antigen protein. The approach was validated by reproducing the binding epitope of HIV gp120 envelop glycoprotein for the human neutralizing antibody as revealed in the available crystal structure. Our method was then applied to predict the epitopes of two glycoproteins of a newly discovered bunyavirus recognized by an antibody named MAb 4-5. These predicted epitopes can be verified by experimental methods. We also discuss the involvement of different amino acids in the antigen-antibody recognition based on the distributions of MCSS minima of different functional groups.

  18. Physical Characteristics of a Citrullinated Pro-Filaggrin Epitope Recognized by Anti-Citrullinated Protein Antibodies in Rheumatoid Arthritis Sera

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Holm, Bettina Eide; Slot, Ole; Locht, Henning; Lindegaard, Hanne; Svendsen, Anders; Houen, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease of complex etiology. A characteristic feature of a subset of RA is the presence of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA), which correlate with a progressive disease course. In this study, we employed streptavidin capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to analyze ACPA reactivity. Using the pro-filaggrin peptide HQCHQEST-Cit-GRSRGRCGRSGS, as template, we analyzed the reactivity of RA sera and healthy donor sera to various peptides in order to determine the physical characteristics of the citrullinated pro-filaggrin epitope and to examine whether biotin labelling influence antibody recognition. The full-length cyclic pro-filaggrin peptide and a linear form with a N-terminal biotin, was recognized to the same level, whereas, a notable difference in ACPA reactivity to the linear peptides with a C-terminal biotin was found, probably due to steric hindrance. Screening of linear and cyclic truncated peptides, revealed that small cyclic peptides containing 10–12 amino acids are favored over the linear. Moreover, the charged amino acids C-terminal to citrulline were found to be essential for antibody reactivity, most important was the charged amino acid in position 4 C-terminal to citrulline. Collectively, peptide structure, length, the presence of charged amino acids and biotin labelling markedly influence antibody reactivity. In relation to the clinical diagnostics of ACPA, these findings may reflect the differences in diagnostic assays used for detection of ACPA, which relates to differences in sensitivity and specificity dependent on the assay applied. PMID:28002483

  19. A monoclonal antibody (1B7) specific for polymorphic determinant on mouse I-A antigens recognizes monomorphic epitope shared by most of RT-1 haplotypes in rats.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, K; Ishikawa, N; Mizuno, K; Kojima, H; Natori, T; Ogasawara, K; Ogasawara, M; Fujita, M; Onoé, K

    1986-10-01

    A monoclonal antibody, 1B7, which was established by immunizing C57BL/10 mice with splenocytes from B10.BR, was investigated by serological, immunochemical and functional analyses in mouse, rat, guinea pig and human systems. 1B7 recognized a polymorphic determinant on class II antigens in the mouse system. In the rat system, however, this antibody appeared to recognize a monomorphic epitope shared by all RT-1 haplotypes. 1B7 showed no reactivity in the human and guinea pig strains tested.

  20. A potent anti-dengue human antibody preferentially recognizes the conformation of E protein monomers assembled on the virus surface

    PubMed Central

    Fibriansah, Guntur; Tan, Joanne L; Smith, Scott A; Alwis, Adamberage R; Ng, Thiam-Seng; Kostyuchenko, Victor A; Ibarra, Kristie D; Wang, Jiaqi; Harris, Eva; Silva, Aravinda; Crowe, James E; Lok, Shee-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), which consists of four serotypes (DENV1-4), infects over 400 million people annually. Previous studies have indicated most human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) from dengue patients are cross-reactive and poorly neutralizing. Rare neutralizing HMAbs are usually serotype-specific and bind to quaternary structure-dependent epitopes. We determined the structure of DENV1 complexed with Fab fragments of a highly potent HMAb 1F4 to 6 Å resolution by cryo-EM. Although HMAb 1F4 appeared to bind to virus and not E proteins in ELISAs in the previous study, our structure showed that the epitope is located within an envelope (E) protein monomer, and not across neighboring E proteins. The Fab molecules bind to domain I (DI), and DI-DII hinge of the E protein. We also showed that HMAb 1F4 can neutralize DENV at different stages of viral entry in a cell type and receptor dependent manner. The structure reveals the mechanism by which this potent and specific antibody blocks viral infection. Subject Categories Microbiology, Virology & Host Pathogen Interaction; Immunology PMID:24421336

  1. Definition of an epitope on NS3 recognized by human CD4+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones cross-reactive for dengue virus types 2, 3, and 4.

    PubMed

    Kurane, I; Zeng, L; Brinton, M A; Ennis, F A

    1998-01-20

    The role of dengue virus-specific serotype-cross-reactive T lymphocytes in recovery from and pathogenesis of dengue virus infections is not known. In the present paper, we have defined a dengue serotype-cross-reactive epitope recognized by two CD4+ CD8- cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones, JK36 and JK46. These T cell clones were established from the peripheral blood T lymphocytes of a dengue-3-immune donor, using a limiting dilution method. JK36 and JK46 were cross-reactive for dengue virus types 2, 3, and 4, but not for type 1, and recognized the NS3 protein. The smallest synthetic peptide recognized by JK36 was an 8-amino acid peptide that contains amino acids (aa) 226 to 233 (VVAAEMEE) of NS3. The smallest peptide recognized by JK46 was an 11-amino acid peptide that contains aa 224 to 234 (TRVVAAEMEEA). HLA-DR15 was the restriction allele for recognition of these peptides by both JK36 and JK46. This is the first epitope to be defined that is recognized by human CD4+ CTL cross-reactive for dengue virus types 2, 3, and 4.

  2. Alphavirus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Recognize a Cross-Reactive Epitope from the Capsid Protein and Can Eliminate Virus from Persistently Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Linn, May La; Mateo, L.; Gardner, J.; Suhrbier, A.

    1998-01-01

    Persistent alphavirus infections in synovial and neural tissues are believed to be associated with chronic arthritis and encephalitis, respectively, and represent likely targets for CD8+ αβ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Here we show that the capsid protein is a dominant target for alphavirus-specific CTL in BALB/c mice and that capsid-specific CTL from these mice recognize an H-2Kd restricted epitope, QYSGGRFTI. This epitope lies in the highly conserved region of the capsid protein, and QYSGGRFTI-specific CTL were cross reactive across a range of Old World alphaviruses. In vivo the acute primary viraemia of these highly cytopathic viruses was unaffected by QYSGGRFTI-specific CTL. However, in vitro these CTL were able to completely clear virus from macrophages persistently and productively infected with the arthrogenic alphavirus Ross River virus. PMID:9573286

  3. Immunodominant IgM and IgG Epitopes Recognized by Antibodies Induced in Enterovirus A71-Associated Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aw-Yong, Kam Leng; Sam, I-Ching; Koh, Mia Tuang

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) is one of the main causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Unlike other enteroviruses that cause HFMD, EV-A71 is more frequently associated with severe neurological complications and fatality. To date, no effective licensed antivirals are available to combat EV-A71 infection. Little is known about the immunogenicity of viral non-structural proteins in humans. Previous studies have mainly focused on characterization of epitopes of EV-A71 structural proteins by using immunized animal antisera. In this study, we have characterized human antibody responses against the structural and non-structural proteins of EV-A71. Each viral protein was cloned and expressed in either bacterial or mammalian systems, and tested with antisera by western blot. Results revealed that all structural proteins (VP1-4), and non-structural proteins 2A, 3C and 3D were targets of EV-A71 IgM, whereas EV-A71 IgG recognized all the structural and non-structural proteins. Sixty three synthetic peptides predicted to be immunogenic in silico were synthesized and used for the characterization of EV-A71 linear B-cell epitopes. In total, we identified 22 IgM and four IgG dominant epitopes. Synthetic peptide PEP27, corresponding to residues 142–156 of VP1, was identified as the EV-A71 IgM-specific immunodominant epitope. PEP23, mapped to VP1 41–55, was recognized as the EV-A71 IgG cross-reactive immunodominant epitope. The structural protein VP1 is the major immunodominant site targeted by anti-EV-A71 IgM and IgG antibodies, but epitopes against non-structural proteins were also detected. These data provide new understanding of the immune response to EV-A71 infection, which benefits the development of diagnostic tools, potential therapeutics and subunit vaccine candidates. PMID:27806091

  4. Proteomic Characterization of Helicobacter pylori CagA Antigen Recognized by Child Serum Antibodies and Its Epitope Mapping by Peptide Array

    PubMed Central

    Akada, Junko; Okuda, Masumi; Hiramoto, Narumi; Kitagawa, Takao; Zhang, Xiulian; Kamei, Shuichi; Ito, Akane; Nakamura, Mikiko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Hiwatani, Tomoko; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Teruko; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Serum antibodies against pathogenic bacteria play immunologically protective roles, and can be utilized as diagnostic markers of infection. This study focused on Japanese child serum antibodies against Helicobacter pylori, a chronically-infected gastric bacterium which causes gastric cancer in adults. Serological diagnosis for H. pylori infection is well established for adults, but it needs to be improved for children. Serum samples from 24 children, 22 H. pylori (Hp)-positive and 2 Hp-negative children, were used to catalogue antigenic proteins of a Japanese strain CPY2052 by two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by immunoblot and LC-MS/MS analysis. In total, 24 proteins were identified as candidate antigen proteins. Among these, the major virulence factor, cytotoxin-associated gene A protein (CagA) was the most reactive antigen recognized by all the Hp-positive sera even from children under the age of 3 years. The major antigenic part of CagA was identified in the middle region, and two peptides containing CagA epitopes were identified using a newly developed peptide/protein-combined array chip method, modified from our previous protein chip method. Each of the epitopes was found to contain amino acid residue(s) unique to East Asian CagA. Epitope analysis of CagA indicated importance of the regional CagA antigens for serodiagnosis of H. pylori infection in children. PMID:25141238

  5. Production of a monoclonal antibody by in vitro immunization that recognizes a native chondroitin sulfate epitope in the embryonic chick limb and heart.

    PubMed

    Capehart, A A; Wienecke, M M; Kitten, G T; Solursh, M; Krug, E L

    1997-11-01

    We report the production of a monoclonal antibody (d1C4) by in vitro immunization that has immunoreactivity with a native chondroitin sulfate epitope in embryonic chick limb and heart. Murine lymphocytes were stimulated by direct exposure to unfixed, unsolubilized precartilage mesenchymal aggregates in high-density micromass culture derived from Stage 22-23 chick limb buds. Specificity of d1C4 reactivity was demonstrated by sensitivity of immunohistochemical staining to pretreatment with chondroitinase ABC or AC, preferential immunoreactivity with chondroitin-6-sulfate glycosaminoglycan (CS-C GAG) in ELISA, and competition of immunohistochemical staining with CS-C GAG. Immunohistochemical analysis of the expression of the d1C4 epitope revealed a striking localization of immunoreactivity in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of precartilage aggregates of chick limb mesenchyme in high-density micromass culture by 16 hr and the prechondrogenic limb core at Stage 23 in vivo. Immunoreactivity in both cultured limb mesenchyme and the embryonic limb continued through differentiation of prechondrogenic condensations into cartilage tissue. In the developing chick heart, d1C4 staining was found throughout the ECM of atrioventricular cushion tissue by Stage 25, but was localized to mesenchyme adjacent to the myocardium in the outflow tract cushions. There was an abrupt demarcation between d1C4-reactive intracardiac mesenchyme and unreactive extracardiac mesenchyme of the dorsal mesocardium in the Stage 22 embryo. This study demonstrates the efficacy of in vitro immunization of lymphocytes for the production of MAbs to native ECM constituents, such as CS-GAGs. Immunohistochemical data utilizing d1C4 suggest that CS-GAGs bearing this epitope may be important in early morphogenetic events leading to cartilage differentiation in the limb and valvuloseptal morphogenesis in the heart.

  6. Antibodies against Escherichia coli O24 and O56 O-Specific Polysaccharides Recognize Epitopes in Human Glandular Epithelium and Nervous Tissue.

    PubMed

    Korzeniowska-Kowal, Agnieszka; Kochman, Agata; Gamian, Elżbieta; Lis-Nawara, Anna; Lipiński, Tomasz; Seweryn, Ewa; Ziółkowski, Piotr; Gamian, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, contains the O-polysaccharide, which is important to classify bacteria into different O-serological types within species. The O-polysaccharides of serotypes O24 and O56 of E. coli contain sialic acid in their structures, already established in our previous studies. Here, we report the isolation of specific antibodies with affinity chromatography using immobilized lipopolysaccharides. Next, we evaluated the reactivity of anti-O24 and anti-O56 antibody on human tissues histologically. The study was conducted under the assumption that the sialic acid based molecular identity of bacterial and tissue structures provides not only an understanding of the mimicry-based bacterial pathogenicity. Cross-reacting antibodies could be used to recognize specific human tissues depending on their histogenesis and differentiation, which might be useful for diagnostic purposes. The results indicate that various human tissues are recognized by anti-O24 and anti-O56 antibodies. Interestingly, only a single specific reactivity could be found in the anti-O56 antibody preparation. Several tissues studied were not reactive with either antibody, thus proving that the presence of cross-reactive antigens was tissue specific. In general, O56 antibody performed better than O24 in staining epithelial and nervous tissues. Positive staining was observed for both normal (ganglia) and tumor tissue (ganglioneuroma). Epithelial tissue showed positive staining, but an epitope recognized by O56 antibody should be considered as a marker of glandular epithelium. The reason is that malignant glandular tumor and its metastasis are stained, and also epithelium of renal tubules and glandular structures of the thyroid gland are stained. Stratified epithelium such as that of skin is definitely not stained. Therefore, the most relevant observation is that the epitope recognized by anti-O56 antibodies is a new marker

  7. Melan-A/MART-1(51-73) represents an immunogenic HLA-DR4-restricted epitope recognized by melanoma-reactive CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Zarour, H M; Kirkwood, J M; Kierstead, L S; Herr, W; Brusic, V; Slingluff, C L; Sidney, J; Sette, A; Storkus, W J

    2000-01-04

    The human Melan-A/MART-1 gene encodes an HLA-A2-restricted peptide epitope recognized by melanoma-reactive CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Here we report that this gene also encodes at least one HLA-DR4-presented peptide recognized by CD4(+) T cells. The Melan-A/MART-1(51-73) peptide was able to induce the in vitro expansion of specific CD4(+) T cells derived from normal DR4(+) donors or from DR4(+) patients with melanoma when pulsed onto autologous dendritic cells. CD4(+) responder T cells specifically produced IFN-gamma in response to, and also lysed, T2.DR4 cells pulsed with the Melan-A/MART-1(51-73) peptide and DR4(+) melanoma target cells naturally expressing the Melan-A/MART-1 gene product. Interestingly, CD4(+) T cell immunoreactivity against the Melan-A/MART-1(51-73) peptide typically coexisted with a high frequency of anti-Melan-A/MART-1(27-35) reactive CD8(+) T cells in freshly isolated blood harvested from HLA-A2(+)/DR4(+) patients with melanoma. Taken together, these data support the use of this Melan-A/MART-1 DR4-restricted melanoma epitope in future immunotherapeutic trials designed to generate, augment, and quantitate specific CD4(+) T cell responses against melanoma in vivo.

  8. Canine and feline parvoviruses preferentially recognize the non-human cell surface sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Löfling, Jonas; Michael Lyi, Sangbom; Parrish, Colin R.; Varki, Ajit

    2013-05-25

    Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) is a pathogen whose canine-adapted form (canine parvovirus (CPV)) emerged in 1978. These viruses infect by binding host transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR), but also hemagglutinate erythrocytes. We show that hemagglutination involves selective recognition of the non-human sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) but not N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), which differs by only one oxygen atom from Neu5Gc. Overexpression of α2-6 sialyltransferase did not change binding, indicating that both α2-3 and α2-6 linkages are recognized. However, Neu5Gc expression on target cells did not enhance CPV or FPV infection in vitro. Thus, the conserved Neu5Gc-binding preference of these viruses likely plays a role in the natural history of the virus in vivo. Further studies must clarify relationships between virus infection and host Neu5Gc expression. As a first step, we show that transcripts of CMAH (which generates Neu5Gc from Neu5Ac) are at very low levels in Western dog breed cells. - Highlights: ► Feline and canine parvoviruses recognize Neu5Gc but not Neu5Ac, which differ by one oxygen atom. ► The underlying linkage of these sialic acids does not affect recognition. ► Induced Neu5Gc expression on target cells that normally express Neu5Ac did not enhance infection. ► Thus, the conserved binding preference plays an important yet unknown role in in vivo infections. ► Population and breed variations in Neu5Gc expression occur, likely by regulating the gene CMAH.

  9. Canine and feline parvoviruses preferentially recognize the non-human cell surface sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid.

    PubMed

    Löfling, Jonas; Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Parrish, Colin R; Varki, Ajit

    2013-05-25

    Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) is a pathogen whose canine-adapted form (canine parvovirus (CPV)) emerged in 1978. These viruses infect by binding host transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR), but also hemagglutinate erythrocytes. We show that hemagglutination involves selective recognition of the non-human sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) but not N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), which differs by only one oxygen atom from Neu5Gc. Overexpression of α2-6 sialyltransferase did not change binding, indicating that both α2-3 and α2-6 linkages are recognized. However, Neu5Gc expression on target cells did not enhance CPV or FPV infection in vitro. Thus, the conserved Neu5Gc-binding preference of these viruses likely plays a role in the natural history of the virus in vivo. Further studies must clarify relationships between virus infection and host Neu5Gc expression. As a first step, we show that transcripts of CMAH (which generates Neu5Gc from Neu5Ac) are at very low levels in Western dog breed cells.

  10. Immune-driven adaptation of hepatitis B virus genotype D involves preferential alteration in B-cell epitopes and replicative attenuation--an insight from human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis B virus coinfection.

    PubMed

    Mondal, R K; Khatun, M; Ghosh, S; Banerjee, P; Datta, S; Sarkar, S; Saha, B; Santra, A; Banerjee, S; Chowdhury, A; Datta, S

    2015-07-01

    An important driving force behind the sequence diversity of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is viral adaptation to host immune responses. To gain an insight into the impact of host immunity on genetic diversification and properties of HBV, we characterized HBV of genotype D from treatment-naive hepatitis B e antigen-positive (EP) and hepatitis B e antigen-negative (EN) patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), where HBV is under stronger immune pressure, with that of HBV derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HBV-coinfected individuals, where HIV infection has significantly weakened the immune system. Full-length sequence analysis showed that HBV heterogeneity was most extensive in EN-CHB followed by EP-CHB and HIV/HBV coinfection. The relative magnitude of non-synonymous changes within B-cell epitopes was greater than that in T-cell epitopes of HBV open reading frames (ORFs) in both EP-CHB and EN-CHB. Nine amino acid substitutions were identified in B-cell epitopes and one in a T-cell epitope of HBV in EN-CHB, most of which resulted in altered hydrophobicities, as determined using the Kyte and Doolittle method, relative to wild-type residues found in HBV from the HIV-positive group. Additionally, 19 substitutions occurred at significantly higher frequencies in non-epitope regions of HBV ORF-P in EN-CHB than HIV/HBV-coinfected patients. In vitro replication assay demonstrated that the substitutions, particularly in reverse transcriptase and RNaseH domains of ORF-P, resulted in a decline in replication capacity of HBV. Hence, our results indicate that HBV adapts to increasing immune pressure through preferential mutations in B-cell epitopes and by replicative attenuation. The viral epitopes linked to immune response identified in this study bear important implications for future HBV vaccine studies.

  11. Identification and characterization of a monoclonal antibody recognizing the linear epitope RVADVI on VP1 protein of enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Man-Li, Tang; Szyporta, Milene; Fang, Lim Xiao; Kwang, Jimmy

    2012-10-01

    Several large outbreaks of hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD) have occurred in the Asian-Pacific region since 1997, with Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and/or Coxsackievirus A16 (CAV16) as the main causative agents. Despite the close genetic relationship between the two viruses, only EV71 is associated with severe clinical manifestations and deaths. Effective antiviral treatment and vaccines are not available. High-quality monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are necessary to improve the accuracy of the diagnosis of EV71. In this study, a mAb (designated 1D9) was generated using EV71 C5 strain virus particles as immunogens. Examined by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blotting, 1D9 detected successfully all 11 subgenotypes of EV71 and showed no cross-reactivity to the four selected subgenogroups of Coxsackieviruses CAV4, CAV6, CAV10, and CAV16. A linear motif, R(3) VADVI(8), which is located at the N-terminus of the EV71 VP1 protein, was identified as the minimal binding region of 1D9. Alignment and comparison of the 1D9-defined epitope sequence against the listed sequences in the NCBI EV71 database indicated that this epitope R(3) VADVI(8) was highly conserved among EV71 strains, while no significant similarity was observed when blasted against the Coxsackieviruses. This suggests that the mAb 1D9 may be useful for the development of a cost-effective and accurate method for surveillance and early differentiation of EV71 from CAV16 infection.

  12. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies that recognize common epitopes located on O antigen of lipopolysaccharide of serotypes 1, 9 and 11 of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Barbosa, J I; Gutiérrez Martín, C B; Tascón, R I; González, O R; Mittal, K R; Rodríguez Ferri, E F

    1996-12-31

    Seven murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against serotype 1 of Actinobacillus (Haemophilus) pleuropneumoniae (reference strain Shope 4074) were produced and characterized. All hybridomas secreting mAbs were reactive with whole-cell antigens from reference strains of serotypes 1, 9 and 11, except for mAb 5D6 that failed to recognized serotype 9. They did not react with other taxonomically related Gram-negative organisms tested. The predominant isotype was immunoglobulin (Ig) M, although IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 were also obtained. The epitopes identified by these mAbs were resistant to proteinase K treatment and boiling in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and reducing conditions; however, they were sensitive to sodium periodate treatment. Enhanced chemiluminescence-immunodetection assay showed that mAbs could be divided in two groups according to the patterns of immunoreaction observed. Group 1 (mAbs 3E10, 4B7, 9H5 and 11C3) recognized a ladder-like banding profile consistent with the O antigen of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from smooth strains. Group II (mAbs 3B10 and 9H1) recognized a long smear of high molecular weight which ranged from 60 to 200 kDa. The mAbs were tested against 96 field isolates belonging to serotypes 1, 5, 9, 11 and 12, which had previously been classified by a combination of serological techniques based on polyclonal rabbit sera (counterimmunoelectrophoresis, immunodiffusion and coagglutination). The panel of mAbs identified all isolates of serotypes 9 and 11, but only 66% of those belonging to serotype 1. This may suggest the existence of antigenic heterogeneity among isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. These mAbs reacted with epitopes common to serotypes 1, 9 and 11 of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae which were located on the O antigen of LPS.

  13. Identification of the human melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan antigen epitope recognized by the antitumor monoclonal antibody 763.74 from a peptide phage library.

    PubMed

    Geiser, M; Schultz, D; Le Cardinal, A; Voshol, H; García-Echeverría, C

    1999-02-15

    To identify the epitope of the melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP) recognized by the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 763.74, we first expressed random DNA fragments obtained from the complete coding sequence of the MCSP core glycoproteins in phages and selected without success for binders to the murine mAb 763.74. We then used a library of random heptapeptides displayed at the surface of the filamentous M13 phage as fusion protein to the NH2-terminal portion of the minor coat protein III. After three rounds of selection on the bound mAb, several phages displaying related binding peptides were identified, yielding the consensus sequence Val-His-Leu-Asn-Tyr-Glu-His. Competitive ELISA experiments showed that this peptide can be specifically prevented from binding to mAb 763.74 by an anti-idiotypic MK2-23 mouse:human chimeric mAb and by A375 melanoma cells expressing the antigen MCSP. We screened the amino acid sequence of the MCSP molecule for a region of homology to the consensus sequence and found that the amino acid sequence Val-His-Ile-Asn-Ala-His spanning positions 289 and 294 has high homology. Synthetic linear peptides corresponding to the consensus sequence as well as to the MCSP-derived epitope inhibit the binding of mAb 763.74 to the phages displaying the consensus amino acid sequence. Finally, the biotinylated consensus peptide absorbed to streptavidin-microtiter plates can be used for the detection of mAb 763.74 in human serum. These results show clearly that the MCSP epitope defined by mAb 763.74 has been identified.

  14. Fluorometric titration approach for calibration of quantity of binding site of purified monoclonal antibody recognizing epitope/hapten nonfluorescent at 340 nm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaolan; Hu, Xiaolei; Xu, Bangtian; Wang, Xin; Qin, Jialin; He, Chenxiong; Xie, Yanling; Li, Yuanli; Liu, Lin; Liao, Fei

    2014-06-17

    A fluorometric titration approach was proposed for the calibration of the quantity of monoclonal antibody (mcAb) via the quench of fluorescence of tryptophan residues. It applied to purified mcAbs recognizing tryptophan-deficient epitopes, haptens nonfluorescent at 340 nm under the excitation at 280 nm, or fluorescent haptens bearing excitation valleys nearby 280 nm and excitation peaks nearby 340 nm to serve as Förster-resonance-energy-transfer (FRET) acceptors of tryptophan. Titration probes were epitopes/haptens themselves or conjugates of nonfluorescent haptens or tryptophan-deficient epitopes with FRET acceptors of tryptophan. Under the excitation at 280 nm, titration curves were recorded as fluorescence specific for the FRET acceptors or for mcAbs at 340 nm. To quantify the binding site of a mcAb, a universal model considering both static and dynamic quench by either type of probes was proposed for fitting to the titration curve. This was easy for fitting to fluorescence specific for the FRET acceptors but encountered nonconvergence for fitting to fluorescence of mcAbs at 340 nm. As a solution, (a) the maximum of the absolute values of first-order derivatives of a titration curve as fluorescence at 340 nm was estimated from the best-fit model for a probe level of zero, and (b) molar quantity of the binding site of the mcAb was estimated via consecutive fitting to the same titration curve by utilizing such a maximum as an approximate of the slope for linear response of fluorescence at 340 nm to quantities of the mcAb. This fluorometric titration approach was proved effective with one mcAb for six-histidine and another for penicillin G.

  15. A neutralizing monoclonal antibody previously mapped exclusively on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 recognizes an epitope in p17 sharing the core sequence IEEE.

    PubMed Central

    Buratti, E; Tisminetzky, S G; D'Agaro, P; Baralle, F E

    1997-01-01

    We report here that a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb 1575) mapped to the conserved putative intracellular region from amino acid residues 735 to 752 (735-752 region) of gp41 also recognizes a region in an extracellular portion of p17. Both epitopes have a core recognition sequence (IEEE) in a nonhomologous context. The IEEE motif found in HIV-1 p17 is located in a region known as HGP-30 (residues 86 to 115) which has been previously associated with virus neutralization, cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity, and mother-to-child transmission. An analysis of available gp41 and p17 sequences demonstrates that in these regions both IEEE sequences are highly conserved in different HIV-1 clades. The presence of the IEEE epitope in p17 allows us to explain some unexpected neutralizing characteristics of MAb 1575. In addition, the gp41 735-752 region has been previously reported both in intra- and extracellular locations. Our results suggest that the extracellular location was the result of cross-reactivity with p17. PMID:9032383

  16. The three members of the selectin receptor family recognize a common carbohydrate epitope, the sialyl Lewis(x) oligosaccharide

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The selectins (lectin-EGF-complement binding-cell adhesion molecules [LEC-CAMs]) are a family of mammalian receptors implicated in the initial interactions between leukocytes and vascular endothelia, leading to lymphocyte homing, platelet binding, and neutrophil extravasation. The three known selectins, L-selectin (leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 [LECAM-1]), E-selectin (endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 [ELAM-1]), and P-selectin (GMP-140) share structural features that include a calcium-dependent lectin domain. The sialyl Lewis(x) carbohydrate epitope has been reported as a ligand for both E- and P-selectins. Although L-selectin has been demonstrated to bind to carbohydrates, structural features of potential mammalian carbohydrate ligand(s) have not been well defined. Using an ELISA developed with a sialyl Lewis(x)-containing glycolipid and an E- selectin-IgG chimera, we have demonstrated the direct binding of the L- selectin-IgG chimera to sialyl Lewis(x). This recognition was calcium dependent, and could be blocked by Mel-14 antibody but not by other antibodies. Recognition was confirmed by the ability of cells expressing the native L-selectin to adhere to immobilized sialyl Lewis(x). These data suggest that the sialyl Lewis(x) oligosaccharide may form the basis of a recognition domain common to all three selectins. PMID:1374413

  17. Definition of Human Epitopes Recognized in Tetanus Toxoid and Development of an Assay Strategy to Detect Ex Vivo Tetanus CD4+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Antunes, Ricardo; Paul, Sinu; Sidney, John; Weiskopf, Daniela; Dan, Jennifer M.; Phillips, Elizabeth; Mallal, Simon; Crotty, Shane; Sette, Alessandro; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S.

    2017-01-01

    Despite widespread uses of tetanus toxoid (TT) as a vaccine, model antigen and protein carrier, TT epitopes have been poorly characterized. Herein we defined the human CD4+ T cell epitope repertoire by reevaluation of previously described epitopes and evaluation of those derived from prediction of HLA Class II binding. Forty-seven epitopes were identified following in vitro TT stimulation, with 28 epitopes accounting for 90% of the total response. Despite this diverse range of epitopes, individual responses were associated with only a few immunodominant epitopes, with each donor responding on average to 3 epitopes. For the top 14 epitopes, HLA restriction could be inferred based on HLA typing of the responding donors. HLA binding predictions re-identified the vast majority of known epitopes, and identified 24 additional novel epitopes. With these epitopes, we created a TT epitope pool, which allowed us to characterize TT responses directly ex vivo using a cytokine-independent Activation Induced Marker (AIM) assay. These TT responses were highly Th1 or Th2 polarized, which was dependent upon the original priming vaccine, either the cellular DTwP or acellular DTaP formulation. This polarization remained despite the original priming having occurred decades past and a recent booster immunization with a reduced acellular vaccine formulation. While TT responses following booster vaccination were not durably increased in magnitude, they were associated with a relative expansion of CD4+ effector memory T cells. PMID:28081174

  18. The Thai phase III trial (RV144) vaccine regimen induces T cell responses that preferentially target epitopes within the V2 region of HIV-1 envelope.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Mark S; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Chuenarom, Weerawan; Schuetz, Alexandra; Chantakulkij, Somsak; Nuntapinit, Bessara; Valencia-Micolta, Anais; Thelian, Doris; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Paris, Robert M; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Michael, Nelson L; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Mathieson, Bonnie; Marovich, Mary; Currier, Jeffrey R; Kim, Jerome H

    2012-05-15

    The Thai HIV phase III prime/boost vaccine trial (RV144) using ALVAC-HIV (vCP1521) and AIDSVAX B/E was, to our knowledge, the first to demonstrate acquisition efficacy. Vaccine-induced, cell-mediated immune responses were assessed. T cell epitope mapping studies using IFN-γ ELISPOT was performed on PBMCs from HIV-1-uninfected vaccine (n = 61) and placebo (n = 10) recipients using HIV-1 Env peptides. Positive responses were measured in 25 (41%) vaccinees and were predominantly CD4(+) T cell-mediated. Responses were targeted within the HIV Env region, with 15 of 25 (60%) of vaccinees recognizing peptides derived from the V2 region of HIV-1 Env, which includes the α(4)β(7) integrin binding site. Intracellular cytokine staining confirmed that Env responses predominated (19 of 30; 63% of vaccine recipients) and were mediated by polyfunctional effector memory CD4(+) T cells, with the majority of responders producing both IL-2 and IFN-γ (12 of 19; 63%). HIV Env Ab titers were higher in subjects with IL-2 compared with those without IL-2-secreting HIV Env-specific effector memory T cells. Proliferation assays revealed that HIV Ag-specific T cells were CD4(+), with the majority (80%) expressing CD107a. HIV-specific T cell lines obtained from vaccine recipients confirmed V2 specificity, polyfunctionality, and functional cytolytic capacity. Although the RV144 T cell responses were modest in frequency compared with humoral immune responses, the CD4(+) T cell response was directed to HIV-1 Env and more particularly the V2 region.

  19. Exclusion of two major areas on thyroid peroxidase from the immunodominant region containing the conformational epitopes recognized by human autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, T; Rapoport, B; McLachlan, S M

    1994-12-01

    We have used a chimeric molecule between thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) as well as new information on the three-dimensional structure of MPO to refine further our understanding of the location of the TPO-immunodominant region recognized by TPO autoantibodies in patients' sera. In TPO-MPO chimera A, the amino-terminal 146 amino acids of MPO substitute for the amino-terminal 121 amino acids of TPO. We performed fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis of Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing TPO-MPO-A on their surface using four monoclonal human autoantibody F(ab) (WR1.7, TR1.8, TR1.9, and SP1.4) that define the immunodominant region. All four F(ab) recognized the TPO-MPO-A chimeric molecule to the same extent. In a second approach to refine the location on the TPO-immunodominant region, we compared the ability of the TPO autoantibody F(ab) to inhibit the binding of serum autoantibodies to the monomeric and dimeric forms of human TPO. The F(ab) inhibited equally (approximately 80%) the binding to the TPO monomer and dimer by autoantibodies in the sera of six individual patients. The present observations exclude two major regions of TPO from the autoantibody-immunodominant region, namely the amino-terminal 121 amino acids of the TPO extracellular domain and the contact region between the two TPO monomers. These findings together with previous data on the Mab47/C21 region of TPO and the recently elucidated 3-dimensional structure of highly homologous MPO, narrow, by a process of exclusion, the site on TPO comprising the immunodominant region. The data provide further support for the thesis, still controversial, that the majority of TPO autoantibodies recognize the native molecule.

  20. Definition of the region on NS3 which contains multiple epitopes recognized by dengue virus serotype-cross-reactive and flavivirus-cross-reactive, HLA-DPw2-restricted CD4+ T cell clones.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Y; Kurane, I; Leporati, A M; Ennis, F A

    1998-04-01

    The epitopes recognized by six CD4+ CD8- cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones established from a dengue-3 virus-immune donor were defined. (i) Three CTL clones, JK10, JK34 and JK39, were cross-reactive for dengue virus types 1-4. (ii) One clone, JK28, was cross-reactive for dengue virus types 1-4 and West Nile virus. (iii) Two clones, JK26 and JK49, were cross-reactive for dengue virus types 1-4, West Nile virus and yellow fever virus. The clones, except for JK49, recognized the same epitope on NS3 in an HLA-DPw2-restricted fashion. The smallest synthetic peptide recognized by the five CTL clones was a 10 aa peptide which comprises aa 255-264 on dengue virus NS3. JK49 recognized the overlapping epitope which comprises aa 257-266 in an HLA-DPw2-restricted fashion. Analysis of T cell receptor (TCR) usage by these T cell clones revealed that (i) JK10 and JK34 use V alpha11, and JK34 and JK28 use V beta23, and (ii) the amino acid sequences of the V(D)J junctional region of the TCR were different among these five CTL clones. There were, however, single amino acid conservations among TCRs of some of these T cell clones. These results indicate that the region on NS3 which comprises aa 255-266 contains multiple epitopes recognized by dengue serotype-cross-reactive and flavivirus-cross-reactive CD4+ CTL in an HLA-DPw2-restricted fashion and that a single epitope can be recognized by T cells which have heterogeneous virus specificities.

  1. New high affinity monoclonal antibodies recognize non-overlapping epitopes on mesothelin for monitoring and treating mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Phung, Yen; Gao, Wei; Kawa, Seiji; Hassan, Raffit; Pastan, Ira; Ho, Mitchell

    2015-05-21

    Mesothelin is an emerging cell surface target in mesothelioma and other solid tumors. Most antibody drug candidates recognize highly immunogenic Region I (296-390) on mesothelin. Here, we report a group of high-affinity non-Region I rabbit monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies do not compete for mesothelin binding with the immunotoxin SS1P that binds Region I of mesothelin. One pair of antibodies (YP218 and YP223) is suitable to detect soluble mesothelin in a sandwich ELISA with high sensitivity. The new assay can also be used to measure serum mesothelin concentration in mesothelioma patients, indicating its potential use for monitoring patients treated with current antibody therapies targeting Region I. The antibodies are highly specific and sensitive in immunostaining of mesothelioma. To explore their use in tumor therapy, we have generated the immunotoxins based on the Fv of these antibodies. One immunotoxin (YP218 Fv-PE38) exhibits potent anti-tumor cytotoxicity towards primary mesothelioma cell lines in vitro and an NCI-H226 xenograft tumor in mice. Furthermore, we have engineered a humanized YP218 Fv that retains full binding affinity for mesothelin-expressing cancer cells. In conclusion, with their unique binding properties, these antibodies may be promising candidates for monitoring and treating mesothelioma and other mesothelin-expressing cancers.

  2. Autoantibody germ-line gene segment encodes V{sub H} and V{sub L} regions of a human anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibody recognizing streptococcal M protein and human cardiac myosin epitopes

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, A.; Cunningham, M.W.; Adderson, E.E.

    1995-04-15

    Cross-reactivity of anti-streptococcal Abs with human cardiac myosin may result in sequelae following group A streptococcal infections. Molecular mimicry between group A streptococcal M protein and cardiac myosin may be the basis for the immunologic cross-reactivity. In this study, a cross-reactive human anti-streptococcal/antimyosin mAb (10.2.3) was characterized, and the myosin epitopes were recognized by the Ab identified. mAb 10.2.3 reacted with four peptides from the light meromyosin (LMM) tail fragment of human cardiac myosin, including LMM-10 (1411-1428), LMM-23 (1580-1597), LMM-27 (1632-1649), and LMM-30 (1671-1687). Only LMM-30 inhibited binding of mAb 10.2.3 to streptococcal M protein and human cardiac myosin. Human mAb 10.2.3 labeled cytoskeletal structures within rat heart cells in indirect immunofluorescence, and reacted with group A streptococci expressing various M protein serotypes, PepM5, and recombinant M protein. The nucleotide sequence of gene segments encoding the Ig heavy and light chain V region of mAb 10.2.3 was determined. The light chain V segment was encoded by a VK1 gene segment that was 98.5% identical with germ-line gene humig{sub K}Vi5. The V segment of the heavy chain was encoded by a V{sub H}3a gene segment that differed from the V{sub H}26 germ-line gene by a single base change. V{sub H}26 is expressed preferentially in early development and encodes autoantibodies with anti-DNA and rheumatoid factor specificities. Anti-streptococcal mAb 10.2.3 is an autoantibody encoded by V{sub H} and V{sub L} genes, with little or no somatic mutation. 63 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Identification of Two New HLA-A*1101-Restricted Tax Epitopes Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in an Adult T-Cell Leukemia Patient after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Harashima, Nanae; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Shimizu, Yukiko; Kurihara, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Takao; Okamura, Jun; Kannagi, Mari

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that Tax-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), directed to single epitopes restricted by HLA-A2 or A24, expanded in vitro and in vivo in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from some adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) patients after but not before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Here, we demonstrated similar Tax-specific CTL expansion in PBMC from another post-HSCT ATL patient without HLA-A2 or A24, whose CTLs equally recognized two newly identified epitopes, Tax88-96 and Tax272-280, restricted by HLA-A11, suggesting that these immunodominant Tax epitopes are present in the ATL patient in vivo. PMID:16014972

  4. Identification of two new HLA-A*1101-restricted tax epitopes recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes in an adult T-cell leukemia patient after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Harashima, Nanae; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Shimizu, Yukiko; Kurihara, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Takao; Okamura, Jun; Kannagi, Mari

    2005-08-01

    We previously reported that Tax-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), directed to single epitopes restricted by HLA-A2 or A24, expanded in vitro and in vivo in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from some adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) patients after but not before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Here, we demonstrated similar Tax-specific CTL expansion in PBMC from another post-HSCT ATL patient without HLA-A2 or A24, whose CTLs equally recognized two newly identified epitopes, Tax88-96 and Tax272-280, restricted by HLA-A11, suggesting that these immunodominant Tax epitopes are present in the ATL patient in vivo.

  5. Three novel NY-ESO-1 epitopes bound to DRB1*0803, DQB1*0401 and DRB1*0901 recognized by CD4 T cells from CHP-NY-ESO-1-vaccinated patients.

    PubMed

    Mizote, Yu; Taniguchi, Taku; Tanaka, Kei; Isobe, Midori; Wada, Hisashi; Saika, Takashi; Kita, Shoichi; Koide, Yukari; Uenaka, Akiko; Nakayama, Eiichi

    2010-07-19

    Three novel NY-ESO-1 CD4 T cell epitopes were identified using PBMC obtained from patients who were vaccinated with a complex of cholesterol-bearing hydrophobized pullulan (CHP) and NY-ESO-1 protein (CHP-NY-ESO-1). The restriction molecules were determined by antibody blocking and using various EBV-B cells with different HLA alleles as APC to present peptides to CD4 T cells. The minimal epitope peptides were determined using various N- and C-termini truncated peptides deduced from 18-mer overlapping peptides originally identified for recognition. Those epitopes were DRB1*0901-restricted NY-ESO-1 87-100, DQB1*0401-restricted NY-ESO-1 95-107 and DRB1*0803-restricted NY-ESO-1 124-134. CD4 T cells used to determine those epitope peptides recognized EBV-B cells or DC that were treated with recombinant NY-ESO-1 protein or NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cell lysate, suggesting that the epitope peptides are naturally processed. These CD4 T cells showed a cytokine profile with Th1 characteristics. Furthermore, NY-ESO-1 87-100 peptide/HLA-DRB1*0901 tetramer staining was observed. Multiple Th1-type CD4 T cell responses are beneficial for inducing effective anti-tumor responses after NY-ESO-1 protein vaccination.

  6. Mapping of an epitope recognized by a neutralizing monoclonal antibody specific to toxin Cn2 from the scorpion Centruroides noxius, using discontinuous synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Calderon-Aranda, E S; Selisko, B; York, E J; Gurrola, G B; Stewart, J M; Possani, L D

    1999-09-01

    The Na+-channel-affecting toxin Cn2 represents the major and one of the most toxic components of the venom of the Mexican scorpion Centruroides noxius Hoffmann. A monoclonal antibody BCF2 raised against Cn2 has been shown previously to be able to neutralize the toxic effect of Cn2 and of the whole venom of C. noxius. In the present study the epitope was mapped to a surface region comprising the N- and C-terminal segments of Cn2, using continuous and discontinuous synthetic peptides, designed on the basis of the sequence and a three-dimensional model of Cn2. The study of peptides of varying length resulted in the identification of segments 5-14 and 56-65 containing residues essential for recognition by BCF2. The peptide (abbreviated SP7) with the highest affinity to BCF2 (IC50 = 5.1 microM) was a synthetic heterodimer comprising the amino acid sequence from position 3-15 (amidated) of Cn2, bridged by disulfide to peptide from position 54-66, acetylated and amidated. Similar affinity was found with peptide SP1 [heterodimer comprising residues 1-14 (amidated) of Cn2, bridged with synthetic peptide 52-66 (acetylated)]. SP1 and SP7 were used to induce anti-peptide antibodies in mouse and rabbit. Both peptides were highly immunogenic. The sera obtained were able to recognize Cn2 and to neutralize Cn2 in vitro. The most efficient protection (8.3 microgram Cn2 neutralized per mL of serum) was induced by rabbit anti-SP1 serum.

  7. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-mediating antibodies from an HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial target multiple epitopes and preferentially use the VH1 gene family.

    PubMed

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Pollara, Justin; Moody, M Anthony; Alpert, Michael D; Chen, Xi; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Gilbert, Peter B; Huang, Ying; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Kozink, Daniel M; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Lewis, George K; DeVico, Anthony; Evans, David T; Ferrari, Guido; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F

    2012-11-01

    The ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX-B/E RV144 vaccine trial showed an estimated efficacy of 31%. RV144 secondary immune correlate analysis demonstrated that the combination of low plasma anti-HIV-1 Env IgA antibodies and high levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) inversely correlate with infection risk. One hypothesis is that the observed protection in RV144 is partially due to ADCC-mediating antibodies. We found that the majority (73 to 90%) of a representative group of vaccinees displayed plasma ADCC activity, usually (96.2%) blocked by competition with the C1 region-specific A32 Fab fragment. Using memory B-cell cultures and antigen-specific B-cell sorting, we isolated 23 ADCC-mediating nonclonally related antibodies from 6 vaccine recipients. These antibodies targeted A32-blockable conformational epitopes (n = 19), a non-A32-blockable conformational epitope (n = 1), and the gp120 Env variable loops (n = 3). Fourteen antibodies mediated cross-clade target cell killing. ADCC-mediating antibodies displayed modest levels of V-heavy (VH) chain somatic mutation (0.5 to 1.5%) and also displayed a disproportionate usage of VH1 family genes (74%), a phenomenon recently described for CD4-binding site broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Maximal ADCC activity of VH1 antibodies correlated with mutation frequency. The polyclonality and low mutation frequency of these VH1 antibodies reveal fundamental differences in the regulation and maturation of these ADCC-mediating responses compared to VH1 bNAbs.

  8. A human monoclonal antibody derived from a vaccinated volunteer recognizes heterosubtypically a novel epitope on the hemagglutinin globular head of H1 and H9 influenza A viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Panthong, Sumolrat; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Phuygun, Siripaporn; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya; Prachasupap, Apichai; Yasugi, Mayo; Ono, Ken-ichiro; and others

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • A human monoclonal antibody against influenza virus was produced from a volunteer. • The antibody was generated from the PBMCs of the volunteer using the fusion method. • The antibody neutralized heterosubtypically group 1 influenza A viruses (H1 and H9). • The antibody targeted a novel epitope in globular head region of the hemagglutinin. • Sequences of the identified epitope are highly conserved among H1 and H9 subtypes. - Abstract: Most neutralizing antibodies elicited during influenza virus infection or by vaccination have a narrow spectrum because they usually target variable epitopes in the globular head region of hemagglutinin (HA). In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), 5D7, that was prepared from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a vaccinated volunteer using the fusion method. The HuMAb heterosubtypically neutralizes group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H9N2, with a strong hemagglutinin inhibition activity. Selection of an escape mutant showed that the HuMAb targets a novel conformational epitope that is located in the HA head region but is distinct from the receptor binding site. Furthermore, Phe114Ile substitution in the epitope made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAb. Amino acid residues in the predicted epitope region are also highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1 and H9N2. The HuMAb reported here may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies against H1 and H9 influenza viruses.

  9. Investigation of the solid- and solution-phase binding reactivities of continuous epitopes recognized by polyclonal guinea-pig anti-recombinant bovine growth hormone antisera.

    PubMed

    Beattie, J

    1992-09-01

    We have used the technique of multiple pin peptide synthesis to identify three major continuous epitopes in the recombinant bovine (rb) GH molecule. We have synthesized these peptides, residues 24-40, 139-152 and 179-189, as N-terminally acetylated, C-terminal amides and confirmed their reactivity in a standard solid-phase ELISA. Subsequently, for epitope 139-152, we have synthesized a peptide affinity column and used this to isolate antibodies with this epitope specificity from whole antiserum. In addition, we demonstrate that under native conditions in a liquid phase RIA, these antibodies will precipitate [125I]rbGH. Further, peptide 139-152 itself also cross-reacts in an rbGH RIA inhibiting binding by up to 20%. Our data suggest that during the immune response to rbGH in guinea-pigs a substantial part of the B-cell response is directed to the 139-152 region and that this part of the protein is a native epitope.

  10. Autoantigenic epitopes of the B and D polypeptides of the U1 snRNP. Analysis of domains recognized by the Y12 monoclonal anti-Sm antibody and by patient sera.

    PubMed

    Hirakata, M; Craft, J; Hardin, J A

    1993-04-15

    Anti-Sm antibodies, a specific marker for SLE, are directed against the B'/B and D polypeptides of Sm small nuclear ribonucleoproteins. The Y12 monoclonal anti-Sm antibody (Y12 mAb), as well as many anti-Sm patient sera, recognize cross-reactive epitopes on the B'/B and D polypeptides. This immunoreactive site is of special interest since polypeptides B and D share little amino acid sequence homology. In the present study, we have sought to establish the autoantigenic domain of polypeptides B and D that accounts for this epitope. We tested the ability of the Y12 mAb and anti-Sm sera to immunoprecipitate truncated forms of polypeptides B and D translated in vitro from mRNA bearing 5' and 3' end deletions. Most anti-Sm sera bound epitopes at the carboxyl-terminus of polypeptide B, however, autoantigenic epitopes were also found at the amino-terminus (amino acids 1 to 83 and 104 to 115). Surprisingly, the Y12 mAb recognized nonoverlapping amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal halves of polypeptide B. One putative Y12 mAb binding site (amino acids 104 to 115) indicated by carboxyl-terminal deletion studies was confirmed through recognition of a corresponding synthetic peptide. Deletion studies with polypeptide D demonstrated a major autoantigenic domain on the carboxyl-terminus (amino acids 85 to 119) that was necessary for recognition by the Y12 mAb and by 7/14 patient sera. These results indicate that a cross-reactive epitope on B'/B and D, as defined by the Y12 mAb, resides on at least two different domains of polypeptide B and localizes to the carboxyl-terminus of polypeptide D. From the shared homology of truncated forms of B and D polypeptides recognizable with the Y12 mAb, we suspect that some form of GRG motif is involved in developing the Y12 mAb epitope that may involve other residues and be largely conformational in nature.

  11. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope.

  12. Type 1 Diabetes at-risk children highly recognize Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis epitopes homologous to human Znt8 and Proinsulin

    PubMed Central

    Niegowska, Magdalena; Rapini, Novella; Piccinini, Simona; Mameli, Giuseppe; Caggiu, Elisa; Manca Bitti, Maria Luisa; Sechi, Leonardo A.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) has been previously associated to T1D as a putative environmental agent triggering or accelerating the disease in Sardinian and Italian populations. Our aim was to investigate the role of MAP in T1D development by evaluating levels of antibodies directed against MAP epitopes and their human homologs corresponding to ZnT8 and proinsulin (PI) in 54 T1D at-risk children from mainland Italy and 42 healthy controls (HCs). A higher prevalence was detected for MAP/ZnT8 pairs (62,96% T1D vs. 7,14% HCs; p < 0.0001) compared to MAP/PI epitopes (22,22% T1D vs. 9,52% HCs) and decreasing trends were observed upon time-point analyses for most peptides. Similarly, classical ZnT8 Abs and GADA decreased in a time-dependent manner, whereas IAA titers increased by 12%. Responses in 0–9 year-old children were stronger than in 10–18 age group (75% vs. 69,1%; p < 0.04). Younger age, female sex and concomitant autoimmune disorders contributed to a stronger seroreactivity suggesting a possible implication of MAP in multiple autoimmune syndrome. Cross-reactivity of the homologous epitopes was reflected by a high correlation coefficient (r2 > 0.8) and a pairwise overlap of positivity (>83% for MAP/ZnT8). PMID:26923214

  13. Conservation of Babesia bovis small heat shock protein (Hsp20) among strains and definition of T helper cell epitopes recognized by cattle with diverse major histocompatibility complex class II haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Norimine, Junzo; Mosqueda, Juan; Palmer, Guy H; Lewin, Harris A; Brown, Wendy C

    2004-02-01

    Babesia bovis small heat shock protein (Hsp20) is recognized by CD4+ T lymphocytes from cattle that have recovered from infection and are immune to challenge. This candidate vaccine antigen is related to a protective antigen of Toxoplasma gondii, Hsp30/bag1, and both are members of the alpha-crystallin family of proteins that can serve as molecular chaperones. In the present study, immunofluorescence microscopy determined that Hsp20 is expressed intracellularly in all merozoites. Importantly, Hsp20 is also expressed by tick larval stages, including sporozoites, so that natural tick-transmitted infection could boost a vaccine-induced response. The predicted amino acid sequence of Hsp20 from merozoites is completely conserved among different B. bovis strains. To define the location of CD4+ T-cell epitopes for inclusion in a multiepitope peptide or minigene vaccine construct, truncated recombinant Hsp20 proteins and overlapping peptides were tested for their ability to stimulate T cells from immune cattle. Both amino-terminal (amino acids [aa] 1 to 105) and carboxy-terminal (aa 48 to 177) regions were immunogenic for the majority of cattle in the study, stimulating strong proliferation and IFN-gamma production. T-cell lines from all individuals with distinct DRB3 haplotypes responded to aa 11 to 62 of Hsp20, which contained one or more immunodominant epitopes for each animal. One epitope, DEQTGLPIKS (aa 17 to 26), was identified by T-cell clones. The presence of strain-conserved T helper cell epitopes in aa 11 to 62 of the ubiquitously expressed Hsp20 that are presented by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules represented broadly in the Holstein breed supports the inclusion of this region in vaccine constructs to be tested in cattle.

  14. Humans differ from other hominids in lacking an activating NK cell receptor that recognizes the C1 epitope of MHC class I.

    PubMed

    Moesta, Achim K; Graef, Thorsten; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Older Aguilar, Anastazia M; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Parham, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Modulation of human NK cell function by killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR) and MHC class I is dominated by the bipartite interactions of inhibitory lineage III KIR with the C1 and C2 epitopes of HLA-C. In comparison, the ligand specificities and functional contributions of the activating lineage III KIR remain poorly understood. Using a robust, sensitive assay of KIR binding and a representative panel of 95 HLA class I targets, we show that KIR2DS1 binds C2 with ~50% the avidity of KIR2DL1, whereas KIR2DS2, KIR2DS3, and KIR2DS5 have no detectable avidity for C1, C2, or any other HLA class I epitope. In contrast, the chimpanzee has activating C1- and C2-specific lineage III KIR with strong avidity, comparable to those of their paired inhibitory receptors. One variant of chimpanzee Pt-KIR3DS2, the activating C2-specific receptor, has the same avidity for C2 as does inhibitory Pt-KIR3DL4, and a second variant has ~73% the avidity. Chimpanzee Pt-KIR3DS6, the activating C1-specific receptor, has avidity for C1 that is ~70% that of inhibitory Pt-KIR2DL6. In both humans and chimpanzees we observe an evolutionary trend toward reducing the avidity of the activating C1- and C2-specific receptors through selective acquisition of attenuating substitutions. However, the extent of attenuation has been extreme in humans, as exemplified by KIR2DS2, an activating C1-specific receptor that has lost all detectable avidity for HLA class I. Supporting such elimination of activating C1-specific receptors as a uniquely human phenomenon is the presence of a high-avidity activating C1-specific receptor (Gg-KIR2DSa) in gorilla.

  15. A galactosyl(alpha 1-3)mannose epitope on phospholipids of Leishmania mexicana and L. braziliensis is recognized by trypanosomatid-infected human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Avila, J L; Rojas, M

    1990-01-01

    An immunoglobulin M antibody reactive with galactosyl(alpha 1-3)mannose [Gal(alpha 1-3)Man] residues present on phospholipids extracted from Leishmania mexicana and L. braziliensis was found to be present in high titer in the serum of every normal individual studied. Periodate oxidation, acid hydrolysis, or acetylation suppressed immunoreactivity, suggesting that an oligosaccharide chain was responsible for antibody binding. Interaction occurs only with alpha-Gal terminal residues, since treatment of purified glycophospholipids with alpha-galactosidase but not with beta-galactosidase abolished it. Antibody bound to galactosyl(alpha 1-3)galactose-linked synthetic antigens but did not bind to the same residues present in rabbit, rat, and guinea pig erythrocytes or in murine laminin. Antigen-antibody binding was strongly blocked with Gal(alpha 1-3)Man and Gal(beta 1-4)Man. These results plus inhibition studies with several oligosaccharides suggest that they are indeed different from antibodies against the galactosyl(alpha 1-3)galactose residue. Anti-Gal(alpha 1-3)Man antibody values were significantly elevated in 89% of patients with diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, 84% of patients with localized cutaneous leishmaniasis, 69% of patients with mucocutaneous leishmaniasis, and 44 and 62% of patients with Trypanosoma cruzi or T. rangeli infection, respectively, but not in patients with 15 other different infectious and inflammatory diseases. Anti-Gal(alpha 1-3)Man antibody readily absorbed to American Leishmania and Trypanosoma culture forms, suggesting a surface membrane localization of reactive epitope. Gal(alpha 1-3)Man-bearing glycophospholipid was easily extracted from American Leishmania promastigotes and T. cruzi trypomastigotes as well as from American Trypanosoma culture forms. The possibility that this antibody arises against parasitic glycophospholipid-linked Gal(alpha 1-3)Man terminal residues is proposed. PMID:1696285

  16. Characterization of murine monoclonal antibodies that recognize defined epitopes of pertussis toxin and neutralize its toxic effect on Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M J; Wehland, J; Timmis, K N; Raupach, B; Schmidt, M A

    1991-01-01

    Three murine monoclonal antibodies (MAb), E19, E205, and E251, raised against pertussis toxin reacted in Western blots (immunoblots) with the S1, S4, and S2-S3 subunits, respectively, and neutralized the Chinese hamster ovary cell-clustering activity of pertussis toxin. MAb E251 recognized a linear synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acids 107 to 120 of the S2 subunit, suggesting a role for this region in receptor binding. Images PMID:1718872

  17. Antigenicity and predefined specificities of the multi-epitope vaccine in candidate consisting of neutralizing epitope and mutated epitopes suggested a new way against HIV-1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Tian, H; Xiao, Y; Qin, L; Chen, Y H

    2001-12-01

    A seven-amino acid epitope GPGRAFY located inside the V3 loop on envelope protein gp120 of HIV-1 is the principal neutralizing epitope (PNE), and a subset of anti-V3 antibodies specific for this epitope show a broad range of neutralizing activity. But this epitope undergoes restricted mutation. In this study, three epitope peptides [C-(GPGRAFY)2, C-(GPGQTFY)2 and C-(GPGQAWY)2] that contain neutralizing epitope GPGRAFY and its two mutated epitope GPGQTFY and GPGQAWY, were synthesized and then conjugated to carrier protein KLH (keyhole limpet hemocyanin). the epitope-vaccines C-(GPGRAFY)2-KLH, C-(GPGQTFY)2-KLH and C-(GPGQAWY)2-KLH induced high levels of antibodies to three V3 loop peptides that contain these epitopes respectively, and the antibody response induced by each epitope-vaccine showed predefined epitope-specific. When these three epitope-peptides mixed together and conjugated to carrier protein, or conjugated to carrier protein separately and then mixed together, high levels of epitope-specific antibodies which respectively recognized these epitopes on V3 loop peptide and both mutated peptides all can be induced by both of them. In blotting assay, these epitope-specific antibodies all recognized the neutralizing epitope and mutated epitopes on peptides respectively. In addition, the reactivity of the antibodies with whole gp120 molecule which contained the epitope GPGRAFY was tested. Only the GPGRAFY-epitope-specific antibodies but not the other antibodies recognized the gp120 molecule. These results provide experimental evidence that the candidate multi-epitope-vaccine containing neutralizing epitope and mutated epitopes may bring new hope against viral mutation resulting in HIV-1 immune evasion and may be developed as an effective vaccine with a broad neutralizing activity against HIV-1 infection.

  18. The sclerostin-neutralizing antibody AbD09097 recognizes an epitope adjacent to sclerostin's binding site for the Wnt co-receptor LRP6

    PubMed Central

    Boschert, V.; Frisch, C.; Back, J. W.; van Pee, K.; Weidauer, S. E.; Muth, E.-M.; Schmieder, P.; Beerbaum, M.; Knappik, A.; Timmerman, P.

    2016-01-01

    The glycoprotein sclerostin has been identified as a negative regulator of bone growth. It exerts its function by interacting with the Wnt co-receptor LRP5/6, blocks the binding of Wnt factors and thereby inhibits Wnt signalling. Neutralizing anti-sclerostin antibodies are able to restore Wnt activity and enhance bone growth thereby presenting a new osteoanabolic therapy approach for diseases such as osteoporosis. We have generated various Fab antibodies against human and murine sclerostin using a phage display set-up. Biochemical analyses have identified one Fab developed against murine sclerostin, AbD09097 that efficiently neutralizes sclerostin's Wnt inhibitory activity. In vitro interaction analysis using sclerostin variants revealed that this neutralizing Fab binds to sclerostin's flexible second loop, which has been shown to harbour the LRP5/6 binding motif. Affinity maturation was then applied to AbD09097, providing a set of improved neutralizing Fab antibodies which particularly bind human sclerostin with enhanced affinity. Determining the crystal structure of AbD09097 provides first insights into how this antibody might recognize and neutralize sclerostin. Together with the structure–function relationship derived from affinity maturation these new data will foster the rational design of new and highly efficient anti-sclerostin antibodies for the therapy of bone loss diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27558933

  19. Subdominant/Cryptic CD8 T Cell Epitopes Contribute to Resistance against Experimental Infection with a Human Protozoan Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Mariana R.; Silveira, Eduardo L. V.; de Vasconcelos, José Ronnie C.; de Alencar, Bruna C. G.; Machado, Alexandre V.; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2011-01-01

    During adaptive immune response, pathogen-specific CD8+ T cells recognize preferentially a small number of epitopes, a phenomenon known as immunodominance. Its biological implications during natural or vaccine-induced immune responses are still unclear. Earlier, we have shown that during experimental infection, the human intracellular pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi restricts the repertoire of CD8+ T cells generating strong immunodominance. We hypothesized that this phenomenon could be a mechanism used by the parasite to reduce the breath and magnitude of the immune response, favoring parasitism, and thus that artificially broadening the T cell repertoire could favor the host. Here, we confirmed our previous observation by showing that CD8+ T cells of H-2a infected mice recognized a single epitope of an immunodominant antigen of the trans-sialidase super-family. In sharp contrast, CD8+ T cells from mice immunized with recombinant genetic vaccines (plasmid DNA and adenovirus) expressing this same T. cruzi antigen recognized, in addition to the immunodominant epitope, two other subdominant epitopes. This unexpected observation allowed us to test the protective role of the immune response to subdominant epitopes. This was accomplished by genetic vaccination of mice with mutated genes that did not express a functional immunodominant epitope. We found that these mice developed immune responses directed solely to the subdominant/cryptic CD8 T cell epitopes and a significant degree of protective immunity against infection mediated by CD8+ T cells. We concluded that artificially broadening the T cell repertoire contributes to host resistance against infection, a finding that has implications for the host-parasite relationship and vaccine development. PMID:21779365

  20. Recombinant multi-epitope vaccine induce predefined epitope-specific antibodies against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Liu, Zu-Qiang; Ding, Jian; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2002-11-01

    Monoclonal antibody 2F5 recognizing ELDKWA-epitope on HIV-1 gp41 has significant neutralization potency against 90% of the investigated viruses of African, Asia, American and European strains, but antibodies responses to ELDKWA-epitope in HIV-1 infected individuals were very low. Based on the epitope-vaccine strategy suggested by us, a recombinant glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein (GST-MELDKWAGELDKWAGELDKWAVDIGPGRAFYGPGRAFYGPGRAFY) as vaccine antigen containing three repeats of neutralizing epitope ELDKWA on gp41 and GPGRAFY on gp120 was designed and expressed in Escherichia coli. After vaccination course, the recombinant multi-epitope vaccine could induce high levels of predefined multi-epitope-specific antibodies in mice. These antibodies in sera could bind to both neutralizing epitopes on gp41 peptide, V3 loop peptide and recombinant soluble gp41 (aa539-684) in ELISA assay (antisera dilution: 1:1,600-25,600), while normal sera did not. Moreover, these antibodies in sera could recognize the CHO-WT cells which expressed HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein on the cell surfaces, indicating that the predefined epitope-specific antibodies could recognize natural envelope protein of HIV-1 though these antibodies were induced by recombinant multi-epitope-vaccine. These experimental results suggested a possible way to develop recombinant multi-epitope vaccine inducing multi-antiviral activities against HIV-1.

  1. Identification of frequently recognized dimorphic T-cell epitopes in plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein-1 in West and East Africans: lack of correlation of immune recognition and allelic prevalence.

    PubMed

    Lee, E A; Flanagan, K L; Odhiambo, K; Reece, W H; Potter, C; Bailey, R; Marsh, K; Pinder, M; Hill, A V; Plebanski, M

    2001-01-01

    The merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP1) is the most studied malaria blood-stage vaccine candidate. Lymphokines such as interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin 4 (IL-4) may mediate blood-stage specific protection. Here we identify Plasmodiumfalciparum MSP1 T-cell epitopes capable of rapid induction of IFN-gamma and/or IL-4 from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of East and West African donors. Both allelic forms of these novel MSP1 T-cell epitopes were stimulatory. An unusually high numbers of Gambian responders (> 80%) to these epitopes were observed, suggesting that MSPI reactivity may have been underestimated previously in this population. Surprisingly, IFN-gamma responses to allelic T-cell epitopes failed to correlate with differential antigenic exposure in The Gambia compared to Kenya. These results suggest an unexpected level of immunoregulation of IFN-gamma response with variable allelic T-cell reactivity independent of the level of antigenic exposure. Further analysis of the mechanisms determining this response pattern may be required if vaccines are to overcome this allelic reactivity bias in malaria-exposed populations.

  2. The Immune Epitope Database 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Vita, Randi; Zarebski, Laura; Greenbaum, Jason A.; Emami, Hussein; Hoof, Ilka; Salimi, Nima; Damle, Rohini; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2010-01-01

    The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB, www.iedb.org) provides a catalog of experimentally characterized B and T cell epitopes, as well as data on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) binding and MHC ligand elution experiments. The database represents the molecular structures recognized by adaptive immune receptors and the experimental contexts in which these molecules were determined to be immune epitopes. Epitopes recognized in humans, nonhuman primates, rodents, pigs, cats and all other tested species are included. Both positive and negative experimental results are captured. Over the course of 4 years, the data from 180 978 experiments were curated manually from the literature, which covers ∼99% of all publicly available information on peptide epitopes mapped in infectious agents (excluding HIV) and 93% of those mapped in allergens. In addition, data that would otherwise be unavailable to the public from 129 186 experiments were submitted directly by investigators. The curation of epitopes related to autoimmunity is expected to be completed by the end of 2010. The database can be queried by epitope structure, source organism, MHC restriction, assay type or host organism, among other criteria. The database structure, as well as its querying, browsing and reporting interfaces, was completely redesigned for the IEDB 2.0 release, which became publicly available in early 2009. PMID:19906713

  3. B cell epitope spreading: mechanisms and contribution to autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cornaby, Caleb; Gibbons, Lauren; Mayhew, Vera; Sloan, Chad S; Welling, Andrew; Poole, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    While a variety of factors act to trigger or initiate autoimmune diseases, the process of epitope spreading is an important contributor in their development. Epitope spreading is a diversification of the epitopes recognized by the immune system. This process happens to both T and B cells, with this review focusing on B cells. Such spreading can progress among multiple epitopes on a single antigen, or from one antigenic molecule to another. Systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and other autoimmune diseases, are all influenced by intermolecular and intramolecular B cell epitope spreading. Endocytic processing, antigen presentation, and somatic hypermutation act as molecular mechanisms that assist in driving epitope spreading and broadening the immune response in autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of B cell epitope spreading with regard to autoimmunity, how it contributes during the progression of various autoimmune diseases, and treatment options available.

