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Sample records for eponymous orthopaedic equipment

  1. Eponymous Instruments in Orthopaedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Buraimoh, M. Ayodele; Liu, Jane Z.; Sundberg, Stephen B.; Mott, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Every day surgeons call for instruments devised by surgeon trailblazers. This article aims to give an account of commonly used eponymous instruments in orthopaedic surgery, focusing on the original intent of their designers in order to inform how we use them today. We searched PubMed, the archives of longstanding medical journals, Google, the Internet Archive, and the HathiTrust Digital Library for information regarding the inventors and the developments of 7 instruments: the Steinmann pin, Bovie electrocautery, Metzenbaum scissors, Freer elevator, Cobb periosteal elevator, Kocher clamp, and Verbrugge bone holding forceps. A combination of ingenuity, necessity, circumstance and collaboration produced the inventions of the surgical tools numbered in our review. In some cases, surgical instruments were improvements of already existing technologies. The indications and applications of the orthopaedic devices have changed little. Meanwhile, instruments originally developed for other specialties have been adapted for our use. Although some argue for a transition from eponymous to descriptive terms in medicine, there is value in recognizing those who revolutionized surgical techniques and instrumentation. Through history, we have an opportunity to be inspired and to better understand our tools. PMID:28852360

  2. Nonoriginal Malappropriate Eponymous Nomenclature: examples relevant to paediatric orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Aresti, Nick; Ramachandran, Manoj

    2012-11-01

    Eponyms are widely used in medicine and their use has been the subject of much debate recently. Advocates stress their historical significance, their ability to simplify complex terminology and their addition of character to science. Opponents cite the controversy among those eponyms and highlight the lack of both scientific and historical accuracy. The law of Nonoriginal Malappropriate Eponymous Nomenclature (NOMEN) suggests that no phenomenon is named after the individual(s) who originally described it. We aimed to determine whether this law is applicable to various clinical conditions and signs relevant to paediatric orthopaedics. We selected a series of 10 eponyms and performed a thorough literature review. In all cases, a description was identified preceding that from whom the disease received its eponymous name. We were also able to identify what we believe to be the earliest recorded description of each disease and sign. Our examples confirm the law of NOMEN in the field of paediatric orthopaedics. We suggest that irregularities in the descriptions and meanings of eponyms are identified and updated.

  3. Medical eponyms

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Robert P.; Thomas, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms are a long-standing tradition in medicine. Eponyms usually involve honoring a prominent physician scientist who played a major role in the identification of the disease. Under the right circumstances, a disease becomes well known through the name of this individual. There are no rules on eponym development. It may take an extraordinary period of time, be different in different languages and cultures, and evolve as more is known about the physician or the disease. PMID:25147644

  4. Eponyms in forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Nečas, Pavel; Hejna, Petr

    2012-12-01

    The phenomenon of eponymous terms in forensic pathology is described in this paper. The authors analyzed representative textbooks (monographs) dealing with forensic pathology in both English and German and identified several eponymous terms. The paper aims to present to the reader the most important eponymous terms in forensic pathology. Included in the paper are the following terms: Beckwith's Sign, Casper's Rule, Krönlein's Shot, Lichtenberg's Figures, Nysten's Law, Paltauf's Spots, Puppe's Rule, Sehrt's Sign, Simon's Sign, Sveshnikov's Sign, Tardieu's Spots, Wischnewski Spots, Wydler's Sign. The spread of eponymous terms throughout various languages is mentioned. The linguistic basis of such terms as well as their advantages and disadvantages in specialist fields, and indeed in even wider circles, is discussed. The authors state that the main function of these terms is to facilitate the open flow of unambiguous information among scholars. Eponymous terms in forensic pathology are characteristic for the German speaking countries and for all countries influenced by the German school of forensic pathology. Their usage in the Anglo-Saxon world is much less widespread, meaning they do not occur very often in English monographs and textbooks.

  5. Animals Eponyms in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Nidhi; Jindal, Pooja; Kumar, Jeevan; Gupta, Sanjeev; Jain, VK

    2014-01-01

    The world of Dermatology is flooded with inflexions among clinical conditions and signs and syndromes; making it interesting, but a tougher subject to remember. Signs and syndromes have always fascinated residents, but simultaneously burdened their minds, as these attractive names are difficult to remember. This work was undertaken to review dermatological conditions and signs based on commonly encountered daily words and objects like animals, etc. Fifty dermatological conditions were found to be based on animal eponyms. For example, the usage of animal terminology in dermatology like leonine facies is present in leprosy, sarcoidosis, mycosis fungoides (MF), and airborne contact dermatitis (ABCD). PMID:25484417

  6. [Scientometric aspects of medical eponyms].

    PubMed

    Schubert, András

    2014-09-07

    Eponyms, scientific concepts named after persons, have a long tradition in medical sciences. Their emergence and use are rather instructive from the aspects of scientometrics, as well. Using a medical sample it is shown that although references to publications giving origin to the eponyms inevitably get obliterated, their citation rate is still many times higher than that of other publications of the same age.

  7. [Czech eponyms in pathology].

    PubMed

    Steiner, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    The 24th European Congress of Pathology taking place in Prague is an opportunity to remind our society of the Czech names appearing as eponyms in pathological terminology: Karel Rokitanský - R. protuberance in dermoid cyst; R. thrombogenic theory of atherosclerosis; Mayer - R. - Küster - Hauser - Winckel syndrome (congenital malformation of the vagina and uterus); Václav Treitz - T. duodenal ligament; T. retroperitoneal hernia; T. uremic colitis; Vilém Dušan Lambl - L. excrescences of heart valves; Lamblia (Giardia) intestinalis, and also the foundation of urological cytology; Stanislav Provázek - Prowazek - Halberstädter bodies (trachoma), Rickettsia Prowazeki (typhus fever); Josef Vaněk - V. tumor (gastric inflammatory fibroid polyp), and also discovery of the etiology of pneumocystic pneumonia; Otto Jírovec - Pneumocystis Jiroveci; Blahoslav Bednář - B. tumor (pigmented dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans).

  8. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology: Part I. Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the field of medicine. In this article, the first of a multipart series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to neoplasms, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographic information of the respective eponym׳s namesake.

  9. Remembering our roots: eponyms in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Popkin, Charles A; Gundry, Cooper R; Larson, Christopher M; Murnaghan, M Lucas

    2013-07-01

    For as long as athletes have been competing, injuries from competition have resulted. Sports medicine has a rich and storied history with significant contributors from many different countries and civilizations. Over time, we have honored the contributions of important figures in sports medicine with the use of eponyms. However, the continued use of eponyms in medicine has been called into question by a number of authors. They cite inaccuracies in definition and context, lack of descriptive value, and the possible celebration of unsavory characters. However, eponyms are pervasive in the medical literature. They bring color and character and allow us to honor those who came before us. Furthermore, eponyms can hide some distressing aspects of a disease. This review of eponyms in sports medicine provides an opportunity to celebrate our predecessors, recognize the international flavor of sports medicine, and promote accurate use of eponyms for the future.

  10. [Presentation of eponymous terms in forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Nečas, P; Hejna, P

    2012-04-01

    The phenomenon of eponymous terms used in forensic medicine is described in the paper. Their linguistic basis, advantages and disadvantages for specialists or wider circles is discussed. Their spread in various language discourses is mentioned. A list of the most important eponymous terms in forensic medicine is the papers focus.

  11. [Eponyms in musculoskeletal radiology: stories of bones, persons, and civilizations].

    PubMed

    Viteri Jusué, A; Eguidazu Elosua, J M; Castillo de Juan, J; Grande Icaran, D

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms reflect the history of medicine, of disease, and of physicians, but eponyms also reflect the history of the societies in which these physicians lived. Both loved and hated, eponyms are at the center of an interminable debate about whether they should continue to be used or whether they should disappear, and this debate has become more intense since some scientific societies have purged their terminologies of eponyms related to Nazism. Eponyms abound in conventional musculoskeletal radiology. In this article, rather than attempt an exhaustive review of all these eponyms, we take a few representative examples to illustrate the contributions of eponyms to medicine and the history of medicine.

  12. Lumbar nerve root: the enigmatic eponyms.

    PubMed

    Dyck, P

    1984-01-01

    Man's quest for recognition has not escaped the physician, whose contributions to medicine perpetuate his name in print. It is a final grasp for professional immortality, which for men like Imhotep and Hippocrates, has prevailed for millennia. This fervor was particularly evident in the latter 19th century, which created a flurry of eponyms, often two or more physicians publishing the same clinical observation. This article reviews the eponym epidemic as it relates to lumbar radiculopathy.

  13. Reflections on eponyms in neuroscience terminology.

    PubMed

    Duque-Parra, Jorge Eduardo; Llano-Idárraga, J Oskar; Duque-Parra, Carlos Alberto

    2006-11-01

    Eponyms have played a very significant linguistic role in technical and scientific terminology. They are an important feature of language that have contributed for a long time to engraving in history the names of those researchers who have devoted their lives to scientific discovery. In the field of medical terminology, they are an asset, although their semantic effectiveness has constituted a long-standing debate. We will analyze how language contributes to the advance of science and technology and the current position of eponyms in the health sciences. Eponymy in neuroscience has been used for a long time as a way to identify and recognize scientific issues, such as diseases, syndromes, methods, processes, substances, organs, and parts of organs as a way to honor those who, in a certain way, contributed to the progress of science. However, sometimes those honors do not correspond to the real contributors, thus receiving a nondeserved acknowledgment. Another problem with eponymic references is the lack of information about the matter in hand, because eponyms do not provide any clear information leading to the identification of the situation under study, as they are not reasonably descriptive. The aim of this article is to encourage the use of descriptive terms instead of eponyms and to establish a system of scientific nomenclature to consolidate the use of the language as a means of conveying scientific information among experts.

  14. Marathon of eponyms: 23 Wegener granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Langdon, J; Evans, J

    2012-03-01

    The use of eponyms has long been contentious, but many remain in common use, as discussed elsewhere (Editorial: Oral Diseases. 2009: 15; 185). The use of eponyms in diseases of the head and neck is found mainly in specialties dealing with medically compromised individuals (paediatric dentistry, special care dentistry, oral and maxillofacial medicine, oral and maxillofacial pathology and oral, oral and maxillofacial radiology and maxillofacial surgery) and particularly by hospital-centred practitioners. This series has selected some of the more recognized relevant eponymous conditions and presents them alphabetically. The information is based largely on data available from MEDLINE and a number of internet websites as noted below: the authors would welcome any corrections. This document summarizes data about Wegener granulomatosis.

  15. Marathon of eponyms: 3 Crouzon syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Langdon, J; Evans, J

    2009-07-01

    The use of eponyms has long been contentious, but many remain in common use, as discussed elsewhere (Editorial: Oral Diseases. 2009: 15; 185). The use of eponyms in diseases of the head and neck is found mainly in specialties dealing with medically compromised individuals (paediatric dentistry, special care dentistry, oral and maxillofacial medicine, oral and maxillofacial pathology, oral and maxillofacial radiology and oral and maxillofacial surgery) and particularly by hospital-centred practitioners. This series has selected some of the more recognised relevant eponymous conditions and presents them alphabetically. The information is based largely on data available from MEDLINE and a number of internet websites as noted below: the authors would welcome any corrections. This document summarises data about Crouzon syndrome.

  16. Marathon of eponyms: 20 Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Langdon, J; Evans, J

    2011-09-01

    The use of eponyms has long been contentious, but many remain in common use, as discussed elsewhere (Editorial: Oral Diseases. 2009: 15; 185). The use of eponyms in diseases of the head and neck is found mainly in specialties dealing with medically compromised individuals (paediatric dentistry, special care dentistry, oral and maxillofacial medicine, oral and maxillofacial pathology, oral and maxillofacial radiology and oral and maxillofacial surgery) and particularly by hospital-centred practitioners. This series has selected some of the more recognized relevant eponymous conditions and presents them alphabetically. The information is based largely on data available from MEDLINE and a number of internet websites as noted below: the authors would welcome any corrections. This document summarizes data about Treacher Collins syndrome. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Anatomical eponyms - unloved names in medical terminology.

    PubMed

    Burdan, F; Dworzański, W; Cendrowska-Pinkosz, M; Burdan, M; Dworzańska, A

    2016-01-01

    Uniform international terminology is a fundamental issue of medicine. Names of various organs or structures have developed since early human history. The first proper anatomical books were written by Hippocrates, Aristotle and Galen. For this reason the modern terms originated from Latin or Greek. In a modern time the terminology was improved in particular by Vasalius, Fabricius and Harvey. Presently each known structure has internationally approved term that is explained in anatomical or histological terminology. However, some elements received eponyms, terms that incorporate the surname of the people that usually describe them for the first time or studied them (e.g., circle of Willis, follicle of Graff, fossa of Sylvious, foramen of Monro, Adamkiewicz artery). Literature and historical hero also influenced medical vocabulary (e.g. Achilles tendon and Atlas). According to various scientists, all the eponyms bring colour to medicine, embed medical traditions and culture to our history but lack accuracy, lead of confusion, and hamper scientific discussion. The current article presents a wide list of the anatomical eponyms with their proper anatomical term or description according to international anatomical terminology. However, since different eponyms are used in various countries, the list could be expanded.

  18. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology--part II: vascular.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in the medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in the medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the science of medicine. In this second part of a multipart series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to the pulmonary vasculature, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographic information of the respective eponym׳s namesake.

  19. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology: part III--interstitium.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in the medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in the medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the science of medicine. In this third installment of this series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to the pulmonary interstitium, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographical information of the respective eponym's namesake.

  20. Clothing-related Eponyms and Signs

    PubMed Central

    Long, Valencia

    2016-01-01

    The world of dermatology is pieced together by clinical conditions unique in their colors, morphology, and configuration. Dermatological signs and terms are influenced by etymology, language, and history. Eponyms also make dermatology a fascinating but linguistically challenging subject. This article reviews dermatological conditions described in relation to fashion, and what we wear in everyday life from top to toe, demonstrating that dermatology can be inspired even in the most common things. PMID:27057040

  1. Clauberg's eponym and crimes against humanity.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Frederick; Csapó-Sweet, Rita M

    2012-12-01

    Scientific journals are ethically bound to cite Professor Dr. Carl Clauberg's Nazi medical crimes against humanity whenever the eponym Clauberg is used. Modern articles still publish the eponym citing only the rabbit bioassy used in developing progesterone agonists or antagonists for birth control. Clauberg's Nazi career is traced to his having subjected thousands of Jewish women at the Ravensbruck and Auschwitz-Birkenau death camps to cruel, murderous sterilization experiments that are enthusiastically described by incriminating letters (reproduced here) between him and the notorious Nazi Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler. The experiments were carried out in women's block 10 in Auschwitz-Birkenau where Clauberg's colleague Dr. Josef Mengele worked alongside. After Germany lost World War II in 1945 Mengele fled to South America, where he lived to an old age. Clauberg was caught by Russian soldiers, put on trial in the Soviet Union for his crimes against humanity, and imprisoned in 1948. In 1955 he was repatriated to Germany, once again imprisoned for his crimes, and belatedly expelled from the German Medical Association. To estimate the contemporary usage of the names Mengele and Clauberg, Internet hits were recorded for Clauberg C or Mengele J (with and without adding the term Auschwitz) with the Google and Scirus search engines. The ratios of hits for combinations of these terms reveal that relative to Mengele, Clauberg's name is barely known. We propose that journals and books printing the eponym Clauberg cite its derivation and reference to the convicted Nazi criminal. The present article can serve for such citations.

  2. Fruit and Food Eponyms in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Nidhi; Jindal, Pooja; Kumar, Jeevan; Gupta, Sanjeev; Jain, VK

    2015-01-01

    Dermatology world is brimming with myriad of interesting clinical conditions, signs and syndromes. It is infinite, which has systemic clinical connotations too. Complicated pronunciations of diagnosis have always placed residents in an intricate state. Each one is trying his best to make this cumbersome subject comparatively more acceptable and convenient. The present paper is an attempt to further simplify the subject by correlating difficult conditions with commonly used and seen things such as fruit and food. A total of 45 dermatological conditions were found to be based on fruit and food eponyms. For example, strawberries can remind us of strawberry gums of Wegener's granulomatosis and strawberry nevus. PMID:25814737

  3. Emergency radiology eponyms: part 2--Naclerio's V sign to Fournier gangrene.

    PubMed

    Sliker, Clint W; Steenburg, Scott D; Archer-Arroyo, Krystal

    2013-06-01

    An eponym is a name based on the name of a person, frequently as a means to honor him/her, and it can be used to concisely communicate or summarize a complex abnormality or injury. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in medicine. Many commonly used eponyms applied to extremity fractures should be familiar to most emergency radiologists and have been previously reported. Yet, a number of non-extremity eponyms can be encountered in an emergency radiology practice as well. This other group of eponyms encompasses a spectrum of traumatic and nontraumatic pathology. In this second part of a two-part series, the authors discuss a number of non-extremity emergency radiology eponyms, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographical information of the eponyms' namesakes.

  4. [From Kandinsky to Clerambault. Value of eponyms].

    PubMed

    Koupernik, C

    1996-05-01

    The Syndrome of Mental Automatism in delusional states has been described by the French psychiatrist G. de Clérambault in 1919. It consists mainly of involuntary production of impressions and ideas, ascribed by the patient to an external influence and still occurring within himself. Phenomena like thought echo, influence delusion, thought guess belong to M.A. Actually this syndrome is largely unknown in Anglo-Saxon countries. Somewhat similar description figures in DSM-III-R under the heading 295. A2-A3. Soviet psychiatrists claim that a quite similar clinical picture has been described by Kandinsky in his monograph posthumously published by his widow in 1890. The present writer shows that a great part of what Kandinsky described was actually based on self-observation. But it is true that Kandinsky described what he calls a "psychological chasm", where thought is either imposed upon the patient or stolen from him. The present writer considers that it is more a phenomenological approach than a semiological one and he is doubtful about the actual value of eponyms.

  5. Cushing's ulcer: the eponym and his own.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2011-06-01

    One of the least remembered eponyms associated with Harvey Cushing is "Cushing's ulcer." The basis of this credit is a paper published in 1932 in which Cushing describes patients who postoperatively and unexpectedly died of perforated peptic ulcers. It is one of the first descriptions of a stress ulcer and a treatise on the brain-stomach connection. Harvey Cushing was puzzled by the pathogenesis of these peptic ulcerations and perforations and advanced several theories. The least plausible included the bile-vomiting theory suggesting that hemorrhagic ulceration could be produced by a combination of bile and acid in a patient recovering from the anesthetic. Other theories were stimulation of a parasympathetic center in the diencephalon or a disturbance of vagal centers in the brainstem. Quite surprisingly to Cushing, the Boston Herald implicitly insinuated that Cushing found the cause of ulcers and this claim upset him greatly. It is ironic that Harvey Cushing, in his later years with failing health, developed an ulcer himself. Cushing noted in his correspondence that he felt the agitation over this newspaper clipping caused his later ulcer. The first description of a neurogenic ulcer remains an important medical observation and is a testament to Cushing's broad accomplishments.

  6. Orthopaedic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.M.; Hughes, S.P.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an account of the principles of modern diagnostic imaging techniques and their applications in orthopedics. The aim is to show radiology as a dynamic subject. Orthopaedic Radiology is divided into two sections with the first part focusing on the principles of diagnostic imaging and interpretation and the second applying this information to practical clinical problems.

  7. [Eponyms and epilepsy (history of Eastern civilizations)].

    PubMed

    Janković, S M; Sokić, D V; Lević, Z M; Susić, V; Drulović, J; Stojsavljević, N; Veskov, R; Ivanus, J

    1996-01-01

    The history of eponyms for epilepsy in the lands of the Eastern globe present the portrait of the attitudes of both the laymen and skilled people towards the disease and patient, as well as to the Nature itself. As opposed to the West which during the Middle ages changed its concepts of epilepsy as the organic brain disease for the sublime 'alchemic' position, the people of the East were more prone to consider from the beginning of their civilization till the XIX century that epilepsy is the consequence of the evanescent spiritual and extracorporal forces which by themselves were out of their reach. As compared to the western civilization, the historical resources are, often as a consequence of a linguistic barriers, more scarce-as consequently is the number of eponyms, but are nevertheless picturesque. The medical science from Babylonian period presumed that epileptic manifestations are the consequence of the demonic or ill spiritual actions. There existed an attitude that at the beginning of an epileptic attack the patient was possessed by a demon (the Akkadic, i.e., Babylonian verb "sibtu" denoting epilepsy, had the meaning "to seize" or "to be obsessed"); at the end of the clonic phase the demon departed from the body. Different demons were responsible for different forms of epilepsy such as nocturnal and children epilepsy, absence epilepsy and pure convulsions, simple and complex automatisms, and gelastic epilepsy. Thus, the doctors from the period of Babylon aside from making primordial classification of epilepsies, knew about their clinical picture (prodromal symptoms and aura, Jackson's epilepsy. Todd's paralysis), postictal phenomena and intericatl emotional instability; provocative factors were also known (sleep deprivation, emotions, as well as alcohol, albeit in a negative sense-as a cure for epilepsy). There is no doubt than in the period of Babylon the clinical picture of serial fits and its progress to status epilepticus were clearly recognized and

  8. Marathon of eponyms: 16 Paget disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Langdon, J; Evans, J

    2011-03-01

    The use of eponyms has long been contentious, but many remain in common use, as discussed elsewhere (Editorial: Oral Diseases. 2009: 15; 185). The use of eponyms in diseases of the head and neck is found mainly in specialties dealing with medically compromised individuals (paediatric dentistry, special care dentistry, oral and maxillofacial medicine, oral and maxillofacial pathology, oral and maxillofacial radiology and oral and maxillofacial surgery) and particularly by hospital-centred practitioners. This series has selected some of the more recognised relevant eponymous conditions and presents them alphabetically. The information is based largely on data available from MEDLINE and a number of internet websites as noted below: the authors would welcome any corrections. This document summarises data about Paget disease of bone.

  9. Marathon of eponyms: 8 Hodgkin disease or lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Langdon, J; Evans, J

    2010-03-01

    The use of eponyms has long been contentious, but many remain in common use, as discussed elsewhere (Editorial: Oral Diseases. 2009: 15; 185). The use of eponyms in diseases of the head and neck is found mainly in specialties dealing with medically compromised individuals (paediatric dentistry, special care dentistry, oral and maxillofacial medicine, oral and maxillofacial pathology, oral and maxillofacial radiology and oral and maxillofacial surgery) and particularly by hospital-centred practitioners. This series has selected some of the more recognized relevant eponymous conditions and presents them alphabetically. The information is based largely on data available from MEDLINE and a number of internet websites as noted below: the authors would welcome any corrections. This document summarizes data about Hodgkin disease.

  10. Marathon of eponyms: 5 Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Langdon, J; Evans, J

    2009-10-01

    The use of eponyms has long been contentious, but many remain in common use, as discussed elsewhere (Editorial: Oral Diseases. 2009: 15; 185). The use of eponyms in diseases of the head and neck is mainly in specialties dealing with medically compromised individuals (paediatric dentistry, special care dentistry, oral and maxillofacial medicine, oral and maxillofacial pathology, oral and maxillofacial radiology and oral and maxillofacial surgery) and particularly by hospital-centred practitioners. This series has selected some of the more recognized relevant eponymous conditions and presents them alphabetically. The information is based largely on data available from MEDLINE and a number of internet websites as noted below: the authors would welcome any corrections. This document summarizes data about Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  11. Anatomical eponyms, Part 2: The other side of the coin.

    PubMed

    Olry, Regis

    2014-11-01

    Over a century after they were removed, at least officially, from anatomical terminology, eponyms remain an obviously controversial topic. In the first part of this paper we acted as their defense counsel, aiming to demonstrate that the 1895 first edition of the Nomina Anatomica and subsequently the Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology (FCAT) probably put the cart before the horse. However, their authors advanced arguments supporting their decision, and it is now time to develop these arguments. Let us now become the public prosecutor of eponyms.

  12. Kallmann Syndrome: Eugenics and the Man behind the Eponym

    PubMed Central

    Benbassat, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Kallmann syndrome is named after Franz Joseph Kallmann, a German-born psychiatrist who described in 1944 twelve subjects from three families who presented with a syndrome of missed puberty, anosmia, and color blindness. Yet, several other eponyms for the same syndrome can be found in the literature. Despite the fact that Kallmann syndrome is the most recognized eponym, very little is known about the man for whom the syndrome is named. A biographical note on Franz Joseph Kallmann and his historical context is presented. PMID:27101217

  13. Tales from previous times: important eponyms in pediatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Berger, Michael; Muensterer, Oliver; Harmon, Carroll M

    2014-01-01

    The use of eponyms in medicine has a long and captivating tradition, which applies to pediatric surgery as well. Unfortunately, even though these eponyms are widely used, oftentimes the fascinating personalities and lives behind these names remain unrecognized or underappreciated, especially among residents, fellows and younger-generation pediatric surgeons. Therefore, in this article, we review 15 names that are frequently used as eponyms in modern pediatric surgery and hereby enlighten the personalities behind them. Given their particular frequency, we choose the following eponyms: Ramstedt pylorotomy, Nissen fundoplication, Murphy's sign and sequence, McBurney's sign and incision, Meckel's diverticulum, Kasai portoenterostomy, Ladd's procedure, Morgagni and Bochdalek hernia, Ravitch operation, Nuss procedure, Hirschsprung disease, Swenson pullthrough, Peña procedure and Wilms tumor. A detailed description of the historical importance of these personalities and their contribution to our field is given. Without the appropriate historical background, it is difficult for the current younger and next generation pediatric surgeons to grasp the full spectrum of the ongoing progress in our field. Therefore, our article conveys not only important insight into the past, but also provides young surgeons with an important historical perspective essential to understand the current and future developments in modern pediatric surgery.

  14. What's in a Name? Neurological Eponyms of the Nazi Era.

    PubMed

    Kondziella, Daniel; Zeidman, Lawrence A

    2016-01-01

    The 1920s were a booming decade for neuroscience, and perhaps nowhere was this truer than in Germany. Following the rise of Hitler's regime and the persecution of Jews and others, however, Germany and Austria lost numerous world-class neuroscientists. Vacant posts were quickly filled with 'Aryan' and academic staff loyal to the Nazis. Indeed, many physicians and scientists went even further and became engaged in National Socialist (NS)-euthanasia programs. In recent years, the medical community has become more aware of the ethical burden associated with eponyms derived from scientists of the Third Reich. This book chapter reviews 53 neurological eponyms derived from physicians who worked in the Nazi era. Among them are victims who were forced out of the country or murdered in concentration camps, protestors who risked their academic careers and often their lives, beneficiaries who published on brains from 'euthanized' children, and collaborators who were directly involved in the planning and execution of NS-euthanasia programs.

  15. [Neuroanatomical eponyms in Revista de Neurología on-line].

    PubMed

    Abdala, P

    Anatomical eponyms are terms that have been proscribed in anatomical terminology, but are widely used in medicine and neurology. Their persistence is due to the fact that they are used in textbooks and scientific papers. To determine which neuroanatomical eponyms are used in neurology in Spanish, and how often they are utilised. We conducted a descriptive, longitudinal, retrospective study of the neuroanatomical eponyms that appeared in papers published in the online version of Revista de Neurología between 1998 and 2006. In all, 46 papers with 193 eponyms were reviewed. The main eponyms used were the following: vein of Galen (14%), circle or polygon of Willis (11.9%) and cerebral or Sylvian aqueduct (11.4%). Other eponyms that do not appear in the Anatomical terminology were: Broca's area (15.5%) and Wernicke's area (7.2%). Most of the eponyms were found in clinical notes (43.4%) and reviews (28.2%), and there was an increase in the number of eponyms published in more recent years, that is, 2003-2006. No studies on the frequency of eponym usage were found and the first data on the subject are those included here. In order to prevent the dissemination of eponyms, they should not appear in the title or the keywords used in articles. Eponyms referring to blood vessels and the ventricular system of the brain were the most commonly used and were found in the clinical notes or reviews dealing with magnetic resonance, computed tomography and ultrasound imaging of the vascular system of the brain.

  16. A convenient "inconvenience": The eponymous legacy of Sir William Richard Gowers (1845-1915).

    PubMed

    Toodayan, Nadeem

    2017-01-01

    A century since his passing, the legacy of the great Victorian clinical neurologist, Sir William Richard Gowers (1845-1915), remains traceable to students and practitioners of medicine worldwide through eponymous medical terms named in his honor. Popular designations like "Gowers' sign" continue to lead curious minds to learn more about the pioneering neurologist's lifework and influence, and yet Gowers himself was not fond of medical eponyms. Memorably remarking that eponyms were an educational "inconvenience" in medicine, Gowers was apt to disfavor the system in the very same lecture in which he reportedly first referred to the spinal cord fasciculus that later took his name. This article will examine Gowers' own use of eponyms alongside the eponymous medical terms named for him, and, in the process, will show how Gowers' "inconvenience" may be of great service to the historically inclined modern clinician today.

  17. The eponymous legacy of Sir William Richard Gowers (1845-1915): A revealing letter.

    PubMed

    Toodayan, Nadeem; Boes, Christopher J

    2016-08-11

    The eponymous legacy of Sir William Richard Gowers (1845-1915) was the subject of a comprehensive appraisal first written for this journal late last year. Since the completion of that work, a revealing February 1903 letter has come to light recording, amongst other things, Gowers' firsthand and somewhat private opinions concerning some of his own eponymous contributions to medicine. This addendum to the primary author's original article will review and contextualize this very interesting find as it relates to Gowers' eponymous legacy. Gowers' "ataxic paraplegia" (referred to as "Gowers' disease" in the letter) and "syringal hemorrhage" are specially considered, and his broader neological contributions are also briefly addressed. For completion, a number of other previously unnoticed eponyms are added to the already impressive list of medical entities named in Gowers' honor, and a more complete collection of eponyms found in Gowers' Manual are tabulated for consideration.

  18. [Epilepsy, eponyms and patron saints (history of Western civilization)].

    PubMed

    Janković, S M; Sokić, D V; Lević, Z M; Susić, V; Stojsavljević, N; Drulović, J

    1996-01-01

    From a historic point of view, epilepsy and its eponyms were in an ontogenetic symbiosis throughout their history. Epilepsy is a disease with a history of eponyms presenting the frame of mind of both streetwise as well as skilled "authors" about its origin and nature. From ancient times the names for epilepsy, archetypal Hippocratic disease, just as rich in number as varied in their implication, reflected the local folkways of thinking. In this article we briefly presented more than 50 eponyms and patrons of epilepsy. As the source of information we used both the apocryphal, canonical and hagiographic as well as heretic literature, legends and iconography from the Middle Ages of domestic and foreign origin. Pre- and post-Hippocratic era, apart from stemming from the oldest written medical sources, point to the position that the disease had organic origin located in the brain. The period of Rome adopted the attitudes set by Galen which remained en vogue throughout the emerging Middle Ages and Renaissance. These eras generated new eponyms which reflected a downfall in the manor, stating that the disease is the consequence of supernatural forces. In the "Age of darkness" eponyms for epilepsy reflected more the relation of men to the Nature than to the disease or a sick man; this is evidenced through the generation of number of patrons for the disease. The most famous patron of patients with epilepsy was St. Valentine (after conversion from pagandom he died in Rome as a martyr, c. 270). He was allotted a patronage either due to the phonic resemblance of his name with the (past participle of the) verb "fallen"-as Martin Luther claimed, or due to a cure of epilepsy of the son of a Roman rhetor who built for him a chapel in which he continued to cure the sick. The emergence of a flamboyant personality of Paracelsus on the historic scene of the XVI century represents a less successful attempt to revoke the way of thinking set by the old Greek doctors; however, it brought

  19. Geographic eponyms: A history of geography in medicine.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Maharra; Pai, Sanjay A

    2016-01-01

    Geographic eponyms have commonly been used in medical terminology, with diseases and medical entities being named after the place where the condition was discovered (e.g. Bombay Blood group) or invented (Jaipur Foot) or where the disease was first detected (Rocky Mountain Spotted fever) or where a consensus meeting has been held (Banff) or for other reasons (Argentina flag, Congo red stain). In 2015, the WHO decided to adopt a politically correct method to name infectious diseases in the future. We illustrate, in verse form, some of the places that have been used in medical terminology, over the centuries. An accompanying essay explains the specific reasons for the selection of these locales in our vocabulary.

  20. What's in a name? Problems, facts and controversies regarding neurological eponyms.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio A G; Lima, Plínio M G; Germiniani, Francisco M B; Munhoz, Renato P

    2016-05-01

    The use of eponyms in neurology remains controversial, and important questions have been raised about their appropriateness. Different approaches have been taken, with some eponyms being excluded, others replaced, and new ones being created. An example is Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome, which has been replaced by neurodegeneration with brain iron accuulatium (NBIA). Amiothoplic lateral sclerosys (ALS), for which the eponym is Charcot's disease, has been replaced in the USA by Lou Gehrig's disease. Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an eponym that is still the subject of controversy, and various different names are associated with it. Finally,restless legs syndrome (RLS), which was for years known as Ekbom's syndrome, has been rechristened as RLS/Willis-Ekbom syndrome.

  1. Eponyms and the Nazi era: time to remember and time for change.

    PubMed

    Strous, Rael D; Edelman, Morris C

    2007-03-01

    Eponyms are titles of medical disorders named for individuals who originally described the condition. They also help us remember and identify the disorder. Medicine is replete with them, and changing them or eradicating them, for whatever reason, is not simple. But when there is a moral issue involved - for example, research conducted under overwhelming unethical conditions - we believe it wrong to perpetuate and thus "rew ard" the memory of the individual for whom the disorder is named. The name of a syndrome should thus be discontinued if described by an individual whose research used extreme measures or who was involved in atrocities against humanity. Ethical considerations should be introduced into medical nosology just as they exist in patient care and research. This article details a group of notable eponyms, the names of which are associated with overt crimes of the medical community during the Nazi era, and provides alternative medical nomenclature. In addition, examples are provided of eponyms named after Nazi era victims, eponyms of those who protested such injustices, and eponyms of those who had to flee discrimination and death. These should be remembered and even strengthened, as opposed to those of the perpetrators, which should be obliterated. Since the greatest accolade a physician can earn is praise from his colleagues as expressed in an eponym entrenched in one's name, the medical profession should remove any honor given to physicians involved in crimes to humanity.

  2. Are eponyms used correctly or not? A literature review with a focus on shoulder and elbow surgery.

    PubMed

    Somford, Matthijs Paul; Nieuwe Weme, Rebecca A; van Dijk, Cornelis Niek; IJpma, Frank Fa; Eygendaal, Denise

    2016-10-01

    Eponymous terms are used frequently in daily patient care and scientific literature. They remind us of our predecessors in surgery. It is debatable whether eponymous terms are reliable in case of information transfer. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the original meaning of eponymous terms in shoulder and elbow surgery has been preserved in its use in contemporary literature. To evaluate whether eponymous terms were used correctly, we analysed the use of frequently encountered eponymous terms from January to December 2014. By means of a PubMed search, articles with eponymous terms were identified and analysed for the way an eponymous term was used, and we compared it with the original description. The original description was traced back to the index publication. The use of the eponymous term was scored as similar, divergent or undefined. In the search for eponymous terms, we included those eponymous terms that were used more than 10 times in the English, German and Dutch literature of 2014. 6 eponymous terms were eligible for analysis: Bankart lesion, Bristow-Latarjet procedure, Essex-Lopresti injury of the forearm, Galeazzi fracture, Hill-Sachs lesion and Monteggia fracture. We analysed 96 articles with the listed eponymous terms, of which 27 (28%) were scored divergent, 32 (33%) undefined and 37 (39%) similar. Bristow-Latarjet scored lowest, with 0% descriptions similar to the original, meaning that all articles had an undefined or divergent eponym, and Essex-Lopresti scored highest with 82% similarity. Eponymous terms in shoulder and elbow trauma and surgery are used inadequately and inconsistently. The use of eponymous terms probably cannot be avoided, but since the majority of eponymous terms are not used properly and understanding of its meaning and content varies from surgeon to surgeon, we should be keen on explaining the meaning of eponymous terms when using them. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where

  3. Can a Strategic Pipeline Initiative Increase the Number of Women and Underrepresented Minorities in Orthopaedic Surgery?

    PubMed

    Mason, Bonnie S; Ross, William; Ortega, Gezzer; Chambers, Monique C; Parks, Michael L

    2016-09-01

    Women and minorities remain underrepresented in orthopaedic surgery. In an attempt to increase the diversity of those entering the physician workforce, Nth Dimensions implemented a targeted pipeline curriculum that includes the Orthopaedic Summer Internship Program. The program exposes medical students to the specialty of orthopaedic surgery and equips students to be competitive applicants to orthopaedic surgery residency programs. The effect of this program on women and underrepresented minority applicants to orthopaedic residencies is highlighted in this article. (1) For women we asked: is completing the Orthopaedic Summer Internship Program associated with higher odds of applying to orthopaedic surgery residency? (2) For underrepresented minorities, is completing the Orthopaedic Summer Internship Program associated with higher odds of applying to orthopaedic residency? Between 2005 and 2012, 118 students completed the Nth Dimensions/American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Orthopaedic Summer Internship Program. The summer internship consisted of an 8-week clinical and research program between the first and second years of medical school and included a series of musculoskeletal lectures, hands-on, practical workshops, presentation of a completed research project, ongoing mentoring, professional development, and counselling through each participant's subsequent years of medical school. In correlation with available national application data, residency application data were obtained for those Orthopaedic Summer Internship Program participants who applied to the match between 2011 through 2014. For these 4 cohort years, we evaluated whether this program was associated with increased odds of applying to orthopaedic surgery residency compared with national controls. For the same four cohorts, we evaluated whether underrepresented minority students who completed the program had increased odds of applying to an orthopaedic surgery residency compared with national

  4. Eponym of Naso-Jugal Fold and Tear Trough.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the eponym of the naso-jugal fold and tear trough and to make a suggestion to standardize the terminology.In a PubMed search, the search terms (naso-jugal) and (fold OR groove); (tear trough) and (anatomy) were used, which resulted in 48 and 37 titles, respectively. Eliminating duplicated titles, 80 abstracts were reviewed. Among them, 18 full papers were reviewed. Two papers were excluded and 3 mined papers were added. Finally, 19 papers were reviewed.In a paper published by an ophthalmologist Dr David Miller, "tear trough" was first used for designating the circular trough carved into a scleral contact in 1969. In the remaining 18 papers including 1 conference presentation, 6 terms were used for the same structure; naso-jugal fold (4), naso-jugal groove (4), naso-jugal ditch (1), tear trough (5), tear trough deformity (6), and tear trough depression (1). Whitnall first used "naso-jugal" and 10 other papers stated "naso-jugal." Eight papers cited Whitnall (2), Duke-Elder (2), and Loeb (4) in the origin of the term "naso-jugal." Flowers adapted "tear trough" for the cheek groove and 12 other papers wrote "tear trough." Eleven papers cited Flowers (9), Le Louarn (1), Mendelson (1) when referring to the origin of the term "tear trough."The name of the structure should contain "naso-jugal" rather than "tear trough" because "naso-jugal" was coined earlier and expresses the location of the structure. The recommended term should be "the deepened naso-jugal groove" since it deepens with age.

  5. Stereoscopy in orthopaedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S. L. E.

    2005-03-01

    Stereoscopy was used in medicine as long ago as 1898, but has not gained widespread acceptance except for a peak in the 1930's. It retains a use in orthopaedics in the form of Radiostereogrammetrical Analysis (RSA), though this is now done by computer software without using stereopsis. Combining computer assisted stereoscopic displays with both conventional plain films and reconstructed volumetric axial data, we are reassessing the use of stereoscopy in orthopaedics. Applications include use in developing nations or rural settings, erect patients where axial imaging cannot be used, and complex deformity and trauma reconstruction. Extension into orthopaedic endoscopic systems and teaching aids (e.g. operative videos) are further possibilities. The benefits of stereoscopic vision in increased perceived resolution and depth perception can help orthopaedic surgeons achieve more accurate diagnosis and better pre-operative planning. Limitations to currently available stereoscopic displays which need to be addressed prior to widespread acceptance are: availability of hardware and software, loss of resolution, use of glasses, and image "ghosting". Journal publication, the traditional mode of information dissemination in orthopaedics, is also viewed as a hindrance to the acceptance of stereoscopy - it does not deliver the full impact of stereoscopy and "hands-on" demonstrations are needed.

  6. The 100 classic papers of pediatric orthopaedic surgery: a bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, R G; Kelly, J C; Kelly, P M; Moore, D P

    2013-09-18

    Pediatric orthopaedic surgery owes its development to many pioneering individuals, and the studies that these individuals have undertaken form the basis for the clinical decisions made on the modern pediatric orthopaedic service. The aim of our study was to use citation analysis to identify the top 100 papers in pediatric orthopaedic surgery. Using the Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge, we searched for citations of all papers relevant to pediatric orthopaedics. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, and country and institution of origin were recorded for each paper. The most cited paper was found to be the classic paper from 1963 by Salter and Harris that introduced the now-eponymous classification system for physeal injuries in the skeletally immature patient. The second most cited was Salter's paper describing the widely used osteotomy for the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip, and the third most cited was Catterall's description of the natural history of Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. Most papers originated in the U.S., and most were published in this journal. A number of authors including Salter, Ponseti, Graf, and Loder had more than one paper in the top-100 list. This paper's identification of the classic papers of pediatric orthopaedic surgery gives us a unique insight into the development of pediatric orthopaedic surgery in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries and identifies those individuals who have contributed the most to the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision-making in pediatric orthopaedics today.

  7. Retractions in orthopaedic research

    PubMed Central

    Yan, J.; MacDonald, A.; Baisi, L-P.; Evaniew, N.; Bhandari, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Despite the fact that research fraud and misconduct are under scrutiny in the field of orthopaedic research, little systematic work has been done to uncover and characterise the underlying reasons for academic retractions in this field. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of retractions and identify the reasons for retracted publications in the orthopaedic literature. Methods Two reviewers independently searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (1995 to current) using MeSH keyword headings and the ‘retracted’ filter. We also searched an independent website that reports and archives retracted scientific publications (www.retractionwatch.com). Two reviewers independently extracted data including reason for retraction, study type, journal impact factor, and country of origin. Results One hundred and ten retracted studies were included for data extraction. The retracted studies were published in journals with impact factors ranging from 0.000 (discontinued journals) to 13.262. In the 20-year search window, only 25 papers were retracted in the first ten years, with the remaining 85 papers retracted in the most recent decade. The most common reasons for retraction were fraudulent data (29), plagiarism (25) and duplicate publication (20). Retracted articles have been cited up to 165 times (median 6; interquartile range 2 to 19). Conclusion The rate of retractions in the orthopaedic literature is increasing, with the majority of retractions attributed to academic misconduct and fraud. Orthopaedic retractions originate from numerous journals and countries, indicating that misconduct issues are widespread. The results of this study highlight the need to address academic integrity when training the next generation of orthopaedic investigators. Cite this article: J. Yan, A. MacDonald, L-P. Baisi, N. Evaniew, M. Bhandari, M. Ghert. Retractions in orthopaedic research: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:263–268. DOI: 10

  8. Orthopaedic Footwear Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Although the need for orthopaedic shoes is increasing, the number of skilled shoemakers has declined. This has led to the development of a CAD/CAM system to design and fabricate, orthopaedic footwear. The NASA-developed RIM database management system is the central repository for CUSTOMLAST's information storage. Several other modules also comprise the system. The project was initiated by Langley Research Center and Research Triangle Institute in cooperation with the Veterans Administration and the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research. Later development was done by North Carolina State University and the University of Missouri-Columbia. The software is licensed by both universities.

  9. What's new in pediatric orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Sanders, James O; Otsuka, Norman Y; Martus, Jeffrey E

    2015-02-18

    This past year has seen an increase in the quality of studies in pediatric orthopaedics, and the completion of BrAIST demonstrated that high-level studies of important questions can be addressed in pediatric orthopaedics. The current commitment of improving quality of care for children promises a healthy future for pediatric orthopaedics.

  10. The Swiss Orthopaedic Registry.

    PubMed

    Röder, Christoph; El-Kerdi, A; Frigg, A; Kolling, C; Staub, L P; Bach, B; Müller, U

    2005-01-01

    Following the tradition of the IDES European Hip Registry inaugurated by M. E. Müller in the 1960s, the Institute for Evaluative Research in Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Bern started a new era of data collection using internet technology (www.memdoc.org). With support of the Swiss Orthopaedic Society, the pilot of the Swiss Orthopaedic Registry was conducted, and in cooperation with different academic and non-academic centers the practicability of integrating the various data collection instruments into the daily clinical workflow was evaluated. Three different sizes of hip and knee questionnaires were compiled, covering the individual demands of the participating hospitals whereby the smaller questionnaires always represent a subset of the next larger one. Different types of data collection instruments are available: the online interface, optical mark reader paper questionnaires, and barcode sheets. Precise implant tracking is implemented by scanning the implant barcodes directly in the operating theaters and linking them to the clinical data set via a central server. In addition, radiographic information can be linked with the clinical data set. The pilot clinics suggested enhancements to the user interface and additional features for data management. Also, recommendations were made to simplify content in some instances and diversify in others. With a new software release and adapted questionnaires the Swiss Orthopaedic Registry was officially launched in Summer 2005.

  11. [Orthopaedics' megalomania - myth or mobbing?

    PubMed

    Gundtoft, Per Hviid; Brand, Eske; Klit, Jakob; Weisskirchner, Kristoffer Barfod

    2016-12-12

    It is a general impression in the world of medicine that orthopaedic surgeons differ from doctors of other specialities in terms of intellect and self-confidence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the self-confidence of orthopaedics. We asked doctors from 30 different specialities to fill out a questionnaire. In addition to this, the participating orthopaedics were asked to rate their self-perceived surgical skills. In all, 120 orthopaedics and 416 non-orthopaedic doctors completed the questionnaire. There was no difference in GSE scores between orthopaedics and other doctors (p = 0.58). 98% of young orthopaedics estimated that their surgical talent was average or above average when compared with their colleagues on the same level of education. 72% believed that they were "equally talented", "more talented", or "far more talented" than their colleagues on a higher level of education. 76% believed that when assisting a senior surgeon the patients would "sometimes" (60%), "often" (14%) or "always" (2%) be better off if they were the ones performing the operation. More orthopaedics than non-orthopaedics believed that their speciality was regarded as one of the least important specialities in the world of medicine (p = 0.001). Orthopaedic surgeons in general are not more self-confident than other doctors or the average population, but young orthopaedic surgeons have a very high level of confidence in their own operation skills. none. none.

  12. Smartphones in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadithy, Nawfal; Gikas, Panagiotis D; Al-Nammari, Shafic Said

    2012-08-01

    With the introduction of the European Working Time Directive, surgical trainees are facing limited training opportunities and doctors are required to maximise their training opportunities. Smartphone sales have been rapidly increasing over the last five years and can be used as a training tool for the orthopaedic trainee and surgeon. Common uses include applications (AO, eLogbook and PubMed), Ebooks, online Logbooks, Guidelines and surgical techniques. In addition, smartphones can be used to immediately complete work-based assessments, in the absence of computers, hopefully increasing completion rates and reliability. Some journals now provide podcasts and video tutorials which may be accessed on smartphones, which is useful for higher examinations. Smartphones can also be used in the clinical setting to take photographs of wounds. Smartphones are enjoying increased uptake and application in the workplace and we review their use for orthopaedic surgeons and trainees to allow them to make the most out of their training opportunities.

  13. Orthopaedic Management of Spasticity.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, Tyler S; Ramirez, Jose M; Schiller, Jonathan R

    2015-12-01

    Spasticity is a common manifestation of many neurological conditions including multiple sclerosis, stroke, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injuries. Management of spasticity seeks to reduce its burden on patients and to limit secondary complications. Non-operative interventions including stretching/splinting, postural management, physical therapy/strengthening, anti-spasticity medications, and botulinum toxin injections may help patients with spasticity. Surgical management of these conditions, however, is often necessary to improve quality of life and prevent complications. Orthopaedic surgeons manage numerous sequelae of spasticity, including joint contractures, hip dislocations, scoliosis, and deformed extremities. When combined with the efforts of rehabilitation specialists, neurologists, and physical/occupational therapists, the orthopaedic management of spasticity can help patients maintain and regain function and independence as well as reduce the risk of long-tem complications.

  14. Neurology and orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Houlden, Henry; Charlton, Paul; Singh, Dishan

    2007-01-01

    Neurology encompasses all aspects of medicine and surgery, but is closer to orthopaedic surgery than many other specialities. Both neurological deficits and bone disorders lead to locomotor system abnormalities, joint complications and limb problems. The main neurological conditions that require the attention of an orthopaedic surgeon are disorders that affect the lower motor neurones. The most common disorders in this group include neuromuscular disorders and traumatic peripheral nerve lesions. Upper motor neurone disorders such as cerebral palsy and stroke are also frequently seen and discussed, as are chronic conditions such as poliomyelitis. The management of these neurological problems is often coordinated in the neurology clinic, and this group, probably more than any other, requires a multidisciplinary team approach. PMID:17308288

  15. Biomaterials in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Navarro, M; Michiardi, A; Castaño, O; Planell, J A

    2008-10-06

    At present, strong requirements in orthopaedics are still to be met, both in bone and joint substitution and in the repair and regeneration of bone defects. In this framework, tremendous advances in the biomaterials field have been made in the last 50 years where materials intended for biomedical purposes have evolved through three different generations, namely first generation (bioinert materials), second generation (bioactive and biodegradable materials) and third generation (materials designed to stimulate specific responses at the molecular level). In this review, the evolution of different metals, ceramics and polymers most commonly used in orthopaedic applications is discussed, as well as the different approaches used to fulfil the challenges faced by this medical field.

  16. Biomaterials in orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, M; Michiardi, A; Castaño, O; Planell, J.A

    2008-01-01

    At present, strong requirements in orthopaedics are still to be met, both in bone and joint substitution and in the repair and regeneration of bone defects. In this framework, tremendous advances in the biomaterials field have been made in the last 50 years where materials intended for biomedical purposes have evolved through three different generations, namely first generation (bioinert materials), second generation (bioactive and biodegradable materials) and third generation (materials designed to stimulate specific responses at the molecular level). In this review, the evolution of different metals, ceramics and polymers most commonly used in orthopaedic applications is discussed, as well as the different approaches used to fulfil the challenges faced by this medical field. PMID:18667387

  17. Registries in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, C

    2015-02-01

    The first nationwide orthopaedic registry was created in Sweden in 1975 to collect data on total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Since then, several countries have established registries, with varying degrees of success. Managing a registry requires time and money. Factors that contribute to successful registry management include the use of a single identifier for each patient to ensure full traceability of all procedures related to a given implant; a long-term funding source; a contemporary, rapid, Internet-based data collection method; and the collection of exhaustive data, at least for innovative implants. The effects of registries on practice patterns should be evaluated. The high cost of registries raises issues of independence and content ownership. Scandinavian countries have been maintaining orthopaedic registries for nearly four decades (since 1975). The first English-language orthopaedic registry was not created until 1998 (in New Zealand), and both the US and many European countries are still struggling to establish orthopaedic registries. To date, there are 11 registered nationwide registries on total knee and total hip replacement. The data they contain are often consistent, although contradictions occur in some cases due to major variations in cultural and market factors. The future of registries will depend on the willingness of health authorities and healthcare professionals to support the creation and maintenance of these tools. Surgeons feel that registries should serve merely to compare implants. Health authorities, in contrast, have a strong interest in practice patterns and healthcare institution performances. Striking a balance between these objectives should allow advances in registry development in the near future.

  18. Vitamin D in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Patton, Chad M; Powell, Amy P; Patel, Alpesh A

    2012-03-01

    Vitamin D is an important component in musculoskeletal development, maintenance, and function. Adequate levels of vitamin D correlate with greater bone mineral density, lower rates of osteoporotic fractures, and improved neuromuscular function. Debate exists about both adequate levels required and intake requirements needed to prevent deficiency of vitamin D. Epidemiologic data have identified an increasing number of orthopaedic patients at risk for vitamin D deficiency, with potentially widespread consequences for bone healing, risk of fracture, and neuromuscular function.

  19. Value of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kocher, Mininder S

    2015-01-01

    Value has become the buzzword of contemporaneous health care reform. Value is defined as outcomes relative to costs. Orthopaedic surgery has come under increasing scrutiny due to high procedural costs. However, orthopaedic surgery may actually be a great value given the benefits of treatment. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) Value Project team was tasked to develop a model for assessing the benefits of orthopaedic surgery including indirect costs related to productivity and health-related quality of life. This model was applied to 5 orthopaedic conditions demonstrating robust societal and economic value. In all cost-effectiveness models, younger patients demonstrated greater cost-effectiveness given increased lifespan and productivity. This has tremendous implications within the field of pediatric orthopedic surgery. Pediatric orthopaedics may be the best value in medicine!

  20. Iowa and Eugene, Oregon, orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2003-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, the commitment of orthopaedic surgeons to basic and clinical research and evaluation of treatment outcomes has made possible remarkable improvements in the care of people with injuries and diseases of the limbs and spine. A group of Oregon orthopaedic surgeons has had an important role in these advances, especially in the orthopaedic specialties of sports medicine and hip reconstruction. Since Don Slocum (Iowa Orthopaedic Resident, 1934-1937), started practice in Eugene, Oregon, in 1939, three orthopaedic surgeons, Denny Collis, Craig Mohler and Paul Watson, who received their orthopaedic residency education at the University of Iowa, and three orthopaedic surgeons, Stan James, Tom Wuest and Dan Fitzpatrick, who received their undergraduate, medical school and orthopaedic residency education at the University of Iowa, have joined the group Dr. Slocum founded. These individuals, and their partners, established and have maintained a successful growing practice that serves the people of the Willamette valley, but in addition, they have made important contributions to the advancement of orthopaedics.

  1. Iowa and Eugene, Oregon, Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2003-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, the commitment of orthopaedic surgeons to basic and clinical research and evaluation of treatment outcomes has made possible remarkable improvements in the care of people with injuries and diseases of the limbs and spine. A group of Oregon orthopaedic surgeons has had an important role in these advances, especially in the orthopaedic specialties of sports medicine and hip reconstruction. Since Don Slocum (Iowa Orthopaedic Resident, 1934-1937), started practice in Eugene, Oregon, in 1939, three orthopaedic surgeons, Denny Collis, Craig Mohler and Paul Watson, who received their orthopaedic residency education at the University of Iowa, and three orthopaedic surgeons, Stan James, Tom Wuest and Dan Fitzpatrick, who received their undergraduate, medical school and orthopaedic residency education at the University of Iowa, have joined the group Dr. Slocum founded. These individuals, and their partners, established and have maintained a successful growing practice that serves the people of the Willamette valley, but in addition, they have made important contributions to the advancement of orthopaedics. PMID:14575262

  2. Corruption in the health care sector: A barrier to access of orthopaedic care and medical devices in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Maryse; Kohler, Jillian C; Orbinski, James; Howard, Andrew

    2012-05-03

    Globally, injuries cause approximately as many deaths per year as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined, and 90% of injury deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries. Given not all injuries kill, the disability burden, particularly from orthopaedic injuries, is much higher but is poorly measured at present. The orthopaedic services and orthopaedic medical devices needed to manage the injury burden are frequently unavailable in these countries. Corruption is known to be a major barrier to access of health care, but its effects on access to orthopaedic services is still unknown. A qualitative case study of 45 open-ended interviews was conducted to investigate the access to orthopaedic health services and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. Participants included orthopaedic surgeons, related healthcare professionals, industry and government representatives, and patients. Participants' experiences in accessing orthopaedic medical devices were explored. Thematic analysis was used to analyze and code the transcripts. Analysis of the interview data identified poor leadership in government and corruption as major barriers to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices. Corruption was perceived to occur at the worker, hospital and government levels in the forms of misappropriation of funds, theft of equipment, resale of drugs and medical devices, fraud and absenteeism. Other barriers elicited included insufficient health infrastructure and human resources, and high costs of orthopaedic equipment and poverty. This study identified perceived corruption as a significant barrier to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. As the burden of injury continues to grow, the need to combat corruption and ensure access to orthopaedic services is imperative. Anti-corruption strategies such as transparency and accountability measures, codes of conduct, whistleblower protection, and higher wages and benefits for workers could be

  3. Corruption in the health care sector: A barrier to access of orthopaedic care and medical devices in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Globally, injuries cause approximately as many deaths per year as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined, and 90% of injury deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries. Given not all injuries kill, the disability burden, particularly from orthopaedic injuries, is much higher but is poorly measured at present. The orthopaedic services and orthopaedic medical devices needed to manage the injury burden are frequently unavailable in these countries. Corruption is known to be a major barrier to access of health care, but its effects on access to orthopaedic services is still unknown. Methods A qualitative case study of 45 open-ended interviews was conducted to investigate the access to orthopaedic health services and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. Participants included orthopaedic surgeons, related healthcare professionals, industry and government representatives, and patients. Participants’ experiences in accessing orthopaedic medical devices were explored. Thematic analysis was used to analyze and code the transcripts. Results Analysis of the interview data identified poor leadership in government and corruption as major barriers to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices. Corruption was perceived to occur at the worker, hospital and government levels in the forms of misappropriation of funds, theft of equipment, resale of drugs and medical devices, fraud and absenteeism. Other barriers elicited included insufficient health infrastructure and human resources, and high costs of orthopaedic equipment and poverty. Conclusions This study identified perceived corruption as a significant barrier to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. As the burden of injury continues to grow, the need to combat corruption and ensure access to orthopaedic services is imperative. Anti-corruption strategies such as transparency and accountability measures, codes of conduct, whistleblower protection, and higher

  4. Eponymous doctors associated with Edinburgh, Part 2--David Bruce, John Cheyne, William Stokes, Alexander Monro Secundus, Joseph Gamgee.

    PubMed

    Doyle, D

    2006-12-01

    This, the second in a three-paper series with this title, looks at famous doctors who trained in Edinburgh and their eponyms. With one possible exception, none seems to have sought the eponym, nor awarded it to themselves, nor used it for self-promotion. Unlike those in the first paper, all eponyms in this paper are still in use and their brevity is in contrast to the lengthy description needed if the eponym is not used. Examples are Cheyne-Stokes respiration, Stokes-Adam attacks, Brucellosis and Gamgee dressing. Monro Secundus is included because of his vehement defence of his professional reputation and research findings when he suspected others of trying to detract credit from him, a characteristic seldom reported for the others.

  5. Unravelling the debate over orthopaedic trauma transfers: The sender's perspective.

    PubMed

    Mamczak, Christiaan N; Streubel, Philipp N; Gardner, Michael J; Ricci, William M

    2013-12-01

    The increasing frequency of orthopaedic trauma patient transfers is an issue at the centre of the current orthopaedic "call crisis" that has the potential to inundate resources at tertiary care centres. Appropriateness of transfer has been investigated only from the perspective of receiving surgeons. This study investigates the suitability and reasons for orthopaedic trauma patient transfer from the viewpoint of transferring surgeons. A questionnaire was e-mailed to a random sampling of 500 active members of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the Orthopaedic Trauma Association. Surgeons were split into three groups: senders of trauma patients (senders); orthopaedic traumatologists who receive transfers (traumatologist receivers); and other trauma transfer receivers that are not traumatologists (non-traumatologist receivers). The perceived complexity and appropriateness for transfer of eight virtual case scenarios were determined, along with the specific reasons mitigating transfer. 51 Senders, 90 traumatologist receivers, and 98 non-traumatologist receivers completed 239 surveys. There was agreement between groups for case complexity and appropriateness for transfer in five of eight case scenarios (p<0.05). Fracture complexity was cited as the primary reason for transfer by 28% of senders. However, just as common was a lack of resources at the sending hospital; OR equipment (18%), critical care services (18%), and inability to handle the immediacy of the case (7%) were also cited. Likelihood of uninsured status was the least common reason for transfer (1%). In most cases, both senders and receivers of orthopaedic trauma have similar viewpoints regarding fracture complexity and appropriateness of transfer. Sending surgeons cite case complexity and a lack of hospital resources as the primary reasons for patient transfer. Mandating increased call for orthopaedic surgeons at non-trauma centres without a concomitant increase in hospital resources is

  6. Smartphone apps for orthopaedic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Franko, Orrin I

    2011-07-01

    The use of smartphones and their associated applications (apps) provides new opportunities for physicians, and specifically orthopaedic surgeons, to integrate technology into clinical practice. The purpose of this study was twofold: to review all apps specifically created for orthopaedic surgeons and to survey orthopaedic residents and surgeons in the United States to characterize the need for novel apps. The five most popular smartphone app stores were searched for orthopaedic-related apps: Blackberry, iPhone, Android, Palm, and Windows. An Internet survey was sent to ACGME-accredited orthopaedic surgery departments to assess the level of smartphone use, app use, and desire for orthopaedic-related apps. The database search revealed that iPhone and Android platforms had apps specifically created for orthopaedic surgery with a total of 61 and 13 apps, respectively. Among the apps reviewed, only one had greater than 100 reviews (mean, 27), and the majority of apps had very few reviews, including AAOS Now and AO Surgery Reference, apps published by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and AO Foundation, respectively. The national survey revealed that 84% of respondents (n = 476) have a smartphone, the majority (55%) have an iPhone, and that 53% of people with smartphones already use apps in clinical practice. Ninety-six percent of respondents who use apps reported they would like more orthopaedic apps and would pay an average of nearly $30 for useful apps. The four most requested categories of apps were textbook/reference, techniques/guides, OITE/board review, and billing/coding. The use of smartphones and apps is prevalent among orthopaedic care providers in academic centers. However, few highly ranked apps specifically related to orthopaedic surgery are available, and the types of apps available do not appear to be the categories most desired by residents and surgeons.

  7. Focal points in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    King, J B

    1992-07-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons have long had an association with sport, although it is arguable whether Galen who was the first sports medicine doctor, appointed to the Pergamum Gladiators in 157 AD was a surgeon by todays definition. This surgical role is now out of proportion to the more global aspects of sports medicine as reflected in the rest of this publication, but accurately related to the consequences of injury to the elite performer, where a minor injury may have a major consequence. As the title makes clear this chapter is a series of cameos some describing aspects of the management of common injuries and others indicating new developments.

  8. Advances in Regenerative Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Orthopaedic injuries are very common and a source of much misery and economic stress. Several relevant tissues, such as cartilage, meniscus and intra-articular ligaments, do not heal. And even bone, which normally regenerates spontaneously, can fail to mend. The regeneration of orthopaedic tissues requires four key components: cells, morphogenetic signals, scaffolds and an appropriate mechanical environment. Although differentiated cells from the tissue in question can be used, most cellular research focuses on the use mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). These can be retrieved from many different tissues, and one unresolved question is the degree to which the origin of the cells matters. Embryonic and induced, pluripotential stem cells are also under investigation. Morphogenetic signals are most frequently supplied by individual, recombinant growth factors or native mixtures provided by, for instance, platelet-rich plasma; MSCs are also a rich source of trophic factors. Obstacles to the sustained delivery of individual growth factors can be addressed by gene transfer or smart scaffolds, but we still lack detailed, necessary information on which delivery profiles are needed. Scaffolds may be based upon natural products, synthetic materials, or devitalized extracellular matrix. Strategies to combine these components to regenerate tissue can follow traditional tissue engineering practices, but these are costly, cumbersome and not well suited to treating large numbers of individuals. More expeditious approaches make full use of intrinsic biological processes in vivo to avoid the need for ex vivo expansion of autologous cells and multiple procedures. Clinical translation remains a bottleneck. PMID:24182709

  9. Orthopaedics and the law.

    PubMed

    Suk, Michael; Udale, Ann Marie; Helfet, David L

    2005-10-01

    Understanding the relevant legal context is critical to the safe and successful practice of orthopaedic surgery. Specifically, three areas of liability are relevant to most physicians: medical malpractice, products liability, and the liability of health care organizations. Medical malpractice encompasses the professional physician-patient relationship with its implied contract, consent, fiduciary responsibilities, and duty to provide the standard of care, as well as certain common-law duties pertinent in special circumstances. Orthopaedic surgeons who design implants or who have a relationship with a device manufacturer are at risk for liability for a failed product. In general, the hospital entity is responsible for the actions of its physician-employees. Still unclear is the degree to which a physician is obligated to appeal to a third-party payer on behalf of a patient. Physicians should remember that, above all else, common sense with regard to the treatment, informed consent, and advocacy of patients is essential to avoiding many medical-legal pitfalls.

  10. Osteointegration of orthopaedic devices.

    PubMed

    Ochsner, Peter E

    2011-05-01

    The different properties of bone must be considered in order to understand the relation between orthopaedic devices and bone. The epi-/metaphyseal areas are defined by their rigidity, their high vascularity and their quick remodelling process. In contrast, the diaphyses of bone are rather elastic and built of dense, scarcely vascularised bone presenting slow remodelling. Implants can integrate by pure mechanical contact without real affinity to bone or, alternatively, they can favour ongrowth of bone, provided that they are osteoconductive. Amongst different bone substitutes, only some of them are absorbable. Only derivates of bone may present the property of osteoinduction, which is the power to create new bone in any region of the body. Orthopaedic devices are characterised by their shape, their stiffness or elasticity and by the characteristic properties of material. They may be osteoconductive such as titanium alloys and some ceramics, allowing integration in bone. Alternatively, other materials such as steel, CoCr alloys and PMMA cements remain separated from bone by a tiny layer of collagen. The surface structure influences the quality of integration. The integration of implants depends on the mutual interaction of the material with the tissue on the implantation site. All implants undergo fatiguing which can lead to fracture of the implant. All implant-bone contacts are threatened by granulation tissue mainly formed because of wear products, infection and other reasons.

