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Sample records for epoxide hydrolase inhibition

  1. A Photorhabdus natural product inhibits insect juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Nollmann, Friederike I; Heinrich, Antje K; Brachmann, Alexander O; Morisseau, Christophe; Mukherjee, Krishnendu; Casanova-Torres, Ángel M; Strobl, Frederic; Kleinhans, David; Kinski, Sebastian; Schultz, Katharina; Beeton, Michael L; Kaiser, Marcel; Chu, Ya-Yun; Phan Ke, Long; Thanwisai, Aunchalee; Bozhüyük, Kenan A J; Chantratita, Narisara; Götz, Friedrich; Waterfield, Nick R; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stelzer, Ernst H K; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi; Hammock, Bruce D; Bode, Helge B

    2015-03-23

    Simple urea compounds ("phurealipids") have been identified from the entomopathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens, and their biosynthesis was elucidated. Very similar analogues of these compounds have been previously developed as inhibitors of juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolase (JHEH), a key enzyme in insect development and growth. Phurealipids also inhibit JHEH, and therefore phurealipids might contribute to bacterial virulence. PMID:25711603

  2. Inhibiting an epoxide hydrolase virulence strategy protects CFTR**

    PubMed Central

    Bahl, Christopher D.; Hvorecny, Kelli L.; Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Stanton, Bruce A.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Morisseau, Christophe; Madden, Dean R.

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic pathogens exploit diverse strategies to sabotage host defenses. Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes the CFTR inhibitory factor Cif and thus triggers loss of CFTR, an ion channel required for airway mucociliary defense. However, Cif's mechanism of action has remained unclear. It catalyzes epoxide hydrolysis, but there is no known role for natural epoxides in CFTR regulation. Here, we show that Cif's hydrolase activity is strictly required for its effects on CFTR. We also uncover a small-molecule inhibitor that protects this key component of the mucociliary defense system. Our results provide a basis for targeting Cif's distinctive virulence chemistry and suggest an unanticipated role of physiological epoxides in intracellular protein trafficking. PMID:26136396

  3. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Pharmacological Inhibition Ameliorates Experimental Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bettaieb, Ahmed; Chahed, Samah; Bachaalany, Santana; Griffey, Stephen; Hammock, Bruce D; Haj, Fawaz G

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease, and is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders worldwide. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH; encoded by Ephx2) deficiency and pharmacological inhibition have beneficial effects in inflammatory diseases. Ephx2 whole-body deficiency mitigates experimental AP in mice, but the suitability of sEH pharmacological inhibition for treating AP remains to be determined. We investigated the effects of sEH pharmacological inhibition on cerulein- and arginine-induced AP using the selective sEH inhibitor 1-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-3-(1-propionylpiperidin-4-yl) urea (TPPU), which was administered before and after induction of pancreatitis. Serum amylase and lipase levels were lower in TPPU-treated mice compared with controls. In addition, circulating levels and pancreatic mRNA of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin Il-1β, and Il-6 were reduced in TPPU-treated mice. Moreover, sEH pharmacological inhibition before and after induction of pancreatitis was associated with decreased cerulein- and arginine-induced nuclear factor-κB inflammatory response, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and cell death. sEH pharmacological inhibition before and after induction of pancreatitis mitigated cerulein- and arginine-induced AP. This work suggests that sEH pharmacological inhibition may be of therapeutic value in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25993999

  4. Limonene-1,2-Epoxide Hydrolase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 Belongs to a Novel Class of Epoxide Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, Mariët J.; Overkamp, Karin M.; de Bont, Jan A. M.

    1998-01-01

    An epoxide hydrolase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 catalyzes the hydrolysis of limonene-1,2-epoxide to limonene-1,2-diol. The enzyme is induced when R. erythropolis is grown on monoterpenes, reflecting its role in the limonene degradation pathway of this microorganism. Limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase was purified to homogeneity. It is a monomeric cytoplasmic enzyme of 17 kDa, and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined. No cofactor was required for activity of this colorless enzyme. Maximal enzyme activity was measured at pH 7 and 50°C. None of the tested inhibitors or metal ions inhibited limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase activity. Limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase has a narrow substrate range. Of the compounds tested, only limonene-1,2-epoxide, 1-methylcyclohexene oxide, cyclohexene oxide, and indene oxide were substrates. This report shows that limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase belongs to a new class of epoxide hydrolases based on (i) its low molecular mass, (ii) the absence of any significant homology between the partial amino acid sequence of limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase and amino acid sequences of known epoxide hydrolases, (iii) its pH profile, and (iv) the inability of 2-bromo-4′-nitroacetophenone, diethylpyrocarbonate, 4-fluorochalcone oxide, and 1,10-phenanthroline to inhibit limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase activity. PMID:9748436

  5. Inhibiting an Epoxide Hydrolase Virulence Factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Protects CFTR.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Christopher D; Hvorecny, Kelli L; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Stanton, Bruce A; Hammock, Bruce D; Morisseau, Christophe; Madden, Dean R

    2015-08-17

    Opportunistic pathogens exploit diverse strategies to sabotage host defenses. Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes the CFTR inhibitory factor Cif and thus triggers loss of CFTR, an ion channel required for airway mucociliary defense. However, the mechanism of action of Cif has remained unclear. It catalyzes epoxide hydrolysis, but there is no known role for natural epoxides in CFTR regulation. It was demonstrated that the hydrolase activity of Cif is strictly required for its effects on CFTR. A small-molecule inhibitor that protects this key component of the mucociliary defense system was also uncovered. These results provide a basis for targeting the distinctive virulence chemistry of Cif and suggest an unanticipated role of physiological epoxides in intracellular protein trafficking. PMID:26136396

  6. Pharmacological inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase ameliorates diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Abishek; Kauter, Kathleen; Alam, Md Ashraful; Hwang, Sung Hee; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D; Brown, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The signs of metabolic syndrome following chronic excessive macronutrient intake include body weight gain, excess visceral adipose deposition, hyperglycaemia, glucose and insulin intolerances, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, endothelial damage, cardiovascular hypertrophy, inflammation, ventricular contractile dysfunction, fibrosis, and fatty liver disease. Recent studies show increased activity of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) during obesity and metabolic dysfunction. We have tested whether sEH inhibition has therapeutic potential in a rat model of diet-induced metabolic syndrome. In these high-carbohydrate, high-fat-fed rats, chronic oral treatment with trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-ylureido)-cyclohexyloxy]-benzoic acid (t-AUCB), a potent sEH inhibitor, alleviated the signs of metabolic syndrome in vivo including glucose, insulin, and lipid abnormalities, changes in pancreatic structure, increased systolic blood pressure, cardiovascular structural and functional abnormalities, and structural and functional changes in the liver. The present study describes the pharmacological responses to this selective sEH inhibitor in rats with the signs of diet-induced metabolic syndrome.

  7. Pharmacological inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase prevents renal interstitial fibrogenesis in obstructive nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinu; Yoon, Sang Pil; Toews, Myron L.; Imig, John D.; Hwang, Sung Hee; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Treating chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been challenging because of its pathogenic complexity. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are cytochrome P-450-dependent derivatives of arachidonic acid with antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory, and profibrinolytic functions. We recently reported that genetic ablation of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), an enzyme that converts EETs to less active dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids, prevents renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis and inflammation in experimental mouse models of CKD. Here, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological inhibition of sEH after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) would attenuate tubulointerstitial fibrosis and inflammation in mouse kidneys and may provide a novel approach to manage the progression of CKD. Inhibition of sEH enhanced levels of EET regioisomers and abolished tubulointerstitial fibrosis, as demonstrated by reduced collagen deposition and myofibroblast formation after UUO. The inflammatory response was also attenuated, as demonstrated by decreased influx of neutrophils and macrophages and decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines keratinocyte chemoattractant, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, TNF-α, and ICAM-1 in kidneys after UUO. UUO upregulated transforming growth factor-β1/Smad3 signaling and induced NF-κB activation, oxidative stress, tubular injury, and apoptosis; in contrast, it downregulated antifibrotic factors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms, especially PPAR-γ. sEH inhibition mitigated the aforementioned malevolent effects in UUO kidneys. These data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of sEH promotes anti-inflammatory and fibroprotective effects in UUO kidneys by preventing tubular injury, downregulation of NF-κB, transforming growth factor-β1/Smad3, and inflammatory signaling pathways, and activation of PPAR isoforms. Our data suggest the potential use of sEH inhibitors in treating fibrogenesis

  8. Inhibition of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Limits Mitochondrial Damage and Preserves Function Following Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Akhnokh, Maria K.; Yang, Feng Hua; Samokhvalov, Victor; Jamieson, Kristi L.; Cho, Woo Jung; Wagg, Cory; Takawale, Abhijit; Wang, Xiuhua; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Seubert, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Myocardial ischemia can result in marked mitochondrial damage leading to cardiac dysfunction, as such identifying novel mechanisms to limit mitochondrial injury is important. This study investigated the hypothesis that inhibiting soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), responsible for converting epoxyeicosatrienoic acids to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids protects mitochondrial from injury caused by myocardial infarction. Methods: sEH null and WT littermate mice were subjected to surgical occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery or sham operation. A parallel group of WT mice received an sEH inhibitor, trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-y1-ureido)-cyclohexyloxy]-benzoic acid (tAUCB; 10 mg/L) or vehicle in the drinking water 4 days prior and 7 days post-MI. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography prior- and 7-days post-surgery. Heart tissues were dissected into infarct, peri-, and non-infarct regions to assess ultrastructure by electron microscopy. Complexes I, II, IV, citrate synthase, PI3K activities, and mitochondrial respiration were assessed in non-infarct regions. Isolated working hearts were used to measure the rates of glucose and palmitate oxidation. Results: Echocardiography revealed that tAUCB treatment or sEH deficiency significantly improved systolic and diastolic function post-MI compared to controls. Reduced infarct expansion and less adverse cardiac remodeling were observed in tAUCB-treated and sEH null groups. EM data demonstrated mitochondrial ultrastructure damage occurred in infarct and peri-infarct regions but not in non-infarct regions. Inhibition of sEH resulted in significant improvements in mitochondrial respiration, ATP content, mitochondrial enzymatic activities and restored insulin sensitivity and PI3K activity. Conclusion: Inhibition or genetic deletion of sEH protects against long-term ischemia by preserving cardiac function and maintaining mitochondrial efficiency. PMID:27375480

  9. Impact of soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition on early kidney damage in hyperglycemic overweight mice.

    PubMed

    Roche, Clothilde; Guerrot, Dominique; Harouki, Najah; Duflot, Thomas; Besnier, Marie; Rémy-Jouet, Isabelle; Renet, Sylvanie; Dumesnil, Anaïs; Lejeune, Annie; Morisseau, Christophe; Richard, Vincent; Bellien, Jeremy

    2015-07-01

    This study addressed the hypothesis that inhibition of the EETs degrading enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase affords renal protection in the early stage of diabetic nephropathy. The renal effects of the sEH inhibitor t-AUCB (10mg/l in drinking water) were compared to those of the sulfonylurea glibenclamide (80mg/l), both administered for 8 weeks in FVB mice subjected to a high-fat diet (HFD, 60% fat) for 16 weeks. Mice on control chow diet (10% fat) and non-treated HFD mice served as controls. Compared with non-treated HFD mice, HFD mice treated with t-AUCB had a decreased EET degradation, as shown by their higher plasma EETs-to-DHETs ratio, and an increased EET production, as shown by the increase in EETs+DHETs levels, which was associated with induction of CYP450 epoxygenase expression. Both agents similarly reduced fasting glycemia but only t-AUCB prevented the increase in the urinary albumine-to-creatinine ratio in HFD mice. Histopathological analysis showed that t-AUCB reduced renal inflammation, which was associated with an increased mRNA expression of the NFκB inhibitor Iκ≡ and related decrease in MCP-1, COX2 and VCAM-1 expressions. Finally, there was a marginally significant increase in reactive oxygen species production in HFD mice, together with an enhanced NOX2 expression. Both agents did not modify these parameters but t-AUCB increased the expression of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 1. These results demonstrate that, independently from its glucose-lowering effect, sEH inhibition prevents microalbuminuria and renal inflammation in overweight hyperglycemic mice, suggesting that this pharmacological strategy could be useful in the management of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26022136

  10. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase in mice promotes reverse cholesterol transport and regression of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Peng, Hongchun; Peng, Ran; Fan, Qingsong; Zhao, Shuiping; Xu, Danyan; Morisseau, Christophe; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-04-01

    Adipose tissue is the body largest free cholesterol reservoir and abundantly expresses ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), which maintains plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels. HDLs have a protective role in atherosclerosis by mediating reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a cytosolic enzyme whose inhibition has various beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease. The sEH is highly expressed in adipocytes, and it converts epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) into less bioactive dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids. We previously showed that increasing EETs levels with a sEH inhibitor (sEHI) (t-AUCB) resulted in elevated ABCA1 expression and promoted ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux from 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The present study investigates the impacts of t-AUCB in mice deficient for the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (Ldlr(-/-) mice) with established atherosclerotic plaques. The sEH inhibitor delivered in vivo for 4 weeks decreased the activity of sEH in adipose tissue, enhanced ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux from adipose depots, and consequently increased HDL levels. Furthermore, t-AUCB enhanced RCT to the plasma, liver, bile and feces. It also showed the reduction of plasma LDL-C levels. Consistently, t-AUCB-treated mice showed reductions in the size of atherosclerotic plaques. These studies establish that raising adipose ABCA1 expression, cholesterol efflux, and plasma HDL levels with t-AUCB treatment promotes RCT, decreasing LDL-C and atherosclerosis regression, suggesting that sEH inhibition may be a promising strategy to treat atherosclerotic vascular disease.

  11. Inhibition of insect juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolase: asymmetric synthesis and assay of glycidol-ester and epoxy-ester inhibitors of trichoplusia ni epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Linderman, R J; Roe, R M; Harris, S V; Thompson, D M

    2000-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) undergoes metabolic degradation by two major pathways involving JH esterase and JH epoxide hydrolase (EH). While considerable effort has been focussed on the study of JH esterase and the development of inhibitors for this enzyme, much less has been reported on the study of JH-EH. In this work, the asymmetric synthesis of two classes of inhibitors of recombinant JH-EH from Trichoplusia ni, a glycidol-ester series and an epoxy-ester series is reported. The most effective glycidol-ester inhibitor, compound 1, exhibited an I(50) of 1.2x10(-8) M, and the most effective epoxy-ester inhibitor, compound 11, exhibited an I(50) of 9.4x10(-8) M. The potency of the inhibitors was found to be dependent on the absolute configuration of the epoxide. In both series of inhibitors, the C-10 R-configuration was found to be significantly more potent that the corresponding C-10 S-configuration. A mechanism for epoxide hydration catalyzed by insect EH is also presented.

  12. Soluble epoxide hydrolase contamination of specific catalase preparations inhibits epoxyeicosatrienoic acid vasodilation of rat renal arterioles.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Kathryn M; Olson, Lauren; Harder, Adam; Isbell, Marilyn; Imig, John D; Gutterman, David D; Falck, J R; Campbell, William B

    2011-10-01

    Cytochrome P-450 metabolites of arachidonic acid, the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), are important signaling molecules in the kidney. In renal arteries, EETs cause vasodilation whereas H(2)O(2) causes vasoconstriction. To determine the physiological contribution of H(2)O(2), catalase is used to inactivate H(2)O(2). However, the consequence of catalase action on EET vascular activity has not been determined. In rat renal afferent arterioles, 14,15-EET caused concentration-related dilations that were inhibited by Sigma bovine liver (SBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml) but not Calbiochem bovine liver (CBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml). SBL catalase inhibition was reversed by the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitor tAUCB (1 μM). In 14,15-EET incubations, SBL catalase caused a concentration-related increase in a polar metabolite. Using mass spectrometry, the metabolite was identified as 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-DHET), the inactive sEH metabolite. 14,15-EET hydrolysis was not altered by the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-ATZ; 10-50 mM), but was abolished by the sEH inhibitor BIRD-0826 (1-10 μM). SBL catalase EET hydrolysis showed a regioisomer preference with greatest hydrolysis of 14,15-EET followed by 11,12-, 8,9- and 5,6-EET (V(max) = 0.54 ± 0.07, 0.23 ± 0.06, 0.18 ± 0.01 and 0.08 ± 0.02 ng DHET·U catalase(-1)·min(-1), respectively). Of five different catalase preparations assayed, EET hydrolysis was observed with two Sigma liver catalases. These preparations had low specific catalase activity and positive sEH expression. Mass spectrometric analysis of the SBL catalase identified peptide fragments matching bovine sEH. Collectively, these data indicate that catalase does not affect EET-mediated dilation of renal arterioles. However, some commercial catalase preparations are contaminated with sEH, and these contaminated preparations diminish the biological activity of H(2)O(2) and EETs.

  13. Soluble epoxide hydrolase contamination of specific catalase preparations inhibits epoxyeicosatrienoic acid vasodilation of rat renal arterioles.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Kathryn M; Olson, Lauren; Harder, Adam; Isbell, Marilyn; Imig, John D; Gutterman, David D; Falck, J R; Campbell, William B

    2011-10-01

    Cytochrome P-450 metabolites of arachidonic acid, the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), are important signaling molecules in the kidney. In renal arteries, EETs cause vasodilation whereas H(2)O(2) causes vasoconstriction. To determine the physiological contribution of H(2)O(2), catalase is used to inactivate H(2)O(2). However, the consequence of catalase action on EET vascular activity has not been determined. In rat renal afferent arterioles, 14,15-EET caused concentration-related dilations that were inhibited by Sigma bovine liver (SBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml) but not Calbiochem bovine liver (CBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml). SBL catalase inhibition was reversed by the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitor tAUCB (1 μM). In 14,15-EET incubations, SBL catalase caused a concentration-related increase in a polar metabolite. Using mass spectrometry, the metabolite was identified as 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-DHET), the inactive sEH metabolite. 14,15-EET hydrolysis was not altered by the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-ATZ; 10-50 mM), but was abolished by the sEH inhibitor BIRD-0826 (1-10 μM). SBL catalase EET hydrolysis showed a regioisomer preference with greatest hydrolysis of 14,15-EET followed by 11,12-, 8,9- and 5,6-EET (V(max) = 0.54 ± 0.07, 0.23 ± 0.06, 0.18 ± 0.01 and 0.08 ± 0.02 ng DHET·U catalase(-1)·min(-1), respectively). Of five different catalase preparations assayed, EET hydrolysis was observed with two Sigma liver catalases. These preparations had low specific catalase activity and positive sEH expression. Mass spectrometric analysis of the SBL catalase identified peptide fragments matching bovine sEH. Collectively, these data indicate that catalase does not affect EET-mediated dilation of renal arterioles. However, some commercial catalase preparations are contaminated with sEH, and these contaminated preparations diminish the biological activity of H(2)O(2) and EETs. PMID:21753077

  14. Protection from hypertension in mice by the Mediterranean diet is mediated by nitro fatty acid inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Rebecca L.; Rudyk, Olena; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Kamynina, Alisa; Yang, Jun; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Eaton, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is inhibited by electrophilic lipids by their adduction to Cys521 proximal to its catalytic center. This inhibition prevents hydrolysis of the enzymes’ epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) substrates, so they accumulate inducing vasodilation to lower blood pressure (BP). We generated a Cys521Ser sEH redox-dead knockin (KI) mouse model that was resistant to this mode of inhibition. The electrophilic lipid 10-nitro-oleic acid (NO2-OA) inhibited hydrolase activity and also lowered BP in an angiotensin II-induced hypertension model in wild-type (WT) but not KI mice. Furthermore, EET/dihydroxy-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid isomer ratios were elevated in plasma from WT but not KI mice following NO2-OA treatment, consistent with the redox-dead mutant being resistant to inhibition by lipid electrophiles. sEH was inhibited in WT mice fed linoleic acid and nitrite, key constituents of the Mediterranean diet that elevates electrophilic nitro fatty acid levels, whereas KIs were unaffected. These observations reveal that lipid electrophiles such as NO2-OA mediate antihypertensive signaling actions by inhibiting sEH and suggest a mechanism accounting for protection from hypertension afforded by the Mediterranean diet. PMID:24843165

  15. Gene deficiency and pharmacological inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase confers resilience to repeated social defeat stress

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Qian; Ma, Min; Ishima, Tamaki; Morisseau, Christophe; Yang, Jun; Wagner, Karen M.; Zhang, Ji-chun; Yang, Chun; Yao, Wei; Dong, Chao; Han, Mei; Hammock, Bruce D.; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a severe and chronic psychiatric disease, affecting 350 million subjects worldwide. Although multiple antidepressants have been used in the treatment of depressive symptoms, their beneficial effects are limited. The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) plays a key role in the inflammation that is involved in depression. Thus, we examined here the role of sEH in depression. In both inflammation and social defeat stress models of depression, a potent sEH inhibitor, TPPU, displayed rapid antidepressant effects. Expression of sEH protein in the brain from chronically stressed (susceptible) mice was higher than of control mice. Furthermore, expression of sEH protein in postmortem brain samples of patients with psychiatric diseases, including depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, was higher than controls. This finding suggests that increased sEH levels might be involved in the pathogenesis of certain psychiatric diseases. In support of this hypothesis, pretreatment with TPPU prevented the onset of depression-like behaviors after inflammation or repeated social defeat stress. Moreover, sEH KO mice did not show depression-like behavior after repeated social defeat stress, suggesting stress resilience. The sEH KO mice showed increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylation of its receptor TrkB in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, but not nucleus accumbens, suggesting that increased BDNF-TrkB signaling in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus confer stress resilience. All of these findings suggest that sEH plays a key role in the pathophysiology of depression, and that epoxy fatty acids, their mimics, as well as sEH inhibitors could be potential therapeutic or prophylactic drugs for depression. PMID:26976569

  16. 3-D QSAR ANALYSIS OF INHIBITION OF MURINE SOLUBLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASE (MSEH) BY BENZOYLUREAS, ARYLUREAS, AND THEIR ANALOGUES. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two hundred and seventy-one compounds including benzoylureas, arylureas and related compounds were assayed using recombinant murine soluble epoxide hydrolase (MsEH) produced from a baculovirus expression system. Among all the insect growth regulators assayed, 18 benzoylphenylu...

  17. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase attenuates hepatic fibrosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by carbon tetrachloride in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Todd R.; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Kodani, Sean; Dong, Hua; Myers, Richard; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Haj, Fawaz G.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2015-07-15

    Liver fibrosis is a pathological condition in which chronic inflammation and changes to the extracellular matrix lead to alterations in hepatic tissue architecture and functional degradation of the liver. Inhibitors of the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) reduce fibrosis in the heart, pancreas and kidney in several disease models. In this study, we assess the effect of sEH inhibition on the development of fibrosis in a carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4})-induced mouse model by monitoring changes in the inflammatory response, matrix remolding and endoplasmic reticulum stress. The sEH inhibitor 1-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-3-(1-propionylpiperidin-4-yl) urea (TPPU) was administered in drinking water. Collagen deposition in the liver was increased five-fold in the CCl{sub 4}-treated group, and this was returned to control levels by TPPU treatment. Hepatic expression of Col1a2 and 3a1 mRNA was increased over fifteen-fold in the CCl{sub 4}-treated group relative to the Control group, and this increase was reduced by 50% by TPPU treatment. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress observed in the livers of CCl{sub 4}-treated animals was attenuated by TPPU treatment. In order to support the hypothesis that TPPU is acting to reduce the hepatic fibrosis and ER stress through its action as a sEH inhibitor we used a second sEH inhibitor, trans-4-(4-[3-(4-trifluoromethoxy-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy)-benzoic acid (t-TUCB), and sEH null mice. Taken together, these data indicate that the sEH may play an important role in the development of hepatic fibrosis induced by CCl{sub 4}, presumably by reducing endogenous fatty acid epoxide chemical mediators acting to reduce ER stress. - Highlights: • We administer an inhibitor of sEH in a CCl4 murine model. • sEH inhibition reduces liver collagen deposition and pro-fibrotic gene expression. • sEH inhibition induces MMP-1a activity.

  18. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase contributes to the anti-inflammatory effect of antimicrobial triclocarban in a murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Junyan; Qiu Hong; Morisseau, Christophe; Hwang, Sung Hee; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Ulu, Arzu; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2011-09-01

    The increasing use of the antimicrobial triclocarban (TCC) in personal care products (PCPs) has resulted in concern regarding environmental pollution. TCC is a potent inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Inhibitors of sEH (sEHIs) are anti-inflammatory, anti-hypertensive and cardio-protective in multiple animal models. However, the in vivo effects anticipated from a sEHI have not been reported for TCC. Here we demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects in vivo of TCC in a murine model. TCC was employed in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine model. Systolic blood pressure, plasma levels of several inflammatory cytokines and chemokine, and metabolomic profile of plasma oxylipins were determined. TCC significantly reversed LPS-induced morbid hypotension in a time-dependent manner. TCC significantly repressed the increased release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokine caused by LPS. Furthermore, TCC significantly shifted the oxylipin profile in vivo in a time-dependent manner towards resolution of inflammation as expected from a sEHI. These results demonstrated that at the doses used TCC is anti-inflammatory in the murine model. This study suggests that TCC may provide some benefits in humans in addition to its antimicrobial activities due to its potent inhibition of sEH. It may be a promising starting point for developing new low volume high value applications of TCC. However these biological effects also caution against the general over use of TCC in PCPs. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights: > Anti-microbial triclocarban (TCC) is anti-inflammatory in a murine model. > TCC significantly shifted the oxylipin profile in vivo as expected from a sEHI. > TCC significantly reversed LPS-induced morbid hypotension in a time-dependent manner. > TCC significantly repressed LPS-induced increased release of inflammatory cytokines.

  19. Fungal epoxide hydrolases: new landmarks in sequence-activity space.

    PubMed

    Smit, Martha S

    2004-03-01

    Epoxide hydrolases are useful catalysts for the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of epoxides, which are sought after intermediates for the synthesis of enantiopure fine chemicals. The epoxide hydrolases from Aspergillus niger and from the basidiomycetous yeasts Rhodotorula glutinis and Rhodosporidium toruloides have demonstrated potential as versatile, user friendly biocatalysts for organic synthesis. A recombinant A. niger epoxide hydrolase, produced by an overproducing A. niger strain, is already commercially available and recombinant yeast epoxide hydrolases expressed in Escherichia coli have shown excellent results. Within the vast body of activity information on the one hand and gene sequence information on the other hand, the epoxide hydrolases from the Rhodotorula spp. and A. niger stand out because we have sequence information as well as activity information for both the wild-type and recombinant forms of these enzymes.

  20. Epoxides and Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase in Cardiovascular Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Imig, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are arachidonic acid metabolites that importantly contribute to vascular and cardiac physiology. The contribution of EETs to vascular and cardiac function is further influenced by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) that degrades EETs to diols. Vascular actions of EETs include dilation and angiogenesis. EETs also decrease inflammation and platelet aggregation and in general act to maintain vascular homeostasis. Myocyte contraction and increased coronary blood flow are the two primary EET actions in the heart. EET cell signaling mechanisms are tissue and organ specific and provide significant evidence for the existence of EET receptors. Additionally, pharmacological and genetic manipulations of EETs and sEH have demonstrated a contribution for this metabolic pathway to cardiovascular diseases. Given the impact of EETs to cardiovascular physiology, there is emerging evidence that development of EET-based therapeutics will be beneficial for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22298653

  1. Epoxides and soluble epoxide hydrolase in cardiovascular physiology.

    PubMed

    Imig, John D

    2012-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are arachidonic acid metabolites that importantly contribute to vascular and cardiac physiology. The contribution of EETs to vascular and cardiac function is further influenced by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) that degrades EETs to diols. Vascular actions of EETs include dilation and angiogenesis. EETs also decrease inflammation and platelet aggregation and in general act to maintain vascular homeostasis. Myocyte contraction and increased coronary blood flow are the two primary EET actions in the heart. EET cell signaling mechanisms are tissue and organ specific and provide significant evidence for the existence of EET receptors. Additionally, pharmacological and genetic manipulations of EETs and sEH have demonstrated a contribution for this metabolic pathway to cardiovascular diseases. Given the impact of EETs to cardiovascular physiology, there is emerging evidence that development of EET-based therapeutics will be beneficial for cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Orally Bioavailable Potent Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sung Hee; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Liu, Jun-Yan; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    A series of N,N′-disubstituted ureas having a conformationally restricted cis- or trans-1,4-cyclohexane α to the urea were prepared and tested as soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors. This series of compounds showed low nanomolar to picomolar activities against recombinant human sEH. Both isomers showed similar potencies, but the trans isomers were more metabolically stable in human hepatic microsomes. Furthermore, these new potent inhibitors show a greater metabolic stability in vivo than previously described sEH inhibitors. We demonstrated that trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-ylureido)cyclohexyloxy]benzoic acid 13g (t-AUCB, IC50 = 1.3 ± 0.05 nM) had excellent oral bioavailability (98%, n = 2) and blood area under the curve in dogs and was effective in vivo to treat hypotension in lipopolysaccharide challenged murine models. PMID:17616115

  3. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase counteracts the development of renal dysfunction and progression of congestive heart failure in Ren-2 transgenic hypertensive rats with aorto-caval fistula.

    PubMed

    Červenka, Luděk; Melenovský, Vojtěch; Husková, Zuzana; Škaroupková, Petra; Nishiyama, Akira; Sadowski, Janusz

    2015-07-01

    The detailed mechanisms determining the course of congestive heart failure (CHF) in hypertensive subjects with associated renal dysfunction remain unclear. In Ren-2 transgenic rats (TGR), a model of angiotensin II (ANG II)-dependent hypertension, CHF was induced by volume overload achieved by creation of the aorto-caval fistula (ACF). In these rats we investigated the putative pathophysiological contribution of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and compared it with the role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). We found that untreated ACF TGR exhibited marked intrarenal and myocardial deficiency of EETs and impairment of renal function. Chronic treatment of these rats with cis-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)cyclohexyloxy]benzoic acid (c-AUCB, 3 mg/L in drinking water), an inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) which normally degrades EETs, increased intrarenal and myocardial EETs, markedly improved survival rate, and increased renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate and fractional sodium excretion, without altering RAS activity. Chronic angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEi) with trandolapril, (6 mg/L in drinking water) improved survival rate even more, and also inhibited the development of renal dysfunction; these beneficial actions were associated with significant suppression of the vasoconstrictor/sodium retaining axis and further activation of the vasodilatory/natriuretic axis of the systemic and intrarenal RAS, without modifying tissue availability of biologically active fatty acid epoxides. In conclusion, these findings strongly suggest that chronic sEH inhibition and chronic treatment with ACEi, each of them altering a different vasoactive system, delay or even prevent the onset of decompensation of CHF in ACF TGR, probably by preventing the development of renal dysfunction.

  4. Post-exposure administration of diazepam combined with soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition stops seizures and modulates neuroinflammation in a murine model of acute TETS intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Vito, Stephen T.; Austin, Adam T.; Banks, Christopher N.; Inceoglu, Bora; Bruun, Donald A.; Zolkowska, Dorota; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Rogawski, Michael A.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2014-12-01

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) is a potent convulsant poison for which there is currently no approved antidote. The convulsant action of TETS is thought to be mediated by inhibition of type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA{sub A}R) function. We, therefore, investigated the effects of post-exposure administration of diazepam, a GABA{sub A}R positive allosteric modulator, on seizure activity, death and neuroinflammation in adult male Swiss mice injected with a lethal dose of TETS (0.15 mg/kg, ip). Administration of a high dose of diazepam (5 mg/kg, ip) immediately following the second clonic seizure (approximately 20 min post-TETS injection) effectively prevented progression to tonic seizures and death. However, this treatment did not prevent persistent reactive astrogliosis and microglial activation, as determined by GFAP and Iba-1 immunoreactivity and microglial cell morphology. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) has been shown to exert potent anti-inflammatory effects and to increase survival in mice intoxicated with other GABA{sub A}R antagonists. The sEH inhibitor TUPS (1 mg/kg, ip) administered immediately after the second clonic seizure did not protect TETS-intoxicated animals from tonic seizures or death. Combined administration of diazepam (5 mg/kg, ip) and TUPS (1 mg/kg, ip, starting 1 h after diazepam and repeated every 24 h) prevented TETS-induced lethality and influenced signs of neuroinflammation in some brain regions. Significantly decreased microglial activation and enhanced reactive astrogliosis were observed in the hippocampus, with no changes in the cortex. Combining an agent that targets specific anti-inflammatory mechanisms with a traditional antiseizure drug may enhance treatment outcome in TETS intoxication. - Highlights: • Acute TETS intoxication causes delayed and persistent neuroinflammation. • Diazepam given post-TETS prevents lethal tonic seizures but not neuroinflammation. • A soluble epoxide hydrolase

  5. Inhibition of mutant KrasG12D-initiated murine pancreatic carcinoma growth by a dual c-Raf and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor t-CUPM.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jie; Hwang, Sung Hee; Li, Haonan; Yang, Yihe; Yang, Jun; Wecksler, Aaron T; Liu, Jun-Yan; Hammock, Bruce D; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-02-28

    Mutant Kras and chronic pancreatitis are the most common pathological events involved in human pancreatic cancer. It has been demonstrated that c-Raf is responsible for transmitting signals from mutant Ras to its downstream signals including MEK-ERK and for initiating carcinogenesis. The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), a pro-inflammatory enzyme, generally inactivates anti-inflammatory and anti-pain epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Herein, we have synthesized a novel compound of trans-4-{4-[3-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methylamide (t-CUPM) via modifying the central phenyl ring of sorafenib and confirmed its dual inhibition of sEH and c-Raf by recombinant kinase activity assay. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that oral dosing of t-CUPM resulted in higher blood levels than that of sorafenib throughout the complete time course (48 h). The effect of t-CUPM on the inhibition of mutant Kras(G12D)-initiated murine pancreatic cancer cell growth was determined using the mouse pancreatic carcinoma cell model obtained from LSL-Kras(G12D)/Pdx1-Cre mice and showed that t-CUPM significantly inhibited this murine pancreatic carcinoma cell growth both in vitro and in mice in vivo. Inhibition of mutant Kras-transmitted phosphorylations of cRAF/MEK/ERK was demonstrated in these pancreatic cancer cells using Western blot assay and immunohistochemical approach. Modulation of oxylipin profile, particularly increased EETs/DHET ratio by sEH inhibition, was observed in mice treated with t-CUPM. These results indicate that t-CUPM is a highly potential agent to treat pancreatic cancer via simultaneously targeting c-Raf and sEH.

  6. Inhibition of mutant KrasG12D-initiated murine pancreatic carcinoma growth by a dual c-Raf and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor t-CUPM.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jie; Hwang, Sung Hee; Li, Haonan; Yang, Yihe; Yang, Jun; Wecksler, Aaron T; Liu, Jun-Yan; Hammock, Bruce D; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-02-28

    Mutant Kras and chronic pancreatitis are the most common pathological events involved in human pancreatic cancer. It has been demonstrated that c-Raf is responsible for transmitting signals from mutant Ras to its downstream signals including MEK-ERK and for initiating carcinogenesis. The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), a pro-inflammatory enzyme, generally inactivates anti-inflammatory and anti-pain epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Herein, we have synthesized a novel compound of trans-4-{4-[3-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methylamide (t-CUPM) via modifying the central phenyl ring of sorafenib and confirmed its dual inhibition of sEH and c-Raf by recombinant kinase activity assay. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that oral dosing of t-CUPM resulted in higher blood levels than that of sorafenib throughout the complete time course (48 h). The effect of t-CUPM on the inhibition of mutant Kras(G12D)-initiated murine pancreatic cancer cell growth was determined using the mouse pancreatic carcinoma cell model obtained from LSL-Kras(G12D)/Pdx1-Cre mice and showed that t-CUPM significantly inhibited this murine pancreatic carcinoma cell growth both in vitro and in mice in vivo. Inhibition of mutant Kras-transmitted phosphorylations of cRAF/MEK/ERK was demonstrated in these pancreatic cancer cells using Western blot assay and immunohistochemical approach. Modulation of oxylipin profile, particularly increased EETs/DHET ratio by sEH inhibition, was observed in mice treated with t-CUPM. These results indicate that t-CUPM is a highly potential agent to treat pancreatic cancer via simultaneously targeting c-Raf and sEH. PMID:26683769

  7. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase enhances the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin and 5-lipoxygenase activation protein inhibitor in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Yan; Yang, Jun; Inceoglu, Bora; Qiu, Hong; Ulu, Arzu; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Hammock, Bruce D

    2010-03-15

    Inflammation is a multi-staged process whose expansive phase is thought to be driven by acutely released arachidonic acid (AA) and its metabolites. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), or soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is known to be anti-inflammatory. Inhibition of sEH stabilizes the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) products epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Here we used a non-selective COX inhibitor aspirin, a 5-lipoxygenase activation protein (FLAP) inhibitor MK886, and a sEH inhibitor t-AUCB to selectively modulate the branches of AA metabolism in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine model. We used metabolomic profiling to simultaneously monitor representative AA metabolites of each branch. In addition to the significant crosstalk among branches of the AA cascade during selective modulation of COX, LOX, or sEH, we demonstrated that co-administration of t-AUCB enhanced the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin or MK886, which was evidenced by the observations that co-administration resulted in favorable eicosanoid profiles and better control of LPS-mediated hypotension as well as hepatic protein expression of COX-2 and 5-LOX. Targeted disruption of the sEH gene displayed a parallel profile to that produced by t-AUCB. These observations demonstrate a significant level of crosstalk among the three major branches of the AA cascade and that they are not simply parallel pathways. These data illustrate that inhibition of sEH by both pharmacological intervention and gene knockout enhances the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin and MK886, suggesting the possibility of modulating multiple branches to achieve better therapeutic effects. PMID:19896470

  8. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonist improve vascular function and decrease renal injury in hypertensive obese rats.

    PubMed

    Imig, John D; Walsh, Katie A; Hye Khan, Md Abdul; Nagasawa, Tasuku; Cherian-Shaw, Mary; Shaw, Sean M; Hammock, Bruce D

    2012-12-01

    Cardiometabolic syndrome occurs with obesity and consists of pathophysiological factors that increase the risk for cardiovascular events. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition (sEHi) is a novel therapeutic approach that exerts renal and cardiovascular protection. Although sEHi as a therapeutic approach is promising, it could be more effective for the treatment of cardiometabolic syndrome when combined with peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists. We hypothesized that the PPARγ agonist, rosiglitazone in combination with a sEHi (tAUCB) will provide synergistic actions to decrease blood pressure, improve vascular function, decrease inflammation, and prevent renal damage in spontaneously hypertensive obese rats (SHROB). SHROB were treated with rosiglitazone, tAUCB or the combination of tAUCB and rosiglitazone for four-weeks and compared with spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Blood pressure increased in SHROB (164 ± 7 mmHg) and decreased 10 mmHg when treated with rosiglitazone, tAUCB, or tAUCB and rosiglitazone. Mesenteric artery dilation to the K(ATP) channel opener pinacidil was attenuated in SHROB (E(Max) = 77 ± 7%), compared with WKY (E(Max) = 115 ± 19) and SHR (E(Max) = 93 ± 12%). Vasodilation to pinacidil was improved by rosiglitazone (E(Max) = 92 ± 14%) but not tAUCB. Renal macrophage infiltration increased in SHROB and significantly decreased with rosiglitazone or tAUCB and rosiglitazone treatment. Albuminuria was increased in SHROB (90 ± 20 mg/d) and was significantly decreased by the combination of tAUCB and rosiglitazone (37 ± 9 mg/d). Glomerular injury in SHROB was also significantly decreased by tAUCB and rosiglitazone. These results indicate that even though sEHi or PPARγ agonist have benefits when used individually, the combination is more beneficial for the multidisease features in cardiometabolic syndrome.

  9. Immunohistochemical study of epoxide hydrolase induced by trichloroethylene in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, T.; Hobara, T.; Ogino, K.; Takemoto, T.; Nakamura, K.; Imamura, A.; Koshiro, A.; Kobayashi, H.; Iwamoto, S.; Sakai, T.

    1987-10-01

    Epoxide hydrolase catalyzes the hydrolation of potentially toxic, electrophilic epoxides that are often generated during cytochrome P-450 catalyzed monooxigenation, forming the corresponding transdihydrodiols. It is well-known that trichloroethylene is metabolized by cytochrome P-450 containing mixed-function oxidase systems to trichloroethylene oxide, which decomposes to other metabolites. As trichloroethylene is an epoxide, epoxide hydrolase is suspected to catalyze the hydrolation of trichloroethylene oxide. No reports have appeared about the relationship between trichloroethylene and epoxide hydrolase. In this report, the authors studied the effect of trichloroethylene on epoxide hydrolase immunohistochemically.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF METABOLICALLY STABLE INHIBITORS OF MAMMALIAN MICROSOMAL EPOXIDE HYDROLASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) plays a significant role in the metabolism of xenobiotics such as polyaromatic toxicants. Additionally, polymorphism studies have underlined a potential role of this enzyme in relation to a number of diseases, such as emphysema, spontaneous abortion, eclampsia ...

  11. Soluble epoxide hydrolase: Gene structure, expression and deletion

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Todd R.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) converts epoxides to their corresponding diols through the addition of a water molecule. sEH readily hydrolyzes lipid signaling molecules, including the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), epoxidized lipids produced from arachidonic acid by the action of cytochrome p450s. Through its metabolism of the EETs and other lipid mediators, sEH contributes to the regulation of vascular tone, nociception, angiogenesis and the inflammatory response. Because of its central physiological role in disease states such as cardiac hypertrophy, diabetes, hypertension, and pain sEH is being investigated as a therapeutic target. This review begins with a brief introduction to sEH protein structure and function. sEH evolution and gene structure are then discussed before human small nucleotide polymorphisms and mammalian gene expression are described in the context of several disease models. The review ends with an overview of studies that have employed the sEH knockout mouse model. PMID:23701967

  12. Soluble epoxide hydrolase: gene structure, expression and deletion.

    PubMed

    Harris, Todd R; Hammock, Bruce D

    2013-09-10

    Mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) converts epoxides to their corresponding diols through the addition of a water molecule. sEH readily hydrolyzes lipid signaling molecules, including the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), epoxidized lipids produced from arachidonic acid by the action of cytochrome p450s. Through its metabolism of the EETs and other lipid mediators, sEH contributes to the regulation of vascular tone, nociception, angiogenesis and the inflammatory response. Because of its central physiological role in disease states such as cardiac hypertrophy, diabetes, hypertension, and pain sEH is being investigated as a therapeutic target. This review begins with a brief introduction to sEH protein structure and function. sEH evolution and gene structure are then discussed before human small nucleotide polymorphisms and mammalian gene expression are described in the context of several disease models. The review ends with an overview of studies that have employed the sEH knockout mouse model. PMID:23701967

  13. Isolation and characterization of Xenopus soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Purba, Endang R; Oguro, Ami; Imaoka, Susumu

    2014-07-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) contributes to cell growth, but the contribution of sEH to embryonic development is not well understood. In this study, Xenopus sEH cDNA was isolated from embryos of Xenopus laevis. The Xenopus sEH was expressed in Escherichia coli and was purified. The epoxide hydrolase and phosphatase activities of purified sEH were investigated. The Xenopus sEH did not show phosphatase activity toward 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate or several lysophosphatidic acids although it had EH activity. The amino acid sequence of Xenopus sEH was compared with that reported previously. We found amino acid substitutions of the 29th Thr to Asn and the 146th Arg to His and prepared a sEH mutant (N29T/H146R), designed as mutant 1. Neither wild-type sEH nor mutant 1 had phosphatase activity. Additional substitution of the 11th Gly with Asp was found by comparison with human sEH which has phosphatase activity, but the Xenopus sEH mutant G11D prepared as mutant 2 did not have phosphatase activity. The epoxide hydrolase activity of sEH seemed to be similar to that of human sEH, while Xenopus sEH did not have phosphatase activity toward several substrates that human sEH metabolizes. PMID:24681163

  14. Discovery of a Novel Microsomal Epoxide Hydrolase-Catalyzed Hydration of a Spiro Oxetane.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Qing; Hayes, Martin A; Grönberg, Gunnar; Berggren, Kristina; Castagnoli, Neal; Weidolf, Lars

    2016-08-01

    Oxetane moieties are increasingly being used by the pharmaceutical industry as building blocks in drug candidates because of their pronounced ability to improve physicochemical parameters and metabolic stability of drug candidates. The enzymes that catalyze the biotransformation of the oxetane moiety are, however, not well studied. The in vitro metabolism of a spiro oxetane-containing compound AZD1979 [(3-(4-(2-oxa-6-azaspiro[3.3]heptan-6-ylmethyl)phenoxy)azetidin-1-yl)(5-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)methanone] was studied and one of its metabolites, M1, attracted our interest because its formation was NAD(P)H independent. The focus of this work was to elucidate the structure of M1 and to understand the mechanism(s) of its formation. We established that M1 was formed via hydration and ring opening of the oxetanyl moiety of AZD1979. Incubations of AZD1979 using various human liver subcellular fractions revealed that the hydration reaction leading to M1 occurred mainly in the microsomal fraction. The underlying mechanism as a hydration, rather than an oxidation reaction, was supported by the incorporation of (18)O from H2 (18)O into M1. Enzyme kinetics were performed probing the formation of M1 in human liver microsomes. The formation of M1 was substantially inhibited by progabide, a microsomal epoxide hydrolase inhibitor, but not by trans-4-[4-(1-adamantylcarbamoylamino)cyclohexyloxy]benzoic acid, a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor. On the basis of these results, we propose that microsomal epoxide hydrolase catalyzes the formation of M1. The substrate specificity of microsomal epoxide hydrolase should therefore be expanded to include not only epoxides but also the oxetanyl ring system present in AZD1979. PMID:27256986

  15. Expression and characterization of an epoxide hydrolase from Anopheles gambiae with high activity on epoxy fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiawen; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    In insects, epoxide hydrolases (EHs) play critical roles in the metabolism of xenobiotic epoxides from the food resources and in the regulation of endogenous chemical mediators, such as juvenile hormones. Using the baculovirus expression system, we expressed and characterized an epoxide hydrolase from Anopheles gambiae (AgEH) that is distinct in evolutionary history from insect juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolases (JHEHs). We partially purified the enzyme by ion exchange chromatography and isoelectric focusing. The experimentally determined molecular weight and pI were estimated to be 35kD and 6.3 respectively, different than the theoretical ones. The AgEH had the greatest activity on long chain epoxy fatty acids such as 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (14,15-EET) and 9,10-epoxy-12Z-octadecenoic acids (9,10-EpOME or leukotoxin) among the substrates evaluated. Juvenile hormone III, a terpenoid insect growth regulator, was the next best substrate tested. The AgEH showed kinetics comparable to the mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolases, and the activity could be inhibited by AUDA [12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido) dodecanoic acid], a urea-based inhibitor designed to inhibit the mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolases. The rabbit serum generated against the soluble epoxide hydrolase of Mus musculus can both cross-react with natural and denatured forms of the AgEH, suggesting immunologically they are similar. The study suggests there are mammalian sEH homologs in insects, and epoxy fatty acids may be important chemical mediators in insects. PMID:25173592

  16. Synthesis and Structure-activity Relationship of piperidine-derived non-urea soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pecic, Stevan; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Newcomer, Marcia E.; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Zhu, Zhengxiang; Rinderspacher, Alison; Deng, Shi-Xian

    2012-01-01

    A series of potent amide non-urea inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is disclosed. The inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase leads to elevated levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), and thus inhibitors of sEH represent one of a novel approach to the development of vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory drugs. Structure-activities studies guided optimization of a lead compound, identified through high-throughput screening, gave rise to sub-nanomolar inhibitors of human sEH with stability in human liver microsomal assay suitable for preclinical development. PMID:23237835

  17. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of piperidine-derived non-urea soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pecic, Stevan; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Newcomer, Marcia E.; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Zhu, Zhengxiang; Rinderspacher, Alison; Deng, Shi-Xian

    2013-09-27

    A series of potent amide non-urea inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is disclosed. The inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase leads to elevated levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), and thus inhibitors of sEH represent one of a novel approach to the development of vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory drugs. Structure–activities studies guided optimization of a lead compound, identified through high-throughput screening, gave rise to sub-nanomolar inhibitors of human sEH with stability in human liver microsomal assay suitable for preclinical development.

  18. A novel activity of microsomal epoxide hydrolase: metabolism of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol

    PubMed Central

    Nithipatikom, Kasem; Endsley, Michael P.; Pfeiffer, Adam W.; Falck, John R.; Campbell, William B.

    2014-01-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1, EC 3.3.2.9) is a highly abundant α/β-hydrolase enzyme that is known for its catalytical epoxide hydrolase activity. A wide range of EPHX1 functions have been demonstrated including xenobiotic metabolism; however, characterization of its endogenous substrates is limited. In this study, we present evidence that EPHX1 metabolizes the abundant endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) to free arachidonic acid (AA) and glycerol. The EPHX1 metabolism of 2-AG was demonstrated using commercially available EPHX1 microsomes as well as PC-3 cells overexpressing EPHX1. Conversely, EPHX1 siRNA markedly reduced the EPHX1 expression and 2-AG metabolism in HepG2 cells and LNCaP cells. A selective EPHX1 inhibitor, 10-hydroxystearamide, inhibited 2-AG metabolism and hydrolysis of a well-known EPHX1 substrate, cis-stilbene oxide. Among the inhibitors studied, a serine hydrolase inhibitor, methoxy-arachidonyl fluorophosphate, was the most potent inhibitor of 2-AG metabolism by EPHX1 microsomes. These results demonstrate that 2-AG is an endogenous substrate for EPHX1, a potential role of EPHX1 in the endocannabinoid signaling and a new AA biosynthetic pathway. PMID:24958911

  19. Peripheral FAAH and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors are synergistically antinociceptive.

    PubMed

    Sasso, Oscar; Wagner, Karen; Morisseau, Christophe; Inceoglu, Bora; Hammock, Bruce D; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-07-01

    We need better medicines to control acute and chronic pain. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) catalyze the deactivating hydrolysis of two classes of bioactive lipid mediators--fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs) and epoxidized fatty acids (EpFAs), respectively--which are biogenetically distinct but share the ability to attenuate pain responses and inflammation. In these experiments, we evaluated the antihyperalgesic activity of small-molecule inhibitors of FAAH and sEH, administered alone or in combination, in two pain models: carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia in mice and streptozocin-induced allodynia in rats. When administered separately, the sEH inhibitor 1-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-3-(1-propionylpiperidine-4-yl)urea (TPPU) and the peripherally restricted FAAH inhibitor URB937 were highly active in the two models. The combination TPPU plus URB937 was markedly synergistic, as assessed using isobolographic analyses. The results of these experiments reveal the existence of a possible functional crosstalk between FAEs and EpFAs in regulating pain responses. Additionally, the results suggest that combinations of sEH and FAAH inhibitors might be exploited therapeutically to achieve greater analgesic efficacy. PMID:25882247

  20. Primary structure and catalytic mechanism of the epoxide hydrolase from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1.

    PubMed

    Rink, R; Fennema, M; Smids, M; Dehmel, U; Janssen, D B

    1997-06-01

    The epoxide hydrolase gene from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1, a bacterium that is able to grow on epichlorohydrin as the sole carbon source, was cloned by means of the polymerase chain reaction with two degenerate primers based on the N-terminal and C-terminal sequences of the enzyme. The epoxide hydrolase gene coded for a protein of 294 amino acids with a molecular mass of 34 kDa. An identical epoxide hydrolase gene was cloned from chromosomal DNA of the closely related strain A. radiobacter CFZ11. The recombinant epoxide hydrolase was expressed up to 40% of the total cellular protein content in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and the purified enzyme had a kcat of 21 s-1 with epichlorohydrin. Amino acid sequence similarity of the epoxide hydrolase with eukaryotic epoxide hydrolases, haloalkane dehalogenase from Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10, and bromoperoxidase A2 from Streptomyces aureofaciens indicated that it belonged to the alpha/beta-hydrolase fold family. This conclusion was supported by secondary structure predictions and analysis of the secondary structure with circular dichroism spectroscopy. The catalytic triad residues of epoxide hydrolase are proposed to be Asp107, His275, and Asp246. Replacement of these residues to Ala/Glu, Arg/Gln, and Ala, respectively, resulted in a dramatic loss of activity for epichlorohydrin. The reaction mechanism of epoxide hydrolase proceeds via a covalently bound ester intermediate, as was shown by single turnover experiments with the His275 --> Arg mutant of epoxide hydrolase in which the ester intermediate could be trapped.

  1. Identification of potent inhibitors of the chicken soluble epoxide hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Shihadih, Diyala S.; Harris, Todd R.; Yang, Jun; Merzlikin, Oleg; Lee, Kin Sing S.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Morisseau, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In vertebrates, soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) hydrolyzes natural epoxy-fatty acids (EpFAs), which are chemical mediators modulating inflammation, pain, and angiogenesis. Chick embryos are used to study angiogenesis, particularly its role in cardiovascular biology and pathology. To find potent and bio-stable inhibitors of the chicken sEH (chxEH) a library of human sEH inhibitors was screened. Derivatives of 1(adamantan-1-yl)-3-(trans-4-phenoxycyclohexyl) urea were found to be very potent tight binding inhibitors (KI < 150 pM) of chxEH while being relatively stable in chicken liver microsomes, suggesting their usefulness to study the role of EpFAs in chickens. PMID:25479771

  2. Expanding the Catalytic Triad in Epoxide Hydrolases and Related Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Potato epoxide hydrolase 1 exhibits rich enantio- and regioselectivity in the hydrolysis of a broad range of substrates. The enzyme can be engineered to increase the yield of optically pure products as a result of changes in both enantio- and regioselectivity. It is thus highly attractive in biocatalysis, particularly for the generation of enantiopure fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. The present work aims to establish the principles underlying the activity and selectivity of the enzyme through a combined computational, structural, and kinetic study using the substrate trans-stilbene oxide as a model system. Extensive empirical valence bond simulations have been performed on the wild-type enzyme together with several experimentally characterized mutants. We are able to computationally reproduce the differences between the activities of different stereoisomers of the substrate and the effects of mutations of several active-site residues. In addition, our results indicate the involvement of a previously neglected residue, H104, which is electrostatically linked to the general base H300. We find that this residue, which is highly conserved in epoxide hydrolases and related hydrolytic enzymes, needs to be in its protonated form in order to provide charge balance in an otherwise negatively charged active site. Our data show that unless the active-site charge balance is correctly treated in simulations, it is not possible to generate a physically meaningful model for the enzyme that can accurately reproduce activity and selectivity trends. We also expand our understanding of other catalytic residues, demonstrating in particular the role of a noncanonical residue, E35, as a “backup base” in the absence of H300. Our results provide a detailed view of the main factors driving catalysis and regioselectivity in this enzyme and identify targets for subsequent enzyme design efforts. PMID:26527505

  3. Epoxide hydrolase of Trichoderma reesei: Biochemical properties and conformational characterization.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabriel Stephani; Adriani, Patricia Pereira; Borges, Flavia Garcia; Lopes, Adriana Rios; Campana, Patricia T; Chambergo, Felipe S

    2016-08-01

    Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are enzymes that are present in all living organisms and catalyze the hydrolysis of epoxides to the corresponding vicinal diols. EHs have biotechnological potential in chiral chemistry. We report the cloning, purification, enzymatic activity, and conformational analysis of the TrEH gene from Trichoderma reesei strain QM9414 using circular dichroism spectroscopy. The EH gene has an open reading frame encoding a protein of 343 amino acid residues, resulting in a molecular mass of 38.2kDa. The enzyme presents an optimum pH of 7.2, and it is highly active at temperatures ranging from 23 to 50°C and thermally inactivated at 70°C (t1/2=7.4min). The Michaelis constants (Km) were 4.6mM for racemic substrate, 21.7mM for (R)-(+)-styrene oxide and 3.0mM for (S)-(-)-styrene oxide. The kcat/Km analysis indicated that TrEH is enantioselective and preferentially hydrolyzes (S)-(-)-styrene oxide. The conformational stability studies suggested that, despite the extreme conditions (high temperatures and extremely acid and basic pHs), TrEH is able to maintain a considerable part of its regular structures, including the preservation of the native cores in some cases. The recombinant protein showed enantioselectivity that was distinct from other fungus EHs, making this protein a potential biotechnological tool. PMID:27177457

  4. Soluble epoxide hydrolase as an anti-inflammatory target of the thrombolytic stroke drug SMTP-7.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Naoki; Suzuki, Eriko; Ishikawa, Makoto; Shirafuji, Takumi; Hasumi, Keiji

    2014-12-26

    Although ischemic stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide, only a small fraction of patients benefit from the current thrombolytic therapy due to a risk of cerebral hemorrhage caused by inflammation. Thus, the development of a new strategy to combat inflammation during thrombolysis is an urgent demand. The small molecule thrombolytic SMTP-7 effectively treats ischemic stroke in several animal models with reducing cerebral hemorrhage. Here we revealed that SMTP-7 targeted soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to suppress inflammation. SMTP-7 inhibited both of the two sEH enzyme activities: epoxide hydrolase (which inactivates anti-inflammatory epoxy-fatty acids) and lipid phosphate phosphatase. SMTP-7 suppressed epoxy-fatty acid hydrolysis in HepG2 cells in culture, implicating the sEH inhibition in the anti-inflammatory mechanism. The sEH inhibition by SMTP-7 was independent of its thrombolytic activity. The simultaneous targeting of thrombolysis and sEH by a single molecule is a promising strategy to revolutionize the current stroke therapy. PMID:25361765

  5. Discovery of Potent Non-urea Inhibitors of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuli; Liu, Yidong; Gong, Gangli; Smith, Deborah H.; Yan, Fang; Rinderspacher, Alison; Feng, Yan; Zhu, Zhengxiang; Li, Xiangpo; Deng, Shi-Xian; Branden, Lars; Vidović, Dušica; Chung, Caty; Schürer, Stephan; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Landry, Donald W.

    2009-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a novel target for the treatment of hypertension and vascular inflammation. A new class of potent non-urea sEH inhibitors was identified via high throughput screening (HTS) and chemical modification. IC50s of the most potent compounds range from micromolar to low nanomolar. A Class of potent non-Urea inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase was discovered via high throughput screening and SARs-guided modification. PMID:19303288

  6. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase does not improve the course of congestive heart failure and the development of renal dysfunction in rats with volume overload induced by aorto-caval fistula.

    PubMed

    Červenka, L; Melenovský, V; Husková, Z; Sporková, A; Bürgelová, M; Škaroupková, P; Hwang, S H; Hammock, B D; Imig, J D; Sadowski, J

    2015-01-01

    The detailed mechanisms determining the course of congestive heart failure (CHF) and associated renal dysfunction remain unclear. In a volume overload model of CHF induced by creation of aorto-caval fistula (ACF) in Hannover Sprague-Dawley (HanSD) rats we explored the putative pathogenetic contribution of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), active products of CYP-450 dependent epoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism, and compared it with the role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Chronic treatment with cis-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido) cyclohexyloxy]benzoic acid (c-AUCB, 3 mg/l in drinking water), an inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) which normally degrades EETs, increased intrarenal and myocardial EETs to levels observed in sham-operated HanSD rats, but did not improve the survival or renal function impairment. In contrast, chronic angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEi, trandolapril, 6 mg/l in drinking water) increased renal blood flow, fractional sodium excretion and markedly improved survival, without affecting left ventricular structure and performance. Hence, renal dysfunction rather than cardiac remodeling determines long-term mortality in advanced stage of CHF due to volume overload. Strong protective actions of ACEi were associated with suppression of the vasoconstrictor/sodium retaining axis and activation of vasodilatory/natriuretic axis of the renin-angiotensin system in the circulating blood and kidney tissue.

  7. Inhibition of Chronic Pancreatitis and Murine Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia by a Dual Inhibitor of c-RAF and Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase in LSL-KrasG12D/Pdx-1-Cre Mice

    PubMed Central

    LIAO, JIE; HWANG, SUNG HEE; LI, HAONAN; LIU, JUN-YAN; HAMMOCK, BRUCE D.; YANG, GUANG-YU

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and chronic pancreatitis are the most common pathogenic events involved in human pancreatic carcinogenesis. In the process of long-standing chronic inflammation, aberrant metabolites of arachidonic acid play a crucial role in promoting carcinogenesis, in which the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), as a pro-inflammatory enzyme, generally inactivates anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Herein, we determined the effect of our newly-synthesized novel compound trans-4-{4-[3-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methylamide (t-CUPM), a dual inhibitor of sEH and RAF1 proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase (c-RAF), on inhibiting the development of pancreatitis and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPanIN) in LSL-KrasG12D/Pdx1-Cre mice. The results showed that t-CUPM significantly reduced the severity of chronic pancreatitis, as measured by the extent of acini loss, inflammatory cell infiltration and stromal fibrosis. The progression of low-grade mPanIN I to high-grade mPanIN II/III was significantly suppressed. Inhibition of mutant Kras-transmitted phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase’s kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinases was demonstrated in pancreatic tissues by western blots. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that t-CUPM treatment significantly reduced the levels of inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis facor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, as well as vascular adhesion molecule-1, and the levels of Sonic hedgehog and Gli transcription factor (Hedgehog pathway). Analysis of the eicosanoid profile revealed a significant increase of the EETs/dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids ratio, which further confirmed sEH inhibition by t-CUPM. These results indicate that simultaneous inhibition of sEH and c-RAF by t-CUPM is important in preventing chronic pancreatitis and carcinogenesis

  8. Inhibition of Chronic Pancreatitis and Murine Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia by a Dual Inhibitor of c-RAF and Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase in LSL-KrasG¹²D/Pdx-1-Cre Mice.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jie; Hwang, Sung Hee; Li, Haonan; Liu, Jun-Yan; Hammock, Bruce D; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and chronic pancreatitis are the most common pathogenic events involved in human pancreatic carcinogenesis. In the process of long-standing chronic inflammation, aberrant metabolites of arachidonic acid play a crucial role in promoting carcinogenesis, in which the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), as a pro-inflammatory enzyme, generally inactivates anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Herein, we determined the effect of our newly-synthesized novel compound trans-4-{4-[3-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methylamide (t-CUPM), a dual inhibitor of sEH and RAF1 proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase (c-RAF), on inhibiting the development of pancreatitis and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPanIN) in LSL-Kras(G12D)/Pdx1-Cre mice. The results showed that t-CUPM significantly reduced the severity of chronic pancreatitis, as measured by the extent of acini loss, inflammatory cell infiltration and stromal fibrosis. The progression of low-grade mPanIN I to high-grade mPanIN II/III was significantly suppressed. Inhibition of mutant Kras-transmitted phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase's kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinases was demonstrated in pancreatic tissues by western blots. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that t-CUPM treatment significantly reduced the levels of inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis facor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, as well as vascular adhesion molecule-1, and the levels of Sonic hedgehog and Gli transcription factor (Hedgehog pathway). Analysis of the eicosanoid profile revealed a significant increase of the EETs/dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids ratio, which further confirmed sEH inhibition by t-CUPM. These results indicate that simultaneous inhibition of sEH and c-RAF by t-CUPM is important in preventing chronic pancreatitis and carcinogenesis

  9. Inhibition of Chronic Pancreatitis and Murine Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia by a Dual Inhibitor of c-RAF and Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase in LSL-KrasG¹²D/Pdx-1-Cre Mice.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jie; Hwang, Sung Hee; Li, Haonan; Liu, Jun-Yan; Hammock, Bruce D; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and chronic pancreatitis are the most common pathogenic events involved in human pancreatic carcinogenesis. In the process of long-standing chronic inflammation, aberrant metabolites of arachidonic acid play a crucial role in promoting carcinogenesis, in which the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), as a pro-inflammatory enzyme, generally inactivates anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Herein, we determined the effect of our newly-synthesized novel compound trans-4-{4-[3-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methylamide (t-CUPM), a dual inhibitor of sEH and RAF1 proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase (c-RAF), on inhibiting the development of pancreatitis and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPanIN) in LSL-Kras(G12D)/Pdx1-Cre mice. The results showed that t-CUPM significantly reduced the severity of chronic pancreatitis, as measured by the extent of acini loss, inflammatory cell infiltration and stromal fibrosis. The progression of low-grade mPanIN I to high-grade mPanIN II/III was significantly suppressed. Inhibition of mutant Kras-transmitted phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase's kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinases was demonstrated in pancreatic tissues by western blots. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that t-CUPM treatment significantly reduced the levels of inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis facor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, as well as vascular adhesion molecule-1, and the levels of Sonic hedgehog and Gli transcription factor (Hedgehog pathway). Analysis of the eicosanoid profile revealed a significant increase of the EETs/dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids ratio, which further confirmed sEH inhibition by t-CUPM. These results indicate that simultaneous inhibition of sEH and c-RAF by t-CUPM is important in preventing chronic pancreatitis and carcinogenesis.

  10. Conformational diversity and enantioconvergence in potato epoxide hydrolase 1.

    PubMed

    Bauer, P; Carlsson, Å Janfalk; Amrein, B A; Dobritzsch, D; Widersten, M; Kamerlin, S C L

    2016-06-28

    Potato epoxide hydrolase 1 (StEH1) is a biocatalytically important enzyme that exhibits rich enantio- and regioselectivity in the hydrolysis of chiral epoxide substrates. In particular, StEH1 has been demonstrated to enantioconvergently hydrolyze racemic mixes of styrene oxide (SO) to yield (R)-1-phenylethanediol. This work combines computational, crystallographic and biochemical analyses to understand both the origins of the enantioconvergent behavior of the wild-type enzyme, as well as shifts in activities and substrate binding preferences in an engineered StEH1 variant, R-C1B1, which contains four active site substitutions (W106L, L109Y, V141K and I155V). Our calculations are able to reproduce both the enantio- and regioselectivities of StEH1, and demonstrate a clear link between different substrate binding modes and the corresponding selectivity, with the preferred binding modes being shifted between the wild-type enzyme and the R-C1B1 variant. Additionally, we demonstrate that the observed changes in selectivity and the corresponding enantioconvergent behavior are due to a combination of steric and electrostatic effects that modulate both the accessibility of the different carbon atoms to the nucleophilic side chain of D105, as well as the interactions between the substrate and protein amino acid side chains and active site water molecules. Being able to computationally predict such subtle effects for different substrate enantiomers, as well as to understand their origin and how they are affected by mutations, is an important advance towards the computational design of improved biocatalysts for enantioselective synthesis. PMID:27049844

  11. Ingestion of the epoxide hydrolase inhibitor AUDA modulates immune responses of the mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus during blood feeding.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiawen; Morisseau, Christophe; Yang, Jun; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Kamita, Shizuo G; Hammock, Bruce D

    2016-09-01

    Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are enzymes that play roles in metabolizing xenobiotic epoxides from the environment, and in regulating lipid signaling molecules, such as juvenile hormones in insects and epoxy fatty acids in mammals. In this study we fed mosquitoes with an epoxide hydrolase inhibitor AUDA during artificial blood feeding, and we found the inhibitor increased the concentration of epoxy fatty acids in the midgut of female mosquitoes. We also observed ingestion of AUDA triggered early expression of defensin A, cecropin A and cecropin B2 at 6 h after blood feeding. The expression of cecropin B1 and gambicin were not changed more than two fold compared to controls. The changes in gene expression were transient possibly because more than 99% of the inhibitor was metabolized or excreted at 42 h after being ingested. The ingestion of AUDA also affected the growth of bacteria colonizing in the midgut, but did not affect mosquito longevity, fecundity and fertility in our laboratory conditions. When spiked into the blood, EpOMEs and DiHOMEs were as effective as the inhibitor AUDA in reducing the bacterial load in the midgut, while EETs rescued the effects of AUDA. Our data suggest that epoxy fatty acids from host blood are immune response regulators metabolized by epoxide hydrolases in the midgut of female mosquitoes, inhibition of which causes transient changes in immune responses, and affects growth of microbes in the midgut. PMID:27369469

  12. Data set of optimal parameters for colorimetric red assay of epoxide hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabriel Stephani; Adriani, Patricia Pereira; Borges, Flavia Garcia; Lopes, Adriana Rios; Campana, Patricia T; Chambergo, Felipe S

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Epoxide hydrolase of Trichoderma reesei: Biochemical properties and conformational characterization" [1]. Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of epoxides to the corresponding vicinal diols. This article describes the optimal parameters for the colorimetric red assay to determine the enzymatic activity, with an emphasis on the characterization of the kinetic parameters, pH optimum and thermal stability of this enzyme. The effects of reagents that are not resistant to oxidation by sodium periodate on the reactions can generate false positives and interfere with the final results of the red assay. PMID:27366781

  13. Pharmacokinetic Screening of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Hwang, Sung Hee; Morisseau, Christophe; Yang, Jun; Jones, Paul D.; Kasagami, Takeo; Kim, In-Hae; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids that have anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory properties are mainly metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH, EC 3.3.2.3). Therefore, sEH has emerged as a therapeutic target for treating various cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory pain. N,N’-Disubstituted ureas are potent sEH inhibitors in vitro. However, in vivo usage of early sEH inhibitors has been limited by their low bioavailability and poor physiochemical properties. Therefore, a group of highly potent compounds with more drug-like physiochemical properties were evaluated by monitoring their plasma profiles in dogs treated orally with sEH inhibitors. Urea compounds with an adamantyl or a 4-trifluoromethoxyphenyl group on one side and a piperidyl or a cyclohexyl ether group on the other side of the urea function showed pharmacokinetic profiles with high plasma concentrations and long half lives. In particular, the inhibitor trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-cyclohexyloxy]-benzoic acid (t-AUCB) not only is very potent with good physiochemical properties, but also shows high oral bioavailability for doses ranging from 0.01 to 1 mg/kg. This compound is also very potent against the sEH of several mammals, suggesting that t-AUCB will be an excellent tool to evaluate the biology of sEH in multiple animal models. Such compounds may also be a valuable lead for the development of veterinary therapeutics. PMID:20359531

  14. Naphthalene cytotoxicity in microsomal epoxide hydrolase deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Carratt, S A; Morin, D; Buckpitt, A R; Edwards, P C; Van Winkle, L S

    2016-03-30

    Naphthalene (NA) is a ubiquitous pollutant to which humans are widely exposed. 1,2-Dihydro-1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene (NA-dihydrodiol) is a major metabolite of NA generated by microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH). To investigate the role of the NA-dihydrodiol and subsequent metabolites (i.e. 1,2-naphthoquinone) in cytotoxicity, we exposed both male and female wild type (WT) and mEH null mice (KO) to NA by inhalation (5, 10, 20 ppm for 4h). NA-dihydrodiol was ablated in the KO mice. High-resolution histopathology was used to study site-specific cytotoxicity, and formation of naphthalene metabolites was measured by HPLC in microdissected airways. Swollen and vacuolated airway epithelial cells were observed in the intra- and extrapulmonary airways of all mice at and below the current OSHA standard (10 ppm). Female mice may be more susceptible to this acute cytotoxicity. In the extrapulmonary airways, WT mice were more susceptible to damage than KO mice, indicating that the metabolites associated with mEH-mediated metabolism could be partially responsible for cytotoxicity at this site. The level of cytotoxicity in the mEH KO mice at all airway levels suggests that non-mEH metabolites are contributing to NA cellular damage in the lung. Our results indicate that the apparent contribution of mEH-dependent metabolites to toxicity differs by location in the lung. These studies suggest that metabolites generated through the mEH pathway may be of minor importance in distal airway toxicity and subsequent carcinogenesis from NA exposure.

  15. Inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase attenuate vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Benjamin B.; Thompson, David A.; Howard, Laura L.; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Weiss, Robert H.

    2002-02-01

    Atherosclerosis, in its myriad incarnations the foremost killer disease in the industrialized world, is characterized by aberrant proliferation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells in part as a result of the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the blood vessel wall. The epoxyeicosatrienoic acids are synthesized from arachidonic acid in a reaction catalyzed by the cytochrome P450 system and are vasoactive substances. Metabolism of these compounds by epoxide hydrolases results in the formation of compounds that affect the vasculature in a pleiotropic manner. As an outgrowth of our observations that urea inhibitors of the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) reduce blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats as well as the findings of other investigators that these compounds possess antiinflammatory actions, we have examined the effect of sEH inhibitors on VSM cell proliferation. We now show that the sEH inhibitor 1-cyclohexyl-3-dodecyl urea (CDU) inhibits human VSM cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and is associated with a decrease in the level of cyclin D1. In addition, cis-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid mimics the growth-suppressive activity of CDU; there is no evidence of cellular toxicity or apoptosis in CDU-treated cells when incubated with 20 μM CDU for up to 48 h. These results, in light of the antiinflammatory and antihypertensive properties of these compounds that have been demonstrated already, suggest that the urea class of sEH inhibitors may be useful for therapy for diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis characterized by exuberant VSM cell proliferation and vascular inflammation.