  4. Measles Virus Hemagglutinin Protein Epitopes: The Basis of Antigenic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Maino; Bürckert, Jean-Philippe; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; Muller, Claude P.; Takeda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Globally eliminating measles using available vaccines is biologically feasible because the measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin (H) protein is antigenically stable. The H protein is responsible for receptor binding, and is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. The immunodominant epitope, known as the hemagglutinating and noose epitope, is located near the receptor-binding site (RBS). The RBS also contains an immunodominant epitope. Loss of receptor binding correlates with an escape from the neutralization by antibodies that target the epitope at RBS. Another neutralizing epitope is located near RBS and is shielded by an N-linked sugar in certain genotype strains. However, human sera from vaccinees and measles patients neutralized all MV strains with similar efficiencies, regardless of the N-linked sugar modification or mutations at these epitopes. Two other major epitopes exist at a distance from RBS. One has an unstructured flexible domain with a linear neutralizing epitope. When MV-H forms a tetramer (dimer of dimers), these epitopes may form the dimer-dimer interface, and one of the two epitopes may also interact with the F protein. The neutralization mechanisms of antibodies that recognize these epitopes may involve inhibiting the H-F interaction or blocking the fusion cascade after MV-H binds to its receptors. PMID:27490564

  5. Heavy Chain-Only IgG2b Llama Antibody Effects Near-Pan HIV-1 Neutralization by Recognizing a CD4-Induced Epitope That Includes Elements of Coreceptor- and CD4-Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Luongo, Timothy S.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Matz, Julie; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Louder, Mark K.; Kessler, Pascal; Yang, Yongping; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Chen, Lei; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick; Martin, Loïc; Mascola, John R.

    2013-01-01

    The conserved HIV-1 site of coreceptor binding is protected from antibody-directed neutralization by conformational and steric restrictions. While inaccessible to most human antibodies, the coreceptor site has been shown to be accessed by antibody fragments. In this study, we used X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and pseudovirus neutralization to characterize the gp120-envelope glycoprotein recognition and HIV-1 neutralization of a heavy chain-only llama antibody, named JM4. We describe full-length IgG2b and IgG3 versions of JM4 that target the coreceptor-binding site and potently neutralize over 95% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. Contrary to established trends that show improved access to the coreceptor-binding region by smaller antibody fragments, the single-domain (VHH) version of JM4 neutralized less well than the full-length IgG2b version of JM4. The crystal structure at 2.1-Å resolution of VHH JM4 bound to HIV-1 YU2 gp120 stabilized in the CD4-bound state by the CD4-mimetic miniprotein, M48U1, revealed a JM4 epitope that combined regions of coreceptor recognition (including the gp120 bridging sheet, V3 loop, and β19 strand) with gp120 structural elements involved in recognition of CD4 such as the CD4-binding loop. The structure of JM4 with gp120 thus defines a novel CD4-induced site of vulnerability involving elements of both coreceptor- and CD4-binding sites. The potently neutralizing JM4 IgG2b antibody that targets this newly defined site of vulnerability adds to the expanding repertoire of broadly neutralizing antibodies that effectively neutralize HIV-1 and thereby potentially provides a new template for vaccine development and target for HIV-1 therapy. PMID:23843638

  6. Heavy chain-only IgG2b llama antibody effects near-pan HIV-1 neutralization by recognizing a CD4-induced epitope that includes elements of coreceptor- and CD4-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Priyamvada; Luongo, Timothy S; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Matz, Julie; Schmidt, Stephen D; Louder, Mark K; Kessler, Pascal; Yang, Yongping; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Chen, Lei; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick; Martin, Loïc; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D

    2013-09-01

    The conserved HIV-1 site of coreceptor binding is protected from antibody-directed neutralization by conformational and steric restrictions. While inaccessible to most human antibodies, the coreceptor site has been shown to be accessed by antibody fragments. In this study, we used X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and pseudovirus neutralization to characterize the gp120-envelope glycoprotein recognition and HIV-1 neutralization of a heavy chain-only llama antibody, named JM4. We describe full-length IgG2b and IgG3 versions of JM4 that target the coreceptor-binding site and potently neutralize over 95% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. Contrary to established trends that show improved access to the coreceptor-binding region by smaller antibody fragments, the single-domain (VHH) version of JM4 neutralized less well than the full-length IgG2b version of JM4. The crystal structure at 2.1-Å resolution of VHH JM4 bound to HIV-1 YU2 gp120 stabilized in the CD4-bound state by the CD4-mimetic miniprotein, M48U1, revealed a JM4 epitope that combined regions of coreceptor recognition (including the gp120 bridging sheet, V3 loop, and β19 strand) with gp120 structural elements involved in recognition of CD4 such as the CD4-binding loop. The structure of JM4 with gp120 thus defines a novel CD4-induced site of vulnerability involving elements of both coreceptor- and CD4-binding sites. The potently neutralizing JM4 IgG2b antibody that targets this newly defined site of vulnerability adds to the expanding repertoire of broadly neutralizing antibodies that effectively neutralize HIV-1 and thereby potentially provides a new template for vaccine development and target for HIV-1 therapy.

  7. Novel monoclonal antibodies recognizing the active conformation of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Ise, Nobuyuki; Omi, Kazuya; Miwa, Kyoko; Honda, Hideo; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Goishi, Katsutoshi

    2010-04-09

    The precise regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is crucial for its function in cellular growth control. Although many antibodies against EGFR have been developed and used to analyze its regulation and function, it is not yet easy to analyze activated EGFR specifically. Activated EGFR has been mainly detected by its phosphorylation state using anti-phospho-EGFR and anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. In the present study, we have established novel monoclonal antibodies which recognize the activated EGFR independently of its phosphorylation. Our antibodies detected active state of EGFR in immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence, by recognizing the epitopes which are exposed through the conformational change induced by ligand-binding. Furthermore, we found that our antibodies preferentially detected the conformation of constitutively active EGFR mutants found in lung cancer cell lines. These results indicate that our antibodies may become novel research and diagnostic tools for detecting and analyzing the conformation of active EGFR in various cells and tissues.

  8. Reflections on HLA Epitope-Based Matching for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Duquesnoy, Rene J.

    2016-01-01

    HLA antibodies are primary causes of transplant rejection; they recognize epitopes that can be structurally defined by eplets. There are many reviews about HLA epitope-based matching in transplantation. This article describes some personal reflections about epitopes including a historical perspective of HLA typing at the antigen and allele levels, the repertoires of antibody-verified HLA epitopes, the use of HLAMatchmaker in determining the specificities of antibodies tested in different assays, and, finally, possible strategies to control HLA antibody responses. PMID:27965660

  9. Recognizing abuse.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, R; Newman-Giger, J

    1996-01-01

    After years as a taboo topic, abuse has come "out of the closet" and is being talked about openly in society. Yet, while abuse in the workplace is being confronted, abuse within families still often goes unrecognized by outsiders, including by nurses. Failure of nurses to recognize abuse is unfortunate since frequently they are the first point of contact with the victim of abuse in the emergency room, clinic and home. Understanding and insight into the problem of family violence by nurses is critical in addressing this problem. Knowledge is crucial in planning strategies that will have the long-lasting effect of decreasing the cycle of abuse in families.

  10. Immunogenicity and specificity of the candidate multi-epitope-vaccines against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Ding, J; Chen, Y H

    2001-11-01

    The failure of some candidate HIV-1 vaccines may result from inducing very weak neutralization activity against representative primary viral isolates. Based on our hypothesis that epitope-vaccine may be a new strategy to induce high levels of neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1, we designed two candidate multi-epitope-vaccines, EP1 [C-G-(ELDKWA-GPGRAFY)2-K] and EP2 (CG-GPGRAFY-G-ELDKWA-G-RILAVERYLKD), containing three neutralizing epitopes (GPGRAFY, ELDKWA and RILAVERYLKD) on HIV-1 envelope protein, and expected them to induce epitope-specific antibodies of predefined epitope-specificity. The two peptides were conjugated to carrier protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and used for immunization of rabbits. Proteins were purified from the rabbit sera induced by both candidate multi-epitope-vaccines (EP1-BSA and EP2-BSA) through affinity chromatography with epitope-peptide-conjugated sepharose-column, and identified as antibodies in silver-staining and immunoblotting. These antibodies were demonstrated to recognize three neutralizing epitopes on peptides and the recombinant gp41 in ELISA-assay and immunoblotting. These results indicated that both candidate multi-epitope-vaccines could induce high levels of antibodies of predefined epitope-specificity which recognized a few of neutralizing epitopes on peptides and protein, providing experimental evidence for the new strategy to develop an effective neutralizing-antibody-based multi-epitope-vaccine against HIV-1.

  11. Controlled CO preferential oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, M.A.; Hoch, M.M.

    1997-06-10

    Method is described for controlling the supply of air to a PROX (PReferential OXidation for CO cleanup) reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference there between correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference. 2 figs.

  12. Use of multiple peptides containing T cell epitopes is a feasible approach for peptide-based immunotherapy in Can f 1 allergy

    PubMed Central

    Immonen, Anu K; Taivainen, Antti H; Närvänen, Ale T O; Kinnunen, Tuure T; Saarelainen, Soili A; Rytkönen-Nissinen, Marja A; Virtanen, Tuomas I

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that the major dog allergen Can f 1 contains seven T cell epitope regions, none of which was preferentially recognized. To identify the immune characteristics of Can f 1 epitopes and to verify their suitability for peptide-based allergen immunotherapy, short-term T cell lines were generated with epitope-containing peptides from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Can f 1 skinprick test-positive allergic and healthy control subjects. The lines were examined for their proliferative capacity and cytokine production upon stimulation with the allergen peptide, a homologous peptide from human tear lipocalin (TL) and Can f 1 and TL proteins. Can f 1 peptides induced proliferation of T cells and gave rise to T cell lines with comparable efficiencies. In particular, the T cell lines of allergic subjects induced with p33–48 and p107–122 favoured the production of interferon-γ and interleukin-10, respectively. A greater number of Can f 1-specific T cell lines were generated from allergic than from healthy individuals. Two p107–122-induced Can f 1-specific T cell lines also reacted to a homologous peptide of human TL. Our results suggest that several T cell epitope-containing peptides should be used in combination for specific immunotherapy in Can f 1 allergy. PMID:17233739

  13. Extensive HLA class I allele promiscuity among viral CTL epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Frahm, Nicole; Yusim, Karina; Suscovich, Todd J.; Adams, Sharon; Sidney, John; Hraber, Peter; Hewitt, Hannah S.; Linde, Caitlyn H.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Woodberry, Tonia; Henry, Leah M.; Faircloth, Kellie; Listgarten, Jennifer; Kadie, Carl; Jojic, Nebojsa; Sango, Kaori; Brown, Nancy V.; Pae, Eunice; Zaman, M. Tauheed; Bihl, Florian; Khatri, Ashok; John, Mina; Mallal, Simon; Marincola, Francesco M.; Walker, Bruce D.; Sette, Alessandro; Heckerman, David; Korber, Bette T.; Brander, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Summary Promiscuous binding of T helper epitopes to MHC class II molecules has been well established, but few examples of promiscuous class I restricted epitopes exist. To address the extent of promiscuity of HLA class I peptides, responses to 242 well-defined viral epitopes were tested in 100 subjects regardless of the individuals’ HLA type. Surprisingly, half of all detected responses were seen in the absence of the originally reported restricting HLA class I allele, and only 3% of epitopes were recognized exclusively in the presence of their original allele. Functional assays confirmed the frequent recognition of HLA class I-restricted T cell epitopes on several alternative alleles across HLA class I supertypes and encoded on different class I loci. These data have significant implications for the understanding of MHC class I restricted antigen presentation and vaccine development. PMID:17705138

  14. Characterization of CTL Recognized Epitopes on Human Breast Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    restricted cytolytic T lymphocytes. J. Exp. Med. 184:121-130, 1996. 22. Weisberg, J. H., Curcio, M., Caron, P. C., Raghu, G., Mechetner, E. B., Roepe, P...liquid chromatography (HPLC). The MOvl8/MOvl9 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and purity of the peptides used in this study ranged be- appears to be restricted ...to ovarian cancer (10). Be- tween 92 and 95%. The purity and amino acid com- cause of its restricted expression, FBP is also ex- position of these

  15. Broad-Spectrum Inhibition of HIV-1 by a Monoclonal Antibody Directed against a gp120-Induced Epitope of CD4

    PubMed Central

    Burastero, Samuele E.; Frigerio, Barbara; Lopalco, Lucia; Sironi, Francesca; Breda, Daniela; Longhi, Renato; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Canevari, Silvana; Figini, Mariangela; Lusso, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    To penetrate susceptible cells, HIV-1 sequentially interacts with two highly conserved cellular receptors, CD4 and a chemokine receptor like CCR5 or CXCR4. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against such receptors are currently under clinical investigation as potential preventive or therapeutic agents. We immunized Balb/c mice with molecular complexes of the native, trimeric HIV-1 envelope (Env) bound to a soluble form of the human CD4 receptor. Sera from immunized mice were found to contain gp120-CD4 complex-enhanced antibodies and showed broad-spectrum HIV-1-inhibitory activity. A proportion of MAbs derived from these mice preferentially recognized complex-enhanced epitopes. In particular, a CD4-specific MAb designated DB81 (IgG1Κ) was found to preferentially bind to a complex-enhanced epitope on the D2 domain of human CD4. MAb DB81 also recognized chimpanzee CD4, but not baboon or macaque CD4, which exhibit sequence divergence in the D2 domain. Functionally, MAb DB81 displayed broad HIV-1-inhibitory activity, but it did not exert suppressive effects on T-cell activation in vitro. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains of MAb DB81 were sequenced. Due to its broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity and lack of immunosuppressive effects, a humanized derivative of MAb DB81 could provide a useful complement to current preventive or therapeutic strategies against HIV-1. PMID:21818294

  16. Epitope peptides and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soichi

    2007-02-01

    Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens, usually proteins or glycoproteins. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Because allergen-specific IgE antibodies are the main effector molecules in the immune response to allergens, many studies have focused on the identification of IgE-binding epitopes (called B cell epitopes), specific and minimum regions of allergen molecules that binds to IgE. Our initial studies have provided evidence that only four to five amino acid residues are enough to comprise an epitope, since pentapeptide QQQPP in wheat glutenin is minimally required for IgE binding. Afterwards, various kinds of B cell epitope structures have been clarified. Such information contributes greatly not only to the elucidation of the etiology of allergy, but also to the development of strategies for the treatment and prevention of allergy. Allergen-specific T cells also play an important role in allergy and are obvious targets for intervention in the disease. Currently, the principle approach is to modify B cell epitopes to prevent IgE binding while preserving T cell epitopes to retain the capacity for immunotherapy. There is mounting evidence that the administration of peptide(s) containing immunodominant T cell epitopes from an allergen can induce T cell nonresponsiveness (immunotherapy). There have been clinical studies of peptide immunotherapy performed, the most promising being for bee venom sensitivity. Clinical trials of immunotherapy for cat allergen peptide have also received attention. An alternative strategy for the generation of an effective but hypoallergenic preparation for immunotherapy is to modify T cell epitope peptides by, for example, single amino acid substitution. In this article, I will present an overview of epitopes related to allergic disease, particularly stress on

  17. HLA-A02:01-Restricted Epitopes Identified from the Herpes Simplex Virus Tegument Protein VP11/12 Preferentially Recall Polyfunctional Effector Memory CD8+ T Cells from Seropositive Asymptomatic Individuals and Protect “Humanized” HLA-A*02:01 Transgenic Mice Against Ocular Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Spencer, Doran; Vahed, Hawa; Lopes, Patricia P.; Thai, Nhi Thi Uyen; Wang, Christine; Pham, Thanh T.; Huang, Jiawei; Scarfone, Vanessa M.; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    The Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 virion tegument phosphoprotein 11/12 (HSV-1 VP11/12) is a major antigen targeted by CD8+ T cells from HSV-seropositive individuals. However, whether and which VP11/12-epitope-specific CD8+ T cells play a role in the “natural” protection seen in seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease) remain to be determined. In this study, we used multiple prediction computer-assisted algorithms to identify 10 potential HLA-A*02:01-restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes from the 716 amino acids sequence of VP11/12. Three out of ten epitopes exhibited high to moderate binding affinity to HLA-A*02:01 molecules. In ten sequentially studied HLA-A*02:01 positive and HSV-1-seropositive ASYMP individuals, the most frequent, robust and polyfunctional effector CD8+ T-cell responses, as assessed by a combination of tetramer frequency, granzyme B, granzyme K, perforin, CD107a/b cytotoxic degranulation, IFN-γ and multiplex cytokines assays, were predominantly directed against three epitopes: VP11/1266–74, VP11/12220–228 and VP11/12702–710. Interestingly, ASYMP individuals had significantly higher proportion of CD45RAlowCCR7lowCD44highCD62LlowCD27lowCD28lowCD8+ effector memory T cells (TEM) specific to the three epitopes, compared to symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent ocular herpetic disease). Moreover, immunization of HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mice with the three ASYMP CD8+ TEM cell epitopes induced robust and polyfunctional epitope-specific CD8+ TEM cells that were associated with a strong protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. Our findings outline phenotypic and functional features of protective HSV-specific CD8+ T cells that should guide the development of an effective T-cell-based herpes vaccine. PMID:25617474

  18. Human Asymptomatic Epitopes Identified from the Herpes Simplex Virus Tegument Protein VP13/14 (UL47) Preferentially Recall Polyfunctional Effector Memory CD44high CD62Llow CD8+ TEM Cells and Protect Humanized HLA-A*02:01 Transgenic Mice against Ocular Herpesvirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A; Garg, Sumit; Syed, Sabrina A; Furness, Julie N; Vahed, Hawa; Pham, Tiffany; Yu, Howard T; Nesburn, Anthony B; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2017-01-15

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection is widespread among humans. The HSV-1 virion protein 13/14 (VP13/14), also known as UL47, is a tegument antigen targeted by CD8(+) T cells from HSV-seropositive individuals. However, whether VP13/14-specific CD8(+) T cells play a role in the natural protection seen in asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (individuals who have never had a clinical herpetic disease) has not been elucidated. Using predictive computer-assisted algorithms, we identified 10 potential HLA-A*02:01-restricted CD8(+) T-cell epitopes from the 693-amino-acid sequence of the VP13/14 protein. Three out of 10 epitopes exhibited a high to moderate affinity of binding to soluble HLA-A*02:01 molecules. The phenotype and function of CD8(+) T cells specific for each epitope were compared in HLA-A*02:01-positive ASYMP individuals and symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (individuals who have frequent clinical herpetic diseases) using determination of a combination of tetramer frequency and the levels of granzyme B, granzyme K, perforin, gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-2 production and CD107(a/b) cytotoxic degranulation. High frequencies of multifunctional CD8(+) T cells directed against three epitopes, VP13/14 from amino acids 286 to 294 (VP13/14286-294), VP13/14 from amino acids 504 to 512 (VP13/14504-512), and VP13/14 from amino acids 544 to 552 (VP13/14544-552), were detected in ASYMP individuals, while only low frequencies were detected in SYMP individuals. The three epitopes also predominantly recalled more CD45RA(low) CD44(high) CCR7(low) CD62L(low) CD8(+) effector memory T cells (TEM cells) in ASYMP individuals than SYMP individuals. Moreover, immunization of HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mice with the three CD8(+) TEM-cell epitopes from ASYMP individuals induced robust and polyfunctional HSV-specific CD8(+) TEM cells associated with strong protective immunity against ocular herpesvirus infection and disease. Our findings outline the

  19. Controlled CO preferential oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, Mark A.; Hoch, Martin M.

    1997-01-01

    Method for controlling the supply of air to a PROX reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference therebetween correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference.

  20. Dissecting Antibodies with Regards to Linear and Conformational Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Forsström, Björn; Bisławska Axnäs, Barbara; Rockberg, Johan; Danielsson, Hanna; Bohlin, Anna; Uhlen, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    An important issue for the performance and specificity of an antibody is the nature of the binding to its protein target, including if the recognition involves linear or conformational epitopes. Here, we dissect polyclonal sera by creating epitope-specific antibody fractions using a combination of epitope mapping and an affinity capture approach involving both synthesized peptides and recombinant protein fragments. This allowed us to study the relative amounts of antibodies to linear and conformational epitopes in the polyclonal sera as well as the ability of each antibody-fraction to detect its target protein in Western blot assays. The majority of the analyzed polyclonal sera were found to have most of the target-specific antibodies directed towards linear epitopes and these were in many cases giving Western blot bands of correct molecular weight. In contrast, many of the antibodies towards conformational epitopes did not bind their target proteins in the Western blot assays. The results from this work have given us insights regarding the nature of the antibody response generated by immunization with recombinant protein fragments and has demonstrated the advantage of using antibodies recognizing linear epitopes for immunoassay involving wholly or partially denatured protein targets. PMID:25816293

  1. Identifying Novel B Cell Epitopes within Toxoplasma gondii GRA6

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanhua; Wang, Guangxiang; Cai, Jian Ping

    2016-01-01

    The study of antigenic epitopes from Toxoplasma gondii has not only enhanced our understanding of the structure and function of antigens, the reactions between antigens and antibodies, and many other aspects of immunology, but it also plays a significant role in the development of new diagnostic reagents and vaccines. In the present study, T. gondii GRA6 epitopes were identified using bioinformatics tools and a synthetic peptide technique. The potential B cell epitopes of GRA6 predicted by bioinformatics tools concentrated upon 3 regions of GRA6, 1-20 aa, 44-103 aa, and 172-221 aa. Ten shorter peptides from the 3 regions were synthesized and assessed by ELISA using pig sera from different time points after infection. Three of the 10 peptides (amino acids 44-63, 172-191, and 192-211) tested were recognized by all sera and determined to be immunodominant B-cell epitopes of GRA6. The results indicated that we precisely and accurately located the T. gondii GRA6 epitopes using pig sera collected at different time points after infection. The identified epitopes may be very useful for further studies of epitope-based vaccines and diagnostic reagents. PMID:27658594

  2. Poly-acetylated chromatin signatures are preferred epitopes for site-specific histone H4 acetyl antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rothbart, Scott B; Lin, Shu; Britton, Laura-Mae; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Keogh, Michael-C; Garcia, Benjamin A; Strahl, Brian D

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies specific for histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) have been central to our understanding of chromatin biology. Here, we describe an unexpected and novel property of histone H4 site-specific acetyl antibodies in that they prefer poly-acetylated histone substrates. By all current criteria, these antibodies have passed specificity standards. However, we find these site-specific histone antibodies preferentially recognize chromatin signatures containing two or more adjacent acetylated lysines. Significantly, we find that the poly-acetylated epitopes these antibodies prefer are evolutionarily conserved and are present at levels that compete for these antibodies over the intended individual acetylation sites. This alarming property of acetyl-specific antibodies has far-reaching implications for data interpretation and may present a challenge for the future study of acetylated histone and non-histone proteins.

  3. Targeting Non-classical Myelin Epitopes to Treat Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Jintao; Baylink, David J.; Li, Chih-Huang; Watts, Douglas M.; Xu, Yi; Qin, Xuezhong; Walter, Michael H.; Tang, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Qa-1 epitopes, the peptides that bind to non-classical major histocompatibility complex Ib Qa-1 molecules and are recognized by Qa-1-restricted CD8+ regulatory T (Treg) cells, have been identified in pathogenic autoimmune cells that attack myelin sheath in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model for multiple sclerosis [MS]). Additionally, immunization with such epitopes ameliorates the EAE. However, identification of such epitopes requires knowledge of the pathogenic autoimmune cells which are largely unknown in MS patients. Hence, we asked whether the CD8+ Treg cells could directly target the myelin sheath to ameliorate EAE. To address this question, we analyzed Qa-1 epitopes in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG that is a protein in myelin sheath). Here, we report identification of a MOG-specific Qa-1 epitope. Immunization with this epitope suppressed ongoing EAE, which was abrogated by CD8+ T cell depletion. Additionally, the epitope immunization activated the epitope-specific CD8+ T cells which specifically accumulated in the CNS-draining cervical lymph nodes. Finally, CD8+ T cells primed by the epitope immunization transferred EAE suppression. Hence, this study reveals a novel regulatory mechanism mediated by the CD8+ Treg cells. We propose that immunization with myelin-specific HLA-E epitopes (human homologues of Qa-1 epitopes) is a promising therapy for MS. PMID:27796368

  4. Vaccine focusing to cross-subtype HIV-1 gp120 variable loop epitopes.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Timothy; Wang, Shixia; Jiang, Xunqing; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Hioe, Catarina; Krachmarov, Chavdar

    2014-09-03

    We designed synthetic, epitope-focused immunogens that preferentially display individual neutralization epitopes targeted by cross-subtype anti-HIV V3 loop neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Vaccination of rabbits with these immunogens resulted in the elicitation of distinct polyclonal serum Abs that exhibit cross-subtype neutralization specificities mimicking the mAbs that guided the design. Our results prove the principle that a predictable range of epitope-specific polyclonal cross-subtype HIV-1 neutralizing Abs can be intentionally elicited in mammals by vaccination. The precise boundaries of the epitopes and conformational flexibility in the presentation of the epitopes in the immunogen appeared to be important for successful elicitation. This work may serve as a starting point for translating the activities of human broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs) into matched immunogens that can contribute to an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine.

  5. Mapping of an autoreactive epitope within glutamate decarboxylase using a diabetes-associated human monoclonal autoantibody and an epitope cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Richter, W; Northemann, W; Müller, M; Böhm, B O

    1996-04-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65) is a major autoantigen in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) and the neurological disorder Stiff-Man-Syndrome (SMS). We derived a human monoclonal autoantibody (MICA 2) from peripheral blood of a patient newly diagnosed with IDDM, which reacted with GAD65 in Western blots. This indicated that a linear epitope is recognized by MICA 2. Using an epitope cDNA library we mapped the MICA 2 epitope to a contiguous stretch of 26 amino acids (506-531) in the C-terminus of GAD65. Neither blocking experiments with synthetic peptides nor analysis of overlapping decapeptides expressed as fusion proteins allowed us to further narrow down the epitope to the typical size of linear epitopes of 6-8 amino acids. We suggest that a miniconformational epitope provided by amino acids 506-531 is recognized by MICA 2, which withstands SDS gel electrophoresis without destruction or partially refolds during the Western blot procedure. A sequence homology with human heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) maps to this region of GAD65 but no cross-reactivity of MICA 2 with HSP60 occurred. Our data demonstrate that reactivity of an antibody in Western blots does not necessarily define a classic linear epitope of 6-8 amino acids and describe a new autoreactive epitope in GAD65 different from those reported for sera from patients with SMS.

  6. Characterization of a cashew allergen, 11S globulin (Ana o 2), conformational epitope.

    PubMed

    Robotham, Jason M; Xia, Lixin; Willison, LeAnna N; Teuber, Suzanne S; Sathe, Shridhar K; Roux, Kenneth H

    2010-05-01

    Both linear and conformational epitopes likely contribute to the allergenicity of tree nut allergens, yet, due largely to technical issues, few conformational epitopes have been characterized. Using the well studied recombinant cashew allergen, Ana o 2, an 11S globulin or legumin, we identified a murine monoclonal antibody which recognizes a conformational epitope and competes with patient IgE Ana o 2-reactive antibodies. This epitope is expressed on the large subunit of Ana o 2, but only when associated with an 11S globulin small subunit. Both Ana o 2 and the homologous soybean Gly m 6 small subunits can foster epitope expression, even when the natural N-terminal to C-terminal subunit order is reversed in chimeric molecules. The epitope, which is also expressed on native Ana o 2, is readily susceptible to destruction by physical and chemical denaturants.

  7. Thyrotropin Receptor Epitope and Human Leukocyte Antigen in Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hidefumi; De Groot, Leslie J.; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease (GD) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major autoantigen in this condition. Since the extracellular domain of human TSHR (TSHR-ECD) is shed into the circulation, TSHR-ECD is a preferentially immunogenic portion of TSHR. Both genetic factors and environmental factors contribute to development of GD. Inheritance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, especially HLA-DR3, is associated with GD. TSHR-ECD protein is endocytosed into antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and processed to TSHR-ECD peptides. These peptide epitopes bind to HLA-class II molecules, and subsequently the complex of HLA-class II and TSHR-ECD epitope is presented to CD4+ T cells. The activated CD4+ T cells secrete cytokines/chemokines that stimulate B-cells to produce TSAb, and in turn hyperthyroidism occurs. Numerous studies have been done to identify T- and B-cell epitopes in TSHR-ECD, including (1) in silico, (2) in vitro, (3) in vivo, and (4) clinical experiments. Murine models of GD and HLA-transgenic mice have played a pivotal role in elucidating the immunological mechanisms. To date, linear or conformational epitopes of TSHR-ECD, as well as the molecular structure of the epitope-binding groove in HLA-DR, were reported to be related to the pathogenesis in GD. Dysfunction of central tolerance in the thymus, or in peripheral tolerance, such as regulatory T cells, could allow development of GD. Novel treatments using TSHR antagonists or mutated TSHR peptides have been reported to be effective. We review and update the role of immunogenic TSHR epitopes and HLA in GD, and offer perspectives on TSHR epitope specific treatments. PMID:27602020

  8. B cell epitope specificity in ANCA-associated vasculitis: does it matter?

    PubMed

    van der Geld, Y M; Stegeman, C A; Kallenberg, C G M

    2004-09-01

    Pauci-immune idiopathic small-vessel vasculitis is strongly associated with the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA). Antibodies to PR3 predominate in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis; antibodies to myeloperoxidase (MPO) are found more frequently in patients with microscopic polyangiitis. There is increasing in vivo and in vitro evidence for a pathogenic role of ANCA in systemic vasculitis based on associations of ANCA with disease activity. If ANCA are pathogenic, why is the course of disease different from one patient to another? Antibodies can recognize different binding sites (epitopes) on their corresponding antigens. Differences in binding specificity may influence the pathogenic potential of the antibodies. Differences between epitope specificity of ANCA between patients or changes in epitope specificity of ANCA in time in an individual patient may, accordingly, result in differences in disease expression. This review will focus on epitope specificity of autoantibodies in systemic autoimmune diseases and especially on the epitope specificity of PR3- and MPO-ANCA. We will discuss whether PR3-ANCA or MPO-ANCA recognize different epitopes on PR3 and MPO, respectively, and whether the epitopes recognized by ANCA change in parallel with the disease activity of ANCA-associated vasculitis. Finally, we will speculate if the direct pathogenic role of ANCA can be ascribed to one relapse- or disease-inducing epitope. Characterization of relapse- or disease-inducing epitopes bound by PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA is significant for understanding initiation and reactivation of ANCA-associated vasculitis. Elucidating a disease-inducing epitope bound by ANCA may lead to the development of epitope-specific therapeutic strategies.

  9. Candidate multi-epitope vaccines in aluminium adjuvant induce high levels of antibodies with predefined multi-epitope specificity against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Ding, J; Lu, Y; Chen, Y

    2000-10-01

    Some neutralizing epitopes on HIV-1 envelope proteins were identified to induce antibodies which could effectively inhibit the infection of different strains in vitro. But only very low levels of these antibodies were determined in the HIV-1 infected individuals. To increase the levels of protective antibodies in vivo, we suggested multi-epitope vaccine as a new strategy to induce high level of neutralization antibodies with predefined multi-epitope specificity. A synthesized epitope peptide MP (CG-GPGRAFY-G-ELDKWA-G-RILAVERYLKD) containing three neutralizing epitopes (GPGRAFY, ELDKWA, RILAVERYLKD) was conjugated to carrier protein KLH, and then used for immunization in mouse together with aluminium adjuvant or Freund's adjuvant (FA). The candidate MP-KLH multi-epitope vaccine in aluminium adjuvant could induce antibody response very strongly to the epitope peptide C-(RILAVERYLKD-G)2 and the immunosuppressive peptide (P1) (LQARILAVERYLKDQQL) (antibody titer: 1:51200), strongly to the epitope peptide C-(ELDKWA-G)4 and the C-domain peptide (P2) (1:12800), and moderately to the epitope peptide C-(GPGRAFY)4 and the V3 loop peptide (1:1600). The immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that the antibodies in sera could recognize P1, P2, V3 loop peptides and rsgp41 (aa 539-684). These results are similar with that in the case of PI-BSA in FA, and suggest that the multi-epitope vaccine in aluminium could induce high levels of antibodies of predefined multi-epitope specificity, which provides experimental evidence for the new strategy to develop an effective neutralizing antibody-based multi-epitope vaccine against HIV-1.

  10. Towards Defining Molecular Determinants Recognized by Adaptive Immunity in Allergic Disease: An Inventory of the Available Data

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Kerrie; Greenbaum, Jason; Kim, Yohan; Vita, Randi; Chung, Jo; Peters, Bjoern; Broide, David; Goodman, Richard; Grey, Howard; Sette, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive immune responses associated with allergic reactions recognize antigens from a broad spectrum of plants and animals. Herein a meta-analysis was performed on allergy-related data from the immune epitope database (IEDB) to provide a current inventory and highlight knowledge gaps and areas for future work. The analysis identified over 4,500 allergy-related epitopes derived from 270 different allergens. Overall, the distribution of the data followed expectations based on the nature of allergic responses. Namely, the majority of epitopes were defined for B cells/antibodies and IgE-mediated reactivity, and relatively fewer T-cell epitopes, mostly CD4+/class II. Interestingly, the majority of food allergen epitopes were B-cells epitopes whereas a fairly even number of B- and T-cell epitopes were defined for airborne allergens. In addition, epitopes from nonhumans hosts were mostly T-cell epitopes. Overall, coverage of known allergens is sparse with data available for only ~17% of all allergens listed by the IUIS database. Thus, further research would be required to provide a more balanced representation across different allergen categories. Furthermore, inclusion of nonpeptidic epitopes in the IEDB also allows for inventory and analysis of immunological data associated with drug and contact allergen epitopes. Finally, our analysis also underscores that only a handful of epitopes have thus far been investigated for their immunotherapeutic potential. PMID:21403821

  11. Preferential Remedies for Employment Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harry T.; Zaretsky, Barry L.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of the problem of preferential remedies to achieve equal employment opportunities for women and minority groups. Contends that "color blindness" will not end discrimination but that some form of "color conscious" affirmative action program must be employed. Temporary preferential treatment is justified, according to…

  12. Conservation of G-Protein Epitopes in Respiratory Syncytial Virus (Group A) Despite Broad Genetic Diversity: Is Antibody Selection Involved in Virus Evolution?

    PubMed Central

    Trento, Alfonsina; Ábrego, Leyda; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Rosa; González-Sánchez, Maria Isabel; González-Martínez, Felipe; Delfraro, Adriana; Pascale, Juan M.; Arbiza, Juan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Worldwide G-glycoprotein phylogeny of human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) group A sequences revealed diversification in major clades and genotypes over more than 50 years of recorded history. Multiple genotypes cocirculated during prolonged periods of time, but recent dominance of the GA2 genotype was noticed in several studies, and it is highlighted here with sequences from viruses circulating recently in Spain and Panama. Reactivity of group A viruses with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize strain-variable epitopes of the G glycoprotein failed to correlate genotype diversification with antibody reactivity. Additionally, no clear correlation was found between changes in strain-variable epitopes and predicted sites of positive selection, despite both traits being associated with the C-terminal third of the G glycoprotein. Hence, our data do not lend support to the proposed antibody-driven selection of variants as a major determinant of hRSV evolution. Other alternative mechanisms are considered to account for the high degree of hRSV G-protein variability. IMPORTANCE An unusual characteristic of the G glycoprotein of human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the accumulation of nonsynonymous (N) changes at higher rates than synonymous (S) changes, reaching dN/dS values at certain sites predictive of positive selection. Since these sites cluster preferentially in the C-terminal third of the G protein, like certain epitopes recognized by murine antibodies, it was proposed that immune (antibody) selection might be driving the apparent positive selection, analogous to the antigenic drift observed in the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA). However, careful antigenic and genetic comparison of the G glycoprotein does not provide evidence of antigenic drift in the G molecule, in agreement with recently published data which did not indicate antigenic drift in the G protein with human sera. Alternative explanations to the immune-driven selection

  13. Involvement of the V1/V2 variable loop structure in the exposure of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 epitopes induced by receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, R; Moore, J; Accola, M; Desjardin, E; Robinson, J; Sodroski, J

    1995-01-01

    The binding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to the cellular receptor CD4 has been suggested to induce conformational changes in the viral envelope glycoproteins that promote virus entry. Conserved, discontinuous epitopes on the HIV-1 gp120 glycoprotein recognized by the 17b, 48d, and A32 antibodies are preferentially exposed upon the binding of soluble CD4 (sCD4). The binding of the 17b and 48d antibodies to the gp120 glycoprotein can also be enhanced by the binding of the A32 antibody. Here we constructed HIV-1 gp120 mutants in which the variable segments of the V1/V2 and V3 structures were deleted, individually or in combination, while the 17b, 48d, and A32 epitopes were retained. The effects of the variable loop deletions on the function of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins and on the exposure of epitopes induced by sCD4 or A32 binding to the monomeric gp120 glycoprotein were examined. The variable-loop-deleted envelope glycoproteins were able to mediate virus entry, albeit at lower efficiencies than those of the wild-type glycoproteins. Thus, the V1/V2 and V3 variable sequences contribute to the efficiency of HIV-1 entry but are not absolutely required for the process. Neither the V1/V2 nor V3 loops were necessary for the increase in exposure of the 17b/48d epitopes induced by binding of the A32 monoclonal antibody. By contrast, induction of the 17b, 48d, and A32 epitopes by sCD4 binding apparently involves a movement of the V1/V2 loops, which in the absence of CD4 partially mask these epitopes on the native gp120 monomer. The results obtained with a mutant glycoprotein containing a deletion of the V1 loop alone indicated that the contribution of the V2 loop to these phenomena was more significant than that of the V1 sequences. These results suggest that the V1/V2 loops, which have been previously implicated in CD4-modulated, postattachment steps in HIV-1 entry, contribute to CD4-induced gp120 conformational changes detected by the 17b, 48d, and A

  14. Major histocompatibility complex conformational epitopes are peptide specific

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Serologically distinct forms of H-2Kb are stabilized by loading cells expressing "empty" class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules with different H-2Kb binding peptides. The H-2Kb epitope recognized by monoclonal antibody (mAb) 28.8.6 was stabilized by ovalbumin (OVA) (257-264) and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) pp89 (168- 176) peptides, but not by vesicular stomatic virus nucleoprotein (VSV NP) (52-59) and influenza NP (Y345-360) peptides. The H-2Kb epitope recognized by mAb 34.4.20 was stabilized by VSV NP (52-59) peptide but not by OVA (257-264), MCMV pp89 (168-176), or influenza NP (Y345-360) peptides. Immunoprecipitation of H-2Kb molecules from normal cells showed that 28.8.6 and 34.4.20 epitopes were only present on a subset of all conformationally reactive H-2Kb molecules. Using alanine- substituted derivatives of the VSV peptide, the 28.8.6 epitope was completely stabilized by substitution of the first residue and partially stabilized by substitution of the third or the fifth residues in the peptides. These results indicate that distinct conformational MHC epitopes are dependent on the specific peptide that occupies the antigenic peptide binding groove on individual MHC molecules. The changes in MHC epitopes observed may also be important in understanding the diversity of T cell receptors used in an immune response and the influence of peptides on development of the T cell repertoire. PMID:1281212

  15. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of multiple antigen peptides (MAP) containing P. vivax CS epitopes in Aotus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Herrera, S; De Plata, C; González, M; Perlaza, B L; Bettens, F; Corradin, G; Arévalo-Herrera, M

    1997-04-01

    Using linear synthetic peptides corresponding to the Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the common type, we have identified several T and B-cell epitopes recognized by human individuals. Three T-cell epitopes studied (p6) from the amino, (p11) from the central and (p25) from the carboxyl regions, were widely recognized by lymphocytes of immune donors. A series of six peptides, in addition to p11, representing the central repeat domain of the CS(p11-p17) protein were used in ELISA assays to map the B-cell epitopes of this region. P11 was the peptide most frequently recognized by sera containing antibodies to the homologous CS protein as determined by IFAT. The sequences corresponding to peptides p6, p11 and P25 as well as that representing a universal T-cell epitope derived from the tetanus toxin were used to assemble eight different Multiple Antigen Peptides (MAP). The immunogenicity of these MAP was analysed in Aotus monkeys. Groups of two animals were immunized with each MAP and both antibody response, T-lymphocyte proliferation and in vitro gamma-IFN production were evaluated. Two MAPs containing the same B-cell epitope and either a promiscuous CS-protein derived T-cell epitope (p25) or the tetanus toxin epitope (p-tt30) proved to be the most immunogenic and induced high levels of anti-peptide antibodies that recognized the native protein. Except for animals immunized with MAP VII, there was no correlation between antibody levels, lymphocyte proliferation or gamma-IFN production in vitro. The broad recognition of these epitopes by individuals which had been exposed to malaria, the capacity of these MAPs to induce antibodies, recognize the cognate protein, and in vitro gamma-IFN production encourages further analyses of the potential of these proteins as malaria vaccine candidates for human use.

  16. Epitope analysis of capsid and matrix proteins of North American ovine lentivirus field isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Marcom, K A; Pearson, L D; Chung, C S; Poulson, J M; DeMartini, J C

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against two phenotypically distinct ovine lentivirus (OvLV) strains were generated by fusion of BALB/c SP2/0-Ag 14 myeloma cells with spleen cells from mice immunized with purified OvLV. Hybridomas were selected by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and analysis of reactivity on immunoblots. The majority (17 of 21) of the MAbs recognized the gag-encoded capsid protein, CA p27, of both strains. Four other MAbs recognized a smaller structural protein, presumably a matrix protein, MA p17. Three distinct epitopes on CA p27 and one on MA p17 were distinguished by the MAbs with competition ELISA. MAbs from each epitope group were able to recognize 17 North American field isolates of OvLV and the closely related caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV). Analysis of the data indicated that these epitopes were highly conserved among naturally occurring isolates. A representative MAb from each epitope group of anti-CA p27 MAbs reacted with four field strains of OvLV and CAEV on immunoblots. An anti-MA p17 MAb recognized the same OvLV strains on immunoblots but failed to recognize CAEV. MAbs which recognize conserved epitopes of gag-encoded lentivirus proteins (CA p27 and MA p17) are valuable tools. These MAbs can be used to develop sensitive diagnostic assays and to study the pathogenesis of lentivirus infections in sheep and goats. Images PMID:1715884

  17. Effects of vector fusion peptides on the conformation and immune reactivity of epitope-shuffled, recombinant multi-epitope antigens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Lin, Yahui; Cai, Pengfei; Wang, Heng

    2011-01-01

    The use of multi-epitopes has been considered as a promising strategy to overcome the obstacle of antigenic variation in malarial vaccine development. Previously, we constructed a multi-epitope artificial antigen, Malaria Random Constructed Antigen-1(M.RCAg-1), to optimize expression of the antigen, and we subcloned the gene into three prokaryotic expression vectors that contain different fusion tags at the N-terminus. Three recombinant proteins expressed by these vectors, named M.RCAg-1/Exp.V-1, V-2, and V-3, were purified after the cleavage of the fusion tag. All three recombinant proteins were able to induce similar levels of antigenicity in BALB/c murine models. However, the antibody responses against the individual epitope peptides of the recombinant products were dramatically different. Additionally, the different epitopes elicited various CD4(+) T-cell responses, as shown by the resulting lymphocyte proliferation and varied IFN-γ and IL-4 levels determined by EILSPOT; however, each could be distinctly recognized by sera derived from malaria patients. Additionally, the rabbit antibody induced by these proteins showed diverse efficacy in malaria parasite growth inhibition assays in vitro. Furthermore, analysis via circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed that the secondary structure was different among these recombinant proteins. These results suggest that the expressed multi-epitope artificial antigens originating from the different vector fusion peptides indeed affect the protein folding and, subsequently, the epitope exposure. Thus, these proteins are able to induce both distinct humoral and cellular immune responses in animal models, and they affect the efficacy of immune inhibition against the parasite. This work should lead to a further understanding of the impact of vector fusion peptides on the conformation and immune reactivity of recombinant proteins and could provide a useful reference for the development of artificial multi-epitope vaccines.

  18. Epitope Mapping of Avian Influenza M2e Protein: Different Species Recognise Various Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Noor Haliza; Ignjatovic, Jagoda; Tarigan, Simson; Peaston, Anne; Hemmatzadeh, Farhid

    2016-01-01

    A common approach for developing diagnostic tests for influenza virus detection is the use of mouse or rabbit monoclonal and/or polyclonal antibodies against a target antigen of the virus. However, comparative mapping of the target antigen using antibodies from different animal sources has not been evaluated before. This is important because identification of antigenic determinants of the target antigen in different species plays a central role to ensure the efficiency of a diagnostic test, such as competitive ELISA or immunohistochemistry-based tests. Interest in the matrix 2 ectodomain (M2e) protein of avian influenza virus (AIV) as a candidate for a universal vaccine and also as a marker for detection of virus infection in vaccinated animals (DIVA) is the rationale for the selection of this protein for comparative mapping evaluation. This study aimed to map the epitopes of the M2e protein of avian influenza virus H5N1 using chicken, mouse and rabbit monoclonal or monospecific antibodies. Our findings revealed that rabbit antibodies (rAbs) recognized epitope 6EVETPTRN13 of the M2e, located at the N-terminal of the protein, while mouse (mAb) and chicken antibodies (cAbs) recognized epitope 10PTRNEWECK18, located at the centre region of the protein. The findings highlighted the difference between the M2e antigenic determinants recognized by different species that emphasized the importance of comparative mapping of antibody reactivity from different animals to the same antigen, especially in the case of multi-host infectious agents such as influenza. The findings are of importance for antigenic mapping, as well as diagnostic test and vaccine development. PMID:27362795

  19. Masking of antigenic epitopes by antibodies shapes the humoral immune response to influenza

    PubMed Central

    Zarnitsyna, Veronika I.; Ellebedy, Ali H.; Davis, Carl; Jacob, Joshy; Ahmed, Rafi; Antia, Rustom

    2015-01-01

    The immune responses to influenza, a virus that exhibits strain variation, show complex dynamics where prior immunity shapes the response to the subsequent infecting strains. Original antigenic sin (OAS) describes the observation that antibodies to the first encountered influenza strain, specifically antibodies to the epitopes on the head of influenza's main surface glycoprotein, haemagglutinin (HA), dominate following infection with new drifted strains. OAS suggests that responses to the original strain are preferentially boosted. Recent studies also show limited boosting of the antibodies to conserved epitopes on the stem of HA, which are attractive targets for a ‘universal vaccine’. We develop multi-epitope models to explore how pre-existing immunity modulates the immune response to new strains following immunization. Our models suggest that the masking of antigenic epitopes by antibodies may play an important role in describing the complex dynamics of OAS and limited boosting of antibodies to the stem of HA. Analysis of recently published data confirms model predictions for how pre-existing antibodies to an epitope on HA decrease the magnitude of boosting of the antibody response to this epitope following immunization. We explore strategies for boosting of antibodies to conserved epitopes and generating broadly protective immunity to multiple strains. PMID:26194761

  20. Structural basis for epitope sharing between group 1 allergens of cedar pollen

    PubMed Central

    Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; Schein, Catherine H.; Mathura, Venkatarajan; Braun, Werner; Czerwinski, Edmund W.; Togawa, Akihisa; Kondo, Yasuto; Oka, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Masanao; Goldblum, Randall M.

    2008-01-01

    The group 1 allergens are a major cause of cedar pollen hypersensitivity in several geographic areas. Allergens from several taxa have been shown to cross-react. The goal of these studies was to compare the structural features of the shared and unique epitopes of the group 1 allergen from mountain cedar (Jun a 1) and Japanese cedar (Cry j 1). An array of overlapping peptides from the sequence of Jun a 1 and a panel of monoclonal anti-Cry j 1 antibodies were used to identify the IgE epitopes recognized by cedar-sensitive patients from Texas and Japan. IgE from Japanese patients reacted with peptides representing one of the two linear epitopes within the highly conserved β-helical core structure and both epitopes within less ordered loops and turns near the N- and C-termini of Jun a 1. A three-dimensional (3D) model of the Cry j 1, based on the crystal structure of Jun a 1, indicated a similar surface exposure for the four described epitopes of Jun a 1 and the homologous regions of Cry j 1. The monoclonal antibodies identified another shared epitope, which is most likely conformational and a unique Cry j 1 epitope that may be the previously recognized glycopeptide IgE epitope. Defining the structural basis for shared and unique epitopes will help to identify critical features of IgE epitopes that can be used to develop mimotopes or identify allergen homologues for vaccine development. PMID:15975657

  1. Localization of non-linear neutralizing B cell epitopes on ricin toxin's enzymatic subunit (RTA).

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Joanne M; Kasten-Jolly, Jane C; Reynolds, Claire E; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to develop a vaccine for ricin toxin are focused on identifying highly immunogenic, safe, and thermostable recombinant derivatives of ricin's enzymatic A subunit (RTA). As a means to guide vaccine design, we have embarked on an effort to generate a comprehensive neutralizing and non-neutralizing B cell epitope map of RTA. In a series of previous studies, we identified three spatially distinct linear (continuous), neutralizing epitopes on RTA, as defined by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) PB10 (and R70), SyH7, and GD12. In this report we now describe a new collection of 19 toxin-neutralizing mAbs that bind non-linear epitopes on RTA. The most potent toxin-neutralizing mAbs in this new collection, namely WECB2, TB12, PA1, PH12 and IB2 each had nanamolar (or sub-nanomolar) affinities for ricin and were each capable of passively protecting mice against a 5-10xLD50 toxin challenge. Competitive binding assays by surface plasmon resonance revealed that WECB2 binds an epitope that overlaps with PB10 and R70; TB12, PA1, PH12 recognize epitope(s) close to or overlapping with SyH7's epitope; and GD12 and IB2 recognize epitopes that are spatially distinct from all other toxin-neutralizing mAbs. We estimate that we have now accounted for ∼75% of the predicted epitopes on the surface of RTA and that toxin-neutralizing mAbs are directed against a very limited number of these epitopes. Having this information provides a framework for further refinement of RTA mutagenesis and vaccine design.

  2. Identification of a variant antigenic neutralizing epitope in hypervariable region 1 of avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    PubMed

    Hou, Minbo; Zhou, Defang; Li, Gen; Guo, Huijun; Liu, Jianzhu; Wang, Guihua; Zheng, Qiankun; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2016-03-08

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is a hypervariable oncogenic retrovirus that causes great economic loss in poultry. Antigenic variations in the variable regions make the development of an effective vaccine a challenging task. In the present study, we identified a variant antigenic neutralizing epitope using reverse vaccinology methods. First, we predicted the B-cell epitopes in gp85 gene of ALV-J strains by DNAman and bioinformatics. Fourteen candidate epitopes were selected and linked in tandem with glycines or serines as a multi-epitope gene. The expressed protein of multi-epitope gene can induce high-titer antibody that can recognize nature ALV-J and neutralize the infectivity of ALV-J strains. Next, we identified a high effective epitope using eight overlapping fragments of gp85 gene reacting with mAb 2D5 and anti-multi-epitope sera. The identified epitope contained one of the predicted epitopes and localized in hyervariable region 1 (hr1), indicating a variant epitope. To better understand if the variants of the epitope have a good antigenicity, we synthesized four variants to react with mAb 2D5 and anti-ALV-J sera. The result showed that all variants could react with the two kinds of antibodies though they showed different antigenicity, while could not react with ALV-J negative sera. Thus, the variant antigenic neutralizing epitope was determined as 137-LRDFIA/E/TKWKS/GDDL/HLIRPYVNQS-158. The result shows a potential use of this variant epitopes as a novel multi-epitope vaccine against ALV-J in poultry.

  3. Epitope specific T-cell responses against influenza A in a healthy population.

    PubMed

    Savic, Miloje; Dembinski, Jennifer L; Kim, Yohan; Tunheim, Gro; Cox, Rebecca J; Oftung, Fredrik; Peters, Bjoern; Mjaaland, Siri

    2016-02-01

    Pre-existing human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immunity may be a useful correlate of protection against severe influenza disease. Identification and evaluation of common epitopes recognized by T cells with broad cross-reactivity is therefore important to guide universal influenza vaccine development, and to monitor immunological preparedness against pandemics. We have retrieved an optimal combination of MHC class I and class II restricted epitopes from the Immune Epitope Database (www.iedb.org), by defining a fitness score function depending on prevalence, sequence conservancy and HLA super-type coverage. Optimized libraries of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell epitopes were selected from influenza antigens commonly present in seasonal and pandemic influenza strains from 1934 to 2009. These epitope pools were used to characterize human T-cell responses in healthy donors using interferon-γ ELISPOT assays. Upon stimulation, significant CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses were induced, primarily recognizing epitopes from the conserved viral core proteins. Furthermore, the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were phenotypically characterized regarding functionality, cytotoxic potential and memory phenotype using flow cytometry. Optimized sets of T-cell peptide epitopes may be a useful tool to monitor the efficacy of clinical trials, the immune status of a population to predict immunological preparedness against pandemics, as well as being candidates for universal influenza vaccines.

  4. Neo-epitopes on methylglyoxal modified human serum albumin lead to aggressive autoimmune response in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jyoti; Mir, Abdul Rouf; Habib, Safia; Siddiqui, Sheelu Shafiq; Ali, Asif; Moinuddin

    2016-05-01

    Glyco-oxidation of proteins has implications in the progression of diabetes type 2. Human serum albumin is prone to glyco-oxidative attack by sugars and methylglyoxal being a strong glycating agent may have severe impact on its structure and consequent role in diabetes. This study has probed the methylglyoxal mediated modifications of HSA, the alterations in its immunological characteristics and possible role in autoantibody induction. We observed an exposure of chromophoric groups, loss in the fluorescence intensity, generation of AGEs, formation of cross-linked products, decrease in α-helical content, increase in hydrophobic clusters, FTIR band shift, attachment of methylglyoxal to HSA and the formation of N(ε)-(carboxyethyl) lysine in the modified HSA, when compared to the native albumin. MG-HSA was found to be highly immunogenic with additional immunogenicity invoking a highly specific immune response than its native counterpart. The binding characteristics of circulating autoantibodies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients showed the generation of anti-MG-HSA auto-antibodies in the these patients, that are preferentially recognized by the modified albumin. We propose that MG induced structural perturbations in HSA, result in the generation of neo-epitopes leading to an aggressive auto-immune response and may contribute to the immunopathogenesis of diabetes type 2 associated complications.

  5. Identification and Phylogeny of the First T Cell Epitope Identified from a Human Gut Bacteroides Species

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Muñoz, Maria Elisa; Joglekar, Payal; Shen, Yi-Ji; Chang, Kuan Y.; Peterson, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Host T cell reactivity toward gut bacterial epitopes has been recognized as part of disease pathogenesis. However, the specificity of T cells that recognize this vast number of epitopes has not yet been well described. After colonizing a C57BL/6J germ-free mouse with the human gut symbiotic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, we isolated a T cell that recognized these bacteria in vitro. Using this T cell, we mapped the first known non-carbohydrate T cell epitope within the phylum Bacteroidetes. The T cell also reacted to two other additional Bacteroides species. We identified the peptide that stimulated the T cell by using a genetic approach. Genomic data from the epitope-positive and epitope-negative bacteria explain the cross-reactivity of the T cell to multiple species. This epitope degeneracy should shape our understanding of the T cell repertoire stimulated by the complex microbiome residing in the gastrointestinal tract in both healthy and disease states. PMID:26637014

  6. Unconventional T-cell recognition of an arthritogenic epitope of proteoglycan aggrecan released from degrading cartilage.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Jane; Mahida, Rahul; Venkatesh, Divya; Pearson, Jeffrey; Robinson, John H

    2016-04-01

    It has been proposed that peptide epitopes bind to MHC class II molecules to form distinct structural conformers of the same MHC II-peptide complex termed type A and type B, and that the two conformers of the same peptide-MHC II complex are recognized by distinct CD4 T cells, termed type A and type B T cells. Both types recognize short synthetic peptides but only type A recognize endosomally processed intact antigen. Type B T cells that recognize self peptides from exogenously degraded proteins have been shown to escape negative selection during thymic development and so have the potential to contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We generated and characterized mouse CD4 T cells specific for an arthritogenic epitope of the candidate joint autoantigen proteoglycan aggrecan. Cloned T-cell hybridomas specific for a synthetic peptide containing the aggrecan epitope showed two distinct response patterns based on whether they could recognize processed intact aggrecan. Fine mapping demonstrated that both types of T-cell recognized the same core epitope. The results are consistent with the generation of aggrecan-specific type A and type B T cells. Type B T cells were activated by supernatants released from degrading cartilage, indicating the presence of antigenic extracellular peptides or fragments of aggrecan. Type B T cells could play a role in the pathogenesis of proteoglycan-induced arthritis in mice, a model for rheumatoid arthritis, by recognizing extracellular peptides or protein fragments of joint autoantigens released by inflamed cartilage.

  7. Insights into the biological features of the antigenic determinants recognized by four monoclonal antibodies in redia and adult stages of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Alba, Annia; Sánchez, Jorge; Hernández, Hilda; Mosqueda, Maryani; Rodríguez, Suanel Y; Capó, Virginia; Otero, Oscar; Alfonso, Carlos; Marcet, Ricardo; Sarracent, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a digenean trematode which infects a wide variety of domestic animals and also humans. Previous studies have demonstrated that four monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against the total extract of F. hepatica redia (named as 1E4, 6G11, 4E5 and 4G11) also recognized the excretion - secretion antigens (ES Ag) of adult parasites, which is a biologically-relevant mixture of molecules with functional roles during infection and immune evasion on definitive hosts. In the present report we describe the partial characterization of the epitopes recognized by these Mabs by heat treatment, mercaptoethanol reduction, pronase proteolysis and sodium peryodate oxidation, which suggested their predominant protein and conformational nature. Also, a comparative study using immunodetection assays on crude extracts and on histological sections of both rediae and adults of F. hepatica were performed to explore the expression pattern of the antigenic determinants in these developmental stages. From these experiments it was found that the Mabs reacted most likely with the same proteins of approximately 64 and 105 kDa present on both rediae and adult's extracts. However, the 1E4, 6G11 and 4E5 Mabs also recognized other molecules of the total extract of F. hepatica adults, a fact that constitutes an evidence of the antigenic variation between both stages and points at a certain biological relevance of the recognized antigenic determinants. Immunolocalization studies on histological sections revealed that all Mabs reacted with the tegument of F. hepatica in both rediae and adults stages, while the epitopes recognized by 1E4, 6G11 and 4E5 antibodies were also preferentially localized in the intestinal caeca and in different organs of the reproductive system of adult specimens. The immunogenicity of these antigenic determinants, their conserved status among different stages of the life cycle of F. hepatica and their presence in both tegument and ES Ag of adult parasites

  8. Immunological consequences of intragenus conservation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis T-cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S.; Paul, Sinu; Mele, Federico; Huang, Charlie; Greenbaum, Jason A.; Vita, Randi; Sidney, John; Peters, Bjoern; Sallusto, Federica; Sette, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    A previous unbiased genome-wide analysis of CD4 Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) recognition using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from individuals with latent MTB infection (LTBI) or nonexposed healthy controls (HCs) revealed that certain MTB sequences were unexpectedly recognized by HCs. In the present study, it was found that, based on their pattern of reactivity, epitopes could be divided into LTBI-specific, mixed reactivity, and HC-specific categories. This pattern corresponded to sequence conservation in nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTMs), suggesting environmental exposure as an underlying cause of differential reactivity. LTBI-specific epitopes were found to be hyperconserved, as previously reported, whereas the opposite was true for NTM conserved epitopes, suggesting that intragenus conservation also influences host pathogen adaptation. The biological relevance of this observation was demonstrated further by several observations. First, the T cells elicited by MTB/NTM cross-reactive epitopes in HCs were found mainly in a CCR6+CXCR3+ memory subset, similar to findings in LTBI individuals. Thus, both MTB and NTM appear to elicit a phenotypically similar T-cell response. Second, T cells reactive to MTB/NTM-conserved epitopes responded to naturally processed epitopes from MTB and NTMs, whereas T cells reactive to MTB-specific epitopes responded only to MTB. Third, cross-reactivity could be translated to antigen recognition. Several MTB candidate vaccine antigens were cross-reactive, but others were MTB-specific. Finally, NTM-specific epitopes that elicit T cells that recognize NTMs but not MTB were identified. These epitopes can be used to characterize T-cell responses to NTMs, eliminating the confounding factor of MTB cross-recognition and providing insights into vaccine design and evaluation. PMID:25548174

  9. FMC46, a cell protrusion-associated leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 epitope on human lymphocytes and thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Pilarski, L M; Turley, E A; Shaw, A R; Gallatin, W M; Laderoute, M P; Gillitzer, R; Beckman, I G; Zola, H

    1991-07-01

    In this report, we describe a 76-kDa glycoprotein recognized by mAb FMC46 that, by virtue of its concentration on cell protrusions involved in motility, may be important in lymphoid cell locomotion. FMC46 detects an epitope of the leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (LAM-1), a member of the selecting family (LAM-1, Endothelial Leukocyte Adhesion Molecular-1 (ELAM-1), and Granule Membrane Protein-140 (GMP-140), that is expressed on LAM-1-transfected cell lines, is a glycosylation epitope based on its loss after culture in tunicamycin, and is closely related to the LAM-1.2 epitope. FMC46 is expressed at high density on the majority of CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ peripheral blood T cells (60 to 70%) and on a subset of thymocytes that includes the multinegative CD3- CD4- CD8- progenitor cells (100% FMC46hi) and the CD45R0- presumptive thymic generative lineage (70% FMC46hi). It appears at reduced density and frequency on CD45RA- thymocytes (50% FMC46lo), comprised mainly of death-committed thymocytes. Among thymic subsets defined by expression of CD4 and/or CD8, FMC46 is expressed at high density predominantly on a subset of single-positive cells and not on double-positive cells. These results suggest a fundamental role for LAM-1 in thymic development, with a high density preferentially expressed on cells involved in thymic generative processes and a low density on cells progressing to intrathymic death. A major subset of peripheral blood B cells and thymic B cells also express FMC46. Immunohistochemistry on frozen sections indicated strong staining in splenic follicles and around blood vessels, staining of the thymic medulla and subcapsular areas, and staining of the mantle zone of germinal centers of the lymph node. FMC46+ lymphocytes accumulated along high endothelial venules in the lymph node. On locomoting multinegative thymocytes, FMC46 is concentrated on the leading tip of extended processes, on pseudopods, and on ruffles, unlike the distribution of either CD44 or TQ1 (LAM 1

  10. Neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies to conformational epitopes of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 gp46.

    PubMed Central

    Hadlock, K G; Rowe, J; Perkins, S; Bradshaw, P; Song, G Y; Cheng, C; Yang, J; Gascon, R; Halmos, J; Rehman, S M; McGrath, M S; Foung, S K

    1997-01-01

    Ten human monoclonal antibodies derived from peripheral B cells of a patient with human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-associated myelopathy are described. One monoclonal antibody recognized a linear epitope within the carboxy-terminal 43 amino acids of HTLV gp21, and two monoclonal antibodies recognized linear epitopes within HTLV type 1 (HTLV-1) gp46. The remaining seven monoclonal antibodies recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 that were expressed on the surfaces of infected cells. Two of these antibodies also bound to viable HTLV-2 infected cells and immunoprecipitated HTLV-2 gp46. Virus neutralization was determined by syncytium inhibition assays. Eight monoclonal antibodies, including all seven that recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46, possessed significant virus neutralization activity. By competitive inhibition analysis it was determined that these antibodies recognized at least four distinct conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46. These findings indicate the importance of conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 in mediating a neutralizing antibody response to HTLV infection. PMID:9223472

  11. A Novel CD8-Independent High-Avidity Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Response Directed against an Epitope in the Phosphoprotein of the Paramyxovirus Simian Virus 5

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Peter M.; Parks, Griffith D.; Alexander-Miller, Martha A.

    2001-01-01

    Adoptive transfer studies have shown that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) of high avidity, capable of recognizing low levels of peptide-MHC I molecules, are more efficient at reducing viral titers than are low-avidity CTL, thus establishing CTL avidity as a critical parameter for the ability of a CTL to clear virus in vivo. It has been well documented that CTL of high avidity are relatively CD8 independent, whereas low-avidity CTL require CD8 engagement in order to become activated. In this study we have analyzed the antiviral CTL response elicited following infection with the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5). We have identified the immunodominant and subdominant CTL responses and subsequently assessed the avidity of these responses by their CD8 dependence. This is the first study in which the relationship between immunodominance and CTL avidity has been investigated. The immunodominant response was directed against an epitope present in the viral M protein, and subdominant responses were directed against epitopes present in the P, F, and HN proteins. Similarly to other CTL responses we have analyzed, the immunodominant response and the subdominant F and HN responses were comprised of both high- and low-avidity CTL. However, the subdominant response directed against the epitope present in the P protein is novel, as it is exclusively high avidity. This high-avidity response is independent of both the route of infection and expression by recombinant SV5. A further understanding of the inherent properties of P that elicit only high-avidity CTL may allow for the design of more efficacious vaccine vectors that preferentially elicit high-avidity CTL in vivo. PMID:11581375

  12. Evolutionarily conserved sequences of striated muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms. Epitope mapping by cDNA expression.

