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Sample records for eponymous orthopaedic equipment

  1. Nonoriginal Malappropriate Eponymous Nomenclature: examples relevant to paediatric orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Aresti, Nick; Ramachandran, Manoj

    2012-11-01

    Eponyms are widely used in medicine and their use has been the subject of much debate recently. Advocates stress their historical significance, their ability to simplify complex terminology and their addition of character to science. Opponents cite the controversy among those eponyms and highlight the lack of both scientific and historical accuracy. The law of Nonoriginal Malappropriate Eponymous Nomenclature (NOMEN) suggests that no phenomenon is named after the individual(s) who originally described it. We aimed to determine whether this law is applicable to various clinical conditions and signs relevant to paediatric orthopaedics. We selected a series of 10 eponyms and performed a thorough literature review. In all cases, a description was identified preceding that from whom the disease received its eponymous name. We were also able to identify what we believe to be the earliest recorded description of each disease and sign. Our examples confirm the law of NOMEN in the field of paediatric orthopaedics. We suggest that irregularities in the descriptions and meanings of eponyms are identified and updated.

  2. Medical eponyms

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Robert P.; Thomas, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms are a long-standing tradition in medicine. Eponyms usually involve honoring a prominent physician scientist who played a major role in the identification of the disease. Under the right circumstances, a disease becomes well known through the name of this individual. There are no rules on eponym development. It may take an extraordinary period of time, be different in different languages and cultures, and evolve as more is known about the physician or the disease. PMID:25147644

  3. Eponyms in forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Nečas, Pavel; Hejna, Petr

    2012-12-01

    The phenomenon of eponymous terms in forensic pathology is described in this paper. The authors analyzed representative textbooks (monographs) dealing with forensic pathology in both English and German and identified several eponymous terms. The paper aims to present to the reader the most important eponymous terms in forensic pathology. Included in the paper are the following terms: Beckwith's Sign, Casper's Rule, Krönlein's Shot, Lichtenberg's Figures, Nysten's Law, Paltauf's Spots, Puppe's Rule, Sehrt's Sign, Simon's Sign, Sveshnikov's Sign, Tardieu's Spots, Wischnewski Spots, Wydler's Sign. The spread of eponymous terms throughout various languages is mentioned. The linguistic basis of such terms as well as their advantages and disadvantages in specialist fields, and indeed in even wider circles, is discussed. The authors state that the main function of these terms is to facilitate the open flow of unambiguous information among scholars. Eponymous terms in forensic pathology are characteristic for the German speaking countries and for all countries influenced by the German school of forensic pathology. Their usage in the Anglo-Saxon world is much less widespread, meaning they do not occur very often in English monographs and textbooks.

  4. Animals Eponyms in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Nidhi; Jindal, Pooja; Kumar, Jeevan; Gupta, Sanjeev; Jain, VK

    2014-01-01

    The world of Dermatology is flooded with inflexions among clinical conditions and signs and syndromes; making it interesting, but a tougher subject to remember. Signs and syndromes have always fascinated residents, but simultaneously burdened their minds, as these attractive names are difficult to remember. This work was undertaken to review dermatological conditions and signs based on commonly encountered daily words and objects like animals, etc. Fifty dermatological conditions were found to be based on animal eponyms. For example, the usage of animal terminology in dermatology like leonine facies is present in leprosy, sarcoidosis, mycosis fungoides (MF), and airborne contact dermatitis (ABCD). PMID:25484417

  5. [Scientometric aspects of medical eponyms].

    PubMed

    Schubert, András

    2014-09-07

    Eponyms, scientific concepts named after persons, have a long tradition in medical sciences. Their emergence and use are rather instructive from the aspects of scientometrics, as well. Using a medical sample it is shown that although references to publications giving origin to the eponyms inevitably get obliterated, their citation rate is still many times higher than that of other publications of the same age.

  6. [Czech eponyms in pathology].

    PubMed

    Steiner, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    The 24th European Congress of Pathology taking place in Prague is an opportunity to remind our society of the Czech names appearing as eponyms in pathological terminology: Karel Rokitanský - R. protuberance in dermoid cyst; R. thrombogenic theory of atherosclerosis; Mayer - R. - Küster - Hauser - Winckel syndrome (congenital malformation of the vagina and uterus); Václav Treitz - T. duodenal ligament; T. retroperitoneal hernia; T. uremic colitis; Vilém Dušan Lambl - L. excrescences of heart valves; Lamblia (Giardia) intestinalis, and also the foundation of urological cytology; Stanislav Provázek - Prowazek - Halberstädter bodies (trachoma), Rickettsia Prowazeki (typhus fever); Josef Vaněk - V. tumor (gastric inflammatory fibroid polyp), and also discovery of the etiology of pneumocystic pneumonia; Otto Jírovec - Pneumocystis Jiroveci; Blahoslav Bednář - B. tumor (pigmented dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans).

  7. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology: Part I. Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the field of medicine. In this article, the first of a multipart series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to neoplasms, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographic information of the respective eponym׳s namesake.

  8. Remembering our roots: eponyms in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Popkin, Charles A; Gundry, Cooper R; Larson, Christopher M; Murnaghan, M Lucas

    2013-07-01

    For as long as athletes have been competing, injuries from competition have resulted. Sports medicine has a rich and storied history with significant contributors from many different countries and civilizations. Over time, we have honored the contributions of important figures in sports medicine with the use of eponyms. However, the continued use of eponyms in medicine has been called into question by a number of authors. They cite inaccuracies in definition and context, lack of descriptive value, and the possible celebration of unsavory characters. However, eponyms are pervasive in the medical literature. They bring color and character and allow us to honor those who came before us. Furthermore, eponyms can hide some distressing aspects of a disease. This review of eponyms in sports medicine provides an opportunity to celebrate our predecessors, recognize the international flavor of sports medicine, and promote accurate use of eponyms for the future.

  9. [Presentation of eponymous terms in forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Nečas, P; Hejna, P

    2012-04-01

    The phenomenon of eponymous terms used in forensic medicine is described in the paper. Their linguistic basis, advantages and disadvantages for specialists or wider circles is discussed. Their spread in various language discourses is mentioned. A list of the most important eponymous terms in forensic medicine is the papers focus.

  10. [Eponyms in musculoskeletal radiology: stories of bones, persons, and civilizations].

    PubMed

    Viteri Jusué, A; Eguidazu Elosua, J M; Castillo de Juan, J; Grande Icaran, D

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms reflect the history of medicine, of disease, and of physicians, but eponyms also reflect the history of the societies in which these physicians lived. Both loved and hated, eponyms are at the center of an interminable debate about whether they should continue to be used or whether they should disappear, and this debate has become more intense since some scientific societies have purged their terminologies of eponyms related to Nazism. Eponyms abound in conventional musculoskeletal radiology. In this article, rather than attempt an exhaustive review of all these eponyms, we take a few representative examples to illustrate the contributions of eponyms to medicine and the history of medicine.

  11. Lumbar nerve root: the enigmatic eponyms.

    PubMed

    Dyck, P

    1984-01-01

    Man's quest for recognition has not escaped the physician, whose contributions to medicine perpetuate his name in print. It is a final grasp for professional immortality, which for men like Imhotep and Hippocrates, has prevailed for millennia. This fervor was particularly evident in the latter 19th century, which created a flurry of eponyms, often two or more physicians publishing the same clinical observation. This article reviews the eponym epidemic as it relates to lumbar radiculopathy.

  12. Reflections on eponyms in neuroscience terminology.

    PubMed

    Duque-Parra, Jorge Eduardo; Llano-Idárraga, J Oskar; Duque-Parra, Carlos Alberto

    2006-11-01

    Eponyms have played a very significant linguistic role in technical and scientific terminology. They are an important feature of language that have contributed for a long time to engraving in history the names of those researchers who have devoted their lives to scientific discovery. In the field of medical terminology, they are an asset, although their semantic effectiveness has constituted a long-standing debate. We will analyze how language contributes to the advance of science and technology and the current position of eponyms in the health sciences. Eponymy in neuroscience has been used for a long time as a way to identify and recognize scientific issues, such as diseases, syndromes, methods, processes, substances, organs, and parts of organs as a way to honor those who, in a certain way, contributed to the progress of science. However, sometimes those honors do not correspond to the real contributors, thus receiving a nondeserved acknowledgment. Another problem with eponymic references is the lack of information about the matter in hand, because eponyms do not provide any clear information leading to the identification of the situation under study, as they are not reasonably descriptive. The aim of this article is to encourage the use of descriptive terms instead of eponyms and to establish a system of scientific nomenclature to consolidate the use of the language as a means of conveying scientific information among experts.

  13. Marathon of eponyms: 23 Wegener granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Langdon, J; Evans, J

    2012-03-01

    The use of eponyms has long been contentious, but many remain in common use, as discussed elsewhere (Editorial: Oral Diseases. 2009: 15; 185). The use of eponyms in diseases of the head and neck is found mainly in specialties dealing with medically compromised individuals (paediatric dentistry, special care dentistry, oral and maxillofacial medicine, oral and maxillofacial pathology and oral, oral and maxillofacial radiology and maxillofacial surgery) and particularly by hospital-centred practitioners. This series has selected some of the more recognized relevant eponymous conditions and presents them alphabetically. The information is based largely on data available from MEDLINE and a number of internet websites as noted below: the authors would welcome any corrections. This document summarizes data about Wegener granulomatosis.

  14. Anatomical eponyms - unloved names in medical terminology.

    PubMed

    Burdan, F; Dworzański, W; Cendrowska-Pinkosz, M; Burdan, M; Dworzańska, A

    2016-01-01

    Uniform international terminology is a fundamental issue of medicine. Names of various organs or structures have developed since early human history. The first proper anatomical books were written by Hippocrates, Aristotle and Galen. For this reason the modern terms originated from Latin or Greek. In a modern time the terminology was improved in particular by Vasalius, Fabricius and Harvey. Presently each known structure has internationally approved term that is explained in anatomical or histological terminology. However, some elements received eponyms, terms that incorporate the surname of the people that usually describe them for the first time or studied them (e.g., circle of Willis, follicle of Graff, fossa of Sylvious, foramen of Monro, Adamkiewicz artery). Literature and historical hero also influenced medical vocabulary (e.g. Achilles tendon and Atlas). According to various scientists, all the eponyms bring colour to medicine, embed medical traditions and culture to our history but lack accuracy, lead of confusion, and hamper scientific discussion. The current article presents a wide list of the anatomical eponyms with their proper anatomical term or description according to international anatomical terminology. However, since different eponyms are used in various countries, the list could be expanded.

  15. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology--part II: vascular.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in the medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in the medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the science of medicine. In this second part of a multipart series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to the pulmonary vasculature, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographic information of the respective eponym׳s namesake.

  16. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology: part III--interstitium.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in the medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in the medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the science of medicine. In this third installment of this series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to the pulmonary interstitium, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographical information of the respective eponym's namesake.

  17. Clothing-related Eponyms and Signs

    PubMed Central

    Long, Valencia

    2016-01-01

    The world of dermatology is pieced together by clinical conditions unique in their colors, morphology, and configuration. Dermatological signs and terms are influenced by etymology, language, and history. Eponyms also make dermatology a fascinating but linguistically challenging subject. This article reviews dermatological conditions described in relation to fashion, and what we wear in everyday life from top to toe, demonstrating that dermatology can be inspired even in the most common things. PMID:27057040

  18. Clauberg's eponym and crimes against humanity.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Frederick; Csapó-Sweet, Rita M

    2012-12-01

    Scientific journals are ethically bound to cite Professor Dr. Carl Clauberg's Nazi medical crimes against humanity whenever the eponym Clauberg is used. Modern articles still publish the eponym citing only the rabbit bioassy used in developing progesterone agonists or antagonists for birth control. Clauberg's Nazi career is traced to his having subjected thousands of Jewish women at the Ravensbruck and Auschwitz-Birkenau death camps to cruel, murderous sterilization experiments that are enthusiastically described by incriminating letters (reproduced here) between him and the notorious Nazi Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler. The experiments were carried out in women's block 10 in Auschwitz-Birkenau where Clauberg's colleague Dr. Josef Mengele worked alongside. After Germany lost World War II in 1945 Mengele fled to South America, where he lived to an old age. Clauberg was caught by Russian soldiers, put on trial in the Soviet Union for his crimes against humanity, and imprisoned in 1948. In 1955 he was repatriated to Germany, once again imprisoned for his crimes, and belatedly expelled from the German Medical Association. To estimate the contemporary usage of the names Mengele and Clauberg, Internet hits were recorded for Clauberg C or Mengele J (with and without adding the term Auschwitz) with the Google and Scirus search engines. The ratios of hits for combinations of these terms reveal that relative to Mengele, Clauberg's name is barely known. We propose that journals and books printing the eponym Clauberg cite its derivation and reference to the convicted Nazi criminal. The present article can serve for such citations.

  19. Fruit and Food Eponyms in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Nidhi; Jindal, Pooja; Kumar, Jeevan; Gupta, Sanjeev; Jain, VK

    2015-01-01

    Dermatology world is brimming with myriad of interesting clinical conditions, signs and syndromes. It is infinite, which has systemic clinical connotations too. Complicated pronunciations of diagnosis have always placed residents in an intricate state. Each one is trying his best to make this cumbersome subject comparatively more acceptable and convenient. The present paper is an attempt to further simplify the subject by correlating difficult conditions with commonly used and seen things such as fruit and food. A total of 45 dermatological conditions were found to be based on fruit and food eponyms. For example, strawberries can remind us of strawberry gums of Wegener's granulomatosis and strawberry nevus. PMID:25814737

  20. Emergency radiology eponyms: part 2--Naclerio's V sign to Fournier gangrene.

    PubMed

    Sliker, Clint W; Steenburg, Scott D; Archer-Arroyo, Krystal

    2013-06-01

    An eponym is a name based on the name of a person, frequently as a means to honor him/her, and it can be used to concisely communicate or summarize a complex abnormality or injury. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in medicine. Many commonly used eponyms applied to extremity fractures should be familiar to most emergency radiologists and have been previously reported. Yet, a number of non-extremity eponyms can be encountered in an emergency radiology practice as well. This other group of eponyms encompasses a spectrum of traumatic and nontraumatic pathology. In this second part of a two-part series, the authors discuss a number of non-extremity emergency radiology eponyms, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographical information of the eponyms' namesakes.

  1. [From Kandinsky to Clerambault. Value of eponyms].

    PubMed

    Koupernik, C

    1996-05-01

    The Syndrome of Mental Automatism in delusional states has been described by the French psychiatrist G. de Clérambault in 1919. It consists mainly of involuntary production of impressions and ideas, ascribed by the patient to an external influence and still occurring within himself. Phenomena like thought echo, influence delusion, thought guess belong to M.A. Actually this syndrome is largely unknown in Anglo-Saxon countries. Somewhat similar description figures in DSM-III-R under the heading 295. A2-A3. Soviet psychiatrists claim that a quite similar clinical picture has been described by Kandinsky in his monograph posthumously published by his widow in 1890. The present writer shows that a great part of what Kandinsky described was actually based on self-observation. But it is true that Kandinsky described what he calls a "psychological chasm", where thought is either imposed upon the patient or stolen from him. The present writer considers that it is more a phenomenological approach than a semiological one and he is doubtful about the actual value of eponyms.

  2. Cushing's ulcer: the eponym and his own.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2011-06-01

    One of the least remembered eponyms associated with Harvey Cushing is "Cushing's ulcer." The basis of this credit is a paper published in 1932 in which Cushing describes patients who postoperatively and unexpectedly died of perforated peptic ulcers. It is one of the first descriptions of a stress ulcer and a treatise on the brain-stomach connection. Harvey Cushing was puzzled by the pathogenesis of these peptic ulcerations and perforations and advanced several theories. The least plausible included the bile-vomiting theory suggesting that hemorrhagic ulceration could be produced by a combination of bile and acid in a patient recovering from the anesthetic. Other theories were stimulation of a parasympathetic center in the diencephalon or a disturbance of vagal centers in the brainstem. Quite surprisingly to Cushing, the Boston Herald implicitly insinuated that Cushing found the cause of ulcers and this claim upset him greatly. It is ironic that Harvey Cushing, in his later years with failing health, developed an ulcer himself. Cushing noted in his correspondence that he felt the agitation over this newspaper clipping caused his later ulcer. The first description of a neurogenic ulcer remains an important medical observation and is a testament to Cushing's broad accomplishments.

  3. [Eponyms and epilepsy (history of Eastern civilizations)].

    PubMed

    Janković, S M; Sokić, D V; Lević, Z M; Susić, V; Drulović, J; Stojsavljević, N; Veskov, R; Ivanus, J

    1996-01-01

    The history of eponyms for epilepsy in the lands of the Eastern globe present the portrait of the attitudes of both the laymen and skilled people towards the disease and patient, as well as to the Nature itself. As opposed to the West which during the Middle ages changed its concepts of epilepsy as the organic brain disease for the sublime 'alchemic' position, the people of the East were more prone to consider from the beginning of their civilization till the XIX century that epilepsy is the consequence of the evanescent spiritual and extracorporal forces which by themselves were out of their reach. As compared to the western civilization, the historical resources are, often as a consequence of a linguistic barriers, more scarce-as consequently is the number of eponyms, but are nevertheless picturesque. The medical science from Babylonian period presumed that epileptic manifestations are the consequence of the demonic or ill spiritual actions. There existed an attitude that at the beginning of an epileptic attack the patient was possessed by a demon (the Akkadic, i.e., Babylonian verb "sibtu" denoting epilepsy, had the meaning "to seize" or "to be obsessed"); at the end of the clonic phase the demon departed from the body. Different demons were responsible for different forms of epilepsy such as nocturnal and children epilepsy, absence epilepsy and pure convulsions, simple and complex automatisms, and gelastic epilepsy. Thus, the doctors from the period of Babylon aside from making primordial classification of epilepsies, knew about their clinical picture (prodromal symptoms and aura, Jackson's epilepsy. Todd's paralysis), postictal phenomena and intericatl emotional instability; provocative factors were also known (sleep deprivation, emotions, as well as alcohol, albeit in a negative sense-as a cure for epilepsy). There is no doubt than in the period of Babylon the clinical picture of serial fits and its progress to status epilepticus were clearly recognized and

  4. Marathon of eponyms: 16 Paget disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Langdon, J; Evans, J

    2011-03-01

    The use of eponyms has long been contentious, but many remain in common use, as discussed elsewhere (Editorial: Oral Diseases. 2009: 15; 185). The use of eponyms in diseases of the head and neck is found mainly in specialties dealing with medically compromised individuals (paediatric dentistry, special care dentistry, oral and maxillofacial medicine, oral and maxillofacial pathology, oral and maxillofacial radiology and oral and maxillofacial surgery) and particularly by hospital-centred practitioners. This series has selected some of the more recognised relevant eponymous conditions and presents them alphabetically. The information is based largely on data available from MEDLINE and a number of internet websites as noted below: the authors would welcome any corrections. This document summarises data about Paget disease of bone.

  5. Marathon of eponyms: 5 Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Langdon, J; Evans, J

    2009-10-01

    The use of eponyms has long been contentious, but many remain in common use, as discussed elsewhere (Editorial: Oral Diseases. 2009: 15; 185). The use of eponyms in diseases of the head and neck is mainly in specialties dealing with medically compromised individuals (paediatric dentistry, special care dentistry, oral and maxillofacial medicine, oral and maxillofacial pathology, oral and maxillofacial radiology and oral and maxillofacial surgery) and particularly by hospital-centred practitioners. This series has selected some of the more recognized relevant eponymous conditions and presents them alphabetically. The information is based largely on data available from MEDLINE and a number of internet websites as noted below: the authors would welcome any corrections. This document summarizes data about Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  6. Kallmann Syndrome: Eugenics and the Man behind the Eponym

    PubMed Central

    Benbassat, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Kallmann syndrome is named after Franz Joseph Kallmann, a German-born psychiatrist who described in 1944 twelve subjects from three families who presented with a syndrome of missed puberty, anosmia, and color blindness. Yet, several other eponyms for the same syndrome can be found in the literature. Despite the fact that Kallmann syndrome is the most recognized eponym, very little is known about the man for whom the syndrome is named. A biographical note on Franz Joseph Kallmann and his historical context is presented. PMID:27101217

  7. Anatomical eponyms, Part 2: The other side of the coin.

    PubMed

    Olry, Regis

    2014-11-01

    Over a century after they were removed, at least officially, from anatomical terminology, eponyms remain an obviously controversial topic. In the first part of this paper we acted as their defense counsel, aiming to demonstrate that the 1895 first edition of the Nomina Anatomica and subsequently the Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology (FCAT) probably put the cart before the horse. However, their authors advanced arguments supporting their decision, and it is now time to develop these arguments. Let us now become the public prosecutor of eponyms.

  8. Tales from previous times: important eponyms in pediatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Berger, Michael; Muensterer, Oliver; Harmon, Carroll M

    2014-01-01

    The use of eponyms in medicine has a long and captivating tradition, which applies to pediatric surgery as well. Unfortunately, even though these eponyms are widely used, oftentimes the fascinating personalities and lives behind these names remain unrecognized or underappreciated, especially among residents, fellows and younger-generation pediatric surgeons. Therefore, in this article, we review 15 names that are frequently used as eponyms in modern pediatric surgery and hereby enlighten the personalities behind them. Given their particular frequency, we choose the following eponyms: Ramstedt pylorotomy, Nissen fundoplication, Murphy's sign and sequence, McBurney's sign and incision, Meckel's diverticulum, Kasai portoenterostomy, Ladd's procedure, Morgagni and Bochdalek hernia, Ravitch operation, Nuss procedure, Hirschsprung disease, Swenson pullthrough, Peña procedure and Wilms tumor. A detailed description of the historical importance of these personalities and their contribution to our field is given. Without the appropriate historical background, it is difficult for the current younger and next generation pediatric surgeons to grasp the full spectrum of the ongoing progress in our field. Therefore, our article conveys not only important insight into the past, but also provides young surgeons with an important historical perspective essential to understand the current and future developments in modern pediatric surgery.

  9. What's in a Name? Neurological Eponyms of the Nazi Era.

    PubMed

    Kondziella, Daniel; Zeidman, Lawrence A

    2016-01-01

    The 1920s were a booming decade for neuroscience, and perhaps nowhere was this truer than in Germany. Following the rise of Hitler's regime and the persecution of Jews and others, however, Germany and Austria lost numerous world-class neuroscientists. Vacant posts were quickly filled with 'Aryan' and academic staff loyal to the Nazis. Indeed, many physicians and scientists went even further and became engaged in National Socialist (NS)-euthanasia programs. In recent years, the medical community has become more aware of the ethical burden associated with eponyms derived from scientists of the Third Reich. This book chapter reviews 53 neurological eponyms derived from physicians who worked in the Nazi era. Among them are victims who were forced out of the country or murdered in concentration camps, protestors who risked their academic careers and often their lives, beneficiaries who published on brains from 'euthanized' children, and collaborators who were directly involved in the planning and execution of NS-euthanasia programs.

  10. Stereoscopy in orthopaedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S. L. E.

    2005-03-01

    Stereoscopy was used in medicine as long ago as 1898, but has not gained widespread acceptance except for a peak in the 1930's. It retains a use in orthopaedics in the form of Radiostereogrammetrical Analysis (RSA), though this is now done by computer software without using stereopsis. Combining computer assisted stereoscopic displays with both conventional plain films and reconstructed volumetric axial data, we are reassessing the use of stereoscopy in orthopaedics. Applications include use in developing nations or rural settings, erect patients where axial imaging cannot be used, and complex deformity and trauma reconstruction. Extension into orthopaedic endoscopic systems and teaching aids (e.g. operative videos) are further possibilities. The benefits of stereoscopic vision in increased perceived resolution and depth perception can help orthopaedic surgeons achieve more accurate diagnosis and better pre-operative planning. Limitations to currently available stereoscopic displays which need to be addressed prior to widespread acceptance are: availability of hardware and software, loss of resolution, use of glasses, and image "ghosting". Journal publication, the traditional mode of information dissemination in orthopaedics, is also viewed as a hindrance to the acceptance of stereoscopy - it does not deliver the full impact of stereoscopy and "hands-on" demonstrations are needed.

  11. A convenient "inconvenience": The eponymous legacy of Sir William Richard Gowers (1845-1915).

    PubMed

    Toodayan, Nadeem

    2017-01-01

    A century since his passing, the legacy of the great Victorian clinical neurologist, Sir William Richard Gowers (1845-1915), remains traceable to students and practitioners of medicine worldwide through eponymous medical terms named in his honor. Popular designations like "Gowers' sign" continue to lead curious minds to learn more about the pioneering neurologist's lifework and influence, and yet Gowers himself was not fond of medical eponyms. Memorably remarking that eponyms were an educational "inconvenience" in medicine, Gowers was apt to disfavor the system in the very same lecture in which he reportedly first referred to the spinal cord fasciculus that later took his name. This article will examine Gowers' own use of eponyms alongside the eponymous medical terms named for him, and, in the process, will show how Gowers' "inconvenience" may be of great service to the historically inclined modern clinician today.

  12. The eponymous legacy of Sir William Richard Gowers (1845-1915): A revealing letter.

    PubMed

    Toodayan, Nadeem; Boes, Christopher J

    2016-08-11

    The eponymous legacy of Sir William Richard Gowers (1845-1915) was the subject of a comprehensive appraisal first written for this journal late last year. Since the completion of that work, a revealing February 1903 letter has come to light recording, amongst other things, Gowers' firsthand and somewhat private opinions concerning some of his own eponymous contributions to medicine. This addendum to the primary author's original article will review and contextualize this very interesting find as it relates to Gowers' eponymous legacy. Gowers' "ataxic paraplegia" (referred to as "Gowers' disease" in the letter) and "syringal hemorrhage" are specially considered, and his broader neological contributions are also briefly addressed. For completion, a number of other previously unnoticed eponyms are added to the already impressive list of medical entities named in Gowers' honor, and a more complete collection of eponyms found in Gowers' Manual are tabulated for consideration.

  13. Retractions in orthopaedic research

    PubMed Central

    Yan, J.; MacDonald, A.; Baisi, L-P.; Evaniew, N.; Bhandari, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Despite the fact that research fraud and misconduct are under scrutiny in the field of orthopaedic research, little systematic work has been done to uncover and characterise the underlying reasons for academic retractions in this field. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of retractions and identify the reasons for retracted publications in the orthopaedic literature. Methods Two reviewers independently searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (1995 to current) using MeSH keyword headings and the ‘retracted’ filter. We also searched an independent website that reports and archives retracted scientific publications (www.retractionwatch.com). Two reviewers independently extracted data including reason for retraction, study type, journal impact factor, and country of origin. Results One hundred and ten retracted studies were included for data extraction. The retracted studies were published in journals with impact factors ranging from 0.000 (discontinued journals) to 13.262. In the 20-year search window, only 25 papers were retracted in the first ten years, with the remaining 85 papers retracted in the most recent decade. The most common reasons for retraction were fraudulent data (29), plagiarism (25) and duplicate publication (20). Retracted articles have been cited up to 165 times (median 6; interquartile range 2 to 19). Conclusion The rate of retractions in the orthopaedic literature is increasing, with the majority of retractions attributed to academic misconduct and fraud. Orthopaedic retractions originate from numerous journals and countries, indicating that misconduct issues are widespread. The results of this study highlight the need to address academic integrity when training the next generation of orthopaedic investigators. Cite this article: J. Yan, A. MacDonald, L-P. Baisi, N. Evaniew, M. Bhandari, M. Ghert. Retractions in orthopaedic research: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:263–268. DOI: 10

  14. Orthopaedic Footwear Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Although the need for orthopaedic shoes is increasing, the number of skilled shoemakers has declined. This has led to the development of a CAD/CAM system to design and fabricate, orthopaedic footwear. The NASA-developed RIM database management system is the central repository for CUSTOMLAST's information storage. Several other modules also comprise the system. The project was initiated by Langley Research Center and Research Triangle Institute in cooperation with the Veterans Administration and the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research. Later development was done by North Carolina State University and the University of Missouri-Columbia. The software is licensed by both universities.

  15. What's new in pediatric orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Sanders, James O; Otsuka, Norman Y; Martus, Jeffrey E

    2015-02-18

    This past year has seen an increase in the quality of studies in pediatric orthopaedics, and the completion of BrAIST demonstrated that high-level studies of important questions can be addressed in pediatric orthopaedics. The current commitment of improving quality of care for children promises a healthy future for pediatric orthopaedics.

  16. [Epilepsy, eponyms and patron saints (history of Western civilization)].

    PubMed

    Janković, S M; Sokić, D V; Lević, Z M; Susić, V; Stojsavljević, N; Drulović, J

    1996-01-01

    From a historic point of view, epilepsy and its eponyms were in an ontogenetic symbiosis throughout their history. Epilepsy is a disease with a history of eponyms presenting the frame of mind of both streetwise as well as skilled "authors" about its origin and nature. From ancient times the names for epilepsy, archetypal Hippocratic disease, just as rich in number as varied in their implication, reflected the local folkways of thinking. In this article we briefly presented more than 50 eponyms and patrons of epilepsy. As the source of information we used both the apocryphal, canonical and hagiographic as well as heretic literature, legends and iconography from the Middle Ages of domestic and foreign origin. Pre- and post-Hippocratic era, apart from stemming from the oldest written medical sources, point to the position that the disease had organic origin located in the brain. The period of Rome adopted the attitudes set by Galen which remained en vogue throughout the emerging Middle Ages and Renaissance. These eras generated new eponyms which reflected a downfall in the manor, stating that the disease is the consequence of supernatural forces. In the "Age of darkness" eponyms for epilepsy reflected more the relation of men to the Nature than to the disease or a sick man; this is evidenced through the generation of number of patrons for the disease. The most famous patron of patients with epilepsy was St. Valentine (after conversion from pagandom he died in Rome as a martyr, c. 270). He was allotted a patronage either due to the phonic resemblance of his name with the (past participle of the) verb "fallen"-as Martin Luther claimed, or due to a cure of epilepsy of the son of a Roman rhetor who built for him a chapel in which he continued to cure the sick. The emergence of a flamboyant personality of Paracelsus on the historic scene of the XVI century represents a less successful attempt to revoke the way of thinking set by the old Greek doctors; however, it brought

  17. The Swiss Orthopaedic Registry.

    PubMed

    Röder, Christoph; El-Kerdi, A; Frigg, A; Kolling, C; Staub, L P; Bach, B; Müller, U

    2005-01-01

    Following the tradition of the IDES European Hip Registry inaugurated by M. E. Müller in the 1960s, the Institute for Evaluative Research in Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Bern started a new era of data collection using internet technology (www.memdoc.org). With support of the Swiss Orthopaedic Society, the pilot of the Swiss Orthopaedic Registry was conducted, and in cooperation with different academic and non-academic centers the practicability of integrating the various data collection instruments into the daily clinical workflow was evaluated. Three different sizes of hip and knee questionnaires were compiled, covering the individual demands of the participating hospitals whereby the smaller questionnaires always represent a subset of the next larger one. Different types of data collection instruments are available: the online interface, optical mark reader paper questionnaires, and barcode sheets. Precise implant tracking is implemented by scanning the implant barcodes directly in the operating theaters and linking them to the clinical data set via a central server. In addition, radiographic information can be linked with the clinical data set. The pilot clinics suggested enhancements to the user interface and additional features for data management. Also, recommendations were made to simplify content in some instances and diversify in others. With a new software release and adapted questionnaires the Swiss Orthopaedic Registry was officially launched in Summer 2005.

  18. Geographic eponyms: A history of geography in medicine.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Maharra; Pai, Sanjay A

    2016-01-01

    Geographic eponyms have commonly been used in medical terminology, with diseases and medical entities being named after the place where the condition was discovered (e.g. Bombay Blood group) or invented (Jaipur Foot) or where the disease was first detected (Rocky Mountain Spotted fever) or where a consensus meeting has been held (Banff) or for other reasons (Argentina flag, Congo red stain). In 2015, the WHO decided to adopt a politically correct method to name infectious diseases in the future. We illustrate, in verse form, some of the places that have been used in medical terminology, over the centuries. An accompanying essay explains the specific reasons for the selection of these locales in our vocabulary.

  19. Smartphones in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadithy, Nawfal; Gikas, Panagiotis D; Al-Nammari, Shafic Said

    2012-08-01

    With the introduction of the European Working Time Directive, surgical trainees are facing limited training opportunities and doctors are required to maximise their training opportunities. Smartphone sales have been rapidly increasing over the last five years and can be used as a training tool for the orthopaedic trainee and surgeon. Common uses include applications (AO, eLogbook and PubMed), Ebooks, online Logbooks, Guidelines and surgical techniques. In addition, smartphones can be used to immediately complete work-based assessments, in the absence of computers, hopefully increasing completion rates and reliability. Some journals now provide podcasts and video tutorials which may be accessed on smartphones, which is useful for higher examinations. Smartphones can also be used in the clinical setting to take photographs of wounds. Smartphones are enjoying increased uptake and application in the workplace and we review their use for orthopaedic surgeons and trainees to allow them to make the most out of their training opportunities.

  20. Neurology and orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Houlden, Henry; Charlton, Paul; Singh, Dishan

    2007-01-01

    Neurology encompasses all aspects of medicine and surgery, but is closer to orthopaedic surgery than many other specialities. Both neurological deficits and bone disorders lead to locomotor system abnormalities, joint complications and limb problems. The main neurological conditions that require the attention of an orthopaedic surgeon are disorders that affect the lower motor neurones. The most common disorders in this group include neuromuscular disorders and traumatic peripheral nerve lesions. Upper motor neurone disorders such as cerebral palsy and stroke are also frequently seen and discussed, as are chronic conditions such as poliomyelitis. The management of these neurological problems is often coordinated in the neurology clinic, and this group, probably more than any other, requires a multidisciplinary team approach. PMID:17308288

  1. Orthopaedic Management of Spasticity.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, Tyler S; Ramirez, Jose M; Schiller, Jonathan R

    2015-12-01

    Spasticity is a common manifestation of many neurological conditions including multiple sclerosis, stroke, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injuries. Management of spasticity seeks to reduce its burden on patients and to limit secondary complications. Non-operative interventions including stretching/splinting, postural management, physical therapy/strengthening, anti-spasticity medications, and botulinum toxin injections may help patients with spasticity. Surgical management of these conditions, however, is often necessary to improve quality of life and prevent complications. Orthopaedic surgeons manage numerous sequelae of spasticity, including joint contractures, hip dislocations, scoliosis, and deformed extremities. When combined with the efforts of rehabilitation specialists, neurologists, and physical/occupational therapists, the orthopaedic management of spasticity can help patients maintain and regain function and independence as well as reduce the risk of long-tem complications.

  2. Biomaterials in orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, M; Michiardi, A; Castaño, O; Planell, J.A

    2008-01-01

    At present, strong requirements in orthopaedics are still to be met, both in bone and joint substitution and in the repair and regeneration of bone defects. In this framework, tremendous advances in the biomaterials field have been made in the last 50 years where materials intended for biomedical purposes have evolved through three different generations, namely first generation (bioinert materials), second generation (bioactive and biodegradable materials) and third generation (materials designed to stimulate specific responses at the molecular level). In this review, the evolution of different metals, ceramics and polymers most commonly used in orthopaedic applications is discussed, as well as the different approaches used to fulfil the challenges faced by this medical field. PMID:18667387

  3. Registries in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, C

    2015-02-01

    The first nationwide orthopaedic registry was created in Sweden in 1975 to collect data on total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Since then, several countries have established registries, with varying degrees of success. Managing a registry requires time and money. Factors that contribute to successful registry management include the use of a single identifier for each patient to ensure full traceability of all procedures related to a given implant; a long-term funding source; a contemporary, rapid, Internet-based data collection method; and the collection of exhaustive data, at least for innovative implants. The effects of registries on practice patterns should be evaluated. The high cost of registries raises issues of independence and content ownership. Scandinavian countries have been maintaining orthopaedic registries for nearly four decades (since 1975). The first English-language orthopaedic registry was not created until 1998 (in New Zealand), and both the US and many European countries are still struggling to establish orthopaedic registries. To date, there are 11 registered nationwide registries on total knee and total hip replacement. The data they contain are often consistent, although contradictions occur in some cases due to major variations in cultural and market factors. The future of registries will depend on the willingness of health authorities and healthcare professionals to support the creation and maintenance of these tools. Surgeons feel that registries should serve merely to compare implants. Health authorities, in contrast, have a strong interest in practice patterns and healthcare institution performances. Striking a balance between these objectives should allow advances in registry development in the near future.

  4. Vitamin D in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Patton, Chad M; Powell, Amy P; Patel, Alpesh A

    2012-03-01

    Vitamin D is an important component in musculoskeletal development, maintenance, and function. Adequate levels of vitamin D correlate with greater bone mineral density, lower rates of osteoporotic fractures, and improved neuromuscular function. Debate exists about both adequate levels required and intake requirements needed to prevent deficiency of vitamin D. Epidemiologic data have identified an increasing number of orthopaedic patients at risk for vitamin D deficiency, with potentially widespread consequences for bone healing, risk of fracture, and neuromuscular function.

  5. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... AAOS Orthopaedic Disclosure Program Position Statements Information Statements Ethics Resources Resolutions Patient, Public & Media Information OrthoInfo Patient Education Newsroom/Media Resources Find ...

  6. Iowa and Eugene, Oregon, orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2003-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, the commitment of orthopaedic surgeons to basic and clinical research and evaluation of treatment outcomes has made possible remarkable improvements in the care of people with injuries and diseases of the limbs and spine. A group of Oregon orthopaedic surgeons has had an important role in these advances, especially in the orthopaedic specialties of sports medicine and hip reconstruction. Since Don Slocum (Iowa Orthopaedic Resident, 1934-1937), started practice in Eugene, Oregon, in 1939, three orthopaedic surgeons, Denny Collis, Craig Mohler and Paul Watson, who received their orthopaedic residency education at the University of Iowa, and three orthopaedic surgeons, Stan James, Tom Wuest and Dan Fitzpatrick, who received their undergraduate, medical school and orthopaedic residency education at the University of Iowa, have joined the group Dr. Slocum founded. These individuals, and their partners, established and have maintained a successful growing practice that serves the people of the Willamette valley, but in addition, they have made important contributions to the advancement of orthopaedics.

  7. Corruption in the health care sector: A barrier to access of orthopaedic care and medical devices in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Globally, injuries cause approximately as many deaths per year as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined, and 90% of injury deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries. Given not all injuries kill, the disability burden, particularly from orthopaedic injuries, is much higher but is poorly measured at present. The orthopaedic services and orthopaedic medical devices needed to manage the injury burden are frequently unavailable in these countries. Corruption is known to be a major barrier to access of health care, but its effects on access to orthopaedic services is still unknown. Methods A qualitative case study of 45 open-ended interviews was conducted to investigate the access to orthopaedic health services and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. Participants included orthopaedic surgeons, related healthcare professionals, industry and government representatives, and patients. Participants’ experiences in accessing orthopaedic medical devices were explored. Thematic analysis was used to analyze and code the transcripts. Results Analysis of the interview data identified poor leadership in government and corruption as major barriers to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices. Corruption was perceived to occur at the worker, hospital and government levels in the forms of misappropriation of funds, theft of equipment, resale of drugs and medical devices, fraud and absenteeism. Other barriers elicited included insufficient health infrastructure and human resources, and high costs of orthopaedic equipment and poverty. Conclusions This study identified perceived corruption as a significant barrier to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. As the burden of injury continues to grow, the need to combat corruption and ensure access to orthopaedic services is imperative. Anti-corruption strategies such as transparency and accountability measures, codes of conduct, whistleblower protection, and higher

  8. Focal points in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    King, J B

    1992-07-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons have long had an association with sport, although it is arguable whether Galen who was the first sports medicine doctor, appointed to the Pergamum Gladiators in 157 AD was a surgeon by todays definition. This surgical role is now out of proportion to the more global aspects of sports medicine as reflected in the rest of this publication, but accurately related to the consequences of injury to the elite performer, where a minor injury may have a major consequence. As the title makes clear this chapter is a series of cameos some describing aspects of the management of common injuries and others indicating new developments.

  9. Advances in Regenerative Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Orthopaedic injuries are very common and a source of much misery and economic stress. Several relevant tissues, such as cartilage, meniscus and intra-articular ligaments, do not heal. And even bone, which normally regenerates spontaneously, can fail to mend. The regeneration of orthopaedic tissues requires four key components: cells, morphogenetic signals, scaffolds and an appropriate mechanical environment. Although differentiated cells from the tissue in question can be used, most cellular research focuses on the use mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). These can be retrieved from many different tissues, and one unresolved question is the degree to which the origin of the cells matters. Embryonic and induced, pluripotential stem cells are also under investigation. Morphogenetic signals are most frequently supplied by individual, recombinant growth factors or native mixtures provided by, for instance, platelet-rich plasma; MSCs are also a rich source of trophic factors. Obstacles to the sustained delivery of individual growth factors can be addressed by gene transfer or smart scaffolds, but we still lack detailed, necessary information on which delivery profiles are needed. Scaffolds may be based upon natural products, synthetic materials, or devitalized extracellular matrix. Strategies to combine these components to regenerate tissue can follow traditional tissue engineering practices, but these are costly, cumbersome and not well suited to treating large numbers of individuals. More expeditious approaches make full use of intrinsic biological processes in vivo to avoid the need for ex vivo expansion of autologous cells and multiple procedures. Clinical translation remains a bottleneck. PMID:24182709

  10. Composites in orthopaedics

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, D.; Levine, D.

    1986-01-01

    With the increasing demand for superior performance placed on present day orthopaedic devices, there exists a constant demand to look for better materials for construction. Because of their good corrosion resistance, early devices were made from 304 or 316 stainless steels. However, the patient population has broadened to include younger individuals. These patients lead active lives and tend to stress the fracture fixation devices. Another requirement for younger patients is a longer implantable service: up to 20 years. With these requirements in mind, high-performance aerospace metal alloys based on cobalt chromium and titanium are used extensively. This paper discusses the requirements and the deficiencies of new materials; biocompatibility, biofunctionality, and manufacturing costs.

  11. Reno Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship business curriculum.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Bray, Timothy J; Hill, Austin D

    2014-07-01

    The Reno Orthopaedic Center (ROC) Trauma Fellowship business curriculum is designed to provide the fellow with a graduate level business practicum and research experience. The time commitments in a typical 12-month trauma fellowship are significant, rendering a traditional didactic master's in business administration difficult to complete during this short time. An organized, structured, practical business education can provide the trauma leaders of tomorrow with the knowledge and experience required to effectively navigate the convoluted and constantly changing healthcare system. The underlying principle throughout the curriculum is to provide the fellow with the practical knowledge to participate in cost-efficient improvements in healthcare delivery. Through the ROC Trauma Fellowship business curriculum, the fellow will learn that delivering healthcare in a manner that provides better outcomes for equal or lower costs is not only possible but a professional and ethical responsibility. However, instilling these values without providing actionable knowledge and programs would be insufficient and ineffective. For this reason, the core of the curriculum is based on individual teaching sessions with a wide array of hospital and private practice administrators. In addition, each section is equipped with a suggested reading list to maximize the learning experience. Upon completion of the curriculum, the fellow should be able to: (1) Participate in strategic planning at both the hospital and practice level based on analysis of financial and clinical data, (2) Understand the function of healthcare systems at both a macro and micro level, (3) Possess the knowledge and skills to be strong leaders and effective communicators in the business lexicon of healthcare, (4) Be a partner and innovator in the improvement of the delivery of orthopaedic services, (5) Combine scientific and strategic viewpoints to provide an evidence-based strategy for improving quality of care in a

  12. Gas gangrene in orthopaedic patients.

    PubMed

    Ying, Zhimin; Zhang, Min; Yan, Shigui; Zhu, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Clostridial myonecrosis is most often seen in settings of trauma, surgery, malignancy, and other underlying immunocompromised conditions. Since 1953 cases of gas gangrene have been reported in orthopaedic patients including open fractures, closed fractures, and orthopaedic surgeries. We present a case of 55-year-old obese woman who developed rapidly progressive gas gangrene in her right leg accompanied by tibial plateau fracture without skin lacerations. She was diagnosed with clostridial myonecrosis and above-the-knee amputation was carried out. This patient made full recovery within three weeks of the initial episode. We identified a total of 50 cases of gas gangrene in orthopaedic patients. Several factors, if available, were analyzed for each case: age, cause of injury, fracture location, pathogen, and outcome. Based on our case report and the literature review, emergency clinicians should be aware of this severe and potentially fatal infectious disease and should not delay treatment or prompt orthopedic surgery consultation.

  13. Simulation in Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bae, Donald S

    2015-01-01

    Surgical simulation has become an increasingly important means of improving skills acquisition, optimizing clinical outcomes, and promoting patient safety. While there have been great strides in other industries and other fields of medicine, simulation training is in its relative infancy within pediatric orthopaedics. Nonetheless, simulation has the potential to be an important component of Quality-Safety-Value Initiative of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA). The purpose of this article will be to review some definitions and concepts related to simulation, to discuss how simulation is beneficial both for trainee education as well as value-based health care, and to provide an update on current initiatives within pediatric orthopaedic surgery.

  14. Gas Gangrene in Orthopaedic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Zhimin; Zhang, Min; Yan, Shigui; Zhu, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Clostridial myonecrosis is most often seen in settings of trauma, surgery, malignancy, and other underlying immunocompromised conditions. Since 1953 cases of gas gangrene have been reported in orthopaedic patients including open fractures, closed fractures, and orthopaedic surgeries. We present a case of 55-year-old obese woman who developed rapidly progressive gas gangrene in her right leg accompanied by tibial plateau fracture without skin lacerations. She was diagnosed with clostridial myonecrosis and above-the-knee amputation was carried out. This patient made full recovery within three weeks of the initial episode. We identified a total of 50 cases of gas gangrene in orthopaedic patients. Several factors, if available, were analyzed for each case: age, cause of injury, fracture location, pathogen, and outcome. Based on our case report and the literature review, emergency clinicians should be aware of this severe and potentially fatal infectious disease and should not delay treatment or prompt orthopedic surgery consultation. PMID:24288638

  15. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  16. Patient-Specific Orthopaedic Implants.

    PubMed

    Haglin, Jack M; Eltorai, Adam E M; Gil, Joseph A; Marcaccio, Stephen E; Botero-Hincapie, Juliana; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-11-01

    Patient-specific orthopaedic implants are emerging as a clinically promising treatment option for a growing number of conditions to better match an individual's anatomy. Patient-specific implant (PSI) technology aims to reduce overall procedural costs, minimize surgical time, and maximize patient outcomes by achieving better biomechanical implant fit. With this commercially-available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used in conjunction with specialized computer programs to create preoperative patient-specific surgical plans and to develop custom cutting guides from 3-D reconstructed images of patient anatomy. Surgeons can then place these temporary guides or "jigs" during the procedure, allowing them to better recreate the exact resections of the computer-generated surgical plan. Over the past decade, patient-specific implants have seen increased use in orthopaedics and they have been widely indicated in total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, and corrective osteotomies. Patient-specific implants have also been explored for use in total shoulder arthroplasty and spinal surgery. Despite their increasing popularity, significant support for PSI use in orthopaedics has been lacking in the literature and it is currently uncertain whether the theoretical biomechanical advantages of patient-specific orthopaedic implants carry true advantages in surgical outcomes when compared to standard procedures. The purpose of this review was to assess the current status of patient-specific orthopaedic implants, to explore their future direction, and to summarize any comparative published studies that measure definitive surgical characteristics of patient-specific orthopaedic implant use such as patient outcomes, biomechanical implant alignment, surgical cost, patient blood loss, or patient recovery.

  17. Radiation Safety in Pediatric Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Caird, Michelle S

    2015-01-01

    Patients, surgeons, and staff are exposed to ionizing radiation in pediatric orthopaedic surgery from diagnostic studies and imaging associated with procedures. Estimating radiation dose to pediatric patients is based on complex algorithms and dose to surgeons and staff is based on dosimeter monitoring. Surgeons can decrease radiation exposure to patients with careful and thoughtful ordering of diagnostic studies and by minimizing exposure intraoperatively. Surgeon and staff radiation exposure can be minimized with educational programs, proper shielding and positioning intraoperatively, and prudent use of intraoperative imaging. Overall, better awareness among pediatric orthopaedic surgeons of our role in radiation exposure can lead to improvements in radiation safety.

  18. Social Media and Orthopaedics: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Suryavanshi, Tanishq; Geier, C David; Leland, J Martin; Silverman, Lance; Duggal, Naven

    2016-01-01

    Social media presents unique opportunities and challenges for practicing orthopaedic surgeons. Social media, such as blogging, Facebook, and Twitter, provides orthopaedic surgeons with a new and innovative way to communicate with patients and colleagues. Social media may be a way for orthopaedic surgeons to enhance communication with patients and healthcare populations; however, orthopaedic surgeons must recognize the limitations of social media and the pitfalls of increased connectedness in patient care.

  19. Applications of nanotechnology in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Tasker, L H; Sparey-Taylor, G J; Nokes, L D M

    2007-03-01

    Nanotechnology is the application of science and engineering at the nanoscale. A diverse range of applications are beginning to emerge in all areas of medicine. We performed a survey from November 2005 to March 2006 using the Internet search engines PubMed, ScienceDirect, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Google Scholar. We report on the role of nanotechnology in orthopaedics, exploring current and potential applications. Nanostructured materials have been proposed as the next generation of orthopaedic implant properties by creating a surface environment more conducive for osteoblast function. Bone substitute materials, whose nanoscale composition emulates the hierarchic organization of natural bone, shows initiation of the desirable formation of an apatite layer. Nanotechnology also has been harnessed to improve the cutting performance and quality of surgical blades. Postoperative infection rates may be reduced by using nanofibrous membrane wound dressings containing antibacterial properties. The most notable application of nanotechnology in orthopaedics may be drug delivery, including nanotherapeutics for treating bone cancer and arthritis. Nanotechnology is being used in orthopaedics, and likely will play a valuable role in future developments.

  20. Fundamentals of orthopaedics. Fourth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Gartland, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses topics on orthopaedic medicine. Treatments, radiographic findings, and potential complications are provided for the complete scope of musculoskeletal problems. It reviews the latest diagnostic techniques, including arthroscopy and CT scanning and also gives updates on the newest approaches to the management of skeletal infections, the latest on joint replacements, and offers a review of arthroscopic surgery.

  1. Stem cells in orthopaedics and fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Alwattar, Basil J; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Kirsch, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell application is a burgeoning field of medicine that is likely to influence the future of orthopaedic surgery. Stem cells are associated with great promise and great controversy. For the orthopaedic surgeon, stem cells may change the way that orthopaedic surgery is practiced and the overall approach of the treatment of musculoskeletal disease. Stem cells may change the field of orthopaedics from a field dominated by surgical replacements and reconstructions to a field of regeneration and prevention. This review will introduce the basic concepts of stem cells pertinent to the orthopaedic surgeon and proceed with a more in depth discussion of current developments in the study of stem cells in fracture healing.

  2. Planning for life after orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Barr, Joseph S; McCaslin, Michael J; Hinds, Cynthia K

    2014-01-01

    The word retirement is going out of fashion. Many orthopaedic surgeons want to work in some capacity when they stop performing surgery. Making a smooth transition from a busy orthopaedic practice to alternative work demands advanced planning. The surgeon must consider personal issues that involve how to use human capital (his or her accumulated knowledge and experience). New ventures, hobbies, travel, and spending time with family and friends are some possibilities. Plans for slowing down or leaving the practice should be discussed and agreed on well ahead of time. Agreements for buyouts may be difficult to work out and will require creative thinking. The solo practitioner can close the practice or hire a successor. Financial planning is perhaps the most important consideration and should be started by approximately age 40. It is recommended that the surgeon develop a portfolio of secure investments and annuities to provide adequate income for as long as is needed and then to turn the residual income to one's family, favorite charities, or other desired cause. A team of competent advisors is needed to help develop and achieve one's goals, create financial security, and provide the discipline to carry out the needed planning for life after orthopaedics.

  3. Orthopaedic conditions in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Wudbhav N; Weiss, Jennifer; Skaggs, David L

    2009-02-01

    The occasional consultation on a neonate can be unfamiliar territory for many orthopaedic surgeons. Just as children are not little adults, newborns are not just little children; rather, they have a unique physiology that affects the presentation of their orthopaedic concerns. Careful physical examination with appropriate understanding of neonatal development is essential to making the proper diagnosis. A flail extremity in the newborn is most commonly attributed to fracture or brachial plexus palsy; however, infection must also be considered and ruled out to prevent long-term morbidity. Metatarsus adductus is the most common foot abnormality, but clubfoot, calcaneovalgus deformity, and congenital vertical talus may also be encountered. Joint contractures that spontaneously improve are normal in the newborn, but it is important to identify and institute proper treatment for early developmental dysplasia of the hip, congenital knee dislocation, and torticollis. Clavicular pseudarthrosis and periosteal reactions may be discovered on radiographic examination. A basic understanding of the relevant conditions will help the orthopaedist with the initial diagnosis and management of orthopaedic issues in the newborn.

  4. Eponymous doctors associated with Edinburgh, part 3--Abraham Colles, Sir William Ferguson, John S Haldane, Argyll Robertson, Thomas Young.

    PubMed

    Doyle, D

    2007-03-01

    In the first papers in this series, it was shown that eponyms were often bestowed on physicians and surgeons who were already famous, had made many discoveries never honoured with eponyms, and were often the leading doctors of their day. Only occasionally was the eponym suggested by a friend or colleague; more usually it was a doctor abroad who wanted to show respect to a great man but the choice of the particular syndrome or discovery was a random one. Eponyms may have had their uses. They were usually much shorter than a detailed description of a medical syndrome or anatomical feature and may sometimes have been used as euphemisms in much the same way as, until recently, bedside teachers protected the patients by speaking of 'mitotic lesions' or 'neoplasms', 'Hansen's Disease' or 'acid-fast bacilli'. The conferring and use of eponyms appears to be lessening but, as shown in this final paper, they are still used and possibly useful, and can tell us things of interest about the recipient and the proposer.

  5. The case for orthopaedic medicine in Israel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal complaints are probably the most frequent reasons for visiting a doctor. They comprise more than a quarter of the complaints to primary practitioners and are also the most common reason for referral to secondary or tertiary medicine. The clinicians most frequently consulted on musculoskeletal problems, and probably perceived to know most on the topic are orthopaedic surgeons. But in Israel, there is significant ambivalence with various aspects of the consultations provided by orthopaedic surgeons, both among the public and among various groups of clinicians, particularly family practitioners and physiotherapists. Methods In order to understand this problem we integrate new data we have collected with previously published data. New data include the rates of visits to orthopaedic surgeons per annum in one of Israel’s large non-profit HMO’s, and the domains of the visits to an orthopaedic surgeon. Results Orthopaedic surgeons are the third most frequently contracted secondary specialists in one of the Israeli HMO’s. Between 2009 and 2012 there was a 1.7% increase in visits to orthopaedists per annum (P < 0.0001, after correction for population growth). Almost 80% of the domains of the problems presented to an orthopaedic surgeon were in fields orthopaedic surgeons have limited formal training. Discussion While orthopaedic surgeons are clearly the authority on surgical problems of the musculoskeletal system, most musculoskeletal problems are not surgical, and the orthopaedic surgeon often lacks training in these areas which might be termed orthopaedic medicine. Furthermore, in Israel and in many other developed countries there is no accessible medical specialty that studies these problems, trains medical students in the subject and focuses on treating these problems. The neglect of this area which can be called the “Orthopaedic Medicine Lacuna” is responsible for inadequate treatment of non-surgical problems of the

  6. Surgical skills simulation in trauma and orthopaedic training.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Euan R B; Lewis, Thomas L; Ferran, Nicholas A

    2014-12-19

    Changing patterns of health care delivery and the rapid evolution of orthopaedic surgical techniques have made it increasingly difficult for trainees to develop expertise in their craft. Working hour restrictions and a drive towards senior led care demands that proficiency be gained in a shorter period of time whilst requiring a greater skill set than that in the past. The resulting conflict between service provision and training has necessitated the development of alternative methods in order to compensate for the reduction in 'hands-on' experience. Simulation training provides the opportunity to develop surgical skills in a controlled environment whilst minimising risks to patient safety, operating theatre usage and financial expenditure. Many options for simulation exist within orthopaedics from cadaveric or prosthetic models, to arthroscopic simulators, to advanced virtual reality and three-dimensional software tools. There are limitations to this form of training, but it has significant potential for trainees to achieve competence in procedures prior to real-life practice. The evidence for its direct transferability to operating theatre performance is limited but there are clear benefits such as increasing trainee confidence and familiarity with equipment. With progressively improving methods of simulation available, it is likely to become more important in the ongoing and future training and assessment of orthopaedic surgeons.

  7. The trends and challenges in orthopaedic simulation

    PubMed Central

    Mediouni, Mohamed; Volosnikov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Generally, in some universities of medicine, orthopaedic training procedures represent a difficult task due to the inadequacies of the systems, the resources, and the use of technologies. This article explains the challenges and the needs for more research in the issue of orthopaedic simulation around the world. PMID:26566328

  8. Orthopaedic research and education foundation and industry.

    PubMed

    Wurth, Gene R; Sherr, Judy H; Coffman, Thomas M

    2003-07-01

    Members of orthopaedic industry commit a significant amount of funds each year to support research and education programs that are directly related to their product(s). In addition, industry supports organizations such as the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation. The relationship between the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation and industry began in the early 1980s. The support to the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation from industry primarily has come in the form of unrestricted grants. These grants best can be looked at as an investment rather than a contribution. This form of giving, once called corporate philanthropy is more accurately referred to as strategic philanthropy. Members of industry make these investments to enhance their reputations, build brand awareness, market their products and services, improve employee morale, increase customer loyalty, and establish strategic alliances. The specialty of orthopaedics is among the leaders in medicine in the amount of funding raised within the specialty for research and education programs. This is because of the amount of support from members of industry and the surgeons. During the past 15 years, 40% of the annual support to the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation has come from industry and the balance has come from surgeons and members of lay public. Future industry support of the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation and other organizations within the specialty of orthopaedics will be dependent on the continued demonstration of tangible returns in areas described.