  16. EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RECOMBINANT JUVENILE HORMONE EPOXIDE HYDROLASE (JHEH) FROM MANDUCA SEXTA. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cDNA of the microsomal Juvenile Hormone Epoxide Hydrolase (JHEH) from Manduca sexta was expressed in vitro in the baculovirus system. In insect cell culture, the recombinant enzyme (Ms-JHEH) was produced at a high level (100 fold over background EH catalytic activit...

  17. 1,3-Disubstituted and 1,3,3-trisubstituted adamantyl-ureas with isoxazole as soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Burmistrov, Vladimir; Morisseau, Christophe; Danilov, Dmitry; Harris, Todd R; Dalinger, Igor; Vatsadze, Irina; Shkineva, Tatiana; Butov, Gennady M; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-12-01

    Adamantyl ureas are good soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors; however they have limited solubility and rapid metabolism, thus limiting their usefulness in some therapeutic indications. Herein, we test the hypothesis that nodal substitution on the adamantane will help solubilize and stabilize the compounds. A series of compounds containing adamantane derivatives and isoxazole functional groups were developed. Overall, the presence of methyl on the nodal positions of adamantane yields higher water solubility than previously reported urea-based sEH inhibitors while maintaining high inhibition potency. However, it did not improve microsomal stability.

  18. Microsomal Epoxide Hydrolase 1 (EPHX1): Gene, Structure, Function, and Role in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Václavíková, Radka; Hughes, David J; Souček, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1) is an evolutionarily highly conserved biotransformation enzyme for converting epoxides to diols. Notably, the enzyme is able to either detoxify or bioactivate a wide range of substrates. Mutations and polymorphic variants in the EPHX1 gene have been associated with susceptibility to several human diseases including cancer. This review summarizes the key knowledge concerning EPHX1 gene and protein structure, expression pattern and regulation, and substrate specificity. The relevance of EPHX1 for human pathology is especially discussed. PMID:26216302

  19. Alteration in plasma testosterone levels in male mice lacking soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Luria, Ayala; Morisseau, Christophe; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Yang, Jun; Inceoglu, Bora; De Taeye, Bart; Watkins, Steven M; Wiest, Michelle M; German, J Bruce; Hammock, Bruce D

    2009-08-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (Ephx2, sEH) is a bifunctional enzyme with COOH-terminal hydrolase and NH(2)-terminal phosphatase activities. sEH converts epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), and the phosphatase activity is suggested to be involved in cholesterol metabolism. EETs participate in a wide range of biological functions, including regulation of vascular tone, renal tubular transport, cardiac contractility, and inflammation. Inhibition of sEH is a potential approach for enhancing the biological activity of EETs. Therefore, disruption of sEH activity is becoming an attractive therapeutic target for both cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. To define the physiological role of sEH, we characterized a knockout mouse colony lacking expression of the Ephx2 gene. Lack of sEH enzyme is characterized by elevation of EET to DHET ratios in both the linoleate and arachidonate series in plasma and tissues of both female and male mice. In male mice, this lack of expression was also associated with decreased plasma testosterone levels, sperm count, and testicular size. However, this genotype was still able to sire litters. Plasma cholesterol levels also declined in this genotype. Behavior tests such as anxiety-like behavior and hedonic response were also examined in Ephx2-null and WT mice, as all can be related to hormonal changes. Null mice showed a level of anxiety with a decreased hedonic response. In conclusion, this study provides a broad biochemical, physiological, and behavioral characterization of the Ephx2-null mouse colony and suggests a mechanism by which sEH and its substrates may regulate circulating levels of testosterone through cholesterol biosynthesis and metabolism. PMID:19458064

  20. Alteration in plasma testosterone levels in male mice lacking soluble epoxide hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Luria, Ayala; Morisseau, Christophe; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Yang, Jun; Inceoglu, Bora; De Taeye, Bart; Watkins, Steven M.; Wiest, Michelle M.; German, J. Bruce; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (Ephx2, sEH) is a bifunctional enzyme with COOH-terminal hydrolase and NH2-terminal phosphatase activities. sEH converts epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), and the phosphatase activity is suggested to be involved in cholesterol metabolism. EETs participate in a wide range of biological functions, including regulation of vascular tone, renal tubular transport, cardiac contractility, and inflammation. Inhibition of sEH is a potential approach for enhancing the biological activity of EETs. Therefore, disruption of sEH activity is becoming an attractive therapeutic target for both cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. To define the physiological role of sEH, we characterized a knockout mouse colony lacking expression of the Ephx2 gene. Lack of sEH enzyme is characterized by elevation of EET to DHET ratios in both the linoleate and arachidonate series in plasma and tissues of both female and male mice. In male mice, this lack of expression was also associated with decreased plasma testosterone levels, sperm count, and testicular size. However, this genotype was still able to sire litters. Plasma cholesterol levels also declined in this genotype. Behavior tests such as anxiety-like behavior and hedonic response were also examined in Ephx2-null and WT mice, as all can be related to hormonal changes. Null mice showed a level of anxiety with a decreased hedonic response. In conclusion, this study provides a broad biochemical, physiological, and behavioral characterization of the Ephx2-null mouse colony and suggests a mechanism by which sEH and its substrates may regulate circulating levels of testosterone through cholesterol biosynthesis and metabolism. PMID:19458064

  1. Characterization of an epoxide hydrolase from the Florida red tide dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengfei; Leeson, Cristian; Zhi, Xiaoduo; Leng, Fenfei; Pierce, Richard H; Henry, Michael S; Rein, Kathleen S

    2016-02-01

    Epoxide hydrolases (EH, EC 3.3.2.3) have been proposed to be key enzymes in the biosynthesis of polyether (PE) ladder compounds such as the brevetoxins which are produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. These enzymes have the potential to catalyze kinetically disfavored endo-tet cyclization reactions. Data mining of K. brevis transcriptome libraries revealed two classes of epoxide hydrolases: microsomal and leukotriene A4 (LTA4) hydrolases. A microsomal EH was cloned and expressed for characterization. The enzyme is a monomeric protein with molecular weight 44kDa. Kinetic parameters were evaluated using a variety of epoxide substrates to assess substrate selectivity and enantioselectivity, as well as its potential to catalyze the critical endo-tet cyclization of epoxy alcohols. Monitoring of EH activity in high and low toxin producing cultures of K. brevis over a three week period showed consistently higher activity in the high toxin producing culture implicating the involvement of one or more EH in brevetoxin biosynthesis.

  2. Effects of a Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitor on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu-Qing; Ma, Yong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is suggested as a vital pharmacologic target for inflammation. In this study, we determined whether a sEH inhibitor, AUDA, exerts lung protection in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in mice. Methods Male BALB/c mice were randomized to receive AUDA or vehicle intraperitoneal injection 4 h after LPS or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) intratracheal instillation. Samples were harvested 24 h post LPS or PBS administration. Results AUDA administration decreased the pulmonary levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Improvement of oxygenation and lung edema were observed in AUDA treated group. AUDA significantly inhibited sEH activity, and elevated epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) levels in lung tissues. Moreover, LPS induced the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB was markedly dampened in AUDA treated group. Conclusion Administration of AUDA after the onset of LPS-induced ALI increased pulmonary levels of EETs, and ameliorated lung injury. sEH is a potential pharmacologic target for ALI. PMID:27490848

  3. Signature motifs identify an Acinetobacter Cif virulence factor with epoxide hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Christopher D; Hvorecny, Kelli L; Bridges, Andrew A; Ballok, Alicia E; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Cady, Kyle C; O'Toole, George A; Madden, Dean R

    2014-03-14

    Endocytic recycling of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is blocked by the CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif). Originally discovered in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Cif is a secreted epoxide hydrolase that is transcriptionally regulated by CifR, an epoxide-sensitive repressor. In this report, we investigate a homologous protein found in strains of the emerging nosocomial pathogens Acinetobacter nosocomialis and Acinetobacter baumannii ("aCif"). Like Cif, aCif is an epoxide hydrolase that carries an N-terminal secretion signal and can be purified from culture supernatants. When applied directly to polarized airway epithelial cells, mature aCif triggers a reduction in CFTR abundance at the apical membrane. Biochemical and crystallographic studies reveal a dimeric assembly with a stereochemically conserved active site, confirming our motif-based identification of candidate Cif-like pathogenic EH sequences. Furthermore, cif expression is transcriptionally repressed by a CifR homolog ("aCifR") and is induced in the presence of epoxides. Overall, this Acinetobacter protein recapitulates the essential attributes of the Pseudomonas Cif system and thus may facilitate airway colonization in nosocomial lung infections. PMID:24474692

  4. Engineering of an epoxide hydrolase for efficient bioresolution of bulky pharmaco substrates

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xu-Dong; Yuan, Shuguang; Li, Lin; Chen, She; Xu, Jian-He; Zhou, Jiahai

    2014-01-01

    Optically pure epoxides are essential chiral precursors for the production of (S)-propranolol, (S)-alprenolol, and other β-adrenergic receptor blocking drugs. Although the enzymatic production of these bulky epoxides has proven difficult, here we report a method to effectively improve the activity of BmEH, an epoxide hydrolase from Bacillus megaterium ECU1001 toward α-naphthyl glycidyl ether, the precursor of (S)-propranolol, by eliminating the steric hindrance near the potential product-release site. Using X-ray crystallography, mass spectrum, and molecular dynamics calculations, we have identified an active tunnel for substrate access and product release of this enzyme. The crystal structures revealed that there is an independent product-release site in BmEH that was not included in other reported epoxide hydrolase structures. By alanine scanning, two mutants, F128A and M145A, targeted to expand the potential product-release site displayed 42 and 25 times higher activities toward α-naphthyl glycidyl ether than the wild-type enzyme, respectively. These results show great promise for structure-based rational design in improving the catalytic efficiency of industrial enzymes for bulky substrates. PMID:25331869

  5. Discovery and characterization of thermophilic limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolases from hot spring metagenomic libraries.

    PubMed

    Ferrandi, Erica Elisa; Sayer, Christopher; Isupov, Michail N; Annovazzi, Celeste; Marchesi, Carlotta; Iacobone, Gianluca; Peng, Xu; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta; Wohlgemuth, Roland; Littlechild, Jennifer A; Monti, Daniela

    2015-08-01

    The epoxide hydrolases (EHs) represent an attractive option for the synthesis of chiral epoxides and 1,2-diols which are valuable building blocks for the synthesis of several pharmaceutical compounds. A metagenomic approach has been used to identify two new members of the atypical EH limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase (LEH) family of enzymes. These two LEHs (Tomsk-LEH and CH55-LEH) show EH activities towards different epoxide substrates, differing in most cases from those previously identified for Rhodococcus erythropolis (Re-LEH) in terms of stereoselectivity. Tomsk-LEH and CH55-LEH, both from thermophilic sources, have higher optimal temperatures and apparent melting temperatures than Re-LEH. The new LEH enzymes have been crystallized and their structures solved to high resolution in the native form and in complex with the inhibitor valpromide for Tomsk-LEH and poly(ethylene glycol) for CH55-LEH. The structural analysis has provided insights into the LEH mechanism, substrate specificity and stereoselectivity of these new LEH enzymes, which has been supported by mutagenesis studies.

  6. Erectogenic and Aphrodisiac Property of Moringa oleifera: Involvement of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Inamdar, Mohammed Naseeruddin; Dethe, Shekhar M; Gururaj, Giligar M; Jamwal, Rohitash; Bhaskar, Anirban; Mundkinajeddu, Deepak; Agarwal, Amit

    2016-07-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors have been reported to improve penile erection; therefore, sEH could be useful for management of erectile dysfunction. Methanolic and aqueous extracts of 30 Indian medicinal plants were screened for their sEH inhibition potential. Fifteen extracts showed >50% inhibition when screened at 50 µg/mL in sEH inhibition assay. Methanolic extract of Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae) seeds (MEMO) was most potent with IC50 1.7 ± 0.1 µg/mL and was selected for in vitro studies on isolated rat corpus cavernosum smooth muscle and in vivo sexual behaviour studies on healthy and diabetic rats. Rats were divided into five groups, each containing six animals and treated orally with either water, vehicle (1% Tween-20), MEMO (45 and 90 mg/kg/day for 21 days), and standard drug, sildenafil (5 mg/kg/day for 7 days). An equal number of female rats were used, and the effect of MEMO and sildenafil was compared with that of vehicle. MEMO significantly relaxed isolated rat corpus cavernosum smooth muscle at 0.1-100 µg/mL in vitro and significantly increased (p < 0.05) sexual activity, intracavernous pressure/mean arterial pressure in normal and diabetic rats. The increase in erectile function of rats by MEMO could be because of its sEH inhibitory activity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27020843

  7. Erectogenic and Aphrodisiac Property of Moringa oleifera: Involvement of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Inamdar, Mohammed Naseeruddin; Dethe, Shekhar M; Gururaj, Giligar M; Jamwal, Rohitash; Bhaskar, Anirban; Mundkinajeddu, Deepak; Agarwal, Amit

    2016-07-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors have been reported to improve penile erection; therefore, sEH could be useful for management of erectile dysfunction. Methanolic and aqueous extracts of 30 Indian medicinal plants were screened for their sEH inhibition potential. Fifteen extracts showed >50% inhibition when screened at 50 µg/mL in sEH inhibition assay. Methanolic extract of Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae) seeds (MEMO) was most potent with IC50 1.7 ± 0.1 µg/mL and was selected for in vitro studies on isolated rat corpus cavernosum smooth muscle and in vivo sexual behaviour studies on healthy and diabetic rats. Rats were divided into five groups, each containing six animals and treated orally with either water, vehicle (1% Tween-20), MEMO (45 and 90 mg/kg/day for 21 days), and standard drug, sildenafil (5 mg/kg/day for 7 days). An equal number of female rats were used, and the effect of MEMO and sildenafil was compared with that of vehicle. MEMO significantly relaxed isolated rat corpus cavernosum smooth muscle at 0.1-100 µg/mL in vitro and significantly increased (p < 0.05) sexual activity, intracavernous pressure/mean arterial pressure in normal and diabetic rats. The increase in erectile function of rats by MEMO could be because of its sEH inhibitory activity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Role of phosphatase activity of soluble epoxide hydrolase in regulating simvastatin-activated endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hsin-Han; Liao, Yi-Jen; Hsiao, Sheng-Huang; Shyue, Song-Kun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2015-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) has C-terminal epoxide hydrolase and N-terminal lipid phosphatase activity. Its hydrolase activity is associated with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction. However, little is known about the role of sEH phosphatase in regulating eNOS activity. Simvastatin, a clinical lipid-lowering drug, also has a pleiotropic effect on eNOS activation. However, whether sEH phosphatase is involved in simvastatin-activated eNOS activity remains elusive. We investigated the role of sEH phosphatase activity in simvastatin-mediated activation of eNOS in endothelial cells (ECs). Simvastain increased the phosphatase activity of sEH, which was diminished by pharmacological inhibitors of sEH phosphatase. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of sEH phosphatase or overexpressing the inactive phosphatase domain of sEH enhanced simvastatin-induced NO bioavailability, tube formation and phosphorylation of eNOS, Akt, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In contrast, overexpressing the phosphatase domain of sEH limited the simvastatin-increased NO biosynthesis and eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1179. Simvastatin evoked epidermal growth factor receptor–c-Src–increased Tyr phosphorylation of sEH and formation of an sEH–Akt–AMPK–eNOS complex, which was abolished by the c-Src kinase inhibitor PP1 or c-Src dominant-negative mutant K298M. These findings suggest that sEH phosphatase activity negatively regulates simvastatin-activated eNOS by impeding the Akt–AMPK–eNOS signaling cascade. PMID:26304753

  9. Role of phosphatase activity of soluble epoxide hydrolase in regulating simvastatin-activated endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hsin-Han; Liao, Yi-Jen; Hsiao, Sheng-Huang; Shyue, Song-Kun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2015-08-25

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) has C-terminal epoxide hydrolase and N-terminal lipid phosphatase activity. Its hydrolase activity is associated with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction. However, little is known about the role of sEH phosphatase in regulating eNOS activity. Simvastatin, a clinical lipid-lowering drug, also has a pleiotropic effect on eNOS activation. However, whether sEH phosphatase is involved in simvastatin-activated eNOS activity remains elusive. We investigated the role of sEH phosphatase activity in simvastatin-mediated activation of eNOS in endothelial cells (ECs). Simvastain increased the phosphatase activity of sEH, which was diminished by pharmacological inhibitors of sEH phosphatase. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of sEH phosphatase or overexpressing the inactive phosphatase domain of sEH enhanced simvastatin-induced NO bioavailability, tube formation and phosphorylation of eNOS, Akt, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In contrast, overexpressing the phosphatase domain of sEH limited the simvastatin-increased NO biosynthesis and eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1179. Simvastatin evoked epidermal growth factor receptor-c-Src-increased Tyr phosphorylation of sEH and formation of an sEH-Akt-AMPK-eNOS complex, which was abolished by the c-Src kinase inhibitor PP1 or c-Src dominant-negative mutant K298M. These findings suggest that sEH phosphatase activity negatively regulates simvastatin-activated eNOS by impeding the Akt-AMPK-eNOS signaling cascade.

  10. Involvement of cytochrome P450, glutathione S-transferase, and epoxide hydrolase in the metabolism of aflatoxin B1 and relevance to risk of human liver cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Guengerich, F P; Johnson, W W; Ueng, Y F; Yamazaki, H; Shimada, T

    1996-01-01

    In recent years there has been considerable interest in the effect of variations in activities of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes on cancer incidence. This interest has accelerated with the development of methods for analyzing genetic polymorphisms. However, progress in epidemiology has been slow and the contributions of polymorphisms to risks from individual chemicals and mixtures are often controversial. A series of studies is presented to show the complexities encountered with a single chemical, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). AFB1 is oxidized by human cytochrome P450 enzymes to several products. Only one of these, the 8,9-exo-epoxide, appears to be mutagenic and the others are detoxication products. P450 3A4, which can both activate and detoxicate AFB1, is found in the liver and the small intestine. In the small intestine, the first contact after oral exposure, epoxidation would not lead to liver cancer. The (nonenzymatic) half-life of the epoxide has been determined to be approximately 1 sec at 23 degrees C and neutral pH. Although the half-life is short, AFB1-8,9-exo-epoxide does react with DNA and glutathione S-transferase. Levels of these conjugates have been measured and combined with the rate of hydrolysis in a kinetic model to predict constants for binding of the epoxide with DNA and glutathione S-transferase. A role for epoxide hydrolase in alteration of AFB1 hepatocarcinogenesis has been proposed, although experimental evidence is lacking. Some inhibition of microsome-generated genotoxicity was observed with rat epoxide hydrolase; further information on the extent of contribution of this enzyme to AFB1 metabolism is not yet available. PMID:8781383

  11. Isolation and Characterization of the Epoxide Hydrolase-Encoding Gene from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Hans; de Bont, Jan A. M.; Verdoes, Jan C.

    1999-01-01

    The epoxide hydrolase (EH)-encoding gene (EPH1) from the basidiomycetous yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous was isolated. The genomic sequence has a 1,236-bp open reading frame which is interrupted by eight introns that encode a 411-amino-acid polypeptide with a calculated molecular mass of 46.2 kDa. The amino acid sequence is similar to that of microsomal EH and belongs to the α/β hydrolase fold family. The EPH1 gene was not essential for growth of X. dendrorhous in rich medium under laboratory conditions. The Eph1-encoding cDNA was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. A sixfold increase in specific activity was observed when we used resting cells rather than X. dendrorhous. The epoxides 1,2-epoxyhexane and 1-methylcyclohexene oxide were substrates for both native and recombinant Eph1. Isolation and characterization of the X. dendrorhous EH-encoding gene are essential steps in developing a yeast EH-based epoxide biotransformation system. PMID:10584004

  12. Omeprazole increases the efficacy of a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor in a PGE₂ induced pain model.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Inceoglu, Bora; Yang, Jun; Wan, Debin; Kodani, Sean D; da Silva, Carlos Antonio Trindade; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-12-15

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are potent endogenous analgesic metabolites produced from arachidonic acid by cytochrome P450s (P450s). Metabolism of EETs by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) reduces their activity, while their stabilization by sEH inhibition decreases both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Here, we tested the complementary hypothesis that increasing the level of EETs through induction of P450s by omeprazole (OME), can influence pain related signaling by itself, and potentiate the anti-hyperalgesic effect of sEH inhibitor. Rats were treated with OME (100mg/kg/day, p.o., 7 days), sEH inhibitor TPPU (3mg/kg/day, p.o.) and OME (100mg/kg/day, p.o., 7 days)+TPPU (3mg/kg/day, p.o., last 3 days of OME dose) dissolved in vehicle PEG400, and their effect on hyperalgesia (increased sensitivity to pain) induced by PGE2 was monitored. While OME treatment by itself exhibited variable effects on PGE2 induced hyperalgesia, it strongly potentiated the effect of TPPU in the same assay. The significant decrease in pain with OME+TPPU treatment correlated with the increased levels of EETs in plasma and increased activities of P450 1A1 and P450 1A2 in liver microsomes. The results show that reducing catabolism of EETs with a sEH inhibitor yielded a stronger analgesic effect than increasing generation of EETs by OME, and combination of both yielded the strongest pain reducing effect under the condition of this study. PMID:26522832

  13. Improved catalytic performance of Bacillus megaterium epoxide hydrolase in a medium containing Tween-80.

    PubMed

    Gong, Peng-Fei; Xu, Jian-He; Tang, Yan-Fa; Wu, Hui-Yuan

    2003-01-01

    A new epoxide hydrolase with high enantioselectivity toward (R)-glycidyl phenyl ether (R-GPE) was partially purified from Bacillus megaterium strain ECU1001. The maximum activity of the isolated enzyme was observed at 30 degrees C and pH 6.5 in a buffer system with 5% (v/v) of DMSO as a cosolvent. The enzyme was quite stable at pH 7.5 and retained full activity after incubation at 40 degrees C for 6 h. Interestingly, when the cosolvent DMSO was replaced by an emulsifier (Tween-80, 0.5% w/v) as an alternative additive to help disperse the water-insoluble substrate, the apparent activity of the epoxide hydrolase significantly increased by about 1.8-fold, while the temperature optimum shifted from 30 to 40 degrees C and the half-life of the enzyme at 50 degrees C increased by 2.5 times. The enzymatic hydrolysis of rac-GPE was highly enantioselective, with an E-value (enantiomeric ratio) of 69.3 in the Tween-80 emulsion system, which is obviously higher than that (41.2) observed in the DMSO-containing system. PMID:12675611

  14. Heavy chain single-domain antibodies to detect native human soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yongliang; Li, Dongyang; Morisseau, Christophe; Dong, Jie-Xian; Yang, Jun; Wan, Debin; Rossotti, Martín A; Gee, Shirley J; González-Sapienza, Gualberto G; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-09-01

    The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a potential pharmacological target for treating hypertension, vascular inflammation, pain, cancer, and other diseases. However, there is not a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to estimate levels of active sEH in tissues. Toward developing such an assay, a polyclonal variable domain of heavy chain antibody (VHH) sandwich immunoassay was developed. Ten VHHs, which are highly selective for native human sEH, were isolated from a phage-displayed library. The ten VHHs have no significant cross-reactivity with human microsomal epoxide hydrolase, rat and mouse sEH, and denatured human sEH. There is a high correlation between protein levels of the sEH determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the catalytic activity of the enzyme in S9 fractions of human tissues (liver, kidney, and lung). The VHH-based ELISA appears to be a new reliable method for monitoring the sEH and may be useful as a diagnostic tool for diseases influenced by sEH. This study also demonstrates the broad utility of VHH in biochemical and pharmacological research.

  15. Heavy Chain Single Domain Antibodies to Detect Native Human Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yongliang; Li, Dongyang; Morisseau, Christophe; Yang, Jun; Wan, Debin; Rossotti, Martín A.; Gee, Shirley J.; González-Sapienza, Gualberto G.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a potential pharmacological target for treating hypertension, vascular inflammation, pain, cancer and other diseases. However, there is not a simple, inexpensive and reliable method to estimate levels of active sEH in tissues. Toward developing such an assay, a polyclonal-variable domain of heavy chain antibody (VHH) sandwich immunoassay was developed. Ten VHHs, which are highly selective for native human sEH, were isolated from a phage displayed library. The ten VHHs have no significant cross-reactivity with human microsomal epoxide hydrolase, rat and mouse sEH, and denatured human sEH. There is a high correlation between protein levels of the sEH determined by the ELISA and the catalytic activity of the enzyme in S9 fractions of human tissues (liver, kidney and lung). The VHH based ELISA appears to be a new reliable method for monitoring the sEH, and may be useful as a diagnostic tool for diseases influenced by sEH. This study also demonstrates the broad utility of VHH in biochemical and pharmacological research. PMID:26229025

  16. The Molecular Structure of Epoxide Hydrolase B From And Its Complex With Urea-Based Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, B.K.; Morisseau, C.; Garen, G.; Cherney, M.M.; Garen, C.; Niu, C.; Hammock, B.D.; James, M.N.G.

    2009-05-11

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the intracellular pathogen that infects macrophages primarily, is the causative agent of the infectious disease tuberculosis in humans. The Mtb genome encodes at least six epoxide hydrolases (EHs A to F). EHs convert epoxides to trans-dihydrodiols and have roles in drug metabolism as well as in the processing of signaling molecules. Herein, we report the crystal structures of unbound Mtb EHB and Mtb EHB bound to a potent, low-nanomolar (IC(50) approximately 19 nM) urea-based inhibitor at 2.1 and 2.4 A resolution, respectively. The enzyme is a homodimer; each monomer adopts the classical alpha/beta hydrolase fold that composes the catalytic domain; there is a cap domain that regulates access to the active site. The catalytic triad, comprising Asp104, His333 and Asp302, protrudes from the catalytic domain into the substrate binding cavity between the two domains. The urea portion of the inhibitor is bound in the catalytic cavity, mimicking, in part, the substrate binding; the two urea nitrogen atoms donate hydrogen bonds to the nucleophilic carboxylate of Asp104, and the carbonyl oxygen of the urea moiety receives hydrogen bonds from the phenolic oxygen atoms of Tyr164 and Tyr272. The phenolic oxygen groups of these two residues provide electrophilic assistance during the epoxide hydrolytic cleavage. Upon inhibitor binding, the binding-site residues undergo subtle structural rearrangement. In particular, the side chain of Ile137 exhibits a rotation of around 120 degrees about its C(alpha)-C(beta) bond in order to accommodate the inhibitor. These findings have not only shed light on the enzyme mechanism but also have opened a path for the development of potent inhibitors with good pharmacokinetic profiles against all Mtb EHs of the alpha/beta type.

  17. Soluble epoxide hydrolase gene deletion improves blood flow and reduces infarct size after cerebral ischemia in reproductively senescent female mice

    PubMed Central

    Zuloaga, Kristen L.; Zhang, Wenri; Roese, Natalie E.; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), a key enzyme in the metabolism of vasodilatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), is sexually dimorphic, suppressed by estrogen, and contributes to underlying sex differences in cerebral blood flow and injury after cerebral ischemia. We tested the hypothesis that sEH inhibition or gene deletion in reproductively senescent (RS) female mice would increase cerebral perfusion and decrease infarct size following stroke. RS (15–18 month old) and young (3–4 month old) female sEH knockout (sEHKO) mice and wild type (WT) mice were subjected to 45 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with laser Doppler perfusion monitoring. WT mice were treated with vehicle or a sEH inhibitor t-AUCB at the time of reperfusion and every 24 h thereafter for 3 days. Differences in regional cerebral blood flow were measured in vivo using optical microangiography (OMAG). Infarct size was measured 3 days after reperfusion. Infarct size and cerebral perfusion 24 h after MCAO were not altered by age. Both sEH gene deletion and sEH inhibition increased cortical perfusion 24 h after MCAO. Neither sEH gene deletion nor sEH inhibition reduced infarct size in young mice. However, sEH gene deletion, but not sEH inhibition of the hydrolase domain of the enzyme, decreased infarct size in RS mice. Results of these studies show that sEH gene deletion and sEH inhibition enhance cortical perfusion following MCAO and sEH gene deletion reduces damage after ischemia in RS female mice; however this neuroprotection in absent is young mice. PMID:25642188

  18. Structure-activity relationships of amide-phosphonate derivatives as inhibitors of the human soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Hae; Park, Yong-Kyu; Nishiwaki, Hisashi; Hammock, Bruce D; Nishi, Kosuke

    2015-11-15

    Structure-activity relationships of amide-phosphonate derivatives as inhibitors of the human soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) were investigated. First, a series of alkyl or aryl groups were substituted on the carbon alpha to the phosphonate function in amide compounds to see whether substituted phosphonates can act as a secondary pharmacophore. A tert-butyl group (16) on the alpha carbon was found to yield most potent inhibition on the target enzyme. A 4-50-fold drop in inhibition was induced by other substituents such as aryls, substituted aryls, cycloalkyls, and alkyls. Then, the modification of the O-substituents on the phosphonate function revealed that diethyl groups (16 and 23) were preferable for inhibition to other longer alkyls or substituted alkyls. In amide compounds with the optimized diethylphosphonate moiety and an alkyl substitution such as adamantane (16), tetrahydronaphthalene (31), or adamantanemethane (36), highly potent inhibitions were gained. In addition, the resulting potent amide-phosphonate compounds had reasonable water solubility, suggesting that substituted phosphonates in amide inhibitors are effective for both inhibition potency on the human sEH and water solubility as a secondary pharmacophore.

  19. Distribution of soluble and microsomal epoxide hydrolase in the mouse brain and its contribution to cerebral epoxyeicosatrienoic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Marowsky, A; Burgener, J; Falck, J R; Fritschy, J-M; Arand, M

    2009-10-01

    Epoxide hydrolases comprise a family of enzymes important in detoxification and conversion of lipid signaling molecules, namely epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), to their supposedly less active form, dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs). EETs control cerebral blood flow, exert analgesic, anti-inflammatory and angiogenic effects and protect against ischemia. Although the role of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) in EET metabolism is well established, knowledge on its detailed distribution in rodent brain is rather limited. Here, we analyzed the expression pattern of sEH and of another important member of the EH family, microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH), in mouse brain by immunohistochemistry. To investigate the functional relevance of these enzymes in brain, we explored their individual contribution to EET metabolism in acutely isolated brain cells from respective EH -/- mice and wild type littermates by mass spectrometry. We find sEH immunoreactivity almost exclusively in astrocytes throughout the brain, except in the central amygdala, where neurons are also positive for sEH. mEH immunoreactivity is abundant in brain vascular cells (endothelial and smooth muscle cells) and in choroid plexus epithelial cells. In addition, mEH immunoreactivity is present in specific neuronal populations of the hippocampus, striatum, amygdala, and cerebellum, as well as in a fraction of astrocytes. In freshly isolated cells from hippocampus, where both enzymes are expressed, sEH mediates the bulk of EET metabolism. Yet we observe a significant contribution of mEH, pointing to a novel role of this enzyme in the regulation of physiological processes. Furthermore, our findings indicate the presence of additional, hitherto unknown cerebral epoxide hydrolases. Taken together, cerebral EET metabolism is driven by several epoxide hydrolases, a fact important in view of the present targeting of sEH as a potential therapeutic target. Our findings suggest that these different enzymes have

  20. Peroxisomal translocation of soluble epoxide hydrolase protects against ischemic stroke injury

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jonathan W; Zhang, Wenri; Alkayed, Nabil J; Koerner, Ines P

    2015-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) contributes to cardiovascular disease, including stroke, although the exact mechanism remains unclear. While primarily a cytosolic enzyme, sEH can translocate into peroxisomes. The relevance of this for stroke injury is not understood. We tested the hypothesis that sEH-mediated injury is tied to the cytoplasmic localization. We found that a human sEH variant possessing increased affinity to peroxisomes reduced stroke injury in sEH-null mice, whereas infarcts were significantly larger when peroxisomal translocation of sEH was disrupted. We conclude that sEH contributes to stroke injury only when localized in the cytoplasm, while peroxisomal sEH may be protective. PMID:26126869

  1. Compositional profile of α/β-hydrolase fold proteins in mangrove soil metagenomes: prevalence of epoxide hydrolases and haloalkane dehalogenases in oil-contaminated sites

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Ottoni, Júlia Ronzella; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of genes encoding biotechnologically relevant α/β-hydrolases in mangrove soil microbial communities was assessed using data obtained by whole-metagenome sequencing of four mangroves areas, denoted BrMgv01 to BrMgv04, in São Paulo, Brazil. The sequences (215 Mb in total) were filtered based on local amino acid alignments against the Lipase Engineering Database. In total, 5923 unassembled sequences were affiliated with 30 different α/β-hydrolase fold superfamilies. The most abundant predicted proteins encompassed cytosolic hydrolases (abH08; ∼ 23%), microsomal hydrolases (abH09; ∼ 12%) and Moraxella lipase-like proteins (abH04 and abH01; < 5%). Detailed analysis of the genes predicted to encode proteins of the abH08 superfamily revealed a high proportion related to epoxide hydrolases and haloalkane dehalogenases in polluted mangroves BrMgv01-02-03. This suggested selection and putative involvement in local degradation/detoxification of the pollutants. Seven sequences that were annotated as genes for putative epoxide hydrolases and five for putative haloalkane dehalogenases were found in a fosmid library generated from BrMgv02 DNA. The latter enzymes were predicted to belong to Actinobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria. Our integrated approach thus identified 12 genes (complete and/or partial) that may encode hitherto undescribed enzymes. The low amino acid identity (< 60%) with already-described genes opens perspectives for both production in an expression host and genetic screening of metagenomes. PMID:25171437

  2. Effect of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase on the Modulation of Coronary Reactive Hyperemia: Role of Oxylipins and PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Ahmad; Edin, Matthew L; Zeldin, Darryl C; Morisseau, Christophe; Nayeem, Mohammed A

    2016-01-01

    Coronary reactive hyperemia (CRH) is a physiological response to ischemic insult that prevents the potential harm associated with an interruption of blood supply. The relationship between the pharmacologic inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) and CRH response to a brief ischemia is not known. sEH is involved in the main catabolic pathway of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), which are converted into dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs). EETs protect against ischemia/reperfusion injury and have numerous beneficial physiological effects. We hypothesized that inhibition of sEH by t-AUCB enhances CRH in isolated mouse hearts through changing the oxylipin profiles, including an increase in EETs/DHETs ratio. Compared to controls, t-AUCB-treated mice had increased CRH, including repayment volume (RV), repayment duration, and repayment/debt ratio (p < 0.05). Treatment with t-AUCB significantly changed oxylipin profiles, including an increase in EET/DHET ratio, increase in EpOME/DiHOME ratio, increase in the levels of HODEs, decrease in the levels of mid-chain HETEs, and decrease in prostanoids (p < 0.05). Treatment with MS-PPOH (CYP epoxygenase inhibitor) reduced CRH, including RV (p < 0.05). Involvement of PPARγ in the modulation of CRH was demonstrated using a PPARγ-antagonist (T0070907) and a PPARγ-agonist (rosiglitazone). T0070907 reduced CRH (p < 0.05), whereas rosiglitazone enhanced CRH (p < 0.05) in isolated mouse hearts compared to the non-treated. These data demonstrate that sEH inhibition enhances, whereas CYP epoxygenases-inhibition attenuates CRH, PPARγ mediate CRH downstream of the CYP epoxygenases-EET pathway, and the changes in oxylipin profiles associated with sEH-inhibition collectively contributed to the enhanced CRH. PMID:27583776

  3. Effect of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase on the Modulation of Coronary Reactive Hyperemia: Role of Oxylipins and PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Hanif, Ahmad; Edin, Matthew L.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Morisseau, Christophe; Nayeem, Mohammed A.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary reactive hyperemia (CRH) is a physiological response to ischemic insult that prevents the potential harm associated with an interruption of blood supply. The relationship between the pharmacologic inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) and CRH response to a brief ischemia is not known. sEH is involved in the main catabolic pathway of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), which are converted into dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs). EETs protect against ischemia/reperfusion injury and have numerous beneficial physiological effects. We hypothesized that inhibition of sEH by t-AUCB enhances CRH in isolated mouse hearts through changing the oxylipin profiles, including an increase in EETs/DHETs ratio. Compared to controls, t-AUCB–treated mice had increased CRH, including repayment volume (RV), repayment duration, and repayment/debt ratio (p < 0.05). Treatment with t-AUCB significantly changed oxylipin profiles, including an increase in EET/DHET ratio, increase in EpOME/DiHOME ratio, increase in the levels of HODEs, decrease in the levels of mid-chain HETEs, and decrease in prostanoids (p < 0.05). Treatment with MS-PPOH (CYP epoxygenase inhibitor) reduced CRH, including RV (p < 0.05). Involvement of PPARγ in the modulation of CRH was demonstrated using a PPARγ-antagonist (T0070907) and a PPARγ-agonist (rosiglitazone). T0070907 reduced CRH (p < 0.05), whereas rosiglitazone enhanced CRH (p < 0.05) in isolated mouse hearts compared to the non-treated. These data demonstrate that sEH inhibition enhances, whereas CYP epoxygenases-inhibition attenuates CRH, PPARγ mediate CRH downstream of the CYP epoxygenases-EET pathway, and the changes in oxylipin profiles associated with sEH-inhibition collectively contributed to the enhanced CRH. PMID:27583776

  4. Metabolic products of soluble epoxide hydrolase are essential for monocyte chemotaxis to MCP-1 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Suman; Roome, Talat; Bhattacharjee, Ashish; Carnevale, Kevin A; Yakubenko, Valentin P; Zhang, Renliang; Hwang, Sung Hee; Hammock, Bruce D; Cathcart, Martha K

    2013-02-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)-induced monocyte chemotaxis is a major event in inflammatory disease. Our prior studies have demonstrated that MCP-1-dependent chemotaxis requires release of arachidonic acid (AA) by activated cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)). Here we investigated the involvement of AA metabolites in chemotaxis. Neither cyclooxygenase nor lipoxygenase pathways were required, whereas pharmacologic inhibitors of both the cytochrome-P450 (CYP) and the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathways blocked monocyte chemotaxis to MCP-1. To verify specificity, we demonstrated that the CYP and sEH products epoxyeiscosatrienoic acids (EETs) and dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), respectively, restored chemotaxis in the presence of the inhibitors, indicating that sEH-derived products are essential for MCP-1-driven chemotaxis. Importantly, DHETs also rescued chemotaxis in cPLA(2)-deficient monocytes and monocytes with blocked Erk1/2 activity, because Erk controls cPLA(2) activation. The in vitro findings regarding the involvement of CYP/sEH pathways were further validated in vivo using two complementary approaches measuring MCP-1-dependent chemotaxis in mice. These observations reveal the importance of sEH in MCP-1-regulated monocyte chemotaxis and may explain the observed therapeutic value of sEH inhibitors in treatment of inflammatory diseases, cardiovascular diseases, pain, and even carcinogenesis. Their effectiveness, often attributed to increasing EET levels, is probably influenced by the impairment of DHET formation and inhibition of chemotaxis.

  5. Metabolic products of soluble epoxide hydrolase are essential for monocyte chemotaxis to MCP-1 in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Suman; Roome, Talat; Bhattacharjee, Ashish; Carnevale, Kevin A.; Yakubenko, Valentin P.; Zhang, Renliang; Hwang, Sung Hee; Hammock, Bruce D.; Cathcart, Martha K.

    2013-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)-induced monocyte chemotaxis is a major event in inflammatory disease. Our prior studies have demonstrated that MCP-1-dependent chemotaxis requires release of arachidonic acid (AA) by activated cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). Here we investigated the involvement of AA metabolites in chemotaxis. Neither cyclooxygenase nor lipoxygenase pathways were required, whereas pharmacologic inhibitors of both the cytochrome-P450 (CYP) and the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathways blocked monocyte chemotaxis to MCP-1. To verify specificity, we demonstrated that the CYP and sEH products epoxyeiscosatrienoic acids (EETs) and dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), respectively, restored chemotaxis in the presence of the inhibitors, indicating that sEH-derived products are essential for MCP-1-driven chemotaxis. Importantly, DHETs also rescued chemotaxis in cPLA2-deficient monocytes and monocytes with blocked Erk1/2 activity, because Erk controls cPLA2 activation. The in vitro findings regarding the involvement of CYP/sEH pathways were further validated in vivo using two complementary approaches measuring MCP-1-dependent chemotaxis in mice. These observations reveal the importance of sEH in MCP-1-regulated monocyte chemotaxis and may explain the observed therapeutic value of sEH inhibitors in treatment of inflammatory diseases, cardiovascular diseases, pain, and even carcinogenesis. Their effectiveness, often attributed to increasing EET levels, is probably influenced by the impairment of DHET formation and inhibition of chemotaxis. PMID:23160182

  6. Ovarian expressed microsomal epoxide hydrolase: Role in detoxification of 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide and regulation by phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Poulomi; Sen, Nivedita; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Keating, Aileen F.

    2012-01-01

    4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) is a metabolite of 4-vinylcyclohexene (VCH) which has the potential to be formed in the ovary through CYP2E1 activity. VCD specifically destroys primordial and small primary follicles in the rodent ovary. Mouse ovaries exposed to VCD demonstrate increased mRNA and protein expression of microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH), and an inactive tetrol metabolite (4-(1,2-dihydroxy)ethyl-1,2-dihydroxycyclohexane) can be formed in mouse ovarian follicles, potentially through detoxification action of mEH. In contrast, mEH can bioactivate another ovotoxic chemical, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) to a more toxic compound, DMBA-3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide. Thus, the present study evaluated a functional role for mEH during detoxification of VCD. Additionally, because inhibition of the phosphatidyinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway in a previous study protected primordial follicles from VCD-induced destruction, but accelerated DMBA-induced ovotoxicity, a role for PI3K in ovarian mEH regulation was evaluated. Using a post-natal day (PND) 4 Fischer 344 rat whole ovary culture system inhibition of mEH using cyclohexene oxide during VCD exposure resulted in a greater (P < 0.05) loss of primordial and small primary follicles relative to VCD-treated ovaries. Also, relative to controls, meh mRNA was increased (P < 0.05) on day 4 of VCD (30 μM) exposure, followed by increased (P < 0.05) mEH protein after 6 days. Furthermore, inhibition of PI3K signaling increased mEH mRNA and protein expression. Thus, these results support a functional role for mEH in the rat ovary, and demonstrate the involvement of PI3K signaling in regulation of ovarian xenobiotic metabolism by mEH. -- Highlights: ► Ovarian mEH functions to metabolize VCD to a less toxic compound. ► mEH expression is increased in a temporal pattern in response to VCD exposure. ► PI3K signaling is involved in regulation of ovarian mEH expression.

  7. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase as a Potential Key Factor for Human Prenatal Development.

    PubMed

    Cizkova, Katerina; Rajdova, Aneta; Ehrmann, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) converts highly active epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) generated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenases from arachidonic acid to less active dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids. Because of the role of EETs in processes potentially relevant to the development of organisms, EETs could be suggested as potential morphogens. Unfortunately, only little is known about sEH expression during human intrauterine development (IUD). We investigated the spatio-temporal expression pattern of sEH in human embryonic/foetal intestines, liver and kidney from the 6th to the 20th week of IUD by two-step immunohistochemistry. sEH was expressed during the whole tested period of prenatal development and its level of expression remained more or less the same during the estimated period of IUD. Distribution of CYP epoxygenases and sEH in the intestinal epithelium and the nephrogenic zone of the kidney suggests an influence of EETs on cell proliferation and differentiation and, consequently, on the development of intestines and kidney. Thus, alterations in the strict spatio-temporal pattern of expression of CYP epoxygenases and/or sEH during human prenatal development by xenobiotics could have a harmful impact for developing organisms. PMID:27144772

  8. ROLE OF SOLUBLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASE IN AGE-RELATED VASCULAR COGNITIVE DECLINE

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jonathan W.; Young, Jennifer M.; Borkar, Rohan; Woltjer, Randy L.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Silbert, Lisa C.; Grafe, Marjorie R.; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2014-01-01

    P450 eicosanoids are important regulators of the cerebral microcirculation, but their role in cerebral small vessel disease is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is linked to reduced cerebral microvascular eicosanoid signaling. We analyzed human brain tissue from individuals formerly enrolled in the Oregon Brain Aging Study, who had a history of cognitive impairment histopathological evidence of microvascular disease. VCI subjects had significantly higher lesion burden both on premortem MRI and postmortem histopathology compared to age- and sex-matched controls. Mass spectrometry-based eicosanoid analysis revealed that 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (DHET) was elevated in cortical brain tissue from VCI subjects. Immunoreactivity of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), the enzyme responsible for 14,15-DHET formation, was localized to cerebral microvascular endothelium, and was enhanced in microvessels of affected tissue. Finally, we evaluated the genotype frequency of two functional single nucleotide polymorphisms of sEH gene EPHX2 in VCI and control groups. Our findings support a role for sEH and a potential benefit from sEH inhibitors in age-related VCI. PMID:25277097

  9. Microsomal epoxide hydrolase of rat liver is a subunit of theanti-oestrogen-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Mésange, F; Sebbar, M; Kedjouar, B; Capdevielle, J; Guillemot, J C; Ferrara, P; Bayard, F; Delarue, F; Faye, J C; Poirot, M

    1998-01-01

    A tritiated photoaffinity labelling analogue of tamoxifen, [(2-azido-4-benzyl)-phenoxy]-N-ethylmorpholine (azido-MBPE), was used to identify the anti-oestrogen-binding site (AEBS) in rat liver tissue [Poirot, Chailleux, Fargin, Bayard and Faye (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 17039-17043]. UV irradiation of rat liver microsomal proteins incubated with tritiated azido-MBPE led to the characterization of two photolabelled proteins of molecular masses 40 and 50 kDa. The amino acid sequences of proteolytic products from the 50 kDa protein were identical with those from rat microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH). Treatment of hepatocytes with anti-sense mRNA directed against mEH abolished AEBS in these cells. In addition we found that tamoxifen and N-morpholino-2-[4-(phenylmethyl)phenoxy]ethanamine, a selective ligand of AEBS, were potent inhibitors of the catalytic hydration of styrene oxide by mEH. However, functional overexpression of the human mEH did not significantly modify the binding capacity of [3H]tamoxifen. Taken together, these results suggest that the 50 kDa protein, mEH, is necessary but not sufficient to reconstitute AEBS. PMID:9693109

  10. Rational Design of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of an Epoxide Hydrolase Virulence Factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Seiya; Hvorecny, Kelli L; Niu, Jun; Hammock, Bruce D; Madden, Dean R; Morisseau, Christophe

    2016-05-26

    The virulence factor cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitory factor (Cif) is secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and is the founding member of a distinct class of epoxide hydrolases (EHs) that triggers the catalysis-dependent degradation of the CFTR. We describe here the development of a series of potent and selective Cif inhibitors by structure-based drug design. Initial screening revealed 1a (KB2115), a thyroid hormone analog, as a lead compound with low micromolar potency. Structural requirements for potency were systematically probed, and interactions between Cif and 1a were characterized by X-ray crystallography. On the basis of these data, new compounds were designed to yield additional hydrogen bonding with residues of the Cif active site. From this effort, three compounds were identified that are 10-fold more potent toward Cif than our first-generation inhibitors and have no detectable thyroid hormone-like activity. These inhibitors will be useful tools to study the pathological role of Cif and have the potential for clinical application. PMID:27120257

  11. Metabolism and toxicity of styrene in microsomal epoxide hydrolase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Gary P

    2010-01-01

    Styrene, which is widely used in manufacturing, is both acutely and chronically toxic to mice. Styrene is metabolized by cytochromes P-450 to the toxic metabolite styrene oxide, which is detoxified via hydrolysis with microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) playing a major role. The purpose of these studies was to characterize the importance of this pathway by determining the hepatotoxicity and pneumotoxicity of styrene in wild-type and mEH-deficient (mEH(-/-)) mice. While the mEH(-/-) mice metabolized styrene to styrene oxide at the same rate as the wild-type mice, as expected there was minimal metabolism of styrene oxide to glycol. mEH(-/-) mice were more susceptible to the lethal effects of styrene. Twenty-four hours following the administration of 200 mg/kg ip styrene, mice demonstrated a greater hepatotoxic response due to styrene, as measured by increased serum sorbitol dehydrogenase activity and greater pneumotoxicity as shown by increased protein levels, cell numbers, and lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid. mEH(-/-) mice were also more susceptible to styrene-induced oxidative stress, as indicated by greater decreases in hepatic glutathione levels 3 h after styrene. Styrene oxide at a dose of 150 mg/kg did not produce hepatotoxicity in either wild-type or mEH(-/-) mice. However, styrene oxide produced pneumotoxicity that was similar in the two strains. Thus, mEH plays an important role in the detoxification of styrene but not for exogenously administered styrene oxide.

  12. Colorectal polyp type and the association with charred meat consumption, smoking, and microsomal epoxide hydrolase polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N; Newcomb, Polly A; Mandelson, Margaret T; Adams, Scott V; Wernli, Karen J; Shadman, Mazyar; Wurscher, Michelle A; Makar, Karen W

    2011-01-01

    We determined the association between charred meat consumption, cigarette smoking, microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) polymorphisms (rs1051740 and rs2234922), and colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps (HPs) and explored gene-environment interactions. Men and women with colorectal adenomas (n = 519), HPs (n = 691), or concurrently with both types of polyps (n = 227) and polyp-free controls (n = 772) receiving a colonoscopy from December 2004 to September 2007 were recruited. Participants completed telephone interviews and provided buccal cell samples; genotyping of mEH was completed using Taqman assays. We conducted polytomous regression and calculated odd ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals. Interactions were evaluated using Wald chi-square tests. Consumption of >3 servings of charred meat per week was associated with distal HPs (OR = 2.0, 1.2-3.4) but not adenomas nor either type of proximal polyp. Heavy cigarette smoking (≥ 22 pack-years) was associated with an increased risk for colorectal adenomas (OR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.2-2.4), HPs (OR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.7-3.3), and both types (OR = 2.8, 95% CI: 1.8-4.3) with the strongest association for distal polyps. There was no association between mEH genotype and colorectal polyps, nor were any statistically significant gene-environment interactions identified. Future investigation of BaP exposure and colorectal neoplasia should analyze whether associations are dependent upon anatomic location.

  13. Lung cancer risk in relation to genetic polymorphisms of microsomal epoxide hydrolase among African-Americans and Caucasians in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    London, S J; Smart, J; Daly, A K

    2000-05-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase participates in the metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene, an important carcinogen in tobacco smoke. Two relatively common polymorphisms of the microsomal epoxide hydrolase gene that influence enzyme activity have been described. An association between genetic variation in microsomal epoxide hydrolase and lung cancer risk has been reported in one of two studies of Caucasians. We examined the relation between these two polymorphisms and lung cancer risk among 337 incident cases and 700 population controls of African-American and Caucasian ethnicity enrolled in a case-control study in Los Angeles County. African-Americans, homozygous for the exon 3 variant allele conferring reduced activity, were at decreased risk of lung cancer (odds ratio (OR)=0.08, 95% CI 0.01-0.62). When data from both the exon 3 and exon 4 polymorphisms were combined into indices of predicted microsomal epoxide hydrolase activity, a decreased risk was seen among African-American subjects with very low predicted activity OR=0.10 (95% CI 0.01-0.83). No comparable association was seen among Caucasians. Although the three published results for Caucasians are somewhat variable, the association among African-Americans in these data provides some support for the hypothesis that genetically reduced microsomal epoxide hydrolase activity may be protective against lung cancer.

  14. Characterization of two juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolases by RNA interference in the Colorado potato beetle.

    PubMed

    Lü, Feng-Gong; Fu, Kai-Yun; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-10-10

    In insect, juvenile hormone (JH) titers are tightly regulated in different development stages through synthesis and degradation pathways. During JH degradation, JH epoxide hydrolase (JHEH) converts JH to JH diol, and hydrolyses JH acid to JH acid diol. In this study, two full length LdJHEH cDNAs were cloned from Leptinotarsa decemlineata, and were provisionally designated LdJHEH1 and LdJHEH2. Both mRNAs were detectable in the thoracic muscles, brain-corpora cardiaca-corpora allata complex, foregut, midgut, hindgut, ventral ganglia, Malpighian tubules, fat bodies, epidermis, and hemocytes of the day 2 fourth-instar larvae, and in female ovaries as well as male reproductive organs of the adults. Moreover, both LdJHEH1 and LdJHEH2 were expressed throughout all larval life, with the highest peaks occurring 32h after ecdysis of the final (fourth) instar larvae. Four double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) (dsJHEH1-1, dsJHEH1-2, dsJHEH2-1, dsJHEH2-2) respectively targeting LdJHEH1 and LdJHEH2 were constructed and bacterially expressed. Ingestion of dsJHEH1-1, dsJHEH1-2, dsJHEH2-1, dsJHEH2-2, and a mixture of dsJHEH1-1+dsJHEH2-1 successfully knocked down corresponding target gene function, and significantly increased JH titer and upregulated Krüppel homolog 1 (LdKr-h1) mRNA level. Knockdown of either LdJHEH1 or LdJHEH2, or both genes slightly reduced larval weight and delayed larval development, and significantly impaired adult emergence. Therefore, it is suggested that knockdown LdJHEH1 and LdJHEH2 affected JH degradation in the Colorado potato beetle. PMID:26079572

  15. Anti-Ulcer Efficacy of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitor TPPU on Diclofenac-Induced Intestinal Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Wan, Debin; Yang, Jun; Trindade da Silva, Carlos A.; Morisseau, Christophe; Kodani, Sean D.; Yang, Guang-Yu; Inceoglu, Bora

    2016-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors such as omeprazole (OME) reduce the severity of gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) but can also increase the chance of dysbiosis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that preventive use of a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor (sEHI) such as TPPU can decrease NSAID-induced ulcers by increasing anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Dose- [10, 30, and 100 mg/kg, by mouth (PO)] and time-dependent (6 and 18 hours) ulcerative effects of diclofenac sodium (DCF, an NSAID) were studied in the small intestine of Swiss Webster mice. Dose-dependent effects of TPPU (0.001–0.1 mg/kg per day for 7 days, in drinking water) were evaluated in DCF-induced intestinal toxicity and compared with OME (20 mg/kg, PO). In addition, the effect of treatment was studied on levels of Hb in blood, EETs in plasma, inflammatory markers such as myeloperoxidase (MPO) in intestinal tissue homogenates, and tissue necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in serum. DCF dose dependently induced ulcers that were associated with both a significant (P < 0.05) loss of Hb and an increase in the level of MPO and TNF-α, with severity of ulceration highest at 18 hours. Pretreatment with TPPU dose dependently prevented ulcer formation by DCF, increased the levels of epoxy fatty acids, including EETs, and TPPU’s efficacy was comparable to OME. TPPU significantly (P < 0.05) reversed the effect of DCF on the level of Hb, MPO, and TNF-α. Thus sEHI might be useful in the management of NSAID-induced ulcers. PMID:26989141

  16. Male mice deficient in microsomal epoxide hydrolase are not susceptible to benzene-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Alison K; Faiola, Brenda; Abernethy, Diane J; Marchan, Rosemarie; Pluta, Linda J; Wong, Victoria A; Gonzalez, Frank J; Butterworth, Byron E; Borghoff, Susan J; Everitt, Jeffrey I; Recio, Leslie

    2003-04-01

    Enzymes involved in benzene metabolism are likely genetic determinants of benzene-induced toxicity. Polymorphisms in human microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) are associated with an increased risk of developing leukemia, specifically those associated with benzene. This study was designed to investigate the importance of mEH in benzene-induced toxicity. Male and female mEH-deficient (mEH-/-) mice and background mice (129/Sv) were exposed to inhaled benzene (0, 10, 50, or 100 ppm) 5 days/week, 6 h/day, for a two-week duration. Total white blood cell counts and bone marrow cell counts were used to assess hematotoxicity and myelotoxicity. Micronucleated peripheral blood cells were counted to assess genotoxicity, and the p21 mRNA level in bone marrow cells was used as a determinant of the p53-regulated DNA damage response. Male mEH-/- mice did not have any significant hematotoxicity or myelotoxicity at the highest benzene exposure compared to the male 129/Sv mice. Significant hematotoxicity or myelotoxicity did not occur in the female mEH-/- or 129/Sv mice. Male mEH-/- mice were also unresponsive to benzene-induced genotoxicity compared to a significant induction in the male 129/Sv mice. The female mEH-/- and 129/Sv mice were virtually unresponsive to benzene-induced genotoxicity. While p21 mRNA expression was highly induced in male 129/Sv mice after exposure to 100-ppm benzene, no significant alteration was observed in male mEH-/- mice. Likewise, p21 mRNA expression in female mEH-/- mice was not significantly induced upon benzene exposure whereas a significant induction was observed in female 129/Sv mice. Thus mEH appears to be critical in benzene-induced toxicity in male, but not female, mice.

  17. Use of a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor as adjunctive analgesic in a laminitic horse

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Alonso G. P.; Morisseau, Christophe; Sole, Albert; Soares, Joao H. N.; Ulu, Arzu; Dong, Hua; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    A 4-year old, 500 kg Thoroughbred female horse diagnosed with bilateral forelimb laminitis and cellulitis on the left forelimb became severely painful and refractory to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory therapy (flunixin meglumine on days 1, 2, 3 and 4; and phenylbutazone on days 5, 6 and 7) alone or in combination with gabapentin (days 6 and 7). Pain scores assessed independently by three individuals with a visual analog scale (VAS; 0= no pain and 10=worst possible pain) were 8.5 on day 6, and it increased to 9.5 on day 7. Non-invasive blood pressure monitoring revealed severe hypertension. As euthanasia was being considered for humane reasons as well as technical and financial constraints, a decision was made to add an experimental new drug, trans-4-{4-[3-(4-Trifluoromethoxy-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-benzoic acid (t-TUCB), which is an inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), to the treatment protocol. Dose and frequency of administration were selected to produce plasma concentrations within the range of 2.5 μM and 30 nM based on the drug potency against equine sEH. Pain scores decreased sharply and remarkably following t-TUCB administration and blood pressure progressively decreased to physiologic normal values. Plasma concentrations of t-TUCB, measured daily, were within the expected range, whereas phenylbutazone and gabapentin plasma levels were below the suggested efficacious concentrations. No adverse effects were detected on clinical and laboratory examinations during and after t-TUCB administration. The mare did not get any episode of laminitis in the three months following the treatment. PMID:23463912

  18. Anti-Ulcer Efficacy of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitor TPPU on Diclofenac-Induced Intestinal Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Wan, Debin; Yang, Jun; Trindade da Silva, Carlos A; Morisseau, Christophe; Kodani, Sean D; Yang, Guang-Yu; Inceoglu, Bora; Hammock, Bruce D

    2016-06-01

    Proton pump inhibitors such as omeprazole (OME) reduce the severity of gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) but can also increase the chance of dysbiosis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that preventive use of a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor (sEHI) such as TPPU can decrease NSAID-induced ulcers by increasing anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Dose- [10, 30, and 100 mg/kg, by mouth (PO)] and time-dependent (6 and 18 hours) ulcerative effects of diclofenac sodium (DCF, an NSAID) were studied in the small intestine of Swiss Webster mice. Dose-dependent effects of TPPU (0.001-0.1 mg/kg per day for 7 days, in drinking water) were evaluated in DCF-induced intestinal toxicity and compared with OME (20 mg/kg, PO). In addition, the effect of treatment was studied on levels of Hb in blood, EETs in plasma, inflammatory markers such as myeloperoxidase (MPO) in intestinal tissue homogenates, and tissue necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in serum. DCF dose dependently induced ulcers that were associated with both a significant (P < 0.05) loss of Hb and an increase in the level of MPO and TNF-α, with severity of ulceration highest at 18 hours. Pretreatment with TPPU dose dependently prevented ulcer formation by DCF, increased the levels of epoxy fatty acids, including EETs, and TPPU's efficacy was comparable to OME. TPPU significantly (P < 0.05) reversed the effect of DCF on the level of Hb, MPO, and TNF-α Thus sEHI might be useful in the management of NSAID-induced ulcers. PMID:26989141

  19. Characterization of two juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolases by RNA interference in the Colorado potato beetle.

    PubMed

    Lü, Feng-Gong; Fu, Kai-Yun; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-10-10

    In insect, juvenile hormone (JH) titers are tightly regulated in different development stages through synthesis and degradation pathways. During JH degradation, JH epoxide hydrolase (JHEH) converts JH to JH diol, and hydrolyses JH acid to JH acid diol. In this study, two full length LdJHEH cDNAs were cloned from Leptinotarsa decemlineata, and were provisionally designated LdJHEH1 and LdJHEH2. Both mRNAs were detectable in the thoracic muscles, brain-corpora cardiaca-corpora allata complex, foregut, midgut, hindgut, ventral ganglia, Malpighian tubules, fat bodies, epidermis, and hemocytes of the day 2 fourth-instar larvae, and in female ovaries as well as male reproductive organs of the adults. Moreover, both LdJHEH1 and LdJHEH2 were expressed throughout all larval life, with the highest peaks occurring 32h after ecdysis of the final (fourth) instar larvae. Four double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) (dsJHEH1-1, dsJHEH1-2, dsJHEH2-1, dsJHEH2-2) respectively targeting LdJHEH1 and LdJHEH2 were constructed and bacterially expressed. Ingestion of dsJHEH1-1, dsJHEH1-2, dsJHEH2-1, dsJHEH2-2, and a mixture of dsJHEH1-1+dsJHEH2-1 successfully knocked down corresponding target gene function, and significantly increased JH titer and upregulated Krüppel homolog 1 (LdKr-h1) mRNA level. Knockdown of either LdJHEH1 or LdJHEH2, or both genes slightly reduced larval weight and delayed larval development, and significantly impaired adult emergence. Therefore, it is suggested that knockdown LdJHEH1 and LdJHEH2 affected JH degradation in the Colorado potato beetle.

  20. Discovery of 1-(1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)piperidine-4-carboxamides as inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Reema K; McAtee, Jeff J; Belyanskaya, Svetlana; Brandt, Martin; Brown, Gregory D; Costell, Melissa H; Ding, Yun; Dodson, Jason W; Eisennagel, Steve H; Fries, Rusty E; Gross, Jeffrey W; Harpel, Mark R; Holt, Dennis A; Israel, David I; Jolivette, Larry J; Krosky, Daniel; Li, Hu; Lu, Quinn; Mandichak, Tracy; Roethke, Theresa; Schnackenberg, Christine G; Schwartz, Benjamin; Shewchuk, Lisa M; Xie, Wensheng; Behm, David J; Douglas, Stephen A; Shaw, Ami L; Marino, Joseph P

    2013-06-15

    1-(1,3,5-Triazin-yl)piperidine-4-carboxamide inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase were identified from high through-put screening using encoded library technology. The triazine heterocycle proved to be a critical functional group, essential for high potency and P450 selectivity. Phenyl group substitution was important for reducing clearance, and establishing good oral exposure. Based on this lead optimization work, 1-[4-methyl-6-(methylamino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]-N-{[[4-bromo-2-(trifluoromethoxy)]-phenyl]methyl}-4-piperidinecarboxamide (27) was identified as a useful tool compound for in vivo investigation. Robust effects on a serum biomarker, 9, 10-epoxyoctadec-12(Z)-enoic acid (the epoxide derived from linoleic acid) were observed, which provided evidence of robust in vivo target engagement and the suitability of 27 as a tool compound for study in various disease models.

  1. In vitro and in vivo metabolism of N-adamantyl substituted urea-based soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Yan; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Morisseau, Christophe; Lango, Jozsef; Hwang, Sung Hee; Watanabe, Takaho; Kim, In-Hae; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-12-15

    N,N'-disubstituted urea-based soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors are promising therapeutics for hypertension, inflammation, and pain in multiple animal models. The drug absorption and pharmacological efficacy of these inhibitors have been reported extensively. However, the drug metabolism of these inhibitors is not well described. Here we reported the metabolic profile and associated biochemical studies of an N-adamantyl urea-based sEH inhibitor 1-adamantan-1-yl-3-(5-(2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethoxy)pentyl)urea (AEPU) in vitro and in vivo. The metabolites of AEPU were identified by interpretation of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and/or NMR. In vitro, AEPU had three major positions for phase I metabolism including oxidations on the adamantyl moiety, urea nitrogen atoms, and cleavage of the polyethylene glycol chain. In a rodent model, the metabolites from the hydroxylation on the adamantyl group and nitrogen atom were existed in blood while the metabolites from cleavage of polyethylene glycol chain were not found in urine. The major metabolite found in rodent urine was 3-(3-adamantyl-ureido)-propanoic acid, a presumably from cleavage and oxidation of the polyethylene glycol moiety. All the metabolites found were active but less potent than AEPU at inhibiting human sEH. Furthermore, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 was found to be a major enzyme mediating AEPU metabolism. In conclusion, the metabolism of AEPU resulted from oxidation by CYP could be shared with other N-adamantyl-urea-based compounds. These findings suggest possible therapeutic roles for AEPU and new strategies for drug design in this series of possible drugs.

  2. The 2014 Bernard B. Brodie Award Lecture—Epoxide Hydrolases: Drug Metabolism to Therapeutics for Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kodani, Sean D.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Bernard Brodie’s legacy is built on fundamental discoveries in pharmacology and drug metabolism that were then translated to the clinic to improve patient care. Similarly, the development of a novel class of therapeutics termed the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors was originally spurred by fundamental research exploring the biochemistry and physiology of the sEH. Here, we present an overview of the history and current state of research on epoxide hydrolases, specifically focusing on sEHs. In doing so, we start with the translational project studying the metabolism of the insect juvenile hormone mimic R-20458 [(E)-6,7-epoxy-1-(4-ethylphenoxy)-3,7-dimethyl-2-octene], which led to the identification of the mammalian sEH. Further investigation of this enzyme and its substrates, including the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, led to insight into mechanisms of inflammation, chronic and neuropathic pain, angiogenesis, and other physiologic processes. This basic knowledge in turn led to the development of potent inhibitors of the sEH that are promising therapeutics for pain, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, arthritis, and other disorders. PMID:25762541

  3. The 2014 Bernard B. Brodie award lecture-epoxide hydrolases: drug metabolism to therapeutics for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Kodani, Sean D; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-05-01

    Dr. Bernard Brodie's legacy is built on fundamental discoveries in pharmacology and drug metabolism that were then translated to the clinic to improve patient care. Similarly, the development of a novel class of therapeutics termed the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors was originally spurred by fundamental research exploring the biochemistry and physiology of the sEH. Here, we present an overview of the history and current state of research on epoxide hydrolases, specifically focusing on sEHs. In doing so, we start with the translational project studying the metabolism of the insect juvenile hormone mimic R-20458 [(E)-6,7-epoxy-1-(4-ethylphenoxy)-3,7-dimethyl-2-octene], which led to the identification of the mammalian sEH. Further investigation of this enzyme and its substrates, including the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, led to insight into mechanisms of inflammation, chronic and neuropathic pain, angiogenesis, and other physiologic processes. This basic knowledge in turn led to the development of potent inhibitors of the sEH that are promising therapeutics for pain, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, arthritis, and other disorders.

  4. Probing ligand-binding modes and binding mechanisms of benzoxazole-based amide inhibitors with soluble epoxide hydrolase by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hang; Zhang, Ying; Li, Liang; Han, Ju-Guang

    2012-08-30

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) has become a new therapeutic target for treating a variety of human diseases. The inhibition of human sEH hydrolase activity was studied by molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation techniques. A set of six benzoxazole-based amide inhibitors binding to sEH has been studied through molecular docking, MD simulation, free energy calculations, and energy decomposition analysis. On the basis of molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area (MM-GB/SA) computation and normal-mode analysis (NMA), the obtained results indicate that the rank of calculated binding free energies (ΔΔGTOT) of these inhibitors is in excellent agreement with that of experimental bioactivity data (IC50). The correlation coefficient (r(2)) between the predicted ΔΔGTOT and IC50 is 0.88. van der Waals energies are the largest component of the total energies, and the entropy changes play an indispensable role in determining the ΔΔGTOT. Rational binding modes were discussed and determined by the docking results and binding free energies. The free energy decomposition of each residue reveals that the residue Trp334 dominates the most binding free energies among all residues and that the activities for these molecules to the sEH are not decided by hydrogen bonds or a certain residue but by the common effect of multiple side chains in the active site.

  5. ADMINISTRATION OF A SUBSTITUTED ADAMANTLY-UREA INHIBITOR OF THE SOLUBLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASE PROTECTS THE KIDNEY FROM DAMAGE IN HYPERTENSIVE GOTO-KAKIZAKI RATS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hypertension and type II diabetes are co-morbid diseases that lead to the development of nephropathy. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors are reported to provide protection from renal injury. We hypothesized that the sEH inhibitor 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido) dodecanoic acid (AUDA) protects ...

  6. Thyroid hormone-induced changes in the hepatic monooxygenase system, heme oxygenase activity and epoxide hydrolase activity in adult male, female and immature rats.

    PubMed

    Leakey, J E; Mukhtar, H; Fouts, J R; Bend, J R

    1982-07-01

    In 8-day-old rat pups, pretreatment with a single injection of L-triiodothyronine or L-thyroxine decreased hepatic cytochrome P-450 content, aminopyrine N-demethylase activity and epoxide hydrolase activity but increased hepatic microsomal cytochrome c reductase, 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and heme oxygenase activities without significantly altering UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity (towards o-aminophenol) or the microsomal yield. In adult rats of either sex such single injections of L-triiodothyronine failed to significantly alter these enzyme activities. However, multiple injections evoked changes similar to those observed in the pups, in all these enzyme activities, except that 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity was slightly decreased rather than increased. These findings demonstrate that: (1) The hepatic monooxygenase system in the rat pup is more responsive to thyroid hormones than that in adult. (2) Thyroid hormones can decrease rat liver cytochrome P-450 content and its dependent monooxygenase activity independently of sexual maturity. (3) Thyroid hormones also decrease hepatic epoxide hydrolase activity in both pups and adults. Thus, hyperthyroidism could render the rat pup more susceptible to hepatotoxicity from electrophilic epoxides which utilize microsomal epoxide hydrolase as the major detoxication pathway.

  7. Cross-linked enzyme aggregates of Mung bean epoxide hydrolases: a highly active, stable and recyclable biocatalyst for asymmetric hydrolysis of epoxides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chun-Yang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Lou, Wen-Yong; Zong, Min-Hua

    2013-06-20

    A highly active and stable cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) of epoxide hydrolases (EHs) from Mung bean, which plays a crucial role in synthesis of valuable enantiopure diols, were successfully prepared and characterized. Under the optimum preparation conditions, the activity recovery of CLEAs recorded 92%. The CLEAs were more efficient than the free enzyme in catalyzing asymmetric hydrolysis of styrene oxide to (R)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol in organic solvent-containing biphasic system. The biocatalytic reaction performed in n-hexane/buffer biphasic system had a clearly faster initial reaction rate, much higher product yield and product e.e. value than that in aqueous medium. Moreover, the optimal volume ratio of n-hexane to buffer, reaction temperature, buffer pH value and substrate concentration for the enzymatic hydrolysis were found to be 1:1, 40 °C, 7.5 and 30 mM, respectively, under which the initial reaction rate, product yield and product e.e. value were 13.26 mM/h, 46% and 93.5%, respectively. The CLEAs retained more than 50% of their initial activity after 8 batches of re-use in phosphate buffer and maintained 53% of their original activity after 8 reaction cycle in biphasic system. The efficient biocatalytic process with CLEAs proved to be feasible on a 250-mL preparative scale, exhibiting great potential for asymmetric synthesis of chiral diols.

  8. Correlation between the physicochemical properties of organic solvents and their biocompatibility toward epoxide hydrolase activity in whole-cells of a yeast, Rhodotorula sp.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Jeanette; Botes, Adriana L; Van Dyk, Martha S; Breytenbach, Jaco C

    2004-08-01

    Epoxides are often highly hydrophobic substrates and the presence of an organic co-solvent within an aqueous bioreactor is in such cases indicated. The effect of 40 water-miscible and -immiscible organic solvents on epoxide hydrolase activity in whole-cells of the yeast Rhodotorula sp. UOFS Y-0448 was investigated. No formal correlation between solvent biocompatibility and physicochemical properties was deductible, although the introduction of hydroxyl groups increased biocompatibility. 1-Pentanol, 2-methylcyclohexanol and 1-octanol were the most biocompatible resulting in relatively low activity losses when used at up to 20% (v/v).