    PubMed

    Miller, J B; Teal, S B; Stockdale, F E

    1989-08-05

    A cDNA expression strategy was used to localize amino acid sequences which were specific for fast, as opposed to slow, isoforms of the chicken skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) and which were conserved in vertebrate evolution. Five monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), termed F18, F27, F30, F47, and F59, were prepared that reacted with all of the known chicken fast MHC isoforms but did not react with any of the known chicken slow nor with smooth muscle MHC isoforms. The epitopes recognized by mAbs F18, F30, F47, and F59 were on the globular head fragment of the MHC, whereas the epitope recognized by mAb F27 was on the helical tail or rod fragment. Reactivity of all five mAbs also was confined to fast MHCs in the rat, with the exception of mAb F59, which also reacted with the beta-cardiac MHC, the single slow MHC isoform common to both the rat heart and skeletal muscle. None of the five epitopes was expressed on amphioxus, nematode, or Dictyostelium MHC. The F27 and F59 epitopes were found on shark, electric ray, goldfish, newt, frog, turtle, chicken, quail, rabbit, and rat MHCs. The epitopes recognized by these mAbs were conserved, therefore, to varying degrees through vertebrate evolution and differed in sequence from homologous regions of a number of invertebrate MHCs and myosin-like proteins. The sequence of those epitopes on the head were mapped using a two-part cDNA expression strategy. First, Bal31 exonuclease digestion was used to rapidly generate fragments of a chicken embryonic fast MHC cDNA that were progressively deleted from the 3' end. These cDNA fragments were expressed as beta-galactosidase/MHC fusion proteins using the pUR290 vector; the fusion proteins were tested by immunoblotting for reactivity with the mAbs; and the approximate locations of the epitopes were determined from the sizes of the cDNA fragments that encoded a particular epitope. The epitopes were then precisely mapped by expression of overlapping cDNA fragments of known sequence that

  13. Mapping of SLE-specific Sm B cell epitopes using murine monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pruijn, G J; Schoute, F; Thijssen, J P; Smeenk, R J; van Venrooij, W J

    1997-04-01

    In this study we have used a number of monoclonal antibodies with various anti-Sm specificities originating from MRL/lpr mice to map B cell epitopes of the Sm-B/B' and Sm-D1 proteins. Selection of Sm-B subfragments reactive with the Sm-B/B'-specific monoclonal antibody ANA125 from a DNaseI fragment expression library revealed that the epitope recognized by this monoclonal antibody is located between amino acids 146 and 158: GRGTVAAAAAAAT. The epitopes recognized by two distinct Sm-D1-specific monoclonal antibodies, 7.13 and ANA127, appeared to be located in the carboxy-terminal region of the protein as revealed by immunoprecipitation of in vitro translated deletion mutants of Sm-D1. These epitopes are probably identical and not simply composed of a GR repeat, which is a characteristic feature of this part of the protein. Immunoprecipitation of in vitro translated deletion mutants of both Sm-B and Sm-D1 was also employed to determine the sequence requirements for recognition by two monoclonal antibodies that are cross-reactive with several Sm proteins, Y12 and ANA128. The epitope recognized by these two monoclonal antibodies is probably also identical and composed by the juxtaposition of several regions in the folded protein. The low, but significant, level of immunoprecipitation of truncated versions of both Sm-B and Sm-D1, suggests that the Sm domain, which is shared by all Sm proteins, in particular the amino-terminal part of the Sm1 motif of Sm-B and Sm-D1, plays an important role in formation of the cross-reactive epitope and might contribute to cross-reactivity with other Sm proteins. The results of immunoprecipitation experiments with cellular extracts show that the epitopes recognized by all anti-Sm monoclonal antibodies used in this study are accessible in the assembled snRNPs.

  14. Significance of Monoclonal Antibodies against the Conserved Epitopes within Non-Structural Protein 3 Helicase of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Yixin; Zhao, Shuoxian; Zhu, Shaomei; Zeng, Jinfeng; Li, Tingting; Fu, Yongshui; Wang, Yuanzhan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Wenjing; Yang, Baocheng; Zhou, Yuanping; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2013-01-01

    Nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) of hepatitis C virus (HCV), codes for protease and helicase carrying NTPase enzymatic activities, plays a crucial role in viral replication and an ideal target for diagnosis, antiviral therapy and vaccine development. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to NS3 helicase were characterized by epitope mapping and biological function test. A total of 29 monoclonal antibodies were produced to the truncated NS3 helicase of HCV-1b (T1b-rNS3, aa1192–1459). Six mAbs recognized 8/29 16mer peptides, which contributed to identify 5 linear and 1 discontinuous putative epitope sequences. Seven mAbs reacted with HCV-2a JFH-1 infected Huh-7.5.1 cells by immunofluorescent staining, of which 2E12 and 3E5 strongly bound to the exposed linear epitope 1231PTGSGKSTK1239 (EP05) or core motif 1373IPFYGKAI1380 (EP21), respectively. Five other mAbs recognized semi-conformational or conformational epitopes of HCV helicase. MAb 2E12 binds to epitope EP05 at the ATP binding site of motif I in domain 1, while mAb 3E5 reacts with epitope EP21 close to helicase nucleotide binding region of domain 2. Epitope EP05 is totally conserved and EP21 highly conserved across HCV genotypes. These two epitope peptides reacted strongly with 59–79% chronic and weakly with 30–58% resolved HCV infected blood donors, suggesting that these epitopes were dominant in HCV infection. MAb 2E12 inhibited 50% of unwinding activity of NS3 helicase in vitro. Novel monoclonal antibodies recognize highly conserved epitopes at crucial functional sites within NS3 helicase, which may become important antibodies for diagnosis and antiviral therapy in chronic HCV infection. PMID:23894620

  15. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  16. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H; Sietsma, J; Offerman, S E

    2016-08-03

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR's) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR's with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller - and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR's. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  17. Characterization of a discontinuous epitope of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) core protein p24 by epitope excision and differential chemical modification followed by mass spectrometric peptide mapping analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Hochleitner, E. O.; Borchers, C.; Parker, C.; Bienstock, R. J.; Tomer, K. B.

    2000-01-01

    A combination of epitope excision, epitope extraction, and differential chemical modification followed by mass spectrometric peptide mapping was used for the characterization of a discontinuous epitope that is recognized by the mouse anti-HIV-p24 monoclonal antibody 5E2.A3. In epitope excision, the protein is first bound to an immobilized antibody and then digested with proteolytic enzymes. In epitope extraction, the protein is first digested and subsequently allowed to react with the antibody. After epitope excision of the p24-5E2.A3 complex with endoproteinase Lys-C, a large fragment remained affinity bound corresponding to amino acids 1-158 of HIV-p24 (fragment 1-158). Further digestion, however, resulted in loss of affinity. Moreover, no affinity-bound fragments were observed after an epitope extraction experiment. These data from the epitope excision and extraction experiments suggest that the epitope is discontinuous. For the further characterization of the epitope, amino groups in the epitope-containing fragment were acetylated in both the affinity bound and free states followed by mass spectrometric analysis. Two successive acetylation reactions were performed: (1) the first used a low molar excess of acetic anhydride, and (2) the second, after separation from the antibody, a high molar excess of its hexadeuteroderivative. This isotopic labeling procedure, in combination with high resolution mass spectrometry, allowed the precise determination of relative reactivities of amino groups. In this study, no differences were observed in the ranking of the relative reactivities of five lysine residues. However, the N-terminal amino group was found to be part of the discontinuous epitope. PMID:10752610

  18. Characterization of a discontinuous epitope of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) core protein p24 by epitope excision and differential chemical modification followed by mass spectrometric peptide mapping analysis.

    PubMed

    Hochleitner, E O; Borchers, C; Parker, C; Bienstock, R J; Tomer, K B

    2000-03-01

    A combination of epitope excision, epitope extraction, and differential chemical modification followed by mass spectrometric peptide mapping was used for the characterization of a discontinuous epitope that is recognized by the mouse anti-HIV-p24 monoclonal antibody 5E2.A3. In epitope excision, the protein is first bound to an immobilized antibody and then digested with proteolytic enzymes. In epitope extraction, the protein is first digested and subsequently allowed to react with the antibody. After epitope excision of the p24-5E2.A3 complex with endoproteinase Lys-C, a large fragment remained affinity bound corresponding to amino acids 1-158 of HIV-p24 (fragment 1-158). Further digestion, however, resulted in loss of affinity. Moreover, no affinity-bound fragments were observed after an epitope extraction experiment. These data from the epitope excision and extraction experiments suggest that the epitope is discontinuous. For the further characterization of the epitope, amino groups in the epitope-containing fragment were acetylated in both the affinity bound and free states followed by mass spectrometric analysis. Two successive acetylation reactions were performed: (1) the first used a low molar excess of acetic anhydride, and (2) the second, after separation from the antibody, a high molar excess of its hexadeuteroderivative. This isotopic labeling procedure, in combination with high resolution mass spectrometry, allowed the precise determination of relative reactivities of amino groups. In this study, no differences were observed in the ranking of the relative reactivities of five lysine residues. However, the N-terminal amino group was found to be part of the discontinuous epitope.

  19. Facile fabrication and instant application of miniaturized antibody-decorated affinity columns for higher-order structure and functional characterization of TRIM21 epitope peptides.

    PubMed

    Al-Majdoub, M; Opuni, K F M; Koy, C; Glocker, M O

    2013-11-05

    Both epitope excision and epitope extraction methods, combined with mass spectrometry, generate precise informations on binding surfaces of full-length proteins, identifying sequential (linear) or assembled (conformational) epitopes, respectively. Here, we describe the one-step fabrication and application of affinity columns using reversibly immobilized antibodies with highest flexibility with respect to antibody sources and lowest sample amount requirements (fmol range). Depending on the antibody source, we made use of protein G- or protein A-coated resins as support materials. These materials are packed in pipet tips and in combination with a programmable multichannel pipet form a highly efficient epitope mapping system. In addition to epitope identification, the influence of epitope structure modifications on antibody binding specificities could be studied in detail with synthetic peptides. Elution of epitope peptides was optimized such that mass spectrometric analysis was feasible after a single desalting step. Epitope peptides were identified by accurate molecular mass determinations or by partial amino acid sequence analysis. In addition, charge state comparison or ion mobility analysis of eluted epitope peptides enabled investigation of higher-order structures. The epitope peptide of the TRIM21 (TRIM: tripartite motif) autoantigen that is recognized by a polyclonal antibody was determined as assembling an "L-E-Q-L" motif on an α-helix. Secondary structure determination by circular dichroism spectroscopy and structure modeling are in accordance with the mass spectrometric results and the antigenic behavior of the 17-mer epitope peptide variants from the full-length autoantigen.

  20. IL-5 links adaptive and natural immunity specific for epitopes of oxidized LDL and protects from atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Christoph J.; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Chang, Mi-Kyung; Miller, Marina; Broide, David; Palinski, Wulf; Curtiss, Linda K.; Corr, Maripat; Witztum, Joseph L.

    2004-01-01

    During atherogenesis, LDL is oxidized, generating various oxidation-specific neoepitopes, such as malondialdehyde-modified (MDA-modified) LDL (MDA-LDL) or the phosphorylcholine (PC) headgroup of oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs). These epitopes are recognized by both adaptive T cell–dependent (TD) and innate T cell–independent type 2 (TI-2) immune responses. We previously showed that immunization of mice with MDA-LDL induces a TD response and atheroprotection. In addition, a PC-based immunization strategy that leads to a TI-2 expansion of innate B-1 cells and secretion of T15/EO6 clonotype natural IgM antibodies, which bind the PC of OxPLs within oxidized LDL (OxLDL), also reduces atherogenesis. T15/EO6 antibodies inhibit OxLDL uptake by macrophages. We now report that immunization with MDA-LDL, which does not contain OxPL, unexpectedly led to the expansion of T15/EO6 antibodies. MDA-LDL immunization caused a preferential expansion of MDA-LDL–specific Th2 cells that prominently secreted IL-5. In turn, IL-5 provided noncognate stimulation to innate B-1 cells, leading to increased secretion of T15/EO6 IgM. Using a bone marrow transplant model, we also demonstrated that IL-5 deficiency led to decreased titers of T15/EO6 and accelerated atherosclerosis. Thus, IL-5 links adaptive and natural immunity specific to epitopes of OxLDL and protects from atherosclerosis, in part by stimulating the expansion of atheroprotective natural IgM specific for OxLDL. PMID:15286809

  1. Rotavirus VP7 epitope chimeric proteins elicit cross-immunoreactivity in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bingxin; Pan, Xiaoxia; Teng, Yumei; Xia, Wenyue; Wang, Jing; Wen, Yuling; Chen, Yuanding

    2015-10-01

    VP7 of group A rotavirus (RVA) contains major neutralizing epitopes. Using the antigenic protein VP6 as the vector, chimeric proteins carrying foreign epitopes have been shown to possess good immunoreactivity and immunogenicity. In the present study, using modified VP6 as the vector, three chimeric proteins carrying epitopes derived from VP7 of RVA were constructed. The results showed that the chimeric proteins reacted with anti-VP6 and with SA11 and Wa virus strains. Antibodies from guinea pigs inoculated with the chimeric proteins recognized VP6 and VP7 of RVA and protected mammalian cells from SA11 and Wa infection in vitro. The neutralizing activities of the antibodies against the chimeric proteins were significantly higher than those against the vector protein VP6F. Thus, development of chimeric vaccines carrying VP7 epitopes using VP6 as a vector could be a promising alternative to enhance immunization against RVAs.

  2. Selection of SARS-Coronavirus-specific B cell epitopes by phage peptide library screening and evaluation of the immunological effect of epitope-based peptides on mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hua; Jiang Lifang . E-mail: jianglf909@yahoo.com.cn; Fang Danyun; Yan Huijun; Zhou Jingjiao; Zhou Junmei; Liang Yu; Gao Yang; Zhao, Wei; Long Beiguo

    2007-03-15

    Antibodies to SARS-Coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-specific B cell epitopes might recognize the pathogen and interrupt its adherence to and penetration of host cells. Hence, these epitopes could be useful for diagnosis and as vaccine constituents. Using the phage-displayed peptide library screening method and purified Fab fragments of immunoglobulin G (IgG Fab) from normal human sera and convalescent sera from SARS-CoV-infected patients as targets, 11 B cell epitopes of SARS-CoV spike glycoprotein (S protein) and membrane protein (M protein) were screened. After a bioinformatics tool was used to analyze these epitopes, four epitope-based S protein dodecapeptides corresponding to the predominant epitopes were chosen for synthesis. Their antigenic specificities and immunogenicities were studied in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry and ELISPOT analysis of lymphocytes as well as a serologic analysis of antibody showed that these peptides could trigger a rapid, highly effective, and relatively safe immune response in BALB/c mice. These findings might aid development of SARS diagnostics and vaccines. Moreover, the role of S and M proteins as important surface antigens is confirmed.

  3. Fine mapping and conservation analysis of linear B-cell epitopes of peste des petits ruminants virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ruisong; Fan, Xiaoming; Xu, Wanxiang; Li, Wentao; Dong, Shijuan; Zhu, Yumin; He, Yaping; Tang, Haiping; Du, Rong; Li, Zhen

    2015-01-30

    Nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant and highly immunogenic protein of morbillivirus, and is presently the basis of most diagnostic assays for peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). In this study, fine epitope mapping and conservation analysis of linear B-cell epitopes on the PPRV NP has been undertaken using biosynthetic peptides. Nineteen linear B-cell epitopes were identified and their corresponding minimal motifs were located on the NP of PPRV China/Tibet/Geg/07-30. Conservation analysis indicated that ten of the 19 minimal motifs were conserved among 46 PPRV strains. Peptides containing the minimal motifs were recognized using anti-PPRV serum from a goat immunized with PPRV vaccine strain Nigeria 75/1. Identified epitopes and their motifs improve our understanding of the antigenic characteristics of PPRV NP and provide a basis for the development of epitope-based diagnostic assays.

  4. Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Novel Conserved Epitopes within Filovirus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Enterlein, Sven G.; Howell, Katie A.; Vu, Hong; Shulenin, Sergey; Warfield, Kelly L.; Froude, Jeffrey W.; Araghi, Nazli; Douglas, Robin; Biggins, Julia; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Wirchnianski, Ariel S.; Lau, Patrick; Wang, Yong; Herbert, Andrew S.; Dye, John M.; Glass, Pamela J.; Holtsberg, Frederick W.; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses cause highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. Current immunotherapeutic options for filoviruses are mostly specific to Ebola virus (EBOV), although other members of Filoviridae such as Sudan virus (SUDV), Bundibugyo virus (BDBV), and Marburg virus (MARV) have also caused sizeable human outbreaks. Here we report a set of pan-ebolavirus and pan-filovirus monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) derived from cynomolgus macaques immunized repeatedly with a mixture of engineered glycoproteins (GPs) and virus-like particles (VLPs) for three different filovirus species. The antibodies recognize novel neutralizing and nonneutralizing epitopes on the filovirus glycoprotein, including conserved conformational epitopes within the core regions of the GP1 subunit and a novel linear epitope within the glycan cap. We further report the first filovirus antibody binding to a highly conserved epitope within the fusion loop of ebolavirus and marburgvirus species. One of the antibodies binding to the core GP1 region of all ebolavirus species and with lower affinity to MARV GP cross neutralized both SUDV and EBOV, the most divergent ebolavirus species. In a mouse model of EBOV infection, this antibody provided 100% protection when administered in two doses and partial, but significant, protection when given once at the peak of viremia 3 days postinfection. Furthermore, we describe novel cocktails of antibodies with enhanced protective efficacy compared to individual MAbs. In summary, the present work describes multiple novel, cross-reactive filovirus epitopes and innovative combination concepts that challenge the current therapeutic models. IMPORTANCE Filoviruses are among the most deadly human pathogens. The 2014-2015 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) led to more than 27,000 cases and 11,000 fatalities. While there are five species of Ebolavirus and several strains of marburgvirus, the current immunotherapeutics primarily target Ebola virus

  5. Identification of a Conserved B-Cell Epitope on Duck Hepatitis A Type 1 Virus VP1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoying; Li, Xiaojun; Zhang, Qingshan; Wulin, Shaozhou; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Yue; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background The VP1 protein of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in ducks; however, B-cell epitopes on the VP1 protein of duck hepatitis A genotype 1 virus (DHAV-1) have not been characterized. Methods and Results To characterize B-cell epitopes on VP1, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2D10 against Escherichia coli-expressed VP1 of DHAV-1. In vitro, mAb 2D10 neutralized DHAV-1 virus. By using an array of overlapping 12-mer peptides, we found that mAb 2D10 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif LPAPTS. Sequence alignment showed that the epitope 173LPAPTS178 is highly conserved among the DHAV-1 genotypes. Moreover, the six amino acid peptide LPAPTS was proven to be the minimal unit of the epitope with maximal binding activity to mAb 2D10. DHAV-1–positive duck serum reacted with the epitope in dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of the six amino acids of the epitope for antibody-epitope binding. Competitive inhibition assays of mAb 2D10 binding to synthetic LPAPTS peptides and truncated VP1 protein fragments, detected by Western blotting, also verify that LPAPTS was the VP1 epitope. Conclusions and Significance We identified LPAPTS as a VP1-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the neutralizing mAb 2D10. Our findings have potential applications in the development of diagnostic techniques and epitope-based marker vaccines against DHAV-1. PMID:25706372

  6. An Introduction to B-Cell Epitope Mapping and In Silico Epitope Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Potocnakova, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Identification of B-cell epitopes is a fundamental step for development of epitope-based vaccines, therapeutic antibodies, and diagnostic tools. Epitope-based antibodies are currently the most promising class of biopharmaceuticals. In the last decade, in-depth in silico analysis and categorization of the experimentally identified epitopes stimulated development of algorithms for epitope prediction. Recently, various in silico tools are employed in attempts to predict B-cell epitopes based on sequence and/or structural data. The main objective of epitope identification is to replace an antigen in the immunization, antibody production, and serodiagnosis. The accurate identification of B-cell epitopes still presents major challenges for immunologists. Advances in B-cell epitope mapping and computational prediction have yielded molecular insights into the process of biorecognition and formation of antigen-antibody complex, which may help to localize B-cell epitopes more precisely. In this paper, we have comprehensively reviewed state-of-the-art experimental methods for B-cell epitope identification, existing databases for epitopes, and novel in silico resources and prediction tools available online. We have also elaborated new trends in the antibody-based epitope prediction. The aim of this review is to assist researchers in identification of B-cell epitopes. PMID:28127568

  7. An Introduction to B-Cell Epitope Mapping and In Silico Epitope Prediction.

    PubMed

    Potocnakova, Lenka; Bhide, Mangesh; Pulzova, Lucia Borszekova

    2016-01-01

    Identification of B-cell epitopes is a fundamental step for development of epitope-based vaccines, therapeutic antibodies, and diagnostic tools. Epitope-based antibodies are currently the most promising class of biopharmaceuticals. In the last decade, in-depth in silico analysis and categorization of the experimentally identified epitopes stimulated development of algorithms for epitope prediction. Recently, various in silico tools are employed in attempts to predict B-cell epitopes based on sequence and/or structural data. The main objective of epitope identification is to replace an antigen in the immunization, antibody production, and serodiagnosis. The accurate identification of B-cell epitopes still presents major challenges for immunologists. Advances in B-cell epitope mapping and computational prediction have yielded molecular insights into the process of biorecognition and formation of antigen-antibody complex, which may help to localize B-cell epitopes more precisely. In this paper, we have comprehensively reviewed state-of-the-art experimental methods for B-cell epitope identification, existing databases for epitopes, and novel in silico resources and prediction tools available online. We have also elaborated new trends in the antibody-based epitope prediction. The aim of this review is to assist researchers in identification of B-cell epitopes.

  8. Preferential Amplification of Pathogenic Sequences.

    PubMed

    Ge, Fang; Parker, Jayme; Chul Choi, Sang; Layer, Mark; Ross, Katherine; Jilly, Bernard; Chen, Jack

    2015-06-11

    The application of next generation sequencing (NGS) technology in the diagnosis of human pathogens is hindered by the fact that pathogenic sequences, especially viral, are often scarce in human clinical specimens. This known disproportion leads to the requirement of subsequent deep sequencing and extensive bioinformatics analysis. Here we report a method we called "Preferential Amplification of Pathogenic Sequences (PATHseq)" that can be used to greatly enrich pathogenic sequences. Using a computer program, we developed 8-, 9-, and 10-mer oligonucleotides called "non-human primers" that do not match the most abundant human transcripts, but instead selectively match transcripts of human pathogens. Instead of using random primers in the construction of cDNA libraries, the PATHseq method recruits these short non-human primers, which in turn, preferentially amplifies non-human, presumably pathogenic sequences. Using this method, we were able to enrich pathogenic sequences up to 200-fold in the final sequencing library. This method does not require prior knowledge of the pathogen or assumption of the infection; therefore, it provides a fast and sequence-independent approach for detection and identification of human viruses and other pathogens. The PATHseq method, coupled with NGS technology, can be broadly used in identification of known human pathogens and discovery of new pathogens.

  9. Preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations

    DOE PAGES

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-08-03

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and thereforemore » nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. As a result, these insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.« less

  10. Preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-08-03

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. As a result, these insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  11. Identification of a linear B-cell epitope on the avian leukosis virus P27 protein using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Qin, Liting; Zhu, Haibo; Sun, Yingjun; Cui, Xuezhi; Gao, Yadong; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-10-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) is an avian oncogenic retrovirus that can induce various clinical tumors. The capsid protein P27 is the group-specific antigen of ALV and has many viral antigen sites that are easy to detect. In this study, we produced a monoclonal antibody (mAb), 3A9, that is specific for the P27 protein. A series of partially overlapping peptides were screened to define (181)PPSAR(185) as the minimal linear epitope recognized by mAb 3A9. The identified epitope could be recognized by chicken anti-ALV and mouse anti-ALV P27 sera. The epitope was highly conserved among a number of ALV-A, ALV-B and ALV-J strains. MAb 3A9 might be a valuable tool for the development of new immunodiagnostic approaches for ALV, and the defined linear epitope might help further our understanding of the antigenic structure of the P27 protein.

  12. Antibodies recognizing different domains of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor.

    PubMed

    Solari, R; Kühn, L; Kraehenbuhl, J P

    1985-01-25

    The receptor responsible for the transepithelial transport of IgA dimer antibodies is a transmembrane glycoprotein known as membrane secretory component (SCm). During transport, the membrane anchoring domain is cleaved and the ectoplasmic domain of the receptor (SCs) remains tightly bound to the IgA dimer in exosecretions. We have produced monoclonal antibodies with distinct specificities against both cytoplasmic and ectoplasmic epitopes of rabbit SCm. One antibody (anti-SC303) reacted both with SCm and free SCs but not with SCs bound to IgA dimer (SIgA). Therefore, it recognized an epitope close to the IgA dimer binding site. The other monoclonal antibody (anti-SC166), which was unable to react with SCs, bound to the 15-kDa cytoplasmic extension of the membrane-spanning domain of the receptor. A polyclonal antibody (GaR-SC), raised in a goat against rabbit milk SCs, reacted with a subpopulation of SCs not recognized by the anti-SC303 monoclonal antibody and in addition also reacted with covalently bound sIgA. The three antibodies cross-reacted with rat SCm. We demonstrate the ability of the anti-SC166 monoclonal antibody to immunoadsorb subcellular organelles as a result of the cytoplasmic orientation of its epitope. Our data indicate that there are functional differences between the high- and low-molecular-weight families of SC in terms of IgA dimer binding.

  13. Protection against lethal cytomegalovirus infection by a recombinant vaccine containing a single nonameric T-cell epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Del Val, M; Schlicht, H J; Volkmer, H; Messerle, M; Reddehase, M J; Koszinowski, U H

    1991-01-01

    The regulatory immediate-early (IE) protein pp89 of murine cytomegalovirus induces CD8+ T lymphocytes that protect against lethal murine cytomegalovirus infection. The IE1 epitope is the only epitope of pp89 that is recognized by BALB/c cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL). Using synthetic peptides, the optimal and minimal antigenic sequences of the IE1 epitope have been defined. To evaluate the predictive value of data obtained with synthetic peptides, recombinant vaccines encoding this single T-cell epitope were constructed using as a vector the hepatitis B virus core antigen encoded in recombinant vaccinia virus. In infected cells expressing the chimeric proteins, only IE1 epitope sequences that were recognized as synthetic peptides at concentrations lower than 10(-6) M were presented to CTL. Vaccination of mice with the recombinant vaccinia virus that encoded a chimeric protein carrying the optimal 9-amino-acid IE1 epitope sequence elicited CD8+ T lymphocytes with antiviral activity and, furthermore, protected against lethal disease. The results thus show for the first time that recombinant vaccines containing a single foreign nonameric CTL epitope can induce T-lymphocyte-mediated protective immunity. Images PMID:1710286

  14. Epitope Mapping of Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies to Human Interferon-γ Using Human-Bovine Interferon-γ Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Bartek; Rudström, Karin; Ehrnfelt, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to identify conformational epitopes, recognized by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) made against human (h) interferon (IFN)-γ. Based on the mAbs' (n = 12) ability to simultaneously bind hIFN-γ in ELISA, 2 epitope clusters with 5 mAbs in each were defined; 2 mAbs recognized unique epitopes. Utilizing the mAbs' lack of reactivity with bovine (b) IFN-γ, epitopes were identified using 7 h/bIFN-γ chimeras where the helical regions (A-F) or the C terminus were substituted with bIFN-γ residues. Chimeras had a N-terminal peptide tag enabling the analysis of mAb recognition of chimeras in ELISA. The 2 mAb clusters mapped to region A and E, respectively; the epitopes of several mAbs also involved additional regions. MAbs in cluster A neutralized, to various degrees, IFN-γ-mediated activation of human cells, in line with the involvement of region A in the IFN-γ receptor interaction. MAbs mapping to region E displayed a stronger neutralizing capacity although this region has not been directly implicated in the receptor interaction. The results corroborate earlier studies and provide a detailed picture of the link between the epitope specificity and neutralizing capacity of mAbs. They further demonstrate the general use of peptide-tagged chimeric proteins as a powerful and straightforward method for efficient mapping of conformational epitopes. PMID:27336613

  15. Epitope Predictions Indicate the Presence of Two Distinct Types of Epitope-Antibody-Reactivities Determined by Epitope Profiling of Intravenous Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Luštrek, Mitja; Lorenz, Peter; Kreutzer, Michael; Qian, Zilliang; Steinbeck, Felix; Wu, Di; Born, Nadine; Ziems, Bjoern; Hecker, Michael; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Cao, Zhiwei; Glocker, Michael O.; Li, Yixue; Fuellen, Georg; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Epitope-antibody-reactivities (EAR) of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs) determined for 75,534 peptides by microarray analysis demonstrate that roughly 9% of peptides derived from 870 different human protein sequences react with antibodies present in IVIG. Computational prediction of linear B cell epitopes was conducted using machine learning with an ensemble of classifiers in combination with position weight matrix (PWM) analysis. Machine learning slightly outperformed PWM with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.884 vs. 0.849. Two different types of epitope-antibody recognition-modes (Type I EAR and Type II EAR) were found. Peptides of Type I EAR are high in tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine, and low in asparagine, glutamine and glutamic acid residues, whereas for peptides of Type II EAR it is the other way around. Representative crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) of Type I EAR are PDB 1TZI and PDB 2DD8, while PDB 2FD6 and 2J4W are typical for Type II EAR. Type I EAR peptides share predicted propensities for being presented by MHC class I and class II complexes. The latter interaction possibly favors T cell-dependent antibody responses including IgG class switching. Peptides of Type II EAR are predicted not to be preferentially presented by MHC complexes, thus implying the involvement of T cell-independent IgG class switch mechanisms. The high extent of IgG immunoglobulin reactivity with human peptides implies that circulating IgG molecules are prone to bind to human protein/peptide structures under non-pathological, non-inflammatory conditions. A webserver for predicting EAR of peptide sequences is available at www.sysmed-immun.eu/EAR. PMID:24244326

  16. Epitope predictions indicate the presence of two distinct types of epitope-antibody-reactivities determined by epitope profiling of intravenous immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Luštrek, Mitja; Lorenz, Peter; Kreutzer, Michael; Qian, Zilliang; Steinbeck, Felix; Wu, Di; Born, Nadine; Ziems, Bjoern; Hecker, Michael; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Cao, Zhiwei; Glocker, Michael O; Li, Yixue; Fuellen, Georg; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Epitope-antibody-reactivities (EAR) of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs) determined for 75,534 peptides by microarray analysis demonstrate that roughly 9% of peptides derived from 870 different human protein sequences react with antibodies present in IVIG. Computational prediction of linear B cell epitopes was conducted using machine learning with an ensemble of classifiers in combination with position weight matrix (PWM) analysis. Machine learning slightly outperformed PWM with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.884 vs. 0.849. Two different types of epitope-antibody recognition-modes (Type I EAR and Type II EAR) were found. Peptides of Type I EAR are high in tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine, and low in asparagine, glutamine and glutamic acid residues, whereas for peptides of Type II EAR it is the other way around. Representative crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) of Type I EAR are PDB 1TZI and PDB 2DD8, while PDB 2FD6 and 2J4W are typical for Type II EAR. Type I EAR peptides share predicted propensities for being presented by MHC class I and class II complexes. The latter interaction possibly favors T cell-dependent antibody responses including IgG class switching. Peptides of Type II EAR are predicted not to be preferentially presented by MHC complexes, thus implying the involvement of T cell-independent IgG class switch mechanisms. The high extent of IgG immunoglobulin reactivity with human peptides implies that circulating IgG molecules are prone to bind to human protein/peptide structures under non-pathological, non-inflammatory conditions. A webserver for predicting EAR of peptide sequences is available at www.sysmed-immun.eu/EAR.

  17. Dengue virus-infected human dendritic cells reveal hierarchies of naturally expressed novel NS3 CD8 T cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Piazza, P; Campbell, D; Marques, E; Hildebrand, W H; Buchli, R; Mailliard, R; Rinaldo, C R

    2014-09-01

    Detailed knowledge of dengue virus (DENV) cell-mediated immunity is limited. In this study we characterize CD8(+) T lymphocytes recognizing three novel and two known non-structural protein 3 peptide epitopes in DENV-infected dendritic cells. Three epitopes displayed high conservation (75-100%), compared to the others (0-50%). A hierarchy ranking based on magnitude and polyfunctionality of the antigen-specific response showed that dominant epitopes were both highly conserved and cross-reactive against multiple DENV serotypes. These results are relevant to DENV pathogenesis and vaccine design.

  18. T helper cell recognition of muscle acetylcholine receptor in myasthenia gravis. Epitopes on the gamma and delta subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Manfredi, A A; Protti, M P; Dalton, M W; Howard, J F; Conti-Tronconi, B M

    1993-01-01

    We tested the response of CD4+ cells and/or total lymphocytes from the blood of 22 myasthenic patients and 10 healthy controls to overlapping synthetic peptides, 20 residues long, to screen the sequence of the gamma and delta subunits of human muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The gamma subunit is part of the AChR expressed in embryonic muscle and is substituted in the AChRs of most adult muscles by an epsilon subunit. The delta subunit is present in both embryonic and adult AChRs. Adult extrinsic ocular muscles, which are preferentially and sometimes uniquely affected by myasthenic symptoms, and thymus, which has a still obscure but important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, express the embryonic gamma subunit. Anti-AChR CD4+ responses were more easily detected after CD8+ depletion. All responders recognized epitopes on both the gamma and delta subunits and had severe symptoms. In four patients the CD4+ cell response was tested twice, when the symptoms were severe and during a period of remission. Consistently, the response was only detectable, or larger, when the patients were severely affected. Images PMID:7688757

  19. Identification of bovine T-cell epitopes for three Mycobacterium bovis antigens: MPB70, 19,000 MW and MPB57.

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, J M; Douglas, A J; Mackie, D P; Neill, S D

    1994-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis remains a serious problem in several regions, partly due to a lack of specific diagnostic tests. The aim of this study was to identify bovine T-cell epitopes for defined Mycobacterium bovis antigens using an experimental model of the natural disease. Panels of synthetic peptides (16-mers with five residue overlaps) were produced from published amino acid sequences for MPB70, the 19,000 MW antigen and MPB57. In vitro lymphocyte proliferation assays were used to identify T-cell epitopes. Lymphocytes from experimentally infected cattle proliferated in response to five epitopes (residues 88-105 and 144-163 for MPB70; 1-16 and 67-84 for the 19,000 MW antigen; and 85-100 for MBP57). These epitopes were not recognized by control, non-infected animals, but were recognized by field reactors to intradermal tuberculin testing. All five epitopes were recognized by three different breeds of cattle (Friesian, Charolais and Simmental). In addition, the bovine T-cell epitopes identified for the 19,000 MW antigen in this study were similar to epitopes previously reported for man and mouse. Thus, as well as identifying candidate reagents for improved diagnostic tests and vaccination, this study provides evidence for genetic promiscuity T-cell recognition of major myobacterial epitopes. PMID:7519175

  20. The epitopes that cause cross-reactions between peanuts and tree nuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many peanut allergic individuals also have allergies to tree nuts. Our previous work has shown that there are epitopes with different amino acid sequences, but similar physical and chemical properties are recognized by the same IgE molecule. Anti-Ara h 2 monoclonal antibodies were produced. They we...

  1. Information filtering via preferential diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential in addressing the information overload problem, namely helping users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including the heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlooking the significance of diversity and novelty that indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on a user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects.

  2. Information filtering via preferential diffusion.

    PubMed

    Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential in addressing the information overload problem, namely helping users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including the heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlooking the significance of diversity and novelty that indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on a user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects.

  3. Analysis of preferential particle concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariff, Karim

    2008-11-01

    It is known from simulations of particle laden turbulent flows (Squires and Eaton 1991; Wang and Maxey 1993) that particles having a relaxation time nearly equal to the Kolmogorov time preferentially concentrate in regions of weak vorticity. Here we consider the set of equations for particle dilatation, strain, and rotation which provides an understanding of this behavior. This set is derived from the two-fluid equations for the coupled fluid and particle phases. Fluid strain induces particle strain, which causes particle dilatation to always decrease. Fluid rotation, on the other hand, induces particle rotation, which causes particle dilatation to always increase. Illustrative solutions are provided for spatially linear flows and the case of pure strain nicely illustrates how particles concentrate. The analysis also suggests devices and flows that would be particularly good at concentrating particles.

  4. "Recognizing Numerical Constants"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The advent of inexpensive, high performance computer and new efficient algorithms have made possible the automatic recognition of numerically computed constants. In other words, techniques now exist for determining, within certain limits, whether a computed real or complex number can be written as a simple expression involving the classical constants of mathematics. In this presentation, some of the recently discovered techniques for constant recognition, notably integer relation detection algorithms, will be presented. As an application of these methods, the author's recent work in recognizing "Euler sums" will be described in some detail.

  5. Identification of a Conserved B-cell Epitope on Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Envelope Protein by Screening a Phage-displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mei; Shi, Xingming; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yan; Cui, Hongyu; Hu, Shunlei; Gao, Hongbo; Cui, Xianlan; Wang, Yun-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Background The gp90 protein of avian reticuloendotheliosis-associated virus (REV-A) is an important envelope glycoprotein, which is responsible for inducing protective antibody immune responses in animals. B-cell epitopes on the gp90 protein of REV have not been well studied and reported. Methods and Results This study describes the identification of a linear B-cell epitope on the gp90 protein by screening a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library with the neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) A9E8 directed against the gp90. The mAb A9E8 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif SVQYHPL. Amino acid sequence of the motif exactly matched 213SVQYHPL219 of the gp90. Further identification of the displayed B cell epitope was conducted using a set of truncated peptides expressed as GST fusion proteins and the Western blot results indicated that 213SVQYHPL219 was the minimal determinant of the linear B cell epitope recognized by the mAb A9E8. Moreover, an eight amino acid peptide SVQYHPLA was proven to be the minimal unit of the epitope with the maximal binding activity to mAb A9E8. The REV-A-positive chicken serum reacted with the minimal linear epitopes in Western blot, revealing the importance of the eight amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding activity. Furthermore, we found that the epitope is a common motif shared among REV-A and other members of REV group. Conclusions and Significance We identified 213SVQYHPL219 as a gp90-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the neutralizing mAb A9E8. The results in this study may have potential applications in development of diagnostic techniques and epitope-based marker vaccines against REV-A and other viruses of the REV group. PMID:23185456

  6. Identification of Enteroviruses by Using Monoclonal Antibodies against a Putative Common Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo-Youn; Kim, Ki-Soon; Lee, Yoon-Sung; Chung, Yoon-Seok; Park, Kwi-Sung; Cheon, Doo-Sung; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Kang, Yoonsung; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Moon, Youngjoon; Choi, Jee-Hye; Cho, Hang-Eui; Min, Na-Young; Son, Jin-Sook; Park, Young-Hoon; Jee, Youngmee; Yoon, Jae-Deuk; Song, Chul-Yong; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2003-01-01

    A common epitope region of enteroviruses was identified by sequence-independent single-primer amplification (SISPA), followed by immunoscreening of 11 cDNA libraries from two Korean enterovirus isolates (echoviruses 7 and 30) and a coxsackievirus B3 (ATCC-VR 30). The putative common epitope region was localized in the N terminus of VP1 when the displayed recombinant proteins from the phages were chased by the convalescent-phase sera. The genomic region encoding the common epitope region was amplified and then expressed by using the vector pGEX-5X-1. The antigenicity of the expressed recombinant protein was identified by Western blotting with guinea pig antisera for six different serotypes of enteroviruses. After successive immunization of mice with the recombinant common epitope protein, splenocytes were extracted and hybridized with P3X63-Ag8-653 cells. A total of 24 hybridomas that produced monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the putative common epitope of enteroviruses were selected. Four of these were immunoglobulin G1 isotypes with a kappa light chain. These MAbs recognized 15 Korean endemic serotypes and prototypes of enteroviruses in an indirect immunofluorescence assay. These results suggest that the expressed protein might be a useful antigen for producing group common antibodies and that the use of the MAbs against the putative common epitope of enteroviruses might be a valuable diagnostic tool for rapidly identifying a broad range of enteroviruses. PMID:12843038

  7. Identification of Genogroup I and Genogroup II Broadly Reactive Epitopes on the Norovirus Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Tracy Dewese; Kitamoto, Noritoshi; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Hutson, Anne M.; Estes, Mary K.

    2005-01-01

    Norwalk virus, a member of the family Caliciviridae, is an important cause of acute epidemic nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Norwalk and related viruses are classified in a separate genus of Caliciviridae called Norovirus, which is comprised of at least three genogroups based on sequence differences. Many of the currently available immunologic reagents used to study these viruses are type specific, which limits the identification of antigenically distinct viruses in detection assays. Identification of type-specific and cross-reactive epitopes is essential for designing broadly cross-reactive diagnostic assays and dissecting the immune response to calicivirus infection. To address this, we have mapped the epitopes on the norovirus capsid protein for both a genogroup I-cross-reactive monoclonal antibody and a genogroup II-cross-reactive monoclonal antibody by use of norovirus deletion and point mutants. The epitopes for both monoclonal antibodies mapped to the C-terminal P1 subdomain of the capsid protein. Although the genogroup I-cross-reactive monoclonal antibody was previously believed to recognize a linear epitope, our results indicate that a conformational component of the epitope explains the monoclonal antibody's genogroup specificity. Identification of the epitopes for these monoclonal antibodies is of significance, as they are components in a commercially available norovirus-diagnostic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:15919896

  8. Genetic and epitopic analysis of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) autoantibodies: markers of the human thyroid autoimmune response.

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, S M; Rapoport, B

    1995-01-01

    TPO autoantibodies, the hallmark of human autoimmune thyroid disease, are of IgG class and are associated with thyroid destruction and hypothyroidism. Using the immunoglobulin gene combinatorial library approach, a panel of human monoclonal TPO autoantibodies (expressed as Fab) has been generated from thyroid tissue-infiltrating B cells. TPO-specific Fab closely resemble patients' serum autoantibodies in terms of L chain type, IgG subclass, affinities for TPO as well as epitopes recognized by > 80% of TPO autoantibodies in an individual's serum. TPO autoantibody V region genes are not unique; H chain V genes are usually mutated, while L chain V genes are sometimes in germ-line conformation. The autoantibodies recognize an immunodominant region involving conformational, overlapping epitopes in domains A and B. Finally, TPO autoantibody epitopic fingerprints are distinctive for individual sera, are not associated with hypothyroidism, but are conserved over time (indicating a lack of B cell epitope spreading). Evidence for conservation as well as inheritance of the fingerprints in some families, together with VH gene polymorphisms, may provide insight into the genetic basis of human autoimmune thyroid disease. Furthermore, monoclonal human TPO autoantibodies will be invaluable for B cell presentation of TPO to determine the T cell epitopes involved in TPO autoantibody production. PMID:7544244

  9. Automatic Generation of Validated Specific Epitope Sets.

    PubMed

    Carrasco Pro, Sebastian; Sidney, John; Paul, Sinu; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia; Weiskopf, Daniela; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurement of B and T cell responses is a valuable tool to study autoimmunity, allergies, immunity to pathogens, and host-pathogen interactions and assist in the design and evaluation of T cell vaccines and immunotherapies. In this context, it is desirable to elucidate a method to select validated reference sets of epitopes to allow detection of T and B cells. However, the ever-growing information contained in the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) and the differences in quality and subjects studied between epitope assays make this task complicated. In this study, we develop a novel method to automatically select reference epitope sets according to a categorization system employed by the IEDB. From the sets generated, three epitope sets (EBV, mycobacteria and dengue) were experimentally validated by detection of T cell reactivity ex vivo from human donors. Furthermore, a web application that will potentially be implemented in the IEDB was created to allow users the capacity to generate customized epitope sets.

  10. Variable epitope library carrying heavily mutated survivin-derived CTL epitope variants as a new class of efficient vaccine immunogen tested in a mouse model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    NoeDominguez-Romero, Allan; Zamora-Alvarado, Rubén; Servín-Blanco, Rodolfo; Pérez-Hernández, Erendira G; Castrillon-Rivera, Laura E; Munguia, Maria Elena; Acero, Gonzalo; Govezensky, Tzipe; Gevorkian, Goar; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The antigenic variability of tumor cells leading to dynamic changes in cancer epitope landscape along with escape from immune surveillance by down-regulating tumor antigen expression/presentation and immune tolerance are major obstacles for the design of effective vaccines. We have developed a novel concept for immunogen construction based on introduction of massive mutations within the epitopes targeting antigenically variable pathogens and diseases. Previously, we showed that these immunogens carrying large combinatorial libraries of mutated epitope variants, termed as variable epitope libraries (VELs), induce potent, broad and long lasting CD8+IFN-γ+ T-cell response as well as HIV-neutralizing antibodies. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested immunogenic properties and anti-tumor effects of the VELs bearing survivin-derived CTL epitope (GWEPDDNPI) variants in an aggressive metastatic mouse 4T1 breast tumor model. The constructed VELs had complexities of 10,500 and 8,000 individual members, generated as combinatorial M13 phage display and synthetic peptide libraries, respectively, with structural composition GWXPXDXPI, where X is any of 20 natural amino acids. Statistically significant tumor growth inhibition was observed in BALB/c mice immunized with the VELs in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Vaccinated mice developed epitope-specific spleen cell and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T-cell responses that recognize more than 50% of the panel of 87 mutated epitope variants, as demonstrated in T-cell proliferation assays and FACS analysis. These data indicate the feasibility of the application of this new class of immunogens based on VEL concept as an alternative approach for the development of molecular vaccines against cancer. PMID:25483665

  11. Variable epitope library carrying heavily mutated survivin-derived CTL epitope variants as a new class of efficient vaccine immunogen tested in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    NoeDominguez-Romero, Allan; Zamora-Alvarado, Rubén; Servín-Blanco, Rodolfo; Pérez-Hernández, Erendira G; Castrillon-Rivera, Laura E; Munguia, Maria Elena; Acero, Gonzalo; Govezensky, Tzipe; Gevorkian, Goar; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The antigenic variability of tumor cells leading to dynamic changes in cancer epitope landscape along with escape from immune surveillance by down-regulating tumor antigen expression/presentation and immune tolerance are major obstacles for the design of effective vaccines. We have developed a novel concept for immunogen construction based on introduction of massive mutations within the epitopes targeting antigenically variable pathogens and diseases. Previously, we showed that these immunogens carrying large combinatorial libraries of mutated epitope variants, termed as variable epitope libraries (VELs), induce potent, broad and long lasting CD8+IFN-γ+ T-cell response as well as HIV-neutralizing antibodies. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested immunogenic properties and anti-tumor effects of the VELs bearing survivin-derived CTL epitope (GWEPDDNPI) variants in an aggressive metastatic mouse 4T1 breast tumor model. The constructed VELs had complexities of 10,500 and 8,000 individual members, generated as combinatorial M13 phage display and synthetic peptide libraries, respectively, with structural composition GWXPXDXPI, where X is any of 20 natural amino acids. Statistically significant tumor growth inhibition was observed in BALB/c mice immunized with the VELs in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Vaccinated mice developed epitope-specific spleen cell and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T-cell responses that recognize more than 50% of the panel of 87 mutated epitope variants, as demonstrated in T-cell proliferation assays and FACS analysis. These data indicate the feasibility of the application of this new class of immunogens based on VEL concept as an alternative approach for the development of molecular vaccines against cancer.

  12. Ligand-induced Epitope Masking

    PubMed Central

    Mould, A. Paul; Askari, Janet A.; Byron, Adam; Takada, Yoshikazu; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Humphries, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing ligand-mimetic inhibitors of integrins are unable to dissociate pre-formed integrin-fibronectin complexes (IFCs). These observations suggested that amino acid residues involved in integrin-fibronectin binding become obscured in the ligand-occupied state. Because the epitopes of some function-blocking anti-integrin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) lie near the ligand-binding pocket, it follows that the epitopes of these mAbs may become shielded in the ligand-occupied state. Here, we tested whether function-blocking mAbs directed against α5β1 can interact with the integrin after it forms a complex with an RGD-containing fragment of fibronectin. We showed that the anti-α5 subunit mAbs JBS5, SNAKA52, 16, and P1D6 failed to disrupt IFCs and hence appeared unable to bind to the ligand-occupied state. In contrast, the allosteric anti-β1 subunit mAbs 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 could dissociate IFCs and therefore were able to interact with the ligand-bound state. However, another class of function-blocking anti-β1 mAbs, exemplified by Lia1/2, could not disrupt IFCs. This second class of mAbs was also distinguished from 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 by their ability to induce homotypic cell aggregation. Although the epitope of Lia1/2 was closely overlapping with those of 13, 4B4, and AIIB2, it appeared to lie closer to the ligand-binding pocket. A new model of the α5β1-fibronectin complex supports our hypothesis that the epitopes of mAbs that fail to bind to the ligand-occupied state lie within, or very close to, the integrin-fibronectin interface. Importantly, our findings imply that the efficacy of some therapeutic anti-integrin mAbs could be limited by epitope masking. PMID:27484800

  13. Standardization of Epitopes for Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Berger, Peter; Lapthorn, Adrian J

    2016-01-01

    hCG and its variants are markers for pregnancy tests, pregnancyrelated complications, trophoblastic diseases, pre-natal screening of Down's syndrome and doping controls. Strong demands are imposed on diagnostic methods by the dynamic changes in the absolute and relative levels of hCG protein backbone variants and glycosylation isoforms in serum and urine during development of pregnancy or the progression/remission of tumors. Observed differences in the results between commercial diagnostic immunoassays reflect the unequal molar recognition of the different metabolic hCG variants, in particular the hCG beta core fragment (hCGβcf), by the diagnostic antibodies (Abs), as their epitopes are not standardized, and the fact that suboptimal hCG standards are used. To rapidly characterize Abs by their epitope recognition and specificity to evaluate their suitability for diagnostic immunoassays a procedure of comparative epitope mapping has been developed using epitope-defined reference Abs. Comparative epitope mapping of diagnostic Abs will provide the basis for the standardization of diagnostic antigenic domains/epitopes and consequently for improved reliability of hCG measurements. Diagnostic first line assays likely consist of pairs of Abs that recognize specific epitopes at the top of the neighboring peptide loops 1 and 3 (Ł1+3) and the cystine knot (ck) of hCGβ, respectively. In future, significant improvements of reliability, robustness and comparability of the results of immunoassays for complex glycoproteins such as hCG will be achieved by the use (i) of standardized diagnostic Abs against welldefined epitopes and (ii) of the new International Standards for hCG and for five hCG variants established by WHO, that are calibrated in molar (SI) units.

  14. Recognizing complex patterns.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Pawan

    2002-11-01

    How the brain recognizes complex patterns in the environment is a central, but little understood question in neuroscience. The problem is of great significance for a host of applications such as biometric-based access control, autonomous robots and content-based information management. Although some headway in these directions has been made, the current artificial systems do not match the robustness and versatility of their biological counterparts. Here I examine recognition tasks drawn from two different sensory modalities--face recognition and speaker/speech recognition. The goal is to characterize the present state of artificial recognition technologies for these tasks, the influence of neuroscience on the design of these systems and the key challenges they face.

  15. Epitope mapping and identification of amino acids critical for mouse IgG-binding to linear epitopes on Gly m Bd 28K.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jun; Yan, Huili

    2016-10-01

    Gly m Bd 28K is one of the major allergens in soybeans, but there is limited information on its IgG-binding epitopes. Thirty-four overlapping peptides that covered the entire sequence of Gly m Bd 28K were synthesized, and 3 monoclonal antibodies against Gly m Bd 28K were utilized to identify the IgG-binding regions of Gly m Bd 28K. Three dominant peptides corresponding to (28)GDKKSPKSLFLMSNS(42)(G28-S42), (56)LKSHGGRIFYRHMHI(70)(L56-I70), and (154)ETFQSFYIGGGANSH(168)(E154-H168) were recognized. L56-I70 is the most important epitope, and a competitive ELISA indicated that it could inhibit the binding of monoclonal antibody to Gly m Bd 28K protein. Alanine scanning of L56-I70 documented that F64, Y65, and R66 were the critical amino acids of this epitope. Two bioinformatics tools, ABCpred and BepiPred, were used to predict the epitopes of Gly m Bd 28K, and the predictions were compared with the epitopes that we had located by monoclonal antibodies.

  16. Generation and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against a Cyclic Variant of Hepatitis C Virus E2 Epitope 412-422

    PubMed Central

    Sandomenico, Annamaria; Leonardi, Antonio; Berisio, Rita; Sanguigno, Luca; Focà, Giuseppina; Focà, Annalia; Ruggiero, Alessia; Doti, Nunzianna; Muscariello, Livio; Barone, Daniela; Farina, Claudio; Owsianka, Ania; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 envelope glycoprotein is crucial for virus entry into hepatocytes. A conserved region of E2 encompassing amino acids 412 to 423 (epitope I) and containing Trp420, a residue critical for virus entry, is recognized by several broadly neutralizing antibodies. Peptides embodying this epitope I sequence adopt a β-hairpin conformation when bound to neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) AP33 and HCV1. We therefore generated new mouse MAbs that were able to bind to a cyclic peptide containing E2 residues 412 to 422 (C-epitope I) but not to the linear counterpart. These MAbs bound to purified E2 with affinities of about 50 nM, but they were unable to neutralize virus infection. Structural analysis of the complex between C-epitope I and one of our MAbs (C2) showed that the Trp420 side chain is largely buried in the combining site and that the Asn417 side chain, which is glycosylated in E2 and solvent exposed in other complexes, is slightly buried upon C2 binding. Also, the orientation of the cyclic peptide in the antibody-combining site is rotated by 180° compared to the orientations of the other complexes. All these structural features, however, do not explain the lack of neutralization activity. This is instead ascribed to the high degree of selectivity of the new MAbs for the cyclic epitope and to their inability to interact with the epitope in more flexible and extended conformations, which recent data suggest play a role in the mechanisms of neutralization escape. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a major health care burden, affecting almost 3% of the global population. The conserved epitope comprising residues 412 to 423 of the viral E2 glycoprotein is a valid vaccine candidate because antibodies recognizing this region exhibit potent neutralizing activity. This epitope adopts a β-hairpin conformation when bound to neutralizing MAbs. We explored the potential of cyclic peptides mimicking this structure to elicit

  17. Clinical Control of HIV-1 by Cytotoxic T Cells Specific for Multiple Conserved Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Murakoshi, Hayato; Akahoshi, Tomohiro; Koyanagi, Madoka; Chikata, Takayuki; Naruto, Takuya; Maruyama, Rie; Tamura, Yoshiko; Ishizuka, Naoki; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Oka, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Identification and characterization of CD8+ T cells effectively controlling HIV-1 variants are necessary for the development of AIDS vaccines and for studies of AIDS pathogenesis, although such CD8+ T cells have been only partially identified. In this study, we sought to identify CD8+ T cells controlling HIV-1 variants in 401 Japanese individuals chronically infected with HIV-1 subtype B, in which protective alleles HLA-B*57 and HLA-B*27 are very rare, by using comprehensive and exhaustive methods. We identified 13 epitope-specific CD8+ T cells controlling HIV-1 in Japanese individuals, though 9 of these epitopes were not previously reported. The breadths of the T cell responses to the 13 epitopes were inversely associated with plasma viral load (P = 2.2 × 10−11) and positively associated with CD4 count (P = 1.2 × 10−11), indicating strong synergistic effects of these T cells on HIV-1 control in vivo. Nine of these epitopes were conserved among HIV-1 subtype B-infected individuals, whereas three out of four nonconserved epitopes were cross-recognized by the specific T cells. These findings indicate that these 12 epitopes are strong candidates for antigens for an AIDS vaccine. The present study highlighted a strategy to identify CD8+ T cells controlling HIV-1 and demonstrated effective control of HIV-1 by those specific for 12 conserved or cross-reactive epitopes. IMPORTANCE HLA-B*27-restricted and HLA-B*57-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play a key role in controlling HIV-1 in Caucasians and Africans, whereas it is unclear which CTLs control HIV-1 in Asian countries, where HLA-B*57 and HLA-B*27 are very rare. A recent study showed that HLA-B*67:01 and HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02 haplotypes were protective alleles in Japanese individuals, but it is unknown whether CTLs restricted by these alleles control HIV-1. In this study, we identified 13 CTLs controlling HIV-1 in Japan by using comprehensive and exhaustive methods. They included 5 HLA-B*52

  18. Common antiviral cytotoxic t-lymphocyte epitope for diverse arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Oldstone, M B; Lewicki, H; Homann, D; Nguyen, C; Julien, S; Gairin, J E

    2001-07-01

    Members of the Arenaviridae family have been isolated from mammalian hosts in disparate geographic locations, leading to their grouping as Old World types (i.e., lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus [LCMV], Lassa fever virus [LFV], Mopeia virus, and Mobala virus) and New World types (i.e., Junin, Machupo, Tacaribe, and Sabia viruses) (C. J. Peters, M. J. Buchmeier, P. E. Rollin, and T. G. Ksiazek, p. 1521-1551, in B. N. Fields, D. M. Knipe, and P. M. Howley [ed.], Fields virology, 3rd ed., 1996; P. J. Southern, p. 1505-1519, in B. N. Fields, D. M. Knipe, and P. M. Howley [ed.], Fields virology, 3rd ed., 1996). Several types in both groups-LFV, Junin, Machupo, and Sabia viruses-cause severe and often lethal human diseases. By sequence comparison, we noted that eight Old World and New World arenaviruses share several amino acids with the nucleoprotein (NP) that consists of amino acids (aa) 118 to 126 (NP 118-126) (RPQASGVYM) of LCMV that comprise the immunodominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitope for H-2(d) mice (32). This L(d)-restricted epitope constituted >97% of the total bulk CTLs produced in the specific antiviral or clonal responses of H-2(d) BALB mice. NP 118-126 of the Old World arenaviruses LFV, Mopeia virus, and LCMV and the New World arenavirus Sabia virus bound at high affinity to L(d). The primary H-2(d) CTL anti-LCMV response as well as that of a CTL clone responsive to LCMV NP 118-126 recognized target cells coated with NP 118-126 peptides derived from LCMV, LFV, and Mopeia virus but not Sabia virus, indicating that a common functional NP epitope exists among Old World arenaviruses. Use of site-specific amino acid exchanges in the NP CTL epitope among these arenaviruses identified amino acids involved in major histocompatibility complex binding and CTL recognition.

  19. Immunogenicity and antigenicity of immunoglobulins. XII. Intact light chain and heavy chain isotype-restricted Vk-associated epitopes.

    PubMed

    Walker, M; Hardie, D; Lowe, J; Ling, N R; De Lange, G; Jefferis, R

    1985-06-01

    Immunization with intact IgG has allowed the isolation of four hybridomas producing antibodies recognizing epitopes expressed within subpopulations of human kappa light chains unrelated to known polymorphisms (Km) and previously defined V-region subgroups. The V-region-associated epitopes recognized are conformation-dependent, being expressed on intact light chain but not on isolated VK or CK fragments. The frequency of expression within paraprotein panels of different heavy chain isotypes varied between individual antibodies. An epitope recognized by B2A6, expressed by greater than 85% IgGK paraproteins, was not represented in 16 IgM paraproteins tested, suggesting that association of VK with mu chains does not result in display of the epitope recognized, or alternatively, that selective association between VK and CH gene products occurs. These data contrast with the reactivity of other McAb for CK epitopes which were reactive with isolated CK fragments, and for all kappa-bearing paraproteins, regardless of heavy chain isotypes.

  20. Discrimination and Variable Impact of ANCA Binding to Different Surface Epitopes on Proteinase 3, the Wegener’s Autoantigen

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Francisco; Hummel, Amber M.; Jenne, Dieter E.; Specks, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3)-specific antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are highly specific for the autoimmune small vessel vasculitis, Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG). PR3-ANCA have proven diagnostic value but their pathogenic potential and utility as a biomarker for disease activity remain unclear. PR3-ANCA recognize conformational epitopes, and epitope-specific PR3-ANCA subsets with variable impact on biological functions of PR3 have been postulated. The aims of this study were to identify specific PR3 surface epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies (moAbs) and to determine whether the findings can be used to measure the functional impact of epitope-specific PR3-ANCA and their potential relationship to disease activity. We used a novel flow cytometry assay based on TALON-beads coated with recombinant human (H) and murine (M) PR3 and 10 custom-designed chimeric human/mouse rPR3-variants (Hm1–5/Mh1–5) identifying 5 separate non-conserved PR3 surface epitopes. Anti-PR3 moAbs recognize 4 major surface epitopes, and we identified the specific surface location of 3 of these with the chimeric rPR3-variants. The ability of PR3-ANCA to inhibit the enzymatic activity of PR3 was measured indirectly using a capture-ELISA system based on the different epitopes recognized by capturing moAbs. Epitope-specific PR3-ANCA capture-ELISA results obtained from patient plasma (n=27) correlated with the inhibition of enzymatic activity of PR3 by paired IgG preparations (r=0.7, P<0.01). The capture-ELISA results also seem to reflect disease activity. In conclusion, insights about epitopes recognized by anti-PR3 moAbs can be applied to separate PR3-ANCA subsets with predictable functional qualities. The ability of PR3-ANCA to inhibit the enzymatic activity of PR3, a property linked to disease activity, can now be gauged using a simple epitope-based capture-ELISA system. PMID:20810247

  1. Discrimination and variable impact of ANCA binding to different surface epitopes on proteinase 3, the Wegener's autoantigen.

    PubMed

    Silva, Francisco; Hummel, Amber M; Jenne, Dieter E; Specks, Ulrich

    2010-12-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3)-specific antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are highly specific for the autoimmune small vessel vasculitis, Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). PR3-ANCA have proven diagnostic value but their pathogenic potential and utility as a biomarker for disease activity remain unclear. PR3-ANCA recognize conformational epitopes, and epitope-specific PR3-ANCA subsets with variable impact on biological functions of PR3 have been postulated. The aims of this study were to identify specific PR3 surface epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies (moAbs) and to determine whether the findings can be used to measure the functional impact of epitope-specific PR3-ANCA and their potential relationship to disease activity. We used a novel flow cytometry assay based on TALON-beads coated with recombinant human (H) and murine (M) PR3 and 10 custom-designed chimeric human/mouse rPR3-variants (Hm1-5/Mh1-5) identifying 5 separate non-conserved PR3 surface epitopes. Anti-PR3 moAbs recognize 4 major surface epitopes, and we identified the specific surface location of 3 of these with the chimeric rPR3-variants. The ability of PR3-ANCA to inhibit the enzymatic activity of PR3 was measured indirectly using a capture-ELISA system based on the different epitopes recognized by capturing moAbs. Epitope-specific PR3-ANCA capture-ELISA results obtained from patient plasma (n=27) correlated with the inhibition of enzymatic activity of PR3 by paired IgG preparations (r=0.7, P<0.01). The capture-ELISA results also seem to reflect disease activity. In conclusion, insights about epitopes recognized by anti-PR3 moAbs can be applied to separate PR3-ANCA subsets with predictable functional qualities. The ability of PR3-ANCA to inhibit the enzymatic activity of PR3, a property linked to disease activity, can now be gauged using a simple epitope-based capture-ELISA system.

  2. How legumes recognize rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Via, Virginia Dalla; Zanetti, María Eugenia; Blanco, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Legume plants have developed the capacity to establish symbiotic interactions with soil bacteria (known as rhizobia) that can convert N2 to molecular forms that are incorporated into the plant metabolism. The first step of this relationship is the recognition of bacteria by the plant, which allows to distinguish potentially harmful species from symbiotic partners. The main molecular determinant of this symbiotic interaction is the Nod Factor, a diffusible lipochitooligosaccharide molecule produced by rhizobia and perceived by LysM receptor kinases; however, other important molecules involved in the specific recognition have emerged over the years. Secreted exopolysaccharides and the lipopolysaccharides present in the bacterial cell wall have been proposed to act as signaling molecules, triggering the expression of specific genes related to the symbiotic process. In this review we will briefly discuss how transcriptomic analysis are helping to understand how multiple signaling pathways, triggered by the perception of different molecules produced by rhizobia, control the genetic programs of root nodule organogenesis and bacterial infection. This knowledge can help to understand how legumes have evolved to recognize and establish complex ecological relationships with particular species and strains of rhizobia, adjusting gene expression in response to identity determinants of bacteria.

  3. First report on the antibody verification of MICA epitopes recorded in the HLA epitope registry.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, R J; Mostecki, J; Marrari, M; da Silva, A S; da Mata Sousa, L C D; do Monte, S J H

    2014-10-01

    The International Registry of HLA Epitopes (http://epregistry.com.br) has been recently established as a tool to understand antibody responses to HLA mismatches. These epitopes are defined structurally by three-dimensional molecular modelling and amino acid sequence differences between HLA antigens. A major goal was to identify HLA epitopes that have been verified experimentally with informative antibodies. This report addresses the identification of MICA epitopes. Our analysis included published information about MICA antibody reactivity in sera from sensitized patients as well as data from our own laboratories. This report describes twenty-one MICA epitopes verified with antibodies which have primarily been tested in Luminex assays with single alleles. The epitopes correspond to distinct eplets that are often defined by single residues. The Registry is still a work-in-progress and will become a useful resource for HLA professionals interested in histocompatibility testing at the epitope level and investigating antibody responses to HLA mismatches in transplant patients.

  4. Characterization of a Novel Conformational GII.4 Norovirus Epitope: Implications for Norovirus-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Vicente, Noelia; Vila-Vicent, Susana; Allen, David; Gozalbo-Rovira, Roberto; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human noroviruses (NoVs) are the main etiological agents of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. While NoVs are highly diverse (more than 30 genotypes have been detected in humans), during the last 40 years most outbreaks and epidemics have been caused by GII.4 genotype strains, raising questions about their persistence in the population. Among other potential explanations, immune evasion is considered to be a main driver of their success. In order to study antibody recognition and evasion in detail, we analyzed a conformational epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody (3C3G3) by phage display, site-directed mutagenesis, and surface plasmon resonance. Our results show that the predicted epitope is composed of 11 amino acids within the P domain: P245, E247, I389, Q390, R397, R435, G443, Y444, P445, N446, and D448. Only two of them, R397 and D448, differ from the homologous variant (GII.4 Den-Haag_2006b) and from a previous variant (GII.4 VA387_1996) that is not recognized by the antibody. A double mutant derived from the VA387_1996 variant containing both changes, Q396R and N447D, is recognized by the 3C3G3 monoclonal antibody, confirming the participation of the two sites in the epitope recognized by the antibody. Furthermore, a single change, Q396R, is able to modify the histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) recognition pattern. These results provide evidence that the epitope recognized by the 3C3G3 antibody is involved in the virus-host interactions, both at the immunological and at the receptor levels. IMPORTANCE Human noroviruses are the main cause of viral diarrhea worldwide in people of all ages. Noroviruses can infect individuals who had been previously exposed to the same or different norovirus genotypes. Norovirus genotype GII.4 has been reported to be most prevalent during the last 40 years. In the present study, we describe a novel viral epitope identified by a monoclonal antibody and located within the highly diverse P domain of the capsid protein

  5. Identification of a conserved B-cell epitope on the GapC protein of Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhou, Xue; Fan, Ziyao; Tang, Wei; Chen, Liang; Dai, Jian; Wei, Yuhua; Zhang, Jianxin; Yang, Xuan; Yang, Xijing; Liu, Daolong; Yu, Liquan; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Sun, Hunan; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactia) GapC is a highly conserved surface dehydrogenase among the streptococcus spp., which is responsible for inducing protective antibody immune responses in animals. However, the B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactia GapC have not been well characterized. In this study, a monoclonal antibody 1F2 (mAb1F2) against S. dysgalactiae GapC was generated by the hybridoma technique and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12) for mapping the linear B-cell epitope. The mAb1F2 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif TRINDLT. Amino acid sequence of the motif exactly matched (30)TRINDLT(36) of the S. dysgalactia GapC. Subsequently, site-directed mutagenic analysis further demonstrated that residues R31, I32, N33, D34 and L35 formed the core of (30)TRINDLT(36), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1F2. The epitope (30)TRINDLT(36) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Overall, our findings characterized a conserved B-cell epitope, which will be useful for the further study of epitope-based vaccines.