  9. [Orthopaedic footwear against foot ulcers in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Bus, Sicco A

    2014-01-01

    In people with diabetes mellitus, foot ulcers are a major problem because they increase the risk of a foot infection and amputation and reduce quality of life. After a foot ulcer has healed, the risk of recurrence is high. Orthopaedic shoes and orthotics are often prescribed to high risk patients and aim to reduce the mechanical pressure on the plantar surface of the foot. Orthopaedic footwear that is modified to reduce pressure is not much more effective in preventing foot ulcer recurrence than orthopaedic footwear that did not undergo such modification, unless the shoes are worn as recommended. In that case, the risk of ulcer recurrence is reduced by 46%. In patients with a history of ulceration, compliance in wearing orthopaedic shoes at home is low, while these patients walk more inside the house than outside the house. Foot pressure measurements should be part of the prescription and evaluation of orthopaedic footwear for patients at high risk for foot ulceration.

  10. Computers and the orthopaedic office.

    PubMed

    Berumen, Edmundo; Barllow, Fidel Dobarganes; Fong, Fransisco Javier; Lopez, Jorge Arturo

    2002-01-01

    The advance of today's medicine could be linked very closely to the history of computers through the last twenty years. In the beginning the first attempt to build a computer was trying to help us with mathematical calculations. This has changed recently and computers are now linked to x-ray machines, CT scanners, and MRIs. Being able to share information is one of the goals of the future. Today's computer technology has helped a great deal to allow orthopaedic surgeons from around the world to consult on a difficult case or to become a part of a large database. Obtaining the results from a method of treatment using a multicentric information study can be done on a regular basis. In the future, computers will help us to retrieve information from patients' clinical history directly from a hospital database or by portable memory cards that will carry every radiograph or video from previous surgeries.

  11. The Vienna Heritage of Iowa Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2003-01-01

    Strong traditions of basic research, clinical innovation, teaching and integrating science and evaluation of outcomes into clinical practice have characterized University of Iowa orthopaedics for ninety years. These traditions were brought to Iowa City from Vienna when Iowa City was a town of fewer than 10,000 people in a sparsely populated rural state. In the last third of the 19th century, surgeons at the University of Vienna, led by Theodore Billroth (1829-1894), helped transform the practice of surgery. They developed new more effective procedures, analyzed the results of their operations, promoted the emergence and growth of surgical specialties and sought understanding of tissue structure, physiology and pathophysiology. Their efforts made Vienna one of the world's most respected centers for operative treatment, basic and clinical research and surgical education. Two individuals who followed Billroth, Eduard Albert (1841-1900) and Adolf Lorenz (1854-1946) focused their research and clinical practice on orthopaedics. Their successes in the study and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders led one of their students, Arthur Steindler (1878-1959), a 1902 graduate of the Vienna Medical School, to pursue a career in orthopaedics. Following medical school, he worked in Lorenz's orthopaedic clinic until 1907 when he joined John Ridlon (1852-1936) at the Chicago Home for Crippled Children. In 1910, Steindler became Professor of Orthopaedics at the Drake Medical School in Des Moines, Iowa, and, in 1913, John G. Bowman, the President of the University of Iowa, recruited him to establish an orthopaedic clinical and academic program in Iowa City. For the next third of a century he guided the development of the University of Iowa Orthopaedics Department, helped establish the fields of orthopaedic biomechanics and kinesiology and tirelessly stressed the importance of physiology, pathology and assessment of the outcomes of operations. From the legacy of Billroth, Albert and

  12. American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Upcoming Meetings Online Education Archived Meetings Faculty Resources Sports Medicine Fellowships Traveling Fellowship Submit an Abstract Submit ... Support AOSSM Research Publications Toggle American Journal of Sports Medicine Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach Orthopaedic Journal ...

  13. Physiotherapy following elective orthopaedic procedures.

    PubMed

    De Kleijn, P; Blamey, G; Zourikian, N; Dalzell, R; Lobet, S

    2006-07-01

    As haemophilic arthropathy and chronic synovitis are still the most important clinical features in people with haemophilia, different kinds of invasive and orthopaedic procedures have become more common during the last decades. The availability of clotting factor has made arthroplasty of one, or even multiple joints possible. This article highlights the role of physiotherapy before and after such procedures. Synovectomies are sometimes advocated in people with haemophilia to stop repetitive cycles of intra-articular bleeds and/or chronic synovitis. The synovectomy itself, however, does not solve the muscle atrophy, loss of range of motion (ROM), instability and poor propriocepsis, often developed during many years. The key is in taking advantage of the subsequent, relatively safe, bleed-free period to address these important issues. Although the preoperative ROM is the most important variable influencing the postoperative ROM after total knee arthroplasty, there are a few key points that should be considered to improve the outcome. Early mobilization, either manual or by means of a continuous passive mobilization machine, can be an optimal solution during the very first postoperative days. Muscle isometric contractions and light open kinetic chain exercises should also be started in order to restore the quadriceps control. Partial weight bearing can be started shortly after, because of quadriceps inhibition and to avoid excessive swelling. The use of continuous clotting factor replacement permits earlier and intensive rehabilitation during the postoperative period. During the rehabilitation of shoulder arthroplasty restoring the function of the rotator cuff is of utmost importance. Often the rotator cuff muscles are inhibited in the presence of pain and loss of ROM. Physiotherapy also assists in improving pain and maintaining ROM and strength. Functional weight-bearing tasks, such as using the upper limbs to sit and stand, are often discouraged during the first 6

  14. Treatment of singultus by traction on the tongue: an eponym revised.

    PubMed

    Petroianu, Georg A

    2013-01-01

    Sir William Osler (1849-1919) is associated with a long list of contributions and eponymous entities including filaria, maneuvers, nodules, syndromes, and triads. Among the less known ones is the Oslerian pulling of the tongue for termination of obstinate hiccup (singultus). Janet Travell (1901-1977) , physician to two United States presidents, attributed the tongue-pulling maneuver to Osler. Dr. Travell cites Osler's Principles and Practice of Medicine from 1912, where mention of the remedy can be found. The therapy, however, is much older and (perhaps not surprisingly) of French origin. It can be viewed as a spin-off of attempts by Jean Laborde (1830-1903) to resuscitate the "presque morts" (almost dead) via rhythmic traction of the tongue. Lesser known physicians involved in the treatment of singultus by traction of the tongue are Jean Viaud (1862-1946) and Raphaël Lépine (1840-1919).

  15. Bioceramic Coatings for Orthopaedic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Allison A.

    2003-11-02

    During the past century, man-made materials and devices have been developed to the point at which they have been used successfully to replace and/or restore function to diseased or damaged tissues. In the field of orthopaedics, the use of metal implants has significantly improved the quality of life for countless individuals. Critical factors for implant success include proper design, material selection, and biocompatibility. While early research focused on the understanding biomechanical properties of the metal device, recent work has turned toward improving the biological properties of these devices. This has lead to the introduction of calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics as a bioactive interface between the bulk metal impart and the surrounding tissue. The first calcium phosphate coatings where produced via vapor phase routes but more recently, there has been the emergence of solution based and biomimetic methods. While each approach has its own intrinsic materials and biological properties, in general CaP coatings have the promise to improve implant biocompatibility and ultimately implant longevity.

  16. Measuring outcomes in orthopaedics: implementation of an outcomes program in an outpatient orthopaedic practice.

    PubMed

    Rodts, Mary F; Glanzman, Renée; Gray, Adam; Johnson, Randal; Viellieu, Dennis; Hachem, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    With increased demand to provide quality care for patients, orthopaedic practices will need to develop ways to efficiently collect and manage data to support the care that they provide. An outcomes management program must be efficient and consistent to provide good data. This article describes the implementation of an outcomes program at one large private orthopaedic practice within an academic medical setting.

  17. Predictors of Orthopaedic Surgery in NCAA Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dean; Rugg, Caitlin Marie; Mayer, Erik; Sulzicki, Pamela; Vail, Jeremy; Hame, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Orthopaedic injury and surgery is relatively common in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes and can have devastating career consequences. However, there is a paucity of data regarding predictors of orthopaedic surgery in collegiate athletes. The purpose of this study was to analyze player-related predictors of orthopaedic surgery, including that of the shoulder, hip, and knee, in NCAA athletes. Methods: All NCAA Division I collegiate athletes at a single institution who began participation from the 2003-2004 through 2008-2009 seasons were retrospectively identified. Player-related factors, including gender, sport, and any pre-college upper or lower extremity orthopaedic surgery, were elicited through pre-participation evaluations (PPEs). Athletes who underwent an orthopaedic surgery in college were identified through the Sports Injury Monitoring System and medical records. All patient-related independent variables were included in a multiple Cox regression model. Exposure time was calculated from the date of PPE to the date of surgery (event) or to the end of the collegiate athletic career (censored). Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: In total, 1,142 athletes in 12 sports (baseball/softball, basketball, football, golf, gymnastics, rowing, swimming & diving, soccer, tennis, track & field/cross country, volleyball, water polo) were identified. There were 262 documented orthopaedic surgeries, including those involving the shoulder (n = 34), hip (n = 25), and knee (n = 72), in 182 athletes. Using the multiple Cox regression model, pre-college lower extremity surgery was an independent predictor of orthopaedic (P = 0.004, HR = 1.88) and knee (P < 0.001, HR = 3.91) surgery, and type of sport was an independent predictor of orthopaedic (P < 0.001), shoulder (P = 0.002), and knee surgery (P < 0.001) (Table 1). Participation in gymnastics, basketball, and

  18. Accredited Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Websites

    PubMed Central

    Yayac, Michael; Javandal, Mitra; Mulcahey, Mary K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: A substantial number of orthopaedic surgeons apply for sports medicine fellowships after residency completion. The Internet is one of the most important resources applicants use to obtain information about fellowship programs, with the program website serving as one of the most influential sources. The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM), San Francisco Match (SFM), and Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA) maintain databases of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs. A 2013 study evaluated the content and accessibility of the websites for accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships. Purpose: To reassess these websites based on the same parameters and compare the results with those of the study published in 2013 to determine whether any improvement has been made in fellowship website content or accessibility. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: We reviewed all existing websites for the 95 accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships included in the AOSSM, SFM, and AANA databases. Accessibility of the websites was determined by performing a Google search for each program. A total of 89 sports fellowship websites were evaluated for overall content. Websites for the remaining 6 programs could not be identified, so they were not included in content assessment. Results: Of the 95 accredited sports medicine fellowships, 49 (52%) provided links in the AOSSM database, 89 (94%) in the SFM database, and 24 (25%) in the AANA database. Of the 89 websites, 89 (100%) provided a description of the program, 62 (70%) provided selection process information, and 40 (45%) provided a link to the SFM website. Two searches through Google were able to identify links to 88% and 92% of all accredited programs. Conclusion: The majority of accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs fail to utilize the Internet to its full potential as a resource to provide applicants with detailed information about the

  19. John Hunter and the origins of modern orthopaedic research.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher H

    2007-04-01

    Orthopaedic research is a multi-disciplinary, eclectic pursuit conducted in a scientific manner. John Hunter (1728-1793), the Founder of Scientific Surgery, was the first to engage systematically in this enterprise. Born in Scotland, Hunter moved to London to help his brother, William, run an anatomy school. This involved both the procurement and dissection of cadavers, for which activities John showed great aptitude. Further training and a spell as an army surgeon equipped him for his life's work as a practitioner, researcher and teacher. Hunter amassed an enormous collection of specimens displayed in a specially designed house he constructed in Leicester Square, and maintained an extensive menagerie and additional laboratories in Earl's Court. Many of his specimens are now housed in the Hunterian Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons in London. Among Hunter's contributions to orthopaedics are his discovery of bone remodeling, and his studies on the repair and regeneration of bone, cartilage and tendon. He developed numerous new surgical procedures, and provided detailed anatomical descriptions that often corrected received wisdom. Many of his pupils became famous in their own right and two of them founded the USA's first medical school. John Hunter died of a heart attack brought on by hospital administrators.

  20. Silver nanoparticles and their orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Brennan, S A; Ní Fhoghlú, C; Devitt, B M; O'Mahony, F J; Brabazon, D; Walsh, A

    2015-05-01

    Implant-associated infection is a major source of morbidity in orthopaedic surgery. There has been extensive research into the development of materials that prevent biofilm formation, and hence, reduce the risk of infection. Silver nanoparticle technology is receiving much interest in the field of orthopaedics for its antimicrobial properties, and the results of studies to date are encouraging. Antimicrobial effects have been seen when silver nanoparticles are used in trauma implants, tumour prostheses, bone cement, and also when combined with hydroxyapatite coatings. Although there are promising results with in vitro and in vivo studies, the number of clinical studies remains small. Future studies will be required to explore further the possible side effects associated with silver nanoparticles, to ensure their use in an effective and biocompatible manner. Here we present a review of the current literature relating to the production of nanosilver for medical use, and its orthopaedic applications.

  1. Intravenous regional anaesthesia for lower limb orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Fagg, P. S.

    1987-01-01

    Intravenous regional anaesthesia in lower limb orthopaedic surgery has rarely been reported. A prospective series of 50 orthopaedic procedures performed with prilocaine is presented. In over 90% of patients excellent anaesthesia was obtained. PMID:3426092

  2. American Orthopaedic Surgeons in World War I.

    PubMed

    Green, David P; DeLee, Jesse C

    2017-04-05

    On April 6, 1917, the United States declared war on Germany and entered what was then called the Great War. Among the first officers sent to Europe were 21 orthopaedic surgeons in the so-called First Goldthwait Unit. Prior to the war, orthopaedics had been a nonoperative "strap-and-buckle" specialty that dealt primarily with infections, congenital abnormalities, and posttraumatic deformity. The Great War changed all of that forever, creating a new surgical specialty with emphasis on acute treatment, prevention of deformity, restoration of function, and rehabilitation.

  3. [Orthopaedic management of long bones metastasis].

    PubMed

    Fleury, Thierry Rod; Holzer, Nicolas; Fleury, Mapi; Hoffmeyer, Pierre J

    2012-12-19

    The recent progress in oncologic management of patients with metastatic disease has permitted a significant improvement of their life expectancy. Many of these patients will suffer from complications related to bone metastasis. Unfortunately an orthopaedic treatment is seldom offered to them, mainly because of the misconception that this would not bring them any benefice. However these patients are often good candidates for an orthopaedic management, which objectives are to relieve pain and to re-establish their quality of life. The available surgical techniques are well described and the management protocols are clearly defined, as are the expectable complications and the errors that must not be done.

  4. The Orthopaedically Handicapped and Computer Usage: The Case of TRNC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dincyurek, Sibel; Arsan, Nihan; Caglar, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Although various studies have been conducted in the field of orthopaedic impairment, research regarding computer education for orthopaedically impaired individuals remains insufficient. This study aimed to evaluate the use of computers by orthopaedically impaired individuals from a wider perspective. The findings of the study emphasise the…

  5. Evidence-based orthopaedics: A brief history

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Daniel J; Bhandari, Mohit

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine was recently noted as one of the top 15 most important medical discoveries over the past 160 years. Since the term was coined in 1990, EBM has seen unparalleled adoption in medicine and surgery. We discuss the early origins of EBM and its dissemination in medicine, especially orthopaedic surgery. PMID:19826513

  6. Getting Started in Orthopaedic Trauma Research.

    PubMed

    Mir, Hassan R

    2015-11-01

    Incorporating research into practice as an orthopaedic trauma surgeon can be very fulfilling. There are challenges when getting started whether in a university or other practice setting. Understanding the various components of the research process is important before beginning and thereafter. This article reviews some of the issues that may be encountered and strategies to help.

  7. Laser Applications on Orthopaedic Bone Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0627 TITLE:“Laser Applications on Orthopaedic Bone Repair” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kotaro Sena , D.D.S., Ph.D...6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Kotaro Sena , D.D.S., Ph.D.; Amarjit S. Virdi, Ph.D. 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION

  8. The Orthopaedic Training Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, George E.; And Others

    A four year study was initiated to systematically improve the certification procedures of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery. Consequently, the immediate research aim was the development of more valid and reliable techniques in assessing professional competence in orthopedics. A definition of professional competence was reached through…

  9. A Psychomotor Skills Course for Orthopaedic Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippert, Frederick G.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The course described and evaluated here was developed at the University of Washington School of Medicine to teach 20 orthopaedic residents operative techniques, instrument usage, and safety precautions outside of the operating room without hazard to the patient or regard to time constraints. (JT)

  10. The orthopaedic surgeon and manufacturing industry relationship. Ethical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lim, E V; Aquino, N J

    1999-11-01

    Orthopaedic surgery has progressed over the years because of innovative work of pioneering orthopaedic surgeons; new developments in internal fixation techniques and implants codeveloped with the orthopaedic manufacturing industry have improved treatment greatly. This article analyzes and reviews the relationship of orthopaedic surgeons to the orthopaedic implant industry, analyzing three broad categories of the relationship: (1) physicians receiving gifts from industry; (2) the orthopaedic industry's financial support of educational and research endeavors of academic trauma and other centers; and (3) the relationship of the industry with innovators in the field of orthopaedic surgery by retainer fees, royalties, and stock options from industry. The ethical relationship requires: (1) putting the patient's concerns first above vested interests; (2) an awareness of a potential for abuse; and (3) a level of awareness of the relationship and the ability to explain and inculcate this relationship in the teaching program of young residents to maintain the high standards that have been set.

  11. Leadership and business education in orthopaedic residency training programs.

    PubMed

    Kiesau, Carter D; Heim, Kathryn A; Parekh, Selene G

    2011-01-01

    Leadership and business challenges have become increasingly present in the practice of medicine. Orthopaedic residency programs are at the forefront of educating and preparing orthopaedic surgeons. This study attempts to quantify the number of orthopaedic residency programs in the United States that include leadership or business topics in resident education program and to determine which topics are being taught and rate the importance of various leadership characteristics and business topics. A survey was sent to all orthopaedic department chairpersons and residency program directors in the United States via e-mail. The survey responses were collected using a survey collection website. The respondents rated the importance of leadership training for residents as somewhat important. The quality of character, integrity, and honesty received the highest average rating among 19 different qualities of good leaders in orthopaedics. The inclusion of business training in resident education was also rated as somewhat important. The topic of billing and coding received the highest average rating among 14 different orthopaedically relevant business topics. A variety of topics beyond the scope of clinical practice must be included in orthopaedic residency educational curricula. The decreased participation of newly trained orthopaedic surgeons in leadership positions and national and state orthopaedic organizations is concerning for the future of orthopaedic surgery. Increased inclusion of leadership and business training in resident education is important to better prepare trainees for the future.

  12. Stroke assessment in the perioperative orthopaedic patient.

    PubMed

    Weinhardt, Janice; Jacobson, Kristine

    2012-01-01

    A growing elderly population with an increasing number of comorbidities is presenting for orthopaedic procedures and interventions, lending themselves to greater risk for complications, including stroke. Prior stroke or transient ischemic attack, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, carotid stenosis, and advanced age are the most common risk factors for perioperative stroke. A comprehensive neurologic assessment should include a thorough history including identification of risk factors, pertinent medications, and a physical examination. This assessment is important to establish a baseline for subsequent neurologic evaluations in the postoperative period. Neurologic physical assessment can be an intimidating task, especially for the orthopaedic nurse who lacks experience in caring for the neurologic patient. Patients who are found with a focal neurologic deficit that is suspicious for stroke require urgent assessment, exclusion of stroke mimics, and activation of the institution's stroke team to allow for brain saving interventions. Time is brain.

  13. Setting standards for medical writing in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Mauffrey, Cyril; Scarlat, Marius M; Pećina, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Once the privilege of few clinical scholars in the field of orthopaedics, medical writing has become a must for career advancement. The number of papers submitted and published yearly has increased steadily, and with the development of the Internet, manuscript and journals have become easily accessible. Medical writing has risen to become a discipline in itself, with rules and standards. However, heterogeneity in the quality of papers submitted still prevails, with large variations in both form and content. With countries such as China and India submitting an exponential number of manuscripts, it is important and helpful that standards of medical writing be emphasised to help writers who do not always have the required support to produce an outstanding manuscript. In this paper, we summarise what may become standards for medical writing in the field of orthopaedics.

  14. Evaluation of malnutrition in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cross, Michael Brian; Yi, Paul Hyunsoo; Thomas, Charlotte F; Garcia, Jane; Della Valle, Craig J

    2014-03-01

    Malnutrition can increase the risk of surgical site infection in both elective spine surgery and total joint arthroplasty. Obesity and diabetes are common comorbid conditions in patients who are malnourished. Despite the relatively high incidence of nutritional disorders among patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery, the evaluation and management of malnutrition is not generally well understood by practicing orthopaedic surgeons. Serologic parameters such as total lymphocyte count, albumin level, prealbumin level, and transferrin level have all been used as markers for nutrition status. In addition, anthropometric measurements, such as calf and arm muscle circumference or triceps skinfold, and standardized scoring systems, such as the Rainey-MacDonald nutritional index, the Mini Nutritional Assessment, and institution-specific nutritional scoring tools, are useful to define malnutrition. Preoperative nutrition assessment and optimization of nutritional parameters, including tight glucose control, normalization of serum albumin, and safe weight loss, may reduce the risk of perioperative complications, including infection.

  15. Nationwide Databases in Orthopaedic Surgery Research.

    PubMed

    Bohl, Daniel D; Singh, Kern; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2016-10-01

    The use of nationwide databases to conduct orthopaedic research has expanded markedly in recent years. Nationwide databases offer large sample sizes, sampling of patients who are representative of the country as a whole, and data that enable investigation of trends over time. The most common use of nationwide databases is to study the occurrence of postoperative adverse events. Other uses include the analysis of costs and the investigation of critical hospital metrics, such as length of stay and readmission rates. Although nationwide databases are powerful research tools, readers should be aware of the differences between them and their limitations. These include variations and potential inaccuracies in data collection, imperfections in patient sampling, insufficient postoperative follow-up, and lack of orthopaedic-specific outcomes.

  16. Synthetic biodegradable polymers for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Behravesh, E; Yasko, A W; Engel, P S; Mikos, A G

    1999-10-01

    Synthetic biodegradable polymers offer an alternative to the use of autografts, allografts, and nondegradable materials for bone replacement. They can be synthesized with tailored mechanical and degradative properties. They also can be processed to porous scaffolds with desired pore morphologic features conducive to tissue ingrowth. Moreover, functionalized polymers can modulate cellular function and induce tissue ingrowth. This review focuses on four classes of polymers that hold promise for orthopaedic applications: poly alpha-hydroxy esters, polyphosphazenes, polyanhydrides, and polypropylene fumarate crosslinked networks.

  17. The surgeon's assistant: an orthopaedic model at Hastings.

    PubMed

    Stenhouse, N; Gallannaugh, S C

    1996-07-01

    An Orthopaedic Surgeon's Assistant has been part of the orthopaedic surgical team at Hastings since 1983. Having a suitably trained person in post ensures continuity and stability and enhances the treatment of patients, the performance of the department and the training offered to Higher Surgical Trainees. Discussion includes the value of such a role, other orthopaedic models and the need for a nationally accredited training scheme and qualification.

  18. Tele-orthopaedics: United States Army European Regional Medical Command.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jeffrey; Walker, Shaka; Melaas, David; Crane, Maria; Bacahui, Jacob; Boedeker, Ben H

    2012-01-01

    Telemedicine is the provision of medical care over long distances by way of videoconferencing and other communication technologies. Staff at Vilseck U.S. Army Clinic set up a 3-month pilot real-time tele-orthopaedic clinic to determine if it was feasible to extend Orthopaedic specialty care over long distances. A full time physician assistant was located at the patient site and an orthopaedic surgeon was located at the Landstuhl or Heidelberg site. Patients were initially evaluated by the PA. Complex consults were reviewed by the PA and Orthopaedic surgeon via telephone or VTC. Patients meeting possible indications for surgery were then scheduled for a VTC consult with a surgeon.

  19. 75 FR 32210 - United States v. Idaho Orthopaedic Society, Timothy Doerr, Jeffrey Hessing, Idaho Sports Medicine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... Antitrust Division United States v. Idaho Orthopaedic Society, Timothy Doerr, Jeffrey Hessing, Idaho Sports.... Idaho Orthopaedic Society, Timothy Doerr, Jeffrey Hessing, Idaho Sports Medicine Institute, John Kloss..., Plaintiffs, vs. Idaho Orthopaedic Society, Timothy Doerr, Jeffrey Hessing, Idaho Sports Medicine...

  20. What is orthopaedic triage? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Joanne H; James, Rebecca E; Davey, Rachel; Waddington, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Complex and chronic disease is placing significant pressure on hospital outpatient departments. Novel ways of delivering care have been developed recently and are often described as ‘triage’ services. This paper reviews the literature pertaining to definitions and descriptions of orthopaedic/musculoskeletal triage processes, in order to provide information on ‘best practice’ to assist health care facilities. Method A comprehensive open-ended search was conducted using electronic databases to identify studies describing models of triage clinics for patients with a musculoskeletal/orthopaedic complaint, who have been referred to hospital outpatient clinics for a surgical consultation. Studies were critically appraised using the McMaster quality appraisal tool and ranked using the National Health and Medical Research Council hierarchy of evidence. A thematic analysis of the definitions, processes and procedures of triage described within the literature was undertaken. Results 1930 studies were identified and 45 were included in the review (including diagnostic and evaluative research). The hierarchy of evidence ranged from I to IV; however, the majority were at low levels of evidence and scored poorly on the critical appraisal tool. Three broad themes of triage were identified: presence of a referral, configuration of the triage (who, how and where) and the aim of triage. However, there were significant inconsistencies across these themes. Conclusions This systematic review highlighted the need for standardization of the definition of triage, the procedures of assessment and management and measures of outcome used in orthopaedic/musculoskeletal triage to ensure best-practice processes, procedures and outcomes for triage clinics. PMID:25410703

  1. Nanostructured diamond coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Catledge, S A; Thomas, V; Vohra, Y K

    2013-01-01

    With increasing numbers of orthopaedic devices being implanted, greater emphasis is being placed on ceramic coating technology to reduce friction and wear in mating total joint replacement components, in order to improve implant function and increase device lifespan. In this chapter, we consider ultra-hard carbon coatings, with emphasis on nanostructured diamond, as alternative bearing surfaces for metallic components. Such coatings have great potential for use in biomedical implants as a result of their extreme hardness, wear resistance, low friction and biocompatibility. These ultra-hard carbon coatings can be deposited by several techniques resulting in a wide variety of structures and properties.

  2. Nanostructured diamond coatings for orthopaedic applications

    PubMed Central

    CATLEDGE, S.A.; THOMAS, V.; VOHRA, Y.K.

    2013-01-01

    With increasing numbers of orthopaedic devices being implanted, greater emphasis is being placed on ceramic coating technology to reduce friction and wear in mating total joint replacement components, in order to improve implant function and increase device lifespan. In this chapter, we consider ultra-hard carbon coatings, with emphasis on nanostructured diamond, as alternative bearing surfaces for metallic components. Such coatings have great potential for use in biomedical implants as a result of their extreme hardness, wear resistance, low friction and biocompatibility. These ultra-hard carbon coatings can be deposited by several techniques resulting in a wide variety of structures and properties. PMID:25285213

  3. The reconstructive microsurgery ladder in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Tintle, Scott M; Levin, L Scott

    2013-03-01

    Since the advent of the operating microscope by Julius Jacobson in 1960, reconstructive microsurgery has become an integral part of extremity reconstruction and orthopaedics. During World War I, with the influx of severe extremity trauma Harold Gillies introduced the concept of the reconstructive ladder for wound closure. The concept of the reconstructive ladder goes from simple to complex means of attaining wound closure. Over the last half century microsurgery has continued to evolve and progress. We now have a microsurgical reconstructive ladder. The microsurgical reconstruction ladder is based upon the early work on revascularization and replantation extending through the procedures that are described in this article.

  4. Current orthopaedic treatment of ballistic injuries.

    PubMed

    Volgas, David A; Stannard, James P; Alonso, Jorge E

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine current orthopaedic treatment of gunshot wounds. Surgeons are increasingly confronted by gunshot wounds that occur in both military and civilian settings. Much of the published work has been from military settings. In the United States, low-energy gunshot wounds are very common, and their incidence is increasing elsewhere in the world. Current treatment and its rationale is reviewed and a systematic approach to the assessment and treatment of these injuries is offered, taking into account the entirety of the injury, rather than simply the velocity of the missile.

  5. Therapeutic recreation: optimal health treatment for orthopaedic disability.

    PubMed

    Wardlaw, F B; McGuire, F A; Overby, Z

    2000-01-01

    Therapeutic recreation is a viable rehabilitation treatment for orthopaedic disabilities. Interdisciplinary treatment teams should consider therapeutic recreation interventions using the Health Prevention/Health Promotion Model in management of orthopaedic disabilities to enhance the client's present level of functioning to optimal health.

  6. Social Competence and Temperament in Children with Chronic Orthopaedic Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagmurlu, Bilge; Yavuz, H. Melis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate social competence in children with orthopaedic disability and its concurrent relations to child's temperament, health condition, and maternal warmth. Participants were 68 Turkish children (mean = 5.94 years) with chronic orthopaedic disability and their mothers coming from disadvantaged backgrounds. Mother…

  7. Combining dissimilar metals in orthopaedic implants: revisited.

    PubMed

    Zartman, Kevin C; Berlet, Gregory C; Hyer, Christopher F; Woodard, Joseph R

    2011-10-01

    The use of metals as implant materials has become common practice in the field of orthopaedics. A wide variety of conditions are treated with metallic implants, and designers have used an assortment of materials to meet the unique mechanical demands of each application. The majority of implants used today, whether pins, plates, screws, or total joints, are made of cobalt-chrome alloy, stainless steel, or titanium. Common metallurgic wisdom cautions against bonding dissimilar metals in a biologically active environment. Surgeons have therefore shied away from combining dissimilar metal implants because of the fear of inciting corrosion that could potentially compromise the implants and lead to aseptic loosening, implant failure, or adverse biological reaction in host tissue. As surgical reconstruction and arthroplasty options expand with the advent of newer implants and expanded operative techniques, the orthopaedic surgeon will increasingly be faced with weighing the risks and benefits of combining implants made of dissimilar metals in a patient. Here, the authors examine the origins of the concern over using mixed metals, discuss mechanisms of corrosion as they relate to surgical implants, and review both in vitro and in vivo studies concerning the most common combinations of dissimilar metals in order to guide the surgeon in choosing implants.

  8. About the beginnings of orthopaedics in Timisoara.

    PubMed

    Poenaru, Dan V

    2015-12-01

    The historical and geographical territory of Banat is part of present-day Romania. Timisoara's history, the capital city of Banat region, dates back to the second century B.C. Medical life in Banat was re-organised after the promulgation of the Aulic Laws in the eighteenth century. Thorough research was undertaken through historic manuscripts, old newspapers, biographies and other papers about the history of Romanian medicine. The eighteenth century witnessed the building of three hospitals in Timisoara. In that period, Banat region benefited from the expertise and professionalism of doctors who graduated and were trained mainly in Central and Western European universities. By the beginning of the twentieth century, many medical clinics or sanatoriums specialising in orthopaedics and traumatology were offering their services to the population. Banat region had many good orthopaedists, and one of them was Prof. Dr. Doc. Berceanu, who graduated from the University of Medicine Bucharest and further specialised in Paris, France. He is the founder of the Orthopaedics and Traumatology Clinic in Timisoara.

  9. Contribution of biomechanics to clinical practice in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Woo, Savio L-Y

    2004-01-01

    Biomechanics is a field that has a very long history. It was described in ancient Chinese and Greek literature as early as 400-500 BC. The foundation of biomechanics, however, was laid during a period between the 1500's to 1700's by renowned personalities, da Vinci, Galileo, Borelli, Hooke, Newton, and so (Fung, Y.C., Biomechanics: Mechanical Properties of Living Tissues, 2nd Ed. Springer Verlag, Chapter 1, 1993). Beginning in the 1950's, Muybridge, Steindler, Inman, Lissner, and Hirsch performed the pioneering work on musculoskeletal biomechanics and the foundation of orthopaedic biomechanics was formed. For the following two decades, the field has blossomed and significant contributions in the biomechanics of bone, articular cartilage, soft tissues, upper and lower extremities, spine and so on has been made. More sophisticated equipment, coupled with mathematical modeling and better engineering design, has enabled us to make great strides. Bioengineers, in collaboration with orthopaedic surgeons, have translated many laboratory discoveries into clinical practice, leading to improved patient treatment and outcome. In the past 30 years, my colleagues and I have focused our research on the biomechanics of musculoskeletal soft tissues, ligaments and tendons, in particular. Therefore, in this lecture, the function of knee ligaments, the associated homeostatic responses secondary to immobilization and exercise, and healing of the ligaments will be reviewed. Examples of scientific findings that help to guide the surgical management of injury to ligaments will be given. New ideas on functional tissue engineering to improve the healing of knee ligaments and tendons will be presented. We have learned that tendons and ligaments are indeed complex biological tissues. To fully understand their behavior, healing and remodelling processes, this author advocates major efforts be made to bring molecular biologists, morphologists, biochemists, bioengineers, physical therapists and

  10. Acoustic emission in orthopaedics: A state of the art review.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Richard A

    2016-12-08

    Acoustic emission (AE) is the phenomenon of sonic and ultrasonic wave generation by materials as they undergo deformation and fracture processes. AE monitoring is widely used throughout civil and mechanical engineering as a highly sensitive and non-destructive technique for structural health monitoring. Advances in computational power and digital data storage have generated much further interest in the possible applications of AE technology. Of particular interest has been its application within the field of Orthopaedic surgery. This paper examines the current literature surrounding the use of AE technology within Orthopaedics and provides a comprehensive overview of its current applications within Orthopaedic surgery. The use of AE technology in Orthopaedics is wide ranging and is discussed under the themes of: the study of the biomechanical properties of bone and fracture mechanics, research into failure mechanisms associated with cemented implants, prosthetic design, diagnostic value of AE and clinical application. AE technology is of great benefit as an Orthopaedic research tool where AE counts can be used to provide a surrogate marker for damage accumulation and flaws can be monitored as they develop. More recently there has been increased interest in the possible clinical applications of AE technology and an appreciation of the potential benefits for the diagnosis and treatment of Orthopaedic pathology. Despite the challenges involved when adopting AE techniques in vivo the potential of AE technology within Orthopaedics is significant. Already widely used in the research setting, clinical application has shown enormous potential and is a rapidly expanding area of contemporary research.

  11. Radiation exposure to the eye lens of orthopaedic surgeons during various orthopaedic procedures.

    PubMed

    Romanova, K; Vassileva, J; Alyakov, M

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the radiation dose to the eye lens of orthopaedic surgeons during various orthopaedic procedures and to make efforts to ensure that radiation protection is optimised. The study was performed for Fractura femoris and Fractura cruris procedures performed in orthopaedic operating theatres, as well as for fractures of wrist, ankle and hand/shoulder performed in the emergency trauma room. The highest mean value of the eye lens dose of 47.2 μSv and higher mean fluoroscopy time of 3 min, as well as the corresponding highest maximum values of 77.1 μSv and 5.0 min were observed for the Fractura femoris procedure performed with the Biplanar 500e fluoroscopy systems. At a normal workload, the estimated mean annual dose values do not exceed the annual occupational dose limit for the lens of eye, but at a heavy workload in the department, this dose limit could be achieved or exceeded. The use of protective lead glasses is recommended as they could reduce the radiation exposure of the lens of the eye. The phantom measurements demonstrated that the use of half-dose mode could additionally reduce dose to the operator's eye lens.

  12. "Patient blood management" in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Canillas, Fernando; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; García-Erce, José Antonio; Pavía-Molina, José; Gómez-Luque, Aurelio; Muñoz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic and trauma surgical procedures (OTS) can lead to significant blood losses and acute postoperative anaemia, which in many cases requires allogeneic blood transfusions (ABT). The clinical, economic and logistical disadvantages of ABT have promoted the development of multidisciplinary and multimodal programs generically known as Patient Blood Management (PBM) programs, which have as their objective to reduce or eliminate the need for ABT and improve clinical outcomes. These programs are supported by the implementation of four groups of perioperative measures: (1) use of restrictive transfusion criteria; (2) stimulation of erythropoiesis; (3) reduction of bleeding; and (4) autologous blood transfusion. In this article, a review is presented of the effectiveness, safety and recommendations of applicable strategies in OTS, as well as the barriers and requirements to the development and implementation of PBM programs in this surgical specialty.

  13. Fabricating specialised orthopaedic implants using additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Paul

    2014-03-01

    It has been hypothesised that AM is ideal for patient specific orthopaedic implants such as those used in bone cancer treatment, that can rapidly build structures such as lattices for bone and tissues to in-grow, that would be impossible using current conventional subtractive manufacturing techniques. The aim of this study was to describe the adoption of AM (direct metal laser sintering and electron beam melting) into the design manufacturing and post-manufacturing processes and the early clinical use. Prior to the clinical use of AM implants, extensive metallurgical and mechanical testing of both laser and electron beam fabrications were undertaken. Concurrently, post-manufacturing processes evaluated included hipping, cleaning and coating treatments. The first clinical application of a titanium alloy mega-implant was undertaken in November 2010. A 3D model of the pelvic wing implant was designed from CT scans. Novel key features included extensive lattice structures at the bone interfaces and integral flanges to fix the implant to the bone. The pelvic device was implanted with the aid of navigation and to date the patient remains active. A further 18 patient specific mega-implants have now been implanted. The early use of this advanced manufacturing route for patient specific implants has been very encouraging enabling the engineer to produce more advanced and anatomical conforming implants. However, there are a new set of design, manufacturing and regulatory challenges that require addressing to permit this technique to be used more widely. This technology is changing the design and manufacturing paradigm for the fabrication of specialised orthopaedic implants.

  14. Major vascular lesions associated with orthopaedic injuries.

    PubMed

    Karavias, D; Korovessis, P; Filos, K S; Siamplis, D; Petrocheilos, J; Androulakis, J

    1992-01-01

    Seventeen patients, aged 11-67 years (mean, 32.6), with major vascular injuries associated with traumatic orthopaedic injuries, were treated operatively in the authors' institution over a 4-year period. The most common mechanism of trauma was a high-energy injury (70.8%), and the rate of open injuries was 88.2%; 64.9% of the injuries were located in the lower extremities. The treatment protocol consisted of aggressive resuscitation; Doppler imaging and, when necessary, angiography; stable bone fixation with subsequent vascular repair; and extended wound debridement. The vascular repair for arterial lacerations consisted of (a) end-to-end anastomosis (47.2%); (b) interpositional homologous vein graft (23.6%); (c) vascular decompression through fracture distraction in one patient (5.9%); (d) xenograft interposition (in one patient; 5.9%); (e) venous repair (in three patients; 17.7%); and (f) embolectomy (in all patients). Three vascular reoperations (17.7%) were necessary because of rupture of the anastomosis. The authors' preferred bone stabilization method was external fixation, which was used in 47.2% of cases. Amputation was performed in three cases (17.7%) as a salvage operation. Although six patients (35.4%) were admitted with delayed shock (mean duration, 73.6 +/- 27.8 min), this led to a lethal outcome due to shock lung in only one patient. Another patient developed massive lung embolism 3 months postoperatively and died. The authors believe that this well-organized approach, based on a specific treatment protocol, for patients with severe orthopaedic trauma and concomitant vascular injury, not only improves outcome but gives good to excellent functional results in the majority of patients.

  15. Evidence-based orthopaedics or 'superstition in the pigeon'.

    PubMed

    Evans, R

    2009-01-01

    Pigeon behavioural conditioning methods are similar to the processes that orthopaedic surgeons use to evaluate new surgical procedures. Alternatively, evidence-based orthopaedics is a tool for surgeons to evaluate procedures in a systematic, patient-centred way that is less instinctive than pigeon behaviour. The objective of this article is to describe evidence-based orthopaedics, and then propose changes to surgical culture with the aim of refining the interpretation of the current literature and improving the quality of future research. The proposals are 'institutional' changes rather than calls for increased funding and more randomised controlled trials.

  16. Research status and application prospects of digital technology in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-xi; Zhang, Kun; Hao, Yi-ni; Hu, Yong-cheng

    2012-08-01

    In the last 10 years, basic and clinical research in orthopaedics has developed rapidly. Understanding of orthopaedic disorders involves not only routine diagnosis, but also the pursuit of highly efficient and accurate three-dimensional imaging of the intra- and extra-medullary distribution, form and structure of orthopaedic disorders, thus allowing scientific evaluation of the indications for surgery, drawing up of the best surgical plan, minimization of operative trauma and the earliest possible restoration of limb function. Meanwhile, the most important type of basic research, which was previously biomechanical research, has gradually become computational biomechanics based on in vitro cadaver experiments. This review aims to summarize the research status and application prospects of digital technology in orthopaedics, including virtual reality technology, reverse engineering and rapid prototyping techniques, computational biomechanics, computer navigation technology and management of digitization of medical records.

  17. The Future of Biologic Coatings for Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Stuart B.; Yao, Zhenyu; Keeney, Michael; Yang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Implants are widely used for othopaedic applications such as fixing fractures, repairing nonunions, obtaining a joint arthrodesis, total joint arthroplasty, spinal reconstruction, and soft tissue anchorage. Previously, orthopaedic implants were designed simply as mechanical devices; the biological aspects of the implant were a byproduct of stable internal/external fixation of the device to the surrounding bone or soft tissue. More recently, biologic coatings have been incorporated into orthopaedic implants in order to modulate the surrounding biological environment. This opinion article reviews current and potential future use of biologic coatings for orthopaedic implants to facilitate osseointegration and mitigate possible adverse tissue responses including the foreign body reaction and implant infection. While many of these coatings are still in the preclinical testing stage, bioengineers, material scientists and surgeons continue to explore surface coatings as a means of improving clinical outcome of patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery. PMID:23391496

  18. Understanding and Addressing the Global Need for Orthopaedic Trauma Care.

    PubMed

    Agarwal-Harding, Kiran J; von Keudell, Arvind; Zirkle, Lewis G; Meara, John G; Dyer, George S M

    2016-11-02

    ➤The burden of musculoskeletal trauma is high worldwide, disproportionately affecting the poor, who have the least access to quality orthopaedic trauma care.➤Orthopaedic trauma care is essential, and must be a priority in the horizontal development of global health systems.➤The education of surgeons, nonphysician clinicians, and ancillary staff in low and middle income countries is central to improving access to and quality of care.➤Volunteer surgical missions from rich countries can sustainably expand and strengthen orthopaedic trauma care only when they serve a local need and build local capacity.➤Innovative business models may help to pay for care of the poor. Examples include reducing costs through process improvements and cross-subsidizing from profitable high-volume activities.➤Resource-poor settings may foster innovations in devices or systems with universal applicability in orthopaedics.

  19. The American Orthopaedic Association-Japanese Orthopaedic Association 2010 traveling fellowship.

    PubMed

    Patel, Alpesh A; Cheng, Ivan; Yao, Jeffrey; Huffman, G Russell

    2011-12-21

    We started this journey excited by the prospects of visiting Japan, a country with a proud and historic past. We ended the fellowship accomplishing those goals, and we left with a great deal of admiration for our orthopaedic colleagues halfway around the world for their excellence in education, clinical care, and research. Their hospitality and attention to the details of our visit were exemplary and a lesson to us as we host visiting fellows in the future. Japan reflects its past, but it also offers a preview into our own nation's future: an aging population, a shrinking workforce, a stagnant economy, nationalized health care, and a mushrooming national debt. Of all of these factors, it is the aging population that we, as orthopaedic surgeons, will be most acutely aware of and involved with. The degenerative disorders that affect elderly patients dominate the landscape of surgical care in Japan. Osteoporosis and osteopenia permeate many aspects of care across orthopaedic subspecialties. The surgeons in Japan are developing innovative and cost-effective means of treating the large volume of older patients within the fiscal constraints of a nationalized health-care system. We learned, and will continue to learn more, from Japan about the management of this growing patient population with its unique pathologies and challenges. With the recent natural disaster and ongoing safety concerns in Japan, the character and will of the people of Japan have been on display. Their courage and resolve combined with order and compassion are a testament to the nation's cultural identity. The seeds of the Traveling Fellowship were planted shortly after Japan's last wide-scale reconstruction, and the ties that have bound the JOA and the AOA together are strengthened through this trying time. We strongly urge our colleagues in the U.S. to help support the people, the physicians, and the health-care system of Japan through its most recent tribulations and offer them the same care and

  20. Quality measurement in orthopaedics: the purchasers' view.

    PubMed

    Lansky, David; Milstein, Arnold

    2009-10-01

    While all of medicine is under pressure to increase transparency and accountability, joint replacement subspecialists will face special scrutiny. Disclosures of questionable consulting fees, a demographic shift to younger patients, and uncertainty about the marginal benefits of product innovation in a time of great cost pressure invite a serious and progressive response from the profession. Current efforts to standardize measures by the National Quality Forum and PQRI will not address the concerns of purchasers, payors, or policy makers. Instead, they will ask the profession to document its commitment to appropriateness, stewardship of resources, coordination of care, and patient-centeredness. One mechanism for addressing these expectations is voluntary development of a uniform national registry for joint replacements that includes capture of preoperative appropriateness indicators, device monitoring information, revision rates, and structured postoperative patient followup. A national registry should support performance feedback and quality improvement activity, but it must also be designed to satisfy payor, purchaser, policymaker, and patient needs for information. Professional societies in orthopaedics should lead a collaborative process to develop metrics, infrastructure, and reporting formats that support continuous improvement and public accountability.

  1. Plaster of Paris: the orthopaedic surgeon heritage.

    PubMed

    Hernigou, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Plastering is one of the most ancient of the building handicrafts. Plaster is the common name for calcium sulphate hemi hydrate made by heating the mineral gypsum, the common name for sulphate of lime. In the tenth century the Arabs used liquid plaster in orthopaedic treatment. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, patients with fractures of the lower extremities-and often of the upper extremities as well-were treated in bed with restriction of all activity for many weeks until the fractures united. It was the practice of surgeons to dress wounds and fractures at frequent intervals. The bandages, pads, and splints were removed, the fractures manipulated, and the dressings reapplied. The search for simpler, less cumbersome methods of treatment led to the development of occlusive dressings, stiffened at first with starch and later with plaster of Paris. The ambulatory treatment of fractures was the direct result of these innovations. Two military surgeons, Antonius Mathijsen of the Netherlands, and Nikolai Ivanovitch Pirogov of Russia, were responsible for the introduction of the new plaster bandage technique. At the beginning of the twentieth century the technique was improved by Jean-François Calot, a French surgeon, who invented the hand manufacture of plaster bandage as a roll. During the twentieth century, walking cast and ambulation for fresh fractures were developed with plaster and pin incorporated in plaster; the open fracture care concept was introduced with plaster of Paris by Trueta before the external fixation.

  2. Orthopaedic tissue engineering and bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Glenn; Buchanan, Fraser; Marsh, David; Harkin-Jones, Eileen; Little, Uel; McCaigue, Mervyn

    2007-01-01

    Orthopaedic tissue engineering combines the application of scaffold materials, cells and the release of growth factors. It has been described as the science of persuading the body to reconstitute or repair tissues that have failed to regenerate or heal spontaneously. In the case of bone regeneration 3-D scaffolds are used as a framework to guide tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal cells obtained from the patient via biopsy are grown on biomaterials in vitro and then implanted at a desired site in the patient's body. Medical implants that encourage natural tissue regeneration are generally considered more desirable than metallic implants that may need to be removed by subsequent intervention. Numerous polymeric materials, from natural and artificial sources, are under investigation as substitutes for skeletal elements such as cartilage and bone. For bone regeneration, cells (obtained mainly from bone marrow aspirate or as primary cell outgrowths from bone biopsies) can be combined with biodegradable polymeric materials and/or ceramics and absorbed growth factors so that osteoinduction is facilitated together with osteoconduction; through the creation of bioactive rather than bioinert scaffold constructs. Relatively rapid biodegradation enables advantageous filling with natural tissue while loss of polymer strength before mass is disadvantageous. Innovative solutions are required to address this and other issues such as the biocompatibility of material surfaces and the use of appropriate scaffold topography and porosity to influence bone cell gene expression.

  3. Orthopaedic manifestations of neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Feldman, David S; Jordan, Charles; Fonseca, Lauren

    2010-06-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) is an autosomal dominant disease that affects 1 in 3,000 persons worldwide. Café-au-lait macules and peripheral nerve sheath tumors (ie, neurofibromas) are the most commonly recognized manifestations of NF-1. However, NF-1 affects multiple organ systems, and a multidisciplinary approach to treatment is required. Management of the orthopaedic manifestations of NF-1 is often difficult. The most complex manifestations are scoliosis (dystrophic and nondystrophic), congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia, and problems related to soft-tissue tumors. Metabolic bone disease is common; many patients are frankly osteopenic, which further complicates treatment. Dystrophic scoliosis, which may be caused by either bony dysplasia or intraspinal pathology, is characterized by early presentation and rapid progression. Pseudarthrosis is common even after instrumented fusion. Nondystrophic scoliosis tends to behave like adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, although it may present earlier and is associated with a higher rate of pseudarthrosis. Congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia is a long-bone dysplasia that afflicts patients with NF-1. Management of this osseous deformity is challenging. Failure to achieve union and refracture are common.

  4. Tissue engineering skeletal muscle for orthopaedic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payumo, Francis C.; Kim, Hyun D.; Sherling, Michael A.; Smith, Lee P.; Powell, Courtney; Wang, Xiao; Keeping, Hugh S.; Valentini, Robert F.; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    With current technology, tissue-engineered skeletal muscle analogues (bioartificial muscles) generate too little active force to be clinically useful in orthopaedic applications. They have been engineered genetically with numerous transgenes (growth hormone, insulinlike growth factor-1, erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor), and have been shown to deliver these therapeutic proteins either locally or systemically for months in vivo. Bone morphogenetic proteins belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily are osteoinductive molecules that drive the differentiation pathway of mesenchymal cells toward the chondroblastic or osteoblastic lineage, and stimulate bone formation in vivo. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells endogenously expressing bone morphogenetic proteins might serve as a vehicle for systemic bone morphogenetic protein delivery in vivo, proliferating skeletal myoblasts (C2C12) were transduced with a replication defective retrovirus containing the gene for recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6 (C2BMP-6). The C2BMP-6 cells constitutively expressed recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6 and synthesized bioactive recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6, based on increased alkaline phosphatase activity in coincubated mesenchymal cells. C2BMP-6 cells did not secrete soluble, bioactive recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6, but retained the bioactivity in the cell layer. Therefore, genetically-engineered skeletal muscle cells might serve as a platform for long-term delivery of osteoinductive bone morphogenetic proteins locally.

  5. Role of technology assessment in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Turkelson, Charles; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2009-10-01

    A technology assessment is a literature-based research project that seeks to determine whether a medical device, drug, procedure, or biologic is effective or to summarize literature on a given technology. A well-conducted assessment is a form of secondary research that employs the same steps used in primary research studies (ie, well-designed clinical trials). The primary difference is that in technology assessment the investigator does not collect the raw data. Rather, (s)he must use data collected by someone else. Nevertheless, a well-designed assessment, like a well-designed study, employs the scientific method, which is a method designed to combat bias. When there is little available information, such as with new technologies, unbiased examinations can typically show that enthusiasm for that technology is not backed by much data. When there is more information, assessments can not only determine whether a technology is effective, but also how effective it is. Technology assessments can provide busy orthopaedic surgeons (who do not have the time to keep up with and critically evaluate current literature) with succinct information that enables them to rapidly determine what is and what is not known about any given medical technology.

  6. Surgical hand scrub practices in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Khan, Adnan; McLaren, Sandra G; Nelson, Carl L

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the practice of surgical hand scrubbing among orthopaedic surgeons, faculty, residents, and nurses met the institution's recommended 5-minute scrub policy and how often a 2-minute surgical hand scrub was used. Forty-eight subjects' hand scrub times were recorded discreetly for a total of 125 observations. All individuals scrubbed for a mean of 2.54 minutes and all scrubbed less than the 5-minute institutionally recommended policy. We found that 35.2% scrubbed less than 2 minutes and 64.8% scrubbed greater than 2 minutes. The subjects studied were polled to determine whether they knew the scrub policy, the minimum effective scrub time, and their perception of how long they scrub. Three of the 16 respondents correctly answered the question regarding the hospital's recommended policy regarding scrub time of 5 minutes. All stated they thought they scrubbed at least 2 minutes and all agreed that at least a 2-minute scrub should be done.

  7. Orthopaedic inpatient rehabilitation conducted by nursing staff in acute orthopaedic wards in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pi-Chu; Wang, Ching-Hui; Liu, Yo-Yi; Chen, Chyang-Shiong

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the postoperative rehabilitation patterns of orthopaedic patients and to explore factors which affected the patients' functional recovery. A descriptive study with convenience sampling was performed. Study participants included orthopaedic inpatients from two hospitals in Taipei. In total, 100 patients were selected with an average age of 60.88 ± 17.61 years, of which the most common type of surgery was a total knee replacement (49.0%). Among these participants, 79.0% received rehabilitation guided by nursing staff, while only 6.0% were instructed by a physical therapist. The predictive factor for the time to first ambulation was the intensity of pain experienced on the second day after the operation, which accounted for 4.5% of the total variance. As for the functional status prior to discharge, predictive factors included the time to first ambulation and whether nursing staff provided instructions on rehabilitation, which accounted for 11.2% of the total variance. We recommend that professional staff should promote patient guidance toward postoperative rehabilitation, assistance in achieving the first ambulation and a resolution of obstacles to rehabilitation.

  8. Allergies in orthopaedic and trauma surgery.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, C H; Hameister, R; Singh, G

    2017-02-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to implants in orthopaedic and trauma surgery are a rare but devastating complication. They are considered as a delayed-type of hypersensitivity reaction (type IV), characterized by an antigen activation of sensitized T-lymphocytes releasing various cytokines and may result in osteoclast activation and bone resorption. Potential haptens are originated from metal alloys or bone-cement. A meta-analysis has confirmed a higher probability of developing a metal hypersensitivity postoperatively and noted a greater risk of failed replacements compared to stable implants. Hypersensitivity to implants may present with a variety of symptoms such as pain, joint effusion, delayed wound/bone healing, persistent secretion, allergic dermatitis (localized or systemic), clicking noises, loss of joint function, instability and failure of the implant. Various diagnostic options have been offered, including patch testing, metal alloy patch testing, histology, lymphocyte transformation test (LTT), memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay (MELISA), leukocyte migration inhibition test (LIF) and lymphocyte activation test (LAT). No significant differences between in vivo and in vitro methods have been found. Due to unconvincing evidence for screening methods, predictive tests are not recommended for routine performance. Infectious aetiology always needs to be excluded. As there is a lack of evidence on large-scale studies with regards to the optimal treatment option, management currently relies on individual case-by-case decisions. Several options for patients with (suspected) metal-related hypersensitivity exist and may include materials based on ceramic, titanium or oxinium or modified surfaces. Promising results have been reported, but long-term experience is lacking. More large-scaled studies are needed in this context. In patients with bone-cement hypersensitivity, the component suspected for hypersensitivity should be avoided. The development of

  9. Podium versus poster publication rates at the Orthopaedic Trauma Association.

    PubMed

    Preston, Charles F; Bhandari, Mohit; Fulkerson, Eric; Ginat, Danial; Koval, Kenneth J; Egol, Kenneth A

    2005-08-01

    Original studies at orthopaedic meetings are presented on the podium and in poster format. Publication of those studies in peer-reviewed journals is the standard of communicating scientific data to colleagues. Investigators of previous studies have reported publication rates, but never differentiated between the modes of presentation. We evaluated the annual meeting of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association from 1994-1998 and found that studies presented on the podium were 1.3 times more likely to be published than those presented in a poster format (67% versus 52%). The mean time to publication was similar, 21.6 months for poster presentations and 24.8 months for podium presentations. Podium presentations were more likely to be published in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, and the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American and British editions). Our findings suggest different rates and distribution of publication between podium and poster presentations at an international trauma meeting. These findings should be considered when evaluating studies of interest at the Orthopaedic Trauma Association meeting.

  10. Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors' selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Orr, Justin D; Hoffmann, Jeffrey D; Arrington, Edward D; Gerlinger, Tad L; Devine, John G; Belmont, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Factors associated with successful selection in U.S. Army orthopaedic surgical programs are unreported. The current analysis includes survey data from all Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors (PDs) to determine these factors. PDs at all Army orthopaedic surgery residency programs were provided 17 factors historically considered critical to successful selection and asked to rank order the factors as well as assign a level of importance to each. Results were collated and overall mean rankings are provided. PDs unanimously expressed that performance during the on-site orthopaedic surgery rotation at the individual program director's institution was most important. Respondents overwhelmingly reported that Steps 1 and 2 licensing exam scores were next most important, respectively. Survey data demonstrated that little importance was placed on letters of recommendation and personal statements. PDs made no discriminations based on allopathic or osteopathic degrees. The most important factors for Army orthopaedic surgery residency selection were clerkship performance at the individual PD's institution and licensing examination score performance. Army PDs consider both USMLE and COMLEX results, because Army programs have a higher percentage of successful osteopathic applicants.

  11. Orthopaedic admissions due to sports and recreation injuries.

    PubMed

    Delaney, R A; Falvey, E; Kalimuthu, S; Molloy, M G; Fleming, P

    2009-02-01

    The health benefits of exercise may be attenuated by sports and recreation related injury (SRI). Though the majority of SRI are mild and self-limiting, a significant number are serious and require orthopaedic intervention. The aims of this study were to assess the burden of these serious injuries on the orthopaedic inpatient service, and to investigate potential target areas for injury prevention. All 1,590 SRI seen in the ED over a 3-month period were analysed using the Patient Information Management System to determine which patients received inpatient orthopaedic care. The medical records of those 63 patients who required inpatient care under orthopaedics were reviewed and data collected on demographic features, history, operative procedure and theatre resources, and length of hospital stay. Data were analyzed using SPSS. SRI accounted for 12.3% of all ED presentations. The principal activities resulting in injury requiring orthopaedic care were soccer, hurling and informal play e.g. trampoline. Falls made up 37% of the overall mechanism of injury but 68% of the injuries severe enough to require operative management. Most operative procedures were performed as part of a routine day trauma list but 20% were performed out of hours. This group of injuries places a significant burden on a busy trauma service. Injury prevention measures such as public education regarding falls in sport may have a role in reducing this burden.

