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Sample records for epoxy vacuum impregnation

  1. Polarization of vacuum-pressure-impregnated high voltage epoxy-mica insulations

    SciTech Connect

    Keskinen, E.; Jaeppinen, J.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the electrical behavior of modern epoxy-mica high voltage insulation is investigated with the help of two-layer insulation model. The simplified model help to understand the charging phenomenon in actual high voltage insulation. The behavior of Vacuum-Pressure-Impregnated (VPI`ed) epoxy-mica insulation is compared with Shellac-Micafolium insulation. It is illustrated that because of higher volume resistivity the rate of change of the field distribution due to charging is considerably slower in epoxy-mica insulation. This tends to result in lower polarization index (PI) value for the epoxy-mica insulation than typically obtained for Shellac-Micafolium insulations. It is also illustrated that the faster PI measurement method (ratio of the 60 seconds value to the 15 seconds value) gives clearly lower PI value than the method defined in IEEE 43 (1974) (ratio of 600 s value to 60 s value). Finally, the effect of moisture on insulation resistance and PI of VPI`ed epoxy-mica winding insulation is discussed.

  2. Managing Coil Epoxy Vacuum Impregnation Systems at the Manufacturing Floor Level To Achieve Ultimate Properties in State-of-the-Art Magnet Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Hubrig; G.H. Biallas

    2005-05-01

    Liquid epoxy resin impregnation systems remain a state-of-the-art polymer material for vacuum and vacuum/pressure impregnation applications in the manufacture of both advanced and conventional coil winding configurations. Epoxy resins inherent latitude in processing parameters accounts for their continued popularity in engineering applications, but also for the tendency to overlook or misinterpret the requisite processing parameters on the manufacturing floor. Resin system impregnation must be managed in detail in order to achieve device life cycle reliability. This closer look reveals how manufacturing floor level management of material acceptance, handling and storage, pre- and post- impregnation processing and cure can be built into a manufacturing plan to increase manufacturing yield, lower unit cost and ensure optimum life cycle performance of the coil.

  3. Interlaboratory comparison of thin section epoxy impregnation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.D.; Byrnes, A.P.

    1987-05-01

    Evidence of the ineffective blue-dye epoxy impregnation is encountered all too commonly in thin sections. A study involving ceramic disks was conducted to compare the efficiencies of a variety of epoxy impregnation procedures used by major laboratories. Disks were sent to five commercial and four major oil company thin section laboratories which then impregnated the disks and returned them for analysis. Porcelain disks were used because of their high degree of uniformity, white color, rocklike composition and pore geometry, uniform pore size, and high pore connectivity. Impregnation efficiency was determined by calculating the pore volume invaded using helium porosimetry and by determining the areas and distances of invasion based on extent of blue-dye invasion in cross-sectional cuts through the disks. Techniques which proved very highly effective are vacuum or vacuum/pressure impregnation in which the epoxy was added to the sample container subsequent to evacuation. Relatively ineffective are vacuum techniques, at room or elevated temperatures, where the sample is submerged in epoxy prior to evacuation. The key to effective impregnation is to remove air from the sample before it is covered by epoxy. Factors which have little or no influence on the effectiveness of impregnation include type of blue dye, epoxy type, and presence of fluorescent dye. High-quality thin sections can be prepared using less-effective techniques if care is taken to prepare them from the outer edge of the impregnated sample.

  4. Epoxy resin developments for large superconducting magnets impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, J. M.; Gallet, B.; Kircher, F.; Lottin, J. C.

    The future detectors ATLAS and CMS of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will use two huge superconducting magnets. Both are now under design, and their electrical insulation could be realized using epoxy resin and a wet impregnation technique. Because of their large dimensions, and the indirect cooling of the superconductor, the strengths of the resin and of the resin/conductor interface are of major importance. A new generation of epoxy resins for vacuum/pressure impregnation methods has been tested, and compared with some classical and well-known epoxy resins used in impregnation techniques. In order to understand the mechanical behaviour at 4 K, the complete evolution from liquid state to low temperature service condition is considered. The paper will present some results on the mechanical properties, the density and the chemical shrinkage occurring during the polymerization and the thermal contraction between room temperature and 4 K for these different types of epoxy resins.

  5. Impregnating magnetic components with MDA free epoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, R. O.; Domeier, L.; Gunewardena, S.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes the use of 'Formula 456' an aliphatic amine cured epoxy for impregnating coils. Methylene dianiline (MDA) has been used for more than 20 years as the curing agent for various epoxy formulations throughout the Department of Energy. Sandia National Laboratories began the process of replacing MDA with other formulations because of regulations imposed by OSHA on the use of MDA.

  6. Epoxy impregnation procedure for hardened-cement samples. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Struble, L.; Stutzman, P.

    1988-05-01

    A method was previously developed for epoxy impregnation of hydrated cementitious materials for microscopical examination without drying the samples, by sequentially replacing pore solution with ethanol, then the ethanol with epoxy. During subsequent application of the procedure, many specimens were cured. Studies were carried out to identify the cause of these problems and to modify the procedure for more reliable impregnation. Contamination with low levels (4%) of water or ethanol was found to prevent proper curing. Modifications in the procedure to prevent contamination, including monitoring the replacement of pore solution by ethanol, were shown to provide consistent and reliable impregnation.

  7. Degradation free epoxy impregnation of REBCO coils and cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, C.; Bagrets, N.; Weiss, K.-P.; Bayer, C. M.; Bast, T.

    2013-05-01

    In applications utilizing high-temperature superconductors (HTS) under high mechanical loads as high-field magnets or rotors of generators and motors, the rare-earth-barium-copper-oxide (REBCO) tapes have to be stabilized mechanically. This is achieved using support structures of structural materials and filling the voids in the support through the impregnation of the tapes. The impregnation prevents movement of the tapes and distributes mechanical loads evenly. With high mechanical strengths and low sensitivities to rapid temperature changes, epoxy resins are desired materials for the impregnation of superconductor tapes. However, a strong decrease of the current-carrying capabilities was observed in previous epoxy-impregnated REBCO coils. In this work the thermal expansion mismatches between epoxy resins and REBCO tapes are identified as the cause of these degradations. Fillers are used to reduce the thermal expansions of glues and resins. Mixtures with varying filler contents are analyzed systematically. Their thermal expansions and the corresponding degradations of short REBCO tape samples are measured. A mixture of epoxy resin and filler is found which allows degradation-free impregnation of REBCO tapes. This mixture is validated on a 1.2 m long 15 × 5 Roebel-assembled-coated-conductor (RACC) cable from Industrial Research Limited (IRL).

  8. Enhancement of the transverse stress tolerance of REBCO Roebel cables by epoxy impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, S.; Dhallé, M.; Gao, P.; Wessel, W.; Kario, A.; Kling, A.; Goldacker, W.

    2015-06-01

    REBCO Roebel cables are considered for application in high-temperature superconducting inserts for accelerator magnets because of their fully transposed geometry, high-engineering current density, and adequate bending tolerance. In these magnets the cables experience Lorentz forces leading to transverse stresses up to 100-150 MPa. Previous reports have shown bare Roebel cables to degrade under such high stresses so that additional reinforcement is required. In this work, two identical Roebel cables are vacuum impregnated with a mixture of epoxy and fused silica in order to improve their tolerance to transverse stress. After impregnation, the critical current of the cables is measured under transverse mechanical loading at T = 4.2 K, {{B}\\bot }=10.5 T. A reference cable without impregnation is tested as well. Pressures up to 350 MPa are applied to a short (30 mm) section of each cable. No degradation was observed for pressures up to 250 MPa and 170 MPa in the two impregnated cables. The critical current of the non-impregnated cable, in contrast, started to decrease at stresses as low as 40 MPa.

  9. DGEBF epoxy blends for use in the resin impregnation of extremely large composite parts

    DOE PAGES

    Madhukar, M. S.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2015-01-16

    Large superconducting electromagnets used in fusion reactors utilize a large amount of glass/epoxy composite for electrical insulation and mechanical and thermal strengths. Moreover, the manufacture of these magnets involves wrapping each superconducting cable bundle with dry glass cloth followed by the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding of the entire magnet. Due to their enormous size (more than 100 tons), it requires more than 40 h for resin impregnation and the subsequent pressure cycles to ensure complete impregnation and removal of any trapped air pockets. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F epoxy resin cross-linked with methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride with an accelerator has been shownmore » to be a good candidate for use in composite parts requiring long impregnation cycles. Viscosity, gel time, and glass transition temperature of four resin-blends of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F resin system were monitored as a function of time and temperature with an objective to find the blend that provides a working window longer than 40h at low viscosity without lowering its glass transition temperature. A resin-blend in the weight ratios of resin:hardener:accelerator=100:82:0.125 is shown to provide more than 60h at low resin viscosity while maintaining the same glass transition temperature as obtained with previously used resin-blends, based on the results.« less

  10. DGEBF epoxy blends for use in the resin impregnation of extremely large composite parts

    SciTech Connect

    Madhukar, M. S.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2015-01-16

    Large superconducting electromagnets used in fusion reactors utilize a large amount of glass/epoxy composite for electrical insulation and mechanical and thermal strengths. Moreover, the manufacture of these magnets involves wrapping each superconducting cable bundle with dry glass cloth followed by the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding of the entire magnet. Due to their enormous size (more than 100 tons), it requires more than 40 h for resin impregnation and the subsequent pressure cycles to ensure complete impregnation and removal of any trapped air pockets. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F epoxy resin cross-linked with methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride with an accelerator has been shown to be a good candidate for use in composite parts requiring long impregnation cycles. Viscosity, gel time, and glass transition temperature of four resin-blends of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F resin system were monitored as a function of time and temperature with an objective to find the blend that provides a working window longer than 40h at low viscosity without lowering its glass transition temperature. A resin-blend in the weight ratios of resin:hardener:accelerator=100:82:0.125 is shown to provide more than 60h at low resin viscosity while maintaining the same glass transition temperature as obtained with previously used resin-blends, based on the results.

  11. Mechanical and electric characteristics of vacuum impregnated no-insulation HTS coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Heecheol; Kim, A.-rong; Kim, Seokho; Park, Minwon; Kim, Kwangmin; Park, Taejun

    2014-09-01

    For the conduction cooling application, epoxy impregnation is inevitable to enhance the thermal conduction. However, there have been several research results on the delamination problem with coated conductor and the main cause of the delamination is related with the different thermal contraction between epoxy, the insulation layer and the weak conductor. To avoid this problem, the amount of epoxy and insulation layer between conductors should be minimized or removed. Therefore, no insulation (NI) winding method and impregnation after dry winding can be considered to solve the problem. The NI coil winding method is very attractive due to high mechanical/thermal stability for the special purpose of DC magnets by removing the insulation layer. In this paper, the NI coil winding method and vacuum impregnation are applied to a HTS coil to avoid the delamination problem and enhance the mechanical/thermal stability for the conduction cooling application. Through the charging/discharging operation, electric/thermal characteristics are investigated at 77 K and 30 K.

  12. Vacuum powder injector and method of impregnating fiber with powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Working, Dennis C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus uniformly impregnate stranded material with dry powder such as low solubility, high melt flow polymer powder to produce, for example, composite prepregs. The stranded material is expanded in an impregnation chamber by an influx of air so that the powder, which may enter through the same inlet as the air, penetrates to the center of the stranded material. The stranded material then is contracted for holding the powder therein. The stranded material and powder may be pulled through the impregnation chamber in the same direction by vacuum. Larger particles of powder which do not fully penetrate the stranded material may be combed into the stranded material and powder which does not impregnate the stranded material may be collected and reused.

  13. Thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy-impregnated Bi-2212/Ag composite

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pei; Wang, Yang; Godeke, Arno; Ye, Liyang; Flanagan, Gene; Shen, Tengming

    2014-11-26

    In this study, knowledge of the thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy/superconductor/insulation composite is important for designing, fabricating, and operating epoxy impregnated high field superconducting magnets near their ultimate potentials. We report measurements of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, and the coefficient of thermal contraction of epoxy-impregnated composite made from the state-of-the-art powder-in-tube multifilamentary Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox round wire at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. Stress-strain curves of samples made from single-strand and Rutherford cables were tested under both monotonic and cyclic compressive loads, with single strands insulated using a thin TiO2 insulation coating and the Rutherford cable insulated with a braided ceramic sleeve.

  14. Thermal-mechanical Properties of Epoxy-impregnated Bi-2212/Ag Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pei; Wang, Yang; Godeke, Arno; Ye, Liyang; Flanagan, Gene; Shen, Tengming

    2014-11-26

    Knowledge of the thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy/superconductor/insulation composite is important for designing, fabricating, and operating epoxy impregnated high field superconducting magnets near their ultimate potentials. We report measurements of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson’s ratio, and the coefficient of thermal contraction of epoxy-impregnated composite made from the state-of-the-art powder-in-tube multifilamentary Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox round wire at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. Stress-strain curves of samples made from single-strand and Rutherford cables were tested under both monotonic and cyclic compressive loads, with single strands insulated using a thin TiO2 insulation coating and the Rutherford cable insulated with a braided ceramic sleeve.

  15. Thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy-impregnated Bi-2212/Ag composite

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Pei; Wang, Yang; Fermi National Accelerator Lab.; Godeke, Arno; National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL; Ye, Liyang; Fermi National Accelerator Lab.; Flanagan, Gene; Shen, Tengming

    2014-11-26

    In this study, knowledge of the thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy/superconductor/insulation composite is important for designing, fabricating, and operating epoxy impregnated high field superconducting magnets near their ultimate potentials. We report measurements of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, and the coefficient of thermal contraction of epoxy-impregnated composite made from the state-of-the-art powder-in-tube multifilamentary Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox round wire at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. Stress-strain curves of samples made from single-strand and Rutherford cables were tested under both monotonic and cyclic compressive loads, with single strands insulated using a thin TiO2 insulation coating and the Rutherford cable insulated with a braided ceramicmore » sleeve.« less

  16. Effects of Vacuum Impregnation with Sucrose Solution on Mango Tissue.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xian; Luo, Cailian; Chen, Yulong

    2016-06-01

    The influences of vacuum impregnation (VI) on the tissue of mango cubes during atmospheric immersion in sucrose solution were investigated. Results showed that VI effectively facilitated water loss (WL) and sugar gain (SG) during the 300min immersion process, with increases of 20.59% and 31.26%, respectively. A pectin solubilization/degradation phenomenon was observed in the immersion process. The intercellular space and cross section area in the VI-treated mango tissue increased immediately after being released to atmospheric pressure. And it was noted that after experiencing shrinkage-relaxation period twice in the 300 min immersion process, the size of VI-treated mango cells recovered to the original level of fresh ones. Major variations in WL, protopectin content, water soluble pectin content, firmness and microstructure of mango cubes appeared within the first 60 min. In addition, the firmness of mango cubes was positively correlated with the protopectin content (P < 0.01), but negatively correlated with WL and the water soluble pectin content (P < 0.01), indicating that WL and degradation of protopectin contributed greatly to the loss of firmness. PMID:27100561

  17. Enhanced antimicrobial effect of organic acid washing against foodborne pathogens on broccoli by vacuum impregnation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun-Won; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-01-18

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of vacuum impregnation applied to the washing process for removal of Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes from broccoli surfaces. Broccoli was inoculated with the two foodborne pathogens and treated with simple dipping washing or with vacuum impregnation in 2% malic acid for 5, 10, 20, or 30 min. There were two methods of vacuum impregnation: continuous and intermittent. After 30 min of 101.3 kPa (=14.7 psi, simple dipping), 61.3 kPa (=8.9 psi), and 21.3 kPa (=3.1 psi) of continuous vacuum impregnation treatment, there were 1.6, 2.0, and 2.4 log 10 CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and 1.5, 1.7, and 2.3 log 10 CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes, respectively. After 30 min of 101.3, 61.3, and 21.3 kPa of intermittent vacuum impregnation treatment, there were 1.5, 2.3, and 3.7 log 10 CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and 1.6, 2.1, and 3.2 log 10 CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes, respectively. Scanning electron photomicrographs showed that bacteria tend to attach to or become entrapped in protective sites after simple wash processing (dipping). However, most bacteria were washed out of protective sites after intermittent treatment. Direct treatment of cell suspensions with vacuum impregnation showed that it had no inactivation capacity in itself since there were no significant differences (P ≥ 0.05) between the reduction rates of non- and vacuum impregnation treatment. These results demonstrate that the increased antimicrobial effect of vacuum impregnation can be attributed to increased accessibility of sanitizer and an enhanced washing effect in protected sites on produce. Color, texture and titratable acidity values of broccoli treated with intermittent vacuum impregnation in 2% malic acid for 30 min were not significantly (P ≥ 0.05) different from those of untreated samples even though a storage interval was needed for titratable acidity values to be reduced to levels comparable to those of

  18. Enhanced antimicrobial effect of organic acid washing against foodborne pathogens on broccoli by vacuum impregnation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun-Won; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-01-18

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of vacuum impregnation applied to the washing process for removal of Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes from broccoli surfaces. Broccoli was inoculated with the two foodborne pathogens and treated with simple dipping washing or with vacuum impregnation in 2% malic acid for 5, 10, 20, or 30 min. There were two methods of vacuum impregnation: continuous and intermittent. After 30 min of 101.3 kPa (=14.7 psi, simple dipping), 61.3 kPa (=8.9 psi), and 21.3 kPa (=3.1 psi) of continuous vacuum impregnation treatment, there were 1.6, 2.0, and 2.4 log 10 CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and 1.5, 1.7, and 2.3 log 10 CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes, respectively. After 30 min of 101.3, 61.3, and 21.3 kPa of intermittent vacuum impregnation treatment, there were 1.5, 2.3, and 3.7 log 10 CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and 1.6, 2.1, and 3.2 log 10 CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes, respectively. Scanning electron photomicrographs showed that bacteria tend to attach to or become entrapped in protective sites after simple wash processing (dipping). However, most bacteria were washed out of protective sites after intermittent treatment. Direct treatment of cell suspensions with vacuum impregnation showed that it had no inactivation capacity in itself since there were no significant differences (P ≥ 0.05) between the reduction rates of non- and vacuum impregnation treatment. These results demonstrate that the increased antimicrobial effect of vacuum impregnation can be attributed to increased accessibility of sanitizer and an enhanced washing effect in protected sites on produce. Color, texture and titratable acidity values of broccoli treated with intermittent vacuum impregnation in 2% malic acid for 30 min were not significantly (P ≥ 0.05) different from those of untreated samples even though a storage interval was needed for titratable acidity values to be reduced to levels comparable to those of

  19. Effect of Strain Rate on Tensile Properties of Carbon Fiber Epoxy-Impregnated Bundle Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-03-01

    The tensile tests for high tensile strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB) carbon fiber epoxy-impregnated bundle composite at various strain rates ranging from 3.33 × 10-5 to 6.0 × 102 s-1 (various crosshead speeds ranging from 8.33 × 10-7 to 1.5 × 101 m/s) were investigated. The statistical distributions of the tensile strength were also evaluated. The results clearly demonstrated that the tensile strength of bundle composite slightly increased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed) and the Weibull modulus of tensile strength for the bundle composite decreased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed), there is a linear relation between the Weibull modulus and the average tensile strength on log-log scale.