  11. Orthopaedic patient education practice.

    PubMed

    Eloranta, Sini; Katajisto, Jouko; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore orthopaedic nurses' perceptions of patient education practice; the educational skills of a nurse, the content, structure and educational approaches to patient education and its changes during nine years at a university hospital in Finland. The subjects of this survey were orthopaedic nurses at one university hospital - 56 nurses in 2001 and 51 nurses in 2010. On the whole, no statistically significant change had taken place in the nurses' patient education skills in the two periods compared. In 2001, the nurses discussed more often the learning objectives with patients compared to 2010. In both years, individual education sessions and written material were often used. In both years, the bio-physiological area of patient education was found to be dealt with most adequately, while the social area received less attention in 2010 than in 2001. According to our results, no change in a positive direction in nurses' patient education skills and the implementation of patient education can be seen over the past decade. The results of the study indicate clear development needs in patient education practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Composites in orthopaedics

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, D.; Levine, D.

    1986-01-01

    With the increasing demand for superior performance placed on present day orthopaedic devices, there exists a constant demand to look for better materials for construction. Because of their good corrosion resistance, early devices were made from 304 or 316 stainless steels. However, the patient population has broadened to include younger individuals. These patients lead active lives and tend to stress the fracture fixation devices. Another requirement for younger patients is a longer implantable service: up to 20 years. With these requirements in mind, high-performance aerospace metal alloys based on cobalt chromium and titanium are used extensively. This paper discusses the requirements and the deficiencies of new materials; biocompatibility, biofunctionality, and manufacturing costs.

  13. Citation classics in pediatric orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Ranjit A; Dhawale, Arjun A; Zavaglia, Bogard C; Slobogean, Bronwyn L; Mulpuri, Kishore

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical pediatric orthopaedic articles with at least 100 citations published in all orthopaedic journals and to examine their characteristics. All journals dedicated to orthopaedics and its subspecialties were selected from the Journal Citation Report 2001 under the subject category "orthopedics." Articles cited 100 times or more were identified using the database of the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED, 1900 to present). The articles were ranked in a comprehensive list. Two authors independently reviewed the full text of each article and applied the inclusion and exclusion criteria to the list of articles. The 2 lists were then compared. All disagreements were resolved by consensus with input from the senior author. The final list of pediatric orthopaedic articles was then compiled. There were a total of 49 journals under the search category "orthopedics." Five journals were excluded as they were non-English journals. The remaining 44 journals were screened for articles with at least 100 citations. A total of 135 clinical pediatric orthopaedic articles cited at least 100 times were included. The most cited article was cited 692 times. The mean number of citations per article was 159 (95% confidence interval, 145-173). All the articles were published between 1949 and 2001, with 1980 and 1989 producing the most citation classics (34). The majority (90) originated from the United States, followed by the United Kingdom (12) and Canada (11). Scoliosis/kyphosis was the most common topic with 26 papers. The second most common subject was hip disorders (24). Therapeutic studies were the most common study type (71). Ninety-seven papers were assigned a 4 for level of evidence. The list of citation classics in pediatric orthopaedic articles is useful for several reasons. It identifies important contributions to the field of pediatric orthopaedics and their originators; it facilitates the understanding and discourse

  14. Orthopaedic Snafus: When Adverse Events Happen in Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mary Atkinson; Walsh, Colleen; Levin, Barbara; Eaten, Kathyrn; Yager, Melissa

    The potential for adverse events exists when treating and managing orthopaedic patients in the intraoperative or postoperative environments, especially when it comes to falls, surgical site infections, venous thromboembolism, and injuries to nerves and blood vessels. Orthopaedic nurses play a vital role in the promotion and use of evidence-based interventions to decrease the incidence of these adverse events, improve quality of care, and minimize the financial burden related to these adverse events.

  15. Eponymous doctors associated with Edinburgh, part 3--Abraham Colles, Sir William Ferguson, John S Haldane, Argyll Robertson, Thomas Young.

    PubMed

    Doyle, D

    2007-03-01

    In the first papers in this series, it was shown that eponyms were often bestowed on physicians and surgeons who were already famous, had made many discoveries never honoured with eponyms, and were often the leading doctors of their day. Only occasionally was the eponym suggested by a friend or colleague; more usually it was a doctor abroad who wanted to show respect to a great man but the choice of the particular syndrome or discovery was a random one. Eponyms may have had their uses. They were usually much shorter than a detailed description of a medical syndrome or anatomical feature and may sometimes have been used as euphemisms in much the same way as, until recently, bedside teachers protected the patients by speaking of 'mitotic lesions' or 'neoplasms', 'Hansen's Disease' or 'acid-fast bacilli'. The conferring and use of eponyms appears to be lessening but, as shown in this final paper, they are still used and possibly useful, and can tell us things of interest about the recipient and the proposer.

  16. Orthopaedic Trauma Care Capacity Assessment and Strategic Planning in Ghana: Mapping a Way Forward.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Barclay T; Gyedu, Adam; Tansley, Gavin; Yeboah, Dominic; Amponsah-Manu, Forster; Mock, Charles; Labi-Addo, Wilfred; Quansah, Robert

    2016-12-07

    Orthopaedic conditions incur more than 52 million disability-adjusted life years annually worldwide. This burden disproportionately affects low and middle-income countries, which are least equipped to provide orthopaedic care. We aimed to assess orthopaedic capacity in Ghana, describe spatial access to orthopaedic care, and identify hospitals that would most improve access to care if their capacity was improved. Seventeen perioperative and orthopaedic trauma care-related items were selected from the World Health Organization's Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care. Direct inspection and structured interviews with hospital staff were used to assess resource availability and factors contributing to deficiencies at 40 purposively sampled facilities. Cost-distance analyses described population-level spatial access to orthopaedic trauma care. Facilities for targeted capability improvement were identified through location-allocation modeling. Orthopaedic trauma care assessment demonstrated marked deficiencies. Some deficient resources were low cost (e.g., spinal immobilization, closed reduction capabilities, and prosthetics for amputees). Resource nonavailability resulted from several contributing factors (e.g., absence of equipment, technology breakage, lack of training). Implants were commonly prohibitively expensive. Building basic orthopaedic care capacity at 15 hospitals without such capacity would improve spatial access to basic care from 74.9% to 83.0% of the population (uncertainty interval [UI] of 81.2% to 83.6%), providing access for an additional 2,169,714 Ghanaians. The availability of several low-cost resources could be better supplied by improvements in organization and training for orthopaedic trauma care. There is a critical need to advocate and provide funding for orthopaedic resources. These initiatives might be particularly effective if aimed at hospitals that could provide care to a large proportion of the population.

  17. Reno Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship business curriculum.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Bray, Timothy J; Hill, Austin D

    2014-07-01

    The Reno Orthopaedic Center (ROC) Trauma Fellowship business curriculum is designed to provide the fellow with a graduate level business practicum and research experience. The time commitments in a typical 12-month trauma fellowship are significant, rendering a traditional didactic master's in business administration difficult to complete during this short time. An organized, structured, practical business education can provide the trauma leaders of tomorrow with the knowledge and experience required to effectively navigate the convoluted and constantly changing healthcare system. The underlying principle throughout the curriculum is to provide the fellow with the practical knowledge to participate in cost-efficient improvements in healthcare delivery. Through the ROC Trauma Fellowship business curriculum, the fellow will learn that delivering healthcare in a manner that provides better outcomes for equal or lower costs is not only possible but a professional and ethical responsibility. However, instilling these values without providing actionable knowledge and programs would be insufficient and ineffective. For this reason, the core of the curriculum is based on individual teaching sessions with a wide array of hospital and private practice administrators. In addition, each section is equipped with a suggested reading list to maximize the learning experience. Upon completion of the curriculum, the fellow should be able to: (1) Participate in strategic planning at both the hospital and practice level based on analysis of financial and clinical data, (2) Understand the function of healthcare systems at both a macro and micro level, (3) Possess the knowledge and skills to be strong leaders and effective communicators in the business lexicon of healthcare, (4) Be a partner and innovator in the improvement of the delivery of orthopaedic services, (5) Combine scientific and strategic viewpoints to provide an evidence-based strategy for improving quality of care in a

  18. Auditing orthopaedic audit.

    PubMed

    Guryel, E; Acton, K; Patel, S

    2008-11-01

    Clinical audit plays an important role in the drive to improve the quality of patient care and thus forms a cornerstone of clinical governance. Assurance that the quality of patient care has improved requires completion of the audit cycle. A considerable sum of money and time has been spent establishing audit activity in the UK. Failure to close the loop undermines the effectiveness of the audit process and wastes resources. We analysed the effectiveness of audit in trauma and orthopaedics at a local hospital by comparing audit projects completed over a 6-year period to criteria set out in the NHS National Audit and Governance report. Of the 25 audits performed since 1999, half were presented to the relevant parties and only 20% completed the audit cycle. Only two of these were audits against national standards and 28% were not based on any standards at all. Only a third of the audits led by junior doctors resulted in implementation of their action plan compared to 75% implementation for consultant-led and 67% for nurse-led audits. A remarkably large proportion of audits included in this analysis failed to meet accepted criteria for effective audit. Audits completed by junior doctors were found to be the least likely to complete the cycle. This may relate to the lack of continuity in modern medical training and little incentive to complete the cycle. Supervision by permanent medical staff, principally consultants, and involvement of the audit department may play the biggest role in improving implementation of change.

  19. Auditing Orthopaedic Audit

    PubMed Central

    Guryel, E; Acton, K; Patel, S

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Clinical audit plays an important role in the drive to improve the quality of patient care and thus forms a cornerstone of clinical governance. Assurance that the quality of patient care has improved requires completion of the audit cycle. A considerable sum of money and time has been spent establishing audit activity in the UK. Failure to close the loop undermines the effectiveness of the audit process and wastes resources. PATIENTS AND METHODS We analysed the effectiveness of audit in trauma and orthopaedics at a local hospital by comparing audit projects completed over a 6-year period to criteria set out in the NHS National Audit and Governance report. RESULTS Of the 25 audits performed since 1999, half were presented to the relevant parties and only 20% completed the audit cycle. Only two of these were audits against national standards and 28% were not based on any standards at all. Only a third of the audits led by junior doctors resulted in implementation of their action plan compared to 75% implementation for consultant-led and 67% for nurse-led audits. CONCLUSIONS A remarkably large proportion of audits included in this analysis failed to meet accepted criteria for effective audit. Audits completed by junior doctors were found to be the least likely to complete the cycle. This may relate to the lack of continuity in modern medical training and little incentive to complete the cycle. Supervision by permanent medical staff, principally consultants, and involvement of the audit department may play the biggest role in improving implementation of change. PMID:18828963

  20. Jules Tinel (1879-1952): Beyond the eponym, the man and his forgotten neurological contributions.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, O

    2017-06-01

    The trauma of World War I had a lasting impact on clinician and physiologist Jules Tinel (1879-1952). His treatment of peripheral nervous system injuries led him, in 1917, to describe the eponymous sign that he linked to activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Among the sequelae of nerve injuries, he was confronted with causalgia that he attributed, here again, to the autonomic nervous system, the main focus of his laboratory research throughout his career. Tinel's sign became so well known that it eclipsed the originality of his seminal descriptions of exertional headache and of hypertensive emergency caused by pheochromocytoma, which could also have been associated with his name. He was always able to marry his clinical practice of neurology and psychiatric consultations with his anatomicopathological, physiological and pathophysiological research, which was based on his daily practice as a physician. At the same time, he directed the work of numerous assistants in his research laboratory, which has since been unjustly forgotten. Several hundreds of scientific publications, including three seminal works, bear witness to his intense activity, which he combined with a genuine talent for teaching and making his findings accessible to a wider public. Those publications alone would fully justify the historical value of extending his renown beyond the existing eponym. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Simulation in Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bae, Donald S

    2015-01-01

    Surgical simulation has become an increasingly important means of improving skills acquisition, optimizing clinical outcomes, and promoting patient safety. While there have been great strides in other industries and other fields of medicine, simulation training is in its relative infancy within pediatric orthopaedics. Nonetheless, simulation has the potential to be an important component of Quality-Safety-Value Initiative of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA). The purpose of this article will be to review some definitions and concepts related to simulation, to discuss how simulation is beneficial both for trainee education as well as value-based health care, and to provide an update on current initiatives within pediatric orthopaedic surgery.

  2. Orthopaedic service lines-revisited.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    This article revisits the application of orthopaedic service lines from early introduction and growth of this organizational approach in the 1980s, through the 1990s, and into the current decade. The author has experienced and worked in various service-line structures through these three decades, as well as the preservice-line era of 1970s orthopaedics. Past lessons learned during earlier phases and then current trends and analysis by industry experts are summarized briefly, with indication given of the future for service lines. Variation versus consistency of certain elements in service-line definitions and in operational models is discussed. Main components of service-line structures and typical processes are described briefly, along with a more detailed section on the service-line director/manager role. Current knowledge contained here will help guide the reader to more "out-of-the-box" thinking toward comprehensive orthopaedic centers of excellence.

  3. Gas gangrene in orthopaedic patients.

    PubMed

    Ying, Zhimin; Zhang, Min; Yan, Shigui; Zhu, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Clostridial myonecrosis is most often seen in settings of trauma, surgery, malignancy, and other underlying immunocompromised conditions. Since 1953 cases of gas gangrene have been reported in orthopaedic patients including open fractures, closed fractures, and orthopaedic surgeries. We present a case of 55-year-old obese woman who developed rapidly progressive gas gangrene in her right leg accompanied by tibial plateau fracture without skin lacerations. She was diagnosed with clostridial myonecrosis and above-the-knee amputation was carried out. This patient made full recovery within three weeks of the initial episode. We identified a total of 50 cases of gas gangrene in orthopaedic patients. Several factors, if available, were analyzed for each case: age, cause of injury, fracture location, pathogen, and outcome. Based on our case report and the literature review, emergency clinicians should be aware of this severe and potentially fatal infectious disease and should not delay treatment or prompt orthopedic surgery consultation.

  4. Gas Gangrene in Orthopaedic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Zhimin; Zhang, Min; Yan, Shigui; Zhu, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Clostridial myonecrosis is most often seen in settings of trauma, surgery, malignancy, and other underlying immunocompromised conditions. Since 1953 cases of gas gangrene have been reported in orthopaedic patients including open fractures, closed fractures, and orthopaedic surgeries. We present a case of 55-year-old obese woman who developed rapidly progressive gas gangrene in her right leg accompanied by tibial plateau fracture without skin lacerations. She was diagnosed with clostridial myonecrosis and above-the-knee amputation was carried out. This patient made full recovery within three weeks of the initial episode. We identified a total of 50 cases of gas gangrene in orthopaedic patients. Several factors, if available, were analyzed for each case: age, cause of injury, fracture location, pathogen, and outcome. Based on our case report and the literature review, emergency clinicians should be aware of this severe and potentially fatal infectious disease and should not delay treatment or prompt orthopedic surgery consultation. PMID:24288638

  5. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  6. Patient-Specific Orthopaedic Implants.

    PubMed

    Haglin, Jack M; Eltorai, Adam E M; Gil, Joseph A; Marcaccio, Stephen E; Botero-Hincapie, Juliana; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-11-01

    Patient-specific orthopaedic implants are emerging as a clinically promising treatment option for a growing number of conditions to better match an individual's anatomy. Patient-specific implant (PSI) technology aims to reduce overall procedural costs, minimize surgical time, and maximize patient outcomes by achieving better biomechanical implant fit. With this commercially-available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used in conjunction with specialized computer programs to create preoperative patient-specific surgical plans and to develop custom cutting guides from 3-D reconstructed images of patient anatomy. Surgeons can then place these temporary guides or "jigs" during the procedure, allowing them to better recreate the exact resections of the computer-generated surgical plan. Over the past decade, patient-specific implants have seen increased use in orthopaedics and they have been widely indicated in total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, and corrective osteotomies. Patient-specific implants have also been explored for use in total shoulder arthroplasty and spinal surgery. Despite their increasing popularity, significant support for PSI use in orthopaedics has been lacking in the literature and it is currently uncertain whether the theoretical biomechanical advantages of patient-specific orthopaedic implants carry true advantages in surgical outcomes when compared to standard procedures. The purpose of this review was to assess the current status of patient-specific orthopaedic implants, to explore their future direction, and to summarize any comparative published studies that measure definitive surgical characteristics of patient-specific orthopaedic implant use such as patient outcomes, biomechanical implant alignment, surgical cost, patient blood loss, or patient recovery.

  7. Social Media and Orthopaedics: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Suryavanshi, Tanishq; Geier, C David; Leland, J Martin; Silverman, Lance; Duggal, Naven

    2016-01-01

    Social media presents unique opportunities and challenges for practicing orthopaedic surgeons. Social media, such as blogging, Facebook, and Twitter, provides orthopaedic surgeons with a new and innovative way to communicate with patients and colleagues. Social media may be a way for orthopaedic surgeons to enhance communication with patients and healthcare populations; however, orthopaedic surgeons must recognize the limitations of social media and the pitfalls of increased connectedness in patient care.

  8. Radiation Safety in Pediatric Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Caird, Michelle S

    2015-01-01

    Patients, surgeons, and staff are exposed to ionizing radiation in pediatric orthopaedic surgery from diagnostic studies and imaging associated with procedures. Estimating radiation dose to pediatric patients is based on complex algorithms and dose to surgeons and staff is based on dosimeter monitoring. Surgeons can decrease radiation exposure to patients with careful and thoughtful ordering of diagnostic studies and by minimizing exposure intraoperatively. Surgeon and staff radiation exposure can be minimized with educational programs, proper shielding and positioning intraoperatively, and prudent use of intraoperative imaging. Overall, better awareness among pediatric orthopaedic surgeons of our role in radiation exposure can lead to improvements in radiation safety.

  9. Galileo's contribution to modern orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Jastifer, James R; Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H; Gustafson, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), world-renowned Italian mathematician, astronomer, physicist and philosopher, made many contributions to science. The objective of this study is to demonstrate that Galileo's discovery of scaling principles permitted others to define and advance orthopaedic research and clinical sciences. The science and scaling principles of Galileo Galilei were extensively analyzed by reviewing his 1638 original work Discorsi e Demostrazioni Matematiche Intorno a Due Nuove Scienze. Works about Galileo's science were reviewed for the concept of the scaling principles and with the idea of shedding light on how his work influenced modern orthopaedics. Galileo strictly adhered to the Copernican heliocentric theory with the sun at the center of the universe, which caused him aggravation and made him the target of inquisition rage at the end of his prodigious life. With his attention away from the cosmos, Galileo--through the voices of Salviati, Sagredo and Simplicio in the Discourses on Two New Sciences--defined how scaling was important to the movement and function of objects. Galileo introduced important advances in scaling laws, which contributed to the development of the field of biomechanics. This discipline, in many ways, has defined modern clinical and research orthopaedics. Galileo, by introducing the principles of scaling, permitted their application to human physical capacity, to bone and tissue response after injury, and to clinical treatment of injuries. Galileo in this way made important contributions to the practice of modern orthopaedics.

  10. Applications of nanotechnology in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Tasker, L H; Sparey-Taylor, G J; Nokes, L D M

    2007-03-01

    Nanotechnology is the application of science and engineering at the nanoscale. A diverse range of applications are beginning to emerge in all areas of medicine. We performed a survey from November 2005 to March 2006 using the Internet search engines PubMed, ScienceDirect, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Google Scholar. We report on the role of nanotechnology in orthopaedics, exploring current and potential applications. Nanostructured materials have been proposed as the next generation of orthopaedic implant properties by creating a surface environment more conducive for osteoblast function. Bone substitute materials, whose nanoscale composition emulates the hierarchic organization of natural bone, shows initiation of the desirable formation of an apatite layer. Nanotechnology also has been harnessed to improve the cutting performance and quality of surgical blades. Postoperative infection rates may be reduced by using nanofibrous membrane wound dressings containing antibacterial properties. The most notable application of nanotechnology in orthopaedics may be drug delivery, including nanotherapeutics for treating bone cancer and arthritis. Nanotechnology is being used in orthopaedics, and likely will play a valuable role in future developments.

  11. Fundamentals of orthopaedics. Fourth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Gartland, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses topics on orthopaedic medicine. Treatments, radiographic findings, and potential complications are provided for the complete scope of musculoskeletal problems. It reviews the latest diagnostic techniques, including arthroscopy and CT scanning and also gives updates on the newest approaches to the management of skeletal infections, the latest on joint replacements, and offers a review of arthroscopic surgery.

  12. Stem cells in orthopaedics and fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Alwattar, Basil J; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Kirsch, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell application is a burgeoning field of medicine that is likely to influence the future of orthopaedic surgery. Stem cells are associated with great promise and great controversy. For the orthopaedic surgeon, stem cells may change the way that orthopaedic surgery is practiced and the overall approach of the treatment of musculoskeletal disease. Stem cells may change the field of orthopaedics from a field dominated by surgical replacements and reconstructions to a field of regeneration and prevention. This review will introduce the basic concepts of stem cells pertinent to the orthopaedic surgeon and proceed with a more in depth discussion of current developments in the study of stem cells in fracture healing.

  13. Translating orthopaedic basic science into clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning

    2014-12-01

    In orthopaedic and trauma surgery, the rapid evolution of biomedical research has fundamentally changed the perception of the musculoskeletal system. Here, the rigor of basic science and the art of musculoskeletal surgery have come together to create a new discipline -experimental orthopaedics- that holds great promise for the causative cure of many orthopaedic conditions. The Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics intends to bridge the gap between orthopaedic basic science and clinical relevance, to allow for a fruitful clinical translation of excellent and important investigations in the field of the entire musculoskeletal system.

  14. Who has been hiding in your tonsillectomy tray? Eponymous instruments in tonsillectomy surgery.

    PubMed

    Lamprell, L; Ahluwalia, S

    2015-04-01

    Surgeons regularly use eponymous instruments when performing tonsillectomies, yet the stories behind each are not commonly known. This paper presents the instruments within the tonsillectomy tray, providing a brief biography of their respective surgeon namesakes. The list captures over two centuries of surgical history, and spans the disciplines of ENT, general surgery, gynaecology, anaesthetics and paediatric surgery. This is the first publication to undertake a historical study of the ensemble of surgeon inventors responsible for the instruments in the tonsillectomy tray as it is today. In furthering knowledge of our forbearer surgeon inventors, who have shaped the tonsillectomy procedure as it is safely performed today, we enrich our understanding of the history of our profession and build appreciation for the instruments employed daily. We may even be inspired to continue the tradition of evolving the craft.

  15. Treatment of singultus by traction on the tongue: an eponym revised.

    PubMed

    Petroianu, Georg A

    2013-01-01

    Sir William Osler (1849-1919) is associated with a long list of contributions and eponymous entities including filaria, maneuvers, nodules, syndromes, and triads. Among the less known ones is the Oslerian pulling of the tongue for termination of obstinate hiccup (singultus). Janet Travell (1901-1977) , physician to two United States presidents, attributed the tongue-pulling maneuver to Osler. Dr. Travell cites Osler's Principles and Practice of Medicine from 1912, where mention of the remedy can be found. The therapy, however, is much older and (perhaps not surprisingly) of French origin. It can be viewed as a spin-off of attempts by Jean Laborde (1830-1903) to resuscitate the "presque morts" (almost dead) via rhythmic traction of the tongue. Lesser known physicians involved in the treatment of singultus by traction of the tongue are Jean Viaud (1862-1946) and Raphaël Lépine (1840-1919).

  16. The History and Current Relevance of the Eponymous Signs of Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Forgie, Sarah E

    2016-07-01

    During the past several decades, researchers have shown that the eponymous signs of meningitis have reduced sensitivity and specificity compared with when they were originally described. This may be because of the changing epidemiology of meningitis and its treatment or it may be because of variations in performance of the maneuvers. For example, in the original descriptions, the Kernig sign (resistance of leg extension) is best elicited with the patient sitting and the Brudzinski nape of the neck sign involves holding down the patient's chest as the neck is flexed. These and other lesser-known signs of meningitis by Amoss, Bikeles and Edelmann all relate to the mechanics of stretching inflamed meninges, and this review will allow the clinician to understand how the history related to these maneuvers is still germane to clinical practice today.

  17. Teaching professionalism in orthopaedic residency.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, R

    2001-04-01

    Two residents, wearing white coats with their names and "Department of Orthopaedics" conspicuously embroidered on them, boarded a hospital elevator crowded with physicians, employees, and visitors. In a clearly audible voice, one resident began a story: "You should have seen the patient I saw in my clinic the other day. She was beautiful. I should send her to see Dr. W. He would love to see her!" This comment drew the undivided attention of everyone in the elevator and cast a ghastly silence over the rest of the ride. In recent years, interest has expanded regarding professionalism and its importance in medicine and surgery. Orthopaedic surgery is no exception, as the topic has recently reached prominence in our literature and policies. It is unlikely that professionalism is a universal and innate characteristic of college students entering medical school, yet it becomes a necessary value in medical practice. Somewhere in the ongoing process of medical education, the issue must be addressed.

  18. Orthopaedic conditions in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Wudbhav N; Weiss, Jennifer; Skaggs, David L

    2009-02-01

    The occasional consultation on a neonate can be unfamiliar territory for many orthopaedic surgeons. Just as children are not little adults, newborns are not just little children; rather, they have a unique physiology that affects the presentation of their orthopaedic concerns. Careful physical examination with appropriate understanding of neonatal development is essential to making the proper diagnosis. A flail extremity in the newborn is most commonly attributed to fracture or brachial plexus palsy; however, infection must also be considered and ruled out to prevent long-term morbidity. Metatarsus adductus is the most common foot abnormality, but clubfoot, calcaneovalgus deformity, and congenital vertical talus may also be encountered. Joint contractures that spontaneously improve are normal in the newborn, but it is important to identify and institute proper treatment for early developmental dysplasia of the hip, congenital knee dislocation, and torticollis. Clavicular pseudarthrosis and periosteal reactions may be discovered on radiographic examination. A basic understanding of the relevant conditions will help the orthopaedist with the initial diagnosis and management of orthopaedic issues in the newborn.

  19. Planning for life after orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Barr, Joseph S; McCaslin, Michael J; Hinds, Cynthia K

    2014-01-01

    The word retirement is going out of fashion. Many orthopaedic surgeons want to work in some capacity when they stop performing surgery. Making a smooth transition from a busy orthopaedic practice to alternative work demands advanced planning. The surgeon must consider personal issues that involve how to use human capital (his or her accumulated knowledge and experience). New ventures, hobbies, travel, and spending time with family and friends are some possibilities. Plans for slowing down or leaving the practice should be discussed and agreed on well ahead of time. Agreements for buyouts may be difficult to work out and will require creative thinking. The solo practitioner can close the practice or hire a successor. Financial planning is perhaps the most important consideration and should be started by approximately age 40. It is recommended that the surgeon develop a portfolio of secure investments and annuities to provide adequate income for as long as is needed and then to turn the residual income to one's family, favorite charities, or other desired cause. A team of competent advisors is needed to help develop and achieve one's goals, create financial security, and provide the discipline to carry out the needed planning for life after orthopaedics.

  20. Review of orthopaedic manipulator arms.

    PubMed

    Hurst, K S; Phillips, R; Viant, W J; Mohsen, A M; Sherman, K P; Bielby, M

    1998-01-01

    Trajectory planning and implementation forms a substantial part of current and future orthopaedic practice. This type of surgery is governed by a basic orthopaedic principle [1] which involves the placement of a surgical tool at a specific site within a region, via a trajectory which is planned from X-ray based 2D images and governed by 3D anatomical constraints. The accuracy and safety of procedures utilising the basic orthopaedic principle depends on the surgeon's judgement, experience, ability to integrate images, utilisation of intra-operative X-ray, knowledge of anatomical-biomechanical constraints and eye hand dexterity. The surgeon must remain as the responsible medical expert in charge of the overall system. At the same time the surgeon covets the accuracy offered by Computer Assisted Surgery including a manipulator. A summary of current inadequacies of manipulators indicates that the main drivers for future work are that accuracy is critical in close contact with the environment, safety concerns dictate manipulator geometry and technological limitations are many. In any effort to develop an optimal manipulator to guide surgical instruments and tools it is an obvious first step to review and categorise current manipulators. The aim of this paper is to review all aspects of manipulator design against the five main criteria of ergonomics; safety; accuracy; sterility and measurable benefits such as reduced operative time, reduced surgical trauma and improved clinical results.

  1. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons/Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons/Orthopaedic Trauma Associations/Pediatric Orthopaedic Association Disaster Response and Preparedness Course.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anthony E; Gerlinger, Tad L; Born, Christopher T

    2015-10-01

    A disaster is a catastrophic event that disrupts normal infrastructure to such a degree that normal response mechanisms and capabilities cannot manage what is required to respond appropriately to the event. Launched after the largest urban disaster in modern history--the 2010 Haiti Earthquake--the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons/Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons/Orthopaedic Trauma Association/Pediatric Orthopaedic Association of North America (AAOS/SOMOS/OTA/POSNA) Disaster Response Course (DRC) is designed to prepare orthopaedic surgeons for service in disaster response and humanitarian assistance efforts in both the acute phases as well as in the recovery and reconstructions phases. To date, 395 orthopaedic surgeons have completed the DRC and 286 (72.4%) have opted to become registered disaster responders.

  2. Social Media in Pediatric Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Lander, Sarah T; Sanders, James O; Cook, Peter C; O'Malley, Natasha T

    Internet searches and social media utilization in health care has exploded over the past 5 years, and patients utilize it to gain information on their health conditions and physicians. Social media has the potential to serve as a means for education, communication, and marketing in all health care specialties. Physicians are sometimes reluctant to engage because of concerns of privacy, litigation, and lack of experience with this modality. Many surgical subspecialties have capitalized on social media but no study to date has examined the specific footprint of pediatric orthopaedic surgeons in this realm. We aim to quantify the utilization of individual social media platforms by pediatric orthopaedic surgeons, and identify any differences between private and hospital-based physicians, but also regional differences. Using the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America Member Directory, each active member's social media presence was reviewed through an Internet search. Members were stratified on the basis of practice model and geographic location. Individual Internet searches, social media sites, and number of publications were reviewed for social media presence. Of 987 Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America members, 95% had a professional webpage, 14.8% a professional Facebook page, 2.2% a professional Twitter page, 36.8% a LinkedIn profile, 25.8% a ResearchGate profile, 33% at least 1 YouTube. Hospital-based physicians had a lower mean level of utilization of social media compared with their private practice peers, and a higher incidence of Pubmed publications. Private practice physicians had double the social media utilization. Regional differences reveal that practicing Pediatric Orthopaedists in the Northeast had increased utilization of ResearchGate and LinkedIn and the West had the lowest mean social media utilization levels. The rapid expansion of social media usage by patients and their family members is an undeniable force affecting the health

  3. Surgical skills simulation in trauma and orthopaedic training.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Euan R B; Lewis, Thomas L; Ferran, Nicholas A

    2014-12-19

    Changing patterns of health care delivery and the rapid evolution of orthopaedic surgical techniques have made it increasingly difficult for trainees to develop expertise in their craft. Working hour restrictions and a drive towards senior led care demands that proficiency be gained in a shorter period of time whilst requiring a greater skill set than that in the past. The resulting conflict between service provision and training has necessitated the development of alternative methods in order to compensate for the reduction in 'hands-on' experience. Simulation training provides the opportunity to develop surgical skills in a controlled environment whilst minimising risks to patient safety, operating theatre usage and financial expenditure. Many options for simulation exist within orthopaedics from cadaveric or prosthetic models, to arthroscopic simulators, to advanced virtual reality and three-dimensional software tools. There are limitations to this form of training, but it has significant potential for trainees to achieve competence in procedures prior to real-life practice. The evidence for its direct transferability to operating theatre performance is limited but there are clear benefits such as increasing trainee confidence and familiarity with equipment. With progressively improving methods of simulation available, it is likely to become more important in the ongoing and future training and assessment of orthopaedic surgeons.

  4. The case for orthopaedic medicine in Israel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal complaints are probably the most frequent reasons for visiting a doctor. They comprise more than a quarter of the complaints to primary practitioners and are also the most common reason for referral to secondary or tertiary medicine. The clinicians most frequently consulted on musculoskeletal problems, and probably perceived to know most on the topic are orthopaedic surgeons. But in Israel, there is significant ambivalence with various aspects of the consultations provided by orthopaedic surgeons, both among the public and among various groups of clinicians, particularly family practitioners and physiotherapists. Methods In order to understand this problem we integrate new data we have collected with previously published data. New data include the rates of visits to orthopaedic surgeons per annum in one of Israel’s large non-profit HMO’s, and the domains of the visits to an orthopaedic surgeon. Results Orthopaedic surgeons are the third most frequently contracted secondary specialists in one of the Israeli HMO’s. Between 2009 and 2012 there was a 1.7% increase in visits to orthopaedists per annum (P < 0.0001, after correction for population growth). Almost 80% of the domains of the problems presented to an orthopaedic surgeon were in fields orthopaedic surgeons have limited formal training. Discussion While orthopaedic surgeons are clearly the authority on surgical problems of the musculoskeletal system, most musculoskeletal problems are not surgical, and the orthopaedic surgeon often lacks training in these areas which might be termed orthopaedic medicine. Furthermore, in Israel and in many other developed countries there is no accessible medical specialty that studies these problems, trains medical students in the subject and focuses on treating these problems. The neglect of this area which can be called the “Orthopaedic Medicine Lacuna” is responsible for inadequate treatment of non-surgical problems of the

  5. The Core Competencies for General Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Kellam, James F; Archibald, Douglas; Barber, James W; Christian, Eugene P; D'Ascoli, Richard J; Haynes, Richard J; Hecht, Suzanne S; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Kellam, James F; McLaren, Alexander C; Peabody, Terrance D; Southworth, Stephen R; Strauss, Robert W; Wadey, Veronica M R

    2017-01-18

    With the changing delivery of orthopaedic surgical care, there is a need to define the knowledge and competencies that are expected of an orthopaedist providing general and/or acute orthopaedic care. This article provides a proposal for the knowledge and competencies needed for an orthopaedist to practice general and/or acute care orthopaedic surgery. Using the modified Delphi method, the General Orthopaedic Competency Task Force consisting of stakeholders associated with general orthopaedic practice has proposed the core knowledge and competencies that should be maintained by orthopaedists who practice emergency and general orthopaedic surgery. For relevancy to clinical practice, 2 basic sets of competencies were established. The assessment competencies pertain to the general knowledge needed to evaluate, investigate, and determine an overall management plan. The management competencies are generally procedural in nature and are divided into 2 groups. For the Management 1 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to provide definitive care including assessment, investigation, initial or emergency care, operative or nonoperative care, and follow-up. For the Management 2 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to assess, investigate, and commence timely non-emergency or emergency care and then either transfer the patient to the appropriate subspecialist's care or provide definitive care based on the urgency of care, exceptional practice circumstance, or individual's higher training. This may include some higher-level procedures usually performed by a subspecialist, but are consistent with one's practice based on experience, practice environment, and/or specialty interest. These competencies are the first step in defining the practice of general orthopaedic surgery including acute orthopaedic care. Further validation and discussion among educators, general orthopaedic surgeons, and subspecialists will ensure that these are relevant to clinical practice. These

  6. [Positron emission tomography and scintigraphy. Nuclear imaging in clinical orthopaedics].

    PubMed

    Kirsch, C M

    2006-09-01

    Nuclear medicine uses the function of organs or organ systems to diagnose and treat disease. The source of radiation is brought into the patient's body by means of a radioactive labelled pharmaceutical. Its way through the body is recorded by appropriate equipment on the outside. Of the many nuclear medical procedures, those primarily applicable to orthopaedic problems are explained here, such as bone scintigraphy, scintigraphy of inflammatory lesions, and tumour scintigraphy. Besides their use in diagnostics, therapeutic applications are covered as well. Using examples from clinical practice, "conventional" nuclear medicine and positron emission tomography are also covered.

  7. Orthopaedic research and education foundation and industry.

    PubMed

    Wurth, Gene R; Sherr, Judy H; Coffman, Thomas M

    2003-07-01

    Members of orthopaedic industry commit a significant amount of funds each year to support research and education programs that are directly related to their product(s). In addition, industry supports organizations such as the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation. The relationship between the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation and industry began in the early 1980s. The support to the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation from industry primarily has come in the form of unrestricted grants. These grants best can be looked at as an investment rather than a contribution. This form of giving, once called corporate philanthropy is more accurately referred to as strategic philanthropy. Members of industry make these investments to enhance their reputations, build brand awareness, market their products and services, improve employee morale, increase customer loyalty, and establish strategic alliances. The specialty of orthopaedics is among the leaders in medicine in the amount of funding raised within the specialty for research and education programs. This is because of the amount of support from members of industry and the surgeons. During the past 15 years, 40% of the annual support to the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation has come from industry and the balance has come from surgeons and members of lay public. Future industry support of the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation and other organizations within the specialty of orthopaedics will be dependent on the continued demonstration of tangible returns in areas described.

  8. The trends and challenges in orthopaedic simulation

    PubMed Central

    Mediouni, Mohamed; Volosnikov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Generally, in some universities of medicine, orthopaedic training procedures represent a difficult task due to the inadequacies of the systems, the resources, and the use of technologies. This article explains the challenges and the needs for more research in the issue of orthopaedic simulation around the world. PMID:26566328

  9. [Orthopaedic footwear against foot ulcers in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Bus, Sicco A

    2014-01-01

    In people with diabetes mellitus, foot ulcers are a major problem because they increase the risk of a foot infection and amputation and reduce quality of life. After a foot ulcer has healed, the risk of recurrence is high. Orthopaedic shoes and orthotics are often prescribed to high risk patients and aim to reduce the mechanical pressure on the plantar surface of the foot. Orthopaedic footwear that is modified to reduce pressure is not much more effective in preventing foot ulcer recurrence than orthopaedic footwear that did not undergo such modification, unless the shoes are worn as recommended. In that case, the risk of ulcer recurrence is reduced by 46%. In patients with a history of ulceration, compliance in wearing orthopaedic shoes at home is low, while these patients walk more inside the house than outside the house. Foot pressure measurements should be part of the prescription and evaluation of orthopaedic footwear for patients at high risk for foot ulceration.

  10. Do Orthopaedic Surgeons Acknowledge Uncertainty?

    PubMed

    Teunis, Teun; Janssen, Stein; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David; Parisien, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Much of the decision-making in orthopaedics rests on uncertain evidence. Uncertainty is therefore part of our normal daily practice, and yet physician uncertainty regarding treatment could diminish patients' health. It is not known if physician uncertainty is a function of the evidence alone or if other factors are involved. With added experience, uncertainty could be expected to diminish, but perhaps more influential are things like physician confidence, belief in the veracity of what is published, and even one's religious beliefs. In addition, it is plausible that the kind of practice a physician works in can affect the experience of uncertainty. Practicing physicians may not be immediately aware of these effects on how uncertainty is experienced in their clinical decision-making. We asked: (1) Does uncertainty and overconfidence bias decrease with years of practice? (2) What sociodemographic factors are independently associated with less recognition of uncertainty, in particular belief in God or other deity or deities, and how is atheism associated with recognition of uncertainty? (3) Do confidence bias (confidence that one's skill is greater than it actually is), degree of trust in the orthopaedic evidence, and degree of statistical sophistication correlate independently with recognition of uncertainty? We created a survey to establish an overall recognition of uncertainty score (four questions), trust in the orthopaedic evidence base (four questions), confidence bias (three questions), and statistical understanding (six questions). Seven hundred six members of the Science of Variation Group, a collaboration that aims to study variation in the definition and treatment of human illness, were approached to complete our survey. This group represents mainly orthopaedic surgeons specializing in trauma or hand and wrist surgery, practicing in Europe and North America, of whom the majority is involved in teaching. Approximately half of the group has more than 10 years

  11. Computers and the orthopaedic office.

    PubMed

    Berumen, Edmundo; Barllow, Fidel Dobarganes; Fong, Fransisco Javier; Lopez, Jorge Arturo

    2002-01-01

    The advance of today's medicine could be linked very closely to the history of computers through the last twenty years. In the beginning the first attempt to build a computer was trying to help us with mathematical calculations. This has changed recently and computers are now linked to x-ray machines, CT scanners, and MRIs. Being able to share information is one of the goals of the future. Today's computer technology has helped a great deal to allow orthopaedic surgeons from around the world to consult on a difficult case or to become a part of a large database. Obtaining the results from a method of treatment using a multicentric information study can be done on a regular basis. In the future, computers will help us to retrieve information from patients' clinical history directly from a hospital database or by portable memory cards that will carry every radiograph or video from previous surgeries.

  12. Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedics Symposium (AROS)

    PubMed Central

    Foldager, Casper B; Bendtsen, Michael; Berg, Lise C; Brinchmann, Jan E; Brittberg, Mats; Bunger, Cody; Canseco, Jose; Chen, Li; Christensen, Bjørn B; Colombier, Pauline; Deleuran, Bent W; Edwards, James; Elmengaard, Brian; Farr, Jack; Gatenholm, Birgitta; Gomoll, Andreas H; Hui, James H; Jakobsen, Rune B; Joergensen, Natasja L; Kassem, Moustapha; Koch, Thomas; Kold, Søren; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Lauridsen, Henrik; Le, Dang; Le Visage, Catherine; Lind, Martin; Nygaard, Jens V; Olesen, Morten L; Pedersen, Michael; Rathcke, Martin; Richardson, James B; Roberts, Sally; Rölfing, Jan H D; Sakai, Daisuke; Toh, Wei Seong; Urban, Jill; Spector, Myron

    2016-01-01

    The combination of modern interventional and preventive medicine has led to an epidemic of ageing. While this phenomenon is a positive consequence of an improved lifestyle and achievements in a society, the longer life expectancy is often accompanied by decline in quality of life due to musculoskeletal pain and disability. The Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedics Symposium (AROS) 2015 was motivated by the need to address regenerative challenges in an ageing population by engaging clinicians, basic scientists, and engineers. In this position paper, we review our contemporary understanding of societal, patient-related, and basic science-related challenges in order to provide a reasoned roadmap for the future to deal with this compelling and urgent healthcare problem. PMID:28271925

  13. The Vienna Heritage of Iowa Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2003-01-01

    Strong traditions of basic research, clinical innovation, teaching and integrating science and evaluation of outcomes into clinical practice have characterized University of Iowa orthopaedics for ninety years. These traditions were brought to Iowa City from Vienna when Iowa City was a town of fewer than 10,000 people in a sparsely populated rural state. In the last third of the 19th century, surgeons at the University of Vienna, led by Theodore Billroth (1829-1894), helped transform the practice of surgery. They developed new more effective procedures, analyzed the results of their operations, promoted the emergence and growth of surgical specialties and sought understanding of tissue structure, physiology and pathophysiology. Their efforts made Vienna one of the world's most respected centers for operative treatment, basic and clinical research and surgical education. Two individuals who followed Billroth, Eduard Albert (1841-1900) and Adolf Lorenz (1854-1946) focused their research and clinical practice on orthopaedics. Their successes in the study and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders led one of their students, Arthur Steindler (1878-1959), a 1902 graduate of the Vienna Medical School, to pursue a career in orthopaedics. Following medical school, he worked in Lorenz's orthopaedic clinic until 1907 when he joined John Ridlon (1852-1936) at the Chicago Home for Crippled Children. In 1910, Steindler became Professor of Orthopaedics at the Drake Medical School in Des Moines, Iowa, and, in 1913, John G. Bowman, the President of the University of Iowa, recruited him to establish an orthopaedic clinical and academic program in Iowa City. For the next third of a century he guided the development of the University of Iowa Orthopaedics Department, helped establish the fields of orthopaedic biomechanics and kinesiology and tirelessly stressed the importance of physiology, pathology and assessment of the outcomes of operations. From the legacy of Billroth, Albert and

  14. Intraoperative radiation safety in orthopaedics: a review of the ALARA (As low as reasonably achievable) principle.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Daniel J; Patel, Jay N; Liporace, Frank A; Yoon, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    The use of fluoroscopy has become commonplace in many orthopaedic surgery procedures. The benefits of fluoroscopy are not without risk of radiation to patient, surgeon, and operating room staff. There is a paucity of knowledge by the average orthopaedic resident in terms proper usage and safety. Personal protective equipment, proper positioning, effective communication with the radiology technician are just of few of the ways outlined in this article to decrease the amount of radiation exposure in the operating room. This knowledge ensures that the amount of radiation exposure is as low as reasonably achievable. Currently, in the United States, guidelines for teaching radiation safety in orthopaedic surgery residency training is non-existent. In Europe, studies have also exhibited a lack of standardized teaching on the basics of radiation safety in the operating room. This review article will outline the basics of fluoroscopy and educate the reader on how to safe fluoroscopic image utilization.

  15. Survival Guide for the Orthopaedic Surgery Match.

    PubMed

    Porter, Scott E; Jobin, Charles M; Lynch, T Sean; Levine, William N

    2017-06-01

    The process of matching into an orthopaedic surgery residency program can be daunting for medical students. Rumors, innuendo, urban myths, and electronic misinformation can accentuate the angst experienced by students both domestically and internationally. This article dispels myths and presents an up-to-date, evidence-based (where possible), and experience-laden road map to assist medical students interested in pursuing a career in orthopaedic surgery. Our framework takes into account the program selection, test scores, letters of recommendation, visiting rotations, interviews, and communication. We hope that this survival guide will serve as a reference point assisting medical students in achieving successful matches into orthopaedic surgery residency programs.

  16. The Malaysian Orthopaedic Association humanitarian mission to Indonesia and Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, I; Saw, A; Hyzan, Y; Sivananthan, K S

    2005-07-01

    The tsunami which occurred off the west coast of North Sumatra on December 26, 2004 devastated the coastal areas of North Sumatra, South-West Thailand, South-East India and Sri Lanka killing more than a quarter of a million people. The destruction was enormous with many coastal villages destroyed. The other countries affected were Malaysia, Myanmar, Maldives, Bangladesh, Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania and the Seychelles. In January 2005, volunteers went in weekly rotation to Banda Aceh in collaboration with Global Peace Mission. These were Dr Hyzan Yusof, Dr Suryasmi Duski, Dr Sharaf Ibrahim, Dr Saw Aik, Dr Kamariah Nor and Dr Nor Azlin. In Banda Aceh, the surgical procedures that we could do were limited to external fixation of open fractures and debriding infected wounds at the Indonesian Red Crescent field hospital. In February, a team comprising Dato Dr K S Sivananthan, Dr T Kumar and Dr S Vasan spent a week in Sri Lanka. In Sri Lanka, Dato Sivananthan and his team were able to perform elective orthopaedic operations in Dr Poonambalam Memorial Hospital. We appealed for national and international aid and received support from local hospitals and the orthopaedic industry. International aid bound for Banda Aceh arrived in Kuala Lumpur from the Philippine Orthopaedic Association, the Chiba Children's Hospital in Japan and the Chinese Orthopaedic Association. The COA donated 1.5 tons of orthopaedic equipments. A special handing over ceremony from the COA to the Indonesian Orthopaedic Association was held in Putrajaya in March. Malaysia Airlines flew in the donated equipment to Kuala Lumpur while the onward flight to Aceh was provided by the Royal Malaysian Air Force. In April, Dr Saw Aik and Dr Yong Su Mei joined the Tsu-Chi International Medical Association for volunteer services on Batam Island, Indonesia. The MOA acknowledges the many individuals and organizations, both governmental and non-governmental, for their contributions in the humanitarian efforts.

  17. American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Upcoming Meetings Online Education Archived Meetings Faculty Resources Sports Medicine Fellowships Traveling Fellowship Submit an Abstract Submit ... Support AOSSM Research Publications Toggle American Journal of Sports Medicine Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach Orthopaedic Journal ...

  18. The use of handbooks in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Giddins, G E; Kurer, M H

    1994-11-01

    The use of handbooks is becoming more widespread in hospital medicine. A review of their use in British orthopaedics received 78 replies (29 per cent) representing 94 (30 per cent) of the orthopaedic units in the United Kingdom. Seventy-five per cent used a handbook, were preparing one or would like to have one. Recommendations are given for the content and format of a handbook, a specimen of which has been prepared.

  19. Surgical simulation in orthopaedic skills training.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; Mabrey, Jay D; Jazrawi, Laith M; Egol, Kenneth A

    2012-07-01

    Mastering rapidly evolving orthopaedic surgical techniques requires a lengthy period of training. Current work-hour restrictions and cost pressures force trainees to face the challenge of acquiring more complex surgical skills in a shorter amount of time. As a result, alternative methods to improve the surgical skills of orthopaedic trainees outside the operating room have been developed. These methods include hands-on training in a laboratory setting using synthetic bones or cadaver models as well as software tools and computerized simulators that enable trainees to plan and simulate orthopaedic operations in a three-dimensional virtual environment. Laboratory-based training offers potential benefits in the development of basic surgical skills, such as using surgical tools and implants appropriately, achieving competency in procedures that have a steep learning curve, and assessing already acquired skills while minimizing concerns for patient safety, operating room time, and financial constraints. Current evidence supporting the educational advantages of surgical simulation in orthopaedic skills training is limited. Despite this, positive effects on the overall education of orthopaedic residents, and on maintaining the proficiency of practicing orthopaedic surgeons, are anticipated.

  20. Physiotherapy following elective orthopaedic procedures.

    PubMed

    De Kleijn, P; Blamey, G; Zourikian, N; Dalzell, R; Lobet, S

    2006-07-01

    As haemophilic arthropathy and chronic synovitis are still the most important clinical features in people with haemophilia, different kinds of invasive and orthopaedic procedures have become more common during the last decades. The availability of clotting factor has made arthroplasty of one, or even multiple joints possible. This article highlights the role of physiotherapy before and after such procedures. Synovectomies are sometimes advocated in people with haemophilia to stop repetitive cycles of intra-articular bleeds and/or chronic synovitis. The synovectomy itself, however, does not solve the muscle atrophy, loss of range of motion (ROM), instability and poor propriocepsis, often developed during many years. The key is in taking advantage of the subsequent, relatively safe, bleed-free period to address these important issues. Although the preoperative ROM is the most important variable influencing the postoperative ROM after total knee arthroplasty, there are a few key points that should be considered to improve the outcome. Early mobilization, either manual or by means of a continuous passive mobilization machine, can be an optimal solution during the very first postoperative days. Muscle isometric contractions and light open kinetic chain exercises should also be started in order to restore the quadriceps control. Partial weight bearing can be started shortly after, because of quadriceps inhibition and to avoid excessive swelling. The use of continuous clotting factor replacement permits earlier and intensive rehabilitation during the postoperative period. During the rehabilitation of shoulder arthroplasty restoring the function of the rotator cuff is of utmost importance. Often the rotator cuff muscles are inhibited in the presence of pain and loss of ROM. Physiotherapy also assists in improving pain and maintaining ROM and strength. Functional weight-bearing tasks, such as using the upper limbs to sit and stand, are often discouraged during the first 6

  1. Bioceramic Coatings for Orthopaedic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Allison A.

    2003-11-02

    During the past century, man-made materials and devices have been developed to the point at which they have been used successfully to replace and/or restore function to diseased or damaged tissues. In the field of orthopaedics, the use of metal implants has significantly improved the quality of life for countless individuals. Critical factors for implant success include proper design, material selection, and biocompatibility. While early research focused on the understanding biomechanical properties of the metal device, recent work has turned toward improving the biological properties of these devices. This has lead to the introduction of calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics as a bioactive interface between the bulk metal impart and the surrounding tissue. The first calcium phosphate coatings where produced via vapor phase routes but more recently, there has been the emergence of solution based and biomimetic methods. While each approach has its own intrinsic materials and biological properties, in general CaP coatings have the promise to improve implant biocompatibility and ultimately implant longevity.

  2. Measuring outcomes in orthopaedics: implementation of an outcomes program in an outpatient orthopaedic practice.

    PubMed

    Rodts, Mary F; Glanzman, Renée; Gray, Adam; Johnson, Randal; Viellieu, Dennis; Hachem, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    With increased demand to provide quality care for patients, orthopaedic practices will need to develop ways to efficiently collect and manage data to support the care that they provide. An outcomes management program must be efficient and consistent to provide good data. This article describes the implementation of an outcomes program at one large private orthopaedic practice within an academic medical setting.

  3. John Hunter and the origins of modern orthopaedic research.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher H

    2007-04-01

    Orthopaedic research is a multi-disciplinary, eclectic pursuit conducted in a scientific manner. John Hunter (1728-1793), the Founder of Scientific Surgery, was the first to engage systematically in this enterprise. Born in Scotland, Hunter moved to London to help his brother, William, run an anatomy school. This involved both the procurement and dissection of cadavers, for which activities John showed great aptitude. Further training and a spell as an army surgeon equipped him for his life's work as a practitioner, researcher and teacher. Hunter amassed an enormous collection of specimens displayed in a specially designed house he constructed in Leicester Square, and maintained an extensive menagerie and additional laboratories in Earl's Court. Many of his specimens are now housed in the Hunterian Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons in London. Among Hunter's contributions to orthopaedics are his discovery of bone remodeling, and his studies on the repair and regeneration of bone, cartilage and tendon. He developed numerous new surgical procedures, and provided detailed anatomical descriptions that often corrected received wisdom. Many of his pupils became famous in their own right and two of them founded the USA's first medical school. John Hunter died of a heart attack brought on by hospital administrators.

  4. Predictors of Orthopaedic Surgery in NCAA Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dean; Rugg, Caitlin Marie; Mayer, Erik; Sulzicki, Pamela; Vail, Jeremy; Hame, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Orthopaedic injury and surgery is relatively common in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes and can have devastating career consequences. However, there is a paucity of data regarding predictors of orthopaedic surgery in collegiate athletes. The purpose of this study was to analyze player-related predictors of orthopaedic surgery, including that of the shoulder, hip, and knee, in NCAA athletes. Methods: All NCAA Division I collegiate athletes at a single institution who began participation from the 2003-2004 through 2008-2009 seasons were retrospectively identified. Player-related factors, including gender, sport, and any pre-college upper or lower extremity orthopaedic surgery, were elicited through pre-participation evaluations (PPEs). Athletes who underwent an orthopaedic surgery in college were identified through the Sports Injury Monitoring System and medical records. All patient-related independent variables were included in a multiple Cox regression model. Exposure time was calculated from the date of PPE to the date of surgery (event) or to the end of the collegiate athletic career (censored). Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: In total, 1,142 athletes in 12 sports (baseball/softball, basketball, football, golf, gymnastics, rowing, swimming & diving, soccer, tennis, track & field/cross country, volleyball, water polo) were identified. There were 262 documented orthopaedic surgeries, including those involving the shoulder (n = 34), hip (n = 25), and knee (n = 72), in 182 athletes. Using the multiple Cox regression model, pre-college lower extremity surgery was an independent predictor of orthopaedic (P = 0.004, HR = 1.88) and knee (P < 0.001, HR = 3.91) surgery, and type of sport was an independent predictor of orthopaedic (P < 0.001), shoulder (P = 0.002), and knee surgery (P < 0.001) (Table 1). Participation in gymnastics, basketball, and

  5. Accredited Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Websites

    PubMed Central

    Yayac, Michael; Javandal, Mitra; Mulcahey, Mary K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: A substantial number of orthopaedic surgeons apply for sports medicine fellowships after residency completion. The Internet is one of the most important resources applicants use to obtain information about fellowship programs, with the program website serving as one of the most influential sources. The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM), San Francisco Match (SFM), and Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA) maintain databases of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs. A 2013 study evaluated the content and accessibility of the websites for accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships. Purpose: To reassess these websites based on the same parameters and compare the results with those of the study published in 2013 to determine whether any improvement has been made in fellowship website content or accessibility. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: We reviewed all existing websites for the 95 accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships included in the AOSSM, SFM, and AANA databases. Accessibility of the websites was determined by performing a Google search for each program. A total of 89 sports fellowship websites were evaluated for overall content. Websites for the remaining 6 programs could not be identified, so they were not included in content assessment. Results: Of the 95 accredited sports medicine fellowships, 49 (52%) provided links in the AOSSM database, 89 (94%) in the SFM database, and 24 (25%) in the AANA database. Of the 89 websites, 89 (100%) provided a description of the program, 62 (70%) provided selection process information, and 40 (45%) provided a link to the SFM website. Two searches through Google were able to identify links to 88% and 92% of all accredited programs. Conclusion: The majority of accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs fail to utilize the Internet to its full potential as a resource to provide applicants with detailed information about the

  6. Randomised trial support for orthopaedic surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyeung C; Adie, Sam; Naylor, Justine M; Harris, Ian A

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the proportion of orthopaedic procedures supported by evidence from randomised controlled trials comparing operative procedures to a non-operative alternative. Orthopaedic procedures conducted in 2009, 2010 and 2011 across three metropolitan teaching hospitals were identified, grouped and ranked according to frequency. Searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) were performed to identify RCTs evaluating the most commonly performed orthopaedic procedures. Included studies were categorised as "supportive" or "not supportive" of operative treatment. A risk of bias analysis was conducted for included studies using the Cochrane Collaboration's Risk of Bias tool. A total of 9,392 orthopaedic procedures were performed across the index period. 94.6% (8886 procedures) of the total volume, representing the 32 most common operative procedure categories, were used for this analysis. Of the 83 included RCTs, 22.9% (19/83) were classified as supportive of operative intervention. 36.9% (3279/8886) of the total volume of procedures performed were supported by at least one RCT showing surgery to be superior to a non-operative alternative. 19.6% (1743/8886) of the total volume of procedures performed were supported by at least one low risk of bias RCT showing surgery to be superior to a non-operative alternative. The level of RCT support for common orthopaedic procedures compares unfavourably with other fields of medicine.

  7. Silver nanoparticles and their orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Brennan, S A; Ní Fhoghlú, C; Devitt, B M; O'Mahony, F J; Brabazon, D; Walsh, A

    2015-05-01

    Implant-associated infection is a major source of morbidity in orthopaedic surgery. There has been extensive research into the development of materials that prevent biofilm formation, and hence, reduce the risk of infection. Silver nanoparticle technology is receiving much interest in the field of orthopaedics for its antimicrobial properties, and the results of studies to date are encouraging. Antimicrobial effects have been seen when silver nanoparticles are used in trauma implants, tumour prostheses, bone cement, and also when combined with hydroxyapatite coatings. Although there are promising results with in vitro and in vivo studies, the number of clinical studies remains small. Future studies will be required to explore further the possible side effects associated with silver nanoparticles, to ensure their use in an effective and biocompatible manner. Here we present a review of the current literature relating to the production of nanosilver for medical use, and its orthopaedic applications. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  8. Intravenous regional anaesthesia for lower limb orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Fagg, P. S.

    1987-01-01

    Intravenous regional anaesthesia in lower limb orthopaedic surgery has rarely been reported. A prospective series of 50 orthopaedic procedures performed with prilocaine is presented. In over 90% of patients excellent anaesthesia was obtained. PMID:3426092

  9. Retractions in orthopaedic research: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yan, J; MacDonald, A; Baisi, L-P; Evaniew, N; Bhandari, M; Ghert, M

    2016-06-01

    Despite the fact that research fraud and misconduct are under scrutiny in the field of orthopaedic research, little systematic work has been done to uncover and characterise the underlying reasons for academic retractions in this field. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of retractions and identify the reasons for retracted publications in the orthopaedic literature. Two reviewers independently searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (1995 to current) using MeSH keyword headings and the 'retracted' filter. We also searched an independent website that reports and archives retracted scientific publications (www.retractionwatch.com). Two reviewers independently extracted data including reason for retraction, study type, journal impact factor, and country of origin. One hundred and ten retracted studies were included for data extraction. The retracted studies were published in journals with impact factors ranging from 0.000 (discontinued journals) to 13.262. In the 20-year search window, only 25 papers were retracted in the first ten years, with the remaining 85 papers retracted in the most recent decade. The most common reasons for retraction were fraudulent data (29), plagiarism (25) and duplicate publication (20). Retracted articles have been cited up to 165 times (median 6; interquartile range 2 to 19). The rate of retractions in the orthopaedic literature is increasing, with the majority of retractions attributed to academic misconduct and fraud. Orthopaedic retractions originate from numerous journals and countries, indicating that misconduct issues are widespread. The results of this study highlight the need to address academic integrity when training the next generation of orthopaedic investigators.Cite this article: J. Yan, A. MacDonald, L-P. Baisi, N. Evaniew, M. Bhandari, M. Ghert. Retractions in orthopaedic research: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:263-268. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.56.BJR-2016-0047. © 2016 Ghert et al.

  10. American Orthopaedic Surgeons in World War I.

    PubMed

    Green, David P; DeLee, Jesse C

    2017-04-05

    On April 6, 1917, the United States declared war on Germany and entered what was then called the Great War. Among the first officers sent to Europe were 21 orthopaedic surgeons in the so-called First Goldthwait Unit. Prior to the war, orthopaedics had been a nonoperative "strap-and-buckle" specialty that dealt primarily with infections, congenital abnormalities, and posttraumatic deformity. The Great War changed all of that forever, creating a new surgical specialty with emphasis on acute treatment, prevention of deformity, restoration of function, and rehabilitation.

  11. Waiting for surgery after orthopaedic trauma.

    PubMed

    Beringer, Antonia; Hagan, Liz; Goodman, Hannah

    2009-04-01

    Nursing staff on a paediatric surgical ward were concerned about delays experienced by children waiting to go to theatre following orthopaedic trauma, and their families. A facilitated action research approach was used which involved describing the issue, gathering information from a range of sources and introducing changes to the process of care. A flowchart was developed to clarify the stages and the staff involved in admitting a child with orthopaedic trauma for surgery. A white board was introduced to record information on 'trauma' patients. A facilitated action research process offers a flexible and accessible way for staff to develop a range of transferable research and change management skills.

  12. [Orthopaedic management of long bones metastasis].

    PubMed

    Fleury, Thierry Rod; Holzer, Nicolas; Fleury, Mapi; Hoffmeyer, Pierre J

    2012-12-19

    The recent progress in oncologic management of patients with metastatic disease has permitted a significant improvement of their life expectancy. Many of these patients will suffer from complications related to bone metastasis. Unfortunately an orthopaedic treatment is seldom offered to them, mainly because of the misconception that this would not bring them any benefice. However these patients are often good candidates for an orthopaedic management, which objectives are to relieve pain and to re-establish their quality of life. The available surgical techniques are well described and the management protocols are clearly defined, as are the expectable complications and the errors that must not be done.

  13. Orthopaedic sport biomechanics - a new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kai-Ming; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Hong, Youlian; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Lui, Pauline Po-Yee

    2008-01-01

    This article proposes a new paradigm, "Orthopaedic sport biomechanics", for the understanding of the role of biomechanics in preventing and managing sports injury. Biomechanics has three main roles in this paradigm: (1) injury prevention, (2) immediate evaluation of treatment, and (3) long-term outcome evaluation. Related previous studies showing the approach in preventing and managing anterior cruciate ligament rupture and anterior talofibular ligament tear are highlighted. Orthopaedics and biomechanics specialists are encouraged to understand what they could contribute to the current and future practice of sports medicine.

  14. The Orthopaedically Handicapped and Computer Usage: The Case of TRNC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dincyurek, Sibel; Arsan, Nihan; Caglar, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Although various studies have been conducted in the field of orthopaedic impairment, research regarding computer education for orthopaedically impaired individuals remains insufficient. This study aimed to evaluate the use of computers by orthopaedically impaired individuals from a wider perspective. The findings of the study emphasise the…

  15. Recognizing and Preventing Burnout among Orthopaedic Leaders

    PubMed Central

    Quick, James Campbell; Sime, Wesley E.; Novicoff, Wendy M.; Einhorn, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    Stress, emotional exhaustion, and burnout are widespread in the medical profession in general and in orthopaedic surgery in particular. We attempted to identify variables associated with burnout as assessed by validated instruments. Surveys were sent to 282 leaders from orthopaedic surgery academic departments in the United States by e-mail and mail. Responses were received from 195 leaders for a response rate of 69%. The average surgeon worked 68.3 hours per week and more than ½ of this time was allocated to patient care. Highest stressors included excessive workload, increasing overhead, departmental budget deficits, tenure and promotion, disputes with the dean, and loss of key faculty. Personal-professional life imbalance was identified as an important risk factor for emotional exhaustion. Withdrawal, irritability, and family disagreements are early warning indicators of burnout and emotional exhaustion. Orthopaedic leaders can learn, and potentially model, ways to mitigate stress from other high-stress professions. Building on the strength of marital and family bonds, improving stress management skills and self-regulation, and improving efficiency and productivity can combine to assist the orthopaedic surgery leader in preventing burnout and emotional exhaustion. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11999-008-0622-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19030943

  16. Laser Applications on Orthopaedic Bone Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0627 TITLE:“Laser Applications on Orthopaedic Bone Repair” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kotaro Sena , D.D.S., Ph.D...6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Kotaro Sena , D.D.S., Ph.D.; Amarjit S. Virdi, Ph.D. 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION

  17. Evidence-based orthopaedics: A brief history

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Daniel J; Bhandari, Mohit

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine was recently noted as one of the top 15 most important medical discoveries over the past 160 years. Since the term was coined in 1990, EBM has seen unparalleled adoption in medicine and surgery. We discuss the early origins of EBM and its dissemination in medicine, especially orthopaedic surgery. PMID:19826513

  18. A Psychomotor Skills Course for Orthopaedic Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippert, Frederick G.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The course described and evaluated here was developed at the University of Washington School of Medicine to teach 20 orthopaedic residents operative techniques, instrument usage, and safety precautions outside of the operating room without hazard to the patient or regard to time constraints. (JT)

  19. Getting Started in Orthopaedic Trauma Research.

    PubMed

    Mir, Hassan R

    2015-11-01

    Incorporating research into practice as an orthopaedic trauma surgeon can be very fulfilling. There are challenges when getting started whether in a university or other practice setting. Understanding the various components of the research process is important before beginning and thereafter. This article reviews some of the issues that may be encountered and strategies to help.