  12. Overcoming resistance to implementation of integrated care pathways in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Manning, Blaine T; Callahan, Charles D; Robinson, Brooke S; Adair, Daniel; Saleh, Khaled J

    2013-07-17

    The future of orthopaedic surgery will be shaped by unprecedented demographic and economic challenges, necessitating movement to so-called "second curve" innovations in the delivery of care. Implementation of integrated care pathways (ICPs) may be one solution to imminent cost and access pressures facing orthopaedic patients in this era of health-care accountability and reform. ICPs can lower costs and the duration of hospital stay while facilitating better outcomes through enhanced interspecialty communication. As with any innovation at the crossroads of paradigm change, implementation of integrated care pathways for orthopaedics may elicit surgeons' concern on a variety of grounds and on levels ranging from casual questioning to vehement opposition. No single method is always effective in promoting cooperation and adoption, so a combination of strategies offers the best chance of success. With a special focus on total joint replacement, we consider general patterns of resistance to change, styles of conflict, and specific issues that may underlie orthopaedic surgeon resistance to implementation of integrated care pathways. Methods to facilitate and sustain orthopaedic surgeon engagement in implementation of such pathways are discussed.

  13. [The history and development of computer assisted orthopaedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Jenny, J-Y

    2006-10-01

    Computer assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) was developed to improve the accuracy of surgical procedures. It has improved dramatically over the last years, being transformed from an experimental, laboratory procedure into a routine procedure theoretically available to every orthopaedic surgeon. The first field of application of computer assistance was neurosurgery. After the application of computer guided spinal surgery, the navigation of total hip and knee joints became available. Currently, several applications for computer assisted surgery are available. At the beginning of navigation, a preoperative CT-scan or several fluoroscopic images were necessary. The imageless systems allow the surgeon to digitize patient anatomy at the beginning of surgery without any preoperative imaging. The future of CAOS remains unknown, but there is no doubt that its importance will grow in the next 10 years, and that this technology will probably modify the conventional practice of orthopaedic surgery.

  14. Orthopaedic implications of multiple gestation pregnancy with triplets.

    PubMed

    Bielski, Robert J; Gesell, Mark W; Teng, Andelle L; Cooper, Daniel H; Muraskas, Jonathan K

    2006-01-01

    Intrauterine crowding has been implicated as a risk factor in several orthopaedic conditions, such as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), metatarsus adductus, and torticollis. The goal of this study was to see whether orthopaedic conditions associated with intrauterine crowding were more frequent in multiple gestation pregnancies, specifically in triplets. The authors reviewed their experience over a 10-year period with 261 children who were products of triplet pregnancies. They surveyed 13 orthopaedic conditions and found only one condition, torticollis, that had a greater incidence than that reported in single gestation pregnancies. A 0% incidence of DDH was found in these patients. Routine ultrasound screening cannot be recommended in these patients based on these results.

  15. Design and execution of clinical trials in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mundi, R.; Chaudhry, H.; Mundi, S.; Godin, K.; Bhandari, M.

    2014-01-01

    High-quality randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating surgical therapies are fundamental to the delivery of evidence-based orthopaedics. Orthopaedic clinical trials have unique challenges; however, when these challenges are overcome, evidence from trials can be definitive in its impact on surgical practice. In this review, we highlight several issues that pose potential challenges to orthopaedic investigators aiming to perform surgical randomised controlled trials. We begin with a discussion on trial design issues, including the ethics of sham surgery, the importance of sample size, the need for patient-important outcomes, and overcoming expertise bias. We then explore features surrounding the execution of surgical randomised trials, including ethics review boards, the importance of organisational frameworks, and obtaining adequate funding. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:161–8. PMID:24869465

  16. The Orthopaedic Trauma Patient Experience: A Qualitative Case Study of Orthopaedic Trauma Patients in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Nathan N.; Mugarura, Rodney; Slobogean, Gerard P.; Bouchard, Maryse

    2014-01-01

    The disability adjusted life years (DALYs) associated with injuries have increased by 34% from 1990 to 2010, making it the 10th leading cause of disability worldwide, with most of the burden affecting low-income countries. Although disability from injuries is often preventable, limited access to essential surgical services contributes to these increasing DALY rates. Similar to many other low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), Uganda is plagued by a growing volume of traumatic injuries. The aim of this study is to explore the orthopaedic trauma patient's experience in accessing medical care in Uganda and what affects the injury might have on the socioeconomic status for the patient and their dependents. We also evaluate the factors that impact an individual's ability to access an appropriate treatment facility for their traumatic injury. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients 18 year of age or older admitted with a fractured tibia or femur at Mulago National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda. As limited literature exists on the socioeconomic impacts of disability from trauma, we designed a descriptive qualitative case study, using thematic analysis, to extract unique information for which little has been previously been documented. This methodology is subject to less bias than other qualitative methods as it imposes fewer preconceptions. Data analysis of the patient interviews (n = 35) produced over one hundred codes, nine sub-themes and three overarching themes. The three overarching categories revealed by the data were: 1) the importance of social supports; 2) the impact of and on economic resources; and 3) navigating the healthcare system. Limited resources to fund the treatment of orthopaedic trauma patients in Uganda leads to reliance of patients on their friends, family, and hospital connections, and a tremendous economic burden that falls on the patient and their dependents. PMID:25360815

  17. The role of orthopaedic surgery in sports medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgery must play a significant role in the development of sports medicine as a viable academic discipline. Potential areas in which orthopaedic surgery can specifically contribute to such an evolution are discussed. Particular areas include skeletal development, the role of athletics on skeletal growth and trauma response, the mechanics of specific sports and the predisposition of specific sports to certain injury patterns, the role of muscle physiology and muscle stimulation in rehabilitation, and differing responses of the male and female skeletal system. Each of these areas is discussed in detail. PMID:7445534

  18. Promoting safety of postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Veney, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    Orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea are at risk for postoperative complications related to administration of pain medications, anxiolytics, and antiemetics. They are more likely to experience respiratory and cardiac complications, be transferred to an intensive care unit, or have an increased length of stay in the hospital. This informational article is for nurses who care for postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The focus is on promoting patient safety through communication, vigilant postoperative sedation assessment, and nursing interventions that include appropriate patient positioning, patient education, and involving patients and their families in care.

  19. The Role of the Orthopaedic Surgeon in Workers' Compensation Cases.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; Kuris, Eren O; Palumbo, Mark A

    2017-03-01

    Workers' compensation is an employer-funded insurance program that provides financial and medical benefits for employees injured at work. Because many occupational injuries are musculoskeletal in nature, the orthopaedic surgeon plays an important role in the workers' compensation system. Along with establishing the correct diagnosis and implementing an appropriate treatment plan, the clinician must understand the fundamental components of the workers' compensation system to manage an injured employee. Ultimately, effective claim management requires collaboration among the employer, the employee, the legal representatives, the insurance company, and the orthopaedic surgeon.

  20. Closing the gap: bone health education in orthopaedic practice.

    PubMed

    Rouhe, Mellissa

    2008-01-01

    Bone health education in an orthopaedic office and hospital setting is uncommon, yet essential. Many benefits are possible for patients by preventing future fractures and improving quality of life in those afflicted with osteoporosis and osteopenia. Ninety percent of hip fractures are due to osteoporosis; only stroke occupies more hospital bed days than hip fracture each year. Clinical time constraints, physician unawareness, cost-effectiveness, and patient noncompliance include some of the obstacles to education. Orthopaedic nurses can be a vital part of the challenging solution to removing barriers and bridging the educational gap for physicians and patients.

  1. Psychological Factors Affecting Rehabilitation and Outcomes Following Elective Orthopaedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Flanigan, David C; Everhart, Joshua S; Glassman, Andrew H

    2015-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgery often requires many months of rehabilitation to achieve a successful outcome, regardless of subspecialty. Several important psychological factors strongly influence pain perceptions, rehabilitation compliance, and patient outcomes after common orthopaedic surgeries that require extensive rehabilitation, including total joint arthroplasty, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and spine surgery for degenerative disease. Early recognition of patients exhibiting psychological distress, fear-avoidance behavior, or poor perceived self-efficacy or pessimistic personality traits can be used to improve preoperative risk stratification for poor rehabilitation or surgical outcomes. Several intervention strategies exist to address these psychological factors when they appear to contribute suboptimal postoperative rehabilitation or recovery.

  2. Reading the Small Print – Labelling Recommendations for Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Haene, Roger A; Sandhu, Ranbir S; Baxandall, Richard

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There exist, currently, no clear guidelines regarding standards for surgical implant labelling. Dimensions of the laminar flow canopies in orthopaedic use fixes the distance at which implant labels can be read. Mistakes when reading the label on an implant box can pose health risks for patients, and financial consequences for medical institutions. SUBJECTS AND METHODS Using scientifically validated tools such as the Snellen Chart Formula, a theoretical minimum standard for text on implant labels was reached. This theoretical standard was then tested under real operating conditions. After discovering a minimum practical standard for implant labels, the authors then audited current labels in use on a wide range of orthopaedic implant packages. Furthermore, other non-text-related labelling problems were also noted. RESULTS There is a definite minimum standard which should be observed when implant labels are manufactured. Implants in current use bear labels on the packaging that are of an insufficient standard to ensure patient safety in theatre. CONCLUSIONS The authors have established text parameters that will increase the legibility of implant labels. In the interests of improving risk management in theatre, therefore, the authors propose a standard for orthopaedic implant labelling, and believe this will provide a useful foundation for further discussion between the orthopaedic community and implant manufacturers. PMID:19686615

  3. Clubfoot: An Orthopaedic Surgeon Describes Clubfoot and Current Treatment Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitale, Michael

    2007-01-01

    As an orthopaedic surgeon who has treated numerous cases of clubfoot in his career, the author knows that it takes exceptional parents to deal with the challenges of having a child born with a clubfoot. However, it should be noted that a clubfoot diagnosis does not mean a life of pain, deformity, and disability for a child. Today's treatment…

  4. Improving translation success of cell-based therapies in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Bara, Jennifer J; Herrmann, Marietta; Evans, Christopher H; Miclau, Theodore; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Richards, R Geoff

    2016-01-01

    There is a clear discrepancy between the growth of cell therapy and tissue engineering research in orthopaedics over the last two decades and the number of approved clinical therapies and products available to patients. At the 2015 annual meeting of the Orthopaedic Research Society, a workshop was held to highlight important considerations from the perspectives of an academic scientist, clinical researcher, and industry representative with the aim of helping researchers to successfully translate their ideas into clinical and commercial reality. Survey data acquired from workshop participants indicated an overall positive opinion on the future potential of cell-based therapies to make a significant contribution to orthopaedic medicine. The survey also indicated an agreement on areas requiring improvement in the development of new therapies, specifically; increased support for fundamental research and education and improved transparency of regulatory processes. This perspectives article summarises the content and conclusions of the workshop and puts forward suggestions on how translational success of cell-based therapies in orthopaedics may be achieved.

  5. Find an Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle MD/DO

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the Smaller Toes How To... Foot Health Foot Injury Footwear News Videos Find a Surgeon Información en ... all ages. They perform reconstructive procedures, treat sports injuries, and manage and treat trauma of the foot and ankle. Orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons work ...

  6. Analysis of Unmatched Orthopaedic Residency Applicants: Options After the Match

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Steven; Ippolito, Joseph; Martinez, Maximilian; Beebe, Kathleen; Benevenia, Joseph; Berberian, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Background Orthopaedic surgery is one of the most competitive specialties, resulting in many applicants going unmatched. Many unmatched applicants pursue a preliminary internship or research fellowship, but whether these activities make them more successful in subsequent match cycles has not been studied. Objective To determine the effectiveness of activities during the intervening period on match success in a subsequent cycle. Methods After reviewing rank order lists for our program and National Resident Matching Program correspondence from 1994 to 2013, we identified 198 of 1216 ranked applicants (16.3%) who did not initially match. Of these, 57 applicants who matched through the Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program did not reapply to orthopaedics or trained overseas. Results Of 141 reapplicants, 56 matched into orthopaedic surgery, with 87.5% (P < .001) matching at a program in the same region where they had either completed their medical degree or postgraduate year, and 37.5% matching at their home institution (P < .001). Successful reapplicants after a research fellowship had a significantly higher number of publications than unsuccessful reapplicants (P < .05). There was no significant difference in success after research or internship (P = .80) and no significant difference in success rates for US versus international reapplicants (P =  .43). Conclusions Success of reapplication into orthopaedic surgery may be less dependent on the route taken during the interim period, and more dependent on developing relationships with faculty at a local or regional institution. PMID:26913110

  7. The use of allografts in paediatric orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Paul, Laurent; Mousny, Maryline; Cornu, Olivier; Delloye, Christian

    2007-10-01

    Autograft harvesting in a growing child sometimes leads to disastrous consequences. Allograft can advantageously replace autograft in the majority of the cases. This overview presents the most frequently used allografts in paediatric orthopaedic surgery and discusses their benefits. Illustrative cases are presented to highlight specific indications.

  8. Military Orthopaedic Trauma Registry: Quality Data Now Available.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Jessica C; Greer, Renee M; Wenke, Joseph C; Ficke, James R; Johnson, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    The Military Orthopaedic Trauma Registry (MOTR) orginally began as part of the Department of Defense Trauma Registry (DoDTR) and became a live registry in 2013. As a quality improvement process, this study examined MOTR data for 20 female amputees compared with DoDTR data. The DoDTR provided diagnosis and procedure codes as a list but no details. The MOTR provided additional data, including specific limb, fracture classifications, and associated injuries per limb. The MOTR allowed for construction of a treatment time line for each limb, including number and timing of debridements, antibiotics, and implant types. Orthopaedic-specific complications were also coded more frequently in the MOTR and clearly identified with a specific injury and treatment. During initial quality control checks, the MOTR provides a greater volume and granularity of detail for orthopaedic-specific injury and treatment information, indicating that the MOTR is on track to provide a valuable repository for data-driven orthopaedic management of combat injury.

  9. Incorporating patient preferences into orthopaedic practice: should the orthopaedic encounter change?

    PubMed

    Bryant, Dianne; Bednarski, Elzbieta; Gafni, Amiram

    2006-04-01

    to begin to think about these issues and how they might investigate potential resolutions for incorporating patient values and sharing their own preferences for treatment options with their patients during the orthopaedic encounter.

  10. Adhesion of Staphylococcus to orthopaedic metals, an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, E; McKenna, J; Mulhall, K J; Marks, P; McCormack, D

    2004-01-01

    This study describes a new model of biofilm study in rabbits. The primary focus of this study was to assess biofilm adhesion to orthopaedic metals in their first 48 h in a femoral intramedullary implantation model. Two previous inoculation methods i.e. that of pre- and direct inoculation were studied with two bacterial isolates namely Staphylococcus aureus and epidermidis, on titanium and stainless steel metallic implants. A method of sonication and log dilution/plating was used to assess biofilm bacteria adhering to implants. Silver coated metals were then compared with their respective control metals in the new model. The direct inoculation model gave larger and more reproducible biofilm adhesion to implanted metals. Staphylococcus epidermidis shows lower adhesion ability to metals, and biofilms adhere in greater numbers to stainless steel over titanium. Silver coated metals show no statistical difference over control metals when exposed to orthopaedic biofilms.

  11. Essentials of disaster management: the role of the orthopaedic surgeon.

    PubMed

    Born, Christopher T; Monchik, Keith O; Hayda, Roman A; Bosse, Michael J; Pollak, Andrew N

    2011-01-01

    Disaster preparedness and management education is essential for allowing orthopaedic surgeons to play a valuable, constructive role in responding to disasters. The National Incident Management System, as part of the National Response Framework, provides coordination between all levels of government and uses the Incident Command System as its unified command structure. An "all-hazards" approach to disasters, whether natural, man-made, intentional, or unintentional, is fundamental to disaster planning. To respond to any disaster, command and control must be established, and emergency management must be integrated with public health and medical care. In the face of increasing acts of terrorism, an understanding of blast injury pathophysiology allows for improved diagnostic and treatment strategies. A practical understanding of potential biologic, chemical, and nuclear agents and their attendant clinical symptoms is also prerequisite. Credentialing and coordination between designated organizations and the federal government are essential to allow civilian orthopaedic surgeons to access systems capable of disaster response.

  12. Using PubMed effectively to access the orthopaedic literature.

    PubMed

    Clough, J F Myles; Hitchcock, Kristin; Nelson, David L

    2011-01-01

    PubMed is the free public Internet interface to the US National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE database of citations to medical scientific articles. Many orthopaedic surgeons use PubMed on a regular basis, but most orthopaedic surgeons have received little or no training in how to use PubMed effectively and express frustration with the experience. Typical problems encountered are data overload with very large numbers of returns to look through, failure to find a specific article, and a concern that a search has missed important papers. It is helpful to understand the system used to enter journal articles into the database and the classification of the common types of searches and to review suggestions for the best ways to use the PubMed interface and find sources for search teaching and assistance.

  13. The Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Atkinson Smith, Mary

    2015-01-01

    In the specialty of orthopaedics, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major contributor to infections of the soft tissues, surgical sites, and joints, in addition to increasing disability, mortality, and healthcare costs. Inappropriate prescribing and misuse of antibiotics have led to bacterial resistance and the rapid emergence of MRSA. It is imperative for healthcare providers and facilities to improve quality, promote safety, and decrease costs related to MRSA infections. The healthcare profession and society as a whole play an important role in minimizing the transmission of pathogens, reducing the incidence of MRSA infections, and decreasing the development of future antibiotic resistant pathogens. This article discusses the epidemiology of MRSA and describes evidence-based guidelines pertaining to the prevention, minimization, and treatment of MRSA-related infections. Specific application to orthopaedics are discussed in the context of patient risk factors, perioperative and postoperative prophylaxis, and current trends regarding education and reporting strategies.

  14. Radiation safety for anaesthesia providers in the orthopaedic operating room.

    PubMed

    Rhea, E B; Rogers, T H; Riehl, J T

    2016-04-01

    In many orthopaedic operating rooms, anaesthesia providers routinely wear lead aprons for protection from radiation, but some studies have questioned whether this is needed. We conducted a systematic review to identify studies that measured the amount of radiation that anaesthetists were exposed to in the orthopaedic operating room. Multiple studies have shown that at 1.5 m from the source of radiation, anaesthetists received no radiation, or amounts so small that a person would have to be present in an unreasonable number of operations to receive cumulative doses of any significance. Radiation doses at this distance were often at the limits of the sensitivity of the measuring dosimeter. We question the need to wear lead protection for anaesthesia providers who are routinely at 1.5 m or a greater distance from standard fluoroscopy units.

  15. Composite Bone Models in Orthopaedic Surgery Research and Education

    PubMed Central

    Elfar, John; Stanbury, Spencer; Menorca, Ron Martin Garcia; Reed, Jeffrey Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Composite bone models are increasingly used in orthopaedic biomechanics research and surgical education—applications that traditionally relied on cadavers. Cadaver bones are suboptimal for myriad reasons, including issues of cost, availability, preservation, and inconsistency between specimens. Further, cadaver samples disproportionately represent the elderly, whose bone quality may not be representative of the greater orthopaedic population. The current fourth-generation composite bone models provide an accurate reproduction of the biomechanical properties of human bone when placed under bending, axial, and torsional loads. The combination of glass fiber and epoxy resin components into a single phase has enabled manufacturing by injection molding. The high anatomic fidelity of the cadaver-based molds and negligible shrinkage properties of the epoxy resin results in a process that allows for excellent definition of anatomic detail in the cortical wall and optimized consistency of features between models. Recent biomechanical studies of composites have validated their use as a suitable substitute for cadaver specimens. PMID:24486757

  16. Bone and metal: an orthopaedic perspective on osseointegration of metals.

    PubMed

    Goriainov, Vitali; Cook, Richard; M Latham, Jeremy; G Dunlop, Douglas; Oreffo, Richard O C

    2014-10-01

    The area of implant osseointegration is of major importance, given the predicted significant rise in the number of orthopaedic procedures and an increasingly ageing population. Osseointegration is a complex process involving a number of distinct mechanisms affected by the implant bulk properties and surface characteristics. Our understanding and ability to modify these mechanisms through alterations in implant design is continuously expanding. The following review considers the main aspects of material and surface alterations in metal implants, and the extent of their subsequent influence on osseointegration. Clinically, osseointegration results in asymptomatic stable durable fixation of orthopaedic implants. The complexity of achieving this outcome through incorporation and balance of contributory factors is highlighted through a clinical case report.

  17. Use of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy in Orthopaedic Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    of open fractures with associated soft-tissue defects.1 Currently, NPWT is ac- cepted for several additional indica- tions associated with orthopaedic...environment in- creases the risk of nosocomial infec- tion. This is of particular relevance in open fractures with marked com- minution and extensive...should be analyzed with caution. Stannard et al25 also compared NPWT with WTD dressing for man- agement of severe open fractures . In a randomized

  18. Eponym : de Quervain thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Engkakul, Pontipa; Mahachoklertwattana, Pat; Poomthavorn, Preamrudee

    2011-04-01

    de Quervain thyroiditis is a self-limited inflammatory disorder of the thyroid gland. It is an uncommon disease in adults and very rare in children. Fritz de Quervain, a Swiss surgeon, who was an authority on thyroid disease, described the unique pathology of this disease. Granulomatous changes with giant cells in thyroid tissue are the pathological findings. Viral infection in genetically predisposed individuals has been proposed as the pathogenesis of the disease. Clinical hallmarks for the diagnosis are painful thyroid enlargement, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein as well as decreased uptake of the thyroid gland on thyroid scintigraphy. In addition, thyrotoxicosis is present in about 50% of cases in early phase of the disease. Serum thyroglobulin level is usually elevated. Only symptomatic treatment with analgesics is usually required for pain relief. Glucocorticoid therapy may be used in severely ill patients. de Quervain thyroiditis is generally completely resolved without complications in 6-12 months. However, permanent hypothyroidism and recurrent disease have been reported in some patients.

  19. Eponymous signs in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Madke, Bhushan; Nayak, Chitra

    2012-01-01

    Clinical signs reflect the sheer and close observatory quality of an astute physician. Many new dermatological signs both in clinical and diagnostic aspects of various dermatoses are being reported and no single book on dermatology literature gives a comprehensive list of these “signs” and postgraduate students in dermatology finds it difficult to have access to the description, as most of these resident doctor do not have access to the said journal articles. “Signs” commonly found in dermatologic literature with a brief discussion and explanation is reviewed in this paper. PMID:23189246

  20. Orthopaedic surgeons in Yorkshire--are we ATLS positive?

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, S. P.; McMurray, D. H. M.; Hinsche, A. F.; Deacon, P.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 1993, the Major Trauma Working Group of Yorkshire proposed that hospitals should be accredited as Trauma Reception Hospitals with a policy for the response to the arrival of a trauma patient. These requirements include specific criteria for orthopaedics. METHODS: To evaluate if these criteria are being fulfilled, we carried out an audit comparing the response in the hospitals within the Yorkshire deanery to the arrival of major trauma. All consultant and middle-grade orthopaedic surgeons on call for trauma were contacted and questioned as to their ATLS provider status and involvement in the "trauma call". RESULTS: 16 hospitals were included of which 13 have a "trauma team". 191 surgeons (96% response) were included. 175 have completed an ATLS course. Of these, 72 (41%) had out-of-date qualifications. Only 9 (13%) were waiting to revalidate. Variation was seen in the frequency of accident and emergency department attendance by different grades of surgeon for major trauma. DISCUSSION: All hospitals have a response for major trauma although variations occur. The vast majority of orthopaedic surgeons in Yorkshire have been adequately trained in ATLS management (more so than any study has previously shown), particularly the middle grades, who are usually first to attend. The level of revalidation is low and reasons for this are discussed with recommendations for revalidation in the future. PMID:15720907

  1. Regenerative orthopaedics: in vitro, in vivo...in silico.

    PubMed

    Geris, Liesbet

    2014-09-01

    In silico, defined in analogy to in vitro and in vivo as those studies that are performed on a computer, is an essential step in problem-solving and product development in classical engineering fields. The use of in silico models is now slowly easing its way into medicine. In silico models are already used in orthopaedics for the planning of complicated surgeries, personalised implant design and the analysis of gait measurements. However, these in silico models often lack the simulation of the response of the biological system over time. In silico models focusing on the response of the biological systems are in full development. This review starts with an introduction into in silico models of orthopaedic processes. Special attention is paid to the classification of models according to their spatiotemporal scale (gene/protein to population) and the information they were built on (data vs hypotheses). Subsequently, the review focuses on the in silico models used in regenerative orthopaedics research. Contributions of in silico models to an enhanced understanding and optimisation of four key elements-cells, carriers, culture and clinics-are illustrated. Finally, a number of challenges are identified, related to the computational aspects but also to the integration of in silico tools into clinical practice.

  2. Musculoskeletal ultrasound education: orthopaedic resident ability following a multimedia tutorial.

    PubMed

    Piposar, Jonathan R; Easley, Mark; Nunley, James A; DeOrio, James K; Talusan, Paul G; Gubler, Kyle E; Reach, John S

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSK-US) is a quick and effective imaging tool that can be utilized by orthopaedic surgeons to identify common musculoskeletal pathology such as ankle tendinopathy. This study evaluated the ability of 15 orthopaedic surgery residents to identify and measure ankle tendons after attending a multimedia tutorial on MSK-US. Afterwards, proficiency of usage was assessed by identification and quantification of three ankle tendons (Achilles, tibialis posterior, and flexor hallucis longus) in a cadaver limb. Resident comfort level and plan for future use were also assessed. After completing the tutorial, accuracy measuring the Achilles, tibialis posterior, and flexor hallucis longus tendons was 94.8%, 90.2%, and 90.1%, respectively. Resident comfort level improved from a level of 2.3 before the tutorial to 6.8 afterwards. Seventy-one percent of residents plan to use ultrasound in clinical practice. These results show that orthopaedic surgery residents can identify and assess tendon size via MSK-US with sufficient accuracy after a multimedia tutorial.

  3. Neoprene Orthopaedic Supports: An Underrecognised Cause of Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hawkey, S; Ghaffar, S

    2015-01-01

    Thioureas, often contained within neoprene to provide water resistance, are an important cause of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in those who use neoprene products. We wish to present three cases of thiourea-induced ACD from three different orthopaedic supports containing neoprene. The first case was a 67-year-old woman who developed an itchy rash on her heel three weeks after using a neoprene insole for plantar fasciitis. The second case was a 47-year-old man who developed an itchy rash on his wrist after wearing neoprene wrist splints for psoriatic arthropathy. The third case was a 77-year-old woman who experienced a severe erythematous rash with blistering from a neoprene elbow brace she received following a humeral fracture. All patients were patch tested to the British Society of Cutaneous Allergy Standard and rubber series and a cut piece from all the relevant supports. At 96 hours, all patients had a + reaction to mixed dialkylthiourea, diethylthiourea, and the supports' material. No other positive patch test reactions were identified. As neoprene is fast becoming one of the most popular materials used for orthopaedic supports, awareness of this reaction and close liaison between dermatologists and orthopaedic surgeons are therefore essential to allow for early recognition of this complication.

  4. The evolution of orthopaedic nursing at the Hospital for Special Surgery: the first orthopaedic institution in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Barbara A

    2005-01-01

    The history of nursing began in London in the late 1800s with the reform of unsanitary conditions by Florence Nightingale. During the same period, the United States was bitterly fighting the Civil War. Nursing had not developed as a profession, and most of the duties performed by nurses were conducted by men. Casualties of war required rehabilitation and care. Crippled children were left to die because they were considered a burden to society. Dr. James Knight founded the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled in his home on Second Avenue. This would later become a world-renowned orthopaedic institution with exceptional nursing care. A historical analysis of nursing education and practice are reviewed, along with the evolution of the first orthopaedic hospital in the United States.

  5. The deployed military orthopaedic surgeon: experiences of a recent Iowa graduate in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Malin, Andrew S; Brannan, Patrick S

    2012-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons deployed to Afghanistan are primarily responsible for the provision of care to injured Us and coalition soldiers. A vast and well-coordinated system of echeloned care has evolved to rapidly treat and evacuate injured soldiers. Orthopaedic care of injured Afghan civilians represents a common secondary mission performed by deployed orthopaedic surgeons. In this article, I describe my experiences while deployed to Afghanistan in 2011 as part of the special Operations surgical team.

  6. Solar Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  7. Telescope Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Renaissance Telescope for high resolution and visual astronomy has five 82-degree Field Tele-Vue Nagler Eyepieces, some of the accessories that contribute to high image quality. Telescopes and eyepieces are representative of a family of optical equipment manufactured by Tele-Vue Optics, Inc.

  8. One in the eye for an orthopaedic surgeon.

    PubMed Central

    Lourie, J.; Hamid, K.

    1996-01-01

    Despite many reports of injuries to surgeons during operative procedures, there is no record of an eye injury caused by a foreign body. Orthopaedic surgeons are particularly vulnerable to such injury. An instance in which a penetrating eye injury occurred while hammering a rasp into the femur during a hip replacement is described. There is a potential oblique trajectory for a foreign body to reach the eye from the operative field despite the use of a visor for eye protection. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8659981

  9. Rapid Prototyping in Orthopaedic Surgery: A User's Guide

    PubMed Central

    Frame, Mark; Huntley, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) is applicable to orthopaedic problems involving three dimensions, particularly fractures, deformities, and reconstruction. In the past, RP has been hampered by cost and difficulties accessing the appropriate expertise. Here we outline the history of rapid prototyping and furthermore a process using open-source software to produce a high fidelity physical model from CT data. This greatly mitigates the expense associated with the technique, allowing surgeons to produce precise models for preoperative planning and procedure rehearsal. We describe the method with an illustrative case. PMID:22666160

  10. Hand disorders in musicians: the orthopaedic surgeon's role.

    PubMed

    Sheibani-Rad, S; Wolfe, S; Jupiter, J

    2013-02-01

    Like athletes, musicians are vulnerable to musculoskeletal injuries that can be career ending or have a severe negative financial impact. All ages are affected, with a peak incidence in the third and fourth decades. Women are slightly more likely to be affected than men. It is incumbent upon orthopaedic surgeons to be able to complete a thorough physical assessment, be aware of the risk factors associated with musculoskeletal symptoms in musicians, and have a detailed knowledge of the specific syndromes they suffer and their appropriate treatment. In this paper we review the common hand injuries that afflict musicians and discuss their treatment.

  11. 78 FR 20328 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee: Notice of Postponement of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee scheduled for April...

  12. The Orthopaedic Training Study, Phase II 1968-1972. Final Report, Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Carl J.; And Others

    Phase two of the Orthopaedic Training Study was designed to examine time, sequence, and content requirements of existing orthopaedic programs. Specifically, the proposal was designed to achieve the following objectives: (1) to provide a model of individualized graduate education in medicine in which the demonstration of individual competence marks…

  13. Antoni marian gabryszewski as a pioneer of orthopaedics and rehabilitation in poland.

    PubMed

    Jandziś, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the work of Dr. Antoni Marian Gabryszewski, orthopaedic surgeon, associate professor at Lvov University, towards the development of orthopaedics and rehabilitation in Poland before World War I. It is based on archival materials, publications in medical journals and articles from the daily press of that time. The author presents little-known facts concerning Dr. Gabryszewski's occupational and academic activity and his work at the Surgery Dept. of Lvov University as well as his habilitation dissertation, regarded as the first attempt to position orthopaedics as distinct from surgery in Poland. The article also describes his long-term work at the private Orthopaedic Facility established in 1898 in Lvov which later incorporated the Zander Institute in 1908. The Zander Institute was the first in Galicia to offer exercise machines designed by Dr. Gustav Zander, imported from Stockholm and enjoying an extraordinary popularity in the world. Dr. Gabryszewski's practice as a spa doctor, which he pursued in Iwonicz Zdrój in the summer months, is also presented. Dr. A. Gabryszewski introduced comprehensive rehabilitation to the treatment of orthopaedic patients both at the Surgery Dept. of Lvov University and at his Orthopaedic Facility. He used therapeutic gymnastics (particularly mechanotherapy), therapeutic massage, physical therapy and orthopaedic aids. Analysis of the source materials leads to unequivocal conclusions attesting to Dr. A. Gabryszewski's pioneering role and significant contribution to the development of orthopaedics and rehabilitation in Poland.

  14. Long Sick Leave after Orthopaedic Inpatient Rehabilitation: Treatment Failure or Relapse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangels, Marija; Schwarz, Susanne; Worringen, Ulrike; Holme, Martin; Rief, Winfried

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether short-term versus long-term sick leave after orthopaedic inpatient rehabilitation can be predicted by initial assessment information, the clinical status at discharge, or whether the follow-up interval is crucial for later sick leave. We examined 214 patients from an orthopaedic rehabilitation hospital at admission,…

  15. 75 FR 33995 - Safety Zone; Michigan Orthopaedic Society 50th Anniversary Fireworks, Lake Huron, Mackinac Island...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Michigan Orthopaedic Society 50th... Society 50th Anniversary Fireworks display, June 19, 2010. This temporary safety zone is necessary to... vessels during the setup and launching of fireworks in conjunction with the Michigan Orthopaedic...

  16. Pudendal nerve palsy in trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Polyzois, Ioannis; Tsitskaris, Konstantinos; Oussedik, Sam

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of pudendal nerve palsy following routine trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery procedures ranges from 1.9% to 27.6%. Excessive and/or prolonged traction against the perineal post of a traction table, leading to direct compression and localised ischaemia to the nerve are suggested mechanisms of injury. Misuse of traction and the inappropriate placement of the perineal post, leading to crushing and stretching of the pudendal nerve, are two main contributing factors leading to its postoperative palsy. The sequelae may be sensory, motor or mixed. In most cases, these injuries are transient and tend to resolve within several weeks or months. However, complete neurological recovery may be unpredictable and the effects of ongoing dysfunction potentially disastrous for the individual. In terms of preventative measures, magnitude and duration of traction time should be minimised; traction should be limited to the critical operative steps only. Additionally, the perineal post should be placed between the genitalia and the contralateral leg. A well-padded, large-diameter perineal post should be used (>10cm). Adequate muscle relaxation during anaesthesia is particularly important in young men who have strong muscles and thus require larger traction forces when compared to elderly patients. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of the pathophysiology behind the development of this palsy and the measures that can be employed to reduce its occurrence. In procedures where a traction table is employed, consenting for pudendal nerve palsy should be considered by the surgical team.

  17. Orthopaedic Surgeons’ Cardiovascular Response During Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Orlic, Dubravko

    2008-01-01

    The literature contains limited and contradictory information regarding the amount of physical effort and/or emotional stress needed to perform surgery. We therefore investigated cardiovascular response to psychophysical stress in orthopaedic surgeons while they were performing surgery. We monitored 29 male orthopaedic surgeons from four university centers while they performed total hip arthroplasties. Changes in their cardiovascular parameters were recorded by ambulatory monitoring methods. Exercise stress testing of each participant was used as a control state. We compared the cardiovascular response during surgery to energy requirements of everyday activities. Preoperative and postoperative testing showed lower values of cardiovascular parameters than during physically less difficult parts of the operation; physically more difficult phases of the operation additionally increased the values of parameters. We concluded performing total hip arthroplasty increases surgeons’ cardiovascular parameters because of psychologic stress and physical effort. Excitement of the cardiovascular system during total hip arthroplasty appears similar to the excitement during moderate-intensity daily activities, such as walking the dog, leisurely bicycling, or climbing stairs. PMID:18196425

  18. Orthopaedic surgeons' cardiovascular response during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bergovec, Marko; Orlic, Dubravko

    2008-02-01

    The literature contains limited and contradictory information regarding the amount of physical effort and/or emotional stress needed to perform surgery. We therefore investigated cardiovascular response to psychophysical stress in orthopaedic surgeons while they were performing surgery. We monitored 29 male orthopaedic surgeons from four university centers while they performed total hip arthroplasties. Changes in their cardiovascular parameters were recorded by ambulatory monitoring methods. Exercise stress testing of each participant was used as a control state. We compared the cardiovascular response during surgery to energy requirements of everyday activities. Preoperative and postoperative testing showed lower values of cardiovascular parameters than during physically less difficult parts of the operation; physically more difficult phases of the operation additionally increased the values of parameters. We concluded performing total hip arthroplasty increases surgeons' cardiovascular parameters because of psychologic stress and physical effort. Excitement of the cardiovascular system during total hip arthroplasty appears similar to the excitement during moderate-intensity daily activities, such as walking the dog, leisurely bicycling, or climbing stairs.

  19. Myths and Legends in Orthopaedic Practice: Are We All Guilty?

    PubMed Central

    Immerman, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Over years of practice, many beliefs and practices become entrenched as tried and tested, and we subconsciously believe they are based on scientific evidence. We identified nine such beliefs by interviewing orthopaedic surgeons in which studies (or lack thereof) apparently do not support such practices. These are: changing the scalpel blade after the skin incision to limit contamination; bending the patient’s knee when applying a thigh tourniquet; bed rest for treatment of deep vein thrombosis; antibiotics in irrigation solution; routine use of hip precautions; routine use of antibiotics for the duration of wound drains; routine removal of hardware in children; correlation between operative time and infection; and not changing dressings on the floor before scrubbing. A survey of 186 practicing orthopaedic surgeons in academic and community settings was performed to assess their routine practice patterns. We present the results of the survey along with an in-depth literature review of these topics. Most surgeon practices are based on a combination of knowledge gained during training, reading the literature, and personal experience. The results of this survey hopefully will raise the awareness of the selected literature for common practices. PMID:18726654

  20. Aspects of current management: orthopaedic surgery in haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E C

    2012-01-01

    If continuous prophylaxis is not feasible due to expense or lack of venous access, we must aggressively treat major haemarthroses (including arthrocentesis) to prevent progression to synovitis, recurrent joint bleeds, and ultimately end-stage osteoarthritis (haemophilic arthropathy). For the treatment of chronic haemophilic synovitis, radiosynovectomy should always be indicated as the first procedure. If, after three procedures with 6-month interval, radiosynovectomy fails, an arthroscopic synovectomy must be indicated. Between the second and fourth decades, many haemophilic patients develop joint destruction (arthropathy). At this stage possible treatments include alignment osteotomy, arthroscopic joint debridement, arthrodesis (joint fusion) and total joint arthroplasty. For the hip press-fit uncemented components (hemispherical acetabulum, flanged femoral stem, metal-to-polyethylene) are recommended whilst for the knee a posterior-stabilized (PS) cemented design is advised. Muscular problems must not be underestimated in haemophilia due to their risk of developing compartment syndromes (which will require surgical decompression) and pseudotumours (which will require surgical removal or percutaneous treatment). Regarding patients with inhibitors, the advent of APCCs and rFVIIa has made major orthopaedic surgery possible, leading to an improved quality of life for haemophilia patients. Concerning local fibrin seal, it is not always necessary to achieve haemostasis in all surgical procedures performed in persons with haemophilia. However, it could be a good adjunct therapy, mainly when a surgical field potentially will bleed more than expected (i.e. patients with inhibitors), and also in some orthopaedic procedures (mainly the surgical removal of pseudotumours).

  1. Epidemiology, trends, and disparities in regional anaesthesia for orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cozowicz, C; Poeran, J; Memtsoudis, S G

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have linked the use of regional anaesthesia to improved outcomes. Epidemiological research on utilization, trends, and disparities in this field is sparse; however, large nationally representative database constructs containing anaesthesia-related data, demographic information, and multiyear files are now available. Together with advances in research methodology and technology, these databases provide the foundation for epidemiological research in anaesthesia. We present an overview of selected studies that provide epidemiological data and describe current anaesthetic practice, trends, and disparities in orthopaedic surgery in particular. This literature suggests that that even among orthopaedic surgical procedures, which are highly amenable to regional anaesthetic techniques, neuraxial anaesthetics and peripheral nerve blocks are used in only a minority of procedures. Trend analyses show that peripheral nerve blocks are gaining in popularity, whereas use of neuraxial anaesthetics is remaining relatively unchanged or even declining over time. Finally, significant disparities and variability in anaesthetic care seem to exist based on demographic and health-care-related factors. With anaesthesia playing an increasingly important part in population-based health-care delivery and evidence indicating improved outcome with use of regional anaesthesia, more research in this area is needed. Furthermore, prevalent disparities and variabilities in anaesthesia practice need to be specified further and addressed in the future.

  2. Is There an Association Between Study Materials and Scores on the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons Part 1 Examination?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    orthopaedic knowledge update 10; AAOS SAE, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons self-assessment examinations; MRO , Miller’s review of...review source listed. OB, www.orthobullets.com; AAOS SAE, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons self-assessment examinations; MRO , Miller’s review of

  3. Experimental validation of A-mode ultrasound acquisition system for computer assisted orthopaedic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lorenzo, Danilo; De Momi, Elena; Beretta, Elisa; Cerveri, Pietro; Perona, Franco; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    2009-02-01

    Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery (CAOS) systems improve the results and the standardization of surgical interventions. Anatomical landmarks and bone surface detection is straightforward to either register the surgical space with the pre-operative imaging space and to compute biomechanical parameters for prosthesis alignment. Surface points acquisition increases the intervention invasiveness and can be influenced by the soft tissue layer interposition (7-15mm localization errors). This study is aimed at evaluating the accuracy of a custom-made A-mode ultrasound (US) system for non invasive detection of anatomical landmarks and surfaces. A-mode solutions eliminate the necessity of US images segmentation, offers real-time signal processing and requires less invasive equipment. The system consists in a single transducer US probe optically tracked, a pulser/receiver and an FPGA-based board, which is responsible for logic control command generation and for real-time signal processing and three custom-made board (signal acquisition, blanking and synchronization). We propose a new calibration method of the US system. The experimental validation was then performed measuring the length of known-shape polymethylmethacrylate boxes filled with pure water and acquiring bone surface points on a bovine bone phantom covered with soft-tissue mimicking materials. Measurement errors were computed through MR and CT images acquisitions of the phantom. Points acquisition on bone surface with the US system demonstrated lower errors (1.2mm) than standard pointer acquisition (4.2mm).

  4. Medical Issues: Equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... support & care > living with sma > medical issues > equipment Equipment Individuals with SMA often require a range of ... you can submit an equipment pool request. Helpful Equipment The following is a list of equipment that ...

  5. The Impact of the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) Research on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Orthopaedic Practice.

    PubMed

    Lynch, T Sean; Parker, Richard D; Patel, Ronak M; Andrish, Jack T; Spindler, Kurt P; Amendola, Annunziata; Brophy, Robert H; Dunn, Warren R; Flanigan, David C; Huston, Laura J; Jones, Morgan H; Kaeding, Christopher C; Marx, Robert G; Matava, Matthew J; McCarty, Eric C; Pedroza, Angela D; Reinke, Emily K; Wolf, Brian R; Wright, Rick W

    2015-03-01

    With an estimated 200,000 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions performed annually in the United States, there is an emphasis on determining patient-specific information to help educate patients on expected clinically relevant outcomes. The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network consortium was created in 2002 to enroll and longitudinally follow a large population cohort of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. The study group has enrolled >4,400 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions from seven institutions to establish the large level I prospective anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction outcomes cohort. The group has become more than a database with information regarding anterior cruciate ligament injuries; it has helped to establish a new benchmark for conducting multicenter, multisurgeon orthopaedic research. The changes in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction practice resulting from the group include the use of autograft for high school, college, and competitive athletes in their primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Other modifications include treatment options for meniscus and cartilage injuries, as well as lifestyle choices made after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  6. Rescue Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Lifeshear cutter, a rescue tool for freeing accident victims from wreckage, was developed under the Clinton Administration's Technology Reinvestment Program. Prior cutting equipment was cumbersome and expensive; the new cutter is 50 percent lighter and 70 percent cheaper. The cutter is pyrotechnically-actuated, using a miniature version of the power cartridges used for separation devices on the Space Shuttle and other NASA spacecraft. Hi-Shear Technology Corporation developed the cutter with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and input from the City of Torrance (California) Fire Department.

  7. Development of orthopaedics in Slovenia and the history of the Orthopaedic Department Ljubljana University Hospital--on the occasion of the WHO "Bone and Joint Decade" (2000-2010).

    PubMed

    Zupanic Slavec, Zvonka; Herman, Srecko; Slavec, Ksenija

    2011-01-01

    In Slovenia, orthopaedics started to develop at the end of WWI, when the number of the handicapped increased. Dr Anton Brecelj, who in 1919 laid the groundwork for the welfare of handicapped and sent a Czech doctor Franc Minař to specialise in orthopaedic surgery. When Minař returned to Ljubljana in 1923, he established an orthopaedic unit within surgery and in 1937 took over its management. Orthopaedics developed very quickly after 1945, when Ljubljana University set up a School of Medicine, a Department of Orthopaedics and Physical Medicine within the School, and Orthopaedic Clinic of the University Hospital. Orthopaedic surgeons from Ljubljana participated in the establishment of a hospital for osteoarticular tuberculosis in Valdoltra, (which later became the largest orthopaedic hospital in Slovenia), specialised clinics and orthopaedic hospital departments throughout Slovenia, schools for physiotherapists in Ljubljana, the Slovenian Rehabilitation Institute - Soča, the Home for Disabled Children in Kamnik, and the spa and rehabilitation centre in Laško. In 2011, orthopaedics in Slovenia holds 600 hospital beds and has about 75 orthopaedic surgeons who annually treat around 50,000 patients.

  8. Professionalism in 21st century professional practice: autonomy and accountability in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Schneller, Eugene S; Wilson, Natalia A

    2009-10-01

    Orthopaedic surgical practice is becoming increasingly complex. The rapid change in pace associated with new information and technologies, the physician-supplier relationship, the growing costs and growing gap between costs and reimbursements for orthopaedic surgical procedures, and the influences of advertising on the patient, challenge all involved in the delivery of orthopaedic care. This paper assesses the concepts of professionalism, autonomy, and accountability in the 21st century practice of orthopaedic surgery. These concepts are considered within the context of the complex value chain surrounding orthopaedic surgery and the changing forces influencing clinical decision making by the surgeon. A leading impetus for challenge to the autonomy of the orthopaedic surgeon has been cost. Mistrust and lack of understanding have characterized the physician-hospital relationship. Resource dependency has characterized the physician-supplier relationship. Accountability for the surgeon has increased. We suggest implant surgery involves shared decision making and "coproduction" between the orthopaedic surgeon and other stakeholders. The challenge for the profession is to redefine professionalism, accountability, and autonomy in the face of these changes and challenges.

  9. Biodegradable metallic materials for orthopaedic implantations: A review.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Kelvin W K; Wong, Karen H M

    2012-09-06

    Non-degradable metals such as stainless steel, cobalt-chromium-based alloys, titanium and its alloys may lead to stress shielding effect after fractured bone has healed. This complication may attribute to the non-degradability and the mismatch of the mechanical properties between these metallic implants and human bone. Biodegradable metallic materials have been therefore studied as alternative implantable metals in orthopaedics for some years. Magnesium is a potential candidate, as its mechanical properties are similar to human. Additionally, it is degradable and its ions are essential for cell functions. However, rapid degradation and release of hydrogen gas may inhibit its applications clinically. Hence, this paper reviews the development of the biodegradable metallic implants and various methods to improve the degradation of magnesium alloys.

  10. Scoring the SF-36 in Orthopaedics: A Brief Guide.

    PubMed

    Laucis, Nicholas C; Hays, Ron D; Bhattacharyya, Timothy

    2015-10-07

    The Short Form-36 (SF-36) is the most widely used health-related quality-of-life measure in research to date. There are currently two sources for the SF-36 and scoring instructions: licensing them from Optum, Inc., or obtaining them from publicly available documentation from the RAND Corporation. The SF-36 yields eight scale scores and two summary scores. The physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores were derived using an orthogonal-factor analytic model that forced the PCS and MCS to be uncorrelated, and it has been shown to contribute to an inflation of the MCS in patients with substantial physical disability. Oblique scoring can reduce this inflation of the MCS in orthopaedic studies. Spreadsheets to score the SF-36, along with a copy of the questionnaire, are provided.

  11. Feasibility of detecting orthopaedic screw overtightening using acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Pullin, Rhys; Wright, Bryan J; Kapur, Richard; McCrory, John P; Pearson, Matthew; Evans, Sam L; Crivelli, Davide

    2017-03-01

    A preliminary study of acoustic emission during orthopaedic screw fixation was performed using polyurethane foam as the bone-simulating material. Three sets of screws, a dynamic hip screw, a small fragment screw and a large fragment screw, were investigated, monitoring acoustic-emission activity during the screw tightening. In some specimens, screws were deliberately overtightened in order to investigate the feasibility of detecting the stripping torque in advance. One set of data was supported by load cell measurements to directly measure the axial load through the screw. Data showed that acoustic emission can give good indications of impending screw stripping; such indications are not available to the surgeon at the current state of the art using traditional torque measuring devices, and current practice relies on the surgeon's experience alone. The results suggest that acoustic emission may have the potential to prevent screw overtightening and bone tissue damage, eliminating one of the commonest sources of human error in such scenarios.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of antiseptic-coated orthopaedic devices.

    PubMed

    Darouiche, R O; Green, G; Mansouri, M D

    1998-04-01

    Antimicrobial coating of medical devices, including fracture fixation devices, has evolved as a potentially effective method for preventing device-related infections. We examined the in vitro antimicrobial activity of titanium cylinders coated with the antiseptic combination of chlorhexidine and chloroxylenol. The coated devices provided zones of inhibition against Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans, at baseline and up to 8 weeks after incubation of the coated cylinders in human serum at 37 degrees C. This durable antimicrobial activity was attributed to the relatively slow leaching of chlorhexidine and chloroxylenol from the coated cylinders as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. These results suggest that antiseptic-coated orthopaedic devices may provide broad-spectrum and durable antimicrobial protection against device-related infection.

  13. Antibiotic stewardship in orthopaedic surgery: principles and practice.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kirk A; Stein, Spencer; Looze, Christopher; Bosco, Joseph A

    2014-12-01

    A thorough knowledge of the principles of antibiotic stewardship is a crucial part of high-quality orthopaedic surgical care. These principles include (1) determining appropriate indications for antibiotic administration, (2) choosing the correct antibiotic based on known or expected pathogens, (3) determining the correct dosage, and (4) determining the appropriate duration of treatment. Antibiotic stewardship programs have a multidisciplinary staff that can help guide antibiotic selection and dosage. These programs also perform active surveillance of antimicrobial use and may reduce Clostridium difficile and other drug-resistant bacterial infections by providing expert guidance on judicious antibiotic usage. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens, the geographical diversity of these infecting pathogens, and the changing patient population require customization of prophylactic regimens to reduce infectious complications. A multidisciplinary approach to antibiotic stewardship can lead to improved patient outcomes and cost-effective medical care.

  14. Robots in orthopaedic surgery: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Bargar, William L

    2007-10-01

    Robots are increasingly being developed for use in surgery to aid physicians in providing more precision, especially during procedures requiring fine movements that may be beyond the scope of the human hand. In addition, robots enable the surgeon to provide improved accuracy and reproducibility with the goal of better outcomes. To date, most robotic surgical systems are in the design and experimental stage. For robotic systems to gain widespread acceptance in surgery, they must first prove their value in clinical application and ease of use as well as provide a favorable cost-to-benefit ratio. I provide an overview of the history of robotics in orthopaedic surgery and a review of their current applications with some predictions of the future for this technology.

  15. International patients on operation vacation – perspectives of patients travelling to Hungary for orthopaedic treatments

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Eszter; Szocska, Gabor; Knai, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Background: The importance of cross-border healthcare, medical and health tourism plays a significant role in the European health policy and health management. After dentistry, orthopaedic treatments are the leading motivation for seeking care in Hungary, as patients with rheumatic and motion diseases are drawn to the thermal spas and well-established orthopaedic centres. This paper aims to gain insight into foreign patients’ perspectives on their experience of having sought medical tourism in orthopaedic care in Hungary. Methods: A patient survey was conducted in 2012 on motivations for seeking treatment abroad, orthopaedic care received and overall satisfaction. In addition, health professionals’ interviews, and 17 phone interviews were conducted in 2013 with Romanian patients who had orthopaedic treatment in Hungary. Finally, medical records of foreign patients were analysed. Results: The survey was completed by 115 participants – 61.1% females, mean age= 41.9, 87% Romanian origin. Most of the patients came to Hungary for orthopaedic surgeries, e.g. arthroscopy, knee/hip prosthesis or spinal surgery. 72.6% chose Hungary because of related to perceived better quality and longstanding culture of Hungarian orthopaedic care. Over 57% of patients reported being ‘very satisfied’ with care received and 41.6% ‘satisfied’. The follow-up interviews further reflected this level of satisfaction, therefore many respondents stating they have already recommended the Hungarian healthcare to others. Conclusion: Based on the findings, patients from neighbouring regions are increasingly seeking orthopaedic care in Hungary. Patients having orthopaedic care are highly satisfied with the quality of care, the whole treatment process from the availability of information to discharge summaries and would consider returning for further treatments. PMID:25396209

  16. A randomised controlled trial. Shifting boundaries of doctors and physiotherapists in orthopaedic outpatient departments

    PubMed Central

    Daker-White, G.; Carr, A. J.; Harvey, I.; Woolhead, G.; Bannister, G.; Nelson, I.; Kammerling, M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of specially trained physiotherapists in the assessment and management of defined referrals to hospital orthopaedic departments. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Orthopaedic outpatient departments in two hospitals. SUBJECTS: 481 patients with musculoskeletal problems referred for specialist orthopaedic opinion. INTERVENTIONS: Initial assessment and management undertaken by post- Fellowship junior orthopaedic surgeons, or by specially trained physiotherapists working in an extended role (orthopaedic physiotherapy specialists). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patient centred measures of pain, functional disability and perceived handicap. RESULTS: A total of 654 patients were eligible to join the trial, 481 (73.6%) gave their consent to be randomised. The two arms (doctor n = 244, physiotherapist n = 237) were similar at baseline. Baseline and follow up questionnaires were completed by 383 patients (79.6%). The mean time to follow up was 5.6 months after randomisation, with similar distributions of intervals to follow up in both arms. The only outcome for which there was a statistically or clinically important difference between arms was in a measure of patient satisfaction, which favoured the physiotherapist arm. A cost minimisation analysis showed no significant differences in direct costs to the patient or NHS primary care costs. Direct hospital costs were lower (p < 0.00001) in the physiotherapist arm (mean cost per patient = 256 Pounds, n = 232), as they were less likely to order radiographs and to refer patients for orthopaedic surgery than were the junior doctors (mean cost per patient in arm = 498 Pounds, n = 238). CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of the patient centred outcomes measured in this randomised trial, orthopaedic physiotherapy specialists are as effective as post-Fellowship junior staff and clinical assistant orthopaedic surgeons in the initial assessment and management of new referrals

  17. How do Orthopaedic Surgeons Address Psychological Aspects of Illness?

    PubMed Central

    Vranceanu, Ana Maria; Beks, Reinier B.; Guitton, Thierry G.; Janssen, Stein J.; Ring, David

    2017-01-01

    Background: Orthopaedic surgeons have a pivotal role in transitioning the care of orthopedic patients from a biomedical to a biopsychosocial model. In an effort to foster this transition, we designed a study aimed to determine surgeons’ attitudes and practice of noticing, screening, discussing psychological illness with patients, as well as making referrals to address psychosocial issues in patients in need. Additionally, we asked surgeons to rank order potential barriers to and reasons for referrals to psychosocial treatment. Methods: Orthopaedic surgeons members of the Science and Variation Group and Ankle Platform (N =350) completed demographics, and a 4-part survey assessing the degree to which surgeons notice, assess, screen and refer for psychological treatments, as well ranked ordered barriers to engaging in these processes. Results: As a group surgeons were neutral to referral for psychological treatment and formal screening of psychological factors, and somewhat likely to notice and discuss psychological factors. Surgeons were more likely to refer for psychological treatment if they engaged in research, or if they reside in South America as opposed to North America. The highest ranked barriers to screening, noticing, discussing and referring for psychological treatment were lack of time, stigma and feeling uncomfortable. Conclusion: Overall surgeons are likely to notice and discuss psychological factors, but less likely to formally screen or refer for psychological treatment. Transition to biopsychosocial models should focus on problem solving these barriers by teaching surgeons communication skills to increase comfort with discussing psychoemotional factors associated with orthopedic problems. The use of empathic communication can be very helpful in normalizing the difficulty of coping with an orthopedic condition, and may facilitate referral. PMID:28271080

  18. Lean Participative Process Improvement: Outcomes and Obstacles in Trauma Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    New, Steve; Hadi, Mohammed; Pickering, Sharon; Robertson, Eleanor; Morgan, Lauren; Griffin, Damian; Collins, Gary; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Catchpole, Ken; McCulloch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of a “systems” approach using Lean methodology to improve surgical care, as part of a programme of studies investigating possible synergy between improvement approaches. Setting A controlled before-after study using the orthopaedic trauma theatre of a UK Trust hospital as the active site and an elective orthopaedic theatre in the same Trust as control. Participants All staff involved in surgical procedures in both theatres. Interventions A one-day “lean” training course delivered by an experienced specialist team was followed by support and assistance in developing a 6 month improvement project. Clinical staff selected the subjects for improvement and designed the improvements. Outcome Measures We compared technical and non-technical team performance in theatre using WHO checklist compliance evaluation, “glitch count” and Oxford NOTECHS II in a sample of directly observed operations, and patient outcome (length of stay, complications and readmissions) for all patients. We collected observational data for 3 months and clinical data for 6 months before and after the intervention period. We compared changes in measures using 2-way analysis of variance. Results We studied 576 cases before and 465 after intervention, observing the operation in 38 and 41 cases respectively. We found no significant changes in team performance or patient outcome measures. The intervention theatre staff focused their efforts on improving first patient arrival time, which improved by 20 minutes after intervention. Conclusions This version of “lean” system improvement did not improve measured safety processes or outcomes. The study highlighted an important tension between promoting staff ownership and providing direction, which needs to be managed in “lean” projects. Space and time for staff to conduct improvement activities are important for success. PMID:27124012

  19. Automatic Bone Drilling - More Precise, Reliable and Safe Manipulation in the Orthopaedic Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiadjiev, George; Kastelov, Rumen; Boiadjiev, Tony; Delchev, Kamen; Zagurski, Kazimir

    2016-06-01

    Bone drilling manipulation often occurs in the orthopaedic surgery. By statistics, nowadays, about one million people only in Europe need such an operation every year, where bone implants are inserted. Almost always, the drilling is performed handily, which cannot avoid the subjective factor influence. The question of subjective factor reduction has its answer - automatic bone drilling. The specific features and problems of orthopaedic drilling manipulation are considered in this work. The automatic drilling is presented according the possibilities of robotized system Orthopaedic Drilling Robot (ODRO) for assuring the manipulation accuracy, precision, reliability and safety.