  9. Zearalenone lactonohydrolase activity in Hypocreales and its evolutionary relationships within the epoxide hydrolase subset of a/b-hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Zearalenone is a mycotoxin produced by several species of Fusarium genus, most notably Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum. This resorcylic acid lactone is one of the most important toxins causing serious animal and human diseases. For over two decades it has been known that the mycoparasitic fungus Clonostachys rosea (synonym: Gliocladium roseum, teleomorph: Bionectria ochroleuca) can detoxify zearalenone, however no such attributes have been described within the Trichoderma genus. Results We screened for the presence of zearalenone lactonohydrolase homologs in isolates of Clonostachys and Trichoderma genera. We report first finding of expressed zearalenone lactonohydrolase in Trichoderma aggressivum. For three isolates (T. aggressivum, C. rosea and Clonostachys catenulatum isolates), we were able to reconstruct full coding sequence and verify the biotransformation ability potential. Additionally, we assessed progression of the detoxification process (in terms of transcript accumulation and mycotoxin decomposition in vitro). In silico, search for origins of zearalenone lactonohydrolase activity in model fungal and bacterial genomes has shown that zearalenone lactonohydrolase homologs form a monophyletic fungal clade among the a/b hydrolase superfamily representatives. We corroborated the finding of functional enzyme homologs by investigating the functional sites (active site pocket with postulated, noncanonical Ser-Glu-His catalytic triad) conserved in both multiple sequence alignment and in homology-based structural models. Conclusions Our research shows the first finding of a functional zearalenone lactonohydrolase in mycoparasitic Trichoderma aggressivum (an activity earlier characterised in the Clonostachys rosea strains). The supporting evidence for presence and activity of functional enzyme homologs is based on the chemical analyses, gene expression patterns, homology models showing conservation of key structural features and marked

  10. Microbiological transformations. 47. A step toward a green chemistry preparation of enantiopure (S)-2-, -3-, and -4-pyridyloxirane via an epoxide hydrolase catalyzed kinetic resolution.

    PubMed

    Genzel, Y; Archelas, A; Broxterman, Q B; Schulze, B; Furstoss, R

    2001-01-26

    The biocatalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution of 2-, 3-, and 4-pyridyloxirane by the Aspergillus niger epoxide hydrolase (EH) has been explored. This was used to perform a gram scale preparation of these epoxides of (S) absolute configuration using a process performed at a concentration as high as 10 g/L (82 mM). All three epoxides have been obtained in a nearly enantiopure form (ee > 98%). Interestingly, it was shown that this biotransformation could be achieved using plain water instead of buffer solution, an important improvement as far as downstream processing of an eventual industrial process is concerned. Neither of these substrates could be obtained in reasonable enantiomeric purity and yield using the nowadays most efficient metal-based catalysts. PMID:11429826

  11. Crystal Structure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Inhibitory Factor Cif Reveals Novel Active-Site Features of an Epoxide Hydrolase Virulence Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Bahl, C.; Morisseau, C; Bomberger, J; Stanton, B; Hammock, B; O' Toole, G; Madden, D

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitory factor (Cif) is a virulence factor secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that reduces the quantity of CFTR in the apical membrane of human airway epithelial cells. Initial sequence analysis suggested that Cif is an epoxide hydrolase (EH), but its sequence violates two strictly conserved EH motifs and also is compatible with other {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase family members with diverse substrate specificities. To investigate the mechanistic basis of Cif activity, we have determined its structure at 1.8-{angstrom} resolution by X-ray crystallography. The catalytic triad consists of residues Asp129, His297, and Glu153, which are conserved across the family of EHs. At other positions, sequence deviations from canonical EH active-site motifs are stereochemically conservative. Furthermore, detailed enzymatic analysis confirms that Cif catalyzes the hydrolysis of epoxide compounds, with specific activity against both epibromohydrin and cis-stilbene oxide, but with a relatively narrow range of substrate selectivity. Although closely related to two other classes of {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase in both sequence and structure, Cif does not exhibit activity as either a haloacetate dehalogenase or a haloalkane dehalogenase. A reassessment of the structural and functional consequences of the H269A mutation suggests that Cif's effect on host-cell CFTR expression requires the hydrolysis of an extended endogenous epoxide substrate.

  12. Potent Natural Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors from Pentadiplandra brazzeana Baillon: Synthesis, Quantification, and Measurement of Biological Activities In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Seiya; Morisseau, Christophe; Inceoglu, Bora; Kamita, Shizuo G.; De Nicola, Gina R.; Nyegue, Maximilienne; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    We describe here three urea-based soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors from the root of the plant Pentadiplandra brazzeana. The concentration of these ureas in the root was quantified by LC-MS/MS, showing that 1, 3-bis (4-methoxybenzyl) urea (MMU) is the most abundant (42.3 μg/g dry root weight). All of the ureas were chemically synthesized, and their inhibitory activity toward recombinant human and recombinant rat sEH was measured. The most potent compound, MMU, showed an IC50 of 92 nM via fluorescent assay and a Ki of 54 nM via radioactivity-based assay on human sEH. MMU effectively reduced inflammatory pain in a rat nociceptive pain assay. These compounds are among the most potent sEH inhibitors derived from natural sources. Moreover, inhibition of sEH by these compounds may mechanistically explain some of the therapeutic effects of P. brazzeana. PMID:25659109

  13. Development of monoclonal antibodies to human microsomal epoxide hydrolase and analysis of “preneoplastic antigen”-like molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Hongying; Yoshimura, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Nobuharu; Sugiyama, Kazuo; Sawada, Jun-ichi; Saito, Yoshiro; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2012-04-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a drug metabolizing enzyme which resides on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and catalyzes the hydration of reactive epoxide intermediates that are formed by cytochrome P450s. mEH is also thought to have a role in bile acid transport on the plasma membrane of hepatocytes. It is speculated that efficient execution of such multiple functions is secured by its orientation and association with cytochrome P450 enzymes on the ER membrane and formation of a multiple transport system on the plasma membrane. In certain disease status, mEH loses its association with the membrane and can be detected as distinct antigens in the cytosol of preneoplastic foci of liver (preneoplastic antigen), in the serum in association with hepatitis C virus infection (AN antigen), or in some brain tumors. To analyze the antigenic structures of mEH in physiological and pathological conditions, we developed monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH. Five different kinds of antibodies were obtained: three, anti-N-terminal portions; one anti-C-terminal; and one, anti-conformational epitope. By combining these antibodies, we developed antigen detection methods which are specific to either the membrane-bound form or the linearized form of mEH. These methods detected mEH in the culture medium released from a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line and a glioblastoma cell line, which was found to be a multimolecular complex with a unique antigenic structure different from that of the membrane-bound form of mEH. These antibodies and antigen detection methods may be useful to study pathological changes of mEH in various human diseases. -- Highlights: ► Monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH were developed. ► They discriminate between the membrane-bound and the linearized forms of mEH. ► We analyze the antigenic structure of the altered form of mEH in tumor cells. ► Preneoplastic antigen is a multimolecular complex of mEH with

  14. Soluble epoxide hydrolase is involved in the development of atherosclerosis and arterial neointima formation by regulating smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingjie; Huo, Leijun; He, Jinlong; Ding, Wenshuang; Su, Hang; Tian, Dongping; Welch, Carrie; Hammock, Bruce D; Ai, Ding; Zhu, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) have beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) metabolizes EETs to less active diols, thus diminishing their biological activity. sEH inhibitors can suppress the progression of atherosclerotic lesions in animal models. However, the regulation of sEH in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and role of sEH in patients with atherosclerosis have not been evaluated. We hypothesize that sEH in VSMCs plays a pivotal role in atherosclerosis and injury-induced neointima formation. In this study, sEH expression in human autopsy atherosclerotic plaque was determined by immunohistochemistry. In cultured rat and human VSMCs, the phenotypic switching marker and sEH expression induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) were examined by Western blot analysis. Carotid-artery balloon injury was performed after adenovirus-mediated overexpression of sEH or oral administration of a potent sEH inhibitor in Sprague-Dawley rats. sEH was highly expressed in VSMCs of the intima and media within human atherosclerotic plaque. In vitro, PDGF-BB upregulated the expression in VSMCs after transcription and promoted cell proliferation and migration; the latter effect could be largely attenuated by an sEH inhibitor. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of sEH could mimic the effect of PDGF-BB and induce VSMC proliferation and migration. In vivo, the sEH inhibitor led to a significant decrease in injury-induced neointima formation in a rat carotid-artery injury model. These data establish the effect of sEH expression on atherosclerotic progression and vascular remodeling after injury, thus identifying a novel integrative role for sEH in VSMC phenotypic modulation and migration. Blocking sEH activity may be a potential therapeutic approach for ameliorating vascular occlusive disease.

  15. Structure-activity relationships of substituted oxyoxalamides as inhibitors of the human soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Hae; Lee, In-Hee; Nishiwaki, Hisashi; Hammock, Bruce D; Nishi, Kosuke

    2014-02-01

    We explored both structure-activity relationships among substituted oxyoxalamides used as the primary pharmacophore of inhibitors of the human sEH and as a secondary pharmacophore to improve water solubility of inhibitors. When the oxyoxalamide function was modified with a variety of alkyls or substituted alkyls, compound 6 with a 2-adamantyl group and a benzyl group was found to be a potent sEH inhibitor, suggesting that the substituted oxyoxalamide function is a promising primary pharmacophore for the human sEH, and compound 6 can be a novel lead structure for the development of further improved oxyoxalamide or other related derivatives. In addition, introduction of substituted oxyoxalamide to inhibitors with an amide or urea primary pharmacophore produced significant improvements in inhibition potency and water solubility. In particular, the N,N,O-trimethyloxyoxalamide group in amide or urea inhibitors (26 and 31) was most effective among those tested for both inhibition and solubility. The results indicate that substituted oxyoxalamide function incorporated into amide or urea inhibitors is a useful secondary pharmacophore, and the resulting structures will be an important basis for the development of bioavailable sEH inhibitors.

  16. Alkylphloroglucinol derivatives and triterpenoids with soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitory activity from Callistemon citrinus.

    PubMed

    Khanh, Pham Ngoc; Duc, Ho Viet; Huong, Tran Thu; Son, Ninh The; Ha, Vu Thi; Van, Doan Thi; Tai, Bui Huu; Kim, Ji Eun; Jo, Ah Reum; Kim, Young Ho; Cuong, Nguyen Manh

    2016-03-01

    Phytochemical analysis of the leaves and stems of Callistemon citrinus (Curtis) Skeels led to the isolation of two new alkylphloroglucinols, gallomyrtucommulone E and F (1 and 2), along with four other known alkylphloroglucinol derivatives, gallomyrtucommulone A (3), endoperoxide G3 (4), myrtucommulone B (5), callistenone B (6) and five known triterpenoids, including betulinic acid (7), 3β-acetylmorolic acid (8), 3β-hydroxy-urs-11-en-13(28)-olide (9), diospyrolide (10) and ursolic acid (11). The structures of the natural compounds were determined from the spectroscopic evidences including 1D-/2D-NMR and HR-MS spectrometry. All the isolated compounds were assessed for the effects on the sEH inhibitory activity. The acylphloroglucinols myrtucommulone B (5)/callistenone B (6) (in mixture), and two triterpenoids, ursolic acid (11) and 3β-hydroxy-urs-11-en-13(28)-olide (9) displayed strong inhibition of sEH activity, with IC50 values of 0.7, 11.2 and 24.8 μM, respectively. PMID:26548595

  17. Multiple Epoxide Hydrolases in Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici and Their Relationship to Medium Composition and Host-Specific Toxin Production

    PubMed Central

    Morisseau, Christophe; Ward, Barney L.; Gilchrist, David G.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    1999-01-01

    The production of Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici host-specific toxins (AAL toxins) and epoxide hydrolase (EH) activity were studied during the growth of this plant-pathogenic fungus in stationary liquid cultures. Media containing pectin as the primary carbon source displayed peaks of EH activity at day 4 and at day 12. When pectin was replaced by glucose, there was a single peak of EH activity at day 6. Partial characterization of the EH activities suggests the presence of three biochemically distinguishable EH activities. Two of them have a molecular mass of 25 kDa and a pI of 4.9, while the other has a molecular mass of 20 kDa and a pI of 4.7. Each of the EH activities can be distinguished by substrate preference and sensitivity to inhibitors. The EH activities present at day 6 (glucose) or day 12 (pectin) are concomitant with AAL toxin production. PMID:10347018

  18. A new phenolic derivative with soluble epoxide hydrolase and nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitory activity from the aqueous extract of Acacia catechu.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya Nan; Li, Wei; Song, Seok Bean; Yan, Xi Tao; Zhao, Yan; Jo, A Reum; Kang, Jong Seong; Young Ho, Kim

    2016-09-01

    One novel phenolic compound, (4S,5R)-4-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-5-(3-oxobutyl)dihydrofuran-2(3H)-one (1), as well as 12 known compounds (2-13) was obtained from the aqueous extract of Acacia catechu and their chemical structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis. Compounds 8 and 9 exhibited significant soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitory activities with IC50 values of 26.6 ± 0.5 and 24.4 ± 5.6 μM, respectively. Compounds 7-10 showed significant inhibitory effects on TNFα-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values ranging from 11.15 to 19.45 μM. PMID:26647286

  19. Effect of fungal mycelia on the HPLC-UV and UV-vis spectrophotometric assessment of mycelium-bound epoxide hydrolase using glycidyl phenyl ether.

    PubMed

    Dolcet, Marta M; Torres, Mercè; Canela, Ramon

    2016-06-25

    The use of mycelia as biocatalysts has technical and economic advantages. However, there are several difficulties in obtaining accurate results in mycelium-catalysed reactions. Firstly, sample extraction, indispensable because of the presence of mycelia, can bring into the extract components with a similar structure to that of the analyte of interest; secondly, mycelia can influence the recovery of the analyte. We prepared calibration standards of 3-phenoxy-1,2-propanediol (PPD) in the pure solvent and in the presence of mycelia (spiked before or after extraction) from five fungi (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus tubingensis, Penicillium aurantiogriseum, Penicillium sp. and Aspergillus terreus). The quantification of PPD was carried out by HPLC-UV and UV-vis spectrophotometry. The manuscript shows that the last method is as accurate as the HPLC method. However, the colorimetric method led to a higher data throughput, which allowed the study of more samples in a shorter time. Matrix effects were evaluated visually from the plotted calibration data and statistically by simultaneously comparing the intercept and slope of calibration curves performed with solvent, post-extraction spiked standards and pre-extraction spiked standards. Significant differences were found between the post- and pre-extraction spiked matrix-matched functions. Pre-extraction spiked matrix-matched functions based on A. tubingensis mycelia, selected as the reference, were validated and used to compensate for low recoveries. These validated functions were successfully applied to the quantification of PPD achieved during the hydrolysis of glycidyl phenyl ether by mycelium-bound epoxide hydrolases and equivalent hydrolysis yields were determined by HPLC-UV and UV-vis spectrophotometry. This study may serve as starting point to implement matrix effects evaluation when mycelium-bound epoxide hydrolases are studied.

  20. Active site engineering of the epoxide hydrolase from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1 to enhance aerobic mineralization of cis-1,2-dichloroethylene in cells expressing an evolved toluene ortho-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Rui, Lingyun; Cao, Li; Chen, Wilfred; Reardon, Kenneth F; Wood, Thomas K

    2004-11-01

    Chlorinated ethenes are the most prevalent ground-water pollutants, and the toxic epoxides generated during their aerobic biodegradation limit the extent of transformation. Hydrolysis of the toxic epoxide by epoxide hydrolases represents the major biological detoxification strategy; however, chlorinated epoxyethanes are not accepted by known bacterial epoxide hydrolases. Here, the epoxide hydrolase from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1 (EchA), which enables growth on epichlorohydrin, was tuned to accept cis-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane as a substrate by accumulating beneficial mutations from three rounds of saturation mutagenesis at three selected active site residues, Phe-108, Ile-219, and Cys-248 (no beneficial mutations were found at position Ile-111). The EchA F108L/I219L/C248I variant coexpressed with a DNA-shuffled toluene ortho-monooxygenase, which initiates attack on the chlorinated ethene, enhanced the degradation of cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE) an infinite extent compared with wild-type EchA at low concentrations (6.8 microm) and up to 10-fold at high concentrations (540 microm). EchA variants with single mutations (F108L, I219F, or C248I) enhanced cis-DCE mineralization 2.5-fold (540 microm), and EchA variants with double mutations, I219L/C248I and F108L/C248I, increased cis-DCE mineralization 4- and 7-fold, respectively (540 microm). For complete degradation of cis-DCE to chloride ions, the apparent Vmax/Km for the Escherichia coli strain expressing recombinant the EchA F108L/I219L/C248I variant was increased over 5-fold as a result of the evolution of EchA. The EchA F108L/I219L/C248I variant also had enhanced activity for 1,2-epoxyhexane (2-fold) and the natural substrate epichlorohydrin (6-fold).

  1. Comparative metabolism of methacrylonitrile and acrylonitrile to cyanide using cytochrome P4502E1 and microsomal epoxide hydrolase-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    El Hadri, L.; Chanas, B.; Ghanayem, B.I. . E-mail: ghanayem@niehs.nih.gov

    2005-06-01

    Methacrylonitrile (MAN) and acrylonitrile (AN) are metabolized via glutathione (GSH) conjugation or epoxide formation. We have recently shown that CYP2E1 is essential for AN epoxidation and subsequent cyanide liberation. Current studies were designed to compare the enzymatic basis of MAN vs. AN metabolism to cyanide using wild-type (WT), CYP2E1-, and mEH-null mice. Mice received a single gavage dose of 0.047, 0.095, 0.19, or 0.38 mmol/kg of MAN or AN, and blood cyanide was measured at 1 or 3 h later. Blood cyanide levels in WT mice treated with AN or MAN were dose and time dependent. At equimolar doses, significantly higher levels of cyanide were detected in the blood of MAN- vs. AN-treated mice. Further, while significant reduction in blood cyanide levels occurred in MAN-treated CYP2E1-null vs. WT mice, AN metabolism to cyanide was largely abolished in CYP2E1-null mice. Pretreatment of mice with 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT, CYP inhibitor) demonstrated that CYPs other than CYP2E1 also contribute to MAN metabolism to cyanide. Blood cyanide levels in mEH-null mice treated with aliphatic nitriles are generally lower than levels in similarly treated WT mice. Western blot analysis showed that expression of sEH was greater in male vs. female mice. The role of various epoxide hydrolases (EHs) in the production of cyanide from aliphatic nitriles is apparently structure and dose dependent. Regardless of genotype, significantly higher levels of cyanide were measured in the blood of male vs. female mice treated with MAN or AN. In conclusion, these data showed that (1) at equimolar doses, higher blood cyanide levels were detected in mice treated with MAN vs. AN; (2) while CYP2E1 is the only enzyme responsible for AN metabolism to cyanide, other CYPs also contribute to MAN metabolism; and (3) significantly higher levels of cyanide were measured in the blood of male vs. female treated with either nitrile. Higher blood cyanide levels in male vs. female mice and in MAN- vs. AN

  2. Enantioconvergent production of (R)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol from styrene oxide by combining the Solanum tuberosum and an evolved Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1 epoxide hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Cao, Li; Lee, Jintae; Chen, Wilfred; Wood, Thomas K

    2006-06-20

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (EH) from the potato Solanum tuberosum and an evolved EH of the bacterium Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1, EchA-I219F, were purified for the enantioconvergent hydrolysis of racemic styrene oxide into the single product (R)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol, which is an important intermediate for pharmaceuticals. EchA-I219F has enhanced enantioselectivity (enantiomeric ratio of 91 based on products) for converting (R)-styrene oxide to (R)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol (2.0 +/- 0.2 micromol/min/mg), and the potato EH converts (S)-styrene oxide primarily to the same enantiomer, (R)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol (22 +/- 1 micromol/min/mg), with an enantiomeric ratio of 40 +/- 17 (based on substrates). By mixing these two purified enzymes, inexpensive racemic styrene oxide (5 mM) was converted at 100% yield to 98% enantiomeric excess (R)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol at 4.7 +/- 0.7 micromol/min/mg. Hence, at least 99% of substrate is converted into a single stereospecific product at a rapid rate.

  3. Intronic DNA elements regulate Nrf-2 chemical responsiveness of the human microsomal epoxide hydrolase gene (EPHX1) through a far upstream alternative promoter

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shengzhong; Yang, Xi; Omiecinski, Curtis J.

    2014-01-01

    In humans, microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) contributes important biological functions that underlie both detoxification and bioactivation fates arising from exposures to foreign chemicals. Previously, we discovered that human mEH gene transcription is initiated from alternative promoters. The respective transcripts are programmed with tissue specificity and the upstream E1b promoter contributes predominantly to mEH expression. The results presented demonstrate that exposures to the Nrf2 activators, sulforaphane (SFN) and tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), markedly activate E1b transcription in human lung and liver cells. Genomic analyses identified two major DNase I hypersensitive regions (HS-1 and HS-2) within the ~15 kb intervening sequence separating E1b from the downstream E1 promoter. In BEAS-2B cells, the Nrf2 effectors, SFN and tBHQ, selectively activated the more distal HS-2 through an antioxidant-response element (ARE). An activator protein 1/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate interaction was further identified within the HS-2 enhancer that functioned to additionally contribute to ARE-mediated induction responsiveness of the E1b promoter. The results demonstrate that ARE modulation, integrated with additional transcriptional complexes, regulates the tissue-specific expression of mEH and that these processes likely coordinate both the protective and bioactivation functions contributed by mEH activities in human tissues. PMID:24704207

  4. Use of hydrophilic ionic liquids in a two-phase system to improve Mung bean epoxide hydrolases-mediated asymmetric hydrolysis of styrene oxide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Jing; Lou, Wen-Yong; Yu, Chun-Yang; Wu, Hong; Zong, Min-Hua; Smith, Thomas J

    2012-12-31

    A comparative study was made of Mung bean epoxide hydrolases-catalyzed asymmetric hydrolysis of styrene oxide to (R)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol in an n-hexane/buffer biphasic system containing various hydrophilic ionic liquids (ILs). Compared to the n-hexane/buffer biphasic system alone, addition of a small amount of hydrophilic ILs reduced the amount of non-enzymatic hydrolysis, and improved the reaction rate by up to 22%. The ILs with cation containing an alkanol group, namely [C(2)OHMIM][BF(4)] and [C(2)OHMIM][TfO], and the choline amino acid ILs [Ch][Arg] and [Ch][Pro] were found to be the most suitable co-solvents for the reaction, owing to their good biocompatibility with the enzyme, which led to high initial rates (0.99-1.25 μmol/min) and high product e.e.s (95%). When substrate concentration was around 30 mM, where optimal performance was observed with the IL-containing systems, the product e.e. was improved from 90% without ILs to ≥95% in the presence of ILs.

  5. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition for the symptomatic relief of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Celorrio, Marta; Fernández-Suárez, Diana; Rojo-Bustamante, Estefanía; Echeverry-Alzate, Víctor; Ramírez, María J; Hillard, Cecilia J; López-Moreno, José A; Maldonado, Rafael; Oyarzábal, Julen; Franco, Rafael; Aymerich, María S

    2016-10-01

    Elements of the endocannabinoid system are strongly expressed in the basal ganglia where they suffer profound rearrangements after dopamine depletion. Modulation of the levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol by inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase alters glial phenotypes and provides neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. In this study, we assessed whether inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolase could also provide beneficial effects on the time course of this disease. The fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, URB597, was administered chronically to mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and probenecid (MPTPp) over 5weeks. URB597 (1mg/kg) prevented MPTPp induced motor impairment but it did not preserve the dopamine levels in the nigrostriatal pathway or regulate glial cell activation. The symptomatic relief of URB597 was confirmed in haloperidol-induced catalepsy assays, where its anti-cataleptic effects were both blocked by antagonists of the two cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), and abolished in animals deficient in these receptors. Other fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors, JNJ1661010 and TCF2, also had anti-cataleptic properties. Together, these results demonstrate an effect of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition on the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease in two distinct experimental models that is mediated by cannabinoid receptors. PMID:27318096

  6. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition for the symptomatic relief of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Celorrio, Marta; Fernández-Suárez, Diana; Rojo-Bustamante, Estefanía; Echeverry-Alzate, Víctor; Ramírez, María J; Hillard, Cecilia J; López-Moreno, José A; Maldonado, Rafael; Oyarzábal, Julen; Franco, Rafael; Aymerich, María S

    2016-10-01

    Elements of the endocannabinoid system are strongly expressed in the basal ganglia where they suffer profound rearrangements after dopamine depletion. Modulation of the levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol by inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase alters glial phenotypes and provides neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. In this study, we assessed whether inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolase could also provide beneficial effects on the time course of this disease. The fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, URB597, was administered chronically to mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and probenecid (MPTPp) over 5weeks. URB597 (1mg/kg) prevented MPTPp induced motor impairment but it did not preserve the dopamine levels in the nigrostriatal pathway or regulate glial cell activation. The symptomatic relief of URB597 was confirmed in haloperidol-induced catalepsy assays, where its anti-cataleptic effects were both blocked by antagonists of the two cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), and abolished in animals deficient in these receptors. Other fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors, JNJ1661010 and TCF2, also had anti-cataleptic properties. Together, these results demonstrate an effect of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition on the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease in two distinct experimental models that is mediated by cannabinoid receptors.

  7. Effect of epoxide hydrolase and glutathione S-tranferase genotypes on the induction of micronuclei and DNA damage by styrene-7,8-oxide in vitro.

    PubMed

    Laffon, Blanca; Pérez-Cadahía, Beatriz; Pásaro, Eduardo; Méndez, Josefina

    2003-04-20

    Styrene is one of the most important organic chemicals used worldwide. Its main metabolite, styrene-7,8-oxide (SO), is considered responsible for the genotoxic effects associated with exposure to styrene. SO is detoxified by hydrolysis catalyzed by epoxide hydrolase (EH), or, to a minor extent, by conjugation mediated by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether EH (exons 3 and 4), GSTP1 (exons 5 and 6), GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms have any influence on the genotoxicity of SO in human leukocytes. Peripheral leukocytes from 30 healthy donors were exposed to SO (50 and 200 micro M) and genotoxicity was evaluated by means of the micronucleus (MN) test and alkaline comet assay, using 1% DMSO as solvent control. When EH genotypes were classified in low, medium, and high with respect to the expected EH activity, an increase in induced comet tail length was observed with decreasing EH activity in SO-exposed cells. An increase was seen in induced MN frequency in EH low-activity donors. These findings are consistent with the detoxifying activity of this enzyme. In addition, increases in MN frequencies for GSTP1 *A/*B and *A/*C genotypes with regard to the wild-type homozygous *A/*A genotype were detected. This may be due to a low detoxifying activity as a consequence of altered SO affinity of the variant protein, but must be confirmed using homozygote variant individuals, not included in this study. No clear results were obtained for GSTM1 or GSTT1 genotypes, even when performing the analysis after grouping individuals with the same expected EH activity, probably due to the minor role that glutathione conjugation plays in styrene metabolism. The present in vitro findings using human leukocytes suggest that polymorphisms in EH, and, to a lesser extent, in GSTP1, may influence induction of cytogenetic and DNA damage by SO.

  8. Expression of ovarian microsomal epoxide hydrolase and glutathione S-transferase during onset of VCD-induced ovotoxicity in B6C3F{sub 1} mice

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Aileen F.; Sipes, I. Glenn; Hoyer, Patricia B.

    2008-07-01

    4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) specifically destroys small pre-antral follicles in the rodent ovary. VCD can be detoxified to an inactive tetrol by microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH), or by conjugation to glutathione (GSH) by glutathione S-transferase (GST). Formation of VCD-GSH adducts in the mouse ovary 4 h after VCD exposure (0.57 mmol/kg/day) has been demonstrated. Because the mouse ovary expresses both mEH and GST, expression of mEH and GST pi and mu during a time-course of VCD-induced ovotoxicity was evaluated in a neonatal mouse ovarian culture system. Ovaries from postnatal day 4 (PND4) B6C3F{sub 1} mice were incubated with VCD (15 {mu}M) for 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, or 15 days. Following incubation, ovaries were histologically evaluated, or assessed for mRNA or protein expression. VCD did not cause follicle loss (p > 0.05) on days 2, 4, or 6 of culture. At days 8, 10, 12, and 15, VCD reduced (p < 0.05) both primordial and primary follicle numbers. Increased (p < 0.05) expression of mEH, GST pi and GST mu mRNA was detected after 4 days of VCD exposure. This expression was reduced on days 6 and 8, when follicle loss was underway, but increased (p < 0.05) after 10 days of exposure. mEH and GST pi proteins were elevated (p < 0.05) following 8 days of VCD-exposure however there was no increase in GST mu protein. These findings suggest that with continuous exposure to VCD, increased expression of detoxification enzymes may participate in retarding the onset of follicle loss, but that this loss cannot ultimately be prevented.

  9. Kinetic resolution of racemic styrene oxide at a high concentration by recombinant Aspergillus usamii epoxide hydrolase in an n-hexanol/buffer biphasic system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Die; Wang, Rui; Shi, Xiao-Ling; Ye, Hui-Hua; Wu, Qin; Wu, Min-Chen; Chu, Jian-Jun

    2016-10-20

    Using the cell-free extract of engineered E. coli/Aueh2, expressing the recombinant Aspergillus usamii epoxide hydrolase (reAuEH2), as a biocatalyst, the kinetic resolution technique of racemic styrene oxide (rac-SO) was examined. In a phosphate buffer system (50mM, pH 7.0), 200mM rac-SO was efficiently resolved, obtaining (S)-SO with 98.1% enantiomeric excess (e.e.), whereas (S)-SO only with 45.2% e.e. was obtained from 750mM rac-SO. The analytical results verified that reAuEH2 shows tolerance towards high substrate concentration but is inactivated at a product concentration of 300mM. To produce (S)-SO with the high concentration, e.e. and volumetric productivity, n-hexanol was selected from a variety of water-miscible and water-immiscible organic solvents to construct an n-hexanol/buffer biphasic system. The optimal phase volume ratio, substrate over enzyme ratio and temperature were 1:1 (v/v), 6:1 (w/w) and 25°C, respectively. In an optimized biocatalytic system, a gram-scale resolution of rac-SO at a high concentration of 1M (120g/L) was performed at 25°C for 2h, obtaining (S)-SO with 98.2% e.e., 34.3% yield (maximum yield of 50%). The substrate concentration and volumetric productivity (1M, 20.6g/L/h) in a biphasic system significantly increased compared with those (0.2M, 3.1g/L/h) in a phosphate buffer system. The efficient resolution of rac-SO at a high concentration in a biphasic system makes it a promising technique for preparing a highly value-added enantiopure (S)-SO with high volumetric productivity. PMID:27546798

  10. A 3’-UTR Polymorphism in Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Gene Is Associated with Acute Rejection in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Gervasini, Guillermo; García-Cerrada, Montserrat; Coto, Eliecer; Vergara, Esther; García-Pino, Guadalupe; Alvarado, Raul; Fernández-Cavada, Maria Jesús; Suárez-Álvarez, Beatriz; Barroso, Sergio; Doblaré, Emilio; Díaz-Corte, Carmen; López-Larrea, Carlos; Cubero, Juan Jose

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are arachidonic acid metabolites that play a protective role against damaging processes that may occur after re-oxygenation of the graft. We aimed to investigate whether the presence of functional polymorphisms in the gene encoding soluble epoxy hydrolase (EPHX2), which metabolizes EETs to less active compounds, may play a role in the outcome of renal transplantation. Methods In a group of 259 Caucasian renal transplant recipients and 183 deceased donors, we determined the presence of three common EPHX2 SNPs, namely rs41507953 (K55R), rs751141 (R287Q) and rs1042032 A/G. Associations with parameters of graft function and the incidence of acute rejection were retrospectively investigated throughout the first year after grafting by logistic regression adjusting for clinical and demographic variables. Results Carriers of the rs1042032 GG genotype displayed significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (38.15 ± 15.57 vs. 45.99 ± 16.05; p = 0.04) and higher serum creatinine values (1.57 ± 0.58 vs. 1.30 ± 0.47 g/dL; p=0.02) one year after grafting, compared to patients carrying the wildtype A-allele. The same GG genotype was also associated to increased risk of acute rejection. Interestingly, this association was observed for the genotype of both recipients [OR =6.34 (1.35-29.90); p = 0.015] and donors [OR = 5.53 (1.10-27.80); p=0.042]. A statistical model including both genotypes along with other meaningful demographic and clinical variables resulted in an increased significance for the association with the recipients’ genotype [OR=8.28 (1.21-74.27); p=0.031]. Conclusions Our results suggest that genetic variability in the EETs-metabolizing gene, EPHX2, may have a significant impact on the outcome of deceased-donor renal transplantation. PMID:26230946

  11. Strategies to reduce end-product inhibition in family 48 glycoside hydrolases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Mo; Bu, Lintao; Alahuhta, Markus; Brunecky, Roman; Xu, Qi; Lunin, Vladimir V.; Brady, John W.; Crowley, Michael F.; Himmel, Michael E.; Bomble, Yannick J.

    2016-02-01

    Family 48 cellobiohydrolases are some of the most abundant glycoside hydrolases in nature. They are able to degrade cellulosic biomass and therefore serve as good enzyme candidates for biofuel production. Family 48 cellulases hydrolyze cellulose chains via a processive mechanism, and produce end products composed primarily of cellobiose as well as other cellooligomers (dp ≤ 4). The challenge of utilizing cellulases in biofuel production lies in their extremely slow turnover rate. A factor contributing to the low enzyme activity is suggested to be product binding to enzyme and the resulting performance inhibition. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the productmore » inhibitory effect of four family 48 glycoside hydrolases using molecular dynamics simulations and product expulsion free-energy calculations. We also suggested a series of single mutants of the four family 48 glycoside hydrolases with theoretically reduced level of product inhibition. As a result, the theoretical calculations provide a guide for future experimental studies designed to produce mutant cellulases with enhanced activity.« less

  12. Buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis, induces expression of soluble epoxide hydrolase and markers of cellular hypertrophy in a rat cardiomyoblast cell line: roles of the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Ghada; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2015-05-01

    Evidence suggests that upregulation of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is associated with the development of myocardial infarction, dilated cardiomyopathy, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure. However, the upregulation mechanism is still unknown. In this study, we treated H9C2 cells with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) to explore whether oxidative stress upregulates sEH gene expression and to identify the molecular and cellular mechanisms behind this upregulatory response. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to measure mRNA and protein expression, respectively. We demonstrated that BSO significantly upregulated sEH at mRNA levels in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, leading to a significant increase in the cellular hypertrophic markers, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). Furthermore, BSO significantly increased the cytosolic phosphorylated IκB-α and translocation of NF-κB p50 subunits, as measured by Western blot analysis. This level of translocation was paralleled by an increase in the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB P50 subunits. Moreover, our results demonstrated that pretreatment with the NF-κB inhibitor PDTC significantly inhibited BSO-mediated induction of sEH and cellular hypertrophic marker gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were transiently phosphorylated by BSO treatment. To understand further the role of MAPKs pathway in BSO-mediated induction of sEH mRNA, we examined the role of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-JunN-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 MAPK. Indeed, treatment with the MEK/ERK signal transduction inhibitor, PD98059, partially blocked the activation of IκB-α and translocation of NF-κB p50 subunits induced by BSO. Moreover, pretreatment with MEK/ERK signal transduction inhibitors, PD98059 and U0126, significantly inhibited BSO-mediated induction of sEH and cellular hypertrophic marker gene expression

  13. Buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis, induces expression of soluble epoxide hydrolase and markers of cellular hypertrophy in a rat cardiomyoblast cell line: roles of the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Ghada; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2015-05-01

    Evidence suggests that upregulation of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is associated with the development of myocardial infarction, dilated cardiomyopathy, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure. However, the upregulation mechanism is still unknown. In this study, we treated H9C2 cells with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) to explore whether oxidative stress upregulates sEH gene expression and to identify the molecular and cellular mechanisms behind this upregulatory response. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to measure mRNA and protein expression, respectively. We demonstrated that BSO significantly upregulated sEH at mRNA levels in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, leading to a significant increase in the cellular hypertrophic markers, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). Furthermore, BSO significantly increased the cytosolic phosphorylated IκB-α and translocation of NF-κB p50 subunits, as measured by Western blot analysis. This level of translocation was paralleled by an increase in the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB P50 subunits. Moreover, our results demonstrated that pretreatment with the NF-κB inhibitor PDTC significantly inhibited BSO-mediated induction of sEH and cellular hypertrophic marker gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were transiently phosphorylated by BSO treatment. To understand further the role of MAPKs pathway in BSO-mediated induction of sEH mRNA, we examined the role of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-JunN-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 MAPK. Indeed, treatment with the MEK/ERK signal transduction inhibitor, PD98059, partially blocked the activation of IκB-α and translocation of NF-κB p50 subunits induced by BSO. Moreover, pretreatment with MEK/ERK signal transduction inhibitors, PD98059 and U0126, significantly inhibited BSO-mediated induction of sEH and cellular hypertrophic marker gene expression

  14. [Inhibition of adherence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae to human buccal epithelium by glycoside hydrolases from marine hydrobiontes].

    PubMed

    Zaporozhets, T S; Makarenkova, I D; Bakunina, I Iu; Burtseva, Iu V; Kusaĭkin, M I; Balabanova, L A; Zviagintseva, T N; Besednova, N N; Rasskazov, V A

    2010-01-01

    A possibility of adhesion inhibition of Corynebacterium diphtheriae to human buccal epithelium by glycoside hydrolases of marine hydrobiontes was investigated using alpha-galactosidase from marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. KMM 701, total enzyme preparation and beta-1,3-glucanase from marine fungi Chaetomium, total enzyme preparation and beta-1,3-glucanase from marine mollusk Littorina kurila, and total enzyme preparation from crystalline style of marine mollusk Spisula sachalinensis were used. The enzymes were added to test-tubes containing buccal epithelial cells and/or the toxigenic bacterial strain C. diphtheriae No 1129, v. gravis. All the investigated enzymes were able to abort C. diphtheriae adherence, to human buccal epithelocytes. Inhibition of adhesion was more pronounced in the case of treatment of epithelocytes with highly purified enzymes of marine hydrobiontes in comparison with total enzyme preparations. The significant inhibition of C. diphtheriae adhesion was observed when the enzymes were added to the epithelocytes with the attached microorganisms. The results obtained show that glycoside hydrolases of marine hydrobiontes degrade any carbohydrates expressed on cell surface of bacterium or human buccal epithelocytes, impair unique lectin-carbohydrate interaction and prevent the adhesion. PMID:20695214

  15. Computational insights into function and inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Giulia; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Cavalli, Andrea; De Vivo, Marco

    2015-02-16

    The Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) enzyme is a membrane-bound serine hydrolase responsible for the deactivating hydrolysis of a family of naturally occurring fatty acid amides. FAAH is a critical enzyme of the endocannabinoid system, being mainly responsible for regulating the level of its main cannabinoid substrate anandamide. For this reason, pharmacological inhibition of FAAH, which increases the level of endogenous anandamide, is a promising strategy to cure a variety of diseases including pain, inflammation, and cancer. Much structural, mutagenesis, and kinetic data on FAAH has been generated over the last couple of decades. This has prompted several informative computational investigations to elucidate, at the atomic-level, mechanistic details on catalysis and inhibition of this pharmaceutically relevant enzyme. Here, we review how these computational studies - based on classical molecular dynamics, full quantum mechanics, and hybrid QM/MM methods - have clarified the binding and reactivity of some relevant substrates and inhibitors of FAAH. We also discuss the experimental implications of these computational insights, which have provided a thoughtful elucidation of the complex physical and chemical steps of the enzymatic mechanism of FAAH. Finally, we discuss how computations have been helpful for building structure-activity relationships of potent FAAH inhibitors. PMID:25240419

  16. The Precise Structures and Stereochemistry of Trihydroxy-linoleates Esterified in Human and Porcine Epidermis and Their Significance in Skin Barrier Function: IMPLICATION OF AN EPOXIDE HYDROLASE IN THE TRANSFORMATIONS OF LINOLEATE.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Takahito; Thomas, Christopher P; Calcutt, M Wade; Boeglin, William E; O'Donnell, Valerie B; Brash, Alan R

    2016-07-01

    Creation of an intact skin water barrier, a prerequisite for life on dry land, requires the lipoxygenase-catalyzed oxidation of the essential fatty acid linoleate, which is esterified to the ω-hydroxyl of an epidermis-specific ceramide. Oxidation of the linoleate moiety by lipoxygenases is proposed to facilitate enzymatic cleavage of the ester bond, releasing free ω-hydroxyceramide for covalent binding to protein, thus forming the corneocyte lipid envelope, a key component of the epidermal barrier. Herein, we report the transformations of esterified linoleate proceed beyond the initial steps of oxidation and epoxyalcohol synthesis catalyzed by the consecutive actions of 12R-LOX and epidermal LOX3. The major end product in human and porcine epidermis is a trihydroxy derivative, formed with a specificity that implicates participation of an epoxide hydrolase in converting epoxyalcohol to triol. Of the 16 possible triols arising from hydrolysis of 9,10-epoxy-13-hydroxy-octadecenoates, using LC-MS and chiral analyses, we identify and quantify specifically 9R,10S,13R-trihydroxy-11E-octadecenoate as the single major triol esterified in porcine epidermis and the same isomer with lesser amounts of its 10R diastereomer in human epidermis. The 9R,10S,13R-triol is formed by SN2 hydrolysis of the 9R,10R-epoxy-13R-hydroxy-octadecenoate product of the LOX enzymes, a reaction specificity characteristic of epoxide hydrolase. The high polarity of triol over the primary linoleate products enhances the concept that the oxidations disrupt corneocyte membrane lipids, promoting release of free ω-hydroxyceramide for covalent binding to protein and sealing of the waterproof barrier. PMID:27151221

  17. The Molecular Basis for Dual Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH)/Cyclooxygenase (COX) Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Giulia; Favia, Angelo D.; Convertino, Marino

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The design of multitarget‐directed ligands is a promising strategy for discovering innovative drugs. Here, we report a mechanistic study that clarifies key aspects of the dual inhibition of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes by a new multitarget‐directed ligand named ARN2508 (2‐[3‐fluoro‐4‐[3‐(hexylcarbamoyloxy)phenyl]phenyl]propanoic acid). This potent dual inhibitor combines, in a single scaffold, the pharmacophoric elements often needed to block FAAH and COX, that is, a carbamate moiety and the 2‐arylpropionic acid functionality, respectively. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that ARN2508 uses a noncovalent mechanism of inhibition to block COXs, while inhibiting FAAH via the acetylation of the catalytic Ser241, in line with previous experimental evidence for covalent FAAH inhibition. This study proposes the molecular basis for the dual FAAH/COX inhibition by this novel hybrid scaffold, stimulating further experimental studies and offering new insights for the rational design of novel anti‐inflammatory agents that simultaneously act on FAAH and COX. PMID:26593700

  18. A high-throughput assay for quantification of starch hydrolase inhibition based on turbidity measurement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Song, Lixia; Wang, Hongyu; Huang, Dejian

    2011-09-28

    A high-throughput method for rapid determination of starch hydrolase inhibition was developed using a 96-well microplate UV-vis reader to monitor the turbidity decrease over time. The area under the curve of turbidity measured over time was used to quantify the inhibitory effect of polyphenolic compounds on porcine pancreatic amylase, rat intestine α-glucosidase, and fungal amyloglucosidase. Acarbose equivalence (AE) was introduced for the first time and defined as IC50 of acarbose divided by the IC50 of the sample measured under the same 96-well plate. This way, the run-to-run variations are canceled out. Among the plant extracts tested, grape seed extracts (1,440 μmolAE/g) and cinnamon bark extracts (1600 μmolAE/g) are the most active in inhibiting rat intestine α-glucosidase. For porcine α-amylase inhibition, grape seed extracts (5710 μmol AE/g) are close to four times more active (equal weight basis) than acarbose (1550 μmolAE/g).

  19. Inhibition of xenobiotic-degrading hydrolases by organophosphinates. Annual progress report No. 1 Jul 82-1 Jul 83

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.M.; Zimmerman, J.K.; Bryson, P.K.; Grothusen, J.R.

    1983-07-01

    Organophosphinate pretreatment agents for chemical warfare defense inhibited carboxylester hydrolase from porcine liver and from rabbit liver. Recovery of rabbit liver monomeric carboxylester hydrolase to at least 30% of its initial activity was observed 48 hr. after inhibition by certain 4-nitrophenyl alkyl(phenyl)phosphinates and analogues. When ranked according to the initial rates at which their phosphinylated enzymes recovered, they were methyl(phenyl)>methyl(2-thienyl)>methyl(2-furyl)>ethyl(phenyl)>di-2-thienyl>diphenyl. Recovery was less than 20% in 96 hr. following inhibition by methyl(naphthyl),di-2-furyl, isopropyl(phenyl), dichloromethyl(phenyl), and bis chloromethyl substituted analogues. High performance liquid chromatography on silica using 10% to 20% 2-propanol in hexane as mobile phase resulted in satisfactory chromatograms for all except the most polar phosphinates. This method was useful in determining purity and decomposition of the compounds. Arylester hydrolase was purified 30-fold from rabbit serum by a sequence of polyethylene glycol fractionation, ion exchange chromatography, ammonium sulfate fractionation, molecular exclusion chromatography and pseudo-affinity chromatography. The partially purified enzyme was activated by 2.5 mM divalent calcium.

  20. Early events in the induction of rat hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, glutathione S-transferase, and microsomal epoxide hydrolase by 1,7-phenanthroline: comparison with oltipraz, tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole, and tert-butylhydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Lamb, J G; Franklin, M R

    2000-09-01

    Several classes of compounds are able to induce a spectrum of drug-metabolizing enzymes without inducing cytochrome P450s. Examples include antioxidants such as tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole and its metabolite tert-butylhydroquinone, dithiolthiones such as oltipraz, and N-heterocycles such as 1,7-phenanthroline. The events associated with induction of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT), glutathione S-transferases, and microsomal epoxide hydrolase after a single oral dose of these agents have been compared. No agent significantly elevated any of these enzyme activities within 24 h, but oltipraz and 1,7-phenanthroline significantly increased glutathione S-transferase and UGT activities by 48 h. 1, 7-Phenanthroline and oltipraz showed generally similar time-course responses of drug-metabolizing enzyme mRNAs; little change from control at 6 h followed by significant and maximal increases 12 to 18 h after treatment. Maximal mRNA changes for 1,7-phenanthroline and oltipraz were of similar magnitude and clustered around 4-fold for most enzymes. With the exception of one UGT isozyme (UGT1A1), the elevations in mRNA were blocked by prior administration of actinomycin D, indicative of a transcription-dependent response. Neither tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole nor tert-butylhydroquinone caused a statistically significant increase in any mRNA examined at any time point. PMID:10950843

  1. Inhibition of the mutagenicity of bay-region diol epoxides of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by naturally occurring plant phenols: Exceptional activity of ellagic acid

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Alexander W.; Huang, Mou-Tuan; Chang, Richard L.; Newmark, Harold L.; Lehr, Roland E.; Yagi, Haruhiko; Sayer, Jane M.; Jerina, Donald M.; Conney, Allan H.

    1982-01-01

    Ferulic, caffeic, chlorogenic, and ellagic acids, four naturally occurring plant phenols, inhibit the mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of (±)-7β,8α-dihydroxy-9α, 10α-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P 7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide-2), the only known ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of benzo[a]pyrene. The mutagenicity of 0.05 nmol of B[a]P 7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide-2 in strain TA100 of Salmonella typhimurium is inhibited 50% by incubation of the bacteria and the diol epoxide with 150 nmol of ferulic acid, 75 nmol of caffeic acid, 50 nmol of chlorogenic acid or, most strikingly, 1 nmol of ellagic acid in the 0.5-ml incubation mixture. A 3-nmol dose of ellagic acid inhibits mutation induction by 90%. Ellagic acid is also a potent antagonist of B[a]P 7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide-2 in Chinese hamster V79 cells. Mutations to 8-azaguanine resistance induced by 0.2 μM diol epoxide are reduced by 50% when tissue culture media also contains 2 μM ellagic acid. Similar to results obtained with the bacteria, ferulic, caffeic, and chlorogenic acids are approximately two orders of magnitude less active than ellagic acid in the mammalian cell assay. The antimutagenic effects of the plant phenols result from their direct interaction with B[a]P 7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide-2, because a concentration-dependent increase in the rate of diol epoxide disappearance in cell-free solutions of 1:9 dioxane/water, pH 7.0, is observed with all four phenols. In parallel with the mutagenicity studies, ellagic acid is 80-300 times more effective than the other phenols in accelerating the disappearance of B[a]P 7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide-2. Ellagic acid at 10 μM increases the disappearance of B[a]P 7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide-2 by approximately 20-fold relative to the spontaneous and hydronium ion-catalyzed hydrolysis of the diol epoxide at pH 7.0. Ellagic acid is a highly potent inhibitor of the mutagenic activity of bay-region diol epoxides of benzo[a]pyrene, dibenzo[a,h]pyrene, and dibenzo[a,i]pyrene, but higher

  2. Analgesic effects of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Maulik D; Richardson, Denise; Kendall, David A; Barrett, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2006-12-20

    Cannabinoid-based medicines have therapeutic potential for the treatment of pain. Augmentation of levels of endocannabinoids with inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is analgesic in models of acute and inflammatory pain states. The aim of this study was to determine whether local inhibition of FAAH alters nociceptive responses of spinal neurons in the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain. Electrophysiological studies were performed 14-18 d after spinal nerve ligation or sham surgery, and the effects of the FAAH inhibitor cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3-carbamoyl biphenyl-3-yl ester (URB597) on mechanically evoked responses of spinal neurons and levels of endocannabinoids were determined. Intraplantar URB597 (25 microg in 50 microl) significantly (p < 0.01) attenuated mechanically evoked responses of spinal neurons in sham-operated rats. Effects of URB597 were blocked by the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1) antagonist AM251 [N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-1-piperidinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide] (30 microg in 50 microl) and the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. URB597 treatment increased levels of anandamide, 2-arachidonyl glycerol, and oleoyl ethanolamide in the ipsilateral hindpaw of sham-operated rats. Intraplantar URB597 (25 microg in 50 microl) did not, however, alter mechanically evoked responses of spinal neurons in spinal nerve ligated (SNL) rats or hindpaw levels of endocannabinoids. Intraplantar injection of a higher dose of URB597 (100 microg in 50 microl) significantly (p < 0.05) attenuated evoked responses of spinal neurons in SNL rats but did not alter hindpaw levels of endocannabinoids. Spinal administration of URB597 attenuated evoked responses of spinal neurons and elevated levels of endocannabinoids in sham-operated and SNL rats. These data suggest that peripheral FAAH activity may be altered or that alternative pathways of metabolism have greater importance in SNL rats.

  3. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase activates Nrf2 signalling and induces heme oxygenase 1 transcription in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, H; Wood, J T; Whitten, K M; Vadivel, S K; Seng, S; Makriyannis, A; Avraham, H K

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Endocannabinoids such as anandamide (AEA) are important lipid ligands regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Their levels are regulated by hydrolase enzymes, the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL). Here, we investigated whether FAAH or AEA are involved in NF (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant responsive element (ARE) pathway. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of AEA or FAAH inhibition by the URB597 inhibitor or FAAH/siRNA on the activation of Nrf2-ARE signalling pathway and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction and transcription. KEY RESULTS Endogenous AEA was detected in the immortalized human mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells (0.034 ng per 106 cells) but not in MCF-7 or MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Because breast tumour cells express FAAH abundantly, we examined the effects of FAAH on Nrf2/antioxidant pathway. We found that inhibition of FAAH by the URB597 inhibitor induced antioxidant HO-1 in breast cancer cells and MCF-10A cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of FAAH or treatment with AEA-activated ARE-containing reporter induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, independent of the cannabinoid receptors, CB1, CB2 or TRPV1. Furthermore, URB597, AEA and siRNA-FAAH treatments induced the nuclear translocation of Nrf2, while siRNA-Nrf2 treatment and Keap1 expression blocked AEA, URB597 and si-FAAH from activation of ARE reporter and HO-1 induction. siRNA-HO-1 treatment decreased the viability of breast cancer cells and MCF-10A cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These data uncovered a novel mechanism by which inhibition of FAAH or exposure to AEA induced HO-1 transcripts and implicating AEA and FAAH as direct modifiers in signalling mediated activation of Nrf2-HO-1 pathway, independent of cannabinoid receptors. PMID:23347118

  4. Long-term consequences of perinatal fatty acid amino hydrolase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Shan; Morgan, Daniel; Jew, Chris P; Haskins, Chris; Andrews, Mary-Jeanette; Leishman, Emma; Spencer, Corinne M; Czyzyk, Traci; Bradshaw, Heather; Mackie, Ken; Lu, Hui-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Background and PurposeFatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors show promise as a treatment for anxiety, depression and pain. Here we investigated whether perinatal exposure to URB597, a fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, alters brain development and affects behaviour in adult mice. Experimental ApproachMouse dams were treated daily from gestational day 10.5 to 16.5 with 1, 3 or 10 mg kg−1 URB597. MS was used to measure a panel of endocannabinoids and related lipid compounds and brain development was assessed at embryonic day 16.5. Separate cohorts of mouse dams were treated with 10 mg kg−1 URB597, from gestational day 10.5 to postnatal day 7, and the adult offspring were assessed with a battery of behavioural tests. Key ResultsPerinatal URB597 exposure elevated anandamide and related N-acyl amides. URB597 did not induce signs of toxicity or affect dam weight gain, neurogenesis or axonal development at embryonic day 16.5. It did lead to subtle behavioural deficits in adult offspring, manifested by reduced cocaine-conditioned preference, increased depressive behaviours and impaired working memory. Anxiety levels, motor function and sensory-motor gating were not significantly altered. Conclusions and ImplicationsTaken together, the present results highlight how exposure to elevated levels of anandamide and related N-acyl amides during brain development can lead to subtle alterations in behaviour in adulthood. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids 2013. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-6 PMID:24730060

  5. The relationship between inhibition of vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide reductase and reduction of clotting factor activity with warfarin.

    PubMed Central

    Choonara, I A; Malia, R G; Haynes, B P; Hay, C R; Cholerton, S; Breckenridge, A M; Preston, F E; Park, B K

    1988-01-01

    1 The effect of low dose steady state warfarin (0.2 mg and 1 mg daily) on clotting factor activity and vitamin K1 metabolism was studied in seven healthy volunteers. 2 Steady state plasma warfarin concentrations were 41-99 ng ml-1 for the 0.2 mg dose and 157-292 ng ml-1 for the 1 mg dose. 3 There was a significant prolongation of the mean prothrombin time (0.9 s) after 1 mg warfarin daily, but no significant change in prothrombin time after 0.2 mg warfarin daily. There was no significant change in individual clotting factor activity (II, VII, IX or X) with either dose of warfarin. 4 Following the administration of a pharmacological dose of vitamin K1 (10 mg), all seven volunteers had detectable levels of vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide with both doses of warfarin (Cpmax 31-409 ng ml-1). 5 Both the Cpmax and the AUC for vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide were significantly greater on 1 mg of warfarin daily than 0.2 mg daily (P less than 0.01). 6 The apparent dissociation between inhibition of vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide reductase and reduction of clotting factor activity, produced by warfarin, may reflect the insensitivity of functional clotting factor assays to a small reduction in clotting factor concentration. PMID:3370190

  6. Heptachlor epoxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Heptachlor epoxide ; CASRN 1024 - 57 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  7. Improving hydrolases for organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskas, R J; Weber, H K

    1998-02-01

    Improving hydrolases by site-directed mutagenesis continues to be important, but an alternative method - directed evolution - also gains favor. Directed evolution combines random mutagenesis with screening or selection for the desired property. Directed evolution is especially useful for cases like solvent tolerance or thermostability where current theories are inadequate to predict which structural changes will give improvement. Researchers have also recently made significant progress on several practical problems: how to maintain the high activity of proteases and lipases in nonpolar organic solvents, how to resolve amines, and how to efficiently recycle the unwanted enantiomer in kinetic resolutions. Besides the lipases and proteases, researchers are also developing new hydrolases, notably dehalogenases and epoxide hydrolases. PMID:9667912

  8. Inhibition of fatty-acid amide hydrolase accelerates acquisition and extinction rates in a spatial memory task.

    PubMed

    Varvel, Stephen A; Wise, Laura E; Niyuhire, Floride; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Lichtman, Aron H

    2007-05-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated that disruption of CB(1) receptor signaling impairs extinction of learned responses in conditioned fear and Morris water maze paradigms. Here, we test the hypothesis that elevating brain levels of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide through either genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of its primary catabolic enzyme fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) will potentiate extinction in a fixed platform water maze task. FAAH (-/-) mice and mice treated with the FAAH inhibitor OL-135, did not display any memory impairment or motor disruption, but did exhibit a significant increase in the rate of extinction. Unexpectedly, FAAH-compromised mice also exhibited a significant increase in acquisition rate. The CB(1) receptor antagonist SR141716 (rimonabant) when given alone had no effects on acquisition, but disrupted extinction. Additionally, SR141716 blocked the effects of OL-135 on both acquisition and extinction. Collectively, these results indicate that endogenous anandamide plays a facilitatory role in extinction through a CB(1) receptor mechanism of action. In contrast, the primary psychoactive constituent of marijuana, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, failed to affect extinction rates, suggesting that FAAH is a more effective target than a direct acting CB(1) receptor agonist in facilitating extinction. More generally, these findings suggest that FAAH inhibition represents a promising pharmacological approach to treat psychopathologies hallmarked by an inability to extinguish maladaptive behaviors, such as post-traumatic stress syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  9. Increases in Levels of Epoxyeicosatrienoic and Dihydroxyeicosatrienoic Acids (EETs and DHETs) in Liver and Heart in Vivo by 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin (TCDD) and in Hepatic EET:DHET Ratios by Cotreatment with TCDD and the Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitor AUDA

    PubMed Central

    Diani-Moore, Silvia; Ma, Yuliang; Gross, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    The environmental toxin and carcinogen 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) binds and activates the transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), inducing CYP1 family cytochrome P450 enzymes. CYP1A2 and its avian ortholog CYP1A5 are highly active arachidonic acid epoxygenases. Epoxygenases metabolize arachidonic acid to four regioisomeric epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and selected monohydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs). EETs can be further metabolized by epoxide hydrolases to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs). As P450–arachidonic acid metabolites affect vasoregulation, responses to ischemia, inflammation, and metabolic disorders, identification of their production in vivo is needed to understand their contribution to biologic effects of TCDD and other AHR activators. Here we report use of an acetonitrile-based extraction procedure that markedly increased the yield of arachidonic acid products by lipidomic analysis over a standard solid-phase extraction protocol. We show that TCDD increased all four EETs (5,6-, 8,9-, 11,12-, and 14,15-), their corresponding DHETs, and 18- and 20-HETE in liver in vivo and increased 5,6-EET, the four DHETs, and 18-HETE in heart, in a chick embryo model. As the chick embryo heart lacks arachidonic acid–metabolizing activity, the latter findings suggest that arachidonic acid metabolites may travel from their site of production to a distal organ, i.e., heart. To determine if the TCDD–arachidonic acid–metabolite profile could be altered pharmacologically, chick embryos were treated with TCDD and the soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA). Cotreatment with AUDA increased hepatic EET-to-DHET ratios, indicating that the in vivo profile of P450–arachidonic acid metabolites can be modified for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:24311719

  10. Full Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Inhibition Combined with Partial Monoacylglycerol Lipase Inhibition: Augmented and Sustained Antinociceptive Effects with Reduced Cannabimimetic Side Effects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sudeshna; Kinsey, Steven G.; Liu, Qing-song; Hruba, Lenka; McMahon, Lance R.; Grim, Travis W.; Merritt, Christina R.; Wise, Laura E.; Abdullah, Rehab A.; Selley, Dana E.; Sim-Selley, Laura J.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) or monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the primary hydrolytic enzymes for the respective endocannabinoids N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), produces antinociception but with minimal cannabimimetic side effects. Although selective inhibitors of either enzyme often show partial efficacy in various nociceptive models, their combined blockade elicits augmented antinociceptive effects, but side effects emerge. Moreover, complete and prolonged MAGL blockade leads to cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) receptor functional tolerance, which represents another challenge in this potential therapeutic strategy. Therefore, the present study tested whether full FAAH inhibition combined with partial MAGL inhibition would produce sustained antinociceptive effects with minimal cannabimimetic side effects. Accordingly, we tested a high dose of the FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 (N-​3-​pyridinyl-​4-​[[3-​[[5-​(trifluoromethyl)-​2-​pyridinyl]oxy]phenyl]methyl]-​1-​piperidinecarboxamide; 10 mg/kg) given in combination with a low dose of the MAGL inhibitor JZL184 [4-nitrophenyl 4-(dibenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl(hydroxy)methyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate] (4 mg/kg) in mouse models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. This combination of inhibitors elicited profound increases in brain AEA levels (>10-fold) but only 2- to 3-fold increases in brain 2-AG levels. This combination produced significantly greater antinociceptive effects than single enzyme inhibition and did not elicit common cannabimimetic effects (e.g., catalepsy, hypomotility, hypothermia, and substitution for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in the drug-discrimination assay), although these side effects emerged with high-dose JZL184 (i.e., 100 mg/kg). Finally, repeated administration of this combination did not lead to tolerance to its antiallodynic actions in the carrageenan assay or CB1 receptor functional tolerance. Thus, full FAAH inhibition combined

  11. Full Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Inhibition Combined with Partial Monoacylglycerol Lipase Inhibition: Augmented and Sustained Antinociceptive Effects with Reduced Cannabimimetic Side Effects in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sudeshna; Kinsey, Steven G; Liu, Qing-Song; Hruba, Lenka; McMahon, Lance R; Grim, Travis W; Merritt, Christina R; Wise, Laura E; Abdullah, Rehab A; Selley, Dana E; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Lichtman, Aron H

    2015-08-01

    Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) or monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the primary hydrolytic enzymes for the respective endocannabinoids N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), produces antinociception but with minimal cannabimimetic side effects. Although selective inhibitors of either enzyme often show partial efficacy in various nociceptive models, their combined blockade elicits augmented antinociceptive effects, but side effects emerge. Moreover, complete and prolonged MAGL blockade leads to cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) receptor functional tolerance, which represents another challenge in this potential therapeutic strategy. Therefore, the present study tested whether full FAAH inhibition combined with partial MAGL inhibition would produce sustained antinociceptive effects with minimal cannabimimetic side effects. Accordingly, we tested a high dose of the FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 (N-​3-​pyridinyl-​4-​[[3-​[[5-​(trifluoromethyl)-​2-​pyridinyl]oxy]phenyl]methyl]-​1-​piperidinecarboxamide; 10 mg/kg) given in combination with a low dose of the MAGL inhibitor JZL184 [4-nitrophenyl 4-(dibenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl(hydroxy)methyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate] (4 mg/kg) in mouse models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. This combination of inhibitors elicited profound increases in brain AEA levels (>10-fold) but only 2- to 3-fold increases in brain 2-AG levels. This combination produced significantly greater antinociceptive effects than single enzyme inhibition and did not elicit common cannabimimetic effects (e.g., catalepsy, hypomotility, hypothermia, and substitution for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in the drug-discrimination assay), although these side effects emerged with high-dose JZL184 (i.e., 100 mg/kg). Finally, repeated administration of this combination did not lead to tolerance to its antiallodynic actions in the carrageenan assay or CB1 receptor functional tolerance. Thus, full FAAH inhibition

  12. The cytotoxic activity of Bacillus anthracis lethal factor is inhibited by leukotriene A4 hydrolase and metallopeptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Menard, A; Papini, E; Mock, M; Montecucco, C

    1996-01-01

    The lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis is central to the pathogenesis of anthrax. Its mechanism of action is still unknown. Recently, on the basis of sequence similarities, we suggested that lethal factor might act similarly to leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4), a bifunctional enzyme also endowed with a metallopeptidase activity. Here we show that some inhibitors of the LTA4 hydrolase and metallopeptidase activities of LTA4 hydrolase also affect the cytotoxicity of the anthrax lethal factor on macrophage cell lines, without interfering with the ability of the lethal factor to enter cells. These results support the proposal that anthrax lethal factor might display in the cytosol of intoxicated cells a peptidase activity similar to that of LTA4 hydrolase. PMID:8973585

  13. Thymine-based molecular beacon for sensing adenosine based on the inhibition of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Nieh, Chih-Chun; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2014-11-15

    This study presents a thymine (T)-based molecular beacon (MB) used for probing S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH)-catalyzed hydrolysis of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and for sensing adenosine based on the inhibition of SAHH activity. The designed MB (T8-MB-T8) contained a 15-mer loop and a stem that consisted of a pair of 8-mer T bases, a fluorophore unit at the 5'-end, and a quencher unit at the 3'-end. In the presence of Hg(2+), a change in the conformation of T8-MB-T8 placed the fluorophore unit and the quencher in proximity to each other and caused collisional quenching of fluorescence between them. The Hg(2+)-induced fluorescence quenching of T8-MB-T8 occurred because the Hg(2+) induced T-T mismatches to form stable T-Hg(2+)-T coordination in the MB stem. SAHH catalyzed the hydrolysis of SAH to produce homocysteine. The generated homocysteine enabled the Hg(2+) to be removed from a hairpin-shaped T8-MB-T8 through the formation of a strong Hg(2+)-S bond, leading to the restoration of its fluorescence. The T8-MB-T8 · Hg(2+) probe showed a limit of detection for SAHH of 4 units L(-1) (approximately 0.24 nM) and was reusable for detecting the SAHH/SAH system. Because adenosine was an effective SAHH activity inhibitor, the T8-MB-T8 · Hg(2+) probe combining the SAHH and SAH systems was used for sensitive and selective detection of adenosine in urine without the interference of other adenosine analogs.

  14. Concurrent cooperativity and substrate inhibition in the epoxidation of carbamazepine by cytochrome P450 3A4 active site mutants inspired by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian S; Knehans, Tim; Davydov, Dmitri R; Bounds, Patricia L; von Mandach, Ursula; Halpert, James R; Caflisch, Amedeo; Koppenol, Willem H

    2015-01-27

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) is the major human P450 responsible for the metabolism of carbamazepine (CBZ). To explore the mechanisms of interactions of CYP3A4 with this anticonvulsive drug, we carried out multiple molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, starting with the complex of CYP3A4 manually docked with CBZ. On the basis of these simulations, we engineered CYP3A4 mutants I369F, I369L, A370V, and A370L, in which the productive binding orientation was expected to be stabilized, thus leading to increased turnover of CBZ to the 10,11-epoxide product. In addition, we generated CYP3A4 mutant S119A as a control construct with putative destabilization of the productive binding pose. Evaluation of the kinetics profiles of CBZ epoxidation demonstrate that CYP3A4-containing bacterial membranes (bactosomes) as well as purified CYP3A4 (wild-type and mutants I369L/F) exhibit substrate inhibition in reconstituted systems. In contrast, mutants S119A and A370V/L exhibit S-shaped profiles that are indicative of homotropic cooperativity. MD simulations with two to four CBZ molecules provide evidence that the substrate-binding pocket of CYP3A4 can accommodate more than one molecule of CBZ. Analysis of the kinetics profiles of CBZ metabolism with a model that combines the formalism of the Hill equation with an allowance for substrate inhibition demonstrates that the mechanism of interactions of CBZ with CYP3A4 involves multiple substrate-binding events (most likely three). Despite the retention of the multisite binding mechanism in the mutants, functional manifestations reveal an exquisite sensitivity to even minor structural changes in the binding pocket that are introduced by conservative substitutions such as I369F, I369L, and A370V.

  15. Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibition Enhances Memory Acquisition through Activation of PPAR-alpha Nuclear Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzola, Carmen; Medalie, Julie; Scherma, Maria; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Drago, Filippo; Cadet, Jean Lud; Goldberg, Steven R.; Yasar, Sevil

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) increase endogenous levels of anandamide (a cannabinoid CB[subscript 1]-receptor ligand) and oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide (OEA and PEA, ligands for alpha-type peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors, PPAR-alpha) when and where they are naturally released in the brain.…

  16. Black raspberry extracts inhibit benzo(a)pyrene diol-epoxide-induced activator protein 1 activation and VEGF transcription by targeting the phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuanshu; Li, Jingxia; Song, Lun; Zhang, Dongyun; Tong, Qiangsong; Ding, Min; Bowman, Linda; Aziz, Robeena; Stoner, Gary D

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that freeze-dried black raspberry extract fractions inhibit benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells and benzo(a)pyrene diol-epoxide [B(a)PDE]-induced activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity in mouse epidermal Cl 41 cells. The phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K)/Akt pathway is critical for B(a)PDE-induced AP-1 activation in mouse epidermal Cl 41 cells. In the present study, we determined the potential involvement of PI-3K and its downstream kinases on the inhibition of AP-1 activation by black raspberry fractions, RO-FOO3, RO-FOO4, RO-ME, and RO-DM. In addition, we investigated the effects of these fractions on the expression of the AP-1 target genes, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Pretreatment of Cl 41 cells with fractions RO-F003 and RO-ME reduced activation of AP-1 and the expression of VEGF, but not iNOS. In contrast, fractions RO-F004 and RO-DM had no effect on AP-1 activation or the expression of either VEGF or iNOS. Consistent with inhibition of AP-1 activation, the RO-ME fraction markedly inhibited activation of PI-3K, Akt, and p70 S6 kinase (p70(S6k)). In addition, overexpression of the dominant negative PI-3K mutant delta p85 reduced the induction of VEGF by B(a)PDE. It is likely that the inhibitory effects of fractions RO-FOO3 and RO-ME on B(a)PDE-induced AP-1 activation and VEGF expression are mediated by inhibition of the PI-3K/Akt pathway. In view of the important roles of AP-1 and VEGF in tumor development, one mechanism for the chemopreventive activity of black raspberries may be inhibition of the PI-3K/Akt/AP-1/VEGF pathway.

  17. Black raspberry extracts inhibit benzo(a)pyrene diol-epoxide-induced activator protein 1 activation and VEGF transcription by targeting the phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuanshu; Li, Jingxia; Song, Lun; Zhang, Dongyun; Tong, Qiangsong; Ding, Min; Bowman, Linda; Aziz, Robeena; Stoner, Gary D

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that freeze-dried black raspberry extract fractions inhibit benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells and benzo(a)pyrene diol-epoxide [B(a)PDE]-induced activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity in mouse epidermal Cl 41 cells. The phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K)/Akt pathway is critical for B(a)PDE-induced AP-1 activation in mouse epidermal Cl 41 cells. In the present study, we determined the potential involvement of PI-3K and its downstream kinases on the inhibition of AP-1 activation by black raspberry fractions, RO-FOO3, RO-FOO4, RO-ME, and RO-DM. In addition, we investigated the effects of these fractions on the expression of the AP-1 target genes, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Pretreatment of Cl 41 cells with fractions RO-F003 and RO-ME reduced activation of AP-1 and the expression of VEGF, but not iNOS. In contrast, fractions RO-F004 and RO-DM had no effect on AP-1 activation or the expression of either VEGF or iNOS. Consistent with inhibition of AP-1 activation, the RO-ME fraction markedly inhibited activation of PI-3K, Akt, and p70 S6 kinase (p70(S6k)). In addition, overexpression of the dominant negative PI-3K mutant delta p85 reduced the induction of VEGF by B(a)PDE. It is likely that the inhibitory effects of fractions RO-FOO3 and RO-ME on B(a)PDE-induced AP-1 activation and VEGF expression are mediated by inhibition of the PI-3K/Akt pathway. In view of the important roles of AP-1 and VEGF in tumor development, one mechanism for the chemopreventive activity of black raspberries may be inhibition of the PI-3K/Akt/AP-1/VEGF pathway. PMID:16397275

  18. Genotoxicity characteristics of reverse diol-epoxides of chrysene.

    PubMed

    Glatt, H; Wameling, C; Elsberg, S; Thomas, H; Marquardt, H; Hewer, A; Phillips, D H; Oesch, F; Seidel, A

    1993-01-01

    Trans-3,4-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrochrysene (chrysene-3,4-diol), a major metabolite of chrysene, is further metabolized by rat liver enzymes to products which effectively revert the his- Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 to histidine prototrophy, but are only weakly mutagenic in strain TA100 and in Chinese hamster V79 cells (acquisition of resistance to 6-thioguanine). The liver enzyme mediated mutagenicity of chrysene-3,4-diol is substantially enhanced in the presence of 1,1,1-trichloropropene 2,3-oxide, an inhibitor of microsomal epoxide hydrolase. The predominant metabolites of chrysene-3,4-diol, namely the anti- and syn-isomers of its 1,2-oxide (termed reverse diol-epoxides), proved to be extraordinarily effective mutagens in S.typhimurium strain TA98, but were only moderately active in strains TA100 and TA104, and in the SOS induction in Escherichia coli PQ37. These genotoxicity spectra in bacteria are completely different from those observed with the bay-region diol-epoxides of chrysene and 3-hydroxychrysene. In V79 cells, the reverse diol-epoxides formed low levels of DNA adducts and were very weak inducers of gene mutations. In M2 mouse prostate cells, however, high numbers of transformed foci were induced by chrysene-3,4-diol and its diastereomeric 1,2-oxides. Chrysene-3,4-diol was somewhat more potent than chrysene-1,2-diol. The potency of both reverse diol-epoxides was similar to that of the syn-diastereomers of the bay-region diol-epoxides of chrysene and 3-hydroxychrysene, but lower than that of their anti-diastereomers. The reverse diol-epoxides of chrysene, unlike the bay-region diol-epoxides, were inactivated by purified microsomal epoxide hydrolase. Noteworthy findings were also made with regard to the chemical stability of the diol-epoxides in buffer, determined from the decline in mutagenicity after preincubation in the absence of the target cells. Despite its lower delta Edeloc/beta value for the formation of the benzylic carbocation, anti

  19. Electrochemical epoxidation of olefins

    SciTech Connect

    van der Eijk, J.M. )

    1987-08-01

    Direct epoxidation of an olefin, using oxygen and a catalyst, only proceeds with a high yield in the case of ethene. All commercial processes for the epoxidation of higher olefins therefore make use of an indirect route, yielding a co-product besides the desired epoxide. From an economic point of view this is an unfavorable situation since it couples the manufacture of two products. Recently, we have made a comprehensive study of a non-conventional method involving the electrochemical oxidation of olefins to epoxides. The major technical challenge posed by the electrochemical route to epoxides is the identification of conditions under which the desired reaction proceeds selectively. An exploratory study had indicated that the direct oxidation of olefins at the surface of catalytically active anodes (Pt, silver oxide, nickel oxide, lead ruthenates (1)) proceeds either slowly or non-selectively. A more promising approach was expected to be electrochemical (re)generation of an epoxidation agent at the anode of an electrochemical cell and carrying out the epoxidation in the anolyte solution. Epoxidation agents of interest included thallium (III) acetate complexes, hypobromite and silver(II)-pyridine complexes. Here we report on the electrochemical oxidation of olefins as mediated by silver-pyridine complexes. Subjects to be dealt with include the chemical efficacy of the process as well as the kinettics and mechanism of the olefin-Ag(II) reaction.