  20. A Psychomotor Skills Course for Orthopaedic Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippert, Frederick G.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The course described and evaluated here was developed at the University of Washington School of Medicine to teach 20 orthopaedic residents operative techniques, instrument usage, and safety precautions outside of the operating room without hazard to the patient or regard to time constraints. (JT)

  1. The Scarcity of Orthopaedic Physician Scientists.

    PubMed

    Buckwalter, Joseph A; Elkins, Jacob M

    2017-01-01

    Breakthrough advances in medicine almost uniformly result from the translation of new basic scientific knowledge into clinical practice, rather than from assessment, modification or refinement of current methods of diagnosis and treatment. However, as is intuitively understood, those most responsible for scientific conception and creation-scientists - are generally not the ones applying these advances at the patient's bedside or the operating room, and vice versa. Recognition of the scarcity of clinicians with a background that prepares them to develop new basic knowledge, and to critically evaluate the underlying scientific basis of methods of diagnosis and treatment, has led to initiatives including federally funded Physician-Scientist programs, whereby young, motivated scholars begin a rigorous training, which encompasses education and mentorship within both medical and scientific fields, culminating in the conferment of both MD and PhD degrees. Graduates have demonstrated success in integrating science into their academic medical careers. However, for unknown reasons, orthopaedic surgery, more than other specialties, has struggled to recruit and retain physician-scientists, who possess a skill set evermore rare in today's increasingly complicated medical and scientific landscape. While the reasons for this shortfall have yet to be completely elucidated, one thing is clear: If orthopaedics is to make significant advances in the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal diseases and injuries, recruitment of the very best and brightest physician-scientists to orthopaedics must become a priority. This commentary explores potential explanations for current low-recruitment success regarding future orthopaedic surgeon-scientists, and discusses avenues for resolution.

  2. The Orthopaedic Training Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, George E.; And Others

    A four year study was initiated to systematically improve the certification procedures of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery. Consequently, the immediate research aim was the development of more valid and reliable techniques in assessing professional competence in orthopedics. A definition of professional competence was reached through…

  3. Orthopaedic Web Links (OWL): a way to find professional orthopaedic information on the internet.

    PubMed

    Clough, J F M; Veillette, C J H

    2011-07-01

    Finding useful high-grade professional orthopaedic information on the Internet is often difficult. Orthopaedic Web Links (OWL) is a searchable database of vetted online orthopaedic resources. OWL uses a subject directory (OWL Directory) and a custom search engine (OWL Web) to provide a list of resources. The most effective way to find readily accessible, full text on-subject material suitable for education of an orthopaedic surgeon or trainee has not been defined. We therefore (1) proposed a method for selecting topics and evaluating searches and (2) compared the search results from an orthopaedic-specific directory (OWL Directory), a custom search engine (OWL Web), and standard Google searches. A scoring system for evaluation of the search results was developed for standardized comparison. Single words and sets of three words from randomly selected examination questions provided the search strings to compare the three strategies. For single keyword searches, the OWL Directory scored highest (16.4/50) of the three methods. For the three keywords searches, OWL Web had the highest mean score (26.0/50), followed by Google (22.8/50), and the OWL Directory (1.0/50). OWL Web searches had higher scores than Google searches, while returning 800 times fewer search results. The OWL Directory of orthopaedic subjects on the Internet provides a simple browsable category structure to find information. The OWL Web search engine scored higher than Google and resulted in a greater proportion of valid, on-subject, and accessible resources in the search results.

  4. Has diversity increased in orthopaedic residency programs since 1995?

    PubMed

    Daniels, Eldra W; French, Keisha; Murphy, Laurie A; Grant, Richard E

    2012-08-01

    Diversity among health professionals is believed to be an important step toward improving patient communication and addressing health disparities. Orthopaedic surgery traditionally has been overly represented by Caucasian males, and it remains one of the least racially and gender-diversified surgical subspecialties. As the US population becomes increasingly diverse, a concomitant increase in ethnic diversity and gender diversity is needed to ensure that all Americans receive high-quality, culturally competent health care. We asked whether (1) representation of female orthopaedic residents and clinical faculty and (2) representation of ethnic minority orthopaedic residents, clinical faculty, and basic science faculty increased during the past 15 years since our original study. A questionnaire, created on SurveyMonkey®, was distributed by email to the coordinators of all 152 orthopaedic residency training programs in the United States. Eighty (53%) responses were received. The percentage of female orthopaedic surgery residents and female clinical faculty has nearly doubled since 1995. The percentages of African American, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Hispanic orthopaedic residents, and of clinical faculty have increased. Orthopaedic basic science research faculty is 83% male and is comprised primarily of Caucasians (62%) and Asian/Pacific Islanders (24%). Despite the increase in diversity in the orthopaedic workforce during the past 15 years, ethnic and gender disparities persist among orthopaedic residency programs regarding residents, clinical faculty, and basic research faculty. To increase diversity in orthopaedic residency programs, an emphasis on recruiting ethnic and gender minority candidates needs to become a priority in the orthopaedic academic community.

  5. The orthopaedic surgeon and manufacturing industry relationship. Ethical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lim, E V; Aquino, N J

    1999-11-01

    Orthopaedic surgery has progressed over the years because of innovative work of pioneering orthopaedic surgeons; new developments in internal fixation techniques and implants codeveloped with the orthopaedic manufacturing industry have improved treatment greatly. This article analyzes and reviews the relationship of orthopaedic surgeons to the orthopaedic implant industry, analyzing three broad categories of the relationship: (1) physicians receiving gifts from industry; (2) the orthopaedic industry's financial support of educational and research endeavors of academic trauma and other centers; and (3) the relationship of the industry with innovators in the field of orthopaedic surgery by retainer fees, royalties, and stock options from industry. The ethical relationship requires: (1) putting the patient's concerns first above vested interests; (2) an awareness of a potential for abuse; and (3) a level of awareness of the relationship and the ability to explain and inculcate this relationship in the teaching program of young residents to maintain the high standards that have been set.

  6. Leadership and business education in orthopaedic residency training programs.

    PubMed

    Kiesau, Carter D; Heim, Kathryn A; Parekh, Selene G

    2011-01-01

    Leadership and business challenges have become increasingly present in the practice of medicine. Orthopaedic residency programs are at the forefront of educating and preparing orthopaedic surgeons. This study attempts to quantify the number of orthopaedic residency programs in the United States that include leadership or business topics in resident education program and to determine which topics are being taught and rate the importance of various leadership characteristics and business topics. A survey was sent to all orthopaedic department chairpersons and residency program directors in the United States via e-mail. The survey responses were collected using a survey collection website. The respondents rated the importance of leadership training for residents as somewhat important. The quality of character, integrity, and honesty received the highest average rating among 19 different qualities of good leaders in orthopaedics. The inclusion of business training in resident education was also rated as somewhat important. The topic of billing and coding received the highest average rating among 14 different orthopaedically relevant business topics. A variety of topics beyond the scope of clinical practice must be included in orthopaedic residency educational curricula. The decreased participation of newly trained orthopaedic surgeons in leadership positions and national and state orthopaedic organizations is concerning for the future of orthopaedic surgery. Increased inclusion of leadership and business training in resident education is important to better prepare trainees for the future.

  7. Evaluation of malnutrition in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cross, Michael Brian; Yi, Paul Hyunsoo; Thomas, Charlotte F; Garcia, Jane; Della Valle, Craig J

    2014-03-01

    Malnutrition can increase the risk of surgical site infection in both elective spine surgery and total joint arthroplasty. Obesity and diabetes are common comorbid conditions in patients who are malnourished. Despite the relatively high incidence of nutritional disorders among patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery, the evaluation and management of malnutrition is not generally well understood by practicing orthopaedic surgeons. Serologic parameters such as total lymphocyte count, albumin level, prealbumin level, and transferrin level have all been used as markers for nutrition status. In addition, anthropometric measurements, such as calf and arm muscle circumference or triceps skinfold, and standardized scoring systems, such as the Rainey-MacDonald nutritional index, the Mini Nutritional Assessment, and institution-specific nutritional scoring tools, are useful to define malnutrition. Preoperative nutrition assessment and optimization of nutritional parameters, including tight glucose control, normalization of serum albumin, and safe weight loss, may reduce the risk of perioperative complications, including infection.

  8. Stroke assessment in the perioperative orthopaedic patient.

    PubMed

    Weinhardt, Janice; Jacobson, Kristine

    2012-01-01

    A growing elderly population with an increasing number of comorbidities is presenting for orthopaedic procedures and interventions, lending themselves to greater risk for complications, including stroke. Prior stroke or transient ischemic attack, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, carotid stenosis, and advanced age are the most common risk factors for perioperative stroke. A comprehensive neurologic assessment should include a thorough history including identification of risk factors, pertinent medications, and a physical examination. This assessment is important to establish a baseline for subsequent neurologic evaluations in the postoperative period. Neurologic physical assessment can be an intimidating task, especially for the orthopaedic nurse who lacks experience in caring for the neurologic patient. Patients who are found with a focal neurologic deficit that is suspicious for stroke require urgent assessment, exclusion of stroke mimics, and activation of the institution's stroke team to allow for brain saving interventions. Time is brain.

  9. Allergic or Hypersensitivity Reactions to Orthopaedic Implants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Timothy T; Haines, Colin M; Uhl, Richard L

    2017-10-01

    Allergic or hypersensitivity reactions to orthopaedic implants can pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Although 10% to 15% of the population exhibits cutaneous sensitivity to metals, deep-tissue reactions to metal implants are comparatively rare. Nevertheless, the link between cutaneous sensitivity and clinically relevant deep-tissue reactions is unclear. Most reactions to orthopaedic devices are type IV, or delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. The most commonly implicated allergens are nickel, cobalt, and chromium; however, reactions to nonmetal compounds, such as polymethyl methacrylate, antibiotic spacers, and suture materials, have also been reported. Symptoms of hypersensitivity to implants are nonspecific and include pain, swelling, stiffness, and localized skin reactions. Following arthroplasty, internal fixation, or implantation of similarly allergenic devices, the persistence or early reappearance of inflammatory symptoms should raise suspicions for hypersensitivity. However, hypersensitivity is a diagnosis of exclusion. Infection, as well as aseptic loosening, particulate synovitis, instability, and other causes of failure must first be eliminated.

  10. Nationwide Databases in Orthopaedic Surgery Research.

    PubMed

    Bohl, Daniel D; Singh, Kern; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2016-10-01

    The use of nationwide databases to conduct orthopaedic research has expanded markedly in recent years. Nationwide databases offer large sample sizes, sampling of patients who are representative of the country as a whole, and data that enable investigation of trends over time. The most common use of nationwide databases is to study the occurrence of postoperative adverse events. Other uses include the analysis of costs and the investigation of critical hospital metrics, such as length of stay and readmission rates. Although nationwide databases are powerful research tools, readers should be aware of the differences between them and their limitations. These include variations and potential inaccuracies in data collection, imperfections in patient sampling, insufficient postoperative follow-up, and lack of orthopaedic-specific outcomes.

  11. Setting standards for medical writing in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Mauffrey, Cyril; Scarlat, Marius M; Pećina, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Once the privilege of few clinical scholars in the field of orthopaedics, medical writing has become a must for career advancement. The number of papers submitted and published yearly has increased steadily, and with the development of the Internet, manuscript and journals have become easily accessible. Medical writing has risen to become a discipline in itself, with rules and standards. However, heterogeneity in the quality of papers submitted still prevails, with large variations in both form and content. With countries such as China and India submitting an exponential number of manuscripts, it is important and helpful that standards of medical writing be emphasised to help writers who do not always have the required support to produce an outstanding manuscript. In this paper, we summarise what may become standards for medical writing in the field of orthopaedics.

  12. The 2016 American Orthopaedic Association-Japanese Orthopaedic Association Traveling Fellowship.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Sumon; Cho, Samuel K; Freedman, Brett A; Firoozabadi, Reza

    2017-06-07

    The American Orthopaedic Association-Japanese Orthopaedic Association (AOA-JOA) Traveling Fellowship, which began in 1992 as a collaborative effort between the 2 orthopaedic communities, is aimed at fostering leadership among early-career surgeons through clinical, academic, and cultural exchange. Over 3 weeks, we experienced an extraordinary journey that led us across nearly 800 miles of the picturesque Japanese countryside, with stops at 6 distinguished academic centers. The opportunity to become personally acquainted with orthopaedic leaders in Japan, learn from their experiences, and immerse ourselves in the ancient and storied culture of a beautiful country was one that we will not soon forget. Along the way, we accumulated a wealth of information while enjoying the legendary hospitality of the Japanese people. There is a ubiquitous challenge in delivering cost-effective, accessible health care while maintaining a commitment to education and research. The U.S. orthopaedic community may take solace in the fact that our Japanese colleagues stand with us as partners in this pursuit, and our relationship with them continues to grow stronger through endeavors such as the AOA-JOA Traveling Fellowship. We look forward to honoring our Japanese colleagues in 2017 when we host them in the United States.

  13. Synthetic biodegradable polymers for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Behravesh, E; Yasko, A W; Engel, P S; Mikos, A G

    1999-10-01

    Synthetic biodegradable polymers offer an alternative to the use of autografts, allografts, and nondegradable materials for bone replacement. They can be synthesized with tailored mechanical and degradative properties. They also can be processed to porous scaffolds with desired pore morphologic features conducive to tissue ingrowth. Moreover, functionalized polymers can modulate cellular function and induce tissue ingrowth. This review focuses on four classes of polymers that hold promise for orthopaedic applications: poly alpha-hydroxy esters, polyphosphazenes, polyanhydrides, and polypropylene fumarate crosslinked networks.

  14. Improving parental satisfaction in pediatric orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Williams, Geraint; Pattison, Giles; Mariathas, Chrishan; Lazar, Joanna; Rashied, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    No previous studies have attempted to measure parental satisfaction and service quality with regards to pediatric orthopaedic inpatient care. We performed a prospective observational study to identify areas of inpatient care which might be improved to increase overall parental satisfaction. We used the validated Swedish parent satisfaction questionnaire to generate data from 104 pediatric orthopaedic hospital inpatients between August 2009 and May 2010 (49 elective and 55 trauma pediatric orthopaedic admissions; median age range, 2 to 6 y). Questions focused on 8 domains of quality: information on illness, information on routines, accessibility, medical treatment, care processes, staff attitudes, parent participation, and staff work environment. Scores generated a percentage of the maximum achievable for that quality index. Data were analyzed using recognized statistical methods. Overall mean combined scores for the care indices were highest for parents' perception of "medical treatment" (95%) and "staff attitudes" (95%). The medical treatment index includes questions regarding staff member's skill and competence. Lowest scores corresponded to the index "information on routines" (86%). Information on routines applies to parental awareness of ward rounds, to whom questions should be directed and which doctors and nursing staff are responsible for their child's care. Lower scores in relation to this index were substantiated by comments from relatives requesting greater information provision. The information parents required was routinely provided suggesting that retention rather than lack of information is the main issue. Provision of information pamphlets tailored to common injuries or elective procedures might prove an effective method for improving parental satisfaction and overall care. Improving information provision and parental retention of this information is the strategy most likely to improve quality of service and parental satisfaction for pediatric

  15. 100 most cited articles in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lefaivre, Kelly A; Shadgan, Babak; O'Brien, Peter J

    2011-05-01

    Citation analysis reflects the recognition a work has received in the scientific community by its peers, and is a common method to determine 'classic' works in medical specialties. We determined which published articles in orthopaedic journals have been most cited by other authors by ranking the 100 top-cited works. By analyzing characteristics of these articles, we intended to determine what qualities make an orthopaedic article important to the specialty. Finally, we determined if there was a change in level of evidence of studies on this list with time. Science Citation Index Expanded was searched for citations to articles published in any of the 49 journals in the subject category "ORTHOPEDICS." Each of the 49 journals was searched separately using the "cited reference search" to determine the 100 most often cited articles. Each article was reviewed for basic information including year of publication, country of origin, source journal of the article, article type, and level of evidence. We categorized the journal article by field of research where possible. The number of citations ranged from 1748 to 353. The 100 most often cited articles in orthopaedic surgery were published in 11 of the 49 journals, spanning from general to more specific subspecialty journals. The majority of the papers (76) were clinical, with the remaining representing some type of basic science research. The most common level of evidence was IV (42 of the 76 studies). Of the 76 clinical articles, 27 introduced or tested classification systems or outcome measurement tools. Authors aiming to write a highly cited article in an orthopaedic surgery journal will be favored by language of publication, source journal, country of origin, and introduction of a classification scheme or outcome tool.

  16. Pay for performance in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Read G; Bozic, Kevin J; Bradford, David S

    2007-04-01

    In recent decades American medicine has undergone tremendous changes. Numerous reimbursement and systems approaches to controlling medical inflation and improving quality have failed to provide cost-effective, high-quality health care in most circumstances. Public and private payers are currently implementing pay for performance, a new reimbursement method linking physician pay to evidence of adherence to performance measures, to constrain costs, encourage efficiency, and maximize value for health care dollars. High-quality research regarding pay for performance and its impact is scarce, particularly in orthopaedic surgery. Although supporters argue pay for performance will remedy the fragmented, costly delivery of health services in the United States, skeptics raise concerns about disagreement over quality guidelines, financial implications for providers and hospitals, inadequate infrastructure, public reporting, system gaming, and physician support. Our survey of orthopaedic surgeons reveals limited understanding of pay for performance, marked skepticism of nonphysician stakeholders' intentions, and a strong desire for greater clinician involvement in shaping the pay for performance movement. As pay for performance will likely be a long-term change that will have an impact on every orthopaedic surgeon, clinician awareness and participation will be fundamental in creating successful pay for performance programs.

  17. [A Paediatric Orthopaedic outpatient clinic referral patterns].

    PubMed

    Moraleda, L; Castellote, M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the commonest referrals to a paediatric orthopaedic outpatient clinic and, therefore, to be able to improve the paediatric residency program in managing musculoskeletal problems. Demographic data, referrals and final diagnosis were collected prospectively on all patients that were evaluated in a paediatric orthopaedic outpatient clinic. The majority of referrals were to evaluate musculoskeletal pain (37%), foot deformity (20%), spine deformity (15%), walking pattern (11%), alignment of the lower limbs (4%), and development of the hip (4%). A normal physical examination or a normal variation was observed in 42% of patients. A mild condition was observed in 17% of patients that should have only been referred to a paediatric orthopaedic clinic after failing to resolve pain with anti-inflammatories or physiotherapy. A mild deformity that only needed treatment if it became symptomatic was seen in 8% of patients. The majority of referrals were due to a normal variation or mild conditions that only required symptomatic treatment. Paediatric residency programs do not reflect the prevalence of musculoskeletal conditions in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical trial networks in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rangan, A; Jefferson, L; Baker, P; Cook, L

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to review the role of clinical trial networks in orthopaedic surgery. A total of two electronic databases (MEDLINE and EMBASE) were searched from inception to September 2013 with no language restrictions. Articles related to randomised controlled trials (RCTs), research networks and orthopaedic research, were identified and reviewed. The usefulness of trainee-led research collaborations is reported and our knowledge of current clinical trial infrastructure further supplements the review. Searching yielded 818 titles and abstracts, of which 12 were suitable for this review. Results are summarised and presented narratively under the following headings: 1) identifying clinically relevant research questions; 2) education and training; 3) conduct of multicentre RCTs and 4) dissemination and adoption of trial results. This review confirms growing international awareness of the important role research networks play in supporting trials in orthopaedic surgery. Multidisciplinary collaboration and adequate investment in trial infrastructure are crucial for successful delivery of RCTs. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:169-74. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  19. Vitamin D deficiency: a paediatric orthopaedic perspective.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Nicholas M P; Page, Jonathan E

    2012-02-01

    At the turn of the last century, rickets (vitamin D deficiency) was one of the most common musculoskeletal diseases of the paediatric population presenting to physicians. Today, the most common referral pathway for these patients ends in a paediatric orthopaedic outpatient clinic. Vitamin D deficiency is a clinical entity that can affect all children and should be looked for in all children with musculoskeletal symptoms. The child at risk of rickets is now white, breastfed, protected from the sun and obese. Vitamin D deficiency can present as atypical muscular pain, pathological fractures or slipped upper femoral epiphysis. Obesity is linked with lower vitamin D levels; however, in the paediatric population, this does not necessarily equal clinical disorder. Vitamin D supplements can be used to reduce the risk of pathological fractures in the cerebral palsy child. It should also form part of the differential diagnosis in the work-up of nonaccidental injuries. Children with a low vitamin D present with a higher incidence of fractures from normal activities. Vitamin D levels need to be assessed before any form of orthopaedic surgery, as it can affect growth, both in the diaphysis of the bone and in the growth plate. Vitamin D levels are a key element in the successful practice of paediatric orthopaedics. It is not just the possible cause of disorder presenting to the clinician but also extremely important in ensuring the successful postoperative recovery of the patient.

  20. The impact of disruptive innovations in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Erik; Bozic, Kevin J

    2009-10-01

    The US healthcare system is currently facing daunting demographic and economic challenges. Because musculoskeletal disorders and disease represent a substantial and growing portion of this healthcare burden, novel approaches will be needed to continue to provide high-quality, affordable, and accessible orthopaedic care to our population. The concept of "disruptive innovations," which has been studied and popularized by Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen, may offer a potential framework for developing strategies to improve quality and control costs associated with musculoskeletal care. The introduction of mobile fluoroscopic imaging systems, the development of the Surgical Implant Generation Network intramedullary nail for treatment of long bone fractures in the developing world, the expanding role and contributions of physician assistants and nurse practitioners to the orthopaedic team, and the rise of ambulatory surgery centers are all examples of disruptive innovations in the field of orthopaedics. Although numerous cultural and regulatory barriers have limited the widespread adoption of these "disruptive innovations," we believe they represent an opportunity for clinicians to regain leadership in health care while at the same time improving quality and access to care for patients with musculoskeletal disease.

  1. Quality of online pediatric orthopaedic education materials.

    PubMed

    Feghhi, Daniel P; Komlos, Daniel; Agarwal, Nitin; Sabharwal, Sanjeev

    2014-12-03

    Increased availability of medical information on the Internet empowers patients to look up answers to questions about their medical conditions. However, the quality of medical information available on the Internet is highly variable. Various tools for the assessment of online medical information have been developed and used to assess the quality and accuracy of medical web sites. In this study we used the LIDA tool (Minervation) to assess the quality of pediatric patient information on the AAOS (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons) and POSNA (Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America) web sites. The accessibility, usability, and reliability of online medical information in the "Children" section of the AAOS web site and on the POSNA web site were assessed with use of the LIDA tool. Flesch-Kincaid (FK) and Flesch Reading Ease (FRE) values were also calculated to assess the readability of the pediatric education material. Patient education materials on each web site scored in the moderate range in assessments of accessibility, usability, and reliability. FK and FRE values indicated that the readability of each web site remained at a somewhat higher (more difficult) level than the recommended benchmark. The quality and readability of online information for children on the AAOS and POSNA web sites are acceptable but can be improved further. The quality of online pediatric orthopaedic patient education materials may affect communication with patients and their caregivers, and further investigation and modification of quality are needed. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  2. ORTHOPAEDIC GENE THERAPY – LOST IN TRANSLATION?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, C.H.; Ghivizzani, S.C.; Robbins, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Orthopaedic gene therapy has been the topic of considerable research for two decades. The preclinical data are impressive and many orthopaedic conditions are well suited to genetic therapies. But there have been few clinical trials and no FDA-approved product exists. This paper examines why this is so. The reasons are multifactorial. Clinical translation is expensive and difficult to fund by traditional academic routes. Because gene therapy is viewed as unsafe and risky, it does not attract major funding from the pharmaceutical industry. Start-up companies are burdened by the complex intellectual property environment and difficulties in dealing with the technology transfer offices of major universities. Successful translation requires close interactions between scientists, clinicians and experts in regulatory and compliance issues. It is difficult to create such a favourable translational environment. Other promising fields of biological therapy have contemplated similar frustrations approximately 20 years after their founding, so there seem to be more general constraints on translation that are difficult to define. Gene therapy has noted some major clinical successes in recent years, and a sense of optimism is returning to the field. We hope that orthopaedic applications will benefit collaterally from this upswing and move expeditiously into advanced clinical trials. PMID:21948071

  3. Publication Productivity of Orthopaedic Surgery Chairs.

    PubMed

    Zelle, Boris A; Weathers, Michael A; Fajardo, Roberto J; Haghshenas, Varan; Bhandari, Mohit

    2017-06-21

    As academic leaders, orthopaedic chairs represent role models for scholarly activities. Despite the importance of journal publications as a measure of scholarly activity, data on the publication productivity of orthopaedic chairs remain limited. The goals of this study were to record the publication productivity of orthopaedic chairs and evaluate the extent to which they maintained their scholarly activity while serving as chairs. The chairs of all orthopaedic residency programs in the United States were identified through the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) web site, and were confirmed by information found on the web site of each orthopaedic program that was included in the study. University and non-university chairs were defined based on affiliation of the program with a medical school. The publication records of the program chairs were retrieved through the Scopus database. During the 7 years prior to their appointment to chair, the mean number of total publications was significantly higher for university chairs (n = 58.6, range 0 to 217) than for non-university chairs (n = 29.1, range 0 to 13) (p = 0.003). The mean number of publications per year during the 7 years leading up to the chair position was 4.66 (range, 0 to 25) for the university chairs, and 2.29 (range, 0 to 10.9) for the non-university group (p = 0.02). While serving as chair, the mean number of publications per year significantly decreased among the university chairs to 3.75 (range, 0 to 32.8; p = 0.015), whereas no significant change was observed among non-university chairs. The mean percentage of first authorships was not significantly different between university and non-university chairs. Both groups showed significant declines in first authorships while serving as chair. At the time of becoming chair, the average university chair had published approximately 60 manuscripts, whereas the average non-university chair had published approximately 30 manuscripts. While

  4. The surgeon's assistant: an orthopaedic model at Hastings.

    PubMed

    Stenhouse, N; Gallannaugh, S C

    1996-07-01

    An Orthopaedic Surgeon's Assistant has been part of the orthopaedic surgical team at Hastings since 1983. Having a suitably trained person in post ensures continuity and stability and enhances the treatment of patients, the performance of the department and the training offered to Higher Surgical Trainees. Discussion includes the value of such a role, other orthopaedic models and the need for a nationally accredited training scheme and qualification.

  5. BMP-Functionalised Coatings to Promote Osteogenesis for Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianfeng; Guo, Jing; Liu, Jingsong; Wei, Limin; Wu, Gang

    2014-01-01

    The loss of bone integrity can significantly compromise the aesthetics and mobility of patients and can be treated using orthopaedic implants. Over the past decades; various orthopaedic implants; such as allografts; xenografts and synthetic materials; have been developed and widely used in clinical practice. However; most of these materials lack intrinsic osteoinductivity and thus cannot induce bone formation. Consequently; osteoinductive functionalisation of orthopaedic implants is needed to promote local osteogenesis and implant osteointegration. For this purpose; bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-functionalised coatings have proven to be a simple and effective strategy. In this review; we summarise the current knowledge and recent advances regardingBMP-functionalised coatings for orthopaedic implants. PMID:24914764

  6. Tele-orthopaedics: United States Army European Regional Medical Command.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jeffrey; Walker, Shaka; Melaas, David; Crane, Maria; Bacahui, Jacob; Boedeker, Ben H

    2012-01-01

    Telemedicine is the provision of medical care over long distances by way of videoconferencing and other communication technologies. Staff at Vilseck U.S. Army Clinic set up a 3-month pilot real-time tele-orthopaedic clinic to determine if it was feasible to extend Orthopaedic specialty care over long distances. A full time physician assistant was located at the patient site and an orthopaedic surgeon was located at the Landstuhl or Heidelberg site. Patients were initially evaluated by the PA. Complex consults were reviewed by the PA and Orthopaedic surgeon via telephone or VTC. Patients meeting possible indications for surgery were then scheduled for a VTC consult with a surgeon.

  7. 75 FR 32210 - United States v. Idaho Orthopaedic Society, Timothy Doerr, Jeffrey Hessing, Idaho Sports Medicine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... Antitrust Division United States v. Idaho Orthopaedic Society, Timothy Doerr, Jeffrey Hessing, Idaho Sports.... Idaho Orthopaedic Society, Timothy Doerr, Jeffrey Hessing, Idaho Sports Medicine Institute, John Kloss..., Plaintiffs, vs. Idaho Orthopaedic Society, Timothy Doerr, Jeffrey Hessing, Idaho Sports Medicine Institute...

  8. Why do medical students choose orthopaedics as a career?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amanda L; Sharma, Jyoti; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Emery, Sanford E; McCollister Evarts, C; Floyd, Mark W; Kaeding, Christopher C; Lavelle, William F; Marsh, J Lawrence; Pellegrini, Vincent D; Van Heest, Ann E; Black, Kevin P

    2012-06-06

    The primary influence on medical students' career choice is their third-year clerkship. However, orthopaedics is not a required rotation in the curriculum of most medical schools. Our goals were to identify factors that motivate students to choose an orthopaedic career and to compare these with the factors that influence students to choose nonorthopaedic disciplines. Fourth-year medical students and orthopaedic residents at the postgraduate year (PGY)-1 level at eight orthopaedic training programs in the United States were surveyed to determine the reasons that they chose orthopaedics instead of other medical or surgical fields. Of the 622 individuals who responded to our survey, 125 were entering orthopaedics and 497 were not. Although career choice in both groups was most heavily influenced by third and fourth-year clinical rotations and faculty contacts, orthopaedics-bound respondents were more likely than non-orthopaedics-bound respondents to be strongly influenced by experiences and people prior to medical school. Orthopaedics-bound respondents were less likely to report a faculty member as the most important person influencing career choice. Fifty-one percent (sixty-three) of 124 students who selected orthopaedics had already decided to pursue this field prior to their third-year rotation. Patient care was chosen by 71% (347) of 490 non-orthopaedics-bound respondents and 75% (ninety-four) of 125 orthopaedics-bound respondents as the most important factor for pursuing a particular field. Income was not selected as the deciding factor by respondents in either group. Although faculty contacts and third-year clinical rotations played an important role in student selection of specialty training, they were less influential for those choosing an orthopaedic career than for those choosing other disciplines. Many students choosing orthopaedics made this decision prior to medical school. We believe that increased exposure to positive clinical role models and

  9. What is orthopaedic triage? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Joanne H; James, Rebecca E; Davey, Rachel; Waddington, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Complex and chronic disease is placing significant pressure on hospital outpatient departments. Novel ways of delivering care have been developed recently and are often described as ‘triage’ services. This paper reviews the literature pertaining to definitions and descriptions of orthopaedic/musculoskeletal triage processes, in order to provide information on ‘best practice’ to assist health care facilities. Method A comprehensive open-ended search was conducted using electronic databases to identify studies describing models of triage clinics for patients with a musculoskeletal/orthopaedic complaint, who have been referred to hospital outpatient clinics for a surgical consultation. Studies were critically appraised using the McMaster quality appraisal tool and ranked using the National Health and Medical Research Council hierarchy of evidence. A thematic analysis of the definitions, processes and procedures of triage described within the literature was undertaken. Results 1930 studies were identified and 45 were included in the review (including diagnostic and evaluative research). The hierarchy of evidence ranged from I to IV; however, the majority were at low levels of evidence and scored poorly on the critical appraisal tool. Three broad themes of triage were identified: presence of a referral, configuration of the triage (who, how and where) and the aim of triage. However, there were significant inconsistencies across these themes. Conclusions This systematic review highlighted the need for standardization of the definition of triage, the procedures of assessment and management and measures of outcome used in orthopaedic/musculoskeletal triage to ensure best-practice processes, procedures and outcomes for triage clinics. PMID:25410703

  10. Orthopaedic injuries among electric bicycle users.

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Shay; Weltsch, Daniel; Bariteau, Jason T; Givon, Adi; Peleg, Kobi; Thein, Ran

    2017-08-11

    The use of electric bicycles (E-bike) has dramatically increased. E-bikes offer convenient, environmental-friendly, and less expensive alternative to other forms of transport. However, E-bikes provide a new public health challenge in terms of safety and injury prevention. This study is the first to specifically investigate the E-bike related orthopaedic injuries, based on a national trauma registry. Data from a National Trauma Registry were reviewed for patients hospitalized following E-bike related injuries. Between Jan 2014 to Dec 2015, a total of 549 patients were reviewed. Data were analyzed according to demography, type of orthopaedic injury, associated injuries and severity, injury mechanism and treatment in the operating room. A total of 360 (65%) patients sustained orthopaedic injuries, out of them 230 (63.8%) sustained limb/pelvis/spine fractures. Lower extremity fractures were more prevalent than upper extremity fractures (p<0.001). The tibia was the most fractured bone (19.2%). Patients over the age of 50 years were at the highest risk for spine (20. 5%, p=0.0001), pelvis (15.9%, p=0.0001) and femoral neck (15.9%, p=0.0172) fractures relative to other age groups. Approximately 42% of patients sustained associated injuries, with head/neck/face injuries being the most prevalent (30.3%). followed by chest (11.9%) and abdominal injury (13.3%). A collision between E-bike and a motorized vehicle was the mechanism of injury in 35% of cases. In this mechanism of injury, patients had 1.7 times the risk for associated injuries (p<0.0001) and the risk for major trauma (ISS score ≥16) was more than the double (p=0.03). One third of patients with orthopaedic injuries required treatment in the operating room. Treatment varied depending on the type of fracture. This study provides unique information on epidemiological characteristics of orthpaedic injuries caused be E-bikes, pertinent both to medical care providers, as well as to health policy-makers allocating

  11. Nanostructured diamond coatings for orthopaedic applications

    PubMed Central

    CATLEDGE, S.A.; THOMAS, V.; VOHRA, Y.K.

    2013-01-01

    With increasing numbers of orthopaedic devices being implanted, greater emphasis is being placed on ceramic coating technology to reduce friction and wear in mating total joint replacement components, in order to improve implant function and increase device lifespan. In this chapter, we consider ultra-hard carbon coatings, with emphasis on nanostructured diamond, as alternative bearing surfaces for metallic components. Such coatings have great potential for use in biomedical implants as a result of their extreme hardness, wear resistance, low friction and biocompatibility. These ultra-hard carbon coatings can be deposited by several techniques resulting in a wide variety of structures and properties. PMID:25285213

  12. Impacting policy change for orthopaedic trauma.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Sarah; Mir, Hassan R; Jahangir, A Alex; Mehta, Samir; Sethi, Manish K

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic injury, which remains the leading cause of death for Americans aged 1 to 44 years, costs the United States over $400 billion because of loss of productivity and medical services each year. Yet, over the last few decades, there has been decreased funding for trauma centers. The 2010 Affordable Care Act is just the start of health care reform, and Congress will continue to create and change policies directly impacting medical care. In this article, we evaluate how orthopaedic trauma surgeons can have a lasting impact on the nation's health care policy through organizations and advocacy on the local, state, and federal levels.

  13. Nanostructured diamond coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Catledge, S A; Thomas, V; Vohra, Y K

    2013-01-01

    With increasing numbers of orthopaedic devices being implanted, greater emphasis is being placed on ceramic coating technology to reduce friction and wear in mating total joint replacement components, in order to improve implant function and increase device lifespan. In this chapter, we consider ultra-hard carbon coatings, with emphasis on nanostructured diamond, as alternative bearing surfaces for metallic components. Such coatings have great potential for use in biomedical implants as a result of their extreme hardness, wear resistance, low friction and biocompatibility. These ultra-hard carbon coatings can be deposited by several techniques resulting in a wide variety of structures and properties.

  14. Current orthopaedic treatment of ballistic injuries.

    PubMed

    Volgas, David A; Stannard, James P; Alonso, Jorge E

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine current orthopaedic treatment of gunshot wounds. Surgeons are increasingly confronted by gunshot wounds that occur in both military and civilian settings. Much of the published work has been from military settings. In the United States, low-energy gunshot wounds are very common, and their incidence is increasing elsewhere in the world. Current treatment and its rationale is reviewed and a systematic approach to the assessment and treatment of these injuries is offered, taking into account the entirety of the injury, rather than simply the velocity of the missile.

  15. The reconstructive microsurgery ladder in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Tintle, Scott M; Levin, L Scott

    2013-03-01

    Since the advent of the operating microscope by Julius Jacobson in 1960, reconstructive microsurgery has become an integral part of extremity reconstruction and orthopaedics. During World War I, with the influx of severe extremity trauma Harold Gillies introduced the concept of the reconstructive ladder for wound closure. The concept of the reconstructive ladder goes from simple to complex means of attaining wound closure. Over the last half century microsurgery has continued to evolve and progress. We now have a microsurgical reconstructive ladder. The microsurgical reconstruction ladder is based upon the early work on revascularization and replantation extending through the procedures that are described in this article.

  16. Representation of developing countries in orthopaedic journals: a survey of four influential orthopaedic journals.

    PubMed

    Aluede, Edward E; Phillips, Jonathan; Bleyer, Jamie; Jergesen, Harry E; Coughlin, Richard

    2012-08-01

    The developing world contains more than ¾ of the world's population, and has the largest burden of musculoskeletal disease. Published studies provide crucial information that can influence healthcare policies. Presumably much information regarding burden in the developing world would arise from authors from developing countries. However, the extent of participation of authors from the developing world in widely read orthopaedic journals is unclear. We surveyed four influential English-language orthopaedic journals to document the contributions of authors from developing countries. We surveyed Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, and the American and British volumes of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, from May 2007 through May 2010. The country of origin of all authors was identified. We used the designations provided by the International Monetary Fund to define countries as either developed or developing. Two hundred sixty-five of 3964 publications (7%) included authors from developing countries. Ninety percent of these had authors from developing countries with industrialized and emerging-market economies. Publications from Sub-Saharan Africa accounted for only 0.4% of the 3964 articles reviewed and 5.6% of the 265 articles with developing world authorship. Countries with the least robust economies were least represented. Less than 1/3 of articles with authors from the developing world had coauthors from developed or other developing countries. Additional studies are needed to determine the reasons for the low representation noted and to establish strategies to increase the number of orthopaedic publications from parts of the world where the burden of musculoskeletal disease is the greatest.

  17. Radiation exposure of eyes, thyroid gland and hands in orthopaedic staff: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kesavachandran, Chandrasekharan Nair; Haamann, Frank; Nienhaus, Albert

    2012-10-30

    Various procedures, especially minimal invasive techniques using fluoroscopy, pose a risk of radiation exposure to orthopaedic staff. Anatomical sites such as the eyes, thyroid glands and hands are more vulnerable to radiation considering the limited use of personal protective devices in the workplace. The objective of the study is to assess the annual mean cumulative and per procedure radiation dose received at anatomical locations like eyes, thyroid glands and hands in orthopaedic staff using systematic review. The review of literature was conducted using systematic search of the database sources like PUBMED and EMBASE using appropriate keywords. The eligibility criteria and the data extraction of literature were based on study design (cohort or cross-sectional study), study population (orthopaedic surgeons or their assistants), exposure (doses of workplace radiation exposure at hands/fingers, eye/forehead, neck/thyroid), language (German and English). The literature search was conducted using a PRISMA checklist and flow chart. Forty-two articles were found eligible and included for the review. The results show that radiation doses for the anatomical locations of eye, thyroid gland and hands were lower than the dose levels recommended. But there is a considerable variation of radiation dose received at all three anatomical locations mainly due to different situations including procedures (open and minimally invasive), work experience (junior and senior surgeons),distance from the primary and secondary radiation, and use of personal protective equipments (PPEs). The surgeons receive higher radiation dose during minimally invasive procedures compared to open procedures. Junior surgeons are at higher risk of radiation exposure compared to seniors. PPEs play a significant role in reduction of radiation dose. Although the current radiation precautions appear to be adequate based on the low dose radiation, more in-depth studies are required on the variations of

  18. Therapeutic recreation: optimal health treatment for orthopaedic disability.

    PubMed

    Wardlaw, F B; McGuire, F A; Overby, Z

    2000-01-01

    Therapeutic recreation is a viable rehabilitation treatment for orthopaedic disabilities. Interdisciplinary treatment teams should consider therapeutic recreation interventions using the Health Prevention/Health Promotion Model in management of orthopaedic disabilities to enhance the client's present level of functioning to optimal health.

  19. Social Competence and Temperament in Children with Chronic Orthopaedic Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagmurlu, Bilge; Yavuz, H. Melis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate social competence in children with orthopaedic disability and its concurrent relations to child's temperament, health condition, and maternal warmth. Participants were 68 Turkish children (mean = 5.94 years) with chronic orthopaedic disability and their mothers coming from disadvantaged backgrounds. Mother…

  20. Social Competence and Temperament in Children with Chronic Orthopaedic Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagmurlu, Bilge; Yavuz, H. Melis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate social competence in children with orthopaedic disability and its concurrent relations to child's temperament, health condition, and maternal warmth. Participants were 68 Turkish children (mean = 5.94 years) with chronic orthopaedic disability and their mothers coming from disadvantaged backgrounds. Mother…

  1. ACGME Accreditation of Orthopaedic Surgery Subspecialty Fellowship Training Programs.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; Grabel, Zachary; DiGiovanni, Christopher W

    2014-06-04

    Orthopaedic surgery training in the United States consists of a five-year-minimum orthopaedic surgery residency program, followed by optional subspecialty fellowship training. There is an increasing trend for trainees to complete at least one fellowship program following residency training, with approximately 90% of current trainees planning to complete a fellowship. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the overall variability of orthopaedic subspecialty fellowships in terms of characteristics, match process, and the tendency to be accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Nine orthopaedic surgery subspecialties were assessed for their fellowship match program, their number of fellowship programs and positions in the match, and the number of programs and positions accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Programs with a Subspecialty Certificate offered by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery were compared with programs without a Subspecialty Certificate. Comparative statistics utilizing an unpaired t test with a statistical cutoff of p < 0.05 were performed. Three separate matching programs are used by the nine subspecialties. Hand surgery utilizes the National Residents Matching Program, shoulder and elbow surgery utilizes the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Fellowship Match, and the other seven subspecialties utilize the San Francisco Matching Program. In total, 478 fellowship programs were identified, representing 897 fellowship positions. The highest percentage of fellowship programs that are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education was in orthopaedic sports medicine (93.1%), compared with the lowest percentage in foot and ankle orthopaedics (16.3%). A significantly higher percentage (p < 0.05) of fellowship programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education were found for subspecialties with American Board of Orthopaedic

  2. Multilayer scaffolds in orthopaedic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; Doral, M Nedim; Karlsson, Jon; Egol, Kenneth A; Jazrawi, Laith M; Coelho, Paulo G; Martinez, Amaury; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Owens, Brett D; Ochi, Mitsuo; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Atala, Anthony; Fu, Freddie H; Lu, Helen H; Rodeo, Scott A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize the recent developments in the field of tissue engineering as they relate to multilayer scaffold designs in musculoskeletal regeneration. Clinical and basic research studies that highlight the current knowledge and potential future applications of the multilayer scaffolds in orthopaedic tissue engineering were evaluated and the best evidence collected. Studies were divided into three main categories based on tissue types and interfaces for which multilayer scaffolds were used to regenerate: bone, osteochondral junction and tendon-to-bone interfaces. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that the use of stratified scaffolds composed of multiple layers with distinct compositions for regeneration of distinct tissue types within the same scaffold and anatomic location is feasible. This emerging tissue engineering approach has potential applications in regeneration of bone defects, osteochondral lesions and tendon-to-bone interfaces with successful basic research findings that encourage clinical applications. Present data supporting the advantages of the use of multilayer scaffolds as an emerging strategy in musculoskeletal tissue engineering are promising, however, still limited. Positive impacts of the use of next generation scaffolds in orthopaedic tissue engineering can be expected in terms of decreasing the invasiveness of current grafting techniques used for reconstruction of bone and osteochondral defects, and tendon-to-bone interfaces in near future.

  3. Combining dissimilar metals in orthopaedic implants: revisited.

    PubMed

    Zartman, Kevin C; Berlet, Gregory C; Hyer, Christopher F; Woodard, Joseph R

    2011-10-01

    The use of metals as implant materials has become common practice in the field of orthopaedics. A wide variety of conditions are treated with metallic implants, and designers have used an assortment of materials to meet the unique mechanical demands of each application. The majority of implants used today, whether pins, plates, screws, or total joints, are made of cobalt-chrome alloy, stainless steel, or titanium. Common metallurgic wisdom cautions against bonding dissimilar metals in a biologically active environment. Surgeons have therefore shied away from combining dissimilar metal implants because of the fear of inciting corrosion that could potentially compromise the implants and lead to aseptic loosening, implant failure, or adverse biological reaction in host tissue. As surgical reconstruction and arthroplasty options expand with the advent of newer implants and expanded operative techniques, the orthopaedic surgeon will increasingly be faced with weighing the risks and benefits of combining implants made of dissimilar metals in a patient. Here, the authors examine the origins of the concern over using mixed metals, discuss mechanisms of corrosion as they relate to surgical implants, and review both in vitro and in vivo studies concerning the most common combinations of dissimilar metals in order to guide the surgeon in choosing implants.

  4. About the beginnings of orthopaedics in Timisoara.

    PubMed

    Poenaru, Dan V

    2015-12-01

    The historical and geographical territory of Banat is part of present-day Romania. Timisoara's history, the capital city of Banat region, dates back to the second century B.C. Medical life in Banat was re-organised after the promulgation of the Aulic Laws in the eighteenth century. Thorough research was undertaken through historic manuscripts, old newspapers, biographies and other papers about the history of Romanian medicine. The eighteenth century witnessed the building of three hospitals in Timisoara. In that period, Banat region benefited from the expertise and professionalism of doctors who graduated and were trained mainly in Central and Western European universities. By the beginning of the twentieth century, many medical clinics or sanatoriums specialising in orthopaedics and traumatology were offering their services to the population. Banat region had many good orthopaedists, and one of them was Prof. Dr. Doc. Berceanu, who graduated from the University of Medicine Bucharest and further specialised in Paris, France. He is the founder of the Orthopaedics and Traumatology Clinic in Timisoara.

  5. Virtual reality in orthopaedics: is it a reality?

    PubMed

    Mabrey, Jay D; Reinig, Karl D; Cannon, W Dilworth

    2010-10-01

    Virtual reality (VR) simulation has been a requirement for airline and military pilots for decades and is only now being integrated into surgical training programs. Thus far, orthopaedic training programs have been slow to adopt VR training. We therefore asked (1) how VR has worked for other surgical specialties; (2) what VR solutions are available for orthopaedics; and (3) should VR simulation become part of the orthopaedic curriculum? An informal literature review was performed, searching for orthopaedically-oriented VR surgical simulators and comparing this to the number of programs available for general surgery teaching programs. An in-depth review of a VR simulator for knee arthroscopy is also presented. WHERE ARE WE NOW?: The number of papers specific to orthopaedics and VR is limited. VR is used effectively in other specialties, especially general surgery. VR simulators are readily available for shoulder and knee arthroscopy but not as well incorporated into training curricula. WHERE DO WE NEED TO GO?: VR technology is available today for training programs. Integration of VR into the orthopaedic curriculum will save time in the OR, reduce operative errors, and improve the resident's overall educational experience. The public will expect their surgeons to train on these simulators. HOW DO WE GET THERE?: Orthopaedic training programs should take advantage of the commercially available VR simulators for orthopaedic procedures and incorporate them into their training curricula. This effort could be led by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS), two of the primary sponsors of a major study in the effectiveness of VR simulators for knee arthroscopy.

  6. The fifty most cited Italian articles in the orthopaedic literature.

    PubMed

    Piolanti, N; Nesti, A; Andreani, L; Parchi, P D; Cervi, V; Castellini, I; Marchetti, S

    2015-08-01

    It is widely known that in Orthopaedics, as in each specialty, the academic influence of an article is also determined by the number of times the article is cited. The aim of this study was to identify the 50 most frequently cited Italian orthopaedics journal articles and to analyse the characteristics that might have made them more citable. Science Citation Index Expanded was searched for the 50 most frequently cited Italian orthopaedics journal articles between 1988 and 2013 in the subject category "Orthopaedics". The 50 most frequently cited articles were all published in English and were published in 12 of the 67 journals in the subject category "Orthopaedics" in the Institute for Scientific Information Web Science (Thomson Reuters, New York, New York, USA). One half of the articles were published before 2000 and the other half later. The number of citations ranged from 423 of the first article (mean citation/years 21.15) to 83 of the fiftieth (mean citation/years 16.60). The articles were all categorized under orthopaedic field, but each of them spanned from orthopaedics to a specific sub-specialty. The majority was clinical articles (n = 39), and the most common fields were sport orthopaedic surgery (including arthroscopy and cartilage) (n = 19) and biomechanics (n = 12). This list of 50 most frequently cited Italian articles is, to our knowledge, significantly important for the general orthopaedic scientific community, particularly for the Italian orthopaedic community. Researchers and doctors may use this work to make their future publications more influential and citable.

  7. Contribution of biomechanics to clinical practice in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Woo, Savio L-Y

    2004-01-01

    Biomechanics is a field that has a very long history. It was described in ancient Chinese and Greek literature as early as 400-500 BC. The foundation of biomechanics, however, was laid during a period between the 1500's to 1700's by renowned personalities, da Vinci, Galileo, Borelli, Hooke, Newton, and so (Fung, Y.C., Biomechanics: Mechanical Properties of Living Tissues, 2nd Ed. Springer Verlag, Chapter 1, 1993). Beginning in the 1950's, Muybridge, Steindler, Inman, Lissner, and Hirsch performed the pioneering work on musculoskeletal biomechanics and the foundation of orthopaedic biomechanics was formed. For the following two decades, the field has blossomed and significant contributions in the biomechanics of bone, articular cartilage, soft tissues, upper and lower extremities, spine and so on has been made. More sophisticated equipment, coupled with mathematical modeling and better engineering design, has enabled us to make great strides. Bioengineers, in collaboration with orthopaedic surgeons, have translated many laboratory discoveries into clinical practice, leading to improved patient treatment and outcome. In the past 30 years, my colleagues and I have focused our research on the biomechanics of musculoskeletal soft tissues, ligaments and tendons, in particular. Therefore, in this lecture, the function of knee ligaments, the associated homeostatic responses secondary to immobilization and exercise, and healing of the ligaments will be reviewed. Examples of scientific findings that help to guide the surgical management of injury to ligaments will be given. New ideas on functional tissue engineering to improve the healing of knee ligaments and tendons will be presented. We have learned that tendons and ligaments are indeed complex biological tissues. To fully understand their behavior, healing and remodelling processes, this author advocates major efforts be made to bring molecular biologists, morphologists, biochemists, bioengineers, physical therapists and

  8. Biomaterials for orthopaedic implants and bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargeant, Timothy David

    For bone regeneration, there is need for biodegradable, synthetic scaffolds that direct the formation of de novo mineralized tissue. Orthopaedic implants additionally require mechanical function. The work described herein attempts to address both of these needs. The general strategy involves integrating molecularly designed tissue engineering scaffolds with porous metallic foams to create hybrid materials to direct cellular behavior. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) that self-assemble into nanofibers were designed to template hydroxyapatite mineral under biological conditions. The molecular design incorporated either serine (S) or phosphoserine S(P) and was mixed with RGDS-bearing PA to evaluate of the key parameters for mineral formation. This led to the discovery of nanoscale hydroxyapatite spheres templated on both S- and S(P)-bearing PA nanofibers. Stem cells were encapsulated in these gels and RT-PCR showed osteoblastic differentiation in all samples. Osteoblast maturation was increased in S-bearing PA compared to S(P)-bearing PA, although the reason is not yet understood. A method to create robust PA nanofiber coatings on NiTi was developed by optimizing the NiTi oxide surface chemistry, optimizing silane vapor deposition, and covalently attaching the PAs to the silanized substrate. The surfaces were characterized by XPS, SIMS, AFM, and fluorimetry. In vitro experiments demonstrated the importance of covalent attachment for cellular adhesion and proved the materials were not cytotoxic. Orthopaedic hybrid materials were created by triggering PA self-assembly within the interconnected pores of Ti foams developed by the Dunand research group. In vitro experiments demonstrate that pre-osteoblasts adhere to, proliferate on, and migrate into PA-Ti hybrids made with S(P)- and RGDS-bearing PA mixtures. The cells differentiate into mature osteoblasts and remain viable up to 28 days. In vivo studies using a rat model demonstrate osteointegration and boney ingrowth into bare

  9. Radiation exposure to the eye lens of orthopaedic surgeons during various orthopaedic procedures.

    PubMed

    Romanova, K; Vassileva, J; Alyakov, M

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the radiation dose to the eye lens of orthopaedic surgeons during various orthopaedic procedures and to make efforts to ensure that radiation protection is optimised. The study was performed for Fractura femoris and Fractura cruris procedures performed in orthopaedic operating theatres, as well as for fractures of wrist, ankle and hand/shoulder performed in the emergency trauma room. The highest mean value of the eye lens dose of 47.2 μSv and higher mean fluoroscopy time of 3 min, as well as the corresponding highest maximum values of 77.1 μSv and 5.0 min were observed for the Fractura femoris procedure performed with the Biplanar 500e fluoroscopy systems. At a normal workload, the estimated mean annual dose values do not exceed the annual occupational dose limit for the lens of eye, but at a heavy workload in the department, this dose limit could be achieved or exceeded. The use of protective lead glasses is recommended as they could reduce the radiation exposure of the lens of the eye. The phantom measurements demonstrated that the use of half-dose mode could additionally reduce dose to the operator's eye lens.

  10. [Achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia in paediatric orthopaedics].

    PubMed

    Correll, J

    2008-01-01

    Achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia are the most common forms of short stature. The leading sign is the diminished body height. Most cases of achondroplasia can be detected by clinical examination. Hypochondroplasia is more often not diagnosed until preschool age.In achondroplasia many different orthopaedic problems can arise, which influence the ADL. Mainly pathologic alterations of the occipitocervical region or a stenosis of the medullary cavity should be expected. In the limbs a bow-leg deformity and hyperlaxity of the ligaments often can be seen, which in some cases restrict walking capacity. Even if many people of short stature contemplate a lengthening procedure, the correction of deformities is much more important. The CORA method should be used in planning any osteotomy.

  11. "Patient blood management" in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Canillas, Fernando; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; García-Erce, José Antonio; Pavía-Molina, José; Gómez-Luque, Aurelio; Muñoz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic and trauma surgical procedures (OTS) can lead to significant blood losses and acute postoperative anaemia, which in many cases requires allogeneic blood transfusions (ABT). The clinical, economic and logistical disadvantages of ABT have promoted the development of multidisciplinary and multimodal programs generically known as Patient Blood Management (PBM) programs, which have as their objective to reduce or eliminate the need for ABT and improve clinical outcomes. These programs are supported by the implementation of four groups of perioperative measures: (1) use of restrictive transfusion criteria; (2) stimulation of erythropoiesis; (3) reduction of bleeding; and (4) autologous blood transfusion. In this article, a review is presented of the effectiveness, safety and recommendations of applicable strategies in OTS, as well as the barriers and requirements to the development and implementation of PBM programs in this surgical specialty.

  12. Advances in radionuclide therapeutics in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Herrick J; Luck, James V; Siegel, Michael E

    2004-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals not only are used for diagnostic purposes but also increasingly in the treatment of many orthopaedic-related disorders. With the development of specific bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals, the side effects of treatment are minimized, therapeutic effects are sustained, and concomitant use with other modalities may have synergistic effects. These new radiopharmaceuticals, such as strontium 89 and samarium 153-ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphate, have been used as palliative treatment for patients with bone pain from osseous metastases. Excellent clinical responses with acceptable hematologic toxicity have been observed, and clinical results rival those of external beam radiation therapy. Radiosynovectomy has become a procedure of choice at many institutions to treat recurrent hemarthrosis and chronic synovitis in patients whose hemophilia is poorly controlled with medical management. Radiosynovectomy also remains a viable option to treat chronic synovitis secondary to inflammatory arthropathies, particularly rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. Major vascular lesions associated with orthopaedic injuries.

    PubMed

    Karavias, D; Korovessis, P; Filos, K S; Siamplis, D; Petrocheilos, J; Androulakis, J

    1992-01-01

    Seventeen patients, aged 11-67 years (mean, 32.6), with major vascular injuries associated with traumatic orthopaedic injuries, were treated operatively in the authors' institution over a 4-year period. The most common mechanism of trauma was a high-energy injury (70.8%), and the rate of open injuries was 88.2%; 64.9% of the injuries were located in the lower extremities. The treatment protocol consisted of aggressive resuscitation; Doppler imaging and, when necessary, angiography; stable bone fixation with subsequent vascular repair; and extended wound debridement. The vascular repair for arterial lacerations consisted of (a) end-to-end anastomosis (47.2%); (b) interpositional homologous vein graft (23.6%); (c) vascular decompression through fracture distraction in one patient (5.9%); (d) xenograft interposition (in one patient; 5.9%); (e) venous repair (in three patients; 17.7%); and (f) embolectomy (in all patients). Three vascular reoperations (17.7%) were necessary because of rupture of the anastomosis. The authors' preferred bone stabilization method was external fixation, which was used in 47.2% of cases. Amputation was performed in three cases (17.7%) as a salvage operation. Although six patients (35.4%) were admitted with delayed shock (mean duration, 73.6 +/- 27.8 min), this led to a lethal outcome due to shock lung in only one patient. Another patient developed massive lung embolism 3 months postoperatively and died. The authors believe that this well-organized approach, based on a specific treatment protocol, for patients with severe orthopaedic trauma and concomitant vascular injury, not only improves outcome but gives good to excellent functional results in the majority of patients.

  14. Fabricating specialised orthopaedic implants using additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Paul

    2014-03-01

    It has been hypothesised that AM is ideal for patient specific orthopaedic implants such as those used in bone cancer treatment, that can rapidly build structures such as lattices for bone and tissues to in-grow, that would be impossible using current conventional subtractive manufacturing techniques. The aim of this study was to describe the adoption of AM (direct metal laser sintering and electron beam melting) into the design manufacturing and post-manufacturing processes and the early clinical use. Prior to the clinical use of AM implants, extensive metallurgical and mechanical testing of both laser and electron beam fabrications were undertaken. Concurrently, post-manufacturing processes evaluated included hipping, cleaning and coating treatments. The first clinical application of a titanium alloy mega-implant was undertaken in November 2010. A 3D model of the pelvic wing implant was designed from CT scans. Novel key features included extensive lattice structures at the bone interfaces and integral flanges to fix the implant to the bone. The pelvic device was implanted with the aid of navigation and to date the patient remains active. A further 18 patient specific mega-implants have now been implanted. The early use of this advanced manufacturing route for patient specific implants has been very encouraging enabling the engineer to produce more advanced and anatomical conforming implants. However, there are a new set of design, manufacturing and regulatory challenges that require addressing to permit this technique to be used more widely. This technology is changing the design and manufacturing paradigm for the fabrication of specialised orthopaedic implants.

  15. Unplanned 30-day readmissions in orthopaedic trauma.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, David; Olufajo, Olubode A; Zogg, Cheryl K; Rios-Diaz, Arturo; Harris, Mitchel; Weaver, Michael J; Haider, Adil H; Salim, Ali

    2016-08-01

    30-day readmission is increasingly used as a hospital quality metric. The objective of this study was to describe the patient factors associated with unplanned 30-day hospital readmission of orthopaedic trauma patients. A statewide observational study was undertaken using data from all acute hospitals in California. All hospital inpatients with a primary diagnosis of fracture or dislocation (ICD-9-CM codes 800-829) were included, except for those with isolated injuries to the skull, face, or ribs. The primary outcome measure was unplanned 30-day readmission to any hospital in California. 416,568 trauma admissions were available for analysis. The overall readmission rate was 6.5%, and 27.3% of readmitted patients presented to a different hospital. Factors significantly associated with readmission were male sex (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.19-1.27), age 46-65 (2.61 [2.27-2.99]), black race (1.19 [1.11-1.27]), entitlement to publicly funded healthcare (1.38 [1.25-1.52]), Charlson Comorbidity Index ≥2 (1.84 [1.79-1.90]), discharge against medical advice (3.13 [2.67-3.68]), and spinal fracture (1.42 [1.34-1.49]). Major reasons for readmission included: cardiopulmonary disease (25.6%), infections (20.1%), musculoskeletal problems (18.1%), and procedural complications (12.0%). Many orthopaedic trauma readmissions are potentially unrelated to the initial hospitalization. Penalties for unplanned readmissions risk penalizing hospitals that serve disadvantaged communities and treat a high proportion of trauma patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Patient Internet Use in a Community Outpatient Orthopaedic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Beall, McPherson S; Beall, M Scott; Greenfield, Mary Lou VH; Biermann, J Sybil

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated Internet use among orthopaedic patients in a private practice general orthopaedic setting. Of 154 respondents, twenty percent had used the Internet to research their orthopaedic diagnosis. Search rates were lowest for patients with arthritis and highest for patients with disorders of the spine or back. Seventy percent of these patients who had searched had found their searches helpful, and over 50% of patients who had searched had questions raised that they planned to address with their physicians. Of those patients who did search the Internet, none reported concern regarding the credibility of Internet retrieved material. PMID:12180601

  17. Evidence-based orthopaedics or 'superstition in the pigeon'.

    PubMed

    Evans, R

    2009-01-01

    Pigeon behavioural conditioning methods are similar to the processes that orthopaedic surgeons use to evaluate new surgical procedures. Alternatively, evidence-based orthopaedics is a tool for surgeons to evaluate procedures in a systematic, patient-centred way that is less instinctive than pigeon behaviour. The objective of this article is to describe evidence-based orthopaedics, and then propose changes to surgical culture with the aim of refining the interpretation of the current literature and improving the quality of future research. The proposals are 'institutional' changes rather than calls for increased funding and more randomised controlled trials.

  18. Quality, Safety, and Value in Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Glotzbecker, Michael P; Wang, Kevin; Waters, Peter M; McCarthy, James; Flynn, John M; Vitale, Michael G

    2016-09-01

    Enhancing patient safety and the quality of care continues to be a focus of considerable public and professional interest. We have made dramatic strides in our technical ability to care for children with pediatric orthopaedic problems, but it has become increasingly obvious that there are also significant opportunities to improve the quality, safety, and value of the care we deliver. The purpose of this article is to introduce pediatric orthopaedic surgeons to the rationale for and principles of quality improvement and to provide an update on quality, safety, and value projects within Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America.