  20. PROPERTY CHANGES OF CYANATE ESTER/EPOXY INSULATION SYSTEMS CAUSED BY AN ITER-LIKE DOUBLE IMPREGNATION AND BY REACTOR IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2010-04-08

    Because of the double pancake design of the ITER TF coils the insulation will be applied in several steps. As a consequence, the conductor insulation as well as the pancake insulation will undergo multiple heat cycles in addition to the initial curing cycle. In particular the properties of the organic resin may be influenced, since its heat resistance is limited. Two identical types of sample consisting of wrapped R-glass/Kapton layers and vacuum impregnated with a cyanate ester/epoxy blend were prepared. The build-up of the reinforcement was identical for both insulation systems; however, one system was fabricated in two steps. In the first step only one half of the reinforcing layers was impregnated and cured. Afterwards the remaining layers were wrapped onto the already cured system, before the resulting system was impregnated and cured again. The mechanical properties were characterized prior to and after irradiation to fast neutron fluences of 1 and 2x10{sup 22} m{sup -2}(E>0.1 MeV) in tension and interlaminar shear at 77 K. In order to simulate the pulsed operation of ITER, tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed in the load controlled mode. The results do not show any evidence for reduced mechanical strength caused by the additional heat cycle.

  1. Property Changes of Cyanate Ester/epoxy Insulation Systems Caused by AN Iter-Like Double Impregnation and by Reactor Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2010-04-01

    Because of the double pancake design of the ITER TF coils the insulation will be applied in several steps. As a consequence, the conductor insulation as well as the pancake insulation will undergo multiple heat cycles in addition to the initial curing cycle. In particular the properties of the organic resin may be influenced, since its heat resistance is limited. Two identical types of sample consisting of wrapped R-glass/Kapton layers and vacuum impregnated with a cyanate ester/epoxy blend were prepared. The build-up of the reinforcement was identical for both insulation systems; however, one system was fabricated in two steps. In the first step only one half of the reinforcing layers was impregnated and cured. Afterwards the remaining layers were wrapped onto the already cured system, before the resulting system was impregnated and cured again. The mechanical properties were characterized prior to and after irradiation to fast neutron fluences of 1 and 2×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) in tension and interlaminar shear at 77 K. In order to simulate the pulsed operation of ITER, tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed in the load controlled mode. The results do not show any evidence for reduced mechanical strength caused by the additional heat cycle.

  2. Measurement of inter-strand contact resistance in epoxy impregnated Nb3Sn Rutherford cables

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgio Ambrosio et al.

    2003-10-07

    An apparatus for the measurement, under transverse pressure, of the inter-strand contact resistance in epoxy-impregnated Nb{sub 3}Sn Rutherford cables has been recently assembled at Fermilab. Procedures have been developed to instrument and measure samples extracted from Nb{sub 3}Sn coils. Samples were extracted from coils fabricated with the Wind-and-React and the React-and-Wind technology, both presently under development at Fermilab. A ceramic binder is used to improve the insulation and to simplify the fabrication of coils using the Wind-and-React technology. Synthetic oil is used to prevent sintering during the heat treatment of coils to be wound after reaction. In order to evaluate the effects of the ceramic binder and of the synthetic oil on the inter-strand resistance, measurements of samples extracted from coils were compared with measurements of cable stacks with varying characteristics. In this paper we describe the apparatus, the sample preparation, the measurement procedure, and the results of the first series of tests.

  3. DC characterization and 3D modelling of a triangular, epoxy-impregnated high temperature superconducting coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, D.; Ainslie, M. D.; Rush, J. P.; Durrell, J. H.; Zou, J.; Raine, M. J.; Hampshire, D. P.

    2015-06-01

    The direct current (dc) characterization of high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils is important for applications, such as electric machines, superconducting magnetic energy storage and transformers. In this paper, the dc characterization of a triangular-shaped, epoxy-impregnated HTS coil wound with YBCO coated conductor intended for use in an axial-flux HTS motor is presented. Voltage was measured at several points along the coil to provide detailed information of its dc characteristics. The coil is modelled based on the H -formulation using a new three-dimensional (3D) technique that utilizes the real superconducting layer thickness, and this model allows simulation of the actual geometrical layout of the HTS coil structure. Detailed information on the critical current density’s dependence on the magnitude and orientation of the magnetic flux density, Jc(B,θ), determined from experimental measurement of a short sample of the coated conductor comprising the coil is included directly in the numerical model by a two-variable direct interpolation to avoid developing complicated equations for data fitting and greatly improve the computational speed. Issues related to meshing the finite elements of the real thickness 3D model are also discussed in detail. Based on a comparison of the measurement and simulation results, it is found that non-uniformity along the length exists in the coil, which implies imperfect superconducting properties in the coated conductor, and hence, coil. By evaluating the current-voltage (I-V) curves using the experimental data, and after taking into account a more practical n value and critical current for the non-uniform region, the modelling results show good agreement with the experimental results, validating this model as an appropriate tool to estimate the dc I-V relationship of a superconducting coil. This work provides a further step towards effective and efficient 3D modelling of superconducting devices for large

  4. [Preparation and characterization of activated carbon-silver composite with antibacterial behavior via vacuum impregnation method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon-silver composite (Ag/AC) for antibacterial performance by controlling silver release was prepared by silver acetate vacuum impregnation method. The antibacterial activity towards E. coil and resistance of water erosion was investigated through distilled water. Surface area and porosity analyzer, Scanning electron spectroscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the surface morphology and pore properties. The results show that Ag0 was deposited on AC symmetrically. The content of silver supported and particle size were increased by the increasing of the concentration of CH3 COOAg, while specific surface area, total pore volume and average pore size were decreased. Ag/AC prepared with silver content of 0.97% which killed 10(7) CFU/mL concentration of E. coil in 120 min exhibited the similar antibacterial activity for E. coil with that prepared by traditional impregnation method. However, the silver loss of the Ag/AC prepared with silver content of 0.97% was 37.6%, showing much higher resistance to water erosion. High antibacterial activity and control silver release can be simultaneously realized by the silver acetate vacuum impregnation method.

  5. Measurements of Modulus of Elasticity and Thermal Contraction of Epoxy Impregnated Niobium-Tin and Niobium-Titanium Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, K.P.; Millos, G.A.

    1998-09-01

    In the high field magnet program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, accelerator magnet prototypes are designed with epoxy impregnated niobium-tin and niobium-titanium superconductor. Accurate mechanical property values are essential for magnet mechanical design and prediction of conductor performance. Two key mean property values are measured on coil samples: modulus of elasticity (Young's modulus) and mean thermal contraction. Measurements are made in compression and are conducted in three orthogonal directions. Modulus of elasticity measurements are currently conducted at room temperature and the mean thermal contraction is measured from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. Room temperature values are compared with values estimated using the individual coil components.

  6. 2D/3D quench simulation using ANSYS for epoxy impregnated Nb3Sn high field magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2002-09-19

    A quench program using ANSYS is developed for the high field collider magnet for three-dimensional analysis. Its computational procedure is explained. The quench program is applied to a one meter Nb{sub 3}Sn high field model magnet, which is epoxy impregnated. The quench simulation program is used to estimate the temperature and mechanical stress inside the coil as well as over the whole magnet. It is concluded that for the one meter magnet with the presented cross section and configuration, the thermal effects due to the quench is tolerable. But we need much more quench study and improvements in the design for longer magnets.

  7. Microwave application on air drying of apple (var. Granny Smith). The influence of vacuum impregnation pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin Esparza, Maria Eugenia

    Combined hot air-microwave drying has been studied on apple (var. Granny Smith), with and without vacuum impregnation (VI) pretreatment with isotonic solution, respect to kinetics, microstructural and final quality items. In order to reach this objective, a drier has been designed and built, that allows to control and to register all the variables which take place during the drying process. Thermal and dielectric properties, that are very important characteristics when studying heat and mass transfer phenomena that occur during the combined drying process, have been related to temperature and/or moisture content throughout empirical equations. It could be observed that all these properties decreased with product moisture content. Respect to dielectric properties, a relationship among water binding forms to food structure and water molecules relaxation frequency has been found. On the other hand, the effect of drying treatment conditions (air rate, drying temperature, sample thickness and incident microwave power) on the drying rate, from an empirical model based on diffusional mechanisms with two kinetic parameters (k1 and k2), both function of the incident microwave power, has been studied. Microwave application to air drying implied a notable decrease on drying time, the higher the applied power the higher the reduction. Microstructural study by Cryo-Sem revealed fast water vaporization taking place when microwaves are applied. Vacuum impregnation did not implied an additional advantage for combined drying as drying rate was similar to that of NIV samples. Finally, it has been studied the influence of process conditions on the color and mechanical properties of the dried product (IV and NIV). Vacuum impregnation implied an increase on the fracture resistance and less purity and tone angle. Microwave application induced product browning with respect to air drying (tone decreased and purity increased).

  8. Proteolysis in Manchego-type cheese salted by brine vacuum impregnation.

    PubMed

    Pavia, M; Trujillo, A J; Guamis, B; Ferragut, V

    2000-07-01

    A new salting procedure based on the brine vacuum impregnation of porous products was tested on Manchego-type cheese and compared with conventional brine immersion. Its effect on cheese proteolysis throughout a 90-d ripening period was determined. Three cheese regions were evaluated (the rind, the middle, and the internal regions). The parameters analyzed were total N, water-soluble N, soluble N in trichloroacetic acid and soluble N in phosphotungstic acid by using the Kjeldahl method, casein profile by urea-PAGE, and peptide profile of the water soluble nitrogen extract by reverse-phase HPLC. Free amino acid formation was monitored with a spectrophotometric method by using a Cd-ninhydrin reagent. Globally, proteolysis was significantly affected by ripening stage (increasing throughout all the maturation period studied) and cheese region (rind showed a proteolysis pattern different from the middle and internal regions). The salting procedure only affected cheese proteolysis in the rind, whereas conventional brine-salted cheeses showed lower proteolysis than vacuum-impregnated cheeses. PMID:10908050

  9. Ascorbic acid enrichment of whole potato tuber by vacuum-impregnation.

    PubMed

    Hironaka, K; Kikuchi, M; Koaze, H; Sato, T; Kojima, M; Yamamoto, K; Yasuda, K; Mori, M; Tsuda, S

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of vacuum-impregnation (VI) for enriching the ascorbic acid content of whole potatoes. Whole potatoes were immersed in a 10% ascorbic acid (AA) solution. A vacuum pressure of 70cm Hg was applied for 0-60min, following atmospheric pressure restoration for 3h, while samples remained in the VI solution. AA concentrations of potatoes were measured using HPLC. The effects of cooking and storage time in subsets of the fortified samples were also evaluated. Results indicated that the AA concentration of whole potatoes increased with vacuum time (max 150mg/100g fr. wt.). In addition, a steam-cooking study showed that 100g of the 25min steam-cooked VI potatoes could provide adults with 90-100% of the recommended daily allowance of AA (100mg). The storage study showed that VI whole potatoes had a relatively high AA concentration (50mg/100gfr. wt.), even at 14days of storage at 4°C. This study indicated that VI treatment of whole potatoes was useful for enriching the AA content.

  10. Antibacterial action of silver-doped activated carbon prepared by vacuum impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ying; Wang, Zi-qiang; Zhao, Xin; Li, Wei; Liu, Shou-xin

    2013-02-01

    Silver-containing activated carbon (Ag/AC) exhibiting controlled release of silver and antibacterial action was prepared by vacuum impregnation using acetate silver as a precursor. The antibacterial activity toward E. coli and resistance to water erosion were investigated with the view of water purification. N2 adsorption at 77 K, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the surface morphology and crystalline properties of the Ag/AC samples. As the concentration of CH3COOAg increased, the samples change from exhibiting no antibacterial activity to inhibition of bacteria growth and then to antibacterial activity because of the higher silver content and smaller size of the silver particles. The Ag/AC composites showed a lower release rate of silver than that of a composite prepared by a traditional AgNO3 impregnation method, which suggests a strong interaction between the silver particles and carbon. Because the Ag particles block the pores of AC, the BET surface area, total pore volume and average pore diameter of the Ag/AC samples decreased as the concentration of the CH3COOAg solution increased. The higher antibacterial activity and controlled release of silver by Ag/AC containing 1.65 wt % silver means that it shows promise for purification of drinking water.

  11. Applicability of Vacuum Impregnation to Modify Physico-Chemical, Sensory and Nutritive Characteristics of Plant Origin Products—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Radziejewska-Kubzdela, Elżbieta; Biegańska-Marecik, Róża; Kidoń, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum impregnation is a non-destructive method of introducing a solution with a specific composition to the porous matrices of fruit and vegetables. Mass transfer in this process is a result of mechanically induced differences in pressure. Vacuum impregnation makes it possible to fill large volumes of intercellular spaces in tissues of fruit and vegetables, thus modifying physico-chemical properties and sensory attributes of products. This method may be used, e.g., to reduce pH and water activity of the product, change its thermal properties, improve texture, color, taste and aroma. Additionally, bioactive compounds may be introduced together with impregnating solutions, thus improving health-promoting properties of the product or facilitating production of functional food. PMID:25244012

  12. Influence of vacuum impregnation and pulsed electric field on the freezing temperature and ice propagation rates of spinach leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efforts are currently directed towards improving the quality of sensitive tissues of fruits and vegetables after freezing and thawing. One of the methods under investigation is the combination of vacuum impregnation (VI) with cryoprotectants and pulsed electric field (PEF) applied to the plant tiss...

  13. Antibacterial effects of the povidone-iodine vacuum impregnation technique in expanded polytetrafluoroethylene augmentation rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Min; Lee, Joong Seob; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Hae Sang; Lee, Ho Jun; Bae, Sung Hee; Jang, Ji Su; Lee, Jae Jun; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-06-01

    Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) is a popular graft material for augmentation rhinoplasty. Gore-Tex and Surgiform are two types of e-PTFE; Surgiform has thicker fibrils and is more compact than Gore-Tex. We conducted an ex vivo study to evaluate the ability of povidone-iodine (PVP-I) vacuum pretreatment to prevent infection with these two types of e-PTFE. Gore-Tex and Surgiform specimens were cut into 2-mm(3) pieces, which were separated into two groups. One group for each e-PTFE was disinfected with vacuum PVP-I impregnation and the other group was not disinfected. Using the pieces of implant material, swabs were obtained from the nasal cavities of 20 healthy adults, and the specimens were incubated on agar plates and viewed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We found that PVP-I treatment significantly reduced the bacterial colony counts in both the Gore-Tex and Surgiform groups. In the SEM images, bacterial colonies were observed both inside and outside the untreated Gore-Tex; on the untreated Surgiform, they were found primarily on the surface. Few bacteria were detected in the PVP-I-treated Gore-Tex and Surgiform groups. Our findings suggest that PVP-I pretreatment can reduce the risk of infection associated with e-PTFE. PMID:27304448

  14. Characterization of a graphite epoxy optical bench during thermal vacuum cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Patricia A.; Jenkins, Teresa K.; Maag, Carl R.; Taylor, Daniel M.

    1988-01-01

    In-situ monitoring of the Wide-Field/Planetary Camera, a Hubble Space Telescope science instrument, was performed in a vacuum environment to better understand the formation of ice on cooled optical detectors. Several diagnostic instruments were mounted on an access plate to view the interior of the instrument housing and the graphite epoxy optical bench. The instrumentation chosen and the rationale for choosing the instrumentation are discussed. In addition, the performance of the instrumentation during monitoring operations is discussed.

  15. Vacuum infusion manufacturing and experimental characterization of Kevlar/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardi, M. R.; Giordano, M.; Langella, A.; Nele, L.; Antonucci, V.

    2014-05-01

    Epoxy/Kevlar composites have been manufactured by conventional Vacuum Infusion process and the Pulse Infusion technique. Pulse Infusion allows to control the pressure of the vacuum bag on the dry fiber reinforcement by using a proper designed pressure distributor that induces a pulsed transverse action and promotes the through thickness resin flow. The realized composite panel have been mechanically characterized by performing tensile and short beam shear tests according with the ASTM D3039 and ASTM D2344/D 2344M standard respectively in order to investigate the effect of Pulse Infusion on the tensile strength and ILSS.

  16. Vacuum infusion manufacturing and experimental characterization of Kevlar/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciardi, M. R.; Giordano, M.; Antonucci, V.; Langella, A.; Nele, L.

    2014-05-15

    Epoxy/Kevlar composites have been manufactured by conventional Vacuum Infusion process and the Pulse Infusion technique. Pulse Infusion allows to control the pressure of the vacuum bag on the dry fiber reinforcement by using a proper designed pressure distributor that induces a pulsed transverse action and promotes the through thickness resin flow. The realized composite panel have been mechanically characterized by performing tensile and short beam shear tests according with the ASTM D3039 and ASTM D2344/D 2344M standard respectively in order to investigate the effect of Pulse Infusion on the tensile strength and ILSS.

  17. Highly radiation-resistant vacuum impregnation resin systems for fusion magnet insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, P. E.; Munshi, N. A.; Denis, R. J.