  20. Teratogen metabolism: activation of thalidomide and thalidomide analogues to products that inhibit the attachment of cells to concanavalin A coated plastic surfaces. Revised version

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, A.G.; Weinreb, S.L.

    1982-01-01

    Thalidomide metabolites inhibit the attachment of tumor cells to concanavalin A coated polyethylene surfaces. Thalidomide, itself, is non-inhibitory. Thalidomide activation to inhibitory products requires hepatic microsomes, an NADPH generating system and molecular oxygen. Production of inhibitory metabolites is unaffected by either epoxide hydrolase or TCPO, an inhibitor of epoxide hydrolase endogenous to hepatic S9 fraction. Therefore the attachment inhibitor is probably not an arene oxide. Inhibition is not accompanied by cytotoxicity as judged by trypan blue exclusion. Although uninduced hepatic microsomes from mice, rats and dogs have similar ability to activate thalidomide, microsomes from Aroclor 1254 induced rats are relatively inactive in the system. Inhibitory metabolites can be generated from the thalidomide analogues EM8, EM12, EM16, EM87, EM136, EM255, E350, phthalimide, phthalimido-phthalimide, indan, 1-indanone and 1,3-indandione. Glutarimide, glutamic acid and phthalic acid do not activate to inhibitory products.

  1. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase by URB597 attenuates the anxiolytic-like effect of acetaminophen in the mouse elevated plus-maze test.

    PubMed

    Zaitone, Sawsan A; El-Wakeil, Ahmed F; Abou-El-Ela, Soad H

    2012-08-01

    Acetaminophen is the most widely used analgesic/antipyretic drug. It is metabolized into N-arachidonoylphenolamine (AM404), which inhibits the reuptake of anandamide. In view of the role of endocannabinoids in the effect of acetaminophen, we tested its anxiolytic-like effect by observing the behavior of mice using the elevated plus-maze test. The results indicated that acetaminophen [100 and 200 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)] exerted an anxiolytic-like effect that was represented by higher percentage open-arm time, percentage open-arm entries, and total number of head dips compared with the vehicle control (P<0.05). Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase, an enzyme involved in the cerebral metabolism of acetaminophen into AM404, using URB597 (0.07 mg/kg, i.p.), attenuated the anxiolytic-like effect of acetaminophen. Pretreatment with the cannabinoid type-1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (1 mg/kg, i.p.) antagonized the effect of acetaminophen. Remarkably, the selected doses of rimonabant or URB597 did not themselves induce any anxiolytic-like effect. Furthermore, the selected doses of acetaminophen (25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) did not significantly alter the locomotor activity of mice in the open-field test. In conclusion, these findings confirmed that acetaminophen shows an anxiolytic-like effect in mice that involves, at least in part, AM404-mediated accumulation of anandamide in the brain and consequent activation of cannabinoid type-1 receptors.

  2. Antifungal Hydrolases in Pea Tissue : II. Inhibition of Fungal Growth by Combinations of Chitinase and beta-1,3-Glucanase.

    PubMed

    Mauch, F; Mauch-Mani, B; Boller, T

    1988-11-01

    Chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase purified from pea pods acted synergistically in the degradation of fungal cell walls. The antifungal potential of the two enzymes was studied directly by adding protein preparations to paper discs placed on agar plates containing germinated fungal spores. Protein extracts from pea pods infected with Fusarium solani f.sp. phaseoli, which contained high activities of chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase, inhibited growth of 15 out of 18 fungi tested. Protein extracts from uninfected pea pods, which contained low activities of chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase, did not inhibit fungal growth. Purified chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase, tested individually, did not inhibit growth of most of the test fungi. Only Trichoderma viride was inhibited by chitinase alone, and only Fusarium solani f.sp. pisi was inhibited by beta-1,3-glucanase alone. However, combinations of purified chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase inhibited all fungi tested as effectively as crude protein extracts containing the same enzyme activities. The pea pathogen, Fusarium solani f.sp. pisi, and the nonpathogen of peas, Fusarium solani f.sp. phaseoli, were similarly strongly inhibited by chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase, indicating that the differential pathogenicity of the two fungi is not due to differential sensitivity to the pea enzymes. Inhibition of fungal growth was caused by the lysis of the hyphal tips.

  3. Stereoselective formations of K-region and non-K-region epoxides in the metabolism of chrysene by rat liver microsomal cytochrome P-450 isozymes.

    PubMed

    Yang, S K; Bao, Z P

    1987-07-01

    The K-region 5,6-epoxide and non-K-region 1,2- and 3,4-epoxides of chrysene were isolated by normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) from a mixture of products formed in the metabolism of chrysene by liver microsomes from untreated (control), phenobarbital-treated, or 3-methylcholanthrene-treated rats in the presence of an epoxide hydrolase inhibitor, 3,3,3-trichloropropylene 1,2-oxide. Epoxides were characterized by ultraviolet, mass, and circular dichroism spectral and chiral stationary phase HPLC analyses. Each of the metabolically formed epoxides was hydrated by rat liver microsomal epoxide hydrolase to a trans-dihydrodiol. The metabolically formed chrysene 5,6-epoxides were determined by chiral stationary phase HPLC and were found to contain (5S,6R):(5R,6S) enantiomer ratios of 68:32 (control), 71:29 (phenobarbital), and 5:95 (3-methylcholanthrene), respectively. The enantiomers of chrysene 1,2-epoxide and 3,4-epoxide were also resolved by chiral stationary phase HPLC. However, the enantiomeric compositions of the metabolically formed chrysene 1,2- and 3,4-epoxides, which racemized rapidly at room temperature, could not be directly determined. By using molecular oxygen-18 in the in vitro incubation of chrysene and by mass spectral analyses of the resulting oxygen-18-containing dihydrodiol metabolites and their acid-catalyzed dehydration (phenolic) products, both 1,2-epoxide and 3,4-epoxide were found to be converted by microsomal epoxide hydrolase-catalyzed water attack at predominantly (greater than or equal to 97%) the allylic carbons.

  4. 5,14-HEDGE, a 20-HETE mimetic, reverses hypotension and improves survival in a rodent model of septic shock: Contribution of soluble epoxide hydrolase, CYP2C23, MEK1/ERK1/2/IKKβ/IκB-α/NF-κB pathway, and proinflammatory cytokine formation

    PubMed Central

    Tunctan, Bahar; Korkmaz, Belma; Sari, Ayse Nihal; Kacan, Meltem; Unsal, Demet; Serin, Mehmet Sami; Buharalioglu, C. Kemal; Sahan-Firat, Seyhan; Cuez, Tuba; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen; Falck, John R.; Malik, Kafait U.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a stable synthetic analog of 20-HETE, N-[20-hydroxyeicosa-5(Z),14(Z)-dienoyl]glycine (5,14-HEDGE), restores vascular reactivity, blood pressure, and heart rate in endotoxemic rats. The aim of this study was to determine whether decreased renal expression and activity of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), MEK1, ERK1/2, IKKβ, IκB-α, and NF-κB as well as systemic and renal proinflammatory cytokine production associated with increased expression and activity of CYP2C23 contributes to the effect of 5,14-HEDGE to prevent hypotension, tachycardia, inflammation, and mortality in response to systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Blood pressure fell by 33 mmHg and heart rate rose by 57 beats/min in LPS (10 mg/kg, i.p.)-treated rats. Administration of LPS also increased mRNA and protein expression of sEH associated with a decrease in CYP2C23 mRNA and protein expression. Increased activity of sEH and p-MEK1, p-ERK1/2, p-IκB-α, NF-κB, and p-NF-κB protein levels as well as TNF-α and IL-8 production by LPS were also associated with a decreased activity of AA epoxygenases. These effects of LPS were prevented by 5,14-HEDGE (30 mg/kg, s.c.; 1 h after LPS). Treatment of endotoxemic mice with 5,14-HEDGE also raised the survival rate of animals from 84% to 98%. A competitive antagonist of vasoconstrictor effects of 20-HETE, 20-hydroxyeicosa-6(Z),15(Z)-dienoic acid, 20-HEDE (30 mg/kg, s.c.; 1 h after LPS) prevented the effects of 5,14-HEDGE on blood pressure, heart rate, expression and/or activity of sEH, CYP2C23, and ERK1/2 as well as TNF-α and IL-8 levels in rats treated with LPS. These results suggest that decreased expression and/or activity of sEH and MEK1/ERK1/2/IKKβ/IκB-α/NF-κB pathway as well as proinflammatory cytokine production associated with increased CYP2C23 expression and antiinflammatory mediator formation participate in the protective effect of 5,14-HEDGE against hypotension, tachycardia, inflammation, and

  5. Antiviral drug therapy of filovirus infections: S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors inhibit Ebola virus in vitro and in a lethal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Huggins, J; Zhang, Z X; Bray, M

    1999-02-01

    Ebola (subtype Zaire) viral replication was inhibited in vitro by a series of nine nucleoside analogue inhibitors of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase, an important target for antiviral drug development. Adult BALB/c mice lethally infected with mouse-adapted Ebola virus die 5-7 days after infection. Treatment initiated on day 0 or 1 resulted in dose-dependent protection, with mortality completely prevented at doses > or =0.7 mg/kg every 8 h. There was significant protection (90%) when treatment was begun on day 2, at which time, the liver had an average titer of 3 x 10(5) pfu/g virus and the spleen had 2 x 10(6) pfu/g. Treatment with 2.2 mg/kg initiated on day 3, when the liver had an average titer of 2 x 10(7) pfu/g virus and the spleen had 2 x 10(8) pfu/g, resulted in 40% survival. As reported here, Carbocyclic 3-deazaadenosine is the first compound demonstrated to cure animals from this otherwise lethal Ebola virus infection.

  6. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    DOEpatents

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  7. Succinic anhydrides from epoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, Geoffrey W.; Rowley, John M.

    2013-07-09

    Catalysts and methods for the double carbonylation of epoxides are disclosed. Each epoxide molecule reacts with two molecules of carbon monoxide to produce a succinic anhydride. The reaction is facilitated by catalysts combining a Lewis acidic species with a transition metal carbonyl complex. The double carbonylation is achieved in single process by using reaction conditions under which both carbonylation reactions occur without the necessity of isolating or purifying the product of the first carbonylation.

  8. Succinic anhydrides from epoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, Geoffrey W; Rowley, John M

    2014-12-30

    Catalysts and methods for the double carbonylation of epoxides are disclosed. Each epoxide molecule reacts with two molecules of carbon monoxide to produce a succinic anhydride. The reaction is facilitated by catalysts combining a Lewis acidic species with a transition metal carbonyl complex. The double carbonylation is achieved in single process by using reaction conditions under which both carbonylation reactions occur without the necessity of isolating or purifying the product of the first carbonylation.

  9. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase and cyclooxygenase by the N-(3-methylpyridin-2-yl)amide derivatives of flurbiprofen and naproxen.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Mariateresa; Björklund, Emmelie; Wilson, Alan A; Congiu, Cenzo; Onnis, Valentina; Fowler, Christopher J

    2013-11-15

    Inhibitors of the metabolism of the endogenous cannabinoid ligand anandamide by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) reduce the gastric damage produced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and synergise with them in experimental pain models. This motivates the design of compounds with joint FAAH/cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitory activity. Here we present data on the N-(3-methylpyridin-2-yl)amide derivatives of flurbiprofen and naproxen (Flu-AM1 and Nap-AM1, respectively) with respect to their properties towards these two enzymes. Flu-AM1 and Nap-AM1 inhibited FAAH-catalysed hydrolysis of [(3)H]anandamide by rat brain homogenates with IC50 values of 0.44 and 0.74 µM. The corresponding values for flurbiprofen and naproxen were 29 and >100 µM, respectively. The inhibition by Flu-AM1 was reversible, mixed-type, with K(i)slope and K(i)intercept values of 0.21 and 1.4 µM, respectively. Flurbiprofen and Flu-AM1 both inhibited COX in the same manner with the order of potencies COX-2 vs. 2-arachidonoylglycerol>COX-1 vs. arachidonic acid>COX-2 vs. arachidonic acid with flurbiprofen being approximately 2-3 fold more potent than Flu-AM1 in the assays. Nap-AM1 was a less potent inhibitor of COX. Flu-AM1 at low micromolar concentrations inhibited the FAAH-driven uptake of [(3)H]anandamide into RBL2H3 basophilic leukaemia cells in vitro, but did not penetrate the brain in vivo sufficiently to block the binding of [(18)F]DOPP to brain FAAH. It is concluded that Flu-AM1 is a dual-action inhibitor of FAAH and COX that may be useful in exploring the optimal balance of effects on these two enzyme systems in producing peripheral alleviation of pain and inflammation in experimental models.

  10. Changes of blood endocannabinoids during anaesthesia: a special case for fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition by propofol?

    PubMed Central

    Jarzimski, Carina; Karst, Matthias; Zoerner, Alexander A; Rakers, Christin; May, Marcus; Suchy, Maria T; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Krauss, Joachim K; Scheinichen, Dirk; Jordan, Jens; Engeli, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    AIMS The aim of our study was to describe the time course of endocannabinoids during different anaesthesia protocols in more detail, and to challenge the hypothesis that propofol acts as a FAAH inhibitor. METHODS Endocannabinoids were measured during the first hour of anaesthesia in 14 women and 14 men undergoing general anaesthesia with propofol and in 14 women and 14 men receiving thiopental/sevoflurane. We also incubated whole human blood samples ex vivo with propofol and the known FAAH inhibitor oloxa and determined FAAH enzyme kinetics. RESULTS Plasma anandamide decreased similarly with propofol and thiopental/sevoflurane anaesthesia, and reached a nadir after 10 min. Areas under the curve for anandamide (mean and 95% CI) were 53.3 (47.4, 59.2) nmol l−1 60 min with propofol and 48.5 (43.1, 53.8) nmol l−1 60 min with thiopental/sevoflurane (P = NS). Anandamide and propofol plasma concentrations were not correlated at any time point. Ex vivo FAAH activity was not inhibited by propofol. Enzyme kinetics (mean ± SD) of recombinant human FAAH were Km= 16.9 ± 8.8 µmol l−1 and Vmax= 44.6 ± 15.8 nmol mg–1 min–1 FAAH without, and Km= 16.6 ± 4.0 µmol l−1 and Vmax= 44.0 ± 7.6 nmol mg–1 min−1 FAAH with 50 µmol l−1 propofol (P = NS for both). CONCLUSIONS Our findings challenge the idea that propofol anaesthesia and also propofol addiction are directly mediated by FAAH inhibition, but we cannot exclude other indirect actions on cannabinoid receptors. PMID:22242687

  11. A multi-target approach for pain treatment: dual inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase and TRPV1 in a rat model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Malek, Natalia; Mrugala, Monika; Makuch, Wioletta; Kolosowska, Natalia; Przewlocka, Barbara; Binkowski, Marcin; Czaja, Martyna; Morera, Enrico; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Starowicz, Katarzyna

    2015-05-01

    The pharmacological inhibition of anandamide (AEA) hydrolysis by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) attenuates pain in animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) but has failed in clinical trials. This may have occurred because AEA also activates transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), which contributes to pain development. Therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of the dual FAAH-TRPV1 blocker OMDM-198 in an MIA-model of osteoarthritic pain. We first investigated the MIA-induced model of OA by (1) characterizing the pain phenotype and degenerative changes within the joint using X-ray microtomography and (2) evaluating nerve injury and inflammation marker (ATF-3 and IL-6) expression in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia of osteoarthritic rats and differences in gene and protein expression of the cannabinoid CB1 receptors FAAH and TRPV1. Furthermore, we compared OMDM-198 with compounds acting exclusively on FAAH or TRPV1. Osteoarthritis was accompanied by the fragmentation of bone microstructure and destroyed cartilage. An increase of the mRNA levels of ATF3 and IL-6 and an upregulation of AEA receptors and FAAH in the dorsal root ganglia were observed. OMDM-198 showed antihyperalgesic effects in the OA model, which were comparable with those of a selective TRPV1 antagonist, SB-366,791, and a selective FAAH inhibitor, URB-597. The effect of OMDM-198 was attenuated by the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM-251, and by the nonpungent TRPV1 agonist, olvanil, suggesting its action as an "indirect" CB1 agonist and TRPV1 antagonist. These results suggest an innovative strategy for the treatment of OA, which may yield more satisfactory results than those obtained so far with selective FAAH inhibitors in human OA.

  12. Microbial production of epoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Thomas R.; Roberto, Francisco F.

    2003-06-10

    A method for microbial production of epoxides and other oxygenated products is disclosed. The method uses a biocatalyst of methanotrophic bacteria cultured in a biphasic medium containing a major amount of a non-aqueous polar solvent. Regeneration of reducing equivalents is carried out by using endogenous hydrogenase activity together with supplied hydrogen gas. This method is especially effective with gaseous substrates and cofactors that result in liquid products.

  13. Deconjugated Bile Salts Produced by Extracellular Bile-Salt Hydrolase-Like Activities from the Probiotic Lactobacillus johnsonii La1 Inhibit Giardia duodenalis In vitro Growth

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Marie-Agnès; Sow, Cissé; Zirah, Séverine; Deregnaucourt, Christiane; Chaouch, Soraya; Queiroz, Rayner M. L.; Charneau, Sébastien; Allain, Thibault; Florent, Isabelle; Grellier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Giardiasis, currently considered a neglected disease, is caused by the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia duodenalis and is widely spread in human as well as domestic and wild animals. The lack of appropriate medications and the spread of resistant parasite strains urgently call for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Host microbiota or certain probiotic strains have the capacity to provide some protection against giardiasis. By combining biological and biochemical approaches, we have been able to decipher a molecular mechanism used by the probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii La1 to prevent Giardia growth in vitro. We provide evidence that the supernatant of this strain contains active principle(s) not directly toxic to Giardia but able to convert non-toxic components of bile into components highly toxic to Giardia. By using bile acid profiling, these components were identified as deconjugated bile-salts. A bacterial bile-salt-hydrolase of commercial origin was able to mimic the properties of the supernatant. Mass spectrometric analysis of the bacterial supernatant identified two of the three bile-salt-hydrolases encoded in the genome of this probiotic strain. These observations document a possible mechanism by which L. johnsonii La1, by secreting, or releasing BSH-like activity(ies) in the vicinity of replicating Giardia in an environment where bile is present and abundant, can fight this parasite. This discovery has both fundamental and applied outcomes to fight giardiasis, based on local delivery of deconjugated bile salts, enzyme deconjugation of bile components, or natural or recombinant probiotic strains that secrete or release such deconjugating activities in a compartment where both bile salts and Giardia are present. PMID:27729900

  14. Experimental colitis in mice is attenuated by changes in the levels of endocannabinoid metabolites induced by selective inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)

    PubMed Central

    Sałaga, M; Mokrowiecka, A; Zakrzewski, P K; Cygankiewicz, A; Leishman, E; Sobczak, M; Zatorski, H; Małecka-Panas, E; Kordek, R; Storr, M; Krajewska, W M; Bradshaw, H B; Fichna, J

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Pharmacological treatment and/or maintenance of remission in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) is currently one of the biggest challenge in the field of gastroenterology. Available therapies are mostly limited to overcoming the symptoms, but not the cause of the disease. Recently, the endocannabinoid system has been proposed as a novel target in the treatment of IBD. Here we aimed to assess the anti-inflammatory action of the novel fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor PF-3845 and its effect on the endocannabinoid and related lipid metabolism during the course of experimental colitis. Methods We used two models of experimental colitis in mice (TNBS- and DSS-induced) and additionally, we employed LC/MS/MS spectrometry to determine the changes in biolipid levels in the mouse colon during inflammation. Results We showed that the FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 reduced experimental TNBS-induced colitis in mice and its anti-inflammatory action is associated with altering the levels of selected biolipids (arachidonic and oleic acid derivatives, prostaglandins and biolipids containing glycine in the mouse colon). Conclusions We show that FAAH is a promising pharmacological target and the FAAH-dependent biolipids play a major role in colitis. Our results highlight and promote therapeutic strategy based on targeting FAAH-dependent metabolic pathways in order to alleviate intestinal inflammation. PMID:24530133

  15. Epoxide-Mediated Differential Packaging of Cif and Other Virulence Factors into Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ballok, Alicia E.; Filkins, Laura M.; Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that contain a number of secreted bacterial proteins, including phospholipases, alkaline phosphatase, and the CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif). Previously, Cif, an epoxide hydrolase, was shown to be regulated at the transcriptional level by epoxides, which serve as ligands of the repressor, CifR. Here, we tested whether epoxides have an effect on Cif levels in OMVs. We showed that growth of P. aeruginosa in the presence of specific epoxides but not a hydrolysis product increased Cif packaging into OMVs in a CifR-independent fashion. The outer membrane protein, OprF, was also increased under these conditions, but alkaline phosphatase activity was not significantly altered. Additionally, we demonstrated that OMV shape and density were affected by epoxide treatment, with two distinct vesicle fractions present when cells were treated with epibromohydrin (EBH), a model epoxide. Vesicles isolated from the two density fractions exhibited different protein profiles in Western blotting and silver staining. We have shown that a variety of clinically or host-relevant treatments, including antibiotics, also alter the proteins packaged in OMVs. Proteomic analysis of purified OMVs followed by an analysis of transposon mutant OMVs yielded mutants with altered vesicle packaging. Finally, epithelial cell cytotoxicity was reduced in the vesicles formed in the presence of EBH, suggesting that this epoxide alters the function of the OMVs. Our data support a model whereby clinically or host-relevant signals mediate differential packaging of virulence factors in OMVs, which results in functional consequences for host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25112474

  16. 1-Heteroaryl-3-phenoxypropan-2-ones as inhibitors of cytosolic phospholipase A₂α and fatty acid amide hydrolase: Effect of the replacement of the ether oxygen with sulfur and nitrogen moieties on enzyme inhibition and metabolic stability.

    PubMed

    Sundermann, Tom; Fabian, Jörg; Hanekamp, Walburga; Lehr, Matthias

    2015-05-15

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are enzymes, which have emerged as attractive targets for the development of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs. We recently reported that certain 3-phenoxy-substituted 1-heteroarylpropan-2-ones are inhibitors of cPLA2α and/or FAAH. Starting from 1-[2-oxo-3-(4-phenoxyphenoxy)propyl]indole-5-carboxylic acid (3) and 1-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)-3-(4-phenoxyphenoxy)propan-2-one (4), the effect of the replacement of the oxygen in position 3 of the propan-2-one scaffold by sulfur and nitrogen containing moieties on inhibition of cPLA2α and fatty acid amide hydrolase as well as on metabolic stability in rat liver S9 fractions was investigated. As a result of these structure-activity relationship studies it was found that the ether oxygen is of great importance for enzyme inhibitory potency. Replacement by sulfur led to an about 100-fold decrease of enzyme inhibition, nitrogen and substituted nitrogen atoms at this position even resulted in inactivity of the compounds. The effect of the structural variations performed on metabolic stability of the important ketone pharmacophore was partly different in the two series of compounds. While introduction of SO and SO2 significantly increased stability of the ketone against reduction in case of the indole-5-carboxylic acid 3, it had no effect in case of the benzotriazole 4. Further analysis of the metabolism of 3 and 4 in rat liver S9 fractions revealed that the major metabolite of 3 was the alcohol 53 formed by reduction of the keto group. In contrast, in case of 4 beside keto reduction an excessive hydroxylation of the terminal phenoxy group occurred leading to the dihydroxy compound 50. Experiments with enzyme inhibitors showed that the phenylhydroxylation of 4 was catalyzed by tranylcypromine sensitive cytochrome P450 isoforms, while the reduction of the ketone function of 3 and 4 was mainly caused by cytosolic short chain dehydrogenases

  17. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    DOEpatents

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2011-04-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  18. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2013-02-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  19. The presence of acyl-CoA hydrolase in rat brown-adipose-tissue peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Alexson, S E; Osmundsen, H; Berge, R K

    1989-08-15

    The subcellular distribution of acyl-CoA hydrolase was studied in rat brown adipose tissue, with special emphasis on possible peroxisomal localization. Subcellular fractionation by sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation, followed by measurement of short-chain (propionyl-CoA) acyl-CoA hydrolase in the presence of NADH, resulted in two peaks of activity in the gradient: one peak corresponded to the distribution of cytochrome oxidase (mitochondrial marker enzyme), and another peak of activity coincided with the peroxisomal marker enzyme catalase. The distribution of the NADH-inhibited short-chain hydrolase activity fully resembled that of cytochrome oxidase. The substrate-specificity curve of the peroxisomal acyl-CoA hydrolase activity indicated the presence of a single enzyme exhibiting a broad substrate specificity, with maximal activity towards fatty acids with chain lengths of 3-12 carbon atoms. The mitochondrial acyl-CoA hydrolase substrate specificity, in contrast, indicated the presence of at least two acyl-CoA hydrolases (of short- and medium-chain-length specificity). The peroxisomal acyl-CoA hydrolase activity was inhibited by CoA at low (microM) concentrations and by ATP at high concentrations (greater than 0.8 mM). In contrast with the mitochondrial short-chain hydrolase, the peroxisomal acyl-CoA hydrolase activity was not inhibited by NADH. PMID:2573347

  20. Organocatalytic asymmetric hydrolysis of epoxides.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Mattia Riccardo; Prévost, Sébastien; List, Benjamin

    2014-07-28

    The hydrolytic ring opening of epoxides is an important biosynthetic transformation and is also applied industrially. We report the first organocatalytic variant of this reaction, exploiting our recently discovered activation of carboxylic acids with chiral phosphoric acids via heterodimerization. The methodology mimics the enzymatic mechanism, which involves an enzyme-bound carboxylate nucleophile. A newly designed phosphoric acid catalyst displays high stereocontrol in the desymmetrization of meso-epoxides. The methodology shows wide generality with cyclic, acylic, aromatic, and aliphatic substrates. We also apply our method in the first highly enantioselective anti-dihydroxylation of simple olefins.

  1. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase and cyclooxygenase-2 increases levels of endocannabinoid related molecules and produces analgesia via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha in a model of inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Maulik D; Richardson, Denise; Robinson, Ian; Garle, Michael J; Patel, Annie; Sun, Yan; Sagar, Devi R; Bennett, Andrew J; Alexander, Stephen P H; Kendall, David A; Barrett, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2008-07-01

    The antinociceptive effects of the endocannabinoids (ECs) are enhanced by inhibiting catabolic enzymes such as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). The physiological relevance of the metabolism of ECs by other pathways, such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) is less clear. To address this question we compared the effects of local inhibition of FAAH versus COX2 (URB597 and nimesulide, respectively) on inflammatory hyperalgesia and levels of endocannabinoids and related molecules in the hindpaw. Inflammatory hyperalgesia was measured following intraplantar injection of carrageenan. Effects of intraplantar injection of URB597 (25 microg and 100 microg) or nimesulide (50 microg) on hyperalgesia and hindpaw levels of anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2AG) and N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) were determined. Although both doses of URB597 increased levels of AEA and 2AG in the carrageenan inflamed hindpaw, only the lower dose of URB597 attenuated hyperalgesia (P<0.05). Nimesulide attenuated both hyperalgesia and hindpaw oedema (P<0.001, P<0.01, respectively) and increased levels of PEA (P<0.05) in the hindpaw. Since both AEA and PEA are ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha), the effects of the PPARalpha antagonist GW6471 on nimesulide- and URB597-mediated effects were studied. GW6471, but not a PPARgamma antagonist, blocked the inhibitory effects of nimesulide and URB597 on hyperalgesia. Our data suggest that both COX2 and FAAH play a role in the metabolism of endocannabinoids and related molecules. The finding that PPARalpha antagonism blocked the inhibitory effects of nimesulide and URB597 suggests that PPARalpha contributes to their antinociceptive effects in the carrageenan model of inflammatory hyperalgesia.

  2. Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are viable cosolvents for enzyme-catalyzed epoxide hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Diana; de la Fuente Revenga, Mario; Widersten, Mikael

    2010-06-01

    A special group of ionic liquids, deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been tested as cosolvents in enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of a chiral (1,2)-trans-2-methylstyrene oxide. The choline chloride:ethane diol (ET), choline chloride:glycerol (GLY) and choline:chloride:urea (REL) DESs were included in the reaction mixtures with epoxide and the potato epoxide hydrolase StEH1. The effect of the DESs on enzyme function was primarily elevations of K(M) (up to 20-fold) and with lesser effects on turnover numbers (twofold variation). The regioselectivity in hydrolysis of the (1R,2R)-2-trans-methylstyrene oxide was altered in the presence of GLY or ET to favor epoxide ring opening at the benzylic carbon (R=2.33), enhancing the regioselectivity observed in buffer-only systems (R=1.35). The DES solutions dissolved 1.5-fold higher epoxide concentrations as compared to phosphate buffer. The total conversion of high concentration (40 g/l) of (1S,2S)-MeSO was not negatively affected by addition of 40% GLY. PMID:20438773

  3. Alpha/Beta-hydrolase fold enzymes: structures, functions and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Holmquist, M

    2000-09-01

    The alpha/beta-hydrolase fold family of enzymes is rapidly becoming one of the largest group of structurally related enzymes with diverse catalytic functions. Members in this family include acetylcholinesterase, dienelactone hydrolase, lipase, thioesterase, serine carboxypeptidase, proline iminopeptidase, proline oligopeptidase, haloalkane dehalogenase, haloperoxidase, epoxide hydrolase, hydroxynitrile lyase and others. The enzymes all have a Nucleophile-His-Acid catalytic triad evolved to efficiently operate on substrates with different chemical composition or physicochemical properties and in various biological contexts. For example, acetylcholine esterase catalyzes the cleavage of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, at a rate close to the limits of diffusion of substrate to the active site of the enzyme. Dienelactone hydrolase uses substrate-assisted catalysis to degrade aromatic compounds. Lipases act adsorbed at the water/lipid interface of their neutral water-insoluble ester substrates. Most lipases have their active site buried under secondary structure elements, a flap, which must change conformation to allow substrate to access the active site. Thioesterases are involved in a multitude of biochemical processes including bioluminiscence, fatty acid- and polyketide biosynthesis and metabolism. Serine carboxypeptidases recognize the negatively charged carboxylate terminus of their peptide substrates. Haloalkane dehalogenase is a detoxifying enzyme that converts halogenated aliphatics to the corresponding alcohols, while haloperoxidase catalyzes the halogenation of organic compounds. Hydroxynitrile lyase cleaves carbon-carbon bonds in cyanohydrins with concomitant hydrogen cyanide formation as a defense mechanism in plants. This paper gives an overview of catalytic activities reported for this family of enzymes by discussing selected examples. The current state of knowledge of the molecular basis for catalysis and substrate specificity is outlined

  4. Peptidoglycan Hydrolases of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    van Heijenoort, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The review summarizes the abundant information on the 35 identified peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases of Escherichia coli classified into 12 distinct families, including mainly glycosidases, peptidases, and amidases. An attempt is also made to critically assess their functions in PG maturation, turnover, elongation, septation, and recycling as well as in cell autolysis. There is at least one hydrolytic activity for each bond linking PG components, and most hydrolase genes were identified. Few hydrolases appear to be individually essential. The crystal structures and reaction mechanisms of certain hydrolases having defined functions were investigated. However, our knowledge of the biochemical properties of most hydrolases still remains fragmentary, and that of their cellular functions remains elusive. Owing to redundancy, PG hydrolases far outnumber the enzymes of PG biosynthesis. The presence of the two sets of enzymes acting on the PG bonds raises the question of their functional correlations. It is difficult to understand why E. coli keeps such a large set of PG hydrolases. The subtle differences in substrate specificities between the isoenzymes of each family certainly reflect a variety of as-yet-unidentified physiological functions. Their study will be a far more difficult challenge than that of the steps of the PG biosynthesis pathway. PMID:22126997

  5. Patulin biosynthesis: Epoxidation of toluquinol and gentisyl alcohol by particulate preparations from Penicillium patulum

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, J.W.; Light, R.J. )

    1989-11-14

    A crude extract that catalyzes the epoxidation of toluquinol and gentisyl alcohol was isolated from cultures of Penicillium patulum. About 60% of the activity sedimented from crude extract upon centrifugation at 105000g for 2 h, and at 30000g for 30 min after precipitation with 30% ammonium sulfate and resuspension in buffer. The quinone epoxide phyllostine, a product of gentisyl alcohol epoxidation, has previously been shown to be an intermediate in the biosynthesis of patulin and was shown to be further converted to neopatulin by the extract. The epoxide product of toluquinol, desoxyphyllostine (2-methyl-5,6-epoxy-1,4-benzoquinone), has not been reported previously from fungal cultures. Its structure was confirmed by GC-mass spectrometry and proton and {sup 13}C NMR. Its CD spectrum showed the same shape and signs as that of phyllostine, indicating that it too is an enzymatic product with a similar absolute configuration. Whereas chemical epoxidation of toluquinone and gentisly quinone occurs with hydrogen peroxide, the enzymatic epoxidation utilized oxygen and the hydroquinone. The epoxidation was inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and {rho}-(chloromercuri)benzenesulfonic acid and by degassing with nitrogen, but no inhibition was observed with KCN, catalase, or CO. The apparent K{sub m}'s were similar for the two substrates with both substrates showing inhibition at 1.0 mM. The rate of desoxyphyllostine formation was more than 10 times that of phyllostine formation at equivalent substrate concentrations. Gentisaldehyde was not a substrate for the enzyme. The epoxidase was induced in late fermentor cultures of P. patulum with the same kinetics as m-hydroxybenzyl alcohol dehydrogenase, another enzyme associated with the induction of patulin biosynthesis.

  6. Organocatalyzed enantioselective desymmetrization of aziridines and epoxides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Summary Enantioselective desymmetrization of meso-aziridines and meso-epoxides with various nucleophiles by organocatalysis has emerged as a cutting-edge approach in recent years. This review summarizes the origin and recent developments of enantioselective desymmetrization of meso-aziridines and meso-epoxides in the presence of organocatalysts. PMID:24062828

  7. Mechanistic Investigations of Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase from Clostridium perfringens*

    PubMed Central

    Jongkees, Seino A. K.; Yoo, Hayoung; Withers, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to probe the details of the hydration-initiated hydrolysis catalyzed by the Clostridium perfringens unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase of glycoside hydrolase family 88 in the CAZy classification system. Direct 1H NMR monitoring of the enzymatic reaction detected no accumulated reaction intermediates in solution, suggesting that rearrangement of the initial hydration product occurs on-enzyme. An attempt at mechanism-based trapping of on-enzyme intermediates using a 1,1-difluoro-substrate was unsuccessful because the probe was too deactivated to be turned over by the enzyme. Kinetic isotope effects arising from deuterium-for-hydrogen substitution at carbons 1 and 4 provide evidence for separate first-irreversible and overall rate-determining steps in the hydration reaction, with two potential mechanisms proposed to explain these results. Based on the positioning of catalytic residues in the enzyme active site, the lack of efficient turnover of a 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-substrate, and several unsuccessful attempts at confirmation of a simpler mechanism involving a covalent glycosyl-enzyme intermediate, the most plausible mechanism is one involving an intermediate bearing an epoxide on carbons 1 and 2. PMID:24573682

  8. Novel inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Sit, S Y; Conway, Charlie; Bertekap, Robert; Xie, Kai; Bourin, Clotilde; Burris, Kevin; Deng, Hongfeng

    2007-06-15

    A class of bisarylimidazole derivatives are identified as potent inhibitors of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Compound 17 (IC(50)=2 nM) dose-dependently (0.1-10mg/kg, iv) potentiates the effects of exogenous anandamide (1 mg/kg, iv) in a rat thermal escape test (Hargreaves test), and shows robust antinociceptive activity in animal models of persistent (formalin test) and neuropathic (Chung model) pain. Compound 17 (20 mg/kg, iv) demonstrates activity in the formalin test that is comparable to morphine (3mg/kg, iv), and is dose-dependently inhibited by the CB1 antagonist SR141716A. In the Chung model, compound 17 shows antineuropathic effects similar to high-dose (100 mg/kg) gabapentin. FAAH inhibition shows potential utility for the clinical treatment of persistent and neuropathic pain.

  9. Polyglycine hydrolases secreted by pathogenic fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogens are known to produce proteases that target host defense proteins. Here we describe polyglycine hydrolases, fungal proteases that selectively cleave glycine-glycine peptide bonds within the polyglycine interdomain linker of targeted plant defense chitinases. Polyglycine hydrolases were puri...

  10. Retinoic acid 5,6-epoxidation by hemoproteins.

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, H; Ikeda, A; Negoro, Y; Kido, R

    1986-01-01

    Retinoic acid 5,6-epoxidase activity was found in several hemoproteins such as human oxy- and methemoglobin (HbO2 and MetHb), equine skeletal muscle oxy- and metmyoglobin (MbO2 and MetMb), bovine liver catalase, and horseradish peroxidase. Hematin also catalyzed retinoic acid 5,6-epoxidation. The results suggest that the heme moiety participates in the epoxidation. However, neither horse heart cytochrome c, nor free ferrous ion nor free ferric ion exhibited the epoxidase activity. Some hemoproteins (HbO2, MetHb, MbO2, MetMb, catalase, peroxidase, and hematin) exhibited characteristic individual pH dependences of the activity, suggesting that the epoxidase activities of the hemoproteins are influenced by the apoenzymes to some degree. This view is also supported by the finding that preincubation of an HbO2 preparation at various temperatures (37-70 degrees C) reduced its epoxidase activity with increasing temperature, whereas the activity of hematin was unaffected. Active oxygen scavengers such as mannitol, catalase, and superoxide dismutase exhibited no effect on the epoxidase activities of HbO2, MetHb, MbO2, and MetMb. A ligand of heme, CN- (100 mM), inhibited the epoxidase activities but N3- (100 mM) did not. The epoxidase activities were completely inhibited by NADPH, NADH, and/or 2-mercaptoethanol but not by NADP+ and/or NAD+. An intermediate in the epoxidation may be reduced by NADPH, NADH and/or 2-mercaptoethanol. Radical species can be considered as plausible candidates for the intermediate. PMID:3957898

  11. POTENT UREA AND CARBAMATE INHIBITORS OF SOLUBLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASES. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  12. Monoclonal antibodies reveal multiple forms of expression of human microsomal epoxide hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Hongying; Takagi, Akira; Kayano, Hidekazu; Koyama, Isamu; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2012-04-01

    In a previous study, we developed five kinds of monoclonal antibodies against different portions of human mEH: three, anti-N-terminal; one, anti-C-terminal; one, anti-conformational epitope. Using them, we stained the intact and the permeabilized human cells of various kinds and performed flow cytometric analysis. Primary hepatocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) showed remarkable differences. On the surface, hepatocytes exhibited 4 out of 5 epitopes whereas PBMC did not show any of the epitopes. mEH was detected inside both cell types, but the most prominent expression was observed for the conformational epitope in the hepatocytes and the two N-terminal epitopes in PBMC. These differences were also observed between hepatocyte-derived cell lines and mononuclear cell-derived cell lines. In addition, among each group, there were several differences which may be related to the cultivation, the degree of differentiation, or the original cell subsets. We also noted that two glioblastoma cell lines reveal marked expression of the conformational epitope on the surface which seemed to correlate with the brain tumor-associated antigen reported elsewhere. Several cell lines also underwent selective permeabilization before flow cytometric analysis, and we noticed that the topological orientation of mEH on the ER membrane in those cells was in accordance with the previous report. However, the orientation on the cell surface was inconsistent with the report and had a great variation between the cells. These findings show the multiple mode of expression of mEH which may be possibly related to the multiple roles that mEH plays in different cells. -- Highlights: ► We examine expression of five mEH epitopes in human cells. ► Remarkable differences exist between hepatocytes and PBMC. ► mEH expression in cell lines differs depending on several factors. ► Some glioblastoma cell lines reveal marked surface expression of mEH. ► Topology of mEH on the cell surface has great variation between the cells.

  13. MICROSOMAL EPOXIDE HYDROLASE (EPHX) POLYMORPHISM AND RISK OF SPONTANEOUS ABORTION. (R825818)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. Kinetic Resolution in Asymmetric Epoxidation using Iminium Salt Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The first reported examples of kinetic resolution in epoxidation reactions using iminium salt catalysis are described, providing up to 99% ee in the epoxidation of racemic cis-chromenes. PMID:23862687

  15. In Vivo Anti-Tumor Activity and Toxicological Evaluations of Perillaldehyde 8,9-Epoxide, a Derivative of Perillyl Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Luciana Nalone; Amaral, Ricardo Guimarães; Dória, Grace Anne Azevedo; Fonseca, Cecília Santos; da Silva, Tayane Kayane Mariano; Albuquerque Júnior, Ricardo Luiz Cavalcante; Thomazzi, Sara Maria; do Nascimento, Lázaro Gomes; Carvalho, Adriana Andrade; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the high cytotoxicity of p-menthane derivatives against human tumor cells. In this study, the substance perillaldehyde 8,9-epoxide, a p-menthane class derivative obtained from (S)-(−)-perillyl alcohol, was selected in order to assess antitumor activity against experimental sarcoma 180 tumors. Toxicological effects related to the liver, spleen, kidneys and hematology were evaluated in mice submitted to treatment. The tumor growth inhibition rate was 38.4%, 58.7%, 35.3%, 45.4% and 68.1% at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg/day for perillaldehyde 8,9-epoxide, perillyl alcohol and 25 mg/kg/day for 5-FU intraperitoneal treatments, respectively. No toxicologically significant effect was found in liver and kidney parameters analyzed in Sarcoma 180-inoculated mice treated with perillaldehyde 8,9-epoxide. Histopathological analyses of the liver, spleen, and kidneys were free from any morphological changes in the organs of the animals treated with perillaldehyde 8,9-epoxide. In conclusion, the data suggest that perillaldehyde 8,9-epoxide possesses significant antitumor activity without systemic toxicity for the tested parameters. By comparison, there was no statistical difference for the antitumor activity between perillaldehyde 8,9-epoxide and perillyl alcohol. PMID:26742032

  16. Production of a polyester degrading extracellular hydrolase from Thermomonospora fusca.

    PubMed

    Gouda, Mona K; Kleeberg, Ilona; van den Heuvel, Joop; Müller, Rolf-Joachim; Deckwer, Wolf-Dieter

    2002-01-01

    The production of a polyester-degrading hydrolase from the thermophilic actinomycete Thermomonospora fusca was investigated with regard to its potential technical application. Only in the presence of a polyester (random aliphatic-aromatic copolyester from 1,4-butanediol, terephthalic acid, and adipic acid with around 40-50 mol % terephthalic acid in the acid component), the excretion of the extracellular enzyme could be achieved with an optimized synthetic medium using pectin and NH(4)Cl as nitrogen source. Compared to complex media, a significantly higher specific activity at comparable volumetric yields could be obtained, thus reducing the expenditure for purification. The activity profile in the medium is controlled by a complex process involving (1) induction of enzyme excretion, (2) enzyme adsorption on the hydrophobic polyester surface, (3) inhibition of enzyme generation by monomers produced by polyester cleavage, and (4) enzyme denaturation. Diafiltration with cellulose acetate membranes as the sole downstream processing step led to a product of high purity and with sufficient yield (60% of total activity). Scaling-up from shaking flasks to a fermentor scale of 100 L revealed no specific problems. However, the excretion of the hydrolase by the actinomycete turned out to be inhibited by the degradation products (monomers) of the aliphatic-aromatic copolyester used as inductor for the enzyme production. The crude enzyme exhibited generally similar properties (temperature and pH optimum) as the highly purified hydrolase described previously; however, the storage capability and thermal stability is improved when the crude enzyme solution is diafiltrated.

  17. 40 CFR 721.10233 - Linear alkyl epoxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Linear alkyl epoxide (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10233 Linear alkyl epoxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as linear alkyl epoxide (PMN...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10233 - Linear alkyl epoxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Linear alkyl epoxide (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10233 Linear alkyl epoxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as linear alkyl epoxide (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10233 - Linear alkyl epoxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Linear alkyl epoxide (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10233 Linear alkyl epoxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as linear alkyl epoxide (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2673 Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic epoxide resin (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2673 Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic epoxide resin (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2673 Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic epoxide resin (PMN...

  3. 40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2673 Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic epoxide resin (PMN...

  4. Asymmetric Epoxidation Using Hydrogen Peroxide as Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2015-10-01

    Asymmetric epoxidation is one of the most important transformations in organic synthesis. Although tremendous progress was achieved in this field in the 1980s and 1990s, it is still desirable from both economical and ecological views to develop environmentally friendly catalytic epoxidation with a broad substrate scope. Hydrogen peroxide is a safe and cheap oxidant, which is easy to handle and generates water as the sole byproduct. Therefore, asymmetric epoxidation of olefins using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant has been a very active research field and has been investigated by many research groups in recent years. In this review, the exciting very recent developments of this rapidly growing area are surveyed and organized according to the catalyst systems.

  5. Organocatalytic Asymmetric Reactions of Epoxides: Recent Progress.

    PubMed

    Meninno, Sara; Lattanzi, Alessandra

    2016-03-01

    In this Minireview recent advances in the asymmetric reactions of meso and racemic epoxides promoted by organocatalysts is reviewed. Organic promoters, such as chiral phosphoric acids, amino- and peptidyl thioureas, and sulfinamides, have been successfully used for a variety of enantioselective transformations of epoxides under catalytic conditions, involving direct nucleophilic attack at the oxirane ring, base-catalysed β-eliminations and Brønsted acid catalysed 1,2-rearrangements. Accordingly, highly valuable enantioenriched 1,2-functionalised alcohols, carbonyl compounds and nitroepoxides are attainable. Dual activation of the reagents, provided by the organocatalysts, appears to be the most recurrent strategy, potentially suitable to face other unmet challenges in asymmetric ring-opening reactions of epoxides.

  6. Heterogeneous reactions of epoxides in acidic media.

    PubMed

    Lal, Vinita; Khalizov, Alexei F; Lin, Yun; Galvan, Maria D; Connell, Brian T; Zhang, Renyi

    2012-06-21

    Epoxides have recently been identified as important intermediates in the gas phase oxidation of hydrocarbons, and their hydrolysis products have been observed in ambient aerosols. To evaluate the role of epoxides in the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), the kinetics and mechanism of heterogeneous reactions of two model epoxides, isoprene oxide and α-pinene oxide, with sulfuric acid, ammonium bisulfate, and ammonium sulfate have been investigated using complementary experimental techniques. Kinetic experiments using a fast flow reactor coupled to an ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ID-CIMS) show a fast irreversible loss of the epoxides with the uptake coefficients (γ) of (1.7 ± 0.1) × 10(-2) and (4.6 ± 0.3) × 10(-2) for isoprene oxide and α-pinene oxide, respectively, for 90 wt % H(2)SO(4) and at room temperature. Experiments using attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) reveal that diols are the major products in ammonium bisulfate and dilute H(2)SO(4) (<25 wt %) solutions for both epoxides. In concentrated H(2)SO(4) (>65 wt %), acetals are formed from isoprene oxide, whereas organosulfates are produced from α-pinene oxide. The reaction of the epoxides with ammonium sulfate is slow and no products are observed. The epoxide reactions using bulk samples and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy reveal the presence of diols as the major products for isoprene oxide, accompanied by aldehyde formation. For α-pinene oxide, organosulfate formation is observed with a yield increasing with the acidity. Large yields of organosulfates in all NMR experiments with α-pinene oxide are attributed to the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) from the use of deuterated sulfuric acid and water. Our results suggest that acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of epoxides results in the formation of a wide range of products, and some of the products have low volatility and contribute to SOA growth under ambient conditions

  7. Location of the two catalytic sites in intestinal lactase-phlorizin hydrolase. Comparison with sucrase-isomaltase and with other glycosidases, the membrane anchor of lactase-phlorizin hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Wacker, H; Keller, P; Falchetto, R; Legler, G; Semenza, G

    1992-09-15

    Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase was isolated by immunoadsorption chromatography from rabbit brush-border membrane vesicles. Inactivation of the enzyme with [3H]conduritol-B-epoxide, a covalent active site-directed inhibitor, labeled glutamates at positions 1271 and 1747. Glu1271 was assigned to lactase, Glu1747 to phlorizin hydrolase activity. In contrast, the nucleophiles in the active sites of sucrase-isomaltase are aspartates (Asp505 and Asp1394). Asp505 is a part of the isomaltase active site and is localized on the larger subunit, which carries the membrane anchor also, while Asp1394 is a part of the active of sucrase. Alignment of these 2 nucleophilic Glu residues in lactase-phlorizin hydrolase and of their flanking regions with published sequences of several other beta-glycosidases allows the classification of the configuration retaining glycosidases into two major families: the "Asp" and the "Glu" glycosidases, depending on the carboxylate presumed to interact with the putative oxocarbonium ion in the transition state. We offer some predictions as to the Glu acting as the nucleophile in the active site of some glycosidases. By hydrophobic photolabeling, the membrane-spanning domain of lactase-phlorizin hydrolase was directly localized in the carboxyl-terminal region thus confirming this enzyme as a monotopic type I protein (i.e. with Nout-Cin orientation) of the brush-border membranes. A simplified version of the Me2+ precipitation method to efficiently and simply prepare brush-border membrane vesicles is also reported.

  8. Polymerization of epoxidized triglycerides with fluorosulfonic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of triglycerides as agri-based renewable raw materials for the development of new products is highly desirable in view of uncertain future petroleum prices. A new method of polymerizing epoxidized soybean oil has been devised with the use of fluorosulfonic acid. Depending on the reaction con...

  9. Alkene epoxidation employing metal nitro complexes

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, M.A.; Cheng, C.W.; Kelley, K.P.

    1982-07-15

    Process for converting alkenes to form epoxides utilizes transition metal nitro complexes of the formula: M(RCN)/sub 2/XNO/sub 2/ wherein M is palladium or platinum, R is an alkyl or aryl group containing up to 12 carbon atoms, and X is a monoanionic, monodentate ligand such as chlorine, optionally in the presence of molecular oxygen.

  10. Epoxidation of Methyl Oleate using Heterogeneous Catalyst

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work we studied the catalytic activity of commercial alumina, and laboratory synthesized alumina doped with Lewis acid metals, in the epoxidation of methyl oleate with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. It was observed that the reaction yields increased when the amount of catalyst, the quantity of ...

  11. THE PARTICULATE HYDROLASES OF MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Zanvil A.; Wiener, Edith

    1963-01-01

    The influence of phagocytosis on the morphological and biochemical properties of macrophage hydrolase-containing granules has been studied in vitro. Following the uptake of large numbers of heat-killed bacteria, an intracellular rearrangement of hydrolytic enzymes occurred. This was associated with the solubilization of 50 to 60 per cent of the total cell content of acid phosphatase, cathepsin, lysozyme, beta glucuronidase, acid ribonuclease, and acid desoxyribonuclease and with a corresponding decrease in granule-bound enzyme. With more prolonged incubation the majority of the soluble intracellular pool of acid ribonuclease and lysozyme was lost to the extracellular medium. No change in the total content of any of the hydrolases was noted during 180 minutes of incubation in vitro. The morphological fate of the granules was studied by a histochemical method for acid phosphatase. After the phagocytosis of yeast cell walls there was a disappearance of acid phosphatase-positive granules and an accumulation of reaction product about the ingested particle. Experiments employing macrophages which were supravitally stained with neutral red also demonstrated the loss of neutral red-positive granules and the accumulation of the dye about the yeast cell walls. These results strongly suggest that lysis of macrophage granules occurs following phagocytosis and that a portion of the granule contents are then resegregated within the newly formed phagocytic vacuole. PMID:14112262

  12. Further metabolism of diol-epoxides of chrysene and dibenz[a,c]anthracene to DNA binding species as evidenced by 32P-postlabelling analysis.

    PubMed

    Hall, M; Parker, D K; Hewer, A J; Phillips, D H; Grover, P L

    1988-05-01

    Incubation of r-1,t-2-dihydroxy-t-3,4-oxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrochrysene (anti-chrysene-1,2-diol 3,4-oxide), the bay-region diol-epoxide of chrysene, with rat liver microsomes in the presence of NADP+ and DNA, followed by 32P-postlabelling analysis of the DNA, revealed the presence of at least two adducts not detected when anti-chrysene-1,2-diol 3,4-oxide was incubated with DNA alone. The formation of these adducts was not blocked by the epoxide hydrolase inhibitor 1,1,1-trichloropropane-2,3-oxide. One of the adducts cochromatographed with the adduct spot obtained when authentic 9-hydroxy-r-1,t-2-dihydroxy-t-3,4-oxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrochrysene (anti-9-OH-chrysene-1,2-diol 3,4-oxide) was reacted with DNA. Evidence suggested that a second adduct could also be formed by further metabolism of anti-9-OH-chrysene-1,2-diol 3,4-oxide. In addition, evidence was obtained for the further metabolism of the syn-isomer of chrysene 1,2-diol 3,4-oxide and the anti-isomer of a non-bay-region diol-epoxide of dibenz[a,c]anthracene to DNA binding species, but not for that of either the anti- or syn-isomers of the bay-region diol-epoxide of benzo[a]pyrene, the anti-isomers of the bay-region or a non-bay-region diol-epoxide of benz[a]anthracene, or the anti-isomer of the bay-region diol-epoxide of benzo[b]fluoranthene.

  13. Thermochemical Studies of Epoxides and Related Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Kathleen M.; Ellis, Jamie A.; Lee, Joseph; Fulton, Ashley; Wilson, Shavonda L.; Dupart, Patrick S.; Dastoori, Rosanna

    2013-01-01

    Gas phase heats of formation for the our butene oxide isomers are reported. They were obtained by measuring the condensed-phase heat of reduction to the corresponding alcohol using reaction calorimetry. Heats of vaporization were determined, and allow gas-phase heats of formation to be obtained. The experimental measurements are compared to calculations obtained using a variety of computational methods. Overall, the G3 and CBS-APNO methods agree quite well with the experimental data. The influence of alkyl substituents on epoxide stability is discussed. Comparisons to alkenes, cyclopropanes, aziridines, thiiranes and phosphiranes are also made. Isodesmic-type reactions were used to determine strain energies of the epoxides and related compounds with various substituents. PMID:23551240

  14. Sulfonyl Fluoride Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Alapafuja, Shakiru O.; Nikas, Spyros P.; Bharatan, Indu; Shukla, Vidyanand G.; Nasr, Mahmoud L.; Bowman, Anna L.; Zvonok, Nikolai; Li, Jing; Shi, Xiaomeng; Engen, John R.; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Sulfonyl fluorides are known to inhibit esterases. Early work from our laboratory has identified hexadecyl sulfonylfluoride (AM374) as a potent in vitro and in vivo inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). We now report on later generation sulfonyl fluoride analogs that exhibit potent and selective inhibition of FAAH. Using recombinant rat and human FAAH we show that 5-(4-hydroxyphenyl)pentanesulfonyl fluoride (AM3506) has similar inhibitory activity for both the rat and the human enzyme, while rapid dilution assays and mass spectrometry analysis suggest that the compound is a covalent modifier for FAAH and inhibits its action in an irreversible manner. Our SAR results are highlighted by molecular docking of key analogs. PMID:23083016

  15. Simple Epoxide Formation for the Organic Laboratory Using Oxone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broshears, Williams C.; Esteb, John J.; Richter, Jeremy; Wilson, Anne M.

    2004-01-01

    Epoxide chemistry is widely used in organic synthesis and regularly discussed in organic chemistry textbooks. An experiment to generate dimethyldioxirane in situ from acetone using Oxone is explained.

  16. Purification and properties of D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate oligomer hydrolase of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Shunsaku; Sano, Konomi; Gao, Dai; Tomihari, Nao; Yamane, Tsuneo; Endo, Isao

    2002-01-10

    D-(-)-3-Hydroxybutyrate (3HB) oligomer hydrolase was purified from Paracoccus denitrificans. The enzyme was a monomeric protein with an approximate molecular mass of 31 kDa. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was 5.2. Optimum temperature and pH were 35-40 degrees C and 8.0, respectively. The enzyme activity was not affected by sulfhydryl reagents but strongly inhibited by serine proteinase inhibitors. Both 3HB trimer and 3HB dimer were hydrolyzed by the enzyme, indicating that the enzyme is not 3HB dimer hydrolase but 3HB oligomer hydrolase. para-Nitrophenyl esters of short-chain fatty acids were also hydrolyzed by the enzyme. 3HB dimer was hydrolyzed somewhat faster than 3HB trimer. The level of the enzyme activity was almost constant, irrespective of carbon sources for the bacterial growth and of the cultivation conditions.

  17. A remarkable activity of human leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) toward unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Byzia, Anna; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Salvesen, Guy S; Drag, Marcin

    2014-05-01

    Leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H--EC 3.3.2.6) is a bifunctional zinc metalloenzyme, which processes LTA4 through an epoxide hydrolase activity and is also able to trim one amino acid at a time from N-terminal peptidic substrates via its aminopeptidase activity. In this report, we have utilized a library of 130 individual proteinogenic and unnatural amino acid fluorogenic substrates to determine the aminopeptidase specificity of this enzyme. We have found that the best proteinogenic amino acid recognized by LTA4H is arginine. However, we have also observed several unnatural amino acids, which were significantly better in terms of cleavage rate (k cat/K m values). Among them, the benzyl ester of aspartic acid exhibited a k cat/K m value that was more than two orders of magnitude higher (1.75 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)) as compared to L-Arg (1.5 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)). This information can be used for design of potent inhibitors of this enzyme, but may also suggest yet undiscovered functions or specificities of LTA4H.

  18. Transformation Kinetics of Chlorinated Ethenes by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and Detection of Unstable Epoxides by On-Line Gas Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    van Hylckama, Vlie... J.; de Koning, W.; Janssen, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    A rapid and accurate method for the determination of transformation kinetics of volatile organic substrates was developed. Concentrations were monitored by on-line gas chromatographic analysis of the headspace of well-mixed incubation mixtures. With this method, the kinetics of transformation of a number of C(inf1) and C(inf2) halogenated alkanes and alkenes by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b expressing particulate methane monooxygenase or soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) were studied. Apparent specific first-order rate constants for cells expressing sMMO decreased in the order of dichloromethane, vinyl chloride, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, trans-1,2-dichloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethene, trichloroethene, chloroform, and 1,2-dichloroethane. During the degradation of trichloroethene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, trans-1,2-dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride, the formation of the corresponding epoxides was observed. The epoxide of vinyl chloride and the epoxide of trichloroethene, which temporarily accumulated in the medium, were chemically degraded according to first-order kinetics, with half-lives of 78 and 21 s, respectively. Cells expressing sMMO actively degraded the epoxide of cis-1,2-dichloroethene but not the epoxide of trans-1,2-dichloroethene. Methane and acetylene inhibited degradation of the epoxide of cis-1,2-dichloroethene, indicating that sMMO was involved. PMID:16535402

  19. Expression and characterization of styrene monooxygenases of Rhodococcus sp. ST-5 and ST-10 for synthesizing enantiopure (S)-epoxides.

    PubMed

    Toda, Hiroshi; Imae, Ryouta; Komio, Tomoko; Itoh, Nobuya

    2012-10-01

    Styrene monooxygenase (StyA, SMOA)- and flavin oxidoreductase (StyB, SMOB)-coding genes of styrene-assimilating bacteria Rhodococcus sp. ST-5 and ST-10 were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. Determined amino acid sequences of StyAs and StyBs of ST-5 and ST-10 showed more similarity with those of Pseudomonas than with self-sufficient styrene monooxygenase (StyA2B) of Rhodococcus. Recombinant enzymes were purified from E. coli cells as functional proteins, and their properties were characterized in detail. StyBs (flavin oxidoreductase) of strains ST-5 and ST-10 have similar enzymatic properties to those of Pseudomonas, but StyB of strain ST-10 exhibited higher temperature stability than that of strain ST-5. StyAs of strains ST-5 and ST-10 catalyzed the epoxidation of vinyl side-chain of styrene and its derivatives and produced (S)-epoxides from styrene derivatives and showed high stereoselectivity. Both StyAs showed higher specific activity on halogenated styrene derivatives than on styrene itself. Additionally, the enzymes could catalyze the epoxidation of short-chain 1-alkenes to the corresponding (S)-epoxides. Aromatic compounds including styrene, 3-chlorostyrene, styrene oxide, and benzene exhibited marked inhibition of SMO reaction, although linear 1-alkene showed no inhibition of SMO activity at any concentration. PMID:22258641

  20. Epoxide ring-opening and Meinwald rearrangement reactions of epoxides catalyzed by mesoporous aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mathew W C; Davies, A Matthew; Buckle, Richard; Mabbett, Ian; Taylor, Stuart H; Graham, Andrew E

    2009-06-21

    Mesoporous aluminosilicates efficiently catalyze the ring-opening of epoxides to produce beta-alkoxyalcohols in high yields under extremely mild reaction conditions. These materials also catalyze the corresponding Meinwald rearrangement in non-nucleophilic solvents to give aldehydes which can be trapped in situ to provide the corresponding acetals in an efficient tandem process.

  1. Functionalized oxepines via fragmentation of highly strained epoxides.

    PubMed

    Leyhane, Andrew J; Snapper, Marc L

    2006-11-01

    [Structure: see text] Epoxidation of highly strained cyclobutenes followed by thermal rearrangement provides a new entry into oxepine-containing bicyclo[5.3.0] ring systems. In contrast to the rearrangement of the corresponding cyclopropanated systems, the strained epoxides in this study are believed to fragment through two competing pathways leading to a mixture of diastereomeric 5-7 ring systems.

  2. Epoxides--is there a human health problem?

    PubMed Central

    Manson, M M

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to consider whether epoxides represent a hazard to human health. Possible means of occupational and non-occupational exposure are discussed with reference to the production and uses of industrially important compounds and other epoxides, such as naturally occurring plant and fungal products. In addition to epoxides themselves, unsaturated compounds that may be metabolised in vivo to epoxides are included, since this appears to be a further important means of exposure. The toxicology, in particular carcinogenicity and mutagenicity, is discussed, along with a brief outline of the biochemistry such as metabolism, binding to cell constituents, and DNA repair mechanisms. The question of interactions between different epoxides in vivo is also raised. PMID:7004476

  3. Identification of Epoxide-Derived Metabolite(s) of Benzbromarone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Wang, Hui; Peng, Ying; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Benzbromarone (BBR) is a benzofuran derivative that has been quite useful for the treatment of gout; however, it was withdrawn from European markets in 2003 because of reported serious incidents of drug-induced liver injury. BBR-induced hepatotoxicity has been suggested to be associated with the formation of a quinone intermediate. The present study reported epoxide-derived intermediate(s) of BBR. An N-acetylcysteine (NAC) conjugate derived from epoxide metabolite(s) was detected in both microsomal incubations of BBR and urine samples of mice treated with BBR. The NAC conjugate was identified as 6-NAC BBR. Ketoconazole suppressed the bioactivation of BBR to the epoxide intermediate(s), and the CYP3A subfamily was the primary enzyme responsible for the formation of the epoxide(s). The present study provided new information on metabolic activation of BBR. PMID:26792818

  4. NMR studies on epoxidations of allenamides. Evidence for formation of nitrogen-substituted allene oxide and spiro-epoxide via trapping experiments.

    PubMed

    Rameshkumar, C; Xiong, Hui; Tracey, Michael R; Berry, Craig R; Yao, Letitia J; Hsung, Richard P

    2002-02-22

    Two epoxidations of chiral allenamides are described here. While treatment with m-CPBA led to highly stereoselective formation of an alpha-keto aminal that can be useful synthetically, DMDO oxidation led to conclusive evidence for both nitrogen-substituted allene oxide (via mono-epoxidation) and spiro-epoxide (via bis-epoxidation) using intramolecular nucleophilic trapping experiments. NMR studies provide reliable evidence for a 3-oxetanone that can be derived from the spiro-epoxide and also suggest the presence of an allene oxide. Despite a facile second epoxidation as evidenced by the predominant formation of the 3-oxetanone, in the presence of furan, [4 + 3] cycloaddition of the nitrogen-substituted allene oxide or oxyallyl cation with furan occurs faster than the second epoxidation efficiently leading to cycloadducts. This rate difference plays an invaluable role for the success of a stereoselective sequential epoxidation-[4 + 3] cycloaddition reaction via DMDO epoxidations of chiral allenamides.

  5. Regiospecific Epoxidation of Carvone: A Discovery-Oriented Experiment for Understanding the Selectivity and Mechanism of Epoxidation Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Kendrew K. W.; Lai, Y. M.; Siu, Yuk-Hong

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a discovery-oriented experiment for demonstrating the selectivity of two epoxidation reactions. Peroxy acids and alkaline H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2] are two commonly used reagents for alkene epoxidation. The former react preferentially with electron-rich alkenes while the latter works better with alpha,beta-unsaturated…

  6. Genotoxicity of tamoxifen, tamoxifen epoxide and toremifene in human lymphoblastoid cells containing human cytochrome P450s.

    PubMed

    Styles, J A; Davies, A; Lim, C K; De Matteis, F; Stanley, L A; White, I N; Yuan, Z X; Smith, L L

    1994-01-01

    The clastogenicity of tamoxifen and toremifene was tested in six human lymphoblastoid cell lines each expressing increased monooxygenase activity associated with a specific transfected human cytochrome P450 cDNA (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2D6, CYP2E1 or CYP3A4). The chemicals were also tested in a cell line (MCL-5) expressing elevated native CYP1A1 and containing transfected CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 and epoxide hydrolase, and in a cell line containing only the viral vector (Ho1). Dose-related increases in micronuclei were observed when cells expressing 2E1, 3A4, 2D6 or MCL-5 cells were exposed to tamoxifen. The positive responses in the cell lines were in the order MCL-5 > 2E1 > 3A4 > 2D6. Toremifene also gave positive results with 2E1, 3A4 and MCL-5 cells, although the responses were less marked and the positive effects required higher doses than with tamoxifen. A synthesized epoxide of tamoxifen was also tested in these cell lines and produced similar increases in the incidences of micronucleated cells. The increases in the responses observed with the epoxide were greater than with tamoxifen or toremifene. The P450 isoenzyme activities in these cells were in a range similar to those of human tumour-derived cell lines. Microsomes (1A1, 2A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2E1, 3A4 and 2D6) from these cells all metabolized tamoxifen. The major metabolite detected by HPLC was N-desmethyltamoxifen, and 4-hydroxytamoxifen was also detected in cells with cytochrome P450 2E1 and 2D6. These results are consistent with the following conclusions. (1) Tamoxifen requires metabolic activation to DNA-reactive species by specific CYP monooxygenases in order to exert its genotoxic effects. (2) The positive clastogenic effects elicited in lymphoblastoid cells by tamoxifen epoxide suggest that the genotoxic (and possibly the carcinogenic) effects of tamoxifen may be due to one or more epoxide metabolites that are generated intracellularly, probably in close proximity to the nucleus. (3) Tamoxifen is

  7. Hydrolase-catalyzed biotransformations in deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Gorke, Johnathan T; Srienc, Friedrich; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2008-03-14

    Hydrolases show good catalytic activity in deep eutectic solvents, despite the presence of urea, which can denature enzymes, or alcohols, which can interfere with hydrolase-catalyzed reactions. PMID:18309428

  8. Structure and function of polyglycine hydrolases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyglycine hydrolases (PGH)s are secreted fungal endoproteases that cleave polyglycine linkers of targeted plant defense chitinases. Unlike typical endoproteases that cleave a specific peptide bond, these 640 amino acid glycoproteins selectively cleave one of multiple peptide bonds within polyglyci...

  9. Twisting of glycosidic bonds by hydrolases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patterns of scissile bond twisting have been found in crystal structures of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) that are complexed with substrates and inhibitors. To estimate the increased potential energy in the substrates that results from this twisting, we have plotted torsion angles for the scissile bond...

  10. Terreic Acid, a Quinone Epoxide Inhibitor of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Yuko; Hartman, Stephen E.; Kinoshita, Eiji; Suzuki, Hidefumi; Kitaura, Jiro; Yao, Libo; Inagaki, Naoki; Franco, Alessandra; Hata, Daisuke; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Fukamachi, Hiromi; Nagai, Hiroichi; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    1999-03-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) plays pivotal roles in mast cell activation as well as in B cell development. Btk mutations lead to severe impairments in proinflammatory cytokine production induced by cross-linking of high-affinity IgE receptor on mast cells. By using an in vitro assay to measure the activity that blocks the interaction between protein kinase C and the pleckstrin homology domain of Btk, terreic acid (TA) was identified and characterized in this study. This quinone epoxide specifically inhibited the enzymatic activity of Btk in mast cells and cell-free assays. TA faithfully recapitulated the phenotypic defects of btk mutant mast cells in high-affinity IgE receptor-stimulated wild-type mast cells without affecting the enzymatic activities and expressions of many other signaling molecules, including those of protein kinase C. Therefore, this study confirmed the important roles of Btk in mast cell functions and showed the usefulness of TA in probing into the functions of Btk in mast cells and other immune cell systems. Another insight obtained from this study is that the screening method used to identify TA is a useful approach to finding more efficacious Btk inhibitors.

  11. In Silico Investigation of Flavonoids as Potential Trypanosomal Nucleoside Hydrolase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Christina Hung Hung; Fatima, Ayesha; Gaurav, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis is endemic to 37 countries of sub-Saharan Africa. It is caused by two related species of Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies suffer from resistance and public accessibility of expensive medicines. Finding safer and effective therapies of natural origin is being extensively explored worldwide. Pentamidine is the only available therapy for inhibiting the P2 adenosine transporter involved in the purine salvage pathway of the trypanosomatids. The objective of the present study is to use computational studies for the investigation of the probable trypanocidal mechanism of flavonoids. Docking experiments were carried out on eight flavonoids of varying level of hydroxylation, namely, flavone, 5-hydroxyflavone, 7-hydroxyflavone, chrysin, apigenin, kaempferol, fisetin, and quercetin. Using AutoDock 4.2, these compounds were tested for their affinity towards inosine-adenosine-guanosine nucleoside hydrolase and the inosine-guanosine nucleoside hydrolase, the major enzymes of the purine salvage pathway. Our results showed that all of the eight tested flavonoids showed high affinities for both hydrolases (lowest free binding energy ranging from −10.23 to −7.14 kcal/mol). These compounds, especially the hydroxylated derivatives, could be further studied as potential inhibitors of the nucleoside hydrolases. PMID:26640486

  12. Inhibitory activity of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors against human cytomegalovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Snoeck, R; Andrei, G; Neyts, J; Schols, D; Cools, M; Balzarini, J; De Clercq, E

    1993-07-01

    Various acyclic and carbocyclic adenosine analogues, which are apparently targeted at the S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) hydrolase have been reported to inhibit the replication of a number of pox-, rhabdo-, paramyxo-, arena-, and reoviruses. Here we show that this activity spectrum extends to human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Of the compounds tested, neplanocin A, 3-deazaneplanocin A, 6'-C-methylneplanocin A and 5'-noraristeromycin were found to be the most potent inhibitors of HCMV replication in vitro. Their 50% inhibitory concentration ranged from 0.05 to 1.35 micrograms/ml. In general, the anti-HCMV activity of the adenosine analogues correlated well with their affinity (Ki) for AdoHcy hydrolase, suggesting that AdoHcy hydrolase may be considered as a target enzyme for anti-HCMV agents. For four compounds (3-deazaneplanocin A, 6'-C-methylneplanocin A (isomers I and II) and 3-deazaadenosine), anti-HCMV potency was greater than could be expected solely from their interaction with AdoHcy hydrolase, suggesting that these compounds may be functioning by an additional mechanism. PMID:8215298

  13. Investigation of copper(II) tetrafluoroborate catalysed epoxide opening

    PubMed Central

    Capes, Amy S.; Crossman, Arthur T.; Webster, Lauren A.; Ferguson, Michael A.J.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2011-01-01

    We report the extension of the copper(II) tetrafluoroborate catalysed opening of epoxides with alcohols to include a wider variety of alcohols, a range of solvents and a method to purify the products from the reaction. PMID:22505782

  14. Molecular Epoxidation Reactions Catalyzed by Rhenium, Molybdenum, and Iron Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kück, Jens W; Reich, Robert M; Kühn, Fritz E

    2016-02-01

    Epoxidations are of high relevance in many organic syntheses, both in industry and academia. In this personal account, the development of rhenium, molybdenum, and iron complexes in molecular epoxidation catalysis is presented. Methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) is the benchmark catalyst for these reactions, with a thoroughly investigated mechanism and reactivity profile. More recently, highly active molecular molybdenum and iron catalysts have emerged, challenging the extraordinary role of MTO in epoxidation catalysis with high turnover frequencies (TOFs). This development is highlighted in its use of cheaper, more readily available metals, and the challenges of using base metals in catalysis are discussed. These results show the promise that relatively cheap and abundant metals, such as molybdenum and iron, hold for the future of epoxidation catalysis. PMID:26776087

  15. Effect of structure and composition on epoxidation of hexene catalyzed by microporous and mesoporous Ti-Si mixed oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Crumbaugh, G.M.; Davis, R.J.