  19. Medical School Experiences Shape Women Students' Interest in Orthopaedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Mary I

    2016-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgery now has the lowest percentage of women in residency programs of any surgical specialty. Understanding factors, particularly those related to the medical school experience, that contribute to the specialty's inability to draw from the best women students is crucial to improving diversity in the profession. (1) Does required medical school exposure to orthopaedic surgery increase the proportion of women choosing the specialty? (2) Do negative perceptions deter women from choosing orthopaedic surgery? (3) What proportion of orthopaedic faculty members are women, and what proportion of residents are women? (4) To what degree has gender bias been identified in the application/interview process? Two PubMed searches of articles between 2005 and 2015 were performed using a combination of medical subject headings. The first search combined "Orthopaedics" with "Physicians, women" and phrases "women surgeons" or "female surgeons" and the second combined "Orthopedics" with "Internship & Residency" or "exp Education, Medical" and "Sex Ratio" or "Sex Factors", resulting in 46 publications of which all abstracts were reviewed resulting in 11 manuscripts that were related to the research questions. The Google Scholar search of "women in orthopaedic surgery" identified one additional publication. These 12 manuscripts were read and bibliographies of each reviewed with two additional publications identified and included. Required exposure to orthopaedics was found to be positively associated with the number of women applicants to the field, whereas negative perceptions have been reported to deter women from choosing orthopaedic surgery. Orthopaedics has the lowest percentage of women faculty and women residents (14%) compared with other specialties; this suggests that same gender mentorship opportunities are limited. For women applying to orthopaedics, gender bias is most evident through illegal interview questions, in which women are asked such questions more

  20. Understanding and Addressing the Global Need for Orthopaedic Trauma Care.

    PubMed

    Agarwal-Harding, Kiran J; von Keudell, Arvind; Zirkle, Lewis G; Meara, John G; Dyer, George S M

    2016-11-02

    ➤The burden of musculoskeletal trauma is high worldwide, disproportionately affecting the poor, who have the least access to quality orthopaedic trauma care.➤Orthopaedic trauma care is essential, and must be a priority in the horizontal development of global health systems.➤The education of surgeons, nonphysician clinicians, and ancillary staff in low and middle income countries is central to improving access to and quality of care.➤Volunteer surgical missions from rich countries can sustainably expand and strengthen orthopaedic trauma care only when they serve a local need and build local capacity.➤Innovative business models may help to pay for care of the poor. Examples include reducing costs through process improvements and cross-subsidizing from profitable high-volume activities.➤Resource-poor settings may foster innovations in devices or systems with universal applicability in orthopaedics. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  1. The Future of Biologic Coatings for Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Stuart B.; Yao, Zhenyu; Keeney, Michael; Yang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Implants are widely used for othopaedic applications such as fixing fractures, repairing nonunions, obtaining a joint arthrodesis, total joint arthroplasty, spinal reconstruction, and soft tissue anchorage. Previously, orthopaedic implants were designed simply as mechanical devices; the biological aspects of the implant were a byproduct of stable internal/external fixation of the device to the surrounding bone or soft tissue. More recently, biologic coatings have been incorporated into orthopaedic implants in order to modulate the surrounding biological environment. This opinion article reviews current and potential future use of biologic coatings for orthopaedic implants to facilitate osseointegration and mitigate possible adverse tissue responses including the foreign body reaction and implant infection. While many of these coatings are still in the preclinical testing stage, bioengineers, material scientists and surgeons continue to explore surface coatings as a means of improving clinical outcome of patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery. PMID:23391496

  2. Concussion in Sports: What Do Orthopaedic Surgeons Need to Know?

    PubMed

    Cahill, Patrick J; Refakis, Christian; Storey, Eileen; Warner, William C

    2016-12-01

    A concussion is a relatively common sports-related injury that affects athletes of all ages. Although orthopaedic surgeons are not expected to replace sports medicine physicians and neurologists with regard to the management of concussions, orthopaedic surgeons, particularly those who are fellowship-trained in sports medicine, must have a current knowledge base of what a concussion is, how a concussion is diagnosed, and how a concussion should be managed. Orthopaedic surgeons should understand the pathophysiology, assessment, and management of concussion so that they have a basic comprehension of this injury, which is at the forefront of the academic literature and North American media. This understanding will prepare orthopaedic surgeons to work in concert with and assist sports medicine physicians, athletic trainers, and physical therapists in providing comprehensive care for athletes with a concussion.

  3. Massachusetts health care reform and orthopaedic trauma: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Harris, Mitchel B

    2014-10-01

    Massachusetts was the first state to implement its own version of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), when it passed the Massachusetts Health Care Reform (MHR) in 2006. Similar to the ACA, its explicit purpose was universal access to health care to all residents of Massachusetts. We believe that the influence of MHR on orthopaedic trauma in Massachusetts will have implications on trauma systems across the country, given the similarities between ACA and MHR. Therefore, in this article, we discuss our experiences as Orthopaedic trauma surgeons with regard to MHR. In this regard, we reviewed the effects of the implementation of MHR on the orthopaedic trauma services at 3 of the 4 level one trauma centers in Boston, MA. Our results demonstrate a dramatic reduction in the proportion of uncompensated care at these centers in addition to the number of uninsured patients with orthopaedic trauma injuries.

  4. Evidence-based pediatric orthopaedics: an introduction, part I.

    PubMed

    Wright, James G; Kocher, Mininder S; Sanders, James O

    2012-09-01

    Evidence-based medicine is a relatively new and sometimes controversial concept when applied to pediatric orthopaedics. This article provides pediatric orthopaedists with some basics to help them understand and apply evidence-based medicine to their clinical practice.

  5. Venturing into the overlap between pediatric orthopaedics and hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H; Zlotolow, Dan A; Ratner, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    There is an overlap between pediatric orthopaedic surgery and hand surgery. A pediatric orthopaedic surgeon is accustomed to the intricacies of the immature skeleton, whereas a hand surgeon is more familiar with the regional anatomy and finer surgical techniques. Many hand diagnoses and surgical techniques are appropriate for the pediatric orthopaedic surgeon, including straightforward duplicated thumb reconstruction of a trigger thumb. Many pediatric diagnoses are more suitable for treatment by a hand surgeon, including simple syndactyly release and complex duplicated thumb reconstruction. Other procedures, such as pollicization, cleft hand reconstruction, synpolydactyly release, and macrodactyly management, require more advanced expertise for successful treatment. It is helpful for pediatric orthopaedic surgeons and hand surgeons to be familiar with the indications, surgical techniques, outcomes, and complications of pediatric hand surgery.

  6. Research status and application prospects of digital technology in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-xi; Zhang, Kun; Hao, Yi-ni; Hu, Yong-cheng

    2012-08-01

    In the last 10 years, basic and clinical research in orthopaedics has developed rapidly. Understanding of orthopaedic disorders involves not only routine diagnosis, but also the pursuit of highly efficient and accurate three-dimensional imaging of the intra- and extra-medullary distribution, form and structure of orthopaedic disorders, thus allowing scientific evaluation of the indications for surgery, drawing up of the best surgical plan, minimization of operative trauma and the earliest possible restoration of limb function. Meanwhile, the most important type of basic research, which was previously biomechanical research, has gradually become computational biomechanics based on in vitro cadaver experiments. This review aims to summarize the research status and application prospects of digital technology in orthopaedics, including virtual reality technology, reverse engineering and rapid prototyping techniques, computational biomechanics, computer navigation technology and management of digitization of medical records.

  7. Eponymous signs in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Madke, Bhushan; Nayak, Chitra

    2012-01-01

    Clinical signs reflect the sheer and close observatory quality of an astute physician. Many new dermatological signs both in clinical and diagnostic aspects of various dermatoses are being reported and no single book on dermatology literature gives a comprehensive list of these “signs” and postgraduate students in dermatology finds it difficult to have access to the description, as most of these resident doctor do not have access to the said journal articles. “Signs” commonly found in dermatologic literature with a brief discussion and explanation is reviewed in this paper. PMID:23189246

  8. Eponym : de Quervain thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Engkakul, Pontipa; Mahachoklertwattana, Pat; Poomthavorn, Preamrudee

    2011-04-01

    de Quervain thyroiditis is a self-limited inflammatory disorder of the thyroid gland. It is an uncommon disease in adults and very rare in children. Fritz de Quervain, a Swiss surgeon, who was an authority on thyroid disease, described the unique pathology of this disease. Granulomatous changes with giant cells in thyroid tissue are the pathological findings. Viral infection in genetically predisposed individuals has been proposed as the pathogenesis of the disease. Clinical hallmarks for the diagnosis are painful thyroid enlargement, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein as well as decreased uptake of the thyroid gland on thyroid scintigraphy. In addition, thyrotoxicosis is present in about 50% of cases in early phase of the disease. Serum thyroglobulin level is usually elevated. Only symptomatic treatment with analgesics is usually required for pain relief. Glucocorticoid therapy may be used in severely ill patients. de Quervain thyroiditis is generally completely resolved without complications in 6-12 months. However, permanent hypothyroidism and recurrent disease have been reported in some patients.

  9. [Application of three-dimensional printing technique in orthopaedics].

    PubMed

    Luo, Qiang; Lau, Tak Wing; Fang, Xinshuo; Leung, Frankie

    2014-03-01

    To review the current progress of three-dimensional (3-D) printing technique in the clinical practice, its limitations and prospects. The recent publications associated with the clinical application of 3-D printing technique in the field of surgery, especially in orthopaedics were extensively reviewed. Currently, 3-D printing technique has been applied in orthopaedic surgery to aid diagnosis, make operative plans, and produce personalized prosthesis or implants. 3-D printing technique is a promising technique in clinical application.

  10. Quality Measures in Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Geoffrey D; Greenberg, Daniel R; Dragoo, Jason L; Safran, Marc R; Kamal, Robin N

    2017-06-24

    To report the current quality measures that are applicable to orthopaedic sports medicine physicians. Six databases were searched with a customized search term to identify quality measures relevant to orthopaedic sports medicine surgeons: MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, the National Quality Forum (NQF) Quality Positioning System (QPS), the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) National Quality Measures Clearinghouse (NQMC), the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) database, and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) website. Results were screened by 2 Board-certified orthopaedic surgeons with fellowship training in sports medicine and dichotomized based on sports medicine-specific or general orthopaedic (nonarthroplasty) categories. Hip and knee arthroplasty measures were excluded. Included quality measures were further categorized based on Donabedian's domains and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) National Quality Strategy priorities. A total of 1,292 quality measures were screened and 66 unique quality measures were included. A total of 47 were sports medicine-specific and 19 related to the general practice of orthopaedics for a fellowship-trained sports medicine specialist. Nineteen (29%) quality measures were collected within PQRS, with 5 of them relating to sports medicine and 14 relating to general orthopaedics. AAOS Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) comprised 40 (60%) of the included measures and were all within sports medicine. Five (8%) additional measures were collected within AHRQ and 2 (3%) within NQF. Most quality measures consist of process rather than outcome or structural measures. No measures addressing concussions were identified. There are many existing quality measures relating to the practice of orthopaedic sports medicine. Most quality measures are process measures described within PQRS or AAOS CPGs. Knowledge of quality measures are important as they may be used to improve care, are increasingly being used to

  11. Smartphone apps for orthopaedic sports medicine - a smart move?

    PubMed

    Wong, Seng Juong; Robertson, Greg A; Connor, Katie L; Brady, Richard R; Wood, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of smartphones together with their downloadable applications (apps), there is increasing opportunities for doctors, including orthopaedic sports surgeons, to integrate such technology into clinical practice. However, the clinical reliability of these medical apps remains questionable. We reviewed available apps themed specifically towards Orthopaedic Sports Medicine and related conditions and assessed the level of medical professional involvement in their design and content, along with a review of these apps. The most popular smartphone app stores (Android, Apple, Blackberry, Windows, Samsung, Nokia) were searched for Orthopaedic Sports medicine themed apps, using the search terms; Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Orthopaedics, Sports medicine, Knee Injury, Shoulder Injury, Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear, Medial Collateral Ligament Tear, Rotator Cuff Tear, Meniscal Tear, Tennis Elbow. All English language apps related to orthopaedic sports medicine were included. A total of 76 individual Orthopaedic Sports Medicine themed apps were identified. According to app store classifications, there were 45 (59 %) medical themed apps, 28 (37 %) health and fitness themed apps, 1 (1 %) business app, 1 (1 %) reference app and 1 (1 %) sports app. Forty-nine (64 %) apps were available for download free of charge. For those that charged access, the prices ranged from £0.69 to £69.99. Only 51 % of sports medicine apps had customer satisfaction ratings and 39 % had named medical professional involvement in their development or content. We found the majority of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine apps had no named medical professional involvement, raising concerns over their content and evidence-base. We recommend increased regulation of such apps to improve the accountability of app content.

  12. Acoustic emission in orthopaedics: A state of the art review.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Richard A

    2016-12-08

    Acoustic emission (AE) is the phenomenon of sonic and ultrasonic wave generation by materials as they undergo deformation and fracture processes. AE monitoring is widely used throughout civil and mechanical engineering as a highly sensitive and non-destructive technique for structural health monitoring. Advances in computational power and digital data storage have generated much further interest in the possible applications of AE technology. Of particular interest has been its application within the field of Orthopaedic surgery. This paper examines the current literature surrounding the use of AE technology within Orthopaedics and provides a comprehensive overview of its current applications within Orthopaedic surgery. The use of AE technology in Orthopaedics is wide ranging and is discussed under the themes of: the study of the biomechanical properties of bone and fracture mechanics, research into failure mechanisms associated with cemented implants, prosthetic design, diagnostic value of AE and clinical application. AE technology is of great benefit as an Orthopaedic research tool where AE counts can be used to provide a surrogate marker for damage accumulation and flaws can be monitored as they develop. More recently there has been increased interest in the possible clinical applications of AE technology and an appreciation of the potential benefits for the diagnosis and treatment of Orthopaedic pathology. Despite the challenges involved when adopting AE techniques in vivo the potential of AE technology within Orthopaedics is significant. Already widely used in the research setting, clinical application has shown enormous potential and is a rapidly expanding area of contemporary research. This analysis will review and summarise the current literature relating to the use of AE technology within Orthopaedic surgery. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Preoperative Planning in Orthopaedic Surgery. Current Practice and Evolving Applications.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; Galos, David; Jazrawi, Laith M; Egol, Kenneth A

    2015-12-01

    Preoperative planning is an essential prerequisite for the success of orthopaedic procedures. Traditionally, the exercise has involved the written down, step by step "blueprint" of the surgical procedure. Preoperative planning of the technical aspects of the orthopaedic procedure has been performed on hardcopy radiographs using various methods such as copying the radiographic image on tracing papers to practice the planned interventions. This method has become less practical due to variability in radiographic magnification and increasing implementation of digital imaging systems. Advances in technology along with recognition of the importance of surgical safety protocols resulted in widespread changes in orthopaedic preoperative planning approaches. Nowadays, perioperative "briefings" have gained particular importance and novel planning methods have started to integrate into orthopaedic practice. These methods include using software that enables surgeons to perform preoperative planning on digital radiographs and to construct 3D digital models or prototypes of various orthopaedic pathologies from a patient's CT scans to practice preoperatively. Evidence-to-date suggests that preoperative planning and briefings are effective means of favorably influencing the outcomes of orthopaedic procedures.

  14. Tele-orthopaedics: a snapshot of services in Australia.

    PubMed

    Caffery, Liam J; Taylor, Monica; North, John B; Smith, Anthony C

    2017-01-01

    Health services in the United States and Europe have reported that tele-orthopaedics saves significant patient travel time, reduces time off work, increases satisfaction with care and in some scenarios reduces the cost of care. Less is known about the role of tele-orthopaedics in Australia. The aim of this study was to explore Australian-based tele-orthopaedic services, and to identify the barriers and enablers associated with these services. We used a qualitative case study methodology where specific services were identified from multiple sources and invited to participate in a structured interview. Nine tele-orthopaedic services contributed to the study. Telehealth activity in each service ranged from one to 75 patients per week, and service maturity ranged from three months to 10 years. Services were used predominantly for fracture clinics and peri-operative consultations. The majority (78%) of services used videoconferencing. Two services used asynchronous methods to review radiographs without direct patient involvement. Tele-orthopaedics was found to be disruptive as it required the redesign of many care processes. However, all services found the redesign feasible. Staff resistance was a commonly cited barrier. Further, imaging repositories from multiple imaging providers complicated access to information. Key enablers included clinical champions, picture archiving and communication systems, and the perceived benefit to patients who would avoid the need for travel. Whilst it appears that tele-orthopaedics is not widely utilised in Australia, recognition of the barriers and enablers is important for the development of similar services.

  15. The American Orthopaedic Association-Japanese Orthopaedic Association 2010 traveling fellowship.

    PubMed

    Patel, Alpesh A; Cheng, Ivan; Yao, Jeffrey; Huffman, G Russell

    2011-12-21

    We started this journey excited by the prospects of visiting Japan, a country with a proud and historic past. We ended the fellowship accomplishing those goals, and we left with a great deal of admiration for our orthopaedic colleagues halfway around the world for their excellence in education, clinical care, and research. Their hospitality and attention to the details of our visit were exemplary and a lesson to us as we host visiting fellows in the future. Japan reflects its past, but it also offers a preview into our own nation's future: an aging population, a shrinking workforce, a stagnant economy, nationalized health care, and a mushrooming national debt. Of all of these factors, it is the aging population that we, as orthopaedic surgeons, will be most acutely aware of and involved with. The degenerative disorders that affect elderly patients dominate the landscape of surgical care in Japan. Osteoporosis and osteopenia permeate many aspects of care across orthopaedic subspecialties. The surgeons in Japan are developing innovative and cost-effective means of treating the large volume of older patients within the fiscal constraints of a nationalized health-care system. We learned, and will continue to learn more, from Japan about the management of this growing patient population with its unique pathologies and challenges. With the recent natural disaster and ongoing safety concerns in Japan, the character and will of the people of Japan have been on display. Their courage and resolve combined with order and compassion are a testament to the nation's cultural identity. The seeds of the Traveling Fellowship were planted shortly after Japan's last wide-scale reconstruction, and the ties that have bound the JOA and the AOA together are strengthened through this trying time. We strongly urge our colleagues in the U.S. to help support the people, the physicians, and the health-care system of Japan through its most recent tribulations and offer them the same care and

  16. Impact of fellowship training on clinical practice of orthopaedic sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bob; Gandhi, Jaipal; Limpisvasti, Orr; Mohr, Karen; ElAttrache, Neal S

    2015-03-04

    Approximately 90% of current orthopaedic graduates are engaging in fellowship training, with sports medicine being the most commonly chosen specialty. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of fellowship training on clinical decision-making by fellowship-trained sports medicine surgeons. A survey was designed to assess the importance of fellowship on common clinical decisions made in the nonoperative and surgical treatment of knee, shoulder, and elbow disorders. The survey also included questions for the respondents on their comfort level with a variety of routine and complex surgical procedures. The survey was sent to alumni of 113 orthopaedic sports medicine programs across the United States. Completed surveys were returned by 310 surgeons who had been in practice for an average of 9.0 years. They represented alumni of twenty-nine orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs across sixteen states. Fellowship was considered very important for surgical decision-making in the knee and shoulder. For nonoperative treatment, fellowship had a greater impact on shoulder disorders than on knee or elbow disorders. Fellowship was significantly more important than residency (p < 0.001) for determining preferred surgical equipment, implants, and braces. Among the surgical procedures assessed, respondents were least comfortable with the treatment of multi-ligamentous knee injuries, posterior cruciate ligament injuries, and shoulder instability with bone loss. Fellowship has a significantly higher impact than residency on industry-related decision-making. Fellowship-trained sports surgeons should consider seeking additional training in the treatment of multi-ligamentous knee injuries, posterior cruciate ligament injuries, shoulder instability with bone loss, and elbow disorders. The current findings were limited by the relatively small respondent pool, which represented only 26% of sports medicine fellowship programs in the United States. Copyright © 2015 by

  17. Quality measurement in orthopaedics: the purchasers' view.

    PubMed

    Lansky, David; Milstein, Arnold

    2009-10-01

    While all of medicine is under pressure to increase transparency and accountability, joint replacement subspecialists will face special scrutiny. Disclosures of questionable consulting fees, a demographic shift to younger patients, and uncertainty about the marginal benefits of product innovation in a time of great cost pressure invite a serious and progressive response from the profession. Current efforts to standardize measures by the National Quality Forum and PQRI will not address the concerns of purchasers, payors, or policy makers. Instead, they will ask the profession to document its commitment to appropriateness, stewardship of resources, coordination of care, and patient-centeredness. One mechanism for addressing these expectations is voluntary development of a uniform national registry for joint replacements that includes capture of preoperative appropriateness indicators, device monitoring information, revision rates, and structured postoperative patient followup. A national registry should support performance feedback and quality improvement activity, but it must also be designed to satisfy payor, purchaser, policymaker, and patient needs for information. Professional societies in orthopaedics should lead a collaborative process to develop metrics, infrastructure, and reporting formats that support continuous improvement and public accountability.

  18. HIV and Orthopaedics: Musculoskeletal Manifestations and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pretell-Mazzini, Juan; Subhawong, Ty; Hernandez, Victor H; Campo, Rafael

    2016-05-04

    ➤Advances in combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) in recent years have transformed HIV infection into a chronic disease when treatment is available, increasing a patient's life expectancy and the chances that orthopaedic surgeons will encounter such patients in their clinical practice.➤Musculoskeletal manifestations in patients with HIV infection are common and sometimes are the initial presentation of the disease. Knowledge about neoplasms and associated conditions affecting muscle, bones, and joints is essential for successful management.➤Since the advent of cART, total joint arthroplasty has been shown to be a safe procedure; however, perioperative infection is still a small risk in patients with uncontrolled viral loads or CD4 counts of <400 cells/mm(3).➤With regard to trauma surgery, the rates of early and late infection around implants, as well as union rates, are comparable with those in the HIV-negative population; however, there is an increased risk of pulmonary, renal, and infectious or septic complications in the polytrauma setting.➤Factors such as CD4 count, nutritional status, cART therapy, viral load count, and other comorbidities (hemophilia, infection among intravenous drug users, etc.) should be considered when treating these patients in order to optimize their clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  19. Surgical hand scrub practices in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Khan, Adnan; McLaren, Sandra G; Nelson, Carl L

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the practice of surgical hand scrubbing among orthopaedic surgeons, faculty, residents, and nurses met the institution's recommended 5-minute scrub policy and how often a 2-minute surgical hand scrub was used. Forty-eight subjects' hand scrub times were recorded discreetly for a total of 125 observations. All individuals scrubbed for a mean of 2.54 minutes and all scrubbed less than the 5-minute institutionally recommended policy. We found that 35.2% scrubbed less than 2 minutes and 64.8% scrubbed greater than 2 minutes. The subjects studied were polled to determine whether they knew the scrub policy, the minimum effective scrub time, and their perception of how long they scrub. Three of the 16 respondents correctly answered the question regarding the hospital's recommended policy regarding scrub time of 5 minutes. All stated they thought they scrubbed at least 2 minutes and all agreed that at least a 2-minute scrub should be done.

  20. Plaster of Paris: the orthopaedic surgeon heritage.

    PubMed

    Hernigou, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Plastering is one of the most ancient of the building handicrafts. Plaster is the common name for calcium sulphate hemi hydrate made by heating the mineral gypsum, the common name for sulphate of lime. In the tenth century the Arabs used liquid plaster in orthopaedic treatment. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, patients with fractures of the lower extremities-and often of the upper extremities as well-were treated in bed with restriction of all activity for many weeks until the fractures united. It was the practice of surgeons to dress wounds and fractures at frequent intervals. The bandages, pads, and splints were removed, the fractures manipulated, and the dressings reapplied. The search for simpler, less cumbersome methods of treatment led to the development of occlusive dressings, stiffened at first with starch and later with plaster of Paris. The ambulatory treatment of fractures was the direct result of these innovations. Two military surgeons, Antonius Mathijsen of the Netherlands, and Nikolai Ivanovitch Pirogov of Russia, were responsible for the introduction of the new plaster bandage technique. At the beginning of the twentieth century the technique was improved by Jean-François Calot, a French surgeon, who invented the hand manufacture of plaster bandage as a roll. During the twentieth century, walking cast and ambulation for fresh fractures were developed with plaster and pin incorporated in plaster; the open fracture care concept was introduced with plaster of Paris by Trueta before the external fixation.

  1. Role of technology assessment in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Turkelson, Charles; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2009-10-01

    A technology assessment is a literature-based research project that seeks to determine whether a medical device, drug, procedure, or biologic is effective or to summarize literature on a given technology. A well-conducted assessment is a form of secondary research that employs the same steps used in primary research studies (ie, well-designed clinical trials). The primary difference is that in technology assessment the investigator does not collect the raw data. Rather, (s)he must use data collected by someone else. Nevertheless, a well-designed assessment, like a well-designed study, employs the scientific method, which is a method designed to combat bias. When there is little available information, such as with new technologies, unbiased examinations can typically show that enthusiasm for that technology is not backed by much data. When there is more information, assessments can not only determine whether a technology is effective, but also how effective it is. Technology assessments can provide busy orthopaedic surgeons (who do not have the time to keep up with and critically evaluate current literature) with succinct information that enables them to rapidly determine what is and what is not known about any given medical technology.

  2. Orthopaedic tissue engineering and bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Glenn; Buchanan, Fraser; Marsh, David; Harkin-Jones, Eileen; Little, Uel; McCaigue, Mervyn

    2007-01-01

    Orthopaedic tissue engineering combines the application of scaffold materials, cells and the release of growth factors. It has been described as the science of persuading the body to reconstitute or repair tissues that have failed to regenerate or heal spontaneously. In the case of bone regeneration 3-D scaffolds are used as a framework to guide tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal cells obtained from the patient via biopsy are grown on biomaterials in vitro and then implanted at a desired site in the patient's body. Medical implants that encourage natural tissue regeneration are generally considered more desirable than metallic implants that may need to be removed by subsequent intervention. Numerous polymeric materials, from natural and artificial sources, are under investigation as substitutes for skeletal elements such as cartilage and bone. For bone regeneration, cells (obtained mainly from bone marrow aspirate or as primary cell outgrowths from bone biopsies) can be combined with biodegradable polymeric materials and/or ceramics and absorbed growth factors so that osteoinduction is facilitated together with osteoconduction; through the creation of bioactive rather than bioinert scaffold constructs. Relatively rapid biodegradation enables advantageous filling with natural tissue while loss of polymer strength before mass is disadvantageous. Innovative solutions are required to address this and other issues such as the biocompatibility of material surfaces and the use of appropriate scaffold topography and porosity to influence bone cell gene expression.

  3. Tissue engineering skeletal muscle for orthopaedic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payumo, Francis C.; Kim, Hyun D.; Sherling, Michael A.; Smith, Lee P.; Powell, Courtney; Wang, Xiao; Keeping, Hugh S.; Valentini, Robert F.; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    With current technology, tissue-engineered skeletal muscle analogues (bioartificial muscles) generate too little active force to be clinically useful in orthopaedic applications. They have been engineered genetically with numerous transgenes (growth hormone, insulinlike growth factor-1, erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor), and have been shown to deliver these therapeutic proteins either locally or systemically for months in vivo. Bone morphogenetic proteins belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily are osteoinductive molecules that drive the differentiation pathway of mesenchymal cells toward the chondroblastic or osteoblastic lineage, and stimulate bone formation in vivo. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells endogenously expressing bone morphogenetic proteins might serve as a vehicle for systemic bone morphogenetic protein delivery in vivo, proliferating skeletal myoblasts (C2C12) were transduced with a replication defective retrovirus containing the gene for recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6 (C2BMP-6). The C2BMP-6 cells constitutively expressed recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6 and synthesized bioactive recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6, based on increased alkaline phosphatase activity in coincubated mesenchymal cells. C2BMP-6 cells did not secrete soluble, bioactive recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6, but retained the bioactivity in the cell layer. Therefore, genetically-engineered skeletal muscle cells might serve as a platform for long-term delivery of osteoinductive bone morphogenetic proteins locally.

  4. Orthopaedic manifestations of neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Feldman, David S; Jordan, Charles; Fonseca, Lauren

    2010-06-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) is an autosomal dominant disease that affects 1 in 3,000 persons worldwide. Café-au-lait macules and peripheral nerve sheath tumors (ie, neurofibromas) are the most commonly recognized manifestations of NF-1. However, NF-1 affects multiple organ systems, and a multidisciplinary approach to treatment is required. Management of the orthopaedic manifestations of NF-1 is often difficult. The most complex manifestations are scoliosis (dystrophic and nondystrophic), congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia, and problems related to soft-tissue tumors. Metabolic bone disease is common; many patients are frankly osteopenic, which further complicates treatment. Dystrophic scoliosis, which may be caused by either bony dysplasia or intraspinal pathology, is characterized by early presentation and rapid progression. Pseudarthrosis is common even after instrumented fusion. Nondystrophic scoliosis tends to behave like adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, although it may present earlier and is associated with a higher rate of pseudarthrosis. Congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia is a long-bone dysplasia that afflicts patients with NF-1. Management of this osseous deformity is challenging. Failure to achieve union and refracture are common.

  5. Racial and ethnic diversity in orthopaedic surgery residency programs.

    PubMed

    Okike, Kanu; Utuk, Mekeme E; White, Augustus A

    2011-09-21

    Although the U.S. population is increasingly diverse, the field of orthopaedic surgery has historically been less diverse. The purpose of this study was to quantify the representation of racial and ethnic minorities among orthopaedic surgery residents compared with those in other fields of medicine and to determine how these levels of diversity have changed over time. We determined the representation of minorities among residents in orthopaedic surgery and in other fields by analyzing the Graduate Medical Education reports published annually by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), which provided data for African-Americans from 1968 to 2008, Hispanics from 1990 to 2008, Asians from 1995 to 2008, and American Indians/Alaskan Natives and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders from 2001 to 2008. During the 1990s and 2000s, representation among orthopaedic residents increased rapidly for Asians (+4.53% per decade, p < 0.0001) and gradually for Hispanics (+1.37% per decade, p < 0.0001) and African-Americans (+0.68% per decade, p = 0.0003). Total minority representation in orthopaedics averaged 20.2% during the most recent years studied (2001 to 2008), including 11.7% for Asians, 4.0% for African-Americans, 3.8% for Hispanics, 0.4% for American Indians/Alaskan Natives, and 0.3% for Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders. However, orthopaedic surgery was significantly less diverse than all of the other residencies examined during this time period (p < 0.001). This was due primarily to the lower representation of Hispanics and Asians in orthopaedic surgery than in any of the other fields of medicine. Minority representation in orthopaedic residency programs has increased over time for Asians, Hispanics, and African-Americans. In spite of these gains, orthopaedic surgery has remained the least diverse of the specialty training programs considered in this study. While further efforts are needed to determine the factors underlying this lack of

  6. Solar Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  7. Solar Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  8. Telescope Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Renaissance Telescope for high resolution and visual astronomy has five 82-degree Field Tele-Vue Nagler Eyepieces, some of the accessories that contribute to high image quality. Telescopes and eyepieces are representative of a family of optical equipment manufactured by Tele-Vue Optics, Inc.

  9. Orthopaedic inpatient rehabilitation conducted by nursing staff in acute orthopaedic wards in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pi-Chu; Wang, Ching-Hui; Liu, Yo-Yi; Chen, Chyang-Shiong

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the postoperative rehabilitation patterns of orthopaedic patients and to explore factors which affected the patients' functional recovery. A descriptive study with convenience sampling was performed. Study participants included orthopaedic inpatients from two hospitals in Taipei. In total, 100 patients were selected with an average age of 60.88 ± 17.61 years, of which the most common type of surgery was a total knee replacement (49.0%). Among these participants, 79.0% received rehabilitation guided by nursing staff, while only 6.0% were instructed by a physical therapist. The predictive factor for the time to first ambulation was the intensity of pain experienced on the second day after the operation, which accounted for 4.5% of the total variance. As for the functional status prior to discharge, predictive factors included the time to first ambulation and whether nursing staff provided instructions on rehabilitation, which accounted for 11.2% of the total variance. We recommend that professional staff should promote patient guidance toward postoperative rehabilitation, assistance in achieving the first ambulation and a resolution of obstacles to rehabilitation.

  10. [Telecommunication and telepathology. New diagnostic routes for orthopaedics and orthopaedic pathology].

    PubMed

    Delling, G; Werner, M; Bernd, L; Ewerbeck, V

    2002-09-01

    In a pilot project of the Department of Bone Pathology of the University of Hamburg and the Orthopaedic Department of the University of Heidelberg, the cases of 121 patients with suspicion of a primary bone tumour have been discussed at weekly interdisciplinary conferences during the period from July 2001 to May 2002., The consequent differential diagnoses were made prior to the biopsy, the optimal location of the biopsy and the further strategy was determined according to the guidelines of the international bone tumour centres. The latter includes the decision if a conventional biopsy or a intraoperative pathology examination on frozen sections should be performed. In 27 cases an intraoperative pathology examination was performed and then assessed in Hamburg. In 24 cases this diagnosis was identical with the final diagnosis. In three cases no definitive diagnosis could be made from the frozen sections. Additionally the pathohistological diagnoses of the cases of the previous week have been discussed in the video-conferences. Through this a unusually close interdisciplinary cooperation over a large distance has evolved, that is highly appreciated especially by the young and less experienced colleagues at the department of bone pathology and the orthopaedic department in Heidelberg. The awareness of the potential and limitations of a medical subject leads to an improved safety in the diagnostic process for bone tumours. The interdisciplinary discussion of all aspects of the diseases may also optimise the therapy of bone tumours.

  11. [Do German-speaking paediatric orthopaedic surgeons agree on diagnostics and treatment of the neonatal hip?].

    PubMed

    Seidl, T; Placzek, R; Funk, J F

    2012-04-01

    Ultrasound examination of the neonatal hip has been an integral part of the German programme for the "early detection of disease in childhood" since 01.01.1996. The aim of this study is to determine if any consensus exists among German-speaking paediatric orthopaedic specialists concerning diagnosis and treatment of the neonatal hip 15 years after legal implementation of hip ultrasound screening by the Graf technique. A questionnaire was sent to all members of the German speaking Association of Paediatric Orthopaedic Surgeons (Vereinigung für Kinderorthopädie - VKO). The query included questions concerning education and field of activity of the member as well as information on the diagnostics of neonatal hip with regard to examiner, technical equipment, and type of screening. In addition, four cases were presented with clinical history, clinical findings, and rateable Graf sonogram (case 1: 3 days old ♀, type D; case 2: 2 days old ♀, type IV; case 3: 4 weeks old ♀, type II a; case 4: 4 months old ♀, type III a) and a treatment recommendation was requested for each case. 78 of 179 contactable VKO members participated in this survey. 75.6 % of the participants are specialists with additional qualification in paediatric orthopaedic surgery. 68 % of the participants work in a hospital. As stated by 61.5 % of the participants the ultrasound examination of the neonatal hip is primarily done by orthopaedic surgeons. One participant stated that the examination is performed primarily by medical-technical assistants. The majority of participants use a 7.5-MHz linear transducer for ultrasound examination, a positioning device according to Graf and a foot switch as technical equipment. State-of-the-art equipment as recommended by Graf including in addition to the above mentioned an upright image display and a transducer guiding arm system is available to only 21.8 % of the participating VKO members. 23 of 50 participants stated that a general screening is performed

  12. Safety syringes and anti-needlestick devices in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sibbitt, Wilmer L; Band, Philip A; Kettwich, Lawrence G; Sibbitt, Cristina R; Sibbitt, Lori J; Bankhurst, Arthur D

    2011-09-07

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery (AAOS), The Joint Commission, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act encourage the integration of safety-engineered devices to prevent needlestick injuries to health-care workers and patients. We hypothesized that safety syringes and needles could be used in outpatient orthopaedic injection and aspiration procedures. The study investigated the orthopaedic uses and procedural idiosyncrasies of safety-engineered devices, including (1) four safety needles (Eclipse, SafetyGlide, SurGuard, and Magellan), (2) a mechanical safety syringe (RPD), (3) two automatic retractable syringes (Integra, VanishPoint), (4) three manual retractable syringes (Procedur-SF, Baksnap, Invirosnap), and (5) three shielded syringes (Safety-Lok, Monoject, and Digitally Activated Shielded [DAS] Syringe). The devices were first tested ex vivo, and then 1300 devices were used for 425 subjects undergoing outpatient arthrocentesis, intra-articular injections, local anesthesia, aspiration biopsy, and ultrasound-guided procedures. During the clinical observation, there were no accidental needlesticks (0 needlesticks per 1300 devices). Safety needles could be successfully used on a Luer syringe but were limited to ≤1.5 in (≤3.81 cm) in length and the shield could interfere with sonography. The mechanical safety syringes functioned well in all orthopaedic procedures. Automatic retractable syringes were too small for arthrocentesis of the knee, and the plunger blew out and prematurely collapsed with high-pressure injections. The manual retractable syringes and shielded syringes could be used with conventional needles for most orthopaedic procedures. The most effective and reliable safety devices for orthopaedic syringe procedures are shielded safety needles, mechanical syringes, manual retractable syringes, and shielded syringes, but not automatic retractable syringes. Even when adopting

  13. Allergies in orthopaedic and trauma surgery.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, C H; Hameister, R; Singh, G

    2017-02-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to implants in orthopaedic and trauma surgery are a rare but devastating complication. They are considered as a delayed-type of hypersensitivity reaction (type IV), characterized by an antigen activation of sensitized T-lymphocytes releasing various cytokines and may result in osteoclast activation and bone resorption. Potential haptens are originated from metal alloys or bone-cement. A meta-analysis has confirmed a higher probability of developing a metal hypersensitivity postoperatively and noted a greater risk of failed replacements compared to stable implants. Hypersensitivity to implants may present with a variety of symptoms such as pain, joint effusion, delayed wound/bone healing, persistent secretion, allergic dermatitis (localized or systemic), clicking noises, loss of joint function, instability and failure of the implant. Various diagnostic options have been offered, including patch testing, metal alloy patch testing, histology, lymphocyte transformation test (LTT), memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay (MELISA), leukocyte migration inhibition test (LIF) and lymphocyte activation test (LAT). No significant differences between in vivo and in vitro methods have been found. Due to unconvincing evidence for screening methods, predictive tests are not recommended for routine performance. Infectious aetiology always needs to be excluded. As there is a lack of evidence on large-scale studies with regards to the optimal treatment option, management currently relies on individual case-by-case decisions. Several options for patients with (suspected) metal-related hypersensitivity exist and may include materials based on ceramic, titanium or oxinium or modified surfaces. Promising results have been reported, but long-term experience is lacking. More large-scaled studies are needed in this context. In patients with bone-cement hypersensitivity, the component suspected for hypersensitivity should be avoided. The development of

  14. Plaster: our orthopaedic heritage: AAOS exhibit selection.

    PubMed

    DeMaio, Marlene; McHale, Kathleen; Lenhart, Martha; Garland, Joshua; McIlvaine, Christopher; Rhode, Michael

    2012-10-17

    Plaster has been used for centuries as a stiffening agent to treat fractures and other musculoskeletal conditions that require rest, immobilization, or correction of a deformity. Despite modern metallurgy and internal stabilization, plaster casts and splints remain an important means of external stabilization. Casting is a dying art as modern internal and external fixation replace external immobilization. Proper casting technique is paramount. This manuscript outlines the history and chemistry of immobilization materials and techniques as well as the differences among them and the advantages and disadvantages of each. Historical references, peer-reviewed journals, textbooks, and primary sources were reviewed to provide data for this review. The history of immobilization reveals a progressive development and refinement of materials that culminated in Mathijsen's plaster bandage in 1851. In 1798, calcium sulfate (plaster of Paris) was introduced. By 1927, crinoline rolls dipped in plaster treated with binding agents facilitated application. Synthetic casting "tapes" (45% polyurethane resin and 55% fiberglass) were introduced in the 1970s. Splinting techniques are ancient, with development spurred by treatment of war wounds. Plaster relies on soft-tissue contact to maintain rigidity. There are well-known advantages, disadvantages, and complications of plaster management. Casting materials all create an exothermic reaction. Burns are associated with water temperatures of >24°C, more than eight layers (ply), and inadequate ventilation. The maximum water temperature must be lower with fiberglass casts. Plaster was the definitive management for most fractures for over 100 years until it was replaced by modern surgical techniques involving internal fixation in the latter part of the twentieth century. Plaster casts and splints remain an important treatment method for acute and chronic orthopaedic conditions.

  15. Clinical use of stem cells in orthopaedics

    PubMed

    Im, G-I

    2017-02-21

    Stem cell research arose from the need to explore new therapeutic possibilities for intractable and lethal diseases. Although musculoskeletal disorders are basically nonlethal, their high prevalence and relative ease of performing clinical trials have facilitated the clinical application of stem cells in this field. However, few reliable clinical studies have been published, despite the plethora of in vitro and preclinical studies in stem cell research for regenerative medicine in the musculoskeletal system. Stem cell therapy can be applied locally for bone, cartilage and tendon regeneration. Candidate disease modalities in bone regeneration include large bone defects, nonunion of fractures, and osteonecrosis. Focal osteochondral defect and osteoarthritis are current targets for cartilage regeneration. For tendon regeneration, bone-tendon junction problems such as rotator cuff tears are hot topics in clinical research. To date, the literature supporting stem cell-based therapies comprises mostly case reports or case series. Therefore, high-quality evidence, including from randomised clinical trials, is necessary to define the role of cell-based therapies in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. It is imperative that clinicians who adopt stem cell treatment into their practices possess a good understanding of the natural course of the disease. It is also highly recommended that treating physicians do not thrust aside the concomitant use of established measures until stem cell therapy is evidently proved worthy in terms of efficacy and cost. The purpose of this review is to summarise on the current status of stem cell application in the orthopaedic field along with the author's view of future prospects.

  16. Orthopaedic admissions due to sports and recreation injuries.

    PubMed

    Delaney, R A; Falvey, E; Kalimuthu, S; Molloy, M G; Fleming, P

    2009-02-01

    The health benefits of exercise may be attenuated by sports and recreation related injury (SRI). Though the majority of SRI are mild and self-limiting, a significant number are serious and require orthopaedic intervention. The aims of this study were to assess the burden of these serious injuries on the orthopaedic inpatient service, and to investigate potential target areas for injury prevention. All 1,590 SRI seen in the ED over a 3-month period were analysed using the Patient Information Management System to determine which patients received inpatient orthopaedic care. The medical records of those 63 patients who required inpatient care under orthopaedics were reviewed and data collected on demographic features, history, operative procedure and theatre resources, and length of hospital stay. Data were analyzed using SPSS. SRI accounted for 12.3% of all ED presentations. The principal activities resulting in injury requiring orthopaedic care were soccer, hurling and informal play e.g. trampoline. Falls made up 37% of the overall mechanism of injury but 68% of the injuries severe enough to require operative management. Most operative procedures were performed as part of a routine day trauma list but 20% were performed out of hours. This group of injuries places a significant burden on a busy trauma service. Injury prevention measures such as public education regarding falls in sport may have a role in reducing this burden.

  17. Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors' selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Orr, Justin D; Hoffmann, Jeffrey D; Arrington, Edward D; Gerlinger, Tad L; Devine, John G; Belmont, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Factors associated with successful selection in U.S. Army orthopaedic surgical programs are unreported. The current analysis includes survey data from all Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors (PDs) to determine these factors. PDs at all Army orthopaedic surgery residency programs were provided 17 factors historically considered critical to successful selection and asked to rank order the factors as well as assign a level of importance to each. Results were collated and overall mean rankings are provided. PDs unanimously expressed that performance during the on-site orthopaedic surgery rotation at the individual program director's institution was most important. Respondents overwhelmingly reported that Steps 1 and 2 licensing exam scores were next most important, respectively. Survey data demonstrated that little importance was placed on letters of recommendation and personal statements. PDs made no discriminations based on allopathic or osteopathic degrees. The most important factors for Army orthopaedic surgery residency selection were clerkship performance at the individual PD's institution and licensing examination score performance. Army PDs consider both USMLE and COMLEX results, because Army programs have a higher percentage of successful osteopathic applicants.

  18. Orthopaedic Physical Therapy: Update to the Description of Specialty Practice.

    PubMed

    Johanson, Marie A; Miller, Michael B; Coe, Jean Bryan; Campo, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Descriptive, cross-sectional observational study. In the physical therapist profession, the outcomes of specialty practice analyses are used to determine content areas for specialty board examinations and for American Physical Therapy Association (APTA)-accredited residency curricula. To maintain currency for specialty practices, the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties (ABPTS) requires any approved specialty area to revalidate its Description of Specialty Practice (DSP) a minimum of every 10 years. The purpose of this article was to describe the most recent practice analysis process and to report revisions to the DSP for orthopaedic physical therapists. A survey instrument was developed by a group of subject matter experts, following guidelines established by the ABPTS. The survey was sent electronically to a random sample of 800 orthopaedic certified specialists (OCSs). The survey contained 5 sections: (1) knowledge areas (eg, human anatomy and physiology); (2) professional roles, responsibilities, and values (eg, consultation); (3) patient/client management model (eg, examination); (4) percentage of body regions treated; and (5) demographic information. A total of 224 completed surveys and 43 partially completed surveys were submitted, for a response rate of 33.4%. Based on a priori decision rules regarding survey data, consensus of the group of subject matter experts, and ABPTS suggestions, the DSP for orthopaedic physical therapy was revised. The revised DSP will be used to reconstruct the blueprint for future OCS examinations, APTA-accredited orthopaedic residency program curricula, as well as professional development activities related to recertification in orthopaedic physical therapy.

  19. Podium versus poster publication rates at the Orthopaedic Trauma Association.

    PubMed

    Preston, Charles F; Bhandari, Mohit; Fulkerson, Eric; Ginat, Danial; Koval, Kenneth J; Egol, Kenneth A

    2005-08-01

    Original studies at orthopaedic meetings are presented on the podium and in poster format. Publication of those studies in peer-reviewed journals is the standard of communicating scientific data to colleagues. Investigators of previous studies have reported publication rates, but never differentiated between the modes of presentation. We evaluated the annual meeting of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association from 1994-1998 and found that studies presented on the podium were 1.3 times more likely to be published than those presented in a poster format (67% versus 52%). The mean time to publication was similar, 21.6 months for poster presentations and 24.8 months for podium presentations. Podium presentations were more likely to be published in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, and the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American and British editions). Our findings suggest different rates and distribution of publication between podium and poster presentations at an international trauma meeting. These findings should be considered when evaluating studies of interest at the Orthopaedic Trauma Association meeting.

  20. Diabetes and its negative impact on outcomes in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Wukich, Dane K

    2015-04-18

    An estimated 285 million adults (aged 20-79 years) worldwide were diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus (DM) in 2010, and this number is projected to grow to 439 million adults by the year 2030. Orthopaedic surgeons, regardless of their subspecialty interest, will encounter patients with DM during their career since this epidemic involves both developed and emerging countries. Diabetes results in complications affecting multiple organ systems, potentially resulting in adverse outcomes after orthopaedic surgery. The purpose of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology of DM and its potential for impacting orthopaedic surgery patients. Diabetes adversely affects the outcome of all orthopaedic surgery subspecialties including foot and ankle, upper extremity, adult reconstructive, pediatrics, spine surgery and sports medicine. Poorly controlled diabetes negatively impacts bone, soft tissue, ligament and tendon healing. It is the complications of diabetes such as neuropathy, peripheral artery disease, and end stage renal disease which contributes to adverse outcomes. Well controlled diabetic patients without comorbidities have similar outcomes to patients without diabetes. Orthopaedic surgeons should utilize consultants who will assist in inpatient glycemic management as well as optimizing long term glycemic control.

  1. Diabetes and its negative impact on outcomes in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wukich, Dane K

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 285 million adults (aged 20-79 years) worldwide were diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus (DM) in 2010, and this number is projected to grow to 439 million adults by the year 2030. Orthopaedic surgeons, regardless of their subspecialty interest, will encounter patients with DM during their career since this epidemic involves both developed and emerging countries. Diabetes results in complications affecting multiple organ systems, potentially resulting in adverse outcomes after orthopaedic surgery. The purpose of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology of DM and its potential for impacting orthopaedic surgery patients. Diabetes adversely affects the outcome of all orthopaedic surgery subspecialties including foot and ankle, upper extremity, adult reconstructive, pediatrics, spine surgery and sports medicine. Poorly controlled diabetes negatively impacts bone, soft tissue, ligament and tendon healing. It is the complications of diabetes such as neuropathy, peripheral artery disease, and end stage renal disease which contributes to adverse outcomes. Well controlled diabetic patients without comorbidities have similar outcomes to patients without diabetes. Orthopaedic surgeons should utilize consultants who will assist in inpatient glycemic management as well as optimizing long term glycemic control. PMID:25893176

  2. Overcoming resistance to implementation of integrated care pathways in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Manning, Blaine T; Callahan, Charles D; Robinson, Brooke S; Adair, Daniel; Saleh, Khaled J

    2013-07-17

    The future of orthopaedic surgery will be shaped by unprecedented demographic and economic challenges, necessitating movement to so-called "second curve" innovations in the delivery of care. Implementation of integrated care pathways (ICPs) may be one solution to imminent cost and access pressures facing orthopaedic patients in this era of health-care accountability and reform. ICPs can lower costs and the duration of hospital stay while facilitating better outcomes through enhanced interspecialty communication. As with any innovation at the crossroads of paradigm change, implementation of integrated care pathways for orthopaedics may elicit surgeons' concern on a variety of grounds and on levels ranging from casual questioning to vehement opposition. No single method is always effective in promoting cooperation and adoption, so a combination of strategies offers the best chance of success. With a special focus on total joint replacement, we consider general patterns of resistance to change, styles of conflict, and specific issues that may underlie orthopaedic surgeon resistance to implementation of integrated care pathways. Methods to facilitate and sustain orthopaedic surgeon engagement in implementation of such pathways are discussed.

  3. [The history and development of computer assisted orthopaedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Jenny, J-Y

    2006-10-01

    Computer assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) was developed to improve the accuracy of surgical procedures. It has improved dramatically over the last years, being transformed from an experimental, laboratory procedure into a routine procedure theoretically available to every orthopaedic surgeon. The first field of application of computer assistance was neurosurgery. After the application of computer guided spinal surgery, the navigation of total hip and knee joints became available. Currently, several applications for computer assisted surgery are available. At the beginning of navigation, a preoperative CT-scan or several fluoroscopic images were necessary. The imageless systems allow the surgeon to digitize patient anatomy at the beginning of surgery without any preoperative imaging. The future of CAOS remains unknown, but there is no doubt that its importance will grow in the next 10 years, and that this technology will probably modify the conventional practice of orthopaedic surgery.

  4. Design and execution of clinical trials in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mundi, R.; Chaudhry, H.; Mundi, S.; Godin, K.; Bhandari, M.

    2014-01-01

    High-quality randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating surgical therapies are fundamental to the delivery of evidence-based orthopaedics. Orthopaedic clinical trials have unique challenges; however, when these challenges are overcome, evidence from trials can be definitive in its impact on surgical practice. In this review, we highlight several issues that pose potential challenges to orthopaedic investigators aiming to perform surgical randomised controlled trials. We begin with a discussion on trial design issues, including the ethics of sham surgery, the importance of sample size, the need for patient-important outcomes, and overcoming expertise bias. We then explore features surrounding the execution of surgical randomised trials, including ethics review boards, the importance of organisational frameworks, and obtaining adequate funding. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:161–8. PMID:24869465

  5. Managing the academic orthopaedic practice as a business.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Jonathan L; Zembo, Michele M; Hamilton, James J; Isenman, Albert W

    2006-01-01

    Efforts by academic orthopaedic surgeons to provide patient care, educate trainees, and perform research into the various facets of musculoskeletal afflictions are being challenged by changes in technology, financing, and demographics. In the current economy, efficient, cost-effective management is essential for survival of an academic or private orthopaedic practice. All practitioners should be acutely aware of the principles involved in the management of a private practice, but academic practices must also deal with such factors as the teaching of residents and medical students, the expectation of comprehensive coverage, indigent case load, and research. Orthopaedic surgeons in the academic environment must proactively manage their practices as businesses to maintain sufficient financial viability to support the other endeavors. Academicians therefore must have an understanding of the principles that will impact their practice and assist in the analysis of an academic practice's productivity.

  6. Orthopaedic implications of multiple gestation pregnancy with triplets.

    PubMed

    Bielski, Robert J; Gesell, Mark W; Teng, Andelle L; Cooper, Daniel H; Muraskas, Jonathan K

    2006-01-01

    Intrauterine crowding has been implicated as a risk factor in several orthopaedic conditions, such as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), metatarsus adductus, and torticollis. The goal of this study was to see whether orthopaedic conditions associated with intrauterine crowding were more frequent in multiple gestation pregnancies, specifically in triplets. The authors reviewed their experience over a 10-year period with 261 children who were products of triplet pregnancies. They surveyed 13 orthopaedic conditions and found only one condition, torticollis, that had a greater incidence than that reported in single gestation pregnancies. A 0% incidence of DDH was found in these patients. Routine ultrasound screening cannot be recommended in these patients based on these results.

  7. Pediatric orthopaedic injuries: the effect of treatment on school attendance.

    PubMed

    Sesko, Andrea M; Choe, Julie C; Vitale, Mark A; Ugwonali, Obinwanne; Hyman, Joshua E

    2005-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether children experience difficulty attending school after an acute orthopaedic injury and, if so, what the barriers are to attendance. Seventy-eight school-aged patients receiving treatment of acute orthopaedic injuries or conditions at the authors' institution were enrolled in this prospective study. Follow-up interviews were conducted with children who could not return to school. Fifty-three percent of the children were able to return to school immediately; those who were not were absent for 35.9 days on average. Nearly three quarters of absentees attributed the nonattendance to refusal by the school, and only 36.7% received home instruction during their absence. A regression model showed that children using crutches were five times less likely to attend school than children without crutches. This study indicates that orthopaedic injuries and their treatments contribute to school absence. Refusal by the school to accommodate the injured child was the primary barrier to attendance.

  8. [SWOT analysis: the analytical method in the process of planning and its application in the development of orthopaedic hospital department].

    PubMed

    Terzić, Zorica; Vukasinović, Zoran; Bjegović-Mikanović, Vesna; Jovanović, Vesna; Janicić, Radmila

    2010-01-01

    SWOT analysis is a managerial tool used to evaluate internal and external environment through strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats. The aim was to demonstrate the application of the SWOT analysis on the example of the Department for Paediatric Orthopaedics and Traumatology at the Institute of Orthopaedic Surgery "Banjica" in Belgrade. Qualitative research was conducted during December 2008 at the Department for Paediatric Orthopaedics and Traumatology of the Institute of Orthopaedic Surgery "Banjica" by applying the focus group technique. Participants were members of the medical staff and patients. In the first phase of the focus group brainstorming was applied to collect the factors of internal and external environment, and to identify strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats, respectively. In the second phase the nominal group technique was applied in order to reduce the list of factors. The factors were assessed according to their influence on the Department. Factors ranked by the three point Likert scale from 3 (highest impact) to 1 (lowest impact). The most important strengths of the Department are competent and skilled staff, high quality of services, average hospital bed utilization, the Department providing the educational basis of the School of Medicine, satisfied patients, pleasant setting, and additional working hours. The weaknesses are: poor spatial organization, personnel unmotivated to refresh knowledge, lack of specifically trained personnel, inadequate sanitary facilities, and uncovered services by the Insurance Fund, long average hospital stay, and low economic status of patients. The opportunities are: legislative regulations, formed paediatric traumatology service at the City level, good regional position of the Institute, and extension of referral areas. The threats are: absent Department autonomy in the personnel policy of the Institute, competitions within the Institute, impossibility to increase the Department

  9. Are the claims made in orthopaedic print advertisements valid?

    PubMed

    Davidson, Donald J; Rankin, Kenneth S; Jensen, Cyrus D; Moverley, Robert; Reed, Mike R; Sprowson, Andrew P

    2014-05-01

    Advertisements are commonplace in orthopaedic journals and may influence the readership with claims of clinical and scientific fact. Since the last assessment of the claims made in orthopaedic print advertisements ten years ago, there have been legislative changes and media scrutiny which have shaped this practice. The purpose of this study is to re-evaluate these claims. Fifty claims from 50 advertisements were chosen randomly from six highly respected peer-reviewed orthopaedic journals (published July-December 2011). The evidence supporting each claim was assessed and validated by three orthopaedic surgeons. The assessors, blinded to product and company, rated the evidence and answered the following questions: Does the evidence as presented support the claim made in the advertisement and what is the quality of that evidence? Is the claim supported by enough evidence to influence your own clinical practice? Twenty-eight claims cited evidence from published literature, four from public presentations, 11 from manufacturer "data held on file" and seven had no supporting evidence. Only 12 claims were considered to have high-quality evidence and only 11 were considered well supported. A strong correlation was seen between the quality of evidence and strength of support (Spearman r = 0.945, p < 0.0001). The average ICC between the assessors' ratings was strong (r = 0.85) giving validity to the results. Orthopaedic surgeons must remain sceptical about the claims made in print advertisements. High-quality evidence is required by orthopaedic surgeons to influence clinical practice and this evidence should be sought by manufacturers wishing to market a successful product.

  10. Using financial incentives to improve value in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Lansky, David; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Bozic, Kevin J

    2012-04-01

    A variety of reforms to traditional approaches to provider payment and benefit design are being implemented in the United States. There is increasing interest in applying these financial incentives to orthopaedics, although it is unclear whether and to what extent they have been implemented and whether they increase quality or reduce costs. We reviewed and discussed physician- and patient-oriented financial incentives being implemented in orthopaedics, key challenges, and prerequisites to payment reform and value-driven payment policy in orthopaedics. We searched the MEDLINE database using as search terms various provider payment and consumer incentive models. We retrieved a total of 169 articles; none of these studies met the inclusion criteria. For incentive models known to the authors to be in use in orthopaedics but for which no peer-reviewed literature was found, we searched Google for further information. Provider financial incentives reviewed include payments for reporting, performance, and patient safety and episode payment. Patient incentives include tiered networks, value-based benefit design, reference pricing, and value-based purchasing. Reform of financial incentives for orthopaedic surgery is challenged by (1) lack of a payment/incentive model that has demonstrated reductions in cost trends and (2) the complex interrelation of current pay schemes in today's fragmented environment. Prerequisites to reform include (1) a reliable and complete data infrastructure; (2) new business structures to support cost sharing; and (3) a retooling of patient expectations. There is insufficient literature reporting the effects of various financial incentive models under implementation in orthopaedics to know whether they increase quality or reduce costs. National concerns about cost will continue to drive experimentation, and all anticipated innovations will require improved collaboration and data collection and reporting.

  11. Retracted Publications in Orthopaedics: Prevalence, Characteristics, and Trends.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rahul; Sabharwal, Sanjeev

    2017-05-03

    Retracted publications are a crucial, yet overlooked, issue in the scientific community. The purpose of our study was to assess the prevalence, characteristics, and trends of retracted publications in the field of orthopaedics. Five databases were utilized to identify retracted publications in orthopaedics. The cited articles were assessed for various characteristics, including reason for retraction, based on the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) guidelines and trends over time. From 1984 to June 4, 2016, 59 of 229,502 orthopaedic publications were retracted (3 per 10,000 articles). There was a spike in the prevalence (22 of 59) of retracted articles in 2015. When compared with the total number of retracted publications identified through PubMed, the field of orthopaedics represented 1.4% of all retracted publications. The original version of 47 of these 59 retracted publications was still available on the respective journal's web site; 14 (30%) of these were not noted as having been retracted. The mean time from electronic publication to retraction was 19.4 ± 23.3 months. The mean number of citations of a retracted publication after the date of retraction was 9.3 ± 19.3. Reasons for retraction included plagiarism (32%), misconduct (27%), redundant publication (22%), miscalculation or experimental error (8%), and unethical research (0%); the reason for retraction was not stated for 10% of the publications. There was no correlation between a journal's impact factor and the mean number of months to retraction (p = 0.564). While uncommon, the retraction of publications within the field of orthopaedics may be increasing. The most often cited reasons for retraction were plagiarism, misconduct, and redundant publication. Retracted articles continue to be cited in the literature after retraction. Greater awareness of the COPE guidelines within the orthopaedic community and more efficient means to prevent the citation of retracted articles are needed.

  12. The Orthopaedic Trauma Patient Experience: A Qualitative Case Study of Orthopaedic Trauma Patients in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Nathan N.; Mugarura, Rodney; Slobogean, Gerard P.; Bouchard, Maryse

    2014-01-01

    The disability adjusted life years (DALYs) associated with injuries have increased by 34% from 1990 to 2010, making it the 10th leading cause of disability worldwide, with most of the burden affecting low-income countries. Although disability from injuries is often preventable, limited access to essential surgical services contributes to these increasing DALY rates. Similar to many other low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), Uganda is plagued by a growing volume of traumatic injuries. The aim of this study is to explore the orthopaedic trauma patient's experience in accessing medical care in Uganda and what affects the injury might have on the socioeconomic status for the patient and their dependents. We also evaluate the factors that impact an individual's ability to access an appropriate treatment facility for their traumatic injury. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients 18 year of age or older admitted with a fractured tibia or femur at Mulago National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda. As limited literature exists on the socioeconomic impacts of disability from trauma, we designed a descriptive qualitative case study, using thematic analysis, to extract unique information for which little has been previously been documented. This methodology is subject to less bias than other qualitative methods as it imposes fewer preconceptions. Data analysis of the patient interviews (n = 35) produced over one hundred codes, nine sub-themes and three overarching themes. The three overarching categories revealed by the data were: 1) the importance of social supports; 2) the impact of and on economic resources; and 3) navigating the healthcare system. Limited resources to fund the treatment of orthopaedic trauma patients in Uganda leads to reliance of patients on their friends, family, and hospital connections, and a tremendous economic burden that falls on the patient and their dependents. PMID:25360815

  13. Rescue Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Lifeshear cutter, a rescue tool for freeing accident victims from wreckage, was developed under the Clinton Administration's Technology Reinvestment Program. Prior cutting equipment was cumbersome and expensive; the new cutter is 50 percent lighter and 70 percent cheaper. The cutter is pyrotechnically-actuated, using a miniature version of the power cartridges used for separation devices on the Space Shuttle and other NASA spacecraft. Hi-Shear Technology Corporation developed the cutter with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and input from the City of Torrance (California) Fire Department.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide in orthopaedic surgery - is it worth the risk?

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Reid, Chris; Nambiar, Mithun; Penn, David

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is commonly used in orthopaedic surgery during cemented arthroplasty and wound washouts. Its purported roles include antisepsis, haemostasis, mechanical debridement, and optimising the cement-bone interface during cementing. However, despite its apparent harmless mechanism of action, H2O2 has been implicated in fatal and near fatal complications caused through oxygen emboli. We present a case of oxygen embolism and review the existing literature to highlight its potential risks and its lack of therapeutic value. We believe there is little role for its use in orthopaedic surgery.

  15. Renal and Gastrointestinal Considerations in Patients Undergoing Elective Orthopaedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Pyrko, Peter; Parvizi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    To minimize perioperative complications after elective orthopaedic procedures, patients may undergo preoperative medical optimization, which includes an assessment of their renal function and gastrointestinal system. The gastrointestinal and renal systems are complex, and their proper optimization in the preoperative period can influence the success of any procedure. Several factors, including a thorough evaluation and screening, with particular emphasis on anemia and its renal and gastrointestinal causes; the management of medications that are metabolized by the liver and excreted by the kidneys; and careful attention to the patient's nutritional status, can prevent complications and reduce morbidity, mortality, and the cost of care after elective orthopaedic procedures.

  16. Barriers to minority participation in the orthopaedic profession. Personal perspectives.

    PubMed

    Phillips, P J

    1999-05-01

    A brief summary of one individual's pathway and the challenges encountered along the road to becoming an orthopaedic surgeon are outlined. Beginning with the decision to pursue a career in medicine, and chronicling the subsequent decisions made along the way, key elements that facilitated this individual's success are reviewed. Some of the difficulties encountered from the perspective of a minority candidate also are discussed and what perhaps may be deemed an indirect pathway to an orthopaedic career. The importance of institutional support, mentorship, and recruitment are essential to facilitate and secure the success of minority candidates.

  17. The Role of the Orthopaedic Surgeon in Workers' Compensation Cases.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; Kuris, Eren O; Palumbo, Mark A

    2017-03-01

    Workers' compensation is an employer-funded insurance program that provides financial and medical benefits for employees injured at work. Because many occupational injuries are musculoskeletal in nature, the orthopaedic surgeon plays an important role in the workers' compensation system. Along with establishing the correct diagnosis and implementing an appropriate treatment plan, the clinician must understand the fundamental components of the workers' compensation system to manage an injured employee. Ultimately, effective claim management requires collaboration among the employer, the employee, the legal representatives, the insurance company, and the orthopaedic surgeon.

  18. Psychological Factors Affecting Rehabilitation and Outcomes Following Elective Orthopaedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Flanigan, David C; Everhart, Joshua S; Glassman, Andrew H

    2015-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgery often requires many months of rehabilitation to achieve a successful outcome, regardless of subspecialty. Several important psychological factors strongly influence pain perceptions, rehabilitation compliance, and patient outcomes after common orthopaedic surgeries that require extensive rehabilitation, including total joint arthroplasty, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and spine surgery for degenerative disease. Early recognition of patients exhibiting psychological distress, fear-avoidance behavior, or poor perceived self-efficacy or pessimistic personality traits can be used to improve preoperative risk stratification for poor rehabilitation or surgical outcomes. Several intervention strategies exist to address these psychological factors when they appear to contribute suboptimal postoperative rehabilitation or recovery.

  19. Closing the gap: bone health education in orthopaedic practice.

    PubMed

    Rouhe, Mellissa

    2008-01-01

    Bone health education in an orthopaedic office and hospital setting is uncommon, yet essential. Many benefits are possible for patients by preventing future fractures and improving quality of life in those afflicted with osteoporosis and osteopenia. Ninety percent of hip fractures are due to osteoporosis; only stroke occupies more hospital bed days than hip fracture each year. Clinical time constraints, physician unawareness, cost-effectiveness, and patient noncompliance include some of the obstacles to education. Orthopaedic nurses can be a vital part of the challenging solution to removing barriers and bridging the educational gap for physicians and patients.

  20. Promoting safety of postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Veney, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    Orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea are at risk for postoperative complications related to administration of pain medications, anxiolytics, and antiemetics. They are more likely to experience respiratory and cardiac complications, be transferred to an intensive care unit, or have an increased length of stay in the hospital. This informational article is for nurses who care for postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The focus is on promoting patient safety through communication, vigilant postoperative sedation assessment, and nursing interventions that include appropriate patient positioning, patient education, and involving patients and their families in care.