    2002-05-01

    Magnets built for fusion devices such as the newly proposed Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) need to be highly reliable, especially in a high radiation environment. Insulation materials are often the weak link in the design of superconducting magnets due to their sensitivity to high radiation doses, embrittlement at cryogenic temperatures, and the limitations on their fabricability. An insulation system capable of being vacuum impregnated with desirable properties such as a long pot-life, high strength, and excellent electrical integrity and which also provides high resistance to radiation would greatly improve magnet performance and reduce the manufacturing costs. A new class of insulation materials has been developed utilizing cyanate ester chemistries combined with other known radiation-resistant resins, such as bismaleimides and polyimides. These materials have been shown to meet the demanding requirements of the next generation of devices, such as FIRE. Post-irradiation testing to levels that exceed those required for FIRE showed no degradation in mechanical properties. In addition, the cyanate ester-based systems showed excellent performance at cryogenic temperatures and possess a wide range of processing variables, which will enable cost-effective fabrication of new magnets. This paper details the processing parameters, mechanical properties at 76 K and 4 K, as well as post-irradiation testing to dose levels surpassing 108 Gy.

  18. Testing of machine wound second generation HTS tape Vacuum Pressure Impregnated coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaffield, D.; Lewis, C.; Eugene, J.; Ingles, M.; Peach, D.

    2014-05-01

    Delamination of second generation (2G) High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) tapes has previously been reported when using resin based insulation systems for wound coils. One proposed root cause is the differential thermal contraction between the coil former and the resin encapsulated coil turns resulting in the tape c-axis tensile stress being exceeded. Importantly, delamination results in unacceptable degradation of the superconductor critical current level. To mitigate the delamination risk and prove winding, jointing and Vacuum Pressure Impregnation (VPI) processes in the production of coils for superconducting rotating machines at GE Power Conversion two scaled trial coils have been wound and extensively tested. The coils are wound from 12mm wide 2G HTS tape supplied by AMSC onto stainless steel 'racetrack' coil formers. The coils are wound in two layers which include both in-line and layer-layer joints subject to in-process test. The resin insulation system chosen is VPI and oven cured. Tests included; insulation resistance, repeat quench and recovery of the superconductor, heat runs and measurement of n-value, before and after multiple thermal cycling between ambient and 35 Kelvin. No degradation of coil performance is evidenced.

  19. Tryout of the vacuum impregnation procedure for the ITER PF1 coil on the VPI mold made of plastic shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, S.; Rodin, I.; Tanchuk, V.; Korban, S.; Bursikov, A.; Mednikov, A.; Pugachev, A.

    2014-05-01

    The PF1 Coil as part of the ITER superconducting magnet system is intended for positioning and shaping of the magnetic poloidal field. The technical specification for the PF1 coil requires a full-scale simulation of the basic technological processes including vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI). Usually, a VPI mold is made of massive stainless steel walls to get the required quality of the monolithic structure of the pancake insulation by hot-curing compound. As a result, we obtain a high-cost furnace with a considerable amount of steel inside to be heated up to the specified temperature; excessive energy consumption for the furnace heating system; problems with the vacuum tightness of the VPI mold. The impregnation procedure using a VPI "plastic" mold was proposed so as to avoid the above mentioned shortcomings associated with the use of the furnace made of stainless steel.

  20. Preparation of flat-polished specimens for SEM-backscattered electron imaging and X-ray microanalysis--importance of epoxy impregnation

    SciTech Connect

    Kjellsen, K.O.; Monsoey, A.; Isachsen, K.; Detwiler, R.J

    2003-04-01

    Representative and quantitative microstructural information of cement-based materials can be obtained in the backscattered electron and X-ray modes of the scanning electron microscope (SEM). One prerequisite, of several, is to use flat specimens. Microstructures that are minimally affected by the grinding and polishing necessary to produce the flat surface can be obtained. It is essential to fill the pores of the specimen with epoxy resin prior to grinding and polishing. After hardening, the epoxy stabilizes the microstructure and enables it to withstand the stresses of grinding and polishing without alteration. In the present paper, we describe a preparation technique that we consider to have produced excellent polished specimens. The importance of epoxy impregnation is demonstrated.

  1. Investigation of alternative materials for impregnation of Nb3Sn accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Deepak Reddy Chichili, Jay Hoffman and Alexander Zlobin

    2003-11-17

    Insulation is one of the most important elements of magnet design, which determines the electrical, mechanical, and thermal performance as well as lifetime of the magnet. The exposure to high radiation loads especially for the proposed LHC second-generation interaction region Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles further limits the choices of the insulation materials. Traditionally Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets were impregnated with epoxy to improve both the mechanical and electrical properties. However, the acceptable radiation limit for epoxy is low which reduces the lifetime of the magnet. The paper presents the results of the feasibility study to replace epoxy with high radiation-resistant material during vacuum impregnation. The mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of samples impregnated with Matrimid were measured and compared with epoxy-impregnated samples.

  2. Experimental and theoretical investigation of mechanical disturbances in epoxy-impregnated superconducting coils. 2. Shear-stress-induced epoxy fracture as the principal source of premature quenches and training theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, E. S.; Williams, J. E. C.; Iwasa, Y.

    An epoxy-impregnated superconducting winding may be considered structurally as a unidirectional composite consisting of superconducting wires embedded in a matrix of epoxy resin. The epoxy, because of its low strength and brittleness at low temperatures, is susceptible to brittle fracture which occurs under stresses induced initially during the cooldown (by differential thermal contractions of epoxy and metal) and subsequently during the magnet charge-up (by the Lorentz forces). Various modes of matrix failure are discussed and analysed. For the composite winding represented by four principal characteristics - geometry; constituent material properties; winding boundary conditions; and microcracks which become stress concentration sites for the initiation of further cracking. It is demonstrated that the transverse shear stresses induced by Lorentz forces in windings with cylindrical symmetry are principally responsible for premature magnet quenches. It is further demonstrated that to minimize shear stresses and thus prevent epoxy fracture in the winding, the whole winding body must not be restrained by the coil form and must be free to take its natural shape as the magnet is energized. This unrestrained winding support design is called the floating coil concept. The conclusions of the analysis agree both qualitatively and quantitatively with experimental results reported in the next two parts of this work.

  3. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, R.P.

    1992-09-15

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput. 3 figs.

  4. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, Roger P.

    1992-01-01

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput.

  5. Modification of fast-growing Chinese Fir wood with unsaturated polyester resin: Impregnation technology and efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qing; Zhao, Zijian; Yi, Songlin; Wang, Tianlong

    In this study, Chinese Fir was impregnated with unsaturated polyester resin to enhance its properties. Samples 20 mm × 20 mm × 20 mm in size were split into different sections with epoxy resin and tinfoil and subjected to an impregnation experiment under various parameters. Vacuum degree was -0.04 MPa, -0.06 MPa or -0.08 MPa and vacuum duration was 15 min, 30 min, or 45 min. The results indicated that impregnation weight percent gain is linearly dependent on curing weight percent gain. Vacuum duration appears to have less influence on the curing weight percent gain than vacuum degree, and impregnation was most successful at the transverse section compared to other sections. The optimal impregnation parameters were 30 min modification under -0.08 MPa vacuum followed by 120 min at atmospheric pressure for samples 200 mm × 100 mm × 20 mm in size. Uneven distribution of weight percent gain and cracking during the curing process suggested that 30 min post-processing at -0.09 MPa vacuum was the most effective way to complete the impregnation process. The sample's bending strength and modulus of elasticity increased after impregnation treatment. Bending strength after impregnation without post-processing reached 112.85%, but reached 71.65% with vacuum-processing; modulus of elasticity improved 67.13% and 58.28% without and with post-processing, respectively.

  6. Low-temperature mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.; Madhukar, M.; Thaicharoenporn, B.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2014-01-01

    Selected mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminate candidates for use in the electrical turn and ground insulation of the ITER Central solenoid (CS) modules were measured. Short-beam shear and flexural tests have been conducted on various E-glass cloth weaves/epoxy laminates at 295 and 77 K. Types of glass weave include 1581, 7500, 7781, and 38050, which represent both satin and plain weaves. The epoxy, planned for use for vacuum-pressure impregnation of the CS module, consists of an anhydride-cured bisphenol F resin system. Inter-laminar shear strength, flexural elastic modulus, and flexural strength have been measured. The data indicate that these properties are dependent on the volume percent of glass. Short-beam shear strength was measured as a function of the span-to-thickness ratio for all laminates at 77 K. Comprehensive fractography was conducted to obtain the failure mode of each short-beam shear test sample.

  7. Low-temperature mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R. P.; Madhukar, M.; Thaicharoenporn, B.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2014-01-27

    Selected mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminate candidates for use in the electrical turn and ground insulation of the ITER Central solenoid (CS) modules were measured. Short-beam shear and flexural tests have been conducted on various E-glass cloth weaves/epoxy laminates at 295 and 77 K. Types of glass weave include 1581, 7500, 7781, and 38050, which represent both satin and plain weaves. The epoxy, planned for use for vacuum-pressure impregnation of the CS module, consists of an anhydride-cured bisphenol F resin system. Inter-laminar shear strength, flexural elastic modulus, and flexural strength have been measured. The data indicate that these properties are dependent on the volume percent of glass. Short-beam shear strength was measured as a function of the span-to-thickness ratio for all laminates at 77 K. Comprehensive fractography was conducted to obtain the failure mode of each short-beam shear test sample.

  8. Vacuum Sealing Drainage Treatment Combined with Antibiotic-Impregnated Bone Cement for Treatment of Soft Tissue Defects and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Liang, Jiulong; Zhao, Jun; Quan, Liangliang; Jia, Xunyuan; Li, Mingchao; Tao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the combined effect of vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) and antibiotic-loaded bone cement on soft tissue defects and infection. Material/Methods This prospective non-blinded study recruited 46 patients with soft tissue defects and infection from January 2010 to May 2014 and randomly divided them into experimental and control groups (n=23). Patients in the experimental group were treated with VSD and antibiotic-loaded bone cement, while the patients in the control group were treated with VSD only. Results In the experimental group, the wound was healed in 23 cases at 4 weeks postoperatively, of which direct suture was performed in 12 cases, and additional free flap transplantation or skin grafting was performed in 6 cases and 5 cases, respectively. No infection reoccurred in 1-year follow-up. In the control group, the wound was healed in 15 cases at 6 weeks postoperatively, of which direct suture was performed in 8 cases, and additional free flap transplantation or skin grafting was performed in 3 cases and 4 cases, respectively. In the other 8 cases the wound was healed at 8 weeks postoperatively. Infection reoccurred in 3 cases during the follow-up. The experimental group had significantly fewer VSD dressing renewals, shorter time needed until the wound was ready for surgery, shorter duration of antibiotic administration, faster wound healing, and shorter hospital stay than the control group (p<0.01). Conclusions The combination of VSD and antibiotic bone cement might be a better method for treatment of soft tissue defects and infection. PMID:27281233

  9. Matrix Characterization and Development for the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, B. W.; Hubert, P.; Hou, T. H.; Cano, R. J.; Loos, A. C.; Pipes, R. B.

    2001-01-01

    The curing kinetics and viscosity of an epoxy resin system, SI-ZG-5A, have been characterized for application in the vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. Impregnation of a typical carbon fiber perform provided the test bed for the characterization. Process simulations were carried out using the process model, COMPRO, to examine heat transfer and curing kinetics for a fully impregnated panel, neglecting resin flow. The predicted viscosity profile and final degree of cure were found to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  10. Thermal expansion of epoxy-fiberglass composite specimens

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Bridgman, C.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal expansion behavior of three epoxy-fiberglass composite specimens was measured from 20 to 120/sup 0/C (70 to 250/sup 0/F) using a fused quartz push-rod dilatometer. Billets produced by vacuum impregnating layers of two types of fiberglass cloth with an epoxy resin were core-drilled to produce cylindrical specimens. These were used to study expansion perpendicular and parallel to the fiberglass layers. The dilatometer is held at a preselected temperature until steady-state is indicated by stable length and temperature data. Before testing the composite specimens, a reliability check of the dilatometer was performed using a copper secondary standard. This indicated thermal expansion coefficient (..cap alpha..) values within +-2% of expected values from 20 to 200/sup 0/C.

  11. Rheological behavior and cryogenic properties of cyanate ester/epoxy insulation material for fusion superconducting magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Z. X.; Huang, C. J.; Li, L. F.; Li, J. W.; Tan, R.; Tu, Y. P.

    2014-01-27

    In a Tokamak fusion reactor device like ITER, insulation materials for superconducting magnets are usually fabricated by a vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) process. Thus these insulation materials must exhibit low viscosity, long working life as well as good radiation resistance. Previous studies have indicated that cyanate ester (CE) blended with epoxy has an excellent resistance against neutron irradiation which is expected to be a candidate insulation material for a fusion magnet. In this work, the rheological behavior of a CE/epoxy (CE/EP) blend containing 40% CE was investigated with non-isothermal and isothermal viscosity experiments. Furthermore, the cryogenic mechanical and electrical properties of the composite were evaluated in terms of interlaminar shear strength and electrical breakdown strength. The results showed that CE/epoxy blend had a very low viscosity and an exceptionally long processing life of about 4 days at 60 °C.

  12. Rheological behavior and cryogenic properties of cyanate ester/epoxy insulation material for fusion superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. X.; Li, L. F.; Li, J. W.; Huang, C. J.; Tan, R.; Tu, Y. P.

    2014-01-01

    In a Tokamak fusion reactor device like ITER, insulation materials for superconducting magnets are usually fabricated by a vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) process. Thus these insulation materials must exhibit low viscosity, long working life as well as good radiation resistance. Previous studies have indicated that cyanate ester (CE) blended with epoxy has an excellent resistance against neutron irradiation which is expected to be a candidate insulation material for a fusion magnet. In this work, the rheological behavior of a CE/epoxy (CE/EP) blend containing 40% CE was investigated with non-isothermal and isothermal viscosity experiments. Furthermore, the cryogenic mechanical and electrical properties of the composite were evaluated in terms of interlaminar shear strength and electrical breakdown strength. The results showed that CE/epoxy blend had a very low viscosity and an exceptionally long processing life of about 4 days at 60 °C.

  13. The preparation technique optimization of epoxy/compressed expanded graphite composite bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Chao; Ming, Pingwen; Hou, Ming; Fu, Jie; Fu, Yunfeng; Luo, Xiaokuan; Shen, Qiang; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian

    Vacuum resin impregnation method has been used to prepare polymer/compressed expanded graphite (CEG) composite bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In this research, three different preparation techniques of the epoxy/CEG composite bipolar plate (Compression-Impregnation method, Impregnation-Compression method and Compression-Impregnation-Compression method) are optimized by the physical properties of the composite bipolar plates. The optimum conditions and the advantages/disadvantages of the different techniques are discussed respectively. Although having different characteristics, bipolar plates obtained by these three techniques can all meet the demands of PEMFC bipolar plates as long as the optimum conditions are selected. The Compression-Impregnation-Compression method is shown to be the optimum method because of the outstanding properties of the bipolar plates. Besides, the cell assembled with these optimum composite bipolar plates shows excellent stability after 200 h durability testing. Therefore the composite prepared by vacuum resin impregnation method is a promising candidate for bipolar plate materials in PEMFCs.

  14. Carbon Nanotube/Cu Nanowires/Epoxy Composite Mats with Improved Thermal and Electrical Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yajuan; Cao, Wei; Li, Wei; Chen, Hongyuan; Wang, Miao; Wei, Hanxing; Hu, Dongmei; Chen, Minghai; Li, Qingwen

    2015-04-01

    Polymer composites with carbon nanofillers have been regarded as a promising candidate for electronic package materials. The challenge for such materials is to increase the electrical and thermal conductivity of the composites. Herein, we reported an epoxy composite film with high thermal and electrical conductivity that were prepared by loading high volume fraction of well-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, around 50 nm in diameter, 1-10 µm in length) and copper nanowires (Cu NWs, 60-70 nm in diameter, 1-5 µm in length) in epoxy matrix. The MWCNT-Cu NW hybrid mats were prepared by a vacuum filtration method with an optimum Cu NW content of 50 wt%. The hybrid mats was then impregnated by epoxy solution to prepare epoxy composite films. The epoxy was modified by the toughening agent to make the composite films tough and flexible. The loading fraction of MWCNTs and Cu NWs was tuned by controlling the viscosity of epoxy solution. A remarkable synergetic effect between the MWCNTs and Cu NWs in improving the electrical and thermal conductivity of epoxy composites was demonstrated. The results showed that the electrical conductivity of nanocomposites with 42.5 wt% epoxy was 1500 S/m, and the thermal conductivity was 2.83 W/m K, which was 10.1 times of the neat epoxy. Its thermal resistance was as low as 1% of the pure epoxy. And the mechanical properties of composites were also investigated. These robust and flexible nanocomposites showed prospective applications as thermal interface materials (TIMs) in the electronic industry.

  15. Properties of Two Carbon Composite Materials Using LTM25 Epoxy Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juan R.; Shah, C. H.; Postyn, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, the properties of two carbon-epoxy prepreg materials are presented. The epoxy resin used in these two materials can yield lower manufacturing costs due to its low initial cure temperature, and the capability of being cured using vacuum pressure only. The two materials selected for this study are MR50/LTM25, and CFS003/LTM25 with Amoco T300 fiber; both prepregs are manufactured by The Advanced Composites Group. MR50/LTM25 is a unidirectional prepreg tape using Mitsubishi MR50 carbon fiber impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. CRS003/LTM25 is a 2 by 2 twill fabric using Amoco T300 fiber and impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. Among the properties presented in this report are strength, stiffness, bolt bearing, and damage tolerance. Many of these properties were obtained at three environmental conditions: cold temperature/dry (CTD), room temperature/dry (RTD), and elevated temperature/wet (ETW). A few properties were obtained at room temperature/wet (RTW), and elevated temperature/dry (ETD). The cold and elevated temperatures used for testing were -125 F and 180 F, respectively. In addition, several properties related to processing are presented.

  16. Evaluation of epoxy systems for use in SBASI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coultas, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of the test program was to evaluate the performance of different epoxy systems as replacements for existing epoxy systems in the SBASI. The three areas of investigation were the connector shell potting, the epoxy tape under the charge cup, and the epoxy impregnated fiberglass over the output charge. Factors considered, in addition to performance, were availability, shelf life, pot life, and effect on producibility and cost.