  6. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for human insulin-like growth factor-I using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies with defined epitope recognition.

    PubMed

    Tamura, K; Kobayashi, M; Suzuki, S; Ishii, Y; Koyama, S; Yamada, H; Hashimoto, K; Niwa, M; Shibayama, F

    1990-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAb) and polyclonal antibodies (PcAb) against human insulin-like growth factor-I (somatomedin C; hIGF-I) were produced. Using these two antibodies, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system for hIGF-I was established. The ELISA system was able to detect hIGF-I at a range of 1-25 micrograms/l, compared with the range of 1-50 micrograms/l detected by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Human IGF-II and human insulin could not be recognized in this system. The plasma concentrations of IGF-I found using the ELISA agreed well with those found using RIA after conventional Sep-Pak C18 cartridge pretreatment. Epitopes of hIGF-I to McAb and PcAb were investigated by enzymatic digestion of hIGF-I followed by comparing the affinity of the antibodies to the peptides obtained proteolytically. The epitope to McAb was found to be a peptide containing Leu10-Val11-Asp12 (epitope 2). Five epitopes to PcAb containing the following key fragments were identified: a conformational structure formed by the disulphide bonds between Cys6 and Cys48, and between Cys47 and Cys52 (epitope 1), Leu10-Val11-Asp12 (epitope 2), Val17-Cys18-Gly19-Asp20 (epitope 3), Arg21-Gly22-Phe23-Tyr24 (epitope 4) and Lys68-Ser69-Ala70 (epitope 5). Of these, the peptide containing epitope 5 showed the highest affinity to PcAb. The results indicated that our ELISA system combined recognition by epitope 2 of McAb and recognition by epitope 5 of PcAb to obtain its good specificity.

  7. Recognition and sensing of low-epitope targets via ternary complexes with oligonucleotides and synthetic receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kyung-Ae; Barbu, Mihaela; Halim, Marlin; Pallavi, Payal; Kim, Benjamin; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M.; Pecic, Stevan; Taylor, Steven; Worgall, Tilla S.; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2014-11-01

    Oligonucleotide-based receptors or aptamers can interact with small molecules, but the ability to achieve high-affinity and specificity of these interactions depends strongly on functional groups or epitopes displayed by the binding targets. Some classes of targets are particularly challenging: for example, monosaccharides have scarce functionalities and no aptamers have been reported to recognize, let alone distinguish from each other, glucose and other hexoses. Here we report aptamers that differentiate low-epitope targets such as glucose, fructose or galactose by forming ternary complexes with high-epitope organic receptors for monosaccharides. In a follow-up example, we expand this method to isolate high-affinity oligonucleotides against aromatic amino acids complexed in situ with a nonspecific organometallic receptor. The method is general and enables broad clinical use of aptamers for the detection of small molecules in mix-and-measure assays, as demonstrated by monitoring postprandial waves of phenylalanine in human subjects.

  8. Preferential urn model and nongrowing complex networks.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Jun; Yasuda, Muneki; Tanaka, Kazuyuki

    2005-12-01

    A preferential urn model, which is based on the concept "the rich get richer," is proposed. From a relationship between a nongrowing model for complex networks and the preferential urn model in regard to degree distributions, it is revealed that a fitness parameter in the nongrowing model is interpreted as an inverse local temperature in the preferential urn model. Furthermore, it is clarified that the preferential urn model with randomness generates a fat-tailed occupation distribution; the concept of the local temperature enables us to understand the fat-tailed occupation distribution intuitively. Since the preferential urn model is a simple stochastic model, it can be applied to research on not only the nongrowing complex networks, but also many other fields such as econophysics and social sciences.

  9. A synthetic multi-epitope antigen enhances hepatitis C virus-specific B- and T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guimei; Chen, Shuwen; Zhu, Xiangying; Liang, Shenghua; Liu, Longding; Ren, Daming

    2011-04-01

    Combining results from previous studies, a multi-epitope antigen PCXZ against the hepatitis C virus was synthesized in this study. The antigenic specificity of PCXZ was determined by recognizing antibodies in serum samples from hepatitis C virus patients, but not from healthy subjects or subjects who had the hepatitis B virus. The characteristics of PCXZ immunogenicity were evaluated in BALB/c mice. Strong antibody responses were generated in mice immunized with either naked PCXZ or PCXZ in Freund's adjuvant. As for the T-cell responses, Freund's adjuvant significantly increased interferon-γ secretion and enhanced the lytic activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The epitope Pa, one component of PCXZ, made the most significant contribution to specific CTL lysis; this epitope was also a B-cell epitope and was able to induce high IgG titers. In summary, PCXZ was found to be highly immunogenic, and elicited both humoral and cellular immune responses in mice.

  10. Homophily versus preferential attachment: Evolutionary mechanisms of scientific collaboration networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Zhu, Jonathan J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Homophily and preferential attachment are among the most recognized mechanisms of network evolution. Instead of examining the two mechanisms separately, this study considers them jointly in a scholarly collaboration network. Specifically, when a new scholar enters a field, how does he/she choose the first collaborator from the pool of available scholars? We find that new scholars tend to collaborate with someone who works in the same institution (which is called constrained acceptance), shares similar specialty interests (active choice), or has already worked with many collaborators (random action). We view constrained acceptance and active choice as supporting evidence for homophily (because similarity is attractive) and random action as supporting evidence for preferential attachment (because popularity is attractive). As such, both homophily and preferential attachment affect the evolution of collaboration networks. Furthermore, the influences vary over time with random action, constrained acceptance, and active choice taking turns to act the dominant force at the beginning, middle and later phases of the evolution process, respectively.

  11. Depigmented Allergoids Reveal New Epitopes with Capacity to Induce IgG Blocking Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    López-Matas, M. Angeles; Gallego, Mayte; Iraola, Víctor; Robinson, Douglas; Carnés, Jerónimo

    2013-01-01

    Background. The synthesis of allergen-specific blocking IgGs that interact with IgE after allergen immunotherapy (SIT) has been related to clinical efficacy. The objectives were to investigate the epitope specificity of IgG-antibodies induced by depigmented-polymerized (Dpg-Pol) allergoids and unmodified allergen extracts, and examine IgE-blocking activity of induced IgG-antibodies. Methods. Rabbits were immunized with native and Dpg-Pol extracts of birch pollen, and serum samples were obtained. Recognition of linear IgG-epitopes of Bet v 1 and Bet v 2 and the capacity of these IgG-antibodies to block binding of human-IgE was determined. Results. Serum from rabbits immunized with native extracts recognised 11 linear epitopes from Bet v 1, while that from Dpg-Pol-immunized animals recognised 8. For Bet v 2, 8 epitopes were recognized by IgG from native immunized animals, and 9 from Dpg-Pol immunized one. Dpg-Pol and native immunized serum did not always recognise the same epitopes, but specific-IgG from both could block human-IgE binding sites for native extract. Conclusions. Depigmented-polymerized birch extract stimulates the synthesis of specific IgG-antibodies which recognize common but also novel epitopes compared with native extracts. IgG-antibodies induced by Dpg-Pol effectively inhibit human-IgE binding to allergens which may be part of the mechanism of action of SIT. PMID:24222901

  12. Isolation and epitope mapping of staphylococcal enterotoxin B single-domain antibodies.

    PubMed

    Turner, Kendrick B; Zabetakis, Dan; Legler, Patricia; Goldman, Ellen R; Anderson, George P

    2014-06-19

    Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs), derived from the heavy chain only antibodies found in camelids such as llamas have the potential to provide rugged detection reagents with high affinities, and the ability to refold after denaturation. We have isolated and characterized sdAbs specific to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) which bind to two distinct epitopes and are able to function in a sandwich immunoassay for toxin detection. Characterization of these sdAbs revealed that each exhibited nanomolar binding affinities or better.  Melting temperatures for the sdAbs ranged from approximately 60 °C to over 70 °C, with each demonstrating at least partial refolding after denaturation and several were able to completely refold. A first set of sdAbs was isolated by panning the library using adsorbed antigen, all of which recognized the same epitope on SEB. Epitope mapping suggested that these sdAbs bind to a particular fragment of SEB (VKSIDQFLYFDLIYSI) containing position L45 (underlined), which is involved in binding to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Differences in the binding affinities of the sdAbs to SEB and a less-toxic vaccine immunogen, SEBv (L45R/Y89A/Y94A) were also consistent with binding to this epitope. A sandwich panning strategy was utilized to isolate sdAbs which bind a second epitope. This epitope differed from the initial one obtained or from that recognized by previously isolated anti-SEB sdAb A3. Using SEB-toxin spiked milk we demonstrated that these newly isolated sdAbs could be utilized in sandwich-assays with each other, A3, and with various monoclonal antibodies.

  13. Predicting population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Sidney, John; Dinh, Kenny; Southwood, Scott; Newman, Mark J; Sette, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Background T cells recognize a complex between a specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule and a particular pathogen-derived epitope. A given epitope will elicit a response only in individuals that express an MHC molecule capable of binding that particular epitope. MHC molecules are extremely polymorphic and over a thousand different human MHC (HLA) alleles are known. A disproportionate amount of MHC polymorphism occurs in positions constituting the peptide-binding region, and as a result, MHC molecules exhibit a widely varying binding specificity. In the design of peptide-based vaccines and diagnostics, the issue of population coverage in relation to MHC polymorphism is further complicated by the fact that different HLA types are expressed at dramatically different frequencies in different ethnicities. Thus, without careful consideration, a vaccine or diagnostic with ethnically biased population coverage could result. Results To address this issue, an algorithm was developed to calculate, on the basis of HLA genotypic frequencies, the fraction of individuals expected to respond to a given epitope set, diagnostic or vaccine. The population coverage estimates are based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data, although the tool can be utilized in a more general fashion. The algorithm was implemented as a web-application available at . Conclusion We have developed a web-based tool to predict population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data. Accordingly, epitope-based vaccines or diagnostics can be designed to maximize population coverage, while minimizing complexity (that is, the number of different epitopes included in the diagnostic or vaccine), and also minimizing the variability of coverage obtained or projected in different ethnic groups. PMID:16545123

  14. Diverse specificity and effector function among human antibodies to HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein epitopes exposed by CD4 binding

    DOE PAGES

    Guan, Yongjun; Pazgier, Marzena; Sajadi, Mohammad M.; ...

    2012-12-13

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) undergoes conformational transitions consequent to CD4 binding and coreceptor engagement during viral entry. The physical steps in this process are becoming defined, but less is known about their significance as targets of antibodies potentially protective against HIV-1 infection. Here we probe the functional significance of transitional epitope exposure by characterizing 41 human mAbs specific for epitopes exposed on trimeric Env after CD4 engagement. These mAbs recognize three epitope clusters: cluster A, the gp120 face occluded by gp41 in trimeric Env; cluster B, a region proximal to the coreceptor-binding site (CoRBS) and involving the V1/V2 domain;more » and cluster C, the coreceptor-binding site. The mAbs were evaluated functionally by antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and for neutralization of Tiers 1 and 2 pseudoviruses. All three clusters included mAbs mediating ADCC. However, there was a strong potency bias for cluster A, which harbors at least three potent ADCC epitopes whose cognate mAbs have electropositive paratopes. Cluster A epitopes are functional ADCC targets during viral entry in an assay format using virion-sensitized target cells. In contrast, only cluster C contained epitopes that were recognized by neutralizing mAbs. There was significant diversity in breadth and potency that correlated with epitope fine specificity. In contrast, ADCC potency had no relationship with neutralization potency or breadth for any epitope cluster. In conclusion, Fc-mediated effector function and neutralization coselect with specificity in anti-Env antibody responses, but the nature of selection is distinct for these two antiviral activities.« less

  15. Diverse specificity and effector function among human antibodies to HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein epitopes exposed by CD4 binding

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Yongjun; Pazgier, Marzena; Sajadi, Mohammad M.; Kamin-Lewis, Roberta; Al-Darmarki, Salma; Flinko, Robin; Lovo, Elena; Wu, Xueji; Robinson, James E.; Seaman, Michael S.; Fouts, Timothy R.; Gallo, Robert C.; DeVico, Anthony L.; Lewis, George K.

    2012-12-13

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) undergoes conformational transitions consequent to CD4 binding and coreceptor engagement during viral entry. The physical steps in this process are becoming defined, but less is known about their significance as targets of antibodies potentially protective against HIV-1 infection. Here we probe the functional significance of transitional epitope exposure by characterizing 41 human mAbs specific for epitopes exposed on trimeric Env after CD4 engagement. These mAbs recognize three epitope clusters: cluster A, the gp120 face occluded by gp41 in trimeric Env; cluster B, a region proximal to the coreceptor-binding site (CoRBS) and involving the V1/V2 domain; and cluster C, the coreceptor-binding site. The mAbs were evaluated functionally by antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and for neutralization of Tiers 1 and 2 pseudoviruses. All three clusters included mAbs mediating ADCC. However, there was a strong potency bias for cluster A, which harbors at least three potent ADCC epitopes whose cognate mAbs have electropositive paratopes. Cluster A epitopes are functional ADCC targets during viral entry in an assay format using virion-sensitized target cells. In contrast, only cluster C contained epitopes that were recognized by neutralizing mAbs. There was significant diversity in breadth and potency that correlated with epitope fine specificity. In contrast, ADCC potency had no relationship with neutralization potency or breadth for any epitope cluster. In conclusion, Fc-mediated effector function and neutralization coselect with specificity in anti-Env antibody responses, but the nature of selection is distinct for these two antiviral activities.

  16. Antibody biomarker discovery through in vitro directed evolution of consensus recognition epitopes.

    PubMed

    Ballew, John T; Murray, Joseph A; Collin, Pekka; Mäki, Markku; Kagnoff, Martin F; Kaukinen, Katri; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2013-11-26

    To enable discovery of serum antibodies indicative of disease and simultaneously develop reagents suitable for diagnosis, in vitro directed evolution was applied to identify consensus peptides recognized by patients' serum antibodies. Bacterial cell-displayed peptide libraries were quantitatively screened for binders to serum antibodies from patients with celiac disease (CD), using cell-sorting instrumentation to identify two distinct consensus epitope families specific to CD patients (PEQ and (E)/DxFV(Y)/FQ). Evolution of the (E)/DxFV(Y)/FQ consensus epitope identified a celiac-specific epitope, distinct from the two CD hallmark antigens tissue transglutaminase-2 and deamidated gliadin, exhibiting 71% sensitivity and 99% specificity (n = 231). Expansion of the first-generation PEQ consensus epitope via in vitro evolution yielded octapeptides QPEQAFPE and PFPEQxFP that identified ω- and γ-gliadins, and their deamidated forms, as immunodominant B-cell epitopes in wheat and related cereal proteins. The evolved octapeptides, but not first-generation peptides, discriminated one-way blinded CD and non-CD sera (n = 78) with exceptional accuracy, yielding 100% sensitivity and 98% specificity. Because this method, termed antibody diagnostics via evolution of peptides, does not require prior knowledge of pathobiology, it may be broadly useful for de novo discovery of antibody biomarkers and reagents for their detection.

  17. Blister-inducing antibodies target multiple epitopes on collagen VII in mice

    PubMed Central

    Csorba, Kinga; Chiriac, Mircea Teodor; Florea, Florina; Ghinia, Miruna Georgiana; Licarete, Emilia; Rados, Andreea; Sas, Alexandra; Vuta, Vlad; Sitaru, Cassian

    2014-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease of mucous membranes and the skin caused by autoantibodies against collagen VII. In silico and wet laboratory epitope mapping studies revealed numerous distinct epitopes recognized by EBA patients' autoantibodies within the non-collagenous (NC)1 and NC2 domains of collagen VII. However, the distribution of pathogenic epitopes on collagen VII has not yet been described. In this study, we therefore performed an in vivo functional epitope mapping of pathogenic autoantibodies in experimental EBA. Animals (n = 10/group) immunized against fragments of the NC1 and NC2 domains of collagen VII or injected with antibodies generated against the same fragments developed to different extent experimental EBA. Our results demonstrate that antibodies targeting multiple, distinct epitopes distributed over the entire NC1, but not NC2 domain of collagen VII induce blistering skin disease in vivo. Our present findings have crucial implications for the development of antigen-specific B- and T cell-targeted therapies in EBA. PMID:25091020

  18. Epitope mapping of metuximab on CD147 using phage display and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    He, Bifang; Mao, Canquan; Ru, Beibei; Han, Hesong; Zhou, Peng; Huang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Metuximab is the generic name of Licartin, a new drug for radioimmunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. Although it is known to be a mouse monoclonal antibody against CD147, the complete epitope mediating the binding of metuximab to CD147 remains unknown. We panned the Ph.D.-12 phage display peptide library against metuximab and got six mimotopes. The following bioinformatics analysis based on mimotopes suggested that metuximab recognizes a conformational epitope composed of more than 20 residues. The residues of its epitope may include T28, V30, K36, L38, K57, F74, D77, S78, D79, D80, Q81, G83, S86, N98, Q100, L101, H102, G103, P104, V131, P132, and K191. The homology modeling of metuximab and the docking of CD147 to metuximab were also performed. Based on the top one docking model, the epitope was predicted to contain 28 residues: AGTVFTTV (23-30), I37, D45, E84, V88, EPMGTANIQLH (92-102), VPP (131-133), Q164, and K191. Almost half of the residues predicted on the basis of mimotope analysis also appear in the docking result, indicating that both results are reliable. As the predicted epitopes of metuximab largely overlap with interfaces of CD147-CD147 interactions, a structural mechanism of metuximab is proposed as blocking the formation of CD147 dimer.

  19. Identification and characterization of nematode specific protective epitopes of Brugia malayi TRX towards development of synthetic vaccine construct for lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Madhumathi, Jayaprakasam; Prince, Prabhu Rajaiah; Anugraha, Gandhirajan; Kiran, Pote; Rao, Donthamsetty Nageswara; Reddy, Maryada Venkata Rami; Kaliraj, Perumal

    2010-07-12

    Although multi-epitope vaccines have been evaluated for various diseases, they have not yet been investigated for lymphatic filariasis. Here, we report for the first time identification of two immunodominant B epitopes (TRXP1 and TRXP2) from the antioxidant Brugia malayi thioredoxin by studying their immune responses in mice model and human subjects. TRXP1 was also found to harbor a T epitope recognized by human PBMCs and mice splenocytes. Further, the epitopic peptides were synthesized as a single peptide conjugate (PC1) and their prophylactic efficacy was tested in a murine model of filariasis with L3 larvae. PC1 conferred a significantly high protection (75.14%) (P < 0.0001) compared to control (3.7%) and recombinant TRX (63.03%) (P < 0.018) in experimental filariasis. Our results suggest that multi-epitope vaccines could be a promising strategy in the control of lymphatic filariasis.

  20. Epitope structure of the Bordetella pertussis protein P.69 pertactin, a major vaccine component and protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Hijnen, Marcel; Mooi, Frits R; van Gageldonk, Pieter G M; Hoogerhout, Peter; King, Audrey J; Berbers, Guy A M

    2004-07-01

    Bordetella pertussis is reemerging in several countries with a traditionally high vaccine uptake. An analysis of clinical isolates revealed antigenic divergence between vaccine strains and circulating strains with respect to P.69 pertactin. Polymorphisms in P.69 pertactin are mainly limited to regions comprised of amino acid repeats, designated region 1 and region 2. Region 1 flanks the RGD motif, which is involved in adherence. Although antibodies against P.69 pertactin are implicated in protective immunity, little is known about the structure and location of its epitopes. Here we describe the identification by pepscan analysis of the locations of mainly linear epitopes recognized by human sera and mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). A total of 24 epitopes were identified, and of these only 2 were recognized by both MAbs and human antibodies in serum. A number of immunodominant epitopes were identified which were recognized by 78 to 93% of the human sera tested. Blocking experiments indicated the presence of high-avidity human antibodies against conformational epitopes. Human antibodies against linear epitopes had much lower avidities, as they were unable to block MAbs. Pepscan analyses revealed several MAbs which bound to both region 1 and region 2. The two regions are separated by 289 amino acids in the primary structure, and we discuss the possibility that they form a single conformational epitope. Thus, both repeat regions may serve to deflect the immune response targeted to the functional domain of P.69 pertactin. This may explain why the variation in P.69 pertactin is so effective, despite the fact that it is limited to only two small segments of the molecule.

  1. Malondialdehyde epitopes as mediators of sterile inflammation.

    PubMed

    Busch, Clara J; Binder, Christoph J

    2017-04-01

    Enhanced lipid peroxidation occurs during oxidative stress and results in the generation of lipid peroxidation end products such as malondialdehyde (MDA), which can attach to autologous biomolecules, thereby generating neo-self epitopes capable of inducing potentially undesired biological responses. Therefore, the immune system has developed mechanisms to protect from MDA epitopes by binding and neutralizing them through both cellular and soluble effectors. Here, we briefly discuss innate immune responses targeting MDA epitopes and their pro-inflammatory properties, followed by a review of physiological carriers of MDA epitopes that are relevant in homeostasis and disease. Then we discuss in detail the evidence for cellular responses towards MDA epitopes mainly in lung, liver and the circulation as well as signal transduction mechanisms and receptors implicated in the response to MDA epitopes. Last, we hypothesize on the role of MDA epitopes as mediators of inflammation in diseases and speculate on their contribution to disease pathogenesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid modification and lipid peroxidation products in innate immunity and inflammation edited by Christoph J. Binder.

  2. Cross-reactive and major virus-specific epitopes are located at the N-terminal halves of the cylindrical inclusion proteins of turnip mosaic and zucchini yellow mosaic potyviruses.

    PubMed

    Kundu, A K; Ohshima, K; Sako, N; Yaegashi, H

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the antigenic nature of cylindrical inclusion proteins (CIPs) of the potyviruses Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) and Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the two CIPs were produced and epitopes on the CIPs were localized using Escherichia coli-expressed CIP fragments in Western blot analysis. All 23 MAbs against ZYMV CIP reacted only with ZYMV CIP. In contrast out of the 18 MAbs produced against TuMV CIP, 14 MAbs were TuMV CIP-specific while the remaining four MAbs cross-reacted with both CIPs. The four cross-reactive MAbs recognized two distinct epitopes in the N-terminal half of TuMV CIP corresponding to amino acid residues 103-119 and 224-237. Thirteen out of 14 TuMV CIP-specific MAbs recognized two distinct epitopes within residues 1-102 and 120-214, while the other one recognized an epitope within residues 301-644. On the other hand, 21 out of 23 ZYMV CIP-specific MAbs recognized epitopes within residues 1-118, while the remaining two recognized epitopes within residues 301-522. These results suggest that cross-reactive and major virus-specific epitopes are located at the N-terminal half of the respective CIPs.

  3. Comparison of antibody responses to different forms of HIV-1 core antigens by epitope mapping.

    PubMed

    Truong, C; Brand, D; Mallet, F; Roingeard, P; Barin, F

    1997-03-01

    The specificity of antibodies to HIV-1 capsid (p24CA) and matrix (p17MA) proteins, produced in mice against unprocessed immature assembled polyprotein (wild-type p55 virus-like particles or chimeric p55 virus-like particles) or against the monomeric mature form (rp24CA/rp17MA), was analyzed by a microplate epitope mapping assay using a panel of synthetic peptides covering the entire p24CA plus p17MA sequences of HIV-1LAI. All immunized mice developed anti-p24CA and anti-p17MA antibodies, although the spectrum of specificity of these antibodies was different. Four p24 CA epitopes (residues 176-192, 201-218, 233-253, 285-304) were recognized by anti-rp24CA/rp17MA antibodies, whereas one p17MA epitope (residues 11-25) and one p24CA epitope (residues 176-192) were constantly recognized by anti-p55 virus-like particle antibodies. These results suggest a different specificity pattern of anti-p24CA and anti-p17MA antibodies depending on whether they are produced against the soluble mature form or the immature assembled form of the gag proteins.

  4. Mapping of the epitopes of poliovirus type 2 in complex with antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bannwarth, Ludovic; Girerd-Chambaz, Yves; Arteni, Ana; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Ronzon, Frederic; Manin, Catherine; Vénien-Bryan, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    The inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) contains poliovirus (PV) samples that belong to serotypes 1, 2 and 3. All three serotypes contain the D-antigen, which induces protective antibodies. The antigenic structure of PVs consists of at least four different antigenic sites and the D-antigen content represents the combined activity of multiple epitopes (Ferguson et al., 1993; Minor, 1990; Minor et al., 1986). The potency of IPV vaccines is determined by measuring the D-antigen content. Several ELISA methods have been developed using polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) in order to quantify the D-antigen content. Characterization of the epitopes recognized by the different Mabs is crucial to map the entire virus surface and ensure the presence of epitopes able to induce neutralizing antibodies. Using a new approach that we developed to study the interaction between monoclonal antibodies and poliovirus type 2, which combines cryo-electron microscopy, image analysis and X-ray crystallography along with identification of exposed amino acids, we have mapped in 3D the epitope sites recognized by three specific Fabs at the surface of poliovirus type 2 (PV2) and characterized precisely the antigenic sites for these Fabs.

  5. Identification and Characterization of Ovarian Carcinoma Peptide Epitopes Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    restricted response from two of six different donors. The peptide sensitized targets for lysis at 1 to 20 nM, indicating that these CTL had receptors ...Immunoediting. Annu Rev Immunol 2004;22(1):329-60. 2. Lollini PL, Cavallo F, Nanni P, Forni G . Vaccines for tumour prevention. Nature Reviews...number? Curr Opin Immunol 2005;17(3):320-5. 6. Parmiani G , Castelli C, Rivoltini L, et al. Immunotherapy of melanoma. Semin Cancer Biol 2003;13(6

  6. Identification and Characterization of Ovarian Carcinoma Peptide Epitopes Recognized by Cylotoxic T Lymphocytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    class II MHC -specific mAb, L243 (Appendix 1, Fig. 2 ). Most lines do not express class II MHC molecules, although low...it was first necessary to characterize the available patient material for class I MHC , TAG, FBP, and Her- 2 /neu expression as has now been done... Class I and II MHC expression The class I MHC genotype of each of the ovarian cancer lines was determined by PCR analysis (Table 2 ). Because

  7. Identification and Characterization of Ovarian Carcinoma Peptide Epitopes Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    class II MHC molecules as determined by their ability to bind the class II MHC -specific mAb, L243 (Fig. 2 ). Most lines do not...express class II MHC molecules, although low expression was detected on CAOV-3, CAOV-4, OVCAR-3, SW626, and a subpopulation of ES- 2 . This indicates that...representative of a minimum of two independent experiments for each cell line. 22 Fig. 2 Class I and class II MHC

  8. Epitope mapping for monoclonal antibodies recognizing tuber necrotic isolates of Potato virus Y

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato virus Y (PVY) is an important viral pathogen of potato responsible for reducing tuber yield and quality across the globe. The PVYN and PVYNTN strains, the latter of which induces potato tuber necrotic ringspot disease (PTNRD), are regulated for international potato trade, and have been routin...

  9. Emergence of tempered preferential attachment from optimization

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Raissa M.; Borgs, Christian; Chayes, Jennifer T.; Berger, Noam; Kleinberg, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    We show how preferential attachment can emerge in an optimization framework, resolving a long-standing theoretical controversy. We also show that the preferential attachment model so obtained has two novel features, saturation and viability, which have natural interpretations in the underlying network and lead to a power-law degree distribution with exponential cutoff. Moreover, we consider a generalized version of this preferential attachment model with independent saturation and viability, leading to a broader class of power laws again with exponential cutoff. We present a collection of empirical observations from social, biological, physical, and technological networks, for which such degree distributions give excellent fits. We suggest that, in general, optimization models that give rise to preferential attachment with saturation and viability effects form a good starting point for the analysis of many networks. PMID:17395721

  10. Novel and promiscuous CTL epitopes in conserved regions of Gag targeted by individuals with early subtype C HIV type 1 infection from southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Masemola, Agatha M; Mashishi, Tumelo N; Khoury, Greg; Bredell, Helba; Paximadis, Maria; Mathebula, Tiyani; Barkhan, Debra; Puren, Adrian; Vardas, Efthyia; Colvin, Mark; Zijenah, Lynn; Katzenstein, David; Musonda, Rosemary; Allen, Susan; Kumwenda, Newton; Taha, Taha; Gray, Glenda; McIntyre, James; Karim, Salim Abdool; Sheppard, Haynes W; Gray, Clive M

    2004-10-01

    Characterization of optimal CTL epitopes in Gag can provide crucial information for evaluation of candidate vaccines in populations at the epicenter of the HIV-1 epidemic. We screened 38 individuals with recent subtype C HIV-1 infection using overlapping consensus C Gag peptides and hypothesized that unique HLA-restricting alleles in the southern African population would determine novel epitope identity. Seventy-four percent of individuals recognized at least one Gag peptide pool. Ten epitopic regions were identified across p17, p24, and p2p7p1p6, and greater than two-thirds of targeted regions were directed at: TGTEELRSLYNTVATLY (p17, 35%); GPKEPFRDYVDRFFKTLRAEQATQDV (p24, 19%); and RGGKLDKWEKIRLRPGGKKHYMLKHL (p17, 15%). After alignment of these epitopic regions with consensus M and a consensus subtype C sequence from the cohort, it was evident that the regions targeted were highly conserved. Fine epitope mapping revealed that five of nine identified optimal Gag epitopes were novel: HLVWASREL, LVWASRELERF, LYNTVATLY, PFRDYVDRFF, and TLRAEQATQD, and were restricted by unique HLA-Cw*08, HLA-A*30/B*57, HLA-A*29/B*44, and HLA-Cw*03 alleles, respectively. Notably, three of the mapped epitopes were restricted by more than one HLA allele. Although these epitopes were novel and restricted by unique HLA, they overlapped or were embedded within previously described CTL epitopes from subtype B HIV-1 infection. These data emphasize the promiscuous nature of epitope binding and support our hypothesis that HLA diversity between populations can shape fine epitope identity, but may not represent a constraint for universal recognition of Gag in highly conserved domains.

  11. IMMUNOCAT-a data management system for epitope mapping studies.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jo L; Sun, Jian; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2010-01-01

    To enable rationale vaccine design, studies of molecular and cellular mechanisms of immune recognition need to be linked with clinical studies in humans. A major challenge in conducting such translational research studies lies in the management and integration of large amounts and various types of data collected from multiple sources. For this purpose, we have established "IMMUNOCAT", an interactive data management system for the epitope discovery research projects conducted by our group. The system provides functions to store, query, and analyze clinical and experimental data, enabling efficient, systematic, and integrative data management. We demonstrate how IMMUNOCAT is utilized in a large-scale research contract that aims to identify epitopes in common allergens recognized by T cells from human donors, in order to facilitate the rational design of allergy vaccines. At clinical sites, demographic information and disease history of each enrolled donor are captured, followed by results of an allergen skin test and blood draw. At the laboratory site, T cells derived from blood samples are tested for reactivity against a panel of peptides derived from common human allergens. IMMUNOCAT stores results from these T cell assays along with MHC:peptide binding data, results from RAST tests for antibody titers in donor serum, and the respective donor HLA typing results. Through this system, we are able to perform queries and integrated analyses of the various types of data. This provides a case study for the use of bioinformatics and information management techniques to track and analyze data produced in a translational research study aimed at epitope identification.

  12. The two-faced T cell epitope

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Leonard; Gutierrez, Andres H.; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Terry, Frances; Leng, Qibin; Abdel Hady, Karim M.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Losikoff, Phyllis T.; Martin, William D.; Rothman, Alan L; De Groot, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the field of T cell immunology have contributed to the understanding that cross-reactivity is an intrinsic characteristic of the T cell receptor (TCR), and that each TCR can potentially interact with many different T cell epitopes. To better define the potential for TCR cross-reactivity between epitopes derived from the human genome, the human microbiome, and human pathogens, we developed a new immunoinformatics tool, JanusMatrix, that represents an extension of the validated T cell epitope mapping tool, EpiMatrix. Initial explorations, summarized in this synopsis, have uncovered what appear to be important differences in the TCR cross-reactivity of selected regulatory and effector T cell epitopes with other epitopes in the human genome, human microbiome, and selected human pathogens. In addition to exploring the T cell epitope relationships between human self, commensal and pathogen, JanusMatrix may also be useful to explore some aspects of heterologous immunity and to examine T cell epitope relatedness between pathogens to which humans are exposed (Dengue serotypes, or HCV and Influenza, for example). In Hand-Foot-Mouth disease (HFMD) for example, extensive enterovirus and human microbiome cross-reactivity (and limited cross-reactivity with the human genome) seemingly predicts immunodominance. In contrast, more extensive cross-reactivity with proteins contained in the human genome as compared to the human microbiome was observed for selected Treg epitopes. While it may be impossible to predict all immune response influences, the availability of sequence data from the human genome, the human microbiome, and an array of human pathogens and vaccines has made computationally–driven exploration of the effects of T cell epitope cross-reactivity now possible. This is the first description of JanusMatrix, an algorithm that assesses TCR cross-reactivity that may contribute to a means of predicting the phenotype of T cells responding to selected T cell

  13. Epitope mapping: the first step in developing epitope-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gershoni, Jonathan M; Roitburd-Berman, Anna; Siman-Tov, Dror D; Tarnovitski Freund, Natalia; Weiss, Yael

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies are an effective line of defense in preventing infectious diseases. Highly potent neutralizing antibodies can intercept a virus before it attaches to its target cell and, thus, inactivate it. This ability is based on the antibodies' specific recognition of epitopes, the sites of the antigen to which antibodies bind. Thus, understanding the antibody/epitope interaction provides a basis for the rational design of preventive vaccines. It is assumed that immunization with the precise epitope, corresponding to an effective neutralizing antibody, would elicit the generation of similarly potent antibodies in the vaccinee. Such a vaccine would be a 'B-cell epitope-based vaccine', the implementation of which requires the ability to backtrack from a desired antibody to its corresponding epitope. In this article we discuss a range of methods that enable epitope discovery based on a specific antibody. Such a reversed immunological approach is the first step in the rational design of an epitope-based vaccine. Undoubtedly, the gold standard for epitope definition is x-ray analyses of crystals of antigen:antibody complexes. This method provides atomic resolution of the epitope; however, it is not readily applicable to many antigens and antibodies, and requires a very high degree of sophistication and expertise. Most other methods rely on the ability to monitor the binding of the antibody to antigen fragments or mutated variations. In mutagenesis of the antigen, loss of binding due to point modification of an amino acid residue is often considered an indication of an epitope component. In addition, computational combinatorial methods for epitope mapping are also useful. These methods rely on the ability of the antibody of interest to affinity isolate specific short peptides from combinatorial phage display peptide libraries. The peptides are then regarded as leads for the definition of the epitope corresponding to the antibody used to screen the peptide library. For

  14. Linear Multi-Epitope (Glyco)peptides for Type-specific Serology of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) infections.

    PubMed

    Risinger, Christian Walter; Sørensen, Kasper Kildegaard; Jensen, Knud J; Olofsson, Sigvard; Bergstrom, Tomas; Blixt, Ola

    2017-02-26

    Detection of type-specific antibodies is an important and essential part of accurate diagnosis, even in silent carriers of HSV-1 (oral) and HSV-2 (genital) infections. Serologic assays that identify HSV-1 and HSV-2 type-specific antibodies have been commercially available for more than a decade but often face problems related to cross-reactivity and similar issues. Attempts to identify type specific peptide epitopes for use in serology for both HSV-1 and HSV-2 have been limited. We recently demonstrated epitope mapping of envelope glycoprotein G2 and identified a type-specific glycopeptide epitope that broadly recognized HSV-2 infected individuals. In the present work we have performed a comprehensive glycopeptide synthesis and microarray epitope mapping of 14 envelope proteins from HSV-1 and HSV-2, namely: gB, gC, gD, gE, gG, gH and gI, using sera from HSV-1 and HSV-2 infected individuals and control sera. Several unique type-specific peptide epitopes with a high cumulative sensitivity were identified and synthesized as one large linear multi-epitope sequence using microwave assisted solid-phase-(glyco)peptide synthesis. Microarray validation with clinically defined HSV and Varicella Zoster (VZV) sera confirmed excellent specificities and sensitivities.

  15. Definition of a discontinuous immunodominant epitope at the NH2 terminus of the La/SS-B ribonucleoprotein autoantigen.

    PubMed Central

    McNeilage, L J; Umapathysivam, K; Macmillan, E; Guidolin, A; Whittingham, S; Gordon, T

    1992-01-01

    High-titer IgG autoantibodies to the La/SS-B ribonucleoprotein (RNP) are a hallmark of patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome. Anti-La/SS-B-positive human sera bind to multiple epitopes on recombinant La/SS-B, although the initial response is against an immunodominant epitope within the first 107 NH2-terminal amino acids (aa). Sequence analysis has identified a striking homology between aa 88-101 in this NH2-terminal region of La/SS-B and a feline retroviral gag polypeptide suggesting the anti-La/SS-B response may be initiated by cross-reactivity with an exogenous agent. In the present study, detailed mapping of this NH2-terminal epitope, using recombinant La/SS-B purified from the expression of overlapping DNA fragments spanning aa 1-107, has shown that this immunodominant epitope is a complex conformational or discontinuous epitope dependent upon both aa 12-28 and 82-99 for expression, even though these regions share no homology with each other. This requirement questions the significance of the homology between La/SS-B and a retroviral gag polypeptide in the generation of the B cell response to La/SS-B and is in accord with the general concept that B cells recognize conformational epitopes on antigens rather than small linear peptide sequences. The finding also reinforces the notion that native autoantigen could be the initiator of the autoimmune response. Images PMID:1373741

  16. Antibody Recognition of a Highly Conserved Influenza Virus Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Ekiert, Damian C.; Bhabha, Gira; Elsliger, Marc-André; Friesen, Robert H.E.; Jongeneelen, Mandy; Throsby, Mark; Goudsmit, Jaap; Wilson, Ian A.; Scripps; Crucell

    2009-05-21

    Influenza virus presents an important and persistent threat to public health worldwide, and current vaccines provide immunity to viral isolates similar to the vaccine strain. High-affinity antibodies against a conserved epitope could provide immunity to the diverse influenza subtypes and protection against future pandemic viruses. Cocrystal structures were determined at 2.2 and 2.7 angstrom resolutions for broadly neutralizing human antibody CR6261 Fab in complexes with the major surface antigen (hemagglutinin, HA) from viruses responsible for the 1918 H1N1 influenza pandemic and a recent lethal case of H5N1 avian influenza. In contrast to other structurally characterized influenza antibodies, CR6261 recognizes a highly conserved helical region in the membrane-proximal stem of HA1 and HA2. The antibody neutralizes the virus by blocking conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion. The CR6261 epitope identified here should accelerate the design and implementation of improved vaccines that can elicit CR6261-like antibodies, as well as antibody-based therapies for the treatment of influenza.

  17. Combination of In Silico Methods in the Search for Potential CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell Epitopes in the Proteome of Leishmania braziliensis

    PubMed Central

    e Silva, Rafael de Freitas; Ferreira, Luiz Felipe Gomes Rebello; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini; de Brito, Maria Edileuza Felinto; de Oliveira, Beatriz Coutinho; da Silva, Ailton Alvaro; de-Melo-Neto, Osvaldo Pompílio; Rezende, Antônio Mauro; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves

    2016-01-01

    The leishmaniases are neglected tropical diseases widespread throughout the globe, which are caused by protozoans from the genus Leishmania and are transmitted by infected phlebotomine flies. The development of a safe and effective vaccine against these diseases has been seen as the best alternative to control and reduce the number of cases. To support vaccine development, this work has applied an in silico approach to search for high potential peptide epitopes able to bind to different major histocompatibility complex Class I and Class II (MHC I and MHC II) molecules from different human populations. First, the predicted proteome of Leishmania braziliensis was compared and analyzed by modern linear programs to find epitopes with the capacity to trigger an immune response. This approach resulted in thousands of epitopes derived from 8,000 proteins conserved among different Leishmania species. Epitopes from proteins similar to those found in host species were excluded, and epitopes from proteins conserved between different Leishmania species and belonging to surface proteins were preferentially selected. The resulting epitopes were then clustered, to avoid redundancies, resulting in a total of 230 individual epitopes for MHC I and 2,319 for MHC II. These were used for molecular modeling and docking with MHC structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. Molecular docking then ranked epitopes based on their predicted binding affinity to both MHC I and II. Peptides corresponding to the top 10 ranked epitopes were synthesized and evaluated in vitro for their capacity to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from post-treated cutaneous leishmaniasis patients, with PBMC from healthy donors used as control. From the 10 peptides tested, 50% showed to be immunogenic and capable to stimulate the proliferation of lymphocytes from recovered individuals. PMID:27621732

  18. Identification of a novel canine distemper virus B-cell epitope using a monoclonal antibody against nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Li; Cheng, Yuening; Zhang, Miao; Cao, Zhigang; Tong, Mingwei; Wang, Jianke; Zhao, Hang; Lin, Peng; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-02-02

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a member of the genus Morbillivirus within the family Paramyxoviridae and has caused severe economic losses in China. Nucleocapsid protein (N) is the major structural viral protein and can be used to diagnose CDV and other morbilliviruses. In this study, a specific monoclonal antibody, 1N8, was produced against the CDV N protein (amino acids 277-471). A linear N protein epitope was identified by subjecting a series of partially overlapping synthesized peptides to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. The results indicated that (350)LNFGRSYFDPA(360) was the minimal linear epitope that could be recognized by mAb 1N8. ELISA assays revealed that mouse anti-CDV sera could also recognize the minimal linear epitope. Alignment analysis of the amino acid sequences indicated that the epitope was highly conserved among CDV strains. Furthermore, the epitope was conserved among other morbilliviruses, which was confirmed with PRRV using western blotting. Taken together, the results of this study may have potential applications in the development of suitable diagnostic techniques for CDV or other morbilliviruses.

  19. Identification of a gag protein epitope conserved among all four groups of primate immunodeficiency viruses by using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Otteken, A; Nick, S; Bergter, W; Voss, G; Faisst, A C; Stahl-Hennig, C; Hunsmann, G

    1992-10-01

    Five monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were raised against the gag proteins of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) from African green monkey (SIVagmTYO-7). Two MAbs reacted with the matrix protein p17 and the other three with the core protein p24. Studies on the cross-reactivity of the MAbs revealed that the anti-p24 MAbs detected an epitope shared by the viruses belonging to the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2)/SIVmac group and SIVagmTYO-7 and SIVagmTYO-5. The anti-p17 MAbs recognized an epitope present on all these viruses and on SIVagmTYO-1, HIV-1 and SIVmnd. This finding demonstrates for the first time that the matrix protein, p17 or p18, respectively, of all nine HIV and SIV isolates tested in this study expresses at least one conserved immunogenic epitope recognized serologically. By using synthetic peptides, this epitope was identified at the N terminus of p17. Furthermore, this epitope was analysed by multiple sequence alignments of the peptide with homologous sequences of HIV and SIV p17.

  20. Production of mouse monoclonal antibody against Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC protein and mapping its conserved B-cell epitope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) GapC protein is a protective antigen that induces partial immunity against S. dysgalactiae infection in animals. To identify the conserved B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactiae GapC, a mouse monoclonal antibody 1E11 (mAb1E11) against GapC was generated and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12). Eleven positive clones recognized by mAb1E11 were identified, most of which matched the consensus motif TGFFAKK. Sequence of the motif exactly matched amino acids 97-103 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC. In addition, the epitope (97)TGFFAKK(103) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues G98, F99, F100 and K103 formed the core of (97)TGFFAKK(103), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1E11. Collectively, the identification of conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC highlights the possibility of developing the epitope-based vaccine.

  1. Analysis of the immune response of a new malaria vaccine based on the modification of cryptic epitopes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Wang, Jun; Huang, Yuxiao; Liang, Jiao; Liu, Xuewu; Wu, Dudu; Jiang, He; Zhao, Ya; Li, Yinghui

    2016-05-01

    Malaria is a severe, life-threatening infectious disease that endangers human health. However, there are no vaccines or immune strategy of vaccines succeeding in both erythrocytic and pre-erythrocytic stage. During the liver stage of the Plasmodium life cycle, sporozoites invade the host liver cells. The sporozoites, then, induce a cellular immune response via the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on their surfaces. The cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) then recognize the corresponding antigen-MHC complex on the surfaces of these infected liver cells and kill them. However, dominant epitopes with high MHC affinity are prone to mutation due to immune selection pressure. CTLs evoked by the original dominant epitopes cannot recognize the mutated epitopes, leading to immune evasion. In this study, we have modified the cryptic epitopes of different antigens in the sporozoite and liver stages of Plasmodium falciparum to increase their immunogenicity without changing T cell antigen receptor (TCR)-peptide binding specificity. In addition, we have also added an important erythrocytic phase protective antigen, named apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1), to this process with the goal of constructing a complex multi-stage, multi-epitope recombinant DNA vaccine against P. falciparum. The vaccine was tested in HHD-2 mice. The method involved multiple stages of the P. falciparum life cycle as well as elucidation both humoral and cellular immunity. The conclusion drawn from the study was that the vaccine might provide an important theoretical and practical basis for generating effective preventative or therapeutic vaccine against P. falciparum.

  2. Mapping of a Mycoplasma-Neutralizing Epitope on the Mycoplasmal p37 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Won-Tae; Lee, Hyun Min; Choi, Hong Seo; Jo, Yu Ra; Lee, Yangsoon; Jeong, Jaemin; Choi, Dongho; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Dae Shick; Jang, Young-Joo; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that the mycoplasmal membrane protein p37 enhances cancer cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Previously, we generated 6 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the mycoplasmal protein p37 and showed the presence of mycoplasma-infected circulating tumor cells in the blood of hepatocellular carcinoma patients by using CA27, one of the six MAbs. When mycoplasmas were incubated with cancer cells in the presence of CA27, mycoplasma infection was completely inhibited, suggesting that CA27 is a neutralizing antibody inhibiting mycoplasma infection. To examine the neutralizing epitope of CA27, we generated a series of glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fused p37 deletion mutant proteins in which p37 was partly deleted. To express p37-coding sequences in E.coli, mycoplasmal TGA codons were substituted with TGG in the p37 deletion mutant genes. GST-fused p37 deletion mutant proteins were then screened to identify the epitope targeted by CA27. Western blots showed that CA27 bound to the residues 216–246 on the middle part of the p37 protein while it did not bind to the residues 183–219 and 216–240. Fine mapping showed that CA27 was able to bind to the residues 226–246, but its binding activity was relatively weakened as compared to that to the residues 216–246, suggesting that the residues 226–246 is essential for optimal binding activity of CA27. Interestingly, the treatment of the purified GST-tagged epitopes with urea showed that CA27 binding to the epitope was sodium dodecyl sulfate-resistant but urea-sensitive. The same 226–246 residues were also recognized by two other anti-p37 MAbs, suggesting that the epitope is immunodominant. The identification of the novel neutralizing epitope may provide new insight into the interaction between the p37 protein and host receptors. PMID:28036384

  3. Analysis of neutralizing epitopes on foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaff, E; Thiel, H J; Beck, E; Strohmaier, K; Schaller, H

    1988-01-01

    For the investigation of the antigenic determinant structure of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against complete virus were characterized by Western blot (immunoblot), enzyme immunoassay, and competition experiments with a synthetic peptide, isolated coat protein VP1, and viral particles as antigens. Two of the four MAbs reacted with each of these antigens, while the other two MAbs recognized only complete viral particles and reacted only very poorly with the peptide. The four MAbs showed different neutralization patterns with a panel of 11 different FMDV strains. cDNA-derived VP1 protein sequences of the different strains were compared to find correlations between the primary structure of the protein and the ability of virus to be neutralized. Based on this analysis, it appears that the first two MAbs recognized overlapping sequential epitopes in the known antigenic site represented by the peptide, whereas the two other MAbs recognized conformational epitopes. These conclusions were supported and extended by structural analyses of FMDV mutants resistant to neutralization by an MAb specific for a conformational epitope. These results demonstrate that no amino acid exchanges had occurred in the primary antigenic site of VP1 but instead in the other coat proteins VP2 and VP3, which by themselves do not induce neutralizing antibodies. Images PMID:2835507

  4. Discovering Preferential Patterns in Sectoral Trade Networks.

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Isabella; Piccardi, Carlo; Tajoli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the patterns of import/export bilateral relations, with the aim of assessing the relevance and shape of "preferentiality" in countries' trade decisions. Preferentiality here is defined as the tendency to concentrate trade on one or few partners. With this purpose, we adopt a systemic approach through the use of the tools of complex network analysis. In particular, we apply a pattern detection approach based on community and pseudocommunity analysis, in order to highlight the groups of countries within which most of members' trade occur. The method is applied to two intra-industry trade networks consisting of 221 countries, relative to the low-tech "Textiles and Textile Articles" and the high-tech "Electronics" sectors for the year 2006, to look at the structure of world trade before the start of the international financial crisis. It turns out that the two networks display some similarities and some differences in preferential trade patterns: they both include few significant communities that define narrow sets of countries trading with each other as preferential destinations markets or supply sources, and they are characterized by the presence of similar hierarchical structures, led by the largest economies. But there are also distinctive features due to the characteristics of the industries examined, in which the organization of production and the destination markets are different. Overall, the extent of preferentiality and partner selection at the sector level confirm the relevance of international trade costs still today, inducing countries to seek the highest efficiency in their trade patterns.

  5. A generalized theory of preferential linking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haibo; Guo, Jinli; Liu, Xuan; Wang, Xiaofan

    2014-12-01

    There are diverse mechanisms driving the evolution of social networks. A key open question dealing with understanding their evolution is: How do various preferential linking mechanisms produce networks with different features? In this paper we first empirically study preferential linking phenomena in an evolving online social network, find and validate the linear preference. We propose an analyzable model which captures the real growth process of the network and reveals the underlying mechanism dominating its evolution. Furthermore based on preferential linking we propose a generalized model reproducing the evolution of online social networks, and present unified analytical results describing network characteristics for 27 preference scenarios. We study the mathematical structure of degree distributions and find that within the framework of preferential linking analytical degree distributions can only be the combinations of finite kinds of functions which are related to rational, logarithmic and inverse tangent functions, and extremely complex network structure will emerge even for very simple sublinear preferential linking. This work not only provides a verifiable origin for the emergence of various network characteristics in social networks, but bridges the micro individuals' behaviors and the global organization of social networks.

  6. Preferential sampling in veterinary parasitological surveillance.

    PubMed

    Cecconi, Lorenzo; Biggeri, Annibale; Grisotto, Laura; Berrocal, Veronica; Rinaldi, Laura; Musella, Vincenzo; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Catelan, Dolores

    2016-04-18

    In parasitological surveillance of livestock, prevalence surveys are conducted on a sample of farms using several sampling designs. For example, opportunistic surveys or informative sampling designs are very common. Preferential sampling refers to any situation in which the spatial process and the sampling locations are not independent. Most examples of preferential sampling in the spatial statistics literature are in environmental statistics with focus on pollutant monitors, and it has been shown that, if preferential sampling is present and is not accounted for in the statistical modelling and data analysis, statistical inference can be misleading. In this paper, working in the context of veterinary parasitology, we propose and use geostatistical models to predict the continuous and spatially-varying risk of a parasite infection. Specifically, breaking with the common practice in veterinary parasitological surveillance to ignore preferential sampling even though informative or opportunistic samples are very common, we specify a two-stage hierarchical Bayesian model that adjusts for preferential sampling and we apply it to data on Fasciola hepatica infection in sheep farms in Campania region (Southern Italy) in the years 2013-2014.

  7. Identification of a conserved JEV serocomplex B-cell epitope by screening a phage-display peptide library with a mAb generated against West Nile virus capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The West Nile virus (WNV) capsid (C) protein is one of the three viral structural proteins, encapsidates the viral RNA to form the nucleocapsid, and is necessary for nuclear and nucleolar localization. The antigenic sites on C protein that are targeted by humoral immune responses have not been studied thoroughly, and well-defined B-cell epitopes on the WNV C protein have not been reported. Results In this study, we generated a WNV C protein-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) and defined the linear epitope recognized by the mAb by screening a 12-mer peptide library using phage-display technology. The mAb, designated as 6D3, recognized the phages displaying a consensus motif consisting of the amino acid sequence KKPGGPG, which is identical to an amino acid sequence present in WNV C protein. Further fine mapping was conducted using truncated peptides expressed as MBP-fusion proteins. We found that the KKPGGPG motif is the minimal determinant of the linear epitope recognized by the mAb 6D3. Western blot (WB) analysis demonstrated that the KKPGGPG epitope could be recognized by antibodies contained in WNV- and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV)-positive equine serum, but was not recognized by Dengue virus 1-4 (DENV1-4)-positive mice serum. Furthermore, we found that the epitope recognized by 6D3 is highly conserved among the JEV serocomplex of the Family Flaviviridae. Conclusion The KKPGGPG epitope is a JEV serocomplex-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the 6D3 mAb generated in this study. The 6D3 mAb may serve as a novel reagent in development of diagnostic tests for JEV serocomplex infection. Further, the identification of the B-cell epitope that is highly conserved among the JEV serocomplex may support the rationale design of vaccines against viruses of the JEV serocomplex. PMID:21375771

  8. Major histocompatibility complex and T cell interactions of a universal T cell epitope from Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein.

    PubMed

    Parra-López, Carlos; Calvo-Calle, J Mauricio; Cameron, Thomas O; Vargas, Luis E; Salazar, Luz Mary; Patarroyo, Manuel E; Nardin, Elizabeth; Stern, Lawrence J

    2006-05-26

    A 20-residue sequence from the C-terminal region of the circumsporozoite protein of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is considered a universal helper T cell epitope because it is immunogenic in individuals of many major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes. Subunit vaccines containing T* and the major B cell epitope of the circumsporozoite protein induce high antibody titers to the malaria parasite and significant T cell responses in humans. In this study we have evaluated the specificity of the T* sequence with regard to its binding to the human class II MHC protein DR4 (HLA-DRB1*0401), its interactions with antigen receptors on T cells, and the effect of natural variants of this sequence on its immunogenicity. Computational approaches identified multiple potential DR4-binding epitopes within T*, and experimental binding studies confirmed the following two tight binding epitopes: one located toward the N terminus (the T*-1 epitope) and one at the C terminus (the T*-5 epitope). Immunization of a human DR4 volunteer with a peptide-based vaccine containing the T* sequence elicited CD4+ T cells that recognize each of these epitopes. Here we present an analysis of the immunodominant N-terminal epitope T*-1. T*-1 residues important for interaction with DR4 and with antigen receptors on T*-specific T cells were mapped. MHC tetramers carrying DR4/T*-1 MHC-peptide complexes stained and efficiently stimulated these cells in vitro. T*-1 overlaps a region of the protein that has been described as highly polymorphic; however, the particular T*-1 residues required for anchoring to DR4 were highly conserved in Plasmodium sequences described to date.

  9. Recognition of a common mycobacterial T-cell epitope in MPB59 of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed Central

    Lightbody, K A; Girvin, R M; Pollock, D A; Mackie, D P; Neill, S D; Pollock, J M

    1998-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, which persists as a residual level of infection in many European countries, has implications not only for the economy of farming communities but also for human health. The aim of this study was to identify a common mycobacterial antigen which was recognized in bovine tuberculosis and to characterize the response to this antigen at the epitope level. A T-cell clone, phenotype CD4+, raised from an animal experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis was shown to proliferate in response to a panel of sonicates derived from different mycobacterial species indicating recognition of an antigen with broad specificity. This antigen was subsequently shown to be MPB59. Recognition of MPB59 at the epitope level was determined in experimental and field cases of bovine tuberculosis using a panel of synthetic peptides (20-mers with 10-residue overlaps) incorporating the signal sequence and mature protein. The results showed that in vitro interferon-gamma was predominantly produced in response to adjacent peptides numbers 10 and 11, suggesting that the dominant epitope was contained in the overlap, correlating to residues 101-110 (YYQSGLSIVM). This epitope was recognized by 54% of tuberculous cattle of mixed breeds, which suggests that it may be genetically permissive in terms of major histocompatibility complex presentation. Sequence analysis confirmed that there were only minor differences in the amino acid composition within this region for various mycobacterial species, which could explain the common T-cell recognition described in this study. Common recognition of this epitope indicates that it would have limited potential for use as a diagnostic reagent per se but may have potential for inclusion in a subunit vaccine. PMID:9640240

  10. Identification of conserved and HLA-A*2402-restricted epitopes in Dengue virus serotype 2.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhi-Liang; Liu, Hui-Fang; Huang, Xi; Wang, Si-Na; Yang, Jin-Lin; Chen, Xin-Yu; Li, De-Zhou; Zhong, Xiao-Zhi; Chen, Bo-Kun; Wen, Jin-Sheng

    2015-01-22

    In this study, we set out to identify dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2)-specific HLA-A*2402-restricted epitopes and determine the characteristics of T cells generated to these epitopes. We screened the full-length amino-acid sequence of DENV-2 to find potential epitopes using the SYFPEITHI algorithm. Twelve putative HLA-A*2402-binding peptides conserved in hundreds of DENV-2 strains were synthesized, and the HLA restriction of peptides was tested in HLA-A*2402 transgenic mice. Nine peptides (NS4b(228-237), NS2a(73-81), E(298-306), M(141-149), NS4a(96-105), NS4b(159-168), NS5(475-484), NS1(162-171), and NS5(611-620)) induced high levels of peptide-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells in HLA-A*2402 transgenic mice. Apart from IFN-γ, NS4b(228-237-), NS2a(73-81-) and E(298-306)-specific CD8(+) cells produced TNF-α and IL-6 simultaneously, whereas M(141-149-) and NS5(475-484-) CD8(+) cells produced only IL-6. Moreover, splenic mononuclear cells (SMCs) efficiently recognized and killed peptide-pulsed splenocytes. Furthermore, each of nine peptides could be recognized by splenocytes from DENV-2-infected HLA-A*2402 transgenic mice. The SMCs from HLA-A*2402 transgenic mice immunized with nine immunogenic peptides efficiently killed DENV-2-infected splenic monocytes. The present identified epitopes have the potential to be new diagnostic tools for characterization of T-cell immunity in DENV infection and may serve as part of a universal epitope-based vaccine.

  11. Kininogen domain 3 contains regions recognized by antiphosphatidylethanolamine antibodies.

    PubMed

    Katsunuma, J; Sugi, T; Inomo, A; Matsubayashi, H; Izumi, S-I; Makino, T

    2003-01-01

    Antiphosphatidylethanolamine antibodies (APE) have been described in patients with thrombotic diseases and recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). It has been reported that certain APE are not specific for phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) per se, but are directed to PE-binding plasma proteins, called kininogens. Our recent in vitro data suggest that APE may recognize the domain 3 (D3) region of kininogens. In this study, we have used synthetic peptides that span the D3 of kininogens in inhibition and direct binding studies to identify epitopes that are sites for binding APE. Our present data demonstrate that among 24 RPL patients who were positive for kininogen-dependent immunoglobulin (IgG) APE, 17 patients (70.8%) recognized the LDC27 peptide. We mapped the APE-binding region on D3 using plasma from a RPL patient (X) who had a high titer of IgG APE that recognized LDC27. APE of patient X recognized a 13-residue segment in LDC27, named CNA13. Leu331-Met357 (LDC27) and Cys333-Lys345 (CNA13) are located on the carboxyl-terminal portion of kininogen D3, which is known as the major kininogen heavy chain cell attachment site where it overlaps its cysteine protease inhibitory region. Because APE interferes with the balance of hemostasis in vitro, APE may therefore induce a similar condition in patients thereby causing thrombosis and RPL.

  12. The multi-epitope approach for immunotherapy for cancer: identification of several CTL epitopes from various tumor-associated antigens expressed on solid epithelial tumors.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, I; Hudson, S J; Tsai, V; Southwood, S; Takesako, K; Appella, E; Sette, A; Celis, E

    1998-01-01

    One approach to development of specific cancer immunotherapy relies on the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAA). Induction of TAA-specific CTL could be used towards the eradication of established tumors, or to prevent their dissemination or recurrence after primary treatment. The present study identifies a set of CTL epitopes from TAA frequently found on solid epithelial tumors such as breast, lung and gastro-intestinal tumors. Specifically, HLA-A2.1 binding peptides from the MAGE2, MAGE3, HER-2/neu and CEA antigens were tested for their capacity to elicit in vitro anti-tumor CTL using lymphocytes from normal volunteers and autologous dendritic cells as antigen-presenting cells. A total of 6 new epitopes (MAGE2[10(157)], MAGE3[9(112)], CEA[9(691)], CEA[9(24)], HER2[9(435)] and HER2[9(5)]) were identified which were capable of specifically recognizing tumor cell lines lines expressing HLA-A2.1 and the corresponding TAA. In one case (CEA[9(24)]), induction of vigorous anti-tumor CTL responses required epitope engineering to increase HLA-A2.1 binding affinity. Finally, most of the newly identified epitopes (5 out of 6) were found to be highly crossreactive with other common HLA alleles of the A2 supertype (A2.2, A2.3, A2.6 and A6802), thus demonstrating their potential in providing broad and non-ethnically biased population coverage. The results are discussed in the context of the development of multi-epitope-based therapies with broad applicability for patients suffering from commonly found tumors.

  13. Meningococcal group A lipooligosaccharides (LOS): preliminary structural studies and characterization of serotype-associated and conserved LOS epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J J; Phillips, N J; Gibson, B W; Griffiss, J M; Yamasaki, R

    1994-01-01

    Structural studies indicate that the neisserial lipooligosaccharides (LOS) are composed of an oligosaccharide (OS) portion with a phosphorylated diheptose (Hep) core attached to the toxic lipid A moiety. A conserved meningococcal LOS epitope, defined by monoclonal antibody (MAb) D6A, is expressed on group A and many group B and C meningococci of different LOS serotypes (J. J. Kim, R. E. Mandrell, H. Zhen, M. A. Apicella, J. T. Poolman, and J. M. Griffiss, Infect. Immun. 56:2631-2638, 1988). This MAb-defined D6A epitope is immunogenic in humans (M. M. Estabrook, R. E. Mandrell, M. A. Apicella, and J. M. Griffiss, Infect. Immun. 58:2204-2213, 1990; M. M. Estabrook, C. J. Baker, and J. M. Griffiss, J. Infect. Dis. 197:966-970, 1993). In this study, we characterize this important MAb-defined LOS epitope. Serotype L10 and L11 group A meningococal LOS were chemically modified and used to investigate what portion of the LOS molecule is important for expression of the conserved (D6A) epitope and serotype-associated LOS epitopes by use of immunoblotting techniques and selected MAbs as probes. Preliminary structural characterization of the LOS was also accomplished by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. Our results indicate the following. (i) Antibodies that recognize the serotype-associated or conserved LOS epitopes recognize the OS portion of the LOS. (ii) The phosphorylated diheptose core region of the OS is essential for expression of the conserved D6A epitope. (iii) The lipid portion of the molecule is important for optimum expression of the LOS epitopes. (iv) The proposed compositions of the O-deacylated LOS are consistent with the presence of a phosphorylated diheptose core and are as follows: for O-deacylated L10 LOS, 3Hex (hexose), 1HexNAc (N-acetylhexosamine), 2KDO (2-keto-3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid), 2Hep (heptose), 1PEA or 2PEA (phosphoethanolamine), and O-deacylated lipid A; and for O-deacylated L11 LOS, 2Hex, 1HexNAc, 2KDO, 2Hep, 2PEA, and O

  14. Epitope structure and binding affinity of single chain llama anti-β-amyloid antibodies revealed by proteolytic excision affinity-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paraschiv, Gabriela; Vincke, Cécile; Czaplewska, Paulina; Manea, Marilena; Muyldermans, Serge; Przybylski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    ß-Amyloid (Aß) immunotherapy has become a promising strategy for reducing the level of Aß in brain. New immunological approaches have been recently proposed for rapid, early diagnosis, and molecular treatment of neurodegenerative diseases related to Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The combination of proteolytic epitope excision and extraction and mass spectrometry using digestion with various proteases has been shown to be an efficient tool for the identification and molecular characterization of antigenic determinants. Here, we report the identification of the Aβ epitope recognized by the variable domain of single chain llama anti-Aβ-antibodies, termed Aβ-nanobodies, that have been discovered in the blood of camelids and found to be promising candidates for immunotherapy of AD. The epitope recognized by two Aβ-specific nanobodies was identified by proteolytic epitope extraction- and excision-mass spectrometry using a series of proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin, GluC-protease, and LysC-protease). Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization--mass spectrometric analysis of the affinity--elution fraction provided the epitope, Aβ(17-28), in the mid- to carboxy-terminal domain of Aβ, which has been shown to exert an Aß-fibril inhibiting effect. Affinity studies of the synthetic epitope confirmed that the Aβ(17-28) peptide is the minimal fragment that binds to the nanobodies. The interactions between the nanobodies and full length Aβ(1-40) or Aβ-peptides containing or lacking the epitope sequence were further characterized by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and bioaffinity analysis. Determinations of binding affinities between the Aβ-nanobodies and Aβ(1-40) and the Aβ(17-28) epitope provided K(D) values of approximately 150 and 700 nmol, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of the epitope may be highly useful for future studies of Aβ-aggregation (oligomerization and fibril formation) and for designing new aggregation inhibitors.