  1. The role of orthopaedic surgery in sports medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgery must play a significant role in the development of sports medicine as a viable academic discipline. Potential areas in which orthopaedic surgery can specifically contribute to such an evolution are discussed. Particular areas include skeletal development, the role of athletics on skeletal growth and trauma response, the mechanics of specific sports and the predisposition of specific sports to certain injury patterns, the role of muscle physiology and muscle stimulation in rehabilitation, and differing responses of the male and female skeletal system. Each of these areas is discussed in detail. PMID:7445534

  2. Military Orthopaedic Trauma Registry: Quality Data Now Available.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Jessica C; Greer, Renee M; Wenke, Joseph C; Ficke, James R; Johnson, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    The Military Orthopaedic Trauma Registry (MOTR) orginally began as part of the Department of Defense Trauma Registry (DoDTR) and became a live registry in 2013. As a quality improvement process, this study examined MOTR data for 20 female amputees compared with DoDTR data. The DoDTR provided diagnosis and procedure codes as a list but no details. The MOTR provided additional data, including specific limb, fracture classifications, and associated injuries per limb. The MOTR allowed for construction of a treatment time line for each limb, including number and timing of debridements, antibiotics, and implant types. Orthopaedic-specific complications were also coded more frequently in the MOTR and clearly identified with a specific injury and treatment. During initial quality control checks, the MOTR provides a greater volume and granularity of detail for orthopaedic-specific injury and treatment information, indicating that the MOTR is on track to provide a valuable repository for data-driven orthopaedic management of combat injury.

  3. Find an Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle MD/DO

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the Smaller Toes How To... Foot Health Foot Injury Footwear News Videos Find a Surgeon Información en ... all ages. They perform reconstructive procedures, treat sports injuries, and manage and treat trauma of the foot and ankle. Orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons work ...

  4. Orthopaedic trauma and the evolution of healthcare policy in America.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Phillip M; Thakore, Rachel; Obremskey, Alexandra; Sethi, Manish K

    2014-10-01

    Healthcare policy has changed drastically, and with the 50-year anniversary of the passage of Medicare approaching in 2015, the authors evaluate the development of the current healthcare system and its relationship to the development of modern orthopaedic trauma. With more changes in healthcare policy forthcoming, it is increasingly important for the orthopaedic traumatologist to understand how changes in policy will affect practice. Historically, the motivators for change have remained largely the same over the past 50 years. The development of diagnosis-related groups, the resource-based relative value scale, and the sustainable growth rate are 3 defining policies that were designed to control costs, but which had an unexpected effect on those caring for the trauma population. Healthcare reform has a unique effect on those systems where care is dictated by a defining event or injury. Evaluating the development of trauma systems, the authors find that legislation directed toward the trauma population has been driven by the study of patient outcomes, providing an opportunity for orthopaedic traumatologists to contribute to future changes in policy. As healthcare policy changes begin to take effect, having a thorough understanding of reform and its drivers will be increasingly important in taking an active role in advocating for the field of orthopaedic trauma and its patients.

  5. Moire Topography For The Detection Of Orthopaedic Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Syed A.; Lindseth, Richard E.

    1981-02-01

    Moire topography is applied for the follow-up of scoliosis patients. The results are then compared with the X-rays. A special lamp and scale arrangement is utilized for patient alignment. It is suggested that this technique will be used for the detection of all orthopaedic defects.

  6. Orthopaedic fellowship selection criteria: a survey of fellowship directors.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Gregory; Walker, Justin W

    2013-10-16

    The pursuit of a fellowship has become increasingly popular over the past several years, with >90% of graduating orthopaedic residents applying for a fellowship position. Despite the ample literature available pertaining to the selection of orthopaedic residents, there is no similar research for the selection of fellows. Four hundred and fifteen of 475 orthopaedic fellowship program directors in the United States were surveyed on selection criteria used to choose fellows. The survey asked fellowship directors to rank the importance of various criteria on a Likert scale of 1 through 5 points (with 1 point denoting most important and 5 points denoting least important). The overall response rate was 193 (46.5%) of 415 orthopaedic fellowship program directors. The most important criteria in selecting an applicant for an interview were a letter of recommendation from subspecialty faculty (1.38 points), quality of residency program (2.02 points), and a letter of recommendation from the residency program director (2.12 points). The most important criteria in completing the rank order list following the interview were the interview (1.17 points), a letter of recommendation from subspecialty faculty (1.46 points), a letter of recommendation from the residency program director (2.16 points), and expressed interest in program (2.16 points).

  7. Reading the Small Print – Labelling Recommendations for Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Haene, Roger A; Sandhu, Ranbir S; Baxandall, Richard

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There exist, currently, no clear guidelines regarding standards for surgical implant labelling. Dimensions of the laminar flow canopies in orthopaedic use fixes the distance at which implant labels can be read. Mistakes when reading the label on an implant box can pose health risks for patients, and financial consequences for medical institutions. SUBJECTS AND METHODS Using scientifically validated tools such as the Snellen Chart Formula, a theoretical minimum standard for text on implant labels was reached. This theoretical standard was then tested under real operating conditions. After discovering a minimum practical standard for implant labels, the authors then audited current labels in use on a wide range of orthopaedic implant packages. Furthermore, other non-text-related labelling problems were also noted. RESULTS There is a definite minimum standard which should be observed when implant labels are manufactured. Implants in current use bear labels on the packaging that are of an insufficient standard to ensure patient safety in theatre. CONCLUSIONS The authors have established text parameters that will increase the legibility of implant labels. In the interests of improving risk management in theatre, therefore, the authors propose a standard for orthopaedic implant labelling, and believe this will provide a useful foundation for further discussion between the orthopaedic community and implant manufacturers. PMID:19686615

  8. A prospective study of teleconferencing for orthopaedic consultations.

    PubMed

    Aarnio, P; Lamminen, H; Lepistö, J; Alho, A

    1999-01-01

    We carried out a prospective study of teleconsulting in orthopaedics. A commercial videoconferencing system was connected by three ISDN lines between the Satakunta Central Hospital in Pori and the Orton Orthopaedic Hospital in Helsinki, 240 km away. A document camera was used to transfer radiographic images and paper documents. Twenty-nine patients who needed an orthopaedic consultation were studied over three months. They were examined by a surgeon in Pori with the aid of teleconferencing and again later in a traditional, face-to-face appointment in Helsinki. Patients and doctors completed questionnaires after the consultations. Technically, the videoconferencing system functioned reliably and the quality of the video was judged to be good. Twenty patients (69%) would not have needed to travel for a face-to-face appointment, because the teleconsultation afforded a definite treatment decision. The orthopaedic surgeons considered all the treatment decisions arising from the teleconsultation good, except in one case which was considered satisfactory. The quality of the radiographic images transferred with the document camera was good or very good in 17 cases and satisfactory in three cases. None of the patients had experienced videoconferencing before; 87% of them thought that teleconsultation was a good or very good method and the rest felt that it was satisfactory. All patients wanted to participate in teleconsultations again and most would have recommended it to other patients.

  9. Analysis of Unmatched Orthopaedic Residency Applicants: Options After the Match

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Steven; Ippolito, Joseph; Martinez, Maximilian; Beebe, Kathleen; Benevenia, Joseph; Berberian, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Background Orthopaedic surgery is one of the most competitive specialties, resulting in many applicants going unmatched. Many unmatched applicants pursue a preliminary internship or research fellowship, but whether these activities make them more successful in subsequent match cycles has not been studied. Objective To determine the effectiveness of activities during the intervening period on match success in a subsequent cycle. Methods After reviewing rank order lists for our program and National Resident Matching Program correspondence from 1994 to 2013, we identified 198 of 1216 ranked applicants (16.3%) who did not initially match. Of these, 57 applicants who matched through the Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program did not reapply to orthopaedics or trained overseas. Results Of 141 reapplicants, 56 matched into orthopaedic surgery, with 87.5% (P < .001) matching at a program in the same region where they had either completed their medical degree or postgraduate year, and 37.5% matching at their home institution (P < .001). Successful reapplicants after a research fellowship had a significantly higher number of publications than unsuccessful reapplicants (P < .05). There was no significant difference in success after research or internship (P = .80) and no significant difference in success rates for US versus international reapplicants (P =  .43). Conclusions Success of reapplication into orthopaedic surgery may be less dependent on the route taken during the interim period, and more dependent on developing relationships with faculty at a local or regional institution. PMID:26913110

  10. Clubfoot: An Orthopaedic Surgeon Describes Clubfoot and Current Treatment Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitale, Michael

    2007-01-01

    As an orthopaedic surgeon who has treated numerous cases of clubfoot in his career, the author knows that it takes exceptional parents to deal with the challenges of having a child born with a clubfoot. However, it should be noted that a clubfoot diagnosis does not mean a life of pain, deformity, and disability for a child. Today's treatment…

  11. A quality assessment of randomized clinical trials in pediatric orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Dulai, Sukhdeep K; Slobogean, Bronwyn L T; Beauchamp, Richard D; Mulpuri, Kishore

    2007-01-01

    The promotion and practice of evidence-based medicine necessitates a critical evaluation of medical literature, including the criterion standard of randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Recent studies have examined the quality of RCTs in various surgical specialties, but no study has focused on pediatric orthopaedics. The purpose of this study was to assess and describe the quality of RCTs published in the last 10 years in journals with high clinical impact in pediatric orthopaedics. All of the RCTs in pediatric orthopaedics published in 5 well-recognized journals between 1995 and 2005 were reviewed using the Detsky Quality Assessment Scale. The mean percentage score on the Detsky scale was 53% (95% confidence interval, 46%-60%). Only 7 (19%) of the articles satisfied the threshold for a satisfactory level of methodological quality (Detsky >75%). Most RCTs in pediatric orthopaedics that are published in well-recognized peer-reviewed journals demonstrate substantial deficiencies in methodological quality. Particular areas of weakness include inadequate rigor and reporting of randomization methods, use of inappropriate or poorly described outcome measures, inadequate description of inclusion and exclusion criteria, and inappropriate statistical analysis. Further efforts are necessary to improve the conduct and reporting of clinical trials in this field to avoid inadvertent misinformation of the clinical community.

  12. Institutional barriers to the orthopaedic clinician-scientist.

    PubMed

    Rosier, Randy N

    2006-08-01

    The clinician-scientist faces many career barriers that changes in medicine over the past two decades have accentuated. Political, socioeconomic, and cultural changes in medicine have increased financial pressures on physicians and hospitals, negatively impacting the ability of clinicians to pursue research activities. Examples of institutional barriers include pressure on physicians to increase clinical productivity to help offset rising costs and declining reimbursements, inadequate resources and structures to protect research time, a lack of consideration of the importance of spatial colocalization of interacting researchers and clinicians, insufficient focus on integrating clinician-scientists into research teams, and inadequate accessibility of administrative research infrastructure. Lack of mentorship and role models in orthopaedics also contributes to the barriers confronting the clinician-scientist. A number of steps could be taken by institutions to positively influence orthopaedic clinician-scientist career development. Creation of research teams in which orthopaedic clinician-scientists can collaborate effectively with other researchers is a critical step, as is providing protected time free of clinical responsibilities to be devoted to research. Increased attention to physical co-localization of the research activities of clinicians and scientists, and provision of research infrastructure at the department level are additional approaches that can be taken to ameliorate the institutional barriers to the orthopaedic clinician-scientist.

  13. Clubfoot: An Orthopaedic Surgeon Describes Clubfoot and Current Treatment Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitale, Michael

    2007-01-01

    As an orthopaedic surgeon who has treated numerous cases of clubfoot in his career, the author knows that it takes exceptional parents to deal with the challenges of having a child born with a clubfoot. However, it should be noted that a clubfoot diagnosis does not mean a life of pain, deformity, and disability for a child. Today's treatment…

  14. Improving translation success of cell-based therapies in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Bara, Jennifer J; Herrmann, Marietta; Evans, Christopher H; Miclau, Theodore; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Richards, R Geoff

    2016-01-01

    There is a clear discrepancy between the growth of cell therapy and tissue engineering research in orthopaedics over the last two decades and the number of approved clinical therapies and products available to patients. At the 2015 annual meeting of the Orthopaedic Research Society, a workshop was held to highlight important considerations from the perspectives of an academic scientist, clinical researcher, and industry representative with the aim of helping researchers to successfully translate their ideas into clinical and commercial reality. Survey data acquired from workshop participants indicated an overall positive opinion on the future potential of cell-based therapies to make a significant contribution to orthopaedic medicine. The survey also indicated an agreement on areas requiring improvement in the development of new therapies, specifically; increased support for fundamental research and education and improved transparency of regulatory processes. This perspectives article summarises the content and conclusions of the workshop and puts forward suggestions on how translational success of cell-based therapies in orthopaedics may be achieved.

  15. Enhanced casualty care from a Global Military Orthopaedic Teleconsultation Program.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Brian R; Laughlin, Matthew D; Belmont, Philip J; Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Pallis, Mark P

    2014-11-01

    Since its advent, telemedicine has facilitated access to subspecialty medical care for the treatment of patients in remote and austere settings. The United States military introduced a formal orthopaedic teleconsultation system in 2007, but few reports have explored its scope of practice and efficacy, particularly in a deployed environment during a time of conflict. All teleconsultations placed to the orthopaedic service between April 2009 and December 2012 were obtained and retrospectively reviewed. Case files were abstracted and anatomical location of injury, type of injury, origin of consult (country or Navy Afloat), branch of service, and treatment recommendations, were recorded for descriptive analysis. The final result of the consult was also determined, with service members transported from the combat theatre or deployment location defined as medically evacuated. Instances where teleconsultations averted a medical evacuation were also documented as a separate outcome. Over a 32-month period, 597 orthopaedic teleconsultations were placed, with the majority derived from Army (46%) and Navy (32%) personnel deployed in Afghanistan, Iraq, or with Navy Afloat. Approximately 51% of consults involved the upper extremity, including 197 hand injuries, followed by lower extremity (37%) and spine (7.8%) complaints. Fractures comprised over half of all injuries, with the hand and foot most commonly affected. The average response time for teleconsultations was 7.54h. A total of 56 service members required immediate evacuation for further orthopaedic management, while at least 26 medical evacuations were prevented due to the teleconsultation system. The teleconsultation system promotes early access to orthopaedic subspecialty care in a resource-limited, deployed military setting. The telemedicine network also appears to mitigate unnecessary aeromedical evacuations, reducing healthcare costs, lost duty time, and treatment delays. These findings have important meaning for

  16. Understanding how orthopaedic surgery practices generate value for healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Olson, Steven A; Mather, Richard C

    2013-06-01

    Orthopaedic surgery practices can provide substantial value to healthcare systems. Increasingly, healthcare administrators are speaking of the need for alignment between physicians and healthcare systems. However, physicians often do not understand what healthcare administrators value and therefore have difficulty articulating the value they create in discussions with their hospital or healthcare organization. Many health systems and hospitals use service lines as an organizational structure to track the relevant data and manage the resources associated with a particular type of care, such as musculoskeletal care. Understanding service lines and their management can be useful for orthopaedic surgeons interested in interacting with their hospital systems. We provide an overview of two basic types of value orthopaedic surgeons create for healthcare systems: financial or volume-driven benefits and nonfinancial quality or value-driven patient care benefits. We performed a search of PubMed from 1965 to 2012 using the term "service line." Of the 351 citations identified, 18 citations specifically involved the use of service lines to improve patient care in both nursing and medical journals. A service line is a structure used in healthcare organizations to enable management of a subset of activities or resources in a focused area of patient care delivery. There is not a consistent definition of what resources are managed within a service line from hospital to hospital. Physicians can positively impact patient care through engaging in service line management. There is increasing pressure for healthcare systems and hospitals to partner with orthopaedic surgeons. The peer-reviewed literature demonstrates there are limited resources for physicians to understand the value they create when attempting to negotiate with their hospital or healthcare organization. To effectively negotiate for resources to provide the best care for patients, orthopaedic surgeons need to claim and

  17. Aquatic Equipment Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sova, Ruth

    Equipment usually used in water exercise programs is designed for variety, intensity, and program necessity. This guide discusses aquatic equipment under the following headings: (1) equipment design; (2) equipment principles; (3) precautions and contraindications; (4) population contraindications; and (5) choosing equipment. Equipment is used…

  18. Factors Influencing Patient Selection of an Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Physician.

    PubMed

    Manning, Blaine T; Bohl, Daniel D; Saltzman, Bryan M; Cotter, Eric J; Wang, Kevin C; Epley, Chad T; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R

    2017-08-01

    The rise in consumer-centric health insurance plans has increased the importance of the patient in choosing a provider. There is a paucity of studies that examine how patients select an orthopaedic sports medicine physician. To evaluate factors that patients consider when choosing an orthopaedic sports medicine physician. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 1077 patients who sought treatment by 3 sports medicine physicians were administered an anonymous questionnaire. The questionnaire included 19 questions asking respondents to rate the importance of specific factors regarding the selection of orthopaedic sports medicine physicians on a scale of 1 (not important at all) to 10 (very important). The remaining 6 questions were multiple-choice and regarded the following criteria: preferred physician age, appointment availability, clinic waiting room times, travel distance, and medical student/resident involvement. Of the 1077 consecutive patients administered the survey, 382 (35%) responded. Of these, 59% (n = 224) were male, and 41% (n = 158) were female. In ranking the 19 criteria in terms of importance, patients rated board certification (9.12 ± 1.88), being well known for a specific area of expertise (8.27 ± 2.39), and in-network provider status (8.13 ± 2.94) as the 3 most important factors in selecting an orthopaedic sports medicine physician. Radio, television, and Internet advertisements were rated the least important. Regarding physician age, 63% of patients would consider seeking a physician who is ≤65 years old. Approximately 78% of patients would consider seeking a different physician if no appointments were available within 4 weeks. The study results suggest that board certification, being well known for a specific area of expertise, and health insurance in-network providers may be the most important factors influencing patient selection of an orthopaedic sports medicine physician. Advertisements were least important to patients. Patient

  19. Evaluation of the sterilization efficacy of domestic electric drills used in orthopaedic surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Goveia, Vania Regina; Pinto, Flavia Morais Gomes; Machoshvili, Irene Alexeevna; Penna, Thereza Christina Vessoni; Graziano, Kazuko Uchikawa

    2009-01-01

    It is estimated that electric drills (ED) have been used in orthopaedic surgeries for bone drilling for more than 50 years in Brazilian hospitals. It is an electric, thermosensitive equipment, not indicated for surgical use, which has not been previously evaluated regarding the sterilization efficacy, being suspect of infection risk. This study evaluated the efficacy of sterilization by ethylene oxide (EtO) of new drills that were intentionally contaminated with Bacillus atrophaeus spores. An experimental, laboratory, randomized applied research was developed, where 16 electric drills were analyzed, in addition to positive and negative controls. All the previously cleaned and sterilized equipment were submitted to contamination by spores. The experimental group was submitted to cleaning and sterilization by EtO and test of sterility by filtration through a 0.45 >m membrane. The membranes were cultivated and Gram and Wirtz-Conklin staining were carried out in positive results for spore visualization. An efficacy of 99.99999881% of the process of sterilization by EtO was confirmed, with a probability of survival of 1.19 x 10 -8. Under the development conditions of the experiment, the efficacy of the sterilization of ED by EtO was confirmed. PMID:24031397

  20. Scatter of orthopaedic research: can orthopods stay up-to-date with research?

    PubMed

    Wijenayake, Lahann; Conroy, Sophie; Turner, Douglas; Thorning, Sarah; Glasziou, Paul

    2015-06-01

    The volume of orthopaedic literature is increasing exponentially, becoming more widely scattered among journals. The rate of increase in orthopaedics is greater than other specialties. We aimed to identify the number of different journals an orthopaedic surgeon would need to read to stay up-to-date with current evidence. We searched PubMed for all orthopaedic-related systematic reviews (SR) and randomized controlled trials (RCT) published in 2011 using MESH (Medical Subject Headings) terms. The search was based on the Australian Orthopaedic Association syllabus of March 2011. The results of the search were exported to EndNote, then Microsoft Excel. We then calculated the least number of journals needed to read 25%, 50% and 100% of the articles. This was done separately for SRs and RCTs. We found 1400 orthopaedic RCTs spread over 392 journals. Ten journals contained 25% of the articles, 36 journals contained 50% and 114 journals contained 75%. Three hundred journals contained three or fewer RCTs. We found 354 orthopaedic-relevant SRs spread over 152 journals. Six journals contained 25% of the articles, 23 journals contained 50% and 63 journals contained 75%. Ninety-three journals contained only one SR. Our results demonstrate the vast scatter of orthopaedic research. Four orthopaedic RCTs are published every day. To read even 25% of the new RCTs and SRs published in orthopaedics, a surgeon would require a subscription to 13 different journals monthly, a costly and time-consuming endeavour. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  1. Incorporating patient preferences into orthopaedic practice: should the orthopaedic encounter change?

    PubMed

    Bryant, Dianne; Bednarski, Elzbieta; Gafni, Amiram

    2006-04-01

    to begin to think about these issues and how they might investigate potential resolutions for incorporating patient values and sharing their own preferences for treatment options with their patients during the orthopaedic encounter.

  2. Essentials of disaster management: the role of the orthopaedic surgeon.

    PubMed

    Born, Christopher T; Monchik, Keith O; Hayda, Roman A; Bosse, Michael J; Pollak, Andrew N

    2011-01-01

    Disaster preparedness and management education is essential for allowing orthopaedic surgeons to play a valuable, constructive role in responding to disasters. The National Incident Management System, as part of the National Response Framework, provides coordination between all levels of government and uses the Incident Command System as its unified command structure. An "all-hazards" approach to disasters, whether natural, man-made, intentional, or unintentional, is fundamental to disaster planning. To respond to any disaster, command and control must be established, and emergency management must be integrated with public health and medical care. In the face of increasing acts of terrorism, an understanding of blast injury pathophysiology allows for improved diagnostic and treatment strategies. A practical understanding of potential biologic, chemical, and nuclear agents and their attendant clinical symptoms is also prerequisite. Credentialing and coordination between designated organizations and the federal government are essential to allow civilian orthopaedic surgeons to access systems capable of disaster response.

  3. Adhesion of Staphylococcus to orthopaedic metals, an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, E; McKenna, J; Mulhall, K J; Marks, P; McCormack, D

    2004-01-01

    This study describes a new model of biofilm study in rabbits. The primary focus of this study was to assess biofilm adhesion to orthopaedic metals in their first 48 h in a femoral intramedullary implantation model. Two previous inoculation methods i.e. that of pre- and direct inoculation were studied with two bacterial isolates namely Staphylococcus aureus and epidermidis, on titanium and stainless steel metallic implants. A method of sonication and log dilution/plating was used to assess biofilm bacteria adhering to implants. Silver coated metals were then compared with their respective control metals in the new model. The direct inoculation model gave larger and more reproducible biofilm adhesion to implanted metals. Staphylococcus epidermidis shows lower adhesion ability to metals, and biofilms adhere in greater numbers to stainless steel over titanium. Silver coated metals show no statistical difference over control metals when exposed to orthopaedic biofilms.

  4. Using PubMed effectively to access the orthopaedic literature.

    PubMed

    Clough, J F Myles; Hitchcock, Kristin; Nelson, David L

    2011-01-01

    PubMed is the free public Internet interface to the US National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE database of citations to medical scientific articles. Many orthopaedic surgeons use PubMed on a regular basis, but most orthopaedic surgeons have received little or no training in how to use PubMed effectively and express frustration with the experience. Typical problems encountered are data overload with very large numbers of returns to look through, failure to find a specific article, and a concern that a search has missed important papers. It is helpful to understand the system used to enter journal articles into the database and the classification of the common types of searches and to review suggestions for the best ways to use the PubMed interface and find sources for search teaching and assistance.

  5. Composite Bone Models in Orthopaedic Surgery Research and Education

    PubMed Central

    Elfar, John; Stanbury, Spencer; Menorca, Ron Martin Garcia; Reed, Jeffrey Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Composite bone models are increasingly used in orthopaedic biomechanics research and surgical education—applications that traditionally relied on cadavers. Cadaver bones are suboptimal for myriad reasons, including issues of cost, availability, preservation, and inconsistency between specimens. Further, cadaver samples disproportionately represent the elderly, whose bone quality may not be representative of the greater orthopaedic population. The current fourth-generation composite bone models provide an accurate reproduction of the biomechanical properties of human bone when placed under bending, axial, and torsional loads. The combination of glass fiber and epoxy resin components into a single phase has enabled manufacturing by injection molding. The high anatomic fidelity of the cadaver-based molds and negligible shrinkage properties of the epoxy resin results in a process that allows for excellent definition of anatomic detail in the cortical wall and optimized consistency of features between models. Recent biomechanical studies of composites have validated their use as a suitable substitute for cadaver specimens. PMID:24486757

  6. Robotic surgery in trauma and orthopaedics: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Karthik, K; Colegate-Stone, T; Dasgupta, P; Tavakkolizadeh, A; Sinha, J

    2015-03-01

    The use of robots in orthopaedic surgery is an emerging field that is gaining momentum. It has the potential for significant improvements in surgical planning, accuracy of component implantation and patient safety. Advocates of robot-assisted systems describe better patient outcomes through improved pre-operative planning and enhanced execution of surgery. However, costs, limited availability, a lack of evidence regarding the efficiency and safety of such systems and an absence of long-term high-impact studies have restricted the widespread implementation of these systems. We have reviewed the literature on the efficacy, safety and current understanding of the use of robotics in orthopaedics. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  7. A NASA discovery has current applications in orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been actively used for nearly 40 yr, during which time it has been known to reduce pain, inflammation, and edema. It also has the ability to promote healing of wounds, including deep tissues and nerves, and prevent tissue damage through cell death. Much of the landmark research was done by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and these studies provided a springboard for many additional basic science studies. Few current clinical studies in orthopaedics have been performed, yet only in the past few years have basic science studies outlined the mechanisms of the effect of LLLT on the cell and subsequently the organism. This article reviews the basic science of LLLT, gives a historical perspective, and explains how it works, exposes the controversies and complications, and shows the new immediately applicable information in orthopaedics. PMID:25541589

  8. Real-world solutions for orthopaedic on-call problems.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Samuel G; Blotter, Robert H; Kosmatka, Paul K; Rudin, Guy J

    2012-01-01

    An increasing percentage of emergency departments are reporting an inadequate number of on-call specialists. This situation is causing a growing crisis in emergency department on-call coverage for patients requiring orthopaedic care. Many orthopaedic surgeons are electing to opt out of emergency department on-call service. For many reasons, including a dwindling supply of eager participants, more medical groups are finding it difficult to fulfill their on-call obligations. This problem demands a variety of strategies to address the multiple causative factors that occur in practice settings. Initially, it may be necessary to incentivize on-call service so more surgeons are willing to participate. Incentives may include improving the group governance and bylaws to avoid confusion on the rules for providing on-call coverage. The on-call experience may require financial improvements, outsourcing with locum tenens, or a complete restructuring of the on-call arrangement with the formation of a hospitalist program.

  9. The use of arthrography in pediatric orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Philip D; Duhn, Ryan

    2014-08-01

    Surgery near pediatric joints can be challenging because it is difficult to visualize vital articular structures. Assessment of underlying pathology is also challenging because the joint structures have not yet ossified. Arthrography is a useful tool that is quick and minimally invasive and allows adequate visualization of joint anatomy during surgery, which aids intraoperative decision making. In pediatric patients, arthrography is most useful for visualization of the elbow, knee, and hip joints. This tool can help the surgeon to refine the diagnosis and management of pediatric fractures and aids in surgical assessment during joint and limb reconstruction. Arthrography adds minimal time to surgery and carries a low risk of complications; it should be part of the armamentarium of any surgeon who treats pediatric orthopaedic patients. Copyright 2014 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  10. The pediatric orthopaedics workforce demands, needs, and resources.

    PubMed

    Schwend, Richard M

    2009-01-01

    The Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America Practice Management Committee evaluated current and future pediatric orthopaedic workforce needs. The resulting informational article summarizes its findings and makes recommendations for improvement of our workforce. Whereas policy decisions are often in the hands of the government with its emphasis on access and cost containment, the area that we can control, the quality of our workforce should be our primary effort. Specific recommendations include the prospective collection of accurate workforce data, increasing the interest of residents and students to enter our specialty, assisting members to improve practice efficiencies and assuming leadership in the musculoskeletal education of our primary care colleagues. We expect that by improving our workforce and professional work environment, we can make a difference for our young patients and for the society.

  11. Bone and metal: an orthopaedic perspective on osseointegration of metals.

    PubMed

    Goriainov, Vitali; Cook, Richard; M Latham, Jeremy; G Dunlop, Douglas; Oreffo, Richard O C

    2014-10-01

    The area of implant osseointegration is of major importance, given the predicted significant rise in the number of orthopaedic procedures and an increasingly ageing population. Osseointegration is a complex process involving a number of distinct mechanisms affected by the implant bulk properties and surface characteristics. Our understanding and ability to modify these mechanisms through alterations in implant design is continuously expanding. The following review considers the main aspects of material and surface alterations in metal implants, and the extent of their subsequent influence on osseointegration. Clinically, osseointegration results in asymptomatic stable durable fixation of orthopaedic implants. The complexity of achieving this outcome through incorporation and balance of contributory factors is highlighted through a clinical case report.

  12. Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Ivkovic, Alan; Marijanovic, Inga; Hudetz, Damir; Porter, Ryan M; Pecina, Marko; Evans, Christopher H

    2011-06-01

    Orthopedic surgery is going through a serious paradigm shift; instead of simply replacing damaged tissues with prosthetic or allograft material, the aim is to regenerate them. This endeavor has generated the field of regenerative orthopaedics, an increasingly expanding area of research with hopes of providing new and better treatments for diseases and injuries affecting the musculoskeletal system. As part of this process, we are witnessing a substantial accumulation of new cellular and molecular insights into connective tissue function, coupled with emerging new concepts in stem cell biology and scaffolding technologies. Indeed, any successful strategy to regenerate musculoskeletal tissues can be portrayed as an intricate interplay between the three main constituents of the regenerative system: cells, environment and scaffolds. This review is not meant to be exhaustive and comprehensive, but aims to highlight concepts and key advances in the field of regenerative orthopaedics and tissue engineering, as well as to present current possibilities for clinical translation.

  13. Radiation safety for anaesthesia providers in the orthopaedic operating room.

    PubMed

    Rhea, E B; Rogers, T H; Riehl, J T

    2016-04-01

    In many orthopaedic operating rooms, anaesthesia providers routinely wear lead aprons for protection from radiation, but some studies have questioned whether this is needed. We conducted a systematic review to identify studies that measured the amount of radiation that anaesthetists were exposed to in the orthopaedic operating room. Multiple studies have shown that at 1.5 m from the source of radiation, anaesthetists received no radiation, or amounts so small that a person would have to be present in an unreasonable number of operations to receive cumulative doses of any significance. Radiation doses at this distance were often at the limits of the sensitivity of the measuring dosimeter. We question the need to wear lead protection for anaesthesia providers who are routinely at 1.5 m or a greater distance from standard fluoroscopy units. © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  14. The Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Atkinson Smith, Mary

    2015-01-01

    In the specialty of orthopaedics, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major contributor to infections of the soft tissues, surgical sites, and joints, in addition to increasing disability, mortality, and healthcare costs. Inappropriate prescribing and misuse of antibiotics have led to bacterial resistance and the rapid emergence of MRSA. It is imperative for healthcare providers and facilities to improve quality, promote safety, and decrease costs related to MRSA infections. The healthcare profession and society as a whole play an important role in minimizing the transmission of pathogens, reducing the incidence of MRSA infections, and decreasing the development of future antibiotic resistant pathogens. This article discusses the epidemiology of MRSA and describes evidence-based guidelines pertaining to the prevention, minimization, and treatment of MRSA-related infections. Specific application to orthopaedics are discussed in the context of patient risk factors, perioperative and postoperative prophylaxis, and current trends regarding education and reporting strategies.

  15. Making Sure the Media Gets It Right on Orthopaedic Research.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Louis F

    2016-11-01

    Patient-centered medicine requires an informed health care consumer. Traditionally, orthopaedic surgeons were the primary source for patients regarding diagnostic and treatment options for musculoskeletal conditions. Now patients get information from a variety of sources including the Internet, social media, and print journalism. Most of these sources are not vetted or peer reviewed and some not even fact checked. Part of the role of the orthopaedic surgeon is to educate patients, and interpreting this type of information is an increasingly demanding but essential task. A recent article in the New York Times titled "Why 'Useless' Surgery Is Still Popular" illustrates the importance of this educational role. Patients deserve the most up-to-date and accurate assessment of medical information. The most appropriate source of that information is their treating physician and surgeon. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Meticillin resistance in orthopaedic coagulase-negative staphylococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Uçkay, I; Harbarth, S; Ferry, T; Lübbeke, A; Emonet, S; Hoffmeyer, P; Pittet, D

    2011-11-01

    Orthopaedic infections due to coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) and meticillin-resistant strains may be increasing. We assessed secular trends of CoNS infections and factors associated with meticillin resistance by performing a 13-year retrospective cohort study of orthopaedic patients with CoNS infections from January 1995 to December 2007. Of 60 CoNS infections, 57 (95%) were implant-related. Median follow-up after end of treatment was 5.1 years (range: 2.4-13.8). During the study period, 44,237 orthopaedic procedures were performed, 21,299 (48%) with implants. The overall cumulative incidence of CoNS-associated infection was 0.14% and 0.28% for implant-related procedures. There were non-significant changes in the absolute number or cumulative incidence of CoNS infection (chi-squared test, P values for trend: 0.45 and 0.97, respectively). Forty-five episodes (75%) were due to meticillin-resistant strains. The proportion of meticillin resistance remained stable over time (P for trend: 0.65). Whereas few (4/15) meticillin-susceptible strains were associated with prior prophylaxis that covered the causative pathogen, 28/45 meticillin-resistant strains were associated with inadequate prophylaxis (P=0.03). The cumulative incidence of orthopaedic CoNS infection is low and stable in our institution and almost exclusively implant-related. The proportion of meticillin resistance among CoNS has remained stable over the last decade with a favourable clinical outcome. Copyright © 2011 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Vancouver winters: environmental influences on inpatient adult orthopaedic trauma demographics.

    PubMed

    Noordin, Shahryar; Masri, Bassam A

    2014-05-01

    To compare the pattern of adult inpatient orthopaedic injuries admitted at three Vancouver hospitals following one of the worst winter snowstorms in the region with the preceding control winter period. The surveillance study was conducted at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 2007 to 2010. Inpatient adult admissions for orthopaedic injuries at three hospitals were recorded, including age, gender, anatomic location of injury, type of fracture (open or closed), fixation method (internal versus external fixation), and length of acute care hospital stay. Comparisons between admissions during this weather pattern and admission during a previous winter with minimal snow were made. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 511 patients admitted under Orthopaedic trauma service during the significant winter snowstorms of December 2008-January 2009, 100 (19.6%) (Cl: 16.2%-23.2%) were due to ice and snow, whereas in the preceding mild winter only 18 of 415 (4.3%) (CI: 2.5%-6.8%) cases were related to snow (p < 0.05). Ankle and wrist fractures were the most frequent injuries during the index snow storm period (p < 0.05). At all the three institutions, 97 (96.5%) fractures were closed during the snowstorm as opposed to 17 (95%) during the control winter period. Internal fixation in 06 (89%) fractures as opposed to external fixation in 12 (11%) patients was the predominant mode of fixation across the board during both time periods. The study demonstrated a significantly higher inpatient orthopaedic trauma volume during the snowstorm. More rigorous prospective studies need to be designed to gain further insight to solving these problems from a public health perspective.

  18. [Nuclear medicine techniques in the diagnosis of orthopaedic diseases].

    PubMed

    Welsch, M; Welsch, F; Grünwald, F

    2006-06-01

    Nuclear medicine techniques show metabolic processes, allowing the diagnoses of many bone and joint disorders. For most orthopaedic indications three-phase bone scintigraphy is used, showing inflammatory bone and joint diseases, traumatic and post-operative disorders as well as necrotic or malignant changes. In addition to bone scintigraphy, there are radiopharmaceuticals to depict inflammatory processes. Finally, positron emission tomography is a modern imaging technique used mainly for tumor diagnostics, but also for detection of inflammation.

  19. Unlocking the Doors to Patient Satisfaction in Pediatric Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Frederick B; Burrows, James F; Shirley, Eric D; Rosen, Paul

    2016-07-20

    Despite efforts to enhance the patient experience, many health care providers continue to struggle to improve patient satisfaction as the identification of tangible quality improvement areas remains difficult. This dilemma is particularly relevant in pediatric settings, where patient satisfaction measures have not been as thoroughly studied in subspecialties such as orthopaedics. We investigate this issue to identify the major drivers of patient satisfaction in pediatric orthopaedics, which has significant financial and professional implications for both hospital administrators and health care providers. Although recent patient experience studies emphasize on improving access to care and nurturing hospitality by facilities upgrades or staff development, we hypothesized that the patient-physician relationship remains the most important factor in patients' assessment of their experiences. Patient satisfaction surveys were collected from outpatient visits to pediatric orthopaedic practices at 5 locations in 3 states. Data were aggregated as monthly percentages of responses on a 5-point Likert scale. Month over month Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients were generated between top responses for "Likelihood of Your Recommending Our Practice to Others" (LTR) and other variables. In total, 6195 families completed satisfaction surveys. The variables most predictive of likelihood to recommend the practice were "Staff Worked Together" (r=0.82), "Friendliness/Courtesy of Care Provider" (r=0.80), "Cheerfulness of Practice" (r=0.80), "Likelihood of Recommending Care Provider" (r=0.80), and "Care Provider's Information about Medications" (r=0.78). Measurements of the patient-physician relationship, along with overall cheerfulness and staff collaboration, have the strongest relationships to LTR. These results suggest that patient satisfaction is influenced by more than just the patient-physician relationship, and may have significance in aiding pediatric orthopaedic

  20. Musculoskeletal ultrasound education: orthopaedic resident ability following a multimedia tutorial.

    PubMed

    Piposar, Jonathan R; Easley, Mark; Nunley, James A; DeOrio, James K; Talusan, Paul G; Gubler, Kyle E; Reach, John S

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSK-US) is a quick and effective imaging tool that can be utilized by orthopaedic surgeons to identify common musculoskeletal pathology such as ankle tendinopathy. This study evaluated the ability of 15 orthopaedic surgery residents to identify and measure ankle tendons after attending a multimedia tutorial on MSK-US. Afterwards, proficiency of usage was assessed by identification and quantification of three ankle tendons (Achilles, tibialis posterior, and flexor hallucis longus) in a cadaver limb. Resident comfort level and plan for future use were also assessed. After completing the tutorial, accuracy measuring the Achilles, tibialis posterior, and flexor hallucis longus tendons was 94.8%, 90.2%, and 90.1%, respectively. Resident comfort level improved from a level of 2.3 before the tutorial to 6.8 afterwards. Seventy-one percent of residents plan to use ultrasound in clinical practice. These results show that orthopaedic surgery residents can identify and assess tendon size via MSK-US with sufficient accuracy after a multimedia tutorial.

  1. Effectiveness of Virtual Reality Training in Orthopaedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Aïm, Florence; Lonjon, Guillaume; Hannouche, Didier; Nizard, Rémy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review to determine the effectiveness of virtual reality (VR) training in orthopaedic surgery. A comprehensive systematic review was performed of articles of VR training in orthopaedic surgery published up to November 2014 from MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. We included 10 relevant trials of 91 identified articles, which all reported on training in arthroscopic surgery (shoulder, n = 5; knee, n = 4; undefined, n = 1). A total of 303 participants were involved. Assessment after training was made on a simulator in 9 of the 10 studies, and in one study it took place in the operating room (OR) on a real patient. A total of 32 different outcomes were extracted; 29 of them were about skills assessment. None involved a patient-related outcome. One study focused on anatomic learning, and the other evaluated technical task performance before and after training on a VR simulator. Five studies established construct validity. Three studies reported a statistically significant improvement in technical skills after training on a VR simulator. VR training leads to an improvement of technical skills in orthopaedic surgery. Before its widespread use, additional trials are needed to clarify the transfer of VR training to the OR. Systematic review of Level I through Level IV studies. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neoprene Orthopaedic Supports: An Underrecognised Cause of Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hawkey, S; Ghaffar, S

    2015-01-01

    Thioureas, often contained within neoprene to provide water resistance, are an important cause of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in those who use neoprene products. We wish to present three cases of thiourea-induced ACD from three different orthopaedic supports containing neoprene. The first case was a 67-year-old woman who developed an itchy rash on her heel three weeks after using a neoprene insole for plantar fasciitis. The second case was a 47-year-old man who developed an itchy rash on his wrist after wearing neoprene wrist splints for psoriatic arthropathy. The third case was a 77-year-old woman who experienced a severe erythematous rash with blistering from a neoprene elbow brace she received following a humeral fracture. All patients were patch tested to the British Society of Cutaneous Allergy Standard and rubber series and a cut piece from all the relevant supports. At 96 hours, all patients had a + reaction to mixed dialkylthiourea, diethylthiourea, and the supports' material. No other positive patch test reactions were identified. As neoprene is fast becoming one of the most popular materials used for orthopaedic supports, awareness of this reaction and close liaison between dermatologists and orthopaedic surgeons are therefore essential to allow for early recognition of this complication.

  3. Orthopaedic surgeons in Yorkshire--are we ATLS positive?

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, S. P.; McMurray, D. H. M.; Hinsche, A. F.; Deacon, P.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 1993, the Major Trauma Working Group of Yorkshire proposed that hospitals should be accredited as Trauma Reception Hospitals with a policy for the response to the arrival of a trauma patient. These requirements include specific criteria for orthopaedics. METHODS: To evaluate if these criteria are being fulfilled, we carried out an audit comparing the response in the hospitals within the Yorkshire deanery to the arrival of major trauma. All consultant and middle-grade orthopaedic surgeons on call for trauma were contacted and questioned as to their ATLS provider status and involvement in the "trauma call". RESULTS: 16 hospitals were included of which 13 have a "trauma team". 191 surgeons (96% response) were included. 175 have completed an ATLS course. Of these, 72 (41%) had out-of-date qualifications. Only 9 (13%) were waiting to revalidate. Variation was seen in the frequency of accident and emergency department attendance by different grades of surgeon for major trauma. DISCUSSION: All hospitals have a response for major trauma although variations occur. The vast majority of orthopaedic surgeons in Yorkshire have been adequately trained in ATLS management (more so than any study has previously shown), particularly the middle grades, who are usually first to attend. The level of revalidation is low and reasons for this are discussed with recommendations for revalidation in the future. PMID:15720907

  4. Orthopaedic surgeons in Yorkshire--are we ATLS positive?

    PubMed

    Kelley, S P; McMurray, D H M; Hinsche, A F; Deacon, P

    2005-01-01

    In 1993, the Major Trauma Working Group of Yorkshire proposed that hospitals should be accredited as Trauma Reception Hospitals with a policy for the response to the arrival of a trauma patient. These requirements include specific criteria for orthopaedics. To evaluate if these criteria are being fulfilled, we carried out an audit comparing the response in the hospitals within the Yorkshire deanery to the arrival of major trauma. All consultant and middle-grade orthopaedic surgeons on call for trauma were contacted and questioned as to their ATLS provider status and involvement in the "trauma call". 16 hospitals were included of which 13 have a "trauma team". 191 surgeons (96% response) were included. 175 have completed an ATLS course. Of these, 72 (41%) had out-of-date qualifications. Only 9 (13%) were waiting to revalidate. Variation was seen in the frequency of accident and emergency department attendance by different grades of surgeon for major trauma. All hospitals have a response for major trauma although variations occur. The vast majority of orthopaedic surgeons in Yorkshire have been adequately trained in ATLS management (more so than any study has previously shown), particularly the middle grades, who are usually first to attend. The level of revalidation is low and reasons for this are discussed with recommendations for revalidation in the future.

  5. Expansion of the coordinator role in orthopaedic residency program management.

    PubMed

    Grant, Richard E; Murphy, Laurie A; Murphy, James E

    2008-03-01

    The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME) Data Accreditation System indicates 124 of 152 orthopaedic surgery residency program directors have 5 or fewer years of tenure. The qualifications and responsibilities of the position based on the requirements of orthopaedic surgery residency programs, the institutions that support them, and the ACGME Outcome Project have evolved the role of the program coordinator from clerical to managerial. To fill the void of information on the coordinators' expanding roles and responsibilities, the 2006 Association of Residency Coordinators in Orthopaedic Surgery (ARCOS) Career survey was designed and distributed to 152 program coordinators in the United States. We had a 39.5% response rate for the survey, which indicated a high level of day-to-day managerial oversight of all aspects of the residency program; additional responsibilities for other department or division functions for fellows, rotating medical students, continuing medical education of the faculty; and miscellaneous business functions. Although there has been expansion of the role of the program coordinator, challenges exist in job congruence and position reclassification. We believe use of professional groups such as ARCOS and certification of program coordinators should be supported and encouraged.

  6. Patients' misunderstanding of common orthopaedic terminology: the need for clarity

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, CHM; Hunter, AR; Bacarese-Hamilton, IA

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Patients' understanding of their medical problems is essential to allow them to make competent decisions, comply with treatment and enable recovery. We investigated Patients' understanding of orthopaedic terms to identify those words surgeons should make the most effort to explain. METHODS This questionnaire-based study recruited patients attending the orthopaedic clinics. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected using free text boxes for the Patients' written definitions and multiple choice questions (MCQs). RESULTS A total of 133 patients took part. Of these, 74% identified English as their first language. ‘Broken bone’ was correctly defined by 71% of respondents whereas ‘fractured bone’ was only correctly defined by 33%. ‘Sprain’ was correctly defined by 17% of respondents, with 29% being almost correct, 25% wrong and 29% unsure. In the MCQs, 51% of respondents answered correctly for ‘fracture’, 55% for ‘arthroscopy’, 46% for ‘meniscus’, 35% for ‘tendon’ and 23% for ‘ligament’. ‘Sprained’ caused confusion, with only 11% of patients answering correctly. Speaking English as a second language was a significant predictive factor for patients who had difficulty with definitions. There was no significant variation among different age groups. CONCLUSIONS Care should be taken by surgeons when using basic and common orthopaedic terminology in order to avoid misunderstanding. Educating patients in clinic is a routine part of practice. PMID:21943466

  7. Patients' misunderstanding of common orthopaedic terminology: the need for clarity.

    PubMed

    Bagley, C H M; Hunter, A R; Bacarese-Hamilton, I A

    2011-07-01

    Patients' understanding of their medical problems is essential to allow them to make competent decisions, comply with treatment and enable recovery. We investigated patients' understanding of orthopaedic terms to identify those words surgeons should make the most effort to explain. This questionnaire-based study recruited patients attending the orthopaedic clinics. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected using free text boxes for the patients' written definitions and multiple choice questions (MCQs). A total of 133 patients took part. Of these, 74% identified English as their first language. 'Broken bone' was correctly defined by 71% of respondents whereas 'fractured bone' was only correctly defined by 33%. 'Sprain' was correctly defined by 17% of respondents, with 29% being almost correct, 25% wrong and 29% unsure. In the MCQs, 51% of respondents answered correctly for 'fracture', 55% for 'arthroscopy', 46% for 'meniscus', 35% for 'tendon' and 23% for 'ligament'. 'Sprained' caused confusion, with only 11% of patients answering correctly. Speaking English as a second language was a significant predictive factor for patients who had difficulty with definitions. There was no significant variation among different age groups. Care should be taken by surgeons when using basic and common orthopaedic terminology in order to avoid misunderstanding. Educating patients in clinic is a routine part of practice.

  8. Analysis of scientific articles published in two general orthopaedic journals.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Lukas A; Holzer, Gerold

    2013-01-01

    To give an overview of the behaviour and scientific contributions of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery American (JBJS-A) and British Volume (JBJS-B). 480 original articles published in 2009 were identified through a combined comprehensive computer and manual library search. Articles were assigned to 11 orthopaedic categories and by country, type and specialty of the institution. Possible grants and citations were analysed. USA led all countries in published articles (36,87%), followed by UK (20,62%) and South Korea (5,83%). Most studies published were performed at academic institutions (65,83 %), only 4,16% at private practices. Almost half of the articles (46,24%) were published in three categories: hip (19.16%), knee (13.75%) and trauma (13.33%). In both journals 47.15% articles had at least one funding source. A review of articles published in major journals allows to show how research in orthopaedics is distributed worldwide. This study shows that a variety of different journals is neccessary to reflect the broad spectrum of orthopaedics in depth. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Comparative Study.

  9. Professional liability in orthopaedics and traumatology in Italy.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Umberto; Giai Via, Alessio; Macrì, Ernesto; Eramo, Alessandro; Marino, Valeria; Marsella, Luigi Tonino

    2013-10-01

    Interest in medical errors has increased during the last few years owing to the number of medical malpractice claims. Reasons for the increasing number of claims may be related to patients' higher expectations, iatrogenic injury, and the growth of the legal services industry. Claims analysis provides helpful information in specialties in which a higher number of errors occur, highlighting areas where orthopaedic care might be improved. We determined: (1) the number of claims involving orthopaedics and traumatology in Rome; (2) the risk of litigation in elective and trauma surgery; (3) the most common surgical procedures involved in claims and indemnity payments; (4) the time between the adverse medical event and the judgment date; and (5) issues related to informed consent. We analyzed 1925 malpractice judgments decided in the Civil Court of Rome between 2004 and 2010. In total, 243 orthopaedics claims were filed, and in 75% of these cases surgeons were found liable; 149 (61%) of these resulted from elective surgery. Surgical teams were sued in 30 claims and found liable in 22. The total indemnity payment ordered was more than €12,350,000 (USD 16,190,000). THA and spinal surgery were the most common surgical procedures involved. Inadequate informed consent was reported in 5.3% of cases. Our study shows that careful medical examination, accurate documentation in medical records, and adequate informed consent might reduce the number of claims. We suggest monitoring of court judgments would be useful to develop prevention strategies to reduce claims.

  10. Best one hundred papers of International Orthopaedics: a bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Mauffrey, Cyril; Quaile, Andrew; Scarlat, Marius M

    2017-04-01

    International Orthopaedics was founded in 1977. Within the 40 volumes and 247 issues since its launch, 5462 scientific articles have been published. This article identifies, analyses and categorises the best cited articles published by the journal to date. We searched Elsevier Scopus database for citations of all papers published in International Orthopaedics since its foundation. Source title was selected, and the journal's title was introduced in the search engine. The identified articles were sorted based on their total number of received citations, forming a descending list from 1 to 100. Total citations and self-citations of all co-authors were recorded. Year of publication, number of co-authors, number of pages, country and institution of origin and study type were identified. The best 100 papers and their citations correspond approximately to 2% of all the journal's publications. Total citations ranged from 62 to 272; 26 papers had >100 citations, of which self-citations accounted for <4%. Mean authorship number per paper was four and mean page number 6.5. United States, Japan and Germany ranked the top three countries of origin. The most common study type was case series, and most common topics were adult reconstruction, sports medicine and trauma. This article identifies topics, authors and institutions that contributed with their high-quality work in the journal's development over time. International Orthopaedics remains faithful to its authors and readers by publishing topical, well-written articles in excellent English.

  11. Regenerative orthopaedics: in vitro, in vivo...in silico.

    PubMed

    Geris, Liesbet

    2014-09-01

    In silico, defined in analogy to in vitro and in vivo as those studies that are performed on a computer, is an essential step in problem-solving and product development in classical engineering fields. The use of in silico models is now slowly easing its way into medicine. In silico models are already used in orthopaedics for the planning of complicated surgeries, personalised implant design and the analysis of gait measurements. However, these in silico models often lack the simulation of the response of the biological system over time. In silico models focusing on the response of the biological systems are in full development. This review starts with an introduction into in silico models of orthopaedic processes. Special attention is paid to the classification of models according to their spatiotemporal scale (gene/protein to population) and the information they were built on (data vs hypotheses). Subsequently, the review focuses on the in silico models used in regenerative orthopaedics research. Contributions of in silico models to an enhanced understanding and optimisation of four key elements-cells, carriers, culture and clinics-are illustrated. Finally, a number of challenges are identified, related to the computational aspects but also to the integration of in silico tools into clinical practice.

  12. Effects of the functional orthopaedic therapy on masticatory muscles activity.

    PubMed

    Di Palma, Elena; Tepedino, Michele; Chimenti, Claudio; Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Sforza, Chiarella

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity of masticatory muscles before and after functional orthopaedic therapy with Sander appliance. Ten adolescents (5 girls, 5 boys) with an Angle Class II, division I malocclusion, 9-13 years old, were submitted to sEMG before and after functional orthopaedic therapy. To verify the neuromuscular equilibrium, the standardized EMG activities of right and left masseter and anterior temporal muscles were recorded during maximum voluntary clench, and analysed calculating: POC (index of the symmetric distribution of the muscular activity determined by the occlusion); TC (index of presence of mandibular torque) and Ac (index suggesting the position of occlusal barycentre). The total muscular activity was also calculated. Pre- and post- functional therapy data were compared with Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test. Before treatment, all subjects had a good neuromuscular equilibrium, which was not altered by treatment. sEMG evaluations allow to quantify the impact of occlusion on masticatory muscle activity and to control that the functional orthopaedic therapy maintain a good muscular coordination. Key words:Functional appliance, Sander appliance, electromyography, masticatory muscles.

  13. The evolution of orthopaedic nursing at the Hospital for Special Surgery: the first orthopaedic institution in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Barbara A

    2005-01-01

    The history of nursing began in London in the late 1800s with the reform of unsanitary conditions by Florence Nightingale. During the same period, the United States was bitterly fighting the Civil War. Nursing had not developed as a profession, and most of the duties performed by nurses were conducted by men. Casualties of war required rehabilitation and care. Crippled children were left to die because they were considered a burden to society. Dr. James Knight founded the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled in his home on Second Avenue. This would later become a world-renowned orthopaedic institution with exceptional nursing care. A historical analysis of nursing education and practice are reviewed, along with the evolution of the first orthopaedic hospital in the United States.

  14. Occupational exposure from common fluoroscopic projections used in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Theocharopoulos, Nicholas; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John; Papadokostakis, George; Hadjipavlou, Alexander; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2003-09-01

    Personnel assisting in or performing fluoroscopically guided procedures may be exposed to high doses of radiation. Accurate occupational dosimetric data for the orthopaedic theater staff are of paramount importance for practicing radiation safety. Fluoroscopic screening was performed on an anthropomorphic phantom with use of four projections common in image-guided orthopaedic surgery. The simulated projections were categorized, according to the imaged anatomic area and the beam orientation, as (1) hip joint posterior-anterior, (2) hip joint lateral cross-table 45 degrees, (3) lumbar spine anterior-posterior, and (4) lumbar spine lateral 90 degrees. The scattered air kerma rate was measured on a grid surrounding the operating table. For each grid point, the effective dose, eye lens dose, and face skin dose values, normalized over the tube dose area product, were derived. For the effective dose calculations, three radiation protection conditions were considered: (1) with the exposed personnel using no protection measures, (2) with the exposed personnel wearing a 0.5-mm lead-equivalent protective apron, and (3) with the exposed personnel wearing both an apron and a thyroid collar. Maximum permissible workloads for typical hip, spine, and kyphoplasty procedures were derived on the basis of compliance with effective dose, eye lens dose, and skin dose limits. We found that the effective dose, eye lens dose, and face skin dose to an orthopaedic surgeon wearing a 0.5-mm lead-equivalent apron will not exceed the corresponding limits if the dose area product of the fluoroscopically guided procedure is <0.38 Gy m (2). When protective eye goggles are also worn, the maximum permissible dose area product increases to 0.70 Gy m (2), while the additional use of a thyroid shield allows a workload of 1.20 Gy m (2). The effective dose to the orthopaedic surgeon working tableside during a typical hip, spine, kyphoplasty procedure was 5.1, 21, and 250 micro Sv, respectively, when a 0

  15. How prevalent are hazardous attitudes among orthopaedic surgeons?

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Wendy E; Becker, Stéphanie J E; Guitton, Thierry G; Kadzielski, John; Ring, David

    2015-05-01

    So-called "hazardous attitudes" (macho, impulsive, antiauthority, resignation, invulnerable, and confident) were identified by the Federal Aviation Administration and the Canadian Air Transport Administration as contributing to road traffic incidents among college-aged drivers and felt to be useful for the prevention of aviation accidents. The concept of hazardous attitudes may also be useful in understanding adverse events in surgery, but it has not been widely studied. We surveyed a cohort of orthopaedic surgeons to determine the following: (1) What is the prevalence of hazardous attitudes in a large cohort of orthopaedic surgeons? (2) Do practice setting and/or demographics influence variation in hazardous attitudes in our cohort of surgeons? (3) Do surgeons feel they work in a climate that promotes patient safety? We asked the members of the Science of Variation Group-fully trained, practicing orthopaedic and trauma surgeons from around the world-to complete a questionnaire validated in college-aged drivers measuring six attitudes associated with a greater likelihood of collision and used by pilots to assess and teach aviation safety. We accepted this validation as applicable to surgeons and modified the questionnaire accordingly. We also asked them to complete the Modified Safety Climate Questionnaire, a questionnaire assessing the absence of a safety climate that is based on the patient safety cultures in healthcare organizations instrument. Three hundred sixty-four orthopaedic surgeons participated, representing a 47% response rate of those with correct email addresses who were invited. Thirty-eight percent (137 of 364 surgeons) had at least one score that would have been considered dangerously high in pilots (> 20), including 102 with dangerous levels of macho (28%) and 41 with dangerous levels of self-confidence (11%). After accounting for possible confounding variables, the variables most closely associated with a macho attitude deemed hazardous in pilots

  16. The deployed military orthopaedic surgeon: experiences of a recent Iowa graduate in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Malin, Andrew S; Brannan, Patrick S

    2012-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons deployed to Afghanistan are primarily responsible for the provision of care to injured Us and coalition soldiers. A vast and well-coordinated system of echeloned care has evolved to rapidly treat and evacuate injured soldiers. Orthopaedic care of injured Afghan civilians represents a common secondary mission performed by deployed orthopaedic surgeons. In this article, I describe my experiences while deployed to Afghanistan in 2011 as part of the special Operations surgical team.

  17. Personal protective equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000447.htm Personal protective equipment To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Personal protective equipment is special equipment you wear to create a ...

  18. Reference accuracy in peer-reviewed pediatric orthopaedic literature.

    PubMed

    Davids, Jon R; Weigl, Daniel M; Edmonds, Joye P; Blackhurst, Dawn W

    2010-05-01

    Reference accuracy of articles published in the biomedical literature is determined by the presence of citation and quotation errors. A recent review demonstrated that the median citation error rate per biomedical journal was 39%, and the median quotation error rate per journal was 20%. Reference accuracy in pediatric orthopaedic articles has not been previously reported, to our knowledge. Two hundred references from twenty articles published in four peer-reviewed orthopaedic journals were randomly selected for assessment of citation and quotation accuracy. Full-text copies of all original references were obtained by interlibrary loan methods and reviewed directly to establish citation accuracy. The presence of citation errors was determined by a single investigator. The relevance of citation errors was determined by assessing the ease of reference retrieval through PubMed. Quotation accuracy was determined by two examiners who reviewed each of the twenty articles and 200 references to compare the claims made for the references in the article against the data and opinions expressed in the actual reference. The total citation error rate across all of the journals was 26% (fifty-one of 200 references) with a 95% confidence interval of 16.5% to 37.3%. The median citation error rate per journal was 27% (range, 10% to 38%). Although citation errors were common, most were of minimal significance, as 196 of the 200 references could be retrieved with ease from PubMed. The total quotation error rate across all of the articles was 38% (152 of 398 reference citations) with a 95% confidence interval of 30.1% to 47.0%. The median quotation error rate per journal was 38% (range, 28% to 46%). Citation and quotation errors are common in the pediatric orthopaedic literature. Reference accuracy continues to be a substantial problem in the biomedical literature despite recent technological advances such as online databases, easily accessible search engines, and widely available

  19. Hand disorders in musicians: the orthopaedic surgeon's role.

    PubMed

    Sheibani-Rad, S; Wolfe, S; Jupiter, J

    2013-02-01

    Like athletes, musicians are vulnerable to musculoskeletal injuries that can be career ending or have a severe negative financial impact. All ages are affected, with a peak incidence in the third and fourth decades. Women are slightly more likely to be affected than men. It is incumbent upon orthopaedic surgeons to be able to complete a thorough physical assessment, be aware of the risk factors associated with musculoskeletal symptoms in musicians, and have a detailed knowledge of the specific syndromes they suffer and their appropriate treatment. In this paper we review the common hand injuries that afflict musicians and discuss their treatment.

  20. Rapid Prototyping in Orthopaedic Surgery: A User's Guide

    PubMed Central

    Frame, Mark; Huntley, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) is applicable to orthopaedic problems involving three dimensions, particularly fractures, deformities, and reconstruction. In the past, RP has been hampered by cost and difficulties accessing the appropriate expertise. Here we outline the history of rapid prototyping and furthermore a process using open-source software to produce a high fidelity physical model from CT data. This greatly mitigates the expense associated with the technique, allowing surgeons to produce precise models for preoperative planning and procedure rehearsal. We describe the method with an illustrative case. PMID:22666160

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine use amongst Malaysian orthopaedic oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Dhanoa, Amreeta; Yong, Tze Lek; Yeap, Stephanie Jin Leng; Lee, Isaac Shi Zhung; Singh, Vivek Ajit

    2014-10-17

    Although studies have shown that a large proportion of cancer patients use CAM, no study on CAM use amongst orthopaedic oncology patients has been published. Therefore, this study aims to determine the prevalence, characteristics and factors associated with CAM use amongst orthopaedic oncology patients. All consecutive consenting patients/parents who presented at the Orthopaedic Oncology Clinic, University Malaya Medical Centre (1st January to 31st December 2013) were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Overall, one hundred sixty-eight of the 274 patients recruited (61.3%) had used CAM at some time during their current illness. The prevalence of CAM used was 68% (123/181) for patients with malignant tumours and 48.4% (45/93) for patients with benign tumours. The most popular CAMs were biological-based therapies (90.5%), followed by mind-body techniques (40.5%). The most frequently used biological therapies were mega/multivitamins (31%), snakehead (Chana striatus) (28%) and sea cucumber (Stichopus horrens) (18%); whereas prayers (31%) and holy water (13%) dominated the mind-body category. Common reasons for CAM use were to improve physical well-being (60.1%), try out everything that would help (59.5%) and to enhance wound-healing (39.3%). Independent predictors for CAM use in multivariate analysis were paediatric patients [OR 2.46; 95% CI 0.99-6.06; p = 0.05], malignant tumours [OR 1.90; 95% CI 1.12-3.25; p = 0.018] and patients who underwent surgery [OR 2.06; 95% CI 1.15-3.69; p = 0.015]. Majority patients started taking CAMs following suggestions from family members (53%) and friends (49%). Sixty-six percent of patients felt they actually benefitted from CAM and 83.3% were satisfied/very satisfied. Only 5 patients reported side-effects. Majority of CAM users planned to continue CAM use or recommend it to others. However, only 31.5% of patients disclosed their CAM usage to their doctors. This survey revealed a high prevalence of CAM usage amongst

  2. Pin site infection in orthopaedic external fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennie

    External fixation is a well-established mode of treatment within orthopaedics; however, despite continued research, pin site infection is still a problem. Pin site infection may cause pain and discomfort to the patient, and result in osteomyelitis or sepsis if minor infection is not managed in a timely and appropriate manner. Fundamental issues such as the assessment and reporting of infection are important in dealing with pin site infection, as is the ongoing management of the pin site itself. Many types of care are evident, with varying evidence to support their use in clinical practice. This article will discuss the identification and classification of pin site infection and the methods of care.

  3. Conductive polymer sensor arrays for smart orthopaedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micolini, Carolina; Holness, F. B.; Johnson, James A.; Price, Aaron D.

    2017-04-01

    This study proposes and demonstrates the design, implementation, and characterization of a 3D-printed smartpolymer sensor array using conductive polyaniline (PANI) structures embedded in a polymeric substrate. The piezoresistive characteristics of PANI were studied to evaluate the efficacy of the manufacturing of an embedded pressure sensor. PANI's stability throughout loading and unloading cycles together with the response to incremental loading cycles was investigated. It is demonstrated that this specially developed multi-material additive manufacturing process for polyaniline is a good candidate for the manufacture of implant components with smart-polymer sensors embedded for the analysis of joint loads in orthopaedic implants.

  4. [Selected techniques of regional anaesthesia for orthopaedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Chabierska, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Central blocks, continuous subarachnoid-epidural anaesthesia, including combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia (CSE) are used for long and painful procedures of lower limbs. They provide quick and good-quality anaesthesia as well as satisfactory postoperative analgesia. After their administration, ambulation is quick and rehabilitation instituted early, which is essential for the postoperative course of orthopaedic procedures. Peripheral blocks are an excellent alternative, especially in patients at high perioperative risk, who require anticoagulants. The novel techniques of location of peripheral nerves and plexuses, i.e., nerve stimulation- and ultrasound-guidance, improve the efficacy of blocks and shorten the duration of anaesthesia. Moreover, they improve safety and comfort of patients.

  5. One in the eye for an orthopaedic surgeon.

    PubMed Central

    Lourie, J.; Hamid, K.