  17. Properties of multiaxial and 3-D orthogonal woven carbon/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bilisik, A.K.; Mohamed, M.H.

    1995-06-01

    A new three-dimensional multiaxial weaving technique was developed at NCSU. Rectangular cross-sectional preforms were fabricated. The preforms have five sets of yarn: these are warp, filling, Z-yarn and {+-}45{degree} yarns. The preforms which are made from carbon fibers were consolidated by vacuum impregnation molding at N.C. A and T State University. Epoxy/resin was used as the matrix. The unit cell of the multiaxial 3-D woven structure has been described. Mechanical tests were carried out on multiaxial 3-D woven and orthogonal woven carbon/epoxy composites. The tests included bending, interlaminar shear and in-plane shear. Test results for both structures were compared and are presented.

  18. Investigation of paramagnetic response of metallic epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.; Chegini, H.

    1986-01-01

    The paramagnetic properties of epoxies which were impregnated with metal ions were examined as the primary task in this research. A major conclusion was that the quality control of the epoxies was insufficient to permit reliable evaluation. Subsequently, a new set of specimens is being prepared. As an additional task, a new method is investigated for estimating heats of combustion for saturated hydrocarbons. The results of that investigation have shown that the empirical approach is a promising method for on-line measurements.

  19. Effect of Matrix Modification on Interlaminar Shear Strength of Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Composites at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhixiong; Li, Jingwen; Huang, Chuanjun; Li, Laifeng

    In order to investigate the effect of the matrix variability on the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of glass fiber reinforced composites at 77K, three kinds of modifiers were employed to diethyl toluene diamine (DETD) cured diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF) epoxy resin system. The woven glass fiber reinforced composites were fabricated by vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI). The ILSS at 77 K was studied and the results indicated that introduction of modifiers used in this study can enhance the ILSS of composite at 77 K. A maximum of 14.87% increase was obtained by addition of 10 wt% IPBE into the epoxy matrix. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate the fracture mechanism and strengthening effect.

  20. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  1. [Allergic contact eczema from epoxy resin].

    PubMed

    Calzado, Leticia; Ortiz-de Frutos, Francisco J; del Prado Sánchez-Caminero, María; Galera, Carmen María; Valverde, Ricardo; Vanaclocha, Francisco

    2005-11-01

    Epoxy resins are plastics that are widely used as electrical insulation, in coatings, and as adhesives and paints. They have strong sensitizing power and are one of the main causes of allergic contact eczema, both in the workplace and elsewhere. We present the case of a worker at a plastics/chemical plant, who handled aeronautical components in the process of manufacturing fuselage parts. He consulted his physician because of eczematous lesions on his fingers, hands and forearms which had developed over a two-year period and were clearly related to his work. The standard battery of skin tests was performed, along with the plastics and adhesives series and tests using the products from his workplace. Positivity was shown to epoxy resins (standard battery) and to the products from his workplace, which included different fiberglass and carbon fiber sheets impregnated with epoxy resins and epoxy adhesives.

  2. Optimization of the Composite Repair Work using 5H Satin Dry Glass Fabric and Epoxy Resin LY5052/HY5052 Materials through the Vacuum Bagging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartono; Rifai, Mochammad; Subawi, Handoko

    2016-08-01

    In composite repair terminology, the intermingled fiber joints (IFJs) concept is clearly identified as the most effective in transferring stress. However, the practical application leads to apply the laminated fiber joints (LFJs) concept for composite repair. The LFJs become almost as strong as the IFJs as the jointed zone length increases. The LFJs concept was implemented to set up the repair configuration for this work. It is identified that fracture tendency as the result of crack propagation starts from the free edges. This tendency is alleviated by applying vacuum bag to compact the laminate system. If necessary, additional accelerated curing was performed at low temperature for short time. However, this repair work preferably applying natural overnight cure to ensure the structure stability. Additionally, the repair handling and waiting purposes take 40% out of the effectively repair time. The waiting time should be anticipated in the composite repair to reduce wasting time for unproductive output.

  3. Effect of carbon nanotube addition on the wear behavior of basalt/epoxy woven composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, M T; Rhee, K Y; Lee, B H; Kim, C J

    2013-08-01

    The effect of acid-treated carbon nanotube (CNT) addition on the wear and dynamic mechanical thermal properties of basalt/epoxy woven composites was investigated in this study. Basalt/CNT/epoxy composites were fabricated by impregnating woven basalt fibers into epoxy resin mixed with 1 wt% CNTs which were acid-treated. Wear and DMA (dynamic mechanical analyzer) tests were performed on basalt/epoxy composites and basalt/CNT/epoxy composites. The results showed that the addition of the acid-treated CNTs improved the wear properties of basalt/epoxy woven composites. Specifically, the friction coefficient of the basalt/epoxy composite was stabilized in the range of 0.5-0.6 while it fell in the range of 0.3-0.4 for basalt/CNT/epoxy composites. The wear volume loss of the basalt/CNT/epoxy composites was approximately 68% lower than that of the basalt/epoxy composites. The results also showed that the glass transition temperature of basalt/CNT/epoxy composites was higher than that of basalt/epoxy composites. The improvement of wear properties of basalt/epoxy composites by the addition of acid-treated CNTs was caused by the homogeneous load transfer between basalt fibers and epoxy matrix due to the reinforcement of CNTs.

  4. Woven graphite epoxy composite test specimens with glass buffer strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnar, G. R.; Palmer, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Woven unidirectional graphite cloth with bands of fiberglass replacing the graphite in discrete lengthwise locations was impregnated with epoxy resin and used to fabricate a series of composite tensile and shear specimens. The finished panels, with the fiberglass buffer strips, were tested. Details of the fabrication process are reported.

  5. Composite material impregnation unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, S. P.; Marchello, J. M.; Johnston, N. J.

    1993-01-01

    This memorandum presents an introduction to the NASA multi-purpose prepregging unit which is now installed and fully operational at the Langley Research Center in the Polymeric Materials Branch. A description of the various impregnation methods that are available to the prepregger are presented. Machine operating details and protocol are provided for its various modes of operation. These include, where appropriate, the related equations for predicting the desired prepreg specifications. Also, as the prepregger is modular in its construction, each individual section is described and discussed. Safety concerns are an important factor and a chapter has been included that highlights the major safety features. Initial experiences and observations for fiber impregnation are described. These first observations have given great insight into the areas of future work that need to be addressed. Future memorandums will focus on these individual processes and their related problems.

  6. GRAPHITE IMPREGNATION METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Kertesz, F.; Buttram, H.J.

    1962-04-24

    ABS>A method for impregnating a refractory material by filling its pores with a first salt having a high melting temperature is described. The salt is mixed with another, more volatile salt, giving the mixture a much lower melting temperature than that of the first salt. The material is coated with the mixture, then heated to drive off the volatile salt, leaving the first salt in place. (AEC)

  7. Analysis of two-dimensional flow of epoxy fluids through woven glass fabric

    SciTech Connect

    Schutz, J.B.; Smith, K.B.

    1997-06-01

    Fabrication of magnet coils for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will require vacuum pressure impregnation of epoxy resin into the glass fabric of the insulation system. Flow of a fluid through a packed bed of woven glass fabric is extremely complicated, and semiempirical methods must be used to analyze these flows. The previous one-dimensional model has been modified for analysis of two-dimensional isotropic flow of epoxy resins through woven glass fabric. Several two-dimensional flow experiments were performed to validate the analysis, and to determine permeabilities of several fabric weave types. The semiempirical permeability is shown to be a characteristic of the fabric weave, and once determined, may be used to analyze flow of fluids of differing viscosities. Plain weave has a lower permeability than satin weave fabric, possibly due to the increased tortuosity of the preferential flow paths along fiber tows. A flow radius of approximately 2 meters through satin weave fabric is predicted for fluid viscosities of 0.10 Pa s (100 cps) in 20 hours, characteristic of VPI resins.

  8. Curing kinetics and thermomechanical properties of latent epoxy/carbon fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalle Vacche, S.; Michaud, V.; Demierre, M.; Bourban, P.-E.; Månson, J.-A. E.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, resins based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy and a latent hardener, dicyandiamide (DICY), as well as carbon fiber (CF) composites based on them, were prepared with three commercial accelerators: a methylene bis (phenyl dimethyl urea), a cycloaliphatic substituted urea, and a modified polyamine. The curing kinetics of the three DGEBA/DICY/accelerator systems were investigated by chemorheology and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in isothermal and over temperature change conditions. Differences in the reaction onset temperature, and in the glass transition temperature (Tg) were highlighted. For curing of thick resin samples, a slow curing cycle at the lowest possible temperature was used, followed by high temperature (160 - 180 °C) post-curing. Indeed, fast curing at higher temperatures caused the formation of hot spots and led to local burning of the samples. The obtained thermomechanical properties, assessed by ultimate tensile testing and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) in single cantilever configuration, were all in the expected range for epoxy resins, with tensile moduli close to 3 GPa and Tg > 140 °C. The longterm stability of these resins at room temperature was verified by DSC. Composite samples were prepared by hand lay-up by manually impregnating four layers of 5-harness satin CF textile, and curing in vacuum bag. Impregnation quality and void content were assessed by optical microscopy. The flexural properties of the post-cured composites were assessed by three-point bending test at room temperature and showed no relevant differences, all composites having bending moduli of 45 - 50 GPa. Finally, composites cured with a faster high temperature curing cycle (20 min at 140 °C) were prepared with the DGEBA/DICY/ methylene bis (phenyl dimethyl urea) system, obtaining similar properties as with the slower curing cycle, showing that the prepreg system allowed more flexibility in terms of curing cycle than the bulk resin

  9. Recent progress and tests of radiation resistant impregnation materials for Nb{sub 3}Sn coils

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.; Krave, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Nobrega, A.; Novitski, I.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2014-01-27

    Fermilab is collaborating with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) (US-LARP collaboration) to develop a large-aperture Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. An important component of this work is the development of materials that are sufficiently radiation resistant for use in critical areas of the upgrade. This paper describes recent progress in characterization of materials, including the baseline CTD101K epoxy, cyanate ester blends, and Matrimid 5292, a bismaleimide-based system. Structural properties of “ten stacks” of cable impregnated with these materials are tested at room and cryogenic temperatures and compared to the baseline CT-101K. Experience with potting 1 and 2 meter long coils with Matrimid 5292 are described. Test results of a single 1-m coil impregnated with Matrimid 5292 are reported and compared to similar coils impregnated with the traditional epoxy.

  10. Recent progress and tests of radiation resistant impregnation materials for Nb3Sn coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossert, R.; Krave, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Nobrega, A.; Novitski, I.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Fermilab is collaborating with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) (US-LARP collaboration) to develop a large-aperture Nb3Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. An important component of this work is the development of materials that are sufficiently radiation resistant for use in critical areas of the upgrade. This paper describes recent progress in characterization of materials, including the baseline CTD101K epoxy, cyanate ester blends, and Matrimid 5292, a bismaleimide-based system. Structural properties of "ten stacks" of cable impregnated with these materials are tested at room and cryogenic temperatures and compared to the baseline CT-101K. Experience with potting 1 and 2 meter long coils with Matrimid 5292 are described. Test results of a single 1-m coil impregnated with Matrimid 5292 are reported and compared to similar coils impregnated with the traditional epoxy.

  11. PROCESS OF PREPARING URANIUM-IMPREGNATED GRAPHITE BODY

    DOEpatents

    Kanter, M.A.

    1958-05-20

    A method for the fabrication of graphite bodies containing uniformly distributed uranium is described. It consists of impregnating a body of graphite having uniform porosity and low density with an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate preferably by a vacuum technique, thereafter removing excess aqueous solution from the surface of the graphite, then removing the solvent water from the body under substantially normal atmospheric conditions of temperature and pressure in the presence of a stream of dry inert gas, and finally heating the dry impregnated graphite body in the presence of inert gas at a temperature between 800 and 1400 d C to convert the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate to an oxide of uranium.

  12. Adhesive, elastomeric gel impregnating composition

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, David Glenn; Pollard, John Randolph; Brooks, Robert Aubrey

    2002-01-01

    An improved capacitor roll with alternating film and foil layers is impregnated with an adhesive, elastomeric gel composition. The gel composition is a blend of a plasticizer, a polyol, a maleic anhydride that reacts with the polyol to form a polyester, and a catalyst for the reaction. The impregnant composition is introduced to the film and foil layers while still in a liquid form and then pressure is applied to aid with impregnation. The impregnant composition is cured to form the adhesive, elastomeric gel. Pressure is maintained during curing.

  13. Secondary polymer layered impregnated tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K. (Inventor); Rasky, Daniel J. (Inventor); Szalai, Christine E. (Inventor); Carroll, Joseph A. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-ta S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A low density organic polymer impregnated preformed fibrous ceramic article includes a plurality of layers. A front layer includes ceramic fibers or carbon fibers or combinations of ceramic fibers and carbon fibers, and is impregnated with an effective amount of at least one organic polymer. A middle layer includes polymer impregnated ceramic fibers. A back layer includes ceramic fibers or carbon fibers or combinations of ceramic fibers and carbon fibers, and is impregnated with an effective amount of at least one low temperature pyrolyzing organic polymer capable of decomposing without depositing residues.

  14. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  15. Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites and Methods of Making Same Without the Use of Oven or Autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnell, Thomas J. (Inventor); Rauscher, Michael D. (Inventor); Stienecker, Rick D. (Inventor); Nickerson, David M. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Method embodiments for producing a fiber-reinforced epoxy composite comprise providing a mold defining a shape for a composite, applying a fiber reinforcement over the mold, covering the mold and fiber reinforcement thereon in a vacuum enclosure, performing a vacuum on the vacuum enclosure to produce a pressure gradient, insulating at least a portion of the vacuum enclosure with thermal insulation, infusing the fiber reinforcement with a reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent under vacuum conditions, wherein the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent generates exothermic heat, and producing the fiber-reinforced epoxy composite having a glass transition temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. by curing the fiber reinforcement infused with the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent by utilizing the exothermically generated heat, wherein the curing is conducted inside the thermally insulated vacuum enclosure without utilization of an external heat source or an external radiation source.

  16. Plasma impregnation of wood with fire retardants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabeliña, Karel G.; Lumban, Carmencita O.; Ramos, Henry J.

    2012-02-01

    The efficacy of chemical and plasma treatments with phosphate and boric compounds, and nitrogen as flame retardants on wood are compared in this study. The chemical treatment involved the conventional method of spraying the solution over the wood surface at atmospheric condition and chemical vapor deposition in a vacuum chamber. The plasma treatment utilized a dielectric barrier discharge ionizing and decomposing the flame retardants into innocuous simple compounds. Wood samples are immersed in either phosphoric acid, boric acid, hydrogen or nitrogen plasmas or a plasma admixture of two or three compounds at various concentrations and impregnated by the ionized chemical reactants. Chemical changes on the wood samples were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) while the thermal changes through thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Plasma-treated samples exhibit superior thermal stability and fire retardant properties in terms of highest onset temperature, temperature of maximum pyrolysis, highest residual char percentage and comparably low total percentage weight loss.

  17. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  18. Epoxy/Fluoroether Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Taylor, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Composite materials made from unfilled and glass-fiber-reinforced epoxy toughened by copolymerization with elastomeric prepolymers of perfluoroalkyl ether diacyl fluoride (EDAF). Improved properties due to hydrogen bonding between rubber phase and epoxy matrix, plus formation of rubberlike phase domains that molecularly interpenetrate with epoxy matrix. With optimum rubber content, particle size, and particle shape, entire molecular structure reinforced and toughened. Improved composites also show increased failure strength, stiffness, glass-transition temperature, and resistance to water.

  19. Epoxy-rubber interactions

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, F.J.; Rosner, R.B.

    1993-12-31

    Films containing amine-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile (ATBN) rubber and diglycidal ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy, cross-linked with amine curing agent, exhibit tensile extensibility over the composition range of 50-600 parts by weight rubber to 100 parts by weight epoxy. This tensile extensibility suggests the presence of ductile behavior in the second-phase particles of ATBN rubber-toughened DGEBA epoxy systems, even if the particles contain substantial amounts of epoxy. Such cured films also are capable of absorbing large additional amounts of liquid epoxy that contains the cure agent. When the epoxy is cured in situ, the film tensile behavior is consistent with the overall proportions of rubber and epoxy present. The solubility behavior also suggests that the glassy epoxy matrix immediately surrounding a precipated particle contains rubber in solid solution and thereby can plastically yield under shear-stress action. As observations confirm, such flow would be heat recoverable. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Dynamic Impregnator Reactor System (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    IBRF poster developed for the IBRF showcase. Describes the multifarious system designed for complex feedstock impregnation and processing. IBRF feedstock system has several unit operations combined into one robust system that provides for flexible and staged process configurations, such as spraying, soaking, low-severity pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, concentration/evaporation, and distillation.

  1. Modified Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of a rubber-modified experimental epoxy resin and a standard epoxy as composite matrices were studied. In addition, a brominated epoxy resin was used in varying quantities to improve the fire resistance of the composite. The experimental resin was tris-(hydroxyphenyl)methane triglycidyl ether, known as tris epoxy novolac (TEN). The standard epoxy resin used was tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM). The above resins were modified with carboxyl-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile (CTBN) rubber. It is concluded that: (1) modification of TEN resin with bromine gives better impact resistance than rubber modification alone; (2) 25% rubber addition is necessary to obtain significant improvement in impact resistance; (3) impact resistance increases with bromine content; (4) impact velocity does not significantly affect the energy absorbed by the test sample; (5) Tg did not decline with rubber modification; and (6) TEN resin had better hot/wet properties than TGDDM resin.