  15. Preferential flow occurs in unsaturated conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Because it commonly generates high-speed, high-volume flow with minimal exposure to solid earth materials, preferential flow in the unsaturated zone is a dominant influence in many problems of infiltration, recharge, contaminant transport, and ecohydrology. By definition, preferential flow occurs in a portion of a medium – that is, a preferred part, whether a pathway, pore, or macroscopic subvolume. There are many possible classification schemes, but usual consideration of preferential flow includes macropore or fracture flow, funneled flow determined by macroscale heterogeneities, and fingered flow determined by hydraulic instability rather than intrinsic heterogeneity. That preferential flow is spatially concentrated associates it with other characteristics that are typical, although not defining: it tends to be unusually fast, to transport high fluxes, and to occur with hydraulic disequilibrium within the medium. It also has a tendency to occur in association with large conduits and high water content, although these are less universal than is commonly assumed. Predictive unsaturated-zone flow models in common use employ several different criteria for when and where preferential flow occurs, almost always requiring a nearly saturated medium. A threshold to be exceeded may be specified in terms of the following (i) water content; (ii) matric potential, typically a value high enough to cause capillary filling in a macropore of minimum size; (iii) infiltration capacity or other indication of incipient surface ponding; or (iv) other conditions related to total filling of certain pores. Yet preferential flow does occur without meeting these criteria. My purpose in this commentary is to point out important exceptions and implications of ignoring them. Some of these pertain mainly to macropore flow, others to fingered or funneled flow, and others to combined or undifferentiated flow modes.

  16. Reverse preferential spread in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoizumi, Hiroshi; Tani, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Naoto; Okamoto, Yoshio

    2012-08-01

    Large-degree nodes may have a larger influence on the network, but they can be bottlenecks for spreading information since spreading attempts tend to concentrate on these nodes and become redundant. We discuss that the reverse preferential spread (distributing information inversely proportional to the degree of the receiving node) has an advantage over other spread mechanisms. In large uncorrelated networks, we show that the mean number of nodes that receive information under the reverse preferential spread is an upper bound among any other weight-based spread mechanisms, and this upper bound is indeed a logistic growth independent of the degree distribution.

  17. Protective immunity against Trichinella spiralis infection induced by a multi-epitope vaccine in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuan; Wei, Junfei; Yang, Jing; Huang, Jingjing; Yang, Xiaodi; Zhu, Xinping

    2013-01-01

    Trichinellosis is one of the most important food-borne parasitic zoonoses throughout the world. Because infected pigs are the major source of human infections, and China is becoming the largest international producer of pork, the development of a transmission-blocking vaccine to prevent swine from being infected is urgently needed for trichinellosis control in China. Our previous studies have demonstrated that specific Trichinella spiralis paramyosin (Ts-Pmy) and Ts-87 antigen could provide protective immunity against T. spiralis infection in immunized mice. Certain protective epitopes of Ts-Pmy and Ts-87 antigen have been identified. To identify more Ts-Pmy protective epitopes, a new monoclonal antibody, termed 8F12, was produced against the N-terminus of Ts-Pmy. This antibody elicited significant protective immunity in mice against T. spiralis infection by passive transfer and was subsequently used to screen a random phage display peptide library to identify recognized epitopes. Seven distinct positive phage clones were identified and their displayed peptides were sequenced. Synthesized epitope peptides conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin were used to immunize mice, four of which exhibited larval reduction (from 18.7% to 26.3%, respectively) in vaccinated mice in comparison to the KLH control. To increase more effective protection, the epitope 8F7 that was found to induce the highest protection in this study was combined with two other previously identified epitopes (YX1 from Ts-Pmy and M7 from Ts-87) to formulate a multi-epitope vaccine. Mice immunized with this multi-epitope vaccine experienced a 35.0% reduction in muscle larvae burden after being challenged with T. spiralis larvae. This protection is significantly higher than that induced by individual-epitope peptides and is associated with high levels of subclasses IgG and IgG1. These results showed that a multi-epitope vaccine induced better protective immunity than an individual epitope and provided a

  18. Intramolecular epitope spreading in Heymann nephritis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pallavi; Tramontano, Alfonso; Makker, Sudesh P

    2007-12-01

    Immunization with megalin induces active Heymann nephritis, which reproduces features of human idiopathic membranous glomerulonephritis. Megalin is a complex immunological target with four discrete ligand-binding domains (LBDs) that may contain epitopes to which pathogenic autoantibodies are directed. Recently, a 236-residue N-terminal fragment, termed "L6," that spans the first LBD was shown to induce autoantibodies and severe disease. We used this model to examine epitope-specific contributions to pathogenesis. Sera obtained from rats 4 weeks after immunization with L6 demonstrated reactivity only with the L6 fragment on Western blot, whereas sera obtained after 8 weeks demonstrated reactivity with all four recombinant fragments of interest (L6 and LBDs II, III, and IV). We demonstrated that the L6 immunogen does not contain the epitopes responsible for the reactivity to the LBD fragments. Therefore, the appearance of antibodies directed at LBD fragments several weeks after the primary immune response suggests intramolecular epitope spreading. In vivo, we observed a temporal association between increased proteinuria and the appearance of antibodies to LBD fragments. These data implicate B cell epitope spreading in antibody-mediated pathogenesis of active Heymann nephritis, a model that should prove valuable for further study of autoimmune dysregulation.

  19. Epitope mapping of B-cell determinants on the 15-kilodalton lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum (Tpp15) with synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Baughn, R E; Demecs, M; Taber, L H; Musher, D M

    1996-01-01

    The antigenicity of the 15-kDa lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum (Tpp15 or TpN15) was comprehensively evaluated in epitope-scanning studies with overlapping deca- and octapeptides and polygonal rabbit and human infant immunoglobulins (Igs) and antisera. This approach enabled us to identify potentially important regions and to determine the optimal dilutions of Igs or antisera for use in further studies. IgM and IgG from both species were capable of recognizing multiple, continuous epitopes. A total of 13 peptides, principally clustered in the central regions of the protein, were recognized by all syphilitic sera and Ig fractions. On the basis of window analyses, frequency profiles, and alanine substitution studies, five heptapeptides were selected for mimetic studies. Two of these five immunodominant, continuous epitopes initially appeared to be species specific; however, antisera elicited against mimetics of all five epitopes were polyspecific, recognizing similar motifs on several other treponemal proteins, including those of avirulent organisms. The only mimetic which yielded positive reactions with infant IgM and syphilitic sera in the absence of cross-reactions with rabbit antisera to avirulent treponemes was the variant of the VMYASSG motif. These findings are relevant to the development of simple, inexpensive assays for the serodiagnosis of active syphilis. PMID:8698467

  20. Identification and characterization of a cross-neutralization epitope of Enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Chyi; Chou, Ai-Hsiang; Lien, Shu-Pei; Lin, Hsiao-Yu; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chang, Jui-Yuan; Guo, Meng-Shin; Chow, Yen-Hung; Yang, Wun-Syue; Chang, Kate Hsuen-Wen; Sia, Charles; Chong, Pele

    2011-06-10

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infections in children manifest as exanthema and are most commonly known as hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD). Because it can cause severe neurological complications like poliomyelitis, EV71 has now emerged as an important neurotropic virus in Asia. EV71 virus has been shown to consist of 3 (A, B and C) genotypes and many subgenotypes. Although EV71 vaccine development has recently yielded promising preclinical results, yet the correlation between the content of antigen(s) in vaccine candidates and the level of protective antibody responses is not established. The neutralization epitope(s) of EV71 antigens could be used as the surrogate biomarker of vaccine potency. Using peptide ELISA, antisera generated from animals immunized with formalin-inactivated EV71 virion vaccine formulated in alum, EV71-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody (nMAb) and a panel of 153 overlapping synthetic peptides covering the entire sequences of VP1, VP2 and VP3 of EV71, we screened for immunodominant linear neutralization epitope(s). Synthetic peptide VP2-28, corresponding to residues 136-150 of VP2, was found to bind to and inhibit the binding to EV71 of nMAb MAB979 that was found to have cross-neutralizing activity against different genotypes of EV71 virus. In addition, VP2-28 was found to be recognized only by neutralizing antisera generated from rabbits immunized with the formalin-inactivated whole EV71 virion vaccine but not by antisera from immunized mice and rats. During the epitope mapping, a murine EV71 genotype- and strain-specific linear neutralization epitope VP1-43 was identified within residues 211-220 of VP1. Furthermore, based on sequence alignment and structure prediction analysis using poliovirus as the template for molecular modeling, the VP1-43 and VP2-28 epitopes were shown to run in parallel within 0.1 nm and form a rim of the canyon at the junction site of VP1 and VP2 in the viral capsid. In mouse, rat and rabbit immunogenicity studies

  1. Genome-wide analysis of complex wheat gliadins, the dominant carriers of celiac disease epitopes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Wei; Li, Da; Wang, Junjun; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Zhaojun; Yue, Guidong; Liu, Xin; Qin, Huanju; Zhang, Kunpu; Dong, Lingli; Wang, Daowen

    2017-03-16

    Gliadins, specified by six compound chromosomal loci (Gli-A1/B1/D1 and Gli-A2/B2/D2) in hexaploid bread wheat, are the dominant carriers of celiac disease (CD) epitopes. Because of their complexity, genome-wide characterization of gliadins is a strong challenge. Here, we approached this challenge by combining transcriptomic, proteomic and bioinformatic investigations. Through third-generation RNA sequencing, full-length transcripts were identified for 52 gliadin genes in the bread wheat cultivar Xiaoyan 81. Of them, 42 were active and predicted to encode 25 α-, 11 γ-, one δ- and five ω-gliadins. Comparative proteomic analysis between Xiaoyan 81 and six newly-developed mutants each lacking one Gli locus indicated the accumulation of 38 gliadins in the mature grains. A novel group of α-gliadins (the CSTT group) was recognized to contain very few or no CD epitopes. The δ-gliadins identified here or previously did not carry CD epitopes. Finally, the mutant lacking Gli-D2 showed significant reductions in the most celiac-toxic α-gliadins and derivative CD epitopes. The insights and resources generated here should aid further studies on gliadin functions in CD and the breeding of healthier wheat.

  2. Epitope map for a growth hormone receptor agonist monoclonal antibody, MAb 263.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yu; Zheng, Yuan Zhi; Harris, Jonathan M; Brown, Richard; Waters, Michael J

    2003-11-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) 263 is a widely used monoclonal antibody that recognizes the extracellular domain (ECD) of the GH receptor. It has been shown to act as a GH agonist both in vitro and in vivo, and we report here that it must be divalent to exert its effect on the full-length receptor. To understand the mechanism of its agonist action, we have determined the precise epitope for this antibody using a novel random PCR mutagenesis approach together with expression screening in yeast. A library of 5200 clones of rabbit GH receptor ECD mutants were screened both with MAb 263 and with an anticarboxy-tag antibody to verify complete ECD expression. Sequencing for clones that expressed complete ECD but were not MAb 263 positive identified 20 epitope residues distributed in a discontinuous manner throughout the ECD. The major part of the epitope, as revealed after mapping onto the crystal structure model of the ECD molecule, was located on the side and upper portion of domain 1, particularly within the D-E strand disulfide loop 79-96. Molecular dynamics docking of an antibody of the same isotype as MAb 263 was used to dock the bivalent antibody to the 1528-A2 epitope and to visualize the likely consequences of MAb binding. The minimized model enables the antibody to grasp two receptors in a pincer-like movement from opposite sides, facilitating alignment of the receptor dimerization domains in a manner similar to, but not identical with, GH.

  3. Multiple B- and T-cell epitopes on a major allergen of Kentucky Bluegrass pollen.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Yang, M; Chong, P; Mohapatra, S S

    1996-01-01

    The B- and T-cell epitopes of a recombinant grass allergen, rKBG60, were delineated using a set of overlapping synthetic peptides. Direct binding by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) utilizing serum pools led to the identification of 13 murine immunoglobulin-, and nine to 13 human IgG- and five to seven human IgE-reactive overlapping peptides. Of the peptides which bound to human IgE antibodies, all but three peptides bound to human and/or murine IgG antibodies. Furthermore, eight out of 12 synthetic peptides induced antigen-specific antibodies in mice, suggesting that these peptides contained epitopes that recognized and/or induced T cells. These results, in conjunction with cross-recognition of different peptides at the C-terminus of rKBG60 by antibodies to neighbouring or non-overlapping peptides suggest that the C-terminus of this antigen represents a dominant antigenic and allergenic site. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation studies using these synthetic peptides for 13 grass allergic individuals indicated that seven potential human T-cell epitopes exist on this allergen. Taken together, the results demonstrate that multiple B- and T-cell epitopes exist on this major group of grass allergens, the majority of which are localized at the C-terminus of this antigen. PMID:8698392

  4. Genome-wide analysis of complex wheat gliadins, the dominant carriers of celiac disease epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Da-Wei; Li, Da; Wang, Junjun; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Zhaojun; Yue, Guidong; Liu, Xin; Qin, Huanju; Zhang, Kunpu; Dong, Lingli; Wang, Daowen

    2017-01-01

    Gliadins, specified by six compound chromosomal loci (Gli-A1/B1/D1 and Gli-A2/B2/D2) in hexaploid bread wheat, are the dominant carriers of celiac disease (CD) epitopes. Because of their complexity, genome-wide characterization of gliadins is a strong challenge. Here, we approached this challenge by combining transcriptomic, proteomic and bioinformatic investigations. Through third-generation RNA sequencing, full-length transcripts were identified for 52 gliadin genes in the bread wheat cultivar Xiaoyan 81. Of them, 42 were active and predicted to encode 25 α-, 11 γ-, one δ- and five ω-gliadins. Comparative proteomic analysis between Xiaoyan 81 and six newly-developed mutants each lacking one Gli locus indicated the accumulation of 38 gliadins in the mature grains. A novel group of α-gliadins (the CSTT group) was recognized to contain very few or no CD epitopes. The δ-gliadins identified here or previously did not carry CD epitopes. Finally, the mutant lacking Gli-D2 showed significant reductions in the most celiac-toxic α-gliadins and derivative CD epitopes. The insights and resources generated here should aid further studies on gliadin functions in CD and the breeding of healthier wheat. PMID:28300172

  5. Evaluation of a multi-epitope subunit vaccine against avian leukosis virus subgroup J in chickens.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingqing; Ma, Xingjiang; Wang, Fangkun; Li, Hongmei; Zhao, Xiaomin

    2015-12-02

    The intricate sequence and antigenic variability of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) have led to unprecedented difficulties in the development of vaccines. Much experimental evidence demonstrates that ALV-J mutants have caused immune evasion and pose a challenge for traditional efforts to develop effective vaccines. To investigate the potential of a multi-epitope vaccination strategy to prevent chickens against ALV-J infections, a recombinant chimeric multi-epitope protein X (rCMEPX) containing both immunodominant B and T epitope concentrated domains selected from the major structural protein of ALV-J using bioinformatics approach was expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3). Its immunogenicity and protective efficacy was studied in chickens. The results showed that rCMEPX could elicit neutralizing antibodies and cellular responses, and antibodies induced by rCMEPX could specifically recognize host cell naturally expressed ALV-J proteins, which indicated that the rCMEPX is a good immunogen. Challenge experiments showed 80% chickens that received rCMEPX were well protected against ALV-J challenge. This is the first report of a chimeric multi-epitope protein as a potential immunogen against ALV-J.

  6. The Probabilistic Nature of Preferential Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieskamp, Jorg

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has developed a variety of theories explaining when and why people's decisions under risk deviate from the standard economic view of expected utility maximization. These theories are limited in their predictive accuracy in that they do not explain the probabilistic nature of preferential choice, that is, why an individual makes…

  7. CdiA Effectors from Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Use Heterotrimeric Osmoporins as Receptors to Recognize Target Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christina M.; Willett, Julia L. E.; Kim, Jeff J.; Low, David A.; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens express contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) systems that promote cell-cell interaction. CDI+ bacteria express surface CdiA effector proteins, which transfer their C-terminal toxin domains into susceptible target cells upon binding to specific receptors. CDI+ cells also produce immunity proteins that neutralize the toxin domains delivered from neighboring siblings. Here, we show that CdiAEC536 from uropathogenic Escherichia coli 536 (EC536) uses OmpC and OmpF as receptors to recognize target bacteria. E. coli mutants lacking either ompF or ompC are resistant to CDIEC536-mediated growth inhibition, and both porins are required for target-cell adhesion to inhibitors that express CdiAEC536. Experiments with single-chain OmpF fusions indicate that the CdiAEC536 receptor is heterotrimeric OmpC-OmpF. Because the OmpC and OmpF porins are under selective pressure from bacteriophages and host immune systems, their surface-exposed loops vary between E. coli isolates. OmpC polymorphism has a significant impact on CDIEC536 mediated competition, with many E. coli isolates expressing alleles that are not recognized by CdiAEC536. Analyses of recombinant OmpC chimeras suggest that extracellular loops L4 and L5 are important recognition epitopes for CdiAEC536. Loops L4 and L5 also account for much of the sequence variability between E. coli OmpC proteins, raising the possibility that CDI contributes to the selective pressure driving OmpC diversification. We find that the most efficient CdiAEC536 receptors are encoded by isolates that carry the same cdi gene cluster as E. coli 536. Thus, it appears that CdiA effectors often bind preferentially to "self" receptors, thereby promoting interactions between sibling cells. As a consequence, these effector proteins cannot recognize nor suppress the growth of many potential competitors. These findings suggest that self-recognition and kin selection are important functions of CDI. PMID:27723824

  8. Dogs recognize dog and human emotions.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Natalia; Guo, Kun; Wilkinson, Anna; Savalli, Carine; Otta, Emma; Mills, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The perception of emotional expressions allows animals to evaluate the social intentions and motivations of each other. This usually takes place within species; however, in the case of domestic dogs, it might be advantageous to recognize the emotions of humans as well as other dogs. In this sense, the combination of visual and auditory cues to categorize others' emotions facilitates the information processing and indicates high-level cognitive representations. Using a cross-modal preferential looking paradigm, we presented dogs with either human or dog faces with different emotional valences (happy/playful versus angry/aggressive) paired with a single vocalization from the same individual with either a positive or negative valence or Brownian noise. Dogs looked significantly longer at the face whose expression was congruent to the valence of vocalization, for both conspecifics and heterospecifics, an ability previously known only in humans. These results demonstrate that dogs can extract and integrate bimodal sensory emotional information, and discriminate between positive and negative emotions from both humans and dogs.

  9. The Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource in Epitope Discovery and Synthetic Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Fleri, Ward; Paul, Sinu; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Mahajan, Swapnil; Xu, Xiaojun; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    The task of epitope discovery and vaccine design is increasingly reliant on bioinformatics analytic tools and access to depositories of curated data relevant to immune reactions and specific pathogens. The Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB) was indeed created to assist biomedical researchers in the development of new vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The Analysis Resource is freely available to all researchers and provides access to a variety of epitope analysis and prediction tools. The tools include validated and benchmarked methods to predict MHC class I and class II binding. The predictions from these tools can be combined with tools predicting antigen processing, TCR recognition, and B cell epitope prediction. In addition, the resource contains a variety of secondary analysis tools that allow the researcher to calculate epitope conservation, population coverage, and other relevant analytic variables. The researcher involved in vaccine design and epitope discovery will also be interested in accessing experimental published data, relevant to the specific indication of interest. The database component of the IEDB contains a vast amount of experimentally derived epitope data that can be queried through a flexible user interface. The IEDB is linked to other pathogen-specific and immunological database resources. PMID:28352270

  10. Proteasomes generate spliced epitopes by two different mechanisms and as efficiently as non-spliced epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Ebstein, F.; Textoris-Taube, K.; Keller, C.; Golnik, R.; Vigneron, N.; Van den Eynde, B. J.; Schuler-Thurner, B.; Schadendorf, D.; Lorenz, F. K. M.; Uckert, W.; Urban, S.; Lehmann, A.; Albrecht-Koepke, N.; Janek, K.; Henklein, P.; Niewienda, A.; Kloetzel, P. M.; Mishto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Proteasome-catalyzed peptide splicing represents an additional catalytic activity of proteasomes contributing to the pool of MHC-class I-presented epitopes. We here biochemically and functionally characterized a new melanoma gp100 derived spliced epitope. We demonstrate that the gp100mel47–52/40–42 antigenic peptide is generated in vitro and in cellulo by a not yet described proteasomal condensation reaction. gp100mel47–52/40–42 generation is enhanced in the presence of the β5i/LMP7 proteasome-subunit and elicits a peptide-specific CD8+ T cell response. Importantly, we demonstrate that different gp100mel-derived spliced epitopes are generated and presented to CD8+ T cells with efficacies comparable to non-spliced canonical tumor epitopes and that gp100mel-derived spliced epitopes trigger activation of CD8+ T cells found in peripheral blood of half of the melanoma patients tested. Our data suggest that both transpeptidation and condensation reactions contribute to the frequent generation of spliced epitopes also in vivo and that their immune relevance may be comparable to non-spliced epitopes. PMID:27049119

  11. The Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource in Epitope Discovery and Synthetic Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Fleri, Ward; Paul, Sinu; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Mahajan, Swapnil; Xu, Xiaojun; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    The task of epitope discovery and vaccine design is increasingly reliant on bioinformatics analytic tools and access to depositories of curated data relevant to immune reactions and specific pathogens. The Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB) was indeed created to assist biomedical researchers in the development of new vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The Analysis Resource is freely available to all researchers and provides access to a variety of epitope analysis and prediction tools. The tools include validated and benchmarked methods to predict MHC class I and class II binding. The predictions from these tools can be combined with tools predicting antigen processing, TCR recognition, and B cell epitope prediction. In addition, the resource contains a variety of secondary analysis tools that allow the researcher to calculate epitope conservation, population coverage, and other relevant analytic variables. The researcher involved in vaccine design and epitope discovery will also be interested in accessing experimental published data, relevant to the specific indication of interest. The database component of the IEDB contains a vast amount of experimentally derived epitope data that can be queried through a flexible user interface. The IEDB is linked to other pathogen-specific and immunological database resources.

  12. Identification of Protective Epitopes by Sequencing of the Major Outer Membrane Protein Gene of a Variant Strain of Chlamydia psittaci Serotype 1 (Chlamydophila abortus)

    PubMed Central

    Vretou, Evangelia; Psarrou, Evgenia; Kaisar, Maria; Vlisidou, Isabella; Salti-Montesanto, Viviane; Longbottom, David

    2001-01-01

    Protective monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of species of the family Chlamydiaceae, which is the primary vaccine candidate antigen, recognize nonlinear epitopes conferred by the oligomeric conformation of the molecule. Protective MAbs failed to recognize oligomeric MOMP of the variant strain LLG, which bears amino acid substitutions in variable segments (VSs) 1, 2, and 4, and competed with monomer-specific MAbs mapping to these VSs in reference strain 577. The results suggest that multiple sites located in the three VSs contribute to the epitope of protective MAbs. PMID:11119563

  13. Identification of two linear B-cell epitopes from West Nile virus NS1 by screening a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The West Nile virus (WNV) nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is an important antigenic protein that elicits protective antibody responses in animals and can be used for the serological diagnosis of WNV infection. Although previous work has demonstrated the vital role of WNV NS1-specific antibody responses, the specific epitopes in the NS1 have not been identified. Results The present study describes the identification of two linear B-cell epitopes in WNV NS1 through screening a phage-displayed random 12-mer peptide library with two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 3C7 and 4D1 that directed against the NS1. The mAbs 3C7 and 4D1 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motifs LTATTEK and VVDGPETKEC, respectively. Exact sequences of both motifs were found in the NS1 (895LTATTEK901 and 925VVDGPETKEC934). Further identification of the displayed B cell epitopes were conducted using a set of truncated peptides expressed as MBP fusion proteins. The data indicated that 896TATTEK901 and925VVDGPETKEC934 are minimal determinants of the linear B cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. Antibodies present in the serum of WNV-positive horses recognized the minimal linear epitopes in Western blot analysis, indicating that the two peptides are antigenic in horses during infection. Furthermore, we found that the epitope recognized by 3C7 is conserved only among WNV strains, whereas the epitope recognized by 4D1 is a common motif shared among WNV and other members of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) serocomplex. Conclusions We identified TATTEK and VVDGPETKEC as NS1-specific linear B-cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study may have potential applications in differential diagnosis and the development of epitope-based marker vaccines against WNV and other viruses of JEV serocomplex. PMID:21729328

  14. Genetic mapping of a highly variable norovirus GII.4 blockade epitope: potential role in escape from human herd immunity.

    PubMed

    Debbink, Kari; Donaldson, Eric F; Lindesmith, Lisa C; Baric, Ralph S

    2012-01-01

    Noroviruses account for 96% of viral gastroenteritis cases worldwide, with GII.4 strains responsible >80% of norovirus outbreaks. Histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are norovirus binding ligands, and antigenic and preferential HBGA binding profiles vary over time as new GII.4 strains emerge. The capsid P2 subdomain facilitates HBGA binding, contains neutralizing antibody epitopes, and likely evolves in response to herd immunity. To identify amino acids regulating HBGA binding and antigenic differences over time, we created chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs) between the GII.4-1987 and GII.4-2006 strains by exchanging amino acids in putative epitopes and characterized their antigenic and HBGA binding profiles using anti-GII.4-1987 and -2006 mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and polyclonal sera, 1988 outbreak human sera, and synthetic HBGAs. The exchange of amino acids 393 to 395 between GII.4-1987 and GII.4-2006 resulted in altered synthetic HBGA binding compared to parental strains. Introduction of GII.4-1987 residues 294, 297 to 298, 368, and 372 (epitope A) into GII.4-2006 resulted in reactivity with three anti-GII.4-1987 MAbs and reduced reactivity with four anti-GII.4-2006 MAbs. The three anti-GII.4-1987 MAbs also blocked chimeric VLP-HBGA interaction, while an anti-GII.4-2006 blocking antibody did not, indicating that epitope A amino acids comprise a potential neutralizing epitope for GII.4-1987 and GII.4-2006. We also tested GII.4-1987-immunized mouse polyclonal sera and 1988 outbreak human sera for the ability to block chimeric VLP-HBGA interaction and found that epitope A amino acids contribute significantly to the GII.4-1987 blockade response. Our data provide insights that help explain the emergence of new GII.4 epidemic strains over time, may aid development of norovirus therapeutics, and may help predict the emergence of future epidemic strains.

  15. Schwann cells and myasthenia gravis. Preferential uptake of soluble and membrane-bound AChR by normal and immortalized Schwann cells, and immunogenic presentation to AChR-specific T line lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y. P.; Porter, S.; Wekerle, H.

    1990-01-01

    The normal neuromuscular synapse is formed by the intimate association of nerve endings, postsynaptic end-plate foldings in the muscle fiber, and nonmyelinating Schwann cells (SC) sealing the synaptic ramifications. Because SC have been recognized recently to have an immunogenic potential inducible to present protein autoantigens to autoimmune T lymphocytes, and considering their close proximity to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-bearing postsynaptic membranes, presentation of soluble and membrane vesicle-bound AChR to appropriate T cells was investigated. Short-term monolayer cultures of SC isolated from neonatal rat sciatic nerves, as well as cells of an immortalized SC line of similar origin, were fully able to present the relevant molecular epitopes to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) compatible AChR-specific T line lymphocytes immunogenically. Presentation of AChR was restricted by RT1.B (I-A) MHC class II products. Both types of cultured rat SC were inducible to expression of MHC class I and II products, and they were able to phagocytose AChR-enriched membrane vesicles preferentially. In contrast, phagocytosis of latex particles by SC was negligible. These data qualify perisynaptic SC as potential presenter cells of autoimmunogenic AChR in myasthenia gravis. Thus, SC may play a critical and as-yet unpredicted regulatory role in the cellular pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. Images Figure 5 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:1688688

  16. Human CTLs to wild-type and enhanced epitopes of a novel prostate and breast tumor-associated protein, TARP, lyse human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, SangKon; Terabe, Masaki; Pendleton, C David; Bhattacharyya, Anu; Bera, Tapan K; Epel, Malka; Reiter, Yoram; Phillips, John; Linehan, W Marston; Kasten-Sportes, Claude; Pastan, Ira; Berzofsky, Jay A

    2004-04-01

    Vaccine therapy for prostate and breast cancer may have potential for treating these major causes of death in males and females, respectively. Critical to the development of tumor-specific vaccines is finding and characterizing novel antigens to be recognized by CD8(+) T cells. To define new CD8(+) T-cell tumor antigens, we determined two wild-type HLA-A2 epitopes from a recently found tumor-associated protein, TARP (T-cell receptor gamma alternate reading frame protein), expressed in prostate and breast cancer cells. We were also able to engineer epitope-enhanced peptides by sequence modifications. Both wild-type and enhanced epitopes induced peptide-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses in A2K(b) transgenic mice. In vitro restimulation of human CD8(+) T cells from a prostate cancer patient resulted in CD8(+) T cells reactive to the peptide epitopes that could lyse HLA-A2(+) human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) expressing TARP. Epitope-specific human CD8(+) T cells were also enumerated in patients' peripheral blood by tetramer staining. Our data suggest that HLA-A2-binding TARP epitopes and enhanced epitopes discovered in this study could be incorporated into a potential vaccine for both breast and prostate cancer.

  17. The Relationship between B-cell Epitope and Mimotope Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Yunyun; Tang, Weina; Zhou, Zhiguo; Sun, Pingping; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitope is a group of residues which is on the surface of an antigen. It invokes humoral responses. Locating B-cell epitope is important for effective vaccine design, and the development of diagnostic reagents. Mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction method is a kind of conformational B-cell epitope prediction, and the core idea of the method is mapping the mimotope sequences which are obtained from a random phage display library. However, current mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods cannot maintain a high degree of satisfaction in the circumstances of employing only mimotope sequences. In this study, we did a multi-perspective analysis on parameters for conformational B-cell epitopes and characteristics between epitope and mimotope on a benchmark datasets which contains 67 mimotope sets, corresponding to 40 unique complex structures. In these 67 cases, there are 25 antigen-antibody complexes and 42 protein-protein interactions. We analyzed the two parts separately. The results showed the mimotope sequences do have some epitope features, but there are also some epitope properties that mimotope sequences do not contain. In addition, the numbers of epitope segments with different lengths were obviously different between the antigen-antibody complexes and the protein-protein interactions. This study reflects how similar do mimotope sequence and genuine epitopes have; and evaluates existing mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods from a novel viewpoint.

  18. Modules for C-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kensuke; Schoeberl, Ursula E.; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-01-01

    Although epitope tagging has been widely used for analyzing protein function in many organisms, there are few genetic tools for epitope tagging in Tetrahymena. In this study, we describe several C-terminal epitope tagging modules that can be used to express tagged proteins in Tetrahymena cells by both plasmid- and PCR-based strategies. PMID:20624430

  19. A monoclonal antibody recognizing a differentiation marker on rat gonocytes.

    PubMed

    van Dissel-Emiliani, F M; van Kooten, P J; de Boer-Brouwer, M; de Rooij, D G; van der Donk, J A

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were raised against a testicular membrane fraction from 18-day post coitum (p.c.) rat testes. One antibody, designated 4B6.3E10 (mu, kappa), was obtained which specifically reacted with gonocytes in the fetal testis. No significant cross-reactivity with other tissues from the 18-day p.c. embryo was found. MAb 4B6.3E10 was reactive with rat gonocytes from 17-day p.c. until the day of birth. Germ cells at later stages of testis development did not show any labelling. The epitope recognized by 4B6.3E10 is a carbohydrate as periodate treatment leads to a loss of reactivity of the antibody. By SDS-PAGE and Western blotting of proteins extracted from a testicular membrane fraction from 18-day p.c. testes, MAb 4B6.3E10 was found to recognize at least 3 protein moieties with apparent molecular weights in the ranges of 80-100, 120, 160-180 kDa (either under reducing- or non-reducing conditions). The results suggest that MAb 4B6.3E10 recognizes a specific differentiation marker for fetal rat gonocytes.

  20. Diversity of PR3-ANCA epitope specificity in Wegener's granulomatosis. Analysis using the biosensor technology.

    PubMed

    Rarok, Agnieszka A; van der Geld, Ymke M; Stegeman, Coen A; Limburg, Pieter C; Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2003-11-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis is a systemic disease characterized by the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies specific for proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA). The functional characteristics of PR3-ANCA differ between quiescent and active disease, suggesting changes in the properties of the autoantibodies in time. Using biosensor technology, we found that PR3-ANCA of different patients (n = 8) recognize a limited number of overlapping regions on PR3 at the time of diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis. This area might cover an immunodominant epitope, common for PR3-ANCA from all patients, irrespective of the size of the total area recognized by an individual autoantibody. Experiments with sera (n = 4) collected at the moment of diagnosis and at the time of relapse showed that the individual epitope specificities of PR3-ANCA change during the course of the disease. These changes in epitope specificity of PR3-ANCA may be responsible for the differences in functional properties of these autoantibodies between various stages of the disease.

  1. A Chimeric Pneumovirus Fusion Protein Carrying Neutralizing Epitopes of Both MPV and RSV

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiaolin; Pickens, Jennifer; Mousa, Jarrod J.; Leser, George P.; Lamb, Robert A.; Crowe, James E.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) are paramyxoviruses that are responsible for substantial human health burden, particularly in children and the elderly. The fusion (F) glycoproteins are major targets of the neutralizing antibody response and studies have mapped dominant antigenic sites in F. Here we grafted a major neutralizing site of RSV F, recognized by the prophylactic monoclonal antibody palivizumab, onto HMPV F, generating a chimeric protein displaying epitopes of both viruses. We demonstrate that the resulting chimeric protein (RPM-1) is recognized by both anti-RSV and anti-HMPV F neutralizing antibodies indicating that it can be used to map the epitope specificity of antibodies raised against both viruses. Mice immunized with the RPM-1 chimeric antigen generate robust neutralizing antibody responses to MPV but weak or no cross-reactive recognition of RSV F, suggesting that grafting of the single palivizumab epitope stimulates a comparatively limited antibody response. The RPM-1 protein provides a new tool for characterizing the immune responses resulting from RSV and HMPV infections and provides insights into the requirements for developing a chimeric subunit vaccine that could induce robust and balanced immunity to both virus infections. PMID:27224013

  2. Mapping of Lol p I allergenic epitopes by using murine monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mourad, W; Bernier, D; Jobin, M; Hébert, J

    1989-11-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against three non-overlapping epitopes of Lol p I allergen were previously produced and subsequently used for purification of the allergen. In the present study, these MAbs were further characterized, and the biological activity of the purified allergen assessed. The three MAbs were of the IgG isotype and carried a kappa light chain. Their affinity constants were in the range of 7.4-15.1 x 10(-9) mol/l. Purified Lol p I kept its biological activity, as shown by its ability to induce histamine release by basophils of Lol p I-sensitive patients. The profiles of histamine release induced by either Lol p I or crude Lolium perenne extracts were comparable. This observation suggests that human IgE bound to basophils are polyspecific which has been confirmed by immunoblot and inhibition assay. Our data indicated also that Lol p I possesses a major allergenic epitope recognized by all human serum IgE tested. This epitope seems to be partially shared by those recognized by the three MAbs. Finally, preincubation of Lol p I with either one of the Mabs did not affect significantly the basophil-histamine release induced by the purified allergen. This suggests that Lol p I possesses allergenic sites other than the one shared by MAbs and IgE Abs.

  3. Myelin basic protein-specific T lymphocyte repertoire in multiple sclerosis. Complexity of the response and dominance of nested epitopes due to recruitment of multiple T cell clones.

    PubMed Central

    Meinl, E; Weber, F; Drexler, K; Morelle, C; Ott, M; Saruhan-Direskeneli, G; Goebels, N; Ertl, B; Jechart, G; Giegerich, G

    1993-01-01

    The human T cell response to the myelin basic protein (MBP) has been studied with respect to T cell receptor (TCR) usage, HLA class II restriction elements, and epitope specificity using a total of 215 long-term MBP-specific T cell lines (TCL) isolated from the peripheral blood of 13 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 10 healthy donors. In most donors, the anti-MBP response was exceedingly heterogeneous. Using a panel of overlapping synthetic peptides spanning the entire length of human MBP, at least 26 epitopes recognized by human TCL could be distinguished. The MBP domain most commonly recognized was sequence 80-105 (31% of MS TCL, and 24% of control TCL). Sequence 29-48 was recognized more frequently by control-derived TCL (24%) than by TCL from MS patients (5%). The MBP epitopes were recognized in the context of DRB1 *0101, DRB5*0101, DRB1*1501, DRB1*0301, DRB1*0401, DRB1*1402, and DRB3*0102, as demonstrated using a panel of DR gene-transfected L cells. The TCR gene usage was also heterogeneous. V beta 5.2, a peptide of which is currently being used in a clinical trial for treatment of MS patients, was expressed by only one of our TCL. However, within this complex pattern of MBP-specific T cell responses, a minority of MS patients were found to exhibit a more restricted response with respect to their TCL epitope specificity. In these patients 75-87% of the TCL responded to a single, patient-specific cluster of immunodominant T cell epitopes located within a small (20-amino acid) domain of MBP. These nested clusters of immunodominant epitopes were noted within the amino acids 80-105, 108-131, and 131-153. The T cell response to the immunodominant epitopes was not monoclonal, but heterogeneous, with respect to fine specificity, TCR usage, and even HLA restriction. In one patient (H.K.), this restricted epitope profile remained stable for > 2 yr. The TCR beta chain sequences of TCL specific for the immunodominant region of HK are consistent with an

  4. Recognizing the adolescent drug abuser.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, R G; Jacobs, E A

    1987-03-01

    Adolescents are at high risk for using and abusing illicit drugs. Guidelines for recognizing drug abusers are presented as well as a staging process for progression of drug use. The family physician is in an ideal position to identify young users/abusers and to assist them and their families in obtaining much needed assistance.

  5. Recognizing Prefixes in Scientific Quantities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Although recognizing prefixes in physical quantities is inherent for practitioners, it might not be inherent for students, who do not use prefixes in their everyday life experiences. This deficiency surfaces in AP Physics exams. For example, readers of an AP Physics exam reported "a common mistake of incorrectly converting nanometers to…

  6. Identification of a dengue virus type 2 (DEN-2) serotype-specific B-cell epitope and detection of DEN-2-immunized animal serum samples using an epitope-based peptide antigen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Han-Chung; Jung, Mei-Ying; Chiu, Chien-Yu; Chao, Ting-Ting; Lai, Szu-Chia; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Shaio, Men-Fang

    2003-10-01

    In this study, a serotype-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb), D(2) 16-1 (Ab4), against dengue virus type 2 (DEN-2) was generated. The specificity of Ab4, which recognized DEN-2 non-structural protein 1, was determined by ELISA, immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analyses. The serotype-specific B-cell epitope of Ab4 was identified further from a random phage-displayed peptide library; selected phage clones reacted specifically with Ab4 and did not react with other mAbs. Immunopositive phage clones displayed a consensus motif, His-Arg/Lys-Leu/Ile, and a synthetic peptide corresponding to the phage-displayed peptide bound specifically to Ab4. The His and Arg residues in this epitope were found to be crucial for peptide binding to Ab4 and binding activity decreased dramatically when these residues were changed to Leu. The epitope-based synthetic peptide not only identified serum samples from DEN-2-immunized mice and rabbits by ELISA but also differentiated clearly between serum samples from DEN-2- and Japanese encephalitis virus-immunized mice. This mAb and its epitope-based peptide antigen will be useful for serologic diagnosis of DEN-2 infection. Furthermore, DEN-2 epitope identification makes it feasible to dissect antibody responses to DEN and to address the role of antibodies in the pathogenesis of primary and secondary DEN-2 infections.

  7. Autoantibodies from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis recognize a region within the nucleoplasmic domain of inner nuclear membrane protein LBR.

    PubMed

    Lin, F; Noyer, C M; Ye, Q; Courvalin, J C; Worman, H J

    1996-01-01

    Autoantibodies from rare patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) recognize LBR, or lamin B receptor, an integral membrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane. Human LBR has a nucleoplasmic, amino-terminal domain of 208 amino acids followed by a carboxyl-terminal domain with eight putative transmembrane segments. Autoantibodies against LBR from four patients with PBC recognized the nucleoplasmic, amino-terminal domain but not the carboxyl-terminal domain. Immunoblotting of smaller fusion proteins demonstrated that these autoantibodies recognized a conformational epitope(s) contained within the stretch of amino acids from 1 to 60. These results, combined with those of previous studies, show that autoepitopes of nuclear membrane proteins are located within their nucleocytoplasmic domains and that autoantibodies from patients with PBC predominantly react with one domain of a protein antigen. This work also provides further characterization of anti-LBR antibodies that have found utility as reagents in cell biology research.

  8. Synthesis and comparison of antibody recognition of conjugates containing herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein D epitope VII.

    PubMed

    Mezö, Gábor; de Oliveira, Eliandre; Krikorian, Dimitrios; Feijlbrief, Matty; Jakab, Annamária; Tsikaris, Vassilios; Sakarellos, Constantinos; Welling-Wester, Sytske; Andreu, David; Hudecz, Ferenc

    2003-01-01

    Synthetic oligopeptides comprising linear or continuous topographic B-cell epitope sequences of proteins might be considered as specific and small size antigens. It has been demonstrated that the strength and specificity of antibody binding could be altered by conjugation to macromolecules or by modification in the flanking regions. However, no systematic studies have been reported to describe the effect of different carrier macromolecules in epitope conjugates. To this end, the influence of carrier structure and topology on antibody recognition of attached epitope has been studied by comparing the antibody binding properties of a new set of conjugates with tetratuftsin analogue (H-[Thr-Lys-Pro-Lys-Gly](4)-NH(2), T20) sequential oligopeptide carrier (SOC(n)), branched chain polypeptide, poly[Lys(Ser(i)-DL-Ala(m))] (SAK), multiple antigenic peptide (MAP), and keyhole limpet hemocyanine (KLH). In these novel constructs, peptide (9)LKNleADPNRFRGKDL(22) ([Nle(11)]-9-22) representing an immunodominant B cell epitope of herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein D (HSV-1 gD) was conjugated to polypeptides through a thioether or amide bond. Here we report on the preparation of sequential and polymeric polypeptides possessing chloroacetyl groups in multiple copies at the alpha- and/or epsilon-amino group of the polypeptides and its use for the conjugation of epitope peptides possessing Cys at C-terminal position. We have performed binding studies (direct and competitive ELISA) with monoclonal antibody (Mab) A16, recognizing the HSV gD-related epitope, [Nle(11)]-9-22, and conjugates containing identical and uniformly oriented epitope peptide in multiple copies attached to five different macromolecules as carrier. Data suggest that the chemical nature of the carrier and the degree of substitution have marked influence on the strength of antibody binding.

  9. Ribosomal scanning past the primary initiation codon as a mechanism for expression of CTL epitopes encoded in alternative reading frames

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    An increasing amount of evidence has shown that epitopes restricted to MHC class I molecules and recognized by CTL need not be encoded in a primary open reading frame (ORF). Such epitopes have been demonstrated after stop codons, in alternative reading frames (RF) and within introns. We have used a series of frameshifts (FS) introduced into the Influenza A/PR/8 /34 nucleoprotein (NP) gene to confirm the previous in vitro observations of cryptic epitope expression, and show that they are sufficiently expressed to prime immune responses in vivo. This presentation is not due to sub-dominant epitopes, transcription from cryptic promoters beyond the point of the FS, or internal initiation of translation. By introducing additional mutations to the construct exhibiting the most potent presentation, we have identified initiation codon readthrough (termed scanthrough here, where the scanning ribosome bypasses the conventional initiation codon, initiating translation further downstream) as the likely mechanism of epitope production. Further mutational analysis demonstrated that, while it should operate during the expression of wild-type (WT) protein, scanthrough does not provide a major source of processing substrate in our system. These findings suggest (i) that the full array of self- and pathogen-derived epitopes available during thymic selection and infection has not been fully appreciated and (ii) that cryptic epitope expression should be considered when the specificity of a CTL response cannot be identified or in therapeutic situations when conventional CTL targets are limited, as may be the case with latent viral infections and transformed cells. Finally, initiation codon readthrough provides a plausible explanation for the presentation of exocytic proteins by MHC class I molecules. PMID:8879204

  10. Discovering Preferential Patterns in Sectoral Trade Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cingolani, Isabella; Piccardi, Carlo; Tajoli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the patterns of import/export bilateral relations, with the aim of assessing the relevance and shape of “preferentiality” in countries’ trade decisions. Preferentiality here is defined as the tendency to concentrate trade on one or few partners. With this purpose, we adopt a systemic approach through the use of the tools of complex network analysis. In particular, we apply a pattern detection approach based on community and pseudocommunity analysis, in order to highlight the groups of countries within which most of members’ trade occur. The method is applied to two intra-industry trade networks consisting of 221 countries, relative to the low-tech “Textiles and Textile Articles” and the high-tech “Electronics” sectors for the year 2006, to look at the structure of world trade before the start of the international financial crisis. It turns out that the two networks display some similarities and some differences in preferential trade patterns: they both include few significant communities that define narrow sets of countries trading with each other as preferential destinations markets or supply sources, and they are characterized by the presence of similar hierarchical structures, led by the largest economies. But there are also distinctive features due to the characteristics of the industries examined, in which the organization of production and the destination markets are different. Overall, the extent of preferentiality and partner selection at the sector level confirm the relevance of international trade costs still today, inducing countries to seek the highest efficiency in their trade patterns. PMID:26485163

  11. Antibody-detected folding: kinetics of surface epitope formation are distinct from other folding phases.

    PubMed Central

    Raman, C. S.; Jemmerson, R.; Nall, B. T.

    2000-01-01

    The rate of macromolecular surface formation in yeast iso-2 cytochrome c and its site-specific mutant, N52I iso-2, has been studied using a monoclonal antibody that recognizes a tertiary epitope including K58 and H39. The results indicate that epitope refolding occurs after fast folding but prior to slow folding, in contrast to horse cytochrome c where surface formation occurs early. The antibody-detected (ad) kinetic phase accompanying epitope formation has k(ad) = 0.2 s(-1) and is approximately 40-fold slower than the fastest detectable event in the folding of yeast iso-2 cytochrome c (k2f approximately 8 s(-1)), but occurs prior to the absorbance- and fluorescence-detected slow folding steps (k1a approximately 0.06 s(-1); k1b approximately 0.09 s(-1)). N5I iso-2 cytochrome c exhibits similar kinetic behavior with respect to epitope formation. A detailed dissection of the mechanistic differences between the folding pathways of horse and yeast cytochromes c identifies possible reasons for the slow surface formation in the latter. Our results suggest that non-native ligation involving H33 or H39 during refolding may slow down the formation of the tertiary epitope in iso-2 cytochrome c. This study illustrates that surface formation can be coupled to early events in protein folding. Thus, the rate of macromolecular surface formation is fine tuned by the residues that make up the surface and the interactions they entertain during refolding. PMID:10739255

  12. Latent NOTCH3 epitopes unmasked in CADASIL and regulated by protein redox state.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojie; Lee, Soo Jung; Young, Kelly Z; Josephson, David A; Geschwind, Michael D; Wang, Michael M

    2014-10-02

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy CADASIL is caused by more than a hundred NOTCH3 mutations. Virtually all encoded mutant proteins contain an odd number of cysteines. As such, structural changes in NOTCH3 may be the primary molecular abnormality in CADASIL. Thus, we sought evidence for structurally altered NOTCH3 protein in CADASIL tissue. Four antibodies were raised in rabbits against two non-overlapping N-terminal NOTCH3 sequences. These reagents were used in immunohistochemical experiments to detect epitopes in post-mortem CADASIL brains (n=8), control brains, and cells overexpressing NOTCH3. To determine the biochemical nature of NOTCH3 epitopes, we used these antibodies to probe pure NOTCH3-Fc fusion proteins treated with acid, urea, guanidinium, ionic detergents, acrylamide, and thiol- and phosphorus-based reductants. All antibodies avidly stained arteries in 8 of 8 CADASIL brain samples. The most prominent staining was in degenerating media of leptomeningeal arteries and sclerotic penetrating vessels. Normal appearing vessels from control brains were not reactive. Antibodies did not react with cultured cells overexpressing NOTCH3 or with purified NOTCH3-Fc protein. Furthermore, treatment of pure protein with acid, chaotropic denaturants, alkylators, and detergents failed to unmask N-terminal NOTCH3 epitopes. Antibodies, however, recognized novel N-terminal epitopes in purified NOTCH3-Fc protein treated with three different reductants (DTT, beta-mercaptoethanol, and TCEP). We conclude that CADASIL arteries feature latent N-terminal NOTCH3 epitopes, suggesting the first evidence in vivo of NOTCH3 structural alterations.

  13. Structural Analysis of a Protective Epitope of the Francisella tularensis O-Polysaccharide†

    PubMed Central

    Rynkiewicz, Michael J.; Lu, Zhaohua; Hui, Julia H.; Sharon, Jacqueline; Seaton, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    Francisella tularensis (Ft), the Gram negative facultative intracellular bacterium that causes tularemia, is considered a biothreat due to its high infectivity and the high mortality rate of respiratory disease. The Ft lipopolysaccharide (Ft LPS) is thought to be a main protective antigen in mice and humans, and we have previously demonstrated the protective effect of the Ft LPS-specific monoclonal antibody Ab52 in a mouse model of respiratory tularemia. Immunochemical characterization has shown that the epitope recognized by Ab52 is contained within two internal repeat units of the O-polysaccharide [O-antigen (OAg)] of Ft LPS. To further localize the Ab52 epitope and understand the molecular interactions between the antibody and the saccharide, we now solved the X-ray crystal structure of the Fab fragment of Ab52 and derived an antibody-antigen complex using molecular docking. The docked complex, refined through energy minimization, reveals an antigen binding site in the shape of a large canyon with a central pocket that accommodates a V-shaped epitope consisting of six sugar residues, α-D-GalpNAcAN(1→4)-α-D-GalpNAcAN(1→3)-β-D-QuipNAc(1→2)-β-D-Quip4NFm(1→4)-α-D-GalpNAcAN(1→4)-α-D-GalpNAcAN. These results inform the development of vaccines and immunotherapeutic/immunoprophylactic antibodies against Ft by suggesting a desired topology for antibody binding to internal epitopes of Ft LPS. This is the first report of an X-ray crystal structure of a monoclonal antibody that targets a protective Ft B cell epitope. PMID:22747335

  14. Localization of immunodominant epitopes within the "a" determinant of hepatitis B surface antigen using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Mohammadi, Hamed; Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Shokri, Fazel

    2016-10-01

    The common "a" determinant is the major immunodominant region of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) shared by all serotypes and genotypes of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Antibodies against this region are thought to confer protection against HBV and are essential for viral clearance. Mutations within the "a" determinant may lead to conformational changes in this region, which can affect the binding of neutralizing antibodies. There is an increasing concern about identification and control of mutant viruses which is possible by comprehensive structural investigation of the epitopes located within this region. Anti-HBs monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against different epitopes of HBsAg are a promising tool to meet this goal. In the present study, 19 anti-HBs mAbs were employed to map epitopes localized within the "a" determinant, using a panel of recombinant mutant HBsAgs. The topology of the epitopes was analyzed by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results indicate that all of the mAbs seem to recognize epitopes within or in the vicinity of the "a" determinant of HBsAg. Different patterns of binding with mutant forms were observed with different mAbs. Amino acid substitutions at positions 123, 126, 129, 144, and 145 dramatically reduced the reactivity of antibodies with HBsAg. The T123N mutation had the largest impact on antibody binding to HBsAg. The reactivity pattern of our panel of mAbs with mutant forms of HBsAg could have important clinical implications for immunoscreening, diagnosis of HBV infection, design of a new generation of recombinant HB vaccines, and immunoprophylaxis of HBV infection as an alternative to therapy with hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG).

  15. Epitope Mapping with Random Phage Display Library

    PubMed Central

    Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; Goldblum, Randall M.

    2017-01-01

    Random phage display library is used to map conformational as well as linear epitopes. These libraries are available in varying lengths and with circularization. We provide here a protocol conveying our experience using a commercially available peptide phage display library, which in our hands provides good results. PMID:24515483

  16. Relevant B Cell Epitopes in Allergic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pomés, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The 3-dimensional structure of an allergen defines the accessible parts on the surface of the molecule or epitopes that interact with antibodies. Mapping the antigenic determinants for IgE antibody binding has been pursued through strategies based on the use of overlapping synthetic peptides, recombinant allergenic fragments or unfolded allergens. These approaches led to the identification of mostly linear epitopes and are useful for food allergens that undergo digestion or food processing. For inhaled allergens, conformational epitopes appear to be the primary targets of IgE responses. Knowledge of the molecular structure of allergens alone and in complex with antibodies that interfere with IgE antibody binding is important to understand the immune recognition of B cell-antigenic determinants on allergens and the design of recombinant allergens for immunotherapy. Starting with the molecular cloning and expression of allergens, and with the advent of X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, we have been able to visualize conformational epitopes on allergens. PMID:19940500

  17. Structure-based design of a protein immunogen that displays an HIV-1 gp41 neutralizing epitope.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, Robyn L; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Pejchal, Robert; Gach, Johannes S; Zwick, Michael B; Wilson, Ian A

    2011-12-02

    Antibody Z13e1 is a relatively broadly neutralizing anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody that recognizes the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein gp41. Based on the crystal structure of an MPER epitope peptide in complex with Z13e1 Fab, we identified an unrelated protein, interleukin (IL)-22, with a surface-exposed region that is structurally homologous in its backbone to the gp41 Z13e1 epitope. By grafting the gp41 Z13e1 epitope sequence onto the structurally homologous region in IL-22, we engineered a novel protein (Z13-IL22-2) that contains the MPER epitope sequence for use as a potential immunogen and as a reagent for the detection of Z13e1-like antibodies. The Z13-IL22-2 protein binds Fab Z13e1 with a K(d) of 73 nM. The crystal structure of Z13-IL22-2 in complex with Fab Z13e1 shows that the epitope region is faithfully replicated in the Fab-bound scaffold protein; however, isothermal calorimetry studies indicate that Fab binding to Z13-IL22-2 is not a lock-and-key event, leaving open the question of whether conformational changes upon binding occur in the Fab, in Z13-IL-22, or in both.

  18. Structure-Based Design of a Protein Immunogen that Displays an HIV-1 gp41 Neutralizing Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Pejchal, Robert; Gach, Johannes S.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-06-27

    Antibody Z13e1 is a relatively broadly neutralizing anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody that recognizes the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein gp41. Based on the crystal structure of an MPER epitope peptide in complex with Z13e1 Fab, we identified an unrelated protein, interleukin (IL)-22, with a surface-exposed region that is structurally homologous in its backbone to the gp41 Z13e1 epitope. By grafting the gp41 Z13e1 epitope sequence onto the structurally homologous region in IL-22, we engineered a novel protein (Z13-IL22-2) that contains the MPER epitope sequence for use as a potential immunogen and as a reagent for the detection of Z13e1-like antibodies. The Z13-IL22-2 protein binds Fab Z13e1 with a K{sub d} of 73 nM. The crystal structure of Z13-IL22-2 in complex with Fab Z13e1 shows that the epitope region is faithfully replicated in the Fab-bound scaffold protein; however, isothermal calorimetry studies indicate that Fab binding to Z13-IL22-2 is not a lock-and-key event, leaving open the question of whether conformational changes upon binding occur in the Fab, in Z13-IL-22, or in both.

  19. Characterization of periplasmic protein BP26 epitopes of Brucella melitensis reacting with murine monoclonal and sheep antibodies.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jinlang; Wang, Wenjing; Wu, Jingbo; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yuanzhi; Qiao, Jun; Chen, Chuangfu; Gao, Goege F; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2012-01-01

    More than 35,000 new cases of human brucellosis were reported in 2010 by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. An attenuated B. melitensis vaccine M5-90 is currently used for vaccination of sheep and goats in China. In the study, a periplasmic protein BP26 from M5-90 was characterized for its epitope reactivity with mouse monoclonal and sheep antibodies. A total of 29 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against recombinant BP26 (rBP26) were produced, which were tested for reactivity with a panel of BP26 peptides, three truncated rBP26 and native BP26 containing membrane protein extracts (NMP) of B. melitensis M5-90 in ELISA and Western-Blot. The linear, semi-conformational and conformational epitopes from native BP26 were identified. Two linear epitopes recognized by mAbs were revealed by 28 of 16mer overlapping peptides, which were accurately mapped as the core motif of amino acid residues ⁹³DRDLQTGGI¹⁰¹ (position 93 to 101) or residues ¹⁰⁴QPIYVYPD¹¹¹, respectively. The reactivity of linear epitope peptides, rBP26 and NMP was tested with 137 sheep sera by ELISAs, of which the two linear epitopes had 65-70% reactivity and NMP 90% consistent with the results of a combination of two standard serological tests. The results were helpful for evaluating the reactivity of BP26 antigen in M5-90.

  20. Cutting edge: identification of novel T cell epitopes in Lol p5a by computational prediction.

    PubMed

    de Lalla, C; Sturniolo, T; Abbruzzese, L; Hammer, J; Sidoli, A; Sinigaglia, F; Panina-Bordignon, P

    1999-08-15

    Although atopic allergy affects epitopes that were able to stimulate T cells from atopic patients. We generated a panel of Lol p5a-specific T cell clones, the majority of which recognized the peptides in a cross-reactive fashion. The computational prediction of DR ligands might thus allow the design of T cell epitopes with potential useful application in novel immunotherapy strategies.

  1. Correlating low-similarity peptide sequences and HIV B-cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kanduc, Darja; Serpico, Rosario; Lucchese, Alberta; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2008-02-01

    Although a large number of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) derived B-cell epitopes has been experimentally identified, the structural requirements underlying HIV humoral immune response remain unknown. Here, we review the current literature on HIV B-cell epitopes as catalogued in the www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology website, searching for common structural and/or functional immunogenic motifs. The analysis of HIV antibody data documents that the linear determinants recognized by human or murine humoral immune responses, are (or harbor) pentapeptide fragments with no or only very low similarity to the respective host proteome. The present literature analysis provides relevant insights that may be applied to design anti-HCV therapeutic approaches exempt from autoimmune collateral effects.

  2. Epitope mapping of Canine distemper virus phosphoprotein by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Akihiro; Kooriyama, Takanori; Sato, Hiroki; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2009-12-01

    The gene for phosphoprotein (P) of CDV encodes three different proteins, P, V, and C. The P protein is involved in viral gene transcription and replication. In the present study, we produced MAbs against a unique domain of the CDV-P protein, from aa 232 to 507, and determined their antigenic sites. By immunizing BALB/c mice with the recombinant P protein-specific fragment, we obtained six MAbs. Competitive binding inhibition assays revealed that they recognized two distinct regions of the P protein. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assays using deletion mutants of the unique C-terminus of the CDV-P protein revealed that all MAbs recognized a central short region (aa 233-303) of the CDV-P protein. In addition, linear and conformational epitopes have been determined, and at least four antigenic sites exist in the P protein central region. Furthermore, four of the MAbs were found to react with the P protein of recent Japanese field isolates but not with that of the older CDV strains, including a vaccine strain. Thus, these MAbs could be clinically useful for quick diagnosis during the CDV outbreaks.

  3. Theoretical analysis of the neuraminidase epitope of the Mexican A H1N1 influenza strain, and experimental studies on its interaction with rabbit and human hosts.

    PubMed

    Loyola, Paola Kinara Reyes; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Bello, Martiniano; Rojas-Hernández, S; Zimic, Mirko; Quiliano, Miguel; Briz, Verónica; Muñoz-Fernández, M Angeles; Tolentino-López, Luis; Correa-Basurto, Jose

    2013-05-01

    The neuraminidase (NA) epitope from the Mexican AH1N1 influenza virus was identified by using sequences registered at the GenBank during the peak of a pandemic (from April 2009 to October 2010). First, NA protein sequences were submitted for multiple alignment analysis, and their three-dimensional models (3-D) were then built by using homology modeling. The most common sequence (denominated wild-type) and its mutants were submitted to linear and nonlinear epitope predictors, which included the major histocompatibility complex type II (MHC II) and B-cell peptides. The epitope prediction was in accordance with evolutionary behavior and some protein structural properties. The latter included a low NA mutation rate, NA 3-D surface exposure, and the presence of high hindrance side chain residues. After selecting the epitope, docking studies and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to explore interactions between the epitope and MHC II. Afterward, several experimental assays were performed to validate the theoretical study by using antibodies from humans (infected by pandemic H1N1) and rabbits (epitope vaccination). The results show 119 complete sequences that were grouped into 28 protein sequences according to their identity (one wild-type and 27 representative mutants (1-5 mutations)). The predictors yielded several epitopes, with the best fit being the one located in the C-terminal region. Theoretical methods demonstrated that the selected epitope reached the P4, P6, P7, and P9 pockets of MHC II, whereas the experimental evidence indicates that the epitope is recognized by human antibodies and also by rabbit antibodies immunized with the peptide.

  4. Recognizing Prefixes in Scientific Quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Although recognizing prefixes in physical quantities is inherent for practitioners, it might not be inherent for students, who do not use prefixes in their everyday life experiences. This deficiency surfaces in AP Physics exams. For example, readers of an AP Physics exam reported "a common mistake of incorrectly converting nanometers to meters." Similar students' mistakes were reported also by AP Chemistry readers "as in previous years, students still had difficulty converting kJ to J." While traditional teaching focuses on memorizing the symbols of prefixes, little attention is given to helping learners recognize a prefix in a given quantity. I noticed in my teaching practice that by making the processes of identifying prefixes more explicit, students make fewer mistakes on unit conversion. Thus, this paper presents an outline of a lesson that focuses on prefix recognition. It is designed for a first-year college physics class; however, its key points can be addressed to any group of physics students.

  5. Do Infants Recognize the Arcimboldo Images as Faces? Behavioral and Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Megumi; Otsuka, Yumiko; Nakato, Emi; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K.; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2012-01-01

    Arcimboldo images induce the perception of faces when shown upright despite the fact that only nonfacial objects such as vegetables and fruits are painted. In the current study, we examined whether infants recognize a face in the Arcimboldo images by using the preferential looking technique and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). In the first…

  6. Efficient epitope mapping by bacteriophage {lambda} surface display

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, I.; Maruyama, H.; Zuberi, R.I.

    1997-01-01

    A bacteriophage {lambda} surface expression system, {lambda}foo, was used for epitope mapping of human galectin-3. We constructed random epitope and peptide libraries and compared their efficiencies in the mapping. The galectin-3 cDNA was randomly digested by DNase I to make random epitope libraries. The libraries were screened by affinity selection using a microtiter plate coated with monoclonal antibodies. Direct DNA sequencing of the selected clones defined two distinct epitope sites consisting of nine and 11 amino-acid residues. Affinity selection of random peptide libraries recovered a number of sequences that were similar to each other but distinct from the galectin-3 sequence. These results demonstrate that a single affinity selection of epitope libraries with antibodies is able to define an epitope determinant as small as nine residues long and is more efficient in epitope mapping than random peptide libraries. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. The Identification and Characterization of Two Novel Epitopes on the Nucleocapsid Protein of the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kang; Xie, Chun; Zhang, Jianan; Zhang, Wenchao; Yang, Deqiang; Yu, Lingxue; Jiang, Yifeng; Yang, Shen; Gao, Fei; Yang, Zhibiao; Zhou, Yanjun; Tong, Guangzhi

    2016-01-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a highly contagious coronavirus that causes severe diarrhea and death, particularly in neonatal piglets. The nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of PEDV presents strong immunogenicity and contributes to the cross-reactivity between PEDV and TGEV. However, the characterization of epitopes on the PEDV N protein remains largely unknown. Here, two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to the N protein of a PEDV strain, FJzz1/2011, were generated and screened against a partially overlapping library of 24 GST-fusion N protein-truncated constructs. We confirmed that residues 18–133 (designated NEP-D4) and residues 252–262 (designated NEP-D6) were the epitopes targeted by MAbs PN-D4 and PN-D6, respectively. Sequence analysis revealed that these two epitopes were highly conserved among PEDV strains but were significantly different from other members of the Coronavirinae subfamily. Western blot analysis showed that they could be specifically recognized by PEDV antisera but could not be recognized by TGEV hyperimmune antisera. Indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) assays confirmed no cross-reaction between these two MAbs and TGEV. In addition, the freeze-thaw cycle and protease treatment results indicated that NEP-D4 was intrinsically disordered. All these results suggest that these two novel epitopes and their cognate MAbs could serve as the basis for the development of precise diagnostic assays for PEDV. PMID:27991537

  8. Induction of humoral immune response against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites by immunization with a synthetic peptide mimotope whose sequence was derived from screening a filamentous phage epitope library.

    PubMed

    Stoute, J A; Ballou, W R; Kolodny, N; Deal, C D; Wirtz, R A; Lindler, L E

    1995-03-01

    The mouse monoclonal antibody 2A10 (immunoglobulin G), which recognizes the (NANP)n repeat of Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite surface protein, was used to screen a filamentous phage epitope library expressing random amino acid hexamers. The sequences obtained were TNRNPQ, SNRNPQ, NND-NPQ, SNYNPQ, and QNDNPQ (single-letter amino acid designation). These peptides showed 50% homology with the native epitope (PNANPN) and therefore were considered to mimic its structure (mimotopes). Two of these mimotopes (TNRNPQ and NNDNPQ) inhibited the binding of monoclonal antibody 2A10 to the recombinant protein R32LR, which contains the amino acid sequence [(NANP)15NVDP]2. Immunization of mice and rabbits using the peptide (TNRNPQ)4 induced a humoral response that recognized R32LR by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and P. falciparum sporozoites by an immunofluorescence assay. These results suggest that phage epitope libraries can be exploited to screen for mimotopes in the design of subunit vaccines against infectious agents.

  9. Epitope-specificities of HLA antibodies: the effect of epitope structure on Luminex technique-dependent antibody reactivity.