  20. Cleaning supplies and equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000443.htm Cleaning supplies and equipment To use the sharing features on this page, ... to clean supplies and equipment. Disinfecting Supplies and Equipment Start by wearing the right personal protective equipment ( ...

  1. 77 FR 66848 - Minimum Clinically Important Difference: An Outcome Metric in Orthopaedic Device Science and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Minimum Clinically Important Difference: An Outcome Metric in Orthopaedic Device Science and Regulation; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is...

  2. Bioactive Coatings for Orthopaedic Implants—Recent Trends in Development of Implant Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bill G. X.; Myers, Damian E.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Brandt, Milan; Choong, Peter F. M.

    2014-01-01

    Joint replacement is a major orthopaedic procedure used to treat joint osteoarthritis. Aseptic loosening and infection are the two most significant causes of prosthetic implant failure. The ideal implant should be able to promote osteointegration, deter bacterial adhesion and minimize prosthetic infection. Recent developments in material science and cell biology have seen the development of new orthopaedic implant coatings to address these issues. Coatings consisting of bioceramics, extracellular matrix proteins, biological peptides or growth factors impart bioactivity and biocompatibility to the metallic surface of conventional orthopaedic prosthesis that promote bone ingrowth and differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts leading to enhanced osteointegration of the implant. Furthermore, coatings such as silver, nitric oxide, antibiotics, antiseptics and antimicrobial peptides with anti-microbial properties have also been developed, which show promise in reducing bacterial adhesion and prosthetic infections. This review summarizes some of the recent developments in coatings for orthopaedic implants. PMID:25000263

  3. The evolution of orthopaedic surgeons from bone and joint surgery at the University of Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D Y

    2000-05-01

    When the first medical school in the North American colonies was founded in 1765 at the Philadelphia College (University of Pennsylvania) there were only two branches of medicine physic (medicine) and surgery. Surgeons such as Philip Syng Physick, and his successors William Gibson, Henry Hollingsworth Smith, and D. Hayes Agnew, in addition to performing general surgery, treated patients with orthopaedic, ophthalmologic, and nuerosurgical problems. Treatment of patients with orthopaedic problems by surgeons continued at the University of Pennsylvania until DeForest Willard founded the Department of Orthopaedics in 1889. In the interval between 1805, when Physick was appointed the first professor of surgery at the University of Pennsylvania, and 1889 many ingenious instruments, splints, and operative procedures for treating patients with orthopaedic problems were developed. The author will describe some of the accomplishments of these pioneers.

  4. Bioactive coatings for orthopaedic implants-recent trends in development of implant coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bill G X; Myers, Damian E; Wallace, Gordon G; Brandt, Milan; Choong, Peter F M

    2014-07-04

    Joint replacement is a major orthopaedic procedure used to treat joint osteoarthritis. Aseptic loosening and infection are the two most significant causes of prosthetic implant failure. The ideal implant should be able to promote osteointegration, deter bacterial adhesion and minimize prosthetic infection. Recent developments in material science and cell biology have seen the development of new orthopaedic implant coatings to address these issues. Coatings consisting of bioceramics, extracellular matrix proteins, biological peptides or growth factors impart bioactivity and biocompatibility to the metallic surface of conventional orthopaedic prosthesis that promote bone ingrowth and differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts leading to enhanced osteointegration of the implant. Furthermore, coatings such as silver, nitric oxide, antibiotics, antiseptics and antimicrobial peptides with anti-microbial properties have also been developed, which show promise in reducing bacterial adhesion and prosthetic infections. This review summarizes some of the recent developments in coatings for orthopaedic implants.

  5. A Review of THE ROLE OF SIMULATION IN DEVELOPING AND ASSESSING ORTHOPAEDIC SURGICAL SKILLS

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Geb W; Johns, Brian D; Marsh, J Lawrence; Anderson, Donald D

    2014-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgical skill is traditionally acquired during training in an apprenticeship model that has been largely unchanged for nearly 100 years. However, increased pressure for operating room efficiency, a focus on patient safety, work hour restrictions, and a movement towards competency-based education are changing the traditional paradigm. Surgical simulation has the potential to help address these changes. This manuscript reviews the scientific background on skill acquisition and surgical simulation as it applies to orthopaedic surgery. It argues that simulation in orthopaedics lags behind other disciplines and focuses too little on simulator validation. The case is made that orthopaedic training is more efficient with simulators that facilitate deliberate practice throughout resident training and more research should be focused on simulator validation and the refinement of skill definition. PMID:25328480

  6. Significance of nano- and microtopography for cell-surface interactions in orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Jäger, M; Zilkens, C; Zanger, K; Krauspe, R

    2007-01-01

    Cell-surface interactions play a crucial role for biomaterial application in orthopaedics. It is evident that not only the chemical composition of solid substances influence cellular adherence, migration, proliferation and differentiation but also the surface topography of a biomaterial. The progressive application of nanostructured surfaces in medicine has gained increasing interest to improve the cytocompatibility and osteointegration of orthopaedic implants. Therefore, the understanding of cell-surface interactions is of major interest for these substances. In this review, we elucidate the principle mechanisms of nano- and microscale cell-surface interactions in vitro for different cell types onto typical orthopaedic biomaterials such as titanium (Ti), cobalt-chrome-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys, stainless steel (SS), as well as synthetic polymers (UHMWPE, XLPE, PEEK, PLLA). In addition, effects of nano- and microscaled particles and their significance in orthopaedics were reviewed. The significance for the cytocompatibility of nanobiomaterials is discussed critically.

  7. Significance of Nano- and Microtopography for Cell-Surface Interactions in Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, M.; Zilkens, C.; Zanger, K.; Krauspe, R.

    2007-01-01

    Cell-surface interactions play a crucial role for biomaterial application in orthopaedics. It is evident that not only the chemical composition of solid substances influence cellular adherence, migration, proliferation and differentiation but also the surface topography of a biomaterial. The progressive application of nanostructured surfaces in medicine has gained increasing interest to improve the cytocompatibility and osteointegration of orthopaedic implants. Therefore, the understanding of cell-surface interactions is of major interest for these substances. In this review, we elucidate the principle mechanisms of nano- and microscale cell-surface interactions in vitro for different cell types onto typical orthopaedic biomaterials such as titanium (Ti), cobalt-chrome-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys, stainless steel (SS), as well as synthetic polymers (UHMWPE, XLPE, PEEK, PLLA). In addition, effects of nano- and microscaled particles and their significance in orthopaedics were reviewed. The significance for the cytocompatibility of nanobiomaterials is discussed critically. PMID:18274618

  8. Ethics as an important determinant of success of orthopaedic dental care for debilitated and elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Schwartzseid, E E

    1989-01-01

    Ethical aspects of orthopaedic dental care for debilitated and elderly patients--the most complex and the least studied aspects of dentistry--are discussed here. Many articles on dental ethics, as a rule, do not cover the essential ethical aspects of orthopaedic care for the elderly or cover them only partially without reflecting on the problem at large. Understanding of the problem may help to provide more efficient dental care for the elderly population thus improving their quality of life.

  9. Aquatic Equipment Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sova, Ruth

    Equipment usually used in water exercise programs is designed for variety, intensity, and program necessity. This guide discusses aquatic equipment under the following headings: (1) equipment design; (2) equipment principles; (3) precautions and contraindications; (4) population contraindications; and (5) choosing equipment. Equipment is used…

  10. Medical record keeping and system performance in orthopaedic trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Cosic, Filip; Kimmel, Lara; Edwards, Elton

    2016-02-18

    Objective The medical record is critical for documentation and communication between healthcare professionals. The aim of the present study was to evaluate important aspects of the orthopaedic medical record and system performance to determine whether any deficiencies exist in these areas.Methods Review of 200 medical records of surgically treated traumatic lower limb injury patients was undertaken. The operative report, discharge summary and first and second outpatient reviews were evaluated.Results In all cases, an operative report was completed by a senior surgeon. Weight-bearing status was adequately documented in 91% of reports. Discharge summaries were completed for 82.5% of admissions, with 87.3% of these having instructions reflective of those in the operative report. Of first and second outpatient reviews, 69% and 73%, respectively, occurred within 1 week of the requested time. Previously documented management plans were changed in 30% of reviews. At 6-months post-operatively, 42% of patients had been reviewed by a member of their operating team.Discussion Orthopaedic medical record documentation remains an area for improvement. In addition, hospital out-patient systems perform suboptimally and may affect patient outcomes.What is known about the topic? Medical records are an essential tool in modern medical practice. Despite the importance of comprehensive documentation in the medical record, numerous examples of poor documentation have been demonstrated, including substandard documentation during consultant ward rounds by junior doctors leading to a breakdown in healthcare professional communication and potential patient mismanagement. Further inadequacies of medical record documentation have been demonstrated in surgical discharge notes, with complete and correct documentation reported to be as low as 65%.What does this paper add? Standards of patient care should be constantly monitored and deficiencies identified in order to implement a remedy and close

  11. Perspective: Integrating research into surgical residency education: lessons learned from orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc I; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Egol, Kenneth A; Ahn, Jaimo; Owens, Brett D; Crosby, Lynn A; Pellegrini, Vincent D

    2012-05-01

    Orthopaedic research has advanced tremendously in parallel with accelerated progress in medical science. Possession of a fundamental understanding of basic and clinical science has become more essential than previously for orthopaedic surgeons to be able to translate advances in research into clinical practice. The number of medical graduates with prior education in scientific research who choose to pursue careers in orthopaedic surgery is small. Therefore, it is important that a core of research education be included during residency training to ensure the continued advancement of the clinical practice of orthopaedics. The authors examine some of the challenges to a comprehensive research experience during residency, including deficient priority, inadequate institutional infrastructure, financial strain on residency budgets, restricted time, and an insufficient number of mentors to encourage and guide residents to become clinician-scientists. They also present some strategies to overcome these challenges, including development and expansion of residency programs with clinician-scientist pathways, promotion of financial sources, and enhancement of opportunities for residents to interact with mentors who can serve as role models. Successful integration of research education into residency programs will stimulate future orthopaedic surgeons to develop the critical skills to lead musculoskeletal research, comprehend related discoveries, and translate them into patient care. Lessons learned from incorporating research training within orthopaedic residency programs will have broad application across medical specialties-in both primary and subspecialty patient care.

  12. Biodegradable injectable polyurethanes: synthesis and evaluation for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Raju; Gunatillake, Pathiraja A; Griffiths, Ian; Tatai, Lisa; Wickramaratna, Malsha; Houshyar, Shadi; Moore, Tim; Mayadunne, Roshan T M; Field, John; McGee, Margaret; Carbone, Tania

    2008-10-01

    Biodegradable polyurethanes offer advantages in the design of injectable or preformed scaffolds for tissue engineering and other medical implant applications. We have developed two-part injectable prepolymer systems (prepolymer A and B) consisting of lactic acid and glycolic acid based polyester star polyols, pentaerythritol (PE) and ethyl lysine diisocyanate (ELDI). This study reports on the formulation and properties of a series of cross linked polyurethanes specifically developed for orthopaedic applications. Prepolymer A was based on PE and ELDI. Polyester polyols (prepolymer B) were based on PE and dl-lactic acid (PEDLLA) or PE and glycolic acid (PEGA) with molecular weights 456 and 453, respectively. Several cross linked porous and non-porous polyurethanes were prepared by mixing and curing prepolymers A and B and their mechanical and thermal properties, in vitro (PBS/37 degrees C/pH 7.4) and in vivo (sheep bi-lateral) degradation evaluated. The effect of incorporating beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP, 5 microns, 10 wt.%) was also investigated. The cured polymers exhibited high compressive strength (100-190 MPa) and modulus (1600-2300 MPa). beta-TCP improved mechanical properties in PEDLLA based polyurethanes and retarded the onset of in vitro and in vivo degradation. Sheep study results demonstrated that the polymers in both injectable and precured forms did not cause any surgical difficulties or any adverse tissue response. Evidence of new bone growth and the gradual degradation of the polymers were observed with increased implant time up to 6 months.

  13. Nanostructured glass–ceramic coatings for orthopaedic applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guocheng; Lu, Zufu; Liu, Xuanyong; Zhou, Xiaming; Ding, Chuanxian; Zreiqat, Hala

    2011-01-01

    Glass–ceramics have attracted much attention in the biomedical field, as they provide great possibilities to manipulate their properties by post-treatments, including strength, degradation rate and coefficient of thermal expansion. In this work, hardystonite (HT; Ca2ZnSi2O7) and sphene (SP; CaTiSiO5) glass–ceramic coatings with nanostructures were prepared by a plasma spray technique using conventional powders. The bonding strength and Vickers hardness for HT and SP coatings are higher than the reported values for plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings. Both types of coatings release bioactive calcium (Ca) and silicon (Si) ions into the surrounding environment. Mineralization test in cell-free culture medium showed that many mushroom-like Ca and phosphorus compounds formed on the HT coatings after 5 h, suggesting its high acellular mineralization ability. Primary human osteoblasts attach, spread and proliferate well on both types of coatings. Higher proliferation rate was observed on the HT coatings compared with the SP coatings and uncoated Ti-6Al-4V alloy, probably due to the zinc ions released from the HT coatings. Higher expression levels of Runx2, osteopontin and type I collagen were observed on both types of coatings compared with Ti-6Al-4V alloy, possibly due to the Ca and Si released from the coatings. Results of this study point to the potential use of HT and SP coatings for orthopaedic applications. PMID:21292725

  14. Energy healing: a complementary treatment for orthopaedic and other conditions.

    PubMed

    DiNucci, Ellen M

    2005-01-01

    Complementary and alternative therapies continue to grow in popularity among healthcare consumers. Among those modalities is energy healing (EH) (Eisenberg et al., 1998). EH is an adjunctive treatment that is noninvasive and poses little downside risk to patients. Well more than 50 major hospitals and clinics throughout the United States offer EH to patients (DiNucci, research table on healthcare facilities that offer Reiki, unpublished data, 2002). The National Institutes of Health is funding numerous EH studies that are examining its effects on a variety of conditions, including temporomandibular joint disorders, wrist fractures, cardiovascular health, cancer, wound healing, neonatal stress, pain, fibromyalgia, and AIDS (National Institutes of Health, 2004a). Several well-designed studies to date show significant outcomes for such conditions as wound healing (Grad, 1965) and advanced AIDS (Sicher, Targ, Moore, & Smith, 1998), and positive results for pain and anxiety (Aetna IntelliHealth, 2003a; Wardell, Weymouth, 2004), among others (Gallob, 2003). It is also suggested that EH may have positive effects on various orthopaedic conditions, including fracture healing, arthritis, and muscle and connective tissue (Prestwood, 2003). Because negative outcomes risk is at or near zero throughout the literature, EH is a candidate for use on many medical conditions.

  15. Nano-Engineered Cubic Zirconia for Orthopaedic Implant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namavar, F.; Rubinstein, A.; Sabirianov, R.; Thiele, G.; Sharp, J.; Pokharel, U.; Namavar, R.; Garvin, K.

    2012-02-01

    Osseointegration failure of the prosthesis prevents long-term stability, which contributes to pain, implant loosening, and infection that usually necessitates revision surgery. Cell attachment and spreading in vitro is generally mediated by adhesive proteins such as fibronectin and vitronectin. We designed and produced pure cubic zirconia (ZrO2) ceramic coatings by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) with nanostructures comparable to the size of proteins. Our ceramic coatings exhibit high hardness and a zero contact angle with serum. In contrast to Hydroxyapatite (HA), nano-engineered zirconia films possess excellent adhesion to all orthopaedic materials. Adhesion and proliferation experiments were performed with a bona fide mesenchymal stromal cells cell line (OMA-AD). Our experimental results indicated that nano-engineered cubic zirconia is superior in supporting growth, adhesion, and proliferation. We performed a comparative analysis of adsorption energies of the FN fragment using quantum mechanical calculations and Monte Carlo simulation on both types of surfaces: smooth and nanostructured. We have found that the initial FN fragment adsorbs significantly stronger on the nanostructured surface than on the smooth surface.

  16. Renal profile in patients with orthopaedic trauma: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ashish; John, Bobby; Pawar, Basant; Sadiq, Shalinder

    2009-08-01

    This prospective study was undertaken to determine the incidence of acute renal failure (ARF) and to identify factors contributing to development of ARF in orthopaedic trauma patients. A total of 55 patients who presented over a period of one year with trauma to upper and lower limbs were studied. Patients with renal injury, chest or abdominal injury, isolated fractures of the hands, feet and axial skeleton involvement were excluded. Out of these, five developed acute renal failure, three recovered and two died. The overall incidence of ARF in this study was 9.1%. Patients with lower limb injuries are at higher risk of developing ARF. Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) > or = 7, higher age, patient presenting with shock, increased myoglobin levels in urine and serum have been correlated with a greater risk of patients developing ARF and a higher mortality. This study attempts to determine the magnitude of crush injury causing renal failure and the incidence of renal failure in patients with injuries affecting the appendicular skeleton exclusively.

  17. [Regenerative medicine: orthopaedical applications and medico legal questions].

    PubMed

    Ricci, S; Ricci, O; Tucci, C E; Massoni, F; Sarra, M V; Ricci, S

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decades, the increase in the global population's mean age has implied a corresponding increase in degenerative disease affecting various anatomical areas and tissues, including bones and cartilages, thus provoking a rising number of disabilities and a wider usage of drugs, mostly anti-inflammatory and cortisone. New developments in technologic and biomedical fields gave birth to new subjects, such as tissue engineering, cell therapy, gene therapy that, by and large, create a knowledge network falling under the concept of Regenerative Medicine. This science is essentially based on the usage of stem cells that can replicate and renovate themselves originating, if adequately stimulated, a number of cell types. Inter alia, in orthopaedic field a particular type of adult stem cells is used, the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). If combined with synthetic material produced in laboratories, the usage of these cells has provided inspiration for new study interests; today, it can be applied in various degenerative and post-traumatic pathologies, with great therapeutic benefits for the patient. Actually, many studies write about an improvement in patients' life quality. In this sense appear significant reflections on legal medicine, both in accidents and insurance, of this innovative therapeutic alternative and is hopefully an equally valid process of improvement of regulatory and case law.

  18. Nanostructured glass-ceramic coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guocheng; Lu, Zufu; Liu, Xuanyong; Zhou, Xiaming; Ding, Chuanxian; Zreiqat, Hala

    2011-08-07

    Glass-ceramics have attracted much attention in the biomedical field, as they provide great possibilities to manipulate their properties by post-treatments, including strength, degradation rate and coefficient of thermal expansion. In this work, hardystonite (HT; Ca2ZnSi2O7) and sphene (SP; CaTiSiO5) glass-ceramic coatings with nanostructures were prepared by a plasma spray technique using conventional powders. The bonding strength and Vickers hardness for HT and SP coatings are higher than the reported values for plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings. Both types of coatings release bioactive calcium (Ca) and silicon (Si) ions into the surrounding environment. Mineralization test in cell-free culture medium showed that many mushroom-like Ca and phosphorus compounds formed on the HT coatings after 5 h, suggesting its high acellular mineralization ability. Primary human osteoblasts attach, spread and proliferate well on both types of coatings. Higher proliferation rate was observed on the HT coatings compared with the SP coatings and uncoated Ti-6Al-4V alloy, probably due to the zinc ions released from the HT coatings. Higher expression levels of Runx2, osteopontin and type I collagen were observed on both types of coatings compared with Ti-6Al-4V alloy, possibly due to the Ca and Si released from the coatings. Results of this study point to the potential use of HT and SP coatings for orthopaedic applications.

  19. Thermal cycling can extend tool life in orthopaedic operating rooms.

    PubMed

    Katchky, Ryan N; McLachlin, Stewart D; Wong, Edwin K Y; Finkelstein, Joel; Kreder, Hans J; Whyne, Cari M

    2016-03-01

    Thermal cycling is a temperature modulation process developed to improve the performance, durability and longevity of materials. This process has been successfully utilized in the automotive, aeronautic and manufacturing industries. Surgical cutting tools undergo cyclical loading and generally fail by dulling, suggesting that thermal cycling may improve their performance and longevity. Ten 2.5 mm orthopaedic drill bits were randomized, with five undergoing thermal cycling within their sterile packaging and five serving as untreated controls. Using a servohydraulic testing machine, 100 drilling cycles were performed with each drill bit into the diaphyseal region of bovine femurs. After every 25 cycles, data was collected by performing identical drilling cycles into simulated human cortical bone material. Maximum force, maximum normalized torque and drilling work were measured, and a scanning electron microscope was used to measure outer corner wear. After 100 drilling cycles, the maximum drilling force, maximum normalized torque, drilling work and microscopic outer corner wear were all significantly lower for the treated drill bits (p < 0.05). Thermal cycling has the potential to decrease operating room costs and thermal necrosis associated with dull cutting tools. Application of this technology may also be relevant to surgical cutting tools such as saw blades, burrs and reamers.

  20. Thermoplastic polymeric adhesive for structural bonding applications for orthopaedic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, D.; King, R.; Swarts, D.; Lin, S.; Ramani, K.; Tagle, J.

    1994-12-31

    The orthopaedics industry has witnessed tremendous growth in recent years primarily due to the introduction of high performance, porous coated implants. These devices have eliminated the need for the use of bone cement for in vivo implant fixation, replacing it with the ingrowth of bone into the porous surfaces. The metallurgical bonding processes used for attaching the porous to the implant body introduce some undesirable effect i.e., the reduction of the fatigue strength of the implant due to the ``notches`` created and also due to the high temperature exposure during the sintering operations. This paper describes the development of a thermoplastic polymeric adhesive based structural bonding technique. The high performance polymeric adhesive is fully characterized with respect to its intended application. The design of the porous layer is optimized to achieve a reliable bond to the implant. A thermal heating/cooling process was developed to control the final polymer morphology. Static and fatigue tests were conducted to fully characterize the adhesive bond strength. A ring shear test method was developed to determine the shear strength of the bond interface. Besides the characterization of the adhesive bond, the joints will be analyzed using finite element models. The correlation between the analytical models and the

  1. Clinical applications of vibration therapy in orthopaedic practice

    PubMed Central

    Cerciello, Simone; Rossi, Silvio; Visonà, Enrico; Corona, Katia; Oliva, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Vibration therapy (VT) has been proposed as an option to improve physical performance and reduce the negative effects of ageing on bone, muscles and tendons. Several discrepancies exist on the type of applications, frequency and magnitude. These differences reflex on the contradictory clinical results in literature. Aim of the present study is to carry on an exhaustive review to focus on technical options on the market, clinical applications in orthopaedic practice and expected outcomes. Methods a literature review using the key words “vibration therapy” and “whole-body vibration” and “orthopaedics” was performed. After checking the available abstracts 71 full text articles were evaluated. Results fifty-one articles focused on the effects of VT on muscles and tendons reporting ways of action and clinical outcomes. In a similar way 20 studies focused on the influence of VT on bone tissue with regard on ways of action and clinical trials. Conclusions VT provides anabolic mechanical signals to bone and musculo-tendinous system. The best effects seem to be achieved with devices that deliver low-intensity stimuli at high frequencies providing linear horizontal displacement. PMID:27331044

  2. Orthopaedic Considerations for the Adult With Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Timothy T; Cepela, Daniel J; Uhl, Richard L; Lozman, Jeffery

    2016-05-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heritable group of collagen-related disorders that affects up to 50,000 people in the United States. Although the disease is most symptomatic in childhood, adults with osteogenesis imperfecta also are affected by the sequelae of the disease. Orthopaedic manifestations include posttraumatic and accelerated degenerative joint disease, kyphoscoliosis, and spondylolisthesis. Other manifestations of abnormal collagen include brittle dentition, hearing loss, cardiac valve abnormalities, and basilar invagination. In general, nonsurgical treatment is preferred for management of acute fractures. High rates of malunion, nonunion, and subsequent deformity have been reported with both closed and open treatment. When surgery is necessary, surgeons should opt for load-sharing intramedullary devices that span the entire length of the bone; locking plates and excessively rigid fixation generally should be avoided. Arthroplasty may be considered for active patients, but the procedure frequently is associated with complications in this patient population. Underlying deformities, such as malunion, bowing, rotational malalignment, coxa vara, and acetabular protrusio, pose specific surgical challenges and underscore the importance of preoperative planning.

  3. Barriers and Facilitators Associated with Non-Surgical Treatment Use for Osteoarthritis Patients in Orthopaedic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Stefanie N.; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J.; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P. M.; van den Ende, Cornelia H. M.; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction International evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with (a combination of) non-surgical treatments, and using surgical intervention only if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatment options. Despite these recommendations, there are strong indications that non-surgical treatments are not optimally used in orthopaedic practice. To improve the adoption of non-surgical treatments, more insight is needed into barriers and facilitators of these treatments. Therefore, this study assessed which barriers and facilitators are associated with the use and prescription of different non-surgical treatments before hip and knee OA in orthopaedic practice among patients and orthopaedic surgeons in the Netherlands. Materials and Methods We performed two internet-based surveys among 172 orthopaedic surgeons and 174 OA patients. Univariate association and multivariable regression techniques are used to identify barriers and facilitators associated with the use of non-surgical treatments. Results Most barriers and facilitators among patients were associated with the use of physical therapy, lifestyle advice and dietary therapy. Among orthopaedic surgeons, most were associated with prescription of acetaminophen, dietary therapy and physical therapy. Examples of barriers and facilitators among patients included “People in my environment had positive experiences with a surgery” (facilitator for education about OA), and “Advice of people in my environment to keep on moving” (facilitator for lifestyle and dietary advice). For orthopaedic surgeons, examples were “Lack of knowledge about guideline” (barrier for lifestyle advice), “Agreements/ deliberations with primary care” and “Easy communication with a dietician” (facilitators for dietary therapy). Also the belief in the efficacy of these treatments was associated with increased prescription. Conclusions

  4. Challenges of bone tissue engineering in orthopaedic patients.

    PubMed

    Guerado, Enrique; Caso, Enrique

    2017-02-18

    Bone defects may impede normal biomechanics and the structural stability of bone as an organ. In many cases, the correction of bone defects requires extensive surgical intervention involving the use of bone-grafting techniques and other procedures in which healing is slow, there is a high risk of infection and considerable pain is provoked - with no guarantee of complete correction of the defect. Therefore, the search for surgical alternatives continues to present a major challenge in orthopaedic traumatology. The reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA) system, which was devised to avoid the problems that can arise with autograft harvesting from the iliac crest, consists of collecting the product of the femoral canal after reaming. The RIA technique improves osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, compared to bone marrow aspiration or cancellous bone harvesting from the iliac crest using a spoon. Another approach, the Masquelet technique, consists of reconstructing a long bone defect by means of an induced membrane grown onto an acrylic cement rod inserted to fill the defect; in a second surgical step, once the membrane is constituted, the cement rod is removed and cancellous autograft is used to fill the defect. Both in RIA and in the Masquelet technique, osteosynthesis is usually needed. Bone transportation by compression-distraction lengthening principles is commonly implemented for the treatment of large bone loss. However, complications are frequently encountered with these techniques. Among new techniques that have been proposed to address the problem of large bone loss, the application of stem cells in conjunction with tissue engineering techniques is very promising, as is the creation of personalised medicine (or precision medicine), in which molecular profiling technologies are used to tailor the therapeutic strategy, to ensure the right method is applied for the right person at the right time, after determining the predisposition to disease among

  5. Challenges of bone tissue engineering in orthopaedic patients

    PubMed Central

    Guerado, Enrique; Caso, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Bone defects may impede normal biomechanics and the structural stability of bone as an organ. In many cases, the correction of bone defects requires extensive surgical intervention involving the use of bone-grafting techniques and other procedures in which healing is slow, there is a high risk of infection and considerable pain is provoked - with no guarantee of complete correction of the defect. Therefore, the search for surgical alternatives continues to present a major challenge in orthopaedic traumatology. The reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA) system, which was devised to avoid the problems that can arise with autograft harvesting from the iliac crest, consists of collecting the product of the femoral canal after reaming. The RIA technique improves osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, compared to bone marrow aspiration or cancellous bone harvesting from the iliac crest using a spoon. Another approach, the Masquelet technique, consists of reconstructing a long bone defect by means of an induced membrane grown onto an acrylic cement rod inserted to fill the defect; in a second surgical step, once the membrane is constituted, the cement rod is removed and cancellous autograft is used to fill the defect. Both in RIA and in the Masquelet technique, osteosynthesis is usually needed. Bone transportation by compression-distraction lengthening principles is commonly implemented for the treatment of large bone loss. However, complications are frequently encountered with these techniques. Among new techniques that have been proposed to address the problem of large bone loss, the application of stem cells in conjunction with tissue engineering techniques is very promising, as is the creation of personalised medicine (or precision medicine), in which molecular profiling technologies are used to tailor the therapeutic strategy, to ensure the right method is applied for the right person at the right time, after determining the predisposition to disease among

  6. Adjustable forming of thermoplastic composites for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Hou, M; Friedrich, K

    1998-02-01

    The present study was focused on the development of a special thermoforming technique for manufacturing of continuous fibre reinforced thermoplastic composite parts with complex surface contours. In particular, a stamp forming process was modified to investigate the potential manufacturing advantages of thermoplastic composites in orthopaedic applications. An apparatus was designed which allowed the thermoforming procedure to be fully automatic, i.e. a cold pre-consolidated laminate panel, as the feed material, was heated up in an infrared heating zone and then transferred into a cold mould system, where it was stamp formed. Both halves of the mould were made of many tiny round metal sticks in a metal frame. This needle-bed mould allowed one to copy any contour by pushing it slightly on spring fixed sticks. The desired position of these sticks could then be adjusted by forcing the side plates of the metal frame together. To prevent any press mark of stick-tops on the composite, i.e. to achieve smooth surfaces of the themoformed composite parts, flexible rubber pads were needed to cover the mould surfaces. Experimental results showed that the surface profile of CF/PP and GF/PP composites formed by the needle-bed mould reproduced fairly well the contour of a saddle shaped, complex model sample. Unique properties of this needle-bed mould are that it can be repeatedly used, and that it can copy any complex surface contours, for example a bone surface, by simply adjusting the stick positions according to the special surface requirements.

  7. The wear of two orthopaedic biopolymers against each other.

    PubMed

    Joyce, T J

    2005-01-01

    The potential for all-polymer prostheses has not been widely investigated. It might be expected that the wear of such biomaterial combinations would be excessive, but an in vivo study of all polymer knee prostheses reported that there were no failures due to wear, even after ten years of clinical use. This design of knee prosthesis used polyacetal and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) as the biopolymers. Similarly, an earlier in vitro study of polyacetal and UHMWPE hip prostheses indicated lower wear than for a cobalt chrome and UHMWPE combination. Therefore this study set out to test the poly-acetal and UHMWPE combination in a wear screening rig which had previously been validated against clinical data for artificial hip joints. Two different motion conditions were applied to the test samples and each biopolymer was tested as both pin and plate. Interestingly it was found that, whatever the contribution from pin or plate, the total mean wear factors were 1.5 10 -6 mm 3/Nm under reciprocation-only, and 4.1 10 -6 mm 3 /Nm under multi-directional motion. These wear factors were greater than those found when a conventional metal-on-UHMWPE couple was tested under the same loading, motion and lu-bricant conditions. A comparison was also undertaken with the wear of other orthopaedic biopolymer combinations, namely cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) against itself, and UHMWPE against itself. The XLPE pairing showed somewhat lower wear than the polyacetal and UHMWPE couple, while the UHMWPE pairing showed the highest wear of all, approximately an or-der of magnitude greater than the polyacetal and UHMWPE combination.

  8. Personal protective equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000447.htm Personal protective equipment To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Personal protective equipment is special equipment you wear to create a ...

  9. Common NICU Equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... care unit (NICU) > Common NICU equipment Common NICU equipment E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... understand how they can help your baby. What equipment is commonly used in the NICU? Providers use ...

  10. A review of virtual reality based training simulators for orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Neil; Dubey, Venketesh N; Wainwright, Thomas W; Middleton, Robert G

    2016-02-01

    This review presents current virtual reality based training simulators for hip, knee and other orthopaedic surgery, including elective and trauma surgical procedures. There have not been any reviews focussing on hip and knee orthopaedic simulators. A comparison of existing simulator features is provided to identify what is missing and what is required to improve upon current simulators. In total 11 hip replacements pre-operative planning tools were analysed, plus 9 hip trauma fracture training simulators. Additionally 9 knee arthroscopy simulators and 8 other orthopaedic simulators were included for comparison. The findings are that for orthopaedic surgery simulators in general, there is increasing use of patient-specific virtual models which reduce the learning curve. Modelling is also being used for patient-specific implant design and manufacture. Simulators are being increasingly validated for assessment as well as training. There are very few training simulators available for hip replacement, yet more advanced virtual reality is being used for other procedures such as hip trauma and drilling. Training simulators for hip replacement and orthopaedic surgery in general lag behind other surgical procedures for which virtual reality has become more common. Further developments are required to bring hip replacement training simulation up to date with other procedures. This suggests there is a gap in the market for a new high fidelity hip replacement and resurfacing training simulator.

  11. Validation of the reporting bases of the orthopaedic and paediatric surveillance schemes.

    PubMed Central

    Godward, S; Dezateux, C

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nationally representative estimates of treatment rates for congenital dislocation of the hip were required to inform a review of the current United Kingdom screening policy. Cases were ascertained through an active reporting scheme involving orthopaedic surgeons and the existing British Paediatric Association Surveillance Unit (BPASU) scheme. OBJECTIVE: To report the methods used to establish, maintain, and validate the orthopaedic and BPASU schemes. METHODS: Multiple sources were used to develop the orthopaedic reporting base. Surgeons treating children were identified by postal questionnaire. The orthopaedic and paediatric reporting bases were compared to the 1992 manpower census surveys of surgeons and paediatricians. RESULTS: A single source of respondent ascertainment would have missed 12% of the 517 surgeons who treated children. Comparison with the manpower census data suggests the orthopaedic and paediatric reporting bases were 97% and 92% complete. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple sources should be used to establish and maintain a reporting base. Targeting respondents avoids unnecessary contact, saves resources, and may improve compliance. Manpower census data can be used for regular validation of the reporting base. PMID:8976664

  12. Are away rotations critical for a successful match in orthopaedic surgery?

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Keith; Weidner, Zachary; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir

    2009-12-01

    Surveys have suggested one of the most important determinants of orthopaedic resident selection is completion of an orthopaedic clerkship at the program director's institution. The purpose of this study was to further elucidate the significance of visiting externships on the resident selection process. We retrospectively reviewed data for all medical students applying for orthopaedic surgery residency from six medical schools between 2006 and 2008, for a total of 143 applicants. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to compare students who matched successfully versus those who did not in terms of number of away rotations, United States Medical Licensing Examination scores, class rank, and other objective factors. Of the 143 medical students, 19 did not match in orthopaedics (13.3%), whereas the remaining 124 matched. On multiple logistic regression analysis, whether a student did more than one home rotation, how many away rotations a student performed, and United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score were factors in the odds of match success. Orthopaedic surgery is one of the most competitive specialties in medicine; the away rotation remains an important factor in match success.

  13. A comparison of airborne bacterial fallout between orthopaedic and vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Stather, P; Salji, M; Hassan, S-U; Abbas, M; Ahmed, A; Mills, H; Elston, T; Backhouse, C; Howard, A; Choksy, S

    2017-04-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of the study was to compare bacterial fallout during vascular prosthesis insertion and orthopaedic major joint replacement performed in conventional and laminar flow ventilation, respectively. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective single-centre case control study of 21 consecutive elective vascular procedures involving prosthetic graft insertion and 24 consecutive elective orthopaedic major joint replacements were tested for degree of bacterial fallout using agar settle plates. Preparation time, waiting time and total procedure duration were collected at the time of surgery, and bacterial colony counts on the agar settle plates from airborne bacterial fallout were counted after an incubation period. RESULTS Bacterial fallout count in vascular prosthetic graft insertion was 15-fold greater than in orthopaedic prosthetic joint insertion (15, (IQR 15) vs 1, (IQR 3) respectively, P < 0.0001, Wilcoxon). Waiting time and patient transfer did not significantly increase bacterial fallout counts during the procedure (P = 0.9). CONCLUSIONS Vascular surgical theatres have significantly higher bacterial fallout compared with orthopaedic theatres. This may be partly explained by orthopaedic surgery being routinely performed in laminar flow ventilation, a practice which has not been widely adopted for vascular surgery, in which prosthetic infection may also result in significant mortality and morbidity.

  14. Improvement of research quality in the fields of orthopaedics and trauma: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Fayaz, Hangama C; Haas, Norbert; Kellam, James; Bavonratanavech, Suthorn; Parvizi, Javad; Dyer, George; Pohlemann, Tim; Jerosch, Jörg; Prommersberger, Karl-Josef; Pape, Hans Christoph; Smith, Malcolm; Vrahas, Marc; Perka, Carsten; Siebenrock, Klaus; Elhassan, Bassem; Moran, Christopher; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2013-07-01

    The international orthopaedic community aims to achieve the best possible outcome for patient care by constantly modifying surgical techniques and expanding the surgeon's knowledge. These efforts require proper reflection within a setting that necessitates a higher quality standard for global orthopaedic publication. Furthermore, these techniques demand that surgeons acquire information at a rapid rate while enforcing higher standards in research performance. An international consensus exists on how to perform research and what rules should be considered when publishing a scientific paper. Despite this global agreement, in today's "Cross Check Era", too many authors do not give attention to the current standards of systematic research. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to describe these performance standards, the available choices for orthopaedic surgeons and the current learning curve for seasoned teams of researchers and orthopaedic surgeons with more than three decades of experience. These lead to provide an accessible overview of all important aspects of the topics that will significantly influence the research development as we arrive at an important globalisation era in orthopaedics and trauma-related research.

  15. Stanley Paris Award Lecture. Reflections on the history and future of orthopaedic physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, C

    1998-09-01

    Carolyn Wadsworth, MS, PT, CHT, OCS, deliver the 1998 Paris Distinguished Service Award Lecture at the Combined Sections Meeting in Boston in February. Wadsworth is the fifth recipient of the Paris Award, which is the Orthopaedic Section's highest honor given to commemorate a member's exceptional and enduring service. The Paris Distinguished Service Award was established in 1990 and is named after Stanley V. Paris, PhD, PT, founder and first president of the Orthopaedic Section. Born in Dunedin, New Zealand, Paris immigrated to the U.S. in 1966. He developed physical therapy practices in Boston, Hamilton, Bermuda, and Atlanta; established the Institute of Graduate Health Sciences in Atlanta, GA; and is currently president of the University of St. Augustine, St. Augustine, FL. Paris is a strong advocate of assertive professional practice, clinical specialization, and strengthening leadership in physical therapy. He also champions wellness, exemplified by his personal achievements in sailing the Atlantic Ocean, swimming the English Channel, and completing the Ironman Triathlon. Carolyn Wadsworth, recipient of the 1998 Paris Award, has served as secretary and president of the Orthopaedic Section and is currently editor of the Orthopaedic Section's Home Study Course. She owns a private practice, teaches nationally, and has written two books, Examination and Mobilization of the Spine and Extremities (1988) and Orthopedic Review for Physical Therapists (1998). Major components of the speech she presented at the Orthopaedic Section Awards Ceremony are highlighted in this article.

  16. A survey of orthopaedic journal editors determining the criteria of manuscript selection for publication

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate the characteristics of editors and criteria used by orthopaedic journal editors in assessing submitted manuscripts. Methods Between 2008 to 2009 all 70 editors of Medline listed orthopaedic journals were approached prospectively with a questionnaire to determine the criteria used in assessing manuscripts for publication. Results There was a 42% response rate. There was 1 female editor and the rest were male with 57% greater than 60 years of age. 67% of the editors worked in university teaching hospitals and 90% of publications were in English. The review process differed between journals with 59% using a review proforma, 52% reviewing an anonymised manuscript, 76% using a routine statistical review and 59% of journals used 2 reviewers routinely. In 89% of the editors surveyed, the editor was able to overrule the final decision of the reviewers. Important design factors considered for manuscript acceptance were that the study conclusions were justified (80%), that the statistical analysis was appropriate (76%), that the findings could change practice (72%). The level of evidence (70%) and type of study (62%) were deemed less important. When asked what factors were important in the manuscript influencing acceptance, 73% cited an understandable manuscript, 53% cited a well written manuscript and 50% a thorough literature review as very important factors. Conclusions The editorial and review process in orthopaedic journals uses different approaches. There may be a risk of language bias among editors of orthopaedic journals with under-representation of non-English publications in the orthopaedic literature. PMID:21527007

  17. The development and implementation of a hospital based paediatric orthopaedic nursing transition program.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Nadine; Houghton, Kerry

    2013-01-01

    Within Australia and the rest of the world paediatric orthopaedic nursing as a subspeciality nursing workforce faces challenges due to a lack of formal education programs that support the development of knowledge. Despite these challenges the need to ensure the availability of competent and knowledgeable nursing staff to positively contribute to health care outcomes remains unchanged. Thus a need has arisen to develop locally implemented education programs. A multi-tiered paediatric orthopaedic nursing transition program which incorporates work based learning processes combined, with formal assessment components, has been designed utilising Benner's "theory of novice to expert" to facilitate the growth of experts in the clinical setting driven by the requirements of individual clinical settings. The implementation of this program has led to increased confidence in the clinical setting for nursing staff which has positively influenced the care of children and their families in the orthopaedic service.

  18. A Look Back in Time: Sir Robert Jones, 'Father of Modern Orthopaedics'.

    PubMed

    Tham, Wyw; Sng, Smc; Lum, Y M; Chee, Y H

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the life of Sir Robert Jones, from his humble beginnings as an apprentice of Thomas Smith, to his many contributions to the orthopaedic specialty. Robert Jones' passion and interest in the subject led to its advancement from a specialty that dealt mainly with crippling diseases in children, to that of treating and rehabilitating disabled adults. He revolutionized the practice by integrating the use of plain radiography, and by developing many new surgical and procedural techniques. He largely improved the specialty by publishing many textbooks and papers, and trained many orthopaedic surgeons from within England and internationally. The purpose of this paper seeks to provide a platform for readers to learn about the man behind the Jones fracture and bandage. It will help readers understand how one man's passion for orthopaedics helped transform it into a specialty in its own rights.

  19. [The Development and Application of the Orthopaedics Implants Failure Database Software Based on WEB].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiahua; Zhou, Hai; Zhang, Binbin; Ding, Biao

    2015-09-01

    This article develops a new failure database software for orthopaedics implants based on WEB. The software is based on B/S mode, ASP dynamic web technology is used as its main development language to achieve data interactivity, Microsoft Access is used to create a database, these mature technologies make the software extend function or upgrade easily. In this article, the design and development idea of the software, the software working process and functions as well as relative technical features are presented. With this software, we can store many different types of the fault events of orthopaedics implants, the failure data can be statistically analyzed, and in the macroscopic view, it can be used to evaluate the reliability of orthopaedics implants and operations, it also can ultimately guide the doctors to improve the clinical treatment level.

  20. The First World War and its influence on the development of orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Scotland, T

    2014-01-01

    By December 1914, overwhelming numbers of soldiers with infected musculoskeletal wounds had filled hospitals in France and Britain. Frequently initial management had been inadequate. In 1915, patients with orthopaedic wounds were segregated for the first time when Robert Jones established an experimental orthopaedic unit in Alder Hey Hospital, Liverpool. In 1916 he opened the first of 17 orthopaedic centres in Britain to surgically treat and rehabilitate patients. Henry Gray from Aberdeen emerged as the leading authority in the management of acute musculoskeletal wounds in casualty clearing stations in France and Flanders. Gray had particular expertise in dealing with compound fractures of the femur for which he documented an 80% mortality rate in 1914-15.

  1. [Prof. Michiharu Matsuoka, founder of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Kyoto University and his achievements in orthopaedic surgery in the Meiji era of Japan (Part 5, Faculty members and training of doctors from Nagoya)].

    PubMed

    Hirotani, Hayato

    2010-09-01

    During the years when Dr. M. Matsuoka was professor of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyoto Medical School, Kyoto Imperial University (June, 1907-January, 1914), seven doctors worked as his faculty members and founded the base of the current development and reputation of the Department. After resignation from their academic positions, they served in orthopaedic practice in several areas in Japan where orthopaedic surgery was not well recognized. In addition, Prof. Matsuoka trained three doctors from the Aichi Prefectural Medical College (School of Medicine, Nagoya University) in the orthopaedic practice, including x-ray technique and they contributed to the development of orthopaedic surgery in the areas of Nagoya city and Tokai. Backgrounds and achievements of these ten doctors are described.

  2. Common Intra-Cluster Competencies Needed in Selected Occupational Clusters. Final Report. Supplemental Volume XIV: Orthopaedic Physician's Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClurg, Ronald B.

    An analysis of survey responses from a sample of orthopaedic physician's assistants on competency characteristics for their occupation is presented in this document. (Orthopaedic physician's assistant is one of seventeen occupation groups included in this research.) The competencies are reported in five categories: (1) those competencies selected…

  3. Skeletal metastases - the role of the orthopaedic and spinal surgeon.

    PubMed

    Eastley, Nicholas; Newey, Martyn; Ashford, Robert U

    2012-09-01

    Developments in oncological and medical therapies mean that life expectancy of patients with metastatic bone disease (MBD) is often measured in years. Complications of MBD may dramatically and irreversibly affect patient quality of life, making the careful assessment and appropriate management of these patients essential. The roles of orthopaedic and spinal surgeons in MBD generally fall into one of four categories: diagnostic, the prophylactic fixation of metastatic deposits at risk of impending fracture (preventative surgery), the stabilisation or reconstruction of bones affected by pathological fractures (reactive surgery), or the decompression and stabilisation of the vertebral column, spinal cord, and nerve roots. Several key principals should be adhered to whenever operating on skeletal metastases. Discussions should be held early with an appropriate multi-disciplinary team prior to intervention. Detailed pre-assessment is essential to gauge a patient's suitability for surgery - recovery from elective surgery must be shorter than the anticipated survival. Staging and biopsies provide prognostic information. Primary bone tumours must be ruled out in the case of a solitary bone lesion to avoid inappropriate intervention. Prophylactic surgical fixation of a lesion prior to a pathological fracture reduces morbidity and length of hospital stay. Regardless of a lesion or pathological fracture's location, all regions of the affected bone must be addressed, to reduce the risk of subsequent fracture. Surgical implants should allow full weight bearing or return to function immediately. Post-operative radiotherapy should be utilised in all cases to minimise disease progression. Spinal surgery should be considered for those with spinal pain due to potentially reversible spinal instability or neurological compromise. The opinion of a spinal surgeon should be sought early, as delays in referral directly correlate to worse functional recovery following intervention

  4. AAOS Research Symposium Updates and Consensus: Biologic Treatment of Orthopaedic Injuries.

    PubMed

    LaPrade, Robert F; Dragoo, Jason L; Koh, Jason L; Murray, Iain R; Geeslin, Andrew G; Chu, Constance R

    2016-07-01

    Strategies that seek to enhance musculoskeletal tissue regeneration and repair by modulating the biologic microenvironment at the site of injury have considerable therapeutic potential. Current and emerging biologic approaches include the use of growth factors, platelet-rich plasma, stem cell therapy, and scaffolds. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons hosted a research symposium in November 2015 to review the current state-of-the-art biologic treatments of articular cartilage, muscle, tendon, and bone injuries and identify knowledge gaps related to these emerging treatments. This review outlines the findings of the symposium and summarizes the consensus reached on how best to advance research on biologic treatment of orthopaedic injuries.

  5. Single-use NPWT for the treatment of complex orthopaedic surgical and trauma wounds.

    PubMed

    Sharp, E

    2013-10-01

    Orthopaedic limb reconstruction patients often have wounds that are difficult to heal either due to the underlying problems, their surgery, underlying comorbidities or a combination of these factors. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a useful tool with which to manage these wounds; however, many systems are not ideal for use in the patient's home, due in part to size and complexity. There are also staff training issues if transferring patients to an area which does not routinely use negative pressure systems. This paper reports the outcomes for some of the patients who were treated with a novel, single-use NPWT device in a orthopaedic trauma/limb reconstruction unit.

  6. Custom-Made Antibiotic Cement Nails in Orthopaedic Trauma: Review of Outcomes, New Approaches, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wasko, Marcin K.; Kaminski, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    Since the first description in 2002 by Paley and Herzenberg, antibiotic bone cement nails (ACNs) have become an effective tool in the orthopaedic trauma surgeons' hands. They simultaneously elute high amounts of antibiotics into medullary canal dead space and provide limited stability to the debrided long bone. In this paper, we perform a systematic review of current evidence on ACNs in orthopaedic trauma and provide an up-to-date review of the indications, operative technique, failure mechanisms, complications, outcomes, and outlooks for the ACNs use in long bone infection. PMID:26509153

  7. Tribology considerations for hip joint articulations in relation to the "new orthopaedic patient".

    PubMed

    Rieker, C B

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine alternative bearings used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and discuss the specific tribologic needs of the "New Orthopaedic Patient". As orthopaedic patients today are younger and more active, there is a clear need for hip joint implants and articulations minimising the amount of wear and guarantying better stability. Recent modern developments in tribology with highly cross-linked polyethylenes and hard-on-hard bearings allow the safe and effective use of larger diameter articulations in THA.

  8. The future of orthopaedics in the United States: an analysis of the effects of managed care in the face of an excess supply of orthopaedic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Clark, R; Thurston, N K

    2000-03-01

    Recent technological advances in orthopaedic surgery have propelled both the volume of surgical cases and their complexity, resulting in increased costs, which should naturally result in higher incomes for surgeons. However, the transition from a fee-for-service model of physician compensation to a managed care model has resulted in major shifts in economic resource allocation. An economic model of this market based on imperfect competition shows that these changes have shifted market power from surgeons to the managed care organizations. Our model predicts that practicing surgeons will retire earlier, medical students will begin to select other specialties, and innovation will be slowed. Antitrust laws limit surgeons' ability to combat this trend through meaningful collective bargaining, creating the potential for future shortages as the baby boom generation reaches retirement age and the demand for orthopaedic services increases dramatically.

  9. [Prof. Michiharu Matsuoka, founder of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyoto University, and his achievements in orthopaedic surgery in the Meiji Era of Japan (part 1: establishment of the department)].

    PubMed

    Hirotani, Hayato

    2005-09-01

    The Department of Orthopaedic and Musculoskeletal Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (formerly the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyoto Medical School, Kyoto Imperial University) was founded by Imperial Ordinance, Article No. 89 issued on April 23, 1906. On May 4, 1906, Dr. Shinichiro Asahara, Assistant Professor of the Department of Surgery, was appointed as the first director of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyoto Medical School, Kyoto Imperial University. Dr. Michiharu Matsuoka, Assistant Doctor of the Department of Surgery, Tokyo Medical School, Imperial University of Tokyo, was appointed Assistant Professor of Surgery, Kyoto Medical School, Kyoto Imperial University in March 1901. From August 1903 to May 1906, he studied orthopaedic surgery in Germany and returned on May 5, 1906. Dr. Matsuoka was appointed as the director and chief of the Department on May 13, 1906 and took over Dr. Asahara's position. On June 18, 1906, Dr. Matsuoka started his clinic and began giving lectures on orthopaedic surgery. This was the first department of orthopaedic surgery among the Japanese medical schools. Dr. Matsuoka was appointed as Professor in 1907. He had to overcome several obstacles to establish the medical department of a new discipline that had never existed in Japanese medical schools. This article discusses Dr. Matsuoka's contributions to establishing and developing orthopaedic surgery in Japan in the Meiji-era.

  10. 78 FR 77689 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... soluble salts or other drugs into the body for purposes other than those specified in part (a). Devices... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION:...

  11. A Physiotherapy Triage Service for Orthopaedic Surgery: An Effective Strategy for Reducing Wait Times

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Robert G.; Hunt, Michael A.; Brooks-Hill, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of a physiotherapy triage service for orthopaedic surgery referrals from primary-care physicians. Methods: A prospective, observational design was used with patients referred to an orthopaedic surgeon based out of two small urban centres in British Columbia. The level of agreement between the physiotherapist and surgeon was determined using a weighted kappa statistic (κw) with 95% CI. A patient satisfaction questionnaire was administered, and the surgical conversion rate (SCR) was calculated to assess the level of appropriate referrals. Results: The analysis found substantial agreement (κw=0.77; 95% CI, 0.60–0.94) between surgeon and physiotherapist for surgical management decisions. All patients reported being “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with the overall care they received from the physiotherapist. The SCR of patients referred by the physiotherapist to the surgeon was 91%, versus 22% among patients referred by a general practitioner or emergency physician. Conclusion: More than three-fourths of patients referred by primary-care physicians did not need to see a surgeon and were able to be managed by an experienced orthopaedic physiotherapist. This triage model could have considerable impact on orthopaedic wait times in Canada by minimizing unnecessary referrals; the model could also promote timely and conservative management of non-surgical conditions by physiotherapists. PMID:24396164

  12. Why veteran orthopaedic trauma surgeons are being fired and what we can do about it?

    PubMed

    Hill, Austin; Althausen, Peter L; O'Mara, Timothy J; Bray, Timothy J

    2013-06-01

    The financial realities of providing trauma care to injured patients can make it difficult to produce an accurate assessment of the cumulative value orthopaedic trauma surgeons provide to healthcare and university institutions. As with many political battles in the field of medicine, physicians who have been diligently focused on providing patient care were completely unaware of the impending upheaval around them. Whether orthopaedic trauma surgeons are employed or in some type of partnership with hospitals, too often surgeons find the relationship one-sided. In order to effectively negotiate with hospitals, surgeons must demonstrate the comprehensive value they provide to their respective healthcare institutions and universities. Orthopaedic trauma surgeons make direct and indirect financial contributions to the hospital in addition to educational and community services. The sum total of these valued contributions helps fund non-revenue generating programs, provides marketing opportunities, and improves the regional and national reputation of the healthcare institution. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the value contributed to healthcare institutions by orthopaedic trauma surgeons and will serve as a blueprint for all surgeons to accurately account for and demonstrate their value to hospitals while providing efficient and compassionate care to our patients.

  13. 77 FR 71195 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To...

  14. Decellularized Tissue and Cell-Derived Extracellular Matrices as Scaffolds for Orthopaedic Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Christina W.; Solorio, Loran D.; Alsberg, Eben

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of musculoskeletal defects is a constant challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. Musculoskeletal injuries such as fractures, chondral lesions, infections and tumor debulking can often lead to large tissue voids requiring reconstruction with tissue grafts. Autografts are currently the gold standard in orthopaedic tissue reconstruction; however, there is a limit to the amount of tissue that can be harvested before compromising the donor site. Tissue engineering strategies using allogeneic or xenogeneic decellularized bone, cartilage, skeletal muscle, tendon and ligament have emerged as promising potential alternative treatment. The extracellular matrix provides a natural scaffold for cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. Decellularization of in vitro cell-derived matrices can also enable the generation of autologous constructs from tissue specific cells or progenitor cells. Although decellularized bone tissue is widely used clinically in orthopaedic applications, the exciting potential of decellularized cartilage, skeletal muscle, tendon and ligament cell-derived matrices has only recently begun to be explored for ultimate translation to the orthopaedic clinic. PMID:24417915

  15. The 2007 ABJS Marshall Urist Award: The impact of direct-to-consumer advertising in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Bozic, Kevin J; Smith, Amanda R; Hariri, Sanaz; Adeoye, Sanjo; Gourville, John; Maloney, William J; Parsley, Brian; Rubash, Harry E

    2007-05-01

    Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) has become an influential factor in healthcare delivery in the United States. We evaluated the influence of DTCA on surgeon and patient opinions and behavior in orthopaedics by surveying orthopaedic surgeons who perform hip and knee arthroplasties and patients who were scheduled to have hip or knee arthro-plasty. Respondents were asked for their opinions of and experiences with DTCA, including the influence of DTCA on surgeon and patient decision making. Greater than 98% of surgeon respondents had experience with patients who were exposed to DTCA. The majority of surgeon respondents reported DTCA had an overall negative impact on their practice and their interaction with patients (74%), and their patients often were confused or misinformed about the appropriate treatment for their condition based on an advertisement (77%). Fifty-two percent of patient respondents recalled seeing or hearing advertisements related to hip or knee arthroplasty. These patients were more likely to request a specific type of surgery or brand of implant from their surgeon and to see more than one surgeon before deciding to have surgery. Direct-to-consumer advertising seems to play a substantial role in surgeon and patient decision making in orthopaedics. Future efforts should be aimed at improving the quality and accuracy of information contained in consumer-directed advertisements related to orthopaedic implants and procedures.

  16. Aligning incentives in orthopaedics: opportunities and challenges -- the Case Medical Center experience.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Randall E; Zenty, Thomas F; Adelman, Harlin G

    2009-10-01

    For 30 years, the orthopaedic faculty at Case Western Reserve University worked as an independent private corporation within University Hospitals Case Medical Center (Hospital). However, by 2002, it became progressively obvious to our orthopaedic practice that we needed to modify our business model to better manage the healthcare regulatory changes and decreased reimbursement if we were to continue to attract and retain the best and brightest orthopaedic surgeons to our practice. In 2002, our surgeons created a new entity wholly owned by the parent corporation at the Hospital. As part of this transaction, the parties negotiated a balanced employment model designed to fully integrate the orthopaedic surgeons into the integrated delivery system that included the Hospital. This new faculty practice plan adopted a RVU-based compensation model for the physicians, with components that created incentives both for clinical practice and for academic and administrative service contributions. Over the past 5 years, aligning incentives with the Hospital has substantially increased the clinical productivity of the surgeons and has also benefited the Hospital and our patients. Furthermore, aligned incentives between surgeons and hospitals could be of substantial financial benefit to both, as Medicare moves forward with its bundled project initiative.