  2. Epoxy + liquid crystalline epoxy coreacted network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punchaipetch, Prakaipetch

    2000-10-01

    Molecular reinforcement through in-situ polymerization of liquid crystalline epoxies (LCEs) and a non-liquid crystalline epoxy has been investigated. Three LCEs: diglycidyl ether of 4,4'-dihydroxybiphenol (DGE-DHBP) and digylcidyl ether of 4-hydroxyphenyl-4″-hydroxybiphenyl-4 '-carboxylate (DGE-HHC), were synthesized and blended with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBP-F) and subsequently cured with anhydride and amine curing agents. Curing kinetics were determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Parameters for autocatalytic curing kinetics of both pure monomers and blended systems were determined. The extent of cure for both monomers was monitored by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The glass transitions were evaluated as a function of composition using DSC and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The results show that the LC constituent affects the curing kinetics of the epoxy resin and that the systems are highly miscible. The effects of molecular reinforcement of DGEBP-F by DGE-DHBP and DGE-HHC were investigated. The concentration of the liquid crystalline moiety affects mechanical properties. Tensile, impact and fracture toughness tests results are evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surfaces shows changes in failure mechanisms compared to the pure components. Results indicate that mechanical properties of the blended samples are improved already at low concentration by weight of the LCE added into epoxy resin. The improvement in mechanical properties was found to occur irrespective of the absence of liquid crystallinity in the blended networks. The mechanism of crack study indicates that crack deflection and crack bridging are the mechanisms in case of LC epoxy. In case of LC modified epoxy, the crack deflection is the main mechanism. Moreover, the effect of coreacting an epoxy with a reactive monomer liquid crystalline epoxy as a matrix for glass fiber composites was investigated. Mechanical

  3. A rapid preparation of acicular Ni impregnated anode with enhanced conductivity and operational stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xingbao; Guan, Chengzhi; Lü, Zhe; Wei, Bo; Li, Yiqian; Su, Wenhui

    2014-06-01

    A novel method for fabricating Ni(NO3)2 solution impregnated YSZ (YSZ: Yttria Stabilized Zirconia) anodes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is presented. In order to reduce the impregnation cycles and increase the reliability of the YSZ membrane, a YSZ support with a porosity of ∼60% is soaked in a saturated Ni(NO3)2 solution with an increased temperature of 80 °C. The impregnated anode is dried in a vacuum drying device without heating, resulting in a flower-like Ni(NO3)2·6H2O crystal. The formed porous structure is likely to facilitate the impregnating process and considered to be the key to success of the impregnation process with saturated solution. After heating at 700 °C, a novel needle-shaped NiO is presented, which exhibits some advantages including fast preparation, high connectivity, large specific surface area and high operational stability (i.e. high aggregation resistance). For the purpose of comparison, Ni(NO3)2 solution impregnated YSZ anodes prepared through the conventional impregnation process are also characterized under the same conditions.

  4. DEGRADATION OF MAGNET EPOXY AT NSLS X-RAY RING.

    SciTech Connect

    HU,J.P.; ZHONG,Z.; HAAS,E.; HULBERT,S.; HUBBARD,R.

    2004-05-24

    Epoxy resin degradation was analyzed for NSLS X-ring magnets after two decades of 2.58-2.8 GeV continuous electron-beam operation, based on results obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeters irradiated along the NSLS ring and epoxy samples irradiated at the beamline target location. A Monte Carlo-based particle transport code, MCNP, was utilized to verify the dose from synchrotron radiation distributed along the axial- and transverse-direction in a ring model, which simulates the geometry of a ring quadrupole magnet and its central vacuum chamber downstream of the bending-magnet photon ports. The actual life expectancy of thoroughly vacuum baked-and-cured epoxy resin was estimated from radiation tests on similar polymeric materials using a radiation source developed for electrical insulation and mechanical structure studies.

  5. Vacuum force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yongquan

    2015-03-01

    To study on vacuum force, we must clear what is vacuum, vacuum is a space do not have any air and also ray. There is not exist an absolute the vacuum of space. The vacuum of space is relative, so that the vacuum force is relative. There is a certain that vacuum vacuum space exists. In fact, the vacuum space is relative, if the two spaces compared to the existence of relative vacuum, there must exist a vacuum force, and the direction of the vacuum force point to the vacuum region. Any object rotates and radiates. Rotate bend radiate- centripetal, gravity produced, relative gravity; non gravity is the vacuum force. Gravity is centripetal, is a trend that the objects who attracted wants to Centripetal, or have been do Centripetal movement. Any object moves, so gravity makes the object curve movement, that is to say, the radiation range curve movement must be in the gravitational objects, gravity must be existed in non vacuum region, and make the object who is in the region of do curve movement (for example: The earth moves around the sun), or final attracted in the form gravitational objects, and keep relatively static with attract object. (for example: objects on the earth moves but can't reach the first cosmic speed).

  6. Pressure Venting Tests of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.; Knutson, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    A series of tests was devised to investigate the pressure venting behavior of one of the candidate ablators for the Orion capsule heat shield. Three different specimens of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) were instrumented with internal pressure taps and subjected to rapid pressure changes from near vacuum to one atmosphere and simulated Orion ascent pressure histories. The specimens vented rapidly to ambient pressure and sustained no detectable damage during testing. Peak pressure differences through the thickness of a 3-inch-thick specimen were less than 1 psi during a simulated ascent pressure history.

  7. Impregnation transition in a powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raux, Pascal; Cockenpot, Heloise; Quere, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    When an initially dry pile of micrometrical grains comes into contact with a liquid, one can observe different behaviors, function of the wetting properties. If the contact angle with the solid is low, the liquid will invade the pile (impregnation), while for higher contact angles, the grains will stay dry. We present an experimental study of this phenomenon: a dry pile of glass beads is deposed on the liquid surface, and we vary the contact angle of the liquid on the grains. We report a critical contact angle below which impregnation always occurs, and develop a model to explain its value. Different parameters modifying this critical contact angle are also investigated. Collaboration with Marco Ramaioli, Nestle Research Center, Lausanne, Switzerland.

  8. Rubberized, Brominated Epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W.; Kourtides, D.; Parker, J.; Nir, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy composite materials made with resins containing bromine and rubber additives. New composites tougher and more resistant to fire. Flame resistance increased by introducing bromine via commercial brominated flame-retartant polymeric additives.

  9. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, James A. [Livermore, CA; Newey, Herbert A. [Lafayette, CA

    1981-02-24

    Primary diamines of the formula ##STR1## wherein R is a straight chain saturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 4 carbons, a disubstituted benzene ring, or disubstituted dibenzo methane for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and pre-impregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses as room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  10. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, J.A.; Newey, H.A.

    1981-02-24

    Primary diamines are disclosed of the formula shown in a diagram wherein R is a straight chain saturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 4 carbons, a disubstituted benzene ring, or disubstituted dibenzomethane for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and pre-impregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses as room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  11. Manufacturing of REBCO coils strongly bonded to cooling members with epoxy resin aimed at its application to Maglev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2014-11-01

    The REBCO coated conductor has been attracted attention because of its high current density in the presence of high magnetic field. If the coated conductor is applied to Maglev, the operational temperature of the on-board magnets will be over 40 K and energy consumption of cryocoolers will be reduced. That high operational temperature also means the absence of liquid helium. Therefore, reliable thermal coupling is desirable for cooling the coils. We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. While the PTFE tape prevents the performance degradation of the coil, the epoxy resin bonds the coil to cooling members. We carried out three experiments to confirm that the coil structure which we propose has robust thermal coupling without the degradation. First, thermal resistances of paraffin and epoxy were measured varying the temperature from room temperature to 10 K. The measurement result indicates that paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. In another experiment, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape insulator prevented performance degradation of a small epoxy impregnated REBCO coil, while another REBCO coil with polyimide tape showed clear performance degradation. Finally, we produced a racetrack REBCO coil with the same outer dimension as a Maglev on-board magnet coil. Although the racetrack coil was installed in a GFRP coil case and tightly bonded to the case by epoxy impregnation, any performance degradation was not observed.

  12. Qualification of a cyanate ester epoxy blend supplied by Japanese industry for the ITER TF coil insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.; Knaster, J.; Savary, F.

    2012-06-01

    During the last years, two cyanate ester epoxy blends supplied by European and US industry have been successfully qualified for the ITER TF coil insulation. The results of the qualification of a third CE blend supplied by Industrial Summit Technology (IST, Japan) will be presented in this paper. Sets of test samples were fabricated exactly under the same conditions as used before. The reinforcement of the composite consists of wrapped R-glass / polyimide tapes, which are vacuum pressure impregnated with the resin. The mechanical properties of this material were characterized prior to and after reactor irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 2×1022m-2 (E>0.1 MeV), i.e. twice the ITER design fluence. Static and dynamic tensile as well as static short beam shear tests were carried out at 77 K. In addition, stress strain relations were recorded to determine the Young's modulus at room temperature and at 77 K. The results are compared in detail with the previously qualified materials from other suppliers.

  13. Cobalt ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Varying concentrations of an organometallic cobalt complex were added to an epoxy system currently used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin. Methods for combining cobalt (III) acetylacetonate with a tetraglycidyl 4,4 prime - diaminodiphenylmethane-based epoxy were investigated. The effects of increasing cobalt ion concentration on the epoxy cure were demonstrated by epoxy gel times and differential scanning calorimetry cure exotherms. Analysis on cured cobalt-containing epoxy castings included determination of glass transition temperatures by thermomechanical analysis, thermooxidative stabilities by thermogravimetric analysis, and densities in a density gradient column. Flexural strength and stiffness were also measured on the neat resin castings.

  14. VACUUM TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  15. Vacuum Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Biltoft, P J

    2004-10-15

    The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

  16. Vacuum Virtues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2007-01-01

    Upright vacuums, like cars, vary in quality, features and performance. Like automobiles, some uprights are reliable, others may be problematic, and some become a problem as a result of neglect or improper use. So, how do education institutions make an informed choice and, having done so, ensure that an upright vacuum goes the distance? In this…

  17. Vacuum mechatronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackwood, Susan; Belinski, Steven E.; Beni, Gerardo

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of vacuum mechatronics is defined as the design and development of vacuum-compatible computer-controlled mechanisms for manipulating, sensing and testing in a vacuum environment. The importance of vacuum mechatronics is growing with an increased application of vacuum in space studies and in manufacturing for material processing, medicine, microelectronics, emission studies, lyophylisation, freeze drying and packaging. The quickly developing field of vacuum mechatronics will also be the driving force for the realization of an advanced era of totally enclosed clean manufacturing cells. High technology manufacturing has increasingly demanding requirements for precision manipulation, in situ process monitoring and contamination-free environments. To remove the contamination problems associated with human workers, the tendency in many manufacturing processes is to move towards total automation. This will become a requirement in the near future for e.g., microelectronics manufacturing. Automation in ultra-clean manufacturing environments is evolving into the concept of self-contained and fully enclosed manufacturing. A Self Contained Automated Robotic Factory (SCARF) is being developed as a flexible research facility for totally enclosed manufacturing. The construction and successful operation of a SCARF will provide a novel, flexible, self-contained, clean, vacuum manufacturing environment. SCARF also requires very high reliability and intelligent control. The trends in vacuum mechatronics and some of the key research issues are reviewed.

  18. Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy Tube Lined With Aluminum Foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernet, Nelson J.; Kerr, Gregory K.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon-fiber/epoxy composite tube lined with welded aluminum foil useful as part of lightweight heat pipe in which working fluid ammonia. Aluminum liner provides impermeability for vacuum seal, to contain ammonia in heat pipe, and to prevent flow of noncondensable gases into heat pipe. Similar composite-material tubes lined with foils also incorporated into radiators, single- and two-phase thermal buses, tanks for storage of cryogenic materials, and other plumbing required to be lightweight.

  19. Curing of Furfuryl Alcohol-Impregnated Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, J. W.; Brayden, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    Delamination problem in reinforced carbon/carbon parts impregnated with oxalic acid-catalyzed furfuryl alcohol overcome by instituting two additional quality-control tests on alcohol and by changing curing conditions.

  20. Application of In Situ Fiberization for fabrication of improved strain isolation pads and graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Seibold, R. W.; Basiulis, D. I.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of applying the in situ fiberization process to the fabrication of strain isolation pads (SIP) for the Space Shuttle and to the fabrication of graphite-epoxy composites was evaluated. The ISF process involves the formation of interconnected polymer fiber networks by agitation of dilute polymer solutions under controlled conditions. High temperature polymers suitable for SIP use were fiberized and a successful fiberization of polychloro trifluoroethylene, a relatively high melting polymer, was achieved. Attempts to fiberize polymers with greater thermal stability were unsuccessful, apparently due to characteristics caused by the presence of aromaticity in the backbone of such materials. Graphite-epoxy composites were fabricated by interconnecting two dimensional arrays of graphite fiber with polypropylene IS fibers with subsequent epoxy resin impregnation. Mechanical property tests were performed on laminated panels of this material to evaluate intralaminar and interlaminar shear strength, and thus fracture toughness. Test results were generally unpromising.

  1. Metal ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of metallic and organometallic complexes to be used as potential additives for an epoxy used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin were investigated. A total of 9 complexes were screened for compatibility and for their ability to accelerate or inhibit the cure of a highly crosslinkable epoxy resin. Methods for combining the metallic complexes with the resin were investigated, gel times recorded, and cure exotherms studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition temperatures of cured metal ion containing epoxy castings were determined by thermomechanical analysis. Thermal stabilities of the castings were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. Mechanical strength and stiffness of these doped epoxies were also measured.

  2. Process for epoxy foam production

    DOEpatents

    Celina, Mathias C.

    2011-08-23

    An epoxy resin mixture with at least one epoxy resin of between approximately 60 wt % and 90 wt %, a maleic anhydride of between approximately 1 wt % and approximately 30 wt %, and an imidazole catalyst of less than approximately 2 wt % where the resin mixture is formed from at least one epoxy resin with a 1-30 wt % maleic anhydride compound and an imidazole catalyst at a temperature sufficient to keep the maleic anhydride compound molten, the resin mixture reacting to form a foaming resin which can then be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form an epoxy foam.

  3. Interaction of water with epoxy.

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Dana Auburn

    2009-07-01

    The chemistries of reactants, plasticizers, solvents and additives in an epoxy paint are discussed. Polyamide additives may play an important role in the absorption of molecular iodine by epoxy paints. It is recommended that the unsaturation of the polyamide additive in the epoxy cure be determined. Experimental studies of water absorption by epoxy resins are discussed. These studies show that absorption can disrupt hydrogen bonds among segments of the polymers and cause swelling of the polymer. The water absorption increases the diffusion coefficient of water within the polymer. Permanent damage to the polymer can result if water causes hydrolysis of ether linkages. Water desorption studies are recommended to ascertain how water absorption affects epoxy paint.

  4. Environmental effects on mechanical properties of a Kevlar 49/epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.T.; Chin, W.K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to determine the mechanical properties of a Kevlar 49/epoxy composite in a simulated flywheel service environment. The composite was filament-wound using an epoxy formulated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The temperature and vacuum chosen were 75/sup 0/C and approx. 7 x 10/sup -3/ torr, respectively. Specimens were preconditioned in the test environment for periods of 1 to 5 months before mechanical tests. The simulated service environment of 75/sup 0/C in vacuum was found to have little effect on static and fatigue properties. While the elevated temperature of 75/sup 0/C was not deleterious, the lack of air could be beneficial because it eliminates the possibility of oxidation. Thus, the elevated temperature of 75/sup 0/C is no deterrent to the application of the present Kevlar 49/epoxy in flywheels.

  5. Drug smuggling using clothing impregnated with cocaine.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Seán D; Power, John D

    2005-11-01

    A case study is presented where a woman travelling from South America to the Republic of Ireland was detained at Dublin Airport and articles of clothing she had in her luggage were found to be impregnated with cocaine. The study shows that the amount of powder recovered from the garments was approximately 14% of the total weight of the garments. The cocaine was in the form of cocaine hydrochloride and the purity was approximately 80%. An examination of the garments under filtered light highlighted the areas exposed to cocaine and indicated that the method of impregnation was by pouring liquid containing cocaine onto the clothing.

  6. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.; Pater, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    High char yield epoxy using novel bisimide amines (BIA's) as curing agents with a state of the art epoxy resin was developed. Stoichiometric quantities of the epoxy resin and the BIA's were studied to determine the cure cycle required for preparation of resin specimens. The bisimide cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). The physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these novel resins were determined. The levels of moisture absorption exhibited by the bisimide amine cured expoxies (IME's) were considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies. The strain-to-failure of the control resin system was improved 25% by replacement of DDS with 6F-DDS. Each BIA containing resin exhibited twice the char yield of the control resin MY 720/DDS. Graphite fiber reinforced control (C) and IME resins were fabricated and characterized. Two of the composite systems showed superior properties compared to the other Celion 6000/IME composite systems and state of the art graphite epoxy systems. The two systems exhibited excellent wet shear and flexural strengths and moduli at 300 and 350 F.

  7. Cross-sectional analysis of W-cored Ni nanoparticle via focused ion beam milling with impregnation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Saeeun; Na, Hyunwoong; Lee, Gwangyeob; Son, Seong Ho; Choi, Hanshin

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten and nickel bimetallic nanoparticle is synthesized by radio frequency thermal plasma process which belongs to the vapor phase condensation technology. The morphology and chemical composition of the synthesized particle were investigated using the conventional nanoparticle transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample. A few part of them looked like core/shell structured particle, but ambiguities were caused by either TEM sample preparation or TEM analysis. In order to clarify whether a core/shell structure is developed for the particle, various methodologies were tried to prepare a cross-sectional TEM sample. Focused ion beam (FIB) milling was conducted for cold-compacted particles, dispersed particles on silicon wafer, and impregnated particles with epoxy which is compatible with electron beam. A sound cross-sectional sample was just obtained from cyanoacrylate impregnation and FIB milling procedure. A tungsten-cored nickel shell structure was precisely confirmed with aid of cross-sectional sample preparation method.

  8. Thermoplastic impact property improvement in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite bumper beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoodi, M. M.; Sapuan, S. M.; Ali, Aidy; Ahmad, D.; Khalina, A.