    PubMed

    Resse, Marianna; Paolillo, Rossella; Minucci, Biagio Pellegrino; Cavalca, Francesco; Casamassimi, Amelia; Napoli, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    The search of HLA antibodies is currently more accessible by solid-phase techniques (Luminex) in the immunized patients leading to an expansion of the antibody patterns. The aim of this study was to investigate low median fluorescence intensity value in unexpected reactivity patterns. Here, we performed HLAMatchmaker analyses to evaluate the potential functional epitopes that can elicit HLA-specific alloantibody responses in a pregnancy-sensitized woman with an epitope defined by the 82LR. Surprisingly, in according to the registry of HLA epitopes, we found that 82LR epitope covered all allelic specificities of our unexpected antibody patterns, shared between Bw4-positive HLA-B antigen and HLA-A23, -A24, -A25 and -A32. This finding is consistent with the verification of HLA ABC epitope recorded in the website-based HLA Epitope Registry and addresses the importance of determining HLA antibody epitope-specificities on Luminex technique-dependent antibody reactivity.

  10. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies to proteinase 3 (PR3) as candidate tools for epitope mapping of human anti-PR3 autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Van Der Geld, Y M; Limburg, P C; Kallenberg, C G

    1999-12-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies directed against PR3 (PR3-ANCA) in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis are supposedly involved in the pathophysiology of this disease as different functional characteristics of the autoantibodies correlate with disease activity. However, little is known about the epitopes of PR3 that are recognized by PR3-ANCA and how epitope specificity may relate to functional characteristics of PR3-ANCA. As candidate tools for epitope mapping we studied 13 anti-PR3 MoAbs, including nine widely used and four newly raised MoAbs, for their mutual binding characteristics to PR3 using biosensor technology. Antigen specificity was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence, immunoblotting, FACS analysis and antigen-specific ELISA. Competition between anti-PR3 MoAbs in binding to PR3 was investigated in a capture system set up in a BIAcore. In this system grouping of 12 of the 13 anti-PR3 MoAbs based on their mutual recognition patterns was achieved. Four MoAbs, from different research groups, namely 12.8, PR3G-2, 6A6 and Hz1F12, recognized comparable epitopes (group 1). Group 2 MoAbs including PR3G-4 and PR3G-6 bound to overlapping regions on PR3. The MoAbs PR3G-3, 4A5 and WGM2 recognized similar epitopes as they inhibited binding of each other (group 3). The fourth group of related MoAbs consisted of MC-PR3-2, 4A3 and WGM3. Because of its binding characteristics MoAb WGM1 could not be grouped. These results demonstrate that eight well-established anti-PR3 MoAbs produced by different research groups and four newly produced anti-PR3 MoAbs recognize four separate epitope areas on PR3, including one area detected with newly raised MoAbs only.

  11. Computational design of high-affinity epitope scaffolds by backbone grafting of a linear epitope.

    PubMed

    Azoitei, Mihai L; Ban, Yih-En Andrew; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Bryson, Steve; Schroeter, Alexandria; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Porter, Justin R; Adachi, Yumiko; Baker, David; Pai, Emil F; Schief, William R

    2012-01-06

    Computational grafting of functional motifs onto scaffold proteins is a promising way to engineer novel proteins with pre-specified functionalities. Typically, protein grafting involves the transplantation of protein side chains from a functional motif onto structurally homologous regions of scaffold proteins. Using this approach, we previously transplanted the human immunodeficiency virus 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes onto heterologous proteins to design novel "epitope-scaffold" antigens. However, side-chain grafting is limited by the availability of scaffolds with compatible backbone for a given epitope structure and offers no route to modify backbone structure to improve mimicry or binding affinity. To address this, we report here a new and more aggressive computational method-backbone grafting of linear motifs-that transplants the backbone and side chains of linear functional motifs onto scaffold proteins. To test this method, we first used side-chain grafting to design new 2F5 epitope scaffolds with improved biophysical characteristics. We then independently transplanted the 2F5 epitope onto three of the same parent scaffolds using the newly developed backbone grafting procedure. Crystal structures of side-chain and backbone grafting designs showed close agreement with both the computational models and the desired epitope structure. In two cases, backbone grafting scaffolds bound antibody 2F5 with 30- and 9-fold higher affinity than corresponding side-chain grafting designs. These results demonstrate that flexible backbone methods for epitope grafting can significantly improve binding affinities over those achieved by fixed backbone methods alone. Backbone grafting of linear motifs is a general method to transplant functional motifs when backbone remodeling of the target scaffold is necessary.

  12. Identification of a tryptophan-like epitope borne by the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG) of African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Semballa, S; Okomo-Assoumou, M C; Holzmuller, P; Büscher, P; Magez, S; Lemesre, J L; Daulouede, S; Courtois, P; Geffard, M; Vincendeau, P

    2007-02-01

    Antibodies (Ab) directed against a tryptophan-like epitope (WE) were previously detected in patients with human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). We investigated whether or not these Ab resulted from immunization against trypanosome antigen(s) expressing a WE. By Western blotting, we identified an antigen having an apparent molecular weight ranging from 60 to 65 kDa, recognized by purified rabbit anti-WE Ab. This antigen, present in trypomastigote forms, was absent in procyclic forms and Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes. Using purified variable surface glycoproteins (VSG) from various trypanosomes, we showed that VSG was the parasite antigen recognized by these rabbit Ab. Anti-WE and anti-VSG Ab were purified from HAT sera by affinity chromatography. Immunoreactivity of purified antibodies eluted from affinity columns and of depleted fractions showed that WE was one of the epitopes borne by VSG. These data underline the existence of an invariant WE in the structure of VSG from several species of African trypanosomes.

  13. Broad epitope coverage of a human in vitro antibody library.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramanian, Arvind; Estep, Patricia; Lynaugh, Heather; Yu, Yao; Miles, Adam; Eckman, Josh; Schutz, Kevin; Piffath, Crystal; Boland, Nadthakarn; Niles, Rebecca Hurley; Durand, Stéphanie; Boland, Todd; Vásquez, Maximiliano; Xu, Yingda; Abdiche, Yasmina

    2017-01-01

    Successful discovery of therapeutic antibodies hinges on the identification of appropriate affinity binders targeting a diversity of molecular epitopes presented by the antigen. Antibody campaigns that yield such broad "epitope coverage" increase the likelihood of identifying candidates with the desired biological functions. Accordingly, epitope binning assays are employed in the early discovery stages to partition antibodies into epitope families or "bins" and prioritize leads for further characterization and optimization. The collaborative program described here, which used hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) as a model antigen, combined 3 key capabilities: 1) access to a diverse panel of antibodies selected from a human in vitro antibody library; 2) application of state-of-the-art high-throughput epitope binning; and 3) analysis and interpretation of the epitope binning data with reference to an exhaustive set of published antibody:HEL co-crystal structures. Binning experiments on a large merged panel of antibodies containing clones from the library and the literature revealed that the inferred epitopes for the library clones overlapped with, and extended beyond, the known structural epitopes. Our analysis revealed that nearly the entire solvent-exposed surface of HEL is antigenic, as has been proposed for protein antigens in general. The data further demonstrated that synthetic antibody repertoires provide as wide epitope coverage as those obtained from animal immunizations. The work highlights molecular insights contributed by increasingly higher-throughput binning methods and their broad utility to guide the discovery of therapeutic antibodies representing a diverse set of functional epitopes.

  14. Modeling Preferential Admissions at Elite Liberal Arts Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cockburn, Sally; Hewitt, Gordon; Kelly, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a model that simulates the effects of varying preferential admissions policies on the academic profile of a set of 35 small liberal arts colleges. An underlying assumption is that all schools in the set use the same ratio of preferential to non-preferential admissions. The model predicts that even drastic changes…

  15. Recognizing new medical knowledge computationally.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, S. J.; Cole, W. G.; Tuttle, M. S.; Olson, N. E.; Sherertz, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    Can new medical knowledge be recognized computationally? We know knowledge is changing, and our knowledge-based systems will need to accommodate that change in knowledge on a regular basis if they are to stay successful. Computational recognition of these changes seems desirable. It is unlikely that low level objects in the computational universe, bits and characters, will change much over time, higher level objects of language, where meaning begins to emerge, may show change. An analysis of ten arbitrarily selected paragraphs from the Medical Knowledge Self-Assessment Program of the American College of Physicians was used as a test bed for nominal phrase recognition. While there were words not known to Meta-1.2, only 8 of the 32 concepts new to the primary author were pointed to by new words. Use of a barrier word method was successful in identifying 23 of the 32 new concepts. Use of co-occurrence (in sentences) of putative nominal phrases may reduce the amount of human effort involved in recognizing the emergence of new relationships. PMID:8130505

  16. Recognizing and treating secondary osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Walker-Bone, Karen

    2012-08-01

    Osteoporosis, through its association with fragility fracture, is a major public health problem, costing an estimated $34.8 billion worldwide per annum. With projected demographic changes, the burden looks set to grow. Therefore, the prevention of osteoporosis, as well as its identification and treatment once established, are becoming increasingly important. Osteoporosis is secondary when a drug, disease or deficiency is the underlying cause. Glucocorticoids, hypogonadism, alcohol abuse and malnutrition are among the most frequently recognized causes of secondary osteoporosis but the list of implicated diseases and drugs is growing and some of the more recently recognized associations, such as those with haematological conditions and acid-suppressing medications, are less well publicized. In some cases, advancement in treatment of the primary disease has led to people living long enough to develop secondary osteoporosis; for example, successful treatment for breast and prostate malignancies by hormonal manipulation, improved survival in HIV with the advent of anti-retroviral therapies, and improved treatment for cystic fibrosis. This Review emphasizes the importance of secondary osteoporosis, discusses familiar and less well-known causes and what is known of their mechanisms, provides guidance as to the pragmatic identification of secondary osteoporosis and summarizes treatment options, where available.

  17. Preferential Flow in Fractured Welded Tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    Salve, Rohit

    2004-08-15

    To better understand preferential flow in fractured rock, we carried out an in situ field experiment in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This experiment involved the release of {approx} 22 m3 of ponded water (at a pressure head of {approx} 0.04 m) over a period of 7 months, directly onto a 12 m2 infiltration plot located on a fractured welded tuff surface. As water was released, changes in moisture content were monitored along horizontal boreholes located in the formation {approx} 19-22 m below. Distinct flow zones, varying in flow velocity, wetted cross-sectional area, and extent of lateral movement, intercepted the monitoring boreholes. There was also evidence of water being diverted above the ceiling of a cavity in the immediate vicinity of the monitoring boreholes. Observations from this field experiment suggest that isolated conduits, each encompassing a large number of fractures, develop within the fractured rock formation to form preferential flow paths that persist if there is a continuous supply of water. In addition, in fractured welded tuffs the propensity for fracture-matrix interactions is significantly greater than that suggested by existing conceptual models,in which flow occurs along a section of fracture surfaces. An overriding conclusion is that field investigations at spatial scales of tens of meters provide data critical to the fundamental understanding of flow in fractured rock.

  18. Complex Cooperative Networks from Evolutionary Preferential Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Poncela, Julia; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Floría, Luis M.; Sánchez, Angel; Moreno, Yamir

    2008-01-01

    In spite of its relevance to the origin of complex networks, the interplay between form and function and its role during network formation remains largely unexplored. While recent studies introduce dynamics by considering rewiring processes of a pre-existent network, we study network growth and formation by proposing an evolutionary preferential attachment model, its main feature being that the capacity of a node to attract new links depends on a dynamical variable governed in turn by the node interactions. As a specific example, we focus on the problem of the emergence of cooperation by analyzing the formation of a social network with interactions given by the Prisoner's Dilemma. The resulting networks show many features of real systems, such as scale-free degree distributions, cooperative behavior and hierarchical clustering. Interestingly, results such as the cooperators being located mostly on nodes of intermediate degree are very different from the observations of cooperative behavior on static networks. The evolutionary preferential attachment mechanism points to an evolutionary origin of scale-free networks and may help understand similar feedback problems in the dynamics of complex networks by appropriately choosing the game describing the interaction of nodes. PMID:18560601

  19. An Anti-Human Lutheran Glycoprotein Phage Antibody Inhibits Cell Migration on Laminin-511: Epitope Mapping of the Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto-Okawa, Yurie; Maeda, Yuka; Harashima, Nozomi; Sugawara, Yumika; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Hozumi, Kentaro; Hui, Kam Man; Nomizu, Motoyoshi; Ito, Yuji; Kikkawa, Yamato

    2017-01-01

    The Lutheran glycoprotein (Lu), also known as basal cell adhesion molecule (B-CAM), is an Ig superfamily (IgSF) transmembrane receptor for laminin α5. Although Lu is not present in normal hepatocytes, its expression is significantly increased in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we isolated thirteen phage antibodies to Lu from a phage library of peripheral blood from HCC patients, suggesting that these patients produced autoantibodies against endogenous Lu. To characterize the phage antibodies, we determined the Lu domains they recognize. The extracellular domain of Lu contains five IgSF domains, D1-D2-D3-D4-D5. The epitope of one phage antibody (A7) was localized to the D5 domain. The other phage antibodies recognized the D2 domain, which is also recognized by a function blocking mouse monoclonal antibody. One of the antibodies to D2 (C7) inhibited the binding of Lu to ligand, and it also prevented tumor cell migration on laminin-511 (LM-511). However, the C7 scFv purified from the periplasm fraction of bacteria did not exhibit the inhibitory effects, indicating that the scFv form could not sterically inhibit the binding of Lu to LM-511. We also identified the amino acid residues that form the epitope recognized by the C7 phage antibody. Mutagenesis studies showed that Arg247 is necessary for forming the epitope. The C7 phage antibody and its epitope may be useful for developing drugs to prevent HCC progression and/or metastasis. PMID:28060819

  20. Antibodies Raised Against Chlamydial Lipopolysaccharide Antigens Reveal Convergence in Germline Gene Usage and Differential Epitope Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Cory L; Müller-Loennies, Sven; Borisova, Svetlana N.; Brade, Lore; Kosma, Paul; Hirama, Tomoko; MacKenzie, C. Roger; Brade, Helmut; Evans, Stephen V

    2011-01-01

    In order to explore monoclonal antibody recognition carbohydrate antigens, several structures from two monoclonal antibodies directed against carbohydrate epitopes derived from chlamydial LPS have been solved to high resolution. With the exception of CDR H3, antibodies S54-10 and S73-2 are both derived from the same set of germline gene segments as the previously reported structures S25-2 and S45-18. Despite this similarity, the antibodies differ in specificity and the mechanism by which they recognize their cognate antigen. S54-10 uses an unrelated CDR H3 to recognize its antigen in a fashion analogous to S45-18; however, S73-2 recognizes the same antigen as S45-18 and S54-10 in a wholly unrelated manner. Together, these antibody-antigen structures provide snapshots into how the immune system uses the same set of inherited germline gene segments to generate multiple possible specificities that allow for differential recognition of epitopes, and how unrelated CDR H3 sequences can result in convergent binding of clinically-relevant bacterial antigens. PMID:20000757

  1. Identification of two neutralization epitopes on the capsid protein of avian hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, E-M; Guo, H; Huang, F F; Sun, Z F; Meng, X J

    2008-02-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) is genetically and antigenically related to human HEV, the causative agent of hepatitis E. To identify the neutralizing epitopes on the capsid (ORF2) protein of avian HEV, four mAbs (7B2, 1E11, 10A2 and 5G10) against recombinant avian HEV ORF2 protein were generated. mAbs 7B2, 1E11 and 10A2 blocked each other for binding to avian HEV ORF2 protein in a competitive ELISA, whereas 5G10 did not block the other mAbs, suggesting that 7B2, 1E11 and 10A2 recognize the same or overlapping epitopes and 5G10 recognizes a different one. The epitopes recognized by 7B2, 1E11 and 10A2, and by 5G10 were mapped by Western blotting between aa 513 and 570, and between aa 476 and 513, respectively. mAbs 1E11, 10A2 and 5G10 were shown to bind to avian HEV particles in vitro, although only 5G10 reacted to viral antigens in transfected LMH cells. To assess the neutralizing activities of the mAbs, avian HEV was incubated in vitro with each mAb before inoculation into specific-pathogen-free chickens. Both viraemia and faecal virus shedding were delayed in chickens inoculated with the mixtures of avian HEV and 1E11, 10A2 or 5G10, suggesting that these three mAbs partially neutralize avian HEV.

  2. Identification of a Novel Haemophilus parasuis-Specific B Cell Epitope Using Monoclonal Antibody against the OppA Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Fang; Jiang, Fucheng; Wang, Xiangling; Zhang, Xueyun; Wang, Zhuo; Li, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) 1B3 against Haemophilus parasuis (H. parasuis) was generated by fusing SP2/0 murine myeloma cells and spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with the whole-bacterial-cell suspension of H. parasuis HS80 (serotype 5). The MAb 1B3 showed strong reactivity with 15 serotype reference strains of H. parasuis using Dot blot and Western blot analysis. Immunoprecipitation and protein spectral analysis indicated that MAb 1B3 recognized by Oligopeptide permease A (OppA) belongs to the ATP binding cassette transporter family. In addition, a linear B-cell epitope recognized by MAb 1B3 was identified by the screening of a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library. Sequence analysis showed that MAb 1B3 was recognized by phages-displaying peptides with the consensus motif KTPSEXR (X means variable amino acids). Its amino acid sequence matched 469KTPAEAR475 of H. parasuis OppA protein. A series of progressively truncated peptides were synthesized to define the minimal region that was required for MAb 1B3 binding. The epitope was highly conserved in OppA protein sequences from the isolated H. parasuis strains, which was confirmed by alignment analysis. Furthermore, the minimal linear epitope was highly specific among 75 different bacterial strains as shown in sequence alignments. These results indicated MAb 1B3 might be potentially used to develop serological diagnostic tools for H. parasuis. PMID:24416241

  3. Proof of principle for epitope-focused vaccine design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Bruno E.; Bates, John T.; Loomis, Rebecca J.; Baneyx, Gretchen; Carrico, Chris; Jardine, Joseph G.; Rupert, Peter; Correnti, Colin; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Vittal, Vinayak; Connell, Mary J.; Stevens, Eric; Schroeter, Alexandria; Chen, Man; MacPherson, Skye; Serra, Andreia M.; Adachi, Yumiko; Holmes, Margaret A.; Li, Yuxing; Klevit, Rachel E.; Graham, Barney S.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Baker, David; Strong, Roland K.; Crowe, James E.; Johnson, Philip R.; Schief, William R.

    2014-03-01

    Vaccines prevent infectious disease largely by inducing protective neutralizing antibodies against vulnerable epitopes. Several major pathogens have resisted traditional vaccine development, although vulnerable epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies have been identified for several such cases. Hence, new vaccine design methods to induce epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies are needed. Here we show, with a neutralization epitope from respiratory syncytial virus, that computational protein design can generate small, thermally and conformationally stable protein scaffolds that accurately mimic the viral epitope structure and induce potent neutralizing antibodies. These scaffolds represent promising leads for the research and development of a human respiratory syncytial virus vaccine needed to protect infants, young children and the elderly. More generally, the results provide proof of principle for epitope-focused and scaffold-based vaccine design, and encourage the evaluation and further development of these strategies for a variety of other vaccine targets, including antigenically highly variable pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus and influenza.

  4. Proof of principle for epitope-focused vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Bruno E.; Bates, John T.; Loomis, Rebecca J.; Baneyx, Gretchen; Carrico, Christopher; Jardine, Joseph G.; Rupert, Peter; Correnti, Colin; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Vittal, Vinayak; Connell, Mary J.; Stevens, Eric; Schroeter, Alexandria; Chen, Man; MacPherson, Skye; Serra, Andreia M.; Adachi, Yumiko; Holmes, Margaret A.; Li, Yuxing; Klevit, Rachel E.; Graham, Barney S.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Baker, David; Strong, Roland K.; Crowe, James E.; Johnson, Philip R.; Schief, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vaccines prevent infectious disease largely by inducing protective neutralizing antibodies against vulnerable epitopes. Multiple major pathogens have resisted traditional vaccine development, although vulnerable epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies have been identified for several such cases. Hence, new vaccine design methods to induce epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies are needed. Here we show, with a neutralization epitope from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), that computational protein design can generate small, thermally and conformationally stable protein scaffolds that accurately mimic the viral epitope structure and induce potent neutralizing antibodies. These scaffolds represent promising leads for research and development of a human RSV vaccine needed to protect infants, young children and the elderly. More generally, the results provide proof of principle for epitope-focused and scaffold-based vaccine design, and encourage the evaluation and further development of these strategies for a variety of other vaccine targets including antigenically highly variable pathogens such as HIV and influenza. PMID:24499818

  5. Naturally occurring IgM antibodies to oxidation-specific epitopes.

    PubMed

    Binder, Christoph J

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring antibodies (NAbs) have specificity for both microbial and self antigens, which allows them to act in the first line defense against invading pathogens, as well as in tissue homeostasis by mediating the clearance of cellular debris. This latter recognition of self by NAbs was often thought to reflect the polyreactivity of low affinity antibodies. The finding that oxidation-specific epitopes are dominant targets of naturally occurring IgM antibodies shed light on this and provided novel insights into the understanding of the house keeping functions of NAbs. Oxidation-specific epitopes represent stress-induced or altered self structures that are generated as a consequence of lipidperoxidation during many physiological and pathological situations. Importantly, the same structures have been found in the membranes of dying cells. Only oxidized lipids and dying cells-but not native membrane lipids or viable cells-are recognized by this set of NAbs. Thus, oxidation-specific epitopes represent ideal marks that identify biological waste for its clearance and the neutralization of its pro-inflammatory properties. Furthermore, this binding property of NAbs has also important implications for various chronic inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis.

  6. Amino acid residues 196–225 of LcrV represent a plague protective epitope

    PubMed Central

    Quenee, Lauriane E.; Berube, Bryan J.; Segal, Joshua; Elli, Derek; Ciletti, Nancy A.; Anderson, Deborah; Schneewind, Olaf

    2010-01-01

    LcrV, a protein that resides at the tip of the type III secretion needles of Yersinia pestis, is the single most important plague protective antigen. Earlier work reported monoclonal antibody MAb 7.3, which binds a conformational epitope of LcrV and protects experimental animals against lethal plague challenge. By screening monoclonal antibodies directed against LcrV for their ability to protect immunized mice against bubonic plague challenge, we examined here the possibility of additional protective epitopes. MAb BA5 protected animals against plague, neutralized the Y. pestis type III secretion pathway and promoted opsonophagocytic clearance of bacteria in blood. LcrV residues 196–225 were necessary and sufficient for MAb-BA5 binding. Compared to full length LcrV, a variant lacking its residues 196–225 retained the ability of eliciting plague protection. These results identify LcrV residues 196–225 as a linear epitope that is recognized by the murine immune system to confer plague protection. PMID:20005318

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome-wide screen exposes multiple CD8+ T cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, A S; Klein, M R; Corrah, T; Fox, A; Jaye, A; McAdam, K P; Brookes, R H

    2005-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I-restricted CD8+ T cells play a role in protective immunity against tuberculosis yet relatively few epitopes specific for the causative organism, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, are reported. Here a total genome-wide screen of M. tuberculosis was used to identify putative HLA-B*3501 T cell epitopes. Of 479 predicted epitopes, 13 with the highest score were synthesized and used to restimulate lymphocytes from naturally exposed HLA-B*3501 healthy individuals in cultured and ex vivo enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays for interferon (IFN)-γ. All 13 peptides elicited a response that varied considerably between individuals. For three peptides CD8+ T cell lines were expanded and four of the 13 were recognized permissively through the HLA-B7 supertype family. Although further testing is required we show the genome-wide screen to be feasible for the identification of unknown mycobacterial antigens involved in immunity against natural infection. While the mechanisms of protective immunity against M. tuberculosis infection remain unclear, conventional class I-restricted CD8+ T cell responses appear to be widespread throughout the genome. PMID:15762882

  8. Identification of relevant properties for epitopes detection using a regression model.

    PubMed

    Ambroise, Jérôme; Giard, Joachim; Gala, Jean-Luc; Macq, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    A B-cell epitope is a part of an antigen that is recognized by a specific antibody or B-cell receptor. Detecting the immunogenic region of the antigen is useful in numerous immunodetection and immunotherapeutics applications. The aim of this paper is to find relevant properties to discriminate the location of potential epitopes from the rest of the protein surface. The most relevant properties, identified using two evaluation approaches, are the geometric properties, followed by the conservation score and some chemical properties, such as the proportion of glycine. The selected properties are used in a patch-based epitope localization method including a Single-Layer Perceptron for regression. The output of this Single-Layer Perceptron is used to construct a probability map on the antigen surface. The predictive performances of the method are assessed by computing the AUC using cross validation on two benchmark data sets and by computing the AUC and the precision for a third independent test set.

  9. Presentation of epitope sequences from foreign viruses on the surface of apple latent spherical virus particles.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Yamagishi, N; Kaido, M; Yoshikawa, N

    2014-09-22

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) has small isometric particles that are comprised of two single-stranded RNA species (RNA1 and RNA2) and three capsid proteins (Vp25, Vp20, and Vp24). We constructed ALSV vectors for presenting foreign peptides on the surface of virus particles. In these vectors, peptides can be fused to either of two C-terminal regions of Vp20 (amino acid positions between G171 and P172 or between P172 and L173) or the C-terminus (T192) of Vp24. An ALSV vector presenting the epitope sequences of the coat protein (CP) of zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) could systemically infect host plants and was specifically recognized by antiserum against ZYMV by ELISA, immunoelectron microscopy, and immunoblotting. RT-PCR showed that the epitope sequences up to 20 amino acids were stably maintained in the chimeric ALSV for more than 10 serial passages and at least six months. Purified chimeric ALSV particles induced an immune response and the production of antibodies against ZYMV-CP in rabbits. The ALSV vector was also used for expression of an epitope from VP1 of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

  10. A Conserved Epitope Mapped with a Monoclonal Antibody against the VP3 Protein of Goose Parvovirus by Using Peptide Screening and Phage Display Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenxi; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Jinzhe; Liu, Dafei; Meng, Runze; Zhang, Qingshan; Shaozhou, Wulin; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Waterfowl parvovirus (WPV) infection causes high mortality and morbidity in both geese (Anser anser) and Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata), resulting in significant losses to the waterfowl industries. The VP3 protein of WPV is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in the waterfowl. However, B-cell epitopes on the VP3 protein of WPV have not been characterized. Methods and Results To understand the antigenic determinants of the VP3 protein, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4A6 to screen a set of eight partially expressed overlapping peptides spanning VP3. Using western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we localized the VP3 epitope between amino acids (aa) 57 and 112. To identify the essential epitope residues, a phage library displaying 12-mer random peptides was screened with mAb 4A6. Phage clone peptides displayed a consensus sequence of YxRFHxH that mimicked the sequence 82Y/FNRFHCH88, which corresponded to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of VP3 protein of WPVs. mAb 4A6 binding to biotinylated fragments corresponding to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of the VP3 protein verified that the 82FxRFHxH88 was the VP3 epitope and that amino acids 82F is necessary to retain maximal binding to mAb 4A6. Parvovirus-positive goose and duck sera reacted with the epitope peptide by dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of these amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding reactivity. Conclusions and Significance We identified the motif FxRFHxH as a VP3-specific B-cell epitope that is recognized by the neutralizing mAb 4A6. This finding might be valuable in understanding of the antigenic topology of VP3 of WPV. PMID:27191594

  11. Identification of a Highly Conserved H1 Subtype-Specific Epitope with Diagnostic Potential in the Hemagglutinin Protein of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Wu, Chao; Gonzalez, Richard; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Vernet, Guy; Wang, Jianwei; Hung, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Subtype specificity of influenza A virus (IAV) is determined by its two surface glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). For HA, 16 distinct subtypes (H1–H16) exist, while nine exist for NA. The epidemic strains of H1N1 IAV change frequently and cause annual seasonal epidemics as well as occasional pandemics, such as the notorious 1918 influenza pandemic. The recent introduction of pandemic A/H1N1 IAV (H1N1pdm virus) into humans re-emphasizes the public health concern about H1N1 IAV. Several studies have identified conserved epitopes within specific HA subtypes that can be used for diagnostics. However, immune specific epitopes in H1N1 IAV have not been completely assessed. In this study, linear epitopes on the H1N1pdm viral HA protein were identified by peptide scanning using libraries of overlapping peptides against convalescent sera from H1N1pdm patients. One epitope, P5 (aa 58–72) was found to be immunodominant in patients and to evoke high titer antibodies in mice. Multiple sequence alignments and in silico coverage analysis showed that this epitope is highly conserved in influenza H1 HA [with a coverage of 91.6% (9,860/10,767)] and almost completely absent in other subtypes [with a coverage of 3.3% (792/23,895)]. This previously unidentified linear epitope is located outside the five well-recognized antigenic sites in HA. A peptide ELISA method based on this epitope was developed and showed high correlation (χ2 = 51.81, P<0.01, Pearson correlation coefficient R = 0.741) with a hemagglutination inhibition test. The highly conserved H1 subtype-specific immunodominant epitope may form the basis for developing novel assays for sero-diagnosis and active surveillance against H1N1 IAVs. PMID:21886787

  12. Atomic-level mapping of antibody epitopes on a GPCR.

    PubMed

    Paes, Cheryl; Ingalls, Jada; Kampani, Karan; Sulli, Chidananda; Kakkar, Esha; Murray, Meredith; Kotelnikov, Valery; Greene, Tiffani A; Rucker, Joseph B; Doranz, Benjamin J

    2009-05-27

    Epitopes that define the immunodominant regions of conformationally complex integral membrane proteins have been difficult to reliably delineate. Here, a high-throughput approach termed shotgun mutagenesis was used to map the binding epitopes of five different monoclonal antibodies targeting the GPCR CCR5. The amino acids, and in some cases the atoms, that comprise the critical contact points of each epitope were identified, defining the immunodominant structures of this GPCR and their physicochemistry.

  13. Internal epitope tagging informed by relative lack of sequence conservation

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Leonard; Zhang, Karen; Bonawitz, Tristan; Grajevskaja, Viktorija; Bellipanni, Gianfranco; Waring, Richard; Balciunas, Darius

    2016-01-01

    Many experimental techniques rely on specific recognition and stringent binding of proteins by antibodies. This can readily be achieved by introducing an epitope tag. We employed an approach that uses a relative lack of evolutionary conservation to inform epitope tag site selection, followed by integration of the tag-coding sequence into the endogenous locus in zebrafish. We demonstrate that an internal epitope tag is accessible for antibody binding, and that tagged proteins retain wild type function. PMID:27892520

  14. Growth fluctuation in preferential attachment dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    In the Yule-Simon process, creation and selection of words follows the preferential attachment mechanism, resulting in a power-law growth in the cumulative number of individual word occurrences as well as the power-law population distribution of the vocabulary. This is derived using mean-field approximation, assuming a continuum limit of both the time and number of word occurrences. However, time and word occurrences are inherently discrete in the process, and it is natural to assume that the cumulative number of word occurrences has a certain fluctuation around the average behavior predicted by the mean-field approximation. We derive the exact and approximate forms of the probability distribution of such fluctuation analytically, and confirm that those probability distributions are well supported by the numerical experiments.

  15. Conserved B-Cell Epitopes among Human Bocavirus Species Indicate Potential Diagnostic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaying; Zhou, Hongli; Wu, Chao; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Vernet, Guy; Guo, Li; Wang, Jianwei

    2014-01-01

    Background Human bocavirus species 1–4 (HBoV1–4) have been associated with respiratory and enteric infections in children. However, the immunological mechanisms in response to HBoV infections are not fully understood. Though previous studies have shown cross-reactivities between HBoV species, the epitopes responsible for this phenomenon remain unknown. In this study, we used genomic and immunologic approaches to identify the reactive epitopes conserved across multiple HBoV species and explored their potential as the basis of a novel diagnostic test for HBoVs. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated HBoV1–3 VP2 gene fragment phage display libraries (GFPDLs) and used these libraries to analyze mouse antisera against VP2 protein of HBoV1, 2, and 3, and human sera positive for HBoVs. Using this approach, we mapped four epitope clusters of HBoVs and identified two immunodominant peptides–P1 (1MSDTDIQDQQPDTVDAPQNT20), and P2 (162EHAYPNASHPWDEDVMPDL180)–that are conserved among HBoV1–4. To confirm epitope immunogenicity, we immunized mice with the immunodominant P1 and P2 peptides identified in our screen and found that they elicited high titer antibodies in mice. These two antibodies could only recognize the VP2 of HBoV 1–4 in Western blot assays, rather than those of the two other parvoviruses human parvovirus B19 and human parvovirus 4 (PARV4). Based on our findings, we evaluated epitope-based peptide-IgM ELISAs as potential diagnostic tools for HBoVs IgM antibodies. We found that the P1+P2-IgM ELISA showed a higher sensitivity and specificity in HBoVs IgM detection than the assays using a single peptide. Conclusions/Significance The identification of the conserved B-cell epitopes among human bocavirus species contributes to our understanding of immunological cross-reactivities of HBoVs, and provides important insights for the development of HBoV diagnostic tools. PMID:24475201

  16. Monitoring Preferential Flow During Infiltration Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, V.; Votrubova, J.; Sanda, M.; Cislerova, M.

    2006-12-01

    Field ponded infiltration experiments monitored by electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) were conducted at the experimental site Liz, Sumava Mts., Southern Bohemia. Single-ring ponded infiltration experiments were carried out repeatedly using a set of permanently installed plastic infiltration rings and additional ring made of concrete. The preferential flow occurring during the infiltration experiment was monitored by means of invasive and non-invasive visualization of flow paths. For the noninvasive visualization two geophysical methods were tested, namely TDR and ERT. Geophysical measurements were taken before, during and after the infiltration. TDR measurements were conducted using Tektronix 1502C cable tester connected to three steel electrodes 1- m long installed vertically in the centre of the infiltration ring. ERT was done using the ARES device (the multi electrode VES employing the Wenner-Schlumberger method). After the initial period of clean water infiltration 10g/l NaCl solute was used to improve the ERT signal. The electrical resistivity images were reconstructed using RES2DINV (Geotomo software). In ERT images the evolution of infiltration processes is clearly visible however the preferential character of the flow is completely smeared. This is clear from the comparison of ERT images with the images of Brilliant Blue dye distribution taken from the dug out horizons at the end of infiltration. In addition, the ERT results show some inconsistencies, which are most probably related to the design and the scale of the ERT network which is not fully consistent with the assumption of the methods employed. The research has been performed in the frame of research projects VaV/650/5/03 and GACR 103/04/0663.

  17. Immunoinformatics prediction of linear epitopes from Taenia solium TSOL18

    PubMed Central

    Zimic, Mirko; Gutiérrez, Andrés Hazaet; Gilman, Robert Hugh; López, César; Quiliano, Miguel; Evangelista, Wilfredo; Gonzales, Armando; García, Héctor Hugo; Sheen, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Cysticercosis is a public health problem in several developing countries. The oncosphere protein TSOL18 is the most immunogenic and protective antigen ever reported against porcine cysticercosis, although no specific epitope has been identified to account for these properties. Recent evidence suggests that protection might be associated with conformational epitopes. Linear epitopes from TSOL18 were computationally predicted and evaluated for immunogenicity and protection against porcine cysticercosis. A synthetic peptide was designed based on predicted linear B cell and T cell epitopes that are exposed on the surface of the theoretically modeled structure of TSOL18. Three surface epitopes from TSOL18 were predicted as immunogenic. A peptide comprising a linear arrangement of these epitopes was chemically synthesized. The capacity of the synthetic peptide to protect pigs against an oral challenge with Taenia solium proglottids was tested in a vaccine trial. The synthetic peptide was able to produce IgG antibodies in pigs and was associated to a reduction of the number of cysts, although was not able to provide complete protection, defined as the complete absence of cysts in necropsy. This study demonstrated that B cell and T cell predicted epitopes from TSOL18 were not able to completely protect pigs against an oral challenge with Taenia solium proglottids. Therefore, other linear epitopes or eventually conformational epitopes may be responsible for the protection conferred by TSOL18. PMID:21738328

  18. Immunoinformatics prediction of linear epitopes from Taenia solium TSOL18.

    PubMed

    Zimic, Mirko; Gutiérrez, Andrés Hazaet; Gilman, Robert Hugh; López, César; Quiliano, Miguel; Evangelista, Wilfredo; Gonzales, Armando; García, Héctor Hugo; Sheen, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Cysticercosis is a public health problem in several developing countries. The oncosphere protein TSOL18 is the most immunogenic and protective antigen ever reported against porcine cysticercosis, although no specific epitope has been identified to account for these properties. Recent evidence suggests that protection might be associated with conformational epitopes. Linear epitopes from TSOL18 were computationally predicted and evaluated for immunogenicity and protection against porcine cysticercosis. A synthetic peptide was designed based on predicted linear B cell and T cell epitopes that are exposed on the surface of the theoretically modeled structure of TSOL18. Three surface epitopes from TSOL18 were predicted as immunogenic. A peptide comprising a linear arrangement of these epitopes was chemically synthesized. The capacity of the synthetic peptide to protect pigs against an oral challenge with Taenia solium proglottids was tested in a vaccine trial. The synthetic peptide was able to produce IgG antibodies in pigs and was associated to a reduction of the number of cysts, although was not able to provide complete protection, defined as the complete absence of cysts in necropsy. This study demonstrated that B cell and T cell predicted epitopes from TSOL18 were not able to completely protect pigs against an oral challenge with Taenia solium proglottids. Therefore, other linear epitopes or eventually conformational epitopes may be responsible for the protection conferred by TSOL18.

  19. Defining the immunogenicity and antigenicity of HLA epitopes is crucial for optimal epitope matching in clinical renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kramer, C S M; Roelen, D L; Heidt, S; Claas, F H J

    2017-04-05

    Transplantation of an human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatched graft can lead to the development of donor-specific antibodies (DSA), which can result in antibody mediated rejection and graft loss as well as complicate repeat transplantation. These DSA are induced by foreign epitopes present on the mismatched HLA antigens of the donor. However, not all epitopes appear to be equally effective in their ability to induce DSA. Understanding the characteristics of HLA epitopes is crucial for optimal epitope matching in clinical transplantation. In this review, the latest insights on HLA epitopes are described with a special focus on the definition of immunogenicity and antigenicity of HLA epitopes. Furthermore, the use of this knowledge to prevent HLA antibody formation and to select the optimal donor for sensitised transplant candidates will be discussed.

  20. First report on the antibody verification of HLA-ABC epitopes recorded in the website-based HLA Epitope Registry.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, R J; Marrari, M; Mulder, A; Sousa, L C D da Mata; da Silva, A S; do Monte, S J H

    2014-06-01

    The International Registry of Antibody-Defined HLA Epitopes ( http://www.epregistry.com.br) has been recently established as a tool to understand humoral responses to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches. These epitopes are defined structurally by three-dimensional molecular modeling and amino acid sequence differences between HLA antigens. So-called eplets represent essential components of HLA epitopes and they are defined by polymorphic residues. A major goal is to identify HLA epitopes that have been verified experimentally with informative antibodies. Our analysis has also included data in many publications. As of 1 November 2013, 95 HLA-ABC antibody-verified epitopes have been recorded, 62 correspond to eplets and 33 are defined by eplets paired with other residue configurations. The Registry is still a work-in-progress and will become a useful resource for HLA professionals interested in histocompatibility testing at the epitope level and investigating antibody responses to HLA mismatches in transplant patients.

  1. Plant-based Production of Two Chimeric Monoclonal IgG Antibodies Directed against Immunodominant Epitopes of Vibrio cholerae Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Kara J.; Giffen, Samantha R.; Pauly, Michael H.; Kim, Do H.; Bohorov, Ognian; Bohorova, Natasha; Whaley, Kevin J.; Zeitlin, Larry; Mantis, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    We have produced and characterized two chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that bind different immunodominant epitopes on Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide (LPS). MAb 2D6 IgG1 recognizes Ogawa O-polysaccharide antigen, while mAb ZAC-3 IgG1 recognizes core/lipid A moiety of Ogawa and Inaba LPS. Both antibodies were expressed using a Nicotiana benthamiana-based rapid antibody-manufacturing platform (RAMP) and evaluated in vitro for activities associated with immunity to V. cholerae, including vibriocidal activity, bacterial agglutination and motility arrest. PMID:25865265

  2. Plant-based production of two chimeric monoclonal IgG antibodies directed against immunodominant epitopes of Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Levinson, Kara J; Giffen, Samantha R; Pauly, Michael H; Kim, Do H; Bohorov, Ognian; Bohorova, Natasha; Whaley, Kevin J; Zeitlin, Larry; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2015-07-01

    We have produced and characterized two chimeric human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that bind different immunodominant epitopes on Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide (LPS). MAb 2D6 IgG1 recognizes Ogawa O-polysaccharide antigen, while mAb ZAC-3 IgG1 recognizes core/lipid A moiety of Ogawa and Inaba LPS. Both antibodies were expressed using a Nicotiana benthamiana-based rapid antibody-manufacturing platform (RAMP) and evaluated in vitro for activities associated with immunity to V. cholerae, including vibriocidal activity, bacterial agglutination and motility arrest.

  3. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Shorter, Shayla K; Schnell, Frederick J; McMaster, Sean R; Pinelli, David F; Andargachew, Rakieb; Evavold, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC) or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL), have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4) are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant.

  4. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, Shayla K.; Schnell, Frederick J.; McMaster, Sean R.; Pinelli, David F.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Evavold, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC) or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL), have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4) are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant. PMID:26915099

  5. The pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis exports extracellular vesicles containing highly immunogenic α-Galactosyl epitopes.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Milene C; Matsuo, Alisson L; Ganiko, Luciane; Medeiros, Lia C Soares; Miranda, Kildare; Silva, Luiz S; Freymüller-Haapalainen, Edna; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Almeida, Igor C; Puccia, Rosana

    2011-03-01

    Exosome-like vesicles containing virulence factors, enzymes, and antigens have recently been characterized in fungal pathogens, such as Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum. Here, we describe extracellular vesicles carrying highly immunogenic α-linked galactopyranosyl (α-Gal) epitopes in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. P. brasiliensis is a dimorphic fungus that causes human paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). For vesicle preparations, cell-free supernatant fluids from yeast cells cultivated in Ham's defined medium-glucose were concentrated in an Amicon ultrafiltration system and ultracentrifuged at 100,000 × g. P. brasiliensis antigens were present in preparations from phylogenetically distinct isolates Pb18 and Pb3, as observed in immunoblots revealed with sera from PCM patients. In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), vesicle components containing α-Gal epitopes reacted strongly with anti-α-Gal antibodies isolated from both Chagas' disease and PCM patients, with Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA) (a lectin that recognizes terminal α-Gal), but only faintly with natural anti-α-Gal. Reactivity was inhibited after treatment with α-galactosidase. Vesicle preparations analyzed by electron microscopy showed vesicular structures of 20 to 200 nm that were labeled both on the surface and in the lumen with MOA. In P. brasiliensis cells, components carrying α-Gal epitopes were found distributed on the cell wall, following a punctuated confocal pattern, and inside large intracellular vacuoles. Lipid-free vesicle fractions reacted with anti-α-Gal in ELISA only when not digested with α-galactosidase, while reactivity with glycoproteins was reduced after β-elimination, which is indicative of partial O-linked chain localization. Our findings open new areas to explore in terms of host-parasite relationships in PCM and the role played in vivo by vesicle components and α-galactosyl epitopes.

  6. Nucleosomal peptide epitopes for nephritis-inducing T helper cells of murine lupus

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Nucleosome-specific T helper (Th) cells provide major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted, cognate help to nephritogenic antinuclear autoantibody-producing B cells in lupus. However, the lupus Th cells do not respond when components of the nucleosome, such as free DNA or histones, are individually presented by antigen-presenting cells. Thus critical peptide epitopes for the pathogenic Th cells are probably protected during uptake and processing of the native nucleosome particle as a whole. Therefore, herein we tested 145 overlapping peptides spanning all four core histones in the nucleosome. We localized three regions in core histones, one in H2B at amino acid position 10-33 (H2B(10-33)), and two in H4, at position 16- 39 (H4(16-39)) and position 71-94 (H4(71-94)), that contained the peptide epitopes recognized by the pathogenic autoantibody-inducing Th cells of lupus. The peptide autoepitopes also triggered the pathogenic Th cells of (SWR x NZB)F1 lupus mice in vivo to induce the development of severe lupus nephritis. The nucleosomal autoepitopes stimulated the production of Th1-type cytokines, consistent with immunoglobulin IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 being the isotypes of nephritogenic autoantibodies induced in the lupus mice. Interestingly, the Th cell epitopes overlapped with regions in histones that contain B cell epitopes targeted by autoantibodies, as well as the sites where histones contact with DNA in the nucleosome. Identification of the disease-relevant autoepitopes in nucleosomes will help in understanding how the pathogenic Th cells of spontaneous systemic lupus erythematosus emerge, and potentially lead to the development of peptide-based tolerogenic therapy for this major autoimmune disease. PMID:8676066

  7. Characterization of the neutralizing epitopes of VP7 of the Gottfried strain of porcine rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Kang, S Y; Benfield, D A; Gorziglia, M; Saif, L J

    1993-09-01

    The neutralization epitopes of the outer capsid protein VP7 of a porcine group A rotavirus were studied by using neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (N-MAbs). Six N-MAbs which were specific for the VP7 protein of the Gottfried strain of porcine rotavirus (serotype G4) were used for analyzing the antigenic sites of VP7. Three different approaches were used for this analysis: testing the serological reactivity of each N-MAb against different G serotypes of human and animal rotaviruses, analyzing N-MAb-resistant viral antigenic variants, and performing a nucleotide sequence analysis of the VP7 gene of each of the viral antigenic variants generated. From the serological analyses, three different reactivity patterns were recognized by plaque reduction virus neutralization and cell culture immunofluorescence tests. A single MAb (RG36H9) reacted with animal rotavirus serotypes G3 and G4 but not with human serotypes G3 and G4. The MAb 57/8 (D. A. Benfield, E. A. Nelson, and Y. Hoshino, p. 111, in Abstr. VIIth Internat. Congr. Virol., 1987, and E. R. Mackow, R. D. Shaw, S. M. Matsui, P. T. Vo, D. A. Benfield, and H. B. Greenberg, Virology 165:511-517, 1988) reacted with animal and human rotavirus serotypes G3 and G4 and also with human serotype G9 and bovine serotype G6. The other four MAbs reacted only with the porcine rotavirus serotype G4. The epitope defined by MAb 57/8 and the epitope defined by the other five MAbs appeared to be partially overlapping or close to each other, as identified by viral antigenic variant analysis. However, data from nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence analyses of the VP7 of each of the viral antigenic variants showed that these two epitopes constituted a large, single neutralization domain.

  8. Major outer membrane protein of Legionella pneumophila carries a species-specific epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, F S; Conlin, C A

    1986-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (LP3IIG2) directed against a species-specific epitope of Legionella pneumophila is available from Genetic Systems Corp., Seattle, Wash., for use as a diagnostic reagent. Outer membrane protein-rich fractions were prepared from L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 8 by treatment of cell envelopes with 2% Triton X-100. Immunoblots of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels demonstrated that each membrane fraction contained two bands that reacted with LP3IIG2. The monoclonal antibody bound preferentially to a 26,000-molecular-weight band that appears to result from modification of the 29,000-molecular-weight major outer membrane protein. Images PMID:2420824

  9. Recognizing characters of ancient manuscripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, Markus; Sablatnig, Robert

    2010-02-01

    Considering printed Latin text, the main issues of Optical Character Recognition (OCR) systems are solved. However, for degraded handwritten document images, basic preprocessing steps such as binarization, gain poor results with state-of-the-art methods. In this paper ancient Slavonic manuscripts from the 11th century are investigated. In order to minimize the consequences of false character segmentation, a binarization-free approach based on local descriptors is proposed. Additionally local information allows the recognition of partially visible or washed out characters. The proposed algorithm consists of two steps: character classification and character localization. Initially Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) features are extracted which are subsequently classified using Support Vector Machines (SVM). Afterwards, the interest points are clustered according to their spatial information. Thereby, characters are localized and finally recognized based on a weighted voting scheme of pre-classified local descriptors. Preliminary results show that the proposed system can handle highly degraded manuscript images with background clutter (e.g. stains, tears) and faded out characters.

  10. Therapeutic Vaccination against the Rhesus Lymphocryptovirus EBNA-1 Homologue, rhEBNA-1, Elicits T Cell Responses to Novel Epitopes in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Eduardo L. V.; Fogg, Mark H.; Leskowitz, Rachel M.; Ertl, Hildegund C.; Wiseman, Roger W.; O'Connor, David H.; Lieberman, Paul; Wang, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a vaccine/immunotherapy target due to its association with several human malignancies. EBNA-1 is an EBV protein consistently expressed in all EBV-associated cancers. Herein, EBNA-1-specific T cell epitopes were evaluated after AdC–rhEBNA-1 immunizations in chronically lymphocryptovirus-infected rhesus macaques, an EBV infection model. Preexisting rhEBNA-1-specific responses were augmented in 4/12 animals, and new epitopes were recognized in 5/12 animals after vaccinations. This study demonstrated that EBNA-1-specific T cells can be expanded by vaccination. PMID:24089556

  11. Resistance-associated epitopes of HIV-1C-highly probable candidates for a multi-epitope vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Swaminathan, Soumya; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth

    2012-10-01

    Earlier studies have identified a large number of immunogenic epitopes in HIV-1. Efforts are required to prioritize these epitopes in order to identify the best candidates for formulating an effective multi-epitope vaccine for HIV. We modeled 155 known cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes of HIV-1 subtype C on the 3D structure of HLA-A*0201, HLA-B*2705, and HLA-B*5101 using MODPROPEP, as these alleles are known to be associated with resistance to HIV/slow progression to AIDS. Thirty-six epitopes were identified to bind to all the three HLA alleles with better binding affinity than the control peptides complexed with each HLA allele but not to any of the HLA alleles reported to be associated with susceptibility to HIV infection/rapid progression to disease. As increase in stability of the epitope-HLA complex results in increased immunogenicity, the short-listed epitopes could be suitable candidates for vaccine development. Twenty of the 36 epitopes were polyfunctional in nature adding to their immunological relevance for vaccine design. Further, 9 of the 20 polyfunctional epitopes were found to bind to all three resistance-associated HLA alleles using an additional method, adding worth to their potential as candidates for a vaccine formulation for HIV-1C.

  12. The Fas antigen (CD95) on human lymphoid cells: epitope analysis with ten antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zola, H; Fusco, M; Ridings, J; Flego, L R; Weedon, H M; Nicholson, I; Organ, N; Roberton, D M; Macardle, P J

    1996-11-01

    The expression of CD95 antigen was examined on adult and cord blood lymphocytes using a highly sensitive immunofluorescence/flow cytometric procedure. CD95 was expressed by the majority of circulating blood T cells in adults, and by a smaller proportion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in cord blood. The majority of circulating B cells did not react with seven CD95 antibodies, but three antibodies did stain B cells. In tonsil sections, CD95 was expressed throughout the tissue but germinal centres showed generally stronger staining than the surrounding follicular mantle and interfollicular areas. This was confirmed by flow cytometry, which showed expression preferentially on B cells with a germinal centre phenotype. Because different antibodies stained different proportions of B cells, CD95 epitopes were examined by inhibition, additive binding and protease susceptibility studies using a panel of ten CD95 antibodies. B cells apparently reacting selectively with CD95 antibodies were sorted and CD95 mRNA was reverse transcribed to cDNA and analyzed, in order to confirm the presence of CD95 in cells which reacted selectively and to explore the possible existence of CD95 isoforms. The major cDNA band was identical in the two populations. Inhibition of N-glycosylation suggested that the epitopes detected differentially could not be accounted for by differential N-glycosylation.

  13. Automated synthesis of arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides enables characterization of antibodies that recognize plant cell wall glycans.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Deborah; Schuhmacher, Frank; Geissner, Andreas; Seeberger, Peter H; Pfrengle, Fabian

    2015-04-07

    Monoclonal antibodies that recognize plant cell wall glycans are used for high-resolution imaging, providing important information about the structure and function of cell wall polysaccharides. To characterize the binding epitopes of these powerful molecular probes a library of eleven plant arabinoxylan oligosaccharides was produced by automated solid-phase synthesis. Modular assembly of oligoarabinoxylans from few building blocks was enabled by adding (2-naphthyl)methyl (Nap) to the toolbox of orthogonal protecting groups for solid-phase synthesis. Conjugation-ready oligosaccharides were obtained and the binding specificities of xylan-directed antibodies were determined on microarrays.

  14. Monoclonal autoantibody recognizing a unique set of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Winkler, A; Watson-McKown, R; Wise, K S

    1988-01-01

    A murine IgG2a, kappa-monoclonal autoantibody (mAb) F78 is described that recognizes a novel epitope associated with small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes (snRNP). F78 selectively immunoprecipitated a unique pattern of small nuclear RNA (U1, U2, and U4 to U6) characterized by a marked depletion of U1 and an elevated proportion of U2 compared with known patterns immunoprecipitated by previously described anti-RNP (2.73) and anti-Sm (7.13, Y12) mAb. Analysis of immunoprecipitated RNA from extracts previously cleared with mAb F78 and probed with anti-RNP mAb 2.73 further indicated the presence of two distinct subsets of U1. Immunoblots of whole cell extracts separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) without heating showed that F78 selectively bound to a trypsin-sensitive component of apparent m.w. greater than 120,000 which was decreased in size following RNase A treatment. The anti-Sm mAb, but not the anti-RNP mAb, also recognized this component in unheated samples. Heating before SDS-PAGE resulted in abrogation of binding to the F78 epitope. Immunoprecipitation of unlabeled or [35S]methionine-labeled cell extracts with F78 revealed the presence of most snRNP peptides, but the absence of peptide C and the 68,000 m.w. component, known to be selectively associated with U1-specific snRNP. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE analysis of F78 immunoprecipitates confirmed that the epitope recognized by this mAb resides on a heat-dissociable complex containing snRNP-related peptides B, B', D, E, F, and G, but lacking U1-associated peptides. F78 mAb therefore defines a subset of snRNP which lack anti-RNP associated U1 RNA as well as peptides known to be selectively associated with this RNA species. It apparently recognizes an epitope associated with an assembled form of these particles and may be useful in examining structures involved in RNA processing.

  15. Computational design of an epitope-specific Keap1 binding antibody using hotspot residues grafting and CDR loop swapping

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Taylor, Richard D.; Griffin, Laura; Coker, Shu-Fen; Adams, Ralph; Ceska, Tom; Shi, Jiye; Lawson, Alastair D. G.; Baker, Terry

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic and diagnostic applications of monoclonal antibodies often require careful selection of binders that recognize specific epitopes on the target molecule to exert a desired modulation of biological function. Here we present a proof-of-concept application for the rational design of an epitope-specific antibody binding with the target protein Keap1, by grafting pre-defined structural interaction patterns from the native binding partner protein, Nrf2, onto geometrically matched positions of a set of antibody scaffolds. The designed antibodies bind to Keap1 and block the Keap1-Nrf2 interaction in an epitope-specific way. One resulting antibody is further optimised to achieve low-nanomolar binding affinity by in silico redesign of the CDRH3 sequences. An X-ray co-crystal structure of one resulting design reveals that the actual binding orientation and interface with Keap1 is very close to the design model, despite an unexpected CDRH3 tilt and VH/VL interface deviation, which indicates that the modelling precision may be improved by taking into account simultaneous CDR loops conformation and VH/VL orientation optimisation upon antibody sequence change. Our study confirms that, given a pre-existing crystal structure of the target protein-protein interaction, hotspots grafting with CDR loop swapping is an attractive route to the rational design of an antibody targeting a pre-selected epitope. PMID:28128368

  16. Autoantibodies to Multiple Epitopes on the Non-Collagenous-1 Domain of Type VII Collagen Induce Blisters.

    PubMed

    Vorobyev, Artem; Ujiie, Hideyuki; Recke, Andreas; Buijsrogge, Jacqueline J A; Jonkman, Marcel F; Pas, Hendri H; Iwata, Hiroaki; Hashimoto, Takashi; Kim, Soo-Chan; Hoon Kim, Jong; Groves, Richard; Samavedam, Unni; Gupta, Yask; Schmidt, Enno; Zillikens, Detlef; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2015-06-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes, characterized by autoantibodies against type VII collagen (COL7), a major component of anchoring fibrils. Different clinical EBA phenotypes are described, including mechanobullous and inflammatory variants. Most EBA patients' sera react with epitopes located within the non-collagenous 1 (NC1) domain of human COL7. However, it has remained unclear whether antibody binding to these different epitopes is pathogenically relevant. To address this issue, we generated recombinant proteins covering the entire NC1 domain. IgG reactivity with these proteins was analyzed in sera of 69 EBA patients. Most recognized clusters of epitopes throughout the NC1 domain. No correlation was detected between antibody specificity and clinical phenotype. To study the pathogenicity of antibodies specific to different NC1 subdomains, rabbit antibodies were generated. All these antibodies caused dermal-epidermal separation ex vivo. Antibodies against two of these subdomains were injected into mice carrying null mutations of mouse COL7 and the human COL7 transgene and induced subepidermal blisters. We here document that autoantibodies to COL7, independent of the targeted epitopes, induce blisters both ex vivo and in vivo. In addition, using COL7-humanized mice, we provide in vivo evidence of pathogenicity of autoantibodies binding to human COL7.

  17. T-cell epitope analysis of Mag 3, an important allergen from the house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, S; Ohno, K; Tategaki, A; Aki, T; Shigeta, S; Jyo, T; Suzuki, O; Ono, K

    2000-04-03

    Here we describe the detection of T-cell epitope region on the house dust mite allergen Mag 3, which has been shown to trigger T-cell proliferation in mite-allergic asthmatic patients. We first examined murine T-cell epitope using T-cell fraction prepared from recombinant Mag 3 (r-Mag 3)-primed H-2k mice. Initial proliferation assay with truncated r-Mag 3 indicated that N-terminal 113 amino acid region was required for triggering T-cell activation. Subsequent epitope scanning with synthetic overlapping peptides revealed that T-cell reactive region was assigned within amino acid range 56-75. We also explored human T-cell determinant using specific T-cells from mite-allergic patients. Intriguingly, we found that amino acid range 56-85, a portion partially overlapping with that identified in r-Mag 3-primed mice, was exclusively recognized by T-cells from different patients. Further investigation of unique T-cell epitope region found in this study would provide insight into the development of animal therapeutic model and/or peptide vaccine for asthma.

  18. Broadly Neutralizing Antibody 8ANC195 Recognizes Closed and Open States of HIV-1 Env.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Louise; Wang, Haoqing; Gao, Han; Chen, Songye; McDowall, Alasdair W; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2015-09-10

    The HIV-1 envelope (Env) spike contains limited epitopes for broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs); thus, most neutralizing antibodies are strain specific. The 8ANC195 epitope, defined by crystal and electron microscopy (EM) structures of bNAb 8ANC195 complexed with monomeric gp120 and trimeric Env, respectively, spans the gp120 and gp41 Env subunits. To investigate 8ANC195's gp41 epitope at higher resolution, we solved a 3.58 Å crystal structure of 8ANC195 complexed with fully glycosylated Env trimer, revealing 8ANC195 insertion into a glycan shield gap to contact gp120 and gp41 glycans and protein residues. To determine whether 8ANC195 recognizes the CD4-bound open Env conformation that leads to co-receptor binding and fusion, one of several known conformations of virion-associated Env, we solved EM structures of an Env/CD4/CD4-induced antibody/8ANC195 complex. 8ANC195 binding partially closed the CD4-bound trimer, confirming structural plasticity of Env by revealing a previously unseen conformation. 8ANC195's ability to bind different Env conformations suggests advantages for potential therapeutic applications.

  19. Epitope Addition and Ablation via Manipulation of a Dengue Virus Serotype 1 Infectious Clone

    PubMed Central

    Gallichotte, Emily N.; Menachery, Vineet D.; Yount, Boyd L.; Widman, Douglas G.; Dinnon, Kenneth H.; Hartman, Steven; de Silva, Aravinda M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the clinical relevance, dengue virus (DENV) research has been hampered by the absence of robust reverse genetic systems to manipulate the viral serotypes for propagation and generation of mutant viruses. In this article, we describe application of an infectious clone system for DENV serotype 1 (DENV1). Similar to previous clones in both flaviviruses and coronaviruses, the approach constructs a panel of contiguous cDNAs that span the DENV genome and can be systematically and directionally assembled to produce viable, full-length viruses. Comparison of the virus derived from the infectious clone with the original viral isolate reveals identical sequence, comparable endpoint titers, and similar focus staining. Both focus-forming assays and percent infection by flow cytometry revealed overlapping replication levels in two different cell types. Moreover, serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) bound similarly to infectious clone and the natural isolate. Using the clone, we were able to insert a DENV4 type-specific epitope recognized by primate MAb 5H2 into envelope (E) protein domain I (EDI) of DENV1 and recover a viable chimeric recombinant virus. The recombinant DENV1 virus was recognized and neutralized by the DENV4 type-specific 5H2 MAb. The introduction of the 5H2 epitope ablated two epitopes on DENV1 EDI recognized by human MAbs (1F4 and 14C10) that strongly neutralize DENV1. Together, the work demonstrates the utility of the infectious clone and provides a resource to rapidly manipulate the DENV1 serotype for generation of recombinant and mutant viruses. IMPORTANCE Dengue viruses (DENVs) are significant mosquito-transmitted pathogens that cause widespread infection and can lead to severe infection and complications. Here we further characterize a novel and robust DENV serotype 1 (DENV1) infectious clone system that can be used to support basic and applied research. We demonstrate how the system can be used to probe the antigenic

  20. Positive Selection in CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes of Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein Revealed by a Comparative Analysis of Human and Swine Viral Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Machkovech, Heather M.; Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous experimental studies have demonstrated that CD8+ T cells contribute to immunity against influenza by limiting viral replication. It is therefore surprising that rigorous statistical tests have failed to find evidence of positive selection in the epitopes targeted by CD8+ T cells. Here we use a novel computational approach to test for selection in CD8+ T-cell epitopes. We define all epitopes in the nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix protein (M1) with experimentally identified human CD8+ T-cell responses and then compare the evolution of these epitopes in parallel lineages of human and swine influenza viruses that have been diverging since roughly 1918. We find a significant enrichment of substitutions that alter human CD8+ T-cell epitopes in NP of human versus swine influenza virus, consistent with the idea that these epitopes are under positive selection. Furthermore, we show that epitope-altering substitutions in human influenza virus NP are enriched on the trunk versus the branches of the phylogenetic tree, indicating that viruses that acquire these mutations have a selective advantage. However, even in human influenza virus NP, sites in T-cell epitopes evolve more slowly than do nonepitope sites, presumably because these epitopes are under stronger inherent functional constraint. Overall, our work demonstrates that there is clear selection from CD8+ T cells in human influenza virus NP and illustrates how comparative analyses of viral lineages from different hosts can identify positive selection that is otherwise obscured by strong functional constraint. IMPORTANCE There is a strong interest in correlates of anti-influenza immunity that are protective against diverse virus strains. CD8+ T cells provide such broad immunity, since they target conserved viral proteins. An important question is whether T-cell immunity is sufficiently strong to drive influenza virus evolution. Although many studies have shown that T cells limit viral replication in animal

  1. Mutant MHC class II epitopes drive therapeutic immune responses to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kreiter, Sebastian; Vormehr, Mathias; van de Roemer, Niels; Diken, Mustafa; Löwer, Martin; Diekmann, Jan; Boegel, Sebastian; Schrörs, Barbara; Vascotto, Fulvia; Castle, John C.; Tadmor, Arbel D.; Schoenberger, Stephen P.; Huber, Christoph; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Tumour-specific mutations are ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy as they lack expression in healthy tissues and can potentially be recognized as neo-antigens by the mature T-cell repertoire. Their systematic targeting by vaccine approaches, however, has been hampered by the fact that every patient’s tumour possesses a unique set of mutations (‘the mutanome’) that must first be identified. Recently, we proposed a personalized immunotherapy approach to target the full spectrum of a patient’s individual tumour-specific mutations1. Here we show in three independent murine tumour models that a considerable fraction of non-synonymous cancer mutations is immunogenic and that, unexpectedly, the majority of the immunogenic mutanome is recognized by CD4+ T cells. Vaccination with such CD4+ immunogenic mutations confers strong antitumour activity. Encouraged by these findings, we established a process by which mutations identified by exome sequencing could be selected as vaccine targets solely through bioinformatic prioritization on the basis of their expression levels and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-binding capacity for rapid production as synthetic poly-neo-epitope messenger RNA vaccines. We show that vaccination with such polytope mRNA vaccines induces potent tumour control and complete rejection of established aggressively growing tumours in mice. Moreover, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cell neo-epitope vaccination reshapes the tumour microenvironment and induces cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses against an independent immunodominant antigen in mice, indicating orchestration of antigen spread. Finally, we demonstrate an abundance of mutations predicted to bind to MHC class II in human cancers as well by employing the same predictive algorithm on corresponding human cancer types. Thus, the tailored immunotherapy approach introduced here may be regarded as a universally applicable blueprint for comprehensive exploitation of the substantial neo-epitope

  2. The response dynamics of preferential choice.

    PubMed

    Koop, Gregory J; Johnson, Joseph G

    2013-12-01

    The ubiquity of psychological process models requires an increased degree of sophistication in the methods and metrics that we use to evaluate them. We contribute to this venture by capitalizing on recent work in cognitive science analyzing response dynamics, which shows that the bearing information processing dynamics have on intended action is also revealed in the motor system. This decidedly "embodied" view suggests that researchers are missing out on potential dependent variables with which to evaluate their models-those associated with the motor response that produces a choice. The current work develops a method for collecting and analyzing such data in the domain of decision making. We first validate this method using widely normed stimuli from the International Affective Picture System (Experiment 1), and demonstrate that curvature in response trajectories provides a metric of the competition between choice options. We next extend the method to risky decision making (Experiment 2) and develop predictions for three popular classes of process model. The data provided by response dynamics demonstrate that choices contrary to the maxim of risk seeking in losses and risk aversion in gains may be the product of at least one "online" preference reversal, and can thus begin to discriminate amongst the candidate models. Finally, we incorporate attentional data collected via eye-tracking (Experiment 3) to develop a formal computational model of joint information sampling and preference accumulation. In sum, we validate response dynamics for use in preferential choice tasks and demonstrate the unique conclusions afforded by response dynamics over and above traditional methods.

  3. Vaccine Targeting of Subdominant CD8+ T Cell Epitopes Increases the Breadth of the T Cell Response upon Viral Challenge, but May Impair Immediate Virus Control.