  17. One year orthopaedic trauma experience using an advanced interdisciplinary hybrid operating room.

    PubMed

    Richter, Peter H; Yarboro, Seth; Kraus, Michael; Gebhard, Florian

    2015-10-01

    Hybrid operating rooms have been used successfully in several surgical specialties, but no data have been published for orthopaedic trauma. We present our one-year orthopaedic trauma experience using a hybrid operating room, which incorporates 3D fluoroscopic imaging as well as navigation capabilities. Data were compiled for a series of 92 cases performed in an advanced hybrid operating room at the level one trauma center in Ulm, Germany. All patients who had surgery performed using this operating room during the first year were included. Setup time and surgical complications using hybrid operating room were recorded and analysed. The hybrid operating room resulted in no higher rate of complication than expected from the same cases in a conventional operating room. The hybrid room did however allow the surgeon to confidently place implants for orthopaedic trauma cases, and was most advantageous for spine and pelvis cases, both minimally invasive and conventional. Further, appropriate reduction and implant position was confirmed with 3D imaging prior to leaving the operating room and obviated the need for postoperative CT scan. Based on our one-year experience, the hybrid operating room is a useful and safe tool for orthopaedic trauma surgery.

  18. Does Change in Functional Performance Affect Quality of Life in Persons with Orthopaedic Impairment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostir, Glenn V.; Berges, Ivonne-Marie; Smith, Pamela M.; Smith, David; Rice, Janida L.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Examine the association between change in functional status and quality of life for individuals with orthopaedic impairments approximately 90 days after discharge from in-patient medical rehabilitation. Methods: A retrospective study from 2001 to 2002 using information from the IT HealthTrack database. The study included…

  19. Evidence-based medicine in military orthopaedics: are we doing our part?

    PubMed

    Tennent, David J; Bailey, James R; Ficke, James R; Stinner, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The clinical application of evidence-based medicine is influenced by the quality of the published literature. Journals assign objective levels of evidence to articles to describe the quality and reliability of individual articles. Studies assigned levels I to III are considered higher quality studies. This study reviewed 60 continuous years of the American edition of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery to analyze trends in the quality of research published by U.S. military orthopaedic surgeons. Three hundred and six of 371 identified articles were assigned a level of evidence from I to V. These were then analyzed to determine if military orthopaedic surgeons were producing higher quality studies over time. Over time, the total number of articles published decreased. However, the number of higher quality studies and average level of evidence per decade improved over time. This trend toward publishing higher quality studies is consistent with the general orthopaedic community and highlights the need for continued work by the military orthopaedic community to conduct higher quality studies.

  20. Undergraduate and foundation training in trauma and orthopaedics: junior doctors have their say.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Yaser; Thakrar, Raj R; Palmer, Jon; Konan, Sujith; Donaldson, James; Olivier, Andre; Gikas, Panos; Briggs, Tim

    2015-07-01

    Undergraduate education in musculoskeletal health is currently insufficient in most medical schools worldwide, in both basic sciences and clinical training. A national survey was carried out to obtain views of current doctors from various specialties about undergraduate and foundation training in trauma and orthopaedics.

  1. The Orthopaedic Training Study, Phase II 1968-1972. Final Report Supplement, Part A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Carl J.; And Others

    This document, as a supplement to the final report of the Orthopaedic Training Study, contains the documents considered to be important in providing the background for the study. The materials are organized into four major areas: initial correspondence, instrumentation, special reports, and psychomotor skills. See also HE 003 275 and HE 003 276.…

  2. Biodegradable magnesium alloys for orthopaedic applications: A review on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sankalp; Curtin, James; Duffy, Brendan; Jaiswal, Swarna

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have been extensively explored as potential biodegradable implant materials for orthopaedic applications (e.g. Fracture fixation). However, the rapid corrosion of Mg based alloys in physiological conditions has delayed their introduction for therapeutic applications to date. The present review focuses on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications of biodegradable Mg alloys for orthopaedic applications. Initially, the corrosion behaviour of Mg alloys and the effect of alloying elements on corrosion and biocompatibility is discussed. Furthermore, the influence of polymeric deposit coatings, namely sol-gel, synthetic aliphatic polyesters and natural polymers on corrosion and biological performance of Mg and its alloy for orthopaedic applications are presented. It was found that inclusion of alloying elements such as Al, Mn, Ca, Zn and rare earth elements provides improved corrosion resistance to Mg alloys. It has been also observed that sol-gel and synthetic aliphatic polyesters based coatings exhibit improved corrosion resistance as compared to natural polymers, which has higher biocompatibility due to their biomimetic nature. It is concluded that, surface modification is a promising approach to improve the performance of Mg-based biomaterials for orthopaedic applications.

  3. The Orthopaedic Training Study, Phase II 1968-1972. Final Report Supplement, Psychomotor Skills, Part B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Carl J.; And Others

    This document, as a supplement to the final report of the Orthopaedic Training Study, presents a discussion of the rationale behind the implementation of a laboratory course in psychomotor skills development for medical students. Medical educators examined resident training in terms of 3 components of cognitive elements of learning: cognitive,…

  4. Level of Perception of Individualized Care and Satisfaction With Nursing in Orthopaedic Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Fatma; Findik, Ummu Yildiz

    2015-01-01

    Lately, individualized nursing care and patient satisfaction are important and current issues being discussed. But there is not enough information for patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the individualized care perception and satisfaction in nursing care levels in orthopaedic surgery patients. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with 156 patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery. Data were collected using the personal information form, the Individualized Care Scale, and the Newcastle Satisfaction With Nursing Scale. The Spearman correlation analysis and descriptive statistics were performed. The mean individualized care and satisfaction with nursing care scores were found to be close to the preset maximum value, and it was determined that an increase in the level of awareness about nursing interventions and the level of perceived individualized care caused an increase in satisfaction levels regarding nursing care. Nurses should recognize the importance of performing individualized care in order to increase the level of satisfaction with nursing care in orthopaedic surgery patients.

  5. The ABJS presidential lecture, June 2004: our orthopaedic heritage: the American Civil War.

    PubMed

    Kuz, Julian E

    2004-12-01

    War, considered to be one of the greatest causes of human suffering, often spurs some of the greatest advances in medical treatments. In the United States, the Civil War was a catalyst for the development of trauma management, including general wound management, amputation techniques, triage, and transportation of wounded soldiers. The War, by necessity, also accelerated surgical knowledge and treatment of gunshot wounds of the extremities more than any previous event. The War also served as the impetus for the specialization of surgical skills, hospital systems, and medical data collection. Orthopaedic surgery, at the time of the War, was not as yet a recognized specialty in the United States. However, the Civil War played an important role in the specialty's heritage and the creation of specialty orthopaedic and prosthetic hospitals. Although many discoveries in the area of orthopaedic surgery were not discovered until the 20th century, many basic orthopaedic procedures and techniques were developed during this war that continue to be used today, including Buck's traction, plaster splints, and open treatment of contaminated wounds. The first recorded attempts at open reduction-internal fixation techniques for gunshot fractures occurred during the War. Resection arthroplasties, shell and bone fragment extraction, and various types of amputation were improved because of the large numbers of casualties.

  6. The disruptive orthopaedic surgeon: implications for patient safety and malpractice liability.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pranay; Robinson, Brooke S; Novicoff, Wendy M; Dunnington, Gary L; Brenner, Michael J; Saleh, Khaled J

    2011-11-02

    Disruptive physician behavior imperils patient safety, erodes the morale of other health care providers, and dramatically increases the risk of malpractice litigation. Increasing patient volume, decreasing physician reimbursement, malpractice litigation, elevated stress, and growing job dissatisfaction have been implicated in disruptive behavior, which has emerged as one of the major challenges in health care. Because the aging patient population relies increasingly on orthopaedic services to maintain quality of life, improving professionalism and eradicating disruptive behavior are urgent concerns in orthopaedic surgery. Although many steps have been taken by The Joint Commission to improve patient care and define disruptive behavior, there is further room for improvement by physicians. Barriers to eliminating disruptive behavior by orthopaedic surgeons include fear of retaliation, lack of awareness among the surgeon's peers, and financial factors. Surgeons have a duty to address patterns of negative peer behavior for the benefit of patient care. This manuscript addresses the causes and consequences of disruptive physician behavior as well as management strategies, especially in orthopaedic surgery.

  7. CSM 2017 Orthopaedic Section Platform Presentations (Abstracts OPL1-OPL64).

    PubMed

    2017-01-01

    These abstracts are presented here as prepared by the authors. The accuracy and content of each abstract remain the responsibility of the authors. In the identification number above each abstract, OPL designates an Orthopaedic Section platform presentation. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(1):A1-A29. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.47.1.A1.

  8. CSM 2017 Orthopaedic Section Poster Presentations (Abstracts OPO1-OPO243).

    PubMed

    2017-01-01

    These abstracts are presented here as prepared by the authors. The accuracy and content of each abstract remain the responsibility of the authors. In the identification number above each abstract, OPO designates an Orthopaedic Section poster presentation. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(1):A58-A161. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.47.1.A58.

  9. Orthopaedic Timing in Polytrauma in a Second Level Emergency Hospital. An Overrated Problem?

    PubMed Central

    V, Dei Giudici; N, Giampaolini; A, Panfighi; M, Marinelli; R, Procaccini; A, Gigante

    2015-01-01

    The main concern for orthopaedic treatment in polytrauma has always been the same for almost forty years, which also regards “where” and “when” to proceed; correct surgical timing and correct interpretation of the DCO concept are still being debated. In the last few years, several attempts have been made to classify patients based on their clinical presentation and by trying to figure out which vital parameters are able to predict the patient’s outcome. This study evaluated all patients who presented with code red at the Emergency Department of our Hospital, a level II trauma center. For every patient, the following characteristics were noted: sex, age, day of hospitalization, orthopaedic trauma, time to surgery, presence of an associated surgical condition in the fields of general surgery, thoracic surgery, neurosurgery and vascular surgery, cardiac frequency, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, Glasgow Coma Scale and laboratory data. All patients included were divided into subgroups based on orthopaedic surgical timing. Two other subgroups were also identified and analyzed in detail: deceased and weekend traumas. A total of 208 patients were included. Our primary goal was to identify a correlation between the mortality and surgical timing of the orthopaedic procedures; our secondary goal was to recognize, if present, a statistically relevant association between historical, clinical and laboratory data, and mortality rate, defining any possible risk factor. A correlation between mortality and orthopaedic surgical timing was not found. Analyzing laboratory data revealed an interesting correlation between mortality and: blood pressure, platelet count, cardiac frequency, hematocrit, hemoglobin and age. PMID:26312113

  10. Exercise Equipment: Neutral Buoyancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Linda; Valle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Load Bearing Equipment for Neutral Buoyancy (LBE-NB) is an exercise frame that holds two exercising subjects in position as they apply counter forces to each other for lower extremity and spine loading resistance exercises. Resistance exercise prevents bone loss on ISS, but the ISS equipment is too massive for use in exploration craft. Integrating the human into the load directing, load generating, and motion control functions of the exercise equipment generates safe exercise loads with less equipment mass and volume.

  11. Mobile Equipment Expands Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, Robert L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes the Mobile Equipment Modules (MEM) system in Duluth, Minnesota. MEM is a way to hold down costs and increase learning opportunities by consolidating purchases of expensive shop equipment within the school district, grouping the equipment in modules, and scheduling and moving it from school to school as needed. (MF)

  12. Validation of an advanced practice physiotherapy model of care in an orthopaedic outpatient clinic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Canada, new models of orthopaedic care involving advanced practice physiotherapists (APP) are being implemented. In these new models, aimed at improving the efficiency of care for patients with musculoskeletal disorders, APPs diagnose, triage and conservatively treat patients. Formal validation of the efficiency and appropriateness of these emerging models is scarce. The purpose of this study is to assess the diagnostic agreement of an APP compared to orthopaedic surgeons as well as to assess treatment concordance, healthcare resource use, and patient satisfaction in this new model. Methods 120 patients presenting for an initial consult for hip or knee complaints in an outpatient orthopaedic hospital clinic in Montreal, Canada, were independently assessed by an APP and by one of three participating orthopaedic surgeons. Each health care provider independently diagnosed the patients and provided triage recommendations (conservative or surgical management). Proportion of raw agreement and Cohen’s kappa were used to assess inter-rater agreement for diagnosis, triage, treatment recommendations and imaging tests ordered. Chi-Square tests were done in order to compare the type of conservative treatment recommendations made by the APP and the surgeons and Student t-tests to compare patient satisfaction between the two types of care. Results The majority of patients assessed were female (54%), mean age was 54.1 years and 91% consulted for a knee complaint. The raw agreement proportion for diagnosis was 88% and diagnostic inter-rater agreement was very high (κ=0.86; 95% CI: 0.80-0.93). The triage recommendations (conservative or surgical management) raw agreement proportion was found to be 88% and inter-rater agreement for triage recommendation was high (κ=0.77; 95% CI: 0.65-0.88). No differences were found between providers with respect to imaging tests ordered (p≥0.05). In terms of conservative treatment recommendations made, the APP gave significantly

  13. Modernising the higher surgical training in trauma and orthopaedic surgery in Ireland: taking the middle path approach.

    PubMed

    Sayana, M K; Ashraf, M; O'Byrne, J

    2009-12-01

    Traditionally, the UK and Ireland have followed the same postgraduate surgical training of orthopaedic surgeons. Modernising medical careers (MMC) and European Working Time Directive (EWTD) have radically changed the way surgical training is delivered in the UK. In Ireland, however, the traditional structure of surgical training system continues with an emphasis to modernise the training with more objective assessment tools. The aim of this review is to highlight the current differences in the higher surgical training in Orthopaedics in the UK and Ireland.

  14. Does Admission to Medicine or Orthopaedics Impact a Geriatric Hip Patient’s Hospital Length of Stay?

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Sarah E.; VanHouten, Jacob P.; Lakomkin, Nikita; Ehrenfeld, Jesse; Jahangir, Amir Alex; Boyce, Robert H.; Obremksey, William T.; Sethi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of our study was to determine the association between admitting service, medicine or orthopaedics, and length of stay (LOS) for a geriatric hip fracture patient. Design Retrospective. Setting Urban level 1 trauma center. Patients/Participants Six hundred fourteen geriatric hip fracture patients from 2000 to 2009. Interventions Orthopaedic surgery for geriatric hip fracture. Main Outcome Measurements Patient demographics, medical comorbidities, hospitalization length, and admitting service. Negative binomial regression used to determine association between LOS and admitting service. Results Six hundred fourteen geriatric hip fracture patients were included in the analysis, of whom 49.2% of patients (n = 302) were admitted to the orthopaedic service and 50.8% (3 = 312) to the medicine service. The median LOS for patients admitted to orthopaedics was 4.5 days compared with 7 days for patients admitted to medicine (P < 0.0001). Readmission was also significantly higher for patients admitted to medicine (n = 92, 29.8%) than for those admitted to orthopaedics (n = 70, 23.1%). After controlling for important patient factors, it was determined that medicine patients are expected to stay about 1.5 times (incidence rate ratio: 1.48, P < 0.0001) longer in the hospital than orthopaedic patients. Conclusions This is the largest study to demonstrate that admission to the medicine service compared with the orthopaedic service increases a geriatric hip fractures patient’s expected LOS. Since LOS is a major driver of cost as well as a measure of quality care, it is important to understand the factors that lead to a longer hospital stay to better allocate hospital resources. Based on the results from our institution, orthopaedic surgeons should be aware that admission to medicine might increase a patient’s expected LOS. PMID:26371621

  15. Titanium-Nitride Coating of Orthopaedic Implants: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    van Hove, Ruud P.; Sierevelt, Inger N.; van Royen, Barend J.; Nolte, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Surfaces of medical implants can be enhanced with the favorable properties of titanium-nitride (TiN). In a review of English medical literature, the effects of TiN-coating on orthopaedic implant material in preclinical studies were identified and the influence of these effects on the clinical outcome of TiN-coated orthopaedic implants was explored. The TiN-coating has a positive effect on the biocompatibility and tribological properties of implant surfaces; however, there are several reports of third body wear due to delamination, increased ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene wear, and cohesive failure of the TiN-coating. This might be due to the coating process. The TiN-coating process should be optimized and standardized for titanium alloy articulating surfaces. The clinical benefit of TiN-coating of CoCrMo knee implant surfaces should be further investigated. PMID:26583113

  16. Nanoscale Surface Modifications of Orthopaedic Implants: State of the Art and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Staruch, RMT; Griffin, MF; Butler, PEM

    2016-01-01

    Background: Orthopaedic implants such as the total hip or total knee replacement are examples of surgical interventions with postoperative success rates of over 90% at 10 years. Implant failure is associated with wear particles and pain that requires surgical revision. Improving the implant - bone surface interface is a key area for biomaterial research for future clinical applications. Current implants utilise mechanical, chemical or physical methods for surface modification. Methods: A review of all literature concerning the nanoscale surface modification of orthopaedic implant technology was conducted. Results: The techniques and fabrication methods of nanoscale surface modifications are discussed in detail, including benefits and potential pitfalls. Future directions for nanoscale surface technology are explored. Conclusion: Future understanding of the role of mechanical cues and protein adsorption will enable greater flexibility in surface control. The aim of this review is to investigate and summarise the current concepts and future directions for controlling the implant nanosurface to improve interactions. PMID:28217214

  17. [Clinical safety and professional liability claims in Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology].

    PubMed

    Bori, G; Gómez-Durán, E L; Combalia, A; Trilla, A; Prat, A; Bruguera, M; Arimany-Manso, J

    2016-01-01

    The specialist in orthopaedic and traumatological surgery, like any other doctor, is subject to the current legal provisions while exercising their profession. Mandatory training in the medical-legal aspects of health care is essential. Claims against doctors are a reality, and orthopaedic and traumatological surgery holds first place in terms of frequency of claims according to the data from the General Council of Official Colleges of Doctors of Catalonia. Professionals must be aware of the fundamental aspects of medical professional liability, as well as specific aspects, such as defensive medicine and clinical safety. The understanding of these medical-legal aspects in the routine clinical practice can help to pave the way towards a satisfactory and safe professional career. The aim of this review is to contribute to this training, for the benefit of professionals and patients.

  18. Three-dimensional Intraoperative Imaging Modalities in Orthopaedic Surgery: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Sheeraz; Lu, Young; McAnany, Steven; Baird, Evan

    2014-12-01

    Intraoperative imaging and navigation systems have revolutionized orthopaedic surgery for the spine, joints, and orthopaedic trauma. Imaging modalities such as the isocentric C-arm, O-arm imaging, and intraoperative MRI or navigation systems allow the visualization of surgical instruments and implants relative to a three-dimensional CT image or MRI. Studies show that these technologies lower the rates of implant misplacement and inadequate fracture reduction, thereby improving surgical outcomes and reducing reoperation rates. An additional benefit is reduced radiation exposure compared with that for conventional fluoroscopy. Concerns surrounding adoption of these technologies include cost and increased operating times, but improvements in design and protocol may improve the integration of these imaging modalities into the operating room.

  19. Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' emotions when using different patient education methods.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Katja; Salanterä, Sanna; Leppänen, Tiina; Vahlberg, Tero; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2012-07-01

    A randomised controlled trial was used to evaluate elective ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' emotions during internet-based patient education or face-to-face education with a nurse. The internet-based patient education was designed for this study and patients used websites individually based on their needs. Patients in the control group participated individually in face-to-face patient education with a nurse in the ambulatory surgery unit. The theoretical basis for both types of education was the same. Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients scored their emotions rather low at intervals throughout the whole surgical process, though their scores also changed during the surgical process. Emotion scores did not decrease after patient education. No differences in patients' emotions were found to result from either of the two different patient education methods.

  20. Improving Pain Management and Long-Term Outcomes Following High-Energy Orthopaedic Trauma (Pain Study).

    PubMed

    Castillo, Renan C; Raja, Srinivasa N; Frey, Katherine P; Vallier, Heather A; Tornetta, Paul; Jaeblon, Todd; Goff, Brandon J; Gottschalk, Allan; Scharfstein, Daniel O; OʼToole, Robert V

    2017-04-01

    Poor pain control after orthopaedic trauma is a predictor of physical disability and numerous negative long-term outcomes. Despite increased awareness of the negative consequences of poorly controlled pain, analgesic therapy among hospitalized patients after orthopaedic trauma remains inconsistent and often inadequate. The Pain study is a 3 armed, prospective, double-blind, multicenter randomized trial designed to evaluate the effect of standard pain management versus standard pain management plus perioperative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or pregabalin in patients of ages 18-85 with extremity fractures. The primary outcomes are chronic pain, opioid utilization during the 48 hours after definitive fixation and surgery for nonunion in the year after fixation. Secondary outcomes include preoperative and postoperative pain intensity, adverse events and complications, physical function, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. One year treatment costs are also compared between the groups.

  1. A discharge planning program in orthopaedics: experiences in implementation and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Matt-Hensrud, N; Severson, M; Hansen, D C; Holland, D E

    2001-01-01

    The acute care orthopaedic registered nurse plays a key role in assessing and communicating the continuing care needs of patient's and their families, coordinating community resources, and formulating a timely discharge plan to maximize rehabilitation and recovery. Developing and maintaining a staff nurse's discharge planning knowledge and skills can be a challenging endeavor. Discharge Planning Coordinators at a tertiary medical center developed and implemented a Discharge Planning Mentorship Program, an educational pilot program designed to enhance the knowledge and skill level of select nurses in the orthopaedic specialty practice, thus maximizing expert resources at the bedside. Program implementation and evaluation of role preparation, practice changes, and actualization challenges are discussed in this article. Overall, participants demonstrated increased skill in articulating and problem solving a patient's postdischarge needs, devised creative strategies to enhance communication between multiple levels of care, and developed a greater knowledge of community resources and reimbursement mechanisms for continuing care.

  2. The Joint-Gut Axis Exploring the Orthopaedic and Rheumatologic Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Michael P; Gaspar, Jonathan P; Kane, Patrick M

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic immunemediated inflammatory conditions involving the gastrointestinal system with potential to adversely affect the musculoskeletal system as well. The numerous overlapping immunogenic and pathophysiologic disease mechanisms of the gastrointestinal and musculoskeletal systems have led to the concept of the "Joint-Gut Axis," illustrating an intimate link between the two organ systems. A solid understanding of the Joint-Gut Axis is necessary for the rheumatologist as well as the orthopaedic surgeon, as concomitant musculoskeletal disease may impart a profoundly negative impact on the quality of life of patients with IBD. Furthermore, a significant subset of patients initially present with secondary musculoskeletal symptoms resulting from an underlying, undiagnosed IBD. Additional non-inflammatory musculoskeletal sequelae of IBD that are not typically attributed to the Joint-Gut Axis should also be recognized by rheumatologists and orthopaedic surgeons in order that the proper preventative and supportive interdisciplinary management may be employed, maximizing patient outcomes and quality of life.

  3. Improving mechanical properties of polyethylene orthopaedic implants by high frequency cold plasma surface activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudoran, Cristian D.; Vlad, Iulia E.; Dadarlat, Dorin N.; Anghel, Sorin D.

    2013-11-01

    Although a tremendous progress has been made in developing new methods and materials for manufacturing orthopaedic implants, the new technology still faces various problems. Polyethylene implants are relatively easy to manufacture and at lower cost compared to metallic or ceramic implants, but they present a fundamental problem: during usage and in time, due to their manufacturing technology, the material suffers from pitting and delamination which leads to crack propagation and finally to sudden fracture. Our studies and tests performed on polyethylene showed that, using cold plasma surface activation during the manufacturing process of the orthopaedic implants made from polyethylene can significantly increase their mechanical properties. The breaking tests revealed an increase of the tensile strength in the laminated polyethylene samples by a factor of 4 after plasma activation. "Aging" tests have been also performed to investigate how the cold plasma treated samples maintain their properties in time, after the surface activation process.

  4. Vitiligo and allergic complications from orthopaedic joint implants: the role of benzoyl peroxide.

    PubMed

    Dudda, Marcel; Godau, Peter; Al-Benna, Sammy; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Gothner, Martin

    2013-05-01

    Orthopaedic joint implants and osteosynthetic materials are progressively being employed more often. Complications mainly include physical-mechanical problems and infections. Uncommonly, allergic reactions to an alloy metal or a bone cement component have been implicated. Less attention has been paid to the components of bone cement, such as acrylate, catalysers (e.g. peroxide), additive polymers or stabilisers. An important bone cement component is benzoylperoxide (BPO), an initiator of the process enhancement of the bone cement. Vitiligo is an acquired, progressive depigmenting disorder that can induce autoimmune diseases. The occurrence of vitiligo in combination with an infection or allergy is not well described, and this manuscript highlights the possibility of an occurrence of a vitiligo whenever the immunesystem is activated and T-cell activation is observed. The aim of this article was to analyze the diagnosis and management of vitiligo and allergic complications from orthopaedic joint implants due to benzoyl-peroxide and relevant patents.

  5. Bioactive glass/ZrO2 composites for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, D; Sola, A; Cannillo, V

    2014-02-01

    Binary biocomposites were realized by combining yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) with a bioactive glass matrix. Few works are available regarding composites containing zirconia and a relatively high content of glass because the resulting samples are usually biocompatible but not bioactive after thermal treatment. In the present research, the promising properties of the new BG_Ca-K glass, with its low tendency to crystallize and high apatite-forming ability, allowed us to sinter the composites at a relatively low temperature with excellent effects in terms of bioactivity. In addition, it was possible to benefit from the good mechanical behaviour of Y-TZP, thus obtaining samples with microhardness values that were among the highest reported in the literature. After a detailed analysis regarding the thermal behaviour of the composite powders, the sintered bodies were fully characterized by means of x-ray diffraction, SEM equipped with EDS, density measurements, volumetric shrinkage determination, mechanical testing and in vitro evaluation in a simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. According to the experimental results, the presence of Y-TZP improved the mechanical performance. Meanwhile, the BG_Ca-K glass, which mainly preserved its amorphous structure after sintering, provided the composites with a good apatite-forming ability in SBF.

  6. Three-dimensional printing in orthopaedic surgery: review of current and future applications.

    PubMed

    Mulford, Jonathan S; Babazadeh, Sina; Mackay, Neil

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a rapidly evolving technology with the potential for significant contributions to surgical practice. There are many current applications for 3D printing technology with future applications being explored. This technology has applications in preoperative planning, education, custom manufacturing (implants, prosthetics and surgical guides) and exciting potential for biological applications. This article reviews the current and future applications of 3D technology in orthopaedic surgery.

  7. Inhibition of Orthopaedic Implant Infections by Immunomodulatory Effects of Host Defense Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    for formation of bac- terial biofilms [18]. Moreover, prolonged infection and progressive inflammation result in osteolysis around the orthopaedic...their pro- duction of chemokines and cytokines [1, 26, 30, 32, 37, 42], can reduce soft tissue infections [1, 37], and can disrupt bac- terial biofilms ...bacterial biofilms on implant surfaces [18], the inflammatory osteolysis that causes osseointe- gration failures and loosening of infected implants [27

  8. Orthopaedic Device Approval Through the Premarket Approval Process: A Financial Feasibility Analysis for a Single Center.

    PubMed

    Yang, Brian W; Iorio, Matthew L; Day, Charles S

    2017-03-15

    The 2 main routes of medical device approval through the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are the premarket approval (PMA) process, which requires clinical trials, and the 510(k) premarket notification, which exempts devices from clinical trials if they are substantially equivalent to an existing device. Recently, there has been growing concern regarding the safety of devices approved through the 510(k) premarket notification. The PMA process decreases the potential for device recall; however, it is substantially more costly and time-consuming. Investors and medical device companies are only willing to invest in devices if they can expect to recoup their investment within a timeline of roughly 7 years. Our study utilizes financial modeling to assess the financial feasibility of approving various orthopaedic medical devices through the 510(k) and PMA processes. The expected time to recoup investment through the 510(k) process ranged from 0.585 years to 7.715 years, with an average time of 2.4 years; the expected time to recoup investment through the PMA route ranged from 2.9 years to 24.5 years, with an average time of 8.5 years. Six of the 13 orthopaedic device systems that we analyzed would require longer than our 7-year benchmark to recoup the investment costs of the PMA process. With the 510(k) premarket notification, only 1 device system would take longer than 7 years to recoup its investment costs. Although the 510(k) premarket notification has demonstrated safety concerns, broad requirements for PMA authorization may limit device innovation for less-prevalent orthopaedic conditions. As a result, new approval frameworks may be beneficial. Our report demonstrates how current regulatory policies can potentially influence orthopaedic device innovation.

  9. Advancing regenerative surgery in orthopaedic sports medicine: the critical role of the surgeon.

    PubMed

    Moran, Cathal J; Barry, Frank P; Maher, Suzanne A; Shannon, Fintan J; Rodeo, Scott A

    2012-04-01

    The constant desire to improve outcomes in orthopaedic sports medicine requires us to continuously consider the challenges faced in the surgical repair or reconstruction of soft tissue and cartilaginous injury. In many cases, surgical efforts targeted at restoring normal anatomy and functional status are ultimately impaired by the biological aspect of the natural history of these injuries, which acts as an obstacle to a satisfactory repair process after surgery. The clinical management of sports injuries and the delivery of appropriate surgical intervention are continuously evolving, and it is likely that the principles of regenerative medicine will have an increasing effect in this specialized field of orthopaedic practice going forward. Ongoing advances in arthroscopy and related surgical techniques should facilitate this process. In contrast to the concept of engineered replacement of entire tissues, it is probable that the earliest effect of regenerative strategies seen in clinical practice will involve biological augmentation of current operative techniques via a synergistic process that might be best considered "regenerative surgery." This article provides an overview of the principles of regenerative surgery in cartilage repair and related areas of orthopaedic surgery sports medicine. The possibilities and challenges of a gradual yet potential paradigm shift in treatment through the increased use of biological augmentation are considered. The translational process and critical role to be played by the specialist surgeon are also addressed. We conclude that increased understanding of the potential and challenges of regenerative surgery should allow those specializing in orthopaedic surgery sports medicine to lead the way in advancing the frontiers of biological strategies to enhance modern clinical care in an evidence-based manner.

  10. Orthopaedic management of children with myelomeningocele: a plea for realistic goals.

    PubMed

    Menelaus, M B

    1976-01-01

    The aims and principles of orthopaedic management of children with a myelomeningocele are discussed. The primary aim is to establish stable posture, and details are given of the various operative procedures used to bring about stable posture. The management described has resulted in reductions in the number of operations for each child, in the incidence of post-immobilisation fractures, in the number of hospital admissions and in the number of bed-days spent in hospital.

  11. The management of the orthopaedic sequelae of meningococcal septicaemia: patients treated to skeletal maturity.

    PubMed

    Park, D H; Bradish, C F

    2011-07-01

    Septicaemia resulting from meningococcal infection is a devastating illness affecting children. Those who survive can develop late orthopaedic sequelae from growth plate arrests, with resultant complex deformities. Our aim in this study was to review the case histories of a series of patients with late orthopaedic sequelae, all treated by the senior author (CFB). We also describe a treatment strategy to address the multiple deformities that may occur in these patients. Between 1997 and 2009, ten patients (seven girls and three boys) were treated for late orthopaedic sequelae following meningococcal septicaemia. All had involvement of the lower limbs, and one also had involvement of the upper limbs. Each patient had a median of three operations (one to nine). Methods of treatment included a combination of angular deformity correction, limb lengthening and epiphysiodesis. All patients were skeletally mature at the final follow-up. One patient with bilateral below-knee amputations had satisfactory correction of her right amputation stump deformity, and has complete ablation of both her proximal tibial growth plates. In eight patients length discrepancy in the lower limb was corrected to within 1 cm, with normalisation of the mechanical axis of the lower limb. Meningococcal septicaemia can lead to late orthopaedic sequelae due to growth plate arrests. Central growth plate arrests lead to limb-length discrepancy and the need for lengthening procedures, and peripheral growth plate arrests lead to angular deformities requiring corrective osteotomies and ablation of the damaged physis. In addition, limb amputations may be necessary and there may be altered growth of the stump requiring further surgery. Long-term follow-up of these patients is essential to recognise and treat any recurrence of deformity.

  12. Negative pressure wound therapy for management of the surgical incision in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Karlakki, S.; Brem, M.; Giannini, S.; Khanduja, V.; Stannard, J.; Martin, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The period of post-operative treatment before surgical wounds are completely closed remains a key window, during which one can apply new technologies that can minimise complications. One such technology is the use of negative pressure wound therapy to manage and accelerate healing of the closed incisional wound (incisional NPWT). Methods We undertook a literature review of this emerging indication to identify evidence within orthopaedic surgery and other surgical disciplines. Literature that supports our current understanding of the mechanisms of action was also reviewed in detail. Results A total of 33 publications were identified, including nine clinical study reports from orthopaedic surgery; four from cardiothoracic surgery and 12 from studies in abdominal, plastic and vascular disciplines. Most papers (26 of 33) had been published within the past three years. Thus far two randomised controlled trials – one in orthopaedic and one in cardiothoracic surgery – show evidence of reduced incidence of wound healing complications after between three and five days of post-operative NPWT of two- and four-fold, respectively. Investigations show that reduction in haematoma and seroma, accelerated wound healing and increased clearance of oedema are significant mechanisms of action. Conclusions There is a rapidly emerging literature on the effect of NPWT on the closed incision. Initiated and confirmed first with a randomised controlled trial in orthopaedic trauma surgery, studies in abdominal, plastic and vascular surgery with high rates of complications have been reported recently. The evidence from single-use NPWT devices is accumulating. There are no large randomised studies yet in reconstructive joint replacement. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:276–84. PMID:24352756

  13. Adaptive meshing technique applied to an orthopaedic finite element contact problem.

    PubMed

    Roarty, Colleen M; Grosland, Nicole M

    2004-01-01

    Finite element methods have been applied extensively and with much success in the analysis of orthopaedic implants. Recently a growing interest has developed, in the orthopaedic biomechanics community, in how numerical models can be constructed for the optimal solution of problems in contact mechanics. New developments in this area are of paramount importance in the design of improved implants for orthopaedic surgery. Finite element and other computational techniques are widely applied in the analysis and design of hip and knee implants, with additional joints (ankle, shoulder, wrist) attracting increased attention. The objective of this investigation was to develop a simplified adaptive meshing scheme to facilitate the finite element analysis of a dual-curvature total wrist implant. Using currently available software, the analyst has great flexibility in mesh generation, but must prescribe element sizes and refinement schemes throughout the domain of interest. Unfortunately, it is often difficult to predict in advance a mesh spacing that will give acceptable results. Adaptive finite-element mesh capabilities operate to continuously refine the mesh to improve accuracy where it is required, with minimal intervention by the analyst. Such mesh adaptation generally means that in certain areas of the analysis domain, the size of the elements is decreased (or increased) and/or the order of the elements may be increased (or decreased). In concept, mesh adaptation is very appealing. Although there have been several previous applications of adaptive meshing for in-house FE codes, we have coupled an adaptive mesh formulation with the pre-existing commercial programs PATRAN (MacNeal-Schwendler Corp., USA) and ABAQUS (Hibbit Karlson and Sorensen, Pawtucket, RI). In doing so, we have retained several attributes of the commercial software, which are very attractive for orthopaedic implant applications.

  14. Non Diabetic and Stress Induced Hyperglycemia [SIH] in Orthopaedic Practice What do we know so Far?

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Randeep; Sud, Ambuj; Ghorpade, Nilesh; Gupta, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is also seen amongst non-diabetics and can cause significant morbidity and mortality. SIH has been reported in literature and studied in relation to trauma and critically ill patients. However, literature specific to orthopaedics on this topic is very small. Further, management of hyperglycemia in such patients is still a matter of debate and no universal consensus exists regarding its management. Future studies are needed on this topic to provide appropriate management guidelines and optimal patient outcomes. PMID:25478381

  15. Workshop on "New Engineering Technology Transfer in Orthopaedic Surgery".

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    Image Guided Interventions • Surgical Robots »Virtual Biomechanical Models < Pre-operative and Pre-treatment Planning Baltimore, Maryland April 30... Biomechanics Laboratory. Without their planning, organiza- tion and meticulous direction, this workshop would not have been as well organized. We would...applications. Biomechanical engineers and orthopaedic surgeons have been quantifying muscle and joint forces and bone stresses under both static and

  16. Interobserver reliability in Pirani clubfoot severity scoring between a paediatric orthopaedic surgeon and a physiotherapy assistant.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Samir; Jaiballa, Hiba; Pirani, Shafique

    2012-07-01

    The Ponseti method, now regarded as the standard of care for congenital clubfoot, is equally effective whether provided by orthopaedic surgeons or orthopaedic paramedics. Therefore, it is particularly suitable for under-resourced nations with lack of surgeons and physicians. At the Sudan Clubfoot Clinic, physiotherapy assistants (3-year diploma nurses with additional physiotherapy experience) are part of the Ponseti clubfoot treatment team, with the role of assessing the degree of deformity by the Pirani score to assist the team in providing treatment. However, the reliability of Pirani scores measured by physiotherapy assistants in this context is unknown. After obtaining informed consent, we measured the interobserver reliability between a physiotherapy assistant and an orthopaedic surgeon in measuring Pirani scores in 91 virgin clubfeet in 54 infants (41 males and 13 females) at the Sudan Clubfoot Clinic. Scores were measured independently before the onset of treatment and analysed by the κ statistic for interobserver reliability. The κ statistic was 0.61 for posterior crease, 0.72 for empty heel, 0.51 for rigid equinus, 0.54 for the hid-foot score, 0.57 for medial crease, 0.54 for curved lateral border, 0.56 for lateral head of talus, 0.50 for the midfoot score and 0.50 for the total score. The mean percentage of agreement of both observers for all Pirani components was 83%. We found moderate to substantial interobserver reliability for the Pirani clubfoot severity score and all its subcomponents. Properly trained physiotherapy assistants are efficient in assessing the degree of severity of clubfoot. This is particularly useful in developing countries, where orthopaedic surgeons are few. Clubfoot treatment can be made more affordable by using paramedical healthcare workers such as physiotherapy assistants.

  17. Readability of sports medicine-related patient education materials from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ganta, Abhishek; Yi, Paul H; Hussein, Khalil; Frank, Rachel M

    2014-04-01

    Although studies have revealed high readability levels of orthopedic patient education materials, no study has evaluated sports medicine-related patient education materials. We conducted a study to assess the readability of sports medicine-related patient education materials from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). All sports medicine patient education articles available online in 2012 from the AAOS and the AOSSM, including the Stop Sports Injuries Campaign (STOP), were identified, and their readability was assessed with the Flesch-Kinkaid (FK) readability test. Mean overall FK grade level of the 170 articles reviewed (104 from AAOS, 36 from AOSSM, 30 from STOP) was 10.2. Mean FK levels for the 3 sources were 9.5 (AAOS), 11.0 (AOSSM), and 11.5 (STOP) (P = .16). Fifteen (8.8%) of the 170 articles had a readability level at or below eighth grade (average reading level of US adults); only 2 (1.2%) of the 170 articles were at or below the recommended sixth-grade level. The majority of sports medicine-related patient education materials from AAOS and AOSSM had reading levels higher than recommended, indicating that the majority of the patient population may find it difficult to comprehend these articles.

  18. Mechanical compatibility of sol-gel annealing with titanium for orthopaedic prostheses.

    PubMed

    Greer, Andrew I M; Lim, Teoh S; Brydone, Alistair S; Gadegaard, Nikolaj

    2016-01-01

    Sol-gel processing is an attractive method for large-scale surface coating due to its facile and inexpensive preparation, even with the inclusion of precision nanotopographies. These are desirable traits for metal orthopaedic prostheses where ceramic coatings are known to be osteoinductive and the effects may be amplified through nanotexturing. However there are a few concerns associated with the application of sol-gel technology to orthopaedics. Primarily, the annealing stage required to transform the sol-gel into a ceramic may compromise the physical integrity of the underlying metal. Secondly, loose particles on medical implants can be carcinogenic and cause inflammation so the coating needs to be strongly bonded to the implant. These concerns are addressed in this paper. Titanium, the dominant material for orthopaedics at present, is examined before and after sol-gel processing for changes in hardness and flexural modulus. Wear resistance, bending and pull tests are also performed to evaluate the ceramic coating. The findings suggest that sol-gel coatings will be compatible with titanium implants for an optimum temperature of 500 °C.

  19. Osteoporosis and the orthopaedic surgeon: basic concepts for successful co-management of patients' bone health.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Ryan P; Herbert, Benoit; Cuellar, Derly O; Hao, Jiandong; Stahel, Philip F; Yasui, Robin; Hak, David J; Mauffrey, Cyril

    2014-08-01

    Osteoporosis has been recognised as a public health concern for at least three decades but it has been relatively recent that the push has been for orthopaedic surgeons to take a more active role in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with decreased bone mineral density (BMD). Most often these patients are encountered after they have suffered a fracture making secondary prevention the area where orthopaedists may exert the greatest influence on patient care. The purpose of this article is to provide a succinct framework for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with decreased BMD. Patients are deemed to have decreased BMD if they have suffered a fragility fracture, a fracture caused by a low-energy traumatic event. These patients are often encountered in the emergency department and admitted for further treatment of their fractures or recommended for follow-up in the clinic. Regardless of treatment course these are opportunities for the orthopaedic surgeon to intervene in the osteoporotic disease process and positively affect a patient's bone health. This article compiles the available literature on osteoporosis and presents it succinctly with the incorporation of both a diagnosis algorithm and treatment profile table. With the use of these two tools, orthopaedic surgeons everywhere should be able to take a more active role in their patients' bone health.

  20. Nanomaterials and synergistic low intensity direct current (LIDC) stimulation technology for orthopaedic implantable medical devices

    PubMed Central

    Samberg, Meghan E.; Cohen, Paul H.; Wysk, Richard A.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials play a significant role in biomedical research and applications due to their unique biological, mechanical, and electrical properties. In recent years, they have been utilised to improve the functionality and reliability of a wide range of implantable medical devices ranging from well-established orthopaedic residual hardware devices (e.g. hip implants) that can repair defects in skeletal systems to emerging tissue engineering scaffolds that can repair or replace organ functions. This review summarizes the applications and efficacies of these nanomaterials that include synthetic or naturally occurring metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites in orthopaedic implants, the largest market segment of implantable medical devices. The importance of synergistic engineering techniques that can augment or enhance the performance of nanomaterial applications in orthopaedic implants is also discussed,, the focus being on a low intensity direct electric current (LIDC) stimulation technology to promote the long-term antibacterial efficacy of oligodynamic metal-based surfaces by ionization, while potentially accelerating tissue growth and osseointegration. While many nanomaterials have clearly demonstrated their ability to provide more effective implantable medical surfaces, further decisive investigations are necessary before they can translate into medically safe and commercially viable clinical applications. The paper concludes with a discussion about some of the critical impending issues with the application of nanomaterials-based technologies in implantable medical devices, and potential directions to address these. PMID:23335493

  1. Similarities and differences in coatings for magnesium-based stents and orthopaedic implants

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Thompson, Marc; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg)-based biodegradable materials are promising candidates for the new generation of implantable medical devices, particularly cardiovascular stents and orthopaedic implants. Mg-based cardiovascular stents represent the most innovative stent technology to date. However, these products still do not fully meet clinical requirements with regards to fast degradation rates, late restenosis, and thrombosis. Thus various surface coatings have been introduced to protect Mg-based stents from rapid corrosion and to improve biocompatibility. Similarly, different coatings have been used for orthopaedic implants, e.g., plates and pins for bone fracture fixation or as an interference screw for tendon-bone or ligament-bone insertion, to improve biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. Metal coatings, nanoporous inorganic coatings and permanent polymers have been proved to enhance corrosion resistance; however, inflammation and foreign body reactions have also been reported. By contrast, biodegradable polymers are more biocompatible in general and are favoured over permanent materials. Drugs are also loaded with biodegradable polymers to improve their performance. The key similarities and differences in coatings for Mg-based stents and orthopaedic implants are summarized. PMID:27695671

  2. Rehabilitation and restoration: orthopaedics and disabled soldiers in Germany and Britain in the First World War.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Julie; Perry, Heather R

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a comparative analysis of the evolution of orthopaedics and rehabilitation within German and British military medicine during the Great War. In it, we reveal how the field of orthopaedics became integral to military medicine by tracing the evolution of the discipline and its practitioners in each nation during the war. In doing so, however, we document not only when and why both medical specialists and military officials realized that maintaining their respective national fighting forces depended upon the efficient rehabilitation of wounded soldiers, but also how these rehabilitative practices and goals reflected the particularities of the military context, civilian society and social structure of each nation. Thus, while our comparison reveals a number of similarities in the orthopaedic developments within each nation as a response to the Great War, we also reveal significant national differences in war-time medical goals, rehabilitation treatments and soldierly 'medical experiences'. Moreover, as we demonstrate, a social and cultural re-conceptualization of the disabled body accompanied the medical advancements developed for him; however, this re-conceptualization was not the same in each nation. Thus, what our article reveals is that although the guns of August fell silent in 1918, the war's medical experiences lingered long thereafter shaping the future of disability medicine in both nations.

  3. Life-space mobility and social support in elderly adults with orthopaedic disorders.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomoko; Kitaike, Tadashi; Ikezaki, Sumie

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional survey was to explore relationships between life-space mobility and the related factors in elderly Japanese people who attend orthopaedic clinics. The study measures included surveys of life-space mobility (Life-space Assessment (LSA) score), social support (social network diversity and social ties), physical ability (instrumental self-maintenance, intellectual activity, social role), orthopaedic factors (diseases and symptoms) and demographic information. The questionnaire was distributed to 156 subjects; 152 persons responded, yielding 140 valid responses. Mean age of the sample was 76.0 ± 6.4 (range, 65-96 years), with 57.9% women (n = 81). In a multiple regression analysis, the six factors were significantly associated with LSA. Standardized partial regression coefficients (β) were gender (0.342), instrumental self-maintenance (0.297), social network diversity (0.217), age (-0.170), difficulty of motion (-0.156) and intellectual activity (0.150), with an adjusted R(2) = 0.488. These results suggest that outpatient health-care providers need to intervene in not only addressing orthopaedic factors but also promoting social support among elderly Japanese.

  4. Database and Registry Research in Orthopaedic Surgery: Part 2: Clinical Registry Data.

    PubMed

    Pugely, Andrew J; Martin, Christopher T; Harwood, Jared; Ong, Kevin L; Bozic, Kevin J; Callaghan, John J

    2015-11-04

    The use of large-scale national databases for observational research in orthopaedic surgery has grown substantially in the last decade, and the data sets can be categorized as either administrative claims or clinical registries. Clinical registries contain secondary data on patients with a specific diagnosis or procedure. The data are typically used for patient outcome surveillance to improve patient safety and health-care quality. Registries used in orthopaedic research exist at the regional, national, and international levels, and many were designed to specifically collect outcomes relevant to orthopaedics, such as short-term surgical complications, longer-term outcomes (implant survival or reoperations), and patient-reported outcomes. Although heterogeneous, clinical registries-in contrast to claims data-typically have a more robust list of variables, with relatively precise prospective data input, management infrastructure, and reporting systems. Some weaknesses of clinical registries include a smaller number of patients, inconstant follow-up duration, and use of sampling methods that may limit generalizability. Within the U.S., national joint registry adoption has lagged international joint registries. Given the changing health-care environment, it is likely that clinical registries will provide valuable information that has the potential to influence clinical practice improvement and health-care policy in the future.

  5. The Use of Growth Factors and Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Kanitkar, Medha; Tailor, Hiteshkumar D; Khan, Wasim S

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is an exciting and upcoming branch of tissue engineering with application in the field of orthopaedics. The most commonly used type of stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), can be easily isolated from bone marrow or synovium and cultured in vitro. Newer techniques using tissue engineering to regenerate musculoskeletal tissue by using biomimetic materials are now being studied. These osteoconductive three dimensional constructs seeded with MSCs are highly porous, biodegradable and biomechanically stable scaffolds which do not evoke an immunogenic host cell response. Research has shown the importance of growth factors in guiding and modulating the differentiation of MSCs in order to obtain the required cell type. Gene-based delivery systems have aided the delivery of sustained quantities of these growth factors. The evidence from growth factor enhanced tissue engineering studies for tissue healing looks very positive. This is a multi-disciplinary approach that integrates molecular, biochemical and clinical techniques with developmental and engineering processes. Initial studies indicate an immense potential for cell based strategies to enhance current orthopaedic approaches in skeletal tissue reconstruction. Ultimately, there is a need for randomised controlled trials on human populations to apply these findings to a clinical setting. Nevertheless, stem cell based tissue engineering in orthopaedics shows a promising future. PMID:21886692

  6. Predictors of success on the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery examination.

    PubMed

    Herndon, James H; Allan, Bassan J; Dyer, George; Jawa, Andrew; Zurakowski, David

    2009-09-01

    Predictors of success of orthopaedic residents on the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) examination are controversial. We therefore evaluated numerous variables that may suggest or predict candidate performance on the ABOS examination. We reviewed files of 161 residents (all graduates) from one residency program distributed into two study groups based on whether they passed or failed their first attempt on the ABOS Part I or Part II examination from 1991 through 2005. Predictors of success/failure on the ABOS I included the mean percentile score on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE) (Years 2 through 4), the percentile OITE score in the last year of training, US Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) score, Dean's letter, election to Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA), and number of honors in selected third-year clerkships. All but the USMLE score predicted passing the ABOS Part II examination. These data suggest there are objective predictors of residents' performance on the ABOS Part I and Part II examinations.

  7. Gait Analysis From a Single Ear-Worn Sensor: Reliability and Clinical Evaluation for Orthopaedic Patients.

    PubMed

    Jarchi, Delaram; Lo, Benny; Wong, Charence; Ieong, Edmund; Nathwani, Dinesh; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2016-08-01

    Objective assessment of detailed gait patterns after orthopaedic surgery is important for post-surgical follow-up and rehabilitation. The purpose of this paper is to assess the use of a single ear-worn sensor for clinical gait analysis. A reliability measure is devised for indicating the confidence level of the estimated gait events, allowing it to be used in free-walking environments and for facilitating clinical assessment of orthopaedic patients after surgery. Patient groups prior to or following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and knee replacement were recruited to assess the proposed method. The ability of the sensor for detailed longitudinal analysis is demonstrated with a group of patients after lower limb reconstruction by considering parameters such as temporal and force-related gait asymmetry derived from gait events. The results suggest that the ear-worn sensor can be used for objective gait assessments of orthopaedic patients without the requirement and expense of an elaborate laboratory setup for gait analysis. It significantly simplifies the monitoring protocol and opens the possibilities for home-based remote patient assessment.

  8. Picturing the pain of animal others: rationalising form, function and suffering in veterinary orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Degeling, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Advances in veterinary orthopaedics are assessed on their ability to improve the function and wellbeing of animal patients. And yet historically veterinarians have struggled to bridge the divide between an animal's physicality and its interior experience of its function in clinical settings. For much of the twentieth century, most practitioners were agnostic to the possibility of animal mentation and its implications for suffering. This attitude has changed as veterinarians adapted to technological innovations and the emergence of a clientele who claimed to understand and relate to the subjective experiences of their animals. While visualising technologies and human analogies have shaped the nuts and bolts of veterinary orthopaedic practices, an emerging awareness of the inability of radiographic images to apprehend or correlate to a patient's experience of their function reliably has required veterinarians to place a greater emphasis on the owner's knowledge of the "selves" inhabiting their animals. Rather than simply basing clinical judgments on the "look" of their patients, the indeterminacy in the connection between form and function has compelled veterinarians to put questions regarding particular human-animal relationships near the centre of their practices, not least in orthopaedic surgery.

  9. Fathers of orthopaedics in Germany (eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries): Lorenz Heister in Helmsted; Johann Friedrich Dieffenbach in Berlin; Heine and family in Würzburg.

    PubMed

    Hernigou, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    In orthopaedic medicine in Germany, Lorenz Heister, practicing in the eighteenth century, is considered one of the fathers of German surgery and is renowned for his books on management of hemorrhage, wounds, fractures, bandaging, instrumentation and surgery. After Heister, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, orthopaedic medicine in Germany developed uniformly. In a period when few doctors were interested in a separate discipline of orthopaedics, Germany led in this field. Heine devoted himself to the development of the new profession of orthopaedics, and in 1816, he opened the first orthopaedic institute on German soil in the former monastery of St. Stephen, which later became known as the Karolinen-Institut. Along with Heine and his family, the special development of orthopaedics in Berlin may be attributed to the work of Dieffenbach who, in 1832, became professor at the University of Berlin and in 1840 director of the Clinical Institute for Surgery at Charité Hospital.

  10. Using simulation to train orthopaedic trainees in non-technical skills: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Samuel R; Little, Zoe; Akhtar, Kash; Ramachandran, Manoj; Lee, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    AIM To enhance non-technical skills and to analyse participant’s experience of a course tailored for orthopaedic surgeons. METHODS A Delphi technique was used to develop a course in human factors specific to orthopaedic residents. Twenty-six residents (six per course) participated in total with seven course facilitators all trained in Crisis Resource Management providing structured feedback. Six scenarios recreated challenging real-life situations using high-fidelity mannequins and simulated patients. Environments included a simulated operating suite, clinic room and ward setting. All were undertaken in a purpose built simulation suite utilising actors, mock operating rooms, mock clinical rooms and a high fidelity adult patient simulator organised through a simulation control room. Participants completed a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire (strongly disagree to strongly agree) before and after the course. This assessed their understanding of non-technical skills, scenario validity, relevance to orthopaedic training and predicted impact of the course on future practice. A course evaluation questionnaire was also completed to assess participants’ feedback on the value and quality of the course itself. RESULTS Twenty-six orthopaedic residents participated (24 male, 2 female; post-graduation 5-10 years), mean year of residency program 2.6 out of 6 years required in the United Kingdom. Pre-course questionnaires showed that while the majority of candidates recognised the importance of non-technical (NT) skills in orthopaedic training they demonstrated poor understanding of non-technical skills and their role. This improved significantly after the course (Likert score 3.0-4.2) and the perceived importance of these skills was reported as good or very good in 100%. The course was reported as enjoyable and provided an unthreatening learning environment with the candidates placing particular value on the learning opportunity provided by reflecting on their performance

  11. Technology Equipment Rooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    2001-01-01

    Examines telecommunications equipment room design features that allow for growth and can accommodate numerous equipment replacements and upgrades with minimal service disruption and with minimal cost. Considerations involving the central hub, power and lighting needs, air conditioning, and fire protection are discussed. (GR)

  12. Shipboard Electronic Equipments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Personnel Program Support Activity, Washington, DC.

    Fundamentals of major electronic equipments on board ships are presented in this text prepared for naval officers in general. Basic radio principles are discussed in connection with various types of transmitters, receivers, antennas, couplers, transfer panels, remote-control units, frequency standard equipments, teletypewriters, and facsimile…

  13. Equipment & New Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Adrian W., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Presents several new products and equipment for teaching college science courses such as laser optics bench, portable digital thermometer, solar energy furnaces and blackboard optics kit. A description of all equipment or products, cost, and addresses of manufacturers are also included. (HM)

  14. Engineer Equipment Mechanic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on engineer equipment mechanics is designed to advance the professional competence of privates through sergeants as equipment mechanics, Military Occupation Specialty 1341, and is adaptable for nonmilitary instruction. Introductory materials include…

  15. Equipment Operator 1 & C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Education and Training Program Development Center, Pensacola, FL.

    The Rate Training Manual and Nonresident Career Course (RTM/NRCC) form a self-study package to assist Navy Equipment Operators First and Chief in fulfilling the requirements of their rating. (Navy Equipment Operators First and Chief direct and coordinate efforts of individuals and crews in construction, earthmoving, roadbuilding, quarrying, and…

  16. AUDIOVISUAL EQUIPMENT STANDARDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PATTERSON, PIERCE E.; AND OTHERS

    RECOMMENDED STANDARDS FOR AUDIOVISUAL EQUIPMENT WERE PRESENTED SEPARATELY FOR GRADES KINDERGARTEN THROUGH SIX, AND FOR JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS. THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EQUIPMENT CONSIDERED WAS THE FOLLOWING--CLASSROOM LIGHT CONTROL, MOTION PICTURE PROJECTOR WITH MOBILE STAND AND SPARE REELS, COMBINATION 2 INCH X 2 INCH SLIDE AND FILMSTRIP…

  17. Adaptive Recreational Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Mary Lou, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Designed for teachers interested in therapeutic recreation, the document lists sources of adaptive recreational equipment and their homemade counterparts. Brief descriptions for ordering or constructing recreational equipment for the visually impaired, poorly coordinated, physically impaired, and mentally retarded are given. Specific adaptations…

  18. WE-G-213-02: The AAPM Award Eponyms: William D. Coolidge, Edith H. Quimby, and Marvin M.D. Williams - Who Were They and What Did They Do?

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberg, L.

    2015-06-15

    Roentgen and the Birth of Modern Medical Physics – Perry Sprawls Wilhelm Roentgen is well known for his discovery of x-radiation. What is less known and appreciated is his intensive research following the discovery to determine the characteristics of the “new kind of radiation” and demonstrate its great value for medical purposes. In this presentation we will imagine ourselves in Roentgen’s mind and follow his thinking, including questions and doubts, as he designs and conducts a series of innovative experiments that provided the foundation for the rapid growth of medical physics. Learning Objectives: Become familiar with the personal characteristics and work of Prof. Roentgen that establishes him as an inspiring model for the medical physics profession. Observe the thought process and experiments that determined and demonstrated the comprehensive characteristics of x-radiation. The AAPM Award Eponyms: William D. Coolidge, Edith H. Quimby, and Marvin M.D. Williams - Who were they and what did they do? – Lawrence N. Rothenberg William David Coolidge (1873–1975) William Coolidge was born in Hudson, NY in 1873. He obtained his BS at the Massacusetts Institute of Technology in 1896. Coolidge then went to the University of Leipzig, Germany for graduate study with physicists Paul Drude and Gustave Wiedemann and received a Ph.D. in 1899. While in Germany he met Wilhelm Roentgen. Coolidge returned to the US to teach at MIT where he was associated with Arthur A. Noyes of the Chemistry Department, working on the electrical conductivity of aqueous solutions. Willis R. Whitney, under whom Coolidge had worked before going to Germany, became head of the newly formed General Electric Research Laboratory and he invited Coolidge to work with him. In 1905, Coolidge joined the staff of the GE laboratory and was associated with it for the remainder of his life. He developed ductile tungsten filaments to replace fragile carbon filaments as the material for electric light

  19. WE-G-213-00: History Symposium: Radiological Physics Pioneers: Roentgen and the AAPM Award Eponyms - William Coolidge, Edith Quimby, and Marvin Williams - Who Were They and What Did They Do?