    2010-05-01

    Utilization of thermoset resin as a bumper beam composite matrix is currently more dominated in car manufacturer suppliers, because of availability, easy processing, low material cost and production equipment investment. Moreover, low viscosity, shrinkage and excellent flow facilitate better fibre impregnation and proper surface resin wetting. Three-dimensional cross linking curing increase impact, creep and environmental stress cracking resistance properties. Low impact properties of natural fibre epoxy composite, are main issues in its employment for automotive structural components. Impact properties in epoxy composite bumper beam could be increased by modifying the resin, reinforcement and manufacturing process as well as geometry parameters such as cross section, thickness, added ribs and fixing method optimizations could strengthen impact resistance. There are two main methods, flexibilisation and toughening, as modifying the resin in order to improve the impact properties of epoxy composite, which form single phase or two-phase morphology to make modifier as epoxy or from separate phase to keep the thermo-mechanical properties. Liquid rubber, thermoplastic, core shell particle and rigid particle are different methods of toughening improvements. In this research, thermoplastic toughening has used to improve impact properties in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite for automotive bumper beam and has achieved reasonable impact improvements.

  9. Partial Discharge Characteristics of Closed Voids in the Low Vacuum Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shin'ichi; Araki, Tomoo; Konashi, Akio; Hozumi, Naohiro

    The purpose of this paper is to grasp the partial discharge property of closed voids under the low vacuum involved in an epoxy resin. When an epoxy resin insulator is manufactured in a factory, some voids may be involved in it. To prevent the invasion, partial discharge is measured for insulators. However, partial discharge may not be detected due to the low vacuum in voids right after the manufactory. Well-known Paschen curve testifies this phenomenon, which describes the partial discharge property ranging from a high vacuum to the atmospheric pressure. However this Paschen curve is acquired several gases between parallel-plane metallic electrode gaps. There is little clear statement of Paschen carve on the void. Therefore authors of this paper studied the partial discharge characteristics of the void within the epoxy resin under the variable vacuum level.

  10. Apparatus for coating and impregnating filament with resin

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, S.C.; Pollard, R.E.

    1986-12-17

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for evenly coating and impregnating a filament with binder material. Dimension control and repeatability of the coating and impregnating characteristics are obtained with the apparatus.

  11. Meeting on insecticide-impregnated materials.

    PubMed

    1996-06-01

    Malaria causes considerable morbidity and mortality in Africa, killing 1.5-2.7 million people on the continent annually. A meeting on insecticide-impregnated materials was held at the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Africa (AFRO) during March 18-20, 1996, to promote the use of insecticide-impregnated materials by communities in Africa, review and discuss the results of recently conducted studies in the Africa Region on the use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) in malaria control, examine the best ways of implementing the wide-scale use of insecticide-impregnated materials under differing epidemiological and socioeconomic conditions, discuss major operational research priorities, and make recommendations for the promotion and wide use of insecticide-impregnated materials by malaria control programs and communities. The meeting was jointly organized by the WHO Division of Control of Tropical Diseases (CTD), the UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), and AFRO, and attended by experts, malaria control program managers, private sector representatives, nongovernmental organizations, and technical and scientific institutions. Conclusions and recommendations include the need to assess whether pregnant women could benefit from the use of ITNs. Elements of the successful implementation of sustained malaria control activities involving the use of ITNs are listed. Problems encountered in the large-scale implementation of ITNs in Africa should be addressed collaboratively at the regional and global levels, and coordinated by WHO.

  12. Epoxy hydantoins as matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J.

    1983-01-01

    Tensile strength and fracture toughness of castings of the hydantoin resins cured with methylenedianiline are significantly higher than MY 720 control castings. Water absorption of an ethyl, amyl hydantoin formulation is 2.1 percent at equilibrium and Tg's are about 160 C, approximately 15 deg below the final cure temperature. Two series of urethane and ester-extended hydantoin epoxy resins were synthesized to determine the effect of crosslink density and functional groups on properties. Castings cured with methylenedianiline or with hexahydrophthalic anhydride were made from these compounds and evaluated. The glass transition temperatures, tensile strengths and moduli, and fracture toughness values were all much lower than that of the simple hydantoin epoxy resins. Using a methylene bishydantoin epoxy with a more rigid structure gave brittle, low-energy fractures, while a more flexible, ethoxy-extended hydantoin epoxy resin gave a very low Tg.

  13. Mathematical models for electrochemical impregnation of nickel electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Chien-Hsien; Nagarajan, Gowri S.; Murthy, Mahesh; VanZee, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    Single step and two-step tetramer precipitation models for electrochemical impregnation of nickel electrodes are presented. The objectives for developing the impregnation model are: to predict the impregnation conditions for uniform loading, to develop quality control tools for electrode manufacturing, and to use it as basis for predicting the performance of batteries with non-uniform loadings. This paper, with the help of graphs and charts, discusses the development and application of the impregnation model.

  14. Evaluation of failure criterion for graphite/epoxy fabric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Wharram, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    The development and application of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for composite laminate analysis is described. Emphasis is given to the fabrication and testing of Narmco Rigidite 5208-WT300, a plain weave fabric of Thornel 300 Graphite fibers impregnated with Narmco 5208 Resin. The quadratic-failure criterion with F sub 12=0 provides accurate estimates of failure stresses for the graphite/epoxy investigated. The cubic failure criterion was recast into an operationally easier form, providing design curves that can be applied to laminates fabricated from orthotropic woven fabric prepregs. In the form presented, no interaction strength tests are required, although recourse to the quadratic model and the principal strength parameters is necessary. However, insufficient test data exist at present to generalize this approach for all prepreg constructions, and its use must be restricted to the generic materials and configurations investigated to date.

  15. Synthesis of polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Benjamin J

    2014-10-07

    The synthesis of a polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy uses a one-step cure by applying an external stimulus to release the acid from the polyoxometalate and thereby catalyze the cure reaction of the epoxy resin. Such polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites afford the cured epoxy unique properties imparted by the intrinsic properties of the polyoxometalate. For example, polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites can be used as corrosion resistant epoxy coatings, for encapsulation of electronics with improved dielectric properties, and for structural applications with improved mechanical properties.

  16. Dynamics of condensation on lubricant impregnated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Sushant; Paxson, Adam; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Beysens, Daniel; Varanasi, Kripa

    2013-03-01

    Replacing the filmwise condensation mode with dropwise condensation promises large improvements in heat transfer that will lead to large cost savings in material, water consumption and decreased size of the systems. In this regards, use of superhydrophobic surfaces fabricated by texturing surfaces with nano/microstructures has been shown to lead decrease in contact line pinning of millimetric drops resulting in fast shedding. However, these useful properties are lost during condensation where droplets that nucleate within texture grow by virtue of condensation to large sized droplets while still adhering to the surface. Recently we have shown that liquid impregnated surfaces can overcome many limitations of conventional superhydrophobic surfaces during condensation. Here we discuss aspects related to condensation on lubricant surfaces, such as behavior of growing droplets. We compare the characteristics of droplets condensing on these surfaces with their behavior on conventional un-impregnated superhydrophobic surfaces and show how use of lubricant impregnated surfaces may lead to large enhancement in heat transfer and energy efficiencies.

  17. Cation adsorption on manganese dioxide impregnated fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, S. ); Stahel, E.P. )

    1992-12-01

    Complete removal of radioactive cations by standard mixed bed ion exchange resins is sometimes not achieved in liquid radwaste systems. Based on a literature survey, acrylic fibers impregnated with manganese dioxide were chosen as a media warranting study of their ability to adsorb the cations present in radwaste systems in the hope of improving performance of such treatment processes. A system to produce impregnated fiber with a heavy MnO[sub 2] loading was designed, constructed, and operated. The system produced fiber at an average fiber loading of 22.5 percent MnO[sub 2] by weight. Leaching tests made on the MnO[sub 2] fiber exhibited no signs of soluble manganese, insoluble MnO[sub 2], acrylonitrile leaching or fiber loss. Laboratory testing has been performed on the adsorption of calcium, cadmium, cesium, cobalt, iron, and manganese on MnO[sub 2] impregnated fiber. Removal of metals from solution was measured at levels specific for each metal tested. The removal efficiency when they were present in combination was also evaluated.

  18. Impregnated Netting Slows Infestation by Triatoma infestans

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael Z.; Quíspe-Machaca, Victor R.; Ylla-Velasquez, Jose L.; Waller, Lance A.; Richards, Jean M.; Rath, Bruno; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; del Carpio, Juan G. Cornejo; Cordova-Benzaquen, Eleazar; McKenzie, F. Ellis; Wirtz, Robert A.; Maguire, James H.; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2008-01-01

    We used sentinel animal enclosures to measure the rate of infestation by the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, in an urban community of Arequipa, Peru, and to evaluate the effect of deltamethrin-impregnated netting on that rate. Impregnated netting decreased the rate of infestation of sentinel enclosures (rate ratio, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13–0.38; P < 0.001), controlling for the density of surrounding vector populations and the distance of these to the sentinel enclosures. Most migrant insects were early-stage nymphs, which are less likely to carry the parasitic agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. Spread of the vector in the city therefore likely precedes spread of the parasite. Netting was particularly effective against adult insects and late-stage nymphs; taking into account population structure, netting decreased the reproductive value of migrant populations from 443.6 to 40.5. Impregnated netting can slow the spread of T. infestans and is a potentially valuable tool in the control of Chagas disease. PMID:18840739

  19. Impregnated netting slows infestation by Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael Z; Quíspe-Machaca, Victor R; Ylla-Velasquez, Jose L; Waller, Lance A; Richards, Jean M; Rath, Bruno; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; del Carpio, Juan G Cornejo; Cordova-Benzaquen, Eleazar; McKenzie, F Ellis; Wirtz, Robert A; Maguire, James H; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2008-10-01

    We used sentinel animal enclosures to measure the rate of infestation by the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, in an urban community of Arequipa, Peru, and to evaluate the effect of deltamethrin-impregnated netting on that rate. Impregnated netting decreased the rate of infestation of sentinel enclosures (rate ratio, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-0.38; P < 0.001), controlling for the density of surrounding vector populations and the distance of these to the sentinel enclosures. Most migrant insects were early-stage nymphs, which are less likely to carry the parasitic agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. Spread of the vector in the city therefore likely precedes spread of the parasite. Netting was particularly effective against adult insects and late-stage nymphs; taking into account population structure, netting decreased the reproductive value of migrant populations from 443.6 to 40.5. Impregnated netting can slow the spread of T. infestans and is a potentially valuable tool in the control of Chagas disease.

  20. Fracture, failure and compression behaviour of a 3D interconnected carbon aerogel (Aerographite) epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Liebig, W. V.; Mecklenberg, M.; Fiedler, B.; Smazna, D.; Adelung, R.; Schulte, K.

    2015-11-04

    Aerographite (AG) is a mechanically robust, lightweight synthetic cellular material, which consists of a 3D interconnected network of tubular carbon [1]. The presence of open channels in AG aids to infiltrate them with polymer matrices, thereby yielding an electrical conducting and lightweight composite. Aerographite produced with densities in the range of 7–15 mg/cm3 was infiltrated with a low viscous epoxy resin by means of vacuum infiltration technique. Detailed morphological and structural investigations on synthesized AG and AG/epoxy composite were performed by scanning electron microscopic techniques. Our present study investigates the fracture and failure of AG/epoxy composites and its energy absorption capacity under compression. The composites displayed an extended plateau region when uni-axially compressed, which led to an increase in energy absorption of ~133% per unit volume for 1.5 wt% of AG, when compared to pure epoxy. Preliminary results on fracture toughness showed an enhancement of ~19% in KIC for AG/epoxy composites with 0.45 wt% of AG. Furthermore, our observations of fractured surfaces under scanning electron microscope gives evidence of pull-out of arms of AG tetrapod, interface and inter-graphite failure as the dominating mechanism for the toughness improvement in these composites. These observations were consistent with the results obtained from photoelasticity experiments on a thin film AG/epoxy model composite.

  1. Fracture, failure and compression behaviour of a 3D interconnected carbon aerogel (Aerographite) epoxy composite

    DOE PAGES

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Liebig, W. V.; Mecklenberg, M.; Fiedler, B.; Smazna, D.; Adelung, R.; Schulte, K.

    2015-11-04

    Aerographite (AG) is a mechanically robust, lightweight synthetic cellular material, which consists of a 3D interconnected network of tubular carbon [1]. The presence of open channels in AG aids to infiltrate them with polymer matrices, thereby yielding an electrical conducting and lightweight composite. Aerographite produced with densities in the range of 7–15 mg/cm3 was infiltrated with a low viscous epoxy resin by means of vacuum infiltration technique. Detailed morphological and structural investigations on synthesized AG and AG/epoxy composite were performed by scanning electron microscopic techniques. Our present study investigates the fracture and failure of AG/epoxy composites and its energy absorptionmore » capacity under compression. The composites displayed an extended plateau region when uni-axially compressed, which led to an increase in energy absorption of ~133% per unit volume for 1.5 wt% of AG, when compared to pure epoxy. Preliminary results on fracture toughness showed an enhancement of ~19% in KIC for AG/epoxy composites with 0.45 wt% of AG. Furthermore, our observations of fractured surfaces under scanning electron microscope gives evidence of pull-out of arms of AG tetrapod, interface and inter-graphite failure as the dominating mechanism for the toughness improvement in these composites. These observations were consistent with the results obtained from photoelasticity experiments on a thin film AG/epoxy model composite.« less

  2. Multifunctional epoxy composites with natural Moroccan clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsif, M.; Zerouale, A.; Kandri, N. Idrissi; Allali, F.; Sgarbossa, P.; Bartolozzi, A.; Tamburini, S.; Bertani, R.

    2016-05-01

    Two natural Moroccan clays, here firstly completely characterized, have been used as fillers without modification in epoxy composites. Mechanical properties resulted to be improved and a significant antibacterial activity is exhibited by the epoxy composite containing the C2 clay.

  3. Fabrication and Characterization of Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Shape Memory Epoxy (CNFR-SME) Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiuyang

    Shape memory polymers have a wide range of applications due to their ability to mechanically change shapes upon external stimulus, while their achievable composite counterparts prove even more versatile. An overview of literature on shape memory materials, fillers and composites was provided to pave a foundation for the materials used in the current study and their inherent benefits. This study details carbon nanofiber and composite fabrication and contrasts their material properties. In the first section, the morphology and surface chemistry of electrospun-poly(acrylonitrile)-based carbon nanofiber webs were tailored through various fabrication methods and impregnated with a shape memory epoxy. The morphologies, chemical compositions, thermal stabilities and electrical resistivities of the carbon nanofibers and composites were then characterized. In the second section, an overview of thermal, mechanical and shape memory characterization techniques for shape memory polymers and their composites was provided. Thermal and mechanical properties in addition to the kinetic and dynamic shape memory performances of neat epoxy and carbon nanofiber/epoxy composites were characterized. The various carbon nanofiber web modifications proved to have notable influence on their respective composite performances. The results from these two sections lead to an enhanced understanding of these carbon nanofiber reinforced shape memory epoxy composites and provided insight for future studies to tune these composites at will.

  4. Measuring the Electrical Properties of Epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sergent, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Two techniques rapidly determine low-frequency resistivity of conductive epoxies and high-frequency dielectric properties of insulating epoxies. Conductive epoxy is molded in channels in plastic block. Four-point ohmmeter is used to apply current and sense voltage; it reads out resistance. Because mold has precise and stable dimensions, it produces accurate consistent measurements.

  5. Vacuum phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Ohsaka, Hiromichi; Jitsuiki, Kei; Yoshizawa, Toshihiko; Takeuchi, Ikuto; Omori, Kazuhiko; Oode, Yasumasa; Ishikawa, Kouhei

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the theory of the formation of the vacuum phenomenon (VP), the detection of the VP, the different medical causes, the different locations of the presentation of the VP, and the differential diagnoses. In the human body, the cavitation effect is recognized on radiological studies; it is called the VP. The mechanism responsible for the formation of the VP is as follows: if an enclosed tissue space is allowed to expand as a rebound phenomenon after an external impact, the volume within the enclosed space will increase. In the setting of expanding volume, the pressure within the space will decrease. The solubility of the gas in the enclosed space will decrease as the pressure of the space decreases. Decreased solubility allows a gas to leave a solution. Clinically, the pathologies associated with the VP have been reported to mainly include the normal joint motion, degeneration of the intervertebral discs or joints, and trauma. The frequent use of CT for trauma patients and the high spatial resolution of CT images might produce the greatest number of chances to detect the VP in trauma patients. The VP is observed at locations that experience a traumatic impact; thus, an analysis of the VP may be useful for elucidating the mechanism of an injury. When the VP is located in the abdomen, it is important to include perforation of the digestive tract in the differential diagnosis. The presence of the VP in trauma patients does not itself influence the final outcome. PMID:27147527

  6. Vacuum phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Ohsaka, Hiromichi; Jitsuiki, Kei; Yoshizawa, Toshihiko; Takeuchi, Ikuto; Omori, Kazuhiko; Oode, Yasumasa; Ishikawa, Kouhei

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the theory of the formation of the vacuum phenomenon (VP), the detection of the VP, the different medical causes, the different locations of the presentation of the VP, and the differential diagnoses. In the human body, the cavitation effect is recognized on radiological studies; it is called the VP. The mechanism responsible for the formation of the VP is as follows: if an enclosed tissue space is allowed to expand as a rebound phenomenon after an external impact, the volume within the enclosed space will increase. In the setting of expanding volume, the pressure within the space will decrease. The solubility of the gas in the enclosed space will decrease as the pressure of the space decreases. Decreased solubility allows a gas to leave a solution. Clinically, the pathologies associated with the VP have been reported to mainly include the normal joint motion, degeneration of the intervertebral discs or joints, and trauma. The frequent use of CT for trauma patients and the high spatial resolution of CT images might produce the greatest number of chances to detect the VP in trauma patients. The VP is observed at locations that experience a traumatic impact; thus, an analysis of the VP may be useful for elucidating the mechanism of an injury. When the VP is located in the abdomen, it is important to include perforation of the digestive tract in the differential diagnosis. The presence of the VP in trauma patients does not itself influence the final outcome.

  7. Method of making thermally removable epoxies

    DOEpatents

    Loy, Douglas A.; Wheeler, David R.; Russick, Edward M.; McElhanon, James R.; Saunders, Randall S.