    1996-03-01

    A series of microporous titania-silica mixed oxides were characterized and tested as catalysts for the liquid-phase epoxidation of 1-hexene with t-butyl hydroperoxide. Results from {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy verified results from earlier characterization studies that indicated cohydrolysis of alkoxide precursors produced well-mixed oxide samples. The catalytic activity of the samples for hexene epoxidation at 353 K increased with increasing silica content. Since the fraction of tetrahedral Ti atoms in the samples also increased with silica content, the active site for the reaction is proposed to be a tetrahedrally coordinated Ti atom in a silica matrix. Polar solvents like water, acetone, and methanol inhibited the epoxidation reaction. To investigate the effect of pore size on activity, mesoporous Ti-Si mixed oxides analogous to MCM-41 were synthesized. The mesoporous samples were the most active and selective catalysts for epoxidation with TBHP, presumably due to the ease of access of the reactants to the active Ti sites. Results from EXAFS and UV reflectance spectroscopy indicated that Ti atoms in the mesoporous mixed oxides are tetrahedrally coordinated to oxygen atoms with the same Ti-O bond distance as TS-1. However, the activities of mesoporous samples are orders of magnitude lower than that of TS-1 for hexene epoxidation with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. Lower hydrophobicity of a silica mesopore (2-4 nm) compared to a TS-1 micropore (0.6 nm) may account for the difference in activity observed in reactions with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. 26 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Bacterial Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase for Water Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Sujin; Mutlu, Baris R.; Aksan, Alptekin

    2015-01-01

    Di- and trichloroisocyanuric acids are widely used as water disinfection agents, but cyanuric acid accumulates with repeated additions and must be removed to maintain free hypochlorite for disinfection. This study describes the development of methods for using a cyanuric acid-degrading enzyme contained within nonliving cells that were encapsulated within a porous silica matrix. Initially, three different bacterial cyanuric acid hydrolases were compared: TrzD from Acidovorax citrulli strain 12227, AtzD from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, and CAH from Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073. Each enzyme was expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and tested for cyanuric acid hydrolase activity using freely suspended or encapsulated cell formats. Cyanuric acid hydrolase activities differed by only a 2-fold range when comparing across the different enzymes with a given format. A practical water filtration system is most likely to be used with nonviable cells, and all cells were rendered nonviable by heat treatment at 70°C for 1 h. Only the CAH enzyme from the thermophile M. thermoacetica retained significant activity under those conditions, and so it was tested in a flowthrough system simulating a bioreactive pool filter. Starting with a cyanuric acid concentration of 10,000 μM, more than 70% of the cyanuric acid was degraded in 24 h, it was completely removed in 72 h, and a respike of 10,000 μM cyanuric acid a week later showed identical biodegradation kinetics. An experiment conducted with water obtained from municipal swimming pools showed the efficacy of the process, although cyanuric acid degradation rates decreased by 50% in the presence of 4.5 ppm hypochlorite. In total, these experiments demonstrated significant robustness of cyanuric acid hydrolase and the silica bead materials in remediation. PMID:26187963

  17. Bacterial Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase for Water Treatment.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Sujin; Mutlu, Baris R; Aksan, Alptekin; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2015-10-01

    Di- and trichloroisocyanuric acids are widely used as water disinfection agents, but cyanuric acid accumulates with repeated additions and must be removed to maintain free hypochlorite for disinfection. This study describes the development of methods for using a cyanuric acid-degrading enzyme contained within nonliving cells that were encapsulated within a porous silica matrix. Initially, three different bacterial cyanuric acid hydrolases were compared: TrzD from Acidovorax citrulli strain 12227, AtzD from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, and CAH from Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073. Each enzyme was expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and tested for cyanuric acid hydrolase activity using freely suspended or encapsulated cell formats. Cyanuric acid hydrolase activities differed by only a 2-fold range when comparing across the different enzymes with a given format. A practical water filtration system is most likely to be used with nonviable cells, and all cells were rendered nonviable by heat treatment at 70°C for 1 h. Only the CAH enzyme from the thermophile M. thermoacetica retained significant activity under those conditions, and so it was tested in a flowthrough system simulating a bioreactive pool filter. Starting with a cyanuric acid concentration of 10,000 μM, more than 70% of the cyanuric acid was degraded in 24 h, it was completely removed in 72 h, and a respike of 10,000 μM cyanuric acid a week later showed identical biodegradation kinetics. An experiment conducted with water obtained from municipal swimming pools showed the efficacy of the process, although cyanuric acid degradation rates decreased by 50% in the presence of 4.5 ppm hypochlorite. In total, these experiments demonstrated significant robustness of cyanuric acid hydrolase and the silica bead materials in remediation. PMID:26187963

  18. Bacterial Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase for Water Treatment.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Sujin; Mutlu, Baris R; Aksan, Alptekin; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2015-10-01

    Di- and trichloroisocyanuric acids are widely used as water disinfection agents, but cyanuric acid accumulates with repeated additions and must be removed to maintain free hypochlorite for disinfection. This study describes the development of methods for using a cyanuric acid-degrading enzyme contained within nonliving cells that were encapsulated within a porous silica matrix. Initially, three different bacterial cyanuric acid hydrolases were compared: TrzD from Acidovorax citrulli strain 12227, AtzD from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, and CAH from Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073. Each enzyme was expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and tested for cyanuric acid hydrolase activity using freely suspended or encapsulated cell formats. Cyanuric acid hydrolase activities differed by only a 2-fold range when comparing across the different enzymes with a given format. A practical water filtration system is most likely to be used with nonviable cells, and all cells were rendered nonviable by heat treatment at 70°C for 1 h. Only the CAH enzyme from the thermophile M. thermoacetica retained significant activity under those conditions, and so it was tested in a flowthrough system simulating a bioreactive pool filter. Starting with a cyanuric acid concentration of 10,000 μM, more than 70% of the cyanuric acid was degraded in 24 h, it was completely removed in 72 h, and a respike of 10,000 μM cyanuric acid a week later showed identical biodegradation kinetics. An experiment conducted with water obtained from municipal swimming pools showed the efficacy of the process, although cyanuric acid degradation rates decreased by 50% in the presence of 4.5 ppm hypochlorite. In total, these experiments demonstrated significant robustness of cyanuric acid hydrolase and the silica bead materials in remediation.

  19. Ligatin binds phosphohexose residues on acidic hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Jakoi, E R; Kempe, K; Gaston, S M

    1981-01-01

    Ligatin, a receptor that recognizes phosphorylated sugars, was isolated from plasma membranes of mouse macrophages, rat ileum, and rat brain. Several acidic hydrolases including N-acetyl beta-D-glucosaminidase (beta-NAG) were solubilized with this receptor. The solubilized beta-NAG bound to ligatin in vitro as demonstrated by affinity chromatography using the immobilized receptor. beta-N-Acetyl D-glucosaminidase-ligatin complexes were dissociated by low concentrations of mannose 6-phosphate (Man6P) and/or glucose 1-phosphate (Glc 1P). The effectiveness of these two phosphomonosaccharides varied depending on the source of the enzyme: ileal beta-NAG-ligatin complexes showed a four-fold preferential dissociation with Man6P; macrophage complexes showed a 160-fold preferential dissociation with Glc 1P. Brain complexes dissociated with nearly equal preference for Man6P and Glc 1P. Heterologous complexes displayed the specificity characteristic of the source of the enzyme regardless of the source of the ligatin. Treatment of the solubilized hydrolases with endoglucosaminidase H released phosphorous-32 label from these enzymes and prevented binding of beta-NAG to ligatin. However, treatment of the solubilized hydrolases with alkaline phosphatase reduced the binding of beta-NAG to ligatin by no more than 30%. This apparent resistance of beta-NAG to dephosphorylation was consistent with the chromatographic behavior of QAE of 3H-labeled acidic oligosaccharides isolated from the solubilized hydrolases. The oligosaccharides that contain phosphorylated hexose were less acidic than phosphomonoesters and were insensitive to alkaline phosphatase until subjected to acid hydrolysis. These results suggested the presence of a phosphodiester on beta-NAG analogous to the NAC glucosamine 1 P6 mannose present on beta-glucuronidase isolated from mouse lymphoma cells (Tabas I, Kornfield, S: J Biol Chem 255: 6633, 1980). PMID:7299841

  20. Esterase SeE of Streptococcus equi ssp. equi is a Novel Non-specific Carboxylic Ester Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gang; Liu, Mengyao; Zhu, Hui; Lei, Benfang

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular carboxylic ester hydrolases are produced by many bacterial pathogens and have been shown recently to be important for virulence of some pathogens. However, these hydrolases are poorly characterized in enzymatic activity. This study prepared and characterized the secreted ester hydrolase of Streptococcus equi ssp. equi (designated SeE for S. equi esterase). SeE hydrolyzes ethyl acetate, acetylsalicylic acid, and tributyrin but not ethyl butyrate. This substrate specificity pattern does not match those of the three conventional types of non-specific carboxylic ester hydrolases (carboxylesterases, arylesterases, and acetylesterases). To determine whether SeE has lipase activity, a number of triglycerides and vinyl esters were tested in SeE-catalyzed hydrolysis. SeE does not hydrolyze triglycerides and vinyl esters of long chain carboxylic acids nor display interfacial activation, indicating that SeE is not a lipase. Like the conventional carboxylesterases, SeE is inhibited by diisopropylfluorophosphate. These findings indicate that SeE is a novel non-specific carboxylic ester hydrolase that has broader substrate specificity than the conventional carboxylesterases. PMID:19054107

  1. Hydrolase secretion is a consequence of membrane recycling

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Acanthamoeba releases lysosomal hydrolases continuously into the culture medium. This release is specific for lysosomal hydrolases, but not other cellular proteins, and is energy dependent. The secreted hydrolases can be separated into two groups on the basis of their secretion kinetics: one is secreted at approximately 15% of the cellular activity per hour and the other at approximately 5%. Intracellularly the lysosomal hydrolases are restricted almost exclusively to secondary lysosomes where the hydrolases demonstrate a differential pH-dependent binding to membrane. Hydrolase secretion is not the result of secondary lysosomes' fusing with the plasma membrane since soluble and particulate lysosomal contents are not released at the same rate. Together the data suggest that the secreted hydrolases are trapped in shuttle vesicles that cycle membrane from secondary lysosomes to the cell surface. The inner membrane and content of these vesicles undergo a marked pH shift when, following fragmentation from lysosomes, these vesicles fuse with plasma membrane. This rapid pH shift and the differential pH-dependent membrane binding of hydrolases appear to account for the heterogeneous hydrolase secretion kinetics. PMID:6707089

  2. Beyond growth: novel functions for bacterial cell wall hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Timna J; Taylor, Jennifer A; Salama, Nina R

    2012-11-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall maintains turgor pressure and cell shape of most bacteria. Cell wall hydrolases are essential, together with synthases, for growth and daughter cell separation. Recent work in diverse organisms has uncovered new cell wall hydrolases that act autonomously or on neighboring cells to modulate invasion of prey cells, cell shape, innate immune detection, intercellular communication, and competitor lysis. The hydrolases involved in these processes catalyze the cleavage of bonds throughout the sugar and peptide moities of peptidoglycan. Phenotypes associated with these diverse hydrolases reveal new functions of the bacterial cell wall beyond growth and division.

  3. Endolysosomes Are the Principal Intracellular Sites of Acid Hydrolase Activity.

    PubMed

    Bright, Nicholas A; Davis, Luther J; Luzio, J Paul

    2016-09-12

    The endocytic delivery of macromolecules from the mammalian cell surface for degradation by lysosomal acid hydrolases requires traffic through early endosomes to late endosomes followed by transient (kissing) or complete fusions between late endosomes and lysosomes. Transient or complete fusion results in the formation of endolysosomes, which are hybrid organelles from which lysosomes are re-formed. We have used synthetic membrane-permeable cathepsin substrates, which liberate fluorescent reporters upon proteolytic cleavage, as well as acid phosphatase cytochemistry to identify which endocytic compartments are acid hydrolase active. We found that endolysosomes are the principal organelles in which acid hydrolase substrates are cleaved. Endolysosomes also accumulated acidotropic probes and could be distinguished from terminal storage lysosomes, which were acid hydrolase inactive and did not accumulate acidotropic probes. Using live-cell microscopy, we have demonstrated that fusion events, which form endolysosomes, precede the onset of acid hydrolase activity. By means of sucrose and invertase uptake experiments, we have also shown that acid-hydrolase-active endolysosomes and acid-hydrolase-inactive, terminal storage lysosomes exist in dynamic equilibrium. We conclude that the terminal endocytic compartment is composed of acid-hydrolase-active, acidic endolysosomes and acid hydrolase-inactive, non-acidic, terminal storage lysosomes, which are linked and function in a lysosome regeneration cycle. PMID:27498570

  4. Carbocyclic adenosine analogues as S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors and antiviral agents: recent advances.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, E

    1998-01-01

    Various carbocyclic analogues of adenosine, including aristeromycin (carbocyclic adenosine), carbocyclic 3-deazaadenosine, neplanocin A, 3-deazaneplanocin A, the 5'-nor derivatives of aristeromycin, carbocylic 3-deazaadenosine, neplanocin A and 3-deazaneplanocin A, and the 2-halo (i.e., 2-fluoro) and 6'-R-alkyl (i.e., 6'-R-methyl) derivatives of neplanocin A have been recognized as potent inhibitors of S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) hydrolase. This enzyme plays a key role in methylation reactions depending on S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) as methyl donor. AdoHcy hydrolase inhibitors have been shown to exert broad-spectrum antiviral activity against pox-, paramyxo-, rhabdo-, filo-, bunya-, arena-, and reoviruses. They also interfere with the replication of human immunodeficiency virus through inhibition of the Tat transactivation process. PMID:9708366

  5. Regulation of S-Adenosylhomocysteine Hydrolase by Lysine Acetylation*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Kavran, Jennifer M.; Chen, Zan; Karukurichi, Kannan R.; Leahy, Daniel J.; Cole, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    S-Adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) is an NAD+-dependent tetrameric enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of S-adenosylhomocysteine to adenosine and homocysteine and is important in cell growth and the regulation of gene expression. Loss of SAHH function can result in global inhibition of cellular methyltransferase enzymes because of high levels of S-adenosylhomocysteine. Prior proteomics studies have identified two SAHH acetylation sites at Lys401 and Lys408 but the impact of these post-translational modifications has not yet been determined. Here we use expressed protein ligation to produce semisynthetic SAHH acetylated at Lys401 and Lys408 and show that modification of either position negatively impacts the catalytic activity of SAHH. X-ray crystal structures of 408-acetylated SAHH and dually acetylated SAHH have been determined and reveal perturbations in the C-terminal hydrogen bonding patterns, a region of the protein important for NAD+ binding. These crystal structures along with mutagenesis data suggest that such hydrogen bond perturbations are responsible for SAHH catalytic inhibition by acetylation. These results suggest how increased acetylation of SAHH may globally influence cellular methylation patterns. PMID:25248746

  6. Formation of furan fatty alkyl esters from their bis-epoxide fatty esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epoxidation of vegetable oils and consecutive epoxide ring-opening reaction is a widely investigated path for producing biobased lubricants and polymers. The reaction mechanism and products are considered well-studied and known. In the current study, the reactions of epoxidized alkyl soyate with fou...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10210 - Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products with diethanolamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10210 Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products... chemical substance identified as soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products with diethanolamine (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10210 - Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products with diethanolamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10210 Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products... chemical substance identified as soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products with diethanolamine (PMN...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10210 - Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products with diethanolamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10210 Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products... chemical substance identified as soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products with diethanolamine (PMN...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10210 - Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products with diethanolamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10210 Soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products... chemical substance identified as soybean oil, epoxidized, reaction products with diethanolamine (PMN...

  11. Cu-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of epoxides with organoboron compounds.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Yu; Yang, Chu-Ting; Liu, Jing-Hui; Zhang, Zheng-Qi; Lu, Xi; Lou, Xin; Xiao, Bin; Fu, Yao

    2015-02-11

    A copper-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of epoxides with arylboronates is described. This reaction is not limited to aromatic epoxides, because aliphatic epoxides are also suitable substrates. In addition, N-sulfonyl aziridines can be successfully converted into the products. This reaction provides convenient access to β-phenethyl alcohols, which are valuable synthetic intermediates. PMID:25564373

  12. Sulfuric acid as a catalyst for ring-opening of biobased bis-epoxides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetable oils can be relatively and easily transformed into bio-based epoxides. Because of this, the acid-catalyzed epoxide ring-opening has been explored for the preparation of bio-based lubricants and polymers. Detailed model studies are carried out only with mono-epoxide made from methyl oleate,...

  13. Epoxide Chemistry: Guided Inquiry Experiment Emphasizing Structure Determination and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurty, H. G.; Jain, Niveta; Samby, Kiran

    2000-04-01

    This paper presents an operationally simple three-step synthesis of an a-hydroxy acid based on epoxide chemistry. The focus of the experiment is on the preparation of the chalcone epoxide and its reaction with hot alcoholic alkali. The experiment leads to an unpredicted reaction product. Its structure is established as 2-benzyl-2-phenylglycollic acid by chemical and spectroscopic analysis. The hydroxyacid is a good example to bring home an important NMR principle: the nonequivalence of hydrogens adjacent to a stereogenic center. The formation of the alpha-hydroxy acid is a mechanistic puzzle. A stepwise mechanism can be developed applying lecture-based organic chemistry concepts. On the other hand, acid-catalyzed (H2SO4, BF3) reaction of the chalcone epoxide gives benzoylphenylacetaldehyde. The exercise can be used as a multistep organic chemistry experiment. It also gives students a research-type experience.

  14. The oxidation of copper catalysts during ethylene epoxidation.

    PubMed

    Greiner, M T; Jones, T E; Johnson, B E; Rocha, T C R; Wang, Z J; Armbrüster, M; Willinger, M; Knop-Gericke, A; Schlögl, R

    2015-10-14

    The oxidation of copper catalysts during ethylene epoxidation was characterized using in situ photoemission spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Gas chromatography, proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry and electron-ionization mass spectrometry were used to characterize the catalytic properties of the oxidized copper. We find that copper corrodes during epoxidation in a 1 : 1 mixture of oxygen and ethylene. The catalyst corrosion passes through several stages, beginning with the formation of an O-terminated surface, followed by the formation of Cu2O scale and eventually a CuO scale. The oxidized catalyst exhibits measurable activity for ethylene epoxidation, but with a low selectivity of <3%. Tests on pure Cu2O and CuO powders confirm that the oxides intrinsically exhibit partial-oxidation activity. Cu2O was found to form acetaldehyde and ethylene epoxide in roughly equal amounts (1.0% and 1.2% respectively), while CuO was found to form much less ethyl aldehyde than ethylene epoxide (0.1% and 1.0%, respectively). Metallic copper catalysts were examined in extreme dilute-O2 epoxidation conditions to try and keep the catalyst from oxidizing during the reaction. It was found that in feed of 1 part O2 to 2500 parts C2H4 (PO2 = 1.2 × 10(-4) mbar) the copper surface becomes O-terminated. The O-terminated surface was found to exhibit partial-oxidation selectivity similar to that of Cu2O. With increasing O2 concentration (>8/2500) Cu2O forms and eventually covers the surface.

  15. Effect of short-term exposure to dichlorvos on synaptic plasticity of rat hippocampal slices: Involvement of acylpeptide hydrolase and {alpha}{sub 7} nicotinic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Olmos, Cristina; Sandoval, Rodrigo; Rozas, Carlos; Navarro, Sebastian; Wyneken, Ursula; Zeise, Marc; Morales, Bernardo; Pancetti, Floria

    2009-07-01

    Dichlorvos is the active molecule of the pro-drug metrifonate used to revert the cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease. A few years ago it was reported that dichlorvos inhibits the enzyme acylpeptide hydrolase at lower doses than those necessary to inhibit acetylcholinesterase to the same extent. Therefore, the aim of our investigation was to test the hypothesis that dichlorvos can enhance synaptic efficacy through a mechanism that involves acylpeptide hydrolase instead of acetylcholinesterase inhibition. We used long-term potentiation induced in rat hippocampal slices as a model of synaptic plasticity. Our results indicate that short-term exposures (20 min) to 50 {mu}M dichlorvos enhance long-term potentiation in about 200% compared to the control condition. This effect is correlated with approximately 60% inhibition of acylpeptide hydrolase activity, whereas acetylcholinesterase activity remains unaffected. Paired-pulse facilitation and inhibition experiments indicate that dichlorvos does not have any presynaptic effect in the CA3 {yields} CA1 pathway nor affect gabaergic interneurons. Interestingly, the application of 100 nM methyllicaconitine, an {alpha}{sub 7} nicotinic receptor antagonist, blocked the enhancing effect of dichlorvos on long-term potentiation. These results indicate that under the exposure conditions described above, dichlorvos enhances long-term potentiation through a postsynaptic mechanism that involves (a) the inhibition of the enzyme acylpeptide hydrolase and (b) the modulation of {alpha}{sub 7} nicotinic receptors.

  16. A strategy for position-selective epoxidation of polyprenols.

    PubMed

    Gnanadesikan, Vijay; Corey, E J

    2008-06-25

    An effective strategy has been developed for the efficient site-selective epoxidation of poylolefinic isoprenoid alcohols, based on the use of an internal control element for intramolecular reaction. The approach is illustrated by application to a series of polyisoprenoid alcohols (polyprenols) at substrate concentration of 0.5 mM. With polyprenol substrates having the hydroxyl function at one terminus, the internal epoxidation can be directed at the double bond of the polyprenol, which is either four or five away from the terminal hydroxyprenyl subunit.

  17. Kinetic Characterization of a Cocaine Hydrolase Engineered from Mouse Butyrylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiabin; Huang, Xiaoqin; Geng, Liyi; Xue, Liu; Hou, Shurong; Zheng, Xirong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Mouse butyrylcholinesterase (mBChE) and an mBChE-based cocaine hydrolase (mCocH, i.e. the A199S/S227A/S287G/A328W/Y332G mutant) have been characterized for their catalytic activities against cocaine, i.e. naturally occurring (−)-cocaine, in comparison with the corresponding human BChE (hBChE) and an hBChE-based cocaine hydrolase (hCocH, i.e. the A199S/F227A/S287G/A328W/Y332G mutant). It has been demonstrated that mCocH and hCocH have improved the catalytic efficiency of mBChE and hBChE against (−)-cocaine by ~8- and ~2000-fold, respectively, although the catalytic efficiencies of mCocH and hCocH against other substrates, including acetylcholine (ACh) and butyrylthiocholine (BTC), are close to those of the corresponding wild-type enzymes mBChE and hBChE. According to the kinetic data, the catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM) of mBChE against (−)-cocaine is comparable to that of hBChE, but the catalytic efficiency of mCocH against (−)-cocaine is remarkably lower than that of hCocH by ~250-fold. The remarkable difference in the catalytic activity between mCocH and hCocH is consistent with the difference between the enzyme-(−)-cocaine binding modes obtained from molecular modeling. Further, both mBChE and hBChE demonstrated substrate activation for all of the examined substrates ((−)-cocaine, ACh, and BTC) at high concentrations, whereas both mCocH and hCocH showed substrate inhibition for all three substrates at high concentrations. The amino-acid mutations have remarkably converted substrate activation of the enzymes into substrate inhibition, implying that the rate-determining step of the reaction in mCocH and hCocH might be different from that in mBChE and hBChE. PMID:25486543

  18. Thermostable Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase from Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingyan; Seffernick, Jennifer L.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2009-01-01

    Cyanuric acid, a metabolic intermediate in the degradation of many s-triazine compounds, is further metabolized by cyanuric acid hydrolase. Cyanuric acid also accumulates in swimming pools due to the breakdown of the sanitizing agents di- and trichloroisocyanuric acid. Structurally stable cyanuric acid hydrolases are being considered for usage in pool water remediation. In this study, cyanuric acid hydrolase from the thermophile Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073 was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to homogeneity. The recombinant enzyme was found to have a broader temperature range and greater stability, at both elevated and low temperatures, than previously described cyanuric acid hydrolases. The enzyme had a narrow substrate specificity, acting only on cyanuric acid and N-methylisocyanuric acid. The M. thermoacetica enzyme did not require metals or other discernible cofactors for activity. Cyanuric acid hydrolase from M. thermoacetica is the most promising enzyme to use for cyanuric acid remediation applications. PMID:19767460

  19. Identification of Neutral Cholesterol Ester Hydrolase, a Key Enzyme Removing Cholesterol from Macrophages*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Hiroaki; Igarashi, Masaki; Nishi, Makiko; Sekiya, Motohiro; Tajima, Makiko; Takase, Satoru; Takanashi, Mikio; Ohta, Keisuke; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Sachiko; Yahagi, Naoya; Ohashi, Ken; Amemiya-Kudo, Michiyo; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Nagai, Ryozo; Kadowaki, Takashi; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Ishibashi, Shun

    2008-01-01

    Unstable lipid-rich plaques in atherosclerosis are characterized by the accumulation of macrophage foam cells loaded with cholesterol ester (CE). Although hormone-sensitive lipase and cholesteryl ester hydrolase (CEH) have been proposed to mediate the hydrolysis of CE in macrophages, circumstantial evidence suggests the presence of other enzymes with neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (nCEH) activity. Here we show that the murine orthologue of KIAA1363, designated as neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (NCEH), is a microsomal nCEH with high expression in murine and human macrophages. The effect of various concentrations of NaCl on its nCEH activity resembles that on endogenous nCEH activity of macrophages. RNA silencing of NCEH decreases nCEH activity at least by 50%; conversely, its overexpression inhibits the CE formation in macrophages. Immunohistochemistry reveals that NCEH is expressed in macrophage foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions. These data indicate that NCEH is responsible for a major part of nCEH activity in macrophages and may be a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of atherosclerosis. PMID:18782767

  20. The fatty-acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB597 does not affect triacylglycerol hydrolysis in rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Clapper, Jason R; Duranti, Andrea; Tontini, Andrea; Mor, Marco; Tarzia, Giorgio; Piomelli, Daniele

    2006-11-01

    The O-arylcarbamate URB597 (cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3'-carbamoylbiphenyl-3-yl ester; also referred to as KDS-4103) is a potent inhibitor of fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), an intracellular serine hydrolase responsible for the inactivation of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide. URB597 demonstrates a remarkable degree of selectivity for FAAH over other serine hydrolases (e.g. cholinesterases) or other components of the endocannabinoid system (e.g. cannabinoid receptors). However, in a proteomic-based selectivity screen based on the displacement of fluorophosphonate-rhodamine (FPR) from mouse brain proteins, it was recently shown that URB597 prevents FPR binding to triacylglycerol hydrolase (TGH) with a median inhibitory concentration of 192nM. To determine whether this effect correlates with inhibition of TGH activity, we investigated the ability of URB597 to inhibit triolein hydrolysis in rat liver and heart tissues, which are rich in TGH, as well as white adipose tissue (WAT), which is rich in adipose triacylglycerol lipase (TGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase. The results show that URB597 does not affect triolein hydrolysis in any of these tissues at concentrations as high as 10microM, whereas it inhibits FAAH activity at low nanomolar concentrations. Moreover, intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of URB597 at doses that maximally inhibit FAAH in vivo (0.3-3mgkg(-1)) exerts no effect on triolein hydrolysis and tissue triacylglycerol (TAG) levels in rat liver, heart or WAT. The results indicate that URB597, while potent at inhibiting FAAH, does not affect TGH and TGL activities in rat tissues.

  1. 3,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126) Decreases Hepatic and Systemic Ratios of Epoxide to Diol Metabolites of Unsaturated Fatty Acids in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianai; Yang, Jun; Morisseau, Christophe; Robertson, Larry W; Hammock, Bruce; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Disruption of the homeostasis of oxygenated regulatory lipid mediators (oxylipins), potential markers of exposure to aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists, such as 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126), is associated with a range of diseases, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Here we test the hypothesis that PCB 126 exposure alters the levels of oxylipins in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (5-weeks old) were treated over a 3-month period every 2 weeks with intraperitoneal injections of PCB 126 in corn oil (cumulative doses of 0, 19.8, 97.8, and 390 µg/kg b.w.; 6 injections total). PCB 126 treatment caused a reduction in growth rates at the highest dose investigated, a dose-dependent decrease in thymus weights, and a dose-dependent increase in liver weights. Liver PCB 126 levels increased in a dose-dependent manner, while levels in plasma were below or close to the detection limit. The ratios of several epoxides to diol metabolites formed via the cytochrome P450 (P450) monooxygenase/soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathway from polyunsaturated fatty acids displayed a dose-dependent decrease in the liver and plasma, whereas levels of oxylipins formed by other metabolic pathways were generally not altered by PCB 126 treatment. The effects of PCB 126 on epoxide-to-diol ratios were associated with an increased CYP1A activity in liver microsomes and an increased sEH activity in liver cytosol and peroxisomes. These results suggest that oxylipins are potential biomarkers of exposure to PCB 126 and that the P450/sEH pathway is a therapeutic target for PCB 126-mediated hepatotoxicity that warrants further attention. PMID:27208083

  2. Stability and friction reducing properties of epoxidized oleochemical methyl esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of oleochemicals as biobased replacements for petrochemical lubricants is an important area of study. Physical properties of the epoxidized fatty esters derived from vegetable oil are reported and compared to their olefinic counterparts. Overall the frictional behavior of epoxy methyl olea...

  3. 40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721.2673 Section 721.2673 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2673 Aromatic...

  4. ULTRASOUND-ASSISTED ORGANIC SYNTHESIS: ALCOHOL OXIDATION AND OLEFIN EPOXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultrasound-assisted Organic Synthesis: Alcohol Oxidation and Olefin Epoxidation

    Unnikrishnan R Pillai, Endalkachew Sahle-Demessie , Vasudevan Namboodiri, Quiming Zhao, Juluis Enriquez
    U.S. EPA , 26 W. Martin Luther King Dr. , Cincinnati, OH 45268
    Phone: 513-569-773...

  5. Bacterial CS2 hydrolases from Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strains are homologous to the archaeal catenane CS2 hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Smeulders, Marjan J; Pol, Arjan; Venselaar, Hanka; Barends, Thomas R M; Hermans, John; Jetten, Mike S M; Op den Camp, Huub J M

    2013-09-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS(2)) and carbonyl sulfide (COS) are important in the global sulfur cycle, and CS(2) is used as a solvent in the viscose industry. These compounds can be converted by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, such as Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans species, to carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a property used in industrial biofiltration of CS(2)-polluted airstreams. We report on the mechanism of bacterial CS(2) conversion in the extremely acidophilic A. thiooxidans strains S1p and G8. The bacterial CS(2) hydrolases were highly abundant. They were purified and found to be homologous to the only other described (archaeal) CS(2) hydrolase from Acidianus strain A1-3, which forms a catenane of two interlocked rings. The enzymes cluster in a group of β-carbonic anhydrase (β-CA) homologues that may comprise a subclass of CS(2) hydrolases within the β-CA family. Unlike CAs, the CS(2) hydrolases did not hydrate CO(2) but converted CS(2) and COS with H(2)O to H(2)S and CO(2). The CS(2) hydrolases of A. thiooxidans strains G8, 2Bp, Sts 4-3, and BBW1, like the CS(2) hydrolase of Acidianus strain A1-3, exist as both octamers and hexadecamers in solution. The CS(2) hydrolase of A. thiooxidans strain S1p forms only octamers. Structure models of the A. thiooxidans CS(2) hydrolases based on the structure of Acidianus strain A1-3 CS(2) hydrolase suggest that the A. thiooxidans strain G8 CS(2) hydrolase may also form a catenane. In the A. thiooxidans strain S1p enzyme, two insertions (positions 26 and 27 [PD] and positions 56 to 61 [TPAGGG]) and a nine-amino-acid-longer C-terminal tail may prevent catenane formation.

  6. Aspergillus niger DLFCC-90 Rhamnoside Hydrolase, a New Type of Flavonoid Glycoside Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingqiang; Zhang, Chunzhi; Lu, Mingchun; Piao, Yongzhe; Ohba, Masashi; Tang, Minqian; Yuan, Xiaodong; Wei, Shenghua; Wang, Kan; Ma, Anzhou; Feng, Xue; Qin, Siqing; Mukai, Chisato; Tsuji, Akira

    2012-01-01

    A novel rutin-α-l-rhamnosidase hydrolyzing α-l-rhamnoside of rutin, naringin, and hesperidin was purified and characterized from Aspergillus niger DLFCC-90, and the gene encoding this enzyme, which is highly homologous to the α-amylase gene, was cloned and expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. The novel enzyme was classified in glycoside-hydrolase (GH) family 13. PMID:22544243

  7. Effect of epoxidation level on thermal properties and ionic conductivity of epoxidized natural rubber solid polymer nanocomposite electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Harun, Fatin; Chan, Chin Han; Winie, Tan; Sim, Lai Har; Zainal, Nurul Fatahah Asyqin

    2015-08-28

    Effect of epoxide content on the thermal and conductivity properties of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) solid polymer nanocomposite electrolytes was investigated. Commercial available epoxidized natural rubber having 25 (ENR25) and 50 mole% (ENR50) epoxide, respectively were incorporated with lithium perchlorate (LiClO{sub 4}) salt and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanofiller via solution casting method. The solid polymer nanocomposite electrolytes were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and impedance spectroscopy (IS) for their thermal properties and conductivity, respectively. It was evident that introduction of LiClO{sub 4} causes a greater increase in glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) and ionic conductivity of ENR50 as compared to ENR25. Upon addition of TiO{sub 2} in ENR/LiClO{sub 4} system, a remarkable T{sub g} elevation was observed for both ENRs where ENR50 reveals a more pronounced changes. It is interesting to note that they exhibit different phenomenon in ionic conductivity with TiO{sub 2} loading where ENR25 shows enhancement of conductivity while ENR50 shows declination.

  8. Effect of epoxidation level on thermal properties and ionic conductivity of epoxidized natural rubber solid polymer nanocomposite electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harun, Fatin; Chan, Chin Han; Sim, Lai Har; Winie, Tan; Zainal, Nurul Fatahah Asyqin

    2015-08-01

    Effect of epoxide content on the thermal and conductivity properties of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) solid polymer nanocomposite electrolytes was investigated. Commercial available epoxidized natural rubber having 25 (ENR25) and 50 mole% (ENR50) epoxide, respectively were incorporated with lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) salt and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanofiller via solution casting method. The solid polymer nanocomposite electrolytes were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and impedance spectroscopy (IS) for their thermal properties and conductivity, respectively. It was evident that introduction of LiClO4 causes a greater increase in glass transition temperature (Tg) and ionic conductivity of ENR50 as compared to ENR25. Upon addition of TiO2 in ENR/LiClO4 system, a remarkable Tg elevation was observed for both ENRs where ENR50 reveals a more pronounced changes. It is interesting to note that they exhibit different phenomenon in ionic conductivity with TiO2 loading where ENR25 shows enhancement of conductivity while ENR50 shows declination.

  9. Membrane composition influences the activity of in vitro refolded human vitamin K epoxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Jaenecke, Frank; Friedrich-Epler, Beatrice; Parthier, Christoph; Stubbs, Milton T

    2015-10-27

    Human vitamin K epoxide reductase (hVKOR) is an integral membrane protein responsible for the maintenance of reduced vitamin K pools, a prerequisite for the action of γ-glutamyl carboxylase and hence for hemostasis. Here we describe the recombinant expression of hVKOR as an insoluble fusion protein in Escherichia coli, followed by purification and chemical cleavage under denaturing conditions. In vitro renaturation and reconstitution of purified solubilized hVKOR in phospholipids could be established to yield active protein. Crucially, the renatured enzyme is inhibited by the powerful coumarin anticoagulant warfarin, and we demonstrate that enzyme activity depends on lipid composition. The completely synthetic system for protein production allows a rational investigation of the multiple variables in membrane protein folding and paves the way for the provision of pure, active membrane protein for structural studies.

  10. Miniaturization of hydrolase assays in thermocyclers.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Severino A; Moraes, Caroline S; Costa, Samara G; de Souza, Wanderley; Azambuja, Patrícia; Garcia, Eloi S; Genta, Fernando A

    2013-03-01

    We adapted the protocols of reducing sugar measurements with dinitrosalicylic acid and bicinchoninic acid for thermocyclers and their use in enzymatic assays for hydrolases such as amylase and β-1,3-glucanase. The use of thermocyclers for these enzymatic assays resulted in a 10 times reduction in the amount of reagent and volume of the sample needed when compared with conventional microplate protocols. We standardized absorbance readings from the polymerase chain reaction plates, which allowed us to make direct readings of the techniques above, and a β-glycosidase assay was also established under the same conditions. Standardization of the enzymatic reaction in thermocyclers resulted in less time-consuming temperature calibrations and without loss of volume through leakage or evaporation from the microplate. Kinetic parameters were successfully obtained, and the use of the thermocycler allowed the measurement of enzymatic activities in biological samples from the field with a limited amount of protein. PMID:23123426

  11. Food applications of bacterial cell wall hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Callewaert, Lien; Walmagh, Maarten; Michiels, Chris W; Lavigne, Rob

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial cell wall hydrolases (BCWHs) display a remarkable structural and functional diversity that offers perspectives for novel food applications, reaching beyond those of the archetype BCWH and established biopreservative hen egg white lysozyme. Insights in BCWHs from bacteriophages to animals have provided concepts for tailoring BCWHs to target specific pathogens or spoilage bacteria, or, conversely, to expand their working range to Gram-negative bacteria. Genetically modified foods expressing BCWHs in situ showed successful, but face regulatory and ethical concerns. An interesting spin-off development is the use of cell wall binding domains of bacteriophage BCWHs for detection and removal of foodborne pathogens. Besides for improving food safety or stability, BCWHs may also find use as functional food ingredients with specific health effects.

  12. Characterization and functional analysis of Trichinella spiralis Nudix hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Long, Shao Rong; Wang, Zhong Quan; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Ruo Dan; Qi, Xin; Liu, Pei; Ren, Hui Jun; Shi, Hai Ning; Cui, Jing

    2015-12-01

    Trichinella spiralis Nudix hydrolase (TsNd) was identified by screening a T7 phage display cDNA library from T. spiralis intestinal infective larvae (IIL), and vaccination of mice with recombinant TsNd protein (rTsNd) or TsNd DNA vaccine produced a partial protective immunity. The aim of this study was to identify the characteristics and biological functions of TsNd in the process of invasion and development of T. spiralis larvae. Transcription and expression of TsNd gene at all developmental stages of T. spiralis were observed by qPCR and immunofluorescent test (IFT). The rTsNd had the Nd enzymatic activity to dGTP, NAD, NADP and CoA. Its kinetic properties on the preferred substrate dGTP were calculated, and the Vmax, Km, and kcat/Km values at pH 8.0 were 3.19 μM min(-1) μg(-1), 370 μM, and 144 s(-1) M(-1), respectively, in reaction matrix containing 5 mM Zn(2+) and 2 mM DTT. The rTsNd was active from 25 °C to 50 °C, with optimal activity at 37 °C. rTsNd was able to bind specifically to mouse intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and promoted the larval invasion of IECs, whereas anti-rTsNd antibodies inhibited the larval invasion of IECs in a dose-dependent manner. Anti-rTsNd antibodies could kill T. spiralis infective larvae by an ADCC-mediated mechanism. Our results showed that the rTsNd protein was able to interact with host IECs, had the Nudix hydrolasing activity and the enzymatic activity appeared to be essential indispensable for the T. spiralis larval invasion, development and survival in host. PMID:26545353

  13. Peptidoglycan Hydrolase Fusions Maintain Their Parental Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, David M.; Dong, Shengli; Garrett, Wes; Rousseau, Geneviève M.; Moineau, Sylvain; Pritchard, David G.

    2006-01-01

    The increased incidence of bacterial antibiotic resistance has led to a renewed search for novel antimicrobials. Avoiding the use of broad-range antimicrobials through the use of specific peptidoglycan hydrolases (endolysins) might reduce the incidence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens worldwide. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae are human pathogens and also cause mastitis in dairy cattle. The ultimate goal of this work is to create transgenic cattle that are resistant to mastitis through the expression of an antimicrobial protein(s) in their milk. Toward this end, two novel antimicrobials were produced. The (i) full-length and (ii) 182-amino-acid, C-terminally truncated S. agalactiae bacteriophage B30 endolysins were fused to the mature lysostaphin protein of Staphylococcus simulans. Both fusions display lytic specificity for streptococcal pathogens and S. aureus. The full lytic ability of the truncated B30 protein also suggests that the SH3b domain at the C terminus is dispensable. The fusions are active in a milk-like environment. They are also active against some lactic acid bacteria used to make cheese and yogurt, but their lytic activity is destroyed by pasteurization (63°C for 30 min). Immunohistochemical studies indicated that the fusion proteins can be expressed in cultured mammalian cells with no obvious deleterious effects on the cells, making it a strong candidate for use in future transgenic mice and cattle. Since the fusion peptidoglycan hydrolase also kills multiple human pathogens, it also may prove useful as a highly selective, multipathogen-targeting antimicrobial agent that could potentially reduce the use of broad-range antibiotics in fighting clinical infections. PMID:16598006

  14. Peptidoglycan hydrolase fusions maintain their parental specificities.

    PubMed

    Donovan, David M; Dong, Shengli; Garrett, Wes; Rousseau, Geneviève M; Moineau, Sylvain; Pritchard, David G

    2006-04-01

    The increased incidence of bacterial antibiotic resistance has led to a renewed search for novel antimicrobials. Avoiding the use of broad-range antimicrobials through the use of specific peptidoglycan hydrolases (endolysins) might reduce the incidence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens worldwide. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae are human pathogens and also cause mastitis in dairy cattle. The ultimate goal of this work is to create transgenic cattle that are resistant to mastitis through the expression of an antimicrobial protein(s) in their milk. Toward this end, two novel antimicrobials were produced. The (i) full-length and (ii) 182-amino-acid, C-terminally truncated S. agalactiae bacteriophage B30 endolysins were fused to the mature lysostaphin protein of Staphylococcus simulans. Both fusions display lytic specificity for streptococcal pathogens and S. aureus. The full lytic ability of the truncated B30 protein also suggests that the SH3b domain at the C terminus is dispensable. The fusions are active in a milk-like environment. They are also active against some lactic acid bacteria used to make cheese and yogurt, but their lytic activity is destroyed by pasteurization (63 degrees C for 30 min). Immunohistochemical studies indicated that the fusion proteins can be expressed in cultured mammalian cells with no obvious deleterious effects on the cells, making it a strong candidate for use in future transgenic mice and cattle. Since the fusion peptidoglycan hydrolase also kills multiple human pathogens, it also may prove useful as a highly selective, multipathogen-targeting antimicrobial agent that could potentially reduce the use of broad-range antibiotics in fighting clinical infections.

  15. Modeling Epoxidation of Drug-like Molecules with a Deep Machine Learning Network.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Tyler B; Miller, Grover P; Swamidass, S Joshua

    2015-07-22

    Drug toxicity is frequently caused by electrophilic reactive metabolites that covalently bind to proteins. Epoxides comprise a large class of three-membered cyclic ethers. These molecules are electrophilic and typically highly reactive due to ring tension and polarized carbon-oxygen bonds. Epoxides are metabolites often formed by cytochromes P450 acting on aromatic or double bonds. The specific location on a molecule that undergoes epoxidation is its site of epoxidation (SOE). Identifying a molecule's SOE can aid in interpreting adverse events related to reactive metabolites and direct modification to prevent epoxidation for safer drugs. This study utilized a database of 702 epoxidation reactions to build a model that accurately predicted sites of epoxidation. The foundation for this model was an algorithm originally designed to model sites of cytochromes P450 metabolism (called XenoSite) that was recently applied to model the intrinsic reactivity of diverse molecules with glutathione. This modeling algorithm systematically and quantitatively summarizes the knowledge from hundreds of epoxidation reactions with a deep convolution network. This network makes predictions at both an atom and molecule level. The final epoxidation model constructed with this approach identified SOEs with 94.9% area under the curve (AUC) performance and separated epoxidized and non-epoxidized molecules with 79.3% AUC. Moreover, within epoxidized molecules, the model separated aromatic or double bond SOEs from all other aromatic or double bonds with AUCs of 92.5% and 95.1%, respectively. Finally, the model separated SOEs from sites of sp(2) hydroxylation with 83.2% AUC. Our model is the first of its kind and may be useful for the development of safer drugs. The epoxidation model is available at http://swami.wustl.edu/xenosite. PMID:27162970

  16. Modeling Epoxidation of Drug-like Molecules with a Deep Machine Learning Network

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Drug toxicity is frequently caused by electrophilic reactive metabolites that covalently bind to proteins. Epoxides comprise a large class of three-membered cyclic ethers. These molecules are electrophilic and typically highly reactive due to ring tension and polarized carbon–oxygen bonds. Epoxides are metabolites often formed by cytochromes P450 acting on aromatic or double bonds. The specific location on a molecule that undergoes epoxidation is its site of epoxidation (SOE). Identifying a molecule’s SOE can aid in interpreting adverse events related to reactive metabolites and direct modification to prevent epoxidation for safer drugs. This study utilized a database of 702 epoxidation reactions to build a model that accurately predicted sites of epoxidation. The foundation for this model was an algorithm originally designed to model sites of cytochromes P450 metabolism (called XenoSite) that was recently applied to model the intrinsic reactivity of diverse molecules with glutathione. This modeling algorithm systematically and quantitatively summarizes the knowledge from hundreds of epoxidation reactions with a deep convolution network. This network makes predictions at both an atom and molecule level. The final epoxidation model constructed with this approach identified SOEs with 94.9% area under the curve (AUC) performance and separated epoxidized and non-epoxidized molecules with 79.3% AUC. Moreover, within epoxidized molecules, the model separated aromatic or double bond SOEs from all other aromatic or double bonds with AUCs of 92.5% and 95.1%, respectively. Finally, the model separated SOEs from sites of sp2 hydroxylation with 83.2% AUC. Our model is the first of its kind and may be useful for the development of safer drugs. The epoxidation model is available at http://swami.wustl.edu/xenosite. PMID:27162970

  17. Inhibition of aryl hydrocarbon receptor transactivation and DNA adduct formation by CYP1 isoform-selective metabolic deactivation of benzo[a]pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Kaori; Uno, Shigeyuki; Seki, Taiichiro; Ariga, Toyohiko; Kusumi, Yoshiaki; Mitsumata, Masako; Yamada, Sachiko; Makishima, Makoto

    2008-07-15

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a polyaromatic hydrocarbon produced by the combustion of cigarettes and coke ovens, is a known procarcinogen. BaP activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and induces the expression of a battery of genes, including CYP1A1, which metabolize BaP to toxic compounds. The possible role of CYP1 enzymes in mediating BaP detoxification or metabolic activation remains to be elucidated. In this study, we assessed the effects of CYP1 enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1) on BaP-induced AhR transactivation and DNA adduct formation in HEK293 cells and HepG2 cells. Transfection of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, but not CYP1A2, suppressed BaP-induced activation of AhR. Expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2, but not CYP1B1, inhibited DNA adduct formation in BaP-treated HepG2 cells. These results indicate that CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 play a role in deactivation of BaP on AhR and that CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 are involved in BaP detoxification by suppressing DNA adduct formation. BaP treatment did not induce DNA adduct formation in HEK293 cells, even after transfection of CYP1 enzymes, suggesting that expression of CYP1 enzymes is not sufficient for DNA adduct formation. Lower expression of epoxide hydrolase and higher expression of glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) and GSTM1/M2 were observed in HEK293 cells compared with HepG2 cells. Dynamic expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 along with expression of other enzymes such as epoxide hydrolase and phase II enzymes may determine the detoxification or metabolic activation of BaP.

  18. The conformations of cyclooctene: consequences for epoxidation chemistry.

    PubMed

    Neuenschwander, Ulrich; Hermans, Ive

    2011-12-16

    The conformational space of cyclooctene has been explored computationally in order to rationalize its high epoxidation selectivity. Four different conformations were identified. Each conformation is chiral and has two enantiomeric forms. The degeneracy is further increased by a ring-inversion process, yielding a total of 16 conformers. The potential energy surface for the interconversion of these conformers was characterized via intrinsic reaction coordinate analyses. Furthermore, an evaluation of the microcanonical partition functions allowed for a quantification of the entropy contributions and hence the calculation of the equilibrium composition at different temperatures. The results strongly suggest that the high epoxidation selectivity, typically observed for cyclooctene, is related to a poor σ(C-αH)-π(C═C) orbital overlap in the predominant conformation, disfavoring αH-abstraction by radical species and thus allylic byproduct formation via undesired homolytic side-reactions.

  19. Toughening of epoxy resins by epoxidized soybean oil

    SciTech Connect

    Frischinger, I.; Dirlikov, S.

    1993-12-31

    Homogeneous mixtures of a liquid rubber based on prepolymers of epoxidized soybean oil with amines, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A epoxy resins, and commercial diamines form, under certain conditions, two-phase thermosetting materials that consist of a rigid epoxy matrix and randomly distributed small rubbery soybean particles (0.1-5 {mu}m). These two-phase thermosets have improved toughness, similar to that of other rubber-modified epoxies, low water absorption, and low sodium content. In comparison to the unmodified thermosets, the two-phase thermosets exhibit slightly lower glass-transition temperatures and Young`s moduli, but their dielectric properties do not change. The epoxidized soybean oil is available at a price below that of commercial epoxy resins and appears very attractive for epoxy toughening on an industrial scale. 15 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Human serum contains a chitinase: identification of an enzyme, formerly described as 4-methylumbelliferyl-tetra-N-acetylchitotetraoside hydrolase (MU-TACT hydrolase).

    PubMed

    Overdijk, B; Van Steijn, G J

    1994-12-01

    Since 1988 an endoglucosaminidase, provisionally named MU-TACT hydrolase, has been known that hydrolyses the artificial substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-tetra-N-acetyl-chitotetraoside (MU-[GlcNAc]4, where GlcNAc is N-acetylglucosamine). The biological function of the enzyme was unknown. In this paper evidence is presented showing that this endoglucosaminidase from human serum is in fact a chitinase that is different from lysozyme. The facts sustaining this finding are: (i) the identification of the products formed from MU-[GlcNAc]3 and [GlcNAc]2;and [GlcNAc]3; (ii) chitin and ethylene glycolchitin can be degraded by the enzyme; (iii) the chitinase inhibitor allosamidin also inhibits the action of MU-TACT hydrolase from human serum; (iv) no hydrolysis of the lysozyme substrate Micrococcus lysodeikticus. The enzyme also occurs in rat liver. It was demonstrated that upon Percoll density gradient centrifugation the enzyme from this tissue distributed parallel to the lysosomal marker enzymes beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase and beta-galactosidase, indicating a lysosomal localization for this enzyme. It is proposed that the enzyme functions in the hydrolysis of chitin, to which mammals are frequently exposed during infection by pathogens. PMID:7734843

  1. Lysophosphatidylcholine hydrolases of human erythrocytes, lymphocytes, and brain: Sensitive targets of conserved specificity for organophosphorus delayed neurotoxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Vose, Sarah C.; Holland, Nina T.; Eskenazi, Brenda; Casida, John E.

    2007-10-01

    Brain neuropathy target esterase (NTE), associated with organophosphorus (OP)-induced delayed neuropathy, has the same OP inhibitor sensitivity and specificity profiles assayed in the classical way (paraoxon-resistant, mipafox-sensitive hydrolysis of phenyl valerate) or with lysophosphatidylcholine (LysoPC) as the substrate. Extending our earlier observation with mice, we now examine human erythrocyte, lymphocyte, and brain LysoPC hydrolases as possible sensitive targets for OP delayed neurotoxicants and insecticides. Inhibitor profiling of human erythrocytes and lymphocytes gave the surprising result of essentially the same pattern as with brain. Human erythrocyte LysoPC hydrolases are highly sensitive to OP delayed neurotoxicants, with in vitro IC{sub 50} values of 0.13-85 nM for longer alkyl analogs, and poorly sensitive to the current OP insecticides. In agricultural workers, erythrocyte LysoPC hydrolyzing activities are similar for newborn children and their mothers and do not vary with paraoxonase status but have high intersample variation that limits their use as a biomarker. Mouse erythrocyte LysoPC hydrolase activity is also of low sensitivity in vitro and in vivo to the OP insecticides whereas the delayed neurotoxicant ethyl n-octylphosphonyl fluoride inhibits activity in vivo at 1-3 mg/kg. Overall, inhibition of blood LysoPC hydrolases is as good as inhibition of brain NTE as a predictor of OP inducers of delayed neuropathy. NTE and lysophospholipases (LysoPLAs) both hydrolyze LysoPC, yet they are in distinct enzyme families with no sequence homology and very different catalytic sites. The relative contributions of NTE and LysoPLAs to LysoPC hydrolysis and clearance from erythrocytes, lymphocytes, and brain remain to be defined.

  2. Markedly Elevated Carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide/Carbamazepine Ratio in a Fatal Carbamazepine Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Jason L.; Spiller, Henry A.; Baker, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Carbamazepine is a widely used anticonvulsant. Its metabolite, carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide, has been found to display similar anticonvulsant and neurotoxic properties. While the ratio of parent to metabolite concentration varies significantly, at therapeutic doses the epoxide concentration is generally about 20% of the parent. We report a case of fatal carbamazepine overdose in which the epoxide metabolite concentration was found to be 450% higher than the parent compound, suggesting a potential role for metabolite quantification in severe toxicity. PMID:26550016

  3. Direct Epoxidation of Propylene over Stabilized Cu+ Surface Sites on Ti Modified Cu2O

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, X.; Kattel, S.; Xiong, K.; Mudiyanselage, K.; Rykov, S.; Senanayake, S. D.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Liu, P.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Chen, J. G.

    2015-07-17

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility to tune the epoxidation selectivity by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu+ active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene.

  4. Cyproheptadine metabolites inhibit proinsulin and insulin biosynthesis and insulin release in isolated rat pancreatic islets

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, S.A.; Falany, J.L.; Fischer, L.J. )

    1989-06-01

    The contribution of drug metabolites to cyproheptadine (CPH)-induced alterations in endocrine pancreatic beta-cells was investigated by examining the inhibitory activity of CPH and its biotransformation products, desmethylcyproheptadine (DMCPH), CPH-epoxide and DMCPH-epoxide, on hormone biosynthesis and secretion in pancreatic islets isolated from 50-day-old rats. Measurement of (pro)insulin (proinsulin and insulin) synthesis using incorporation of 3H-leucine showed that DMCPH-epoxide, DMCPH and CPH-epoxide were 22, 10 and 4 times, respectively, more potent than CPH in inhibiting hormone synthesis. The biosynthesis of (pro)insulin was also inhibited by CPH and DMCPH-epoxide in islets isolated from 21-day-old rat fetuses. The inhibitory action of CPH and its metabolites was apparently specific for (pro)insulin, and the synthesis of other islet proteins was not affected. Other experiments showed the metabolites of CPH were active in inhibiting glucose-stimulated insulin secretion but were less potent than the parent drug in producing this effect. CPH and its structurally related metabolites, therefore, have differential inhibitory activities on insulin synthesis and release. The observation that CPH metabolites have higher potency than CPH to inhibit (pro)insulin synthesis, when considered with published reports on the disposition of the drug in rats, indicate that CPH metabolites, particularly DMCPH-epoxide, are primarily responsible for the insulin depletion observed when the parent compound is given to fetal and adult animals.

  5. Luciferase-based assay for adenosine: application to S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Emmanuel S; Gulab, Shivali A; Cassera, María B; Schramm, Vern L

    2012-04-17

    S-Adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) catalyzes the reversible conversion of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) to adenosine (ADO) and L-homocysteine, promoting methyltransferase activity by relief of SAH inhibition. SAH catabolism is linked to S-adenosylmethionine metabolism, and the development of SAHH inhibitors is of interest for new therapeutics with anticancer or cholesterol-lowering effects. We have developed a continuous enzymatic assay for adenosine that facilitates high-throughput analysis of SAHH. This luciferase-based assay is 4000-fold more sensitive than former detection methods and is well suited for continuous monitoring of ADO formation in a 96-well-plate format. The high-affinity adenosine kinase from Anopheles gambiae efficiently converts adenosine to adenosine monophosphate (AMP) in the presence of guanosine triphosphate. AMP is converted to adenosine triphosphate and coupled to firefly luciferase. With this procedure, kinetic parameters (K(m), k(cat)) for SAHH were obtained, in good agreement with literature values. Assay characteristics include sustained light output combined with ultrasensitive detection (10(-7) unit of SAHH). The assay is documented with the characterization of slow-onset inhibition for inhibitors of the hydrolase. Application of this assay may facilitate the development of SAHH inhibitors and provide an ultrasensitive detection for the formation of adenosine from other biological reactions.

  6. Interaction of the serine hydrolase KIAA1363 with organophosphorus agents: Evaluation of potency and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ross, Matthew K; Pluta, Kim; Bittles, Victoria; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Crow, J Allen

    2016-01-15

    Oxons are bioactive metabolites of organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) that covalently inactivate serine hydrolases. KIAA1363 is one of the most abundant serine hydrolases in mouse brain. Although the physiological consequences related to the inhibition of KIAA1363 due to environmental exposures to OPs are poorly understood, the enzyme was previously shown to have a role in the detoxification of oxons. Here, we overexpressed human KIAA1363 and CES1 in COS7 cells and compared the potency of inhibition (IC50s, 15 min) of KIAA1363 and CES1 by chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO), paraoxon (PO), and methyl paraoxon (MPO). The order of potency was CPO > PO > MPO for both enzymes. We also determined the bimolecular rate constants (kinact/Ki) for reactions of CPO and PO with KIAA1363 and CES1. KIAA1363 and CES1 were inactivated by CPO at comparable rates (4.4 × 10(6) s(-1) M(-1) and 6.7 × 10(6) s(-1) M(-1), respectively), whereas PO inactivated both enzymes at slower rates (0.4 × 10(6) s(-1) M(-1) and 1.5 × 10(6) s(-1) M(-1), respectively). Finally, the reactivation rate of KIAA1363 following inhibition by CPO was evaluated. Together, the results define the kinetics of inhibition of KIAA1363 by active metabolites of agrochemicals and indicate that KIAA1363 is highly sensitive to inhibition by these compounds. PMID:26617293

  7. Human Valacyclovir Hydrolase/Biphenyl Hydrolase-Like Protein Is a Highly Efficient Homocysteine Thiolactonase

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Matthew G.; Rademacher, Peter M.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Hsieh, Edward J.; Rettie, Allan E.; Furlong, Clement E.

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteinylation of lysine residues by homocysteine thiolactone (HCTL), a reactive homocysteine metabolite, results in protein aggregation and malfunction, and is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular, autoimmune and neurological diseases. Human plasma paraoxonase-1 (PON1) and bleomycin hydrolase (Blmh) have been reported as the physiological HCTL detoxifying enzymes. However, the catalytic efficiency of HCTL hydrolysis by Blmh is low and not saturated at 20 mM HCTL. The catalytic efficiency of PON1 for HCTL hydrolysis is 100-fold lower than that of Blmh. A homocysteine thiolactonase (HCTLase) was purified from human liver and identified by mass spectrometry (MS) as the previously described human biphenyl hydrolase-like protein (BPHL). To further characterize this newly described HCTLase activity, BPHL was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The sequence of the recombinant BPHL (rBPHL) and hydrolytic products of the substrates HCTL and valacyclovir were verified by MS. We found that the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of rBPHL for HCTL hydrolysis was 7.7 × 104 M−1s−1, orders of magnitude higher than that of PON1 or Blmh, indicating a more significant physiological role for BPHL in detoxifying HCTL. PMID:25333274

  8. Characterization of the folate salvage enzyme p-aminobenzoylglutamate hydrolase in plants.

    PubMed

    Bozzo, Gale G; Basset, Gilles J C; Naponelli, Valeria; Noiriel, Alexandre; Gregory, Jesse F; Hanson, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    Folates break down in vivo to give pterin and p-aminobenzoylglutamate (pABAGlu) fragments, the latter usually having a polyglutamyl tail. Pilot studies have shown that plants can hydrolyze pABAGlu and its polyglutamates to p-aminobenzoate, a folate biosynthesis precursor. The enzymatic basis of this hydrolysis was further investigated. pABAGlu hydrolase activity was found in all species and organs tested; activity levels implied that the proteins responsible are very rare. The activity was located in cytosol/vacuole and mitochondrial fractions of pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves, and column chromatography of the activity from Arabidopsis tissues indicated at least three peaks. A major activity peak from Arabidopsis roots was purified 86-fold by a three-column procedure; activity loss during purification exceeded 95%. Size exclusion chromatography gave a molecular mass of approximately 200 kDa. Partially purified preparations showed a pH optimum near 7.5, a Km value for pABAGlu of 370 microM, and activity against folic acid. Activity was relatively insensitive to thiol and serine reagents, but was strongly inhibited by 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid and stimulated by Mn2+, pointing to a metalloenzyme. The Arabidopsis genome was searched for proteins similar to Pseudomonas carboxypeptidase G, which contains zinc and is the only enzyme yet confirmed to attack pABAGlu. The sole significant matches were auxin conjugate hydrolase family members and the At4g17830 protein. None was found to have significant pABAGlu hydrolase activity, suggesting that this activity resides in hitherto unrecognized enzymes. The finding that Arabidopsis has folate-hydrolyzing activity points to an enzymatic component of folate degradation in plants.

  9. Exopolysaccharide biosynthetic glycoside hydrolases can be utilized to disrupt and prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Baker, Perrin; Hill, Preston J; Snarr, Brendan D; Alnabelseya, Noor; Pestrak, Matthew J; Lee, Mark J; Jennings, Laura K; Tam, John; Melnyk, Roman A; Parsek, Matthew R; Sheppard, Donald C; Wozniak, Daniel J; Howell, P Lynne

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial biofilms present a significant medical challenge because they are recalcitrant to current therapeutic regimes. A key component of biofilm formation in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the biosynthesis of the exopolysaccharides Pel and Psl, which are involved in the formation and maintenance of the structural biofilm scaffold and protection against antimicrobials and host defenses. Given that the glycoside hydrolases PelAh and PslGh encoded in the pel and psl biosynthetic operons, respectively, are utilized for in vivo exopolysaccharide processing, we reasoned that these would provide specificity to target P. aeruginosa biofilms. Evaluating these enzymes as potential therapeutics, we demonstrate that these glycoside hydrolases selectively target and degrade the exopolysaccharide component of the biofilm matrix. PelAh and PslGh inhibit biofilm formation over a 24-hour period with a half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 69.3 ± 1.2 and 4.1 ± 1.1 nM, respectively, and are capable of disrupting preexisting biofilms in 1 hour with EC50 of 35.7 ± 1.1 and 12.9 ± 1.1 nM, respectively. This treatment was effective against clinical and environmental P. aeruginosa isolates and reduced biofilm biomass by 58 to 94%. These noncytotoxic enzymes potentiated antibiotics because the addition of either enzyme to a sublethal concentration of colistin reduced viable bacterial counts by 2.5 orders of magnitude when used either prophylactically or on established 24-hour biofilms. In addition, PelAh was able to increase neutrophil killing by ~50%. This work illustrates the feasibility and benefits of using bacterial exopolysaccharide biosynthetic glycoside hydrolases to develop novel antibiofilm therapeutics. PMID:27386527

  10. Exopolysaccharide biosynthetic glycoside hydrolases can be utilized to disrupt and prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Perrin; Hill, Preston J.; Snarr, Brendan D.; Alnabelseya, Noor; Pestrak, Matthew J.; Lee, Mark J.; Jennings, Laura K.; Tam, John; Melnyk, Roman A.; Parsek, Matthew R.; Sheppard, Donald C.; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms present a significant medical challenge because they are recalcitrant to current therapeutic regimes. A key component of biofilm formation in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the biosynthesis of the exopolysaccharides Pel and Psl, which are involved in the formation and maintenance of the structural biofilm scaffold and protection against antimicrobials and host defenses. Given that the glycoside hydrolases PelAh and PslGh encoded in the pel and psl biosynthetic operons, respectively, are utilized for in vivo exopolysaccharide processing, we reasoned that these would provide specificity to target P. aeruginosa biofilms. Evaluating these enzymes as potential therapeutics, we demonstrate that these glycoside hydrolases selectively target and degrade the exopolysaccharide component of the biofilm matrix. PelAh and PslGh inhibit biofilm formation over a 24-hour period with a half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 69.3 ± 1.2 and 4.1 ± 1.1 nM, respectively, and are capable of disrupting preexisting biofilms in 1 hour with EC50 of 35.7 ± 1.1 and 12.9 ± 1.1 nM, respectively. This treatment was effective against clinical and environmental P. aeruginosa isolates and reduced biofilm biomass by 58 to 94%. These noncytotoxic enzymes potentiated antibiotics because the addition of either enzyme to a sublethal concentration of colistin reduced viable bacterial counts by 2.5 orders of magnitude when used either prophylactically or on established 24-hour biofilms. In addition, PelAh was able to increase neutrophil killing by ~50%. This work illustrates the feasibility and benefits of using bacterial exopolysaccharide biosynthetic glycoside hydrolases to develop novel antibiofilm therapeutics. PMID:27386527

  11. Asymmetric Epoxidation: A Twinned Laboratory and Molecular Modeling Experiment for Upper-Level Organic Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hii, King Kuok; Rzepa, Henry S.; Smith, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    The coupling of a student experiment involving the preparation and use of a catalyst for the asymmetric epoxidation of an alkene with computational simulations of various properties of the resulting epoxide is set out in the form of a software toolbox from which students select appropriate components. At the core of these are the computational…

  12. Towards a General Understanding of Carbonyl-Stabilised Ammonium Ylide-Mediated Epoxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Novacek, Johanna; Roiser, Lukas; Zielke, Katharina; Robiette, Raphaël; Waser, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The key factors for carbonyl-stabilised ammonium ylide-mediated epoxidation reactions were systematically investigated by experimental and computational means and the hereby obtained energy profiles provide explanations for the observed experimental results. In addition, we were able to identify the first tertiary amine-based chiral auxiliary that allows for high enantioselectivities and high yields for such epoxidation reactions. PMID:27381752

  13. 40 CFR 721.7210 - Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. 721.7210 Section 721.7210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7210 Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. (a)...

  14. 40 CFR 721.7210 - Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. 721.7210 Section 721.7210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7210 Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. (a)...

  15. Fluorinated Alcohols as Activators for the Solvent-Free Chemical Fixation of Carbon Dioxide into Epoxides.

    PubMed

    Gennen, Sandro; Alves, Margot; Méreau, Raphaël; Tassaing, Thierry; Gilbert, Bernard; Detrembleur, Christophe; Jerome, Christine; Grignard, Bruno

    2015-06-01

    The addition of fluorinated alcohols to onium salts provides highly efficient organocatalysts for the chemical fixation of CO2 into epoxides under mild experimental conditions. The combination of online kinetic studies, NMR titrations and DFT calculations allows understanding this synergistic effect that provides an active organocatalyst for CO2 /epoxides coupling.

  16. Towards a General Understanding of Carbonyl-Stabilised Ammonium Ylide-Mediated Epoxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Novacek, Johanna; Roiser, Lukas; Zielke, Katharina; Robiette, Raphaël; Waser, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The key factors for carbonyl-stabilised ammonium ylide-mediated epoxidation reactions were systematically investigated by experimental and computational means and the hereby obtained energy profiles provide explanations for the observed experimental results. In addition, we were able to identify the first tertiary amine-based chiral auxiliary that allows for high enantioselectivities and high yields for such epoxidation reactions.

  17. 40 CFR 721.7210 - Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. 721.7210 Section 721.7210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7210 Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. (a)...

  18. 40 CFR 721.7210 - Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. 721.7210 Section 721.7210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7210 Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. (a)...

  19. 40 CFR 721.7210 - Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. 721.7210 Section 721.7210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7210 Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. (a)...

  20. COMPARATIVE STUDIES OF THE EFFECT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON GEOMETRY ON THE HYDROLYSIS OF DIOL EPOXIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative studies of the effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon geometry on the hydrolysis of diol epoxides

    The interaction of the diol epoxides (DEs) of both planar and non-planar PAHs with water have been examined using quantum mechanical and molecular dynamics. Th...

  1. Towards a General Understanding of Carbonyl-Stabilised Ammonium Ylide-Mediated Epoxidation Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Robiette, Raphaël; Waser, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The key factors for carbonyl-stabilised ammonium ylide-mediated epoxidation reactions were systematically investigated by experimental and computational means and the hereby obtained energy profiles provide explanations for the observed experimental results. In addition, we were able to identify the first tertiary amine-based chiral auxiliary that allows for high enantioselectivities and high yields for such epoxidation reactions. PMID:27381752

  2. General, Highly Selective Synthesis of 1,3- and 1,4-Difunctionalized Building Blocks by Regiodivergent Epoxide Opening.

    PubMed

    Funken, Nico; Mühlhaus, Felix; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2016-09-19

    We describe a regiodivergent epoxide opening (REO) featuring a catalyst-controlled synthesis of enantiomerically and diastereomerically highly enriched or pure syn- and anti- 1,3- and 1,4-difunctionalized building blocks from a common epoxide precursor. The REO is attractive for natural product synthesis and as a branching reaction for diversity-oriented synthesis with epoxides.

  3. General, Highly Selective Synthesis of 1,3- and 1,4-Difunctionalized Building Blocks by Regiodivergent Epoxide Opening.

    PubMed

    Funken, Nico; Mühlhaus, Felix; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2016-09-19

    We describe a regiodivergent epoxide opening (REO) featuring a catalyst-controlled synthesis of enantiomerically and diastereomerically highly enriched or pure syn- and anti- 1,3- and 1,4-difunctionalized building blocks from a common epoxide precursor. The REO is attractive for natural product synthesis and as a branching reaction for diversity-oriented synthesis with epoxides. PMID:27600090

  4. 40 CFR 63.1427 - Process vent requirements for processes using extended cookout as an epoxide emission reduction...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... constant, 1/hr. t = Time, hours. Note: This equation assumes a first order reaction with respect to epoxide... epoxide concentration using 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, Method 18. (ii) Determine the epoxide concentration in the vapor space using Raoult's Law or another appropriate phase equilibrium equation and...

  5. Versatile physiological functions of the Nudix hydrolase family in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Kazuya; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Nudix hydrolases are widely distributed in all kingdoms of life and have the potential to hydrolyze a wide range of organic pyrophosphates, including nucleoside di- and triphosphates, nucleotide coenzymes, nucleotide sugars, and RNA caps. However, except for E. coli MutT and its orthologs in other organisms that sanitize oxidized nucleotides to prevent DNA and RNA mutations, the functions of Nudix hydrolases had largely remained unclear until recently, because many members of this enzyme family exhibited broad substrate specificities. There is now increasing evidence to show that their functions extend into many aspects of the regulation of cellular responses. This review summarizes current knowledge on the molecular and enzymatic properties as well as physiological functions of Arabidopsis Nudix hydrolases. The information presented here may provide novel insights into the physiological roles of these enzymes in not only plant species, but also other organisms. PMID:25483172

  6. Biodegradation of heptachlor and heptachlor epoxide-contaminated soils by white-rot fungal inocula.

    PubMed

    Purnomo, Adi Setyo; Putra, Surya Rosa; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi; Kondo, Ryuichiro

    2014-10-01

    The ability of certain white-rot fungi (WRF) inocula to transform heptachlor and heptachlor epoxide and its application in artificially contaminated soil were investigated. Fungal inoculum of Pleurotus ostreatus eliminated approximately 89 % of heptachlor after 28 days of incubation, and chlordene was detected as the primary metabolite. The fungal inoculum of Pleurotus ostreatus had the highest ability to degrade heptachlor epoxide; approximately 32 % were degraded after 28 days of incubation, and heptachlor diol was detected as the metabolite product. Because Pleurotus ostreatus transformed heptachlor into a less toxic metabolite and could also effectively degrade heptachlor epoxide, it was then selected to be applied to artificially contaminated soil. The spent mushroom waste (SMW) of Pleurotus ostreatus degraded heptachlor and heptachlor epoxide by approximately 91 and 26 %, respectively, over 28 days. This finding indicated that Pleurotus ostreatus SMW could be used to bioremediate heptachlor- and heptachlor epoxide-contaminated environments.