    PubMed

    Steffensen, Maria A; Pedersen, Louise H; Jahn, Marie L; Nielsen, Karen N; Christensen, Jan P; Thomsen, Allan R

    2016-03-15

    As a result of the difficulties in making efficient vaccines against genetically unstable viruses such as HIV, it has been suggested that future vaccines should preferentially target subdominant epitopes, the idea being that this should allow a greater breadth of the induced T cell response and, hence, a greater efficiency in controlling escape variants. However, to our knowledge the evidence supporting this concept is limited at best. To improve upon this, we used the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus model and adenoviral vectors to compare a vaccine expressing unmodified Ag to a vaccine expressing the same Ag without its immunodominant epitope. We found that removal of the dominant epitope allowed the induction of CD8(+) T cell responses targeting at least two otherwise subdominant epitopes. Importantly, the overall magnitude of the induced T cell responses was similar, allowing us to directly compare the efficiency of these vaccines. Doing this, we observed that mice vaccinated with the vaccine expressing unmodified Ag more efficiently controlled an acute viral challenge. In the course of a more chronic viral infection, mice vaccinated using the vaccine targeting subdominant epitopes caught up with the conventionally vaccinated mice, and analysis of the breadth of the CD8(+) T cell response revealed that this was notably greater in the former mice. However, under the conditions of our studies, we never saw any functional advantage of this. This may represent a limitation of our model, but clearly our findings underscore the importance of carefully weighing the pros and cons of changes in epitope targeting before any implementation.

  4. Preferential recognition of methylglyoxal-modified calf thymus DNA by circulating antibodies in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, M Imtiaz; Ahmad, Saheem; Moinuddin

    2011-08-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) has been implicated in mutagenesis and cancer. Present study probes the antigenicity of MG damaged DNA in cancer patients. Purified calf thymus DNA was damaged by the synergistic action of MG, lysine (Lys) and CuSO4 for 24 h at 37 degrees C. DNA modifications produced single-strand breaks, hyperchromicity in UV spectrum and increased fluorescence intensity. Binding characteristics of auto-antibodies in cancer patients were assessed by direct binding and inhibition ELISA. These antibodies exhibited enhanced binding with the modified DNA, as compared to the native form. The effect was more pronounced when affinity-purified IgG was used in place of the serum. In conclusion, MG-modified DNA presents unique epitopes which are recognized as non-self by the immune system and may, therefore, be one of the factors for the autoantibody induction in cancer patients.

  5. Immunodominant epitope and properties of pyroglutamate-modified Abeta-specific antibodies produced in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Acero, G; Manoutcharian, K; Vasilevko, V; Munguia, M E; Govezensky, T; Coronas, G; Luz-Madrigal, A; Cribbs, D H; Gevorkian, G

    2009-08-18

    N-truncated and N-modified forms of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide are found in diffused and dense core plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome patients as well as transgenic mouse models of AD. Although the pathological significance of these shortened forms Abeta is not completely understood, previous studies have demonstrated that these peptides are significantly more resistant to degradation, aggregate more rapidly in vitro and exhibit similar or, in some cases, increased toxicity in hippocampal neuronal cultures compared to the full length peptides. In the present study we further investigated the mechanisms of toxicity of one of the most abundant N-truncated/modified Abeta peptide bearing amino-terminal pyroglutamate at position 3 (AbetaN3(pE)). We demonstrated that AbetaN3(pE) oligomers induce phosphatidyl serine externalization and membrane damage in SH-SY5Y cells. Also, we produced AbetaN3(pE)-specific polyclonal antibodies in rabbit and identified an immunodominant epitope recognized by anti-AbetaN3(pE) antibodies. Our results are important for developing new immunotherapeutic compounds specifically targeting AbetaN3(pE) aggregates since the most commonly used immunogens in the majority of vaccines for AD have been shown to induce antibodies that recognize the N-terminal immunodominant epitope (EFRH) of the full length Abeta, which is absent in N-amino truncated peptides.

  6. IMMUNODOMINANT EPITOPE AND PROPERTIES OF PYROGLUTAMATE-MODIFIED Aβ-SPECIFIC ANTIBODIES PRODUCED IN RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Acero, G.; Manoutcharian, K.; Vasilevko, V.; Munguia, M.E.; Govezensky, T.; Coronas, G.; Luz-Madrigal, A.; Cribbs, DH.; Gevorkian, G.

    2009-01-01

    N-truncated and N-modified forms of amyloid beta (Aß) peptide are found in diffused and dense core plaques in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Down’s syndrome patients as well as transgenic mouse models of AD. Although the pathological significance of these shortened forms Aβ is not completely understood, previous studies have demonstrated that these peptides are significantly more resistant to degradation, aggregate more rapidly in vitro and exhibit similar or, in some cases, increased toxicity in hippocampal neuronal cultures compared to the full-length peptides. In the present study we further investigated the mechanisms of toxicity of one of the most abundant Ntruncated/modified Aβ peptide bearing amino-terminal pyroglutamate at position 3 (AβN3(pE)). We demonstrated that AβN3(pE) oligomers induce phosphatidyl serine externalization and membrane damage in SH-SY5Y cells. Also, we produced AβN3(pE)-specific polyclonal antibodies in rabbit and identified an immunodominant epitope recognized by anti-AβN3(pE) antibodies. Our results are important for developing new immunotherapeutic compounds specifically targeting AβN3(pE) aggregates since the most commonly used immunogens in the majority of vaccines for AD have been shown to induce antibodies that recognize the N-terminal immunodominant epitope (EFRH) of the full length Aβ, which is absent in N-amino truncated peptides. PMID:19545911

  7. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPE68-specific HLA-A*0201-restricted epitopes for tuberculosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhi-Liang; Li, Qiang; Wang, Sina; Chen, Xin-Yu; Liu, Hui-Fang; Chen, Bo-Kun; Li, De-Zhou; Huang, Xi; Wen, Jin-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    PPE68 is a Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific protein which is absent from the vaccine strains of BCG. A panel of 14 PPE68-derived peptides predicted to bind to HLA-A*0201 was synthesized. The HLA-A*0201 restriction of these peptides was determined in T2 cell line and HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. The specificity of peptides was assessed in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients using IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay, and immunodominant peptides were further used to evaluate their diagnostic potential in HLA-A*0201-positive pulmonary TB patients. 13 out of 14 peptides were identified as high-affinity binders. Of these peptides, 12 peptides induced significant IFN-γ-secreting T cell response in transgenic mice and 9 peptides were efficiently recognized by peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 10 HLA-A*0201-positive TB patients. Four immunodominant HLA-A*0201-restricted epitopes (PPE68126-134, PPE68133-141, PPE68140-148, and PPE68148-156) were recognized by the most of 80 HLA-A*0201-positive TB patients (81, 86, 74, and 84 %, respectively). These epitopes may be used for a potential diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection.

  8. Autoantibody recognition mechanisms of p53 epitopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    There is an urgent need for economical blood based, noninvasive molecular biomarkers to assist in the detection and diagnosis of cancers in a cost-effective manner at an early stage, when curative interventions are still possible. Serum autoantibodies are attractive biomarkers for early cancer detection, but their development has been hindered by the punctuated genetic nature of the ten million known cancer mutations. A landmark study of 50,000 patients (Pedersen et al., 2013) showed that a few p53 15-mer epitopes are much more sensitive colon cancer biomarkers than p53, which in turn is a more sensitive cancer biomarker than any other protein. The function of p53 as a nearly universal "tumor suppressor" is well established, because of its strong immunogenicity in terms of not only antibody recruitment, but also stimulation of autoantibodies. Here we examine dimensionally compressed bioinformatic fractal scaling analysis for identifying the few sensitive epitopes from the p53 amino acid sequence, and show how it could be used for early cancer detection (ECD). We trim 15-mers to 7-mers, and identify specific 7-mers from other species that could be more sensitive to aggressive human cancers, such as liver cancer. Our results could provide a roadmap for ECD.

  9. Broad epitope coverage of a human in vitro antibody library

    PubMed Central

    Sivasubramanian, Arvind; Lynaugh, Heather; Yu, Yao; Miles, Adam; Eckman, Josh; Schutz, Kevin; Piffath, Crystal; Boland, Nadthakarn; Durand, Stéphanie; Boland, Todd; Vásquez, Maximiliano; Xu, Yingda; Abdiche, Yasmina

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Successful discovery of therapeutic antibodies hinges on the identification of appropriate affinity binders targeting a diversity of molecular epitopes presented by the antigen. Antibody campaigns that yield such broad “epitope coverage” increase the likelihood of identifying candidates with the desired biological functions. Accordingly, epitope binning assays are employed in the early discovery stages to partition antibodies into epitope families or “bins” and prioritize leads for further characterization and optimization. The collaborative program described here, which used hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) as a model antigen, combined 3 key capabilities: 1) access to a diverse panel of antibodies selected from a human in vitro antibody library; 2) application of state-of-the-art high-throughput epitope binning; and 3) analysis and interpretation of the epitope binning data with reference to an exhaustive set of published antibody:HEL co-crystal structures. Binning experiments on a large merged panel of antibodies containing clones from the library and the literature revealed that the inferred epitopes for the library clones overlapped with, and extended beyond, the known structural epitopes. Our analysis revealed that nearly the entire solvent-exposed surface of HEL is antigenic, as has been proposed for protein antigens in general. The data further demonstrated that synthetic antibody repertoires provide as wide epitope coverage as those obtained from animal immunizations. The work highlights molecular insights contributed by increasingly higher-throughput binning methods and their broad utility to guide the discovery of therapeutic antibodies representing a diverse set of functional epitopes. PMID:27748644

  10. Classification epitopes in groups based on their protein family

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The humoral immune system response is based on the interaction between antibodies and antigens for the clearance of pathogens and foreign molecules. The interaction between these proteins occurs at specific positions known as antigenic determinants or B-cell epitopes. The experimental identification of epitopes is costly and time consuming. Therefore the use of in silico methods, to help discover new epitopes, is an appealing alternative due the importance of biomedical applications such as vaccine design, disease diagnostic, anti-venoms and immune-therapeutics. However, the performance of predictions is not optimal been around 70% of accuracy. Further research could increase our understanding of the biochemical and structural properties that characterize a B-cell epitope. Results We investigated the possibility of linear epitopes from the same protein family to share common properties. This hypothesis led us to analyze physico-chemical (PCP) and predicted secondary structure (PSS) features of a curated dataset of epitope sequences available in the literature belonging to two different groups of antigens (metalloproteinases and neurotoxins). We discovered statistically significant parameters with data mining techniques which allow us to distinguish neurotoxin from metalloproteinase and these two from random sequences. After a five cross fold validation we found that PCP based models obtained area under the curve values (AUC) and accuracy above 0.9 for regression, decision tree and support vector machine. Conclusions We demonstrated that antigen's family can be inferred from properties within a single group of linear epitopes (metalloproteinases or neurotoxins). Also we discovered the characteristics that represent these two epitope groups including their similarities and differences with random peptides and their respective amino acid sequence. These findings open new perspectives to improve epitope prediction by considering the specific antigen

  11. Mapping Antigenic Epitopes on the Human Bocavirus Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Kailasan, Shweta; Garrison, Jamie; Ilyas, Maria; Chipman, Paul; McKenna, Robert; Kantola, Kalle; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Kučinskaitė-Kodzė, Indrė; Žvirblienė, Aurelija

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human bocaviruses (HBoV1 to -4) are emerging pathogens associated with pneumonia and/or diarrhea in young children. Currently, there is no treatment or vaccination, so there is a need to study these pathogens to understand their disease mechanisms on a molecular and structural level for the development of control strategies. Here, we report the structures of six HBoV monoclonal antibody (MAb) fragment complexes, HBoV1-15C6, HBoV2-15C6, HBoV4-15C6, HBoV1-4C2, HBoV1-9G12, and HBoV1-12C1, determined by cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction to 18.0- to 8.5-Å resolution. Of these, the 15C6 MAb cross-reacted with HBoV1, HBoV2, and HBoV4, while the 4C2, 12C1, and 9G12 MAbs recognized only HBoV1. Pseudoatomic modeling mapped the 15C6 footprint to the capsid surface DE and HI loops, at the 5-fold axis and the depression surrounding it, respectively, which are conserved motifs in Parvoviridae. The footprints for 4C2, 12C1, and 9G12 span the surface loops that assemble portions of the 2-/5-fold wall (a raised surface feature between the 2-fold and 5-fold axes of symmetry) and the shoulder of the 3-fold protrusions. The MAb footprints, cross reactive and strain specific, coincide with regions with high and low sequence/structural identities, respectively, on the capsid surfaces of the HBoVs and identify potential regions for the development of peptide vaccines for these viruses. IMPORTANCE Human bocaviruses (HBoVs) may cause severe respiratory and gastrointestinal infections in young children. The nonenveloped parvovirus capsid carries determinants of host and tissue tropism, pathogenicity, genome packaging, assembly, and antigenicity important for virus infection. This information is currently unavailable for the HBoVs and other bocaparvoviruses. This study identifies three strain-specific antigenic epitopes on the HBoV1 capsid and a cross-reactive epitope on the HBoV1, HBoV2, and HBoV4 capsids using structures of capsid

  12. Identification of Caucasian CD4 T cell epitopes on the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium vivax. T cell memory.

    PubMed

    Bilsborough, J; Carlisle, M; Good, M F

    1993-07-15

    We have identified a population of Caucasians with a defined past history of infection with Plasmodium vivax malaria. Using purified synthetic peptides overlapping the sequence of the circumsporozoite protein, we determined the percentage of individuals whose T cells proliferated or secreted IFN-gamma in response to peptide stimulation, for both this population and a population of nonmalaria-exposed control individuals. A number of peptides were recognized by both groups, but 11 peptides were uniquely recognized by the exposed population, and thus represented malaria-specific T cell epitopes. CD4 T cells were found to be responsible for the proliferative response. Humans last exposed to vivax sporozoites as long ago as 49 yr responded as well or better to these malaria-specific epitopes as individuals exposed within the previous month. Since such malaria-induced memory response may not be a feature of Plasmodium falciparum infections, and since P. falciparum does not have a persisting hypnozoite stage, our data argue that the persistence of T cell memory to vivax epitopes may result from antigenic persistence in the liver.

  13. Characterization of the AT180 epitope of phosphorylated Tau protein by a combined nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Amniai, Laziza; Lippens, Guy; Landrieu, Isabelle

    2011-09-09

    We present here the characterization of the epitope recognized by the AT180 monoclonal antibody currently used to define an Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related pathological form of the phosphorylated Tau protein. Some ambiguity remains as to the exact phospho-residue(s) recognized by this monoclonal: pThr231 or both pThr231 and pSer235. To answer this question, we have used a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize in a qualitative and quantitative manner the phospho-residue(s) essential for the epitope recognition. Data from the first step of NMR experiments are used to map the residues bound by the antibodies, which were found to be limited to a few residues. A fluorophore is then chemically attached to a cystein residue introduced close-by the mapped epitope, at arginine 221, by mutagenesis of the recombinant protein. The second step of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the AT180 antibody tryptophanes and the phospho-Tau protein fluorophore allows to calculate a dissociation constant Kd of 30 nM. We show that the sole pThr231 is necessary for the AT180 recognition of phospho-Tau and that phosphorylation of Ser235 does not interfere with the binding.

  14. B epitope multiplicity and B/T epitope orientation influence immunogenicity of foot-and-mouth disease peptide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Esther; Cubillos, Carolina; Moreno, Noelia; Bárcena, Juan; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Andreu, David; Sobrino, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic peptides incorporating protective B- and T-cell epitopes are candidates for new safer foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines. We have reported that dendrimeric peptides including four copies of a B-cell epitope (VP1 136 to 154) linked to a T-cell epitope (3A 21 to 35) of FMD virus (FMDV) elicit potent B- and T-cell specific responses and confer protection to viral challenge, while juxtaposition of these epitopes in a linear peptide induces less efficient responses. To assess the relevance of B-cell epitope multivalency, dendrimers bearing two (B2T) or four (B4T) copies of the B-cell epitope from type O FMDV (a widespread circulating serotype) were tested in CD1 mice and showed that multivalency is advantageous over simple B-T-epitope juxtaposition, resulting in efficient induction of neutralizing antibodies and optimal release of IFN γ . Interestingly, the bivalent B2T construction elicited similar or even better B- and T-cell specific responses than tetravalent B4T. In addition, the presence of the T-cell epitope and its orientation were shown to be critical for the immunogenicity of the linear juxtaposed monovalent peptides analyzed in parallel. Taken together, our results provide useful insights for a more accurate design of FMD subunit vaccines.

  15. Alterations in expression of Cat-315 epitope of perineuronal nets during normal ageing, and its modulation by an open-channel NMDA receptor blocker, memantine.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Jun; Ohgomori, Tomohiro; Jinno, Shozo

    2017-03-08

    The perineuronal net (PNN), a specialized aggregate of the extracellular matrix, is involved in neuroprotection against oxidative stress, which is now recognized as a major contributor to age-related decline in brain functions. In this study, we investigated the age-related molecular changes of PNNs using monoclonal antibody Cat-315, which recognizes human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) glycan on aggrecan-based PNNs. Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of Cat-315 epitope in the hippocampus were higher in middle-aged (MA, 12-month-old) mice than in young adult (YA, 2-month-old) mice. Although there were no differences in the expression levels of Cat-315 epitope between old age (OA, 20-month-old) and MA mice, Cat-315 immunoreactivity was also detected in astrocytes of OA mice. To focus on Cat-315 epitope in PNNs, we used YA and MA mice in the following experiments. Optical disector analysis showed that there were no differences in the numbers of Cat-315-positive (Cat-315(+) ) PNNs between YA and MA mice. Fluorescence intensity analysis indicated that Cat-315 immunoreactivity in PNNs increased with age in the dorsal hippocampus, which is mainly involved in cognitive functions. Administration of an open-channel blocker of NMDA receptor, memantine, reduced the expression levels of Cat-315 epitope in the hippocampus. Furthermore, the numbers of glutamatergic and GABAergic terminals colocalized with Cat-315 epitope around parvalbumin-positive neurons were decreased by memantine. These findings provide novel insight into the involvement of PNNs in normal brain ageing, and suggest that memantine may counteract the age-related alterations in expression levels of Cat-315 epitope via regulation of its subcellular localization. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of the epitope structure of purified Dac G I and Lol p I, the major allergens of Dactylis glomerata and Lolium perenne pollens, using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mourad, W; Mécheri, S; Peltre, G; David, B; Hébert, J

    1988-11-15

    The use of mAb allowed us to further analyze the cross-reactivity between purified Dac g I and Lol p I, the major allergens of Dactylis glomerata (cocksfoot) and Lolium perenne (Rye grass), respectively. It was first shown, using IEF, followed by immunoprinting, that serum IgE antibodies from most grass-sensitive patients recognize both Dac g I and Lol p I. Second, three different anti-Lol p I mAb, 290A-167, 348A-6, and 539A-6, and one anti-Dac g I mAb, P3B2 were all shown to react with Dac g I and Lol p I, indicating that the two molecules share common epitopes. Epitope specificity of the mAb was determined by competitive binding inhibition of a given labeled mAb to solid phase fixed Dac g I or Lol p I by the mAb. The results indicated that the four mAb are directed against four different and non-overlapping epitopes present on both allergens. Using double-binding RIA, our data strongly suggest that the common epitopes are not repetitive on both molecules. In addition to their similar physicochemical characteristics, such as isolectric points and m.w., Dac g I and Lol p I share four identical epitopes. Binding inhibition of human IgE to Lol p I and Dac g I by the mAb was also assessed. The results indicated that each mAb was able to inhibit such reactions to variable degree but no additive inhibition was observed when two mAb of different specificities were used in combination, suggesting that the human IgE binding site is partially shared by each epitope recognized by the four mAb.

  17. Type II collagen antibody response is enriched in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid joints and directed to the same major epitopes as in collagen induced arthritis in primates and mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Antibodies towards type II collagen (CII) are detected in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in non-human primates and rodents with collagen induced arthritis (CIA). We have previously shown that antibodies specific for several CII-epitopes are pathogenic using monoclonal antibodies from arthritic mice, although the role of different anti-CII epitopes has not been investigated in detail in other species. We therefore performed an inter-species comparative study of the autoantibody response to CII in patients with RA versus monkeys and mice with CIA. Methods Analysis of the full epitope repertoire along the disease course of CIA was performed using a library of CII triple-helical peptides. The antibody responses to the major CII epitopes were analyzed in sera and synovial fluid from RA patients, and in sera from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) and mice. Results Many CII epitopes including the major C1, U1, and J1 were associated with established CIA and arginine residues played an important role in the anti-CII antibody interactions. The major epitopes were also recognized in RA patients, both in sera and even more pronounced in synovial fluid: 77% of the patients had antibodies to the U1 epitope. The anti-CII immune response was not restricted to the anti-citrulline protein antibodies (ACPA) positive RA group. Conclusion CII conformational dependent antibody responses are common in RA and are likely to originate from rheumatoid joints but did not show a correlation with ACPA response. Importantly, the fine specificity of the anti-CII response is similar with CIA in monkeys and rodents where the recognized epitopes are conserved and have a major pathogenic role. Thus, anti-CII antibodies may both contribute to, as well as be the consequence of, local joint inflammation. PMID:25005029

  18. Characterization and specificity of the linear epitope of the enterovirus 71 VP2 protein

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a major causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease in the Asia-Pacific region over the last decade. Hand, foot and mouth disease can be caused by different etiological agents from the enterovirus family, mainly EV71 and coxsackieviruses, which are genetically closely related. Nevertheless, infection with EV71 may occasionally lead to high fever, neurologic complications and the emergence of a rapidly fatal syndrome of pulmonary edema associated with brainstem encephalitis. The rapid progression and high mortality of severe EV71 infection has highlighted the need for EV71-specific diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Monoclonal antibodies are urgently needed to specifically detect EV71 antigens from patient specimens early in the infection process. Furthermore, the elucidation of viral epitopes will contribute to the development of targeted therapeutics and vaccines. Results We have identified the monoclonal antibody 7C7 from a screen of hybridoma cells derived from mice immunized with the EV71-B5 strain. The linear epitope of 7C7 was mapped to amino acids 142-146 (EDSHP) of the VP2 capsid protein and was characterized in detail. Mutational analysis of the epitope showed that the aspartic acid to asparagine mutation of the EV71 subgenogroup A (BrCr strain) did not interfere with antibody recognition. In contrast, the serine to threonine mutation at position 144 of VP2, present in recently emerged EV71-C4 China strains, abolished antigenicity. Mice injected with this virus strain did not produce any antibodies against the VP2 protein. Immunofluorescence and Western blotting confirmed that 7C7 specifically recognized EV71 subgenogroups and did not cross-react to Coxsackieviruses 4, 6, 10, and 16. 7C7 was successfully used as a detection antibody in an antigen-capture ELISA assay. Conclusions Detailed mapping showed that the VP2 protein of Enterovirus 71 contains a single, linear, non-neutralizing epitope, spanning

  19. Immunological evaluation of a synthetic Clostridium difficile oligosaccharide conjugate vaccine candidate and identification of a minimal epitope.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christopher E; Broecker, Felix; Oberli, Matthias A; Komor, Julia; Mattner, Jochen; Anish, Chakkumkal; Seeberger, Peter H

    2013-07-03

    Clostridium difficile is the cause of emerging nosocomial infections that result in abundant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Thus, the development of a vaccine to kill the bacteria to prevent this disease is highly desirable. Several recently identified bacterial surface glycans, such as PS-I and PS-II, are promising vaccine candidates to preclude C. difficile infection. To circumvent difficulties with the generation of natural PS-I due to its low expression levels in bacterial cultures, improved chemical synthesis protocols for the pentasaccharide repeating unit of PS-I and oligosaccharide substructures were utilized to produce large quantities of well-defined PS-I related glycans. The analysis of stool and serum samples obtained from C. difficile patients using glycan microarrays of synthetic oligosaccharide epitopes revealed humoral immune responses to the PS-I related glycan epitopes. Two different vaccine candidates were evaluated in the mouse model. A synthetic PS-I repeating unit CRM197 conjugate was immunogenic in mice and induced immunoglobulin class switching as well as affinity maturation. Microarray screening employing PS-I repeating unit substructures revealed the disaccharide Rha-(1→3)-Glc as a minimal epitope. A CRM197-Rha-(1→3)-Glc disaccharide conjugate was able to elicit antibodies recognizing the C. difficile PS-I pentasaccharide. We herein demonstrate that glycan microarrays exposing defined oligosaccharide epitopes help to determine the minimal immunogenic epitopes of complex oligosaccharide antigens. The synthetic PS-I pentasaccharide repeating unit as well as the Rha-(1→3)-Glc disaccharide are promising novel vaccine candidates against C. difficile that are currently in preclinical evaluation.

  20. Screening and Identification of an H-2Kb-Restricted CTL Epitope within the Glycoprotein of Hantaan Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rui-xue; Cheng, Lin-feng; Ying, Qi-kang; Liu, Rong-rong; Ma, Tie-jun; Zhang, Xiao-xiao; Liu, Zi-yu; Zhang, Liang; Ye, Wei; Zhang, Fang-lin; Xu, Zhi-kai; Wang, Fang; Wu, Xing-an

    2016-01-01

    The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response plays a key role in controlling viral infection, but only a few epitopes within the HTNV glycoprotein (GP) that are recognized by CTLs have been reported. In this study, we identified one murine HTNV GP-derived H2-Kb-restricted CTL epitope in C57BL/6 mice, which could be used to design preclinical studies of vaccines for HTNV infection. First, 15 8-mer peptides were selected from the HTNV GP amino acid sequence based on a percentile rank of <=1% by IEDB which is the most comprehensive collection of epitope prediction and analysis tool. A lower percentile rank indicates higher affinity and higher immune response. In the case of the consensus method, we also evaluated the binding score of peptide-binding affinity by the BIMAS software to confirm that all peptides were able to bind H2-Kb. Second, one novel GP-derived CTL epitope, GP6 aa456-aa463 (ITSLFSLL), was identified in the splenocytes of HTNV-infected mice using the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay. Third, a single peptide vaccine was administered to C57BL/6 mice to evaluate the immunogenic potential of the identified peptides. ELISPOT and cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays showed that this peptide vaccine induced a strong IFN-γ response and potent cytotoxicity in immunized mice. Last, we demonstrated that the peptide-vaccinated mice had partial protection from challenge with HTNV. In conclusion, we identified an H2-Kb-restricted CTL epitope with involvement in the host immune response to HTNV infection. PMID:27933274

  1. Hypoxia upregulates the expression of the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine containing epitope H in human ependymal cells.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Leonidas D; Vassiou, Katerina; Kotrotsios, Anastasios; Sgantzos, Markos N

    2011-02-15

    Epitope H contains an O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) residue in a specific conformation and/or environment recognized by mouse IgM monoclonal antibody H (mabH). Epitope H is present in several types of cells and in several polypeptides outside the CNS. Previous results have shown that in the adult human brains, epitope H is confined mostly to a minority of fibrous astrocytes, and it is greatly upregulated in the reactive astrocytes. Post-translational modification with O-GlcNAc occurs on many proteins involved in several cell processes, such as cell cycle progression, apoptosis, proteasome degradation pathways, and modulation of cellular function in response to nutrition and stress. Hypoxia is one of the major causes of cellular stress. Therefore, in this study, we used the mAbH and the indirect immunoperoxidase method to investigate the expression of epitope H in ependymal cells in brains of persons who died with signs of hypoxic encephalopathy. The results of the present study showed that practically all ependymal cells showed cytoplasmic staining for epitope H in supranuclear cytoplasm in the brain of two premature neonates and in ten infants who died with signs of hypoxic encephalopathy. However, the overwhelming majority of ependymal cells of the nine human embryos taken from legal abortions, ranging from 26 days until 13 weeks of gestational age, and of the ten infants' brains without any sign of hypoxic encephalopathy remained negative. Only occasionally did the ependymal cells show weak cytoplasmic staining in some foci. In addition, the reactive astrocytes in the hypoxic brains showed strong cytoplasmic staining, confirming previous results.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Two Monoclonal Antibodies against the Same Epitope on B-Cell Receptor Associated Protein 31.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Tae; Shin, Saemina; Hwang, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Min Kyu; Jung, Han-Sung; Park, Hwangseo; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we showed that B-cell receptor associated protein 31 (BAP31), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane chaperone, is also expressed on the cell surface by two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 297-D4 and 144-A8. Both MAbs recognize the same linear epitope on the C-terminal domain of BAP31, although they were independently established. Here, flow cytometric analysis showed that 144-A8 had additional binding properties to some cells, as compared to 297-D4. Quantitative antigen binding assays also showed that 144-A8 had higher antigen binding capacity than 297-D4. Affinity measurement revealed that 144-A8 had 1.54-fold higher binding affinity than 297-D4. Analysis of the heavy- and light-chain variable region sequences of two MAbs revealed that both MAbs belonged to the same heavy chain (Igh-V3660 VH3) and light chain subgroup (IGKV21) with just two amino acid differences in each framework region, indicating that both MAbs arise from the same germline origin. Seven amino acid differences were found between the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of the two MAbs. Molecular modeling of the epitope-paratope complexes revealed that the epitope appeared to reside in closer proximity to the CDRs of 144-A8 than to those of 297-D4 with the stronger hydrogen bond interactions with the former than the latter. More interestingly, an additional hydrophobic interaction appeared to be established between the leucine residue of epitope and the paratope of 144-A8, due to the substitution of H-Tyr101 for H-Phe101 in 144-A8. Thus, the different binding specificity and affinity of 144-A8 appeared to be due to the different hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interaction induced by the alterations of amino acids in CDRs of 144-A8. The results provide molecular insights into how the binding specificities and affinities of antibodies evolve with the same epitope in different microenvironments.

  3. Structural basis for broad neutralization of HIV-1 through the molecular recognition of 10E8 helical epitope at the membrane interface

    PubMed Central

    Rujas, Edurne; Caaveiro, Jose M. M.; Partida-Hanon, Angélica; Gulzar, Naveed; Morante, Koldo; Apellániz, Beatriz; García-Porras, Miguel; Bruix, Marta; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Scott, Jamie K.; Jiménez, M. Ángeles; Nieva, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism by which the HIV-1 MPER epitope is recognized by the potent neutralizing antibody 10E8 at membrane interfaces remains poorly understood. To solve this problem, we have optimized a 10E8 peptide epitope and analyzed the structure and binding activities of the antibody in membrane and membrane-like environments. The X-ray crystal structure of the Fab-peptide complex in detergents revealed for the first time that the epitope of 10E8 comprises a continuous helix spanning the gp41 MPER/transmembrane domain junction (MPER-N-TMD; Env residues 671–687). The MPER-N-TMD helix projects beyond the tip of the heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3 loop, indicating that the antibody sits parallel to the plane of the membrane in binding the native epitope. Biophysical, biochemical and mutational analyses demonstrated that strengthening the affinity of 10E8 for the TMD helix in a membrane environment, correlated with its neutralizing potency. Our research clarifies the molecular mechanisms underlying broad neutralization of HIV-1 by 10E8, and the structure of its natural epitope. The conclusions of our research will guide future vaccine-design strategies targeting MPER. PMID:27905530

  4. Direct discovery and validation of a peptide/MHC epitope expressed in primary human breast cancer cells using a TCRm monoclonal antibody with profound antitumor properties.

    PubMed

    Verma, Bhavna; Hawkins, Oriana E; Neethling, Francisca A; Caseltine, Shannon L; Largo, Sherly R; Hildebrand, William H; Weidanz, Jon A

    2010-04-01

    The identification and validation of new cancer-specific T cell epitopes continues to be a major area of research interest. Nevertheless, challenges remain to develop strategies that can easily discover and validate epitopes expressed in primary cancer cells. Regarded as targets for T cells, peptides presented in the context of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are recognized by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). These mAbs are of special importance as they lend themselves to the detection of epitopes expressed in primary tumor cells. Here, we use an approach that has been successfully utilized in two different infectious disease applications (WNV and influenza). A direct peptide-epitope discovery strategy involving mass spectrometric analysis led to the identification of peptide YLLPAIVHI in the context of MHC A*02 allele (YLL/A2) from human breast carcinoma cell lines. We then generated and characterized an anti-YLL/A2 mAb designated as RL6A TCRm. Subsequently, the TCRm mAb was used to directly validate YLL/A2 epitope expression in human breast cancer tissue, but not in normal control breast tissue. Moreover, mice implanted with human breast cancer cells grew tumors, yet when treated with RL6A TCRm showed a marked reduction in tumor size. These data demonstrate for the first time a coordinated direct discovery and validation strategy that identified a peptide/MHC complex on primary tumor cells for antibody targeting and provide a novel approach to cancer immunotherapy.

  5. Epitope mapping on the dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) pathogen-attachment factor.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Filardi, Elena; Estecha, Ana; Samaniego, Rafael; Fernández-Ruiz, Elena; Colmenares, María; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Steinman, Ralph M; Granelli-Piperno, Angela; Corbí, Angel L

    2010-01-01

    DC-SIGN (dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin) is a myeloid pathogen-attachment factor C-type lectin which recognizes mannose- and fucose-containing oligosaccharide ligands on clinically relevant pathogens. Intracellular signaling initiated upon ligand engagement of DC-SIGN interferes with TLR-initiated signals, and modulates the T cell activating and polarizing ability of antigen-presenting cells. The C-terminal carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) of DC-SIGN is preceded by a neck domain composed of eight 23-residue repeats which mediate molecule multimerization, and whose polymorphism correlates with altered susceptibility to SARS and HIV infection. Naturally occurring isoforms and chimaeric molecules, in combination with established recognition properties, were used to define seven structural and functional epitopes on DC-SIGN. Three epitopes mapped to the CRD, one of which is multimerization-dependent and only exposed on DC-SIGN monomers. Epitopes within the neck domain were conformation-independent and unaltered upon molecule multimerization, but were differentially affected by neck domain truncations. Although neck-specific antibodies exhibited lower function-blocking ability, they were more efficient at inducing molecule internalization. Moreover, crosslinking of the different epitopes resulted in distinct levels of microclustering on the cell surface. The identification of independent epitopes on the DC-SIGN molecule might facilitate the design of reagents that modulate the T cell activating and polarizing ability of DC-SIGN-expressing cells without preventing its antigen- and pathogen-recognition capacities.

  6. Dengue virus-reactive CD8+ T cells display quantitative and qualitative differences in their response to variant epitopes of heterologous viral serotypes.

    PubMed

    Bashyam, Hema S; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L

    2006-03-01

    Reactivation of serotype cross-reactive CD8+ memory T lymphocytes is thought to contribute to the immunopathogenesis of dengue disease during secondary infection by a heterologous serotype. Using cytokine flow cytometry, we have defined four novel HLA-A*02-restricted dengue viral epitopes recognized by up to 1.5% of circulating CD8+ T cells in four donors after primary vaccination. All four donors had the highest cytokine response to the epitope NS4b 2353. We also studied the effect of sequence differences in heterologous dengue serotypes on dengue-reactive CD8+ memory T cell cytokine and proliferative responses. The D3 variant of a different NS4b epitope 2423 and the D2 variant of the NS4a epitope 2148 induced the largest cytokine response, compared with their respective heterologous sequences in all donors regardless of the primary vaccination serotype. Stimulation with variant peptides also altered the relative frequencies of the various subsets of cells that expressed IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, MIP-1beta, and combinations of these cytokines. These results indicate that the prior infection history of the individual as well as the serotypes of the primary and heterologous secondary viruses influence the nature of the secondary response. These differences in the effector functions of serotype cross-reactive memory T cells induced by heterologous variant epitopes, which are both quantitative and qualitative, may contribute to the clinical outcome of secondary dengue infection.

  7. Structure of the factor VIII C2 domain in a ternary complex with 2 inhibitor antibodies reveals classical and nonclassical epitopes.

    PubMed

    Walter, Justin D; Werther, Rachel A; Brison, Caileen M; Cragerud, Rebecca K; Healey, John F; Meeks, Shannon L; Lollar, Pete; Spiegel, P Clint

    2013-12-19

    The factor VIII C2 domain is a highly immunogenic domain, whereby inhibitory antibodies develop following factor VIII replacement therapy for congenital hemophilia A patients. Inhibitory antibodies also arise spontaneously in cases of acquired hemophilia A. The structural basis for molecular recognition by 2 classes of anti-C2 inhibitory antibodies that bind to factor VIII simultaneously was investigated by x-ray crystallography. The C2 domain/3E6 FAB/G99 FAB ternary complex illustrates that each antibody recognizes epitopes on opposing faces of the factor VIII C2 domain. The 3E6 epitope forms direct contacts to the C2 domain at 2 loops consisting of Glu2181-Ala2188 and Thr2202-Arg2215, whereas the G99 epitope centers on Lys2227 and also makes direct contacts with loops Gln2222-Trp2229, Leu2261-Ser2263, His2269-Val2282, and Arg2307-Gln2311. Each binding interface is highly electrostatic, with positive charge present on both C2 epitopes and complementary negative charge on each antibody. A new model of membrane association is also presented, where the 3E6 epitope faces the negatively charged membrane surface and Arg2320 is poised at the center of the binding interface. These results illustrate the potential complexities of the polyclonal anti-factor VIII immune response and further define the "classical" and "nonclassical" types of antibody inhibitors against the factor VIII C2 domain.

  8. Preferential Option for the Poor: Making a Pedagogical Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirylo, James D.

    2006-01-01

    When children are sick, hurt, or in desperate need, parents/caregivers naturally make preferential options for them. Yet, as it relates to social justice, particularly when working with students from marginalized and poverty situations, the concept of making a preferential option in a school setting is not as clear. However, a school setting is a…

  9. Student Incentives and Preferential Treatment in College Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastine, Ivan; Pastine, Tuvana

    2012-01-01

    We consider a framework in which the optimal admissions policy of a purely academic-quality oriented college implements preferential treatment in favor of the student from the deprived socioeconomic background which maximizes the competition between candidates. We find that the exact form of the preferential treatment admissions policy matters for…

  10. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to a wild type hepatitis B virus epitope in patients chronically infected by variant viruses carrying substitutions within the epitope

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Mutations that abrogate recognition of a viral epitope by class I- restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) can lead to viral escape if the CTL response against that epitope is crucial for viral clearance. The likelihood of this type of event is low when the CTL response is simultaneously directed against multiple viral epitopes, as has been recently reported for patients with acute self-limited hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The CTL response to HBV is usually quite weak, however, during chronic HBV infection, and it is generally acknowledged that this is a major determinant of viral persistence in this disease. If such individuals were to produce a mono- or oligospecific CTL response, however, negative selection of the corresponding mutant viruses might occur. We have recently studied two HLA-A2-positive patients with chronic hepatitis B who, atypically, developed a strong HLA-A2-restricted CTL response against an epitope (FLPSDFFPSV) that contains an HLA-A2-binding motif located between residues 18-27 of the viral nucleocapsid protein, hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg). These patients failed, however, to respond to any of other HLA-A2-restricted HBV-derived peptides that are generally immunogenic in acutely infected patients who successfully clear the virus. Interestingly, DNA sequence analysis of HBV isolates from these two patients demonstrated alternative residues at position 27 (V --> A and V --> I) and position 21 (S --> N, S --> A, and S --> V) that reduced the HLA and T cell receptor-binding capacities of the variant sequences, respectively. Synthetic peptides containing these alternative sequences were poorly immunogenic compared to the prototype HBc18-27 sequence, and they could not be recognized by CTL clones specific for the prototype peptide. While we do not know if the two patients were originally infected by these variant viruses or if the variants emerged subsequent to infection because of immune selection, the results are most consistent with

  11. Structure of an Antibody in Complex with Its Mucin Domain Linear Epitope That Is Protective against Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Olal, Daniel; Kuehne, Ana I.; Bale, Shridhar; Halfmann, Peter; Hashiguchi, Takao; Fusco, Marnie L.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; King, Liam B.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Dye, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody 14G7 is protective against lethal Ebola virus challenge and recognizes a distinct linear epitope in the prominent mucin-like domain of the Ebola virus glycoprotein GP. The structure of 14G7 in complex with its linear peptide epitope has now been determined to 2.8 Å. The structure shows that this GP sequence forms a tandem β-hairpin structure that binds deeply into a cleft in the antibody-combining site. A key threonine at the apex of one turn is critical for antibody interaction and is conserved among all Ebola viruses. This work provides further insight into the mechanism of protection by antibodies that target the protruding, highly accessible mucin-like domain of Ebola virus and the structural framework for understanding and characterizing candidate immunotherapeutics. PMID:22171276

  12. Bypass of carrier-induced epitope-specific suppression using a T-helper epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Sad, S; Rao, K; Arora, R; Talwar, G P; Raghupathy, R

    1992-01-01

    A gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-based vaccine is being developed as a method for non-surgical immunotherapy as immunization with this vaccine results in atrophy of the prostate. This vaccine, a conjugate of GnRH and diphtheria toxoid (DT), provides a unique hapten-carrier system for investigating the influence of carrier presensitization on antibody responses to self haptens. In a recent communication we showed that preimmunization with carriers diphtheria toxoid and tetanus toxoid results in a strain-dependent inhibition of anti-GnRH responses in mice and that T cells from carrier-presensitized mice are responsible for anti-haptenic suppression. In the present report we describe a strategy for bypassing DT-induced epitopic suppression using a T-helper epitope from DT. PMID:1383134

  13. Kinesin-II is preferentially targeted to assembling cilia and is required for ciliogenesis and normal cytokinesis in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Brown, J M; Marsala, C; Kosoy, R; Gaertig, J

    1999-10-01

    We cloned two genes, KIN1 and KIN2, encoding kinesin-II homologues from the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila and constructed strains lacking either KIN1 or KIN2 or both genes. Cells with a single disruption of either gene showed partly overlapping sets of defects in cell growth, motility, ciliary assembly, and thermoresistance. Deletion of both genes resulted in loss of cilia and arrests in cytokinesis. Mutant cells were unable to assemble new cilia or to maintain preexisting cilia. Double knockout cells were not viable on a standard medium but could be grown on a modified medium on which growth does not depend on phagocytosis. Double knockout cells could be rescued by transformation with a gene encoding an epitope-tagged Kin1p. In growing cells, epitope-tagged Kin1p preferentially accumulated in cilia undergoing active assembly. Kin1p was also detected in the cell body but did not show any association with the cleavage furrow. The cell division arrests observed in kinesin-II knockout cells appear to be induced by the loss of cilia and resulting cell paralysis.

  14. Preferential hydration and the exclusion of cosolvents from protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Seishi; Smith, Derek J

    2004-07-08

    Protein stability is enhanced by the addition of osmolytes, such as sugars and polyols and inert crowders, such as polyethylene glycols. This stability enhancement has been quantified by the preferential hydration parameter which can be determined by experiments. To understand the mechanism of protein stability enhancement, we present a statistical mechanical analysis of the preferential hydration parameter based upon Kirkwood-Buff theory. Previously, the preferential hydration parameter was interpreted in terms of the number of hydration waters, as well as the cosolvent exclusion volume. It was not clear how accurate these interpretations were, nor what the relationship is between the two. By using the Kirkwood-Buff theory and experimental data, we conclude that the contribution from the cosolvent exclusion dominantly determines the preferential hydration parameters for crowders. For osmolytes, although the cosolvent exclusion largely determines the preferential hydration parameters, the contribution from hydration may not be negligible.

  15. Characterizing affinity epitopes between prion protein and β-amyloid using an epitope mapping immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mino; Kim, Su Yeon; An, Seong Soo A; Ju, Young Ran

    2013-01-01

    Cellular prion protein, a membrane protein, is expressed in all mammals. Prion protein is also found in human blood as an anchorless protein, and this protein form is one of the many potential sources of misfolded prion protein replication during transmission. Many studies have suggested that β-amyloid1–42 oligomer causes neurotoxicity associated with Alzheimer's disease, which is mediated by the prion protein that acts as a receptor and regulates the hippocampal potentiation. The prevention of the binding of these proteins has been proposed as a possible preventative treatment for Alzheimer's disease; therefore, a greater understanding of the binding hot-spots between the two molecules is necessary. In this study, the epitope mapping immunoassay was employed to characterize binding epitopes within the prion protein and complementary epitopes in β-amyloid. Residues 23–39 and 93–119 in the prion protein were involved in binding to β-amyloid1–40 and 1–42, and monomers of this protein interacted with prion protein residues 93–113 and 123–166. Furthermore, β-amyloid antibodies against the C-terminus detected bound β-amyloid1–42 at residues 23–40, 104–122 and 159–175. β-Amyloid epitopes necessary for the interaction with prion protein were not determined. In conclusion, charged clusters and hydrophobic regions of the prion protein were involved in binding to β-amyloid1–40 and 1–42. The 3D structure appears to be necessary for β-amyloid to interact with prion protein. In the future, these binding sites may be utilized for 3D structure modeling, as well as for the pharmaceutical intervention of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23907583

  16. Proteomic analysis of endothelial cell autoantigens recognized by anti-dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsien-Jen; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Lei, Huan-Yao; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2009-01-01

    We previously showed the occurrence of autoimmune responses in dengue virus (DV) infection, which has potential implications for the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic syndrome. In the present study, we have used a proteomic analysis to identify several candidate proteins on HMEC-1 endothelial cells recognized by anti-DV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) antibodies. The target proteins, including ATP synthase beta chain, protein disulfide isomerase, vimentin, and heat shock protein 60, co-localize with anti-NS1 binding sites on nonfixed HMEC-1 cells using immunohistochemical double staining and confocal microscopy. The cross-reactivity of anti-target protein antibodies with HMEC-1 cells was inhibited by NS1 protein pre-absorption. Furthermore, a cross-reactive epitope on NS1 amino acid residues 311-330 (P311-330) was predicted using homologous sequence alignment. The reactivity of dengue hemorrhagic patient sera with HMEC-1 cells was blocked by synthetic peptide P311-330 pre-absorption. Taken together, our results identify putative targets on endothelial cells recognized by anti-DV NS1 antibodies, where NS1 P311-330 possesses the shared epitope.

  17. Epitope-vaccine strategy against HIV-1: today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zuqiang; Xiao, Yi; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2003-01-01

    Vaccines play important roles in preventing infectious diseases caused by different pathogens. However, some pathogens such as HIV-1 challenge current vaccine strategy. Poor immunogenicity and the high mutation rate of HIV-1 make great difficulties in inducing potent immune responses strong enough to prevent infection via vaccination. Epitope-vaccine, which could intensively enhance predefined epitope-specific immune responses, was suggested as a new strategy against HIV-1 and HIV-1 mutation. Epitope-vaccines afford powerful approaches to elicit potent, broad and complete immune protection against not only primary homologous viral isolates but also heterologous viral mutants. Although most studies are still preliminary now, epitope-vaccine as a novel strategy against the AIDS epidemic has great developmental potential. To trigger T-cell-dependent IgG antibody responses and improve affinities of the epitope-specific antibodies, approaches such as recombinant multi-epitope-vaccination and prime-boosting vaccination were suggested. Cellular immune responses, especially CTL responses, could also be elicited and enhanced in addition to humoral immune responses. Developed epitope-vaccines activating both arms of the immune system would benefit prevention and immunotherapy not only against HIV but also other chronic infections.

  18. Building Classifier Ensembles for B-Cell Epitope Prediction

    PubMed Central

    EL-Manzalawy, Yasser; Honavar, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Identification of B-cell epitopes in target antigens is a critical step in epitope-driven vaccine design, immunodiagnostic tests, and antibody production. B-cell epitopes could be linear, i.e., a contiguous amino acid sequence fragment of an antigen, or conformational, i.e., amino acids that are often not contiguous in the primary sequence but appear in close proximity within the folded 3D antigen structure. Numerous computational methods have been proposed for predicting both types of B-cell epitopes. However, the development of tools for reliably predicting B-cell epitopes remains a major challenge in immunoinformatics. Classifier ensembles a promising approach for combining a set of classifiers such that the overall performance of the resulting ensemble is better than the predictive performance of the best individual classifier. In this chapter, we show how to build a classifier ensemble for improved prediction of linear B-cell epitopes. The method can be easily adapted to build classifier ensembles for predicting conformational epitopes. PMID:25048130

  19. Identification of cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes in dengue virus serotype 1.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhiliang; Guo, Jianglong; Huang, Xi; Liu, Huifang; Chen, Xinyu; Jiang, Minghua; Wen, Jinsheng

    2015-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) has a serious and growing impact on global health and the exact role of DENV-specific CD8(+) T-cells in DENV infection is still uncertain. In the present study, SYFPEITHI algorithm was used to screen the amino acid sequence of Dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV-1) for potential epitopes, and seven putative HLA-A*1101-restricted and five putative HLA-A*2402-restricted epitopes conserved in hundreds of DENV-1 strains were synthesized. The binding affinity of these epitope candidates to corresponding HLA molecules was evaluated using competitive peptide-binding assay. The immunogenicity and specificity of peptides were further tested in HLA-A*1101 transgenic mice, HLA-A*2402 transgenic mice and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients infected with DENV-1. Percentage inhibition (PI) values calculated in competitive peptide-binding assay showed that six peptides (E39-47 PTLDIELLK, NS5(505-513) GVEGEGLHK, NS2b(15-23) SILLSSLLK, NS5(561-569) ALLATSIFK, NS3(99-107) AVEPGKNPK, and NS4b(159-167) VVYDAKFEK) could bind to HLA-A*1101 molecule with high affinity and five peptides (NS3472-480 QYIYMGQPL, NS4a40-48 AYRHAMEEL, NS5(880-888) DYMTSMKRF, NS3(548-556) SYKVASEGF, and NS3(22-30) IYRILQRGL) have a high affinity for HLA-A*2402 molecule. Enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) results indicated that these high-affinity peptides were recognized by splenocytes of DENV-1-infected transgenic mice and high-affinity peptide-immunized transgenic mice displayed high levels of peptide-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells. In addition, both peptide-pulsed splenocytes and DENV-1-infected splenic monocytes were efficiently killed by these peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Finally, except NS2b(15-23), 10 high-affinity peptides were recognized by PBMCs of patients infected with DENV-1. These identified epitopes would contribute to the understanding of the function of DENV-specific CD8(+) T-cells.

  20. Preferentially Cytotoxic Constituents of Andrographis paniculata and their Preferential Cytotoxicity against Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sullim; Morita, Hiroyuki; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2015-07-01

    In the course of our search for anticancer agents based on a novel anti-austerity strategy, we found that the 70% EtOH extract of the crude drug Andrographis Herba (aerial parts of Andrographis paniculata), used in Japanese Kampo medicines, killed PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells preferentially in nutrient-deprived medium (NDM). Phytochemical investigation of the 70% EtOH extract led to the isolation of 21 known compounds consisting of six labdane-type diterpenes (11, 15, 17-19, 21), six flavones (5, 7, 10, 12, 14, 20), three flavanones (2, 6, 16), two sterols (3, 8), a fatty acid (1), a phthalate (4), a triterpene (9), and a monoterpene (13). Among them, 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (17) displayed the most potent preferential cytotoxicity against PANC-1 and PSN-1 cells with PC50 values of 10.0 μM and 9.27 μM, respectively. Microscopical observation, double staining with ethidium bromide (EB) and acridine orange (AO), and flow cytometry with propidium iodide/annexin V double staining indicated that 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (17) triggered apoptosis-like cell death in NDM with an amino acids and/or serum-sensitive mode.

  1. Characterization of the AT180 epitope of phosphorylated Tau protein by a combined nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy approach

    SciTech Connect

    Amniai, Laziza; Lippens, Guy; Landrieu, Isabelle

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} pThr231 of the Tau protein is necessary for the binding of the AT180 antibody. {yields} pSer235 of the Tau protein does not interfere with the AT180 recognition of pThr231. {yields} Epitope mapping is efficiently achieved by combining NMR and FRET spectroscopy. -- Abstract: We present here the characterization of the epitope recognized by the AT180 monoclonal antibody currently used to define an Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related pathological form of the phosphorylated Tau protein. Some ambiguity remains as to the exact phospho-residue(s) recognized by this monoclonal: pThr231 or both pThr231 and pSer235. To answer this question, we have used a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize in a qualitative and quantitative manner the phospho-residue(s) essential for the epitope recognition. Data from the first step of NMR experiments are used to map the residues bound by the antibodies, which were found to be limited to a few residues. A fluorophore is then chemically attached to a cystein residue introduced close-by the mapped epitope, at arginine 221, by mutagenesis of the recombinant protein. The second step of Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the AT180 antibody tryptophanes and the phospho-Tau protein fluorophore allows to calculate a dissociation constant Kd of 30 nM. We show that the sole pThr231 is necessary for the AT180 recognition of phospho-Tau and that phosphorylation of Ser235 does not interfere with the binding.

  2. In silico epitope prediction, expression and functional analysis of Per a 10 allergen from the American cockroach

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xunliang; Guo, Miao; Jin, Min; Chen, Hao; Li, Yanming; Wei, Ji-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Cockroach (CR) allergies caused by the American cockroach hyave been recognized to be repsonsible for IgE-mediated type I hypersensitivity worldwide. Per a 10 is one of the recognized main allergens of the American CR. In a previous study, we examined another American CR allergen, Per a 9 in patients with CR allergies and examined epitope sequences in this allergen. In the present study, we aimed to examine epitope sequences in the Per a 10 allergen. for this purpose, the Per a 10 gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) systems. Our results revealed that 9 out of 16 (56.3%) sera from patients with American CR allergies reacted to Per a10, as assessed by ELISA, confirming that Per a 10 is a major allergen of the American CR. Our results also revealed that the expression of CD63 and CCR3 on passively sensitized basophils (obtained sera of patients with American CR allergies) was increased by approximately 2.3-fold, indicating that recombinant Per a 10 is functionally active. In addition, 3 immunoinformatics tools, namely the DNAStar Protean system, the Bioinformatics Predicted Antigenic Peptides (BPAP) system and the BepiPred 1.0 server were used to predict the peptides and the results revealed 8 peptides (2–12, 55–67, 98–120, 125–133, 149–160, 170–182, 201–208 and 223–227) as potential B cell epitopes of the Per a 10 allergen. Moreover, Per a 10 was predicted to have 3 T cell epitope sequences, namely 83–92, 139–147 and 162–170. The findings of our study on the CR allergen may prove to be useful in the development of peptide-based vaccine for the prevention and/or treatment of CR allergies. PMID:27840898

  3. Use of epitope libraries to identify exon-specific monoclonal antibodies for characterization of altered dystrophins in muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen thi Man; Morris, G.E. )

    1993-06-01

    The majority of mutations in Xp21-linked muscular dystrophy (MD) can be identified by PCR or Southern blotting, as deletions or duplications of groups of exons in the dystrophin gene, but it is not always possible to predict how much altered dystrophin, if any, will be produced. Use of exon-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on muscle biopsies from MD patients can, in principle, provide information on both the amount of altered dystrophin produced and, when dystrophin is present, the nature of the genetic deletion or point mutation. For this purpose, mAbs which recognize regions of dystrophin encoded by known exons and whose binding is unaffected by the absence of adjacent exons are required. To map mAbs to specific exons, random [open quotes]libraries[close quotes] of expressed dystrophin fragments were created by cloning DNAseI digestion fragments of a 4.3-kb dystrophin cDNA into a pTEX expression vector. The libraries were then used to locate the epitopes recognized by 48 mAbs to fragments of 25--60 amino acids within the 1,434-amino-acid dystrophin fragment used to produce the antibodies. This is sufficiently detailed to allow further refinement by using synthetic peptides and, in many cases, to identify the exon in the DMD (Duchenne MD) gene which encodes the epitope. To illustrate their use in dystrophin analysis, a Duchenne patient with a frameshift deletion of exons 42 and 43 makes a truncated dystrophin encoded by exons 1--41, and the authors now show that this can be detected in the sarcolemma by mAbs up to and including those specific for exon 41 epitopes but not by mAbs specific for exon 43 or later epitopes. 38 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Identification of a Highly Conserved Epitope on Avian Influenza Virus Non-Structural Protein 1 Using a Peptide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xuexia; Bao, Hongmei; Shi, Lin; Tao, Qimeng; Jiang, Yongping; Zeng, Xianying; Xu, Xiaolong; Tian, Guobin; Zheng, Shimin; Chen, Hualan

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a multifunctional protein. It is present at high levels in infected cells and can be used for AIV detection and diagnosis. In this study, we generated monoclonal antibody (MAb) D7 against AIV NS1 protein by immunization of BALB/c mice with purified recombinant NS1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli. Isotype determination revealed that the MAb was IgG1/κ-type subclass. To identify the epitope of the MAb D7, the NS1 protein was truncated into a total of 225 15-mer peptides with 14 amino acid overlaps, which were spotted for a peptide microarray. The results revealed that the MAb D7 recognized the consensus DAPF motif. Furthermore, the AIV NS1 protein with the DAPF motif deletion was transiently expressed in 293T cells and failed to react with MAb D7. Subsequently, the DAPF motif was synthesized with an elongated GSGS linker at both the C- and N-termini. The MAb D7 reacted with the synthesized peptide both in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot-blot assays. From these results, we concluded that DAPF motif is the epitope of MAb D7. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a 4-mer epitope on the NS1 protein of AIV that can be recognized by MAb using a peptide microarray, which is able to simplify epitope identification, and that could serve as the basis for immune responses against avian influenza. PMID:26938453

  5. The biological activity of human CD20 monoclonal antibodies is linked to unique epitopes on CD20.

    PubMed

    Teeling, Jessica L; Mackus, Wendy J M; Wiegman, Luus J J M; van den Brakel, Jeroen H N; Beers, Stephen A; French, Ruth R; van Meerten, Tom; Ebeling, Saskia; Vink, Tom; Slootstra, Jerry W; Parren, Paul W H I; Glennie, Martin J; van de Winkel, Jan G J

    2006-07-01

    We have previously defined a panel of fully human CD20 mAb. Most of these were unexpectedly efficient in their ability to recruit C1q to the surface of CD20-positive cells and mediate tumor lysis via activation of the classical pathway of complement. This complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) potency appeared to relate to the unusually slow off-rate of these human Abs. However, we now present epitope-mapping data, which indicates that all human mAb bind a novel region of CD20 that may influence CDC potency. Epitope mapping, using both mutagenesis studies and overlapping 15-mer peptides of the extracellular loops of CD20, defined the amino acids required for binding by an extensive panel of mouse and human mAb. Binding by rituximab and mouse CD20 mAb, had an absolute requirement for alanine and proline at positions 170 and 172, respectively, within the large extracellular loop of CD20. Surprisingly, however, all of the human CD20 mAb recognize a completely novel epitope located N-terminally of this motif, also including the small extracellular loop of CD20. Thus, although off-rate may influence biological activity of mAb, another critical factor for determining CDC potency by CD20 mAb appears to be the region of the target molecule they recognize. We conclude that recognition of the novel epitope cooperates with slow off-rate in determining the activity of CD20 Ab in activation of complement and induction of tumor cell lysis.

  6. Identification of human viral protein-derived ligands recognized by individual MHCI-restricted T-cell receptors

    PubMed Central

    Szomolay, Barbara; Liu, Jie; Brown, Paul E; Miles, John J; Clement, Mathew; Llewellyn-Lacey, Sian; Dolton, Garry; Ekeruche-Makinde, Julia; Lissina, Anya; Schauenburg, Andrea J; Sewell, Andrew K; Burrows, Scott R; Roederer, Mario; Price, David A; Wooldridge, Linda; van den Berg, Hugo A

    2016-01-01

    Evidence indicates that autoimmunity can be triggered by virus-specific CD8+ T cells that crossreact with self-derived peptide epitopes presented on the cell surface by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules. Identification of the associated viral pathogens is challenging because individual T-cell receptors can potentially recognize up to a million different peptides. Here, we generate peptide length-matched combinatorial peptide library (CPL) scan data for a panel of virus-specific CD8+ T-cell clones spanning different restriction elements and a range of epitope lengths. CPL scan data drove a protein database search limited to viruses that infect humans. Peptide sequences were ranked in order of likelihood of recognition. For all anti-viral CD8+ T-cell clones examined in this study, the index peptide was either the top-ranked sequence or ranked as one of the most likely sequences to be recognized. Thus, we demonstrate that anti-viral CD8+ T-cell clones are highly focused on their index peptide sequence and that ‘CPL-driven database searching' can be used to identify the inciting virus-derived epitope for a given CD8+ T-cell clone. Moreover, to augment access to CPL-driven database searching, we have created a publicly accessible webtool. Application of these methodologies in the clinical setting may clarify the role of viral pathogens in the etiology of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26846725

  7. Identification of a Conserved Linear B-Cell Epitope of Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC Protein by Screening Phage-Displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Wang, Xintong; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    The GapC of Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) is a highly conserved surface protein that can induce protective humoral immune response in animals. However, B-cell epitopes on the S. dysgalactiae GapC have not been well identified. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb5B7) against the GapC1-150 protein was prepared. After passive transfer, mAb5B7 could partially protect mice against S. dysgalactiae infection. Eleven positive phage clones recognized by mAb5B7 were identified by screening phage-displayed random 12-peptide library, most of which matched the consensus motif DTTQGRFD. The motif sequence exactly matches amino acids 48-55 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC protein. In addition, the motif 48DTTQGRFD55 shows high homology among various streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues D48, T50, Q51, G52 and F54 formed the core motif of 48DTTQGRFD55. This motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb5B7. As expected, epitope-peptide evoked protective immune response against S. dysgalactiae infection in immunized mice. Taken together, this identified conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC could provide very valuable insights for vaccine design against S. dysgalactiae infection. PMID:26121648

  8. Measles Virus Epitope Presentation by HLA: Novel Insights into Epitope Selection, Dominance, and Microvariation

    PubMed Central

    Schellens, Ingrid M.; Meiring, Hugo D.; Hoof, Ilka; Spijkers, Sanne N.; Poelen, Martien C. M.; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A. M.; Costa, Ana I.; Vennema, Harry; Keşmir, Can; van Baarle, Debbie; van Els, Cécile A. C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Immunity to infections with measles virus (MV) can involve vigorous human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I-restricted CD8+ cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses. MV, albeit regarded monotypic, is known to undergo molecular evolution across its RNA genome. To address which regions of the MV proteome are eligible for recognition by CD8+ CTLs and how different HLA class I loci contribute to the epitope display, we interrogated the naturally processed and presented MV peptidome extracted from cell lines expressing in total a broad panel of 16 different common HLA-A, -B, and -C molecules. The repertoire and abundance of MV peptides were bona fide identified by nanoHPLC–MS/MS. ­Eighty-nine MV peptides were discovered and assignment to an HLA-A, -B, or -C allele, based on HLA-peptide affinity prediction, was in most cases successful. Length variation and presentation by multiple HLA class I molecules was common in the MV peptidome. More than twice as many unique MV epitopes were found to be restricted by HLA-B than by HLA-A, while MV peptides with supra-abundant expression rates (>5,000 cc) were rather associated with HLA-A and HLA-C. In total, 59 regions across the whole MV proteome were identified as targeted by HLA class I. Sequence coverage by epitopes was highest for internal proteins transcribed from the MV-P/V/C and -M genes and for hemagglutinin. At the genome level, the majority of the HLA class I-selected MV epitopes represented codons having a higher non-synonymous mutation rate than silent mutation rate, as established by comparison of a set of 58 unique full length MV genomes. Interestingly, more molecular variation was seen for the epitopes expressed at rates ≥1,000 cc. These data for the first time indicate that HLA class I broadly samples the MV proteome and that CTL pressure may contribute to the genomic evolution of MV. PMID:26579122

  9. Identification of cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes on swine viruses: multi-epitope design for universal T cell vaccine.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Chieh-Hua; Chung, Wen-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF), foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) are the primary diseases affecting the pig industry globally. Vaccine induced CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune response might be long-lived and cross-serotype and thus deserve further attention. Although large panels of synthetic overlapping peptides spanning the entire length of the polyproteins of a virus facilitate the detection of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, it is an exceedingly costly and cumbersome approach. Alternatively, computational predictions have been proven to be of satisfactory accuracy and are easily performed. Such a method enables the systematic identification of genome-wide CTL epitopes by incorporating epitope prediction tools in analyzing large numbers of viral sequences. In this study, we have implemented an integrated bioinformatics pipeline for the identification of CTL epitopes of swine viruses including the CSF virus (CSFV), FMD virus (FMDV) and PRRS virus (PRRSV) and assembled these epitopes on a web resource to facilitate vaccine design. Identification of epitopes for cross protections to different subtypes of virus are also reported in this study and may be useful for the development of a universal vaccine against such viral infections among the swine population. The CTL epitopes identified in this study have been evaluated in silico and possibly provide more and wider protection in compared to traditional single-reference vaccine design. The web resource is free and open to all users through http://sb.nhri.org.tw/ICES.

  10. Design and Characterization of Epitope-Scaffold Immunogens That Present the Motavizumab Epitope from Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Correia, Bruno E.; Chen, Man; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Schief, William R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2012-06-28

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, but an effective vaccine has not yet been developed. An ideal vaccine would elicit protective antibodies while avoiding virus-specific T-cell responses, which have been implicated in vaccine-enhanced disease with previous RSV vaccines. We propose that heterologous proteins designed to present RSV-neutralizing antibody epitopes and to elicit cognate antibodies have the potential to fulfill these vaccine requirements, as they can be fashioned to be free of viral T-cell epitopes. Here we present the design and characterization of three epitope-scaffolds that present the epitope of motavizumab, a potent neutralizing antibody that binds to a helix-loop-helix motif in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Two of the epitope-scaffolds could be purified, and one epitope-scaffold based on a Staphylococcus aureus protein A domain bound motavizumab with kinetic and thermodynamic properties consistent with the free epitope-scaffold being stabilized in a conformation that closely resembled the motavizumab-bound state. This epitope-scaffold was well folded as assessed by circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry, and its crystal structure (determined in complex with motavizumab to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution) was similar to the computationally designed model, with all hydrogen-bond interactions critical for binding to motavizumab preserved. Immunization of mice with this epitope-scaffold failed to elicit neutralizing antibodies but did elicit sera with F binding activity. The elicitation of F binding antibodies suggests that some of the design criteria for eliciting protective antibodies without virus-specific T-cell responses are being met, but additional optimization of these novel immunogens is required.