    2002-01-01

    A method of making a thermally-removable epoxy by mixing a bis(maleimide) compound to a monomeric furan compound containing an oxirane group to form a di-epoxy mixture and then adding a curing agent at temperatures from approximately room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a thermally-removable epoxy. The thermally-removable epoxy can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The epoxy material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

  8. METHOD OF IMPREGNATING A POROUS MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Steele, G.N.

    1960-06-01

    A method of impregnating a porous body with an inorganic uranium- containing salt is outlined and comprises dissolving a water-soluble uranium- containing salt in water; saturating the intercommunicating pores of the porous body with the salt solution; infusing ammonia gas into the intercommunicating pores of the body, the ammonia gas in water chemically reacting with the water- soluble uranium-containing salt in the water solvent to form a nonwater-soluble uranium-containing precipitant; and evaporating the volatile unprecipitated products from the intercommunicating pores whereby the uranium-containing precipitate is uniformly distributed in the intercommunicating peres of the porous body.

  9. Multilayer Impregnated Fibrous Thermal Insulation Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Szalai, Christine e.; Hsu, Ming-ta; Carroll, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    The term "secondary polymer layered impregnated tile" ("SPLIT") denotes a type of ablative composite-material thermal- insulation tiles having engineered, spatially non-uniform compositions. The term "secondary" refers to the fact that each tile contains at least two polymer layers wherein endothermic reactions absorb considerable amounts of heat, thereby helping to prevent overheating of an underlying structure. These tiles were invented to afford lighter-weight alternatives to the reusable thermal-insulation materials heretofore variously used or considered for use in protecting the space shuttles and other spacecraft from intense atmospheric-entry heating.

  10. Epoxy Grout With Silica Thickener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Grout cures quickly, even in presence of hydraulic oil. Grout is mixture of aggregate particles, finely-divided silica, epoxy resin, and triethylenetetramine curing agent, with mixture containing about 85 percent silica and aggregate particle sand 15 percent resin and curing agent. Silica is thickening agent and keeps grout from sagging.

  11. Fire-Retardant Epoxy Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    Phosphorus-containing epoxy is fire-retardant and translucent. Intended as adhesive for laminated plastic sheets, new material bonds well to titanium dioxide-filled plastic film, which ordinarily shows little surface interaction with adhesives. Fire retardancy has been demonstrated, and smoke density is low enough to avoid smoke obscuration.

  12. Fire-retardant epoxy polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akawie, R. I.; Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.

    1978-01-01

    Phosphorus atoms in molecular structure of epoxies make them fire-retardant without degrading their adhesive strength. Moreover, polymers are transparent, unlike compounds that contain arsenic or other inorganics. They have been used to bond polyvinylfluoride and polyether sulfone films onto polyimide glass laminates.

  13. Multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement for advanced epoxy composites.

    PubMed

    Bekyarova, E; Thostenson, E T; Yu, A; Kim, H; Gao, J; Tang, J; Hahn, H T; Chou, T-W; Itkis, M E; Haddon, R C

    2007-03-27

    We report an approach to the development of advanced structural composites based on engineered multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement. Electrophoresis was utilized for the selective deposition of multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on woven carbon fabric. The CNT-coated carbon fabric panels were subsequently infiltrated with epoxy resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to fabricate multiscale hybrid composites in which the nanotubes were completely integrated into the fiber bundles and reinforced the matrix-rich regions. The carbon nanotube/carbon fabric/epoxy composites showed approximately 30% enhancement of the interlaminar shear strength as compared to that of carbon fiber/epoxy composites without carbon nanotubes and demonstrate significantly improved out-of-plane electrical conductivity. PMID:17326671

  14. Polyaniline stabilized magnetite nanoparticle reinforced epoxy nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hongbo; Tadakamalla, Sruthi; Huang, Yudong; Colorado, Henry A; Luo, Zhiping; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Young, David P; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2012-10-24

    Magnetic epoxy polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) reinforced with magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles (NPs) have been prepared at different particle loading levels. The particle surface functionality tuned by conductive polyaniline (PANI) is achieved via a surface initiated polymerization (SIP) approach. The effects of nanoparticle loading, surface functionality, and temperature on both the viscosity and storage/loss modulus of liquid epoxy resin suspensions and the physicochemical properties of the cured solid PNCs are systematically investigated. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the cured epoxy filled with the functionalized NPs has shifted to the higher temperature in the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) compared with that of the cured pure epoxy. Enhanced mechanical properties of the cured epoxy PNCs filled with the functionalized NPs are observed in the tensile test compared with that of the cured pure epoxy and cured epoxy PNCs filled with as-received NPs. The uniform NP distribution in the cured epoxy PNCs filled with functionalized NPs is observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). These magnetic epoxy PNCs show the good magnetic properties and can be attached by a permanent magnet. Enhanced interfacial interaction between NPs and epoxy is revealed in the fracture surface analysis. The PNCs formation mechanism is also interpreted from the comprehensive analysis based on the TGA, DSC, and FTIR in this work.

  15. Note: Ultra-low birefringence dodecagonal vacuum glass cell

    SciTech Connect

    Brakhane, Stefan Alt, Wolfgang; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Moon, Geol; Alberti, Andrea

    2015-12-15

    We report on an ultra-low birefringence dodecagonal glass cell for ultra-high vacuum applications. The epoxy-bonded trapezoidal windows of the cell are made of SF57 glass, which exhibits a very low stress-induced birefringence. We characterize the birefringence Δn of each window with the cell under vacuum conditions, obtaining values around 10{sup −8}. After baking the cell at 150 °C, we reach a pressure below 10{sup −10} mbar. In addition, each window is antireflection coated on both sides, which is highly desirable for quantum optics experiments and precision measurements.

  16. Note: Ultra-low birefringence dodecagonal vacuum glass cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakhane, Stefan; Alt, Wolfgang; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Moon, Geol; Alberti, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    We report on an ultra-low birefringence dodecagonal glass cell for ultra-high vacuum applications. The epoxy-bonded trapezoidal windows of the cell are made of SF57 glass, which exhibits a very low stress-induced birefringence. We characterize the birefringence Δn of each window with the cell under vacuum conditions, obtaining values around 10-8. After baking the cell at 150 °C, we reach a pressure below 10-10 mbar. In addition, each window is antireflection coated on both sides, which is highly desirable for quantum optics experiments and precision measurements.

  17. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  18. Natural vacuum electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leggett, Nickolaus

    1990-01-01

    The ambient natural vacuum of space is proposed as a basis for electron valves. Each valve is an electron controlling structure similiar to a vacuum tube that is operated without a vacuum sustaining envelope. The natural vacuum electron valves discussed offer a viable substitute for solid state devices. The natural vacuum valve is highly resistant to ionizing radiation, system generated electromagnetic pulse, current transients, and direct exposure to space conditions.

  19. Advanced Multifunctional Properties of Aligned Carbon Nanotube-Epoxy Composites from Carbon Nanotube Aerogel Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Thang; Liu, Peng; Fan, Zeng; Ngern, Nigel; Duong, Hai

    2015-03-01

    Unlike previous methods of making carbon nanotube (CNT) thin films, aligned CNT thin films in this work are synthesized directly from CNT aerogels in a CVD process. CH4/H2/He gases and ferrocene/thiophene catalysts are mixed and reacted in the reactor at 1200 °C to form CNT aerogel socks. By pulling out the socks with a metal rod, CNT thin films with 15-nm diameter MWNTs are aligned and produced continuously at a speed of a few meters per minute. The number of the aligned CNT thin film layers/ thickness can also be controlled well. The as-synthesized aligned CNT films are further condensed by acetone spray and post-treated by UV light. The aligned CNT films without any above post-treatment have a high electrical conductivity of 400S/cm. We also develop aligned CNT-epoxy composites by infiltrating epoxy into the above aligned CNT thin films using Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) method. Our cost-effective fabrication method of the aligned CNT films is more advanced for developing the composites having CNT orientation control. The mechanical, electrical and optical properties of the aligned CNT epoxy composites are measured. About 2% of the aligned CNTs can enhance significantly the electrical conductivity and hardness of aligned CNT-epoxy composite films. Effects of morphologies, volume fraction, and alignment of the CNTs on the advanced multifunctional properties of the aligned CNT-epoxy composites are also quantified.

  20. Impregnation of Fenofibrate on mesoporous silica using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Bouledjouidja, Abir; Masmoudi, Yasmine; Van Speybroeck, Michiel; Schueller, Laurent; Badens, Elisabeth

    2016-02-29

    Low oral bioavailability can be circumvented by the formulation of the poorly water soluble drug in ordered mesoporous silica (OMS-L-7). Fenofibrate is an orally administered, poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), used clinically to lower lipid levels. Fenofibrate was loaded into silica using two methods: incipient wetness and supercritical impregnation. This study investigates the impact of loading and the impact of varying supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) processing conditions. The objective is to enhance Fenofibrate loading into silica while reducing degree of the drug crystallinity, so as to increase the drug's dissolution rate and its bioavailability. The comparison of both impregnation processes was made in terms of impregnation yields and duration as well as physical characterization of the drug. While incipient wetness method led to a Fenofibrate loading up to 300 mgdrug/gsilica in 48 h of impregnation, the supercritical impregnation method yielded loading up to 485 mgdrug/gsilica in 120 min of impregnation duration, at 16 MPa and 308 K, with a low degree of crystallinity (about 1%) comparable to the crystallinity observed via the solvent method. In addition to the enhancement of impregnation efficiency, the supercritical route provides a solvent-free alternative for impregnation.

  1. Impregnation of Fenofibrate on mesoporous silica using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Bouledjouidja, Abir; Masmoudi, Yasmine; Van Speybroeck, Michiel; Schueller, Laurent; Badens, Elisabeth

    2016-02-29

    Low oral bioavailability can be circumvented by the formulation of the poorly water soluble drug in ordered mesoporous silica (OMS-L-7). Fenofibrate is an orally administered, poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), used clinically to lower lipid levels. Fenofibrate was loaded into silica using two methods: incipient wetness and supercritical impregnation. This study investigates the impact of loading and the impact of varying supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) processing conditions. The objective is to enhance Fenofibrate loading into silica while reducing degree of the drug crystallinity, so as to increase the drug's dissolution rate and its bioavailability. The comparison of both impregnation processes was made in terms of impregnation yields and duration as well as physical characterization of the drug. While incipient wetness method led to a Fenofibrate loading up to 300 mgdrug/gsilica in 48 h of impregnation, the supercritical impregnation method yielded loading up to 485 mgdrug/gsilica in 120 min of impregnation duration, at 16 MPa and 308 K, with a low degree of crystallinity (about 1%) comparable to the crystallinity observed via the solvent method. In addition to the enhancement of impregnation efficiency, the supercritical route provides a solvent-free alternative for impregnation. PMID:26732521

  2. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy (IME) resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are presented. State of the art epoxy resin, MY720, was used. Three aromatic bisimide amines and one aromatic aliphatic BIA were evaluated. BIA's derived from 6F anhydride (3,3 prime 4,4 prime-(hexafluoro isopropyl idene) bis (phthalic anhydride) and diamines, 3,3 prime-diam nodiphenyl sulfone (3,3 prime-DDS), 4,4 prime-diamino diphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS), 1.12-dodecane diamine (1,12-DDA) were used. BIA's were abbreviated 6F-3,3 prime-DDS, 6F-4,4 prime-DDS, 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime DDS, and 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA corresponding to 6F anhydride and diamines mentioned. Epoxy resin and BIA's (MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA and a 50:50 mixture of a BIA and parent diamine, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA/3,3 prime-DDS were studied to determine effect of structure and composition. Effect of the addition of two commercial epoxies, glyamine 200 and glyamine 100 on the properties of several formulations was evaluated. Bisimide amine cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). Physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these resins were determined. Moisture absorption in boiling water exhibited by several of the IME's was considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies (from 3.2% for the control and state of the art to 2.0 wt% moisture absorption). Char yields are increased from 20% for control and state of the art epoxies to 40% for IME resins. Relative toughness characteristics of IME resins were measured by 10 deg off axis tensile tests of Celion 6000/IME composites. Results show that IME's containing 6F-3,3 prime-DDS or 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA improved the "toughness" characteristics of composites by about 35% (tensile strength), about 35% (intralaminar shear

  3. Evaluation of experimental epoxy monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St.clair, T. L.; Pratt, J. R.; Ficklin, R.

    1985-01-01

    Future generation aircraft need higher performance polymer matrices to fully achieve the weight savings possible with composite materials. New resins are being formulated in an effort to understand basic polymer behavior and to develop improved resins. Some polymer/curing agent combinations that could be useful are difficult to process. In the area of epoxies, a major problem is that some components have physical properties which make them difficult to utilize as matrix resins. A previous study showed that the use of ultrasonic energy can be advantageous in the mixing of curing agents into a standard epoxy resin, such as MY 720 (Ciba-Geigy designation). This work is expanded to include three novel epoxides.

  4. Performance of suspension-impregnated sintered nickel composite electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrando, W.A.

    1985-10-01

    Direct impregnation for the development of a porous, sintered, nickel-plated graphite fiber plaque by fine particulate Ni(OH)2 is examined. The suspension impregnation method is described, noting that the entire process can be carried out in a very short time. The use of a cobalt additive to improve utilization and the life cycle of nickel electrodes is mentioned. It is found that the suspension method of active material impregnation has potential to produce high energy density, electrically durable, light weight nickel composite electrodes. It is also found that excellent life cycle durability results are obtained with the suspension-impregnated composite electrode. Finally, the electrochemical process, an alternative method of active material Ni(OH)2 impregnation, is mentioned.

  5. Flammability of Epoxy Resins Containing Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G.; Connell, J. W.; Hinkley, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire-resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial and general aviation aircraft, flame-retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured neat epoxy formulations were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis, microscale combustion calorimetry, and fire calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness and compressive strength of several cured formulations showed no detrimental effect due to phosphorus content. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  6. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  7. Desorption of TEDA from impregnated charcoals

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.

    1980-01-01

    Triethylenediamine (TEDA) is one of the most effective charcoal impregnants for trapping organic forms of radioiodine from air. It is used in air cleaning adsorbers, air samplers, and air purifying respirator canisters and cartridges for airborne radioiodine. Volatility of the pure crystals suggested the possibility of significant TEDA desorption in these applications, resulting in toxic levels of amine and/or degradation of sorbent efficiency. Measurements of TEDA desorption rates were made for four commercial charcoals. Temperatures of 70 to 120/sup 0/C were used to give levels detectable with a photoionization detector. Extrapolations to temperatures nearer normal ambient were made by using Clapeyron equation plots. Among three charcoals with the same 5% level of TEDA impregnation, desorption rates varied over factors as great as 10. Slopes of Clapeyron plots were similar, giving an average 25 kcal/mol heat of desorption. This corresponds to a doubling of the TEDA desorption rate with each 5/sup 0/C (9/sup 0/F) rise in temperature. Desorption rates were directly proportional to airflow rates or velocities through the test beds and independent of humidity. Desorption rates per unit weight of charcoal decreased exponentially with bed depth, presumably due to TEDA readsorption. Calculations based on this data and the geometry of a standard adsorber cell showed that at normal ambient temperatures: (1) concentrations of TEDA in effluent air are well below expected toxic levels; and (2) losses of TEDA may be significant. At elevated temperatures TEDA desorption rates are high enough to affect methyl iodide trapping efficiencies and, possibly, charcoal ignition temperatures.

  8. Lightweight Forms for Epoxy/Aramid Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mix, E. W.; Anderson, A. N.; Bedford, Donald L., Sr.

    1986-01-01

    Aluminum mandrels easy to remove. Lightweight aluminum mandrel for shaping epoxy/aramid ducts simplifies and speeds production. In new process, glass-reinforced epoxy/aramid cloth wrapped on aluminum mandrel. Stainless-steel flanges and other hardware fitted on duct and held by simple tooling. Entire assembly placed in oven to cure epoxy. After curing, assembly placed in alkaline bath dissolves aluminum mandrel in about 4 hours. Epoxy/aramid shell ready for use as duct. Aluminum mandrel used to make ducts of various inside diameters up to 6 in. Standard aluminum forms used. Conventional tube-bending equipment produces requisite curves in mandrels.

  9. Sticky superhydrophobic filter paper developed by dip-coating of fluorinated waterborne epoxy emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiangxuan; Wen, Xiufang; Cheng, Jiang; Yang, Zhuoru

    2012-09-01

    A superhydrophobic and superoleophilic coating for oil filter paper was synthesized based on waterborne bisphenol-A novolac epoxy emulsion. The benzoic acid (BA) and maleic anhydride (MA) were used as modification agents to give the epoxy resin hydrophilic groups (carboxyl) and Cdbnd C double bonds. And the fluorinated waterborne epoxy emulsion was prepared by free radical solution polymerization of dodecafluoroheptyl methacrylate (DFMA) monomer. The covalent bound low free energy fluorinated chains in the monomer reduce the surface energy of solidification polymers sufficiently to give rise to superhydrophobic behavior while conserving superoleophilicity. Surfaces prepared show a sticky property, which exhibits a static water contact angle of 152° for a 5 μL droplet that does not slid off even when the sample is held upside down. This synthetic emulsion is simple and convenient as impregnating agent for filter paper, which can be considered as a suitable candidate for various substrates such as cotton textiles, E-glass and artificial fiber, and so on.

  10. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  11. Curing of epoxy matrix composite in stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Kondyurina, Irina; Bilek, Marcela

    Large structures for habitats, greenhouses, space bases, space factories are needed for next stage of space exploitation. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the polymerization technology of fiber-filled composites with a curable polymer matrix applied in the free space environment. The polymerisation process is proposed for the material exposed to high vacuum, dramatic temperature changes, space plasma, sun irradiation and atomic oxygen (in low Earth orbit), micrometeorite fluence, electric charging and microgravitation. The stratospheric flight experiments are directed to an investigation of the curing polymer matrix under the stratospheric conditions on. The unique combination of low atmospheric pressure, high intensity UV radiation including short wavelength UV and diurnal temperature variations associated with solar irradiation strongly influences the chemical processes in polymeric materials. The first flight experiment with uncured composites was a part of the NASA scientific balloon flight program realised at the NASA stratospheric balloon station in Alice Springs, Australia. A flight cassette installed on payload was lifted with a “zero-pressure” stratospheric balloon filled with Helium. Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF) provided the launch, flight telemetry and landing of the balloon and payload. A cassette of uncured composite materials with an epoxy resin matrix was exposed 3 days in the stratosphere (40 km altitude). The second flight experiment was realised in South Australia in 2012, when the cassette was exposed in 27 km altitude. An analysis of the chemical structure of the composites showed, that the space irradiations are responsible for crosslinking of the uncured polymers exposed in the stratosphere. The first prepreg in the world was cured successfully in stratosphere. The investigations were supported by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, NASA and RFBR (12-08-00970) grants.