  7. Photoaffinity labeling of opioid receptor with morphine-7,8-oxide (morphine epoxide)

    SciTech Connect

    Takayanagi, I.; Shibata, R.; Miyata, N.; Hirobe, M.

    1982-05-01

    The opioid receptor mediating inhibitory action of morphine in the electrically stimulated guinea pig ileum was irreversibly photoinactivated by morphine epoxide (3 X 10(-6) M). Morphine epoxide (up to 3 X 10(-5) M) did not influence the responses of rat vas deferens (epsilon-receptor) or rabbit vas deferens (kappa-receptor) to electrical stimulation. Effective concentrations of morphine epoxide were much lower in the guinea pig ileum (mu-receptor) than in the mouse vas deference (delta-receptor). The inhibitory action of (Met)-enkephalin on the twitch responses of the rat vas deferens and mouse vas deferens to electrical stimulation were not influenced after irradiation in the presence of morphine epoxide (3 X 10(-6) M). Therefore, morphine epoxide is probably a useful probe for photoaffinity labeling of the mu-receptor in vitro.

  8. Catalysts for CO2/epoxide ring-opening copolymerization

    PubMed Central

    Trott, G.; Saini, P. K.; Williams, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes and reviews recent progress in the development of catalysts for the ring-opening copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides. The copolymerization is an interesting method to add value to carbon dioxide, including from waste sources, and to reduce pollution associated with commodity polymer manufacture. The selection of the catalyst is of critical importance to control the composition, properties and applications of the resultant polymers. This review highlights and exemplifies some key recent findings and hypotheses, in particular using examples drawn from our own research. PMID:26755758

  9. Prunus serotina Amygdalin Hydrolase and Prunasin Hydrolase : Purification, N-Terminal Sequencing, and Antibody Production.

    PubMed

    Li, C P; Swain, E; Poulton, J E

    1992-09-01

    In black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) seed homogenates, amygdalin hydrolase (AH) participates with prunasin hydrolase (PH) and mandelonitrile lyase in the sequential degradation of (R)-amygdalin to HCN, benzaldehyde, and glucose. Four isozymes of AH (designated AH I, I', II, II') were purified from mature cherry seeds by concanavalin A-Sepharose 4B chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography, and chromatofocusing. All isozymes were monomeric glycoproteins with native molecular masses of 52 kD. They showed similar kinetic properties (pH optima, K(m), V(max)) but differed in their isoelectric points and N-terminal amino acid sequences. Analytical isoelectric focusing revealed the presence of subisozymes of each isozyme. The relative abundance of these isozymes and/or subisozymes varied from seed to seed. Three isozymes of PH (designated PH I, IIa, and IIb) were purified to apparent homogeneity by affinity, ion-exchange, and hydroxyapatite chromatography and by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PH I and PH IIb are 68-kD monomeric glycoproteins, whereas PH IIa is dimeric (140 kD). The N-terminal sequences of all PH and AH isozymes showed considerable similarity. Polyclonal antisera raised in rabbits against deglycosylated AH I or a mixture of the three deglycosylated PH isozymes were not monospecific as judged by immunoblotting analysis, but also cross-reacted with the opposing glucosidase. Monospecific antisera deemed suitable for immunocytochemistry and screening of expression libraries were obtained by affinity chromatography. Each antiserum recognized all known isozymes of the specific glucosidase used as antigen. PMID:16652959

  10. Expression and purification of an engineered, yeast-expressed Leishmania donovani nucleoside hydrolase with immunogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Hudspeth, Elissa M; Wang, Qian; Seid, Christopher A; Hammond, Molly; Wei, Junfei; Liu, Zhuyun; Zhan, Bin; Pollet, Jeroen; Heffernan, Michael J; McAtee, C Patrick; Engler, David A; Matsunami, Risë K; Strych, Ulrich; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2016-07-01

    Leishmania donovani is the major cause of visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar), now recognized as the parasitic disease with the highest level of mortality second only to malaria. No human vaccine is currently available. A 36 kDa L. donovani nucleoside hydrolase (LdNH36) surface protein has been previously identified as a potential vaccine candidate antigen. Here we present data on the expression of LdNH36 in Pichia pastoris and its purification at the 20 L scale to establish suitability for future pilot scale manufacturing. To improve efficiency of process development and ensure reproducibility, 4 N-linked glycosylation sites shown to contribute to heterogeneous high-mannose glycosylation were mutated to glutamine residues. The mutant LdNH36 (LdNH36-dg2) was expressed and purified to homogeneity. Size exclusion chromatography and light scattering demonstrated that LdNH36-dg2 existed as a tetramer in solution, similar to the wild-type recombinant L. major nucleoside hydrolase. The amino acid mutations do not affect the tetrameric interface as confirmed by theoretical modeling, and the mutated amino acids are located outside the major immunogenic domain. Immunogenic properties of the LdNH36-dg2 recombinant protein were evaluated in BALB/c mice using formulations that included a synthetic CpG oligodeoxynucleotide, together with a microparticle delivery platform (poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)). Mice exhibited high levels of IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b antibodies that were reactive to both LdNH36-dg2 and LdNH36 wild-type. While the point mutations did affect the hydrolase activity of the enzyme, the IgG antibodies elicited by LdNH36-dg2 were shown to inhibit the hydrolase activity of the wild-type LdNH36. The results indicate that LdNH36-dg2 as expressed in and purified from P. pastoris is suitable for further scale-up, manufacturing, and testing in support of future first-in-humans phase 1 clinical trials. PMID:26839079

  11. Discovery libraries targeting the major enzyme classes: the serine hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Otrubova, Katerina; Srinivasan, Venkat; Boger, Dale L

    2014-08-15

    Two libraries of modestly reactive ureas containing either electron-deficient acyl anilines or acyl pyrazoles were prepared and are reported as screening libraries for candidate serine hydrolase inhibitors. Within each library is a small but powerful subset of compounds that serve as a chemotype fragment screening library capable of subsequent structural diversification. Elaboration of the pyrazole-based ureas provided remarkably potent irreversible inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH, apparent Ki=100-200 pM) complementary to those previously disclosed enlisting electron-deficient aniline-based ureas.

  12. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of acylpeptide hydrolase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ping; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Ze

    2016-04-10

    Acylpeptide hydrolase (APH) can catalyze the release of the N-terminal amino acid from acetylated peptides. There were many documented examples of this enzyme in various prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. However, knowledge about APH in insects still remains unknown. In this study, we cloned and sequenced a putative silkworm Bombyx mori APH (BmAPH) gene. The BmAPH gene encodes a protein of 710 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 78.5kDa. The putative BmAPH and mammal APHs share about 36% amino acid sequence identity, yet key catalytic residues are conserved (Ser566, Asp654, and His686). Expression and purification of the recombinant BmAPH in Escherichia coli showed that it has acylpeptide hydrolase activity toward the traditional substrate, Ac-Ala-pNA. Furthermore, organophosphorus (OP) insecticides, chlorpyrifos, phoxim, and malathion, significantly inhibited the activity of the APH both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, BmAPH was expressed in all tested tissues and developmental stages of the silkworm. Finally, immunohistochemistry analysis showed that BmAPH protein was localized in the basement membranes. These results suggested that BmAPH may be involved in enhancing silkworm tolerance to the OP insecticides. In a word, our results provide evidence for understanding of the biological function of APH in insects.

  13. Identification of the Major Prostaglandin Glycerol Ester Hydrolase in Human Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Joseph D.; Wepy, James A.; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Chang, Jae Won; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin glycerol esters (PG-Gs) are produced as a result of the oxygenation of the endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, by cyclooxygenase 2. Understanding the role that PG-Gs play in a biological setting has been difficult because of their sensitivity to enzymatic hydrolysis. By comparing PG-G hydrolysis across human cancer cell lines to serine hydrolase activities determined by activity-based protein profiling, we identified lysophospholipase A2 (LYPLA2) as a major enzyme responsible for PG-G hydrolysis. The principal role played by LYPLA2 in PGE2-G hydrolysis was confirmed by siRNA knockdown. Purified recombinant LYPLA2 hydrolyzed PG-Gs in the following order of activity: PGE2-G > PGF2α-G > PGD2-G; LYPLA2 hydrolyzed 1- but not 2-arachidonoylglycerol or arachidonoylethanolamide. Chemical inhibition of LYPLA2 in the mouse macrophage-like cell line, RAW264.7, elicited an increase in PG-G production. Our data indicate that LYPLA2 serves as a major PG-G hydrolase in human cells. Perturbation of this enzyme should enable selective modulation of PG-Gs without alterations in endocannabinoids, thereby providing a means to decipher the unique functions of PG-Gs in biology and disease. PMID:25301951

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis FtsX extracellular domain activates the peptidoglycan hydrolase, RipC

    PubMed Central

    Mavrici, Daniela; Marakalala, Mohlopheni J.; Holton, James M.; Prigozhin, Daniil M.; Gee, Christine L.; Zhang, Yanjia J.; Rubin, Eric J.; Alber, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial growth and cell division are coordinated with hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan (PG) layer of the cell wall, but the mechanisms of regulation of extracellular PG hydrolases are not well understood. Here we report the biochemical, structural, and genetic analysis of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis homolog of the transmembrane PG-hydrolase regulator, FtsX. The purified FtsX extracellular domain binds the PG peptidase Rv2190c/RipC N-terminal segment, causing a conformational change that activates the enzyme. Deletion of ftsEX and ripC caused similar phenotypes in Mycobacterium smegmatis, as expected for genes in a single pathway. The crystal structure of the FtsX extracellular domain reveals an unprecedented fold containing two lobes connected by a flexible hinge. Mutations in the hydrophobic cleft between the lobes reduce RipC binding in vitro and inhibit FtsX function in M. smegmatis. These studies suggest how FtsX recognizes RipC and support a model in which a conformational change in FtsX links the cell division apparatus with PG hydrolysis. PMID:24843173

  15. Expression of key hydrolases for soy sauce fermentation in Zygosaccharomyces rouxii.

    PubMed

    Yuzuki, Masanobu; Matsushima, Kenichiro; Koyama, Yasuji

    2015-01-01

    Several key hydrolases in soy sauce fermentation such as proteases, peptidases, and glutaminases are supplied by Aspergillus sojae or Aspergillus oryzae. The genes encoding these hydrolases were successfully expressed in salt-tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. These transformants are expected to supply extra hydrolases during soy sauce fermentation process.

  16. Temperature dependence of violaxanthin de-epoxidation and non-photochemical fluorescence quenching in intact leaves of Gossypium hirsutum L. and Malva parviflora L.

    PubMed

    Bilger, W; Björkman, O

    1991-05-01

    The temperature dependence of the rate of de-epoxidation of violaxanthin to zeaxanthin was determined in leaves of chilling-sensitive Gossypium hirsutum L. (cotton) and chilling-resistant Malva parviflora L. by measurements of the increase in absorbance at 505 nm (ΔA 505) and in the contents of antheraxanthin and zeaxanthin that occur upon exposure of predarkened leaves to excessive light. A linear relationship between ΔA 505 and the decrease in the epoxidation state of the xanthophyll-cycle pigment pool was obtained over the range 10-40° C. The maximal rate of de-epoxidation was strongly temperature dependent; Q10 measured around the temperature at which the leaf had developed was 2.1-2.3 in both species. In field-grown Malva the rate of de-epoxidation at any given measurement temperature was two to three times higher in leaves developed at a relatively low temperature in the early spring than in those developed in summer. Q10 measured around 15° C was in the range 2.2-2.6 in both kinds of Malva leaves, whereas it was as high as 4.6 in cotton leaves developed at a daytime temperature of 30° C. Whereas the maximum (initial) rate of de-epoxidation showed a strong decrease with decreased temperature the degree of de-epoxidation reached in cotton leaves after a 1-2 · h exposure to a constant photon flux density increased with decreased temperature as the rate of photosynthesis decrease. The zeaxanthin content rose from 2 mmol · (mol chlorophyll)(-1) at 30° C to 61 mmol · (mol Chl)(-1) at 10° C, corresponding to a de-epoxidation of 70% of the violaxanthin pool at 10° C. The degree of de-epoxidation at each temperature was clearly related to the amount of excessive light present at that temperature. The relationship between non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence and zeaxanthin formation at different temperatures was determined for both untreated control leaves and for leaves in which zeaxanthin formation was prevented by dithiothreitol

  17. Metabolism of cholesteryl palmitate by rat brain in vitro; formation of cholesterol epoxides and cholestane-3beta,5alpha,6beta-triol.

    PubMed

    Martin, C M; Nicholas, H J

    1973-11-01

    Incubation of [4-(14)C]cholesteryl palmitate with the 12,000 g supernatant fraction of adult rat brain fortified with an NADPH-generating system and beta-mercaptoethylamine resulted in formation (2-5%) of more polar metabolites characterized as a mixture of cholesterol-5,6-epoxides. Under extended incubation conditions, cholestane-3beta-5alpha-6beta-triol was isolated as the major end product of the incubations. Free [4-(14)C]cholesterol incubated under similar conditions was not oxidized, whereas oxidation of [4-(14)C]cholesteryl palmitate appeared to be dependent upon hydrolysis of the ester by the rat brain microsomal subcellular fraction. Elimination of the NADPH-generating system or the addition of EDTA to the incubation mixture inhibited epoxide formation, suggesting that the products are derived from an NADPH-dependent enzymatic lipoperoxidation mechanism. The in vitro conversion of [4-(14)C]cholesterol-5alpha,6alpha-epoxide to cholestane-3beta,5alpha,6beta-triol was also demonstrated in rat brain subcellular fractions in the absence of added cofactors.

  18. Blood acylpeptide hydrolase activity is a sensitive marker for exposure to some organophosphate toxicants.

    PubMed

    Quistad, Gary B; Klintenberg, Rebecka; Casida, John E

    2005-08-01

    Acylpeptide hydrolase (APH) unblocks N-acetyl peptides. It is a major serine hydrolase in rat blood, brain, and liver detected by derivatization with (3)H-diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) or a biotinylated fluorophosphonate. Although APH does not appear to be a primary target of acute poisoning by organophosphorus (OP) compounds, the inhibitor specificity of this secondary target is largely unknown. This study fills the gap and emphasizes blood APH as a potential marker of OP exposure. The most potent in vitro inhibitors for human erythrocyte and mouse brain APH are DFP (IC(50) 11-17 nM), chlorpyrifos oxon (IC(50) 21-71 nM), dichlorvos (IC(50) 230-560 nM), naled (IC(50) 370-870 nM), and their analogs with modified alkyl substituents. (3)H-diisopropyl fluorophosphate is a potent inhibitor of mouse blood and brain APH in vivo (ED(50) 0.09-0.2 mg/kg and 0.02-0.03 mg/l for ip and vapor exposure, respectively). Mouse blood and brain APH and blood butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) are of similar sensitivity to DFP in vitro and in vivo (ip and vapor exposure), but APH inhibition is much more persistent in vivo (still >80% inhibition after 4 days). The inhibitory potency of OP pesticides in vivo in mice varies from APH selective (dichlorvos, naled, and trichlorfon), to APH and BChE selective (profenofos and tribufos), to ChE selective or nonselective (many commercial insecticides). Sarin administered ip at a lethal dose to guinea pigs inhibits blood acetylcholinesterase and BChE completely but erythrocyte APH only partially. Blood APH activity is therefore a sensitive marker for exposure to some but not all OP pesticides and chemical warfare agents. PMID:15888665

  19. Synergistic function of four novel thermostable glycoside hydrolases from a long-term enriched thermophilic methanogenic digester

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Lai, Guo-Li; Nie, Yong; Geng, Shuang; Liu, Liming; Zhu, Baoli; Shi, Zhongping; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2015-01-01

    In biofuel production from lignocellulose, low thermostability and product inhibition strongly restrict the enzyme activities and production process. Application of multiple thermostable glycoside hydrolases, forming an enzyme “cocktail”, can result in a synergistic action and therefore improve production efficiency and reduce operational costs. Therefore, increasing enzyme thermostabilities and compatibility are important for the biofuel industry. In this study, we reported the screening, cloning and biochemical characterization of four novel thermostable lignocellulose hydrolases from a metagenomic library of a long-term dry thermophilic methanogenic digester community, which were highly compatible with optimal conditions and specific activities. The optimal temperatures of the four enzymes, β-xylosidase, xylanase, β-glucosidase, and cellulase ranged from 60 to 75°C, and over 80% residual activities were observed after 2 h incubation at 50°C. Mixtures of these hydrolases retained high residual synergistic activities after incubation with cellulose, xylan, and steam-exploded corncob at 50°C for 72 h. In addition, about 55% dry weight of steam-exploded corncob was hydrolyzed to glucose and xylose by the synergistic action of the four enzymes at 50°C for 48 h. This work suggested that since different enzymes from a same ecosystem could be more compatible, screening enzymes from a long-term enriching community could be a favorable strategy. PMID:26052323

  20. Integrated process and dual-function catalyst for olefin epoxidation

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Bing; Rueter, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The invention discloses a dual-functional catalyst composition and an integrated process for production of olefin epoxides including propylene oxide by catalytic reaction of hydrogen peroxide from hydrogen and oxygen with olefin feeds such as propylene. The epoxides and hydrogen peroxide are preferably produced simultaneously in situ. The dual-functional catalyst comprises noble metal crystallites with dimensions on the nanometer scale (on the order of <1 nm to 10 nm), specially dispersed on titanium silicalite substrate particles. The dual functional catalyst catalyzes both the direct reaction of hydrogen and oxygen to generate hydrogen peroxide intermediate on the noble metal catalyst surface and the reaction of the hydrogen peroxide intermediate with the propylene feed to generate propylene oxide product. Combining both these functions in a single catalyst provides a very efficient integrated process operable below the flammability limits of hydrogen and highly selective for the production of hydrogen peroxide to produce olefin oxides such as propylene oxide without formation of undesired co-products.

  1. ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE-BASED ASSAY FOR ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report a rapid and versatile Organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH)-based method for measurement of organophosphates. This assay is based on a substrate-dependent change in pH at the local vicinity of the enzyme. The pH change is monitored using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), ...

  2. Bacteriophage virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases: potential new enzybiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases (VAPGH) are phage-encoded lytic enzymes that locally degrade the peptidoglycan (PG) of the bacterial cell wall during infection. Their action usually generates a small hole through which the phage tail crosses the cell envelope to inject the phage genetic m...

  3. New ¹H NMR-Based Technique To Determine Epoxide Concentrations in Oxidized Oil.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Budge, Suzanne M; Lumsden, Michael D

    2015-06-24

    A new method to determine epoxide concentrations in oxidized oils was developed and validated using (1)H NMR. Epoxides derived from lipid oxidation gave signals between 2.90 and 3.24 ppm, well separated from the signals of other lipid oxidation products. To calibrate, soybean oils with a range of epoxide concentrations were synthesized and analyzed using (1)H NMR by taking the sn-1,3 glycerol protons (4.18, 4.33 ppm) as internal references. The (1)H NMR signals were compared to the epoxide content determined by titration with hydrogen bromide (HBr)-acetic acid solution. As expected, the signal response increased with concentration linearly (R(2) = 99.96%), and validation of the method gave results comparable to those of the HBr method. A study of the oxidative stability of soybean oil was performed by applying this method to monitor epoxides during thermal lipid oxidation. The epoxide content increased over time and showed a different trend compared to peroxide value (PV). A phenomenological model was suggested to model epoxides derived from lipid oxidation. PMID:26035119

  4. Aminoacylase 1-catalysed deacetylation of bioactives epoxides mycotoxin-derived mercapturates; 3,4-epoxyprecocenes as models of cytotoxic epoxides.

    PubMed

    Stocker, Pierre; Brunel, Jean Michel; de Rezende, Leandro; do Amaral, Antonia Tavares; Morelli, Xavier; Roche, Phillipe; Vidal, Nicolas; Giardina, Thierry; Perrier, Josette

    2012-08-01

    The mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a carcinogenic food contaminant which is metabolically activated by epoxydation. The metabolism of mycotoxins via the mercapturate metabolic pathway was shown, in general, to lead to their detoxication. Mercapturic acids thus formed (S-substitued-N-acetyl-l-cysteines) may be accumulated in the kidney and either excreted in the urine or desacetylated by Acylase 1 (ACY1) to yield cysteine S-conjugates. To be toxic, the N-acetyl-l-cysteine-S-conjugates first have to undergo deacetylation by ACY 1. The specificity and rate of mercapturic acid deacetylation may determine the toxicity, however the exact deacetylation processes involved are not well known. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ACY1 in the toxicity of some bioactive epoxides from Aflatoxin B1. We characterized the kinetic parameters of porcine kidney and human recombinant aminoacylase-1 towards some aromatic and aliphatic-derived mercapturates analogue of mycotoxin-mercapturic acids and 3,4-epoxyprecocene, a bioactive epoxide derivated from aflatoxin. The deacetylation of mercapturated substrates was followed both by reverse phase HPLC and by TNBS method. Catalytic activity was discussed in a structure-function relationship. Ours results indicate for the first time that aminoacylase-1 could play an important role in deacetylating mercapturate metabolites of aflatoxin analogues and this process may be in relation with their cyto- and nephrotoxicity in human.

  5. Fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases bind starch and β-cyclodextrin similarly to amylolytic hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Nekiunaite, Laura; Isaksen, Trine; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2016-08-01

    Starch-binding modules of family 20 (CBM20) are present in 60% of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) catalyzing the oxidative breakdown of starch, which highlights functional importance in LPMO activity. The substrate-binding properties of starch-active LMPOs, however, are currently unexplored. Affinities and binding-thermodynamics of two recombinant fungal LPMOs toward starch and β-cyclodextrin were shown to be similar to fungal CBM20s. Amplex Red assays showed ascorbate and Cu-dependent activity, which was inhibited in the presence of β-cylodextrin and amylose. Phylogenetically, the clustering of CBM20s from starch-targeting LPMOs and hydrolases was in accord with taxonomy and did not correlate to appended catalytic activity. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the CBM20-binding scaffold is retained in the evolution of hydrolytic and oxidative starch-degrading activities. PMID:27397613

  6. Mechanism of olefin epoxidation in the presence of a titanium-containing zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danov, S. M.; Krasnov, V. L.; Sulimov, A. V.; Ovcharova, A. V.

    2013-11-01

    The effect of the nature of a solvent on the liquid-phase epoxidation of olefins with an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide over a titanium-containing zeolite is studied. Butanol-1, butanol-2, propanol-1, isopropanol, methanol, ethanol, water, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, isobutanol, and tert-butanol are examined as solvents. A mechanism of olefin epoxidation with hydrogen peroxide in an alcohol medium over a titanium-containing zeolite is proposed. Epoxidation reactions involving hydrogen peroxide and different olefins are studied experimentally.

  7. Methods of producing epoxides from alkenes using a two-component catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Mayfair C.; Kung, Harold H.; Jiang, Jian

    2013-07-09

    Methods for the epoxidation of alkenes are provided. The methods include the steps of exposing the alkene to a two-component catalyst system in an aqueous solution in the presence of carbon monoxide and molecular oxygen under conditions in which the alkene is epoxidized. The two-component catalyst system comprises a first catalyst that generates peroxides or peroxy intermediates during oxidation of CO with molecular oxygen and a second catalyst that catalyzes the epoxidation of the alkene using the peroxides or peroxy intermediates. A catalyst system composed of particles of suspended gold and titanium silicalite is one example of a suitable two-component catalyst system.

  8. Heterogeneous expression and biological function of ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shuier; Qiao, Guanglei; Min, Daliu; Zhang, Zhichang; Lin, Feng; Yang, Qingcheng; Feng, Tao; Tang, Lina; Sun, Yuanjue; Zhao, Hui; Li, Hongtao; Yu, Wenxi; Yang, Yumei; Shen, Zan; Yao, Yang

    2015-04-01

    Ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1), a member of the UCH class of DUBs, has been reported as either an oncogene or a tumor suppressor. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the biological function of UCHL1 in osteosarcoma is still unclear. This study was aimed at elucidating the roles of UCHL1 in regulating the biological behavior of osteosarcoma cells. In this study, we found that UCHL1 was elevated in osteosarcoma compared with normal bone tissue. Moreover, UCHL1 expression level was correlated with tumor maximum diameter, high rate of lung metastases and short survival time. Then, we found that knockdown of UCHL1 in osteosarcoma cell MG63 inhibited cell proliferation and significantly increased cell population in the G1 phase. Several cyclins promoting G1/S phase transition were reduced after UCHL1 knockdown, including cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, cyclin E1 and CDK6. Moreover, inhibition of UCHL1 in MG63 cells dramatically induced cell apoptosis. We also found that down-regulation of UCHL1 in MG63 significantly inhibited cell invasion. Then, we found that there was a positive correlation between UCHL1 expression level and the Akt and ERK phosphorylation status. Finally, in vivo data showed that knockdown of UCHL1 inhibited osteosarcoma growth in nude mice. These results indicate that UCHL1 could work as an oncogene and may serve as a promising therapeutic strategy for osteosarcoma.

  9. Heterogeneous expression and biological function of ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shuier; Qiao, Guanglei; Min, Daliu; Zhang, Zhichang; Lin, Feng; Yang, Qingcheng; Feng, Tao; Tang, Lina; Sun, Yuanjue; Zhao, Hui; Li, Hongtao; Yu, Wenxi; Yang, Yumei; Shen, Zan; Yao, Yang

    2015-04-01

    Ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1), a member of the UCH class of DUBs, has been reported as either an oncogene or a tumor suppressor. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the biological function of UCHL1 in osteosarcoma is still unclear. This study was aimed at elucidating the roles of UCHL1 in regulating the biological behavior of osteosarcoma cells. In this study, we found that UCHL1 was elevated in osteosarcoma compared with normal bone tissue. Moreover, UCHL1 expression level was correlated with tumor maximum diameter, high rate of lung metastases and short survival time. Then, we found that knockdown of UCHL1 in osteosarcoma cell MG63 inhibited cell proliferation and significantly increased cell population in the G1 phase. Several cyclins promoting G1/S phase transition were reduced after UCHL1 knockdown, including cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, cyclin E1 and CDK6. Moreover, inhibition of UCHL1 in MG63 cells dramatically induced cell apoptosis. We also found that down-regulation of UCHL1 in MG63 significantly inhibited cell invasion. Then, we found that there was a positive correlation between UCHL1 expression level and the Akt and ERK phosphorylation status. Finally, in vivo data showed that knockdown of UCHL1 inhibited osteosarcoma growth in nude mice. These results indicate that UCHL1 could work as an oncogene and may serve as a promising therapeutic strategy for osteosarcoma. PMID:25578779

  10. Purification and characterization of a novel chlorpyrifos hydrolase from Cladosporium cladosporioides Hu-01.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Chen, Shaohua; Hu, Meiying; Hu, Qiongbo; Luo, Jianjun; Li, Yanan

    2012-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos is of great environmental concern due to its widespread use in the past several decades and its potential toxic effects on human health. Thus, the degradation study of chlorpyrifos has become increasing important in recent years. A fungus capable of using chlorpyrifos as the sole carbon source was isolated from organophosphate-contaminated soil and characterized as Cladosporium cladosporioides Hu-01 (collection number: CCTCC M 20711). A novel chlorpyrifos hydrolase from cell extract was purified 35.6-fold to apparent homogeneity with 38.5% overall recovery by ammoniumsulfate precipitation, gel filtration chromatography and anion-exchange chromatography. It is a monomeric structure with a molecular mass of 38.3 kDa. The pI value was estimated to be 5.2. The optimal pH and temperature of the purified enzyme were 6.5 and 40°C, respectively. No cofactors were required for the chlorpyrifos-hydrolysis activity. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by Hg²⁺, Fe³⁺, DTT, β-mercaptoethanol and SDS, whereas slight inhibitory effects (5-10% inhibition) were observed in the presence of Mn²⁺, Zn²⁺, Cu²⁺, Mg²⁺, and EDTA. The purified enzyme hydrolyzed various organophosphorus insecticides with P-O and P-S bond. Chlorpyrifos was the preferred substrate. The Km and Vmax values of the enzyme for chlorpyrifos were 6.7974 μM and 2.6473 μmol·min⁻¹, respectively. Both NH2-terminal sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF-MS) identified an amino acid sequence MEPDGELSALTQGANS, which shared no similarity with any reported organophosphate-hydrolyzing enzymes. These results suggested that the purified enzyme was a novel hydrolase and might conceivably be developed to fulfill the practical requirements to enable its use in situ for detoxification of chlorpyrifos. Finally, this is the first described chlorpyrifos hydrolase from fungus.

  11. Antitermite activity of beta-caryophyllene epoxide and episulfide.

    PubMed

    Ashitani, Tatsuya; Kusumoto, Norihisa; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Fujita, Koki; Takahashi, Koetsu

    2013-01-01

    Caryophyllene-6,7-epoxide and caryophyllene-6,7-episulfide can be easily synthesized from beta-caryophyllene by autoxidation or episulfidation. The bioactivities of beta-caryophyllene and its derivatives were investigated against the subterranean termite Reticulitermes speratus Kolbe. The antifeedant, feeding, and termiticidal activities of each compound were tested using no-choice, dual-choice, and non-contact methods. Antitermitic activities were not shown by beta-caryophyllene, but were observed for the oxide and sulfide derivatives. Caryophyllene-6,7-episulfide showed especially high antifeedant and termiticidal activities. Thus, naturally abundant, non-bioactive beta-caryophyllene can be easily converted into an antitermite reagent via a non-biological process. PMID:24066515

  12. Olefin Epoxidation in Aqueous Phase Using Ionic-Liquid Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Cokoja, Mirza; Reich, Robert M; Wilhelm, Michael E; Kaposi, Marlene; Schäffer, Johannes; Morris, Danny S; Münchmeyer, Christian J; Anthofer, Michael H; Markovits, Iulius I E; Kühn, Fritz E; Herrmann, Wolfgang A; Jess, Andreas; Love, Jason B

    2016-07-21

    Hydrophobic imidazolium-based ionic liquids (IL) act as catalysts for the epoxidation of unfunctionalized olefins in water using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Although the catalysts are insoluble in both the substrate and in water, surprisingly, they are very well soluble in aqueous H2 O2 solution, owing to perrhenate-H2 O2 interactions. Even more remarkably, the presence of the catalyst also boosts the solubility of substrate in water. This effect is crucially dependent on the cation design. Hence, the imidazolium perrhenates enable both the transfer of hydrophobic substrate into the aqueous phase, and serve as actual catalysts, which is unprecedented. At the end of the reaction and in absence of H2 O2 the IL catalyst forms a third phase next to the lipophilic product and water and can easily be recycled.

  13. Structure of a bacterial homologue of vitamin K epoxide reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weikai; Schulman, Sol; Dutton, Rachel J.; Boyd, Dana; Beckwith, Jon; Rapoport, Tom A.

    2010-03-19

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) generates vitamin K hydroquinone to sustain {gamma}-carboxylation of many blood coagulation factors. Here, we report the 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of a bacterial homologue of VKOR from Synechococcus sp. The structure shows VKOR in complex with its naturally fused redox partner, a thioredoxin-like domain, and corresponds to an arrested state of electron transfer. The catalytic core of VKOR is a four transmembrane helix bundle that surrounds a quinone, connected through an additional transmembrane segment with the periplasmic thioredoxin-like domain. We propose a pathway for how VKOR uses electrons from cysteines of newly synthesized proteins to reduce a quinone, a mechanism confirmed by in vitro reconstitution of vitamin K-dependent disulphide bridge formation. Our results have implications for the mechanism of the mammalian VKOR and explain how mutations can cause resistance to the VKOR inhibitor warfarin, the most commonly used oral anticoagulant.

  14. Characteristics of polyaniline cobalt supported catalysts for epoxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Grzegorz; Pielichowski, Jan; Grzesik, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    A study of polyaniline (PANI) doping with various cobalt compounds, that is, cobalt(II) chloride, cobalt(II) acetate, and cobalt(II) salen, is presented. The catalysts were prepared by depositing cobalt compounds onto the polymer surface. PANI powders containing cobalt ions were obtained by one- or two-step method suspending PANI in the following acetonitrile/acetic acid solution or acetonitrile and then acetic acid solution. Moreover different ratios of Co(II) : PANI were studied. Catalysts obtained with both methods and at all ratios were investigated using various techniques including AAS and XPS spectroscopy. The optimum conditions for preparation of PANI/Co catalysts were established. Catalytic activity of polyaniline cobalt(II) supported catalysts was tested in dec-1-ene epoxidation with molecular oxygen at room temperature. The relationship between the amount of cobalt species, measured with both AAS and XPS techniques, and the activity of PANI-Co catalysts has been established.

  15. Olefin Epoxidation in Aqueous Phase Using Ionic-Liquid Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Cokoja, Mirza; Reich, Robert M; Wilhelm, Michael E; Kaposi, Marlene; Schäffer, Johannes; Morris, Danny S; Münchmeyer, Christian J; Anthofer, Michael H; Markovits, Iulius I E; Kühn, Fritz E; Herrmann, Wolfgang A; Jess, Andreas; Love, Jason B

    2016-07-21

    Hydrophobic imidazolium-based ionic liquids (IL) act as catalysts for the epoxidation of unfunctionalized olefins in water using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Although the catalysts are insoluble in both the substrate and in water, surprisingly, they are very well soluble in aqueous H2 O2 solution, owing to perrhenate-H2 O2 interactions. Even more remarkably, the presence of the catalyst also boosts the solubility of substrate in water. This effect is crucially dependent on the cation design. Hence, the imidazolium perrhenates enable both the transfer of hydrophobic substrate into the aqueous phase, and serve as actual catalysts, which is unprecedented. At the end of the reaction and in absence of H2 O2 the IL catalyst forms a third phase next to the lipophilic product and water and can easily be recycled. PMID:27219852

  16. Biobased composites from thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer and cross-linked acrylated-epoxidized soybean oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean oil is an important sustainable material. Crosslinked acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is brittle without flexibility and the incorporation of thermoplastic polyurethane improves its toughness for industrial applications. The hydrophilic functional groups from both oil and polyurethan...

  17. A Computational Study of Acid Catalyzed Aerosol Reactions of Atmospherically Relevant Epoxides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epoxides are important intermediates of atmospheric isoprene oxidation. Their subsequent reactions in the particle phase lead to the production of organic compounds detected in ambient aerosols. We apply density functional theory to determine the important kinetic factors that ...

  18. Poly(aspartic acid) (PAA) hydrolases and PAA biodegradation: current knowledge and impact on applications.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, Tomohiro

    2016-02-01

    Thermally synthesized poly(aspartic acid) (tPAA) is a bio-based, biocompatible, biodegradable, and water-soluble polymer that has a high proportion of β-Asp units and equivalent moles of D- and L-Asp units. Poly(aspartic acid) (PAA) hydrolase-1 and hydrolase-2 are tPAA biodegradation enzymes purified from Gram-negative bacteria. PAA hydrolase-1 selectively cleaves amide bonds between β-Asp units via an endo-type process, whereas PAA hydrolase-2 catalyzes the exo-type hydrolysis of the products of tPAA hydrolysis by PAA hydrolase-1. The novel reactivity of PAA hydrolase-1 makes it a good candidate for a biocatalyst in β-peptide synthesis. This mini-review gives an overview of PAA hydrolases with emphasis on their biochemical and functional properties, in particular, PAA hydrolase-1. Functionally related enzymes, such as poly(R-3-hydroxybutyrate) depolymerases and β-aminopeptidases, are compared to PAA hydrolases. This mini-review also provides findings that offer an insight into the catalytic mechanisms of PAA hydrolase-1 from Pedobacter sp. KP-2. PMID:26695157

  19. Epoxidation of trans-cyclooctene by Methyltrioxorhenium/H(2)O(2): reaction of trans-epoxide with the monoperoxo complex

    PubMed

    Adam; Saha-Moller; Weichold

    2000-08-11

    The epoxidation of trans-cyclooctene (trans-1) with the MTO/H(2)O(2), MTO/UHP, and NaY/MTO/H(2)O(2) oxidants leads to a mixture of trans/cis-olefins 1, trans/cis-epoxides 2, and the cis-diol 3. While the oxygen transfer proceeds stereoselectively, the monoperoxo rhenium complex A, which is generated in situ during the catalytic cycle, is responsible for the facile deoxygenation, isomerization, and hydrolysis of the trans-epoxide. In the case of the homogeneous MTO/H(2)O(2) system, rapid decomposition of the catalytically active rhenium species into HReO(4) circumvents the formation of such side products. In contrast, for the heterogeneous oxidants MTO/UHP and NaY/MTO/H(2)O(2), the catalytically active rhenium species are sufficiently stabilized and survive long enough to promote the observed side reactions.

  20. Hydroxyl-Substituted Ladder Polyethers via Selective Tandem Epoxidation/Cyclization Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Czabaniuk, Lara C.; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    A new and highly selective method for the synthesis of hydroxyl-substituted tetrahydropyrans is described. This method utilizes titanium(IV) iso-propoxide and diethyl tartrate to perform a diastereoselective epoxidation followed by in situ epoxide activation and highly selective endo-cyclization to form the desired tetrahydropyran ring. The HIJ ring fragment of the marine ladder polyether yessotoxin was synthesized using this two-stage tactic that proceeds with high efficiency and excellent regioselectivity. PMID:25647091

  1. Highly Active Titanocene Catalysts for Epoxide Hydrosilylation: Synthesis, Theory, Kinetics, EPR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Dina Schwarz G; Zimmer, Katharina; Klare, Sven; Meyer, Andreas; Rojo-Wiechel, Elena; Bauer, Mirko; Sure, Rebecca; Grimme, Stefan; Schiemann, Olav; Flowers, Robert A; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2016-06-27

    A catalytic system for titanocene-catalyzed epoxide hydrosilylation is described. It features a straightforward preparation of titanocene hydrides that leads to a reaction with low catalyst loading, high yields, and high selectivity of radical reduction. The mechanism was studied by a suite of methods, including kinetic studies, EPR spectroscopy, and computational methods. An unusual resting state leads to the observation of an inverse rate order with respect to the epoxide.

  2. The Epoxidation of Carbonyl Compounds with a Benzyne-Triggered Sulfur Ylide.

    PubMed

    Lou, Mei-Mei; Wang, Han; Song, Li; Liu, Hong-Yi; Li, Zhong-Qiu; Guo, Xiao-Shuang; Zhang, Fu-Geng; Wang, Bin

    2016-07-15

    An efficient method for the synthesis of epoxides from carbonyl compounds, sulfoxides, and benzyne is presented. The strategy involved an epoxidation by a sulfur ylide which is formed in situ from sulfoxide and benzyne through the S-O bond insertion and deprotonation. This one-pot reaction proceeds under mild and base-free conditions, providing a convenient way to introduce the substituted methylene groups onto the carbonyl carbon.

  3. Highly Active Titanocene Catalysts for Epoxide Hydrosilylation: Synthesis, Theory, Kinetics, EPR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Dina Schwarz G; Zimmer, Katharina; Klare, Sven; Meyer, Andreas; Rojo-Wiechel, Elena; Bauer, Mirko; Sure, Rebecca; Grimme, Stefan; Schiemann, Olav; Flowers, Robert A; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2016-06-27

    A catalytic system for titanocene-catalyzed epoxide hydrosilylation is described. It features a straightforward preparation of titanocene hydrides that leads to a reaction with low catalyst loading, high yields, and high selectivity of radical reduction. The mechanism was studied by a suite of methods, including kinetic studies, EPR spectroscopy, and computational methods. An unusual resting state leads to the observation of an inverse rate order with respect to the epoxide. PMID:27125466

  4. Bromine-catalyzed conversion of CO2 and epoxides to cyclic carbonates under continuous flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Jennifer A; Wu, Jie; Su, Xiao; Simeon, Fritz; Hatton, T Alan; Jamison, Timothy F

    2013-12-11

    A continuous method for the formation of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide (CO2) is described. The catalysts used are inexpensive and effective in converting the reagents to the products in a residence time (t(R)) of 30 min. The cyclic carbonate products are obtained in good to excellent yield (51-92%). On the basis of a series of kinetics experiments, we propose a reaction mechanism involving epoxide activation by electrophilic bromine and CO2 activation by an amide.

  5. Alkylation of 2-substituted (6-methyl-2-pyridyl)methyllithium species with epoxides

    PubMed Central

    Vyvyan, James R.; Brown, Rebecca C.; Woods, Brian P.

    2009-01-01

    Substituted (6-methyl-2-pyridyl)methyllithium species were reacted with 1,2-epoxyoctane and 2-methyl-2,3-epoxynonane. The monosubstituted epoxide reacted efficiently with lutidyllithium and a number of 2-substituted-(6-methyl-2-pyridyl)methyllithium derivatives. The trisubstituted epoxide gave low yields of adducts with all (2-pyridyl)methyllithium species studied. These results are discussed in the context of a proposed synthesis of cananodine. PMID:19113936

  6. Enantioselective epoxidation and carbon-carbon bond cleavage catalyzed by Coprinus cinereus peroxidase and myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Tuynman, A; Spelberg, J L; Kooter, I M; Schoemaker, H E; Wever, R

    2000-02-01

    We demonstrate that myeloperoxidase (MPO) and Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CiP) catalyze the enantioselective epoxidation of styrene and a number of substituted derivatives with a reasonable enantiomeric excess (up to 80%) and in a moderate yield. Three major differences with respect to the chloroperoxidase from Caldariomyces fumago (CPO) are observed in the reactivity of MPO and CiP toward styrene derivatives. First, in contrast to CPO, MPO and CiP produced the (S)-isomers of the epoxides in enantiomeric excess. Second, for MPO and CiP the H(2)O(2) had to be added very slowly (10 eq in 16 h) to prevent accumulation of catalytically inactive enzyme intermediates. Under these conditions, CPO hardly showed any epoxidizing activity; only with a high influx of H(2)O(2) (300 eq in 1.6 h) was epoxidation observed. Third, both MPO and CiP formed significant amounts of (substituted) benzaldehydes as side products as a consequence of C-alpha-C-beta bond cleavage of the styrene derivatives, whereas for CPO and cytochrome c peroxidase this activity is not observed. C-alpha-C-beta cleavage was the most prominent reaction catalyzed by CiP, whereas with MPO the relative amount of epoxide formed was higher. This is the first report of peroxidases catalyzing both epoxidation reactions and carbon-carbon bond cleavage. The results are discussed in terms of mechanisms involving ferryl oxygen transfer and electron transfer, respectively.

  7. Kinetics and docking studies of two potential new inhibitors of the nucleoside hydrolase from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Rennó, Magdalena Nascimento; França, Tanos Celmar Costa; Nico, Dirlei; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B; Tinoco, Luzineide Wanderley; Figueroa-Villar, José Daniel

    2012-10-01

    In this study the recombinant enzyme nucleoside hydrolase of Leishmania donovani (rLdNH) was expressed in Escherichia coli in connection with maltose binding protein (MBP). The rLdNH-MBP showed efficient a significant in vitro activity with inosine as substrate. From the coupled reaction with xanthine oxidase (XO) it was possible to determine the kinetic constants of rLdNH-MBP as K(M) (434 ± 109 μM) and V(max) (0.20 ± 0.02 μM). In addition, two nucleoside analogs (compounds 1 and 2) were tested as prototypes of rLdNH inhibitors. These compounds presented high affinity for the enzyme with K(i) values of 1.6 ± 0.2 and 17.0 ± 2.1 μM, respectively, as well as 271 and 26 folds higher than the affinity constant found for inosine. We also determined the type of enzyme inhibition, using double-reciprocal plot for these two compounds and the results confirmed a competitive inhibition. Additional docking studies showed the binding manner of compounds 1 and 2 inside the active site of LdNH revealing the essential residues for an effective inhibition. These results confirm that compounds 1 and 2 are strong rLdNH-MBP inhibitors.

  8. Secretion of lysosomal hydrolases by stimulated and nonstimulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Peritoneal macrophages were obtained from untreated mice and from mice treated with thioglycollate medium (TA), proteose peptone medium (PP), or a suspension of streptococcus A cell wall material (SA). The biochemical and secretory properties of these cells in long term cultures (up to 2 wk) were compared. TA-elicited macrophages contained more protein, lactate dehydrogenase, lysosomal hydrolases, and in particular, more plasminogen activator than the other cells studied. All types of macrophages studied were found to release considerable amounts of lysosomal hydrolases (beta-glucuronidase, N-acetyl-beta- glucosaminidase, alpha-mannosidase, and acid phosphatase) into the medium. Release was independent of phagocytosis and must, therefore, be regarded as true secretion. In both elicited and nonelicited macrophages, the rates of lysosomal enzyme secretion were virtually identical in the presence and in the absence of serum, and they were not enhanced by increasing serum concentrations. Lysosomal enzyme secretion in macrophages appears to depend on protein synthesis, since it was blocked by low concentrations of cycloheximide which neither affected cell viability nor lowered the intracellular enzyme levels. The amounts of lysosomal hydrolases secreted were highest in TA- elicited macrophages. The rates of secretion of PP- or SA-elicited and of nonelicited macrophages were about one-fourth of that of the TA- elicited cells. This difference, although significant, is much smaller than that observed for the secretion of plasminogen activator which was 20-50 times higher in TA-elicited cells. Acid glycosidases were also found in the peritoneal lavage media used for cell harvesting from both treated and nontreated mice. This indicates that active secretion of lysosomal hydrolases may be an in vivo property of the macrophage. PMID:29935

  9. Basal and inducible anti-inflammatory epoxygenase activity in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Askari, Ara A.; Thomson, Scott; Edin, Matthew L.; Lih, Fred B.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • We examined epoxygenase product formation and regulation in endothelial cells. • The epoxygenase CYP2J2 is an LPS (TLR-4) inducible enzyme in endothelial cells. • The endothelial cell line EA.Hy926 synthesises epoxygenase products. • Inhibition of endothelial epoxygenases increases TNFα secretion. • Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors reduce inflammation-induced TNFα and NFκB. - Abstract: The roles of CYP lipid-metabolizing pathways in endothelial cells are poorly understood. Human endothelial cells expressed CYP2J2 and soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) mRNA and protein. The TLR-4 agonist LPS (1 μg/ml; 24 h) induced CYP2J2 but not sEH mRNA and protein. LC–MS/MS analysis of the stable commonly used human endothelial cell line EA.Hy926 showed active epoxygenase and epoxide hydrolase activity: with arachidonic acid (stable epoxide products 5,6-DHET, and 14,15-DHET), linoleic acid (9,10-EPOME and 12,13-EPOME and their stable epoxide hydrolase products 9,10-DHOME and 12,13-DHOME), docosahexaenoic acid (stable epoxide hydrolase product 19,20-DiHDPA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (stable epoxide hydrolase product 17,18-DHET) being formed. Inhibition of epoxygenases using either SKF525A or MS-PPOH induced TNFα release, but did not affect LPS, IL-1β, or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced TNFα release. In contrast, inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase by AUDA or TPPU inhibited basal, LPS, IL-1β and PMA induced TNFα release, and LPS-induced NFκB p65 nuclear translocation. In conclusion, human endothelial cells contain a TLR-4 regulated epoxygenase CYP2J2 and metabolize linoleic acid > eicosapentaenoic acid > arachidonic acid > docosahexaenoic acid to products with anti-inflammatory activity.

  10. Characterization of a serine hydrolase targeted by acyl-protein thioesterase inhibitors in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Louise E; Rusch, Marion; Adibekian, Alexander; Bullen, Hayley E; Graindorge, Arnault; Freymond, Céline; Rottmann, Matthias; Braun-Breton, Catherine; Baumeister, Stefan; Porfetye, Arthur T; Vetter, Ingrid R; Hedberg, Christian; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2013-09-20

    In eukaryotic organisms, cysteine palmitoylation is an important reversible modification that impacts protein targeting, folding, stability, and interactions with partners. Evidence suggests that protein palmitoylation contributes to key biological processes in Apicomplexa with the recent palmitome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum reporting over 400 substrates that are modified with palmitate by a broad range of protein S-acyl transferases. Dynamic palmitoylation cycles require the action of an acyl-protein thioesterase (APT) that cleaves palmitate from substrates and conveys reversibility to this posttranslational modification. In this work, we identified candidates for APT activity in Toxoplasma gondii. Treatment of parasites with low micromolar concentrations of β-lactone- or triazole urea-based inhibitors that target human APT1 showed varied detrimental effects at multiple steps of the parasite lytic cycle. The use of an activity-based probe in combination with these inhibitors revealed the existence of several serine hydrolases that are targeted by APT1 inhibitors. The active serine hydrolase, TgASH1, identified as the homologue closest to human APT1 and APT2, was characterized further. Biochemical analysis of TgASH1 indicated that this enzyme cleaves substrates with a specificity similar to APTs, and homology modeling points toward an APT-like enzyme. TgASH1 is dispensable for parasite survival, which indicates that the severe effects observed with the β-lactone inhibitors are caused by the inhibition of non-TgASH1 targets. Other ASH candidates for APT activity were functionally characterized, and one of them was found to be resistant to gene disruption due to the potential essential nature of the protein. PMID:23913689

  11. Characterization of a Serine Hydrolase Targeted by Acyl-protein Thioesterase Inhibitors in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Louise E.; Rusch, Marion; Adibekian, Alexander; Bullen, Hayley E.; Graindorge, Arnault; Freymond, Céline; Rottmann, Matthias; Braun-Breton, Catherine; Baumeister, Stefan; Porfetye, Arthur T.; Vetter, Ingrid R.; Hedberg, Christian; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, cysteine palmitoylation is an important reversible modification that impacts protein targeting, folding, stability, and interactions with partners. Evidence suggests that protein palmitoylation contributes to key biological processes in Apicomplexa with the recent palmitome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum reporting over 400 substrates that are modified with palmitate by a broad range of protein S-acyl transferases. Dynamic palmitoylation cycles require the action of an acyl-protein thioesterase (APT) that cleaves palmitate from substrates and conveys reversibility to this posttranslational modification. In this work, we identified candidates for APT activity in Toxoplasma gondii. Treatment of parasites with low micromolar concentrations of β-lactone- or triazole urea-based inhibitors that target human APT1 showed varied detrimental effects at multiple steps of the parasite lytic cycle. The use of an activity-based probe in combination with these inhibitors revealed the existence of several serine hydrolases that are targeted by APT1 inhibitors. The active serine hydrolase, TgASH1, identified as the homologue closest to human APT1 and APT2, was characterized further. Biochemical analysis of TgASH1 indicated that this enzyme cleaves substrates with a specificity similar to APTs, and homology modeling points toward an APT-like enzyme. TgASH1 is dispensable for parasite survival, which indicates that the severe effects observed with the β-lactone inhibitors are caused by the inhibition of non-TgASH1 targets. Other ASH candidates for APT activity were functionally characterized, and one of them was found to be resistant to gene disruption due to the potential essential nature of the protein. PMID:23913689

  12. Annotation and comparative analysis of the glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Ludmila; Bragg, Jennifer; Wu, Jiajie; Yang, Xiaohan; Tuskan, Gerald A; Vogel, John

    2010-01-01

    Background Glycoside hydrolases cleave the bond between a carbohydrate and another carbohydrate, a protein, lipid or other moiety. Genes encoding glycoside hydrolases are found in a wide range of organisms, from archea to animals, and are relatively abundant in plant genomes. In plants, these enzymes are involved in diverse processes, including starch metabolism, defense, and cell-wall remodeling. Glycoside hydrolase genes have been previously cataloged for Oryza sativa (rice), the model dicotyledonous plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and the fast-growing tree Populus trichocarpa (poplar). To improve our understanding of glycoside hydrolases in plants generally and in grasses specifically, we annotated the glycoside hydrolase genes in the grasses Brachypodium distachyon (an emerging monocotyledonous model) and Sorghum bicolor (sorghum). We then compared the glycoside hydrolases across species, both at the whole-genome level and at the level of individual glycoside hydrolase families. Results We identified 356 glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium and 404 in sorghum. The corresponding proteins fell into the same 34 families that are represented in rice, Arabidopsis, and poplar, helping to define a glycoside hydrolase family profile which may be common to flowering plants. Examination of individual glycoside hydrolase familes (GH5, GH13, GH18, GH19, GH28, and GH51) revealed both similarities and distinctions between monocots and dicots, as well as between species. Shared evolutionary histories appear to be modified by lineage-specific expansions or deletions. Within families, the Brachypodium and sorghum proteins generally cluster with those from other monocots. Conclusions This work provides the foundation for further comparative and functional analyses of plant glycoside hydrolases. Defining the Brachypodium glycoside hydrolases sets the stage for Brachypodium to be a monocot model for investigations of these enzymes and their diverse roles in planta. Insights

  13. Epoxidation Activities of Human Cytochromes P450c17 and P450c21

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Some cytochrome P450 enzymes epoxidize unsaturated substrates, but this activity has not been described for the steroid hydroxylases. Physiologic steroid substrates, however, lack carbon–carbon double bonds in the parts of the pregnane molecules where steroidogenic hydroxylations occur. Limited data on the reactivity of steroidogenic P450s toward olefinic substrates exist, and the study of occult activities toward alternative substrates is a fundamental aspect of the growing field of combinatorial biosynthesis. We reasoned that human P450c17 (steroid 17-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase, CYP17A1), which 17- and 16α-hydroxylates progesterone, might catalyze the formation of the 16α,17-epoxide from 16,17-dehydroprogesterone (pregna-4,16-diene-3,20-dione). CYP17A1 catalyzed the novel 16α,17-epoxidation and the ordinarily minor 21-hydroxylation of 16,17-dehydroprogesterone in a 1:1 ratio. CYP17A1 mutation A105L, which has reduced progesterone 16α-hydroxylase activity, gave a 1:5 ratio of epoxide:21-hydroxylated products. In contrast, human P450c21 (steroid 21-hydroxylase, CYP21A2) converted 16,17-dehydroprogesterone to the 21-hydroxylated product and only a trace of epoxide. CYP21A2 mutation V359A, which has significant 16α-hydroxylase activity, likewise afforded the 21-hydroxylated product and slightly more epoxide. CYP17A1 wild-type and mutation A105L do not 21- or 16α-hydroxylate pregnenolone, but the enzymes 21-hydroxylated and 16α,17-epoxidized 16,17-dehydropregnenolone (pregna-5,16-diene-3β-ol-20-one) in 4:1 or 12:1 ratios, respectively. Catalase and superoxide dismutase did not prevent epoxide formation. The progesterone epoxide was not a time-dependent, irreversible CYP17A1 inhibitor. Our substrate modification studies have revealed occult epoxidase and 21-hydroxylase activities of CYP17A1, and the fraction of epoxide formed correlated with the 16α-hydroxylase activity of the enzymes. PMID:25386927

  14. MULTIPLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASES IN ALTERNARIA ALTERNATA F. SP. LYCOPERSICI AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO MEDIUM COMPOSITION AND HOST-SPECIFIC TOXIN PRODUCTION. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. SNPs of GSTM1, T1, P1, epoxide hydrolase and DNA repair enzyme XRCC1 and risk of urinary transitional cell carcinoma in southwestern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, L.-I; Chiu, Allen W.; Huan, Steven K.; Chen, C.-L.; Wang, Y.-H.; Hsieh, F.-I; Chou, W.-L.; Wang, L.-H.; Chen, C.-J.

    2008-04-15

    A hospital-based case-control study was conducted near a former black-foot disease (BFD)-endemic area in southwestern Taiwan to examine the possible risk factors and genetic susceptibility for urinary transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). A total of 221 patients with pathologically confirmed TCC and 223 age-sex-matched control subjects from urology outpatient clinics were recruited between 1998 and 2002. The results showed that residency in the BFD area and consumption of well water for more than 10 years was a strong factor on urinary cancer risk (odds ratio [OR],8.16, 95% confidence interval [CI],3.34-19.90, p < 0.0001). Dose response relationship between average arsenic concentration in well water and TCC risk was also observed. Cigarette smoking played a relatively minor role in urinary carcinogenesis in this study. The GSTP1 Ile105Val A {yields} G polymorphism was significantly associated with cancer risk (A/G + G/G: OR = 0.60, 95%CI = 0.39-0.94, p = 0.02), and the effect of Val105 allele was largely confined to the subjects diagnosed earlier than 55 years old (A/G + G/G: OR,0.29; 95% CI, 0.09-0.87, p = 0.03). The results suggest that GSTP1 is a candidate for susceptibility locus and Ile105 allele may predispose individuals to early-onset urinary TCC. The GSTM1 null genotype was associated with tumors of high-invasiveness (OR,2.21; 95% CI, 1.34-4.73) as well as with early-onset TCC risk (OR,2.53; 95% CI, 0.97-6.59). Our preliminary results showed the XRCC1 Arg194Trp were associated with arsenic-related urinary TCC and the interaction between the genotype and the exposure was statistically significant. The modulating effect of the GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 Ile105Val, EPHX Tyr113His and XRCC1 Arg280His on arsenic-related TCC risk was also suggestive. These observations implied that impaired metabolism of carcinogenic exposure as well as impaired DNA repair function play an important role in arsenic-related urinary transitional cell carcinogenesis.

  16. Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1), slow (exon 3, 113His) and fast (exon 4, 139Arg) alleles confer susceptibility to squamous cell esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Meenu; Tilak, Anup Raj; Upadhyay, Rohit; Kumar, Ashwani; Mittal, Balraj

    2008-07-15

    Genetic polymorphisms in xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes may alter risk of various cancers. Present case-control study evaluated the influence of EPHX1 genetic variations on squamous cell esophageal cancer (ESCC) susceptibility in 107 patients and 320 controls. EPHX1 polymorphic alleles were genotyped by direct sequencing (exon 3, Tyr113His) or PCR-RFLP (exon 4, His139Arg). Patients with exon 3 genotypes (Tyr113His, His113His) and 113His allele were at risk of ESCC (OR{sub Tyr113His} 2.0, 95% CI = 1.2-3.4, p = 0.007; OR{sub His113His} 2.3 95% CI = 1.0-5.2, p = 0.03 and OR{sub His} 1.5, 95% CI = 1.0-2.1, p = 0.01). In contrast, individuals with exon 4, 139Arg allele were at low risk of cancer (OR 0.34, 95% CI = 0.20-0.56, p = 0.001). However, none of haplotype combinations of exon 3 (Tyr113His) and exon 4 (His139Arg) polymorphisms showed modulation of risk for ESCC. Sub-grouping of patients based on anatomical location of tumor predicted that patients with exon 3, His113His and Tyr113His genotypes were at higher risk for developing ESCC tumor at upper and middle third locations (OR 4.4, 95% CI = 1.0-18.5, p = 0.04; OR 2.5, 95% CI = 1.3-5.0, p = 0.005 respectively). The frequency of exon 4, His139Arg genotype was significantly lower in ESCC patients with lower third tumor location as compared to controls (14.8% vs. 36.3%, p = 0.02). In case-only study, gene-environment interaction of EPHX1 genotypes with tobacco, alcohol and occupational exposures did not appear to modulate the cancer susceptibility. In conclusion, exon 3, Tyr113His genotype was associated with higher risk of ESCC particularly at upper and middle-third anatomical locations of tumor. However, His139Arg genotype of exon 4, exhibited low risk for ESCC as well as its clinical characteristics.

  17. Cytochrome P450 epoxygenase pathway of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Arthur A.; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are oxidized by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases to PUFA epoxides which function as potent lipid mediators. The major metabolic pathways of PUFA epoxides are incorporation into phospholipids and hydrolysis to the corresponding PUFA diols by soluble epoxide hydrolase. Inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase stabilize PUFA epoxides and potentiate their functional effects. The epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) synthesized from arachidonic acid produce vasodilation, stimulate angiogenesis, have anti-inflammatory actions, and protect the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury. EETs produce these functional effects by activating receptor-mediated signaling pathways and ion channels. The epoxyeicosatetraenoic acids synthesized from eicosapentaenoic acid and epoxydocosapentaenoic acids synthesized from docosahexaenoic acid are potent inhibitors of cardiac arrhythmias. Epoxydocosapentaenoic acids also inhibit angiogenesis, decrease inflammatory and neuropathic pain, and reduce tumor metastasis. These findings indicate that a number of the beneficial functions of PUFA may be due to their conversion to PUFA epoxides. PMID:25093613

  18. Final Report: Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Surface Oxametallacycles - Connections to Heterogeneous Olefin Epoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Barteau

    2009-09-15

    This project has aimed at the rational design of catalysts for direct epoxidation of olefins. This chemistry remains one of the most challenging problems in heterogeneous catalysis. Although the epoxidation of ethylene by silver catalysts to form ethylene oxide (EO) has been practiced for decades, little progress has been made in expanding this technology to other products and processes. We have made significant advances through the combination of surface science experiments, Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, and catalytic reactor experiments, toward understanding the mechanism of this reaction on silver catalysts, and to the rational improvement of selectivity. The key has been our demonstration of surface oxametallacycle intermediates as the species that control reaction selectivity. This discovery permits the influence of catalyst promoters on selectivity to be probed, and new catalyst formulations to be developed. It also guides the development of new chemistry with potential for direct epoxidation of more complex olefins. During the award period we have focused on 1. the formation and reaction selectivity of complex olefin epoxides on silver surfaces, and 2. the influence of co-adsorbed oxygen atoms on the reactions of surface oxametallacycles on silver, and 3. the computational prediction, synthesis, characterization and experimental evaluation of bimetallic catalysts for ethylene epoxidation. The significance of these research thrusts is as follows. Selective epoxidation of olefins more complex than ethylene requires suppression of not only side reactions available to the olefin such as C-H bond breaking, but it requires formation and selective ring closure of the corresponding oxametallacycle intermediates. The work carried out under this grant has significantly advanced the field of catalyst design from first principles. The combination of computational tools, surface science, and catalytic reactor experiments in a single laboratory has few

  19. A short synthesis of (+)-narciclasine via a strategy derived from stereocontrolled epoxide formation and SnCl(4)-catalyzed arene-epoxide coupling.

    PubMed

    Elango, Shanmugham; Yan, Tu-Hsin

    2002-10-01

    A facile construction of the typical framework of narcissus alkaloids has been realized by virtue of the development of a practical route involving stereocontrolled epoxide formation and SnCl(4)-catalyzed arene-epoxide coupling. To achieve this goal, it proved to be necessary to devise a strategy that would enable chemical transformations to install an epoxy moiety in a congested environment. The successful preparation of a hindered epoxide from O-isopropylidene-protected 4-aminocyclohexenol required three steps consisting principally of controlled bromohydration and base-promoted closure and N-alkylation. It was found that a catalytic amount of SnCl(4) not only maintained the catalytic cycle but also effected clean arylation to form a fused BC ring system. Several tactics that ultimately proved to be unsatisfactory are also discussed in an effort to set important boundary limits on arene-epoxide coupling. The requisite enantiopure 4-aminocyclohexenol was available via an asymmetric cycloaddition of diene to camphor-based chloronitroso. The total synthesis of (+)-narciclasine was realized in nine steps with an overall yield of 19%.

  20. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics modeling of fatty acid amide hydrolase reactivation distinguishes substrate from irreversible covalent inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lodola, Alessio; Capoferri, Luigi; Rivara, Silvia; Tarzia, Giorgio; Piomelli, Daniele; Mulholland, Adrian; Mor, Marco

    2013-03-28

    Carbamate and urea derivatives are important classes of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors that carbamoylate the active-site nucleophile Ser241. In the present work, the reactivation mechanism of carbamoylated FAAH is investigated by means of a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach. The potential energy surfaces for decarbamoylation of FAAH covalent adducts, derived from the O-aryl carbamate URB597 and from the N-piperazinylurea JNJ1661610, were calculated and compared to that for deacylation of FAAH acylated by the substrate oleamide. Calculations show that a carbamic group bound to Ser241 prevents efficient stabilization of transition states of hydrolysis, leading to large increments in the activation barrier. Moreover, the energy barrier for the piperazine carboxylate was significantly lower than that for the cyclohexyl carbamate derived from URB597. This is consistent with experimental data showing slowly reversible FAAH inhibition for the N-piperazinylurea inhibitor and irreversible inhibition for URB597.

  1. [Determination of epoxidized soybean oil in bottled foods].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yoko; Kanno, Shinji; Mutsuga, Motoh; Tanamoto, Kenichi

    2006-12-01

    A determination method for epoxidized soybean oil (ESBO) in bottled foods was developed and used to survey bottled foods on the Japanese market. The amount of sample required was decreased to 20 g and the standard addition method was adopted for the quantification, because lipid in foods interrupted the hydrolysis of ESBO. The recoveries were 87.1 and 98.9% and the determination limit was 5.0 microg/g for a 20 g sample, be cause lipid in foods interupted the hydrolysis of ESBO. The recoveries using the internal standard method varied widely, because hydrolysis of the internal standard, cis-11,14-eicosadienoic acid ethyl ester, was affected more than that of ESBO by coexisting lipid in the sample. ESBO was not detected in any of the bottled baby food samples examined (14 samples), though it had been frequently detected in previous European surveys. This difference may be related to the low fat content and low fluidity of the bottled baby foods retailed in Japan. On the other hand, ESBO was detected at levels of 25.7-494.0 microg/g in liver paste, pasta sauce, Sungan in spicy oil, and spicy oil. These foods had higher fat content and higher fluidity. However, ESBO intake from these foods appears unlikely to exceed the TDI in the EU (1 mg/kg bw/day). PMID:17228787

  2. Grignard Reaction of an Epoxide: A Mechanistic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciaccio, James A.; Volpi, Sabrina; Clarke, Ransford

    1996-12-01

    Addition of PhMgBr to styrene oxide (1) affords a mixture of 2,2-diphenylethanol (3) and 1,2-diphenylethanol (6) (3:6 = 1:3); reversing the order of addition inverts the ratio of 3 to 6 formed (3:6 = 2:1). Students identify 3 and 6 by TLC comparison with authentic samples which they prepare by independent synthesis (hydride reduction of the corresponding carbonyl compounds), and establish the ratios of 3 to 6 by a combination of 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopies. This undergraduate experiment serves as an interesting alternative to more traditional Grignard experiments and is an excellent vehicle for a "discovery-based" experiment in which students are introduced to epoxide chemistry, share their laboratory data and make mechanistic conclusions from their experimental results. Unlike most undergraduate Grignard experiments which are performed merely for the sake of illustrating a textbook reaction, this Grignard synthesis is performed to probe the reactivity of styrene oxide. Students are required to analyze their products by TLC and NMR spectroscopy (instead of just submitting them for a grade) in order to obtain the data necessary for making mechanistic conclusions.

  3. α/β-Hydrolase domain-6-accessible monoacylglycerol controls glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shangang; Mugabo, Yves; Iglesias, Jose; Xie, Li; Delghingaro-Augusto, Viviane; Lussier, Roxane; Peyot, Marie-Line; Joly, Erik; Taïb, Bouchra; Davis, Matthew A; Brown, J Mark; Abousalham, Abdelkarim; Gaisano, Herbert; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2014-06-01

    Glucose metabolism in pancreatic β cells stimulates insulin granule exocytosis, and this process requires generation of a lipid signal. However, the signals involved in lipid amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) are unknown. Here we show that in β cells, glucose stimulates production of lipolysis-derived long-chain saturated monoacylglycerols, which further increase upon inhibition of the membrane-bound monoacylglycerol lipase α/β-Hydrolase Domain-6 (ABHD6). ABHD6 expression in β cells is inversely proportional to GSIS. Exogenous monoacylglycerols stimulate β cell insulin secretion and restore GSIS suppressed by the pan-lipase inhibitor orlistat. Whole-body and β-cell-specific ABHD6-KO mice exhibit enhanced GSIS, and their islets show elevated monoacylglycerol production and insulin secretion in response to glucose. Inhibition of ABHD6 in diabetic mice restores GSIS and improves glucose tolerance. Monoacylglycerol binds and activates the vesicle priming protein Munc13-1, thereby inducing insulin exocytosis. We propose saturated monoacylglycerol as a signal for GSIS and ABHD6 as a negative modulator of insulin secretion. PMID:24814481

  4. Catalytic performance and molecular dynamic simulation of immobilized CC bond hydrolase based on carbon nanotube matrix.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Qu, Yuanyuan; Kong, Chunlei; Li, Duanxing; Shen, E; Ma, Qiao; Zhang, Xuwang; Wang, Jingwei; Zhou, Jiti

    2014-04-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has been proved to be a kind of novel support for enzyme immobilization. In this study, we tried to find the relationship between conformation and catalytic performance of immobilized enzyme. Two CC bond hydrolases BphD and MfphA were immobilized on CNTs (SWCNT and MWCNT) via physical adsorption and covalent attachment. Among the conjugates, the immobilized BphD on chemically functionalized SWCNT (BphD-CSWCNT) retained the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km value) compared to free BphD (92.9%). On the other hand, when MfphA bound to pristine SWCNT (MfphA-SWCNT), it was completely inactive. Time-resolved fluorescence spectrum indicated the formation of static ground complexes during the immobilization processes. Circular dichroism (CD) showed that the secondary structures of immobilized enzymes changed in varying degrees. In order to investigate the inhibition mechanism of MfphA by SWCNT, molecular dynamics simulation was employed to analyze the adsorption process, binding sites and time evolution of substrate tunnels. The results showed that the preferred binding sites (Trp201 and Met81) of MfphA for SWCNT blocked the main substrate access tunnel, thus making the enzyme inactive. The "tunnel-block" should be a novel possible inhibition mechanism for enzyme-nanotube conjugate.

  5. Role of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 in antipolyspermy defense of mammalian oocytes.

    PubMed

    Susor, Andrej; Liskova, Lucie; Toralova, Tereza; Pavlok, Antonin; Pivonkova, Katerina; Karabinova, Pavla; Lopatarova, Miloslava; Sutovsky, Peter; Kubelka, Michal

    2010-06-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates many cellular processes through rapid proteasomal degradation of ubiquitin-tagged proteins. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCHL1) is one of the most abundant proteins in mammalian oocytes. It has weak hydrolytic activity as a monomer and acts as a ubiquitin ligase in its dimeric or oligomeric form. Recently published data show that insufficiency in UCHL1 activity coincides with polyspermic fertilization; however, the mechanism by which UCHL1 contributes to this process remains unclear. Using UCHL1-specific inhibitors, we induced a high rate of polyspermy in bovine zygotes after in vitro fertilization. We also detected decreased levels in the monomeric ubiquitin and polyubiquitin pool. The presence of UCHL1 inhibitors in maturation medium enhanced formation of presumptive UCHL1 oligomers and subsequently increased abundance of K63-linked polyubiquitin chains in oocytes. We analyzed the dynamics of cortical granules (CGs) in UCHL1-inhibited oocytes; both migration of CGs toward the cortex during oocyte maturation and fertilization-induced extrusion of CGs were impaired. These alterations in CG dynamics coincided with high polyspermy incidence in in vitro-produced UCHL1-inhibited zygotes. These data indicate that antipolyspermy defense in bovine oocytes may rely on UCHL1-controlled functioning of CGs.

  6. Discovery and molecular basis of potent noncovalent inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)

    PubMed Central

    Min, Xiaoshan; Thibault, Stephen T.; Porter, Amy C.; Gustin, Darin J.; Carlson, Timothy J.; Xu, Haoda; Lindstrom, Michelle; Xu, Guifen; Uyeda, Craig; Ma, Zhihua; Li, Yihong; Kayser, Frank; Walker, Nigel P. C.; Wang, Zhulun

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), an amidase-signature family member, is an integral membrane enzyme that degrades lipid amides including the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide and the sleep-inducing molecule oleamide. Both genetic knock out and pharmacological administration of FAAH inhibitors in rodent models result in analgesic, anxiolytic, and antiinflammatory phenotypes. Targeting FAAH activity, therefore, presents a promising new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pain and other neurological-related or inflammatory disorders. Nearly all FAAH inhibitors known to date attain their binding potency through a reversible or irreversible covalent modification of the nucleophile Ser241 in the unusual Ser-Ser-Lys catalytic triad. Here, we report the discovery and mechanism of action of a series of ketobenzimidazoles as unique and potent noncovalent FAAH inhibitors. Compound 2, a representative of these ketobenzimidazoles, was designed from a series of ureas that were identified from high-throughput screening. While urea compound 1 is characterized as an irreversible covalent inhibitor, the cocrystal structure of FAAH complexed with compound 2 reveals that these ketobenzimidazoles, though containing a carbonyl moiety, do not covalently modify Ser241. These inhibitors achieve potent inhibition of FAAH activity primarily from shape complementarity to the active site and through numerous hydrophobic interactions. These noncovalent compounds exhibit excellent selectivity and good pharmacokinetic properties. The discovery of this distinctive class of inhibitors opens a new avenue for modulating FAAH activity through nonmechanism-based inhibition. PMID:21502526

  7. α/β-Hydrolase domain-6-accessible monoacylglycerol controls glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shangang; Mugabo, Yves; Iglesias, Jose; Xie, Li; Delghingaro-Augusto, Viviane; Lussier, Roxane; Peyot, Marie-Line; Joly, Erik; Taïb, Bouchra; Davis, Matthew A; Brown, J Mark; Abousalham, Abdelkarim; Gaisano, Herbert; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2014-06-01

    Glucose metabolism in pancreatic β cells stimulates insulin granule exocytosis, and this process requires generation of a lipid signal. However, the signals involved in lipid amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) are unknown. Here we show that in β cells, glucose stimulates production of lipolysis-derived long-chain saturated monoacylglycerols, which further increase upon inhibition of the membrane-bound monoacylglycerol lipase α/β-Hydrolase Domain-6 (ABHD6). ABHD6 expression in β cells is inversely proportional to GSIS. Exogenous monoacylglycerols stimulate β cell insulin secretion and restore GSIS suppressed by the pan-lipase inhibitor orlistat. Whole-body and β-cell-specific ABHD6-KO mice exhibit enhanced GSIS, and their islets show elevated monoacylglycerol production and insulin secretion in response to glucose. Inhibition of ABHD6 in diabetic mice restores GSIS and improves glucose tolerance. Monoacylglycerol binds and activates the vesicle priming protein Munc13-1, thereby inducing insulin exocytosis. We propose saturated monoacylglycerol as a signal for GSIS and ABHD6 as a negative modulator of insulin secretion.