  11. Mapping of epitopes on Poa p I and Lol p I allergens with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z W; Ekramoddoullah, A K; Jaggi, K S; Dzuba-Fischer, J; Rector, E; Kisil, F T

    1990-01-01

    Allergen Poa p I isolated from the dialysed aqueous extract of Kentucky blue grass pollen by affinity chromatography with an anti-Lol p I murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) 290A-167 was previously shown to consist of a 35.8-kilodalton (kD) component with a pI of 6.4, designated as Poa p Ia, and a 33-kD component with a pI of 9.1, designated as Poa p Ib. The present study reports on the comparative antigenic analyses of these two components, using MAbs produced separately against Poa p I and Lol p I. Thus, anti-Poa p I MAbs 60 and 61 and anti-Lol p I MAb 290A-167 recognized Poa p Ia and Poa p Ib whereas anti-Poa p I MAbs 62, 63 and 64 and anti-Lol p I MAb 348A-6 recognized only Poa p Ia. The specificities of the MAbs were further resolved by comparing their respective abilities to inhibit the binding of 125I-Poa p I or 125I-Lol p I to the different MAbs prepared in the form of solid phase. These studies revealed that at least 4 distinct epitopes (designated as E1, E2, E3 and E4) were shared by both Poa p I and Lol p I. All 4 epitopes were present on Poa p Ia whereas only E1 and E3 were detected on Poa p Ib. E1 was recognized by MAbs 60 and 61, E2 by MAbs 62, 63 and 64, E3 by MAb 290A-167 and E4 by MAb 348A-6.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Epitope mapping of mAbs to denatured human testicular ACE (CD143).

    PubMed

    Balyasnikova, I V; Metzger, R; Franke, F E; Conrad, N; Towbin, H; Schwartz, D E; Sturrock, E D; Danilov, S M

    2008-10-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE; CD143) has two homologous enzymatically active domains (N and C) and plays a crucial role in blood pressure regulation and vascular remodeling. A wide spectrum of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to different epitopes on the N and C domains of human ACE have been used to study different aspects of ACE biology. In this study, we characterized a set of nine mAbs, developed against the C domain of human ACE, which recognize the denatured forms of ACE and thus are suitable for the detection and quantification of somatic ACE (sACE) and testicular ACE (tACE) using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded human tissues. The epitopes for these mAbs were defined using species cross-reactivity, phage display library screening, Western blotting and ACE mutagenesis. Most of the mAbs recognized common/overlapping region(s) on both somatic and testicular forms of human ACE, whereas mAb 4E10 was relatively specific for the testicular isoform and mAb 5B9 mainly recognized the glycan attached to Asn 731. This set of mAbs is useful for identifying even subtle changes in human ACE conformation because of denaturation. These mAbs are also sensitive tools for the detection of human sACE and tACE in biological fluids and tissues using proteomic approaches. Their high reactivity in paraffin-embedded tissues provides opportunities to study changes in the pattern of ACE expression and glycosylation (particularly with mAb 5B9) in different tissues and cells.

  13. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as a sensitive and useful tool for revealing potential overlaps between the epitopes of monoclonal antibodies on viral particles.

    PubMed

    Richert, Ludovic; Humbert, Nicolas; Larquet, Eric; Girerd-Chambaz, Yves; Manin, Catherine; Ronzon, Frédéric; Mély, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Although the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is well established for quantitating epitopes on inactivated virions used as vaccines, it is less suited for detecting potential overlaps between the epitopes recognized by different antibodies raised against the virions. We used fluorescent correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to detect the potential overlaps between 3 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs 4B7-1H8-2E10, 1E3-3G4, 4H8-3A12-2D3) selected for their ability to specifically recognize poliovirus type 3. Competition of the Alexa488-labeled mAbs with non-labeled mAbs revealed that mAbs 4B7-1H8-2E10 and 4H8-3A12-2D3 compete strongly for their binding sites on the virions, suggesting an important overlap of their epitopes. This was confirmed by the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo EM) structure of the poliovirus type 3 complexed with the corresponding antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) of the mAbs, which revealed that Fabs 4B7-1H8-2E10 and 4H8-3A12-2D3 epitopes share common amino acids. In contrast, a less efficient competition between mAb 1E3-3G4 and mAb 4H8-3A12-2D3 was observed by FCS, and there was no competition between mAbs 1E3-3G4 and 4B7-1H8-2E10. The Fab 1E3-3G4 epitope was found by cryoEM to be close to but distinct from the epitopes of both Fabs 4H8-3A12-2D3 and 4B7-1H8-2E10. Therefore, the FCS data additionally suggest that mAbs 4H8-3A12-2D3 and 4B7-1H8-2E10 bind in a different orientation to their epitopes, so that only the former sterically clashes with the mAb 1E3-3G4 bound to its epitope. Our results demonstrate that FCS can be a highly sensitive and useful tool for assessing the potential overlap of mAbs on viral particles.

  14. Chagas disease-specific antigens: characterization of epitopes in CRA/FRA by synthetic peptide mapping and evaluation by ELISA-peptide assay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The identification of epitopes in proteins recognized by medically relevant antibodies is useful for the development of peptide-based diagnostics and vaccines. In this study, epitopes in the cytoplasmic repetitive antigen (CRA) and flagellar repetitive antigen (FRA) proteins from Trypanosoma cruzi were identified using synthetic peptide techniques and pooled sera from Chagasic patients. The epitopes were further assayed with an ELISA assay based on synthetic peptides. Methods Twenty-two overlapping synthetic peptides representing the coding sequence of the T. cruzi CRA and FRA proteins were assessed by a Spot-synthesis array analysis using sera donated by patients with Chagas disease. Shorter peptides were selected that represented the determined epitopes and synthesized by solid phase synthesis to evaluate the patterns of cross-reactivities and discrimination through an ELISA-diagnostic assay. Results The peptide Spot-synthesis array successfully identified two IgG antigenic determinants in the CRA protein and four in FRA. Bioinformatics suggested that the CRA antigens were unique to T. cruzi while the FRA antigen showed similarity with sequences present within various proteins from Leishmania sp. Subsequently, shorter peptides representing the CRA-1, CRA-2 and FRA-1 epitopes were synthesized by solid phase synthesis and assayed by an ELISA-diagnostic assay. The CRA antigens gave a high discrimination between Chagasic, Leishmaniasis and T. cruzi-uninfected serum. A sensitivity and specificity of 100% was calculated for CRA. While the FRA antigen showed a slightly lower sensitivity (91.6%), its specificity was only 60%. Conclusions The epitopes recognized by human anti-T. cruzi antibodies have been precisely located in two biomarkers of T. cruzi, CRA and FRA. The results from screening a panel of patient sera through an ELISA assay based on peptides representing these epitopes strongly suggest that the sequences from CRA would be useful for the

  15. Epitope discovery and their use in peptide based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Nadine L; Perlmutter, Patrick; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Croft, Nathan P; Purcell, Anthony W

    2010-01-01

    With recent advances in the design and delivery of peptide-based therapeutics there has been a growing interest on the use of peptides in vaccine design. Moreover, functional dissection and proteomic analysis of the immunogenic epitopes of proteins from pathogenic micro-organisms, cancers and self-tissues targeted by autoimmune responses, have broadened the range of target epitopes and given clues to enhancing peptide immunogenicity. Consistent with these observations; peptides can be synthesised with defined chemical modifications to mimic natural epitopes and/or deliberately introduce protease resistant peptide bonds to regulate their processing independent of tissue specific proteolysis and to stabilize these compounds in vivo. We discuss the potential of peptide-based vaccines for the treatment of chronic viral diseases and cancer and review recent developments in the field of epitope discovery and peptide-based vaccines.

  16. Structure of allergens and structure based epitope predictions☆

    PubMed Central

    Dall’Antonia, Fabio; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Zangger, Klaus; Keller, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The structure determination of major allergens is a prerequisite for analyzing surface exposed areas of the allergen and for mapping conformational epitopes. These may be determined by experimental methods including crystallographic and NMR-based approaches or predicted by computational methods. In this review we summarize the existing structural information on allergens and their classification in protein fold families. The currently available allergen-antibody complexes are described and the experimentally obtained epitopes compared. Furthermore we discuss established methods for linear and conformational epitope mapping, putting special emphasis on a recently developed approach, which uses the structural similarity of proteins in combination with the experimental cross-reactivity data for epitope prediction. PMID:23891546

  17. Immunogenicity of a multi-epitope DNA vaccine against hantavirus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Sun, Ying; Zhao, Yujie; Wang, Si; Yu, Tongtong; Du, Feng; Yang, X Frank; Luo, Enjie

    2012-02-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a severe epidemic disease caused by hantaviruses including Hantaan virus (HTNV), Seoul virus (SEOV), Dobrava virus (DOBV) and Puumala virus. Three of the four HFRS hantaviruses, HTNV, SEOV, and PUUV are found in China. Currently, there is no effective strategy available to reduce infection risk. In this study, we constructed a multi-epitope chimeric DNA vaccine that encodes expressing 25 glycoprotein epitopes from SEOV, HTNV and PUUV (designated as SHP chimeric gene). Vaccination of BALb/c mice with SHP multi-epitope chimeric DNA vaccine led to a dramatic augmentation of humoral and cellular responses. The SHP vaccine DNA was detected in many organs but not for more than 60 d. There was no risk of mutation due to integration. Thus, the SHP multi-epitope chimeric DNA vaccine is a potential effective and safe DNA vaccine against infection by SEOV, HTNV, and PUUV.

  18. Synergistic capture of Clostridium botulinum Type A neurotoxin by scFv antibodies to novel epitopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Sean A.; Barr, John R.; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Marks, James D.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Cangelosi, Gerard A.; Miller, Keith D.; Feldhaus, Michael J.

    2011-10-01

    A non-immune library of human single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies displayed on Saccharomyces cerevisiae was screened for binding to the Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain [BoNT/A (Hc)] with the goal of identifying scFv to novel epitopes. To do this, an antibody-mediated labeling strategy was used in which antigen-binding yeast clones were selected after labeling with previously characterized monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to the Hc. Twenty unique scFv clones were isolated that bound Hc. Of these, three also bound to full-length BoNT/A toxin complex with affinities ranging from 5 nM to 170 nM. Epitope binning showed that the three unique clones recognized at least two epitopes that were distinct from one another and from the detection MAbs. After production in E. coli, the scFv were coupled to magnetic particles and tested for their ability to capture BoNT/A holotoxin using an Endopep-MS assay. In this assay, toxin captured by scFv coated magnetic particles was detected by incubation of the complex with a peptide containing a BoNT/A-specific cleavage sequence. Mass spectrometry was used to detect the ratio of intact peptide to cleavage products as evidence for toxin capture. When tested individually, each of the scFv showed a weak positive Endopep-MS result. However, when the particles were coated with all three scFv simultaneously, they exhibited significantly higher Endopep-MS activity, consistent with synergistic binding. These results demonstrate novel approaches toward the isolation and characterization of scFv antibodies specific to unlabeled antigen. They also provide evidence that distinct scFv antibodies can work synergistically to increase the efficiency of antigen capture onto a solid support.

  19. Identification of Two Major Conformational Aquaporin-4 Epitopes for Neuromyelitis Optica Autoantibody Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Francesco; Mastrototaro, Mauro; Rossi, Andrea; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Tortorella, Carla; Ruggieri, Maddalena; Trojano, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease characterized by the presence of anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibodies in the patient sera. We recently reported that these autoantibodies are able to bind AQP4 when organized in the supramolecular structure called the orthogonal array of particles (OAP). To map the antigenic determinants, we produced a series of AQP4 mutants based on multiple alignment sequence analysis between AQP4 and other OAP-forming AQPs. Mutations were introduced in the three extracellular loops (A, C, and E), and the binding capacity of NMO sera was tested on AQP4 mutants. Results indicate that one group of sera was able to recognize a limited portion of loop C containing the amino acid sequence 146GVT(T/M)V150. A second group of sera was characterized by a predominant role of loop A. Deletion of four AQP4-specific amino acids (61G(S/T)E(N/K)64) in loop A substantially affected the binding of this group of sera. However, the binding capacity was further reduced when amino acids in loop A were mutated together with those in loop E or when those in loop C were mutated in combination with loop E. Finally, a series of AQP0 mutants were produced in which the extracellular loops were progressively changed to make them identical to AQP4. Results showed that none of the mutants was able to reproduce in AQP0 the NMO-IgG epitopes, indicating that the extracellular loop sequence by itself was not sufficient to determine the rearrangement required to create the epitopes. Although our data highlight the complexity of the disease, this study identifies key immunodominant epitopes and provides direct evidence that the transition from AQP4 tetramers to AQP4-OAPs involves conformational changes of the extracellular loops. PMID:21212277

  20. Identification of two major conformational aquaporin-4 epitopes for neuromyelitis optica autoantibody binding.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Francesco; Mastrototaro, Mauro; Rossi, Andrea; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Tortorella, Carla; Ruggieri, Maddalena; Trojano, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria

    2011-03-18

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease characterized by the presence of anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibodies in the patient sera. We recently reported that these autoantibodies are able to bind AQP4 when organized in the supramolecular structure called the orthogonal array of particles (OAP). To map the antigenic determinants, we produced a series of AQP4 mutants based on multiple alignment sequence analysis between AQP4 and other OAP-forming AQPs. Mutations were introduced in the three extracellular loops (A, C, and E), and the binding capacity of NMO sera was tested on AQP4 mutants. Results indicate that one group of sera was able to recognize a limited portion of loop C containing the amino acid sequence (146)GVT(T/M)V(150). A second group of sera was characterized by a predominant role of loop A. Deletion of four AQP4-specific amino acids ((61)G(S/T)E(N/K)(64)) in loop A substantially affected the binding of this group of sera. However, the binding capacity was further reduced when amino acids in loop A were mutated together with those in loop E or when those in loop C were mutated in combination with loop E. Finally, a series of AQP0 mutants were produced in which the extracellular loops were progressively changed to make them identical to AQP4. Results showed that none of the mutants was able to reproduce in AQP0 the NMO-IgG epitopes, indicating that the extracellular loop sequence by itself was not sufficient to determine the rearrangement required to create the epitopes. Although our data highlight the complexity of the disease, this study identifies key immunodominant epitopes and provides direct evidence that the transition from AQP4 tetramers to AQP4-OAPs involves conformational changes of the extracellular loops.

  1. Producing peptide arrays for epitope mapping by intein-mediated protein ligation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Luo; Rush, John; Ghosh, Inca; Maunus, Jeremy R; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2004-09-01

    Peptide arrays are increasingly used to define antibody epitopes and substrate specificities of protein kinases. Their use is hampered, however, by ineffective and variable binding efficiency of peptides, which often results in low sensitivity and inconsistent results. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel method for making arrays of synthetic peptides on various membranes after ligating the peptide substrates to an intein-generated carrier protein. We have conducted screening for optimal carrier proteins by immunoreactivity and direct assessment of binding using a peptide derivatized at a lysine sidechain with fluorescein, CDPEK(fluorescein)DS. Ligation of a synthetic peptide antigen to a carrier protein, HhaI methylase, resulted in an improved retention of peptides and an increased sensitivity of up to 10(4)-fold in immunoassay- and epitope-scanning experiments. Denaturing the ligation products with 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or an organic solvent (20% methanol) prior to arraying did not significantly affect the immunoreactivity of the HhaI methylase-peptide product. Because the carrier protein dominates the binding of ligation products and contains one peptide reactive site, the amount of peptide arrayed onto the membranes can be effectively normalized. This technique was utilized in the alanine scanning of hemagglutinin (HA) antigen using two monoclonal antibodies, resulting in distinguishing the different antigen epitope profiles. Furthermore, we show that this method can be used to characterize the antibodies that recognize phosphorylated peptides. This novel approach allows for synthetic peptides to be uniformly arrayed onto membranes, compatible with a variety of applications.

  2. Generation of potent mouse monoclonal antibodies to self-proteins using T-cell epitope "tags".

    PubMed

    Percival-Alwyn, Jennifer L; England, Elizabeth; Kemp, Benjamin; Rapley, Laura; Davis, Nicola H E; McCarthy, Grant R; Majithiya, Jayesh B; Corkill, Dominic J; Welsted, Sarah; Minton, Kevin; Cohen, E Suzanne; Robinson, Matthew J; Dobson, Claire; Wilkinson, Trevor C I; Vaughan, Tristan J; Groves, Maria A T; Tigue, Natalie J

    2015-01-01

    Immunization of mice or rats with a "non-self" protein is a commonly used method to obtain monoclonal antibodies, and relies on the immune system's ability to recognize the immunogen as foreign. Immunization of an antigen with 100% identity to the endogenous protein, however, will not elicit a robust immune response. To develop antibodies to mouse proteins, we focused on the potential for breaking such immune tolerance by genetically fusing two independent T-cell epitope-containing sequences (from tetanus toxin (TT) and diphtheria toxin fragment A (DTA)) to a mouse protein, mouse ST2 (mST2). Wild-type CD1 mice were immunized with three mST2 tagged proteins (Fc, TT and DTA) and the specific serum response was determined. Only in mice immunized with the T-cell epitope-containing antigens were specific mST2 serum responses detected; hybridomas generated from these mice secreted highly sequence-diverse IgGs that were capable of binding mST2 and inhibiting the interaction of mST2 with its ligand, mouse interleukin (IL)-33 (mIL-33). Of the hundreds of antibodies profiled, we identified five potent antibodies that were able to inhibit IL-33 induced IL-6 release in a mast cell assay; notably one such antibody was sufficiently potent to suppress IL-5 release and eosinophilia infiltration in an Alternaria alternata challenge mouse model of asthma. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that T-cell epitope-containing tags have the ability to break tolerance in wild-type mice to 100% conserved proteins, and it provides a compelling argument for the broader use of this approach to generate antibodies against any mouse protein or conserved ortholog.

  3. Evaluation of conformational epitopes on thyroid peroxidase by antipeptide antibody binding and mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    GORA, M; GARDAS, A; WIKTOROWICZ, W; HOBBY, P; WATSON, P F; WEETMAN, A P; SUTTON, B J; BANGA, J P

    2004-01-01

    Autoantibodies to thyroid peroxidase (TPO) recognize predominantly conformational epitopes, which are restricted to two distinct determinants, termed immunodominant domain region (IDR) A and B. These dominant determinants reside in the region with structural homology to myeloperoxidase (MPO)-like domain and may extend into the adjacent complement control protein (CCP) domain. We have explored the location of these determinants on the MPO-like domain of the structural model of TPO, by identifying exposed hydrophilic loops that are potential candidates for the autoantigenic sites, generating rabbit antipeptide antisera, and competing with well characterized murine monoclonal antibodies (mabs) specific for these two IDRs. We recently defined the location of IDR-B, and here report our findings on the location of IDR-A and its relationship to IDR-B, defined with a new panel of 15 antipeptide antisera. Moreover, in combination with single amino acid replacements by in vitro mutagenesis, we have defined the limits of the IDR-B region on the TPO model. The combination of antisera to peptides P12 (aa 549–563), P14 (aa 599–617) and P18 (aa 210–225) inhibited the binding of the mab specific for IDR-A (mab 2) by 75. The same combination inhibited the binding of autoantibodies to native TPO from 67 to 94% (mean 81·5%) at autoantibody levels of 5 IU. Fabs prepared from the antipeptide IgG and pooled in this combination were also effective in competition assays, thus defining the epitopes more precisely. IDR-A was found to lie immediately adjacent to IDR-B and thus the two immunodominant epitopes form an extended patch on the surface of TPO. Finally, by single amino acid mutagenesis, we show that IDR-B extends to residue N642, thus further localizing the boundary of this autoantigenic region on the structural model. PMID:15030525

  4. Insights into native epitopes of proliferating cell nuclear antigen using recombinant DNA protein products

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding full-length human proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was used to generate a panel of in vitro translated labeled protein products with COOH-terminal deletions and to construct a set of fusion proteins with COOH- and NH2-terminal deletions. A rabbit antiserum raised against an NH2-terminal peptide, a well- characterized murine monoclonal antibody (mAb), and 14 human lupus sera with autoantibody to PCNA were analyzed for their reactivity with the constructs using both immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting techniques. The rabbit antiserum reacted in immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting with constructs containing the appropriate NH2-terminal sequence and mAb reacted with a sequence from the midregion of PCNA. These experimentally induced antibodies also reacted with 15-mer synthetic peptides in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In contrast, none of the lupus sera reacted with synthetic peptides in ELISA. 9 of the 14 lupus sera also failed to react in Western immunoblotting with any recombinant fusion protein, although they all immunoprecipitated in vitro translated full-length protein. Four of the nine had variable patterns of immunoprecipitation with shorter constructs. The remaining five lupus sera were able to immunoprecipitate translation products as well as Western blot recombinant fusion proteins. From analysis of the patterns of reactivity of human lupus sera, it was deduced that the apparent heterogeneity of human autoantibodies to PCNA could be explained by immune response to highly conformational epitopes. These observations demonstrate that there might be special features in "native" epitopes of intranuclear antigens that are recognized by autoantibodies, and that these special features of native epitopes might not be present in prepared antigen used for experimental immunization. These features may be related to protein folding or to association of the antigen with other intranuclear proteins or nucleic acids, as

  5. Clinical spectrum associated with MOG autoimmunity in adults: significance of sharing rodent MOG epitopes.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Maria; Armangue, Thaís; Martinez-Hernandez, Eugenia; Arrambide, Georgina; Sola-Valls, Nuria; Sabater, Lidia; Téllez, Nieves; Midaglia, Luciana; Ariño, Helena; Peschl, Patrick; Reindl, Markus; Rovira, Alex; Montalban, Xavier; Blanco, Yolanda; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc; Saiz, Albert

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to report the clinical spectrum associated with antibodies to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) in adult patients, and to assess whether phenotypic variants are dependent on recognition of rodent MOG epitopes. We retrospectively analyzed the features, course and outcome of 56 patients whose samples were investigated by brain tissue immunohistochemistry and cell-based assays using human and rodent MOG. The median age at symptom onset was 37 years (range 18-70); 35 patients (63 %) were female. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range 4-554), only 14 patients (25 %) developed a neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), 27 patients (47 %) retained the initial diagnosis of isolated optic neuritis, 7 (12 %) of longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis, and 2 (4 %) of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis; 6 patients (11 %) developed atypical demyelinating syndromes (4 had relapsing episodes of short myelitis lesions which in one occurred with optic neuritis; 1 had relapsing brainstem symptoms, and 1 relapsing demyelinating encephalomyelitis). The course was frequently associated with relapses (71 %) and good outcome. Twenty-seven patients (49 %) had antibodies that recognized rodent MOG epitopes, and 9 of them (16 %) showed a myelin staining pattern in rodent tissue. Only the myelin staining pattern was linked to NMOSD (p = 0.005). In conclusion, MOG autoimmunity in adult patients associates with a clinical spectrum wider than the one expected for patients with suspected NMOSD and overall good outcome. Antibodies to rodent MOG epitopes do not associate with any phenotypic variant.

  6. Analysis of HPV-1 E4 gene expression using epitope-defined antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Doorbar, J; Evans, H S; Coneron, I; Crawford, L V; Gallimore, P H

    1988-01-01

    Six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been raised against the E4 proteins of HPV-1. Five of these were found to recognize denaturation-resistant epitopes as determined by Western blotting--and their binding sites were identified by determining their reactivity against a panel of bacterial E4--beta-galactosidase fusion proteins which contained progressive deletions at the C-terminal end of the E4 region. The five mAbs were found to bind to four distinct sites. By using these epitope-defined mAbs, along with anti-peptide antibodies raised against putative N- and C-terminal E4 sequences, we have determined the relationships between the eight distinct polypeptides (mol. wt 10/11 kd, 16/17 kd, 21/23 kd and 32/34 kd) previously shown to be expressed from the E4 gene of HPV-1 in productively infected papillomas. The 17 kd E4 polypeptide appears to be the product of a spliced mRNA encoding five amino acids from open reading frame (ORF) E1 joined onto 120 from the E4 ORF. The 16 kd and 10/11 kd proteins, which may be derived from this, lack sequences (approximately 15 and 70 amino acids respectively) encoded by the 5' end of the E4 gene. The 32/34 kd proteins were detected by all antibodies which reacted with the 16/17 kd polypeptides, suggesting that they represent dimers of the latter species. The 21/23 kd polypeptides, however, do not appear to be simple dimers of the 10/11 kd protein as previously predicted, and reacted with antibodies whose epitopes mapped in the N-terminal half of the E4 protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:2456213

  7. Glycosylation and epitope mapping of the 5T4 glycoprotein oncofoetal antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, David M; Woods, Andrew M; Myers, Kevin A; Westwater, Caroline; Rahi-Saund, Veena; Davies, Michael J; Renouf, David V; Hounsell, Elizabeth F; Stern, Peter L

    2002-01-01

    The human 5T4 oncofoetal antigen is a focus for development of several antibody-directed therapies on the basis of the murine monoclonal antibody against 5T4 (mAb5T4), which recognizes a conformational epitope. 5T4 molecules are highly N-glycosylated transmembrane glycoproteins whose extracellular domain contains two regions of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and associated flanking regions, separated by an intervening hydrophilic sequence. Using a series of deletion and mutated cDNA constructs as well as chimaeras with the murine homologue, we have mapped the mAb5T4 epitope to the more membrane-proximal LRR2 or its flanking region. Analysis of the glycosylation of the seven consensus Asp-Xaa-Ser/Thr sites was consistent with all of the sites being glycosylated. A combination of two high-mannose chains (predominantly octasaccharide) and five mostly sialylated bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary complex chains with minor quantities of core fucose were detected. The two glycosylation sites, which are the most likely to have predominantly high-mannose chains, are in the only two regions that show significant differences between the human and the 81% identical mouse sequence. A site-directed mutation, which abolished glycosylation at one of these sites (position 192), did not alter antigenicity. The other, which is nearest to the N-terminus in the human, has an Asn-Leu-Thr to Asn-Leu-Leu conversion in the mouse, so cannot be glycosylated in the latter species. The large complex glycosylation at the other sites is likely to influence the antigenicity and tertiary structure generating the 5T4 epitope. PMID:11903056

  8. Comprehensive, quantitative mapping of T cell epitopes in gluten in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Tye-Din, Jason A; Stewart, Jessica A; Dromey, James A; Beissbarth, Tim; van Heel, David A; Tatham, Arthur; Henderson, Kate; Mannering, Stuart I; Gianfrani, Carmen; Jewell, Derek P; Hill, Adrian V S; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; Anderson, Robert P

    2010-07-21

    Celiac disease is a genetic condition that results in a debilitating immune reaction in the gut to antigens in grain. The antigenic peptides recognized by the T cells that cause this disease are incompletely defined. Our understanding of the epitopes of pathogenic CD4(+ )T cells is based primarily on responses shown by intestinal T-cells in vitro to hydrolysates or polypeptides of gluten, the causative antigen. A protease-resistant 33-amino acid peptide from wheat alpha-gliadin is the immunodominant antigen, but little is known about the spectrum of T cell epitopes in rye and barley or the hierarchy of immunodominance and consistency of recognition of T-cell epitopes in vivo. We induced polyclonal gluten-specific T cells in the peripheral blood of celiac patients by feeding them cereal and performed a comprehensive, unbiased analysis of responses to all celiac toxic prolamins, a class of plant storage protein. The peptides that stimulated T cells were the same among patients who ate the same cereal, but were different after wheat, barley and rye ingestion. Unexpectedly, a sequence from omega-gliadin (wheat) and C-hordein (barley) but not alpha-gliadin was immunodominant regardless of the grain consumed. Furthermore, T cells specific for just three peptides accounted for the majority of gluten-specific T cells, and their recognition of gluten peptides was highly redundant. Our findings show that pathogenic T cells in celiac disease show limited diversity, and therefore suggest that peptide-based therapeutics for this disease and potentially other strongly HLA-restricted immune diseases should be possible.

  9. Higher-Order Neural Networks Recognize Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Spirkovska, Lilly; Ochoa, Ellen

    1996-01-01

    Networks of higher order have enhanced capabilities to distinguish between different two-dimensional patterns and to recognize those patterns. Also enhanced capabilities to "learn" patterns to be recognized: "trained" with far fewer examples and, therefore, in less time than necessary to train comparable first-order neural networks.

  10. Vitrification: Machines learn to recognize glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceriotti, Michele; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of a viscous liquid undergo a dramatic slowdown when it is cooled to form a solid glass. Recognizing the structural changes across such a transition remains a major challenge. Machine-learning methods, similar to those Facebook uses to recognize groups of friends, have now been applied to this problem.

  11. Mimotope vaccines: epitope mimics induce anti-cancer antibodies.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Angelika B; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2007-10-31

    Mimotopes are epitope-mimicking structures. When applied for immunizations they induce desired antibody specificities exclusively based on the principle of molecular mimicry. This is important as antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens may harbor diverse biological effects depending on their epitope specificity. Thus they may inhibit or promote tumor growth. This review gives an update on different vaccination strategies based on the mimotope concept.

  12. Bioinformatic prediction of the epitopes of Echinococcus granulosus antigen 5

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wei; Chen, De-Sheng; Lu, Yun-Juan; Sun, Fen-Fen; Xu, Hui-Wen; Zhang, Ya-Wen; Yan, Chao; Fu, Lin-Lin; Zheng, Kui-Yang; Tang, Ren-Xian

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to predict and analyze the secondary structure, and B and T cell epitopes of Echinococcus granulosus antigen 5 (Ag5) using online software in order to investigate its immunogenicity and preliminarily evaluate its potential as an effective antigen peptide vaccine for cystic echinococcosis. The PortParam program was used to analyze molecular weight, the theoretical isoelectric point, instability index and other physicochemical properties. The secondary structure of the Ag5 protein was predicted using Self-Optimized Prediction method With Alignment and the tertiary structure of the Ag5 protein was predicted using 3DLigandSite together with Center for Biological Sequence Analysis Prediction Servers. Furthermore, the Immune Epitope Database software was used to predict B cell epitopes, and T cell epitopes were predicted with the BioInformatics and Molecular Analysis Section and SYFPEITHI programs. The results demonstrated that α-helixes, β-turns, random coils and extended strands account for 23.35, 10.95, 41.32, and 24.38% of the secondary structure of the Ag5 protein, respectively. Ten potential B cell epitopes of Ag5 were identified as the amino acids sequences 27–39, 70–80, 117–130, 146–168, 250–262, 284–293, 339–349, 359–371, 403–412 and 454–462, and seven potential T cell epitopes were identified as the amino acid sequences 52–60, 57–65, 182–190, 231–239, 273–281, 318–326 and 467–475. Thus, ten B cell epitopes and seven T cell epitopes were identified on Ag5, suggesting the strong immunogenicity of this protein, which could be applied to design antigen peptide vaccines for echinococcosis.

  13. Removing T-cell epitopes with computational protein design

    PubMed Central

    King, Chris; Garza, Esteban N.; Mazor, Ronit; Linehan, Jonathan L.; Pastan, Ira; Pepper, Marion; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    Immune responses can make protein therapeutics ineffective or even dangerous. We describe a general computational protein design method for reducing immunogenicity by eliminating known and predicted T-cell epitopes and maximizing the content of human peptide sequences without disrupting protein structure and function. We show that the method recapitulates previous experimental results on immunogenicity reduction, and we use it to disrupt T-cell epitopes in GFP and Pseudomonas exotoxin A without disrupting function. PMID:24843166

  14. Two human antibodies reacting with different epitopes on integrin beta 3 of platelets and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jallu, V; Diaz-Ricart, M; Ordinas, A; Pico, M; Vezon, G; Nurden, A T

    1994-06-15

    Glanzmann's thrombasthenia is an inherited bleeding disorder that results from a deficit of glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa complexes in platelets. Patient (EBV) is an adult male with GP IIb-IIIa levels < 5% of normal values and a history of blood transfusions. Western-blot analysis revealed a strong IgG antibody to GP IIIa in his plasma. The determinants were localized to the minimum-sized fragment of GP IIIa (50 kDa) retained on chymotrypsin-treated platelets and were lost on reduction of disulphides. A female patient (AF), previously described by us [Jallu, V., Pico, M., Chevaleyre, J., Vezon, G., Kunicki, T.J. & Nurden, A.T. (1992) Hum. Antibod. Hybridomas 3, 93-106] developed her anti-GP-IIIa antibody during pregnancy. This antibody was poorly reactive with the 50-kDa proteolytic fragment, yet bound to 115-kDa and 60-kDa hydrolytic products of GP IIIa. Antibodies from both patients recognized the GP-IIIa-like protein of endothelial cells, thus confirming that they were directed against the integrin beta 3-subunit. The (EBV) antibody reacted strongly with GP IIb-IIIa in an antigen capture assay performed with each of a panel of four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing different epitopes on GP IIb-IIIa. In contrast, that from (AF) was specifically inhibited by AP-3, a murine mAb whose epitope is thought to be localized between amino acids 324-422 of GP IIIa. The residual GP IIb and GP IIIa contents of platelets from each patient were assessed in Western blotting using chemiluminescence detection. SZ-22, a murine mAb to the GP IIb heavy chain (140 kDa), located small amounts of a 130-kDa protein in (EBV) platelets. The anti-GP IIIa mAbs XII F9, P 37 and P 97 revealed trace amounts of protein with a relative mobility identical to that of GP IIIa in both (AF) and (EBV) platelets. This residual GP IIIa represented less than 0.5% of the amount in normal platelets. When, for each patient, plasma was tested in Western blotting against their own platelets

  15. Revealing the anti-HRP epitope in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis.

    PubMed

    Paschinger, Katharina; Rendić, Dubravko; Wilson, Iain B H

    2009-04-01

    Antibodies are very often used as specific cell and/or tissue markers. An example of this is anti-horseradish peroxidase (HRP), an antibody raised against a plant glycoprotein, which was shown some twenty-five years ago to specifically stain neural tissue in an animal, Drosophila melanogaster. This peculiar finding was later expanded to other invertebrate species including Caenorhabditis elegans, which were also shown to bear anti-HRP epitopes. Initial experiments indicated that the epitopes recognised by anti-HRP in invertebrates are of carbohydrate nature. Indeed, more recent experiments have characterised relevant core alpha1-3-fucosylated N-glycan structures that act as epitopes in various model and parasitic organisms. Moreover, a number of enzymes required for the synthesis of such structures have been identified. Over the years, medically-relevant roles of these structures have become apparent as regards allergenicity and immunoregulation. Although major advances have been made in understanding of the underlying mechanisms and structures related to the anti-HRP epitope, the in vivo role of the relevant epitopes in neural and other tissues is yet to be resolved. Current understanding of the anti-HRP epitopes synthesis and their relevance is discussed and elaborated.

  16. T-Cell Epitope Discovery for Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Sri; Anderson, Karen S

    2016-01-01

    The success of recent immune checkpoint blockade trials in solid tumors has demonstrated the tremendous potential of immune-mediated treatment strategies for cancer therapy. These immune therapies activate preexisting cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells (CTL) to selectively target and eradicate malignant cells. In vitro models suggest that these therapies may be more effective in combination with priming of CTL using cancer vaccines. CTL-mediated tumor targeting is achieved by its recognition of tumor antigenic epitopes presented on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by tumor cells. Discovering CTL-antigenic epitopes is therefore central to the design of therapeutic T-cell vaccines and immune monitoring of these complex immunotherapies. However, selecting and monitoring T-cell epitopes remains difficult due to the extensive polymorphism of HLA alleles and the presence of confounding non-immunogenic self-peptides. To overcome these challenges, this chapter presents methodologies for the design of CTL-targeted vaccines using selection of target HLA alleles, novel integrated computational strategies to predict HLA-class I CTL epitopes, and epitope validation methods using short-term ex vivo T-cell stimulation. This strategy results in the improved efficiency for selecting antigenic epitopes for CTL-mediated vaccines and for immune monitoring of tumor antigens.

  17. Kinetics of Antigen Expression and Epitope Presentation during Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Nathan P.; Smith, Stewart A.; Wong, Yik Chun; Tan, Chor Teck; Dudek, Nadine L.; Flesch, Inge E. A.; Lin, Leon C. W.; Tscharke, David C.; Purcell, Anthony W.

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge about the dynamics of antigen presentation to T cells during viral infection is very poor despite being of fundamental importance to our understanding of anti-viral immunity. Here we use an advanced mass spectrometry method to simultaneously quantify the presentation of eight vaccinia virus peptide-MHC complexes (epitopes) on infected cells and the amounts of their source antigens at multiple times after infection. The results show a startling 1000-fold range in abundance as well as strikingly different kinetics across the epitopes monitored. The tight correlation between onset of protein expression and epitope display for most antigens provides the strongest support to date that antigen presentation is largely linked to translation and not later degradation of antigens. Finally, we show a complete disconnect between the epitope abundance and immunodominance hierarchy of these eight epitopes. This study highlights the complexity of viral antigen presentation by the host and demonstrates the weakness of simple models that assume total protein levels are directly linked to epitope presentation and immunogenicity. PMID:23382674

  18. Computational elucidation of potential antigenic CTL epitopes in Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Dikhit, Manas R; Kumar, Santosh; Vijaymahantesh; Sahoo, Bikash R; Mansuri, Rani; Amit, Ajay; Yousuf Ansari, Md; Sahoo, Ganesh C; Bimal, Sanjiva; Das, Pradeep

    2015-12-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is important for the control of Ebola virus infection. We hypothesized that those HLA A0201 and HLA B40 restricted epitopes derived from Ebola virus proteins, would mount a good antigenic response. Here we employed an immunoinformatics approach to identify specific 9mer amino acid which may be capable of inducing a robust cell-mediated immune response in humans. We identified a set of 28 epitopes that had no homologs in humans. Specifically, the epitopes derived from NP, RdRp, GP and VP40 share population coverage of 93.40%, 84.15%, 74.94% and 77.12%, respectively. Based on the other HLA binding specificity and population coverage, seven novel promiscuous epitopes were identified. These 7 promiscuous epitopes from NP, RdRp and GP were found to have world-wide population coverage of more than 95% indicating their potential significance as useful candidates for vaccine design. Epitope conservancy analysis also suggested that most of the peptides are highly conserved (100%) in other virulent Ebola strain (Mayinga-76, Kikwit-95 and Makona-G3816- 2014) and can therefore be further investigated for their immunological relevance and usefulness as vaccine candidates.

  19. Characterization of Conformation-dependent Prion Protein Epitopes*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hae-Eun; Weng, Chu Chun; Saijo, Eri; Saylor, Vicki; Bian, Jifeng; Kim, Sehun; Ramos, Laylaa; Angers, Rachel; Langenfeld, Katie; Khaychuk, Vadim; Calvi, Carla; Bartz, Jason; Hunter, Nora; Telling, Glenn C.

    2012-01-01

    Whereas prion replication involves structural rearrangement of cellular prion protein (PrPC), the existence of conformational epitopes remains speculative and controversial, and PrP transformation is monitored by immunoblot detection of PrP(27–30), a protease-resistant counterpart of the pathogenic scrapie form (PrPSc) of PrP. We now describe the involvement of specific amino acids in conformational determinants of novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised against randomly chimeric PrP. Epitope recognition of two mAbs depended on polymorphisms controlling disease susceptibility. Detection by one, referred to as PRC5, required alanine and asparagine at discontinuous mouse PrP residues 132 and 158, which acquire proximity when residues 126–218 form a structured globular domain. The discontinuous epitope of glycosylation-dependent mAb PRC7 also mapped within this domain at residues 154 and 185. In accordance with their conformational dependence, tertiary structure perturbations compromised recognition by PRC5, PRC7, as well as previously characterized mAbs whose epitopes also reside in the globular domain, whereas conformation-independent epitopes proximal or distal to this region were refractory to such destabilizing treatments. Our studies also address the paradox of how conformational epitopes remain functional following denaturing treatments and indicate that cellular PrP and PrP(27–30) both renature to a common structure that reconstitutes the globular domain. PMID:22948149

  20. Design of multi-epitope, analogue-based cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fikes, John D; Sette, Alessandro

    2003-09-01

    The current objective of our cancer programme is to develop an effective vaccine based on rationally designed T cell epitope analogues, for use in the adjuvant setting for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and colon cancer. Analogue epitopes, enhanced for either human leukocyte antigen (HLA) binding or T cell receptor (TCR) signalling, have been shown to be more effective at breaking immunological tolerance than cognate wild-type epitopes. Although encouraging early-phase clinical data has been obtained by others using a limited number of HLA-A2-restricted epitope analogues, the clinical benefits and immune correlates for vaccines comprised of multiple epitope analogues restricted by multiple HLA supertypes remains to be investigated. Clinical studies are currently being conducted on EP-2101, a prototype vaccine that delivers multiple HLA-A2-restricted analogue epitopes. In parallel, fixed anchor and heteroclitic analogues restricted by three other commonly expressed HLA supertypes are being identified. These analogues will be incorporated into future vaccines including optimised minigenes (epigenes) and tested in preclinical and clinical studies addressing various different cancer indications.

  1. Identification and characterization of CD4⁺ T-cell epitopes on GapC protein of Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    PubMed

    Yao, Di; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xintong; Yu, Simiao; Wei, Yuhua; Liu, Wei; Wang, Jiannan; Chen, Xiaoting; Zhang, Zhenghai; Sun, Hunan; Yu, Liquan; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Song, Baifen; Cui, Yudong

    2016-02-01

    The GapC protein is highly conserved surface dehydrogenase among Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) and is shown to be involved in bacterial virulence. Immunization of GapC protein can induce specific CD4(+) T-cell immune responses and protect against S. dysgalactiae infection. However, there are no studies to identify immunodominant CD4(+) T-cell epitopes on GapC protein. In this study, in silico MHC affinity measurement method was firstly used to predict potential CD4(+) T-cell epitopes on GapC protein. Six predictive 15-mer peptides were synthesized and two novel GapC CD4(+) T-cell epitopes, GapC63-77 and GapC96-110, were for the first time identified using CD4(+) T-cells obtained from GapC-immunized BALB/c (H-2(d)) and C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice spleen based on cell proliferation and cytokines response. The results showed that peptides containing 63-77 and 96-110 induced significant antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cells proliferation response in vivo. At the same time, high levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A, as well as moderate levels of IL-10 and IL-4 were detected in CD4(+) T-cells isolated from both GapC and peptide-immunized mice in vivo, suggesting that GapC63-77 and GapC96-110 preferentially elicited polarized Th1/Th17-type responses. The characterization of GapC CD4(+) T-cell epitopes not only helps us understand its protective immunity, but also contributes to design effective T-cell epitope-based vaccine against S. dysgalactiae infection.

  2. Does rain fall preferentially over wet or dry soils?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiring, S. M.; Ford, T.; Rapp, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of soil moisture on precipitation, particularly at sub-daily time scales, is not well understood. We use in situ soil moisture observations and satellite-based precipitation estimates to examine if afternoon convective precipitation falls preferentially over wet or dry soils in Oklahoma. Convective precipitation events during the warm season (May - September) in Oklahoma from 2003 and 2012 are categorized by how favorable atmospheric conditions are for convection, as well as the presence or absence of the Great Plains low-level jet. Our results show convective precipitation falls preferentially over wet soils when the Great Plains low-level jet is absent. In contrast, convective precipitation falls preferentially over dry soils when the low level jet is present. The results suggest that rain falls preferentially over over wetter and drier than normal soils, depending on the overall synoptic and dynamic conditions.

  3. 19 CFR 10.213 - Articles eligible for preferential treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Articles Under the African Growth and Opportunity Act § 10.213 Articles eligible for preferential treatment... Customs finds that price to be unreasonable, all reasonable expenses incurred in the growth,...

  4. 19 CFR 10.213 - Articles eligible for preferential treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Articles Under the African Growth and Opportunity Act § 10.213 Articles eligible for preferential treatment... Customs finds that price to be unreasonable, all reasonable expenses incurred in the growth,...

  5. Network Evolution by Relevance and Importance Preferential Attachment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-06

    improved preferential attachment (PA) algorithm to take in consideration the relevance between vertices of the network measured by a given metric. We...Network Evolution by Relevance and Importance Preferential Attachment The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the... attachment by importance and relevance REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) ARO 8

  6. Identification of a human immunodominant B-cell epitope within the immunoglobulin A1 protease of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    De Paolis, Francesca; Beghetto, Elisa; Spadoni, Andrea; Montagnani, Francesca; Felici, Franco; Oggioni, Marco R; Gargano, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    Background The IgA1 protease of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a proteolytic enzyme that specifically cleaves the hinge regions of human IgA1, which dominates most mucosal surfaces and is the major IgA isotype in serum. This protease is expressed in all of the known pneumococcal strains and plays a major role in pathogen's resistance to the host immune response. The present work was focused at identifying the immunodominant regions of pneumococcal IgA1 protease recognized by the human antibody response. Results An antigenic sequence corresponding to amino acids 420–457 (epiA) of the iga gene product was identified by screening a pneumococcal phage display library with patients' sera. The epiA peptide is conserved in all pneumococci and in two out of three S. mitis strains, while it is not present in other oral streptococci so far sequenced. This epitope was specifically recognized by antibodies present in sera from 90% of healthy adults, thus representing an important target of the humoral response to S. pneumoniae and S. mitis infection. Moreover, sera from 68% of children less than 4 years old reacted with the epiA peptide, indicating that the human immune response against streptococcal antigens occurs during childhood. Conclusion The broad and specific recognition of the epiA polypeptide by human sera demonstrate that the pneumococcal IgA1 protease contains an immunodominant B-cell epitope. The use of phage display libraries to identify microbe or disease-specific antigens recognized by human sera is a valuable approach to epitope discovery. PMID:18088426

  7. Artificial polyepitope HIV-1 immunogen containing mimotope of 2F5 epitope.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakova, Nadezhda S; Shcherbakov, Dmitry N; Bakulina, Anastasiya Yu; Karpenko, Larisa I; Ryzhikov, Alexander B; Ilyichev, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    Constructing a vaccine against HIV-1, able to induce production of broadly neutralizing antibodies, is crucial. We report here the selection and characterization of RDWSFDRWSLSEFWL peptide mimotope that binds specifically to bNAbs 2F5. The peptide mimotope was selected from 15-mer phage-displayed peptide library by using Mab 2F5 as the selecting agent. The most abundant RDWSFDRWSLSEFWL peptide was inserted into a carrier, an artificial polyepitope immunogen - TBI (T- and B-cell immunogen). TBI-2F5 polyepitope immunogen that includes the mimotope of 2F5 epitope was constructed. It was shown that sera of mice immunized with TBI-2F5 protein recognized TBI protein as well as RDWSFDRWSLSEFWL peptide. The capacity of sera of immunized mice to neutralize HIV-1 was demonstrated using subtype B env-pseudoviruses of HIV-1 QH0692.42 and PVO.4. Based on these results, we conclude that peptide mimotope of 2F5 epitope RDWSFDRWSLSEFWL can be an essential component for a successful HIV-vaccine.

  8. The Humoral Theory of Transplantation: Epitope Analysis and the Pathogenicity of HLA Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Farber, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Central to the humoral theory of transplantation is production of antibodies by the recipient against mismatched HLA antigens in the donor organ. Not all mismatches result in antibody production, however, and not all antibodies are pathogenic. Serologic HLA matching has been the standard for solid organ allocation algorithms in current use. Antibodies do not recognize whole HLA molecules but rather polymorphic residues on the surface, called epitopes, which may be shared by multiple serologic HLA antigens. Data are accumulating that epitope analysis may be a better way to determine organ compatibility as well as the potential immunogenicity of given HLA mismatches. Determination of the pathogenicity of alloantibodies is evolving. Potential features include antibody strength (as assessed by antibody titer or, more commonly and inappropriately, mean fluorescence intensity) and ability to fix complement (in vitro by C1q or C3d assay or by IgG subclass analysis). Technical issues with the use of solid phase assays are also of prime importance, such as denaturation of HLA antigens and manufacturing and laboratory variability. Questions and controversies remain, and here we review new relevant data. PMID:28070526

  9. Identification of class I HLA T cell control epitopes for West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Kaabinejadian, Saghar; Piazza, Paolo A; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Vernon, Stephen R; Cate, Steven J; Bardet, Wilfried; Schafer, Fredda B; Jackson, Kenneth W; Campbell, Diana M; Buchli, Rico; Rinaldo, Charles R; Hildebrand, William H

    2013-01-01

    The recent West Nile virus (WNV) outbreak in the United States underscores the importance of understanding human immune responses to this pathogen. Via the presentation of viral peptide ligands at the cell surface, class I HLA mediate the T cell recognition and killing of WNV infected cells. At this time, there are two key unknowns in regards to understanding protective T cell immunity: 1) the number of viral ligands presented by the HLA of infected cells, and 2) the distribution of T cell responses to these available HLA/viral complexes. Here, comparative mass spectroscopy was applied to determine the number of WNV peptides presented by the HLA-A*11:01 of infected cells after which T cell responses to these HLA/WNV complexes were assessed. Six viral peptides derived from capsid, NS3, NS4b, and NS5 were presented. When T cells from infected individuals were tested for reactivity to these six viral ligands, polyfunctional T cells were focused on the GTL9 WNV capsid peptide, ligands from NS3, NS4b, and NS5 were less immunogenic, and two ligands were largely inert, demonstrating that class I HLA reduce the WNV polyprotein to a handful of immune targets and that polyfunctional T cells recognize infections by zeroing in on particular HLA/WNV epitopes. Such dominant HLA/peptide epitopes are poised to drive the development of WNV vaccines that elicit protective T cells as well as providing key antigens for immunoassays that establish correlates of viral immunity.

  10. Epitope mapping of 10 monoclonal antibodies against the pig analogue of human membrane cofactor protein (MCP)

    PubMed Central

    PéRez De La Lastra, J M; Van Den Berg, C W; Bullido, R; Almazán, F; Domínguez, J; Llanes, D; Morgan, B P

    1999-01-01

    Pig membrane cofactor protein (MCP; CD46) is a 50 000–60 000 MW glycoprotein that is expressed on a wide variety of cells, including erythrocytes. Pig MCP has cofactor activity for factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b and is an efficient regulator of the classical and alternative pathway of human and pig complement. A panel of 10 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was collected from two different laboratories; all of these mAbs were raised against pig leucocytes and all recognized the same complex banding pattern on sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS–PAGE) of erythrocyte membranes. All were shown to be reactive with pig MCP and were divided into four groups of mutually competitive antibodies based on competition studies for membrane-bound MCP and for soluble MCP, the latter by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis. The antigenic properties of membrane-bound and soluble MCP were similar, although some interesting differences were revealed. None of the 10 mAbs were cross-reactive with human MCP and only one showed cross-reactivity with leucocytes from a panel of large mammals – a weak cross-reactivity with a subset of dog leucocytes. All antibodies in one of the epitope groups and some in a second epitope group were able to block the functional activity of pig MCP, as measured by inhibition of MCP-catalysed C3 degradation by factor I. PMID:10233756

  11. Phospholipid epitopes for mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, S

    1987-01-01

    The reactivity of mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes (BrMRBC) with phospholipid epitopes was assessed by ELISA, using four clones of monoclonal anti-BrMRBC antibodies that had idiotypes distinct from one another. The four antibodies could bind to low-density lipoproteins (LDL) from human and chicken, but not to LDL from mouse and rat. As to liposomes of natural phospholipids, all the clones reacted with liposomes of phosphatidylcholine, and some of them could react with liposomes of sphingomyelin, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylic acid or cardiolipin. For liposomes of synthetic phosphatidylcholine with different fatty acids, the length of carbon chains and the number of unsaturated carbon chains of the fatty acids markedly affected the binding of each monoclonal antibody to the liposomes. The addition of dicetyl phosphate or stearylamine to phosphatidylcholine liposomes changed the reactivity of the liposomes. These results support the view that mouse anti-BrMRBC antibodies can recognize appropriately spaced phosphorylcholine residues on the surface of phospholipid liposomes, LDL and cells. The four clones had similar capacities for binding to LDL as well as to BrMRBC, but they had obviously different capacities for binding to phospholipid liposomes; the epitopes on phospholipid liposomes used in the present study were not so perfect as to react well with every anti-BrMRBC antibody. PMID:2443446

  12. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibody specific to recombinant dengue multi-epitope protein.

    PubMed

    Abhyankar, Ajay Vinayak; Bhargava, Rakesh; Jana, Asha Mukul; Sahni, Ajay Kumar; Rao, P V Lakshmana

    2008-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against novel dengue recombinant protein were produced following immunization of Balb/c mice with recombinant dengue multi-epitope protein (r-DMEP) expressed in Escherichia coli vector and purified in a single-step chromatography system. Antigenicity of r-DMEP was evaluated by dot enzyme immunoassay. Mice were immunized intraperitoneally with five doses each of 100 microg of this novel antigen at 1-week intervals and a final intravenous booster dose prior to the fusion. Hybridomas resulted from fusion of myeloma cells and splenocytes using PEG-1500 as an additive. Selection of the hybrids was done using HAT medium, and the hybrids thus selected were finally screened qualitatively and quantitatively by dot and plate immunoassays, respectively. Five antibody secretory hybrid clones exhibited specific reactivity against r-DMEP by dot-ELISA, whereas a lone clone was found to be cross-reactive with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to r-DME protein recognized the envelope and non-structural epitopes by Western blot analysis. These MAbs were further checked for their diagnostic efficacy using dengue suspected clinical samples and found overall sensitivity and specificity for DRDE dipstick ELISA. MAb-based dipstick ELISA results were 85%, 75% and 85%, 90%, respectively.

  13. Preferential phenotypic association linked with cooperation in paper wasps.

    PubMed

    Tibbetts, E A; Injaian, A

    2013-11-01

    Animals can influence their social environment by preferentially associating with certain conspecifics. Such preferential association has gained increasing theoretical attention, as it may influence social evolution and population dynamics. However, relatively little empirical work has examined the occurrence of preferential association and its effects on cooperative group formation. Here, we test the factors associated with cooperative group formation in Polistes dominulus nest-founding queen wasps. P. dominulus are a good system to study preferential association, as foundresses can nest alone or in groups and group membership is flexible. We found that both social and environmental factors were associated with partner choice. First, facial patterns were associated with cooperation. Wasps with more similar facial patterns were more likely to cooperate than wasps with less similar facial patterns. This preferential phenotypic association fits the theoretical criteria for the evolution of tag-based cooperation. Season was also associated with cooperation; wasps on early-season nests were more likely to cooperate than wasps on late-season nests. High levels of aggression by nest owners during initial interactions were also correlated with lower probabilities of subsequent cooperation, suggesting that nest owners have some control over group membership. Other factors including body weight, weight similarity and nest productivity were not linked with cooperation. Overall, multiple factors influence cooperation in paper wasps, including facial pattern similarity. The occurrence of preferential phenotypic association in paper wasps is quite interesting and may influence the evolution of cooperation and population divergence in this group.

  14. What Characteristics Confer Proteins the Ability to Induce Allergic Responses? IgE Epitope Mapping and Comparison of the Structure of Soybean 2S Albumins and Ara h 2.

    PubMed

    Han, Youngshin; Lin, Jing; Bardina, Ludmilla; Grishina, Galina A; Lee, Chaeyoon; Seo, Won Hee; Sampson, Hugh A

    2016-05-12

    Ara h 2, a peanut 2S albumin, is associated with severe allergic reactions, but a homologous protein, soybean 2S albumin, is not recognized as an important allergen. Structural difference between these proteins might explain this clinical discrepancy. Therefore, we mapped sequential epitopes and compared the structure of Ara h 2, Soy Al 1, and Soy Al 3 (Gly m 8) to confirm whether structural differences account for the discrepancy in clinical responses to these two proteins. Commercially synthesized peptides covering the full length of Ara h 2 and two soybean 2S albumins were analyzed by peptide microarray. Sera from 10 patients with peanut and soybean allergies and seven non-atopic controls were examined. The majority of epitopes in Ara h 2 identified by microarray are consistent with those identified previously. Several regions in the 2S albumins are weakly recognized by individual sera from different patients. A comparison of allergenic epitopes on peanut and soybean proteins suggests that loop-helix type secondary structures and some amino acids with a large side chain including lone electron pair, such as arginine, glutamine, and tyrosine, makes the peptides highly recognizable by the immune system. By utilizing the peptide microarray assay, we mapped IgE epitopes of Ara h 2 and two soybean 2S albumins. The use of peptide microarray mapping and analysis of the epitope characteristics may provide critical information to access the allergenicity of food proteins.

  15. Tetramer-guided epitope mapping: rapid identification and characterization of immunodominant CD4+ T cell epitopes from complex antigens.

    PubMed

    Novak, E J; Liu, A W; Gebe, J A; Falk, B A; Nepom, G T; Koelle, D M; Kwok, W W

    2001-06-01

    T cell responses to Ags involve recognition of selected peptide epitopes contained within the antigenic protein. In this report, we describe a new approach for direct identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes of complex Ags that uses human class II tetramers to identify reactive cells. With a panel of 60 overlapping peptides covering the entire sequence of the VP16 protein, a major Ag for HSV-2, we generated a panel of class II MHC tetramers loaded with peptide pools that were used to stain peripheral lymphocytes of an HSV-2 infected individual. With this approach, we identified four new DRA1*0101/DRB1*0401- and two DRA1*0101/DRB1*0404-restricted, VP16-specific epitopes. By using tetramers to sort individual cells, we easily obtained a large number of clones specific to these epitopes. Although DRA1*0101/DRB1*0401 and DRA1*0101/DRB1*0404 are structurally very similar, nonoverlapping VP16 epitopes were identified, illustrating high selectivity of individual allele polymorphisms within common MHC variants. This rapid approach to detecting CD4+ T cell epitopes from complex Ags can be applied to any known Ag that gives a T cell response.

  16. Protective Effect of Human Leukocyte Antigen B27 in Hepatitis C Virus Infection Requires the Presence of a Genotype-Specific Immunodominant CD8+ T-Cell Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Kersting, Nadine; Fitzmaurice, Karen; Oniangue-Ndza, Cesar; Kemper, Michael N.; Humphreys, Isla; McKiernan, Susan; Kelleher, Dermot; Lohmann, Volker; Bowness, Paul; Huzly, Daniela; Rosen, Hugo R.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Lauer, Georg M.; Allen, Todd M.; Barnes, Eleanor; Roggendorf, Michael; Blum, Hubert E.; Thimme, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen B27 (HLA-B27) is associated with protection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This protective role is linked to single immunodominant HLA-B27-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes in both infections. In order to define the relative contribution of a specific HLA-B27-restricted epitope to the natural course of HCV infection, we compared the biological impact of the highly conserved HCV genotype 1 epitope, for which the protective role has been described, with the corresponding region in genotype 3 that differs in its sequence by three amino acid residues. The genotype 3a peptide was not recognized by CD8+ T cells specific for the genotype 1 peptide. Furthermore, patients with acute or chronic infection with HCV genotype 3a did not mount T-cell responses to this epitope region, and their autologous viral sequences showed no evidence of T-cell pressure. Finally, we found a significantly higher frequency of HLA-B27 positivity in patients with chronic HCV genotype 3a infection compared to genotype 1 infection, indicating that there is no protection by HLA-B27 in HCV genotype 3 infection. Conclusion Our data indicate that the protective effect of HLA-B27 is limited to HCV genotype 1 infection and does not expand to other genotypes such as genotype 3a. This can most likely be explained by intergenotype sequence diversity leading to the loss of the immunodominant HLA-B27 epitope in viral strains other than genotype 1. Our results underline the central role of a single HLA-B27-restricted epitope-specific CD8+ T-cell response in mediating protection in HCV genotype 1 infection. PMID:20034048

  17. Shifting immunodominance pattern of two cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes in the F glycoprotein of the Long strain of respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Carolina; de León, Patricia; Medina, Francisco; Melero, José A; García-Barreno, Blanca; Del Val, Margarita

    2004-11-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory infection in children and in the elderly. The RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein has long been recognized as a vaccine candidate as it elicits cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) and antibody responses. Two murine H-2K(d)-restricted CTL epitopes (F85-93 and F92-106) are known in the F protein of the A2 strain of RSV. F-specific CTL lines using BCH4 fibroblasts that are persistently infected with the Long strain of human RSV as stimulators were generated, and it was found that in this strain only the F85-93 epitope is conserved. Motif based epitope prediction programs and an F2 chain deleted F protein encoded in a recombinant vaccinia virus enabled identification of a new epitope in the Long strain, F249-258, which is presented by K(d) as a 9-mer (TYMLTNSEL) or a 10-mer (TYMLTNSELL) peptide. The results suggest that the 10-mer might be a naturally processed endogenous K(d) ligand. The CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses to epitopes F85-93 and F249-258 present in the F protein of RSV Long were found to be strongly skewed to F85-93 in in vitro multispecific CTL lines and in vivo during a secondary response to a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses the entire F protein. However, no hierarchy in CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses to F85-93 and F249-258 epitopes was observed in vivo during a primary response.

  18. Novel HLA-B27-restricted Epitopes from Chlamydia trachomatis Generated upon Endogenous Processing of Bacterial Proteins Suggest a Role of Molecular Mimicry in Reactive Arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Navarro, Carlos; Cragnolini, Juan J.; Dos Santos, Helena G.; Barnea, Eilon; Admon, Arie; Morreale, Antonio; López de Castro, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive arthritis (ReA) is an HLA-B27-associated spondyloarthropathy that is triggered by diverse bacteria, including Chlamydia trachomatis, a frequent intracellular parasite. HLA-B27-restricted T-cell responses are elicited against this bacterium in ReA patients, but their pathogenetic significance, autoimmune potential, and relevant epitopes are unknown. High resolution and sensitivity mass spectrometry was used to identify HLA-B27 ligands endogenously processed and presented by HLA-B27 from three chlamydial proteins for which T-cell epitopes were predicted. Fusion protein constructs of ClpC, Na+-translocating NADH-quinone reductase subunit A, and DNA primase were expressed in HLA-B27+ cells, and their HLA-B27-bound peptidomes were searched for endogenous bacterial ligands. A non-predicted peptide, distinct from the predicted T-cell epitope, was identified from ClpC. A peptide recognized by T-cells in vitro, NQRA(330–338), was detected from the reductase subunit. This is the second HLA-B27-restricted T-cell epitope from C. trachomatis with relevance in ReA demonstrated to be processed and presented in live cells. A novel peptide from the DNA primase, DNAP(211–223), was also found. This was a larger variant of a known epitope and was highly homologous to a self-derived natural ligand of HLA-B27. All three bacterial peptides showed high homology with human sequences containing the binding motif of HLA-B27. Molecular dynamics simulations further showed a striking conformational similarity between DNAP(211–223) and its homologous and much more flexible human-derived HLA-B27 ligand. The results suggest that molecular mimicry between HLA-B27-restricted bacterial and self-derived epitopes is frequent and may play a role in ReA. PMID:23867464

  19. Novel HLA-B27-restricted epitopes from Chlamydia trachomatis generated upon endogenous processing of bacterial proteins suggest a role of molecular mimicry in reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Navarro, Carlos; Cragnolini, Juan J; Dos Santos, Helena G; Barnea, Eilon; Admon, Arie; Morreale, Antonio; López de Castro, José A

    2013-09-06

    Reactive arthritis (ReA) is an HLA-B27-associated spondyloarthropathy that is triggered by diverse bacteria, including Chlamydia trachomatis, a frequent intracellular parasite. HLA-B27-restricted T-cell responses are elicited against this bacterium in ReA patients, but their pathogenetic significance, autoimmune potential, and relevant epitopes are unknown. High resolution and sensitivity mass spectrometry was used to identify HLA-B27 ligands endogenously processed and presented by HLA-B27 from three chlamydial proteins for which T-cell epitopes were predicted. Fusion protein constructs of ClpC, Na(+)-translocating NADH-quinone reductase subunit A, and DNA primase were expressed in HLA-B27(+) cells, and their HLA-B27-bound peptidomes were searched for endogenous bacterial ligands. A non-predicted peptide, distinct from the predicted T-cell epitope, was identified from ClpC. A peptide recognized by T-cells in vitro, NQRA(330-338), was detected from the reductase subunit. This is the second HLA-B27-restricted T-cell epitope from C. trachomatis with relevance in ReA demonstrated to be processed and presented in live cells. A novel peptide from the DNA primase, DNAP(211-223), was also found. This was a larger variant of a known epitope and was highly homologous to a self-derived natural ligand of HLA-B27. All three bacterial peptides showed high homology with human sequences containing the binding motif of HLA-B27. Molecular dynamics simulations further showed a striking conformational similarity between DNAP(211-223) and its homologous and much more flexible human-derived HLA-B27 ligand. The results suggest that molecular mimicry between HLA-B27-restricted bacterial and self-derived epitopes is frequent and may play a role in ReA.

  20. Presence of celiac disease epitopes in modern and old hexaploid wheat varieties: wheat breeding may have contributed to increased prevalence of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Hein C.; Salentijn, Elma M. J.; Dekking, Liesbeth; Bosch, Dirk; Hamer, Rob J.; Gilissen, Ludovicus J. W. J.; van der Meer, Ingrid M.; Smulders, Marinus J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Gluten proteins from wheat can induce celiac disease (CD) in genetically susceptible individuals. Specific gluten peptides can be presented by antigen presenting cells to gluten-sensitive T-cell lymphocytes leading to CD. During the last decades, a significant increase has been observed in the prevalence of CD. This may partly be attributed to an increase in awareness and to improved diagnostic techniques, but increased wheat and gluten consumption is also considered a major cause. To analyze whether wheat breeding contributed to the increase of the prevalence of CD, we have compared the genetic diversity of gluten proteins for the presence of two CD epitopes (Glia-α9 and Glia-α20) in 36 modern European wheat varieties and in 50 landraces representing the wheat varieties grown up to around a century ago. Glia-α9 is a major (immunodominant) epitope that is recognized by the majority of CD patients. The minor Glia-α20 was included as a technical reference. Overall, the presence of the Glia-α9 epitope was higher in the modern varieties, whereas the presence of the Glia-α20 epitope was lower, as compared to the landraces. This suggests that modern wheat breeding practices may have led to an increased exposure to CD epitopes. On the other hand, some modern varieties and landraces have been identified that have relatively low contents of both epitopes. Such selected lines may serve as a start to breed wheat for the introduction of ‘low CD toxic’ as a new breeding trait. Large-scale culture and consumption of such varieties would considerably aid in decreasing the prevalence of CD. PMID:20664999

  1. Mapping the conformational epitope of a neutralizing antibody (AcV1) directed against the AcMNPV GP64 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jian; Blissard, Gary W. . E-mail: gwb1@cornell.edu

    2006-09-01

    The envelope glycoprotein GP64 of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is necessary and sufficient for the acid-induced membrane fusion activity that is required for fusion of the budded virus (BV) envelope and the endosome membrane during virus entry. Infectivity of the budded viru