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    Roentgen and the Birth of Modern Medical Physics – Perry Sprawls Wilhelm Roentgen is well known for his discovery of x-radiation. What is less known and appreciated is his intensive research following the discovery to determine the characteristics of the “new kind of radiation” and demonstrate its great value for medical purposes. In this presentation we will imagine ourselves in Roentgen’s mind and follow his thinking, including questions and doubts, as he designs and conducts a series of innovative experiments that provided the foundation for the rapid growth of medical physics. Learning Objectives: Become familiar with the personal characteristics and work of Prof. Roentgen that establishes him as an inspiring model for the medical physics profession. Observe the thought process and experiments that determined and demonstrated the comprehensive characteristics of x-radiation. The AAPM Award Eponyms: William D. Coolidge, Edith H. Quimby, and Marvin M.D. Williams - Who were they and what did they do? – Lawrence N. Rothenberg William David Coolidge (1873–1975) William Coolidge was born in Hudson, NY in 1873. He obtained his BS at the Massacusetts Institute of Technology in 1896. Coolidge then went to the University of Leipzig, Germany for graduate study with physicists Paul Drude and Gustave Wiedemann and received a Ph.D. in 1899. While in Germany he met Wilhelm Roentgen. Coolidge returned to the US to teach at MIT where he was associated with Arthur A. Noyes of the Chemistry Department, working on the electrical conductivity of aqueous solutions. Willis R. Whitney, under whom Coolidge had worked before going to Germany, became head of the newly formed General Electric Research Laboratory and he invited Coolidge to work with him. In 1905, Coolidge joined the staff of the GE laboratory and was associated with it for the remainder of his life. He developed ductile tungsten filaments to replace fragile carbon filaments as the material for electric light

  20. Accidents associated with equipment.

    PubMed

    Heath, M L

    1984-01-01

    Serious accidents in which the possibility of equipment-related hazards are raised have been reported to the Scientific and Technical Branch of the Department of Health and Social Security. The author has examined anonymous summaries of 23 such reports of events which occurred over a 5-year period. The principle cause of catastrophe in seventeen of the incidents was user error involving disconnexion or misconnexion. Faulty systems of equipment management combined in some cases with inadequate pre-anaesthetic checking of apparatus were responsible for the other instances. Appropriate systems of equipment management and checking together with meticulous basic clinical monitoring are recommended as the best safeguards in anaesthetic practice.

  1. [Medical Equipment Maintenance Methods].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    Due to the high technology and the complexity of medical equipment, as well as to the safety and effectiveness, it determines the high requirements of the medical equipment maintenance work. This paper introduces some basic methods of medical instrument maintenance, including fault tree analysis, node method and exclusive method which are the three important methods in the medical equipment maintenance, through using these three methods for the instruments that have circuit drawings, hardware breakdown maintenance can be done easily. And this paper introduces the processing methods of some special fault conditions, in order to reduce little detours in meeting the same problems. Learning is very important for stuff just engaged in this area.

  2. Leasing versus buying equipment.

    PubMed

    Grossman, R

    1983-01-01

    For the upgrading of equipment that is necessary in radiologic practice, leasing is more convenient and less expensive than buying. Changes in tax laws, embodied in the Economic Recovery Act of 1981, have increased tax benefits of this arrangement.

  3. Equipment & New Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Adrian W., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews new science equipment and products for the laboratory. Includes hand-held calculators, fiberglass fume hoods, motorized microtomy, disposable mouse cages, and electric timers. Describes 11 products total. Provides manufacturer name, address, and price. (MA)

  4. Selecting Library Furniture & Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Media & Methods, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Offers suggestions for selecting school library furniture and equipment. Describes various models of computer workstations; reading tables and chairs; and shelving. Sidebar lists names and addresses of library furniture manufactures and distributors. (AEF)

  5. Automatic Test Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-28

    Search Terms Automatic Test Equipment Frequency Analyzers Oscilloscopes Pulse Analyzers Signal Generators "Etc." Third Level Search Guided...VAST Building Block Equipment RF Test Point Control Switch Digital Multimeter Frequency and Time Interval Meter Digital Word Generator Delay...Generator RF Amplifier, 95 Hz-2 GHz RF Amplifier, 2-4 GHz RF Amplifier, 4-8 GHz RF Amplifier, 8-12.2 GHz Signal Generator, 0.1 Hz-50 kHz

  6. Listing of Food Service Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI. Testing Lab.

    A comprehensive listing of food service equipment including--(1) companies authorized to use the National Sanitation Foundation seal of approval, and (2) equipment listed as meeting NSF standards including soda fountains, spray-type dishwashers, dishwashing equipment, cooking equipment, commerical cooking and warming equipment, freezers,…

  7. Medical equipment management strategies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binseng; Furst, Emanuel; Cohen, Ted; Keil, Ode R; Ridgway, Malcolm; Stiefel, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Clinical engineering professionals need to continually review and improve their management strategies in order to keep up with improvements in equipment technology, as well as with increasing expectations of health care organizations. In the last 20 years, management strategies have evolved from the initial obsession with electrical safety to flexible criteria that fit the individual institution's needs. Few hospitals, however, are taking full advantage of the paradigm shift offered by the evolution of joint Commission standards. The focus should be on risks caused by equipment failure, rather than on equipment with highest maintenance demands. Furthermore, it is not enough to consider risks posed by individual pieces of equipment to individual patients. It is critical to anticipate the impact of an equipment failure on larger groups of patients, especially when dealing with one of a kind, sophisticated pieces of equipment that are required to provide timely and accurate diagnoses for immediate therapeutic decisions or surgical interventions. A strategy for incorporating multiple criteria to formulate appropriate management strategies is provided in this article.

  8. Machine oil inhibits the osseointegration of orthopaedic implants by impairing osteoblast attachment and spreading.

    PubMed

    Bonsignore, Lindsay A; Goldberg, Victor M; Greenfield, Edward M

    2015-07-01

    The most important factor contributing to short-term and long-term success of cementless total joint arthroplasties is osseointegration. Osseointegration leads to a direct structural and functional connection between living bone and the surface of an implant. Surface contaminants may remain on orthopaedic implants after sterilization procedures and impair osseointegration. For example, specific lots of hip replacement Sulzer Inter-OP(TM) acetabular shells that were associated with impaired osseointegration and early failure rates were found to be contaminated with both bacterial debris and machine oil residues. However, the effect of machine oil on implant integration is unknown. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine if machine oil inhibits the osseointegration of orthopaedic implants. To test this hypothesis in vivo we used our murine model of osseointegration where titanium alloy implants are implanted into a unicortical pilot hole in the mid-diaphysis of the femur. We found that machine oil inhibited bone-to-implant contact and biomechanical pullout measures. Machine oil on titanium alloy discs inhibited early stages of MC3T3-E1 osteogenesis in vitro such as attachment and spreading. Inhibition of osteoblast attachment and spreading occurred in both areas with and without detectable oil. Osteoblast growth was in turn inhibited on discs with machine oil due to both a decrease in proliferation and an increase in cell death. Later stages of osteogenic differentiation and mineralization on titanium alloy discs were also inhibited. Thus, machine oil can inhibit osseointegration through cell autonomous effects on osteoblast cells. These results support routine testing by manufacturers of machine oil residues on orthopaedic implants.

  9. Results of treatment when orthopaedic surgeons follow gait-analysis recommendations in children with CP.

    PubMed

    Lofterød, Bjørn; Terjesen, Terje

    2008-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the outcome of orthopaedic surgery in ambulant children with cerebral palsy, when the orthopaedic surgeons followed the recommendations from preoperative three-dimensional gait analysis. 55 children, mean age 10 y 11 mo, were clinically evaluated by orthopaedic surgeons who proposed a surgical treatment plan. After gait analysis and subsequent surgery, three groups were defined. In group A, there was agreement between clinical proposals, gait-analysis recommendations, and subsequent surgery in 128 specific surgical procedures. In group B, 54 procedures were performed based on gait analysis, although these procedures had not been proposed at the clinical examination. In group C, 55 surgical procedures that had been proposed after clinical evaluation were not performed because of the gait-analysis recommendations. The children underwent follow-up gait analysis 1 to 2 years after the initial analysis. The kinematic results were satisfactory, with improvement in most of the gait parameters in children who had undergone surgery and no significant deterioration in those who were not operated. In group A, there were significant improvements in maximum hip extension in stance, minimum knee flexion in stance, timing of maximum knee flexion in swing and knee range of motion, maximum ankle dorsiflexion in stance, and mean femur rotation in stance. In group B, there were significant improvements in maximum hip extension in stance, minimum knee flexion in stance, and knee range of motion. We conclude that gait analysis was useful in confirming clinical indications for surgery, in defining indications for surgery that had not been clinically proposed, and for excluding or delaying surgery that was clinically proposed.

  10. Aesthetic, urological, orthopaedic and functional outcomes in complex bladder exstrophy-epispadias's management

    PubMed Central

    Kouame, Bertin Dibi; Kouame, Guy Serge Yapo; Sounkere, Moufidath; Koffi, Maxime; Yaokreh, Jean Baptiste; Odehouri-Koudou, Thierry; Tembely, Samba; Dieth, Gaudens Atafi; Ouattara, Ossenou; Dick, Rufin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative complications are related to the surgical procedures, of failures of initial bladder closure and influence the urological, aesthetical and orthopaedic outcomes. Materials and Methods: We reviewed four patients who underwent complex bladder exstrophy-epispadias repair over a period of 14 years. The outcomes of treatment were assessed using, aesthetic, urological and orthopaedic examination data. Orthopaedic complications were explored by a radiography of the pelvis. Results: Out of four patients who underwent bladder exstrophy surgical management, aesthetic, functional outcomes and complications in the short and long follow-up were achieved in three patients. The first patient is a male and had a good penis aspect. He has a normal erection during micturition with a good jet miction. He has a moderate urinary incontinence, which requires diaper. In the erection, his penis-measures 4 cm long and 3 cm as circumference. The second patient was a female. She had an unsightly appearance of the female external genitalia with bipartite clitoris. Urinary continence could not be assessed; she did not have the age of cleanness yet. The third patient had a significant urinary leakage due to the failure of the epispadias repair. He has a limp, a pelvic obliquity, varus and internal rotation of the femoral head. He has an inequality of limbs length. Pelvis radiograph shows the right osteotomy through the ilium bone, the left osteotomy through the hip joint at the acetabular roof. Conclusion: When, the epispadias repair is performed contemporary to initial bladder closure, its success is decisive for urinary continence. In the female, surgical revision is required after the initial bladder closure for an aesthetic appearance to the external genitalia. Innominate osteotomy must be performed with brilliancy amplifier to avoid osteotomy through to the hip joint to prevent inequality in leg length. PMID:25659552

  11. [Orthopaedic manual therapy : definition, characteristics and update on the situation in Belgium].

    PubMed

    Demoulin, C; Depas, Y; Vanderthommen, M; Henrotin, Y; Wolfs, S; Cagnie, B; Hidalgo, B

    2017-03-01

    Although orthopaedic manual therapy (OMT) has existed for decades, and although a recent Belgian Royal Decree, published in 2014, recognized it as a particular professional qualification in physiotherapy for the treatment of neuromusculoskeletal dysfunctions, OMT remains little known by patients, but also by healthcare professionals. Yet, this professional qualification, based on clinical reasoning, using highly specific treatments, guided by the best available scientific and clinical evidence and the specific biopsychosocial characteristics of each patient, is the subject of a growing number of scientific studies pointing out its effectiveness. This article summarizes the knowledge related to OMT (definition, history, characteristics, techniques, indications, access and reimbursement) and describes its situation in Belgium.

  12. Soft Tissue Structure Modelling for Use in Orthopaedic Applications and Musculoskeletal Biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audenaert, E. A.; Mahieu, P.; van Hoof, T.; Pattyn, C.

    2009-12-01

    We present our methodology for the three-dimensional anatomical and geometrical description of soft tissues, relevant for orthopaedic surgical applications and musculoskeletal biomechanics. The technique involves the segmentation and geometrical description of muscles and neurovascular structures from high-resolution computer tomography scanning for the reconstruction of generic anatomical models. These models can be used for quantitative interpretation of anatomical and biomechanical aspects of different soft tissue structures. This approach should allow the use of these data in other application fields, such as musculoskeletal modelling, simulations for radiation therapy, and databases for use in minimally invasive, navigated and robotic surgery.

  13. Synthesis and characterisation of core-shell structures for orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rusen, Edina; Zaharia, Cătălin; Zecheru, Teodora; Mărculescu, Bogdan; Filmon, Robert; Chappard, Daniel; Bădulescu, Roxana; Cincu, Corneliu

    2007-01-01

    This paperwork deals with the obtaining and characterisation of new acrylic cements for bone surgery. The final mixture of cement contains derivatives of methacryloyloxyethyl phosphate, methacrylic acid or 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane sulphonic acid. The idea of using these monomers is sustained by their ability to form ionic bonds with barium, which is responsible for X-ray reflection and by the biocompatibility of these structures. The strategy consists in the obtaining of core-shell structures through heterogeneous polymerisation, which are used for final cement's manufacture. The orthopaedic cements were characterised by SEM, EDX, compression resistance and cytotoxicity assays.

  14. Bone marrow derived stem cells in trauma and orthopaedics: a review of the current trend.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagwant; Onimowo, Jemina O; Khan, Wasim S

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a promising therapeutic option to enhance tissue regeneration and repair. The development of bone tissue engineering is directly related to changes in materials technology. While the inclusion of material requirements is standard in the design process of engineered bone substitutes, it is critical to incorporate clinical requirements in order to engineer a clinically relevant device. This review focuses on the potentials of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) in trauma and orthopaedics and presents the need for bone tissue-engineered alternatives.

  15. Use Of Tv-Frame Memory On Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry Applied To Orthopaedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, O. D.; Lage, A. L.

    1983-03-01

    An automatic image digitizer has been developed to operate on the observation of transient phenomena in real time to the study of orthopaedics systems. The image of the speckle pattern corresponding to the combination of illuminating pulses is recorded in the solid state frame store. The stored electronic image is then automatically subtracted from a sub sequent image corresponding to the second pulse set. The live fringes appear on the monitor and are video recorded for later evaluation. Other operation modes can equally be realized with the Tv-frame memory. Real time hologrammetry can also be performed within the correlation range. Benefits can be acquired in moire techniques utilizing the proposed memory.

  16. DIY 3D printing of custom orthopaedic implants: a proof of concept study.

    PubMed

    Frame, Mark; Leach, William

    2014-03-01

    3D printing is an emerging technology that is primarily used for aiding the design and prototyping of implants. As this technology has evolved it has now become possible to produce functional and definitive implants manufactured using a 3D printing process. This process, however, previously required a large financial investment in complex machinery and professionals skilled in 3D product design. Our pilot study's aim was to design and create a 3D printed custom orthopaedic implant using only freely available consumer hardware and software.

  17. Adult onset primary focal dystonia of the foot: an orthopaedic intervention.

    PubMed

    Logan, Loretta; Resseque, Barbara; Dontamsetti, Monica Sakshi

    2016-03-30

    A 54-year-old woman presented to a foot centre with a chief symptom of cramping in her toes, which, she believed, was of a secondary cause originating from a bunion. She was treated conservatively; however, she returned a month later as the symptoms had progressed to painful cramping of toes, toe-curling and instability while walking, due to involuntary movement of her toes. It was believed that the patient presented with a rare case of primary adult onset focal foot dystonia. This case report explains dystonia further in detail and delves into the different treatment and management options available today, including the unique orthopaedic intervention provided for this patient.

  18. Some limits to evidence-based medicine: a case study from elective orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Ferlie, E.; Wood, M.; Fitzgerald, L.

    1999-01-01

    There has been growing interest in recent years in the application of the principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM), although implementation is complex. Scientific, organisational, and behavioural factors all combine to shape clinical behaviour change. Case study based qualitative data are presented which illuminate such processes within one clinical setting (elective orthopaedics), drawn from a larger study. It is suggested that (1) there are alternative models of what constitutes "evidence" in use; (2) scientific knowledge is in part socially constructed; and (3) clinical professionals retain a monopoly of technical knowledge. The implication is that there may be severe obstacles to the rapid or broad implementation of EBM. PMID:10557685

  19. How to get the most out of your orthopaedic fellowship: thinking about practice-based learning.

    PubMed

    Templeman, David

    2012-09-01

    Practice-based learning and improvement is an important skill set to develop during an orthopaedic trauma fellowship and is 1 of the 6 core competencies stated by the ACGME. The review of clinic cases is best done using a few simple models to develop a structured approach for studying cases. Three common sense and easy-to-use strategies to improve clinical practice are as follows: performing each case three times, studying the 4 quadrants of patient outcomes, and the application of the Pareto 80/20 rule. These principles help to develop a structured approach for analyzing and thinking about practice-based experiences.

  20. A novel route for processing cobalt–chromium–molybdenum orthopaedic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bhairav; Inam, Fawad; Reece, Mike; Edirisinghe, Mohan; Bonfield, William; Huang, Jie; Angadji, Arash

    2010-01-01

    Spark plasma sintering has been used for the first time to prepare the ASTM F75 cobalt–chromium–molybdenum (Co–Cr–Mo) orthopaedic alloy composition using nanopowders. In the preliminary work presented in this report, the effect of processing variables on the structural features of the alloy (phases present, grain size and microstructure) has been investigated. Specimens of greater than 99.5 per cent theoretical density were obtained. Carbide phases were not detected in the microstructure but oxides were present. However, harder materials with finer grains were produced, compared with the commonly used cast/wrought processing methods, probably because of the presence of oxides in the microstructure. PMID:20200035

  1. About Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Equipment for Infection Control Questions About Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Print Q1. How do manufacturers ensure personal protective equipment (PPE) is safe and effective? A1. To help ...

  2. Scientific research output in orthopaedics from China and other top-ranking countries: a 10-year survey of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yuming; Li, Quan; Xu, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Orthopaedics-related diseases and conditions are a significant burden worldwide. In this study, we aimed to compare the quantity and quality of research output in the field of orthopaedics from Mainland China (MC), USA, UK, Japan and Germany. Setting The USA, UK, Japan, Germany and MC. Participants We selected orthopaedics journals from the subject category ‘orthopedics’ from the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE). Outcome measures The number of publications, the number of publications in the surveyed publication types, impact factor (IF) and citations from the corresponding country from 2005 to 2014 were collected for quantity and quality comparisons. Results A total of 128 895 articles were published worldwide in orthopaedics-related journals from 2005 to 2014. The USA contributed the largest proportion (31 190 (24.20%)), followed by the UK (6703 (5.20%)), Japan (5718 (4.41%)), Germany (4701 (3.66%)) and MC (3389 (2.63%)). Publications from MC represented the fewest, but this quantity is rapidly increasing. The quantity of annual publications from MC has exceeded that of Germany since 2012. The USA plays a predominant role in all kinds of publication types under investigation in the study, except in the category of meta-analysis. MC was in the last place for cumulative IFs, and the average IF actually decreased from the beginning of the study. For total and average citations, MC still lags behind the other countries in the study. Conclusions The USA has occupied the dominant place in orthopaedics-related research for the last 10 years. Although MC has made great progress in the number of published works in the field of orthopaedics over the last 10 years, the quality of these publishing efforts needs further improvement. PMID:27638493

  3. Variation in use of non-surgical treatments among osteoarthritis patients in orthopaedic practice in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2015-01-01

    Objectives National and international evidence-based guidelines for hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with non-surgical treatments, followed by surgical intervention if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatments, but there are indications that these are not optimally used. The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which all recommended non-surgical treatments were used by patients with hip or knee OA who receive(d) a total hip or knee replacement, as reported by patients and orthopaedic surgeons. Setting We performed two cross-sectional internet-based surveys among patients and orthopaedic surgeons throughout the Netherlands. Participants 195 OA patients either have undergone total knee arthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty no longer than 12 months ago or being on the waiting list for surgery with a confirmed date within 3 months and 482 orthopaedic surgeons were invited to participate. Primary and secondary outcome measures The use of recommended non-surgical treatments including education about OA/treatment options, lifestyle advice, dietary therapy, physical therapy, acetaminophen, NSAIDs and glucocorticoid injections. Results 174 OA patients (93%) and 172 orthopaedic surgeons (36%) completed the surveys. Most recommended non-surgical treatments were given to the majority of patients (eg, 80% education about OA, 73% physical therapy, 72% acetaminophen, 80% NSAIDs). However, only 6% of patients and 10% of orthopaedic surgeons reported using a combination of all recommended treatments. Dietary therapy was used least frequently. Only 11% of overweight and 30% of obese participants reported having received dietary therapy and 28% of orthopaedic surgeons reported to prescribe dietary therapy to overweight patients. Conclusions While most recommended non-surgical treatments were used frequently as single therapy, the combination is used in only a small percentage of OA patients. Especially, use of dietary therapy

  4. Prioritizing equipment for replacement.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Mike

    2010-01-01

    It is suggested that clinical engineers take the lead in formulating evaluation processes to recommend equipment replacement. Their skill, knowledge, and experience, combined with access to equipment databases, make them a logical choice. Based on ideas from Fennigkoh's scheme, elements such as age, vendor support, accumulated maintenance cost, and function/risk were used.6 Other more subjective criteria such as cost benefits and efficacy of newer technology were not used. The element of downtime was also omitted due to the data element not being available. The resulting Periop Master Equipment List and its rationale was presented to the Perioperative Services Program Council. They deemed the criteria to be robust and provided overwhelming acceptance of the list. It was quickly put to use to estimate required capital funding, justify items already thought to need replacement, and identify high-priority ranked items for replacement. Incorporating prioritization criteria into an existing equipment database would be ideal. Some commercially available systems do have the basic elements of this. Maintaining replacement data can be labor-intensive regardless of the method used. There is usually little time to perform the tasks necessary for prioritizing equipment. However, where appropriate, a clinical engineering department might be able to conduct such an exercise as shown in the following case study.

  5. [The singular story of Doctor Worm -Nicholas Andry de Boisregard- and of his daughters Parasitology and Orthopaedics].

    PubMed

    Ledermann, Walter

    2012-10-01

    Homini verminoso or Dr. Worm were the nicknames that Nicholas Aindry won in life for his consecration to the study of intestinal worms and for his bad temper, which led him to fiercely attack the surgeons. The article reassumes the studies and contributions that gave Andry the title of Father of Parasitology and the candidacy to Father of Orthopaedics, and mentions some other candidates to this honor. Quite a man, he had -besides his biological one- two famous daughters, growing till our days; wrote at least three valuable books; and planted the immortal "tree of Andry", the symbol of Orthopaedics.

  6. Orthopaedic care coordination for the intellectually and developmentally disabled adult in the residential care setting: a perfect storm.

    PubMed

    Kurre, Paula A

    2014-01-01

    The role of the nurse as care coordinator is important in all patient populations, including orthopaedic settings, and is essential in promoting safe patient care for the intellectually and developmentally disabled (I/DD) person living in the residential setting. Care coordination for this population is challenging. Most healthcare providers, as well as nurses, are not familiar with the residential group home setting or with the special needs of this population, especially when presented with orthopaedic challenges. These factors, as well as funding issues, make for a "perfect storm" for care coordination. Educating nurses can help open the door to communication, smoother transitions, and collaboration among care coordinators in all settings.

  7. German mining equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The German mining equipment industry developed to supply machines and services to the local mining industry, i.e., coal, lignite, salt, potash, ore mining, industrial minerals, and quarrying. The sophistication and reliability of its technology also won it worldwide export markets -- which is just as well since former major domestic mining sectors such as coal and potash have declined precipitously, and others such as ore mining have all but disappeared. Today, German mining equipment suppliers focus strongly on export sales, and formerly unique German mining technologies such as continuous mining with bucket wheel excavators and conveyors for open pits, or plowing of underground coal longwalls are widely used abroad. The status of the German mining equipment industry is reviewed.

  8. Metabolic and clinical traits in horses undergoing feed deprivation for elective orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Reinprecht, Birgit; Hackl, Sigrun; Reisinger, Renate; Zickl, Michaela; Spona, Jürgen; Stanek, Christian; Zentek, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate some metabolic and clinical effects of feed deprivation in horses that were submitted for orthopaedic surgery. The effects of preoperative feed restriction were investigated in 20 horses submitted for elective orthopaedic surgery. The patients were fasted from 12 hours before until 4 hours after surgery. Serum free amino acids, glucose,free fatty acids (FFA), white blood cell counts, creatine kinase (CK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were determined 24 hours before surgery, 2 hours after the end of anaesthesia and 24 and 72 hours after surgery. Besides, abdominal sounds, appetite, faecal quality and body temperature were examined. Serum free amino acids did not react homogenously, concentrations were partly increasing or decreasing. Plasma glucose and FFA increased after surgery and returned to their preoperative levels 72 hours after surgery. A significant rise of the segmented granulocytes occurred 24 hours after surgery, all other parameters of the leukogram did not exceed the physiological range. AST reached its highest activity 24 hours after surgery, whereas CK activities were highest at 2 hours after surgery. Abdominal sounds were significantly reduced until 24 hours after surgery, however, appetite was not depressed. Faecal quality was physiological after surgery. Mean body temperature stayed within the physiological range. In conclusion, a relatively short perioperative fasting period had significant effects on the metabolic traits in horses, however the effects on physiological functions were minor. The consequences of major surgical procedures need to be addressed in future studies.

  9. Orthopaedic Aspects of Marfan Syndrome: The Experience of a Referral Center for Diagnosis of Rare Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fichera, Alessandro; De Luna, Vincenzo; Mancini, Federico; Caterini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1). The most important features affect the cardiovascular system, eyes, and skeleton. The aim of this study was to report the most frequent musculoskeletal alterations observed in 146 patients affected by Marfan syndrome. Fifty-four patients (37%) underwent cardiac surgery and 11 of them received emergent surgery for acute aortic dissection. Ectopia lentis was found in 68 patients (47%) whereas myopia above 3D occurred in 46 patients (32%). Musculoskeletal anomalies were observed in all patients with Marfan syndrome. In 88 patients (60.2%), the associated “wrist and thumb sign” was present; in 58 patients (39.7%), pectus carinatum deformity; in 44 patients (30.1%), pectus excavatum; in 49 patients (33.5%), severe flatfoot; in 31 patients (21.2%), hindfoot deformity; in 54 patients (36.9%), reduced US/LS ratio or increased arm span-height ratio; in 37 patients (25.3%), scoliosis or thoracolumbar kyphosis; in 22 patients (15%), reduced elbow extension (170° or less). Acetabular protrusion was ascertained on radiographs in 27 patients (18.4%). Orthopaedic aspects of the disease are very important for an early diagnosis; however, we have not observed definite correlations between the extent of orthopaedic involvement and aortic complications. PMID:28050285

  10. Epidemiology of combat wounds in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom: orthopaedic burden of disease.

    PubMed

    Belmont, Philip J; Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Goodman, Gens

    2010-01-01

    The United States forces in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) are primarily engaged in counterinsurgency operations within an irregular war. The US combat medical experience has reported new injury patterns secondary to the enemy's reliance on explosive mechanisms, particularly improvised explosive devices (IEDs), and the widespread use of individual and vehicular body armor. Musculoskeletal extremity injuries have been reported to comprise approximately 50% of all combat wounds for OIF/OEF. Utilization of individual body armor has dramatically reduced thoracic injuries and has decreased the lethality of gunshot wounds, as measured by the percent killed in action, which in conflicts prior to OIF/OEF was estimated at 33% but is now 4.6%. Explosive mechanisms of injury, with IEDs being the most common, account for over 75% of all combat casualties. The lethality of IEDs coupled with the protection of the thorax and abdomen provided by individual body armor has resulted in increasingly severe orthopaedic injuries. Collection and careful examination of orthopaedic combat casualties will allow for improved military personnel protective measures and treatment of injured soldiers.

  11. Modelling and optimization of temperature in orthopaedic drilling: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Rupesh Kumar; Panda, Sudhanshu Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    This present investigation uses the Taguchi and response surface methodology (RSM) for modelling and optimization of the temperature produced during bone drilling. The drilling of bone is a common procedure in orthopaedic surgery to produce hole for screw insertion to fixate the fracture devices and implants. A major problem which is encountered during such a procedure is the increase in temperature of the bone due to the plastic deformation of chips and the friction between the bone and the drill. The increase in temperature can result in thermal osteonecrosis which may delay healing or reduce the stability and strength of the fixation. The drilling experiments are conducted on poly-methyl-meth-acrylate (PMMA) (as a substitute for bone) using Taguchi's L27 experimental design technique. The cutting parameters used are drill diameter, feed rate and cutting speed. The optimum cutting parameters for minimum temperature are determined by using S/N ratios and the effect of individual cutting parameters on temperature produced is evaluated using analysis of variance (ANOVA). A second-order model is established between the drilling parameters and temperature using RSM. The experimental results show that the drill diameter is the most significant drilling parameter affecting the temperature during drilling followed by cutting speed and feed, respectively. The values predicted and the values obtained from experiment are fairly close, which indicates that the developed RSM model can be effectively used to predict the temperature in orthopaedic drilling.

  12. Orthopaedic techniques of Sabuncuoğlu in the 15th century Ottoman period.

    PubMed

    Sarban, Sezgin; Aksoy, Sahin; Uzel, Ilter; Işikan, Uğur E; Atik, Sahap

    2005-10-01

    Serefeddin Sabuncuoğlu (1385-1468) was the author of the surgical textbook Cerrahiyyetü'l-Haniyye (Imperial Surgery). It was the first illustrated surgical textbook in the Turkish-Islamic medical literature. Cerrahiyyetü'l-Haniyye is significant because it includes Sabuncuoğlu's color illustrations of surgical procedures, incisions, fracture dislocation reduction techniques, and instruments. There are only three handwritten copies. Two originally were written by Sabuncuoğlu and are exhibited in Paris and Istanbul. The book was rediscovered in 1936, but some parts are suspected to be missing. The book currently consists of three chapters divided into 193 sections. The third chapter includes orthopaedics and traumatology, reduction techniques of lower and upper extremities, fractures and dislocations, and relevant Greek, Arabic, and Persian textbooks are cited. Sabuncuoğlu also wrote about surgical treatment of congenital hand anomalies. He was the first to advise placing a wooden splint under the palmar side after hand surgery. We reviewed the sections of Cerrahiyyetü'l-Haniyye related to orthopaedics and traumatology. Compared with previous writings by Hippocrates, Ibn-i Sina, and Al-Zahrawi, there are no major differences in the treatment of fracture dislocations.

  13. How to Study Biofilms after Microbial Colonization of Materials Used in Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Drago, Lorenzo; Agrappi, Serse; Bortolin, Monica; Toscano, Marco; Romanò, Carlo Luca; De Vecchi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Over the years, various techniques have been proposed for the quantitative evaluation of microbial biofilms. Spectrophotometry after crystal violet staining is a widespread method for biofilm evaluation, but several data indicate that it does not guarantee a good specificity, although it is rather easy to use and cost saving. Confocal laser microscopy is one of the most sensitive and specific tools to study biofilms, and it is largely used for research. However, in some cases, no quantitative measurement of the matrix thickness or of the amount of embedded microorganisms has been performed, due to limitation in availability of dedicated software. For this reason, we have developed a protocol to evaluate the microbial biofilm formed on sandblasted titanium used for orthopaedic implants, that allows measurement of biomass volume and the amount of included cells. Results indicate good reproducibility in terms of measurement of biomass and microbial cells. Moreover, this protocol has proved to be applicable for evaluation of the efficacy of different anti-biofilm treatments used in the orthopaedic setting. Summing up, the protocol here described is a valid and inexpensive method for the study of microbial biofilm on prosthetic implant materials. PMID:26927075

  14. Neutron diffraction residual strain measurements in nanostructured hydroxyapatite coatings for orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, R; Faisal, N H; Paradowska, A M; Fitzpatrick, M E; Khor, K A

    2011-11-01

    The failure of an orthopaedic implant can be initiated by residual strain inherent to the hydroxyapatite coating (HAC). Knowledge of the through-thickness residual strain profile in the thermally sprayed hydroxyapatite coating/substrate system is therefore important in the development of a new generation of orthopaedic implants. As the coating microstructure is complex, non-destructive characterization of residual strain, e.g. using neutron diffraction, provides a useful measure of through thickness strain profile without altering the stress field. This first detailed study using a neutron diffraction technique, non-destructively evaluates the through thickness strain measurement in nanostructured hydroxyapatite plasma sprayed coatings on a titanium alloy substrate (as-sprayed, heat treated, and heat treated then soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF)). The influence of crystallographic plane orientation on the residual strain measurement is shown to indicate texturing in the coating. This texturing is expected to influence both the biological and fracture response of HA coatings. Results are discussed in terms of the influence of heat-treatment and SBF on the residual stress profile for these biomedical coatings. The results show that the through thickness residual strain in all three coatings was different for different crystallographic planes but was on average tensile. It is also concluded that the heat-treatment and simulated body fluid exposure had a significant effect on the residual strain profile in the top layers of HAC.

  15. Improving the Standard of Orthopaedic Operation Documentation Using Typed Proforma Operation Notes: A Completed Audit Loop

    PubMed Central

    Ellanti, Prasad; Moriarty, Andrew; McAuley, Nuala; Hogan, Niall

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) published Good Surgical Practice guidelines in 2008 and revised them in 2014. They outline the basic standard that all surgical operation notes should meet. Objectives To retrospectively audit 57 typed orthopaedic operation notes from St. James’s Hospital in Dublin (from August to November 2015) against the RCS Good Surgical Practice guidelines published in 2014. They were then compared with the department’s previous audit of handwritten notes to complete the audit loop. Materials and methods A total of 57 orthopaedic operation notes were audited by a single reviewer. They were prospectively collected between August and November 2015. All notes were typed on the standard St. James’s Hospital operation note proforma. Results Of the surgeries, 89.5% were emergencies with 77.2% of them being performed by trainees. All of the operation notes were typed and signed by trainees. The procedure name, incision and closure details, tourniquet time (when relevant), and postoperative instructions were documented in 100% of the notes. In total, 80.7% had an operative diagnosis included while only 26.9% of the documentation had prosthesis serial numbers. All of the typed notes were deemed to be legible. Conclusion The use of printed operation notes allows for improved legibility when compared to typed notes. Documentation standards remained very high in the same areas as the handwritten notes and a marked improvement was seen in areas that had been poorly documented.

  16. Capturing orthopaedic surgical site infection data and assessing dental recommendations with respect to total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Florschutz, Anthony V; Parsley, Brian S; Shapiro, Irving M

    2015-04-01

    Greater documentation of patient history and clinical course is crucial for identifying factors that can influence surgical outcomes. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have already begun public reporting of hospital data on readmission, complication, and infection rates and will soon launch a website to make physician-specific outcomes data public. The orthopaedic community has the opportunity to lead the way in ensuring that adequate and accurate data is collected to facilitate appropriate comparisons that are based on patients' true risk of complications and the complexity of treatment. Several studies have reported a link between oral pathogens and periprosthetic infection, although it remains unclear whether organisms unique to dental tissues are also present in osteoarthritic joints and tissues affected by periprosthetic joint infection. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Dental Association are aware of these concerns and have created guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis in patients who have undergone total hip or knee arthroplasty and require high-risk dental procedures. Because these guidelines have received considerable criticism, recommendations that are based on scientific and case-controlled clinical studies and provide effective guidance on this important subject are needed.

  17. Quality and Safety in Orthopaedics: Learning and Teaching at the Same Time: AOA Critical Issues.

    PubMed

    Black, Kevin P; Armstrong, April D; Hutzler, Lorraine; Egol, Kenneth A

    2015-11-04

    Increasing attention has been placed on providing higher quality and safer patient care. This requires the development of a new set of competencies to better understand and navigate the system and lead the orthopaedic team. While still trying to learn and develop these competencies, the academic orthopaedist is also expected to model and teach them.The orthopaedic surgeon must understand what is being measured and why, both for purposes of providing better care and to eliminate unnecessary expense in the system. Metrics currently include hospital-acquired conditions, "never events," and thirty-day readmission rates. More will undoubtedly follow.Although commitment and excellence at the individual level are essential, the orthopaedist must think at the systems level to provide the highest value of care. A work culture characterized by respect and trust is essential to improved communication, teamwork, and confidential peer review. An increasing number of resources, both in print and electronic format, are available for us to understand what we can do now to improve quality and safety.Resident education in quality and safety is a fundamental component of the systems-based practice competency, the Next Accreditation System, and the Clinical Learning Environment Review. This needs to be longitudinally integrated into the curriculum and applied parallel to the development of resident knowledge and skill, and will be best learned if resident learning is experiential and taught within a genuine culture of quality and safety.

  18. Evidence-based surgery – evidence from survey and citation analysis in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Malhar; Gopalakrishna, Chethan; Swaminath, Pazhayannur V; Mysore, Sanjay S

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The results of a survey on evidence-based surgery (EBS) among members of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the British Orthopaedic Association (BOA) are presented. The study also analyzes the citations earned by articles with different levels of evidence (LOE) to see if LOE have any bearing on the importance attached to the articles by authors and contributors to the journals. SUBJECTS AND METHODS The questionnaire was e-mailed to 1000 randomly chosen consultant orthopaedic surgeons who were members of either the AAOS or the BOA. Participants were provided with the option of responding through web-based entry. For citation analysis, citation data were gathered from the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American volume) between the years 2003 and 2007 (5-year period). RESULTS The survey showed that awareness and access to EBS have improved greatly over the years. At the present time, these factors are not important barriers to the implementation of EBS in clinical practice in developed countries. There was a statistically significant difference in those with and without additional qualifications with regard to the approach to EBS. However, an equal percentage of surgeons with and without additional qualifications felt that it was difficult to adhere to EBS guidelines in daily clinical practice. Citation analysis showed that readers of professional journals attach importance to LOE category of the article and tend to cite level-I evidence articles more than other articles. PMID:21073824

  19. Complications and 30-day Outcomes Associated With Venous Thromboembolism in the Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgical Population

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Dustin; Sherrod, Brandon; McGwin, Gerald; Ponce, Brent; Gilbert, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The risk of morbidity associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE) after pediatric orthopaedic surgery remains unclear despite increased use of thromboprophylaxis measures. Methods The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, Pediatric database was queried for patients undergoing an orthopaedic surgical procedure between 2012 and 2013. Upper extremity and skin/subcutaneous surgeries were excluded. Associations between VTE and procedure, demographics, comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, and 30-day postoperative outcomes were evaluated. Results Of 14,776 cases, 15 patients (0.10%) experienced postoperative VTE. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurred in 13 patients (0.09%), and pulmonary embolism developed in 2 patients (0.01%). The procedure with the highest VTE rate was surgery for infection (1.2%). Patient factors associated with the development of VTE included hyponatremia (P = 0.003), abnormal partial thromboplastin time (P = 0.046), elevated aspartate transaminase level (P = 0.004), and gastrointestinal (P = 0.011), renal (P = 0.016), and hematologic (P = 0.019) disorders. Nearly half (46.2%) of DVTs occurred postdischarge. Complications associated with VTE included prolonged hospitalization (P = <0.001), pneumonia (P = <0.001), unplanned intubation (P = 0.003), urinary tract infection (P = 0.003), and central line-associated bloodstream infection (P = <0.001). Most of the postoperative complications (66.7%) occurred before VTE diagnosis, and no patients with VTE died. Conclusion In the absence of specified risk factors, thromboprophylaxis may be unnecessary for this population. PMID:26855119

  20. Role of Staphylococcus aureus surface adhesins in orthopaedic device infections: are results model-dependent?

    PubMed

    Darouiche, R O; Landon, G C; Patti, J M; Nguyen, L L; Fernau, R C; McDevitt, D; Greene, C; Foster, T; Klima, M

    1997-01-01

    Bacterial colonisation of prosthetic material can lead to clinical infection or implant failure, or both, often requiring removal of the device. Adherence of Staphylococcus aureus to bioprosthetic materials is mediated by adhesins belonging to the MSCRAMM (microbial surface components recognising adhesive matrix molecules) family of microbial cell surface proteins. The objective of this study was to compare the virulence of a mutant strain of S. aureus Newman that possesses all three fibrinogen-, fibronectin- and collagen-binding MSCRAMMs (MSCRAMM-positive strain) with that of a mutant strain that lacks all three types of MSCRAMMs (MSCRAMM-negative strain) in a rabbit model of orthopaedic device-related infection. After a hole was drilled into the knee joint of each animal, a group of 10 rabbits was inoculated with the MSCRAMM-positive strain and another group of 10 rabbits received the MSCRAMM-negative strain. A stainless steel screw was then placed into the drilled hole. Two weeks later, the rabbits were killed and serum samples, bone tissue and implants were harvested for bacteriological and histopathological evaluation. No significant difference in infection rates was demonstrated between the two groups. The ability to delineate the role of S. aureus surface adhesins in causing orthopaedic device-related infection could be model-dependent.

  1. Local antibiotic therapy strategies in orthopaedic trauma: Practical tips and tricks and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hake, Mark E; Young, Heather; Hak, David J; Stahel, Philip F; Hammerberg, E Mark; Mauffrey, Cyril

    2015-08-01

    The use of local antibiotics for the prevention of infection in the setting of open fractures and as part of the treatment of osteomyelitis is well established. Antibiotics are most commonly incorporated into polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement, which can then be formed into beads, moulded to fit a bone defect or used to coat a guide wire or IM nail. Newer delivery vehicles and techniques are being evaluated to improve upon these methods. Many factors influence how local antibiotics are applied. Treatment strategies are challenging to standardise due to the variability of clinical presentations. The presence of hardware, upper versus lower extremity, healed versus non-healed fracture and quality of soft tissues overlying the affected bone, as well as patients' comorbidities all need to be considered. Despite the accepted use of local antibiotic therapy in orthopaedic trauma, high-quality evidence regarding the use of local antibiotics is lacking. Indications, techniques, dosages, types of antibiotics, elution properties and pharmacokinetics are poorly defined in the clinical setting. The purpose of our manuscript is to review current strategies and provide practical tips for local application of antibiotics in orthopaedic trauma. We focus on delivery vehicles, types of antibiotics, dosage recommendations when mixed with PMMA and indications.

  2. The applications of buckminsterfullerene C60 and derivatives in orthopaedic research

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qihai; Cui, Quanjun; Li, Xudong Joshua; Jin, Li

    2014-01-01

    Buckminsterfullerene C60 and derivatives have been extensively explored in biomedical research due to their unique structure and unparalleled physicochemical properties. C60 is characterized as a “free radical sponge” with an anti-oxidant efficacy several hundred-fold higher than conventional anti-oxidants. Also, the C60 core has a strong electron-attracting ability and numerous functional compounds with widely different properties can be added to this fullerene cage. This review focused on the applications of C60 and derivatives in orthopaedic research, such as the treatment of cartilage degeneration, bone destruction, intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD), vertebral bone marrow disorder, radiculopathy, etc., as well as their toxicity in vitro and in vivo. We suggest that C60 and derivatives, especially the C60 cores coupled with functional groups presenting new biological and pharmacological activities, are advantageous in orthopaedic research and will be promising in clinical performance for musculoskeletal disorders treatment; however, the pharmacokinetics and toxicology of these agents as local/systemic administration need to be carefully determined. PMID:24409811

  3. Physical examination of the foot and ankle by orthopaedic and accident and emergency clinicians.

    PubMed

    Roche, Andy; Hunter, Laura; Pocock, Nick; Brown, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Our aim was to test the knowledge of clinicians in the Orthopaedic clinic and in the Emergency department of the surface anatomical landmarks that should be examined routinely in the assessment of foot and ankle injuries. A survey of 109 clinicians was conducted. Each participant was asked to palpate six important surface landmarks. Two participants failed to identify even a single landmark. Of 109 assessed only 27% correctly identified all six landmarks. The mean number of landmarks correctly identified by each clinician was 4.1 with a standard deviation of 1.5 and range of 0-6. The knowledge of surface anatomy overall by junior Orthopaedic and Emergency clinicians was found to be very poor. Clinicians are becoming more reliant on potentially unnecessary and expensive imaging investigations. They have neglected the basic art of physical examination based on a sound knowledge of human anatomy. At present, the authors believe that the anatomical teaching that should begin in undergraduate medicine is inadequate.

  4. Equipment Operational Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  5. Equipment Management Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Equipment Management Manual (NHB 4200.1) is issued pursuant to Section 203(c)(1) of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958, as amended (42 USC 2473), and sets forth policy, uniform performance standards, and procedural guidance to NASA personnel for the acquisition, management, and use of NASA-owned equipment. This revision is effective upon receipt. This is a controlled manual, issued in loose-leaf form, and revised through page changes. Additional copies for internal use may be obtained through normal distribution.

  6. Novel Bio-functional Magnesium Coating on Porous Ti6Al4V Orthopaedic Implants: In vitro and In vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaokang; Gao, Peng; Wan, Peng; Pei, Yifeng; Shi, Lei; Fan, Bo; Shen, Chao; Xiao, Xin; Yang, Ke; Guo, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys with various porous structures are one of the most important metals used in orthopaedic implants due to favourable properties as replacement for hard tissues. However, surface modification is critical to improve the osteointegration of titanium and its alloys. In this study, a bioactive magnesium coating was successfully fabricated on porous Ti6Al4V by means of arc ion plating, which was proved with fine grain size and high film/substrate adhesion. The surface composition and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy. Furthermore, the in vitro study of cytotoxicity and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells showed that magnesium coated porous Ti6Al4V had suitable degradation and biocompatibility. Moreover, the in vivo studies including fluorescent labelling, micro-computed tomography analysis scan and Van-Gieson staining of histological sections indicated that magnesium coated porous Ti6Al4V could significantly promote bone regeneration in rabbit femoral condylar defects after implantation for 4 and 8 weeks, and has better osteogenesis and osteointegration than the bare porous Ti6Al4V. Therefore, it is expected that this bioactive magnesium coating on porous Ti6Al4V scaffolds with improved osteointegration and osteogenesis functions can be used for orthopedic applications. PMID:28102294

  7. Risk Factors for Deep Venous Thrombosis Following Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery: An Analysis of 56,000 patients

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Paul S.; White-Dzuro, Gabrielle A.; Greenberg, Sarah E.; VanHouten, Jacob P.; Avilucea, Frank R.; Obremskey, William T.; Sethi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are recognized as major causes of morbidity and mortality in orthopaedic trauma patients. Despite the high incidence of these complications following orthopaedic trauma, there is a paucity of literature investigating the clinical risk factors for DVT in this specific population. As our healthcare system increasingly emphasizes quality measures, it is critical for orthopaedic surgeons to understand the clinical factors that increase the risk of DVT following orthopaedic trauma. Objectives: Utilizing the ACS-NSQIP database, we sought to determine the incidence and identify independent risk factors for DVT following orthopaedic trauma. Patients and Methods: Using current procedural terminology (CPT) codes for orthopaedic trauma procedures, we identified a prospective cohort of patients from the 2006 to 2013 ACS-NSQIP database. Using Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests where appropriate, patient demographics, comorbidities, and operative factors were compared between patients who developed a DVT within 30 days of surgery and those who did not. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and identify independent risk factors for DVT. Significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: 56,299 orthopaedic trauma patients were included in the analysis, of which 473 (0.84%) developed a DVT within 30 days. In univariate analysis, twenty-five variables were significantly associated with the development of a DVT, including age (P < 0.0001), BMI (P = 0.037), diabetes (P = 0.01), ASA score (P < 0.0001) and anatomic region injured (P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified several independent risk factors for development of a DVT including use of a ventilator (OR = 43.67, P = 0.039), ascites (OR = 41.61, P = 0.0038), steroid use (OR = 4.00, P < 0.001), and alcohol use (OR = 2.98, P = 0.0370). Compared to patients with upper extremity trauma, those with lower

  8. Engineer Equipment Operator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by engineer equipment operators. Addressed in the seven individual units of the course are the following topics: introduction to Military Occupation Specialty (MOS) 1345…

  9. Engineer Equipment Chief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by engineer equipment chiefs. Addressed in the five individual units of the course are the following topics: construction management (planning, scheduling, and supervision);…

  10. Homemade Innovative Play Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, L. Roger, Comp.

    Sponsored by the Title III Elementary and Secondary Education Act Project "Discovery Outdoor Education", this guide is a collection of inexpensive, innovative, homemade equipment and devices for physical activities. Although designed for the impaired, disabled, and handicapped, these materials are adaptable to and applicable for groups…

  11. Equipment & New Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Adrian W., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Presents information about equipment and new products such as the melting point instrument and TV-microscope coupler which are helpful in college science teaching. Descriptions of each product, how it operates, its prices, and address for ordering are presented. (HM)

  12. Lennox - Student Training Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox Industries, Inc., Marshalltown, IA.

    Presents a series of demonstration units designed by Lennox Industries for the purpose of training students to become familiar with Lennox mechanical equipment. Demonstrators are designed to present technical information in a clear simplified manner thus reducing frustration for the beginning trainee. The following demonstrators are available--(1)…

  13. Basic Engineer Equipment Mechanic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by basic engineer equipment mechanics. Addressed in the four individual units of the course are the following topics: mechanics and their tools (mechanics, hand tools, and power…

  14. Dairy Equipment Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Lake To Lake Dairy Cooperative, Manitowoc, Wisconsin, operates four plants in Wisconsin for processing milk, butter and cheese products from its 1,300 member farms. The large co-op was able to realize substantial savings by using NASA information for improved efficiency in plant maintenance. Under contract to Marshall Space Flight Center, Midwest Research Institute compiled a handbook consolidating information about commercially available lubricants. The handbook details chemical and physical properties, applications, specifications, test procedures and test data for liquid and solid lubricants. Lake To Lake's plant engineer used the handbook to effect savings in maintenance labor and materials costs by reducing the number of lubricants used on certain equipment. Strict U.S. Department of Agriculture and Food and Drug Administration regulations preclude lubrication changes n production equipment, but the co-op's maintenance chief was able to eliminate seven types of lubricants for ancillary equipment, such as compressors and high pressure pumps. Handbook data enabled him to select comparable but les expensive lubricants in the materials consolidation process, and simplified lubrication schedules and procedures. The handbook is in continuing use as a reference source when a new item of equipment is purchased.

  15. STDN ranging equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Final results of the Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) Ranging Equipment program are summarized. Basic design concepts and final design approaches are described. Theoretical analyses which define requirements and support the design approaches are presented. Design verification criteria are delineated and verification test results are specified.

  16. Vocational Education Equipment Standards. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document lists equipment and equipment-like supplies used in classrooms in nine vocational education programs in North Carolina. It was prepared to help local educational agencies assess the adequacy of their vocational education equipment; identify and plan for equipment purchases to meet the minimum requirements; and determine the…

  17. The role of chairman and research director in influencing scholarly productivity and research funding in academic orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Stavrakis, Alexandra I; Patel, Ankur D; Burke, Zachary D C; Loftin, Amanda H; Dworsky, Erik M; Silva, Mauricio; Bernthal, Nicholas M

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what orthopaedic surgery department leadership characteristics are most closely correlated with securing NIH funding and increasing scholarly productivity. Scopus database was used to identify number of publications/h-index for 4,328 faculty, department chairs (DC), and research directors (RD), listed on departmental websites from 138 academic orthopaedic departments in the United States. NIH funding data was obtained for the 2013 fiscal year. While all programs had a DC, only 46% had a RD. Of $54,925,833 in NIH funding allocated to orthopaedic surgery faculty in 2013, 3% of faculty and 31% of departments were funded. 16% of funded institutions had a funded DC whereas 65% had a funded RD. Department productivity and funding were highly correlated to leadership productivity and funding(p< 0.05). Mean funding was $1,700,000 for departments with a NIH-funded RD, $104,000 for departments with an unfunded RD, and $72,000 for departments with no RD. These findings suggest that orthopaedic department academic success is directly associated with scholarly productivity and funding of both DC and RD. The findings further highlight the correlation between a funded RD and a well-funded department. This does not hold for an unfunded RD.

  18. The Impact of Early Infant Jaw-Orthopaedics on Early Speech Production in Toddlers with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohmander, Anette; Lillvik, Malin; Friede, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of study was to investigate the impact of pre-surgical Infant Orthopaedics (IO) on consonant production at 18 months of age in children with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate (UCLP) and to compare the consonant production to that of age-matched children without clefts. The first ten children in a consecutive series of 20 with UCLP…

  19. National Trends in Carpal Tunnel Release and Hand Fracture Procedures Performed During Orthopaedic Residency: An Analysis of ACGME Case Logs

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, Richard M.; Gottschalk, Michael B.; Capo, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Background  Mastery in performing carpal tunnel release (CTR) and hand fracture procedures is an essential component of orthopaedic residency training. Objective  To assess orthopaedic resident case log data for temporal trends in CTR and hand fracture cases and to determine the degree of variability in case volume among residents. Methods  Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education orthopaedic surgery resident case logs were reviewed for graduation years 2007 through 2014. Annual data regarding the mean number of CTR and hand fracture/dislocation procedures were recorded, as well as the median number of procedures reported by the top and bottom 10% of residents (by case volume). Temporal trends were assessed using linear regression modeling. Results  There was no change in the mean number of CTRs performed per resident. Over the 8-year period, the top 10% of residents performed a significantly greater number of CTRs than the bottom 10% (62.1 versus 9.3, P < .001). Similarly, no change was noted in the mean number of total hand fracture/dislocation cases performed, with the top 10% of residents performing significantly more hand fracture cases than the bottom 10% (47.1 versus 9.3, P < .001). Conclusions  Our results indicate no change in CTR and hand fracture caseload for orthopaedic residents. However, as resident experience performing both procedures varies significantly, this variability likely has important educational implications. PMID:26913105

  20. Validity of NBME Parts I and II for the Selection of Residents: The Case of Orthopaedic Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Susan M.

    The predictive validity of scores on the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Part I and Part II examinations for the selection of residents in orthopaedic surgery was investigated. Use of NBME scores has been criticized because of the time lag between taking Part I and entering residency and because Part I content is not directly linked to…

  1. The burden of bone, native joint and soft tissue infections on orthopaedic emergency referrals in a city hospital.

    PubMed

    Howell, A; Parker, S; Tsitskaris, K; Oddy, M J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bone, native joint and soft tissue infections are frequently referred to orthopaedic units although their volume as a proportion of the total emergency workload has not been reported previously. Geographic and socioeconomic variation may influence their presentation. The aim of this study was to quantify the burden of such infections on the orthopaedic department in an inner city hospital, determine patient demographics and associated risk factors, and review our current utilisation of specialist services. Methods All cases involving bone, native joint and soft tissue infections admitted under or referred to the orthopaedic team throughout 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Prosthetic joint infections were excluded. Results Almost 15% of emergency admissions and referrals were associated with bone, native joint or soft tissue infection or suspected infection. The cohort consisted of 169 patients with a mean age of 43 years (range: 1-91 years). The most common diagnosis was cellulitis/other soft tissue infection and the mean length of stay was 13 days. Two-thirds of patients (n=112, 66%) underwent an operation. Fifteen per cent of patients were carrying at least one blood borne virus, eleven per cent were alcohol dependent, fifteen per cent were using or had been using intravenous drugs and nine per cent were homeless or vulnerably housed. Conclusions This study has shown that a significant number of patients are admitted for orthopaedic care as a result of infection. These patients are relatively young, with multiple complex medical and social co-morbidities, and a long length of stay.

  2. Current status on clinical applications of magnesium-based orthopaedic implants: A review from clinical translational perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dewei; Witte, Frank; Lu, Faqiang; Wang, Jiali; Li, Junlei; Qin, Ling

    2017-01-01

    As a new generation of medical metallic material, magnesium (Mg) and its alloys with or without surface coating have attracted a great deal of attention due to its biodegradability and potential for avoiding a removal operation after the implant has fulfilled its function for surgical fixation of injured musculoskeletal tissues. Although a few clinical cases on Mg-based orthopaedic implants were reported more than a century ago, it was not until recently that clinical trials using these implants with improved physicochemical properties were carried out in Germany, China and Korea for bone fracture fixation. The promising results so far suggest a bright future for biodegradable Mg-based orthopaedic implants and would warrant large scale phase II/III studies. Given the increasing interest on this emerging biomaterials and intense effort to improve its properties for various clinical applications, this review covers the evolution, current strategies, and future perspectives in the development of Mg-based orthopaedic implants. We also highlight a few clinical cases performed in China that may be unfamiliar to the general orthopaedic community.