    1996-01-01

    Despite many reports of injuries to surgeons during operative procedures, there is no record of an eye injury caused by a foreign body. Orthopaedic surgeons are particularly vulnerable to such injury. An instance in which a penetrating eye injury occurred while hammering a rasp into the femur during a hip replacement is described. There is a potential oblique trajectory for a foreign body to reach the eye from the operative field despite the use of a visor for eye protection. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8659981

  6. Equipment. Out of order.

    PubMed

    Connolly, C

    2000-08-17

    The NHS has underinvested in equipment for more than 20 years. Most hospitals have inadequate equipment inventories. More than half the anaesthetic machines in use are more than five years old and should be replaced. Almost a fifth of the equipment used in cancer treatment is obsolete. Current accounting systems act as a disincentive to replacing old equipment.

  7. Experience of collaboration between a Dutch surgical team in a Ghanaian Orthopaedic Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Timmers, T K; Kortekaas, E; Beyer, Bpc; Huizinga, E; V Hezik van, S M; Twagirayezu, E; Bemelman, M

    2016-09-01

    Surgery is an indivisible, indispensable part of healthcare. In Africa, surgery may be thought of as the neglected stepchild of global public health. We describe our experience over a 3-year period of intensive collaboration between specialized teams from a Dutch hospital and local teams of an orthopaedic hospital in Effiduase-Koforidua, Ghana. During 2010-2012, medical teams from our hospital were deployed to St. Joseph's Hospital. These teams were completely self-supporting. They were encouraged to work together with the local-staff. Apart from clinical work, effort was also spent on education/ teaching operation techniques/ regional anaesthesia techniques/ scrubbing techniques/ and principles around sterility. Knowledge and quality of care has improved. Nevertheless, the overall level of quality of care still lags behind compared to what we see in the Western world. This is mainly due to financial constraints; restricting the capacity to purchase good equipment, maintaining it, and providing regular education. The relief provided by institutions like Care-to-Move is very valuable and essential to improve the level of healthcare. The hospital has evolved to such a high level that general European teams have become redundant. Focused and dedicated teams should be the next step of support within the nearby future.

  8. Experimental validation of A-mode ultrasound acquisition system for computer assisted orthopaedic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lorenzo, Danilo; De Momi, Elena; Beretta, Elisa; Cerveri, Pietro; Perona, Franco; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    2009-02-01

    Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery (CAOS) systems improve the results and the standardization of surgical interventions. Anatomical landmarks and bone surface detection is straightforward to either register the surgical space with the pre-operative imaging space and to compute biomechanical parameters for prosthesis alignment. Surface points acquisition increases the intervention invasiveness and can be influenced by the soft tissue layer interposition (7-15mm localization errors). This study is aimed at evaluating the accuracy of a custom-made A-mode ultrasound (US) system for non invasive detection of anatomical landmarks and surfaces. A-mode solutions eliminate the necessity of US images segmentation, offers real-time signal processing and requires less invasive equipment. The system consists in a single transducer US probe optically tracked, a pulser/receiver and an FPGA-based board, which is responsible for logic control command generation and for real-time signal processing and three custom-made board (signal acquisition, blanking and synchronization). We propose a new calibration method of the US system. The experimental validation was then performed measuring the length of known-shape polymethylmethacrylate boxes filled with pure water and acquiring bone surface points on a bovine bone phantom covered with soft-tissue mimicking materials. Measurement errors were computed through MR and CT images acquisitions of the phantom. Points acquisition on bone surface with the US system demonstrated lower errors (1.2mm) than standard pointer acquisition (4.2mm).

  9. Inhibition of Orthopaedic Implant Infections by Immunomodulatory Effects of Host Defense Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    10-1-0872 TITLE: Inhibition of Orthopaedic Implant Infections by Immunomodulatory Effects of Host Defense Peptides PRINCIPAL...Orthopaedic Implant Infections by Immunomodulatory Effects of Host Defense Peptides Edward Greenfield Case Western Reserve University...Cleveland, OH 44106 Host defense peptides represent a promising new approach to inhibit infection . The anti

  10. Inhibition of Orthopaedic Implant Infections by Immunomodulatory Effects of Host Defense Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    the murine model of orthopaedic implant infection . Appropriate concentrations of Staph . aureus were identified that reproducibly provide chronic... Infections by Immunomodulatory Effects of Host Defense Peptides PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Edward Greenfield, PhD...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 15 September 2011- 14 September 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Inhibition of Orthopaedic Implant Infections by

  11. 78 FR 20328 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee: Notice of Postponement of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee scheduled for April...

  12. 75 FR 33995 - Safety Zone; Michigan Orthopaedic Society 50th Anniversary Fireworks, Lake Huron, Mackinac Island...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Michigan Orthopaedic Society 50th... Society 50th Anniversary Fireworks display, June 19, 2010. This temporary safety zone is necessary to... vessels during the setup and launching of fireworks in conjunction with the Michigan Orthopaedic...

  13. 75 FR 9422 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration ] (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation... CS is not a prosthetic device and is not intended to replace normal body structure. FDA intends to...

  14. Advanced practice physiotherapy in paediatric orthopaedics: innovation and collaboration to improve service delivery.

    PubMed

    Ó Mír, M; O'Sullivan, C

    2017-05-06

    One in eight paediatric primary care presentations is for a musculoskeletal (MSK) disorder. These patients are frequently referred to paediatric orthopaedic surgeons; however, up to 50% of referrals are for normal variants. This results in excessive wait-times and impedes access for urgent surgical cases. Adult MSK medicine has successfully utilised advanced practice physiotherapists (APP) managing non-surgical candidates, with documented benefits both to patients and services. There is a gap in the literature with regard to APP in paediatric orthopaedics. In this review, we investigate demands on paediatric orthopaedic services, examine the literature regarding APP in paediatric orthopaedics and explore the value the role has to offer current outpatient services. Paediatric orthopaedic services are under-resourced with concurrent long wait times. Approximately 50% of referrals are for normal variants, which do not require specialist intervention. Poor musculoskeletal examination skills and low diagnostic confidence amongst primary care physicians have been identified as a cause of inappropriate referrals. APP clinics for normal variants have reported independent management rate and discharge rates of 95% and marked reduction in patient wait times. There is limited evidence to support the APP in paediatric orthopaedics. Further studies are needed investigating diagnostic agreement, patient/stakeholder satisfaction, patient outcomes and economic evaluation. Paediatric orthopaedics is in crisis as to how to effectively manage the overwhelming volume of referrals. Innovative multidisciplinary solutions are required so that the onus is not solely on physicians to provide all services. The APP in paediatric orthopaedics may be part of the solution.

  15. Long Sick Leave after Orthopaedic Inpatient Rehabilitation: Treatment Failure or Relapse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangels, Marija; Schwarz, Susanne; Worringen, Ulrike; Holme, Martin; Rief, Winfried

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether short-term versus long-term sick leave after orthopaedic inpatient rehabilitation can be predicted by initial assessment information, the clinical status at discharge, or whether the follow-up interval is crucial for later sick leave. We examined 214 patients from an orthopaedic rehabilitation hospital at admission,…

  16. A review of the epidemiology and treatment of orthopaedic injuries after earthquakes in developing countries.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, James S; Banskota, Bibek; Sirisreetreerux, Norachart; Shafiq, Babar; Hasenboehler, Erik A

    2017-01-01

    Earthquakes in developing countries are devastating events. Orthopaedic surgeons play a key role in treating earthquake-related injuries to the extremities. We describe orthopaedic injury epidemiology to help guide response planning for earthquake-related disasters. Several databases were searched for articles reporting primary injury after major earthquakes from 1970 to June 2016. We used the following key words: "earthquake" AND "fracture" AND "injury" AND "orthopedic" AND "treatment" AND "epidemiology." The initial search returned 528 articles with 253 excluded duplicates. The remaining 275 articles were screened using inclusion criteria, of which the main one was the description of precise anatomic location of fracture. This yielded 17 articles from which we analyzed the ratio of orthopaedic to nonorthopaedic injuries; orthopaedic injury location, type, and frequency; fracture injury characteristics (open vs. closed, single vs. multiple, and simple vs. comminuted); and first-line treatments. Most injuries requiring treatment after earthquakes (87%) were orthopaedic in nature. Nearly two-thirds of these injuries (65%) were fractures. The most common fracture locations were the tibia/fibula (27%), femur (17%), and foot/ankle (16%). Forty-two percent were multiple fractures, 22% were open, and 16% were comminuted. The most common treatment for orthopaedic injuries in the setting of earthquakes was debridement (33%). Orthopaedic surgeons play a critical role after earthquake disasters in the developing world. A strong understanding of orthopaedic injury epidemiology and treatment is critical to providing effective preparation and assistance in future earthquake disasters.

  17. The Orthopaedic Training Study, Phase II 1968-1972. Final Report, Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Carl J.; And Others

    Phase two of the Orthopaedic Training Study was designed to examine time, sequence, and content requirements of existing orthopaedic programs. Specifically, the proposal was designed to achieve the following objectives: (1) to provide a model of individualized graduate education in medicine in which the demonstration of individual competence marks…

  18. Antoni marian gabryszewski as a pioneer of orthopaedics and rehabilitation in poland.

    PubMed

    Jandziś, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the work of Dr. Antoni Marian Gabryszewski, orthopaedic surgeon, associate professor at Lvov University, towards the development of orthopaedics and rehabilitation in Poland before World War I. It is based on archival materials, publications in medical journals and articles from the daily press of that time. The author presents little-known facts concerning Dr. Gabryszewski's occupational and academic activity and his work at the Surgery Dept. of Lvov University as well as his habilitation dissertation, regarded as the first attempt to position orthopaedics as distinct from surgery in Poland. The article also describes his long-term work at the private Orthopaedic Facility established in 1898 in Lvov which later incorporated the Zander Institute in 1908. The Zander Institute was the first in Galicia to offer exercise machines designed by Dr. Gustav Zander, imported from Stockholm and enjoying an extraordinary popularity in the world. Dr. Gabryszewski's practice as a spa doctor, which he pursued in Iwonicz Zdrój in the summer months, is also presented. Dr. A. Gabryszewski introduced comprehensive rehabilitation to the treatment of orthopaedic patients both at the Surgery Dept. of Lvov University and at his Orthopaedic Facility. He used therapeutic gymnastics (particularly mechanotherapy), therapeutic massage, physical therapy and orthopaedic aids. Analysis of the source materials leads to unequivocal conclusions attesting to Dr. A. Gabryszewski's pioneering role and significant contribution to the development of orthopaedics and rehabilitation in Poland.

  19. Long Sick Leave after Orthopaedic Inpatient Rehabilitation: Treatment Failure or Relapse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangels, Marija; Schwarz, Susanne; Worringen, Ulrike; Holme, Martin; Rief, Winfried

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether short-term versus long-term sick leave after orthopaedic inpatient rehabilitation can be predicted by initial assessment information, the clinical status at discharge, or whether the follow-up interval is crucial for later sick leave. We examined 214 patients from an orthopaedic rehabilitation hospital at admission,…

  20. Orthopaedics and the Physician Payments Sunshine Act: An Examination of Payments to U.S. Orthopaedic Surgeons in the Open Payments Database.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Sravisht; Derman, Peter; Sandhu, Harvinder S

    2016-03-02

    The U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released the Open Payments database (OPD) detailing payments from industry to physicians and teaching hospitals. We seek here to provide an overview of the data with a focus on the orthopaedic community. We analyzed payments in the OPD from August 1 to December 31, 2013. The OPD consists of three individual databases: General Payments, Research Payments, and Ownership. Physician identification number, physician specialty, payment type, and payment value were collected. Physicians assigned to multiple specialties were excluded. Comparisons were made between orthopaedic surgeons and the remainder of the top fifteen specialties by payment value. In all, 2,697,015 payments with physicians were recorded; 491,223 of these payments (18.2%) were made to physicians with multiple listed specialties and were excluded. Excluding these potentially misattributed payments did not have a significant impact on the trends identified, and $394.5 million in payments remained. Orthopaedic surgeons represented 3.4% of payments but 25.6% of value, and 13,347 orthopaedic surgeons (68.9% of all active orthopaedic surgeons) were listed in the OPD. Payments over $10,000 represented only 1.6% of payments to orthopaedic surgeons but 75.5% of value. The majority of these payments (56.1%) were royalties. The median payment value for orthopaedic surgeons listed in the OPD was $38.11, with two payments per surgeon; the median aggregated value was $132.56 per surgeon. Orthopaedic surgeons listed in the OPD were more likely to receive payments for travel compared with all other specialties (p < 0.001) and more likely to receive payments for royalties compared with all other specialties (p < 0.001) except neurological surgery. Financial interactions between orthopaedic surgeons and industry are highly prevalent. A small subset of orthopaedic surgeons received large royalties, which accounted for a majority of the transactional value

  1. Pudendal nerve palsy in trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Polyzois, Ioannis; Tsitskaris, Konstantinos; Oussedik, Sam

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of pudendal nerve palsy following routine trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery procedures ranges from 1.9% to 27.6%. Excessive and/or prolonged traction against the perineal post of a traction table, leading to direct compression and localised ischaemia to the nerve are suggested mechanisms of injury. Misuse of traction and the inappropriate placement of the perineal post, leading to crushing and stretching of the pudendal nerve, are two main contributing factors leading to its postoperative palsy. The sequelae may be sensory, motor or mixed. In most cases, these injuries are transient and tend to resolve within several weeks or months. However, complete neurological recovery may be unpredictable and the effects of ongoing dysfunction potentially disastrous for the individual. In terms of preventative measures, magnitude and duration of traction time should be minimised; traction should be limited to the critical operative steps only. Additionally, the perineal post should be placed between the genitalia and the contralateral leg. A well-padded, large-diameter perineal post should be used (>10cm). Adequate muscle relaxation during anaesthesia is particularly important in young men who have strong muscles and thus require larger traction forces when compared to elderly patients. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of the pathophysiology behind the development of this palsy and the measures that can be employed to reduce its occurrence. In procedures where a traction table is employed, consenting for pudendal nerve palsy should be considered by the surgical team.

  2. Epidemiology, trends, and disparities in regional anaesthesia for orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cozowicz, C; Poeran, J; Memtsoudis, S G

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have linked the use of regional anaesthesia to improved outcomes. Epidemiological research on utilization, trends, and disparities in this field is sparse; however, large nationally representative database constructs containing anaesthesia-related data, demographic information, and multiyear files are now available. Together with advances in research methodology and technology, these databases provide the foundation for epidemiological research in anaesthesia. We present an overview of selected studies that provide epidemiological data and describe current anaesthetic practice, trends, and disparities in orthopaedic surgery in particular. This literature suggests that that even among orthopaedic surgical procedures, which are highly amenable to regional anaesthetic techniques, neuraxial anaesthetics and peripheral nerve blocks are used in only a minority of procedures. Trend analyses show that peripheral nerve blocks are gaining in popularity, whereas use of neuraxial anaesthetics is remaining relatively unchanged or even declining over time. Finally, significant disparities and variability in anaesthetic care seem to exist based on demographic and health-care-related factors. With anaesthesia playing an increasingly important part in population-based health-care delivery and evidence indicating improved outcome with use of regional anaesthesia, more research in this area is needed. Furthermore, prevalent disparities and variabilities in anaesthesia practice need to be specified further and addressed in the future. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Aspects of current management: orthopaedic surgery in haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E C

    2012-01-01

    If continuous prophylaxis is not feasible due to expense or lack of venous access, we must aggressively treat major haemarthroses (including arthrocentesis) to prevent progression to synovitis, recurrent joint bleeds, and ultimately end-stage osteoarthritis (haemophilic arthropathy). For the treatment of chronic haemophilic synovitis, radiosynovectomy should always be indicated as the first procedure. If, after three procedures with 6-month interval, radiosynovectomy fails, an arthroscopic synovectomy must be indicated. Between the second and fourth decades, many haemophilic patients develop joint destruction (arthropathy). At this stage possible treatments include alignment osteotomy, arthroscopic joint debridement, arthrodesis (joint fusion) and total joint arthroplasty. For the hip press-fit uncemented components (hemispherical acetabulum, flanged femoral stem, metal-to-polyethylene) are recommended whilst for the knee a posterior-stabilized (PS) cemented design is advised. Muscular problems must not be underestimated in haemophilia due to their risk of developing compartment syndromes (which will require surgical decompression) and pseudotumours (which will require surgical removal or percutaneous treatment). Regarding patients with inhibitors, the advent of APCCs and rFVIIa has made major orthopaedic surgery possible, leading to an improved quality of life for haemophilia patients. Concerning local fibrin seal, it is not always necessary to achieve haemostasis in all surgical procedures performed in persons with haemophilia. However, it could be a good adjunct therapy, mainly when a surgical field potentially will bleed more than expected (i.e. patients with inhibitors), and also in some orthopaedic procedures (mainly the surgical removal of pseudotumours).

  4. Thermal cycling can extend tool life in orthopaedic operating rooms.

    PubMed

    Katchky, Ryan N; McLachlin, Stewart D; Wong, Edwin K Y; Finkelstein, Joel; Kreder, Hans J; Whyne, Cari M

    2016-03-01

    Thermal cycling is a temperature modulation process developed to improve the performance, durability and longevity of materials. This process has been successfully utilized in the automotive, aeronautic and manufacturing industries. Surgical cutting tools undergo cyclical loading and generally fail by dulling, suggesting that thermal cycling may improve their performance and longevity. Ten 2.5 mm orthopaedic drill bits were randomized, with five undergoing thermal cycling within their sterile packaging and five serving as untreated controls. Using a servohydraulic testing machine, 100 drilling cycles were performed with each drill bit into the diaphyseal region of bovine femurs. After every 25 cycles, data was collected by performing identical drilling cycles into simulated human cortical bone material. Maximum force, maximum normalized torque and drilling work were measured, and a scanning electron microscope was used to measure outer corner wear. After 100 drilling cycles, the maximum drilling force, maximum normalized torque, drilling work and microscopic outer corner wear were all significantly lower for the treated drill bits (p < 0.05). Thermal cycling has the potential to decrease operating room costs and thermal necrosis associated with dull cutting tools. Application of this technology may also be relevant to surgical cutting tools such as saw blades, burrs and reamers. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Nanotechnology: current concepts in orthopaedic surgery and future directions.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M P; McHale, K J; Parvizi, J; Mehta, S

    2014-05-01

    Nanotechnology is the study, production and controlled manipulation of materials with a grain size < 100 nm. At this level, the laws of classical mechanics fall away and those of quantum mechanics take over, resulting in unique behaviour of matter in terms of melting point, conductivity and reactivity. Additionally, and likely more significant, as grain size decreases, the ratio of surface area to volume drastically increases, allowing for greater interaction between implants and the surrounding cellular environment. This favourable increase in surface area plays an important role in mesenchymal cell differentiation and ultimately bone-implant interactions. Basic science and translational research have revealed important potential applications for nanotechnology in orthopaedic surgery, particularly with regard to improving the interaction between implants and host bone. Nanophase materials more closely match the architecture of native trabecular bone, thereby greatly improving the osseo-integration of orthopaedic implants. Nanophase-coated prostheses can also reduce bacterial adhesion more than conventionally surfaced prostheses. Nanophase selenium has shown great promise when used for tumour reconstructions, as has nanophase silver in the management of traumatic wounds. Nanophase silver may significantly improve healing of peripheral nerve injuries, and nanophase gold has powerful anti-inflammatory effects on tendon inflammation. Considerable advances must be made in our understanding of the potential health risks of production, implantation and wear patterns of nanophase devices before they are approved for clinical use. Their potential, however, is considerable, and is likely to benefit us all in the future.

  6. Assessing readability of patient education materials: current role in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Badarudeen, Sameer; Sabharwal, Sanjeev

    2010-10-01

    Health literacy is the single best predictor of an individual's health status. It is important to customize health-related education material to the individual patient's level of reading skills. Readability of a given text is the objective measurement of the reading skills one should possess to understand the written material. In this article, some of the commonly used readability assessment tools are discussed and guidelines to improve the comprehension of patient education handouts are provided. Where are we now? Several healthcare organizations have recommended the readability of patient education materials be no higher than sixth- to eighth-grade level. However, most of the patient education materials currently available on major orthopaedic Web sites are written at a reading level that may be too advanced for comprehension by a substantial proportion of the population. WHERE DO WE NEED TO GO?: There are several readily available and validated tools for assessing the readability of written materials. While use of audiovisual aids such as video clips, line drawings, models, and charts can enhance the comprehension of a health-related topic, standard readability tools cannot construe such enhancements. HOW DO WE GET THERE?: Given the variability in the capacity to comprehend health-related materials among individuals seeking orthopaedic care, stratifying the contents of patient education materials at different levels of complexity will likely improve health literacy and enhance patient-centered communication.

  7. Detection of Orthopaedic Implants by Airport Metal Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Abbassian, Ali; Datla, Balarama; Brooks, RA

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We performed a questionnaire study to establish the frequency and consequences of the detection of orthopaedic implants by airport security and to help us advise patients correctly. All published literature on this subject is based on experimental studies and no ‘real-life’ data are available. PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 200 patients with a variety of implants were identified. All patients were sent a postal questionnaire enquiring about their experience with airport security since their surgery. RESULTS Of the cohort, 154 (77%) patients responded. About half of the implants (47%) were detected, but the majority of patients (72%) were not significantly inconvenienced. When detected, only 9% of patients were asked for documentary evidence of their implant. We also found that patients with a total knee replacement (TKR) had a greater chance of detection as compared to those with a total hip replacement (THR; 71% versus 31%; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS All patients, and in particular those with a TKR, can be re-assured that, although they have a fair chance of detection by airport security, a major disruption to their journey is unlikely. We advise that documentation to prove the presence of an orthopaedic implant should be offered to those who are concerned about the potential for inconvenience, but such documentation is not required routinely. PMID:17394716

  8. Levels of evidence at the Orthopaedic Trauma Association annual meetings.

    PubMed

    Slobogean, Gerard P; Dielwart, Cassandra; Johal, Herman S; Shantz, Jesse A S; Mulpuri, Kishore

    2013-09-01

    To examine the strength of evidence presented at the Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) annual meetings before and after the level of evidence guidelines became popular in the literature. 10 years of abstracts from OTA podium presentations, preguidelines (1998-2002), and postguidelines (2007-2011). All abstracts were blinded and randomized for review. Only therapeutic, diagnostic, prognostic, and economic study types were included. Study type and level of evidence were determined for each abstract. Five hundred thirteen abstracts were included, primarily consisting of therapeutic studies (63%). The distribution of study types between the pre- and postguideline periods was similar (P = 0.37). The levels of evidence for podium presentations in the preguideline period were as follows: level I, 10%; level II, 16%; level III, 14%; and level IV, 60%. The distribution in the postguideline period was as follows: level I, 13%; level II, 2%; level III, 29%; and level IV, 36%. The differences between the pre- and postguideline presentations were significant (P < 0.0001), indicating an improvement in the strength of evidence presented at the annual meetings. The majority of podium presentations at the OTA annual meetings are level IV studies; however, there has been a measurable decrease in the number of uncontrolled case series presented at more recent meetings. Encouraging reporting of levels of evidence at future annual meetings has the potential to positively influence the orthopaedic trauma community by improving readers' understanding of the strength of evidence presented, the study design hierarchy, and encouraging investigators to conduct controlled study designs when possible.

  9. Surgical site infections in oncologic orthopaedic prosthetics surgery.

    PubMed

    Nobile, M; Navone, P; Domeniconi, G; Della Valle, A; Daolio, P A; Buccino, N A; Auxilia, F

    2015-01-01

    Literature reports an incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs) in oncological patients undergoing prosthetic replacement between 8% and 35% after first implantation and 43% after revision. The purpose of this retrospective study, conducted at the oncologic orthopaedic unit of G. Pini Orthopaedic Hospital in Milan, was to evaluate: - number of SSIs in oncological megaprosthetic reconstruction between 2008 and 2011, - possible risk factors associated with the onset of SSIs, - antibiotic prophylaxis applied. We reviewed medical records of patients who underwent megaprosthetic reconstruction and collected data on whole treatment and follow up after discharge, focusing on possible risk factors implied in the onset of SSIs such as patient characteristics, site of surgery, duration of surgery, number of persons in the operating room, size of resection, antibiotic prophylaxis. We recorded every SSI which met the criteria set by the Hospital in Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS) protocol. One-hundred and eleven surgeries were evaluated. Administration of prophylaxis was generally recorded and continued postoperatively for an average of 18.89 days, often depending on the length of the post-surgical stay. Mean duration of surgery was 254 minutes with an average of 7 persons attending the operating room. We recorded 6 SSIs.

  10. Orthopaedic surgeons' cardiovascular response during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bergovec, Marko; Orlic, Dubravko

    2008-02-01

    The literature contains limited and contradictory information regarding the amount of physical effort and/or emotional stress needed to perform surgery. We therefore investigated cardiovascular response to psychophysical stress in orthopaedic surgeons while they were performing surgery. We monitored 29 male orthopaedic surgeons from four university centers while they performed total hip arthroplasties. Changes in their cardiovascular parameters were recorded by ambulatory monitoring methods. Exercise stress testing of each participant was used as a control state. We compared the cardiovascular response during surgery to energy requirements of everyday activities. Preoperative and postoperative testing showed lower values of cardiovascular parameters than during physically less difficult parts of the operation; physically more difficult phases of the operation additionally increased the values of parameters. We concluded performing total hip arthroplasty increases surgeons' cardiovascular parameters because of psychologic stress and physical effort. Excitement of the cardiovascular system during total hip arthroplasty appears similar to the excitement during moderate-intensity daily activities, such as walking the dog, leisurely bicycling, or climbing stairs.

  11. Orthopaedic Surgeons’ Cardiovascular Response During Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Orlic, Dubravko

    2008-01-01

    The literature contains limited and contradictory information regarding the amount of physical effort and/or emotional stress needed to perform surgery. We therefore investigated cardiovascular response to psychophysical stress in orthopaedic surgeons while they were performing surgery. We monitored 29 male orthopaedic surgeons from four university centers while they performed total hip arthroplasties. Changes in their cardiovascular parameters were recorded by ambulatory monitoring methods. Exercise stress testing of each participant was used as a control state. We compared the cardiovascular response during surgery to energy requirements of everyday activities. Preoperative and postoperative testing showed lower values of cardiovascular parameters than during physically less difficult parts of the operation; physically more difficult phases of the operation additionally increased the values of parameters. We concluded performing total hip arthroplasty increases surgeons’ cardiovascular parameters because of psychologic stress and physical effort. Excitement of the cardiovascular system during total hip arthroplasty appears similar to the excitement during moderate-intensity daily activities, such as walking the dog, leisurely bicycling, or climbing stairs. PMID:18196425

  12. Consultation of Orthopaedics Cases Using Multimedia Messaging Services

    PubMed Central

    Eranki, Vivek; Munt, Justin; Lim, Ming J; Atkinson, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background: Frequently, radiological data is transferred verbally between the Emergency Department (ED) and orthopaedic registrar. Given the different language skills and medical experience of health staff, there is often a limit to the adequacy of the verbal description that could lead to suboptimal patient care. This study proposes that concurrent review of MMS teleradiology with traditional verbal reporting results in a significant therapeutic benefit. Methods: Case notes of 40 patients who presented to ED were reviewed. Images were captured and sent to an Orthopaedic registrar along with a brief clinical synopsis. Information was collected on the diagnosis of the MMS radiograph, need for urgent admission and management plan outlined to ED. Results: Correct diagnosis was made in 27 of 40 cases. Using the latest technology available, MMS teleradiology had 79% sensitivity, 83% specificity and an accuracy of 80%. 50% of paediatric fractures and 60% of undisplaced fractures were diagnosed successfully. Conclusion: MMS teleradiology is not suitable by itself as a remote diagnostic tool. However, when combined with existing clinical practice, it is effective in screening patients, enhances confidence in decision making and communication between doctors. PMID:21249168

  13. Myths and Legends in Orthopaedic Practice: Are We All Guilty?

    PubMed Central

    Immerman, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Over years of practice, many beliefs and practices become entrenched as tried and tested, and we subconsciously believe they are based on scientific evidence. We identified nine such beliefs by interviewing orthopaedic surgeons in which studies (or lack thereof) apparently do not support such practices. These are: changing the scalpel blade after the skin incision to limit contamination; bending the patient’s knee when applying a thigh tourniquet; bed rest for treatment of deep vein thrombosis; antibiotics in irrigation solution; routine use of hip precautions; routine use of antibiotics for the duration of wound drains; routine removal of hardware in children; correlation between operative time and infection; and not changing dressings on the floor before scrubbing. A survey of 186 practicing orthopaedic surgeons in academic and community settings was performed to assess their routine practice patterns. We present the results of the survey along with an in-depth literature review of these topics. Most surgeon practices are based on a combination of knowledge gained during training, reading the literature, and personal experience. The results of this survey hopefully will raise the awareness of the selected literature for common practices. PMID:18726654

  14. Fractures and amputations in children and adolescents requiring hospitalization after farm equipment injuries.

    PubMed

    Lubicky, John P; Feinberg, Judy R

    2009-01-01

    The majority of farm-related injuries in children are caused by farm machinery. The aim of this study is to report the incidence of children requiring hospitalization for orthopaedic trauma after injury secondary to farm equipment accidents. Data for this study were culled from the Kids' Inpatient Database for the years 2000, 2003, and 2006 using the E-code for injuries caused by agricultural machinery to identify the study group. Only those children with fractures (nonskull) and/or amputations were included for analysis. The 3-year study data include 292 children, 88% male, with an average age of 11.9 years. Of the 439 orthopaedic injuries, there were 115 upper extremity, 173 lower extremity, and 96 vertebral, rib, or pelvic fractures, and 55 amputations (34 upper and 21 lower extremity). There were proportionally more closed fractures of the upper extremity in children under the age of 12 years compared with the older children with no difference in rates of other fractures or amputation by age group. This study provides data on incidence of significant orthopaedic trauma in children in the United States as a result of farm equipment accidents. Most earlier studies have focused on fatality rates or have been limited to a single institution or single state or have been from a non-US population. This study provides pediatric orthopaedists, particularly those practicing in agricultural areas, with injury statistics related to farm equipment injuries that may lead to more and better safety education programs.

  15. Reproducibility of and sex differences in common orthopaedic ankle and foot tests in runners

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background For future etiologic cohort studies in runners it is important to identify whether (hyper)pronation of the foot, decreased ankle joint dorsiflexion (AJD) and the degree of the extension of the first Metatarsophalangeal joint (MTP1) are risk factors for running injuries and to determine possible sex differences. These parameters are frequently determined with the navicular drop test (NDT) Stance and Single Limb-Stance, the Ankle Joint Dorsiflexion-test, and the extension MTP1-test in a healthy population. The aim of this clinimetric study was to determine the reproducibility of these three orthopaedic tests in runners, using minimal equipment in order to make them applicable in large cohort studies. Furthermore, we aimed to determine possible sex differences of these tests. Methods The three orthopaedic tests were administered by two sports physiotherapists in a group of 42 (22 male and 20 female) recreational runners. The intra-class correlation (ICC) for interrater and intrarater reliability and the standard error of measurement (SEM) were calculated. Bland and Altman plots were used to determine the 95% limits of agreements (LOAs). Furthermore, the difference between female and male runners was determined. Results The ICC’s of the NDT were in the range of 0.37 to 0.45, with a SEM in the range of 2.5 to 5 mm. The AJD-test had an ICC of 0.88 and 0.86 (SEM 2.4° and 8.7°), with a 95% LOA of -6.0° to 6.3° and -5.3° to 7.9°, and the MTP1-test had an ICC of 0.42 and 0.62 (SEM 34.4° and 9.9°), with a 95% LOA of -30.9° to 20.7° and -20° to 17.8° for the interrater and intrarater reproducibility, respectively. Females had a significantly (p < 0.05) lower navicular drop score and higher range of motion in extension of the MTP1, but no sex differences were found for ankle dorsiflexion (p ≥ 0.05). Conclusion The reproducibility for the AJD test in runners is good, whereas that of the NDT and extension MTP1 was moderate or low. We found a

  16. The Impact of the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) Research on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Orthopaedic Practice.

    PubMed

    Lynch, T Sean; Parker, Richard D; Patel, Ronak M; Andrish, Jack T; Spindler, Kurt P; Amendola, Annunziata; Brophy, Robert H; Dunn, Warren R; Flanigan, David C; Huston, Laura J; Jones, Morgan H; Kaeding, Christopher C; Marx, Robert G; Matava, Matthew J; McCarty, Eric C; Pedroza, Angela D; Reinke, Emily K; Wolf, Brian R; Wright, Rick W

    2015-03-01

    With an estimated 200,000 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions performed annually in the United States, there is an emphasis on determining patient-specific information to help educate patients on expected clinically relevant outcomes. The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network consortium was created in 2002 to enroll and longitudinally follow a large population cohort of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. The study group has enrolled >4,400 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions from seven institutions to establish the large level I prospective anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction outcomes cohort. The group has become more than a database with information regarding anterior cruciate ligament injuries; it has helped to establish a new benchmark for conducting multicenter, multisurgeon orthopaedic research. The changes in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction practice resulting from the group include the use of autograft for high school, college, and competitive athletes in their primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Other modifications include treatment options for meniscus and cartilage injuries, as well as lifestyle choices made after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  17. Women in Orthopaedic Fellowships: What Is Their Match Rate, and What Specialties Do They Choose?

    PubMed

    Cannada, Lisa K

    2016-09-01

    Orthopaedic fellowship training is a common step before becoming a practicing orthopaedic surgeon. In the past, fellowship decisions in orthopaedics were made early in the residency and without a formal match. The process was disorganized, often not fair to the applicants or fellowship programs. More recently, there has been an organized match process for nine different disciplines in orthopaedics. Although the numbers of women applicants into orthopaedic residency has been reported and is the target of efforts to continue to improve gender diversity in orthopaedics, the numbers regarding women in orthopaedic fellowships have not been known. Other details including if there is a difference in match rate between male and female fellowship applicants and what discipline they choose to pursue across orthopaedic surgery has not been reported. (1) How have the numbers of women applying to orthopaedic fellowships changed over a 5-year period? (2) Is gender associated with fellowship match success? (3) Which subspecialties have greater proportions of female applicants? Available orthopaedic residency match data regarding number of applicants and number of female residents between 2010 and 2014 were obtained. For fellowship data, our method was a review of the applicants who submitted rank lists and the number of applicants who matched in all subspecialties through San Francisco Match and from the American Shoulder and Elbow Society from 2010 to 2014. For each year, the number of females versus males applying was abstracted. The total number of females versus males who matched was then obtained. For each subspecialty represented in this article, the number of female applicants and matches was compared with the male applicants and matches. The proportion of fellowship applicants who are female ranged from 7% to 10% annually, and the percentage of matched female applicants ranged from 8% to 12%. Overall, combining results from 2010 to 2014, female fellowship applicants had a

  18. The Perry Initiative's Medical Student Outreach Program Recruits Women Into Orthopaedic Residency.

    PubMed

    Lattanza, Lisa L; Meszaros-Dearolf, Laurie; O'Connor, Mary I; Ladd, Amy; Bucha, Amy; Trauth-Nare, Amy; Buckley, Jenni M

    2016-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgery lags behind other surgical specialties in terms of gender diversity. The percentage of women entering orthopaedic residency persistently remains at 14% despite near equal ratios of women to men in medical school classes. This trend has been attributed to negative perceptions among women medical students of workplace culture and lifestyle in orthopaedics as well as lack of exposure, particularly during medical school when most women decide to enter the field. Since 2012, The Perry Initiative, a nonprofit organization that is focused on recruiting and retaining women in orthopaedics, had conducted extracurricular outreach programs for first- and second-year female medical students to provide exposure and mentoring opportunities specific to orthopaedics. This program, called the Medical Student Outreach Program (MSOP), is ongoing at medical centers nationwide and has reached over 300 medical students in its first 3 program years (2012-2014). (1) What percentage of MSOP participants eventually match into orthopaedic surgery residency? (2) Does MSOP impact participants' perceptions of the orthopaedics profession as well as intellectual interest in the field? The percentage of program alumnae who matched into orthopaedics was determined by annual followup for our first two cohorts who graduated from medical school. All program participants completed a survey immediately before and after the program that assessed the impact of MSOP on the student's intention to pursue orthopaedics as well as perceptions of the field and intellectual interest in the discipline. The orthopaedic surgery match rate for program participants was 31% in our first graduating class (five of 16 participants in 2015) and 28% in our second class (20 of 72 participants in 2016). Pre/post program comparisons showed that the MSOP influenced students' perceptions of the orthopaedics profession as well as overall intellectual interest in the field. The results of our study suggest that

  19. Surface modulation of silicon nitride ceramics for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Bock, Ryan M; McEntire, Bryan J; Bal, B Sonny; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Boffelli, Marco; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) has a distinctive combination of material properties such as high strength and fracture toughness, inherent phase stability, scratch resistance, low wear, biocompatibility, hydrophilic behavior, excellent radiographic imaging and resistance to bacterial adhesion, all of which make it an attractive choice for orthopaedic implants. Unlike oxide ceramics, the surface chemistry and topography of Si3N4 can be engineered to address potential in vivo needs. Morphologically, it can be manufactured to have an ultra-smooth or highly fibrous surface structure. Its chemistry can be varied from that of a silica-like surface to one which is predominately comprised of silicon-amines. In the present study, a Si3N4 bioceramic was subjected to thermal, chemical, and mechanical treatments in order to induce changes in surface composition and features. The treatments included grinding and polishing, etching in aqueous hydrofluoric acid, and heating in nitrogen or air. The treated surfaces were characterized using a variety of microscopy techniques to assess morphology. Surface chemistry and phase composition were determined using X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Streaming potential measurements evaluated surface charging, and sessile water drop techniques assessed wetting behavior. These treatments yielded significant differences in surface properties with isoelectric points ranging from 2 to 5.6, and moderate to extremely hydrophilic water contact angles from ∼65° to ∼8°. This work provides a basis for future in vitro and in vivo studies which will examine the effects of these treatments on important orthopaedic properties such as friction, wear, protein adsorption, bacteriostasis and osseointegration. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) exhibits a unique combination of bulk mechanical and surface chemical properties that make it an ideal biomaterial for orthopaedic implants. It is already being used for interbody spinal fusion cages and is

  20. The hundred most-cited publications in orthopaedic knee research.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sufian S; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios S; Abbasian, M; Röder, Christoph; Kohl, Sandro

    2014-11-19

    Despite its limitations, citation analysis remains one of the best currently available tools for quantifying the impact of articles. Bibliometric studies list the "best-sellers" in a single location, and they have been published frequently in many fields during recent years. The purpose of the present study was to report the qualities and characteristics of citation classics in orthopaedic knee research. The database of the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) was utilized for identification of articles published from 1945 to March 2014. All knee articles that had been published in sixty-five orthopaedic and twenty-nine rheumatology journals and that had been cited at least 200 times were identified. The top 100 were selected for further analysis of authorship, source journal, number of citations, citation rate (both since publication and in 2013), geographic origin, article type, and level of evidence. The publication dates of the 100 most-cited articles ranged from 1948 to 2007, with the greatest number of articles published in the 1980s. Citations per article ranged from 2640 to 287. All articles were published in eleven of the ninety-four journals. The leading countries of origin were the U.S. followed by the U.K. and Sweden. The two main focus areas were sports traumatology and degenerative disease. The number of citations per article was also greatest for articles published in the 1980s. Basic research articles were cited more quickly, but not more often, than clinical articles. Most articles represented Level-IV evidence, followed by Levels II, III, and I. This bibliometric study is likely to include a list of intellectual milestones in orthopaedic knee research. It is apparent that a high level of evidence is not mandatory for an article to gain a large number of citations. Bibliometric reports provide a reflection of the quality of cited research published in a specific field and should therefore provoke thinking within the scientific community

  1. The quality of pediatric orthopaedic information on the internet.

    PubMed

    Winship, Brenton; Grisell, Margaret; Yang, Carolyn B; Chen, Rachel X; Bauer, Andrea S

    2014-06-01

    Many patients use the Internet for health information. However, there are few guarantees to the reliability and accuracy of this information. This study examined the quality and content of the Internet Web pages for 10 common pediatric orthopaedic diagnoses. We identified 10 common diagnoses in pediatric orthopaedics: brachial plexus injury, cerebral palsy, clubfoot, developmental dysplasia of the hip, leg length discrepancy, osteochondroma, polydactyly, scoliosis, spina bifida, and syndactyly. We used 2 of the most popular search engines to identify the top 10 Web sites for each disease. We evaluated the Web sites utilizing both the quality-based Health On the Net (HON) Foundation criteria and our own content-based grading sheets. The custom grading sheets focused on essential information about disease summary, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. Three orthopaedic surgeons graded 98 academic, commercial, nonprofit, and physicians' Web sites for 10 diseases. Academic Web sites scored the highest in content (mean, 60.8% ± 15.5%), whereas commercial Web sites scored the lowest (mean, 46.7% ± 22.2%). Among the diagnoses, osteochondroma Web sites had the highest content scores (mean, 75.8% ± 11.8%), whereas polydactyly Web sites had the lowest content scores (mean, 39.3% ± 15.7%). In contrast, Web sites about developmental dysplasia of the hip had the highest HON scores (65.0 ± 11.1), whereas those about brachial plexus birth palsy scored the lowest (42.6% ± 16.9%). Among the content subgroups, scores were generally higher for disease summary and diagnostics and lower for prognosis. The Internet Web sites reviewed demonstrated a wide range of content and information. We found that nonprofit and academic Web sites were the most reliable sources, whereas commercial and, surprisingly, physician-run Web sites were the least reliable. We advise physicians to talk to their patients about the information they get on the Internet and how it dictates their

  2. Development of orthopaedics in Slovenia and the history of the Orthopaedic Department Ljubljana University Hospital--on the occasion of the WHO "Bone and Joint Decade" (2000-2010).

    PubMed

    Zupanic Slavec, Zvonka; Herman, Srecko; Slavec, Ksenija

    2011-01-01

    In Slovenia, orthopaedics started to develop at the end of WWI, when the number of the handicapped increased. Dr Anton Brecelj, who in 1919 laid the groundwork for the welfare of handicapped and sent a Czech doctor Franc Minař to specialise in orthopaedic surgery. When Minař returned to Ljubljana in 1923, he established an orthopaedic unit within surgery and in 1937 took over its management. Orthopaedics developed very quickly after 1945, when Ljubljana University set up a School of Medicine, a Department of Orthopaedics and Physical Medicine within the School, and Orthopaedic Clinic of the University Hospital. Orthopaedic surgeons from Ljubljana participated in the establishment of a hospital for osteoarticular tuberculosis in Valdoltra, (which later became the largest orthopaedic hospital in Slovenia), specialised clinics and orthopaedic hospital departments throughout Slovenia, schools for physiotherapists in Ljubljana, the Slovenian Rehabilitation Institute - Soča, the Home for Disabled Children in Kamnik, and the spa and rehabilitation centre in Laško. In 2011, orthopaedics in Slovenia holds 600 hospital beds and has about 75 orthopaedic surgeons who annually treat around 50,000 patients.

  3. Exercise Equipment: Neutral Buoyancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Linda; Valle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Load Bearing Equipment for Neutral Buoyancy (LBE-NB) is an exercise frame that holds two exercising subjects in position as they apply counter forces to each other for lower extremity and spine loading resistance exercises. Resistance exercise prevents bone loss on ISS, but the ISS equipment is too massive for use in exploration craft. Integrating the human into the load directing, load generating, and motion control functions of the exercise equipment generates safe exercise loads with less equipment mass and volume.

  4. Mobile Equipment Expands Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, Robert L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes the Mobile Equipment Modules (MEM) system in Duluth, Minnesota. MEM is a way to hold down costs and increase learning opportunities by consolidating purchases of expensive shop equipment within the school district, grouping the equipment in modules, and scheduling and moving it from school to school as needed. (MF)

  5. Streamline Your Equipment Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMeen, George R.

    1976-01-01

    To facilitate the distribution of audiovisual equipment Moorhead State University in Moorhead, Minnesota, has established audiovisual equipment control centers in various departments throughout the university. The audiovisual center then relays information among faculty concerning the location and condition of equipment. (JY)

  6. Mobile Equipment Expands Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, Robert L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes the Mobile Equipment Modules (MEM) system in Duluth, Minnesota. MEM is a way to hold down costs and increase learning opportunities by consolidating purchases of expensive shop equipment within the school district, grouping the equipment in modules, and scheduling and moving it from school to school as needed. (MF)

  7. Equipment costs rise moderately

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, G.

    1996-10-07

    The paper presents data on costs for the five equipment items which make up the Nelson-Farrar cost index. Equipment includes pumps and compressors, electrical machinery, engines, instruments, and heat exchangers. Data are also presented on refining costs, broken down into the following categories: operating costs, operating labor cost, construction labor cost, and equipment and materials.

  8. Current Issues Affecting the Practice of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgeons: Results of the 2014 Workforce Survey of American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Pooya; Copley, Lawson; Ruch-Ross, Holly; Schwend, Richard M; Sawyer, Jeffrey R

    2016-09-22

    The opinions of the pediatric orthopaedic workforce are shaped by market forces, regulatory processes, and local experience. The purpose of this report is to summarize the findings of the recent Workforce Survey of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Section on Orthopaedics (SOOr). This submission has been reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA). In 2014, the AAP generated a survey to assess perceptions of pediatric orthopaedic surgeons about current issues that affect practice. The survey was sent to 856 POSNA and 141 AAP-SOOr members. Responses were topically organized to report current workforce composition, practice patterns, and perceptions about electronic medical records (EMRs). Responses were collected from August to December, 2014, from 496 (50%) survey recipients including 83 of 141 (59%) AAP-SOOr members and 413 of 856 (48%) POSNA members. Analyses were restricted to the 397 respondents who reported that they are currently practicing pediatric orthopaedics. Nearly all of these (390/391, 100%) indicated that they provide direct patient care and work an average of 60 hours per week. Many (105/378, 28%) indicated that they would soon limit their practice or retire. A majority (299/394, 76%) indicated that they face competition in their geographic area, predominantly due to pediatric orthopaedic subspecialists (269/299, 90%). Major business changes had recently occurred or were anticipated by 21% of participants. Respondents reported that use of EMR makes them less efficient (252/397, 63%) and interferes with the patient-physician relationship (172/397, 43%). This workforce survey suggests that pediatric orthopaedic surgeons are concerned with challenges of competition despite concurrent increasing volume and complexity of referrals. External processes such as EMR changes are perceived to negatively impact practice efficiency and satisfaction.

  9. Orthopaedic nurses' attitudes towards clinical nursing research - A cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-05-01

    The call for evidence-based knowledge in clinical nursing practice has increased during recent decades and research in orthopaedic nursing is needed to improve patients' conditions, care and treatment. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the self-perceived theoretical knowledge and practical research competencies among orthopaedic nurses and their interest and motivation to increase these in everyday practice. A newly developed questionnaire was given to a convenience sample of 87 orthopaedic nurses. Forty three orthopaedic nurses (49.4%) completed the questionnaire. The results indicated that despite the majority of orthopaedic nurses having low self-perceived theoretical knowledge and practical research competencies, their interest and motivation to improve these were high, especially their inner motivation. However, the nurses' inner motivation was inhibited by a lack of acceptance from colleagues and section head nurses and a shortage of time. This study forms a baseline as a part of a larger study and contributes knowledge useful to other orthopaedic departments with an interest in optimizing nursing research to improve orthopaedic nursing care quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Professionalism in 21st century professional practice: autonomy and accountability in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Schneller, Eugene S; Wilson, Natalia A

    2009-10-01

    Orthopaedic surgical practice is becoming increasingly complex. The rapid change in pace associated with new information and technologies, the physician-supplier relationship, the growing costs and growing gap between costs and reimbursements for orthopaedic surgical procedures, and the influences of advertising on the patient, challenge all involved in the delivery of orthopaedic care. This paper assesses the concepts of professionalism, autonomy, and accountability in the 21st century practice of orthopaedic surgery. These concepts are considered within the context of the complex value chain surrounding orthopaedic surgery and the changing forces influencing clinical decision making by the surgeon. A leading impetus for challenge to the autonomy of the orthopaedic surgeon has been cost. Mistrust and lack of understanding have characterized the physician-hospital relationship. Resource dependency has characterized the physician-supplier relationship. Accountability for the surgeon has increased. We suggest implant surgery involves shared decision making and "coproduction" between the orthopaedic surgeon and other stakeholders. The challenge for the profession is to redefine professionalism, accountability, and autonomy in the face of these changes and challenges.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of antiseptic-coated orthopaedic devices.

    PubMed

    Darouiche, R O; Green, G; Mansouri, M D

    1998-04-01

    Antimicrobial coating of medical devices, including fracture fixation devices, has evolved as a potentially effective method for preventing device-related infections. We examined the in vitro antimicrobial activity of titanium cylinders coated with the antiseptic combination of chlorhexidine and chloroxylenol. The coated devices provided zones of inhibition against Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans, at baseline and up to 8 weeks after incubation of the coated cylinders in human serum at 37 degrees C. This durable antimicrobial activity was attributed to the relatively slow leaching of chlorhexidine and chloroxylenol from the coated cylinders as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. These results suggest that antiseptic-coated orthopaedic devices may provide broad-spectrum and durable antimicrobial protection against device-related infection.

  12. Antibiotic stewardship in orthopaedic surgery: principles and practice.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kirk A; Stein, Spencer; Looze, Christopher; Bosco, Joseph A

    2014-12-01

    A thorough knowledge of the principles of antibiotic stewardship is a crucial part of high-quality orthopaedic surgical care. These principles include (1) determining appropriate indications for antibiotic administration, (2) choosing the correct antibiotic based on known or expected pathogens, (3) determining the correct dosage, and (4) determining the appropriate duration of treatment. Antibiotic stewardship programs have a multidisciplinary staff that can help guide antibiotic selection and dosage. These programs also perform active surveillance of antimicrobial use and may reduce Clostridium difficile and other drug-resistant bacterial infections by providing expert guidance on judicious antibiotic usage. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens, the geographical diversity of these infecting pathogens, and the changing patient population require customization of prophylactic regimens to reduce infectious complications. A multidisciplinary approach to antibiotic stewardship can lead to improved patient outcomes and cost-effective medical care.

  13. Biodegradable metallic materials for orthopaedic implantations: A review.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Kelvin W K; Wong, Karen H M

    2012-09-06

    Non-degradable metals such as stainless steel, cobalt-chromium-based alloys, titanium and its alloys may lead to stress shielding effect after fractured bone has healed. This complication may attribute to the non-degradability and the mismatch of the mechanical properties between these metallic implants and human bone. Biodegradable metallic materials have been therefore studied as alternative implantable metals in orthopaedics for some years. Magnesium is a potential candidate, as its mechanical properties are similar to human. Additionally, it is degradable and its ions are essential for cell functions. However, rapid degradation and release of hydrogen gas may inhibit its applications clinically. Hence, this paper reviews the development of the biodegradable metallic implants and various methods to improve the degradation of magnesium alloys.

  14. Patient resilience in the fracture orthopaedic rehabilitation geriatric environment.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Sabrina; Loh, Sze Ming

    2017-03-01

    To explore the relationship between resilience and rehabilitation outcomes in older orthopaedic patients. Geriatric rehabilitation patients admitted to a general metropolitan hospital following a fracture were interviewed face-to-face. Their resilience was assessed using the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC), and rehabilitation outcomes were assessed according to functional independence measure (FIM) gain, length of stay, discharge destination and mortality rate. A total of 29 patient interviews were used in data analysis. Resilience scores varied from 49-92, with an average of 73, representing overall high resilience compared to general population samples. Resilience scores as measured by the CD-RISC did not correlate with functional improvements during rehabilitation postfracture. Further studies, including patients with a broader range of resilience scores, particularly at the lower end of the spectrum, are required to explore the relationship between resilience and rehabilitation outcomes in greater depth. © 2016 AJA Inc.

  15. Feasibility of detecting orthopaedic screw overtightening using acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Pullin, Rhys; Wright, Bryan J; Kapur, Richard; McCrory, John P; Pearson, Matthew; Evans, Sam L; Crivelli, Davide

    2017-03-01

    A preliminary study of acoustic emission during orthopaedic screw fixation was performed using polyurethane foam as the bone-simulating material. Three sets of screws, a dynamic hip screw, a small fragment screw and a large fragment screw, were investigated, monitoring acoustic-emission activity during the screw tightening. In some specimens, screws were deliberately overtightened in order to investigate the feasibility of detecting the stripping torque in advance. One set of data was supported by load cell measurements to directly measure the axial load through the screw. Data showed that acoustic emission can give good indications of impending screw stripping; such indications are not available to the surgeon at the current state of the art using traditional torque measuring devices, and current practice relies on the surgeon's experience alone. The results suggest that acoustic emission may have the potential to prevent screw overtightening and bone tissue damage, eliminating one of the commonest sources of human error in such scenarios.

  16. 3D printing: clinical applications in orthopaedics and traumatology

    PubMed Central

    Auricchio, Ferdinando; Marconi, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Advances in image processing have led to the clinical use of 3D printing technology, giving the surgeon a realistic physical model of the anatomy upon which he or she will operate. Relying on CT images, the surgeon creates a virtual 3D model of the target anatomy from a series of bi-dimensional images, translating the information contained in CT images into a more usable format. 3D printed models can play a central role in surgical planning and in the training of novice surgeons, as well as reducing the rate of re-operation. Cite this article: Auricchio F, Marconi S. 3D printing: clinical applications in orthopaedics and traumatology. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:121–127. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000012. PMID:28461938

  17. 3D printing: clinical applications in orthopaedics and traumatology.

    PubMed

    Auricchio, Ferdinando; Marconi, Stefania

    2016-05-01

    Advances in image processing have led to the clinical use of 3D printing technology, giving the surgeon a realistic physical model of the anatomy upon which he or she will operate.Relying on CT images, the surgeon creates a virtual 3D model of the target anatomy from a series of bi-dimensional images, translating the information contained in CT images into a more usable format.3D printed models can play a central role in surgical planning and in the training of novice surgeons, as well as reducing the rate of re-operation. Cite this article: Auricchio F, Marconi S. 3D printing: clinical applications in orthopaedics and traumatology. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:121-127. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000012.

  18. Industrial support of orthopaedic research in the academic setting.

    PubMed

    Brand, Richard A; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Talman, Charlotte L; Happe, Daniel G

    2003-07-01

    Industry support provides critical resources for researchers in departments of orthopaedic surgery, and affords research that otherwise likely would not be possible. However, in contrast to sponsorship from the federal agencies or most foundations, corporate sponsorship raises ethical, practical, and legal issues for the individual researcher, the department, the academic institution, the scientific community at large, and industry. Most of these issues relate to ownership of intellectual property, confidentiality, disclosure of results, and apparent bias. For the public the issues involve ethical issues, including trust. Academic institutions have evolved approaches for contracts with industry, which minimize, but not eliminate these problems. Given appropriate contracts, corporate sponsorship of research is not only mutually beneficial, but for many departments, critical.

  19. Robots in orthopaedic surgery: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Bargar, William L

    2007-10-01

    Robots are increasingly being developed for use in surgery to aid physicians in providing more precision, especially during procedures requiring fine movements that may be beyond the scope of the human hand. In addition, robots enable the surgeon to provide improved accuracy and reproducibility with the goal of better outcomes. To date, most robotic surgical systems are in the design and experimental stage. For robotic systems to gain widespread acceptance in surgery, they must first prove their value in clinical application and ease of use as well as provide a favorable cost-to-benefit ratio. I provide an overview of the history of robotics in orthopaedic surgery and a review of their current applications with some predictions of the future for this technology.

  20. Scoring the SF-36 in Orthopaedics: A Brief Guide.

    PubMed

    Laucis, Nicholas C; Hays, Ron D; Bhattacharyya, Timothy

    2015-10-07

    The Short Form-36 (SF-36) is the most widely used health-related quality-of-life measure in research to date. There are currently two sources for the SF-36 and scoring instructions: licensing them from Optum, Inc., or obtaining them from publicly available documentation from the RAND Corporation. The SF-36 yields eight scale scores and two summary scores. The physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores were derived using an orthogonal-factor analytic model that forced the PCS and MCS to be uncorrelated, and it has been shown to contribute to an inflation of the MCS in patients with substantial physical disability. Oblique scoring can reduce this inflation of the MCS in orthopaedic studies. Spreadsheets to score the SF-36, along with a copy of the questionnaire, are provided.

  1. International patients on operation vacation – perspectives of patients travelling to Hungary for orthopaedic treatments

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Eszter; Szocska, Gabor; Knai, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Background: The importance of cross-border healthcare, medical and health tourism plays a significant role in the European health policy and health management. After dentistry, orthopaedic treatments are the leading motivation for seeking care in Hungary, as patients with rheumatic and motion diseases are drawn to the thermal spas and well-established orthopaedic centres. This paper aims to gain insight into foreign patients’ perspectives on their experience of having sought medical tourism in orthopaedic care in Hungary. Methods: A patient survey was conducted in 2012 on motivations for seeking treatment abroad, orthopaedic care received and overall satisfaction. In addition, health professionals’ interviews, and 17 phone interviews were conducted in 2013 with Romanian patients who had orthopaedic treatment in Hungary. Finally, medical records of foreign patients were analysed. Results: The survey was completed by 115 participants – 61.1% females, mean age= 41.9, 87% Romanian origin. Most of the patients came to Hungary for orthopaedic surgeries, e.g. arthroscopy, knee/hip prosthesis or spinal surgery. 72.6% chose Hungary because of related to perceived better quality and longstanding culture of Hungarian orthopaedic care. Over 57% of patients reported being ‘very satisfied’ with care received and 41.6% ‘satisfied’. The follow-up interviews further reflected this level of satisfaction, therefore many respondents stating they have already recommended the Hungarian healthcare to others. Conclusion: Based on the findings, patients from neighbouring regions are increasingly seeking orthopaedic care in Hungary. Patients having orthopaedic care are highly satisfied with the quality of care, the whole treatment process from the availability of information to discharge summaries and would consider returning for further treatments. PMID:25396209

  2. Early Career Experience of Pediatric Orthopaedic Fellows: What to Expect and Need for Their Services.

    PubMed

    Glotzbecker, Michael P; Shore, Benjamin J; Fletcher, Nicholas D; Larson, A Noelle; Hydorn, Christopher R; Sawyer, Jeffery R

    2016-06-01

    A dramatic increase in the number of pediatric orthopaedic fellows being trained has led to concerns that there may be an oversupply of pediatric orthopaedists. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this perception is accurate and whether the practice expectations of recent pediatric fellowship graduates are being met by surveying recent pediatric fellowship graduates about their early practice experiences. A 36-question survey approved by the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) leadership was electronically distributed to 120 recent graduates of pediatric orthopaedic fellowships; 81 responses were ultimately obtained (67.5% response rate). Almost all (91%) of the respondents were very or extremely satisfied with their fellowship experience. Half of the respondents had at least 1 job offer before they entered their fellowships. After completion of fellowships, 35% received 1 job offer and 62.5% received ≥2 job offers; only 2.5% did not receive a job offer. Most reported a practice consisting almost entirely of pediatric orthopaedics, and 93.5% thought this was in line with their expectations; 87% indicated satisfaction with their current volume of pediatric orthopaedics, and 85% with the complexity of their pediatric orthopaedic cases. Despite the high employment percentages and satisfaction with practice profiles, nearly a third (28%) of respondents replied that too many pediatric orthopaedists are being trained. Positive messages from this survey include the satisfaction of graduates with their fellowship training, the high percentage of graduates who readily found employment, and the satisfaction of graduates with their current practice environments; this indicates that the pediatric orthopaedic job environment is not completely saturated and there are continued opportunities for graduating pediatric fellows despite the increased number of fellows being trained. Although not determined by this study, it may be that the stable

  3. A randomised controlled trial. Shifting boundaries of doctors and physiotherapists in orthopaedic outpatient departments

    PubMed Central

    Daker-White, G.; Carr, A. J.; Harvey, I.; Woolhead, G.; Bannister, G.; Nelson, I.; Kammerling, M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of specially trained physiotherapists in the assessment and management of defined referrals to hospital orthopaedic departments. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Orthopaedic outpatient departments in two hospitals. SUBJECTS: 481 patients with musculoskeletal problems referred for specialist orthopaedic opinion. INTERVENTIONS: Initial assessment and management undertaken by post- Fellowship junior orthopaedic surgeons, or by specially trained physiotherapists working in an extended role (orthopaedic physiotherapy specialists). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patient centred measures of pain, functional disability and perceived handicap. RESULTS: A total of 654 patients were eligible to join the trial, 481 (73.6%) gave their consent to be randomised. The two arms (doctor n = 244, physiotherapist n = 237) were similar at baseline. Baseline and follow up questionnaires were completed by 383 patients (79.6%). The mean time to follow up was 5.6 months after randomisation, with similar distributions of intervals to follow up in both arms. The only outcome for which there was a statistically or clinically important difference between arms was in a measure of patient satisfaction, which favoured the physiotherapist arm. A cost minimisation analysis showed no significant differences in direct costs to the patient or NHS primary care costs. Direct hospital costs were lower (p < 0.00001) in the physiotherapist arm (mean cost per patient = 256 Pounds, n = 232), as they were less likely to order radiographs and to refer patients for orthopaedic surgery than were the junior doctors (mean cost per patient in arm = 498 Pounds, n = 238). CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of the patient centred outcomes measured in this randomised trial, orthopaedic physiotherapy specialists are as effective as post-Fellowship junior staff and clinical assistant orthopaedic surgeons in the initial assessment and management of new referrals

  4. International patients on operation vacation - perspectives of patients travelling to Hungary for orthopaedic treatments.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Eszter; Szocska, Gabor; Knai, Cécile

    2014-11-01

    The importance of cross-border healthcare, medical and health tourism plays a significant role in the European health policy and health management. After dentistry, orthopaedic treatments are the leading motivation for seeking care in Hungary, as patients with rheumatic and motion diseases are drawn to the thermal spas and well-established orthopaedic centres. This paper aims to gain insight into foreign patients' perspectives on their experience of having sought medical tourism in orthopaedic care in Hungary. A patient survey was conducted in 2012 on motivations for seeking treatment abroad, orthopaedic care received and overall satisfaction. In addition, health professionals' interviews, and 17 phone interviews were conducted in 2013 with Romanian patients who had orthopaedic treatment in Hungary. Finally, medical records of foreign patients were analysed. The survey was completed by 115 participants - 61.1% females, mean age= 41.9, 87% Romanian origin. Most of the patients came to Hungary for orthopaedic surgeries, e.g. arthroscopy, knee/hip prosthesis or spinal surgery. 72.6% chose Hungary because of related to perceived better quality and longstanding culture of Hungarian orthopaedic care. Over 57% of patients reported being 'very satisfied' with care received and 41.6% 'satisfied'. The follow-up interviews further reflected this level of satisfaction, therefore many respondents stating they have already recommended the Hungarian healthcare to others. Based on the findings, patients from neighbouring regions are increasingly seeking orthopaedic care in Hungary. Patients having orthopaedic care are highly satisfied with the quality of care, the whole treatment process from the availability of information to discharge summaries and would consider returning for further treatments.

  5. Lean Participative Process Improvement: Outcomes and Obstacles in Trauma Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    New, Steve; Hadi, Mohammed; Pickering, Sharon; Robertson, Eleanor; Morgan, Lauren; Griffin, Damian; Collins, Gary; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Catchpole, Ken; McCulloch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of a “systems” approach using Lean methodology to improve surgical care, as part of a programme of studies investigating possible synergy between improvement approaches. Setting A controlled before-after study using the orthopaedic trauma theatre of a UK Trust hospital as the active site and an elective orthopaedic theatre in the same Trust as control. Participants All staff involved in surgical procedures in both theatres. Interventions A one-day “lean” training course delivered by an experienced specialist team was followed by support and assistance in developing a 6 month improvement project. Clinical staff selected the subjects for improvement and designed the improvements. Outcome Measures We compared technical and non-technical team performance in theatre using WHO checklist compliance evaluation, “glitch count” and Oxford NOTECHS II in a sample of directly observed operations, and patient outcome (length of stay, complications and readmissions) for all patients. We collected observational data for 3 months and clinical data for 6 months before and after the intervention period. We compared changes in measures using 2-way analysis of variance. Results We studied 576 cases before and 465 after intervention, observing the operation in 38 and 41 cases respectively. We found no significant changes in team performance or patient outcome measures. The intervention theatre staff focused their efforts on improving first patient arrival time, which improved by 20 minutes after intervention. Conclusions This version of “lean” system improvement did not improve measured safety processes or outcomes. The study highlighted an important tension between promoting staff ownership and providing direction, which needs to be managed in “lean” projects. Space and time for staff to conduct improvement activities are important for success. PMID:27124012

  6. The misuse of 'no significant difference' in British orthopaedic literature.

    PubMed

    Sexton, S A; Ferguson, N; Pearce, C; Ricketts, D M

    2008-01-01

    Many studies published in medical journals do not consider the statistical power required to detect a meaningful difference between study groups. As a result, these studies are often underpowered: the sample size may not be large enough to pick up a statistically significant difference (or other effect of interest) of a given size between the study groups. Therefore, the conclusion that there is no statistically significant difference between groups cannot be made unless a study has been shown to have sufficient power. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of negative studies with inadequate statistical power in British journals to which orthopaedic surgeons regularly submit. We assessed all papers in the last consecutive six issues prior to the start of the study (April 2005) in The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (British), Injury, and Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. We sought published evidence that a power analysis had been performed in association with the main hypothesis of the paper. There were a total of 170 papers in which a statistical comparison of two or more groups was undertaken. Of these 170 papers, 49 (28.8%) stated as their primary conclusion that there was no statistically significant difference between the groups studied. Of these 49 papers, only 3 (6.1%) had performed a power analysis demonstrating adequate sample size. These results demonstrate that the majority of negative studies in the British orthopaedic literature that we have looked at have not performed the statistical analysis necessary to reach their stated conclusions. In order to remedy this, we recommend that the journals sampled include the following guidance in their instructions to authors: the statement 'no statistically significant difference was found between study groups' should be accompanied by the results of a power analysis.