  8. 4-sulfomuconolactone hydrolases from Hydrogenophaga intermedia S1 and Agrobacterium radiobacter S2.

    PubMed

    Halak, Sad; Basta, Tamara; Bürger, Sibylle; Contzen, Matthias; Wray, Victor; Pieper, Dietmar Helmut; Stolz, Andreas

    2007-10-01

    The 4-carboxymethylen-4-sulfo-but-2-en-olide (4-sulfomuconolactone) hydrolases from Hydrogenophaga intermedia strain S1 and Agrobacterium radiobacter strain S2 are part of a modified protocatechuate pathway responsible for the degradation of 4-sulfocatechol. In both strains, the hydrolase-encoding genes occur downstream of those encoding the enzymes that catalyze the lactonization of 3-sulfomuconate. The deduced amino acid sequences of the 4-sulfomuconolactone hydrolases demonstrated the highest degree of sequence identity to 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate hydrolases, which take part in the meta cleavage pathway of protocatechuate. The 4-sulfomuconolactone hydrolases did not convert 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate, and the 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate hydrolase from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 did not convert 4-sulfomuconolactone. Nevertheless, the presence of highly conserved histidine residues in the 4-sulfomuconolactone and the 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate hydrolases and some further sequence similarities suggested that both enzymes belong to the metallo-dependent hydrolases (the "amidohydrolase superfamily"). The 4-sulfomuconolactone hydrolases were heterologously expressed as His-tagged enzyme variants. Gel filtration experiments suggested that the enzymes are present as monomers in solution, with molecular weights of approximately 33,000 to 35,000. 4-Sulfomuconolactone was converted by sulfomuconolactone hydrolases to stoichiometric amounts of maleylacetate and sulfite. The 4-sulfomuconolactone hydrolases from both strains showed pH optima at pH 7 to 7.5 and rather similar catalytic constant (k(cat)/K(M))values. The suggested 4-sulfocatechol pathway from 4-sulfocatechol to maleylacetate was confirmed by in situ nuclear magnetic resonance analysis using the recombinantly expressed enzymes.

  9. Mutagenic and cell-transforming activities of triol-epoxides as compared to other chrysene metabolites.

    PubMed

    Glatt, H; Seidel, A; Bochnitschek, W; Marquardt, H; Marquardt, H; Hodgson, R M; Grover, P L; Oesch, F

    1986-09-01

    The syn- and anti-isomers of the bay-region diol-epoxides of chrysene and of 3-hydroxychrysene and their metabolic precursors have been investigated for mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium (reversion to histidine prototrophy) and V79 Chinese hamster cells (acquirement of resistance to 6-thioguanine) and for transforming activity in M2 mouse prostate cells. Other known and potential chrysene metabolites have been included in mutagenicity experiments. Direct mutagenic activity in S. typhimurium TA 100 exhibited, in order of potency, anti-triol-epoxide greater than syn-triol-epoxide greater than anti-diol-epoxide greater than syn-diol-epoxide greater than chrysene 5,6-oxide much greater than chrysene-1,2-quinone, chrysene-3,4-quinone, and chrysene 5,6-quinone. Chrysene, the six isomeric chrysenols, and the trans-dihydrodiols [trans-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrochrysene (chrysene-1,2-diol), trans-3,4-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrochrysene, trans-5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrochrysene, and 9-hydroxy-trans-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrochrysene (9-hydroxychrysene-1,2-diol)] were inactive per se but were activated to mutagens in the presence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-fortified postmitochondrial fraction (S9 mix) of liver homogenate from Arochlor 1254-treated rats. Chrysene, 3-hydroxychrysene, chrysene-1,2-diol, and 9-hydroxychrysene-1,2-diol were activated efficiently; the other compounds were activated weakly. In S. typhimurium TA 98, the mutagenic activities of the chrysene derivatives were weak in comparison with those in the strain TA 100. trans-3,4-Dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrochrysene (in the presence of S9 mix) was the most efficacious mutagen in strain TA 98. The relative mutagenic potencies of the directly active compounds differed from the results obtained in strain TA 100, in that in strain TA 98 the anti-diol-epoxide was more mutagenic than the triol-epoxides and chrysene 5,6-oxide was more mutagenic than syn-diol-epoxide and syn-triol-epoxide. In V79 cells

  10. Metatungstate and tungstoniobate-containing LDHs: Preparation, characterisation and activity in epoxidation of cyclooctene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriazo, D.; Lima, S.; Martín, C.; Pillinger, M.; Valente, A. A.; Rives, V.

    2007-10-01

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) H2W12O406- and W4Nb2O194- have been intercalated between the brucite-like layers of Mg, Al and Zn, Al hydrotalcites by anion exchange, starting from the corresponding nitrate precursors. The solids have been characterised by Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD), Fourier Transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, N2 adsorption desorption at -196 °C and thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermal analyses (DTA), and have been tested in the epoxidation of cyclooctene using H2O2 or t-BuOOH as oxidants. The results show that both anions are effectively located in the interlayer space maintaining their pristine structures without depolymerisation. Upon intercalation of such large anions microporosity is developed and subsequently an increase in the specific surface areas is also observed. In general, the prepared materials possess catalase and epoxidation activity, with ZnAl-intercalated H2W12O406- giving the best results in terms of epoxide yield (17% at 24 h). Product selectivity is different for the intercalated and free POMs, the latter yielding 1,2-cyclooctanediol as the only product, whereas the former produces only the epoxide. The epoxidation reaction seems to be catalysed in homogeneous phase by the POM.

  11. Synthesis and physicochemical properties of epoxidized Tmp trioleate by in situ method

    SciTech Connect

    Samidin, Salma; Salimon, Jumat

    2014-09-03

    Tmp trioleate was initially synthesized via esterification of trimetilolprapane and oleic acid (90%) using 1.5% of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} as a catalyst. The production of Tmp trioleate was observed at 98% (w/w). The iodine value of Tmp trioleate was analyzed for further reaction of epoxidation. Epoxide was important reaction as an intermediate for preparation of chemical modified lubricants from vegetable oils. Finding the best way of epoxidation process will give high quality for further modification of oil instead of reduce the cost and time for the preparation process during reaction of epoxidation. In this study, the epoxidation of unsaturation Tmp trioleate with peroxyformic acid generated in-situ from hydrogen peroxide 30% in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with formic acid was studied. 95% conversion to oxygen oxirane content (OOC) ring was obtained. The derivatization showed an improvement of the compound's oxidative stability evidenced from pressurized differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC) data which are 177°C to 200°C. Physicochemical properties showed increasing of temperature of flash point from 280°C to 300°C and viscosity index (VI) from 146 to 154. However, the pour point showed increasing temperature which was −58.81°C to −17.32°C. From the data obtained, these derivatives have shown better performance of lubricity properties. Overall, the data indicates that these performances are compatible to the commercial lubricants.

  12. Synthesis and physicochemical properties of epoxidized Tmp trioleate by in situ method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samidin, Salma; Salimon, Jumat

    2014-09-01

    Tmp trioleate was initially synthesized via esterification of trimetilolprapane and oleic acid (90%) using 1.5% of H2SO4 as a catalyst. The production of Tmp trioleate was observed at 98% (w/w). The iodine value of Tmp trioleate was analyzed for further reaction of epoxidation. Epoxide was important reaction as an intermediate for preparation of chemical modified lubricants from vegetable oils. Finding the best way of epoxidation process will give high quality for further modification of oil instead of reduce the cost and time for the preparation process during reaction of epoxidation. In this study, the epoxidation of unsaturation Tmp trioleate with peroxyformic acid generated in-situ from hydrogen peroxide 30% in H2O2 with formic acid was studied. 95% conversion to oxygen oxirane content (OOC) ring was obtained. The derivatization showed an improvement of the compound's oxidative stability evidenced from pressurized differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC) data which are 177°C to 200°C. Physicochemical properties showed increasing of temperature of flash point from 280°C to 300°C and viscosity index (VI) from 146 to 154. However, the pour point showed increasing temperature which was -58.81°C to -17.32°C. From the data obtained, these derivatives have shown better performance of lubricity properties. Overall, the data indicates that these performances are compatible to the commercial lubricants.

  13. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  14. CREST - a large and diverse superfamily of putative transmembrane hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A number of membrane-spanning proteins possess enzymatic activity and catalyze important reactions involving proteins, lipids or other substrates located within or near lipid bilayers. Alkaline ceramidases are seven-transmembrane proteins that hydrolyze the amide bond in ceramide to form sphingosine. Recently, a group of putative transmembrane receptors called progestin and adipoQ receptors (PAQRs) were found to be distantly related to alkaline ceramidases, raising the possibility that they may also function as membrane enzymes. Results Using sensitive similarity search methods, we identified statistically significant sequence similarities among several transmembrane protein families including alkaline ceramidases and PAQRs. They were unified into a large and diverse superfamily of putative membrane-bound hydrolases called CREST (alkaline ceramidase, PAQR receptor, Per1, SID-1 and TMEM8). The CREST superfamily embraces a plethora of cellular functions and biochemical activities, including putative lipid-modifying enzymes such as ceramidases and the Per1 family of putative phospholipases involved in lipid remodeling of GPI-anchored proteins, putative hormone receptors, bacterial hemolysins, the TMEM8 family of putative tumor suppressors, and the SID-1 family of putative double-stranded RNA transporters involved in RNA interference. Extensive similarity searches and clustering analysis also revealed several groups of proteins with unknown function in the CREST superfamily. Members of the CREST superfamily share seven predicted core transmembrane segments with several conserved sequence motifs. Conclusions Universal conservation of a set of histidine and aspartate residues across all groups in the CREST superfamily, coupled with independent discoveries of hydrolase activities in alkaline ceramidases and the Per1 family as well as results from previous mutational studies of Per1, suggests that the majority of CREST members are metal-dependent hydrolases

  15. A biotechnological approach to the synthesis of epoxides: bioconversion of hydrocarbons by Pseudomonas oleovorans during growth in a multiphase system

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    This communication examines the oxidation of alkanes and alkenes by Pseudomonas oleovorans. A variety of substrates were tested in order to extend the practical use of P. oleovorans for the synthesis of chiral epoxides. Concludes that hydrocarbon fermentations of P. oleovorans might be an important tool not only in the production of epoxides but also in the production of aliphatic polyesters and biosurfactants.

  16. 40 CFR 63.1427 - Process vent requirements for processes using extended cookout as an epoxide emission reduction...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... epoxide in the reactor liquid at the beginning of the time period, weight percent. k = Reaction rate... directly measuring the concentration of the unreacted epoxide, or by using process knowledge, reaction... accordance with paragraph (f)(1)(i) of this section, or reaction kinetics in accordance with paragraph...

  17. [(Salcen)Cr(III) + Lewis base]-catalyzed synthesis of N-aryl-substituted oxazolidinones from epoxides and aryl isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Robert L; Adhikari, Debashis; Lord, Richard L; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Nguyen, SonBinh T

    2014-12-14

    [(Salcen)Cr(III) + Lewis base] was found to be a highly active and selective catalyst system in the [2+3] cycloaddition between epoxides and isocyanates to form 5-oxazolidinones. The reaction proceeds to high yield under mild reaction conditions and is applicable to a variety of terminal epoxides and aryl isocyanates.

  18. Highly Selective Olefin Epoxidation with Aqueous H₂O₂ Over Surfacemodified TaSBA15 Prepared via the TMP Method

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, Daniel A.; Tilley, T. D.

    2007-07-17

    Trialkylsiloxy-modified Ta(V) centers on mesoporous silica exhibit excellent selectivity for epoxide formation (>98% after 2 h) in the oxidation of cyclohexene using aqueous H₂O₂ as the oxidant; the modified catalysts exhibit an increased lifetime, retaining high selectivity after 6 h of reaction (>95% epoxide).

  19. 40 CFR 63.1427 - Process vent requirements for processes using extended cookout as an epoxide emission reduction...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... at the beginning of the time period, weight percent. k = Reaction rate constant, 1/hr. t = Time... epoxide concentration using 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, Method 18. (ii) Determine the epoxide concentration in the vapor space using Raoult's Law or another appropriate phase equilibrium equation and...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1427 - Process vent requirements for processes using extended cookout as an epoxide emission reduction...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... at the beginning of the time period, weight percent. k = Reaction rate constant, 1/hr. t = Time... epoxide concentration using 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, Method 18. (ii) Determine the epoxide concentration in the vapor space using Raoult's Law or another appropriate phase equilibrium equation and...

  1. Pharmacokinetics: time-dependent changes--autoinduction of carbamazepine epoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Bertilsson, L.; Tomson, T.; Tybring, G.

    1986-07-01

    Drugs labeled with stable isotopes have been useful to study time-dependent changes in kinetics. Early studies suggested that carbamazepine (CBZ) may induce its own metabolism, but this could not be proved until tetradeuterium-labeled CBZ (CBZ-D4) was synthesized and then given to patients. CBZ-D4 was administered to three children during long-term treatment of epilepsy with CBZ. After 17 to 32 days of treatment, the plasma clearance of CBZ-D4 was doubled, but during the next four months, there was no further increase, indicating that autoinduction was complete within one month. Two patients with chronic alcoholism were treated with CBZ for five days. Half of the first dose of 600 mg was comprised of CBZ-D4. The half-life of this CBZ-D4 dose in the two patients (20 and 26 hr, respectively) was similar to the post-steady-state half-life of CBZ (23 hr in both patients) measured later. A single dose of CBZ given one week after the last maintenance dose had a longer half-life (46 and 45 hr, respectively), which probably is close to the disposition of the drug before starting the treatment with CBZ. This shows that autoinduction of CBZ metabolism was completed during the very first doses of CBZ. Autoinduction also disappeared rapidly after stopping the treatment. We have shown that it is mainly the epoxide-diol pathway that is induced, both during autoinduction and after induction with other antiepileptic agents.

  2. Microbial metabolism of steviol and steviol-16alpha,17-epoxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ming; Hsu, Feng-Lin; Chang, Shwu-Fen; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Hsu, Ju-Yin; Hsu, Chung-Yi; Liu, Pan-Chun; Lin, Shwu-Jiuan

    2007-02-01

    Steviol (2) possesses a blood glucose-lowering property. In order to produce potentially more- or less-active, toxic, or inactive metabolites compared to steviol (2), its microbial metabolism was investigated. Incubation of 2 with the microorganisms Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581, Mucor recurvatus MR 36, and Aspergillus niger BCRC 32720 yielded one new metabolite, ent-7alpha,11beta,13-trihydroxykaur-16-en-19-oic acid (7), together with four known related biotransformation products, ent-7alpha,13-dihydroxykaur-16-en-19-oic acid (3), ent-13-hydroxykaur-16-en-19-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl ester (4), ent-13,16beta,17-trihydroxykauran-19-oic acid (5), and ent-13-hydroxy-7-ketokaur-16-en-19-oic acid (6). The preliminary testing of antihyperglycemic effects showed that 5 was more potent than the parent compound (2). Thus, the microbial metabolism of steviol-16alpha,17-epoxide (8) with M. recurvatus MR 36 was continued to produce higher amounts of 5 for future study of its action mechanism. Preparative-scale fermentation of 8 yielded 5, ent-11alpha,13,16alpha,17-tetrahydroxykauran-19-oic acid (10), ent-1beta,17-dihydroxy-16-ketobeyeran-19-oic acid (11), and ent-7alpha,17-dihydroxy-16-ketobeyeran-19-oic acid (13), together with three new metabolites: ent-13,16beta-dihydroxykauran-17-acetoxy-19-oic acid (9), ent-11beta,13-dihydroxy-16beta,17-epoxykauran-19-oic acid (12), and ent-11beta,13,16beta,17-tetrahydroxykauran-19-oic acid (14). The structures of the compounds were fully elucidated using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques, as well as HRFABMS. In addition, a GRE (glucocorticoid responsive element)-mediated luciferase reporter assay was used to initially screen the compounds 3-5, and 7 as glucocorticoid agonists. Compounds 4, 5 and 7 showed significant effects. PMID:17207824

  3. A broadly applicable and practical oligomeric (salen) Co catalyst for enantioselective epoxide ring-opening reactions

    PubMed Central

    White, David E.; Tadross, Pamela M.; Lu, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    The (salen) Co catalyst (4a) can be prepared as a mixture of cyclic oligomers in a short, chromatography-free synthesis from inexpensive, commercially available precursors. This catalyst displays remarkable enhancements in reactivity and enantioselectivity relative to monomeric and other multimeric (salen) Co catalysts in a wide variety of enantioselective epoxide ring-opening reactions. The application of catalyst 4a is illustrated in the kinetic resolution of terminal epoxides by nucleophilic ring-opening with water, phenols, and primary alcohols; the desymmetrization of meso epoxides by addition of water and carbamates; and the desymmetrization of oxetanes by intramolecular ring opening with alcohols and phenols. The favorable solubility properties of complex 4a under the catalytic conditions facilitated mechanistic studies, allowing elucidation of the basis for the beneficial effect of oligomerization. Finally, a catalyst selection guide is provided to delineate the specific advantages of oligomeric catalyst 4a relative to (salen) Co monomer 1 for each reaction class. PMID:25045188

  4. Increased silver activity for direct propylene epoxidation via subnanometer size effects.

    PubMed

    Lei, Y; Mehmood, F; Lee, S; Greeley, J; Lee, B; Seifert, S; Winans, R E; Elam, J W; Meyer, R J; Redfern, P C; Teschner, D; Schlögl, R; Pellin, M J; Curtiss, L A; Vajda, S

    2010-04-01

    Production of the industrial chemical propylene oxide is energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with direct propylene epoxidation by molecular oxygen have not resolved these problems because of substantial formation of carbon dioxide. We found that unpromoted, size-selected Ag3 clusters and approximately 3.5-nanometer Ag nanoparticles on alumina supports can catalyze this reaction with only a negligible amount of carbon dioxide formation and with high activity at low temperatures. Density functional calculations show that, relative to extended silver surfaces, oxidized silver trimers are more active and selective for epoxidation because of the open-shell nature of their electronic structure. The results suggest that new architectures based on ultrasmall silver particles may provide highly efficient catalysts for propylene epoxidation. PMID:20378815

  5. Increased Silver Activity for Direct Propylene Epoxidation via Subnanometer Size Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Y.; Mehmood, Faisal; Lee, Sang Soo; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Lee, Byeongdu; Seifert, Soenke; Winans, R. E.; Elam, J. W.; Meyer, R. J.; Redfern, Paul C.; Teschner, D.; Schlogl, Robert; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Vajda, S.

    2010-04-09

    Production of the industrial chemical propylene oxide is energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with direct propylene epoxidation by molecular oxygen have not resolved these problems because of substantial formation of carbon dioxide. We found that unpromoted, size-selected Ag3 clusters and ~3.5-nanometer Ag nanoparticles on alumina supports can catalyze this reaction with only a negligible amount of carbon dioxide formation and with high activity at low temperatures. Density functional calculations show that, relative to extended silver surfaces, oxidized silver trimers are more active and selective for epoxidation because of the open-shell nature of their electronic structure. The results suggest that new architectures based on ultrasmall silver particles may provide highly efficient catalysts for propylene epoxidation.

  6. Increased silver activity for direct propylene epoxidation via subnanometer size effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Y.; Mehmood, F.; Lee, S.; Greeley, J. P.; Lee, B.; Seifert, S.; Winans, R. E.; Elam, J. E.; Meyer, R. J.; Redfern, P. C.; Teschner, D.; Schlogl, R.; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, L. A.; Vajda, S.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Fritz-Haber Inst. der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft; Yale Univ.

    2010-04-09

    Production of the industrial chemical propylene oxide is energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with direct propylene epoxidation by molecular oxygen have not resolved these problems because of substantial formation of carbon dioxide. We found that unpromoted, size-selected Ag{sub 3} clusters and {approx}3.5-nanometer Ag nanoparticles on alumina supports can catalyze this reaction with only a negligible amount of carbon dioxide formation and with high activity at low temperatures. Density functional calculations show that, relative to extended silver surfaces, oxidized silver trimers are more active and selective for epoxidation because of the open-shell nature of their electronic structure. The results suggest that new architectures based on ultrasmall silver particles may provide highly efficient catalysts for propylene epoxidation.

  7. Epoxidized natural rubber toughened aqueous resole type liquefied EFB resin: Physical and chemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amran, Umar Adli; Zakaria, Sarani; Chia, Chin Hua

    2013-11-01

    A preliminary study on the reaction between aqueous resole type resinified liquefied palm oil empty fruit bunches fibres (RLEFB) with epoxidized natural rubber (ENR). Liquefaction of empty fruit bunches (EFB) is carried out at different ratio of phenol to EFB (P:EFB). Resole type phenolic resin is prepared using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) as the catalyst with the ratio of liquefied EFB (LEFB) to formaldehyde (LEFB:F) of 1:1.8. 50% epoxidation of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-50) is used to react with resole resin by mixing with ENR with aqueous resole resin. The cured resin is characterized with FT-IR and SEM. Aqueous system have been found to be unsuitable medium in the reaction between resin and ENR. This system produced a highly porous product when RLEFB/ENR resin is cured.

  8. Gulosibacter molinativorax ON4T Molinate Hydrolase, a Novel Cobalt-Dependent Amidohydrolase ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Márcia; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Junca, Howard; Gales, Luís; Pieper, Dietmar H.; Nunes, Olga C.

    2011-01-01

    A new pathway of molinate mineralization has recently been described. Among the five members of the mixed culture able to promote such a process, Gulosibacter molinativorax ON4T has been observed to promote the initial breakdown of the herbicide into ethanethiol and azepane-1-carboxylate. In the current study, the gene encoding the enzyme responsible for molinate hydrolysis was identified and heterologously expressed, and the resultant active protein was purified and characterized. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the gene encodes a 465-amino-acid protein of the metal-dependent hydrolase A subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily with a predicted molecular mass of 50.9 kDa. Molinate hydrolase shares the highest amino acid sequence identity (48 to 50%) with phenylurea hydrolases of Arthrobacter globiformis and Mycobacterium brisbanense. However, in contrast to previously described members of the metal-dependent hydrolase A subfamily, molinate hydrolase contains cobalt as the only active-site metal. PMID:21840982

  9. Marine extremophiles: a source of hydrolases for biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Dalmaso, Gabriel Zamith Leal; Ferreira, Davis; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2015-04-03

    The marine environment covers almost three quarters of the planet and is where evolution took its first steps. Extremophile microorganisms are found in several extreme marine environments, such as hydrothermal vents, hot springs, salty lakes and deep-sea floors. The ability of these microorganisms to support extremes of temperature, salinity and pressure demonstrates their great potential for biotechnological processes. Hydrolases including amylases, cellulases, peptidases and lipases from hyperthermophiles, psychrophiles, halophiles and piezophiles have been investigated for these reasons. Extremozymes are adapted to work in harsh physical-chemical conditions and their use in various industrial applications such as the biofuel, pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and food industries has increased. The understanding of the specific factors that confer the ability to withstand extreme habitats on such enzymes has become a priority for their biotechnological use. The most studied marine extremophiles are prokaryotes and in this review, we present the most studied archaea and bacteria extremophiles and their hydrolases, and discuss their use for industrial applications.

  10. Structure of unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase complexed with substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Takafumi; Ochiai, Akihito; Mikami, Bunzo; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku . E-mail: kmurata@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-09-08

    Bacillus subtilis strain 168 YteR has been identified as a novel enzyme 'unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase' classified in glycoside hydrolase family 105. This enzyme acts specifically on unsaturated rhamnogalacturonan (RG) produced from plant cell wall RG type-I treated with RG lyases, releasing unsaturated galacturonic acid ({delta}GalA) from the substrate. The most likely candidate catalytic residue is Asp-143. Here, we show the structure of D143N in complex with unsaturated RG disaccharide (substrate) determined at 1.9 A resolution by X-ray crystallography. This structural feature directly contributes to the postulation of the enzyme reaction mechanism. YteR triggers the hydration of vinyl ether group in {delta}GalA, but not of glycoside bond, by using Asp-143 as a general acid and base catalyst. Asp-143 donates proton to the double bond of {delta}GalA as an acid catalyst and also deprotonates a water molecule as a base catalyst. Deprotonated water molecule attacks the C5 atom of {delta}GalA.

  11. Marine extremophiles: a source of hydrolases for biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Dalmaso, Gabriel Zamith Leal; Ferreira, Davis; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2015-04-01

    The marine environment covers almost three quarters of the planet and is where evolution took its first steps. Extremophile microorganisms are found in several extreme marine environments, such as hydrothermal vents, hot springs, salty lakes and deep-sea floors. The ability of these microorganisms to support extremes of temperature, salinity and pressure demonstrates their great potential for biotechnological processes. Hydrolases including amylases, cellulases, peptidases and lipases from hyperthermophiles, psychrophiles, halophiles and piezophiles have been investigated for these reasons. Extremozymes are adapted to work in harsh physical-chemical conditions and their use in various industrial applications such as the biofuel, pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and food industries has increased. The understanding of the specific factors that confer the ability to withstand extreme habitats on such enzymes has become a priority for their biotechnological use. The most studied marine extremophiles are prokaryotes and in this review, we present the most studied archaea and bacteria extremophiles and their hydrolases, and discuss their use for industrial applications. PMID:25854643

  12. Recovering glycoside hydrolase genes from active tundra cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pinnell, Lee J; Dunford, Eric; Ronan, Patrick; Hausner, Martina; Neufeld, Josh D

    2014-07-01

    Bacteria responsible for cellulose hydrolysis in situ are poorly understood, largely because of the relatively recent development of cultivation-independent methods for their detection and characterization. This study combined DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) and metagenomics for identifying active bacterial communities that assimilated carbon from glucose and cellulose in Arctic tundra microcosms. Following DNA-SIP, bacterial fingerprint analysis of gradient fractions confirmed isotopic enrichment. Sequenced fingerprint bands and clone library analysis of 16S rRNA genes identified active bacterial taxa associated with cellulose-associated labelled DNA, including Bacteroidetes (Sphingobacteriales), Betaproteobacteria (Burkholderiales), Alphaproteobacteria (Caulobacteraceae), and Chloroflexi (Anaerolineaceae). We also compared glycoside hydrolase metagenomic profiles from bulk soil and heavy DNA recovered from DNA-SIP incubations. Active populations consuming [(13)C]glucose and [(13)C]cellulose were distinct, based on ordinations of light and heavy DNA. Metagenomic analysis demonstrated a ∼3-fold increase in the relative abundance of glycoside hydrolases in DNA-SIP libraries over bulk-soil libraries. The data also indicate that multiple displacement amplification introduced bias into the resulting metagenomic analysis. This research identified DNA-SIP incubation conditions for glucose and cellulose that were suitable for Arctic tundra soil and confirmed that DNA-SIP enrichment can increase target gene frequencies in metagenomic libraries.

  13. Marine Extremophiles: A Source of Hydrolases for Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Dalmaso, Gabriel Zamith Leal; Ferreira, Davis; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment covers almost three quarters of the planet and is where evolution took its first steps. Extremophile microorganisms are found in several extreme marine environments, such as hydrothermal vents, hot springs, salty lakes and deep-sea floors. The ability of these microorganisms to support extremes of temperature, salinity and pressure demonstrates their great potential for biotechnological processes. Hydrolases including amylases, cellulases, peptidases and lipases from hyperthermophiles, psychrophiles, halophiles and piezophiles have been investigated for these reasons. Extremozymes are adapted to work in harsh physical-chemical conditions and their use in various industrial applications such as the biofuel, pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and food industries has increased. The understanding of the specific factors that confer the ability to withstand extreme habitats on such enzymes has become a priority for their biotechnological use. The most studied marine extremophiles are prokaryotes and in this review, we present the most studied archaea and bacteria extremophiles and their hydrolases, and discuss their use for industrial applications. PMID:25854643

  14. An efficient, multiply promiscuous hydrolase in the alkaline phosphatase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    van Loo, Bert; Jonas, Stefanie; Babtie, Ann C.; Benjdia, Alhosna; Berteau, Olivier; Hyvönen, Marko; Hollfelder, Florian

    2010-01-01

    We report a catalytically promiscuous enzyme able to efficiently promote the hydrolysis of six different substrate classes. Originally assigned as a phosphonate monoester hydrolase (PMH) this enzyme exhibits substantial second-order rate accelerations ((kcat/KM)/kw), ranging from 107 to as high as 1019, for the hydrolyses of phosphate mono-, di-, and triesters, phosphonate monoesters, sulfate monoesters, and sulfonate monoesters. This substrate collection encompasses a range of substrate charges between 0 and -2, transition states of a different nature, and involves attack at two different reaction centers (P and S). Intrinsic reactivities (half-lives) range from 200 days to 105 years under near neutrality. The substantial rate accelerations for a set of relatively difficult reactions suggest that efficient catalysis is not necessarily limited to efficient stabilization of just one transition state. The crystal structure of PMH identifies it as a member of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily. PMH encompasses four of the native activities previously observed in this superfamily and extends its repertoire by two further activities, one of which, sulfonate monoesterase, has not been observed previously for a natural enzyme. PMH is thus one of the most promiscuous hydrolases described to date. The functional links between superfamily activities can be presumed to have played a role in functional evolution by gene duplication. PMID:20133613

  15. Protective mechanisms against homocysteine toxicity: the role of bleomycin hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Zimny, Jaroslaw; Sikora, Marta; Guranowski, Andrzej; Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2006-08-11

    Homocysteine (Hcy) editing by methionyl-tRNA synthetase results in the formation of Hcy-thiolactone and initiates a pathway that has been implicated in human disease. In addition to being cleared from the circulation by urinary excretion, Hcy-thiolactone is detoxified by the serum Hcy-thiolactonase/paraoxonase carried on high density lipoprotein. Whether Hcy-thiolactone is detoxified inside cells was unknown. Here we show that Hcy-thiolactone is hydrolyzed by an intracellular enzyme, which we have purified to homogeneity from human placenta and identified by proteomic analyses as human bleomycin hydrolase (hBLH). We have also purified an Hcy-thiolactonase from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identified it as yeast bleomycin hydrolase (yBLH). BLH belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved cysteine aminopeptidases, and its only known biologically relevant function was deamidation of the anticancer drug bleomycin. Recombinant hBLH or yBLH, expressed in Escherichia coli, exhibits Hcy-thiolactonase activity similar to that of the native enzymes. Active site mutations, C73A for hBLH and H369A for yBLH, inactivate Hcy-thiolactonase activities. Yeast blh1 mutants are deficient in Hcy-thiolactonase activity in vitro and in vivo, produce more Hcy-thiolactone, and exhibit greater sensitivity to Hcy toxicity than wild type yeast cells. Our data suggest that BLH protects cells against Hcy toxicity by hydrolyzing intracellular Hcy-thiolactone. PMID:16769724

  16. Synthesis of Marine Polycyclic Polyethers via Endo-Selective Epoxide-Opening Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Vilotijevic, Ivan; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2010-01-01

    The proposed biosynthetic pathways to ladder polyethers of polyketide origin and oxasqualenoids of terpenoid origin share a dramatic epoxide-opening cascade as a key step. Polycyclic structures generated in these biosynthetic pathways display biological effects ranging from potentially therapeutic properties to extreme lethality. Much of the structural complexity of ladder polyether and oxasqualenoid natural products can be traced to these hypothesized cascades. In this review we summarize how such epoxide-opening cascade reactions have been used in the synthesis of ladder polyethers and oxasqualenoid natural products. PMID:20411125

  17. Zirconium(IV)- and hafnium(IV)-catalyzed highly enantioselective epoxidation of homoallylic and bishomoallylic alcohols.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2010-06-16

    In this report, zirconium(IV)- and hafnium(IV)-bishydroxamic acid complexes were utilized in the highly enantioselective epoxidation of homoallylic alcohols and bishomoallylic alcohols, which used to be quite difficult substrates for other types of asymmetric epoxidation reactions. The performance of the catalyst was improved by adding polar additive and molecular sieves. For homoallylic alcohols, the reaction could provide epoxy alcohols in up to 83% yield and up to 98% ee, while, for bishomoallylic alcohols, up to 79% yield and 99% ee of epoxy alcohols rather than cyclized tetrahydrofuran compounds could be obtained in most cases.

  18. The selection reaction of homogeneous catalyst in soy-epoxide hydroxylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvistia Firdaus, Flora

    2014-04-01

    Hydroxylation reaction of soy-epoxide has resulted soy-polyol; a prepolymeric material for polyurethane. The conversion and selectivity of soy-epoxide butanol based to hydroxylation was found higher than soy-ethylene glycol (EG) based. These reactions were performed by sulfur acid which commonly known as homogeneous catalyst. Conversion and selectivity of homogeneous catalyst compared to bentonite; a heteregeneous catalyst was lower as in fact the mixtures were more viscous. The catalysis were significantly effected to cell morphology. Foams were conducted by heterogeneous catalyst resulted an irregular form of windows while homogeneous catalyst are more ordered.

  19. Asymmetric epoxidation of allylic alcohols catalyzed by vanadium-binaphthylbishydroxamic Acid complex.

    PubMed

    Noji, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Uechi, Yuria; Kikuchi, Asami; Kondo, Hisako; Sugiyama, Shigeo; Ishii, Keitaro

    2015-03-20

    A vanadium-binaphthylbishydroxamic acid (BBHA) complex-catalyzed asymmetric epoxidation of allylic alcohols is described. The optically active binaphthyl-based ligands BBHA 2a and 2b were synthesized from (S)-1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-dicarboxylic acid and N-substituted-O-trimethylsilyl (TMS)-protected hydroxylamines via a one-pot, three-step procedure. The epoxidations of 2,3,3-trisubstituted allylic alcohols using the vanadium complex of 2a were easily performed in toluene with a TBHP water solution to afford (2R)-epoxy alcohols in good to excellent enantioselectivities.

  20. Cross metathesis of unsaturated epoxides for the synthesis of polyfunctional building blocks

    PubMed Central

    Abderrezak, Meriem K; Šichová, Kristýna; Dominguez-Boblett, Nancy; Dupé, Antoine; Kabouche, Zahia; Bruneau, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cross metathesis of 1,2-epoxy-5-hexene (1) with methyl acrylate and acrylonitrile was investigated as an entry to the synthesis of polyfunctional compounds. The resulting cross metathesis products were hydrogenated in a tandem fashion employing the residual ruthenium from the metathesis step as the hydrogenation catalyst. Interestingly, the epoxide ring remained unreactive toward this hydrogenation method. The saturated compound resulting from the cross metathesis of 1 with methyl acrylate was transformed by means of nucleophilic ring-opening of the epoxide to furnish a diol, an alkoxy alcohol and an amino alcohol in high yields. PMID:26664605

  1. Ternary liquid-liquid equilibria measurement for epoxidized soybean oil + acetic acid + water.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shuang-Fei; Wang, Li-Sheng; Yan, Guo-Qing; Li, Yi; Feng, Yun-Xia; Linghu, Rong-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Liquid-liquid equilibria (LLE) data were measured for ternary system epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) + acetic acid + water at 313.15, 323.15 and 333.15 K, respectively. The consistency of the measured LLE data was tested, using Othmer-Tobias correlation and root-mean-square deviation (sigma) in mass fraction of water in the lower phase and average value of the absolute difference (AAD) between experimental mass fraction of epoxidized soybean oil in the upper phase and that calculated using Othmer-Tobias correlation.

  2. Regioselective and Stereospecific Copper-Catalyzed Deoxygenation of Epoxides to Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingxun; Zhou, Yu; Lin, Zhenyang; Tong, Rongbiao

    2016-09-16

    Two copper salts (Cu(CF3CO2)2 and IMesCuCl) were identified as earth-abundant, inexpensive, but effective metal catalysts together with diazo malonate for chemo-/regioselective and stereospecific deoxygenation of various epoxides with tolerance of common functional groups (alkene, ketone, ester, p-methoxybenzyl, benzyl, tert-butyldimethylsilyl, and triisopropylsilyl). In particular, the unprecedented regioselectivity allowed for the first time monodeoxygenation of diepoxides to alkenyl epoxides. Density functional theory mechanistic studies showed that the deoxygenation occurred by collapsing the free ylide, unfavoring the possible intuitive pathway via cycloreversion of possible oxetane. PMID:27596225

  3. Green chemistry: Efficient epoxides ring-opening with 1-butanol under microwave irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Vidal, Jesús A.; Durán-Valle, Carlos J.; Ferrera-Escudero, Santiago

    2006-06-01

    Two activated carbons treated with mineral acids (HNO 3 and sulfonitric mixture) have been tested as acid catalysts in the epoxides (1,2-epoxyhexane and styrene oxide) ring-opening reaction with 1-butanol under microwave (MW) irradiation. The mayor obtained product is that resulting of the alcohol addition to the most substituted carbon in the epoxide ring. The most active catalyst is that treated with sulfonitric mixture. The use of a MW oven allows achieving to the complete conversion of styrene oxide in only 2 min.

  4. The Vital Function of Fe3O4@Au nanocomposites for Hydrolase Biosensor Design and Its Application in Detection of Methyl Parathion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yuting; Zhang, Weiying; Lin, Yuehe; Du, Dan

    2013-02-04

    A nanocomposite of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) decorating a magnetic Fe3O4 core was synthesized using cysteamine (SH–NH2) as linker, and characterized by TEM, XPS, UV and electrochemistry. Then a hydrolase biosensor, based on self-assembly of methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH) on the Fe3O4@Au nanocomposite, was developed for sensitive and selective detection of the organophosphorus pesticide (OP) methyl parathion. The magnetic nanocomposite provides an easy way to construct the enzyme biosensor by simply exerting an external magnetic field, and also provides a simple way to renew the electrode surface by removing the magnet. Unlike inhibition-based enzyme biosensors, the hydrolase is not poisoned by OPs and thus is reusable for continuous measurement. AuNPs not only provide a large surface area, high loading efficiency and fast electron transfer, but also stabilize the enzyme through electrostatic interactions. The MPH biosensor shows rapid response and high selectivity for detection of methyl parathion, with a linear range from 0.5 to 1000 ng/mL and a detection limit of 0.1 ng/mL. It also shows acceptable reproducibility and stability. The simplicity and ease of operation of the proposed method has great potential for on-site detection of P–S containing pesticides and provides a promising strategy to construct a robust biosensor.

  5. Phenotypic assessment of THC discriminative stimulus properties in fatty acid amide hydrolase knockout and wildtype mice.

    PubMed

    Walentiny, D Matthew; Vann, Robert E; Wiley, Jenny L

    2015-06-01

    A number of studies have examined the ability of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide to elicit Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-like subjective effects, as modeled through the THC discrimination paradigm. In the present study, we compared transgenic mice lacking fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme primarily responsible for anandamide catabolism, to wildtype counterparts in a THC discrimination procedure. THC (5.6 mg/kg) served as a discriminative stimulus in both genotypes, with similar THC dose-response curves between groups. Anandamide fully substituted for THC in FAAH knockout, but not wildtype, mice. Conversely, the metabolically stable anandamide analog O-1812 fully substituted in both groups, but was more potent in knockouts. The CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant dose-dependently attenuated THC generalization in both groups and anandamide substitution in FAAH knockouts. Pharmacological inhibition of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the primary catabolic enzyme for the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), with JZL184 resulted in full substitution for THC in FAAH knockout mice and nearly full substitution in wildtypes. Quantification of brain endocannabinoid levels revealed expected elevations in anandamide in FAAH knockout mice compared to wildtypes and equipotent dose-dependent elevations in 2-AG following JZL184 administration. Dual inhibition of FAAH and MAGL with JZL195 resulted in roughly equipotent increases in THC-appropriate responding in both groups. While the notable similarity in THC's discriminative stimulus effects across genotype suggests that the increased baseline brain anandamide levels (as seen in FAAH knockout mice) do not alter THC's subjective effects, FAAH knockout mice are more sensitive to the THC-like effects of pharmacologically induced increases in anandamide and MAGL inhibition (e.g., JZL184).

  6. Influenza C virus esterase: analysis of catalytic site, inhibition, and possible function.

    PubMed Central

    Vlasak, R; Muster, T; Lauro, A M; Powers, J C; Palese, P

    1989-01-01

    The active site serine of the acetylesterase of influenza C virus was localized to amino acid 71 of the hemagglutinin-esterase protein by affinity labeling with 3H-labeled diisopropylfluorophosphate. This serine and the adjacent amino acids (Phe-Gly-Asp-Ser) are part of a consensus sequence motif found in serine hydrolases. Since comparative analysis failed to reveal esterase sequence similarities with other serine hydrolases, we suggest that this viral enzyme is a serine hydrolase constituting a new family of serine esterases. Furthermore, we found that the influenza C virus esterase was inhibited by isocoumarin derivatives, with 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin being the most potent inhibitor. Addition of this compound prevented elution of influenza C virus from erythrocytes and inhibited virus infectivity, possibly through inhibition of virus entry into cells. Images PMID:2495370

  7. Influenza C virus esterase: analysis of catalytic site, inhibition, and possible function

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasak, R.; Muster, T.; Lauro, A.M.; Powers, J.C.; Palese, P.

    1989-05-01

    The active site serine of the acetylesterase of influenza C virus was localized to amino acid 71 of the hemagglutinin-esterase protein by affinity labeling with /sup 3/H-labeled diisopropylfluorophosphate. This serine and the adjacent amino acids (Phe-Gly-Asp-Ser) are part of a consensus sequence motif found in serine hydrolases. Since comparative analysis failed to reveal esterase sequence similarities with other serine hydrolases, the authors suggest that this viral enzyme is a serine hydrolase constituting a new family of serine esterases. Furthermore, they found that the influenza C virus esterase was inhibited by isocoumarin derivatives, with 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin being the most potent inhibitor. Addition of this compound prevented elution of influenza C virus from erythrocytes and inhibited virus infectivity, possibly through inhibition of virus entry into cells.

  8. A molecular model for the active site of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Yeh, J C; Borchardt, R T; Vedani, A

    1991-06-01

    S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (AdoHcy hydrolase, EC 3.3.1.1), a specific target for antiviral drug design, catalyzes the hydrolysis of AdoHcy to adenosine (Ado) and homocysteine (Hcy) as well as the synthesis of AdoHcy from Ado and Hcy. The enzyme isolated from different sources has been shown to contain tightly bound NAD+. Based on the 2.0 A-resolution X-ray crystal structure of dogfish lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which is functionally homologous to AdoHcy hydrolase, and the primary sequence of rat liver AdoHcy hydrolase, we have derived a molecular model of an extended active site for AdoHcy hydrolase. The computational mutation was performed using the software MUTAR (Yeh et al., University of Kansas, Lawrence), followed by molecular mechanics optimizations using the programs AMBER (Singh et al., University of California, San Francisco) and YETI (Vedani, University of Kansas). Solvation of the model structure was achieved by use of the program SOLVGEN (Jacober, University of Kansas); 56 water molecules were explicitly included in all refinements. Some of these may be involved in the catalytic reaction. We also studied a model of the complex of AdoHcy hydrolase with NAD+, as well as the ternary complexes of the enzyme, NAD+, and substrate or inhibitor molecules. Our refined model is capable of explaining part of the redox reaction catalyzed by AdoHcy hydrolase and has been used to differentiate the relative binding strength of inhibitors.

  9. Adult-onset liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma in S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Stender, Stefan; Chakrabarti, Rima S.; Xing, Chao; Gotway, Garrett; Cohen, Jonathan C.; Hobbs, Helen H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The etiology of liver disease remains elusive in some adults presenting with severe hepatic dysfunction. Methods and results Here we describe a woman of Pakistani descent who had elevated aminotransferases at age 23. She developed muscle weakness in her mid-20s, and was diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma at age 29. She died without a diagnosis at age 32 after having a liver transplant. Exome sequencing revealed that she was homozygous for a missense mutation (R49H) in AHCY, the gene encoding S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) hydrolase. SAH hydrolase catalyzes the final step in conversion of methionine to homocysteine and inactivating mutations in this enzyme cause a rare autosomal recessive disorder, SAH hydrolase deficiency, that typically presents in infancy. An asymptomatic 7-year old son of the proband is also homozygous for the AHCY-R49H mutation and has elevated serum aminotransferase levels, as well as markedly elevated serum levels of SAH, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and methionine, which are hallmarks of SAH hydrolase deficiency. Conclusion This report reveals several new aspects of SAH hydrolase deficiency. Affected women with SAH hydrolase deficiency can give birth to healthy children. SAH hydrolase deficiency can remain asymptomatic in childhood, and the disorder can be associated with early onset hepatocellular carcinoma. The measurement of serum amino acids should be considered in patients with liver disease or hepatocellular carcinoma of unknown etiology. PMID:26527160

  10. Development of the aza-crown ether metal complexes as artificial hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lan; Li, Fang-zhen; Wu, Jiao-yi; Xie, Jia-qing; Li, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Hydrolases play a crucial role in the biochemical process, which can catalyze the hydrolysis of various compounds like carboxylic esters, phosphoesters, amides, nucleic acids, peptides, and so on. The design of artificial hydrolases has attracted extensive attention due to their scientific significance and potential applications in the field of gene medicine and molecular biology. Numerous macrocyclic metal complexes have been used as artificial hydrolase in the catalytic hydrolysis of the organic substrate. Aza-crown ether for this comment is a special class of the macrocyclic ligand containing both the nitrogen atoms and oxygen atoms in the ring. The studies showed that the aza-crown complexes exhibited high activity of hydrolytic enzyme. However, the aza-crown ether metal complex as artificial hydrolase is still very limited because of its difficulty in synthesis. This review summarizes the development of the aza-crown ether metal complexes as the artificial hydrolase, including the synthesis and catalysis of the transition metal complexes and lanthanide metal complexes of aza-crown ethers. The purpose of this review is to highlight: (1) the relationship between the structure and hydrolytic activity of synthetic hydrolase; (2) the synergistic effect of metal sites and ligands in the course of organic compound hydrolysis; and (3) the design strategies of the aza-crown ethers as hydrolase. PMID:26460062

  11. A Proton Wire and Water Channel Revealed in the Crystal Structure of Isatin Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Bjerregaard-Andersen, Kaare; Sommer, Theis; Jensen, Jan K.; Jochimsen, Bjarne; Etzerodt, Michael; Morth, J. Preben

    2014-01-01

    The high resolution crystal structures of isatin hydrolase from Labrenzia aggregata in the apo and the product state are described. These are the first structures of a functionally characterized metal-dependent hydrolase of this fold. Isatin hydrolase converts isatin to isatinate and belongs to a novel family of metalloenzymes that include the bacterial kynurenine formamidase. The product state, mimicked by bound thioisatinate, reveals a water molecule that bridges the thioisatinate to a proton wire in an adjacent water channel and thus allows the proton released by the reaction to escape only when the product is formed. The functional proton wire present in isatin hydrolase isoform b represents a unique catalytic feature common to all hydrolases is here trapped and visualized for the first time. The local molecular environment required to coordinate thioisatinate allows stronger and more confident identification of orthologous genes encoding isatin hydrolases within the prokaryotic kingdom. The isatin hydrolase orthologues found in human gut bacteria raise the question as to whether the indole-3-acetic acid degradation pathway is present in human gut flora. PMID:24917679

  12. Cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity is abolished in HSL-/- macrophages but unchanged in macrophages lacking KIAA1363.

    PubMed

    Buchebner, Marlene; Pfeifer, Thomas; Rathke, Nora; Chandak, Prakash G; Lass, Achim; Schreiber, Renate; Kratzer, Adelheid; Zimmermann, Robert; Sattler, Wolfgang; Koefeler, Harald; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kostner, Gerhard M; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Chiang, Kyle P; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Cravatt, Benjamin; Kratky, Dagmar

    2010-10-01

    Cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation in macrophages represents a crucial event during foam cell formation, a hallmark of atherogenesis. Here we investigated the role of two previously described CE hydrolases, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and KIAA1363, in macrophage CE hydrolysis. HSL and KIAA1363 exhibited marked differences in their abilities to hydrolyze CE, triacylglycerol (TG), diacylglycerol (DG), and 2-acetyl monoalkylglycerol ether (AcMAGE), a precursor for biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF). HSL efficiently cleaved all four substrates, whereas KIAA1363 hydrolyzed only AcMAGE. This contradicts previous studies suggesting that KIAA1363 is a neutral CE hydrolase. Macrophages of KIAA1363(-/-) and wild-type mice exhibited identical neutral CE hydrolase activity, which was almost abolished in tissues and macrophages of HSL(-/-) mice. Conversely, AcMAGE hydrolase activity was diminished in macrophages and some tissues of KIAA1363(-/-) but unchanged in HSL(-/-) mice. CE turnover was unaffected in macrophages lacking KIAA1363 and HSL, whereas cAMP-dependent cholesterol efflux was influenced by HSL but not by KIAA1363. Despite decreased CE hydrolase activities, HSL(-/-) macrophages exhibited CE accumulation similar to wild-type (WT) macrophages. We conclude that additional enzymes must exist that cooperate with HSL to regulate CE levels in macrophages. KIAA1363 affects AcMAGE hydrolase activity but is of minor importance as a direct CE hydrolase in macrophages.

  13. Human carboxymethylenebutenolidase as a bioactivating hydrolase of olmesartan medoxomil in liver and intestine.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Tomoko; Fujimori, Izumi; Kato, Mitsunori; Noji-Sakikawa, Chisa; Saito, Motoko; Yoshigae, Yasushi; Kubota, Kazuishi; Kurihara, Atsushi; Izumi, Takashi; Ikeda, Toshihiko; Okazaki, Osamu

    2010-04-16

    Olmesartan medoxomil (OM) is a prodrug type angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist widely prescribed as an antihypertensive agent. Herein, we describe the identification and characterization of the OM bioactivating enzyme that hydrolyzes the prodrug and converts to its pharmacologically active metabolite olmesartan in human liver and intestine. The protein was purified from human liver cytosol by successive column chromatography and was identified by mass spectrometry to be a carboxymethylenebutenolidase (CMBL) homolog. Human CMBL, whose endogenous function has still not been reported, is a human homolog of Pseudomonas dienelactone hydrolase involved in the bacterial halocatechol degradation pathway. The ubiquitous expression of human CMBL gene transcript in various tissues was observed. The recombinant human CMBL expressed in mammalian cells was clearly shown to activate OM. By comparing the enzyme kinetics and chemical inhibition properties between the recombinant protein and human tissue preparations, CMBL was demonstrated to be the primary OM bioactivating enzyme in the liver and intestine. The recombinant CMBL also converted other prodrugs having the same ester structure as OM, faropenem medoxomil and lenampicillin, to their active metabolites. CMBL exhibited a unique sensitivity to chemical inhibitors, thus, being distinguishable from other known esterases. Site-directed mutagenesis on the putative active residue Cys(132) of the recombinant CMBL caused a drastic reduction of the OM-hydrolyzing activity. We report for the first time that CMBL serves as a key enzyme in the bioactivation of OM, hydrolyzing the ester bond of the prodrug type xenobiotics. PMID:20177059

  14. The lung lysosomal hydrolases and phospholipase A in acute experimental pancreatitis with reference to heparin treatment.

    PubMed

    Wereszczyńska, U; Długosz, J; Gabryelewicz, A; Andrzejewska, A

    1986-10-01

    The pulmonary complications are severe sequeles of acute pancreatitis. The pathogenesis of these complications is unsolved. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the status of lung lysosomes and phospholipase A activity in acute experimental pancreatitis (AEP) and the effect of heparin as a potentially protective agent. Taurocholate-induced AEP in rats lasting 24 and 48 hours was treated with heparin intraperitoneally (2 mg/kg every 8 hours). The total activity of cathepsins and B-glucuronidase in lysosomal enriched subfraction increased markedly during 48 hours of AEP in untreated animals, but the relative free activity was maximal after 24 hours. Free activity of cathepsins and acid phosphatase in supernatant was maximal after 24 hours. The phospholipase A activity was maximally elevated (more than twofold) after 48 hours. Heparin prevented the increase of activity of B-glucuronidase, depressed the relative free activity of all investigated lysosomal hydrolases and inhibited the phospholipase A activity in the lung homogenate. Our results indicate the significance of labilization of lung lysosomes and increment of phospholipase A activity in the lungs in the damage of this organ during AEP in the rats, and suggest the beneficial effect of heparin on these factors. PMID:2431400

  15. Attenuation of Cystitis and Pain Sensation in Mice Lacking Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zun-Yi; Wang, Peiqing; Hillard, Cecilia J.; Bjorling, Dale E.

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids, such as N-arachidonylethanolamine (AEA, also called anandamide), exert potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is primarily responsible for degradation of AEA, and deletion of FAAH increases AEA content in various tissues. Since FAAH has been shown to be present in the bladder of various species, we compared bladder function, severity of experimental cystitis, and cystitis-associated referred hyperalgesia in male wild type (WT) and FAAH knock-out (KO) mice. Basal concentrations of AEA were greater, and the severity of cyclophosphamide (CYP)-induced cystitis was reduced in bladders from FAAH KO compared to WT mice. Cystitis-associated increased peripheral sensitivity to mechanical stimuli and enhanced bladder activity (as reflected by increased voiding frequency) were attenuated in FAAH KO compared to WT mice. Further, abundances of mRNA for several pro-inflammatory compounds were increased in bladder mucosa after CYP treatment of WT mice, and this increase was inhibited in FAAH KO mice. These data indicate that endogenous substrates of FAAH, including the cannabinoid AEA, play an inhibitory role in bladder inflammation and subsequent changes in pain perception. Therefore, FAAH could be a therapeutic target to treat clinical symptoms of painful inflammatory bladder diseases. PMID:25374388

  16. Human Carboxymethylenebutenolidase as a Bioactivating Hydrolase of Olmesartan Medoxomil in Liver and Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Tomoko; Fujimori, Izumi; Kato, Mitsunori; Noji-Sakikawa, Chisa; Saito, Motoko; Yoshigae, Yasushi; Kubota, Kazuishi; Kurihara, Atsushi; Izumi, Takashi; Ikeda, Toshihiko; Okazaki, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    Olmesartan medoxomil (OM) is a prodrug type angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist widely prescribed as an antihypertensive agent. Herein, we describe the identification and characterization of the OM bioactivating enzyme that hydrolyzes the prodrug and converts to its pharmacologically active metabolite olmesartan in human liver and intestine. The protein was purified from human liver cytosol by successive column chromatography and was identified by mass spectrometry to be a carboxymethylenebutenolidase (CMBL) homolog. Human CMBL, whose endogenous function has still not been reported, is a human homolog of Pseudomonas dienelactone hydrolase involved in the bacterial halocatechol degradation pathway. The ubiquitous expression of human CMBL gene transcript in various tissues was observed. The recombinant human CMBL expressed in mammalian cells was clearly shown to activate OM. By comparing the enzyme kinetics and chemical inhibition properties between the recombinant protein and human tissue preparations, CMBL was demonstrated to be the primary OM bioactivating enzyme in the liver and intestine. The recombinant CMBL also converted other prodrugs having the same ester structure as OM, faropenem medoxomil and lenampicillin, to their active metabolites. CMBL exhibited a unique sensitivity to chemical inhibitors, thus, being distinguishable from other known esterases. Site-directed mutagenesis on the putative active residue Cys132 of the recombinant CMBL caused a drastic reduction of the OM-hydrolyzing activity. We report for the first time that CMBL serves as a key enzyme in the bioactivation of OM, hydrolyzing the ester bond of the prodrug type xenobiotics. PMID:20177059

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cis-epoxysuccinate hydrolase from Bordetella sp. BK-52.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haifeng; Bao, Wenna; Xie, Zhipeng; Zhang, Jianguo; Li, Yongquan

    2010-04-01

    A cis-epoxysuccinate hydrolase (CESH) from Bordetella sp. BK-52 was purified 51.4-fold with a yield of 27.1% using ammonium sulphate precipitation, ionic exchange, hydrophobic interaction, molecular sieve chromatograph and an additional anion exchange chromatography. The CESH was stable in a broad range of temperature (up to 50 degrees C) and pH (4.0-10.0) with optima of 40 degrees C and pH6.5, respectively. It could be partially inhibited by EDTA-Na2, Ag+, SDS and DTT, while slightly enhanced by Ba2+ and Ca2+. The enzyme exhibited high stereospecificity in D(-)-tartaric acid (enantiomeric excess value higher than 99 %) with Km and Vmax value of 18.67 mM and 94.34 micronM/min/mg for disodium cis-epoxysuccinate, respectively. The Bordetella sp. BK-52 CESH gene, which contained 885 nucleotides (open reading frame) encoding 294 amino acids with a molecular mass of about 32 kDa, was successfully overexpressed in Escherichia coli using a T7/lac promoter vector and the enzyme activity increased 42-times compared to original strain. It may be an industrial biocatalyst for the preparation of D(-)-tartaric acid.

  18. H19 lncRNA alters DNA methylation genome wide by regulating S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jichun; Yang, Lihua; Zhong, Tianyu; Mueller, Martin; Men, Yi; Zhang, Na; Xie, Juanke; Giang, Karolyn; Chung, Hunter; Sun, Xueguang; Lu, Lingeng; Carmichael, Gordon G; Taylor, Hugh S; Huang, Yingqun

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is essential for mammalian development and physiology. Here we report that the developmentally regulated H19 lncRNA binds to and inhibits S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH), the only mammalian enzyme capable of hydrolysing S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). SAH is a potent feedback inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferases that methylate diverse cellular components, including DNA, RNA, proteins, lipids and neurotransmitters. We show that H19 knockdown activates SAHH, leading to increased DNMT3B-mediated methylation of an lncRNA-encoding gene Nctc1 within the Igf2-H19-Nctc1 locus. Genome-wide methylation profiling reveals methylation changes at numerous gene loci consistent with SAHH modulation by H19. Our results uncover an unanticipated regulatory circuit involving broad epigenetic alterations by a single abundantly expressed lncRNA that may underlie gene methylation dynamics of development and diseases and suggest that this mode of regulation may extend to other cellular components. PMID:26687445

  19. S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) accelerates flagellar regeneration in Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghua; Zhu, Liqiang; Yan, Yunmeng; Chai, Dandan; Li, Jie; Xue, Lexun

    2013-08-01

    S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) is an enzyme, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) which is formed after the donation of the methyl group of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to a methyl acceptor in methylation reaction. As a potent regulator of methylation, SAHH plays a critical role in methylation reaction in the cells. Here we cloned the SAHH gene from unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina (dsSAHH) and investigated its effects on flagellar regeneration of D. salina, and found that dsSAHH was upregulated both at the protein and the transcription levels during pH shock-triggered flagellar regeneration of D. salina. The flagellar regeneration was accelerated when dsSAHH was overexpressed, but it was inhibited by SAHH inhibitor 3-deazaadenosine (DZA). Moreover, a receptor for activated C kinase 1 from D. salina (dsRACK1), which was identified to interact with dsSAHH, was increased when dsSAHH was overexpressed in D. salina as shown by real-time PCR. The findings of this study suggest that dsSAHH may participate in the regulation of flagellar regeneration of D. salina.

  20. Cloning and characterization of two rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase genes from Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed Central

    Suykerbuyk, M E; Kester, H C; Schaap, P J; Stam, H; Musters, W; Visser, J

    1997-01-01

    A rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase gene of Aspergillus aculeatus was used as a probe for the cloning of two rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase genes of Aspergillus niger. The corresponding proteins, rhamnogalacturonan hydrolases A and B, are 78 and 72% identical, respectively, with the A. aculeatus enzyme. In A. niger cultures which were shifted from growth on sucrose to growth on apple pectin as a carbon source, the expression of the rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase A gene (rhgA) was transiently induced after 3 h of growth on apple pectin. The rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase B gene was not induced by apple pectin, but the rhgB gene was derepressed after 18 h of growth on either apple pectin or sucrose. Gene fusions of the A. niger rhgA and rhgB coding regions with the strong and inducible Aspergillus awamori exlA promoter were used to obtain high-producing A. awamori transformants which were then used for the purification of the two A. niger rhamnogalacturonan hydrolases. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography of oligomeric degradation products showed that optimal degradation of an isolated highly branched pectin fraction by A. niger rhamnogalacturonan hydrolases A and B occurred at pH 3.6 and 4.1, respectively. The specific activities of rhamnogalacturonan hydrolases A and B were then 0.9 and 0.4 U/mg, respectively, which is significantly lower than the specific activity of A. aculeatus rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase (2.5 U/mg at an optimal pH of 4.5). Compared to the A enzymes, the A. niger B enzyme appears to have a different substrate specificity, since additional oligomers are formed. PMID:9212401

  1. [Polyenzymatic activation of cellular hydrolases induced by interferon; its role in cytolysis and other cellular manifestations induced by interferon].

    PubMed

    Zagury, D; Mazière, J C; Morgan, D; Fouchard, M; Gagne, I; Hosli, P

    1982-01-25

    Interferon (IFN) treatment of human effector T cells activates CMC directed against K562 targets. An increase of the activity of the different hydrolytic enzymes tested (hexosaminidase and acid-phosphatase) measured in the effector cell population parallels cytolysis activation. IFN and IFN inducers (PIC) treatment of cultured murine L-929 cells generate molecular mediated cytolysis. An increase of hydrolytic enzyme activity (hexosaminidase; B-glucuronidase, acid and alkalin phosphatases) precedes cell lysis. Thus, in both cytolytic systems, IFN induced a polyenzymatic activation of hydrolases. This activation is similar to coordinate enzyme induction discovered by Hosli [16] in pathological and experimental instances, when absorbed substrates cannot be hydrolyzed by lack of specific enzymes. Activation of hydrolytic enzymes induced by IFN which determines its enhancing effect on CMC and on fibroblast autolysis [17] could speculatively explain other effects of IFN such as antiviral action, diminution of cell protein synthesis, inhibition of cell division or molecular alterations of cell surface. PMID:6177383

  2. Sultones and Sultines via a Julia-Kocienski Reaction of Epoxides.

    PubMed

    Smith, Geoffrey M T; Burton, Paul M; Bray, Christopher D

    2015-12-01

    The development of the homologous Julia-Kocienski reaction has led to the discovery of two new reaction modes of epoxides with sulfones. These pathways allow rapid and direct access to a range of γ-sultones and γ-sultines.

  3. Synthesis of an Epoxide Carbonylation Catalyst: Exploration of Contemporary Chemistry for Advanced Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getzler, Yutan D. Y. L.; Schmidt, Joseph A. R.; Coates, Geoffrey W.

    2005-01-01

    A class of highly active, well-defined compounds for the catalytic carbonylation of epoxides and aziridines to beta-lactones and beta-lactams are introduced. The synthesis of one of the catalysts involves a simple imine condensation to form the ligand followed by air-sensitive metalation and salt metathesis steps.

  4. Enzymatic epoxidation of soybean oil using ionic liquid as reaction media.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shangde; Li, Ping; Bi, Yanlan; Xiao, Fugang

    2014-01-01

    An ionic liquid (IL) system for the enzymatic epoxidation of soybean oil was studied. The effects of active oxygen carriers (different fatty acids) and ILs ([Bmim]PF6 and [Bmim]BF4) on the enzymatic epoxidation were investigated. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to study and optimize the effects of variables (reaction time, reaction temperature, molar ratio of H2O2/C=C-bonds, and molar ratio of fatty acid/C=C-bonds) on the epoxy oxygen group content (EOC) of epoxidized soybean oil (ESO). Results showed that the enzymatic epoxidation of soybean oil can be enhanced using tetradecanoic acid (C13H27COOH) as active oxygen carrier and [Bmim]PF6 as reaction medium. The optimum EOC of ESO was 5.9 ± 0.3% under the following conditions: reaction temperature 46°C, reaction time 11 h, enzyme load 3% (w/w, relative to the weight of soybean oil), molar ratio of H2O2/C=C-bonds 1.8:1, and molar ratio of C13H27COOH/C=C-bonds 0.5:1.

  5. INTERACTION OF BENZO(A)PYRENE DIOL EPOXIDE WITH SVAO MINICHROMOSOMES

    SciTech Connect

    Gamper, Howard B.; Yokota, Hisao A.; Bartholomew, James C.

    1980-03-01

    SV40 minichromosomes were reacted with (+)7{beta},8{alpha}-dihydroxy-9{alpha},10{alpha}-epoxy- 7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BaP diol epoxide). Low levels of modification (< 5 DNA adducts/minichromosome) did not detectably alter the structure of the minichromosomes but high levels (> 200 DNA adducts/minichromosome) led to extensive fragmentation. Relative to naked SV40 DNA BaP diol epoxide induced alkylation and strand scission of minichromosomal DNA was reduced or enhanced by factors of 1.5 and 2.0, respectively. The reduction in covalent binding was attributed to the presence of histones, which competed with DNA for the hydrocarbon and reduced the probability of BaP diol epoxide intercalation by tightening the helix. The enhancement of strand scission was probably due to the catalytic effect of histones on the rate of S-elimination at apurinic sites, although an altered adduct profile or the presence of a repair endonuclease were not excluded. Staphylococcal nuclease digestion indicated that BaP dial epoxide randomly alkylated the minichromosomal DNA. This is in contrast to studies with cellular chromatin where internucleosomal DNA was preferentially modified. Differences in the minichromosomal protein complement were responsible for this altered susceptibility.

  6. Catalytic epoxidation by perrhenate through the formation of organic-phase supramolecular ion pairs.

    PubMed

    Cokoja, Mirza; Markovits, Iulius I E; Anthofer, Michael H; Poplata, Saner; Pöthig, Alexander; Morris, Danny S; Tasker, Peter A; Herrmann, Wolfgang A; Kühn, Fritz E; Love, Jason B

    2015-02-25

    Organic-phase supramolecular ion pair (SIP) host-guest assemblies of perrhenate anions (ReO4(-)) with ammonium amide receptor cations are reported. These compounds act as catalysts for the epoxidation of alkenes by aqueous hydrogen peroxide under biphasic conditions and can be recycled several times with no loss in activity.

  7. Formation of furan fatty alkyl esters from their bis-epoxide fatty esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reactions of epoxidized alkyl soyate with four different alcohols: ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, 2-ethylhexanol, benzyl alcohol, in the presence of Bronsted acid catalyst, were investigated. Products that were not reported in prior studies of similar reactions were found. These were furan fatty acid a...

  8. (Salen)Mn(III) Catalyzed Asymmetric Epoxidation Reactions by Hydrogen Peroxide in Water: A Green Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Ballistreri, Francesco Paolo; Gangemi, Chiara M. A.; Pappalardo, Andrea; Tomaselli, Gaetano A.; Toscano, Rosa Maria; Trusso Sfrazzetto, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Enantioselective epoxidation reactions of some chosen reactive alkenes by a chiral Mn(III) salen catalyst were performed in H2O employing H2O2 as oxidant and diethyltetradecylamine N-oxide (AOE-14) as surfactant. This procedure represents an environmentally benign protocol which leads to e.e. values ranging from good to excellent (up to 95%). PMID:27420047

  9. Formation of furan fatty alkyl esters from their bis-epoxide fatty esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reactions of epoxidized alkyl soyate with four different alcohols: ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, 2-ethylhexanol, and benzyl alcohol were investigated in the presence of Bronsted acid catalyst. Products not reported in prior studies of similar reactions were found. These were furan fatty acid alkyl est...

  10. Differences in Catalytic Sites for CO Oxidation and Propylene Epoxidation on Au Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.S.; Stach, E.; Zhang, R.; Akatay, M.C.; Baertsch, C.D.; Ribeiro, F.H.; Delgass, W.N.

    2011-08-29

    Sintering and increased Au loading of Au/TS-1 causes the rate of CO oxidation per mole of Au to increase, whereas that for epoxidation of propylene in O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} decreases. This opposite trend in rate behavior shows that the catalytic sites for the two reactions must be different.

  11. EPOXIDATION OF SMALL ORGANIC MOLECULES USING A SPINNING TUBE-IN-TUBE REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The commodity-scale epoxidation of several organic molecules has been carried out using a Spinning Tube-in-Tube (STTr) reactor (manufactured by Kreido Laboratories). This reactor, which embodies and facilitates the use of Green Chemistry principles and Process Intensification, a...

  12. Highly selective oxidative cleavage of beta-cyclodextrin-epoxide/aziridine complexes with IBX in water.

    PubMed

    Surendra, K; Krishnaveni, N Srilakshmi; Reddy, M Arjun; Nageswar, Y V D; Rao, K Rama

    2003-11-14

    Water, an environmentally friendly reaction medium, has been utilized for the reaction of IBX with various epoxides 1 and aziridines 2 as their beta-cyclodextrin complexes to afford for the first time alpha-hydroxyketones 3 and alpha-aminoketones 4, respectively.

  13. Synthesis of epoxidized cardanol and its antioxidative properties for vegetable oils and biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel antioxidant epoxidized cardanol (ECD), derived from cardanol, was synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR. Oxidative stability of ECD used in vegetable oils and biodiesel was evaluated by pressurized differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC) and the Rancimat method, respect...

  14. Diastereoselective synthesis of CF3-substituted, epoxide-fused heterocycles with β-(trifluoromethyl)vinylsulfonium salts.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Sven P; West, Thomas H; McGarrigle, Eoghan M; Aggarwal, Varinder K

    2012-12-21

    CF(3)-substituted vinyl diphenylsulfonium triflate is an effective annulation reagent for the formation of α-CF(3) substituted, epoxide-fused heterocycles (pyrrolidines, piperidines, and tetrahydrofurans). This simple method affords a variety of valuable heterocyclic building blocks in a highly diastereoselective manner (dr >20:1). PMID:23231752

  15. Metabolism of methaqualone by the epoxide-diol pathway in man and the rat.

    PubMed

    Stillwell, W G; Gregory, P A; Horning, M G

    1975-01-01

    The metabolism of methaqualone (2-methyl-3-o-tolyl-4(3H)-quinazolinone) has been studied in man and the rat using gas phase analytical methods. Seven new metabolites formed by the epoxide-diol pathway were detected in human urine after methaqualone administration. Five of these compounds were characterized as dihydrodiols and two as hydroxydihydrodiols. The seven dihydrodiol metabolites were present in the nonhydrolyzed fraction isolated from urine. After intraperitoneal administration of methaqualone to the rat (40 mg/kg) the major monohydroxyl metabolites of the drug in hydrolyzed urine were identified as 2-methyl-3-(2'-hydroxymethylphenyl)-4(3H)-quinazolinone (I) and 2-hydroxymethyl-3-o-tolyl-4(3H)-quinazolinone (II). Two dihydroxyl metabolites were also present, but only trace amounts of a dihydrodiol were detected. The major monohydroxyl metabolites of methaqualone detected in human urine after enzymic hydrolysis were I, II, 2-methyl-3-(3'-hydroxy-2'-methylphenyl)-4(3H)-quinazolinone (III), and 2-methyl-3-(4'-hydroxy-2'-methylphenyl)-4(3H)-quinazolinone (IV). Hydroxylation of the tolyl moiety of methaqualone probably occurs by way of an epoxide intermediate. The phenols, III and IV, may be formed from an epoxide or from the dihydrodiol(s) by enzymic or nonenzymic reactions. The results obtained suggest that epoxidation of methaqualone represents a major pathway of metabolism in the human.

  16. Application of hydrated and anhydrous fluroantimonic acids in the polymerization of epoxidized soybean oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymerizations of epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) were catalyzed by the superacids, fluroantimonic acid hexahydrate (HSbF6•6H2O) and anhydrous fluroantimonic acid (HSbF6) using ethyl acetate solvent. This work was conducted in an effort to develop useful biodegradable polymers from renewable resources...

  17. Development of epoxidized soybean oil and soy fibre composites with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS) nano reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Ryan Sietze

    Soy fibre and soybean oil were utilized to produce a bio-composite targeted as a substitute for conventional petroleum-based materials. The study was divided into two parts; the first was the development of a bio-epoxy that consisted of conventional epoxy, epoxidized soybean oil, and two types of functionalized POSS. The second part of the study involved blending of the bio-epoxy with titanate treated soy fibre. Combined incorporation of epoxide and amine functionalized POSS in the bio-epoxy matrix resulted in a 29% impact strength improvement compared to the petroleum-based epoxy. Incorporation of the epoxide functionalized POSS resulted in improvements in tensile strength by 8%, tensile modulus by 2%, and an increase in the glass transition temperature by 4% compared to the petroleum-based epoxy and epoxidized soybean oil hybrid. The coupling of titanate to soy fibre in comparison to the soy fibre without titanate treatment resulted in an impact strength improvement of 37%. Furthermore, the coupling of titanate increased the tensile strength and tensile modulus by 24% and 22% respectively, and reduced the water absorption by 70%.