  3. Does a "Level I Evidence" rating imply high quality of reporting in orthopaedic randomised controlled trials?

    PubMed Central

    Poolman, Rudolf W; Struijs, Peter AA; Krips, Rover; Sierevelt, Inger N; Lutz, Kristina H; Bhandari, Mohit

    2006-01-01

    Background The Levels of Evidence Rating System is widely believed to categorize studies by quality, with Level I studies representing the highest quality evidence. We aimed to determine the reporting quality of Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) published in the most frequently cited general orthopaedic journals. Methods Two assessors identified orthopaedic journals that reported a level of evidence rating in their abstracts from January 2003 to December 2004 by searching the instructions for authors of the highest impact general orthopaedic journals. Based upon a priori eligibility criteria, two assessors hand searched all issues of the eligible journal from 2003–2004 for RCTs. The assessors extracted the demographic information and the evidence rating from each included RCT and scored the quality of reporting using the reporting quality assessment tool, which was developed by the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group. Scores were conducted in duplicate, and we reached a consensus for any disagreements. We examined the correlation between the level of evidence rating and the Cochrane reporting quality score. Results We found that only the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery – American Volume (JBJS-A) used a level of evidence rating from 2003 to 2004. We identified 938 publications in the JBJS-A from January 2003 to December 2004. Of these publications, 32 (3.4%) were RCTs that fit the inclusion criteria. The 32 RCTs included a total of 3543 patients, with sample sizes ranging from 17 to 514 patients. Despite being labelled as the highest level of evidence (Level 1 and Level II evidence), these studies had low Cochrane reporting quality scores among individual methodological safeguards. The Cochrane reporting quality scores did not differ significantly between Level I and Level II studies. Correlations varied from 0.0 to 0.2 across the 12 items of the Cochrane reporting quality assessment tool (p > 0.05). Among items closely corresponding to the Levels

  4. Astronomical Equipment for Amateurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobberley, Martin

    Telescopes - refractors and reflectors - are the main items of equipment used by almost every amateur astronomer. The purpose of astronomical telescopes is to collect and focus more light than the human eye can, forming an image that can be viewed, photographed, or analysed. Astronomical Equipment for Amateurs makes buying and using both telescopes and their ancillary instruments easy for astronomers of all abilities. It begins by looking at the advantages and disadvantages of the basic types of refractors, reflectors, mountings and accessories. Observation techniques are also included, along with the use of filters, (colour, anti-pollution and nebula), types of photography (piggy-back, prime focus and eyepiece projection), and also CCD imaging (including types of CCD camera and their advantages and disadvantages compared to photography). Martin Mobberley provides a fascinating insight into astronomical software.

  5. Equipment management in practice.

    PubMed

    Garrett, J A

    1984-01-01

    This article describes the setting up, funding and organization of an in-house equipment management service in the Bristol & Weston Health Authority. Existing resources were redeployed to form the present service. The range of equipment now maintained under the auspices of the Medical Physics Bioengineering Group has a capital value of 12 million pounds. All work is costed and a charge made to the client for whom work is carried out. A team of 27 medical physics technicians and three graduate engineers are maintained from this source of income. This method of funding is now making way for a system of job costing which will provide a basis for comparison with an outside service.

  6. Daptomycin for the treatment of osteomyelitis and orthopaedic device infections: real-world clinical experience from a European registry.

    PubMed

    Malizos, K; Sarma, J; Seaton, R A; Militz, M; Menichetti, F; Riccio, G; Gaudias, J; Trostmann, U; Pathan, R; Hamed, K

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is a serious infection predominantly caused by Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Orthopaedic device-related infections are complex and require a careful combination of surgical intervention and antimicrobial therapy. Daptomycin, a cyclic lipopeptide, effectively penetrates soft tissue and bone and demonstrates rapid concentration-dependent bactericidal activity against Gram-positive pathogens. This retrospective, non-interventional study evaluated clinical outcomes in patients with osteomyelitis or orthopaedic device infections treated with daptomycin from the European Cubicin® Outcomes Registry and Experience (EU-CORE(SM)) study. Patients were treated between January 2006 and April 2012, with follow-up to 2014. Clinical outcomes were assessed as success (cured or improved), failure or non-evaluable. Of 6,075 patients enrolled, 638 (median age, 63.5 years) had primary infections of osteomyelitis or orthopaedic device infections, 224 had non-prosthetic osteomyelitis, 208 had osteomyelitis related to a permanent or temporary prosthetic device, and 206 had orthopaedic device infections. The most commonly isolated pathogen was S. aureus (214 [49.1 %]; 24.8 % were MRSA). Overall, 455 (71.3 %) patients had received previous antibiotic therapy. Patients underwent surgical interventions, including tissue (225 [35.3 %]) and bone (196 [30.7 %]) debridement, as part of their treatment. Clinical success rates were 82.7 % and 81.7 % in S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococcal infections. Adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs assessed as possibly related to daptomycin were observed in 6.7 % and 1.9 % of patients, respectively. Daptomycin was discontinued by 5.5 % of patients due to AEs and 10 (1.6 %) deaths were reported. In conclusion, daptomycin was effective and safe in patients with osteomyelitis or orthopaedic device infections.

  7. The perceptions and attitudes of medical students towards trauma and orthopaedic teaching: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Boutefnouchet, Tarek; Budair, Basil

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to identify how undergraduate students perceive learning opportunities available to them and to determine whether students with an interest in trauma and orthopaedic (T&O) surgery have different perceptions and attitudes towards learning. Methods: All fourth year medical students from the University of Birmingham Medical School (UK) were surveyed regarding their career intentions and their attitudes towards the teaching received in trauma and orthopaedic surgery. The questionnaire was designed to capture student perception of learning environments, core knowledge and career motivations. Results: Of the 157 respondents, 35 (22.3%) expressed an interest in a career in trauma and orthopaedic surgery. Medical students who reported educational value for trauma and orthopaedic surgery revealed that bedside teaching with a consultant was perceived extremely useful by 57.8% (n = 89). A similar ranking was awarded to small group teaching seminars and bedside teaching with a junior doctor or trainee by 54.5% (n = 85) and 51.6% (n = 79) of students, respectively. In contrast, trauma meetings and operating theatre learning environments were perceived to be of low educational value. Seeing patients within the clinical setting and the quality of teaching received were reported as the most motivating factors in career interest towards trauma and orthopaedic surgery, rated 43.9% (n = 69) and 35% (n = 55), respectively. Conclusions: Perceptions of educational benefit derived from each learning environment vary among undergraduate medical students. Overall the most valuable learning environment perceived by the students is formal patient-based teaching. Despite diverging speciality choices students demonstrate similar learning needs. PMID:28176671

  8. Army Equipment Modernization Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    transition , we must continue to provide the Nation with the best equipped, most modernized, and highly capable Army to prevail in any operational...interoperability. • Conducted the Initial Operational Test and Evaluation (IOTE) for WIN-T Inc 2 provid- ing an initial on-the-move capability to BCTs and...the Joint Air to Ground Missile (JAGM) which supports the transition of Army Hellfire missile to a joint missile system and replaces the Marine

  9. Advanced service equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mockovciak, J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Orbiter-based service equipment needs/usage are identified by considering a broad spectrum of on-orbit operational scenarios associated with three primary mission events: initial launch, revisits, and Earth return. Nominal and alternate modes of operation, contingency situations (as remote manipulator system inoperative), and Orbiter close proximity operations are included. Satellite classes considered are direct delivery and servicing of the orbiter, low Earth orbiter/propulsion, sorties and DOD, geosatellites, and planetary and other satellites.

  10. Secure authenticated video equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Doren, N.E.

    1993-07-01

    In the verification technology arena, there is a pressing need for surveillance and monitoring equipment that produces authentic, verifiable records of observed activities. Such a record provides the inspecting party with confidence that observed activities occurred as recorded, without undetected tampering or spoofing having taken place. The secure authenticated video equipment (SAVE) system provides an authenticated series of video images of an observed activity. Being self-contained and portable, it can be installed as a stand-alone surveillance system or used in conjunction with existing monitoring equipment in a non-invasive manner. Security is provided by a tamper-proof camera enclosure containing a private, electronic authentication key. Video data is transferred communication link consisting of a coaxial cable, fiber-optic link or other similar media. A video review station, located remotely from the camera, receives, validates, displays and stores the incoming data. Video data is validated within the review station using a public key, a copy of which is held by authorized panics. This scheme allows the holder of the public key to verify the authenticity of the recorded video data but precludes undetectable modification of the data generated by the tamper-protected private authentication key.

  11. Management of long bone metastases: recommendations from the Italian Orthopaedic Society bone metastasis study group.

    PubMed

    Capanna, Rodolfo; Piccioli, Andrea; Di Martino, Alberto; Daolio, Primo Andrea; Ippolito, Vincenzo; Maccauro, Giulio; Piana, Raimondo; Ruggieri, Pietro; Gasbarrini, Alessandro; Spinelli, Maria Silvia; Campanacci, Domenico Andrea

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to outline the current approach to patients affected by metastasis to the long bones and to present a clinical and surgical algorithm available for clinicians and for future research. A modern approach to patients affected by long bone metastasis in fact requires a multidisciplinary contest where oncologists, radiotherapists, surgeons and physical therapists cooperate with a shared vision, in order to provide the best possible integrated treatments available. The authors of this article constitute the Bone Metastasis Study Group of the Italian Orthopaedic Society (SIOT): a national group of orthopedic tumor surgeons who are dedicated to studying the approach, techniques and outcomes of surgery for metastatic tumours of the musculoskeletal system.

  12. Proton therapy for prostate cancer: why and what orthopaedic surgeons need to know about it.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, J Ollie; Lee, Andrew K

    2015-01-01

    Most orthopaedic surgeons are unfamiliar with proton therapy or the difference between proton radiation and photon (X-ray) radiation. After they perform a total hip replacement or metallic hip implant, their patient cannot have proton therapy for prostate cancer because the protons must pass exclusively through the hips and are blocked by metal. Proton therapy is a sophisticated and expensive technology with growing demand and limited supply. In proton therapy, heavy protons are accelerated to almost the speed of light in a synchrotron (particle accelerator) down a magnetic beam the length of a football field to radiate cancers. Proton therapy is a remarkably safe and effective treatment for prostate cancer, the most common cancer in men, although treatment superiority has yet to be proved in randomized studies. There are currently only 10 proton centers in the United States.

  13. Intimate partner violence and Musculoskeletal injury: bridging the knowledge gap in Orthopaedic fracture clinics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious health issue. There have been widespread research efforts in the area of IPV over the past several decades, primarily focusing on obstetrics, emergency medicine, and primary care settings. Until recently there has been a paucity of research focusing on IPV in surgery, and thus a resultant knowledge gap. Renewed interest in the underlying risk of IPV among women with musculoskeletal injuries has fueled several important studies to determine the nature and scope of this issue in orthopaedic surgery. Our review summarizes the evidence from surgical research in the field of IPV and provides recommendations for developing and evaluating an IPV identification and support program and opportunities for future research. PMID:23316813

  14. Risk factors for infection after orthopaedic spine surgery at a high-volume institution.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Adam M; Dobbertien, Ryan P; Ferranti, Jeffrey M; Brown, Christopher R; Michael, Keith W; Richardson, William J

    2013-01-01

    Surgical site infections are associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and resource utilization. To identify risk factors for infection, the authors reviewed all orthopaedic spine operations at Duke University Medical Center from 2005 to 2010. Of the 3138 patients treated during the study period, 115 developed a surgical site infection (3.7%). Demographics, comorbidities, and perioperative blood glucose levels were analyzed in the infected and uninfected cohorts. History of myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, renal disease, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and diabetes mellitus (DM) were associated with a higher risk of infection. Notably, a diagnosis of DM nearly doubled the risk of infection. Even in patients without DM, perioperative blood glucose levels greater than 140 mg/dL doubled the risk of infection. The authors propose that strict blood glucose control in both DM and non-DM patients may significantly reduce the risk of infection after spinal surgery.

  15. Demand and supply of bone allograft and the role of orthopaedic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ghulam; Bali, Subir L; Abbas, Neelam; Dalton, David J

    2007-08-01

    This study assessed factors responsible for exclusion of patients from bone donation at primary hip arthroplasty in order to improve bone banking. Fifty-five patients underwent screening in preoperative clinics assessing their suitability for femoral head donation. Records at the bone bank were then reviewed post operatively to check whether bone had been harvested from these individuals during surgery. Overall, 95% of the patients screened did not proceed to bone banking. After the initial screening stage 60% of patients were excluded. The majority of exclusions (70%) were unacceptable as donors because of their potential risk of transmission of disease to recipients. Although 40% were consented for donation, femoral heads from only 5% were harvested and sent for storage in the bone bank during hip arthroplasty. Orthopaedic surgeons must take an active part in bone banking and alternative sources of bone grafts require exploration in the future to meet the increasing demand.

  16. Next Generation Orthopaedic Implants by Additive Manufacturing Using Electron Beam Melting

    PubMed Central

    Murr, Lawrence E.; Gaytan, Sara M.; Martinez, Edwin; Medina, Frank; Wicker, Ryan B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents some examples of knee and hip implant components containing porous structures and fabricated in monolithic forms utilizing electron beam melting (EBM). In addition, utilizing stiffness or relative stiffness versus relative density design plots for open-cellular structures (mesh and foam components) of Ti-6Al-4V and Co-29Cr-6Mo alloy fabricated by EBM, it is demonstrated that stiffness-compatible implants can be fabricated for optimal stress shielding for bone regimes as well as bone cell ingrowth. Implications for the fabrication of patient-specific, monolithic, multifunctional orthopaedic implants using EBM are described along with microstructures and mechanical properties characteristic of both Ti-6Al-4V and Co-29Cr-6Mo alloy prototypes, including both solid and open-cellular prototypes manufactured by additive manufacturing (AM) using EBM. PMID:22956957

  17. Proactive patient rounding to increase customer service and satisfaction on an orthopaedic unit.

    PubMed

    Tea, Christine; Ellison, Michael; Feghali, Fadia

    2008-01-01

    Customer service and patient satisfaction have become increasingly important in the healthcare industry. Given limited resources and a myriad of choices, on which facets of patient satisfaction should healthcare providers focus? An analysis of 40,000 observations across 4 hospitals found 1 important intervention: timely staff responsiveness. Using the Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) quality methodology, the goal was set to improve staff responsiveness to orthopaedic patient needs and requests, thus improving patient satisfaction. A model to improve staff responsiveness was systematically developed and implemented. The I Care Rounding model places the emphasis on proactively meeting patient needs through hourly rounding, rather than caregivers providing care in a reactionary mode. After full implementation, positive improvement was demonstrated.

  18. Microbial colonisation of orthopaedic tourniquets: a potential risk for surgical site infection.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S K; Tudu, B; Mall, P K

    2015-02-01

    Pneumatic tourniquets have been used in orthopaedic surgery to get avascular fields. Sixteen such tourniquets were analysed for microbial colonisation. Samples were taken from two inner and two outer areas of each tourniquet and cultured on sheep blood agar. Eight of these were wiped with Savlon and the rest with Sterillium solution. Post-treatment samples from the same sites were again cultured. After incubation, colonies from each site were identified and counted. It was observed that the tourniquets were colonised with coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus, diphtheroids, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, enterococci, enterobacteria, and Candida. On treating with Savlon and Sterillium, there was 92.18% and 95.70% reduction in the colony count, respectively.

  19. Comparison of the thermomechanical characteristics of porcher carbon fabric-based composites for orthopaedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, E. S.; Yudin, V. E.; Kydralieva, K. A.; Elokhovskii, V. Yu.

    2012-07-01

    Prepregs of fiber-reinforced plastics based on a PORCHER-43200 carbon twill-weave fabric and two types of binders — thermoreactive and thermoplastic — were fabricated using electrostatic spraying, followed by rolling the prepregs in temperature-controlled calenders. A solid epoxy olygomer with dicyandiamine as a hardener and Fortron® polyphenylene sulfide were used as the thermoreactive and thermoplastic binders. The thermomechanical properties of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics processed from these prepregs, as well as commercial Sigranex® PREPREGCE8201-200-45 S prepregs as model ones, and composites manufactured from them were investigated for comparison. The latter ones are being used for the design of orthopaedic products. It is shown that the composites based on polyphenylene sulfide are characterized by higher values of flexural strength, flexural and shear moduli, and interlaminar fracture toughness ( G IC), the latter being the most important parameter.

  20. Importance of air quality and related factors in the prevention of infection in orthopaedic implant surgery.

    PubMed

    Gosden, P E; MacGowan, A P; Bannister, G C

    1998-07-01

    Small numbers of organisms can cause orthopaedic implant infections, which give rise to a considerable degree of morbidity and also mortality. The periprosthetic infection rates have been shown to correlate with the number of airborne bacteria within 30 cm of the wound. This is influenced by factors such as the number of operating theatre personnel, their clothing and the type of ventilation system used. Guidance on routine bacteriological monitoring of ultraclean air theatres, based on the Department of Health document Health Technical Memorandum 2025, is discussed. Factors important in minimizing the number of postoperative implant infections such as the use of ultraclean air, ultraviolet radiation, different types of surgical clothing, prophylactic antibiotics and host-related factors are also discussed. The importance of proper scientific investigation into the effectiveness of practical preventative measures in the operating room is emphasized.

  1. The link between texting and motor vehicle collision frequency in the orthopaedic trauma population

    PubMed Central

    Issar, Neil M.; Kadakia, Rishin J.; Tsahakis, James M.; Yoneda, Zachary T.; Sethi, Manish K.; Mir, Hassan R.; Archer, Kristin; Obremskey, William T.; Jahangir, Amir A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Background: This study will evaluate whether or not texting frequency while driving and/or texting frequency in general are associated with an increased risk of incurring a motor vehicle collision (MVC) resulting in orthopaedic trauma injuries. Methods: All patients who presented to the Vanderbilt University Medical Center Orthopaedic Trauma Clinic were administered a questionnaire to determine background information, mean phone use, texting frequency, texting frequency while driving, and whether or not the injury was the result of an MVC in which the patient was driving. Results: 237 questionnaires were collected. 60 were excluded due to incomplete date, leaving 57 questionnaires in the MVC group and 120 from patients with non-MVC injuries. Patients who sent more than 30 texts per week (“heavy texters”) were 2.22 times more likely to be involved in an MVC than those who texted less frequently. 84% of respondents claimed to never text while driving. Dividing the sample into subsets on the basis of age (25 years of age or below considered “young adult,” and above 25 years of age considered “adult”),young, heavy texters were 6.76 times more likely to be involved in an MVC than adult non-heavy texters (p = 0.000). Similarly, young adult, non-heavy texters were 6.65 (p = 0.005) times more likely to be involved in an MVC, and adult, heavy texters were 1.72 (p = 0.186) times more likely to be involved in an MVC. Conclusions: Patients injured in an MVC sent more text messages per week than non-MVC patients. Additionally, controlling for age demonstrated that young age and heavy general texting frequency combined had the highest increase in MVC risk, with the former being the variable of greatest effect. PMID:23416747

  2. Comparative Readability of Shoulder and Elbow Patient Education Materials within Orthopaedic Websites.

    PubMed

    Beutel, Bryan G; Danna, Natalie R; Melamed, Eitan; Capo, John T

    2015-12-01

    There is growing concern that the readability of online orthopaedic patient education materials are too difficult for the general public to fully understand. It is recommended that this information be at the sixth grade reading level or lower. This study compared the readability of shoulder and elbow education articles from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) websites. Seventy-six patient education articles from the AAOS and ASSH concerning shoulder and elbow disorders were evaluated. Each article was assessed for the number of years since its last update, word count, percentage of passive sentences, Flesch Reading Ease score, Flesch-Kincaid grade level, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) grade, and New Dale-Chall grade level. Only one article was at or below the sixth grade reading level. The AAOS and ASSH articles had the following respective scores: a mean Flesch Reading Ease score of 54.3 and 51.8, Flesch-Kincaid grade level of 9.4 and 10.3, SMOG grade of 8.5 and 9.4, and New Dale-Chall grade of 10.4 and 11.0. Articles from the AAOS were longer (p < 0.001), had a lower percentage of passive sentences (p < 0.001), and were more recently updated (p = 0.02) than their ASSH counterparts. Higher percentages of passive sentences were found to correlate with more difficult readability. Patient education materials regarding the shoulder and elbow on the AAOS and ASSH websites have readability scores above the recommended reading level. These may be too challenging for the majority of patients to read and consequently serve as a barrier to proper patient education. Reducing the percentage of passive sentences may serve as a novel target for improving readability.

  3. An audit of consent for allograft use in elective orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Mullan, C J; Pagoti, R; Davison, H; McAlinden, M G

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Patients receiving musculoskeletal allografts may be at risk of postoperative infection. The General Medical Council guidelines on consent highlight the importance of providing patients with the information they want or need on any proposed investigation or treatment, including any potential adverse outcomes. With the increased cost of defending medicolegal claims, it is paramount that adequate, clear informed patient consent be documented. Methods We retrospectively examined the patterns of informed consent for allograft bone use during elective orthopaedic procedures in a large unit with an onsite bone bank. The initial audit included patients operated over the course of 1 year. Following a feedback session, a re-audit was performed to identify improvements in practice. Results The case mix of both studies was very similar. Revision hip arthroplasty surgery constituted the major subgroup requiring allograft (48%), followed by foot and ankle surgery (16.3%) and revision knee arthroplasty surgery (11.4%) .On the initial audit, 17/45 cases (38%) had either adequate preoperative documentation of the outpatient discussion or an appropriately completed consent form on the planned use of allograft. On the re-audit, 44/78 cases (56%) had adequate pre-operative documentation. There was little correlation between how frequently a surgeon used allograft and the adequacy of consent (Correlation coefficient -0.12). Conclusions Although the risk of disease transmission with allograft may be variable, informed consent for allograft should be a routine part of preoperative discussions in elective orthopaedic surgery. Regular audit and feedback sessions may further improve consent documentation, alongside the targeting of high volume/low compliance surgeons.

  4. Microstructure and biomechanical characteristics of bone substitutes for trauma and orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many (artificial) bone substitute materials are currently available for use in orthopaedic trauma surgery. Objective data on their biological and biomechanical characteristics, which determine their clinical application, is mostly lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate structural and in vitro mechanical properties of nine bone substitute cements registered for use in orthopaedic trauma surgery in the Netherlands. Methods Seven calcium phosphate cements (BoneSource®, Calcibon®, ChronOS®, Eurobone®, HydroSet™, Norian SRS®, and Ostim®), one calcium sulphate cement (MIIG® X3), and one bioactive glass cement (Cortoss®) were tested. Structural characteristics were measured by micro-CT scanning. Compression strength and stiffness were determined following unconfined compression tests. Results Each bone substitute had unique characteristics. Mean total porosity ranged from 53% (Ostim®) to 0.5% (Norian SRS®). Mean pore size exceeded 100 μm only in Eurobone® and Cortoss® (162.2 ± 107.1 μm and 148.4 ± 70.6 μm, respectively). However, 230 μm pores were found in Calcibon®, Norian SRS®, HydroSet™, and MIIG® X3. Connectivity density ranged from 27/cm3 for HydroSet™ to 0.03/cm3 for Calcibon®. The ultimate compression strength was highest in Cortoss® (47.32 MPa) and lowest in Ostim® (0.24 MPa). Young's Modulus was highest in Calcibon® (790 MPa) and lowest in Ostim® (6 MPa). Conclusions The bone substitutes tested display a wide range in structural properties and compression strength, indicating that they will be suitable for different clinical indications. The data outlined here will help surgeons to select the most suitable products currently available for specific clinical indications. PMID:21288333

  5. A systematic review of contemporary trials of anticoagulants in orthopaedic thromboprophylaxis: suggestions for a radical reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Chan, Noel C; Siegal, Deborah; Lauw, Mandy N; Ginsberg, Jeffrey S; Eikelboom, John W; Guyatt, Gordon H; Hirsh, Jack

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade, major advances in venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in orthopaedic surgery have included the development of new anticoagulants that are poised to replace low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) and improvements in operative and perioperative care that have likely led to a decline in the rates of symptomatic VTE and mortality independent of anticoagulant use. A systematic review of the literature was performed to identify phase III randomized controlled trials of VTE prevention that compared new anticoagulants (fondaparinux, rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban) with LMWH (enoxaparin) in major elective orthopaedic surgery. Our aims were to obtain best estimates of the rates of patient important events (symptomatic VTE, mortality, and bleeding) in contemporary trials of VTE prevention, and to consider the implications of these contemporary rates for clinical practice and future research. Fourteen studies, which enrolled 40,285 patients, were included in the analyses. The combined median rates (ranges) for all five anticoagulants for symptomatic VTE and mortality to the end of follow-up were 0.99 % (0.15-2.58 %) and 0.26 % (0-0.92 %) respectively, whereas the median rate (range) of clinically important bleeding was 3.44 % (2.25-7.74 %). In contemporary trials of anticoagulants, the rates of symptomatic VTE and mortality are low, but the rates of clinically important post-operative bleeding remain relatively high. Based on these results, we propose that approaches that minimize bleeding without substantially reducing efficacy merit investigation, particularly if improvement in surgical and perioperative care have also resulted in falling baseline patient important VTE rates independent of anticoagulant use.

  6. Myofascial Release as a Treatment for Orthopaedic Conditions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McKenney, Kristin; Elder, Amanda Sinclair; Elder, Craig; Hutchins, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To critically analyze published literature to determine the effectiveness of myofascial release therapy as a treatment for orthopaedic conditions. Data Sources: We searched the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, Cochrane Library, and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), with key words myofascial release, myofascial release therapy, myofascial release treatment, musculoskeletal, and orthopedic. No date limitations were applied to the searches. Study Selection: Articles were selected based upon the use of the term myofascial release in the abstract or key words. Final selection was made by applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria to the full text. Studies were included if they were English-language, peer-reviewed studies on myofascial release for an orthopaedic condition in adult patients. Ten studies were eligible. Data Extraction: Data collected were number of participants, condition being treated, treatment used, control group, outcome measures and results. Studies were analyzed using the PEDro scale and the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine's Levels of Evidence Scale. Data Synthesis: Study scores on the PEDro scale ranged from 6 of 10 to 8 of 10. Based on the Levels of Evidence Scale, the case studies (n = 6) were of lower quality, with a rank of 4. Three of the 4 remaining studies were rated at 2b, and the final study was rated at 1b. Conclusions: The quality of studies was mixed, ranging from higher-quality experimental to lower-quality case studies. Overall, the studies had positive outcomes with myofascial release, but because of the low quality, few conclusions could be drawn. The studies in this review may serve as a good foundation for future randomized controlled trials. PMID:23725488

  7. 12. VIEW OF REMOTELY OPERATED EQUIPMENT. OPERATORS VIEWED THE EQUIPMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF REMOTELY OPERATED EQUIPMENT. OPERATORS VIEWED THE EQUIPMENT THROUGH A WATER-FILLED WINDOW. (10/8/81) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery Facility, Northwest portion of Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  8. Getting Equipped and Staying Equipped, Part 2: Finding the Funds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordahl, Gregory; Orwig, Ann

    1995-01-01

    Suggests how school libraries can fund computer equipment; gain assistance from high-tech businesses; develop business partnerships and foundations; lease equipment; accept equipment donations; fund raise; build money into the budget; and communicate school needs with budget voters. Sidebars include leasing advice; resources for parent-teacher…

  9. Highway Maintenance Equipment Operator. Specialized Equipment. Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perky, Sandra Dutreau; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides instructional materials to assist in training equipment operators in the safe and effective use of highway maintenance equipment. It includes 18 units of instruction covering the large equipment used in maintenance operations. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance objectives,…

  10. How to Use Equipment Therapeutically.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowne, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    Shares therapeutic and economic practices surrounding equipment used in New York's Higher Horizons adventure program of therapy for troubled youth. Encourages educators, therapists, and administrators to explore relationship between equipment selection, program goals, and clients. (NEC)

  11. TELEMETRY EQUIPMENT WITH DIGITAL READING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Basic peculiarities of telemetry equipment with digital reading ; Elements of pulse technology applied in telemetry equipment with digital... reading ; Digital reading systems; Telemetry systems with digital reading . (Author)

  12. Precision Instrument and Equipment Repairers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Ian

    2001-01-01

    Explains the job of precision instrument and equipment repairers, who work on cameras, medical equipment, musical instruments, watches and clocks, and industrial measuring devices. Discusses duties, working conditions, employment and earnings, job outlook, and skills and training. (JOW)

  13. Safety Equipment in the Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Willard A.S.

    1964-01-01

    Findings of two recent surveys on safety equipment in laboratory facilities are presented. The first survey was a pilot study of emergency shower and eye wash equipment. This study was followed by a more comprehensive random survey of safety equipment in 2,820 labs. Among other findings, the surveys indicate that many plants are underequipped, or…

  14. NIH Standard. Animal Care Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Office of Administrative Management.

    The National Institutes of Health standardized animal care equipment is presented in this catalog. Each piece of equipment is illustrated and described in terms of overall dimensions, construction, and general usage. A price list is included to estimate costs in budgeting, planning, and requisitioning animal care equipment. The standards and…

  15. Decision Analysis for Equipment Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cilliers, J. J.

    2005-01-01

    Equipment selection during process design is a critical aspect of chemical engineering and requires engineering judgment and subjective analysis. When educating chemical engineering students in the selection of proprietary equipment during design, the focus is often on the types of equipment available and their operating characteristics. The…

  16. Gentle persuasive approaches: introducing an educational program on an orthopaedic unit for staff caring for patients with dementia and delirium.

    PubMed

    Pizzacalla, Anne; Montemuro, Maureen; Coker, Esther; Martin, Lori Schindel; Gillies, Leslie; Robinson, Karen; Pepper, Heather; Benner, Jeff; Gusciora, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Gentle Persuasive Approaches in Dementia Care (GPA), a curriculum originally designed for long-term care, was introduced into an acute care setting. This person-centered approach to supporting and responding to persons with behaviors associated with dementia was shown to be applicable for staff on an orthopaedic surgery unit where they had reported significant challenges and care burdens when faced with behaviors such as shouting, explosiveness, and resistance to care. Staff confidence in their ability to care for persons with behaviors increased after attending the 1-day GPA workshop, and they reported being highly satisfied with the curriculum, found it to be applicable to their practice, indicated that it was also useful for patients with delirium, and would recommend it to others. Some of the staff on the orthopaedic unit became certified GPA coaches. The passion of those champions, along with demonstrated success of the program on their unit, contributed to its spread to other units, including rehabilitation and acute medicine.

  17. Consensus conference on Chiari: a malformation or an anomaly? Scoliosis and others orthopaedic deformities related to Chiari 1 malformation.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Luca F; Motta, Francesco

    2011-12-01

    In this article, we analysed the orthopaedic malformation in patients affected by Chiari I malformations as well as conservative or surgical treatment. The most common deformity in these patients is scoliosis. Different studies suggest a causal relation between syringomyelia and spinal deformities that differ by the type of deformities: asymptomatic scoliosis is characterized by a higher incidence of a single curve and convexity to the left, while symptomatic scoliosis is characterized by a double thoracolumbar curve. The conservative treatment with brace in these patients is not effective and scoliosis is typically evolutive. The evidence of the international data is that in patients without myelomeningocele or congenital scoliosis, but with Arnold Chiari I malformation and syringomyelia, suboccipital craniectomy gives the best chance for syrinx reduction and scoliosis improvement, particulary in children younger than 10 years and below a Cobb angle of 30°. The orthopaedic treatment in late decompression or in progressive curve is spine arthrodesis.

  18. [Scoliotic young girls and orthopaedics in Belle Epoque: the urban surge of mecanotherapy in Lausanne and Geneva].

    PubMed

    Kaba, Mariama

    2013-01-01

    In Belle Epoque towns marked by the industrial and medical surge, a new technical therapy, called mechanotherapy, emerged, stemming from Swedish medical gymnastics and auxiliary to orthopaedics. Aiming mostly at treating scoliosis, this therapy by movement attracted a sizeable female clientele to these towns, because of the hygienic and social conceptions feeding collective imagination linked to the bodies of scoliotic young girls. Taking the French-speaking Swiss towns of Lausanne and Geneva as examples, the article first seeks to describe the emergence of mechanotherapy as a medical and urban phenomenon. It then addresses the role played by scoliosis in this orthopaedic practice, and examines the clientele attracted to the towns, among which well-born young girls seem to be predominant.

  19. Orbital construction support equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Approximately 200 separate construction steps were defined for the three solar power satellite (SPS) concepts. Detailed construction scenarios were developed which describe the specific tasks to be accomplished, and identify general equipment requirements. The scenarios were used to perform a functional analysis, which resulted in the definition of 100 distinct SPS elements. These elements are the components, parts, subsystems, or assemblies upon which construction activities take place. The major SPS elements for each configuration are shown. For those elements, 300 functional requirements were identified in seven generic processes. Cumulatively, these processes encompass all functions required during SPS construction/assembly. Individually each process is defined such that it includes a specific type of activity. Each SPS element may involve activities relating to any or all of the generic processes. The processes are listed, and examples of the requirements defined for a typical element are given.

  20. Managing design excellence tools during the development of new orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Défossez, Henri J P; Serhan, Hassan

    2013-11-01

    Design excellence (DEX) tools have been widely used for years in some industries for their potential to facilitate new product development. The medical sector, targeted by cost pressures, has therefore started adopting them. Numerous tools are available; however only appropriate deployment during the new product development stages can optimize the overall process. The primary study objectives were to describe generic tools and illustrate their implementation and management during the development of new orthopaedic implants, and compile a reference package. Secondary objectives were to present the DEX tool investment costs and savings, since the method can require significant resources for which companies must carefully plan. The publicly available DEX method "Define Measure Analyze Design Verify Validate" was adopted and implemented during the development of a new spinal implant. Several tools proved most successful at developing the correct product, addressing clinical needs, and increasing market penetration potential, while reducing design iterations and manufacturing validations. Cost analysis and Pugh Matrix coupled with multi generation planning enabled developing a strong rationale to activate the project, set the vision and goals. improved risk management and product map established a robust technical verification-validation program. Design of experiments and process quantification facilitated design for manufacturing of critical features, as early as the concept phase. Biomechanical testing with analysis of variance provided a validation model with a recognized statistical performance baseline. Within those tools, only certain ones required minimum resources (i.e., business case, multi generational plan, project value proposition, Pugh Matrix, critical To quality process validation techniques), while others required significant investments (i.e., voice of customer, product usage map, improved risk management, design of experiments, biomechanical testing

  1. Internet and social media usage of orthopaedic patients: A questionnaire-based survey

    PubMed Central

    Duymus, Tahir Mutlu; Karadeniz, Hilmi; Çaçan, Mehmet Akif; Kömür, Baran; Demirtaş, Abdullah; Zehir, Sinan; Azboy, İbrahim

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate social media usage of orthopaedic patients to search for solutions to their health problems. METHODS The study data were collected using face-to-face questionnaire with randomly selected 1890 patients aged over 18 years who had been admitted to the orthopaedic clinics in different cities and provinces across Turkey. The questionnaire consists of a total of 16 questions pertaining to internet and social media usage and demographics of patients, patients’ choice of institution for treatment, patient complaints on admission, online hospital and physician ratings, communication between the patient and the physician and its effects. RESULTS It was found that 34.2% (n = 647) of the participants consulted with an orthopaedist using the internet and 48.7% (n = 315) of them preferred websites that allow users to ask questions to a physician. Of all question-askers, 48.5% (n = 314) reported having found the answers helpful. Based on the educational level of the participants, there was a highly significant difference between the rates of asking questions to an orthopaedist using the internet (P = 0.001). The rate of question-asking was significantly lower in patients with an elementary education than that in those with secondary, high school and undergraduate education (P = 0.001) The rate of reporting that the answers given was helpful was significantly higher in participants with an undergraduate degree compared to those who were illiterate, those with primary, elementary or high school education (P = 0.001). It was also found that the usage of the internet for health problems was higher among managers-qualified participants than unemployed-housewives, officers, workers-intermediate staff (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION We concluded that patients have been increasingly using the internet and social media to select a specific physician or to seek solution to their health problems in an effective way. Even though the internet and social media offer beneficial effects

  2. Rivaroxaban compared with standard thromboprophylaxis after major orthopaedic surgery: co‐medication interactions

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Sylvia; Holberg, Gerlind; Lassen, Michael R.; Mantovani, Lorenzo G.; Schmidt, André; Turpie, Alexander G. G.

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of the present study was to analyse concomitant drug use and its association with outcome in patients (N = 17 701) receiving rivaroxaban or standard of care (SOC) for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after major orthopaedic surgery in the non‐interventional, phase IV XAMOS (Xarelto® in the prophylaxis of post‐surgical venous thromboembolism after elective major orthopaedic surgery of hip or knee) study. Methods Concomitant drug use was at the discretion of the treating physician. Prespecified co‐medications of interest were cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4/P‐glycoprotein inhibitors/inducers, platelet aggregation inhibitors (PAIs) and nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Crude event incidences were compared between rivaroxaban and SOC groups. Results CYP3A4/P‐glycoprotein inhibitor/inducer use was infrequent, in contrast to PAI (~7%) and NSAID (~52%) use. Rivaroxaban was associated with a lower incidence of overall symptomatic thromboembolic events compared with SOC, regardless of co‐medication use. In both treatment groups, PAI users, with higher age and prevalence of cardiovascular co‐morbidities, had similar higher (>7‐fold) incidences of symptomatic arterial but not venous thromboembolic events compared with non‐users. NSAID use had no influence on thromboembolic events. However, odds ratios (ORs) for major bleeding events (European Medicines Agency definition) were higher in NSAID users compared with non‐users in rivaroxaban [OR = 1.50; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06, 2.13] and SOC (OR = 1.70; CI 1.16, 2.49) groups. In PAI users, ORs for major bleeding events were no different from those of non‐users in both the rivaroxaban (OR = 1.49; CI 0.84, 2.65) and SOC (OR = 1.46; CI 0.82, 2.62) groups. Conclusions Use of NSAIDs in XAMOS was frequent and associated with a higher frequency of bleeding events in patients receiving rivaroxaban or SOC, although the benefit–risk profile of rivaroxaban compared

  3. Impact of academic collaboration and quality of clinical orthopaedic research conducted in low- and middle-income countries

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao-Hua; Liu, Max; Patel, Kushal R.; Turner, Wes; Baltus, Lincoln; Caldwell, Amber M.; Hahn, Jesse C.; Coughlin, Ralph Richard; Morshed, Saam; Miclau, Theodore; Shearer, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the quality of orthopaedic investigations conducted in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Academic collaboration is one model to build research capacity and improve research quality. Our study aimed to determine (1) the quality of clinical orthopaedic research conducted in LMICs, (2) the World Bank Regions and LMICs that publish the highest quality studies, (3) the pattern of collaboration among investigators and (4) whether academic collaboration between LMIC and non-LMIC investigators is associated with studies that have higher levels of evidence. Methods: Orthopaedic studies from 2004 to 2014 conducted in LMICs were extracted from multiple electronic databases. The World Bank Region, level of evidence and author country-affiliation were recorded. Collaboration was defined as a study that included an LMIC with non-LMIC investigator. Results: There were 958 studies that met inclusion criteria of 22,714 searched. Ninety-seven (10.1%) of included studies achieved Level 1 or 2 evidence, but case series (52.3%) were the most common. Collaboration occurred in 14.4% of studies and the vast majority of these (88.4%) were among academic institutions. Collaborative studies were more likely to be Level 1 or 2 (20.3% vs. 8.4%, p < 0.01), prospective (34.8% vs. 22.9% p = 0.04) and controlled (29.7% vs. 14.4%, p < 0.01) compared to non-collaborative studies. Conclusions: Although orthopaedic studies in LMICs rarely reach Level 1 or 2 evidence, studies published through academic collaboration between LMIC and non-LMIC investigators are associated with higher levels of evidence and more prospective, controlled designs. PMID:28134090

  4. A pilot study of orthopaedic resident self-assessment using a milestones’ survey just prior to milestones implementation

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Kendall E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To pilot test if Orthopaedic Surgery residents could self-assess their performance using newly created milestones, as defined by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education.  Methods In June 2012, an email was sent to Program Directors and administrative coordinators of the154 accredited Orthopaedic Surgery Programs, asking them to send their residents a link to an online survey. The survey was adapted from the Orthopaedic Surgery Milestone Project. Completed surveys were aggregated in an anonymous, confidential database. SAS 9.3 was used to perform the analyses. Results Responses from 71 residents were analyzed. First and second year residents indicated through self-assessment that they had substantially achieved Level 1 and Level 2 milestones. Third year residents reported they had substantially achieved 30/41, and fourth year residents, all Level 3 milestones. Fifth year, graduating residents, reported they had substantially achieved 17 Level 4 milestones, and were extremely close on another 15. No milestone was rated at Level 5, the maximum possible.  Earlier in training, Patient Care and Medical Knowledge milestones were rated lower than the milestones reflecting the other four competencies of Practice Based Learning and Improvement, Systems Based Practice, Professionalism, and Interpersonal Communication. The gap was closed by the fourth year. Conclusions Residents were able to successfully self-assess using the 41 Orthopaedic Surgery milestones. Respondents’ rate improved proficiency over time. Graduating residents report they have substantially, or close to substantially, achieved all Level 4 milestones.  Milestone self-assessment may be a useful tool as one component of a program’s overall performance assessment strategy. PMID:26752012

  5. Socioeconomic deprivation and age are barriers to the online collection of patient reported outcome measures in orthopaedic patients

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, PJ; Sng, S; Brooksbank, K; Brooksbank, AJ

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Questionnaires are used commonly to assess functional outcome and satisfaction in surgical patients. Although these have in the past been administered through written forms, there is increasing interest in the use of new technology to improve the efficiency of collection. The aim of this study was to assess the availability of internet access for a group of orthopaedic patients and the acceptability of online survey completion. Methods A total of 497 patients attending orthopaedic outpatient clinics were surveyed to assess access to the internet and their preferred means for completing follow-up questionnaires. Results Overall, 358 patients (72%) reported having internet access. Lack of access was associated with socioeconomic deprivation and older age. Multivariable regression confirmed increased age and greater deprivation to be independently associated with lack of internet access. Out of the total group, 198 (40%) indicated a preference for assessment of outcomes via email and the internet. Conclusions Internet access was not universal among the patients in our orthopaedic clinic. Reliance on internet collection of PROMs may introduce bias by not including results from patients in older age groups and those from the more deprived socioeconomic groups. PMID:26688398

  6. Peripheral orthopaedic surgery down-regulates hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor and impairs remote memory in mouse.

    PubMed

    Fidalgo, A R; Cibelli, M; White, J P M; Nagy, I; Noormohamed, F; Benzonana, L; Maze, M; Ma, D

    2011-09-08

    Peripheral orthopaedic surgery induces a profound inflammatory response. This includes a substantial increase in cytokines and, especially, in the level of interleukin (IL)-1β in the hippocampus, which has been shown to impair hippocampal-dependent memory in mice. We have employed two tests of contextual remote memory to demonstrate that the inflammatory response to surgical insult in mice also results in impairment of remote memory associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC). We have also found that, under the conditions presented in the social interaction test, peripheral orthopaedic surgery does not increase anxiety-like behaviour in our animal model. Although such surgery induces an increase in the level of IL-1β in the hippocampus, it fails to do so in the PFC. Peripheral orthopaedic surgery also results in a reduction in the level of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and this may contribute, in part, to the memory impairment found after such surgery. Our data suggest that a reduction in the level of hippocampal BDNF and an increase in the level of hippocampal IL-1β following surgery may affect the transference of fear memory in the mouse brain.

  7. An analysis of the hip and knee reconstruction section of the orthopaedic in-training examination.

    PubMed

    Cross, Michael B; Osbahr, Daryl C; Nam, Denis; Reinhardt, Keith R; Bostrom, Mathias P G; Dines, Joshua S

    2011-09-09

    This article analyzes the hip and knee reconstruction section of the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE). All of the hip and knee reconstruction questions from 2005 to 2009 were analyzed, and the following data were recorded: number of questions per year in the hip and knee section, total number of questions on the OITE per year, national average score by year in training, references cited, taxonomy classification of each question, topics that were tested, imaging modalities used for a given question, and treatment modalities tested. Eight percent to 9% of the questions on the OITE each year were hip and knee reconstruction-related questions. Performance improved with each year in training, but not by a statistically significant amount. The most commonly tested topics over the past 5 years were anatomy and physiology, ligament and/or gap balancing during total knee arthroplasty (TKA), surgical approaches, properties of polyethylene, periprosthetic fractures about an arthroplasty, and questions dealing with the mechanical properties of implants. In 4 out of 5 years, the majority of questions were classified as Taxonomy 1 (knowledge and recall). The bulk of the questions each year did not require the examinee to interpret a radiograph or make a treatment decision. The most common references cited were from Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American), followed by the Journal of Arthroplasty. This detailed analysis of the hip and knee reconstruction section of the OITE should improve resident performance, and may serve as a study tool for the OITE.

  8. Electromagnetic induction heating of an orthopaedic nickel--titanium shape memory device.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian W; Pfeifer, Ronny; El-Kashef, Tarek; Hurschler, Christof; Herzog, Dirk; Oszwald, Markus; Haasper, Carl; Krettek, Christian; Gösling, Thomas

    2010-12-01

    Shape memory orthopaedic implants made from nickel-titanium (NiTi) might allow the modulation of fracture healing, changing their cross-sectional shape by employing the shape memory effect. We aimed to show the feasibility and safety of contact-free electromagnetic induction heating of NiTi implants in a rat model. A water-cooled generator-oscillator combination was used. Induction characteristics were determined by measuring the temperature increase of a test sample in correlation to generator power and time. In 53 rats, NiTi implants were introduced into the right hind leg. The animals were transferred to the inductor, and the implant was electromagnetically heated to temperatures between 40 and 60°C. Blood samples were drawn before and 4 h after the procedure. IL-1, IL-4, IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-γ were measured. Animals were euthanized at 3 weeks. Histological specimens from the hind leg and liver were retrieved and examined for inflammatory changes, necrosis, and corrosion pits. Cytokine measurements and histological specimens showed no significant differences among the groups. We concluded that electromagnetic induction heating of orthopedic NiTi implants is feasible and safe in a rat model. This is the first step in the development of new orthopedic implants in which stiffness or rigidity can be modified after implantation to optimize bone-healing.

  9. Improving Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) care on a Trauma and Orthopaedics ward.

    PubMed

    Piorkowska, Marta; Al-Raweshidy, Zahra; Yeong, Keefai

    2013-01-01

    Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) blockage rate was audited over a two month period on the Trauma & Orthopaedics ward at our District General Hospital. A 70% (five out of seven) PICC blockage rate was observed. High blockage rates lead to potential treatment complications, delays in delivery of treatment, increase in costs, and reduction in patient satisfaction. The factors contributing to the significant blockage rate include, long and contradictory PICC care guidelines, no information sheets in the patient notes, lack of training and awareness about care of, and flushing of, PICC lines, and lack of accountability for PICC flushing. Our project aimed to achieve a greater rate of PICC patency. We produced one succinct and comprehensive PICC care guideline, carried out staff training sessions, introduced a sticker reminding staff to flush the PICC line after use, and introduced a prescription of weekly heparin saline and PRN saline flushes (for monitoring and accountability). We used questionnaires to assess competency of hospital staff pre-teaching (doctors 6%, nurses 0%), and post-teaching (doctors 70%, nurses 38%). Blockage rate data post-intervention is pending. Education improved awareness of guidelines amongst staff and we anticipate that the proposed interventions will translate into reduced blockage rates, improving patient outcomes and reducing costs.

  10. Engineered Protein Coatings to Improve the Osseointegration of Dental and Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Raphel, Jordan; Karlsson, Johan; Galli, Silvia; Wennerberg, Ann; Lindsay, Christopher; Haugh, Matthew; Pajarinen, Jukka; Goodman, Stuart B.; Jimbo, Ryo; Andersson, Martin; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the design of an engineered, elastin-like protein (ELP) that is chemically modified to enable stable coatings on the surfaces of titanium-based dental and orthopaedic implants by novel photocrosslinking and solution processing steps. The ELP includes an extended RGD sequence to confer bio-signaling and an elastin-like sequence for mechanical stability. ELP thin films were fabricated on cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V surfaces using scalable spin and dip coating processes with photoactive covalent crosslinking through a carbene insertion mechanism. The coatings withstood procedures mimicking dental screw and hip replacement stem implantations, a key metric for clinical translation. They promoted rapid adhesion of MG63 osteoblast-like cells, with over 80% adhesion after 24 hours, compared to 38% adhesion on uncoated Ti6Al4V. MG63 cells produced significantly more mineralization on ELP coatings compared to uncoated Ti6Al4V. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) had an earlier increase in alkaline phosphatase activity, indicating more rapid osteogenic differentiation and mineral deposition on adhesive ELP coatings. Rat tibia and femur in vivo studies demonstrated that cell-adhesive ELP-coated implants increased bone-implant contact area and interfacial strength after one week. These results suggest that ELP coatings withstand surgical implantation and promote rapid osseointegration, enabling earlier implant loading and potentially preventing micromotion that leads to aseptic loosening and premature implant failure. PMID:26790146

  11. Electrophoretic deposition of gentamicin-loaded bioactive glass/chitosan composite coatings for orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Pishbin, Fatemehsadat; Mouriño, Viviana; Flor, Sabrina; Kreppel, Stefan; Salih, Vehid; Ryan, Mary P; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-06-11

    Despite their widespread application, metallic orthopaedic prosthesis failure still occurs because of lack of adequate bone-bonding and the incidence of post-surgery infections. The goal of this research was to develop multifunctional composite chitosan/Bioglass coatings loaded with gentamicin antibiotic as a suitable strategy to improve the surface properties of metallic implants. Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) was applied as a single-step technology to simultaneously deposit the biopolymer, bioactive glass particles, and the antibiotic on stainless steel substrate. The microstructure and composition of the coatings were characterized using SEM/EDX, XRD, FTIR, and TGA/DSC, respectively. The in vitro bioactivity of the coatings was demonstrated by formation of hydroxyapatite after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) in a short period of 2 days. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements indicated the release of 40% of the loaded gentamicin in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) within the first 5 days. The developed composite coating supported attachment and proliferation of MG-63 cells up to 10 days. Moreover, disc diffusion test showed improved bactericidal effect of gentamicin-loaded composite coatings against S. aureus compared to control non-gentamicin-loaded coatings.

  12. In vitro tests of substitute lubricants for wear testing orthopaedic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Scholes, Susan C; Joyce, Thomas J

    2013-06-01

    Bovine serum is the lubricant recommended by several international standards for the wear testing of orthopaedic biomaterials; however, there are issues over its use due to batch variation, degradation, cost and safety. For these reasons, alternative lubricants were investigated. A 50-station Super-CTPOD (circularly translating pin-on-disc) wear test rig was used, which applied multidirectional motion to ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene test pins rubbing against cobalt chromium discs. Thirteen possible alternative lubricants were tested. The use of soy protein as a lubricant gave statistically higher wear, while soya oil, olive oil, Channel Island milk, whole milk, whey, wheatgerm oil, 11 mg/mL egg white, albumin/globulin mix and albumin/globulin/chondroitin sulphate mix all gave statistically lower wear than bovine serum. The lubricants giving the closest wear results to bovine serum were 20 and 40 mg/mL egg white solutions. A light absorbance assay found that these egg white solutions suffered from a high degradation rate that increased with increasing protein content. While egg white solutions offer the best alternative lubricant to bovine serum due to the wear volumes produced, cost-effectiveness and safety of handling, protein degradation will still occur, leading to the need for regular lubricant replacement. Of the lubricants tested in this study, none were found to be superior to bovine serum.

  13. Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chitosan/Collagen Microbeads for Orthopaedic Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Rao, Rameshwar R.; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2013-01-01

    Microencapsulation and delivery of stem cells in biomaterials is a promising approach to repairing damaged tissue in a minimally invasive manner. An appropriate biomaterial niche can protect the embedded cells from the challenging environment in the host tissue, while also directing stem cell differentiation toward the desired lineage. In this study, adult human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were embedded in hydrogel microbeads consisting of chitosan and Type I collagen using an emulsification process. Glyoxal and β-glycerophosphate were used as physical and chemical crosslinkers to initiate co-polymerization of the matrix materials. The average size and size distribution of the microbeads could be varied by controlling the emulsification conditions. Spheroidal microbeads ranging in diameter from 82±19 to 290±78 μm were produced. Viability staining showed that MSC survived the encapsulation process (>90% viability), and spread inside the matrix over a period of 9 days in culture. Induced osteogenic differentiation using medium supplements showed that MSC increased gene expression of osterix and osteocalcin over time in culture, and also deposited calcium mineral. Bone sialoprotein and Type I collagen gene expression were not affected. Delivery of microbeads through standard needles at practically relevant flow rates did not adversely affect cell viability, and microbeads also could be easily molded into prescribed geometries for delivery. Such protein-based microbeads may have utility in orthopaedic tissue regeneration by allowing minimally invasive delivery of progenitor cells in microenvironments that are both protective and instructive. PMID:23571151

  14. Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System (VIMS) in orthopaedic research, education and clinical patient care.

    PubMed

    Chao, Edmund Y S; Armiger, Robert S; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Lim, Jonathan; Haraguchi, Naoki

    2007-03-08

    The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the "Virtual Human" reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System). Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of these unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system, model library and database will impact on orthopaedic education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal joint system reconstruction, trauma management, and rehabilitation.

  15. A Spinal Triage Programme Delivered by Physiotherapists in Collaboration with Orthopaedic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Grona, Stacey Lovo; Janzen, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe the characteristics of participants in a physiotherapist spinal triage programme, compare the profiles of patients for whom surgery was and was not recommended by a surgeon, and determine the surgical yield among those referred to surgeons. Methods: Data were collected retrospectively by reviewing charts of people who used the service over a 3-year period (2003–2006). Data from up to1,096 people were used in the analysis; complete data were available for 299 people. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize demographics, clinical features, and management recommendations. Characteristics of those who were and were not recommended for surgery were examined using Pearson's chi-square or Fisher's Exact tests. Results: The majority of 746 participants were classified as “mechanical spine” (92.5%), 2.9% were “other body part,” 2.5% were “medical/other,” and only 2% were classified as “surgical spine.” Recommendations for surgery (by a surgeon) were independent of patients' age, sex, duration of symptoms, residence (urban/rural), source of health care funding, and diagnosis. The surgical yield was 80%. Conclusions: Most people were not considered candidates for surgery. Triage assessment by physiotherapists can increase the efficiency of an orthopaedic surgeon's caseload by reducing the number of non-surgical referrals and can thus help to ensure more timely access to appropriate health care. PMID:23997390

  16. Virtual interactive musculoskeletal system (VIMS) in orthopaedic research, education and clinical patient care

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Edmund YS; Armiger, Robert S; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Lim, Jonathan; Haraguchi, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the "Virtual Human" reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System). Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of these unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system, model library and database will impact on orthopaedic education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal joint system reconstruction, trauma management, and rehabilitation. PMID:17343764

  17. Strain in UHMWPE for orthopaedic use studied by Raman microprobe spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kyomoto, Masayuki; Miwa, Yasutake; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been the most popular bearing material against both metal and ceramic counter-faces in total hip and knee joint replacements. Therefore, it is desirable to clarify the complex phenomena occurring both in vivo and in vitro, using highly sensitive analytical techniques. However, conventional analytical techniques used so far suffer from destructive measurements, lack of precision and/or intricate techniques. In the present study, the physical and chemical properties of both conventional UHMWPE (PE) and highly cross-linked UHMWPE (CLPE) were investigated by Raman microprobe spectroscopy, which combines the advantages of high precision and non-destructive measurements. It was found that the strain of UHMWPE can be evaluated by a change in the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of a selected Raman band (located at around 1127 cm(-1)), and that these spectroscopic strain coefficients were (0.42 +/- 0.01) x 10(-2) cm(-1)/% elongation and (0.48 +/- 0.01) x 10(-2) cm(-1)/% elongation for PE and CLPE (100 kGy), respectively. The difference in the crystalline nature between PE and CLPE was also confirmed by Raman microprobe spectroscopy. In addition, the Raman microprobe spectroscopy technique enabled us to obtain hyperspectral images of strain and crystallinity on a microscopic scale. Thus, Raman microprobe spectroscopy is a very effective method for analyzing UHMWPE for orthopaedic use.

  18. Improving the quality of procedure-specific operation reports in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Barritt, Andrew W; Clark, Laura; Cohen, Adam MM; Hosangadi-Jayedev, Naveen; Gibb, Paul A

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objectives of this study were to: (i) assess whether handwritten operation reports for hip hemi-arthroplasties adhere to The Royal College of Surgeons of England (RCSE) guidelines on surgical documentation; (ii) improve adherence to these guidelines with procedure-specific computerised operation reports; and (iii) improve the quality of documentation in surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS Thirty-three parameters based on RCSE guidelines were used to score hip hemi-arthroplasty operation reports. The first audit cycle was performed retrospectively to assess 50 handwritten operation reports, and the second cycle prospectively to assess 30 new computerised procedure-specific operation reports produced for hip hemi-arthroplasties. Eighty patients undergoing hip hemi-arthroplasty in a department of orthopaedic surgery within a UK hospital between September 2007 and August 2008 formed the study cohort. RESULTS The main outcome measure was the average scores attained by handwritten versus computerised operation reports. Handwritten reports scored an average of 58.7%, rising significantly (P < 0.01) to 92.8% following the introduction of detailed, computerised proformas for the operation note. Adherence to each RCSE parameter was improved. CONCLUSIONS Computerised proformas reduce variability between different operation reports for the same procedure and increase their content in line with RCSE recommendations. The proformas also constitute a more robust means of operative documentation. PMID:19995491

  19. Topological design and additive manufacturing of porous metals for bone scaffolds and orthopaedic implants: A review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojian; Xu, Shanqing; Zhou, Shiwei; Xu, Wei; Leary, Martin; Choong, Peter; Qian, M; Brandt, Milan; Xie, Yi Min

    2016-03-01

    One of the critical issues in orthopaedic regenerative medicine is the design of bone scaffolds and implants that replicate the biomechanical properties of the host bones. Porous metals have found themselves to be suitable candidates for repairing or replacing the damaged bones since their stiffness and porosity can be adjusted on demands. Another advantage of porous metals lies in their open space for the in-growth of bone tissue, hence accelerating the osseointegration process. The fabrication of porous metals has been extensively explored over decades, however only limited controls over the internal architecture can be achieved by the conventional processes. Recent advances in additive manufacturing have provided unprecedented opportunities for producing complex structures to meet the increasing demands for implants with customized mechanical performance. At the same time, topology optimization techniques have been developed to enable the internal architecture of porous metals to be designed to achieve specified mechanical properties at will. Thus implants designed via the topology optimization approach and produced by additive manufacturing are of great interest. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of topological design and manufacturing processes of various types of porous metals, in particular for titanium alloys, biodegradable metals and shape memory alloys. This review also identifies the limitations of current techniques and addresses the directions for future investigations.