  7. Orthopaedic surgeon-hospital alignment at Geisinger Health System.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Daniel S

    2013-06-01

    There is broad recognition that the healthcare crisis in the United States is going to require a response and change in clinical practice. The management structure of Geisinger Health System is unique, and this has the potential to change the dynamics of surgeon-administration alignment. Our goal is to summarize and clarify the relationship between orthopaedic surgeons and the healthcare system at Geisinger, evaluate the positive and negative aspects, and consider which components may be reproducible. This overview arises from a review of management publications, discussions with orthopaedic attendings and administrators, and personal observations and comparison with my previous 15-year university-based practice. The Geisinger Health System has always been physician-run. The overall efficiency and pragmatic approach found at Geisinger relies heavily on changing surgeon behavior to match what is optimal for the system rather than the individual. This approach appears to bring greater stability and more consistent outcomes, but only by removing what some see as the art of medicine and at the loss of perceived provider autonomy. Despite the rigid demands placed on the surgeon, the system remains adaptable to change and appears to retain faculty at a high rate. The Geisinger System is unique in its ability to control an insurance plan, multiple hospitals, and a large physician group. Through clear protocols and behavioral pressure, it demands surgeon alignment with the system as a whole and in return provides a stable work environment. It is not ideal for all surgeons and it is unclear whether it can be reproduced in a less structured setting.

  8. Lean Participative Process Improvement: Outcomes and Obstacles in Trauma Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    New, Steve; Hadi, Mohammed; Pickering, Sharon; Robertson, Eleanor; Morgan, Lauren; Griffin, Damian; Collins, Gary; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Catchpole, Ken; McCulloch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of a "systems" approach using Lean methodology to improve surgical care, as part of a programme of studies investigating possible synergy between improvement approaches. A controlled before-after study using the orthopaedic trauma theatre of a UK Trust hospital as the active site and an elective orthopaedic theatre in the same Trust as control. All staff involved in surgical procedures in both theatres. A one-day "lean" training course delivered by an experienced specialist team was followed by support and assistance in developing a 6 month improvement project. Clinical staff selected the subjects for improvement and designed the improvements. We compared technical and non-technical team performance in theatre using WHO checklist compliance evaluation, "glitch count" and Oxford NOTECHS II in a sample of directly observed operations, and patient outcome (length of stay, complications and readmissions) for all patients. We collected observational data for 3 months and clinical data for 6 months before and after the intervention period. We compared changes in measures using 2-way analysis of variance. We studied 576 cases before and 465 after intervention, observing the operation in 38 and 41 cases respectively. We found no significant changes in team performance or patient outcome measures. The intervention theatre staff focused their efforts on improving first patient arrival time, which improved by 20 minutes after intervention. This version of "lean" system improvement did not improve measured safety processes or outcomes. The study highlighted an important tension between promoting staff ownership and providing direction, which needs to be managed in "lean" projects. Space and time for staff to conduct improvement activities are important for success.

  9. How do Orthopaedic Surgeons Address Psychological Aspects of Illness?

    PubMed Central

    Vranceanu, Ana Maria; Beks, Reinier B.; Guitton, Thierry G.; Janssen, Stein J.; Ring, David

    2017-01-01

    Background: Orthopaedic surgeons have a pivotal role in transitioning the care of orthopedic patients from a biomedical to a biopsychosocial model. In an effort to foster this transition, we designed a study aimed to determine surgeons’ attitudes and practice of noticing, screening, discussing psychological illness with patients, as well as making referrals to address psychosocial issues in patients in need. Additionally, we asked surgeons to rank order potential barriers to and reasons for referrals to psychosocial treatment. Methods: Orthopaedic surgeons members of the Science and Variation Group and Ankle Platform (N =350) completed demographics, and a 4-part survey assessing the degree to which surgeons notice, assess, screen and refer for psychological treatments, as well ranked ordered barriers to engaging in these processes. Results: As a group surgeons were neutral to referral for psychological treatment and formal screening of psychological factors, and somewhat likely to notice and discuss psychological factors. Surgeons were more likely to refer for psychological treatment if they engaged in research, or if they reside in South America as opposed to North America. The highest ranked barriers to screening, noticing, discussing and referring for psychological treatment were lack of time, stigma and feeling uncomfortable. Conclusion: Overall surgeons are likely to notice and discuss psychological factors, but less likely to formally screen or refer for psychological treatment. Transition to biopsychosocial models should focus on problem solving these barriers by teaching surgeons communication skills to increase comfort with discussing psychoemotional factors associated with orthopedic problems. The use of empathic communication can be very helpful in normalizing the difficulty of coping with an orthopedic condition, and may facilitate referral. PMID:28271080

  10. Orthopaedic surgeons’ strategies in pharmacological treatment of fragility fractures

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Antonio; Orgiano, Francesca; Pianu, Francesca; Planta, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Fragility fractures are the most severe complications of osteoporosis and the poor mechanical properties of bone can make fixation and healing of these fracture extremely difficult. The role of orthopaedic surgeons does not end in skillful fixation of the fractures, but they have the unique opportunity to prevent complications which can negatively affect the patient’s quality of life. The best practice for preventing the risk of further fractures in patients presenting fragility fractures includes fall prevention, investigation of possible causes underlying osteoporosis, attention to exercise, calcium and vitamin D supplementation as well as prescription of drugs. Actually two classes of agents can be used for their effect on fracture prevention: antiresorptive and bone forming agents. Systemic therapy reduces the risk of vertebral (30–70%) and non-vertebral fractures (12–53%), depending on agents and patients’ compliance. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that pharmacological agents involved in osteoporosis can also influence the phases of fracture repair. Preclinical studies and evidences from case reports showed a positive effect of anabolic drugs on bone healing and implant osseointegration. The interventions in the process of fracture healing had evolved from a diamond to a pentagon concept, with interactions between the mechanical environment, the local therapies, the vascularity of the fracture site, the biology of the host and the systemic therapy which has the potential to represent the fifth interaction factor. The orthopaedic surgeon plays a central role in clinical setting to evaluate the efficacy of systemic anti-fracture drugs for improving fracture repair and preventing complications. PMID:25285136

  11. Anaemia in elective orthopaedic surgery - Royal Adelaide Hospital, Australia.

    PubMed

    Kearney, B; To, J; Southam, K; Howie, D; To, B

    2016-01-01

    An anaemia clinic was established to improve the preoperative management of elective orthopaedic patients scheduled for arthroplasty. This paper is a report on the first 100 patients assessed. To assess the incidence and causes of anaemia in patients on a waiting list for elective arthroplasty in a public hospital and to assess the impact of anaemia detection in this patient population. Patients attending an Anaemia Clinic for elective orthopaedic surgical patients, during March 2010 to June 2013 were studied. Outcome measures included change in haemoglobin preoperative results and perioperative transfusion rates by preoperative haemoglobin. Seventeen per cent of patients scheduled for elective surgery were found to be anaemic. Of the 100 patients who attended, approximately half were found to be iron deficient and the remainder had anaemia of chronic disease. Serum ferritin <30 µg/L alone did not identify iron deficiency in 80% of patients with iron deficiency. Patients with iron deficient anaemia were able to be treated, in all cases, to achieve a significant increase in preoperative haemoglobin. The general unavailability of erythropoietin limited effective intervention for the non-iron-deficient anaemic patients. Seven patients had their surgery cancelled because of the screening programme. Half of the anaemic patients in a joint replacement screening clinic were iron deficient, and treatment was effective in improving the pre-operative haemoglobin and reducing perioperative transfusion rates. This screening process should improve patient outcome. Another important finding in this group of patients is that ferritin levels cannot be reliably used as the sole indicator in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia in this group of patients undergoing elective arthroplasty. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  12. Helical rosette nanotubes: a more effective orthopaedic implant material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Ai Lin; Moralez, Jesus G.; Fenniri, Hicham; Webster, Thomas J.

    2004-04-01

    Due to the nanometric properties of some physiological components of bone, nanomaterials have been proposed as the next generation of improved orthopaedic implant materials. Yet current efforts in the design of orthopaedic materials such as titanium (Ti) are not aimed at tailoring their nanoscale features, which is now believed to be one reason why Ti sometimes fails clinically as a bone implant material. Much effort is thus being dedicated to developing improved bioactive nanometric surfaces and nanomaterials for biospecificity. Helical rosette nanotubes (HRN) are a new class of self-assembled organic nanotubes possessing biologically-inspired nanoscale dimensions. Because of their chemical and structural similarity with naturally-occurring nanostructured constituent components in bone such as collagen and hydroxyapatite, we anticipated that an HRN-coated surface may simulate an environment that bone cells are accustomed to interacting with. The objective of the present in vitro study is therefore to determine the efficacy of HRN as a bone prosthetic material. Results of this study clearly show that both HRN-K1 and HRN-Arg coated Ti displayed enhanced cell adhesion when compared to uncoated Ti. Enhanced cell adhesion was observed even at concentrations as low as 0.005 mg ml-1. These results point towards new possibilities in bone tissue engineering as they serve as a starting point for further mechanistic studies as well as future manipulation of the outer chemistries of HRN to improve the results beyond those presented here. One such effort is the incorporation of peptide sequences on the outer surface of HRN and/or growth factors known to enhance bone functions.

  13. Resources for your career in orthopaedic traumatology: what can the OTA do for you?

    PubMed

    Mehta, Samir; Smith, Jeffrey M

    2012-09-01

    For those choosing a career in orthopaedic traumatology, several resources have been established by the Orthopaedic Trauma Association to facilitate progression from the years in training to the early years in practice. Young practitioners have access to educational programming, such as preparation for Part II of the Board Examination, web-based resources, such as on-line job postings, advocacy in health policy for the issues that will affect their ability to practice, and public relations efforts to increase their presence in the community. Ultimately, the resources set aside for the young practitioner by the Orthopaedic Trauma Association are intended to facilitate a sense of excellence, service, and community.

  14. The use of three-dimensional printing technology in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tak Man; Jin, Jimmy; Lau, Tak Wing; Fang, Christian; Yan, Chun Hoi; Yeung, Kelvin; To, Michael; Leung, Frankie

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) printing or additive manufacturing, an advanced technology that 3-D physical models are created, has been wildly applied in medical industries, including cardiothoracic surgery, cranio-maxillo-facial surgery and orthopaedic surgery. The physical models made by 3-D printing technology give surgeons a realistic impression of complex structures, allowing surgical planning and simulation before operations. In orthopaedic surgery, this technique is mainly applied in surgical planning especially revision and reconstructive surgeries, making patient-specific instruments or implants, and bone tissue engineering. This article reviews this technology and its application in orthopaedic surgery.

  15. Changing paediatric orthopaedic education and certification for the RN in Northern Ireland?

    PubMed

    Clarke, Sonya

    2007-01-01

    This article highlights the development of orthopaedic nurse education in Northern Ireland and how it equates with the United Kingdom and United States when focused on children's nursing. It also examines the historical development of initial preregistration nurse education and equates it to children's nursing where children are generally acknowledged as a vulnerable group. This article concludes by offering recommendations that may further enhance the development of Northern Ireland's orthopaedic nurse education that demonstrate standardization and equality for all practicing nurses within the specialty of orthopaedics.

  16. Automatic Bone Drilling - More Precise, Reliable and Safe Manipulation in the Orthopaedic Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiadjiev, George; Kastelov, Rumen; Boiadjiev, Tony; Delchev, Kamen; Zagurski, Kazimir

    2016-06-01

    Bone drilling manipulation often occurs in the orthopaedic surgery. By statistics, nowadays, about one million people only in Europe need such an operation every year, where bone implants are inserted. Almost always, the drilling is performed handily, which cannot avoid the subjective factor influence. The question of subjective factor reduction has its answer - automatic bone drilling. The specific features and problems of orthopaedic drilling manipulation are considered in this work. The automatic drilling is presented according the possibilities of robotized system Orthopaedic Drilling Robot (ODRO) for assuring the manipulation accuracy, precision, reliability and safety.

  17. Acetabular Labral Tears: Diagnostic Accuracy of Clinical Examination by a Physical Therapist, Orthopaedic Surgeon, and Orthopaedic Residents

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Norman W.; Freedman, Brett A.; Ross, Amy E.; Javernick, Matthew A.; Murphy, Kevin P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown military physical therapists (PT) to have comparable clinical diagnostic accuracy (CDA) and interobserver agreement to orthopaedic surgeons (OS). However, no studies have examined hip pathology or used intraoperative findings as the reference standard for diagnosis. Objective To compare the CDA of physical examination findings among a PT, an OS, and two surgical orthopaedic residents (ORs) for hip labral tears. Methods Thirty-six patients (15 males, 21 females) aged 18–47 (mean + SD, 31.4 + 8.1 years) with 37 symptomatic hips were enrolled in a prospective study and underwent a standardized clinical examination followed by hip arthroscopy. A PT, an OS, and two ORs independently performed history and examinations with the emphasis of diagnosis on the results of six special tests. Results Thirty-two of 37 individuals (86%) had labral tears to the hip at arthroscopy. Analysis of agreement between clinical diagnosis and intra-operative findings of a labral tear produced a CDA of 85.3% (29/34 correct) for the PT, 84.4% (27/32 correct) for the OS, and 80.0% (24/30 correct) for ORs. No significant difference in CDA occurred in comparing the PT, OS, and ORs. Conclusions Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, hip labral tears were clinically suspected with 80–85% accuracy. The clinical diagnostic accuracy of the PT, OS, and ORs was high with no significant difference between examiners. In this study, an experienced PT, an OS, and two ORs demonstrated similarly high diagnostic skills. PMID:21509119

  18. Significance of nano- and microtopography for cell-surface interactions in orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Jäger, M; Zilkens, C; Zanger, K; Krauspe, R

    2007-01-01

    Cell-surface interactions play a crucial role for biomaterial application in orthopaedics. It is evident that not only the chemical composition of solid substances influence cellular adherence, migration, proliferation and differentiation but also the surface topography of a biomaterial. The progressive application of nanostructured surfaces in medicine has gained increasing interest to improve the cytocompatibility and osteointegration of orthopaedic implants. Therefore, the understanding of cell-surface interactions is of major interest for these substances. In this review, we elucidate the principle mechanisms of nano- and microscale cell-surface interactions in vitro for different cell types onto typical orthopaedic biomaterials such as titanium (Ti), cobalt-chrome-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys, stainless steel (SS), as well as synthetic polymers (UHMWPE, XLPE, PEEK, PLLA). In addition, effects of nano- and microscaled particles and their significance in orthopaedics were reviewed. The significance for the cytocompatibility of nanobiomaterials is discussed critically.

  19. Bioactive coatings for orthopaedic implants-recent trends in development of implant coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bill G X; Myers, Damian E; Wallace, Gordon G; Brandt, Milan; Choong, Peter F M

    2014-07-04

    Joint replacement is a major orthopaedic procedure used to treat joint osteoarthritis. Aseptic loosening and infection are the two most significant causes of prosthetic implant failure. The ideal implant should be able to promote osteointegration, deter bacterial adhesion and minimize prosthetic infection. Recent developments in material science and cell biology have seen the development of new orthopaedic implant coatings to address these issues. Coatings consisting of bioceramics, extracellular matrix proteins, biological peptides or growth factors impart bioactivity and biocompatibility to the metallic surface of conventional orthopaedic prosthesis that promote bone ingrowth and differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts leading to enhanced osteointegration of the implant. Furthermore, coatings such as silver, nitric oxide, antibiotics, antiseptics and antimicrobial peptides with anti-microbial properties have also been developed, which show promise in reducing bacterial adhesion and prosthetic infections. This review summarizes some of the recent developments in coatings for orthopaedic implants.

  20. Bioactive Coatings for Orthopaedic Implants—Recent Trends in Development of Implant Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bill G. X.; Myers, Damian E.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Brandt, Milan; Choong, Peter F. M.

    2014-01-01

    Joint replacement is a major orthopaedic procedure used to treat joint osteoarthritis. Aseptic loosening and infection are the two most significant causes of prosthetic implant failure. The ideal implant should be able to promote osteointegration, deter bacterial adhesion and minimize prosthetic infection. Recent developments in material science and cell biology have seen the development of new orthopaedic implant coatings to address these issues. Coatings consisting of bioceramics, extracellular matrix proteins, biological peptides or growth factors impart bioactivity and biocompatibility to the metallic surface of conventional orthopaedic prosthesis that promote bone ingrowth and differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts leading to enhanced osteointegration of the implant. Furthermore, coatings such as silver, nitric oxide, antibiotics, antiseptics and antimicrobial peptides with anti-microbial properties have also been developed, which show promise in reducing bacterial adhesion and prosthetic infections. This review summarizes some of the recent developments in coatings for orthopaedic implants. PMID:25000263

  1. A Review of THE ROLE OF SIMULATION IN DEVELOPING AND ASSESSING ORTHOPAEDIC SURGICAL SKILLS

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Geb W; Johns, Brian D; Marsh, J Lawrence; Anderson, Donald D

    2014-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgical skill is traditionally acquired during training in an apprenticeship model that has been largely unchanged for nearly 100 years. However, increased pressure for operating room efficiency, a focus on patient safety, work hour restrictions, and a movement towards competency-based education are changing the traditional paradigm. Surgical simulation has the potential to help address these changes. This manuscript reviews the scientific background on skill acquisition and surgical simulation as it applies to orthopaedic surgery. It argues that simulation in orthopaedics lags behind other disciplines and focuses too little on simulator validation. The case is made that orthopaedic training is more efficient with simulators that facilitate deliberate practice throughout resident training and more research should be focused on simulator validation and the refinement of skill definition. PMID:25328480

  2. The evolution of orthopaedic surgeons from bone and joint surgery at the University of Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D Y

    2000-05-01

    When the first medical school in the North American colonies was founded in 1765 at the Philadelphia College (University of Pennsylvania) there were only two branches of medicine physic (medicine) and surgery. Surgeons such as Philip Syng Physick, and his successors William Gibson, Henry Hollingsworth Smith, and D. Hayes Agnew, in addition to performing general surgery, treated patients with orthopaedic, ophthalmologic, and nuerosurgical problems. Treatment of patients with orthopaedic problems by surgeons continued at the University of Pennsylvania until DeForest Willard founded the Department of Orthopaedics in 1889. In the interval between 1805, when Physick was appointed the first professor of surgery at the University of Pennsylvania, and 1889 many ingenious instruments, splints, and operative procedures for treating patients with orthopaedic problems were developed. The author will describe some of the accomplishments of these pioneers.

  3. Significance of Nano- and Microtopography for Cell-Surface Interactions in Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, M.; Zilkens, C.; Zanger, K.; Krauspe, R.

    2007-01-01

    Cell-surface interactions play a crucial role for biomaterial application in orthopaedics. It is evident that not only the chemical composition of solid substances influence cellular adherence, migration, proliferation and differentiation but also the surface topography of a biomaterial. The progressive application of nanostructured surfaces in medicine has gained increasing interest to improve the cytocompatibility and osteointegration of orthopaedic implants. Therefore, the understanding of cell-surface interactions is of major interest for these substances. In this review, we elucidate the principle mechanisms of nano- and microscale cell-surface interactions in vitro for different cell types onto typical orthopaedic biomaterials such as titanium (Ti), cobalt-chrome-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys, stainless steel (SS), as well as synthetic polymers (UHMWPE, XLPE, PEEK, PLLA). In addition, effects of nano- and microscaled particles and their significance in orthopaedics were reviewed. The significance for the cytocompatibility of nanobiomaterials is discussed critically. PMID:18274618

  4. Diversity based on race, ethnicity, and sex between academic orthopaedic surgery and other specialties: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Day, Charles S; Lage, Daniel E; Ahn, Christine S

    2010-10-06

    Previous studies have demonstrated a lack of diversity in orthopaedics; however, it is unclear whether this observation is unique to orthopaedics or similar to other surgical fields. The present study compares diversity in the field of orthopaedics with diversity in other surgical and nonsurgical fields. To our knowledge, no previous study has placed this issue in a comparative perspective between specialties at both the residency and faculty levels. Public registries from 2006 and 2007 were used to determine the composition (according to race, ethnicity, and sex) of the orthopaedic workforce in the United States, including medical students, orthopaedic residents, orthopaedic faculty, and full professors. The diversity of orthopaedic residents and faculty was then compared with that in five other specialties. In addition, the applicant pools to orthopaedic and general surgery residencies were compared. Within the 2006 orthopaedic workforce, there was a significant decrease in the representation of African-Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Asian-Americans, and women from medical schools to orthopaedic residencies (p < 0.001). African-Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, and Asian-Americans were underrepresented among orthopaedic faculty compared with their representation in orthopaedic residency programs (p < 0.05). Furthermore, women and Asian-Americans were disproportionately underrepresented as full professors compared with their presence on the faculty at academic orthopaedic institutions (p < 0.05). When compared with other surgical specialties, African-Americans and Hispanics/Latinos made up a significantly smaller proportion of orthopaedic residents than general surgery residents and neurological surgery. Orthopaedic surgery had the lowest representation of female residents and faculty (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). In examining the applicant pool, orthopaedic surgery was less diverse than general surgery (p < 0.001). Furthermore, African-American and Hispanic

  5. RETRIEVAL EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Steinhoff

    1997-08-25

    The objective and the scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major mobile equipment necessary for waste package (WP) retrieval from the proposed subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. There are no quality assurance requirements or QA controls in this document. Retrieval under normal conditions is accomplished with the same fleet of equipment as is used for emplacement. Descriptions of equipment used for retrieval under normal conditions is found in Emplacement Equipment Descriptions, DI: BCAF00000-01717-5705-00002 (a document in progress). Equipment used for retrieval under abnormal conditions is addressed in this document and consists of the following: (1) Inclined Plane Hauler; (2) Bottom Lift Transporter; (3) Load Haul Dump (LHD) Loader; (4) Heavy Duty Forklift for Emplacement Drifts; (5) Covered Shuttle Car; (6) Multipurpose Vehicle; and (7) Scaler.

  6. An algorithmic approach for managing orthopaedic surgical wounds of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eugenia H; Garcia, Ryan; Pien, Irene; Thomas, Steven; Levin, L Scott; Hollenbeck, Scott T

    2014-06-01

    Wound breakdown after orthopaedic foot and ankle surgery may necessitate secondary soft tissue coverage. The foot and ankle region is challenging to reconstruct for orthopaedic and plastic surgeons owing to its complex bony anatomy and unique functional demands. Therefore, identifying strategies for plastic surgery of these wounds may help guide surgeons in defining the best treatment plan. We evaluated our current algorithmic approach for managing orthopaedic surgical wounds of the foot and ankle with respect to whether (1) prophylactic or simultaneous soft tissue coverage affected wound-healing complications (secondary plastic surgery, orthopaedic hardware removal, malunion, further orthopaedic surgery, ultimate failure) and (2) postoperative referral for soft tissue management was associated with wound location, size, and orthopaedic procedure. We retrospectively reviewed 112 patients who underwent elective orthopaedic foot or ankle surgery and required concomitant plastic surgery at our institution. Study end points included secondary plastic surgery procedures, hardware removal for infection, foot or ankle malunion, further orthopaedic surgery, and wound-healing failure as defined by a chronic nonhealing wound or need for amputation. Minimum followup was 0.6 months (mean, 24.9 months; range, 0.6-197 months). Four patients were lost to complete followup. We developed an algorithm that centers on two critical points of care: preoperative evaluation by the orthopaedic surgeon and evaluation and treatment by the plastic surgeon after referral. Compared with postoperative intervention, prophylactic or simultaneous soft tissue coverage did not lead to differences in frequency of secondary plastic surgery procedures (p = 0.55), hardware removal procedures (p = 0.13), malunions (p = 0.47), further orthopaedic surgery (p = 0.48), and ultimate failure (p = 0.27). Patients referred postoperatively for soft tissue management most frequently had dorsal ankle wounds (p < 0

  7. Readability of patient education materials from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America web sites.

    PubMed

    Badarudeen, Sameer; Sabharwal, Sanjeev

    2008-01-01

    While experts recommend that the readability of patient education materials should be less than the sixth grade level, the available information pertaining to orthopaedic diseases may be excessively complex for some to read and comprehend. The Flesch-Kincaid grade level is the most widely used tool to evaluate the readability score of a given text, with a lower grade level suggesting easier readability. The goal of our study was to assess the readability of pediatric orthopaedic patient education materials that were developed by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) and were accessible to the general public through the Internet. All articles from the "Children" section of the patient education library, "Your Orthopaedic Connection," on the AAOS web site and the "Parent/Patient" section on the POSNA web site were identified. The Flesch-Kincaid grade level of each article was determined with use of Microsoft Office Word software. The mean grade levels of articles that were available in 2001 were compared with those accessible in 2007. Fifty-seven unique articles were available in 2007 on both web sites compared with twenty-five articles available in 2001. The readability score of only one (2%) of the currently available articles was less than sixth grade level. The mean Flesch-Kincaid grade level of the currently available articles was 8.9 compared with 8.7 for the articles available in 2001 (p = 0.71). Our findings suggest that most of the pediatric orthopaedic patient education materials available on the AAOS and POSNA web sites have readability scores that may be too high, making comprehension difficult for a substantial portion of the United States population.

  8. Tracking Cumulative Radiation Exposure in Orthopaedic Surgeons and Residents: What Dose Are We Getting?

    PubMed

    Gausden, Elizabeth B; Christ, Alexander B; Zeldin, Roseann; Lane, Joseph M; McCarthy, Moira M

    2017-08-02

    The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of cumulative radiation exposure received by orthopaedic surgeons and residents in various subspecialties. We obtained dosimeter measures over 12 months on 24 residents and 16 attending surgeons. Monthly radiation exposure was measured over a 12-month period for 24 orthopaedic residents and 16 orthopaedic attending surgeons. The participants wore a Landauer Luxel dosimeter on the breast pocket of their lead apron. The dosimeters were exchanged every rotation (5 to 7 weeks) for the resident participants and every month for the attending surgeon participants. Radiation exposure was compared by orthopaedic subspecialty, level of training, and type of fluoroscopy used (regular C-arm compared with mini C-arm). Orthopaedic residents participating in this study received monthly mean radiation exposures of 0.2 to 79 mrem/month, lower than the dose limits of 5,000 mrem/year recommended by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S. NRC). Senior residents rotating on trauma were exposed to the highest monthly radiation (79 mrem/month [range, 15 to 243 mrem/month]) compared with all other specialty rotations (p < 0.001). Similarly, attending orthopaedic surgeons who specialize in trauma or deformity surgery received the highest radiation exposure of their peers, and the mean exposure was 53 mrem/month (range, 0 to 355 mrem/month). Residents and attending surgeons performing trauma or deformity surgical procedures are exposed to significantly higher doses of radiation compared with all other subspecialties within orthopaedic surgery, but the doses are still within the recommended limits. The use of ionizing radiation in the operating room has become an indispensable part of orthopaedic surgery. Although all surgeons in our study received lower than the yearly recommended dose limit, it is important to be aware of how much radiation we are exposed to as surgeons and to take measures to further limit that exposure.

  9. Ethics as an important determinant of success of orthopaedic dental care for debilitated and elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Schwartzseid, E E

    1989-01-01

    Ethical aspects of orthopaedic dental care for debilitated and elderly patients--the most complex and the least studied aspects of dentistry--are discussed here. Many articles on dental ethics, as a rule, do not cover the essential ethical aspects of orthopaedic care for the elderly or cover them only partially without reflecting on the problem at large. Understanding of the problem may help to provide more efficient dental care for the elderly population thus improving their quality of life.

  10. Evaluation of the orthopaedics and traumatology resident education in Turkey: A descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Huri, Gazi; Cabuk, Yusuf Sertan; Gursoy, Safa; Akkaya, Mustafa; Ozkan, Secil; Oztuna, Volkan; Aydingoz, Onder; Senkoylu, Alparslan

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the current situation regarding the training, working conditions, future plans, fields of interest and satisfaction of orthopaedics and traumatology residents in Turkey. A descriptive survey questionnaire consisting of 24 questions was designed to identify the problems and solution suggestions concerning training of orthopaedic residents. All orthopaedics and traumatology residents who took the 2013 Progress Testing for Speciality in Medicine (UEGS) held by Turkish Orthopaedics and Traumatology Education Council (TOTEK) were surveyed in the class at the end thereof as well as the young orthopaedic surgeons who were reached through the email groups of Turkish Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology - Residents and Young Attendings Council (TOTBID-AGUH). A total of 725 residents and 132 young attendings were surveyed. The most outstanding answers are as follows: 62,7% of the respondents replied to the question "Is there a training program/Is it being applied" as "yes/yes". It was found out that 94,3% of the respondents wanted to be involved in a rotation abroad. The "patient care" was the most common answer, with a ratio of 36,9%, to the question "What's the priority of the department you are studying in?". Regarding work conditions, "many emergency on-calls" was found to be the most important parameter affecting life conditions (p < 0.05). Aiming to identify the challenges that orthopaedics and traumatology residents in Turkey face as regards their training, this survey stands as a pioneering study with a high participation rate. Analysis of survey data highlights the importance of several key factors such as the development of training programs and increasing the time spent with academicians as well as spreading and promotion of log book application. Copyright © 2016 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Does Admission to Medicine or Orthopaedics Impact a Geriatric Hip Patient's Hospital Length of Stay?

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Sarah E; VanHouten, Jacob P; Lakomkin, Nikita; Ehrenfeld, Jesse; Jahangir, Amir Alex; Boyce, Robert H; Obremksey, William T; Sethi, Manish K

    2016-02-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the association between admitting service, medicine or orthopaedics, and length of stay (LOS) for a geriatric hip fracture patient. Retrospective. Urban level 1 trauma center. Six hundred fourteen geriatric hip fracture patients from 2000 to 2009. Orthopaedic surgery for geriatric hip fracture. Patient demographics, medical comorbidities, hospitalization length, and admitting service. Negative binomial regression used to determine association between LOS and admitting service. Six hundred fourteen geriatric hip fracture patients were included in the analysis, of whom 49.2% of patients (n = 302) were admitted to the orthopaedic service and 50.8% (3 = 312) to the medicine service. The median LOS for patients admitted to orthopaedics was 4.5 days compared with 7 days for patients admitted to medicine (P < 0.0001). Readmission was also significantly higher for patients admitted to medicine (n = 92, 29.8%) than for those admitted to orthopaedics (n = 70, 23.1%). After controlling for important patient factors, it was determined that medicine patients are expected to stay about 1.5 times (incidence rate ratio: 1.48, P < 0.0001) longer in the hospital than orthopaedic patients. This is the largest study to demonstrate that admission to the medicine service compared with the orthopaedic service increases a geriatric hip fractures patient's expected LOS. Since LOS is a major driver of cost as well as a measure of quality care, it is important to understand the factors that lead to a longer hospital stay to better allocate hospital resources. Based on the results from our institution, orthopaedic surgeons should be aware that admission to medicine might increase a patient's expected LOS. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  12. "Is There An App For That?" Orthopaedic Patient Preferences For A Smartphone Application.

    PubMed

    Datillo, Jonathan R; Gittings, Daniel J; Sloan, Matthew; Hardaker, William M; Deasey, Matthew J; Sheth, Neil P

    2017-08-16

    Patients are seeking out medical information on the Internet and utilizing smartphone health applications ("apps"). Smartphone use has exponentially increased among orthopaedic surgeons and patients. Despite this increase, patients are rarely directed to specific apps by physicians. No study exists querying patient preferences for a patient-centered, orthopaedic smartphone application. The purpose of this study is to 1) determine Internet use patterns amongst orthopaedic patients; 2) ascertain access to and use of smartphones; and 3) elucidate what features orthopaedic patients find most important in a smartphone application. We surveyed patients in an orthopaedic practice in an urban academic center to assess demographics, access to and patterns of Internet and Smartphone use, and preferences for features in a smartphone app. A total of 310 surveys were completed. Eighty percent of patients reported Internet access, and 62% used the Internet for health information. Seventy-seven percent owned smartphones, 45% used them for health information, and 28% owned health apps. Only 11% were referred to an app by a physician. The highest ranked features were appointment reminders, ability to view test results, communication with physicians, and discharge instructions. General orthopaedic information and pictures or videos explaining surgery were the 2 lowest ranked features. Seventy-one percent of patients felt an app with some of the described features would improve their healthcare experiences, and 40% would pay for the app. The smartphone is an under-utilized tool to enhance patient-physician communication, increase satisfaction, and improve quality of care. Patients were enthusiastic about app features that are often included in patient health portals, but ranked orthopaedic educational features lowest. Further study is required to elucidate how best to use orthopaedic apps as physician-directed educational opportunities to promote patient satisfaction and quality of

  13. Industry Financial Relationships in Orthopaedic Surgery: Analysis of the Sunshine Act Open Payments Database and Comparison with Other Surgical Subspecialties.

    PubMed

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Chalmers, Peter N; Bach, Bernard R

    2015-08-05

    Industry financial relationships for orthopaedic surgeons in the United States are now publicly reported in the Sunshine Act Open Payments database. We sought to present these data in a more easily understandable format and to describe how industry relationships in orthopaedic surgery compare with other surgical subspecialties. The Open Payments database was searched for all records of industry financial relationships for orthopaedic surgeons. Data analyzed included the value of reported financial relationships per surgeon, the type of financial relationship, and geographic region. Similar analytics were collected for neurological surgery, urology, plastic surgery, and otolaryngology. Data were normalized to the overall number of providers in each subspecialty in the United States from the American Medical Association 2012 data. For 12,320 orthopaedic surgeons, 58,127 industry financial relationships were reported, with a total value of $80.2 million. Royalties or licensing fees, which were received by 1.7% of U.S. orthopaedic surgeons, accounted for 69.5% of the total monetary value of payments to orthopaedic surgeons. Between August and December 2013, 50.1% of U.S. orthopaedic surgeons had a reported financial relationship. Orthopaedics had the second lowest percentage of physicians with industry financial relationships among the five surgical subspecialties studied. The overall value of payments per orthopaedic surgeon was higher than in the other subspecialties, driven by the large value of royalties and licensing. One-half of U.S. orthopaedic surgeons have industry financial relationships reported in the Open Payments database. Orthopaedic surgeons are less likely than most surgical subspecialists to receive industry payments, and the majority of the overall value of orthopaedic financial relationships is driven by a small number of orthopaedic surgeons receiving royalties and licensing for reimbursable innovation within the field. Copyright © 2015 by The

  14. Medical record keeping and system performance in orthopaedic trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Cosic, Filip; Kimmel, Lara; Edwards, Elton

    2016-02-18

    Objective The medical record is critical for documentation and communication between healthcare professionals. The aim of the present study was to evaluate important aspects of the orthopaedic medical record and system performance to determine whether any deficiencies exist in these areas.Methods Review of 200 medical records of surgically treated traumatic lower limb injury patients was undertaken. The operative report, discharge summary and first and second outpatient reviews were evaluated.Results In all cases, an operative report was completed by a senior surgeon. Weight-bearing status was adequately documented in 91% of reports. Discharge summaries were completed for 82.5% of admissions, with 87.3% of these having instructions reflective of those in the operative report. Of first and second outpatient reviews, 69% and 73%, respectively, occurred within 1 week of the requested time. Previously documented management plans were changed in 30% of reviews. At 6-months post-operatively, 42% of patients had been reviewed by a member of their operating team.Discussion Orthopaedic medical record documentation remains an area for improvement. In addition, hospital out-patient systems perform suboptimally and may affect patient outcomes.What is known about the topic? Medical records are an essential tool in modern medical practice. Despite the importance of comprehensive documentation in the medical record, numerous examples of poor documentation have been demonstrated, including substandard documentation during consultant ward rounds by junior doctors leading to a breakdown in healthcare professional communication and potential patient mismanagement. Further inadequacies of medical record documentation have been demonstrated in surgical discharge notes, with complete and correct documentation reported to be as low as 65%.What does this paper add? Standards of patient care should be constantly monitored and deficiencies identified in order to implement a remedy and close

  15. Bone graft materials in fixation of orthopaedic implants in sheep.

    PubMed

    Babiker, Hassan

    2013-07-01

    Bone graft is widely used within orthopaedic surgery especially in revision joint arthroplasty and spine fusion. The early implant fixation in the revision situation of loose joint prostheses is important for the long-term survival. Bone autograft has been considered as gold standard in many orthopaedic procedures, whereas allograft is the gold standard by replacement of extensive bone loss. However, the use of autograft is associated with donor site morbidity, especially chronic pain. In addition, the limited supply is a significant clinical challenge. Limitations in the use of allograft include the risk of bacterial contamination and disease transmission as well as non-union and poor bone quality. Other bone graft and substitutes have been considered as alternative in order to improve implant fixation. Hydroxyapatite and collagen type I composite (HA/Collagen) have the potential in mimicking skeletal bones. The osteoconductive properties of the composite might be improved by adding bone marrow aspirate (BMA), which can be harvested during surgery. Other alternatives to bone graft are demineralised bone matrix (DBM) and human cancellous bone (CB). DBM is prepared by acid extraction of human bone and includes bone collagen, morphogenetic proteins and growth factors. The combination of DBM with CB and with allograft might improve the healing potential of these grafts around non-cemented orthopaedic implants and thereby the implant fixation. Study I investigates the effect of HA/Collagen composite alone and in combination with BMA on the early fixation of porous coated titanium implants. In addition, the study compares also the effect of autograft with the gold standard allograft. By using a sheep model, the implants were inserted in the trabecular bone of femoral condyles. The test biomaterials were placed in a well defined peri-implant gap. After the observation period, the bone-implant specimens were harvested and evaluated mechanically by a destructive push

  16. Perspective: Integrating research into surgical residency education: lessons learned from orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc I; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Egol, Kenneth A; Ahn, Jaimo; Owens, Brett D; Crosby, Lynn A; Pellegrini, Vincent D

    2012-05-01

    Orthopaedic research has advanced tremendously in parallel with accelerated progress in medical science. Possession of a fundamental understanding of basic and clinical science has become more essential than previously for orthopaedic surgeons to be able to translate advances in research into clinical practice. The number of medical graduates with prior education in scientific research who choose to pursue careers in orthopaedic surgery is small. Therefore, it is important that a core of research education be included during residency training to ensure the continued advancement of the clinical practice of orthopaedics. The authors examine some of the challenges to a comprehensive research experience during residency, including deficient priority, inadequate institutional infrastructure, financial strain on residency budgets, restricted time, and an insufficient number of mentors to encourage and guide residents to become clinician-scientists. They also present some strategies to overcome these challenges, including development and expansion of residency programs with clinician-scientist pathways, promotion of financial sources, and enhancement of opportunities for residents to interact with mentors who can serve as role models. Successful integration of research education into residency programs will stimulate future orthopaedic surgeons to develop the critical skills to lead musculoskeletal research, comprehend related discoveries, and translate them into patient care. Lessons learned from incorporating research training within orthopaedic residency programs will have broad application across medical specialties-in both primary and subspecialty patient care.

  17. Orthopaedic Patient Information on the World Wide Web: An Essential Review.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, John Tristan; Baker, Joseph F

    2016-02-17

    Patients increasingly use the Internet to research health-related issues. Internet content, unlike other forms of media, is not regulated. Although information accessed online can impact patients' opinions and expectations, there is limited information about the quality or readability of online orthopaedic information. PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar were searched using anatomic descriptors and three title keywords ("Internet," "web," and "online"). Articles examining online orthopaedic information from January 1, 2000, until April 1, 2015, were recorded. Articles were assessed for the number of reviewers evaluating the online material, whether the article examined for a link between authorship and quality, and the use of recognized quality and readability assessment tools. To facilitate a contemporary discussion, only publications since January 1, 2010, were considered for analysis. A total of thirty-eight peer-reviewed articles published since 2010 examining the quality and/or readability of online orthopaedic information were reviewed. For information quality, there was marked variation in the quality assessment methods utilized, the number of reviewers, and the manner of reporting. To date, the majority of examined information is of poor quality. Studies examining readability have focused on pages produced by professional orthopaedic societies. The quality and readability of online orthopaedic information are generally poor. For modern practices to adapt to the Internet and to prevent misinformation, the orthopaedic community should develop high-quality, readable online patient information. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  18. Engineer Equipment Mechanic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on engineer equipment mechanics is designed to advance the professional competence of privates through sergeants as equipment mechanics, Military Occupation Specialty 1341, and is adaptable for nonmilitary instruction. Introductory materials include…

  19. Equipment & New Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Adrian W., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Presents several new products and equipment for teaching college science courses such as laser optics bench, portable digital thermometer, solar energy furnaces and blackboard optics kit. A description of all equipment or products, cost, and addresses of manufacturers are also included. (HM)

  20. Adaptive Recreational Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Mary Lou, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Designed for teachers interested in therapeutic recreation, the document lists sources of adaptive recreational equipment and their homemade counterparts. Brief descriptions for ordering or constructing recreational equipment for the visually impaired, poorly coordinated, physically impaired, and mentally retarded are given. Specific adaptations…

  1. Equipment & New Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Adrian W., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Presents several new products and equipment for teaching college science courses such as laser optics bench, portable digital thermometer, solar energy furnaces and blackboard optics kit. A description of all equipment or products, cost, and addresses of manufacturers are also included. (HM)

  2. Equipment Operator 1 & C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Education and Training Program Development Center, Pensacola, FL.

    The Rate Training Manual and Nonresident Career Course (RTM/NRCC) form a self-study package to assist Navy Equipment Operators First and Chief in fulfilling the requirements of their rating. (Navy Equipment Operators First and Chief direct and coordinate efforts of individuals and crews in construction, earthmoving, roadbuilding, quarrying, and…

  3. Test Equipment Management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    1 1 Terminology. .. .................. .. . .... 1 Importance . ........... .............. 1- 3 Report Organization. .. ................... 1...the composite of ETE (limited to manual test equipment only, including both general and special purpose), ATE, and TPSs. IMPORTANCE The need for...aviation weapon systems, is the Support Equipment Recommendation Data ( SERD ). The prime contractor for the weapon system usually prepares the SERD and

  4. Technology Equipment Rooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    2001-01-01

    Examines telecommunications equipment room design features that allow for growth and can accommodate numerous equipment replacements and upgrades with minimal service disruption and with minimal cost. Considerations involving the central hub, power and lighting needs, air conditioning, and fire protection are discussed. (GR)

  5. Shipboard Electronic Equipments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Personnel Program Support Activity, Washington, DC.

    Fundamentals of major electronic equipments on board ships are presented in this text prepared for naval officers in general. Basic radio principles are discussed in connection with various types of transmitters, receivers, antennas, couplers, transfer panels, remote-control units, frequency standard equipments, teletypewriters, and facsimile…

  6. AUDIOVISUAL EQUIPMENT STANDARDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PATTERSON, PIERCE E.; AND OTHERS

    RECOMMENDED STANDARDS FOR AUDIOVISUAL EQUIPMENT WERE PRESENTED SEPARATELY FOR GRADES KINDERGARTEN THROUGH SIX, AND FOR JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS. THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EQUIPMENT CONSIDERED WAS THE FOLLOWING--CLASSROOM LIGHT CONTROL, MOTION PICTURE PROJECTOR WITH MOBILE STAND AND SPARE REELS, COMBINATION 2 INCH X 2 INCH SLIDE AND FILMSTRIP…

  7. Equipment Operator 1 & C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Education and Training Program Development Center, Pensacola, FL.

    The Rate Training Manual and Nonresident Career Course (RTM/NRCC) form a self-study package to assist Navy Equipment Operators First and Chief in fulfilling the requirements of their rating. (Navy Equipment Operators First and Chief direct and coordinate efforts of individuals and crews in construction, earthmoving, roadbuilding, quarrying, and…

  8. Technology Equipment Rooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    2001-01-01

    Examines telecommunications equipment room design features that allow for growth and can accommodate numerous equipment replacements and upgrades with minimal service disruption and with minimal cost. Considerations involving the central hub, power and lighting needs, air conditioning, and fire protection are discussed. (GR)

  9. Are Orthopaedic Residents Competent at Performing Basic Nonoperative Procedures in an Unsupervised Setting? A "Pop Quiz" of Casting, Knee Arthrocentesis, and Pressure Checks for Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua M; O'Toole, Robert V; Paryavi, Ebrahim; Sterling, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Many patient care procedures are routinely performed by orthopaedic residents while not directly supervised by attending physicians. However, resident competence to perform these procedures is often presumed and not confirmed by objective measures. The purpose of this study was to formally evaluate 3 basic pediatric orthopaedic procedures commonly performed without attending supervision. All orthopaedic residents (n=20) were asked to complete 3 procedures (placement and removal of a short arm cast, aspiration of a knee joint, and compartment pressure checks of a leg) under direct attending supervision. Attending faculty developed a checklist for each procedure, listing the appropriate steps required and criteria with which to assess the final results. Scores were calculated, including means and SDs. Change in score by postgraduate year level was determined by simple linear regression. The mean score for short arm cast application and removal was 6.2 of a total possible score of 8, with an average 1.1 increase in score per year of training (P<0.001). Uneven cast padding and lack of full thumb motion were the most common reasons for losing points. Knee joint aspiration had an average score of 6.2 of 7, with an average increase in score of 0.3 per year of training (P=0.046). Lack of equipment preparation and not donning gloves in a sterile manner were the most common reasons for losing points. Measure of leg compartment pressures had an average score of 9.7 of 12, with an average increase in score of 0.5 per increase in year of training (P=0.087). Injecting an inappropriate amount of fluid and not recording measurements were the most common reasons for losing points. The ability of a resident to appropriately perform certain procedures without direct supervision improves with advancing level of training. The most junior residents might not appropriately be placing short arm casts, aspirating knee joints, or checking compartment pressures of the leg. Level II—Diagnostic.

  10. Biodegradable injectable polyurethanes: synthesis and evaluation for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Raju; Gunatillake, Pathiraja A; Griffiths, Ian; Tatai, Lisa; Wickramaratna, Malsha; Houshyar, Shadi; Moore, Tim; Mayadunne, Roshan T M; Field, John; McGee, Margaret; Carbone, Tania

    2008-10-01

    Biodegradable polyurethanes offer advantages in the design of injectable or preformed scaffolds for tissue engineering and other medical implant applications. We have developed two-part injectable prepolymer systems (prepolymer A and B) consisting of lactic acid and glycolic acid based polyester star polyols, pentaerythritol (PE) and ethyl lysine diisocyanate (ELDI). This study reports on the formulation and properties of a series of cross linked polyurethanes specifically developed for orthopaedic applications. Prepolymer A was based on PE and ELDI. Polyester polyols (prepolymer B) were based on PE and dl-lactic acid (PEDLLA) or PE and glycolic acid (PEGA) with molecular weights 456 and 453, respectively. Several cross linked porous and non-porous polyurethanes were prepared by mixing and curing prepolymers A and B and their mechanical and thermal properties, in vitro (PBS/37 degrees C/pH 7.4) and in vivo (sheep bi-lateral) degradation evaluated. The effect of incorporating beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP, 5 microns, 10 wt.%) was also investigated. The cured polymers exhibited high compressive strength (100-190 MPa) and modulus (1600-2300 MPa). beta-TCP improved mechanical properties in PEDLLA based polyurethanes and retarded the onset of in vitro and in vivo degradation. Sheep study results demonstrated that the polymers in both injectable and precured forms did not cause any surgical difficulties or any adverse tissue response. Evidence of new bone growth and the gradual degradation of the polymers were observed with increased implant time up to 6 months.

  11. Nanostructured glass–ceramic coatings for orthopaedic applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guocheng; Lu, Zufu; Liu, Xuanyong; Zhou, Xiaming; Ding, Chuanxian; Zreiqat, Hala

    2011-01-01

    Glass–ceramics have attracted much attention in the biomedical field, as they provide great possibilities to manipulate their properties by post-treatments, including strength, degradation rate and coefficient of thermal expansion. In this work, hardystonite (HT; Ca2ZnSi2O7) and sphene (SP; CaTiSiO5) glass–ceramic coatings with nanostructures were prepared by a plasma spray technique using conventional powders. The bonding strength and Vickers hardness for HT and SP coatings are higher than the reported values for plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings. Both types of coatings release bioactive calcium (Ca) and silicon (Si) ions into the surrounding environment. Mineralization test in cell-free culture medium showed that many mushroom-like Ca and phosphorus compounds formed on the HT coatings after 5 h, suggesting its high acellular mineralization ability. Primary human osteoblasts attach, spread and proliferate well on both types of coatings. Higher proliferation rate was observed on the HT coatings compared with the SP coatings and uncoated Ti-6Al-4V alloy, probably due to the zinc ions released from the HT coatings. Higher expression levels of Runx2, osteopontin and type I collagen were observed on both types of coatings compared with Ti-6Al-4V alloy, possibly due to the Ca and Si released from the coatings. Results of this study point to the potential use of HT and SP coatings for orthopaedic applications. PMID:21292725

  12. Nanostructured glass-ceramic coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guocheng; Lu, Zufu; Liu, Xuanyong; Zhou, Xiaming; Ding, Chuanxian; Zreiqat, Hala

    2011-08-07

    Glass-ceramics have attracted much attention in the biomedical field, as they provide great possibilities to manipulate their properties by post-treatments, including strength, degradation rate and coefficient of thermal expansion. In this work, hardystonite (HT; Ca2ZnSi2O7) and sphene (SP; CaTiSiO5) glass-ceramic coatings with nanostructures were prepared by a plasma spray technique using conventional powders. The bonding strength and Vickers hardness for HT and SP coatings are higher than the reported values for plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings. Both types of coatings release bioactive calcium (Ca) and silicon (Si) ions into the surrounding environment. Mineralization test in cell-free culture medium showed that many mushroom-like Ca and phosphorus compounds formed on the HT coatings after 5 h, suggesting its high acellular mineralization ability. Primary human osteoblasts attach, spread and proliferate well on both types of coatings. Higher proliferation rate was observed on the HT coatings compared with the SP coatings and uncoated Ti-6Al-4V alloy, probably due to the zinc ions released from the HT coatings. Higher expression levels of Runx2, osteopontin and type I collagen were observed on both types of coatings compared with Ti-6Al-4V alloy, possibly due to the Ca and Si released from the coatings. Results of this study point to the potential use of HT and SP coatings for orthopaedic applications.

  13. [Regenerative medicine: orthopaedical applications and medico legal questions].

    PubMed

    Ricci, S; Ricci, O; Tucci, C E; Massoni, F; Sarra, M V; Ricci, S

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decades, the increase in the global population's mean age has implied a corresponding increase in degenerative disease affecting various anatomical areas and tissues, including bones and cartilages, thus provoking a rising number of disabilities and a wider usage of drugs, mostly anti-inflammatory and cortisone. New developments in technologic and biomedical fields gave birth to new subjects, such as tissue engineering, cell therapy, gene therapy that, by and large, create a knowledge network falling under the concept of Regenerative Medicine. This science is essentially based on the usage of stem cells that can replicate and renovate themselves originating, if adequately stimulated, a number of cell types. Inter alia, in orthopaedic field a particular type of adult stem cells is used, the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). If combined with synthetic material produced in laboratories, the usage of these cells has provided inspiration for new study interests; today, it can be applied in various degenerative and post-traumatic pathologies, with great therapeutic benefits for the patient. Actually, many studies write about an improvement in patients' life quality. In this sense appear significant reflections on legal medicine, both in accidents and insurance, of this innovative therapeutic alternative and is hopefully an equally valid process of improvement of regulatory and case law.

  14. Clinical applications of vibration therapy in orthopaedic practice

    PubMed Central

    Cerciello, Simone; Rossi, Silvio; Visonà, Enrico; Corona, Katia; Oliva, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Vibration therapy (VT) has been proposed as an option to improve physical performance and reduce the negative effects of ageing on bone, muscles and tendons. Several discrepancies exist on the type of applications, frequency and magnitude. These differences reflex on the contradictory clinical results in literature. Aim of the present study is to carry on an exhaustive review to focus on technical options on the market, clinical applications in orthopaedic practice and expected outcomes. Methods a literature review using the key words “vibration therapy” and “whole-body vibration” and “orthopaedics” was performed. After checking the available abstracts 71 full text articles were evaluated. Results fifty-one articles focused on the effects of VT on muscles and tendons reporting ways of action and clinical outcomes. In a similar way 20 studies focused on the influence of VT on bone tissue with regard on ways of action and clinical trials. Conclusions VT provides anabolic mechanical signals to bone and musculo-tendinous system. The best effects seem to be achieved with devices that deliver low-intensity stimuli at high frequencies providing linear horizontal displacement. PMID:27331044

  15. Renal profile in patients with orthopaedic trauma: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ashish; John, Bobby; Pawar, Basant; Sadiq, Shalinder

    2009-08-01

    This prospective study was undertaken to determine the incidence of acute renal failure (ARF) and to identify factors contributing to development of ARF in orthopaedic trauma patients. A total of 55 patients who presented over a period of one year with trauma to upper and lower limbs were studied. Patients with renal injury, chest or abdominal injury, isolated fractures of the hands, feet and axial skeleton involvement were excluded. Out of these, five developed acute renal failure, three recovered and two died. The overall incidence of ARF in this study was 9.1%. Patients with lower limb injuries are at higher risk of developing ARF. Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) > or = 7, higher age, patient presenting with shock, increased myoglobin levels in urine and serum have been correlated with a greater risk of patients developing ARF and a higher mortality. This study attempts to determine the magnitude of crush injury causing renal failure and the incidence of renal failure in patients with injuries affecting the appendicular skeleton exclusively.

  16. Tissue Engineering Strategies for the Regeneration of Orthopaedic Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Helen H.; Subramony, Siddarth D.; Boushell, Margaret K.; Zhang, Xinzhi

    2013-01-01

    A major focus in the field of orthopaedic tissue engineering is the development of tissue engineered bone and soft tissue grafts with biomimetic functionality to allow for their translation to the clinical setting. One of the most significant challenges of this endeavor is promoting the biological fixation of these grafts with each other as well as the implant site. Such fixation requires strategic biomimicry to be incorporated into the scaffold design in order to re-establish the critical structure-function relationship of the native soft tissue-to-bone interface. The integration of distinct tissue types (e.g. bone and soft tissues such as cartilage, ligaments, or tendons), requires a multi-phased or stratified scaffold with distinct yet continuous tissue regions accompanied by a gradient of mechanical properties that mimics that of the multi-tissue transition between bone and soft tissues. This review discusses tissue engineering strategies for regenerating common tissue-to-tissue interfaces (ligament-to-bone, tendon-to-bone or cartilage-to-bone), and the strategic biomimicry implemented in stratified scaffold design for multi-tissue regeneration. Potential challenges and future directions in this emerging field will also be presented. It is anticipated that interface tissue engineering will enable integrative soft tissue repair, and will be instrumental for the development of complex musculoskeletal tissue systems with biomimetic complexity and functionality. PMID:20422291

  17. Post-operative pyrexia in an orthopaedic unit.

    PubMed

    Gakuu, L N

    1997-08-01

    The causes of post operative pyrexia in an orthopaedic unit was studied prospectively in 520 patients who underwent surgery. Two hundred patients (38.4%) developed postoperative pyrexia as defined by having recorded high temperatures of over 38 degrees C on two occasions within 24 hours (excluding the first 24 hours post-operatively). The commonest causes of post-operative pyrexia were wound infection in 70 (13.4%), respiratory tract infections in 40 (7.6%) and malaria in 30 (5.7%) patients, while other causes were urinary tract infection in 20 (3.8%), thrombophlebitis in 15 (2.8%) and deep vein thrombosis in 15 (2.8%) of the patients; while ten (1.9%) patients had pyrexia of undetermined cause despite exhaustive clinical and laboratory workup. The other associated conditions in patients who developed pyrexia were diabetes mellitus in 20 (3.8%), HIV seropositivity and malignancy in 30 (5.7%) and six (1.1%) patients, respectively.

  18. Strategic planning in a highly specialized orthopaedic institution.

    PubMed

    Vukasinović, Zoran; Bjegović-Mikanović, Vesna; Jancić, Radmila; Spasovski, Dusko; Zivković, Zorica; Cerović, Sofija; Terzić, Zorica

    2009-01-01

    The Institute for Orthopaedic Surgery "Banjica" in Belgrade provides tertiary healthcare services on national level. After decades of constant development, a recent decline coincided with the decade of great social and governmental disturbance, the transition period after the dissociation of former Yugoslavia. In order to overcome the crisis, we used modern management methods to define problems in the institution management, and to propose appropriate strategies. A survey that included 100 employees (17.67%) was carried out, followed by descriptive statistical analysis, PEST and SWOT analyses. The impact of political fluctuations, ageing of population, financing model, obsolete medical technology was evaluated. Various personal and interpersonal factors were assessed: the quality of medical service (3.59 +/- 0.76, mark 1-5); relations among health service participants (3.39 +/- 0.78); occupational conditions (not good-91%); human, financial and other resources; professional cooperation, stimulation; rivalry and mobbing (declared in 56%); public informing, institution image (rank 3.70 +/- 0.88) and PR activities (new to 78%). 93% declared to give maximum effort at work. Using these results, we defined several strategic objectives. These include strengthening scientific activities, general orientation to specific and exclusive pathological conditions and treatment methods, improvement of management transparency, introduction of quality-based stimulation of workers, support of promotional and PR activities.

  19. From Cape Town to Cambridge: Orthopaedic trauma in contrasting environments.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, John E; Khanduja, Vikas

    2016-05-18

    To compare the trauma experience gained by a trainee at a United Kingdom major trauma centre and a secondary level hospital in South Africa. A profile of inpatient trauma cases during a five-week period in Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge and Somerset Hospital, Cape Town was created. This was achieved by recording various parameters for each patient admitted including age, gender, injury, mechanism of injury and postal/area code. This, together with details of the departments themselves, allows a comparison of the amount and variety of orthopaedic trauma cases experienced by an individual trainee in each setting. The trauma profiles differed significantly. Patients in Cape Town were younger and more likely to be male. In the young, injury in Cape Town was more likely to occur due to assault or being struck by a vehicle, whilst patients in Cambridge were more likely to be injured whilst in a vehicle or in high energy falls. In older patients, trauma at both centres was almost exclusively due to mechanical falls. In a given age group, injuries at the two centres were similar, however the majority of patients admitted to Addenbrooke's were elderly, resulting in less variation in the overall injury profile. The trauma profile of a major trauma centre in the United Kingdom is less varied than that of a South African secondary centre, with significantly fewer cases per surgeon. This suggests a more varied training experience in the developing world with a greater caseload.

  20. Nano-Engineered Cubic Zirconia for Orthopaedic Implant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namavar, F.; Rubinstein, A.; Sabirianov, R.; Thiele, G.; Sharp, J.; Pokharel, U.; Namavar, R.; Garvin, K.

    2012-02-01

    Osseointegration failure of the prosthesis prevents long-term stability, which contributes to pain, implant loosening, and infection that usually necessitates revision surgery. Cell attachment and spreading in vitro is generally mediated by adhesive proteins such as fibronectin and vitronectin. We designed and produced pure cubic zirconia (ZrO2) ceramic coatings by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) with nanostructures comparable to the size of proteins. Our ceramic coatings exhibit high hardness and a zero contact angle with serum. In contrast to Hydroxyapatite (HA), nano-engineered zirconia films possess excellent adhesion to all orthopaedic materials. Adhesion and proliferation experiments were performed with a bona fide mesenchymal stromal cells cell line (OMA-AD). Our experimental results indicated that nano-engineered cubic zirconia is superior in supporting growth, adhesion, and proliferation. We performed a comparative analysis of adsorption energies of the FN fragment using quantum mechanical calculations and Monte Carlo simulation on both types of surfaces: smooth and nanostructured. We have found that the initial FN fragment adsorbs significantly stronger on the nanostructured surface than on the smooth surface.

  1. Current application of β-tricalcium phosphate composites in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Lun, Deng-xing

    2012-08-01

    Presently, bioceramic materials have been extensively used in spinal surgery as bone grafts; however, there are some limitations for bioceramic materials. Calcium sulfate is rapidly absorbed in vivo, the degradation of which often occurs prior to the formation of new bones. Hydroxyapatite (HA) is hardly absorbed, which blocks the formation of new bones and remodeling, and results in poor local stability or permanent stress concentration. Only β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is relatively balanced between scaffold absorption and bone formation. And it is a good biodegradable ceramic material that could supply a large quantity of calcium ion and sulfate ion as well as scaffold structure for bone regeneration. However, the problem of single β-TCP is lack of osteoinductivity and osteogenicity, which restricts its application. Therefore β-TCP composite materials have been used in the field of orthopaedics in recent decades, which fully use excellent properties of other bone repairing materials, such as biodegradability, osteoinductivity, osteogenicity and osteoconductivity. These materials make up for the deficiencies of single β-TCP and endow β-TCP with more biological and physical properties. © 2012 Tianjin Hospital and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. An ultrasonic orthopaedic surgical device based on a cymbal transducer.

    PubMed

    Bejarano, Fernando; Feeney, Andrew; Wallace, Robert; Simpson, Hamish; Lucas, Margaret

    2016-12-01

    An ultrasonic orthopaedic surgical device is presented, where the ultrasonic actuation relies on a modification of the classical cymbal transducer. All current devices consist of a Langevin ultrasonic transducer with a tuned cutting blade attached, where resonance is required to provide sufficient vibrational amplitude to cut bone. However, this requirement restricts the geometry and offers little opportunity to propose miniaturised devices or complex blades. The class V flextensional cymbal transducer is proposed here as the basis for a new design, where the cymbal delivers the required vibrational amplitude, and the design of the attached cutting insert can be tailored for the required cut. Consequently, the device can be optimised to deliver an accurate and precise cutting capability. A prototype device is presented, based on the cymbal configuration and designed to operate at 25.5kHz with a displacement amplitude of 30μm at 300V. Measurements of vibrational and impedance responses elucidate the mechanical and electrical characteristics of the device. Subsequent cutting tests on rat femur demonstrate device performance consistent with a commercial Langevin-based ultrasonic device and show that cutting is achieved using less electrical power and a lower piezoceramic volume. Histological analysis exhibits a higher proportion of live cells in the region around the cut site for the cymbal device than for a powered sagittal or a manual saw, demonstrating the potential for the ultrasonic device to result in faster healing. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermoplastic polymeric adhesive for structural bonding applications for orthopaedic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, D.; King, R.; Swarts, D.; Lin, S.; Ramani, K.; Tagle, J.

    1994-12-31

    The orthopaedics industry has witnessed tremendous growth in recent years primarily due to the introduction of high performance, porous coated implants. These devices have eliminated the need for the use of bone cement for in vivo implant fixation, replacing it with the ingrowth of bone into the porous surfaces. The metallurgical bonding processes used for attaching the porous to the implant body introduce some undesirable effect i.e., the reduction of the fatigue strength of the implant due to the ``notches`` created and also due to the high temperature exposure during the sintering operations. This paper describes the development of a thermoplastic polymeric adhesive based structural bonding technique. The high performance polymeric adhesive is fully characterized with respect to its intended application. The design of the porous layer is optimized to achieve a reliable bond to the implant. A thermal heating/cooling process was developed to control the final polymer morphology. Static and fatigue tests were conducted to fully characterize the adhesive bond strength. A ring shear test method was developed to determine the shear strength of the bond interface. Besides the characterization of the adhesive bond, the joints will be analyzed using finite element models. The correlation between the analytical models and the

  4. Orthopaedic Considerations for the Adult With Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Timothy T; Cepela, Daniel J; Uhl, Richard L; Lozman, Jeffery

    2016-05-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heritable group of collagen-related disorders that affects up to 50,000 people in the United States. Although the disease is most symptomatic in childhood, adults with osteogenesis imperfecta also are affected by the sequelae of the disease. Orthopaedic manifestations include posttraumatic and accelerated degenerative joint disease, kyphoscoliosis, and spondylolisthesis. Other manifestations of abnormal collagen include brittle dentition, hearing loss, cardiac valve abnormalities, and basilar invagination. In general, nonsurgical treatment is preferred for management of acute fractures. High rates of malunion, nonunion, and subsequent deformity have been reported with both closed and open treatment. When surgery is necessary, surgeons should opt for load-sharing intramedullary devices that span the entire length of the bone; locking plates and excessively rigid fixation generally should be avoided. Arthroplasty may be considered for active patients, but the procedure frequently is associated with complications in this patient population. Underlying deformities, such as malunion, bowing, rotational malalignment, coxa vara, and acetabular protrusio, pose specific surgical challenges and underscore the importance of preoperative planning.