  18. Genes encoding vitamin-K epoxide reductase are present in Drosophila and trypanosomatid protists.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Hugh M

    2004-10-01

    Vitamin-K epoxide reductase is encoded by the VKORC1 gene in mammals and other vertebrates, which also have a paralog, VKORC1L1. Single homologs are present in basal deuterostome and insect genomes, including Drosophila, and three trypanosomatid protists. VKOR is therefore an ancient gene/protein that can be studied in the Drosophila model system.

  19. Thermal behavior of epoxidized cardanol diethyl phosphate as novel renewable plasticizer for poly(vinyl chloride)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel plasticizer, epoxidized cardanol diethyl phosphate (ECEP), based on cardanol was synthesized. Chemical structure of ECEP was characterized by fourier transform infrared (FTIR), 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance(1H NMR) and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance(13C NMR) spectroscopy. Effects of ECEP sub...

  20. Oxodiperoxo molybdenum modified mesoporous MCM-41 materials for the catalytic epoxidation of cyclooctene.

    PubMed

    Jia, Mingjun; Thiel, Werner R

    2002-10-21

    A hybrid heterogeneous catalyst system, which has been synthesized by covalently anchoring oxodiperoxo molybdenum chelate complexes onto the surface of mesoporous MCM-41, is highly active and truly heterogeneous for the liquid-phase epoxidation of cyclooctene with tBuOOH as the oxygen source.

  1. Surface Tension Studies of Alkyl Esters and Epoxidized Alkyl Esters Relevant to Oleochemically Based Fuel Additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the surface tension of several epoxidized oleochemicals and their comparable fatty esters at temperatures between 25 and 60 deg C. Surface tensions of the olefins measured at 40 deg C range from 25.9 mN m-1, for isobutyl oleate, to 28.4 mN m-1 for methyl linoleate. The epoxy versions of ...

  2. Graphene oxide as an acid catalyst for the room temperature ring opening of epoxides.

    PubMed

    Dhakshinamoorthy, Amarajothi; Alvaro, Mercedes; Concepción, Patricia; Fornés, Vicente; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2012-06-01

    The minute amount of hydrogen sulfate groups introduced into the graphene oxide (GO) obtained by Hummers oxidation of graphite renders this material as a highly efficient, recyclable acid catalyst for the ring opening of epoxides with methanol and other primary alcohols as nucleophile and solvent. PMID:22534622

  3. 40 CFR 63.1431 - Process vent annual epoxides emission factor plan requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... factor plan requirements. 63.1431 Section 63.1431 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Polyether Polyols Production § 63.1431 Process vent annual epoxides emission factor plan requirements. (a) Applicability of emission factor plan requirements. An owner or operator electing to comply with an...

  4. Boron Trifluoride Catalized Ring-Opening Polymerization of Epoxidized Soybean Oil in Liquid Carbon Dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BF3.OEt2) catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of epoxidized soybean oil (ESO), in liquid carbon dioxide, was conducted in an effort to develop useful biobased biodegradable polymers. The resulting polymers (RPESO) were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, differ...

  5. Lewis Acid Catalyzed Ring-opening Polymerization of Epoxidized Soybean Oil in Liquid Carbon Dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ring-opening polymerization of epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) catalyzed by boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BF3•OEt2), in liquid carbon dioxide, was conducted in an effort to develop useful biobased biodegradable polymers. The resulting polymers (RPESO) were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, diff...

  6. Preferential Glutathione Conjugation of a Reverse Diol Epoxide Compared to a Bay Region Diol Epoxide of Phenanthrene in Human Hepatocytes: Relevance to Molecular Epidemiology Studies of Glutathione-S-Transferase Polymorphisms and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Stephen S.; Berg, Jeannette Zinggeler; Hochalter, J. Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Bay region diol epoxides are recognized ultimate carcinogens of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and in vitro studies have demonstrated that they can be detoxified by conjugation with glutathione, leading to the widely investigated hypothesis that individuals with low activity forms of glutathione-S-transferases are at higher risk of PAH induced cancer, a hypothesis that has found at most weak support in molecular epidemiology studies. A weakness in this hypothesis was that the mercapturic acids resulting from conjugation of PAH bay region diol epoxides had never been identified in human urine. We recently analyzed smokers’ urine for mercapturic acids derived from phenanthrene, the simplest PAH with a bay region. The only phenanthrene diol epoxide-derived mercapturic acid in smokers’ urine was produced from the reverse diol epoxide, anti-phenanthrene-3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide (11), not the bay region diol epoxide, anti-phenanthrene-1,2-diol-3,4-epoxide (10), which does not support the hypothesis noted above. In this study, we extended these results by examining the conjugation of phenanthrene metabolites with glutathione in human hepatocytes. We identified the mercapturic acid N-acetyl-S-(r-4,t-2,3-trihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-c-1-phenanthryl)-L-cysteine (14a), (0.33–35.9 pmol/mL at 10 µM 8, 24h incubation, N = 10) in all incubations with phenanthrene-3,4-diol (8) and the corresponding diol epoxide 11, but no mercapturic acids were detected in incubations with phenanthrene-1,2-diol (7) and only trace amounts were observed in incubations with the corresponding bay region diol epoxide 10. Taken together with our previous results, these studies clearly demonstrate that glutathione conjugation of a reverse diol epoxide of phenanthrene is favored over conjugation of a bay region diol epoxide. Since reverse diol epoxides of PAH are generally weakly or non-mutagenic/carcinogenic, these results, if generalizable to other PAH, do not support the widely held

  7. Plasma biomarker identification in S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sedic, Mirela; Kraljevic Pavelic, Sandra; Cindric, Mario; Vissers, Johannes P C; Peronja, Marija; Josic, Djuro; Cuk, Mario; Fumic, Ksenija; Pavelic, Krešimir; Baric, Ivo

    2011-08-01

    S-Adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (AHCY) deficiency is a rare congenital disorder in methionine metabolism clinically characterized by white matter atrophy, delayed myelination, slowly progressive myopathy, retarded psychomotor development and mildly active chronic hepatitis. In the present study, we utilized a comparative proteomics strategy based on 2-DE/MALDI-MS and LC/ESI-MS to analyze plasma proteins from three AHCY-deficient patients prior to and after receiving dietary treatment designed to alleviate disease symptoms. Obtained results revealed candidate biomarkers for the detection of myopathy specifically associated with AHCY deficiency, such as carbonic anhydrase 3, creatine kinase, and thrombospondin 4. Several proteins mediating T-cell activation and function were identified as well, including attractin and diacylglycerol kinase α. Further validation and functional analysis of identified proteins with clinical value would ensure that these biomarkers make their way into routine diagnosis and management of AHCY deficiency.

  8. Vesicle formation in hydrocarbons assisted with microbial hydrolases and biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Gnanamani, A; Kavitha, V; Sekaran, G; Rajakumar, G Suseela

    2008-12-01

    The present study demonstrates the role of microbial hydrolases in the transformation of hydrocarbons (soybean, sunflower, groundnut and gingelly oil, etc.) to vesicles. The combined effect of lipolytic enzyme generation and biosurfactants production during microbial growth at optimized media and environmental conditions mediates this transformation. Among the microbial species, Candida albicans exhibit complete transformation compared to Pseudomonads and Bacillus sps. Within hydrocarbons, only soybean and sunflower oils transformed to solid mass and no change with the remaining oils. Characterization of the vesicles revealed an increase in total weight by 160-180% compared to the original weight of hydrocarbon taken for the study and more than 73% increases in viscosity. Acid value and saponification value also showed an increase, respectively, by 78 and 84%. The bound water content estimated was 26%. Light microscopic analysis exhibit, presence of unilamellar and bi-lamellar structures. PMID:18829271

  9. Characterization of intracellular pteroylpolyglutamate hydrolase (PPH) from human intestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.T.Y.; Chandler, C.J.; Halsted, C.H.

    1986-03-01

    There are two forms of pteroylpolyglutamate hydrolase (PPH) in the human intestinal mucosa, one in the brush border membrane and the other intracellular; brush border PPH is an exopeptidase with optimal activity at pH 6.5 and a requirement for zinc. The presence study characterized human intracellular PPH and compared its properties to those of brush border PPH. Intracellular PPH was purified 30-fold. The enzyme had a MW of 75,000 by gel filtration, was optimally active at pH 4.5, and had an isoelectric point at pH 8.0. In contrast to brush border PPH, intracellular PPH was unstable at increasing temperatures, was unaffected by dialysis against chelating agents and showed no requirement for Zn/sup 2 +/. Using PteGlu/sub 2/(/sup 14/C)Glu as substrate, they demonstrated a K/sub m/ of 1.2 ..mu..M and increasing affinity for folates with longer glutamate chains. Intracellular PPH required the complete folic acid (PteGlu) moiety and a ..gamma..-glutamyl linkage for activity. Using ion exchange chromatography and an HPLC method to determine the hydrolytic products of the reaction, they found intracellular PPH could cleave both internal and terminal ..gamma..-glutamyl linkages, with PteGlu as an end product. After subcellular fractionation of the mucosa, PPH was found in the lysosomes. In summary, the distinct characteristics of brush border and intracellular PPH suggest that the two hydrolases serve different roles in folate metabolism.

  10. Mononuclear Nonheme High-Spin Iron(III)-Acylperoxo Complexes in Olefin Epoxidation and Alkane Hydroxylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Lee, Yong-Min; Clémancey, Martin; Seo, Mi Sook; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Latour, Jean-Marc; Nam, Wonwoo

    2016-02-24

    Mononuclear nonheme high-spin iron(III)-acylperoxo complexes bearing an N-methylated cyclam ligand were synthesized, spectroscopically characterized, and investigated in olefin epoxidation and alkane hydroxylation reactions. In the epoxidation of olefins, epoxides were yielded as the major products with high stereo-, chemo-, and enantioselectivities; cis- and trans-stilbenes were oxidized to cis- and trans-stilbene oxides, respectively. In the epoxidation of cyclohexene, cyclohexene oxide was formed as the major product with a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) value of 1.0, indicating that nonheme iron(III)-acylperoxo complexes prefer C═C epoxidation to allylic C-H bond activation. Olefin epoxidation by chiral iron(III)-acylperoxo complexes afforded epoxides with high enantioselectivity, suggesting that iron(III)-acylperoxo species, not high-valent iron-oxo species, are the epoxidizing agent. In alkane hydroxylation reactions, iron(III)-acylperoxo complexes hydroxylated C-H bonds as strong as those in cyclohexane at -40 °C, wherein (a) alcohols were yielded as the major products with high regio- and stereoselectivities, (b) activation of C-H bonds by the iron(III)-acylperoxo species was the rate-determining step with a large KIE value and good correlation between reaction rates and bond dissociation energies of alkanes, and (c) the oxygen atom in the alcohol product was from the iron(III)-acylperoxo species, not from molecular oxygen. In isotopically labeled water (H2(18)O) experiments, incorporation of (18)O from H2(18)O into oxygenated products was not observed in the epoxidation and hydroxylation reactions. On the basis of mechanistic studies, we conclude that mononuclear nonheme high-spin iron(III)-acylperoxo complexes are strong oxidants capable of oxygenating hydrocarbons prior to their conversion into iron-oxo species via O-O bond cleavage.

  11. Pilot scale production, characterization, and optimization of epoxidized vegetable oil-based resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monono, Ewumbua Menyoli

    Novel epoxidized sucrose soyate (ESS) resins perform much better than other vegetable oil-based resins; thus, they are of current interest for commercial scale production and for a wide range of applications in coatings and polymeric materials. However, no work has been published that successfully scaled-up the reaction above a 1 kg batch size. To achieve this goal, canola oil was first epoxidized at a 300 g scale to study the epoxidation rate and thermal profile at different hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) addition rates, bath temperatures, and reaction times. At least 83% conversion of double bonds to oxirane was achieved by 2.5 h, and the reaction temperature was 8-15 °C higher than the water bath temperature within the first 30-40 min of epoxidation. A 38 L stainless steel kettle was modified as a reactor to produce 10 kg of ESS. Twenty 7-10 kg batches of ESS were produced with an overall 87.5% resin yield and > 98% conversion after batch three. The conversion and resin quality were consistent across the batches due to the modifications on the reaction that improved mixing and reaction temperature control within 55-65 oC. The total production time was reduced from 8 to 4 days due to the fabrication of a 40 L separatory funnel for both washing and filtration. A math model was developed to optimize the epoxidation process. This was done by using the Box-Behnken design to model the conversion at various acetic acid, H2O2, and Amberlite ratios and at various reaction temperatures and times. The model had an adjusted R2 of 97.6% and predicted R2 of 96.8%. The model showed that reagent amounts and time can be reduced by 18% without compromising the desired conversion value and quality.

  12. Titania-silica mixed oxides. II. Catalytic behaviour in olefin epoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hutter, R.; Mallat, T.; Baiker, A.

    1995-04-15

    Various titania-silica aerogels prepared by an alkoxide-sol-gel route have been tested in the epoxidation of bulky olefins using cumene hydroperoxide as oxidant. The drying method, the titanium content between 2 and 20 wt%, and the calcination temperature between 473 and 1073 K were the most important preparation parameters, influencing the catalytic behaviour of the aerogels. The aerogels dried by semicontinuous extraction with supercritical CO{sub 2} at low temperature (LT aerogel) were found to be much more efficient epoxidation catalysts than aerogels prepared by high-temperature supercritical drying and conventionally dried xerogels. The reaction rate of cyclohexene epoxidation over LT aerogels increased monotonically with increasing Ti content. In the range of 333-363 K the catalysts containing 20 wt% TiO{sub 2} (20LT) showed high activity and selectivity (79-93% to peroxide and 87-100% to epoxide) in the oxidation of various cyclic olefins, including cyclododecene, norbornene, cyclohexene, and limonene. Catalytic experiments, FTIR, and UV-vis spectroscopy indicated that the LT aerogels consist of two different types of active species: titanium well-dispersed in the silica matrix and titania nanodomains. The key factors determining the activity and selectivity of sol-gel titania-silica catalysts are the morphology (surface area and pore size) and the relative proportions of Ti-O-Si and Ti-O-Ti structural parts. A comparative study of the epoxidation of cyclohexene, cyclododecene, and norbornene over structurally different titania-silica catalysts, indicates that 20LT shows better catalytic behaviour in these reactions than Ti zeolites and silica-supported titania. 46 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Reusable manganese compounds containing pyrazole-based ligands for olefin epoxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Ester; Poater, Albert; Fontrodona, Xavier; Solà, Miquel; Rodríguez, Montserrat; Romero, Isabel

    2015-10-28

    We describe the synthesis of new manganese(ii) and manganese(iii) complexes containing the bidentate ligands 2-(3-pyrazolyl)pyridine, pypz-H, and 3(5)-(2-hydroxyphenyl)pyrazole, HOphpz-H, with formula [MnX2(pypz-H)2] (X = Cl(-), 1, CF3SO3(-), 2, OAc(-), 3 or NO3(-) (4)), [MnCl2(pypz-H)(H2O)2], 5, or [MnCl(Ophpz-H)2], 6. All the complexes have been characterized through analytical, spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. Single X-ray structure analysis revealed a six-coordinated Mn(ii) ion in complexes 1-5, and a five-coordinated Mn(iii) ion in complex 6. Compound 5 is the first co-crystal of Mn(ii) containing Cl and H2O ligands together with bidentate nitrogen ligands. The catalytic activity of complexes 1-6 has been tested with regard to the epoxidation of styrene and, in the case of 1, 5 and 6, other alkenes have been epoxidized using peracetic acid as oxidant in different media, among which glycerol, a green solvent never used in epoxidation reactions using peracetic acid as oxidant. The catalysts show moderate to high conversions and selectivities towards the corresponding epoxides. For complexes 1, 5 and 6, a certain degree of cis→trans isomerization is observed in the case of cis-β-methylstyrene. These observations have been explained through computational calculations. The reutilization of catalysts 1 and 6 for the epoxidation of alkenes has been evaluated in [bmim] : acetonitrile mixture (bmim = 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium), allowing the effective recyclability of the catalytic system and keeping high conversion and selectivity values up to 12 successive runs, in all cases.

  14. Reusable manganese compounds containing pyrazole-based ligands for olefin epoxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Ester; Poater, Albert; Fontrodona, Xavier; Solà, Miquel; Rodríguez, Montserrat; Romero, Isabel

    2015-10-28

    We describe the synthesis of new manganese(ii) and manganese(iii) complexes containing the bidentate ligands 2-(3-pyrazolyl)pyridine, pypz-H, and 3(5)-(2-hydroxyphenyl)pyrazole, HOphpz-H, with formula [MnX2(pypz-H)2] (X = Cl(-), 1, CF3SO3(-), 2, OAc(-), 3 or NO3(-) (4)), [MnCl2(pypz-H)(H2O)2], 5, or [MnCl(Ophpz-H)2], 6. All the complexes have been characterized through analytical, spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. Single X-ray structure analysis revealed a six-coordinated Mn(ii) ion in complexes 1-5, and a five-coordinated Mn(iii) ion in complex 6. Compound 5 is the first co-crystal of Mn(ii) containing Cl and H2O ligands together with bidentate nitrogen ligands. The catalytic activity of complexes 1-6 has been tested with regard to the epoxidation of styrene and, in the case of 1, 5 and 6, other alkenes have been epoxidized using peracetic acid as oxidant in different media, among which glycerol, a green solvent never used in epoxidation reactions using peracetic acid as oxidant. The catalysts show moderate to high conversions and selectivities towards the corresponding epoxides. For complexes 1, 5 and 6, a certain degree of cis→trans isomerization is observed in the case of cis-β-methylstyrene. These observations have been explained through computational calculations. The reutilization of catalysts 1 and 6 for the epoxidation of alkenes has been evaluated in [bmim] : acetonitrile mixture (bmim = 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium), allowing the effective recyclability of the catalytic system and keeping high conversion and selectivity values up to 12 successive runs, in all cases. PMID:26389716

  15. Capsanthone 3,6-epoxide, a new carotenoid from the fruits of the red paprika Capsicum annuum L.

    PubMed

    Maoka, T; Fujiwara, Y; Hashimoto, K; Akimoto, N

    2001-08-01

    The structure of a new carotenoid, isolated from the fruits of the red tomato-shaped paprika Capsicum annuum L., was elucidated to be (3S,5R,6S,5'R)-3,6-epoxy-5,6-dihydro-5-hydroxy-beta,kappa-carotene-3',6'-dione by spectroscopic analyses, including fast atom bombardment collision-induced dissociation-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (FAB CID-MS/MS) and was designated capsanthone 3,6-epoxide. Capsanthone 3,6-epoxide is assumed to be an oxidative metabolite of capsanthin 3,6-epoxide in paprika.

  16. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors confer anti-invasive and antimetastatic effects on lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Katrin; Ramer, Robert; Dithmer, Sophie; Ivanov, Igor; Merkord, Jutta; Hinz, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of endocannabinoid degradation has been suggested as tool for activation of endogenous tumor defense. One of these strategies lies in blockade of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) which catalyzes the degradation of endocannabinoids (anandamide [AEA], 2-arachidonoylglycerol [2-AG]) and endocannabinoid-like substances (N-oleoylethanolamine [OEA], N-palmitoylethanolamine [PEA]). This study addressed the impact of two FAAH inhibitors (arachidonoyl serotonin [AA-5HT], URB597) on A549 lung cancer cell metastasis and invasion. LC-MS analyses revealed increased levels of FAAH substrates (AEA, 2-AG, OEA, PEA) in cells incubated with either FAAH inhibitor. In athymic nude mice FAAH inhibitors were shown to elicit a dose-dependent antimetastatic action yielding a 67% and 62% inhibition of metastatic lung nodules following repeated administration of 15 mg/kg AA-5HT and 5 mg/kg URB597, respectively. In vitro, a concentration-dependent anti-invasive action of either FAAH inhibitor was demonstrated, accompanied with upregulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1). Using siRNA approaches, a causal link between the TIMP-1-upregulating and anti-invasive action of FAAH inhibitors was confirmed. Moreover, knockdown of FAAH by siRNA was shown to confer decreased cancer cell invasiveness and increased TIMP-1 expression. Inhibitor experiments point toward a role of CB2 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in conferring anti-invasive effects of FAAH inhibitors and FAAH siRNA. Finally, antimetastatic and anti-invasive effects were confirmed for all FAAH substrates with AEA and OEA causing a TIMP-1-dependent anti-invasive action. Collectively, the present study provides first-time proof for an antimetastatic action of FAAH inhibitors. As mechanism of its anti-invasive properties an upregulation of TIMP-1 was identified. PMID:26930716

  17. Altered Escherichia coli membrane protein assembly machinery allows proper membrane assembly of eukaryotic protein vitamin K epoxide reductase

    PubMed Central

    Hatahet, Feras; Blazyk, Jessica L.; Martineau, Eugenie; Mandela, Eric; Zhao, Yongxin; Campbell, Robert E.; Beckwith, Jonathan; Boyd, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Functional overexpression of polytopic membrane proteins, particularly when in a foreign host, is often a challenging task. Factors that negatively affect such processes are poorly understood. Using the mammalian membrane protein vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKORc1) as a reporter, we describe a genetic selection approach allowing the isolation of Escherichia coli mutants capable of functionally expressing this blood-coagulation enzyme. The isolated mutants map to components of membrane protein assembly and quality control proteins YidC and HslV. We show that changes in the VKORc1 sequence and in the YidC hydrophilic groove along with the inactivation of HslV promote VKORc1 activity and dramatically increase its expression level. We hypothesize that such changes correct for mismatches in the membrane topogenic signals between E. coli and eukaryotic cells guiding proper membrane integration. Furthermore, the obtained mutants allow the study of VKORc1 reaction mechanisms, inhibition by warfarin, and the high-throughput screening for potential anticoagulants. PMID:26598701

  18. Structural and Enzymatic Characterization of a Nucleoside Diphosphate Sugar Hydrolase from Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    PubMed Central

    Duong-ly, Krisna C.; Schoeffield, Andrew J.; Pizarro-Dupuy, Mario A.; Zarr, Melissa; Pineiro, Silvia A.; Amzel, L. Mario; Gabelli, Sandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Given the broad range of substrates hydrolyzed by Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate linked to X) enzymes, identification of sequence and structural elements that correctly predict a Nudix substrate or characterize a family is key to correctly annotate the myriad of Nudix enzymes. Here, we present the structure determination and characterization of Bd3179 –- a Nudix hydrolase from Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus–that we show localized in the periplasmic space of this obligate Gram-negative predator. We demonstrate that the enzyme is a nucleoside diphosphate sugar hydrolase (NDPSase) and has a high degree of sequence and structural similarity to a canonical ADP-ribose hydrolase and to a nucleoside diphosphate sugar hydrolase (1.4 and 1.3 Å Cα RMSD respectively). Examination of the structural elements conserved in both types of enzymes confirms that an aspartate-X-lysine motif on the C-terminal helix of the α-β-α NDPSase fold differentiates NDPSases from ADPRases. PMID:26524597

  19. DETOXIFICATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES BY IMMOBILIZED ESCHERICHIA COLI EXPRESSING ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE ON CELL SURFACE. (R823663)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved whole-cell technology for detoxifying organophosphate nerve agents was recently developed based on genetically engineered Escherichia coli with organophosphorus hydrolase anchored on the surface. This article reports the immobilization of these novel biocatalys...

  20. Trends in predicted chemoselectivity of cytochrome P450 oxidation: B3LYP barrier heights for epoxidation and hydroxylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Rydberg, Patrik; Lonsdale, Richard; Harvey, Jeremy N; Mulholland, Adrian J; Olsen, Lars

    2014-07-01

    Prediction of epoxide formation in drug metabolism is a difficult but important task, as epoxide formation is linked to drug toxicity. A comparison of the energy barriers for cytochrome P450 mediated epoxidation of alkenes to the barriers for the hydroxylation of an aliphatic carbon atom next to a double bond has been performed using B3LYP and B3LYP-D3. Relevant experimental data on oxidation selectivity has also been assessed. The results show that density functional theory, when using B3LYP-D3, does well in reproducing the experimental trends. Considering that the comparison involves chemical steps with quite different features this is remarkable. We also find that B3LYP consistently underestimates the hydrogen abstraction barriers relative to the epoxidation barriers, and that including a dispersion correction reduces this problem.

  1. Isolation of β-Cryptoxanthin-epoxides, Precursors of Cryptocapsin and 3'-Deoxycapsanthin, from Red Mamey (Pouteria sapota).

    PubMed

    Turcsi, Erika; Murillo, Enrique; Kurtán, Tibor; Szappanos, Ádám; Illyés, Tünde-Zita; Gulyás-Fekete, Gergely; Agócs, Attila; Avar, Péter; Deli, József

    2015-07-01

    From an extract of red mamey (Pouteria sapota) β-cryptoxanthin-5,6-epoxide, β-cryptoxanthin-5',6'-epoxide, 3'-deoxycapsanthin, and cryptocapsin were isolated and characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, electronic circular dichroism (ECD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry (MS). Epoxidation of β-cryptoxanthin delivered the β-(5'R,6'S)- and (5'S,6'R)-cryptoxanthin-5',6'-epoxides, which were identified by HPLC-ECD analysis. These carotenoids among others are quite common in the fruits of Central America, and as they are natural provitamins A, they should play an important role in the diet of the mostly vitamin A deficient population of this region. PMID:26057604

  2. Isolation of β-Cryptoxanthin-epoxides, Precursors of Cryptocapsin and 3'-Deoxycapsanthin, from Red Mamey (Pouteria sapota).

    PubMed

    Turcsi, Erika; Murillo, Enrique; Kurtán, Tibor; Szappanos, Ádám; Illyés, Tünde-Zita; Gulyás-Fekete, Gergely; Agócs, Attila; Avar, Péter; Deli, József

    2015-07-01

    From an extract of red mamey (Pouteria sapota) β-cryptoxanthin-5,6-epoxide, β-cryptoxanthin-5',6'-epoxide, 3'-deoxycapsanthin, and cryptocapsin were isolated and characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, electronic circular dichroism (ECD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry (MS). Epoxidation of β-cryptoxanthin delivered the β-(5'R,6'S)- and (5'S,6'R)-cryptoxanthin-5',6'-epoxides, which were identified by HPLC-ECD analysis. These carotenoids among others are quite common in the fruits of Central America, and as they are natural provitamins A, they should play an important role in the diet of the mostly vitamin A deficient population of this region.

  3. Epoxide pathways improve model predictions of isoprene markers and reveal key role of acidity in aerosol formation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isoprene significantly contributes to organic aerosol in the southeastern United States where biogenic hydrocarbons mix with anthropogenic emissions. In this work, the Community Multiscale Air Quality model is updated to predict isoprene aerosol from epoxides produced under both ...

  4. Processing of cholinesterase-like α/β-hydrolase fold proteins: alterations associated with congenital disorders.

    PubMed

    De Jaco, Antonella; Comoletti, Davide; Dubi, Noga; Camp, Shelley; Taylor, Palmer

    2012-02-01

    The α/β hydrolase fold family is perhaps the largest group of proteins presenting significant structural homology with divergent functions, ranging from catalytic hydrolysis to heterophilic cell adhesive interactions to chaperones in hormone production. All the proteins of the family share a common three-dimensional core structure containing the α/β hydrolase fold domain that is crucial for proper protein function. Several mutations associated with congenital diseases or disorders have been reported in conserved residues within the α/β-hydrolase fold domain of cholinesterase-like proteins, neuroligins, butyrylcholinesterase and thyroglobulin. These mutations are known to disrupt the architecture of the common structural domain either globally or locally. Characterization of the natural mutations affecting the α/β-hydrolase fold domain in these proteins has shown that they mainly impair processing and trafficking along the secretory pathway causing retention of the mutant protein in the endoplasmic reticulum. Studying the processing of α/β-hydrolase fold mutant proteins should uncover new functions for this domain, that in some cases require structural integrity for both export of the protein from the ER and for facilitating subunit dimerization. A comparative study of homologous mutations in proteins that are closely related family members, along with the definition of new three-dimensional crystal structures, will identify critical residues for the assembly of the α/β-hydrolase fold.

  5. Generation of CF3-containing epoxides and aziridines by visible-light-driven trifluoromethylation of allylic alcohols and amines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjin; Choi, Sungkyu; Kim, Heejeong; Cho, Eun Jin

    2013-05-10

    Radical reactions! Efficient methods for the generation of CF3-containing epoxides and aziridines have been developed (see scheme). A variety of allylic alcohols and allylic amines were transformed into the corresponding epoxides and aziridines by using [Ru(bpy)3]Cl2 (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), CF3 I, and 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU) (or N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine, TMEDA) under visible-light irradiation.

  6. A New Biocatalyst for Production of Optically Pure Aryl Epoxides by Styrene Monooxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens ST

    PubMed Central

    Di Gennaro, Patrizia; Colmegna, Andrea; Galli, Enrica; Sello, Guido; Pelizzoni, Francesca; Bestetti, Giuseppina

    1999-01-01

    We developed a biocatalyst by cloning the styrene monooxygenase genes (styA and styB) from Pseudomonas fluorescens ST responsible for the oxidation of styrene to its corresponding epoxide. Recombinant Escherichia coli was able to oxidize different aryl vinyl and aryl ethenyl compounds to their corresponding optically pure epoxides. The results of bioconversions indicate the broad substrate preference of styrene monooxygenase and its potential for the production of several fine chemicals. PMID:10347083

  7. Expression of Nudix hydrolase genes in barley under UV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Sayuri; Sugimoto, Manabu; Kihara, Makoto

    Seed storage and cultivation should be necessary to self-supply foods when astronauts would stay and investigate during long-term space travel and habitation in the bases on the Moon and Mars. Thought the sunlight is the most importance to plants, both as the ultimate energy source and as an environmental signal regulating growth and development, UV presenting the sunlight can damage many aspects of plant processes at the physiological and DNA level. Especially UV-C, which is eliminated by the stratospheric ozone layer, is suspected to be extremely harmful and give a deadly injury to plants in space. However, the defense mechanism against UV-C irradiation damage in plant cells has not been clear. In this study, we investigated the expression of Nudix hydrolases, which defense plants from biotic / abiotic stress, in barley under UV irradiation. The genes encoding the amino acid sequences, which show homology to those of 28 kinds of Nudix hydrolases in Arabidopsis thaliana, were identified in the barley full-length cDNA library. BLAST analysis showed 14 kinds of barley genes (HvNUDX1-14), which encode the Nudix motif sequence. A phylogenetic tree showed that HvNUDX1, HvNUDX7, HvNUDX9 and HvNUDX11 belonged to the ADP-ribose pyrophosphohydrolase, ADP-sugar pyrophosphohydrolase, NAD(P)H pyrophosphohydrolase and FAD pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, respectively, HvNUDX3, HvNUDX6, and HvNUDX8 belonged to the Ap _{n}A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, HvNUDX5 and HvNUDX14 belonged to the coenzyme A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, HvNUDX12 and HvNUDX13 belonged to the Ap _{4}A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies. Induction of HvNUDX genes by UV-A (340nm), UV-B (312nm), and UV-C (260nm) were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that HvNUDX4 was induced by UV-A and UV-B, HvNUDX6 was induced by UV-B and UV-C, and HvNUDX7 and HvNUDX14 were induced by UV-C, significantly. Our results suggest that the response of HvNUDXs to UV irradiation is different by UV

  8. A new group of exo-acting family 28 glycoside hydrolases of Aspergillus niger that are involved in pectin degradation

    PubMed Central

    Martens-Uzunova, Elena S.; Zandleven, Joris S.; Benen, Jaques A. E.; Awad, Hanem; Kools, Harrie J.; Beldman, Gerrit; Voragen, Alphons G. J.; Van Den Berg, Johan A.; Schaap, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    The fungus Aspergillus niger is an industrial producer of pectin-degrading enzymes. The recent solving of the genomic sequence of A. niger allowed an inventory of the entire genome of the fungus for potential carbohydrate-degrading enzymes. By applying bioinformatics tools, 12 new genes, putatively encoding family 28 glycoside hydrolases, were identified. Seven of the newly discovered genes form a new gene group, which we show to encode exoacting pectinolytic glycoside hydrolases. This group includes four exo-polygalacturonan hydrolases (PGAX, PGXA, PGXB and PGXC) and three putative exo-rhamnogalacturonan hydrolases (RGXA, RGXB and RGXC). Biochemical identification using polygalacturonic acid and xylogalacturonan as substrates demonstrated that indeed PGXB and PGXC act as exo-polygalacturonases, whereas PGXA acts as an exo-xylogalacturonan hydrolase. The expression levels of all 21 genes were assessed by microarray analysis. The results from the present study demonstrate that exo-acting glycoside hydrolases play a prominent role in pectin degradation. PMID:16822232

  9. Nudix hydrolases degrade protein-conjugated ADP-ribose

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Casey M.; Thirawatananond, Puchong; Ong, Shao-En; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Leung, Anthony K. L.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the transfer of the ADP-ribose group from NAD+ to target proteins post-translationally, either attached singly as mono(ADP-ribose) (MAR) or in polymeric chains as poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). Though ADP-ribosylation is therapeutically important, investigation of this protein modification has been limited by a lack of proteomic tools for site identification. Recent work has demonstrated the potential of a tag-based pipeline in which MAR/PAR is hydrolyzed down to phosphoribose, leaving a 212 Dalton tag at the modification site. While the pipeline has been proven effective by multiple groups, a barrier to application has become evident: the enzyme used to transform MAR/PAR into phosphoribose must be purified from the rattlesnake Crotalus adamanteus venom, which is contaminated with proteases detrimental for proteomic applications. Here, we outline the steps necessary to purify snake venom phosphodiesterase I (SVP) and describe two alternatives to SVP—the bacterial Nudix hydrolase EcRppH and human HsNudT16. Importantly, expression and purification schemes for these Nudix enzymes have already been proven, with high-quality yields easily attainable. We demonstrate their utility in identifying ADP-ribosylation sites on Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1) with mass spectrometry and discuss a structure-based rationale for this Nudix subclass in degrading protein-conjugated ADP-ribose, including both MAR and PAR. PMID:26669448

  10. Genetic regulation of expression of leukotriene A4 hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Castaldi, Peter; Cho, Michael H.; Blalock, J. Edwin; Gaggar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    In chronic inflammatory lung disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the concurrent organ-specific and systemic inflammatory responses lead to airway remodelling and vascular dysfunction. Although a major common risk factor for COPD, cigarette smoke alone cannot explain the progression of this disease; there is increasing evidence that genetic predisposition also plays a role in COPD susceptibility and progression. A key enzyme in chronic lung inflammation is leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H). With its aminopeptidase activity, LTA4H degrades the neutrophil chemoattractant tripeptide PGP. In this study, we used the luciferase reporter gene analysis system and quantitative trait locus analysis to explore the impact of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the putative promoter region of LTA4H on LTA4H expression. We show that not only is the putative promoter of LTA4H larger than previously reported but also that SNPs in the expanded promoter region regulate expression of LTA4H both in cell-based systems and in peripheral blood samples from human subjects. These findings provide significant evidence for an active region upstream of the previously reported LTA4H promoter, which may have implications related to ongoing inflammatory processes in chronic lung disease. PMID:27730172

  11. Molecular Basis of Arabinobio-hydrolase Activity in Phytopathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Carapito, Raphaël; Imberty, Anne; Jeltsch, Jean-Marc; Byrns, Simon C.; Tam, Pui-Hang; Lowary, Todd L.; Varrot, Annabelle; Phalip, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    The phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum secretes a very diverse pool of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) aimed at degrading plant cell walls. α-l-Arabinanases are essential GHs participating in the complete hydrolysis of hemicellulose, a natural resource for various industrial processes, such as bioethanol or pharmaceuticals production. Arb93A, the exo-1,5-α-l-arabinanase of F. graminearum encoded by the gene fg03054.1, belongs to the GH93 family, for which no structural data exists. The enzyme is highly active (1065 units/mg) and displays a strict substrate specificity for linear α-1,5-l-arabinan. Biochemical assays and NMR experiments demonstrated that the enzyme releases α-1,5-l-arabinobiose from the nonreducing end of the polysaccharide. We determined the crystal structure of the native enzyme and its complex with α-1,5-l-arabinobiose, a degradation product of α-Me-1,5-l-arabinotetraose, at 1.85 and 2.05Å resolution, respectively. Arb93A is a monomeric enzyme, which presents the six-bladed β-propeller fold characteristic of sialidases of clan GHE. The configuration of the bound arabinobiose is consistent with the retaining mechanism proposed for the GH93 family. Catalytic residues were proposed from the structural analysis, and site-directed mutagenesis was used to validate their role. They are significantly different from those observed for GHE sialidases. PMID:19269961

  12. Extracellular Glycoside Hydrolase Activities in the Human Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Lauren C.; Dodds, Michael W. J.; Hanley, A. Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate availability shifts when bacteria attach to a surface and form biofilm. When salivary planktonic bacteria form an oral biofilm, a variety of polysaccharides and glycoproteins are the primary carbon sources; however, simple sugar availabilities are limited due to low diffusion from saliva to biofilm. We hypothesized that bacterial glycoside hydrolase (GH) activities would be higher in a biofilm than in saliva in order to maintain metabolism in a low-sugar, high-glycoprotein environment. Salivary bacteria from 13 healthy individuals were used to grow in vitro biofilm using two separate media, one with sucrose and the other limiting carbon sources to a complex carbohydrate. All six GHs measured were higher in vitro when grown in the medium with complex carbohydrate as the sole carbon source. We then collected saliva and overnight dental plaque samples from the same individuals and measured ex vivo activities for the same six enzymes to determine how oral microbial utilization of glycoconjugates shifts between the planktonic phase in saliva and the biofilm phase in overnight dental plaque. Overall higher GH activities were observed in plaque samples, in agreement with in vitro observation. A similar pattern was observed in GH activity profiles between in vitro and ex vivo data. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that plaque samples had a higher abundance of microorganisms with larger number of GH gene sequences. These results suggest differences in sugar catabolism between the oral bacteria located in the biofilm and those in saliva. PMID:26048943

  13. Release of acid hydrolases in spectrum of human leprosy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B; Jaswal, S; Vaishnavi, C; Thakur, M; Kaur, S; Ganguly, N K

    1992-01-01

    Release of acid hydrolases by blood monocytes (BM) of leprosy patients both before and after 6 months of chemotherapy was measured fluorimetrically. Monocyte cultures were set up for spontaneous as well as zymosan dependent enzyme release measured after 2 hrs and 24 hrs of culture. In the untreated multibacillary group (BL/LL) a significantly higher (P < 0.001) release of both B-glucuronidase (BG) and N-acetyl glucosaminidase (NAG) was observed compared to the paucibacillary group (BT/TT) and healthy controls. On comparing the BT/TT group with controls a significant decrease (P < 0.001) in zymosan dependent NAG release was observed in the former group at 2 hrs culture. After 6 months of antileprosy therapy, a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in BG release was observed from BM of multibacillary patients, whereas NAG activity increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the paucibacillary group compared to the controls. The results of the present study suggest that non-oxidative metabolic status of BM vary within the leprosy spectrum. PMID:1300357

  14. Cyanuric acid hydrolase: evolutionary innovation by structural concatenation

    PubMed Central

    Peat, Thomas S; Balotra, Sahil; Wilding, Matthew; French, Nigel G; Briggs, Lyndall J; Panjikar, Santosh; Cowieson, Nathan; Newman, Janet; Scott, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The cyanuric acid hydrolase, AtzD, is the founding member of a newly identified family of ring-opening amidases. We report the first X-ray structure for this family, which is a novel fold (termed the ‘Toblerone’ fold) that likely evolved via the concatenation of monomers of the trimeric YjgF superfamily and the acquisition of a metal binding site. Structures of AtzD with bound substrate (cyanuric acid) and inhibitors (phosphate, barbituric acid and melamine), along with mutagenesis studies, allowed the identification of the active site. The AtzD monomer, active site and substrate all possess threefold rotational symmetry, to the extent that the active site possesses three potential Ser–Lys catalytic dyads. A single catalytic dyad (Ser85–Lys42) is hypothesized, based on biochemical evidence and crystallographic data. A plausible catalytic mechanism based on these observations is also presented. A comparison with a homology model of the related barbiturase, Bar, was used to infer the active-site residues responsible for substrate specificity, and the phylogeny of the 68 AtzD-like enzymes in the database were analysed in light of this structure–function relationship. PMID:23651355

  15. Bacteriophage virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases: potential new enzybiotics.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Martínez, Beatriz; Donovan, David M; Rodríguez, Ana; García, Pilar

    2013-11-01

    Virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases (VAPGH) are phage-encoded lytic enzymes that locally degrade the peptidoglycan (PG) of the bacterial cell wall during infection. In contrast to endolysins, PGHs that mediate lysis of the host bacteria at the end of the lytic cycle to release of phage progeny, the action of VAPGHs generates a small hole through which the phage tail tube crosses the cell envelope to eject the phage genetic material at the beginning to the infection cycle. The antimicrobial activity of VAPGHs was first discovered through the observation of the phenomenon of 'lysis from without', in which the disruption of the bacterial cell wall occurs prior to phage production and is caused by a high number of phages adsorbed onto the cell surface. Based on a unique combination of properties of VAPGHs such as high specificity, remarkable thermostability, and a modular organization, these proteins are potential candidates as new antibacterial agents, e.g. against antibiotic-resistant bacteria in human therapy and veterinary as well as biopreservatives in food safety, and as biocontrol agents of harmful bacteria in agriculture. This review provides an overview of the different VAPGHs discovered to date and their potential as novel antimicrobials.

  16. Purification and characterization of paraoxon hydrolase from rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, L; Gil, F; Hernandez, A F; Marina, A; Vazquez, J; Pla, A

    1997-01-01

    Paraoxonase (paraoxon hydrolase), an enzyme that hydrolyses paraoxon (O,O-diethyl O-p-nitrophenyl phosphate), is located in mammals primarily in the serum and liver. Although considerable information is available regarding serum paraoxonase, little is known about the hepatic form of this enzyme. The present work represents the first study on the purification of rat liver paraoxonase. This enzyme has been purified 415-fold to apparent homogeneity with a final specific activity of 1370 units/mg using a protocol consisting of five steps: solubilization of the microsomal fraction, hydroxyapatite adsorption, chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B, non-specific affinity chromatography on Cibacron Blue 3GA and anion exchange on Mono Q HR 5/5. The presence of Ca2+ and Triton X-100 in the buffers throughout the purification procedure was essential for maintaining enzyme activity. SDS/PAGE of the final preparation indicated a single protein-staining band with an apparent Mr of 45 000. N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences were determined and compared with those of paraoxonases from human and rabbit serum and mouse liver, showing a high similarity. The pH profile showed optimum activity at pH 8.5. The pH stability and heat inactivation of the enzyme were also studied. The Km for liver paraoxonase was 1.69 mM. PMID:9032442

  17. Extracellular Glycoside Hydrolase Activities in the Human Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Inui, Taichi; Walker, Lauren C; Dodds, Michael W J; Hanley, A Bryan

    2015-08-15

    Carbohydrate availability shifts when bacteria attach to a surface and form biofilm. When salivary planktonic bacteria form an oral biofilm, a variety of polysaccharides and glycoproteins are the primary carbon sources; however, simple sugar availabilities are limited due to low diffusion from saliva to biofilm. We hypothesized that bacterial glycoside hydrolase (GH) activities would be higher in a biofilm than in saliva in order to maintain metabolism in a low-sugar, high-glycoprotein environment. Salivary bacteria from 13 healthy individuals were used to grow in vitro biofilm using two separate media, one with sucrose and the other limiting carbon sources to a complex carbohydrate. All six GHs measured were higher in vitro when grown in the medium with complex carbohydrate as the sole carbon source. We then collected saliva and overnight dental plaque samples from the same individuals and measured ex vivo activities for the same six enzymes to determine how oral microbial utilization of glycoconjugates shifts between the planktonic phase in saliva and the biofilm phase in overnight dental plaque. Overall higher GH activities were observed in plaque samples, in agreement with in vitro observation. A similar pattern was observed in GH activity profiles between in vitro and ex vivo data. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that plaque samples had a higher abundance of microorganisms with larger number of GH gene sequences. These results suggest differences in sugar catabolism between the oral bacteria located in the biofilm and those in saliva.

  18. Epoxidation of allyl alcohol to glycidol over the microporous TS-1 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wróblewska, Agnieszka; Fajdek, Anna

    2010-07-15

    The results of the epoxidation of allyl alcohol with 30% hydrogen peroxide over the TS-1 catalyst have been presented. The studies were carried out under the atmospheric pressure and at the presence of methanol as a solvent. The influence of the following technological parameters on the course of epoxidation was examined: the temperature of 20-60 degrees C, the molar ratio of AA/H(2)O(2) 1:1-5:1, the methanol concentration of 5-90 wt%, the catalyst content of 0.1-5.0 wt% and the reaction time 5-300 min. The main functions describing the process were the selectivity to glycidol in relation to allyl alcohol consumed, the conversion of substrates, and the selectivity of transformation to organic compounds in relation to hydrogen peroxide consumed. The parameters at which the functions describing the process reached the highest values were determined.

  19. Block Copolymerization of Lactide and an Epoxide Facilitated by a Redox Switchable Iron-Based Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Biernesser, Ashley B; Delle Chiaie, Kayla R; Curley, Julia B; Byers, Jeffery A

    2016-04-18

    A cationic iron(III) complex was active for the polymerization of various epoxides, whereas the analogous neutral iron(II) complex was inactive. Cyclohexene oxide polymerization could be "switched off" upon in situ reduction of the iron(III) catalyst and "switched on" upon in situ oxidation, which is orthogonal to what was observed previously for lactide polymerization. Conducting copolymerization reactions in the presence of both monomers resulted in block copolymers whose identity can be controlled by the oxidation state of the catalyst: selective lactide polymerization was observed in the iron(II) oxidation state and selective epoxide polymerization was observed in the iron(III) oxidation state. Evidence for the formation of block copolymers was obtained from solubility differences, GPC, and DOSY-NMR studies. PMID:26991820

  20. Spectrofluorometric determination of common epoxides with sodium sulfide and o-phthalaldehyde and taurine reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, A.; Takitani, S.

    1985-07-01

    A spectrofluorometric method has been developed for the determination of common epoxides. Epoxides in ethanol solution gave an intense blue fluorescence (lambda/sub ex/ ca. 345 nm and lambda/sub em/ ca. 440 nm), after the first reaction with aqueous sodium sulfide at 55/sup 0/C for 20 min and followed by the second reaction with taurine and o-phthalaldehyde reagents at pH 8.3. By the proposed method, 1,2-epoxy-3-phenoxypropane and 1,2-epoxyoctane can be determined in the ranges 0.05-3 nmol/100 ..mu..L and 0.1-8 nmol/100 ..mu..L, respectively, with coefficients of variation of 1.6-2.9%. Some other alkylating agents also showed fluorescence by this method. 16 references, 8 figures, 3 tables.

  1. CO2 copolymers from epoxides: catalyst activity, product selectivity, and stereochemistry control.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Bing; Ren, Wei-Min; Wu, Guang-Peng

    2012-10-16

    The use of carbon dioxide as a carbon source for the synthesis of organic chemicals can contribute to a more sustainable chemical industry. Because CO(2) is such a thermodynamically stable molecule, few effective catalysts are available to facilitate this transformation. Currently, the major industrial processes that convert CO(2) into viable products generate urea and hydroxybenzoic acid. One of the most promising new technologies for the use of this abundant, inexpensive, and nontoxic renewable resource is the alternating copolymerization of CO(2) and epoxides to provide biodegradable polycarbonates, which are highly valuable polymeric materials. Because this process often generates byproducts, such as polyether or ether linkages randomly dispersed within the polycarbonate chains and/or the more thermodynamically stable cyclic carbonates, the choice of catalyst is critical for selectively obtaining the expected product. In this Account, we outline our efforts to develop highly active Co(III)-based catalysts for the selective production of polycarbonates from the alternating copolymerization of CO(2) with epoxides. Binary systems consisting of simple (salen)Co(III)X and a nucleophilic cocatalyst exhibited high activity under mild conditions even at 0.1 MPa CO(2) pressure and afforded copolymers with >99% carbonate linkages and a high regiochemical control (∼95% head-to-tail content). Discrete, one-component (salen)Co(III)X complexes bearing an appended quaternary ammonium salt or sterically hindered Lewis base showed excellent activity in the selectively alternating copolymerization of CO(2) with both aliphatic epoxides and cyclohexene oxide at high temperatures with low catalyst loading and/or low pressures of CO(2). Binary or one-component catalysts based on unsymmetric multichiral Co(III) complexes facilitated the efficient enantioselective copolymerization of CO(2) with epoxides, providing aliphatic polycarbonates with >99% head-to-tail content. These

  2. Block Copolymerization of Lactide and an Epoxide Facilitated by a Redox Switchable Iron-Based Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Biernesser, Ashley B; Delle Chiaie, Kayla R; Curley, Julia B; Byers, Jeffery A

    2016-04-18

    A cationic iron(III) complex was active for the polymerization of various epoxides, whereas the analogous neutral iron(II) complex was inactive. Cyclohexene oxide polymerization could be "switched off" upon in situ reduction of the iron(III) catalyst and "switched on" upon in situ oxidation, which is orthogonal to what was observed previously for lactide polymerization. Conducting copolymerization reactions in the presence of both monomers resulted in block copolymers whose identity can be controlled by the oxidation state of the catalyst: selective lactide polymerization was observed in the iron(II) oxidation state and selective epoxide polymerization was observed in the iron(III) oxidation state. Evidence for the formation of block copolymers was obtained from solubility differences, GPC, and DOSY-NMR studies.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activities towards epoxidation of olefins of dinuclear copper(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Shibashis; Mukherjee, Aparajita; Ghosh, Koushik; Dey, Sudipto; Nandi, Mahasweta; Roy, Partha

    2015-12-01

    Two copper(II) complexes, [Cu2(L1)Cl3].2H2O (1) and [Cu2(L2)(N3)Cl2] (2) where HL1 = 4-methyl-2,6-bis((2-morpholinoethylimino)methyl)phenol and HL2 = 4-methyl-2,6-bis((3-morpholinopropylimino)methyl)phenol have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, various spectroscopic methods, TGA and single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that in both the complexes, two copper atoms are linked by phenoxo oxygen atom and a bridging ligand, namely chloride and azide, respectively. These complexes have been used as catalyst for the epoxidation of cyclohexene, styrene, α-methyl styrene, trans-stilbene and norbornene using tert-butyl hydroperoxide as the oxidant in acetonitrile under mild conditions. All of the substrates undergo conversion to produce respective epoxide as the major product.

  4. Synthesis of cyclic sulfites from epoxides and sulfur dioxide with silica-immobilized homogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Yasumasa; Kiyosu, Takahiro; Mori, Goro; Choi, Jun-Chul; Fukaya, Norihisa; Sakakura, Toshiyasu; Yasuda, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium- and amino-functionalized silica catalysts have been prepared for the selective synthesis of cyclic sulfites from epoxides and sulfur dioxide, demonstrating the effects of immobilizing the homogeneous catalysts on silica. The cycloaddition of sulfur dioxide to various epoxides was conducted under solvent-free conditions at 100 °C. The quaternary ammonium- and amino-functionalized silica catalysts produced cyclic sulfites in high yields (79-96 %) that are comparable to those produced by the homogeneous catalysts. The functionalized silica catalysts could be separated from the product solution by filtration, thereby avoiding the catalytic decomposition of the cyclic sulfite products upon distillation of the product solution. Heterogenization of a homogeneous catalyst by immobilization can, therefore, improve the efficiency of the purification of crude reaction products. Despite a decrease in catalytic activity after each recycling step, the heterogeneous pyridine-functionalized silica catalyst provided high yields after as many as five recycling processes.

  5. Mechanistic study of secondary organic aerosol components formed from nucleophilic addition reactions of methacrylic acid epoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsall, A. W.; Miner, C. R.; Mael, L. E.; Elrod, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    Recently, methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) has been proposed as a precursor to an important class of isoprene-derived compounds found in secondary organic aerosol (SOA): 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG) and a set of oligomers, nitric acid esters and sulfuric acid esters related to 2-MG. However, the specific chemical mechanisms by which MAE could form these compounds have not been previously studied. In order to determine the relevance of these processes to atmospheric aerosol, MAE and 2-MG have been synthesized and a series of bulk solution-phase experiments aimed at studying the reactivity of MAE using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been performed. The present results indicate that the acid-catalyzed MAE reaction is more than 600 times slower than a similar reaction of an important isoprene-derived epoxide, but is still expected to be kinetically feasible in the atmosphere on more acidic SOA. The specific mechanism by which MAE leads to oligomers was identified, and the reactions of MAE with a number of atmospherically relevant nucleophiles were also investigated. Because the nucleophilic strengths of water, sulfate, alcohols (including 2-MG), and acids (including MAE and 2-MG) in their reactions with MAE were found to be of a similar magnitude, it is expected that a diverse variety of MAE + nucleophile product species may be formed on ambient SOA. Thus, the results indicate that epoxide chain reaction oligomerization will be limited by the presence of high concentrations of non-epoxide nucleophiles (such as water); this finding is consistent with previous environmental chamber investigations of the relative humidity-dependence of 2-MG-derived oligomerization processes and suggests that extensive oligomerization may not be likely on ambient SOA because of other competitive MAE reaction mechanisms.

  6. Mechanistic study of secondary organic aerosol components formed from nucleophilic addition reactions of methacrylic acid epoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsall, A. W.; Miner, C. R.; Mael, L. E.; Elrod, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) has been proposed as a precursor to an important class of isoprene-derived compounds found in secondary organic aerosol (SOA): 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG) and a set of oligomers, nitric acid esters, and sulfuric acid esters related to 2-MG. However, the specific chemical mechanisms by which MAE could form these compounds have not been previously studied with experimental methods. In order to determine the relevance of these processes to atmospheric aerosol, MAE and 2-MG have been synthesized and a series of bulk solution-phase experiments aimed at studying the reactivity of MAE using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been performed. The present results indicate that the acid-catalyzed MAE reaction is more than 600 times slower than a similar reaction of an important isoprene-derived epoxide, but is still expected to be kinetically feasible in the atmosphere on more acidic SOA. The specific mechanism by which MAE leads to oligomers was identified, and the reactions of MAE with a number of atmospherically relevant nucleophiles were also investigated. Because the nucleophilic strengths of water, sulfate, alcohols (including 2-MG), and acids (including MAE and 2-MG) in their reactions with MAE were found to be of similar magnitudes, it is expected that a diverse variety of MAE + nucleophile product species may be formed on ambient SOA. Thus, the results indicate that epoxide chain reaction oligomerization will be limited by the presence of high concentrations of non-epoxide nucleophiles (such as water); this finding is consistent with previous environmental chamber investigations of the relative humidity dependence of 2-MG-derived oligomerization processes and suggests that extensive oligomerization may not be likely on ambient SOA because of other competitive MAE reaction mechanisms.

  7. Dichlorodioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes bearing oxygen-donor ligands as olefin epoxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tânia S M; Gomes, Ana C; Lopes, André D; Lourenço, João P; Almeida Paz, Filipe A; Pillinger, Martyn; Gonçalves, Isabel S

    2015-08-21

    Treatment of the solvent adduct [MoO2Cl2(THF)2] with either 2 equivalents of N,N-dimethylbenzamide (DMB) or 1 equivalent of N,N'-diethyloxamide (DEO) gave the dioxomolybdenum(vi) complexes [MoO2Cl2(DMB)2] () and [MoO2Cl2(DEO)] (). The molecular structures of and were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Both complexes present a distorted octahedral geometry and adopt the cis-oxo, trans-Cl, cis-L configuration typical of complexes of the type [MoO2X2(L)n], with either the monodentate DMB or bidentate DEO oxygen-donor ligands occupying the equatorial positions trans to the oxo groups. The complexes were applied as homogeneous catalysts for the epoxidation of olefins, namely cis-cyclooctene (Cy), 1-octene, trans-2-octene, α-pinene and (R)-(+)-limonene, using tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP) as oxidant. In the epoxidation of Cy at 55 °C, the desired epoxide was the only product and turnover frequencies in the range of ca. 3150-3200 mol molMo(-1) h(-1) could be reached. The catalytic production of cyclooctene oxide was investigated in detail, varying either the reaction temperature or the cosolvent. Complexes and were also applied in liquid-liquid biphasic catalytic epoxidation reactions by using an ionic liquid of the type [C4mim][X] (C4mim = 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium; X = NTf2, BF4 or PF6] as a solvent to immobilise the metal catalysts. Recycling for multiple catalytic runs was achieved without loss of activity. PMID:26174418

  8. Association of DDT and heptachlor epoxide in human blood with diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Everett, Charles J; Thompson, Olivia M

    2015-01-01

    Six organochlorine pesticides and pesticide metabolites in human blood were tested to determine their relationships with diabetic nephropathy. The data were derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2004 (unweighted, n=2992, population estimate=133,088,752). The six chemicals were p,p'-DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane), p,p'-DDE (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethylene), beta-hexachlorocyclohexane, oxychlordane, trans-nonachlor and heptachlor epoxide. In this research, total diabetes included diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes (glycohemoglobin, A1c ≥6.5%), and nephropathy was defined as a urinary albumin to creatinine ratio >30 mg/g, representing microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria. The pesticide p,p'-DDT and pesticide metabolite heptachlor epoxide were significantly associated with total diabetes with nephropathy, with odds ratios of 2.08 (95% CI 1.06-4.11) and 1.75 (95% CI 1.05-2.93), respectively. Organochlorine pesticides are thought to act through the constitutive androstane receptor/pregnane X receptor disease pathway, but this is not well established. When p,p'-DDT and heptachlor epoxide were both elevated, the odds ratio for diabetic nephropathy was 2.76 (95% CI 1.31-5.81), and when six of six organochlorine pesticides and pesticide metabolites, were elevated, the odds ratio for diabetic nephropathy was 3.00 (95% CI 1.08-8.36). The differences in the odds ratios for these groups appear to be due to differences in the mean heptachlor epoxide concentration of each category. Organochlorine pesticides and pesticide metabolites are known to have estrogenic, antiestrogenic or antiandrogenic activity. The constitutive androstane receptor/pregnane X receptor pathway is thought to interact with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor pathway, and the associations noted may be due to that interaction. PMID:25822320

  9. Technological Aspects of Chemoenzymatic Epoxidation of Fatty Acids, Fatty Acid Esters and Vegetable Oils: A Review.

    PubMed

    Milchert, Eugeniusz; Malarczyk, Kornelia; Kłos, Marlena

    2015-12-02

    The general subject of the review is analysis of the effect of technological parameters on the chemoenzymatic epoxidation processes of vegetable oils, fatty acids and alkyl esters of fatty acids. The technological parameters considered include temperature, concentration, amount of hydrogen peroxide relative to the number of unsaturated bonds, the amounts of enzyme catalysts, presence of solvent and amount of free fatty acids. Also chemical reactions accompanying the technological processes are discussed together with different technological options and significance of the products obtained.

  10. A non-canonical caleosin from Arabidopsis efficiently epoxidizes physiological unsaturated fatty acids with complete stereoselectivity.

    PubMed

    Blée, Elizabeth; Flenet, Martine; Boachon, Benoît; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure

    2012-10-01

    In plants, epoxygenated fatty acids (EFAs) are constituents of oil seeds as well as defence molecules and components of biopolymers (cutin, suberin). While the pleiotropic biological activities of mammalian EFAs have been well documented, there is a paucity of information on the physiological relevance of plant EFAs and their biosynthesis. Potential candidates for EFA formation are caleosin-type peroxygenases which catalyze the epoxidation of unsaturated fatty acids in the presence of hydroperoxides as co-oxidants. However, the caleosins characterized so far, which are mostly localized in seeds, are poor epoxidases. In sharp contrast, quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that PXG4, a class II caleosin gene, is expressed in roots, stems, leaves and flowers of Arabidopsis. Expressed in yeast, PXG4 encodes a calcium-dependent membrane-associated hemoprotein able to catalyze typical peroxygenase reactions. Moreover, we show here that purified recombinant PXG4 is an efficient fatty acid epoxygenase, catalyzing the oxidation of cis double bonds of unsaturated fatty acids. Physiological linoleic and linolenic acids proved to be the preferred substrates for PXG4; they are oxidized into the different positional isomers of the monoepoxides and into diepoxides. An important regioselectivity was observed; the C-12,13 double bond of these unsaturated fatty acids being the least favored unsaturation epoxidized by PXG4, linolenic acid preferentially yielded the 9,10-15,16-diepoxide. Remarkably, PXG4 catalyzes exclusively the formation of (R),(S)-epoxide enantiomers, which is the absolute stereochemistry of the epoxides found in planta. These findings pave the way for the study of the functional role of EFAs and caleosins in plants. PMID:22913587

  11. Association of DDT and heptachlor epoxide in human blood with diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Everett, Charles J; Thompson, Olivia M

    2015-01-01

    Six organochlorine pesticides and pesticide metabolites in human blood were tested to determine their relationships with diabetic nephropathy. The data were derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2004 (unweighted, n=2992, population estimate=133,088,752). The six chemicals were p,p'-DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane), p,p'-DDE (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethylene), beta-hexachlorocyclohexane, oxychlordane, trans-nonachlor and heptachlor epoxide. In this research, total diabetes included diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes (glycohemoglobin, A1c ≥6.5%), and nephropathy was defined as a urinary albumin to creatinine ratio >30 mg/g, representing microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria. The pesticide p,p'-DDT and pesticide metabolite heptachlor epoxide were significantly associated with total diabetes with nephropathy, with odds ratios of 2.08 (95% CI 1.06-4.11) and 1.75 (95% CI 1.05-2.93), respectively. Organochlorine pesticides are thought to act through the constitutive androstane receptor/pregnane X receptor disease pathway, but this is not well established. When p,p'-DDT and heptachlor epoxide were both elevated, the odds ratio for diabetic nephropathy was 2.76 (95% CI 1.31-5.81), and when six of six organochlorine pesticides and pesticide metabolites, were elevated, the odds ratio for diabetic nephropathy was 3.00 (95% CI 1.08-8.36). The differences in the odds ratios for these groups appear to be due to differences in the mean heptachlor epoxide concentration of each category. Organochlorine pesticides and pesticide metabolites are known to have estrogenic, antiestrogenic or antiandrogenic activity. The constitutive androstane receptor/pregnane X receptor pathway is thought to interact with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor pathway, and the associations noted may be due to that interaction.

  12. Monolithic Nickel (II) Oxide Aerogels Using an Organic Epoxide: The Importance of the Counter Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A E; Satcher, J H; Simpson, R L

    2004-01-13

    The synthesis and characterization of nickel (II) oxide aerogel materials prepared using the epoxide addition method is described. The addition of the organic epoxide propylene oxide to an ethanolic solution of NiCl{sub 2} 6H{sub 2}O resulted in the formation of an opaque light green monolithic gel and subsequent drying with supercritical CO{sub 2} gave a monolithic aerogel material of the same color. This material has been characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. The results indicate that the nickel (II) oxide aerogel has very low bulk density (98 kg/m{sup 3} ({approx}98 %porous)), high surface area (413 m{sup 2}/g), and has a particulate-type aerogel microstructure made up of very fine spherical particles with an open porous network. By comparison, a precipitate of Ni{sub 3}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 4} is obtained when the same preparation is attempted with the common Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} 6H{sub 2}O salt as the precursor. The implications of the difference of reactivity of the two different precursors are discussed in the context of the mechanism of gel formation via the epoxide addition method. The synthesis of nickel (II) oxide aerogel, using the epoxide addition method, is especially unique in our experience. It is our first example of the successful preparation of a metal oxide aerogel using a metal divalent metal ion and may have implications for the application of this method to the preparation of aerogels or nanoparticles of other divalent metal oxides. To our knowledge this is the first report of a monolithic pure nickel (II) oxide aerogel materials.

  13. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  14. Dichlorodioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes bearing oxygen-donor ligands as olefin epoxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tânia S M; Gomes, Ana C; Lopes, André D; Lourenço, João P; Almeida Paz, Filipe A; Pillinger, Martyn; Gonçalves, Isabel S

    2015-08-21

    Treatment of the solvent adduct [MoO2Cl2(THF)2] with either 2 equivalents of N,N-dimethylbenzamide (DMB) or 1 equivalent of N,N'-diethyloxamide (DEO) gave the dioxomolybdenum(vi) complexes [MoO2Cl2(DMB)2] () and [MoO2Cl2(DEO)] (). The molecular structures of and were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Both complexes present a distorted octahedral geometry and adopt the cis-oxo, trans-Cl, cis-L configuration typical of complexes of the type [MoO2X2(L)n], with either the monodentate DMB or bidentate DEO oxygen-donor ligands occupying the equatorial positions trans to the oxo groups. The complexes were applied as homogeneous catalysts for the epoxidation of olefins, namely cis-cyclooctene (Cy), 1-octene, trans-2-octene, α-pinene and (R)-(+)-limonene, using tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP) as oxidant. In the epoxidation of Cy at 55 °C, the desired epoxide was the only product and turnover frequencies in the range of ca. 3150-3200 mol molMo(-1) h(-1) could be reached. The catalytic production of cyclooctene oxide was investigated in detail, varying either the reaction temperature or the cosolvent. Complexes and were also applied in liquid-liquid biphasic catalytic epoxidation reactions by using an ionic liquid of the type [C4mim][X] (C4mim = 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium; X = NTf2, BF4 or PF6] as a solvent to immobilise the metal catalysts. Recycling for multiple catalytic runs was achieved without loss of activity.

  15. A stable epoxide as a potential endogenous estrogen metabolite: Possible significance in breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Raeside, James I

    2016-06-01

    Epoxides as reactive intermediates of estrogen metabolism have been considered to be potential precursors of the 2- and 4-hydroxy, catechol estrogens and even to be mutagenic/carcinogenic agents themselves. The labile nature of the intermediates has made proof of their existence difficult in natural biological conditions. In our studies on estrogen metabolism in vitro, in various tissues from several laboratory and domestic species, there was chromatographic evidence of formation of a stable estrogen metabolite that could be seen after incubation with radiolabeled estrone, but not with unlabeled substrate. Investigation with acid treatment of the metabolite yielded material detected as 6-hydroxy-estrone-suggesting the presence of an additional oxygen atom in the molecule. An identification of the "unknown compound" has not yet been made but, with this evidence, the properties revealed so far can best be met by assuming the presence of 5,6-epoxy-estrone. The recent favorable reports on the role of 5α,6α-epoxy-cholesterol in breast cancer has led to the hypothesis that the formation of a similar, stable epoxide of an estrogen could potentially be a compound of interest. If a metabolic pathway from estrone to 6-hydroxy-estrone through a stable epoxide has indeed been observed, it would suggest that identifying and screening for the enzymes responsible for its production, as opposed to those generating the catecholestrogens, could provide valuable information in relation to breast cancer. The balance in production of estrogen epoxides could be a key factor in determining normal health or risk of tumor development. PMID:27142140

  16. Direct Epoxidation of Propylene over Stabilized Cu+ Surface Sites on Ti Modified Cu2O

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Kattel, S.; Xiong, K.; Mudiyanselage, K.; Rykov, S.; Senanayake, S. D.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Liu, P.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Chen, J. G.

    2015-07-17

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility to tune the epoxidation selectivity by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu+ active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene.

  17. Sucrose hydrolases from the midgut of the sugarcane stalk borer Diatraea saccharalis.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Cíntia N B; Isejima, Eliza M; Samuels, Richard I; Silva, Carlos P

    2004-11-01

    A beta-fructosidase (EC 3.2.1.26) was isolated from the midgut of larval sugar cane stalk borer Diatraea saccharalis by mild-denaturing electrophoresis and further purified to near homogeneity by gel filtration. beta-Fructosidase hydrolysed sucrose, raffinose and the fructosyl-trisaccharide isokestose, but it had no activity against maltose, melibiose and synthetic substrates for alpha-glucosidases. Two other sucrose hydrolases, one resembling a alpha-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.20) and the other one active specifically against sucrose (sucrase) were detected in the larval midgut of D. saccharalis. All three sucrose hydrolases were associated with the midgut epithelium of larval D. saccharalis. Relative molecular mass (M(r)) of the beta-fructosidase was estimated around 45,000 (by gel filtration). The other two sucrose hydrolases had M(r) of 54,000 (alpha-glucosidase) and 59,000 (sucrase). The pH optima of the sucrose hydrolases were 5-10 for both alpha-glucosidase and sucrase and 7-8 for beta-fructosidase. Considering V(max)/K(m) ratios, beta-fructosidase preferentially cleaves isokestose rather than raffinose and sucrose. In order to evaluate the possible contribution of microorganisms isolated from the midgut to the pool of sucrose hydrolases, washed midgut epithelia were homogenised and plated onto appropriate media. Seven bacterial and one yeast species were isolated. None of the sucrose hydrolases extracted from the microorganisms corresponded to the enzymes isolated from midgut tissue homogenates. This result suggests that the major sucrose hydrolases found in the midgut of larval D. saccharalis were probably produced by the insect themselves not by the gut microflora.

  18. Epoxide group relationship with cytotoxicity in withanolide derivatives from Withania somnifera.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pallavi; Misra, Laxminarain; Siddique, Amreen A; Srivastava, Monica; Kumar, Shiv; Darokar, Mahendra P

    2014-01-01

    Withania somnifera is one of the highly reputed medicinal plants of India. Its steroidal constituents exist in the form of two major substitution patterns, viz. withaferin A (1) and withanone (5). Withaferin A with oxidation at carbons 4, 5, and 6 is considered as an active type, especially as anticancer, whereas the withanones with oxidation at carbons 5, 6, and 7 rarely show any activity. We prepared a series of derivatives with modifications at carbons 5, 6, and 7 in ring B of these withanolides to study the role of the epoxide group towards the cytotoxic property of these bioactive steroids. We have converted withanolides into the respective thiiranes, amino alcohols and alcohols by selective reactions at the epoxide ring and were evaluated for in vitro anticancer activity against four cancer cell lines to study the structure activity relationships. The transformations of the epoxide group in withanolides of the withaferin A type showed moderate reduction in their cytotoxicity whereas the almost inactive withanones have shown some improvements in their alcohol derivatives.

  19. Efficient epoxidation of a terminal alkene containing allylic hydrogen atoms: trans-methylstyrene on Cu{111}.

    PubMed

    Cropley, Rachael L; Williams, Federico J; Urquhart, Andrew J; Vaughan, Owain P H; Tikhov, Mintcho S; Lambert, Richard M

    2005-04-27

    The selective oxidation of trans-methylstyrene, a phenyl-substituted propene that contains labile allylic hydrogen atoms, has been studied on Cu{111}. Mass spectrometry and synchrotron fast XPS were used to detect, respectively, desorbing gaseous products and the evolution of surface species as a function of temperature and time. Efficient partial oxidation occurs yielding principally the epoxide, and the behavior of the system is sensitive to the order in which reactants are adsorbed. The latter is understandable in terms of differences in the spatial distribution of oxygen adatoms; isolated adatoms lead to epoxidation, while islands of "oxidic" oxygen do not. NEXAFS data taken over a range of coverages and in the presence and absence of coadsorbed oxygen indicate that the adsorbed alkene lies essentially flat with the allylic hydrogen atoms close to the surface. The photoemission results and comparison with the corresponding behavior of styrene on Cu{111} strongly suggest that allylic hydrogen abstraction is indeed a critical factor that limits epoxidation selectivity. An overall mechanism consistent with the structural and reactive properties is proposed.

  20. Novel bio-based thermoset resins based on epoxidized vegetable oils for structural adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivasubramanian, Shivshankar

    Conventional engineered wood composites are bonded for the most part through formaldehyde-based structural adhesives such as urea formaldehyde (UF), melamine formaldehyde (MF), phenol formaldehyde (PF) and resorcinol formaldehyde (RF). Formaldehyde is a known human carcinogen; the occupational exposure and emission after manufacturing of these binders is raising more and more concern. With increasing emphasis on environmental issues, there is clear incentive to replace these hazardous conventional formaldehyde-based binders with cco-friendly resins having similar properties but derived from renewable sources, bearing in mind the economics of the structural wood composite industry. In this thesis, the curing reaction of bio-derived epoxy thermosets with inexpensive, low-toxicity precursors, including polyimines and amino acids was investigated. Epoxidized linseed oil (ELO) and epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) were successfully crosslinked with both branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) and triethylenetetramine (fETA). Epoxidized castor oil (ECO) was crosslinked with polyethyleneimine (PEI), having different molecular weights. Curing conditions were optimized through solvent uptake and soluble fraction analysis. Finally, the mechanical properties of the optimized compositions of rigid bioepoxies were evaluated using dynamic mechanical rheological testing (DMRT). While not as stiff as conventional materials, optimized materials have sufficient room temperature moduli to show promise for coatings and as binders in engineered wood products.