  20. Development of a software package for electronic documentation of orthopaedic x-ray findings.

    PubMed

    Dew, Douglas K; Halpern, Steven J; Micheals, Charles E

    2007-10-11

    Proper documentation of x-ray findings, including anatomical location, joint position, arthritis location with severity, fracture patterns, bone changes,changes from joint arthroplasty, and ICD-9 coding,are a vital aspect of the orthopedic surgeons' daily office task. While radiology software is available for certain templated studies, there is little in the way of orthopaedic electronic documentation other than templated "pick-lists" for common findings. The authors developed a software package with line drawings of a selected anatomical area that are color coded to divide individual bones into proximal interarticular,distal inter-articular, and shaft fractures. Each color coded section of a bone details both fracture patterns and bone changes possible for that area of the bone or joint. When a cursor is moved over each section of the bone, the various fracture patterns and bone changes then appear on the screen. The chosen fracture pattern, along with its associated description, is then electronically recorded coupled with its ICD-9 code including the specific digit when appropriate.

  1. Properties of open-cell porous metals and alloys for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gladius

    2013-10-01

    One shortcoming of metals and alloys used to fabricate various components of orthopaedic systems, such as the femoral stem of a total hip joint replacement and the tibial plate of a total knee joint replacement, is well-recognized. This is that the material modulus of elasticity (E') is substantially larger than that of the contiguous cancellous bone, a consequence of which is stress shielding which, in turn, has been postulated to be implicated in a cascade of events that culminates in the principal life-limiting phenomenon of these systems, namely, aseptic loosening. Thus, over the years, a host of research programs have focused on the synthesis of metallic biomaterials whose E' can be tailored to match that of cancellous bone. The present work is a review of the extant large volume of literature on these materials, which are called open-cell porous metals/alloys (or, sometimes, metal foams or cellular materials). As such, its range is wide, covering myriad aspects such as production methods, characterization studies, in vitro evaluations, and in vivo performance. The review also includes discussion of seven areas for future research, such as parametric studies of the influence of an assortment of process variables (such as the space holder material and the laser power in the space holder method and the laser-engineered net-shaping process, respectively) on various properties (notably, permeability, fatigue strength, and corrosion resistance) of a given porous metal/alloy, innovative methods of determining fatigue strength, and modeling of corrosion behavior.

  2. Orthopaedic Interface Tissue Engineering for the Biological Fixation of Soft Tissue Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Moffat, Kristen L .; Wang, I-Ning Elaine; Rodeo, Scott A.; Lu, Helen H.

    2012-01-01

    Interface tissue engineering is a promising new strategy aimed at the regeneration of tissue interfaces and ultimately enabling the biological fixation of soft tissue grafts utilized in orthopaedic repair and sports medicine. Many ligaments and tendons with direct insertions into subchondral bone exhibit a complex enthesis consisting of several distinct yet continuous regions of soft tissue, noncalcified fibrocartilage, calcified fibrocartilage and bone. Regeneration of this multi-tissue interface will be critical for functional graft integration and improving long term clinical outcome. This review will highlight current knowledge of the structure-function relationship at the interface, the mechanism of interface regeneration, and the strategic biomimicry implemented in stratified scaffold design for interface tissue engineering and multi-tissue regeneration. Potential challenges and future directions in this emerging field will also be discussed. It is anticipated that interface tissue engineering will lead to the design of a new generation of integrative fixation devices for soft tissue repair, and it will be instrumental for the development of integrated musculoskeletal tissue systems with biomimetic complexity and functionality. PMID:19064172

  3. The effect of strain hardening on resistance to electrochemical corrosion of wires for orthopaedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przondziono, J.; Walke, W.; Hadasik, E.; Szymszal, J.

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate electrochemical corrosion resistance of wire with modified surface, made of stainless steel of Cr-Ni-Mo type, widely used in implants for orthopaedics, depending on hardening created in the process of drawing. Tests have been carried out in the environment imitating human osseous tissue. Pitting corrosion was determined on the ground of registered anodic polarisation curves by means of potentiodynamic method with application of electrochemical testing system VoltaLab® PGP 201. Wire corrosion tests were carried out in Tyrode solution on samples that were electrochemically polished as well as electrochemically polished and finally chemically passivated. Initial material for tests was wire rod made of X2CrNiMo17-12-2 steel with diameter of 5.5 mm in supersaturated condition. Wire rod was drawn up to diameter of 1.35 mm. This work shows the course of flow curve of wire made of this grade of steel and mathematical form of yield stress function. The study also presents exemplary curves showing the dependence of polarisation resistance in strain function in the drawing process of electrochemically passivated and electrochemically polished and then chemically passivated wire.

  4. Therapeutic Potential of Endothelial Progenitor Cells in the Field of Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yohei; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Mifune, Yutaka; Fukui, Tomoaki; Patel, Kunj G; Walker, Garth N; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke

    2017-01-01

    Inadequate blood supply frequently impedes the viability of tissue-engineered constructs in the initial phase after implantation, and can lead to improper cell integration or cell death. Vascularization using stem cells has continued to evolve as a potential solution to this problem. In this review, we summarize studies that utilize endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) for musculoskeletal regeneration. This review will also highlight recent concepts for EPC identification in conjunction with the development of EPC biology research. EPCs promote bone regeneration in animal models through a variety of mechanisms. By differentiating toward endothelial cell lineages and osteoblasts, EPCs stimulate vasculogenesis, angiogenesis and osteogenesis. Moreover, EPCs influence supporting cells through the secretion of growth factors and cytokines. Phase I/II clinical trials have applied circulating CD34+ cells/EPCs to nonunion bone fractures and have exhibited promising results including accelerated bone healing. Similar mechanisms of angiogenesis and osteogenesis are proposed for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptured tissue derived CD34+ cells, and thus EPCs have implied a critical role at the site of tendon-bone integration. EPCs are an emerging strategy among other cell-based therapies in the field of orthopaedics for the promotion of musculoskeletal regeneration.

  5. Engineered protein coatings to improve the osseointegration of dental and orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Raphel, Jordan; Karlsson, Johan; Galli, Silvia; Wennerberg, Ann; Lindsay, Christopher; Haugh, Matthew G; Pajarinen, Jukka; Goodman, Stuart B; Jimbo, Ryo; Andersson, Martin; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2016-03-01

    Here we present the design of an engineered, elastin-like protein (ELP) that is chemically modified to enable stable coatings on the surfaces of titanium-based dental and orthopaedic implants by novel photocrosslinking and solution processing steps. The ELP includes an extended RGD sequence to confer bio-signaling and an elastin-like sequence for mechanical stability. ELP thin films were fabricated on cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V surfaces using scalable spin and dip coating processes with photoactive covalent crosslinking through a carbene insertion mechanism. The coatings withstood procedures mimicking dental screw and hip replacement stem implantations, a key metric for clinical translation. They promoted rapid adhesion of MG63 osteoblast-like cells, with over 80% adhesion after 24 h, compared to 38% adhesion on uncoated Ti6Al4V. MG63 cells produced significantly more mineralization on ELP coatings compared to uncoated Ti6Al4V. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) had an earlier increase in alkaline phosphatase activity, indicating more rapid osteogenic differentiation and mineral deposition on adhesive ELP coatings. Rat tibia and femur in vivo studies demonstrated that cell-adhesive ELP-coated implants increased bone-implant contact area and interfacial strength after one week. These results suggest that ELP coatings withstand surgical implantation and promote rapid osseointegration, enabling earlier implant loading and potentially preventing micromotion that leads to aseptic loosening and premature implant failure.

  6. Strengthening mechanisms in Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta and Ti-Mo-Zr-Fe orthopaedic alloys.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rajarshi; Nag, Soumya; Stechschulte, John; Fraser, Hamish L

    2004-08-01

    The microstructural evolution and attendant strengthening mechanisms in two novel orthopaedic alloy systems, Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta and Ti-Mo-Zr-Fe, have been compared and contrasted in this paper. Specifically, the alloy compositions considered are Ti-34Nb-9Zr-8Ta and Ti-13Mo-7Zr-3Fe. In the homogenized condition, both alloys exhibited a microstructure consisting primarily of a beta matrix with grain boundary alpha precipitates and a low-volume fraction of intra-granular alpha precipitates. On ageing the homogenized alloys at 600 degrees C for 4 hr, both alloys exhibited the precipitation of refined scale secondary alpha precipitates homogeneously in the beta matrix. However, while the hardness of the Ti-Mo-Zr-Fe alloy marginally increased, that of the Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta alloy decreased substantially as a result of the ageing treatment. In order to understand this difference in the mechanical properties after ageing, TEM studies have been carried out on both alloys prior to and post the ageing treatment. The results indicate the existence of a metastable B2 ordering in the Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta alloy in the homogenized condition which is destroyed by the ageing treatment, consequently leading to a decrease in the hardness.

  7. [Diagnosis and treatment of foreign-body-associated infection in orthopaedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Frommelt, L

    2009-09-01

    Periprosthetic infection is a foreign-body-associated infection that is characterised by delayed osteomyelitis of bone tissue surrounding artificial joint replacement. Most of these infections result from intraoperative bacterial contamination of the prosthetic device implanted. The period from contamination to clinically apparent infection can last months or even years. In these cases, the initial surgical procedure is often not blamed for the actual infection. Moreover, these infections often produce minimal symptoms that can be mistaken for aseptic loosening of the artificial joint replacement. The bacterial burden of the causative pathogen is low in these cases, a fact that need to be considered in the diagnostic procedures.Knowledge of the pathogenesis allows the orthopaedic surgeon to plan the diagnostic procedures and therapy as well. In this context, the pathogen's ability to form biofilm is of crucial significance and explains why it is necessary to remove the foreign body (prosthesis or other artificial devices, such as material used for osteosynthesis or spinal stabilisation) to control this type of infection. This article gives some basic information for better understanding of foreign-body-associated infection in order to improve diagnostics and therapy in the clinical routine.

  8. Comparison of epidural morphine, hydromorphone and fentanyl for postoperative pain control in children undergoing orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, M

    1999-01-01

    The safety and side-effects profile of epidural administration of a hydrophilic (morphine), highly lipophilic (fentanyl) and a drug with intermediate hydrophilic and lipophilic activity (hydromorphone) were compared in 90 children undergoing orthopaedic procedures. Ninety patients were randomly assigned (30 in each group) to receive epidural morphine, hydromorphone, or fentanyl for postoperative analgesia. Respiratory effects, nausea, somnolence, urinary retention, pruritus and visual pain scales were evaluated and compared during a 30-h period following surgery. In the morphine group, 25% showed respiratory depression with oxygen saturation below 90% but there was no incidence of respiratory depression in the fentanyl or hydromorphone groups. Somnolence was prominent in some of the patients in all the groups, but was more prolonged in the morphine group. Statistically, there was no significant difference in nausea between the groups, but pruritus was more severe and frequent in the morphine group. The incidence of urinary retention in the morphine group was higher compared with the fentanyl and hydromorphone groups. In conclusion, epidural hydromorphone, demonstrating less side-effects, is preferable to morphine and fentanyl for epidural analgesia in children.

  9. Scanning electron microscopical observation of an osteoblast/osteoclast co-culture on micropatterned orthopaedic ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Ker, Andrew; Meek, RM Dominic; Nadeem, Danish; Sjostrom, Terje; Su, Bo; McNamara, Laura E; Dalby, Matthew J; Young, Peter S

    2014-01-01

    In biomaterial engineering, the surface of an implant can influence cell differentiation, adhesion and affinity towards the implant. On contact with an implant, bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stromal cells demonstrate differentiation towards bone forming osteoblasts, which can improve osteointegration. The process of micropatterning has been shown to improve osteointegration in polymers, but there are few reports surrounding ceramics. The purpose of this study was to establish a co-culture of bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stromal cells with osteoclast progenitor cells and to observe the response to micropatterned zirconia toughened alumina ceramics with 30 µm diameter pits. The aim was to establish whether the pits were specifically bioactive towards osteogenesis or were generally bioactive and would also stimulate osteoclastogenesis that could potentially lead to osteolysis. We demonstrate specific bioactivity of micropatterns towards osteogenesis, with more nodule formation and less osteoclastogenesis compared to planar controls. In addition, we found that that macrophage and osteoclast-like cells did not interact with the pits and formed fewer full-size osteoclast-like cells on the pitted surfaces. This may have a role when designing ceramic orthopaedic implants. PMID:25383174

  10. Perspectives on the policy 'black box': a comparative case study of orthopaedics services in England.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Hugh; Millar, Ross; Goodwin, Nick; Powell, Martin

    2014-10-01

    There has been much recent debate on the impact of competition on the English National Health Service (NHS). However, studies have tended to view competition in isolation and are controversial. This study examines the impact of programme theories associated with the health system reforms, which sought to move from a dominant target-led 'central control' programme theory, to one based on 'market forces', on orthopaedics across six case-study local health economies. It draws on a realistic evaluation approach to open up the policy 'black box' across different contexts using a mixed methods approach: analysis of 152 interviews with key informants and analysis of waiting times and admissions. We find that the urban health economies were more successful in reaching the access targets than the rural health economies, although the gap in performance closed over time. Most interviewees were aware of the policies to increase choice and competition, but their role appeared comparatively weak. Local commissioners' ability to influence demand appeared limited with providers' incentives dominating service delivery. Looking forward, it is clear that the role of competition in the NHS has to be considered alongside, rather than in isolation from, other policy mechanisms.

  11. [What's new in orthopaedic surgery: hopes and facts in total hip and spine arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Gillet, P

    2007-01-01

    Progress in implant design and surface properties have improved long-term survival of total hip prosthesis and lowered the incidence of dislocation. New materials, particularly ceramics and metals, decrease the risk for implant loosening because they induce less particle disease than polyethylene debris. These new materials have been submitted to simulator studies before being released for clinical use. They have been used since a sufficient amount of time in clinical practice to consider them as being part of our current armamentarium. They enable the orthopaedic surgeon to tailor the optimal hip prosthesis to each patient's need, depending on his/her bone stock, activity level and life expectancy. Disk prostheses and the general concept of non fusion surgery in spine surgery seems attractive, since intervertebral fusion carries a number of drawbacks, particularly at the level of adjacent segments. However, the documented follow-up of non-fusion spine surgery is at present insufficient to consider a widespread use of these new technologies. Their own possible complications are largely unknown and they do not replace bone fusion in the most clear-cut accepted indications for spine surgery. The use of disk prostheses should therefore be strictly limited according to present knowledge.

  12. Reduced Costs for Staphylococcus aureus Carriers Treated Prophylactically with Mupirocin and Chlorhexidine in Cardiothoracic and Orthopaedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Baak, Diane A.; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.; Vos, Margreet C.

    2012-01-01

    Background A multi centre double-blind randomised-controlled trial (M-RCT), carried out in the Netherlands in 2005–2007, showed that hospitalised patients with S. aureus nasal carriage who were treated prophylactically with mupirocin nasal ointment and chlorhexidine gluconate medicated soap (MUP-CHX), had a significantly lower risk of health-care associated S. aureus infections than patients receiving placebo (3.4% vs. 7.7%, RR 0.42, 95% CI 0.23–0.75). The objective of the present study was to determine whether treatment of patients undergoing elective cardiothoracic or orthopaedic surgery with MUP-CHX (screen-and-treat strategy) affected the costs of patient care. Methods We compared hospital costs of patients undergoing cardiothoracic or orthopaedic surgery (n = 415) in one of the participating centres of the M-RCT. Data from the ‘Planning and Control’ department were used to calculate total hospital costs of the patients. Total costs were calculated including nursing days, costs of surgery, costs for laboratory and radiological tests, functional assessments and other costs. Costs for personnel, materials and overhead were also included. Mean costs in the two treatment arms were compared using the t-test for equality of means (two-tailed). Subgroup analysis was performed for cardiothoracic and orthopaedic patients. Results An investigator-blinded analysis revealed that costs of care in the treatment arm (MUP-CHX, n = 210) were on average €1911 lower per patient than costs of care in the placebo arm (n = 205) (€8602 vs. €10513, p = 0.01). Subgroup analysis showed that MUP-CHX treated cardiothoracic patients cost €2841 less (n = 280, €9628 vs €12469, p = 0.006) and orthopaedic patients €955 less than non-treated patients (n = 135, €6097 vs €7052, p = 0.05). Conclusions In conclusion, in patients undergoing cardiothoracic or orthopaedic surgery, screening for S. aureus nasal carriage and treating carriers

  13. Do orthopaedic shoes improve local dynamic stability of gait? An observational study in patients with chronic foot and ankle injuries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Complex foot and ankle fractures, such as calcaneum fractures or Lisfranc dislocations, are often associated with a poor outcome, especially in terms of gait capacity. Indeed, degenerative changes often lead to chronic pain and chronic functional limitations. Prescription footwear represents an important therapeutic tool during the rehabilitation process. Local Dynamic Stability (LDS) is the ability of locomotor system to maintain continuous walking by accommodating small perturbations that occur naturally during walking. Because it reflects the degree of control over the gait, LDS has been advocated as a relevant indicator for evaluating different conditions and pathologies. The aim of this study was to analyze changes in LDS induced by orthopaedic shoes in patients with persistent foot and ankle injuries. We hypothesised that footwear adaptation might help patients to improve gait control, which could lead to higher LDS: Methods Twenty-five middle-aged inpatients (5 females, 20 males) participated in the study. They were treated for chronic post-traumatic disabilities following ankle and/or foot fractures in a Swiss rehabilitation clinic. During their stay, included inpatients received orthopaedic shoes with custom-made orthoses (insoles). They performed two 30s walking trials with standard shoes and two 30s trials with orthopaedic shoes. A triaxial motion sensor recorded 3D accelerations at the lower back level. LDS was assessed by computing divergence exponents in the acceleration signals (maximal Lyapunov exponents). Pain was evaluated with Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). LDS and pain differences between the trials with standard shoes and the trials with orthopaedic shoes were assessed. Results Orthopaedic shoes significantly improved LDS in the three axes (medio-lateral: 10% relative change, paired t-test p < 0.001; vertical: 9%, p = 0.03; antero-posterior: 7%, p = 0.04). A significant decrease in pain level (VAS score -29%) was observed

  14. Welding equipment for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhanibekov, V. A.; Zagrebel'Nyi, A. A.; Garvish, S. S.; Stesin, V. V.; Sheliagin, V. D.; Iurchenko, N. N.; Markov, A. V.

    A survey is presented of representative Soviet-period equipment for welding, brazing, coating, and cutting operations that are to be conducted in EVA and other microgravity/vacuum conditions by cosmonauts. Power-supply and process information-processing units are essential components of the 'Isparitel', 'Yantar', and hand-held 'Uri' equipment discussed; in addition, these welding equipment designs strove to achieve the greatest possible lightness, compactness, and energy efficiency. Accounts are given of cosmonaut EVA operational experience with the welding equipment presented.

  15. Orbiter electrical equipment utilization baseline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The baseline for utilization of Orbiter electrical equipment in both electrical and Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) thermal analyses is established. It is a composite catalog of Space Shuttle equipment, as defined in the Shuttle Operational Data Book. The major functions and expected usage of each component type are described. Functional descriptions are designed to provide a fundamental understanding of the Orbiter electrical equipment, to insure correlation of equipment usage within nominal analyses, and to aid analysts in the formulation of off-nominal, contingency analyses.

  16. Information technology equipment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  17. Ewing Sarcoma: An Eponym Window to History

    PubMed Central

    Cripe, Timothy P.

    2011-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma was named after James R. Ewing, an eminent American pathologist at Cornell who described the first cases in 1921. Although he is best remembered for this singular achievement, Ewing's contributions to the study of cancer were far more profound and influential. He essentially launched oncology as a discipline with the publication of his seminal textbook and founded the major American cancer societies that exist today. His vision of comprehensive cancer centers still drives our research infrastructure. Since his initial report, these organizations have helped us achieve numerous milestones in understanding and treating patients with Ewing sarcoma. PMID:21151695

  18. VIEW OF ULTRASONIC TESTING EQUIPMENT IN BUILDING 991. THIS EQUIPMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ULTRA-SONIC TESTING EQUIPMENT IN BUILDING 991. THIS EQUIPMENT NON-DESTRUCTIVELY TESTS WEAPONS COMPONENTS FOR FLAWS AND CRACKS. (9/11/85) - Rocky Flats Plant, Final Assembly & Shipping, Eastern portion of plant site, south of Spruce Avenue, east of Tenth Street & north of Central Avenue, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  19. Power Product Equipment Technician: Equipment Systems. Teacher Edition. Student Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilley, Robert

    This packet contains teacher and student editions on the topic of equipment systems, intended for the preparation of power product equipment technicians. This publication contains seven units: (1) principles of power transmission; (2) mechanical drive systems; (3) principles of fluid power; (4) hydraulic and pneumatic drive systems; (5) wheel and…

  20. Available Equipment in School Foodservice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Mary Kay

    This report provides data on the National Food Service Management Institute's multi-year research project that identified type, style, age, and condition of available food service equipment in K-12 schools nationwide. The study found that smaller schools, serving less than 400 lunches per day, had kitchens equipped with ranges, small…

  1. Heavy Equipment Mechanic. Instructor Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laborn J.; And Others

    This manual is intended to assist heavy equipment instructors in teaching the latest concepts and functions of heavy equipment. It includes 7 sections and 27 instructional units. Sections (and units) are: orientation (shop safety and first aid, hand tools and miscellaneous tools, measuring, basic rigging and hoisting), engines (basic engine…

  2. Heavy Equipment Mechanic Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    Designed to train an entry-level mechanic, this heavy equipment mechanic program guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a heavy equipment mechanic program. The general information section contains the following: purpose and objectives; program description,…

  3. Food Service Equipment and Appurtenances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    Equipment design specifications are presented relating to tables of all kinds, counters, sinks and drainboards, bins, shelves, drawers, hoods and similar kitchen appurtenances, not including baking, roasting, toasting, broiling or frying equipment, food preparation machinery such as slicers, choppers, and cutters, mixers and grinders, steam…

  4. Lunar surface mining equipment study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podnieks, Egons R.; Siekmeier, John A.

    Results of a NASA-sponsored assessment of the various proposed lunar surface mining equipment concepts submitted to NASA are presented. The proposed equipment was reviewed and evaluated with due consideration of equipment design criteria, basic mining principles, and the lunar environment. On the basis of this assessment, two pieces of mining equipment were conceptualized for surface mining operations: the ripper-excavator-loader, also capable of operating as a load-haul-dump vehicle, and the haulage vehicle, capable of transporting feedstock from the pit, liquid oxygen containers from the processing plant, and materials during construction. Reliable and durable lunar mining equipment is found to be best developed by the evolution of proven terrestrial technology adapted to the lunar environment.

  5. Information technology equipment cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-20

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools air utilized by the rack of information technology equipment to cool the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat generated by the rack of information technology equipment.

  6. Aeration equipment for small depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluše, Jan; Pochylý, František

    2015-05-01

    Deficit of air in water causes complications with cyanobacteria mainly in the summer months. Cyanobacteria is a bacteria that produces poison called cyanotoxin. When the concentration of cyanobacteria increases, the phenomena "algal bloom" appears, which is very toxic and may kill all the organisms. This article describes new equipment for aeration of water in dams, ponds and reservoirs with small depth. This equipment is mobile and it is able to work without any human factor because its control is provided by a GPS module. The main part of this equipment consists of a floating pump which pumps water from the surface. Another important part of this equipment is an aerator where water and air are blended. Final aeration process runs in the nozzles which provide movement of all this equipment and aeration of the water. Simulations of the flow are solved by multiphase flow with diffusion in open source program called OpenFOAM. Results will be verified by an experiment.

  7. Education and Indigenous Knowledge in Africa: Traditional Bonesetting and Orthopaedic Medicine in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezeanya, Chika A.

    The underlying philosophy of education in contemporary Africa has been established to be alien, and detached from the indigenous knowledge of the people. Modern day formal education in sub-Saharan Africa came about, for the most part, as a result of missionary activities and colonial efforts of Europe. The education bequeathed to Africa was, therefore, fundamentally European in paradigm and lacking in authenticity. The end of colonialism across sub-Saharan Africa did not herald any tangible transformation in the curriculum of study. Education in Africa is still dependent on foreign input for sustainability, thereby stifling research, creativity and innovation. Sustainable development is founded on indigenous knowledge. When such grassroots knowledge assumes the foundation of learning, home-grown development is easily fostered in all sectors of a national economy. In the field of medicine, indigenous knowledge of healing has been considered unscientific by western biomedical practitioners. Since the days of the missionaries, many Africans have considered indigenous medicine to be fetish; the Christian converts would not be associated with its practice and patronage. However, traditional bonesetting has been proven to be highly efficacious with little supernatural content, it continues to attract huge patronage from Africans, cutting across social and religious boundaries. This study attempts an exploration of the disconnect between indigenous knowledge, practices and learning, on the one hand, and formal education in Africa, on the other. With a focus on traditional bonesetting, the study seeks to determine why that branch of indigenous medicine attracts huge patronage, but is granted very little recognition by modern orthopaedic medical education.

  8. Occupational Radiation Exposure from C Arm Fluoroscopy During Common Orthopaedic Surgical Procedures and its Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Sumant; Saran, Atul K; Mahajan, M K; Mam, M K

    2015-01-01

    Background: Image intensifiers have become popular due to the concept of minimally invasive surgeries leading to decreasing invasiveness, decreased operative time, and less morbidity. The drawback, however, is an increased risk of radiation exposure to surgeon, patient and theatre staff. These exposures have been of concern due to their potential ability to produce biological effects. The present study was embarked upon to analyse the amount of radiation received by orthopedic surgeons in India using standard precautionary measures and also to bring awareness about the use of image intensifier safety in everyday practice. Materials and Methods: Twelve right-handed male orthopedic surgeons (4 senior consultants, 5 junior consultants and 3 residents) were included in a three month prospective study for radiation exposure measurement with adequate protection measures in all procedures requiring C Arm fluoroscopy. Each surgeon was provided with 5 Thermo Luminescent Dosimeter (TLD) badges which were tagged at the level of neck, chest, gonads and both wrists. Operative time and exposure time of each procedure was recorded. Exposure dose of each badge at the end of the study was obtained and the results were analysed. Results: Mean radiation exposure to all the parts were well within permissible limits. There was a significantly positive correlation between the exposure time and the exposure dose for the left wrist (r=0.735, p<0.01) and right wrist (r=0.58, p<0.05). The dominant hand had the maximum exposure overall. Conclusion: Orthopaedic surgeons are not classified radiation workers. The mean exposure doses to all parts of the body were well within permissible limits. Nothing conclusive, however, can be said about the stochastic effects (chance effects like cancers). Any amount of radiation taken is bound to pose an additional occupational hazard. It is thus desirable that radiation safety precautions should be taken and exposures regularly monitored with at least one

  9. Readability of Trauma-Related Patient Education Materials From the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Eltorai, Adam E. M.; P. Thomas, Nathan; Yang, Heejae; Daniels, Alan H.; Born, Christopher T.

    2016-01-01

    Context: According to the american medical association (AMA) and the national institutes of health (NIH), the recommended readability of patient education materials should be no greater than a sixth-grade reading level. The online patient education information produced by the american academy of orthopaedic surgeons (AAOS) may be too complicated for some patients to understand. This study evaluated whether the AAOS’s online trauma-related patient education materials meet recommended readability guidelines for medical information. Evidence Acquisition: Ninety-nine articles from the “Broken Bones and Injuries” section of the AAOS-produced patient education website, orthoinfo.org, were analyzed for grade level readability using the Flesch-Kincaid formula, a widely-used and validated tool to evaluate the text reading level. Results for each webpage were compared to the AMA/NIH recommended sixth-grade reading level and the average reading level of U.S. adults (eighth-grade). Results: The mean (SD) grade level readability for all patient education articles was 8.8 (1.1). All but three of the articles had a readability score above the sixth-grade level. The readability of the articles exceeded this level by an average of 2.8 grade levels (95% confidence interval, 2.6 - 3.0; P < 0.0001). Furthermore, the average readability of the articles exceeded the average reading skill level of U.S. adults (eighth grade) by nearly an entire grade level (95% confidence interval, 0.6-1.0; P < 0.0001). Conclusions: The majority of the trauma-related articles from the AAOS patient education website have readability levels that may make comprehension difficult for a substantial portion of the patient population. PMID:27218045

  10. Importance of patient-centred signage and navigation guide in an orthopaedic and plastics clinic.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Talha; Raju, Sneha; In, Eunji

    2016-01-01

    Gulshan & Nanji Orthopaedic and Plastics Center at the North York General Hospital is the second busiest site after the emergency department serving more than 26,000 patients annually. Increase in patient flow, overworked staff, and recent renovations to the hospital have resulted in patients experiencing long wait times, and thusly patient dissatisfaction and stress. Several factors contribute to patient dissatisfaction and stress: i) poor and unfriendly signage; ii) inconsistent utilization of the numbering system; and iii) difficulty navigating to and from the imaging center. A multidisciplinary QI team was assembled to improve the patient experience. We developed a questionnaire to assess patient stress levels at the baseline. Overall, more than half of the patients (54.8%) strongly agreed or agreed to having a stressful waiting experience. Subsequently, based on patient feedback and staff perspectives, we implemented two PDSA cycles. For PDSA 1, we placed a floor graphic (i.e. black tape) to assist patients in navigating from the clinic to the imaging centre and back. For PDSA 2, we involved creating a single 21"×32" patient-friendly sign at the entrance to welcome patients, with clear instructions outlining registration procedures. Surveys were re-administered to assess patient stress levels. A combination of both interventions caused a statistically significant reduction in patient stress levels based on the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U Tests. The present project highlighted the importance of involving stakeholders as well as frontline staff when undertaking quality improvement projects as a way to identify bottlenecks as well as establish sustainable solutions. Additionally, the team recognized the importance of incorporating empirical based solutions and involving experts in the field to optimize results. The present project successfully implemented strategies to improve patient satisfaction and reduce stress in a high flow community clinic. These

  11. The Use of WhatsApp Smartphone Messaging Improves Communication Efficiency within an Orthopaedic Surgery Team

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Andrew; Coughlan, Fionn; McCarthy, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Effective and timely communication is important for any surgical specialty to function. The use of smartphones is prevalent amongst doctors. Numerous smartphone applications offer the potential for fast and cost-effective communication. WhatsApp is a commonly used application that is free, easy to use, and capable of text and multimedia messaging. We report on the use of WhatsApp over a six month period in our unit. Materials and Methods: WhatsApp communication between non-consultant members of an orthopaedic team over a six-month period was analysed. Both the phones and the WhatsApp application were password-protected, and patient details were anonymised. A series of 20 communications using the hospital pager system and the telephone system were also analysed. Results: A total of 5,492 messages were sent during the six-month period and were part of 1,916 separate communication events. The vast majority of messages, 5,090, were related to patient care. A total of 195 multimedia messages were sent and these included images of radiographs and wounds. When using the hospital telephones, the length of time spent on a communication averaged 5.78 minutes and using the hospital pager system averaged 7.45 minutes. Using the WhatsApp messaging system has potentially saved up to 7,664 minutes over the study period. All participants found WhatsApp easy to use and found it to be more efficient than the traditional pager system Conclusion: Compared to the traditional pager systems, the use of WhatsApp is easy, inexpensive, and reliable and can help improve the efficiency of communication within a surgical team.  PMID:28357172

  12. Importance of patient-centred signage and navigation guide in an orthopaedic and plastics clinic

    PubMed Central

    Maqbool, Talha; Raju, Sneha; In, Eunji

    2016-01-01

    Gulshan & Nanji Orthopaedic and Plastics Center at the North York General Hospital is the second busiest site after the emergency department serving more than 26,000 patients annually. Increase in patient flow, overworked staff, and recent renovations to the hospital have resulted in patients experiencing long wait times, and thusly patient dissatisfaction and stress. Several factors contribute to patient dissatisfaction and stress: i) poor and unfriendly signage; ii) inconsistent utilization of the numbering system; and iii) difficulty navigating to and from the imaging center. A multidisciplinary QI team was assembled to improve the patient experience. We developed a questionnaire to assess patient stress levels at the baseline. Overall, more than half of the patients (54.8%) strongly agreed or agreed to having a stressful waiting experience. Subsequently, based on patient feedback and staff perspectives, we implemented two PDSA cycles. For PDSA 1, we placed a floor graphic (i.e. black tape) to assist patients in navigating from the clinic to the imaging centre and back. For PDSA 2, we involved creating a single 21”×32” patient-friendly sign at the entrance to welcome patients, with clear instructions outlining registration procedures. Surveys were re-administered to assess patient stress levels. A combination of both interventions caused a statistically significant reduction in patient stress levels based on the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U Tests. The present project highlighted the importance of involving stakeholders as well as frontline staff when undertaking quality improvement projects as a way to identify bottlenecks as well as establish sustainable solutions. Additionally, the team recognized the importance of incorporating empirical based solutions and involving experts in the field to optimize results. The present project successfully implemented strategies to improve patient satisfaction and reduce stress in a high flow community clinic

  13. [Developing rehabilitation treatment groups for cardiology and orthopaedics -- findings of a research project].

    PubMed

    Ranneberg, J; Neubauer, G

    2005-02-01

    The call for a more specific and transparent service and reimbursement system for medical rehabilitation is not new. However, in practice, the idea was not followed up for a long time. This situation changed with the introduction of German Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs) for acute care settings. It is now strongly being discussed whether such a sophisticated lump sum reimbursement system might also be a viable alternative in the field of rehabilitation. There still exist different opinions over the suitability of a lump sum-system for medical rehabilitation, but the main direction seems to be clear. There is no doubt that medical rehabilitation requires a needs-adapted, differentiated patient classification system. The benefits of such cost-homogeneous groups are evident. They support medical and management services and are suitable for both internal and external use. The main intent of the project presented was to develop such a patient classification system, adapted to the requirements of medical rehabilitation. The project concentrated on orthopaedic and cardiac rehabilitaton. For these two areas, needs-adapted and cost-homogeneous groups (RBG, Rehabilitationsbehandlungsgruppen - Rehabilitation Treatment Groups) were developed in order to adequately represent the underlying service portfolio and to act as a link between acute and post-acute care. In addition, severity level indicators were identified, in order to explain for different needs and resource volumes and in order to create severity-RBGs representing patients with the same severity level. Based on these groups, a needs-adapted lump sum reimbursement system can be developed, allowing for a differentiated service and cost controlling. The project described formed part of the Research Funding Programme Rehabilitation Sciences defrayed by the German Pension Insurance and the Federal Ministry for Education and Research. As part of the Freiburg/Bad Sackingen research network, it was realised at the

  14. Assessing the adequacy of procedure-specific consent forms in orthopaedic surgery against current methods of operative consent

    PubMed Central

    Barritt, Andrew W; Clark, Laura; Teoh, Victoria; Cohen, Adam MM; Gibb, Paul A

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This is an audit of patient understanding following their consent for orthopaedic procedures and uses information on new Orthoconsent forms endorsed by the British Orthopaedic Association as the set standard. The objectives were to: (i) assess whether patients& understanding of knee arthroscopy (KA) and total knee replacement (TKR) at the point of confirming their consent reaches the set standard; and (ii) to ascertain whether issuing procedure-specific Orthoconsent forms to patients can improve this understanding. SUBJECTS AND METHODS This was a prospective audit using questionnaires consisting of 26 (for KA) or 35 (for TKR) questions based on the appropriate Orthoconsent form in a department of orthopaedic surgery within a UK hospital. Participants were 100 patients undergoing KA and 60 patients undergoing TKR between February and July 2008. Participants were identified from sequential operating lists and all had capacity to give consent. During the first audit cycle, consent was discussed with the patient and documented on standard yellow NHS Trust approved generic consent forms. During the second audit cycle, patients were additionally supplied with the appropriate procedure-specific consent form downloaded from which they were required to read at home and sign on the morning of surgery. RESULTS Knee arthroscopy patients consented with only the standard yellow forms scored an average of 56.7%, rising to 80.5% with use of Orthoconsent forms. Similarly, total knee replacement patients& averages rose from 57.6% to 81.6%. CONCLUSIONS Providing patients with an Orthoconsent form significantly improves knowledge of their planned procedure as well as constituting a more robust means of information provision and consent documentation. PMID:20412675

  15. TRANSPORT AND EMPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    1997-09-29

    The objective and the scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major mobile equipment necessary for waste package (WP) Transport and Emplacement in the proposed subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. The Transport and Emplacement equipment described in this document consists of the following: (1) WP Transporter; (2) Reusable Rail Car; (3) Emplacement Gantry; (4) Gantry Carrier; and (5) Transport Locomotive.

  16. [The posibility of usage microwave energy as an alternative method of disinfection for silicone impressions in orthopaedic dentistry].

    PubMed

    Nespriad'ko, V P; Shevchuk, V O; Omel'ianenko, M D

    2011-01-01

    In this experimental investigation estimated the effect of microwave disinfection on the alteration of dimensional stability of silicone impressions and gypsum casts poured from them comparing to an invariable parameters of metal die. In this article uncovers the main point of origin, spreading and influence according to the classical theory of electro-magnetic waves (EMW) as an example was used the model M745R Samsung microwave oven. We evaluated possibilities and advantages of use the auxiliary plant for flowing regulation of the power of microwave radiation that calls "microUndaDent". It was designed, developed and installated by us in the department of orthopaedic dentistry.

  17. Heavy Equipment Mechanic Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the heavy equipment mechanic program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning);…

  18. Water-Using Equipment: Domestic

    SciTech Connect

    Solana, Amy E.; Mcmordie, Katherine

    2006-01-24

    Water management is an important aspect of energy engineering. This article addresses water-using equipment primarily used for household purposes, including faucets, showers, toilets, urinals, dishwashers, and clothes washers, and focuses on how the equipment can be optimized to save both water and energy. Technology retrofits and operation and maintenance changes are the primary methods discussed for water and energy conservation. Auditing to determine current consumption rates is also described for each technology.

  19. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  20. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  1. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  2. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  3. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  4. Equipment Efficiency for Healthy School Meals. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Food Service Management Inst., University, MS.

    A satellite seminar on large-scale food production equipment discusses ways child nutrition personnel can maximize use of existing equipment, considers research related to use of existing equipment, explains plan reviews for equipment selection and purchase, and explores new equipment options. Examples illustrate use of planning or modernizing…

  5. 1968 Listing of Swimming Pool Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI. Testing Lab.

    An up-to-date listing of swimming pool equipment including--(1) companies authorized to display the National Sanitation Foundation seal of approval, (2) equipment listed as meeting NSF swimming pool equipment standards relating to diatomite type filters, (3) equipment listed as meeting NSF swimming pool equipment standard relating to sand type…

  6. Postoutbreak disinfection of mobile equipment.

    PubMed

    Alphin, R L; Ciaverelli, C D; Hougentogler, D P; Johnson, K J; Rankin, M K; Benson, E R

    2010-03-01

    Current control strategies for avian influenza virus, exotic Newcastle disease, and other highly contagious poultry diseases include surveillance, quarantine, depopulation, disposal, and decontamination. Skid steer loaders and other mobile equipment are extensively used during depopulation and disposal. Movement of contaminated equipment has been implicated in the spread of disease in previous outbreaks. One approach to equipment decontamination is to power wash the equipment, treat with a liquid disinfectant, change any removable filters, and let it sit idle for several days. In this project, multiple disinfectant strategies were individually evaluated for their effectiveness at inactivating Newcastle disease virus (NDV) on mechanical equipment seeded with the virus. A small gasoline engine was used to simulate typical mechanical equipment. A high titer of LaSota strain, NDV was applied and dried onto a series of metal coupons. The coupons were then placed on both interior and exterior surfaces of the engine. Liquid disinfectants that had been effective in the laboratory were not as effective at disinfecting the engine under field conditions. Indirect thermal fog showed a decrease in overall virus titer or strength. Direct thermal fog was more effective than liquid spray application or indirect thermal fog application.

  7. Computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery and robotic surgery in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Various systems of computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) in total hip arthroplasty (THA) were reviewed. The first clinically applied system was an active robotic system (ROBODOC), which performed femoral implant cavity preparation as programmed preoperatively. Several reports on cementless THA with ROBODOC showed better stem alignment and less variance in limb-length inequality on radiographic evaluation, less incidence of pulmonary embolic events on transesophageal cardioechogram, and less stress shielding on the dual energy X-ray absorptiometry analysis than conventional manual methods. On the other hand, some studies raise issues with active systems, including a steep learning curve, muscle and nerve damage, and technical complications, such as a procedure stop due to a bone motion during cutting, requiring re-registration and registration failure. Semi-active robotic systems, such as Acrobot and Rio, were developed for ease of surgeon acceptance. The drill bit at the tip of the robotic arm is moved by a surgeon's hand, but it does not move outside of a milling path boundary, which is defined according to three-dimensional (3D) image-based preoperative planning. However, there are still few reports on THA with these semi-active systems. Thanks to the advancements in 3D sensor technology, navigation systems were developed. Navigation is a passive system, which does not perform any actions on patients. It only provides information and guidance to the surgeon who still uses conventional tools to perform the surgery. There are three types of navigation: computed tomography (CT)-based navigation, imageless navigation, and fluoro-navigation. CT-based navigation is the most accurate, but the preoperative planning on CT images takes time that increases cost and radiation exposure. Imageless navigation does not use CT images, but its accuracy depends on the technique of landmark pointing, and it does not take into account the individual uniqueness of the anatomy

  8. Surface texture and micromechanics of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) orthopaedic implant bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Monica A.

    2001-07-01

    Tibial bearings of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) were characterized to identify differences in morphology, surface texture (roughness and skewness), and micro-scale mechanical behavior. These orthopaedic implant components were fabricated by direct molding or by machining after isostatic compression molding. Sterilization was by gamma irradiation (3.3 Mrad) in air, followed by shelf aging for 2 years. Comparisons were made between unsterile and sterile bearings to identify differences in structure and properties related to wear debris. Characterization methods included confocal optical microscopy, nanoindentation, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and polarized light microscopy. Morphology was compared between bulk and surface (top and bottom) specimens of the bearings. Cryo-microtomy was used to prepare thin specimens transverse to the top surface for polarized microscopy. Nanoindentation was performed on the top bearing surfaces, near areas examined by confocal microscopy. Processing methods affected both small- and large-scale morphology of UHMWPE. Direct molding produced thinner lamellae, thicker long periods, and slightly lower crystallinity than isostatic compression molding. Both bearing types contained a thick interface between the crystalline and amorphous phases. Interfacial free energy varied with interface thickness. Resin particles were consolidated better in direct molded bearings than in machined bearings. Segregated amorphous regions were observed in the machined bearings. Sterilization and shelf aging affected nanometer-scale morphology. Chain scission significantly decreased the interface thickness, causing an increase in lamellar thickness and a small increase in crystallinity. Only a small decrease in the amorphous thickness resulted. Heterogeneous oxidation increased these changes in interface

  9. Antimicrobial coated implants in trauma and orthopaedics-A clinical review and risk-benefit analysis.

    PubMed

    Alt, Volker

    2016-12-21

    Implant-associated infections remain a major issue in orthopaedics and antimicrobial functionalization of the implant surface by antibiotics or other anti-infective agents have gained interest. The goal of this article is to identify antimicrobial coatings, for which clinical data are available and to review their clinical need, safety profile, and their efficacy to reduce infection rates. PubMed database of the National Library of Medicine was searched for clinical studies on antimicrobial coated implants for internal fracture fixation devices and endoprostheses for bone surgery, for which study design, level of evidence, biocompatibility, development of resistance, and effectiveness to reduce infection rates were analyzed. Four different coating technologies were identified: gentamicin poly(d, l-lactide) coating for tibia nails, one high (MUTARS(®)) and one low amount silver (Agluna) technology for tumor endoprostheses, and one povidone-iodine coating for titanium implants. There was a total of 9 published studies with 435 patients, of which 7 studies were case series (level IV evidence) and 2 studies were case control studies (level III evidence). All technologies were reported with good systemic and local biocompatibility, except the development of local argyria with blue to bluish grey skin discoloration after the use of silver MUTARS(®) megaendoprostheses. For the local use of gentamicin, there is contradictory data on the risk of emergence of gentamicin-resistance strains, a risk that does not seem to exist for silver and iodine based technologies. Regarding reduction of infection rates, one case control study showed a significant reduction of infection rates by Agluna silver coated tumor endoprostheses. Based on socio-economic data, there is a strong need for improvement of infection prevention and treatment strategies, including implant coatings, in fracture care, primary and revision arthroplasty, and bone tumor surgery. The reviewed gentamicin, silver

  10. Welded-woven fabrics for use as synthetic, minimally invasive orthopaedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodts, Timothy W.

    The treatment of osteoarthritis in healthcare today focuses on minimizing pain and retaining mobility. Osteoarthritis of the knee is a common disease and known to be associated with traumatic injuries, among other factors. An identified trend is that patients are younger and have expectations of life with the preservation of an active lifestyle. As a result, great strain is placed on the available offerings of healthcare professionals and device manufacturers alike. This results in numerous design challenges for managing pain and disease over an extended period of time. The available treatments are being extended into younger populations, which increasingly suffer traumatic knee injuries. However, these patients are not good candidates for total joint replacement. A common problem for young patients is localized cartilage damage. This can heal, but often results in a painful condition that requires intervention. A welded-woven three-dimensional polymer fabric was developed to mimic the properties of articular cartilage. A process for the laser welding reinforcement of the surface layers of three-dimensional fabrics was investigated. Confined compression creep and pin-on-disc wear studies were conducted to characterize the contribution of the surface welding reinforcement. All materials used in the studies have previously been used in orthopaedic devices or meet the requirements for United States Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) Class VI biocompatibility approval. The compressive behavior of three-dimensional fabrics was tailored by the inclusion of surface welds. The compressive properties of the welded-woven fabrics were shown to better approximate articular cartilage compressive properties than conventional woven materials. The wear performance was benchmarked against identical fabrics without welding reinforcement. The wear rates were significantly reduced and the lifespan of the fabrics was markedly improved due to surface welding. Welding reinforcement offers a

  11. 2011 SOSORT guidelines: Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation treatment of idiopathic scoliosis during growth

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The International Scientific Society on Scoliosis Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORT), that produced its first Guidelines in 2005, felt the need to revise them and increase their scientific quality. The aim is to offer to all professionals and their patients an evidence-based updated review of the actual evidence on conservative treatment of idiopathic scoliosis (CTIS). Methods All types of professionals (specialty physicians, and allied health professionals) engaged in CTIS have been involved together with a methodologist and a patient representative. A review of all the relevant literature and of the existing Guidelines have been performed. Documents, recommendations, and practical approach flow charts have been developed according to a Delphi procedure. A methodological and practical review has been made, and a final Consensus Session was held during the 2011 Barcelona SOSORT Meeting. Results The contents of the document are: methodology; generalities on idiopathic scoliosis; approach to CTIS in different patients, with practical flow-charts; literature review and recommendations on assessment, bracing, physiotherapy, Physiotherapeutic Specific Exercises (PSE) and other CTIS. Sixty-five recommendations have been given, divided in the following topics: Bracing (20 recommendations), PSE to prevent scoliosis progression during growth (8), PSE during brace treatment and surgical therapy (5), Other conservative treatments (3), Respiratory function and exercises (3), Sports activities (6), Assessment (20). No recommendations reached a Strength of Evidence level I; 2 were level II; 7 level III; and 20 level IV; through the Consensus procedure 26 reached level V and 10 level VI. The Strength of Recommendations was Grade A for 13, B for 49 and C for 3; none had grade D. Conclusion These Guidelines have been a big effort of SOSORT to paint the actual situation of CTIS, starting from the evidence, and filling all the gray areas using a scientific

  12. Fabrication of poly(propylene fumarate)-based orthopaedic implants by photo-crosslinking through transparent silicone molds.

    PubMed

    Timmer, Mark D; Carter, Cory; Ambrose, Catherine G; Mikos, Antonios G

    2003-11-01

    This work presents a new molding process for photo-crosslinked, degradable polymeric networks of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) and the crosslinking agent poly(propylene fumarate)-diacrylate (PPF-DA). Transparent room temperature vulcanizing silicone molds were fabricated for parts ranging from simple test coupons to orthopaedic implants. The PPF/PPF-DA resin blend was injected into the cavity and photo-crosslinked as light was transmitted through the mold wall. The volumetric shrinkage, mechanical properties, and the effects of gamma sterilization were reported for molded PPF/PPF-DA networks prepared with varying compositions of the two polymer components. The shrinkage decreased while the mechanical properties displayed a general increasing trend when more of the crosslinking agent was incorporated into the network. Gamma irradiation resulted in an improvement of the mechanical properties. In addition, PPF/PPF-DA replicates of a 70:30 poly(L/DL-lactide) biodegradable fixation plate and a bone allograft interbody fusion spacer were produced to evaluate the performance of PPF/PPF-DA as an orthopaedic implant and allow for a comparison to be made with materials that have been established for clinical use.

  13. Single-step electrochemical deposition of antimicrobial orthopaedic coatings based on a bioactive glass/chitosan/nano-silver composite system.

    PubMed

    Pishbin, F; Mouriño, V; Gilchrist, J B; McComb, D W; Kreppel, S; Salih, V; Ryan, M P; Boccaccini, A R

    2013-07-01

    Composite orthopaedic coatings with antibacterial capability containing chitosan, Bioglass® particles (9.8μm) and silver nanoparticles (Ag-np) were fabricated using a single-step electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique, and their structural and preliminary in vitro bactericidal and cellular properties were investigated. Stainless steel 316 was used as a standard metallic orthopaedic substrate. The coatings were compared with EPD coatings of chitosan and chitosan/Bioglass®. The ability of chitosan as both a complexing and stabilizing agent was utilized to form uniformly deposited Ag-np. Due to the presence of Bioglass® particles, the coatings were bioactive in terms of forming carbonated hydroxyapatite in simulated body fluid (SBF). Less than 7wt.% of the incorporated silver was released over the course of 28days in SBF and the possibility of manipulating the release rate by varying the deposition order of coating layers was shown. The low released concentration of Ag ions (<2.5ppm) was efficiently antibacterial against Staphyloccocus aureus up to 10days. Although chitosan and chitosan/Bioglass® coating supported proliferation of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells up to 7days of culture, chitosan/Bioglass®/Ag-np coatings containing 342 μg of Ag-np showed cytotoxic effects. This was attributed to the relatively high concentration of Ag-np incorporated in the coatings.

  14. Multi-Disciplinary Antimicrobial Strategies for Improving Orthopaedic Implants to Prevent Prosthetic Joint Infections in Hip and Knee

    PubMed Central

    Getzlaf, Matthew A.; Lewallen, Eric A.; Kremers, Hilal M.; Jones, Dakota L.; Bonin, Carolina A.; Dudakovic, Amel; Thaler, Roman; Cohen, Robert C.; Lewallen, David G.; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2016-01-01

    Like any foreign object, orthopaedic implants are susceptible to infection when introduced into the human body. Without additional preventative measures, the absolute number of annual prosthetic joint infections will continue to rise, and may exceed the capacity of health care systems in the near future. Bacteria are difficult to eradicate from synovial joints due to their exceptionally diverse taxonomy, complex mechanistic attachment capabilities, and tendency to evolve antibiotic resistance. When a primary orthopaedic implant fails from prosthetic joint infection, surgeons are generally challenged by limited options for intervention. In this review, we highlight the etiology and taxonomic groupings of bacteria known to cause prosthetic joint infections, and examine their key mechanisms of attachment. We propose that antimicrobial strategies should focus on the most harmful bacteria taxa within the context of occurrence, taxonomic diversity, adhesion mechanisms, and implant design. Patient-specific identification of organisms that cause prosthetic joint infections will permit assessment of their biological vulnerabilities. The latter can be targeted using a range of antimicrobial techniques that exploit different colonization mechanisms including implant surface attachment, biofilm formation, and/or hematogenous recruitment. We anticipate that customized strategies for each patient, joint, and prosthetic component will be most effective at reducing prosthetic joint infections, including those caused by antibiotic-resistant and polymicrobial bacteria. PMID:26449208

  15. Effect of the systemic inflammatory response, as provoked by elective orthopaedic surgery, on HbA1c.

    PubMed

    Chadburn, Andrew J; Garman, Elizabeth; Abbas, Raad; Modupe, Anu; Ford, Clare; Thomas, Osmond L; Chugh, Sanjiv; Deshpande, Shreeram; Gama, Rousseau

    2017-01-01

    Background In acutely ill patients with new onset hyperglycaemia, plasma glucose cannot reliably distinguish between stress hyperglycaemia and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. We, therefore, investigated the diagnostic reliability of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in acute illness by prospectively evaluating the effect of the systemic inflammatory response, as provoked by elective orthopaedic surgery, on HbA1c. Methods HbA1c and serum C-reactive protein concentrations were compared before and two days after elective knee or hip surgery in 30 patients without diabetes. C-reactive protein was used to assess the systemic inflammatory response. Results The mean (standard deviation) serum C-reactive protein increased following surgery (4.8 [7.5] vs. 179.7 [61.9] mg/L; P<0.0001). HbA1c was similar before and after surgery (39.2 [5.4] vs. 38.1 [5.1] mmol/moL, respectively; P = 0.4363). Conclusions HbA1c is unaffected within two days of a systemic inflammatory response as provoked by elective orthopaedic surgery. This suggests that HbA1c may be able to differentiate newly presenting type 2 diabetes mellitus from stress hyperglycaemia in acutely ill patients with new onset hyperglycaemia.

  16. Titanium coated with functionalized carbon nanotubes--a promising novel material for biomedical application as an implantable orthopaedic electronic device.

    PubMed

    Przekora, Agata; Benko, Aleksandra; Nocun, Marek; Wyrwa, Jan; Blazewicz, Marta; Ginalska, Grazyna

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to fabricate titanium (Ti) material coated with functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs) that would have potential medical application in orthopaedics as an implantable electronic device. The novel biomedical material (Ti-CNTs-H2O) would possess specific set of properties, such as: electrical conductivity, non-toxicity, and ability to inhibit connective tissue cell growth and proliferation protecting the Ti-CNTs-H2O surface against covering by cells. The novel material was obtained via an electrophoretic deposition of CNTs-H2O on the Ti surface. Then, physicochemical, electrical, and biological properties were evaluated. Electrical property evaluation revealed that a Ti-CNTs-H2O material is highly conductive and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that there are mainly COOH groups on the Ti-CNTs-H2O surface that are found to inhibit cell growth. Biological properties were assessed using normal human foetal osteoblast cell line (hFOB 1.19). Conducted cytotoxicity tests and live/dead fluorescent staining demonstrated that Ti-CNTs-H2O does not exert toxic effect on hFOB cells. Moreover, fluorescence laser scanning microscope observation demonstrated that Ti-CNTs-H2O surface retards to a great extent cell proliferation. The study resulted in successful fabrication of highly conductive, non-toxic Ti-CNTs-H2O material that possesses ability to inhibit osteoblast proliferation and thus has a great potential as an orthopaedic implantable electronic device.

  17. Multi-disciplinary antimicrobial strategies for improving orthopaedic implants to prevent prosthetic joint infections in hip and knee.

    PubMed

    Getzlaf, Matthew A; Lewallen, Eric A; Kremers, Hilal M; Jones, Dakota L; Bonin, Carolina A; Dudakovic, Amel; Thaler, Roman; Cohen, Robert C; Lewallen, David G; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2016-02-01

    Like any foreign object, orthopaedic implants are susceptible to infection when introduced into the human body. Without additional preventative measures, the absolute number of annual prosthetic joint infections will continue to rise, and may exceed the capacity of health care systems in the near future. Bacteria are difficult to eradicate from synovial joints due to their exceptionally diverse taxonomy, complex mechanistic attachment capabilities, and tendency to evolve antibiotic resistance. When a primary orthopaedic implant fails from prosthetic joint infection, surgeons are generally challenged by limited options for intervention. In this review, we highlight the etiology and taxonomic groupings of bacteria known to cause prosthetic joint infections, and examine their key mechanisms of attachment. We propose that antimicrobial strategies should focus on the most harmful bacteria taxa within the context of occurrence, taxonomic diversity, adhesion mechanisms, and implant design. Patient-specific identification of organisms that cause prosthetic joint infections will permit assessment of their biological vulnerabilities. The latter can be targeted using a range of antimicrobial techniques that exploit different colonization mechanisms including implant surface attachment, biofilm formation, and/or hematogenous recruitment. We anticipate that customized strategies for each patient, joint, and prosthetic component will be most effective at reducing prosthetic joint infections, including those caused by antibiotic-resistant and polymicrobial bacteria.

  18. Magnesium-containing layered double hydroxides as orthopaedic implant coating materials--An in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Weizbauer, Andreas; Kieke, Marc; Rahim, Muhammad Imran; Angrisani, Gian Luigi; Willbold, Elmar; Diekmann, Julia; Flörkemeier, Thilo; Windhagen, Henning; Müller, Peter Paul; Behrens, Peter; Budde, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The total hip arthroplasty is one of the most common artificial joint replacement procedures. Several different surface coatings have been shown to improve implant fixation by facilitating bone ingrowth and consequently enhancing the longevity of uncemented orthopaedic hip prostheses. In the present study, two different layered double hydroxides (LDHs), Mg-Fe- and Mg-Al-LDH, were investigated as potential magnesium (Mg)-containing coating materials for orthopaedic applications in comparison to Mg hydroxide (Mg(OH)2). In vitro direct cell compatibility tests were carried out using the murine fibroblast cell line NIH 3T3 and the mouse osteosarcoma cell line MG 63. The host response of bone tissue was evaluated in in vivo experiments with nine rabbits. Two cylindrical pellets (3 × 3 mm) were implanted into each femoral condyle of the left hind leg. The samples were analyzed histologically and with μ-computed tomography (μ-CT) 6 weeks after surgery. An in vitro cytotoxicity test determined that more cells grew on the LDH pellets than on the Mg(OH)2-pellets. The pH value and the Mg(2+) content of the cell culture media were increased after incubation of the cells on the degradable samples. The in vivo tests demonstrated the formation of fibrous capsules around Mg(OH)2 and Mg-Fe-LDH. In contrast, the host response of the Mg-Al-LDH samples indicated that this Mg-containing biomaterial is a potential candidate for implant coating.

  19. Medical equipment leasing. Benefits and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hill, R

    1995-03-01

    Medical equipment manufacturers throughout Europe now have the opportunity to take advantage of changes in the United Kingdom Treasury rules, which introduce flexibility into hospital financing. This could result in more equipment sales for manufacturers and better equipped hospitals.

  20. Medical Equipment at Home After the NICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical equipment at home after the NICU Medical equipment at home after the NICU E-mail to ... care unit (NICU) don’t need special medical equipment, like monitors or feeding tubes, when they leave ...