  5. National Institutes of Health Funding to Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery at U.S. Medical Schools.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Jason; Ahn, Jaimo; Levin, L Scott

    2017-01-18

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the largest supporter of biomedical research in the U.S., yet its contribution to orthopaedic research is poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the portfolio of NIH funding to departments of orthopaedic surgery at U.S. medical schools. The NIH RePORT (Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools) database was queried for NIH grants awarded to departments of orthopaedic surgery in 2014. Funding totals were determined for award mechanisms and NIH institutes. Trends in NIH funding were determined for 2005 to 2014 and compared with total NIH extramural research funding. Funding awarded to orthopaedic surgery departments was compared with that awarded to departments of other surgical specialties in 2014. Characteristics of NIH-funded principal investigators were obtained from department web sites. In 2014, 183 grants were awarded to 132 investigators at 44 departments of orthopaedic surgery. From 2005 to 2014, NIH funding increased 24.3%, to $54,608,264 (p = 0.030), but the rates of increase seen did not differ significantly from those of NIH extramural research funding as a whole (p = 0.141). Most (72.6%) of the NIH funding was awarded through the R01 mechanism, with a median annual award of $343,980 (interquartile range [IQR], $38,372). The majority (51.1%) of the total funds supported basic science research, followed by translational (33.0%), clinical (10.0%), and educational (5.9%) research. NIH-funded orthopaedic principal investigators were predominately scientists whose degree was a PhD (71.1%) and who were male (79.5%). Eleven NIH institutes were represented, with the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) providing the preponderance (74.2%) of the funding. In 2014, orthopaedic surgery ranked below the surgical departments of general surgery, ophthalmology, obstetrics and gynecology, otolaryngology, and urology in terms of NIH funding received. The percentage increase of NIH

  6. The NFL Orthopaedic Surgery Outcomes Database (NO-SOD): The Effect of Common Orthopaedic Procedures on Football Careers.

    PubMed

    Mai, Harry T; Alvarez, Andrew P; Freshman, Ryan D; Chun, Danielle S; Minhas, Shobhit V; Patel, Alpesh A; Nuber, Gordon W; Hsu, Wellington K

    2016-09-01

    Injuries are inherent to the sport of American football and often require operative management. Outcomes have been reported for certain surgical procedures in professional athletes in the National Football League (NFL), but there is little information comparing the career effect of these procedures. To catalog the postoperative outcomes of orthopaedic procedures in NFL athletes and to compare respective prognoses and effects on careers. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Athletes in the NFL undergoing procedures for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, Achilles tendon tears, patellar tendon tears, cervical disc herniation, lumbar disc herniation, sports hernia, knee articular cartilage repair (microfracture technique), forearm fractures, tibial shaft fractures, and ankle fractures were identified through team injury reports or other public records. Game and performance statistics during the regular season were collected before and after surgery. Statistical analysis was performed with significance accepted as P < .05. A total of 559 NFL athletes were included. Overall, 79.4% of NFL athletes returned to play after an orthopaedic procedure. Forearm open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF), sports hernia repair, and tibia intramedullary nailing (IMN) led to significantly higher return-to-play (RTP) rates (90.2%-96.3%), while patellar tendon repair led to a significantly lower rate (50%) (P < .001). Athletes undergoing ACL reconstruction (ACLR), Achilles tendon repair, patellar tendon repair, and ankle fracture ORIF had significant declines in games played at 1 year and recovered to baseline at 2 to 3 years after surgery. Athletes undergoing ACLR, Achilles tendon repair, patellar tendon repair, and tibia IMN had decreased performance in postoperative season 1. Athletes in the Achilles tendon repair and tibia IMN cohorts recovered to baseline performance, while those in the ACLR and patellar tendon repair cohorts demonstrated sustained decreases in performance

  7. Trends in primary and revision knee arthroplasty among orthopaedic surgeons who take the American Board of Orthopaedics part II exam.

    PubMed

    Pour, Aidin Eslam; Bradbury, Thomas L; Horst, Patrick; Harrast, John J; Erens, Greg A; Roberson, James R

    2016-10-01

    A certified list of all operative cases performed within a six month period is required of surgeons by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) as a prerequisite to taking the Part II Oral Examination. Using the data on these cases collected and maintained by ABOS, this study assessed the influence of prior fellowship training in adult reconstruction on the volume and surgeon-reported complication rate of knee joint arthroplasty cases over time. All data were self reported to a secure Internet database (SCRIBE) by candidates who applied to take Part II of the ABOS Examination for the first time. This database was searched for all procedures done between 2003 and 2013 with CPT codes for total and revision knee arthroplasty and removal of knee implant (static or dynamic spacer) to determine procedural volumes and early complication rates among Board-eligible orthopaedic surgeons with and without adult reconstructive fellowship training. More than 43,000 knee arthroplasty surgeries were identified. Surgeons who had completed adult reconstruction fellowship training after residency performed 55 % of total knee arthroplasties, averaging 33.5 knee arthroplasties during the six month case-collection period compared to 7.4 procedures by non-fellowship-trained surgeons (p < 0.001). Adult reconstruction fellowship-trained surgeons performed significantly more revisions for infection (average 6.6 versus 2.2 revisions) (p < 0.001). Adult reconstruction fellowship training did not significantly affect complication rates for primary arthroplasty but was associated with an increased complication rate for revisions. Those surgeons who performed more than 100 arthroplasties a year reported significantly fewer complications in primary arthroplasties (12.7 % versus 16.9 %) (p < 0.001). Over time, an increasing percentage of arthroplasties were done by surgeons with adult reconstruction fellowship training. Adult reconstruction fellowship-trained surgeons

  8. How many referrals to a pediatric orthopaedic hospital specialty clinic are primary care problems?

    PubMed

    Hsu, Eric Y; Schwend, Richard M; Julia, Leamon

    2012-01-01

    Many primary care physicians believe that there are too few pediatric orthopaedic specialists available to meet their patients' needs. However, a recent survey by the Practice Management Committee of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America found that new referrals were often for cases that could have been managed by primary care practitioners. We wished to determine how many new referral cases seen by pediatric orthopaedic surgeons are in fact conditions that can be readily managed by a primary care physician should he/she chose to do so. We prospectively studied all new referrals to our hospital-based orthopaedic clinic during August 2010. Each new referral was evaluated for whether it met the American Board of Pediatrics criteria for being a condition that could be managed by a primary care pediatrician. Each referral was also evaluated for whether it met the American Academy of Pediatrics Surgery Advisory Panel guidelines recommending referral to an orthopaedic specialist, regardless of whether it is for general orthopaedics or pediatric orthopaedics. On the basis of these criteria, we classified conditions as either a condition manageable by primary care physicians or a condition that should be referred to an orthopaedic surgeon or a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon. We used these guidelines not to identify diagnosis that primary care physicians should treat but, rather, to compare the guideline-delineated referrals with the actual referrals our specialty pediatric orthopaedic clinic received over a period of 1 month. A total of 529 new patient referrals were seen during August 2010. A total of 246 (47%) were considered primary care conditions and 283 (53%) orthopaedic specialty conditions. The most common primary care condition was a nondisplaced phalanx fracture (25/246, 10.1%) and the most common specialty condition was a displaced single-bone upper extremity fracture needing reduction (36/283, 13%). Only 77 (14.6%) of the total cases met the strict

  9. Etiology of Readmissions Following Orthopaedic Procedures and Medical Admissions. A Comparative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Jed; Hutzler, Lorraine; Slover, James; Bosco, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    The Federal Government, the largest payer of health care, considers readmission within 30 days of discharge an indicator of quality of care. Many studies have focused on causes for and strategies to reduce readmissions following medical admissions. However, few studies have focused on the differences between them. We believe that the causes for readmission following orthopaedic surgery are markedly different than those following medical admissions, and therefore, the strategies developed to reduce medical readmissions will not be as effective in reducing readmissions after elective orthopaedic surgery. All unplanned 30-day readmissions following an index hospitalization for an elective orthopaedic procedure (primary and revision total joint arthroplasty and spine procedure) or for one of the three publicly reported medical conditions (AMI, HF, and pneumonia, which accounted for 11% of readmissions) were identified at our institution from 2010 through 2012. A total of 268 patients and 390 medical patients were identified as having an unplanned 30-day readmission. We reviewed a prospectively collected data base to determine the reason for readmission in each encounter. A total of 233 (86.9%) orthopaedic patients were readmitted for surgical complications, most commonly for a wound infection (56.0%) or wound complication (11.6%). Following an index admission of HF or AMI, the primary reason for readmission was a disease of the circulatory system (55.9% and 57.4%, respectively). Following an index admission for pneumonia, the primary reason for readmission was a disease of the respiratory system (34.5%). The causes of readmissions following orthopaedic surgery and medical admissions are different. Patients undergoing orthopaedic procedures are readmitted for surgical complications, frequently unrelated to aftercare, and medicine patients are readmitted for reasons related to the index diagnosis. Interventions designed to reduce orthopaedic readmissions must focus on

  10. Pediatric Orthopaedic Workforce in 2014: Current Workforce and Projections for the Future.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Jones, Kerwyn C; Copley, Lawson A; Chambers, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    The changing nature of the United States (US) health care system has prompted debate concerning the physician supply. The basic questions are: do we have an adequate number of surgeons to meet current demands and are we training the correct number of surgeons to meet future demands? The purpose of this analysis was to characterize the current pediatric orthopaedic workforce in terms of supply and demand, both present and future. Databases were searched (POSNA, SF Match, KID, MGMA) to determine the current pediatric orthopaedic workforce and workforce distribution, as well as pediatric orthopaedic demand. The number of active Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) members increased over the past 20 years, from 410 in 1993 to 653 in 2014 (155% increase); however, the density of POSNA members is not equally distributed, but correlates to population density. The number of estimated pediatric discharges, orthopaedic and nonorthopaedic, has remained relatively stable from 6,348,537 in 1997 to 5,850,184 in 2012. Between 2003 and 2013, the number of pediatric orthopaedic fellows graduating from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and non-Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education programs increased from 39 to 50 (29%), with a peak of 67 fellows (71%) in 2009. Although predicting the exact need for pediatric orthopaedic surgeons (POS) is impossible because of the complex interplay among macroeconomic, governmental, insurance, and local factors, some trends were identified: the supply of POS has increased, which may offset the expected numbers of experienced surgeons who will be leaving the workforce in the next 10 to 15 years; macroeconomic factors influencing demand for physician services, driven by gross domestic product and population growth, are expected to be stable in the near future; expansion of the scope of practice for POS is expected to continue; and further similar assessments are warranted. Level II-economic and

  11. Current and future use of surgical skills training laboratories in orthopaedic resident education: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Karam, Matthew D; Pedowitz, Robert A; Natividad, Hazel; Murray, Jayson; Marsh, J Lawrence

    2013-01-02

    Acquisition of surgical skills through laboratory-based training and simulation is appealing to surgical training programs. The purpose of this study was to provide baseline information on the current use of surgical skills training laboratories in orthopaedic resident education and to determine the interest in expansion of these facilities and training techniques. The creation of the survey was a collaborative effort between the authors and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Two online versions of the Surgical Skills Simulation survey were created, one (with twenty-three items) specifically for program directors and one (with fourteen items) for orthopaedic residents. The survey was sent via e-mail to 185 program directors and 4549 residents. Data were retrieved and analyzed by the AAOS Department of Research and Scientific Affairs. Eighty-six (46%) of the 185 surveys distributed to orthopaedic surgery residency directors and 687 (15%) of the 4549 distributed to orthopaedic surgery residents were completed. Seventy-six percent of the program directors reported having a surgical skills laboratory, and 46% of these reported having a structured surgical skills laboratory curriculum. Fifty-eight percent of program directors and 83% of residents believed that surgical skill improvement by orthopaedic residents was not being objectively measured. Both 80% of program directors and 86% of residents agreed that surgical skills simulations should become a required part of training, and 82% and 76% were interested in a standardized surgical skills curriculum. Eighty-seven percent of program directors identified a lack of available funding as the most substantial barrier to development of a formal surgical skills program at their institution. There was strong agreement among both program directors and residents that surgical skills laboratories and simulation technology should be a required component of orthopaedic resident training. At the present time, the

  12. Ionizing Radiation Doses Detected at the Eye Level of the Primary Surgeon During Orthopaedic Procedures.

    PubMed

    Cheriachan, Deepak; Hughes, Adrian M; du Moulin, William S M; Williams, Christopher; Molnar, Robert

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the ionizing radiation dose received by the eyes of orthopaedic surgeons during various orthopaedic procedures. Secondary objective was to compare the ionizing radiation dose received between differing experience level. Prospective comparative study between January 2013 and May 2014. Westmead Hospital, a Level 1 Trauma Centre for Greater Western Sydney. A total of 26 surgeons volunteered to participate within the study. Experience level, procedure performed, fluoroscopy time, dose area product, total air kerma, and eye dose received was recorded. Participants were evaluated on procedure and experience level. Radiation dose received at eye level by the primary surgeon during an orthopaedic procedure. Data from a total of 131 cases was recorded and included for analysis. The mean radiation dose detected at the eye level of the primary surgeon was 0.02 mSv (SD = 0.05 mSv) per procedure. Radiation at eye level was only detected in 31 of the 131 cases. The highest registered dose for a single procedure was 0.31 mSv. Femoral nails and pelvic fixation procedures had a significantly higher mean dose received than other procedure groups (0.04 mSv (SD = 0.07 mSv) and 0.04 mSv (SD = 0.06 mSv), respectively). Comparing the eye doses received by orthopaedic consultants and trainees, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups. The risk of harmful levels of radiation exposure at eye level to orthopaedic surgeons is low. This risk is greatest during insertion of femoral intramedullary nails and pelvic fixation, and it is recommended that in these situations, surgeons take all reasonable precautions to minimize radiation dose. The orthopaedic trainees in this study were not subjected to higher doses of radiation than their consultant trainers. On the basis of these results, most of the orthopaedic surgeons remain well below the yearly radiation dose of 20 mSv as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

  13. Barriers and Facilitators Associated with Non-Surgical Treatment Use for Osteoarthritis Patients in Orthopaedic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Stefanie N.; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J.; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P. M.; van den Ende, Cornelia H. M.; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction International evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with (a combination of) non-surgical treatments, and using surgical intervention only if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatment options. Despite these recommendations, there are strong indications that non-surgical treatments are not optimally used in orthopaedic practice. To improve the adoption of non-surgical treatments, more insight is needed into barriers and facilitators of these treatments. Therefore, this study assessed which barriers and facilitators are associated with the use and prescription of different non-surgical treatments before hip and knee OA in orthopaedic practice among patients and orthopaedic surgeons in the Netherlands. Materials and Methods We performed two internet-based surveys among 172 orthopaedic surgeons and 174 OA patients. Univariate association and multivariable regression techniques are used to identify barriers and facilitators associated with the use of non-surgical treatments. Results Most barriers and facilitators among patients were associated with the use of physical therapy, lifestyle advice and dietary therapy. Among orthopaedic surgeons, most were associated with prescription of acetaminophen, dietary therapy and physical therapy. Examples of barriers and facilitators among patients included “People in my environment had positive experiences with a surgery” (facilitator for education about OA), and “Advice of people in my environment to keep on moving” (facilitator for lifestyle and dietary advice). For orthopaedic surgeons, examples were “Lack of knowledge about guideline” (barrier for lifestyle advice), “Agreements/ deliberations with primary care” and “Easy communication with a dietician” (facilitators for dietary therapy). Also the belief in the efficacy of these treatments was associated with increased prescription. Conclusions

  14. Barriers and Facilitators Associated with Non-Surgical Treatment Use for Osteoarthritis Patients in Orthopaedic Practice.

    PubMed

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2016-01-01

    International evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with (a combination of) non-surgical treatments, and using surgical intervention only if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatment options. Despite these recommendations, there are strong indications that non-surgical treatments are not optimally used in orthopaedic practice. To improve the adoption of non-surgical treatments, more insight is needed into barriers and facilitators of these treatments. Therefore, this study assessed which barriers and facilitators are associated with the use and prescription of different non-surgical treatments before hip and knee OA in orthopaedic practice among patients and orthopaedic surgeons in the Netherlands. We performed two internet-based surveys among 172 orthopaedic surgeons and 174 OA patients. Univariate association and multivariable regression techniques are used to identify barriers and facilitators associated with the use of non-surgical treatments. Most barriers and facilitators among patients were associated with the use of physical therapy, lifestyle advice and dietary therapy. Among orthopaedic surgeons, most were associated with prescription of acetaminophen, dietary therapy and physical therapy. Examples of barriers and facilitators among patients included "People in my environment had positive experiences with a surgery" (facilitator for education about OA), and "Advice of people in my environment to keep on moving" (facilitator for lifestyle and dietary advice). For orthopaedic surgeons, examples were "Lack of knowledge about guideline" (barrier for lifestyle advice), "Agreements/ deliberations with primary care" and "Easy communication with a dietician" (facilitators for dietary therapy). Also the belief in the efficacy of these treatments was associated with increased prescription. Strategies to improve non-surgical treatment use in orthopaedic practice

  15. New design of care: Assessment of an interdisciplinary orthopaedic clinic with a pivot nurse in the province of Quebec.

    PubMed

    Poder, Thomas G; Bellemare, Christian; Bédard, Suzanne K; He, Jie; Lemieux, Renald

    2010-01-01

    New designs of care in orthopaedic clinics are needed to cope with the shortage of orthopaedic surgeons and the lengthening of waiting times. To assess the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary orthopaedic clinic with a pivot nurse in the Canadian province of Quebec with regard to accessibility, quality of care, efficacy and efficiency of the clinic, and patient's quality of life. Two strategies were developed: (1) a selected cohort of new patients attending an orthopaedic service from February to September 2008 were entered into a database recording patient details, source of referral, diagnosis, satisfaction, and quality of life (36-Item Short Form Health Survey version 2). In this setting, 2 sets of questionnaires were administered to the patients: the first one during the first visit and the second one, 2 months later. A total of 243 patients from the case control were compared with 89 patients of the case study, where an interdisciplinary orthopaedic clinic with a pivot nurse has been developed; (2) costs per patient were calculated using the staff timesheets provided by the two orthopaedic clinics. The results showed a significant reduction in the waiting-list duration (accessibility) in the case study clinic owing to a strong decrease in the inappropriate consultations with the orthopaedic consultant. The quality of care remained high, and the target surgeries for total hip and knee replacement were reached, despite a strong shortage of orthopaedic doctors. Interdisciplinary orthopaedic clinic with a pivot nurse is a new approach in the province of Quebec and first results are encouraging.

  16. Accidents associated with equipment.

    PubMed

    Heath, M L

    1984-01-01

    Serious accidents in which the possibility of equipment-related hazards are raised have been reported to the Scientific and Technical Branch of the Department of Health and Social Security. The author has examined anonymous summaries of 23 such reports of events which occurred over a 5-year period. The principle cause of catastrophe in seventeen of the incidents was user error involving disconnexion or misconnexion. Faulty systems of equipment management combined in some cases with inadequate pre-anaesthetic checking of apparatus were responsible for the other instances. Appropriate systems of equipment management and checking together with meticulous basic clinical monitoring are recommended as the best safeguards in anaesthetic practice.

  17. [Medical Equipment Maintenance Methods].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    Due to the high technology and the complexity of medical equipment, as well as to the safety and effectiveness, it determines the high requirements of the medical equipment maintenance work. This paper introduces some basic methods of medical instrument maintenance, including fault tree analysis, node method and exclusive method which are the three important methods in the medical equipment maintenance, through using these three methods for the instruments that have circuit drawings, hardware breakdown maintenance can be done easily. And this paper introduces the processing methods of some special fault conditions, in order to reduce little detours in meeting the same problems. Learning is very important for stuff just engaged in this area.

  18. Equipment & New Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Adrian W., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews new science equipment and products for the laboratory. Includes hand-held calculators, fiberglass fume hoods, motorized microtomy, disposable mouse cages, and electric timers. Describes 11 products total. Provides manufacturer name, address, and price. (MA)

  19. Selecting Library Furniture & Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Media & Methods, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Offers suggestions for selecting school library furniture and equipment. Describes various models of computer workstations; reading tables and chairs; and shelving. Sidebar lists names and addresses of library furniture manufactures and distributors. (AEF)

  20. Leasing versus buying equipment.

    PubMed

    Grossman, R

    1983-01-01

    For the upgrading of equipment that is necessary in radiologic practice, leasing is more convenient and less expensive than buying. Changes in tax laws, embodied in the Economic Recovery Act of 1981, have increased tax benefits of this arrangement.

  1. Equipment & New Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Adrian W., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews new science equipment and products for the laboratory. Includes hand-held calculators, fiberglass fume hoods, motorized microtomy, disposable mouse cages, and electric timers. Describes 11 products total. Provides manufacturer name, address, and price. (MA)

  2. Adjustable forming of thermoplastic composites for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Hou, M; Friedrich, K

    1998-02-01

    The present study was focused on the development of a special thermoforming technique for manufacturing of continuous fibre reinforced thermoplastic composite parts with complex surface contours. In particular, a stamp forming process was modified to investigate the potential manufacturing advantages of thermoplastic composites in orthopaedic applications. An apparatus was designed which allowed the thermoforming procedure to be fully automatic, i.e. a cold pre-consolidated laminate panel, as the feed material, was heated up in an infrared heating zone and then transferred into a cold mould system, where it was stamp formed. Both halves of the mould were made of many tiny round metal sticks in a metal frame. This needle-bed mould allowed one to copy any contour by pushing it slightly on spring fixed sticks. The desired position of these sticks could then be adjusted by forcing the side plates of the metal frame together. To prevent any press mark of stick-tops on the composite, i.e. to achieve smooth surfaces of the themoformed composite parts, flexible rubber pads were needed to cover the mould surfaces. Experimental results showed that the surface profile of CF/PP and GF/PP composites formed by the needle-bed mould reproduced fairly well the contour of a saddle shaped, complex model sample. Unique properties of this needle-bed mould are that it can be repeatedly used, and that it can copy any complex surface contours, for example a bone surface, by simply adjusting the stick positions according to the special surface requirements.

  3. Multiscale Inorganic Hierarchically Materials: Towards an Improved Orthopaedic Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ruso, Juan M; Sartuqui, Javier; Messina, Paula V

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a biologically and structurally sophisticated multifunctional tissue. It dynamically responds to biochemical, mechanical and electrical clues by remodelling itself and accordingly the maximum strength and toughness are along the lines of the greatest applied stress. The challenge is to develop an orthopaedic biomaterial that imitates the micro- and nano-structural elements and compositions of bone to locally match the properties of the host tissue resulting in a biologically fixed implant. Looking for the ideal implant, the convergence of life and materials sciences occurs. Researchers in many different fields apply their expertise to improve implantable devices and regenerative medicine. Materials of all kinds, but especially hierarchical nano-materials, are being exploited. The application of nano-materials with hierarchical design to calcified tissue reconstructive medicine involve intricate systems including scaffolds with multifaceted shapes that provides temporary mechanical function; materials with nano-topography modifications that guarantee their integration to tissues and that possesses functionalized surfaces to transport biologic factors to stimulate tissue growth in a controlled, safe, and rapid manner. Furthermore materials that should degrade on a timeline coordinated to the time that takes the tissues regrow, are prepared. These implantable devices are multifunctional and for its construction they involve the use of precise strategically techniques together with specific material manufacturing processes that can be integrated to achieve in the design, the required multifunctionality. For such reasons, even though the idea of displacement from synthetic implants and tissue grafts to regenerative-medicine-based tissue reconstruction has been guaranteed for well over a decade, the reality has yet to emerge. In this paper, we examine the recent approaches to create enhanced bioactive materials. Their design and manufacturing procedures as well

  4. Challenges of bone tissue engineering in orthopaedic patients.

    PubMed

    Guerado, Enrique; Caso, Enrique

    2017-02-18

    Bone defects may impede normal biomechanics and the structural stability of bone as an organ. In many cases, the correction of bone defects requires extensive surgical intervention involving the use of bone-grafting techniques and other procedures in which healing is slow, there is a high risk of infection and considerable pain is provoked - with no guarantee of complete correction of the defect. Therefore, the search for surgical alternatives continues to present a major challenge in orthopaedic traumatology. The reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA) system, which was devised to avoid the problems that can arise with autograft harvesting from the iliac crest, consists of collecting the product of the femoral canal after reaming. The RIA technique improves osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, compared to bone marrow aspiration or cancellous bone harvesting from the iliac crest using a spoon. Another approach, the Masquelet technique, consists of reconstructing a long bone defect by means of an induced membrane grown onto an acrylic cement rod inserted to fill the defect; in a second surgical step, once the membrane is constituted, the cement rod is removed and cancellous autograft is used to fill the defect. Both in RIA and in the Masquelet technique, osteosynthesis is usually needed. Bone transportation by compression-distraction lengthening principles is commonly implemented for the treatment of large bone loss. However, complications are frequently encountered with these techniques. Among new techniques that have been proposed to address the problem of large bone loss, the application of stem cells in conjunction with tissue engineering techniques is very promising, as is the creation of personalised medicine (or precision medicine), in which molecular profiling technologies are used to tailor the therapeutic strategy, to ensure the right method is applied for the right person at the right time, after determining the predisposition to disease among

  5. The wear of two orthopaedic biopolymers against each other.

    PubMed

    Joyce, T J

    2005-01-01

    The potential for all-polymer prostheses has not been widely investigated. It might be expected that the wear of such biomaterial combinations would be excessive, but an in vivo study of all polymer knee prostheses reported that there were no failures due to wear, even after ten years of clinical use. This design of knee prosthesis used polyacetal and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) as the biopolymers. Similarly, an earlier in vitro study of polyacetal and UHMWPE hip prostheses indicated lower wear than for a cobalt chrome and UHMWPE combination. Therefore this study set out to test the poly-acetal and UHMWPE combination in a wear screening rig which had previously been validated against clinical data for artificial hip joints. Two different motion conditions were applied to the test samples and each biopolymer was tested as both pin and plate. Interestingly it was found that, whatever the contribution from pin or plate, the total mean wear factors were 1.5 10 -6 mm 3/Nm under reciprocation-only, and 4.1 10 -6 mm 3 /Nm under multi-directional motion. These wear factors were greater than those found when a conventional metal-on-UHMWPE couple was tested under the same loading, motion and lu-bricant conditions. A comparison was also undertaken with the wear of other orthopaedic biopolymer combinations, namely cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) against itself, and UHMWPE against itself. The XLPE pairing showed somewhat lower wear than the polyacetal and UHMWPE couple, while the UHMWPE pairing showed the highest wear of all, approximately an or-der of magnitude greater than the polyacetal and UHMWPE combination.

  6. Challenges of bone tissue engineering in orthopaedic patients

    PubMed Central

    Guerado, Enrique; Caso, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Bone defects may impede normal biomechanics and the structural stability of bone as an organ. In many cases, the correction of bone defects requires extensive surgical intervention involving the use of bone-grafting techniques and other procedures in which healing is slow, there is a high risk of infection and considerable pain is provoked - with no guarantee of complete correction of the defect. Therefore, the search for surgical alternatives continues to present a major challenge in orthopaedic traumatology. The reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA) system, which was devised to avoid the problems that can arise with autograft harvesting from the iliac crest, consists of collecting the product of the femoral canal after reaming. The RIA technique improves osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, compared to bone marrow aspiration or cancellous bone harvesting from the iliac crest using a spoon. Another approach, the Masquelet technique, consists of reconstructing a long bone defect by means of an induced membrane grown onto an acrylic cement rod inserted to fill the defect; in a second surgical step, once the membrane is constituted, the cement rod is removed and cancellous autograft is used to fill the defect. Both in RIA and in the Masquelet technique, osteosynthesis is usually needed. Bone transportation by compression-distraction lengthening principles is commonly implemented for the treatment of large bone loss. However, complications are frequently encountered with these techniques. Among new techniques that have been proposed to address the problem of large bone loss, the application of stem cells in conjunction with tissue engineering techniques is very promising, as is the creation of personalised medicine (or precision medicine), in which molecular profiling technologies are used to tailor the therapeutic strategy, to ensure the right method is applied for the right person at the right time, after determining the predisposition to disease among

  7. Low-income countries' orthopaedic information needs: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Kathryn; Rothman, Linda; Johnston, Luke; Le, Kim; Wu, Joanna; Howard, Andrew

    2010-10-01

    The Internet should, in theory, facilitate access to peer-reviewed scientific articles for orthopaedic surgeons in low-income countries (LIC). However, there are major barriers to access, and most full-text journal articles are available only on a subscription basis, which many in LIC cannot afford. Various models exist to remove such barriers. We set out to examine the potential, and reality, of journal article access for surgeons in LIC by studying readership patterns and journal access through a number of Internet-based initiatives, including an open access journal ("PLoS Medicine"), and programs from the University of Toronto (The Ptolemy Project) and World Health Organization (WHO) (Health InterNetwork Access to Research Initiative [HINARI]). Do Internet-based initiatives that focus on peer-reviewed journal articles deliver clinically relevant information to those who need it? More specifically: (1) Can the WHO's program meet the information needs of practicing surgeons in Africa? (2) Are healthcare workers across the globe aware of, and using, open access journals in a manner that reflects global burden of disease (GBD)? We compared actual Ptolemy use to HINARI holdings. We also compared "PLoS Medicine" readership patterns among low-, middle-, and high-income regions. Many of the electronic resources used through Ptolemy are not available through HINARI. In contrast to higher-income regions, "PLoS Medicine" readership in Africa is proportional to both the density of healthcare workers and the GBD there. Free or low-cost Internet-based initiatives can improve access to the medical literature in LIC. Open access journals are a key component to providing clinically relevant literature to the regions and healthcare workers who need it most.

  8. WE-G-213-02: The AAPM Award Eponyms: William D. Coolidge, Edith H. Quimby, and Marvin M.D. Williams - Who Were They and What Did They Do?

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberg, L.

    2015-06-15

    Roentgen and the Birth of Modern Medical Physics – Perry Sprawls Wilhelm Roentgen is well known for his discovery of x-radiation. What is less known and appreciated is his intensive research following the discovery to determine the characteristics of the “new kind of radiation” and demonstrate its great value for medical purposes. In this presentation we will imagine ourselves in Roentgen’s mind and follow his thinking, including questions and doubts, as he designs and conducts a series of innovative experiments that provided the foundation for the rapid growth of medical physics. Learning Objectives: Become familiar with the personal characteristics and work of Prof. Roentgen that establishes him as an inspiring model for the medical physics profession. Observe the thought process and experiments that determined and demonstrated the comprehensive characteristics of x-radiation. The AAPM Award Eponyms: William D. Coolidge, Edith H. Quimby, and Marvin M.D. Williams - Who were they and what did they do? – Lawrence N. Rothenberg William David Coolidge (1873–1975) William Coolidge was born in Hudson, NY in 1873. He obtained his BS at the Massacusetts Institute of Technology in 1896. Coolidge then went to the University of Leipzig, Germany for graduate study with physicists Paul Drude and Gustave Wiedemann and received a Ph.D. in 1899. While in Germany he met Wilhelm Roentgen. Coolidge returned to the US to teach at MIT where he was associated with Arthur A. Noyes of the Chemistry Department, working on the electrical conductivity of aqueous solutions. Willis R. Whitney, under whom Coolidge had worked before going to Germany, became head of the newly formed General Electric Research Laboratory and he invited Coolidge to work with him. In 1905, Coolidge joined the staff of the GE laboratory and was associated with it for the remainder of his life. He developed ductile tungsten filaments to replace fragile carbon filaments as the material for electric light

  9. WE-G-213-00: History Symposium: Radiological Physics Pioneers: Roentgen and the AAPM Award Eponyms - William Coolidge, Edith Quimby, and Marvin Williams - Who Were They and What Did They Do?

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    Roentgen and the Birth of Modern Medical Physics – Perry Sprawls Wilhelm Roentgen is well known for his discovery of x-radiation. What is less known and appreciated is his intensive research following the discovery to determine the characteristics of the “new kind of radiation” and demonstrate its great value for medical purposes. In this presentation we will imagine ourselves in Roentgen’s mind and follow his thinking, including questions and doubts, as he designs and conducts a series of innovative experiments that provided the foundation for the rapid growth of medical physics. Learning Objectives: Become familiar with the personal characteristics and work of Prof. Roentgen that establishes him as an inspiring model for the medical physics profession. Observe the thought process and experiments that determined and demonstrated the comprehensive characteristics of x-radiation. The AAPM Award Eponyms: William D. Coolidge, Edith H. Quimby, and Marvin M.D. Williams - Who were they and what did they do? – Lawrence N. Rothenberg William David Coolidge (1873–1975) William Coolidge was born in Hudson, NY in 1873. He obtained his BS at the Massacusetts Institute of Technology in 1896. Coolidge then went to the University of Leipzig, Germany for graduate study with physicists Paul Drude and Gustave Wiedemann and received a Ph.D. in 1899. While in Germany he met Wilhelm Roentgen. Coolidge returned to the US to teach at MIT where he was associated with Arthur A. Noyes of the Chemistry Department, working on the electrical conductivity of aqueous solutions. Willis R. Whitney, under whom Coolidge had worked before going to Germany, became head of the newly formed General Electric Research Laboratory and he invited Coolidge to work with him. In 1905, Coolidge joined the staff of the GE laboratory and was associated with it for the remainder of his life. He developed ductile tungsten filaments to replace fragile carbon filaments as the material for electric light

  10. Accredited Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Websites: An Updated Assessment of Accessibility and Content.

    PubMed

    Yayac, Michael; Javandal, Mitra; Mulcahey, Mary K

    2017-01-01

    A substantial number of orthopaedic surgeons apply for sports medicine fellowships after residency completion. The Internet is one of the most important resources applicants use to obtain information about fellowship programs, with the program website serving as one of the most influential sources. The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM), San Francisco Match (SFM), and Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA) maintain databases of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs. A 2013 study evaluated the content and accessibility of the websites for accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships. To reassess these websites based on the same parameters and compare the results with those of the study published in 2013 to determine whether any improvement has been made in fellowship website content or accessibility. Cross-sectional study. We reviewed all existing websites for the 95 accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships included in the AOSSM, SFM, and AANA databases. Accessibility of the websites was determined by performing a Google search for each program. A total of 89 sports fellowship websites were evaluated for overall content. Websites for the remaining 6 programs could not be identified, so they were not included in content assessment. Of the 95 accredited sports medicine fellowships, 49 (52%) provided links in the AOSSM database, 89 (94%) in the SFM database, and 24 (25%) in the AANA database. Of the 89 websites, 89 (100%) provided a description of the program, 62 (70%) provided selection process information, and 40 (45%) provided a link to the SFM website. Two searches through Google were able to identify links to 88% and 92% of all accredited programs. The majority of accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs fail to utilize the Internet to its full potential as a resource to provide applicants with detailed information about the program, which could help residents in the selection and ranking

  11. Automatic Test Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-28

    Search Terms Automatic Test Equipment Frequency Analyzers Oscilloscopes Pulse Analyzers Signal Generators "Etc." Third Level Search Guided...VAST Building Block Equipment RF Test Point Control Switch Digital Multimeter Frequency and Time Interval Meter Digital Word Generator Delay...Generator RF Amplifier, 95 Hz-2 GHz RF Amplifier, 2-4 GHz RF Amplifier, 4-8 GHz RF Amplifier, 8-12.2 GHz Signal Generator, 0.1 Hz-50 kHz

  12. A review of virtual reality based training simulators for orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Neil; Dubey, Venketesh N; Wainwright, Thomas W; Middleton, Robert G

    2016-02-01

    This review presents current virtual reality based training simulators for hip, knee and other orthopaedic surgery, including elective and trauma surgical procedures. There have not been any reviews focussing on hip and knee orthopaedic simulators. A comparison of existing simulator features is provided to identify what is missing and what is required to improve upon current simulators. In total 11 hip replacements pre-operative planning tools were analysed, plus 9 hip trauma fracture training simulators. Additionally 9 knee arthroscopy simulators and 8 other orthopaedic simulators were included for comparison. The findings are that for orthopaedic surgery simulators in general, there is increasing use of patient-specific virtual models which reduce the learning curve. Modelling is also being used for patient-specific implant design and manufacture. Simulators are being increasingly validated for assessment as well as training. There are very few training simulators available for hip replacement, yet more advanced virtual reality is being used for other procedures such as hip trauma and drilling. Training simulators for hip replacement and orthopaedic surgery in general lag behind other surgical procedures for which virtual reality has become more common. Further developments are required to bring hip replacement training simulation up to date with other procedures. This suggests there is a gap in the market for a new high fidelity hip replacement and resurfacing training simulator. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparison of airborne bacterial fallout between orthopaedic and vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Stather, P; Salji, M; Hassan, S-U; Abbas, M; Ahmed, A; Mills, H; Elston, T; Backhouse, C; Howard, A; Choksy, S

    2017-04-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of the study was to compare bacterial fallout during vascular prosthesis insertion and orthopaedic major joint replacement performed in conventional and laminar flow ventilation, respectively. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective single-centre case control study of 21 consecutive elective vascular procedures involving prosthetic graft insertion and 24 consecutive elective orthopaedic major joint replacements were tested for degree of bacterial fallout using agar settle plates. Preparation time, waiting time and total procedure duration were collected at the time of surgery, and bacterial colony counts on the agar settle plates from airborne bacterial fallout were counted after an incubation period. RESULTS Bacterial fallout count in vascular prosthetic graft insertion was 15-fold greater than in orthopaedic prosthetic joint insertion (15, (IQR 15) vs 1, (IQR 3) respectively, P < 0.0001, Wilcoxon). Waiting time and patient transfer did not significantly increase bacterial fallout counts during the procedure (P = 0.9). CONCLUSIONS Vascular surgical theatres have significantly higher bacterial fallout compared with orthopaedic theatres. This may be partly explained by orthopaedic surgery being routinely performed in laminar flow ventilation, a practice which has not been widely adopted for vascular surgery, in which prosthetic infection may also result in significant mortality and morbidity.

  14. Validation of the reporting bases of the orthopaedic and paediatric surveillance schemes.

    PubMed Central

    Godward, S; Dezateux, C

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nationally representative estimates of treatment rates for congenital dislocation of the hip were required to inform a review of the current United Kingdom screening policy. Cases were ascertained through an active reporting scheme involving orthopaedic surgeons and the existing British Paediatric Association Surveillance Unit (BPASU) scheme. OBJECTIVE: To report the methods used to establish, maintain, and validate the orthopaedic and BPASU schemes. METHODS: Multiple sources were used to develop the orthopaedic reporting base. Surgeons treating children were identified by postal questionnaire. The orthopaedic and paediatric reporting bases were compared to the 1992 manpower census surveys of surgeons and paediatricians. RESULTS: A single source of respondent ascertainment would have missed 12% of the 517 surgeons who treated children. Comparison with the manpower census data suggests the orthopaedic and paediatric reporting bases were 97% and 92% complete. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple sources should be used to establish and maintain a reporting base. Targeting respondents avoids unnecessary contact, saves resources, and may improve compliance. Manpower census data can be used for regular validation of the reporting base. PMID:8976664

  15. 9th Chapter of Surgeons' Lecture: the orthopaedic surgeon: historical perspective, ethical considerations and the future.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, N

    1999-05-01

    From a fishing village with colonial surgeons from the East India Company, Singapore is now a medical and business hub servicing the region and beyond in trade and medical education. Orthopaedic Surgery is a young specialty and is the fastest growing sub-specialty in Surgery. Orthopaedic education in Singapore has a structured syllabus and training is coordinated with the Royal Colleges and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Part of the training as Fellows is in the United Kingdom and USA on an HMDP Fellowship. Ethics and Continuing Medical Education need further emphasis. Sub-specialisation in Orthopaedic Surgery is now well-established in Trauma, Adult Reconstructive Surgery, Sports Medicine, Spinal Surgery, Hand Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine. Ageing in the next millennium with osteoporosis and hip fracture problems of gait and balance need more orthopaedic surgeons to be committed to rehabilitation medicine and voluntary service in the community. There is a need for good role models and knowledge on Quality Assurance, Clinical Pathways and Administration. Appropriate use of high technology and care for the aged in the community with dignity is fundamental to good ethical practice. Selfish, pecuniary interests will destroy the very soul and fabric of medicine.

  16. A survey of orthopaedic journal editors determining the criteria of manuscript selection for publication

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate the characteristics of editors and criteria used by orthopaedic journal editors in assessing submitted manuscripts. Methods Between 2008 to 2009 all 70 editors of Medline listed orthopaedic journals were approached prospectively with a questionnaire to determine the criteria used in assessing manuscripts for publication. Results There was a 42% response rate. There was 1 female editor and the rest were male with 57% greater than 60 years of age. 67% of the editors worked in university teaching hospitals and 90% of publications were in English. The review process differed between journals with 59% using a review proforma, 52% reviewing an anonymised manuscript, 76% using a routine statistical review and 59% of journals used 2 reviewers routinely. In 89% of the editors surveyed, the editor was able to overrule the final decision of the reviewers. Important design factors considered for manuscript acceptance were that the study conclusions were justified (80%), that the statistical analysis was appropriate (76%), that the findings could change practice (72%). The level of evidence (70%) and type of study (62%) were deemed less important. When asked what factors were important in the manuscript influencing acceptance, 73% cited an understandable manuscript, 53% cited a well written manuscript and 50% a thorough literature review as very important factors. Conclusions The editorial and review process in orthopaedic journals uses different approaches. There may be a risk of language bias among editors of orthopaedic journals with under-representation of non-English publications in the orthopaedic literature. PMID:21527007

  17. Stanley Paris Award Lecture. Reflections on the history and future of orthopaedic physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, C

    1998-09-01

    Carolyn Wadsworth, MS, PT, CHT, OCS, deliver the 1998 Paris Distinguished Service Award Lecture at the Combined Sections Meeting in Boston in February. Wadsworth is the fifth recipient of the Paris Award, which is the Orthopaedic Section's highest honor given to commemorate a member's exceptional and enduring service. The Paris Distinguished Service Award was established in 1990 and is named after Stanley V. Paris, PhD, PT, founder and first president of the Orthopaedic Section. Born in Dunedin, New Zealand, Paris immigrated to the U.S. in 1966. He developed physical therapy practices in Boston, Hamilton, Bermuda, and Atlanta; established the Institute of Graduate Health Sciences in Atlanta, GA; and is currently president of the University of St. Augustine, St. Augustine, FL. Paris is a strong advocate of assertive professional practice, clinical specialization, and strengthening leadership in physical therapy. He also champions wellness, exemplified by his personal achievements in sailing the Atlantic Ocean, swimming the English Channel, and completing the Ironman Triathlon. Carolyn Wadsworth, recipient of the 1998 Paris Award, has served as secretary and president of the Orthopaedic Section and is currently editor of the Orthopaedic Section's Home Study Course. She owns a private practice, teaches nationally, and has written two books, Examination and Mobilization of the Spine and Extremities (1988) and Orthopedic Review for Physical Therapists (1998). Major components of the speech she presented at the Orthopaedic Section Awards Ceremony are highlighted in this article.

  18. Administrative Databases in Orthopaedic Research: Pearls and Pitfalls of Big Data.

    PubMed

    Patel, Alpesh A; Singh, Kern; Nunley, Ryan M; Minhas, Shobhit V

    2016-03-01

    The drive for evidence-based decision-making has highlighted the shortcomings of traditional orthopaedic literature. Although high-quality, prospective, randomized studies in surgery are the benchmark in orthopaedic literature, they are often limited by size, scope, cost, time, and ethical concerns and may not be generalizable to larger populations. Given these restrictions, there is a growing trend toward the use of large administrative databases to investigate orthopaedic outcomes. These datasets afford the opportunity to identify a large numbers of patients across a broad spectrum of comorbidities, providing information regarding disparities in care and outcomes, preoperative risk stratification parameters for perioperative morbidity and mortality, and national epidemiologic rates and trends. Although there is power in these databases in terms of their impact, potential problems include administrative data that are at risk of clerical inaccuracies, recording bias secondary to financial incentives, temporal changes in billing codes, a lack of numerous clinically relevant variables and orthopaedic-specific outcomes, and the absolute requirement of an experienced epidemiologist and/or statistician when evaluating results and controlling for confounders. Despite these drawbacks, administrative database studies are fundamental and powerful tools in assessing outcomes on a national scale and will likely be of substantial assistance in the future of orthopaedic research.

  19. Readability of Orthopaedic Oncology-related Patient Education Materials Available on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Shah, Akash K; Yi, Paul H; Stein, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    A person's health literacy is one of the most important indicators of a patient's health status. According to national recommendations, patient education materials should be written at no higher than the sixth- to eighth-grade reading level. The purpose of our study was to assess the readability of online patient education materials related to orthopaedic oncology on the websites of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), American Cancer Society (ACS), Bone and Cancer Foundation (BCF), and National Cancer Institute (NCI). We searched the online patient education libraries of the AAOS, ACS, BCF, and NCI for all articles related to orthopaedic oncology. The Flesch-Kincaid (FK) readability score was calculated for each article and compared between sources. A total of 227 articles were identified with an overall mean FK grade level of 9.8. Stratified by source, the mean FK grade levels were 10.1, 9.6, 11.1, and 9.5 for the AAOS, ACS, BCF, and NCI, respectively (P < 0.003). Only 31 articles (14%) and 1 article (0.4%) were at or below the recommended eighth- and sixth-grade levels, respectively. Online patient education materials related to orthopaedic oncology appear to be written at a level above the comprehension ability of the average patient. Copyright 2015 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  20. Supply and Demand Analysis of the Orthopaedic Trauma Surgeon Workforce in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sielatycki, John A; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Mir, Hassan R

    2016-05-01

    To investigate recent trends in the orthopaedic trauma workforce and to assess whether supply of orthopaedic trauma surgeons (OTS) matches the demand for their skills. Supply estimated using Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) membership and American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons census data. The annual number of operative pelvic and acetabular fractures reported by American College of Surgeons verified trauma centers in the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) was used as a surrogate of demand. Because surrogates were used, the annual rate of change in OTA membership versus rate of change in operative injuries per NTDB center was compared. From 2002 to 2012, reported operative pelvic and acetabular injuries increased by an average of 21.0% per year. The number of reporting trauma centers increased by 27.2% per year. The number of OTA members increased each year except in 2009, with mean annual increase of 9.8%. The mean number of orthopaedic surgeons per NTDB center increased from 7.98 to 8.58, an average of 1.5% per year. The annual number of operative pelvic and acetabular fractures per NTDB center decreased from 27.1 in 2002 to 19.03 in 2012, down 2.0% per year. In the United States, from 2002 to 2012, the number of OTS trended upward, whereas operative pelvic and acetabular cases per reporting NTDB center declined. These trends suggest a net loss of such cases per OTS over this period.

  1. Resident education in orthopaedic trauma: the future role of competency-based medical education.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, M T; McQueen, S A; Hall, J; Kraemer, W; Ferguson, P; Marsh, J L; Reznick, R R; Reed, M R; Sonnadara, R

    2016-10-01

    As residency training programmes around the globe move towards competency-based medical education (CBME), there is a need to review current teaching and assessment practices as they relate to education in orthopaedic trauma. Assessment is the cornerstone of CBME, as it not only helps to determine when a trainee is fit to practice independently, but it also provides feedback on performance and guides the development of competence. Although a standardised core knowledge base for trauma care has been developed by the leading national accreditation bodies and international agencies that teach and perform research in orthopaedic trauma, educators have not yet established optimal methods for assessing trainees' performance in managing orthopaedic trauma patients. This review describes the existing knowledge from the literature on assessment in orthopaedic trauma and highlights initiatives that have recently been undertaken towards CBME in the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States. In order to support a CBME approach, programmes need to improve the frequency and quality of assessments and improve on current formative and summative feedback techniques in order to enhance resident education in orthopaedic trauma. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1320-5. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  2. Orthopaedic education in the era of surgical simulation: Still at the crawling stage.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; MacDonald, Peter; Leiter, Jeff; Dubberley, James; Satava, Richard; VanHeest, Ann; Hurwitz, Shepard; Marsh, J Lawrence

    2017-04-18

    Surgical skills education is in the process of a crucial transformation from a master-apprenticeship model to simulation-based training. Orthopaedic surgery is one of the surgical specialties where simulation-based skills training needs to be integrated into the curriculum efficiently and urgently. The reason for this strong and pressing need is that orthopaedic surgery covers broad human anatomy and pathologies and requires learning enormously diverse surgical procedures including basic and advanced skills. Although the need for a simulation-based curriculum in orthopaedic surgery is clear, several obstacles need to be overcome for a smooth transformation. The main issues to be addressed can be summarized as defining the skills and procedures so that simulation-based training will be most effective; choosing the right time period during the course of orthopaedic training for exposure to simulators; the right amount of such exposure; using objective, valid and reliable metrics to measure the impact of simulation-based training on the development and progress of surgical skills; and standardization of the simulation-based curriculum nationwide and internationally. In the new era of surgical education, successful integration of simulation-based surgical skills training into the orthopaedic curriculum will depend on efficacious solutions to these obstacles in moving forward.

  3. Non-resident orthopaedic admissions to Dunedin Hospital, New Zealand: 1997 to 2004.

    PubMed

    Gwynne Jones, David

    2005-06-24

    The purpose of this study is to audit the numbers of non-residents requiring orthopaedic admission to our hospital and determine the effect of increasing tourist numbers and changes in Accident ACC regulations on healthcare resources. Details of non-resident orthopaedic admissions for fiscal years 1997/8 to 2003/4 were analysed with respect to country of residence, mechanism of injury, case weights consumed, and actual costs. There has been no change in numbers of admissions or cost, averaging 32 cases (50 case weights [CWs]) per year. Most patients came from Asia (59 cases; 26%), then Australia (52 cases; 23%) and UK (40 cases; 18%). Snowsports accounted for 40% of admissions, Motor vehicle accidents (MVA) for 17%, and falls for 29%. Non-resident, non-MVA admissions have averaged 21 CWs per year since the changes in ACC regulations in 1999. Despite increasing tourist numbers, there has been no increase in numbers or CW of non-residents requiring orthopaedic admission. Although representing only a small proportion of the orthopaedic budget, they generate many hidden costs. The 50 CWs annually equates to approximately 13 major joint replacements per year. The increase in CWs consumed due to the ACC changes have had no corresponding increase in contracted orthopaedic volumes.

  4. Are away rotations critical for a successful match in orthopaedic surgery?

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Keith; Weidner, Zachary; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir

    2009-12-01

    Surveys have suggested one of the most important determinants of orthopaedic resident selection is completion of an orthopaedic clerkship at the program director's institution. The purpose of this study was to further elucidate the significance of visiting externships on the resident selection process. We retrospectively reviewed data for all medical students applying for orthopaedic surgery residency from six medical schools between 2006 and 2008, for a total of 143 applicants. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to compare students who matched successfully versus those who did not in terms of number of away rotations, United States Medical Licensing Examination scores, class rank, and other objective factors. Of the 143 medical students, 19 did not match in orthopaedics (13.3%), whereas the remaining 124 matched. On multiple logistic regression analysis, whether a student did more than one home rotation, how many away rotations a student performed, and United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score were factors in the odds of match success. Orthopaedic surgery is one of the most competitive specialties in medicine; the away rotation remains an important factor in match success.

  5. Improvement of research quality in the fields of orthopaedics and trauma: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Fayaz, Hangama C; Haas, Norbert; Kellam, James; Bavonratanavech, Suthorn; Parvizi, Javad; Dyer, George; Pohlemann, Tim; Jerosch, Jörg; Prommersberger, Karl-Josef; Pape, Hans Christoph; Smith, Malcolm; Vrahas, Marc; Perka, Carsten; Siebenrock, Klaus; Elhassan, Bassem; Moran, Christopher; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2013-07-01

    The international orthopaedic community aims to achieve the best possible outcome for patient care by constantly modifying surgical techniques and expanding the surgeon's knowledge. These efforts require proper reflection within a setting that necessitates a higher quality standard for global orthopaedic publication. Furthermore, these techniques demand that surgeons acquire information at a rapid rate while enforcing higher standards in research performance. An international consensus exists on how to perform research and what rules should be considered when publishing a scientific paper. Despite this global agreement, in today's "Cross Check Era", too many authors do not give attention to the current standards of systematic research. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to describe these performance standards, the available choices for orthopaedic surgeons and the current learning curve for seasoned teams of researchers and orthopaedic surgeons with more than three decades of experience. These lead to provide an accessible overview of all important aspects of the topics that will significantly influence the research development as we arrive at an important globalisation era in orthopaedics and trauma-related research.

  6. Medical equipment management strategies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binseng; Furst, Emanuel; Cohen, Ted; Keil, Ode R; Ridgway, Malcolm; Stiefel, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Clinical engineering professionals need to continually review and improve their management strategies in order to keep up with improvements in equipment technology, as well as with increasing expectations of health care organizations. In the last 20 years, management strategies have evolved from the initial obsession with electrical safety to flexible criteria that fit the individual institution's needs. Few hospitals, however, are taking full advantage of the paradigm shift offered by the evolution of joint Commission standards. The focus should be on risks caused by equipment failure, rather than on equipment with highest maintenance demands. Furthermore, it is not enough to consider risks posed by individual pieces of equipment to individual patients. It is critical to anticipate the impact of an equipment failure on larger groups of patients, especially when dealing with one of a kind, sophisticated pieces of equipment that are required to provide timely and accurate diagnoses for immediate therapeutic decisions or surgical interventions. A strategy for incorporating multiple criteria to formulate appropriate management strategies is provided in this article.

  7. Listing of Food Service Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI. Testing Lab.

    A comprehensive listing of food service equipment including--(1) companies authorized to use the National Sanitation Foundation seal of approval, and (2) equipment listed as meeting NSF standards including soda fountains, spray-type dishwashers, dishwashing equipment, cooking equipment, commerical cooking and warming equipment, freezers,…

  8. A population-based study of ambulatory and surgical services provided by orthopaedic surgeons for musculoskeletal conditions

    PubMed Central

    Canizares, Mayilee; MacKay, Crystal; Davis, Aileen M; Mahomed, Nizar; Badley, Elizabeth M

    2009-01-01

    Background The ongoing process of population aging is associated with an increase in prevalence of musculoskeletal conditions with a concomitant increase in the demand of orthopaedic services. Shortages of orthopaedic services have been documented in Canada and elsewhere. This population-based study describes the number of patients seen by orthopaedic surgeons in office and hospital settings to set the scene for the development of strategies that could maximize the availability of orthopaedic resources. Methods Administrative data from the Ontario Health Insurance Plan and Canadian Institute for Health Information hospital separation databases for the 2005/06 fiscal year were used to identify individuals accessing orthopaedic services in Ontario, Canada. The number of patients with encounters with orthopaedic surgeons, the number of encounters and the number of surgeries carried out by orthopaedic surgeons were estimated according to condition groups, service location, patient's age and sex. Results In 2005/06, over 520,000 Ontarians (41 per 1,000 population) had over 1.3 million encounters with orthopaedic surgeons. Of those 86% were ambulatory encounters and 14% were in hospital encounters. The majority of ambulatory encounters were for an injury or related condition (44%) followed by arthritis and related conditions (37%). Osteoarthritis accounted for 16% of all ambulatory encounters. Orthopaedic surgeons carried out over 140,000 surgeries in 2005/06: joint replacement accounted for 25% of all orthopaedic surgeries, whereas closed repair accounted for 16% and reductions accounted for 21%. Half of the orthopaedic surgeries were for arthritis and related conditions. Conclusion The large volume of ambulatory care points to the significant contribution of orthopaedic surgeons to the medical management of chronic musculoskeletal conditions including arthritis and injuries. The findings highlight that surgery is only one component of the work of orthopaedic surgeons

  9. EPA’s Response Equipment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA maintains a variety of equipment to respond to hazardous substance emergencies such as releases or oil spills regardless of their nature, size, or location. This include ASPECT, PHILIS, Equipment Module (EM), and personal protective equipment.

  10. About Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Equipment for Infection Control Questions About Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Print Q1. How do manufacturers ensure personal protective equipment (PPE) is safe and effective? A1. To help ...

  11. Trace metal determination as it relates to metallosis of orthopaedic implants: Evolution and current status.

    PubMed

    Ring, Gavin; O'Mullane, John; O'Riordan, Alan; Furey, Ambrose

    2016-05-01

    In utilising metal surfaces that are in constant contact with each other, metal-on-metal (MoM) surgical implants present a unique challenge, in the sense that their necessity is accompanied by the potential risk of wear particle generation, metal ion release and subsequent patient toxicity. This is especially true of orthopaedic devices that are faulty and subject to failure, where the metal surfaces undergo atypical degradation and release even more unwanted byproducts, as was highlighted by the recent recall of orthopaedic surgical implants. The aim of this review is to examine the area of metallosis arising from the wear of MoM articulations in orthopaedic devices, including how the surgical procedures and detection methods have advanced to meet growing performance and analytical needs, respectively. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [The Development and Application of the Orthopaedics Implants Failure Database Software Based on WEB].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiahua; Zhou, Hai; Zhang, Binbin; Ding, Biao

    2015-09-01

    This article develops a new failure database software for orthopaedics implants based on WEB. The software is based on B/S mode, ASP dynamic web technology is used as its main development language to achieve data interactivity, Microsoft Access is used to create a database, these mature technologies make the software extend function or upgrade easily. In this article, the design and development idea of the software, the software working process and functions as well as relative technical features are presented. With this software, we can store many different types of the fault events of orthopaedics implants, the failure data can be statistically analyzed, and in the macroscopic view, it can be used to evaluate the reliability of orthopaedics implants and operations, it also can ultimately guide the doctors to improve the clinical treatment level.

  13. The First World War and its influence on the development of orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Scotland, T

    2014-01-01

    By December 1914, overwhelming numbers of soldiers with infected musculoskeletal wounds had filled hospitals in France and Britain. Frequently initial management had been inadequate. In 1915, patients with orthopaedic wounds were segregated for the first time when Robert Jones established an experimental orthopaedic unit in Alder Hey Hospital, Liverpool. In 1916 he opened the first of 17 orthopaedic centres in Britain to surgically treat and rehabilitate patients. Henry Gray from Aberdeen emerged as the leading authority in the management of acute musculoskeletal wounds in casualty clearing stations in France and Flanders. Gray had particular expertise in dealing with compound fractures of the femur for which he documented an 80% mortality rate in 1914-15.

  14. Surgical advances during the First World War: the birth of modern orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Arul; Eardley, W G P; Edwards, D S; Clasper, J C; Stewart, M P M

    2016-02-01

    The First World War (1914-1918) was the first truly industrial conflict in human history. Never before had rifle fire and artillery barrage been employed on a global scale. It was a conflict that over 4 years would leave over 750,000 British troops dead with a further 1.6 million injured, the majority with orthopaedic injuries. Against this backdrop, the skills of the orthopaedic surgeon were brought to the fore. Many of those techniques and systems form the foundation of modern orthopaedic trauma management. On the centenary of 'the War to end all Wars', we review the significant advances in wound management, fracture treatment, nerve injury and rehabilitation that were developed during that conflict. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. The development and implementation of a hospital based paediatric orthopaedic nursing transition program.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Nadine; Houghton, Kerry

    2013-01-01

    Within Australia and the rest of the world paediatric orthopaedic nursing as a subspeciality nursing workforce faces challenges due to a lack of formal education programs that support the development of knowledge. Despite these challenges the need to ensure the availability of competent and knowledgeable nursing staff to positively contribute to health care outcomes remains unchanged. Thus a need has arisen to develop locally implemented education programs. A multi-tiered paediatric orthopaedic nursing transition program which incorporates work based learning processes combined, with formal assessment components, has been designed utilising Benner's "theory of novice to expert" to facilitate the growth of experts in the clinical setting driven by the requirements of individual clinical settings. The implementation of this program has led to increased confidence in the clinical setting for nursing staff which has positively influenced the care of children and their families in the orthopaedic service.

  16. Perceptions of Orthopaedic Surgeons Regarding Hepatitis C Viral Transmission: A Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, GC; Kim, WY; Chaudhary, BR; Henderson, JJ

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Occupationally acquired hepatitis C viral infection is an important issue in surgery since there are no known vaccines or effective prophylaxis. MATERIALS AND METHODS An anonymous questionnaire survey was performed to determine the attitudes and perception of risks of occupational acquired hepatitis C viral transmission in orthopaedic surgeons. RESULTS A total of 763 questionnaires were posted to orthopaedic surgeons with various subspecialty interests and 261 surgeons responded (34.2%). Of respondents, 117 (47%) had sustained sharps injuries in the previous 12 months. Only 82 surgeons (33%) always reported such injuries, although 208 (84%) expressed concerns of occupationally acquired hepatitis C viral transmission. Orthopaedic surgeons were mostly unaware of the true prevalence of hepatitis C in high-risk groups, such as intravenous drug abusers. CONCLUSIONS Greater awareness of all aspects of hepatitis C infection and its risks to the practice of surgery is required. Further debate is necessary on the role of routine testing of surgeons and patients. PMID:17394714

  17. A Look Back in Time: Sir Robert Jones, 'Father of Modern Orthopaedics'.

    PubMed

    Tham, Wyw; Sng, Smc; Lum, Y M; Chee, Y H

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the life of Sir Robert Jones, from his humble beginnings as an apprentice of Thomas Smith, to his many contributions to the orthopaedic specialty. Robert Jones' passion and interest in the subject led to its advancement from a specialty that dealt mainly with crippling diseases in children, to that of treating and rehabilitating disabled adults. He revolutionized the practice by integrating the use of plain radiography, and by developing many new surgical and procedural techniques. He largely improved the specialty by publishing many textbooks and papers, and trained many orthopaedic surgeons from within England and internationally. The purpose of this paper seeks to provide a platform for readers to learn about the man behind the Jones fracture and bandage. It will help readers understand how one man's passion for orthopaedics helped transform it into a specialty in its own rights.

  18. [Prof. Michiharu Matsuoka, founder of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Kyoto University and his achievements in orthopaedic surgery in the Meiji era of Japan (Part 5, Faculty members and training of doctors from Nagoya)].

    PubMed

    Hirotani, Hayato

    2010-09-01

    During the years when Dr. M. Matsuoka was professor of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyoto Medical School, Kyoto Imperial University (June, 1907-January, 1914), seven doctors worked as his faculty members and founded the base of the current development and reputation of the Department. After resignation from their academic positions, they served in orthopaedic practice in several areas in Japan where orthopaedic surgery was not well recognized. In addition, Prof. Matsuoka trained three doctors from the Aichi Prefectural Medical College (School of Medicine, Nagoya University) in the orthopaedic practice, including x-ray technique and they contributed to the development of orthopaedic surgery in the areas of Nagoya city and Tokai. Backgrounds and achievements of these ten doctors are described.

  19. Prioritizing equipment for replacement.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Mike

    2010-01-01

    It is suggested that clinical engineers take the lead in formulating evaluation processes to recommend equipment replacement. Their skill, knowledge, and experience, combined with access to equipment databases, make them a logical choice. Based on ideas from Fennigkoh's scheme, elements such as age, vendor support, accumulated maintenance cost, and function/risk were used.6 Other more subjective criteria such as cost benefits and efficacy of newer technology were not used. The element of downtime was also omitted due to the data element not being available. The resulting Periop Master Equipment List and its rationale was presented to the Perioperative Services Program Council. They deemed the criteria to be robust and provided overwhelming acceptance of the list. It was quickly put to use to estimate required capital funding, justify items already thought to need replacement, and identify high-priority ranked items for replacement. Incorporating prioritization criteria into an existing equipment database would be ideal. Some commercially available systems do have the basic elements of this. Maintaining replacement data can be labor-intensive regardless of the method used. There is usually little time to perform the tasks necessary for prioritizing equipment. However, where appropriate, a clinical engineering department might be able to conduct such an exercise as shown in the following case study.

  20. What factors influence applicants' rankings of orthopaedic surgery residency programs in the National Resident Matching Program?

    PubMed

    Huntington, William P; Haines, Nikkole; Patt, Joshua C

    2014-09-01

    In accordance with the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons' strategic goal of enriching our field by building a more diverse orthopaedic workforce, the specialty needs further information delineating the factors important to the applicant pool as a whole and more specifically to women and other underrepresented minority groups. This study aims to identify (1) factors important to residency applicants selecting an orthopaedic residency program; (2) differences in factor importance for men, women, and minorities, and (3) the importance of different information sources used when making his or her rank list. All 742 applicants who applied to the authors' orthopaedic surgery residency program in the 2013 National Resident Matching Program were queried. The response rate was 28% (207 of 742). Respondents were asked to rank, on a 5-point Likert scale, 37 factors that may have affected their rank lists to differing degrees. Respondents also identified the importance of sources of information used to make their rank lists, factors that residency programs considered important when ranking applicants, and their level of agreement with various sex- and racial-specific statements regarding orthopaedic training. The most important factors affecting rank lists were perceived happiness/quality of life of current residents, resident camaraderie, and impression after an away rotation. Women weighed their personal interactions and a program's proximity to family and friends more heavily when determining a rank list. Sixty-eight percent of women eliminated residency programs from their options based on perceived sex biases versus less than 1% of men. Applicants valued information obtained from away rotations at an institution and in talking with current residents most when determining his or her rank list. Programs should consider interpersonal factors, like quality of life and resident camaraderie as factors in attracting applicants. They also should minimize perceived biases