  12. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  13. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-03-06

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  14. The Classical Vacuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    1985-01-01

    The classical vacuum of physics is not empty, but contains a distinctive pattern of electromagnetic fields. Discovery of the vacuum, thermal spectrum, classical electron theory, zero-point spectrum, and effects of acceleration are discussed. Connection between thermal radiation and the classical vacuum reveals unexpected unity in the laws of…

  15. Thermoset epoxy polymers from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    East, Anthony; Jaffe, Michael; Zhang, Yi; Catalani, Luiz H

    2009-11-17

    Novel thermoset epoxy polymers using the bisglycidyl ethers of anhydrosugars, such as isosorbide, isomannide, and isoidide, are disclosed. The bisglycidyl ethers are useful as substitutes for bisphenol A in the manufacture of thermoset epoxy ethers. The anhydrosugars are derived from renewable sources and the bisglycidyl ethers are not xenoestrogenic and the thermoset curing agents are likewise derived form renewable resources.

  16. EPOXI at Comet Hartley 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    A'Hearn, Michael F.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Delamere, W. Alan; Feaga, Lori M.; Hampton, Donald; Kissel, Jochen; Klaasen, Kenneth P.; McFadden, Jessica M.; Meech, Karen J.; Melosh, H. Jay; Schultz, Peter H.; Sunshine, Jessica M.; Thomas, Peter C.; Veverka, Joseph; Wellnitz, Dennis D.; Yeomans, Donald K.; Besse, Sebastien; Bodewits, Dennis; Bowling, Timothy J.; Carcish, Brian T.; Collins, Steven M.; Farnham, Tony F.; Groussin, Oliver; Hermalyn, Brendan; Kelley, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how comets work, i,e., what drives their activity, is crucial to using comets to study the early solar system. EPOXI flew past comet 103P/Hartley 2, one with an unusually small but very active nucleus. taking both images and spectra. Unlike large, relatively inactive nuclei, this nncleus is outgassing primarily due to CO2, which drags chnnks of ice out of the nnclens. It also shows significant differences in the relative abundance of volatiles from various parts of the nucleus.

  17. Antibiotic release from impregnated pellets and beads.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, G W; Cumberland, N

    1994-03-01

    Antibiotic impregnated beads are being used increasingly in the initial treatment of open fracture wounds, producing high antibiotic levels locally, over the first few days. Pellets were prepared to assess the release of the following antibiotics: benzylpenicillin, flucloxacillin, amoxycillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate (Co-Amoxiclav), ciprofloxacin, imipenem, or gentamicin; the carrier material was either polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or plaster of Paris (PoP). Elution of antibiotic over 72 hours from the pellets in vitro was determined using an agar-diffusion microbiologic assay. The initial rapid release of antibiotic lasted 12-24 hours, with release from PoP pellets at least four-fold greater than that from corresponding PMMA pellets. A second phase consisted of a sustained but gradually diminishing elution. The release of antibiotics from PoP pellets compared favorably with that from the PMMA beads currently used. We conclude that PoP pellets may be particularly suitable for short-term applications such as infection prophylaxis in open fractures.

  18. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose F.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal protection materials used for spacecraft heat shields are subjected to various thermal-mechanical loads during an atmospheric reentry which can threaten the structural integrity of the system. This paper discusses the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside the thermal protection material, Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). PICA has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and was the TPS material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), that will fly in 2011. Although PICA has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. To thoroughly understand failure in PICA, experiments were performed using FiberForm(Registered TradeMark) (precursor of PICA), virgin and furnace-charred PICA. Several small samples were tested inside an electron microscope to investigate the failure mechanisms. Micrographs were obtained before and after the failure in order to study crack initiation and growth. Videos were obtained to capture failure mechanisms in real time. Stress-strain data was obtained simultaneously for all the samples with the help of a data acquisition system, integrated to the mechanical stages. It was found that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred PICA, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred PICA showed greater strength values compared to FiberForm coupons, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  19. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose; Pham, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside thermal protection materials. The focus of this research is on the class of materials known as phenolic impregnated carbon ablators. It has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and is the thermal protection system material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory and SpaceX Dragon spacecraft. Although it has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. To understand failure mechanisms in carbon ablators, fracture tests were performed on FiberForm(Registered TradeMark) (precursor), virgin, and charred ablator materials. Several samples of these materials were tested to investigate failure mechanisms at a microstructural scale. Stress-strain data were obtained simultaneously to estimate the tensile strength and toughness. It was observed that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred carbon ablators, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred carbon ablators showed greater strength values compared with FiberForm samples, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  20. Wood impregnation of yeast lees for winemaking.

    PubMed

    Palomero, Felipe; Bertani, Paolo; Fernández de Simón, Brígida; Cadahía, Estrella; Benito, Santiago; Morata, Antonio; Suárez-Lepe, José A

    2015-03-15

    This study develops a new method to produce more complex wines by means of an indirect diffusion of wood aromas from yeast cell-walls. An exogenous lyophilized biomass was macerated with an ethanol wood extract solution and subsequently dried. Different times were used for the adsorption of polyphenols and volatile compounds to the yeast cell-walls. The analysis of polyphenols and volatile compounds (by HPLC/DAD and GC-MS, respectively) demonstrate that the adsorption/diffusion of these compounds from the wood to the yeast takes place. Red wines were also aged with Saccharomyces cerevisiae lees that had been impregnated with wood aromas and subsequently dried. Four different types of wood were used: chestnut, cherry, acacia and oak. Large differences were observed between the woods studied with regards to their volatile and polyphenolic profiles. Sensory evaluations confirmed large differences even with short-term contact between the wines and the lees, showing that the method could be of interest for red wine making. In addition, the results demonstrate the potential of using woods other than oak in cooperage.

  1. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose F.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal protection materials used for spacecraft heat shields are subjected to various thermal-mechanical loads during an atmospheric entry which can threaten the structural integrity of the system. This paper discusses the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside thermal protection materials. The focus of research is Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). It has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and is the TPS material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and Dragon spacecraft. Although PICA has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. In order to thoroughly understand failure in PICA, fracture tests were performed on FiberForm* (precursor of PICA), virgin and charred PICA materials. Several samples of these materials were tested to investigate failure mechanisms at a microstructural scale. Stress-strain data were obtained simultaneously to estimate the fracture toughness. It was found that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred PICA, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred PICA showed greater strength values compared to FiberForm coupons, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  2. Monoethanolamine Impregnation of Titanosilicate Zeolite ETS-10.

    PubMed

    Tanchuk, Brenden; Sawada, James A; Kuznicki, Steven M

    2015-03-01

    ETS-10, a mixed octahedral/tetrahedral titanosilicate molecular sieve, has a unique architecture where its 0.8 nm pores are lined exclusively with silicon which imparts a high degree of chemical stability, yet the anionic framework can be modified by cation exchange. In this work, the hydrogen-exchanged form of ETS-10 was impregnated with monoethanolamine and the thermal stability and CO2 adsorption characteristics were analyzed. The surface area of the material was characterized by N2 physisorption, the thermal stability of the material assessed through TG-MS experiments, the CO2 capacity was measured via static volumetric adsorption experiments, and the influence of moisture as a carbamate promoter was investigated through a series of gravimetric CO2 adsorption/desorption cycling experiments. Several measurements converge on ~7 wt% monoethanolamine loading which occupies about half of the available pore volume of the sieve. The results suggest that the monoethanolamine is so effectively retained by the molecular sieve that, while the amine is effectively immobilized, under both humid and dry process streams the monoethanolamine is either chemically or sterically hindered and is unable to react measurable quantities of CO2. PMID:26413705

  3. Sealing Materials for Use in Vacuum at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Donald R.; Camarda, Charles J.; Lee Vaughn, Wallace

    2012-01-01

    Sealing materials that can be applied and left in place in vacuum over a wide range of temperatures (especially temperatures of a few thousand degrees Celsius) have been conceived and investigated for potential utility in repairing thermal-protection tiles on the space shuttles in orbit before returning to Earth. These materials are also adaptable to numerous terrestrial applications that involve vacuum processing and/or repair of structures that must withstand high temperatures. These materials can be formulated to have mechanical handling characteristics ranging from almost freely flowing liquid-like consistency through paste-like consistency to stiff puttylike consistency, and to retain these characteristics in vacuum until heated to high curing temperatures. A sealing material of this type can be formulated to be used in any of several different ways for example, to be impregnated into a high-temperature-fabric patch, impregnated into a high-temperature-fabric gasket for sealing a patch, applied under a patch, or applied alone in the manner of putty or wallboard compound. The sealing material must be formulated to be compatible with, and adhere to, the structural material(s) to be repaired. In general, the material consists of a vacuum-compatible liquid containing one or more dissolved compound(s) and/or mixed with suspended solid particles. Depending on the intended application, the liquid can be chosen to be of a compound that can remain in place in vacuum for a time long enough to be useful, and/or to evaporate or decompose in a controlled way to leave a useful solid residue behind. The evaporation rate is determined by proper choice of vapor pressure, application of heat, and/or application of ultraviolet light or other optical radiation. The liquid chosen for the original space shuttle application is a commercial silicone vacuum-pump oil.

  4. A Modeling Approach to Fiber Fracture in Melt Impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Feng; Zhang, Cong; Yu, Yang; Xin, Chunling; Tang, Ke; He, Yadong

    2016-08-01

    The effect of process variables such as roving pulling speed, melt temperature and number of pins on the fiber fracture during the processing of thermoplastic based composites was investigated in this study. The melt impregnation was used in this process of continuous glass fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites. Previous investigators have suggested a variety of models for melt impregnation, while comparatively little effort has been spent on modeling the fiber fracture caused by the viscous resin. Herein, a mathematical model was developed for impregnation process to predict the fiber fracture rate and describe the experimental results with the Weibull intensity distribution function. The optimal parameters of this process were obtained by orthogonal experiment. The results suggest that the fiber fracture is caused by viscous shear stress on fiber bundle in melt impregnation mold when pulling the fiber bundle.

  5. REDFORD CORE MAKING MACHINE. RESIN IMPREGNATED SAND IS BLOWN INTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REDFORD CORE MAKING MACHINE. RESIN IMPREGNATED SAND IS BLOWN INTO THE HEATED CORE BOX THAT SETS THE RESIN CREATING THE HARDENED CORE SHOWN HERE. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Core Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  6. Ice adhesion on lubricant-impregnated textured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Subramanyam, Srinivas Bengaluru; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2013-11-01

    Ice accretion is an important problem and passive approaches for reducing ice-adhesion are of great interest in various systems such as aircrafts, power lines, wind turbines, and oil platforms. Here, we study the ice-adhesion properties of lubricant-impregnated textured surfaces. Force measurements show ice adhesion strength on textured surfaces impregnated with thermodynamically stable lubricant films to be higher than that on surfaces with excess lubricant. Systematic ice-adhesion measurements indicate that the ice-adhesion strength is dependent on texture and decreases with increasing texture density. Direct cryogenic SEM imaging of the fractured ice surface and the interface between ice and lubricant-impregnated textured surface reveal stress concentrators and crack initiation sites that can increase with texture density and result in lowering adhesion strength. Thus, lubricant-impregnated surfaces have to be optimized to outperform state-of-the-art icephobic treatments.

  7. Reducing Sliding Friction with Liquid-Impregnated Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Mohammad; Collier, C. Patrick; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team; CenterNanophase Materials Sciences Team

    2015-11-01

    Liquid-impregnated surfaces are fabricated by infusing a lubricating liquid into the micro/nano roughness of a textured substrate, such that the surface is slippery for any deposited liquid immiscible with the lubricant. To date, liquid-impregnated surfaces have almost exclusively focused on repelling liquids by minimizing the contact angle hysteresis. Here, we demonstrate that liquid-impregnated surfaces are also capable of reducing sliding friction for solid objects. Ordered arrays of silicon micropillars were infused with lubricating liquids varying in viscosity by two orders of magnitude. Five test surfaces were used: two different micropillared surfaces with and without liquid infusion and a smooth, dry control surface. The static and kinetic coefficients of friction were measured using a polished aluminum cube as the sliding object. Compared to the smooth control surface, the sliding friction was reduced by at least a factor of two on the liquid-impregnated surfaces.

  8. Wide-spectrum activity of a silver-impregnated fabric.

    PubMed

    Gerba, Charles P; Sifuentes, Laura Y; Lopez, Gerardo U; Abd-Elmaksoud, Sherif; Calabrese, Jesse; Tanner, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    Fabrics, such as clothing, drapes, pillowcases, and bedsheets are potential sources of pathogenic bacteria and viruses. We found fabrics (ie, professional clothing, pillowcases, and lab coats) treated with a silver-impregnated material to be effective in significantly reducing a wide spectrum of ordinary and drug-resistant microorganisms, including Salmonella, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Propionibacterium acnes, Trichphyton mentagrophytes, and norovirus. Fabrics impregnated with antimicrobial agents help provide an additional barrier to the transport or reservoir of pathogens in health care environments.

  9. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are described. State-of-the-art epoxides MY720 and DER383 were used, and four bismide amines were evaluated. These were the BIA's derived from the 6F anhydride (4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(phthalic anhydride) and the diamines 3,3'-diaminodiphynyl sulfone, 4,4'-oxygianiline, 4,4'-methylene dianiline, and 1,12-dodecane diamine. A key intermediate, designated 6F anhydride, is required for the synthesis of the bisimide amines. Reaction parameters to synthesize a precursor to the 6F anhydride (6FHC) in high yields were investigated. The catalyst trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was studied. Although small scale runs yielded the 6FHC in 50 percent yield, efforts to ranslate these results to a larger scale synthesis gave the 6FHC in only 9 percent yield. Results show that the concept of using bisimide amine as curing agents to improve the toughness properties of epoxies is valid.

  10. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  11. Novel Diels-Alder based self-healing epoxies for aerospace composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coope, T. S.; Turkenburg, D. H.; Fischer, H. R.; Luterbacher, R.; van Bracht, H.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Epoxy resins containing Diels-Alder (DA) furan and maleimide moieties are presented with the capability to self-heal after exposure to an external heat source. A conventional epoxy amine system has been combined with furfuryl and maleimide functional groups in a two-step process, to avoid major side-reactions, and the concentration of a thermo-reversibly binding cross-linker was considered to balance thermoset and thermoplastic behaviours, and the subsequent self-healing performance. In the context of self-repair technologies an inbuilt ‘intrinsic’ self-healing system is deemed favourable as the healing agent can be placed in known ‘hot spot’ regions (i.e. skin-stringer run outs, ply drops and around drilled holes) where operational damage predominately occurs in load bearing aerospace structures. In this study, the mechanical and self-healing performance of furan functionalised epoxy resins containing varying amounts (10, 20, 30 or 40 pph) of bismaleimide were investigated using a bulk epoxy polymer tapered double cantilever beam test specimen geometry. Two forms, a thin film and a bulk material, were evaluated to account for future integration methods into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. The highest healing efficiency, with respect to the obtained initial load value, was observed from the 20 pph bulk material derivative. The polymers were successful in achieving consistent multiple (three) healing cycles when heated at 150 °C for 5 min. This novel investigated DA material exhibits favourable processing characteristics for FRP composites as preliminary studies have shown successful coextrution with reinforcing fibres to form free standing films and dry fibre impregnation.

  12. A Model for Tow Impregnation and Consolidation for Partially Impregnated Thermoset Prepregs

    SciTech Connect

    John J. Gangloff Jr; Shatil Sinha; Suresh G. Advani

    2011-05-23

    The formation and transport of voids in composite materials remains a key research area in composite manufacturing science. Knowledge of how voids, resin, and fiber reinforcement propagate throughout a composite material continuum from green state to cured state during an automated tape layup process is key to minimizing defects induced by void-initiated stress concentrations under applied loads for a wide variety of composite applications. This paper focuses on modeling resin flow in a deforming fiber tow during an automated process of partially impregnated thermoset prepreg composite material tapes. In this work, a tow unit cell based model has been presented that determines the consolidation and impregnation of a thermoset prepreg tape under an input pressure profile. A parametric study has been performed to characterize the behavior of varying tow speed and compaction forces on the degree of consolidation. Results indicate that increased tow consolidation is achieved with slower tow speeds and higher compaction forces although the relationship is not linear. The overall modeling of this project is motivated to address optimization of the 'green state' composite properties and processing parameters to reduce or eliminate 'cured state' defects, such as porosity and de-lamination. This work is partially funded by the Department of Energy under Award number DE-EE0001367.

  13. Pyrolysis of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA).

    PubMed

    Bessire, Brody K; Lahankar, Sridhar A; Minton, Timothy K

    2015-01-28

    Molar yields of the pyrolysis products of thermal protection systems (TPSs) are needed in order to improve high fidelity material response models. The volatile chemical species evolved during the pyrolysis of a TPS composite, phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA), have been probed in situ by mass spectrometry in the temperature range 100 to 935 °C. The relative molar yields of the desorbing species as a function of temperature were derived by fitting the mass spectra, and the observed trends are interpreted in light of the results of earlier mechanistic studies on the pyrolysis of phenolic resins. The temperature-dependent product evolution was consistent with earlier descriptions of three stages of pyrolysis, with each stage corresponding to a temperature range. The two main products observed were H2O and CO, with their maximum yields occurring at ∼350 °C and ∼450 °C, respectively. Other significant products were CH4, CO2, and phenol and its methylated derivatives; these products tended to desorb concurrently with H2O and CO, over the range from about 200 to 600 °C. H2 is presumed to be the main product, especially at the highest pyrolysis temperatures used, but the relative molar yield of H2 was not quantified. The observation of a much higher yield of CO than CH4 suggests the presence of significant hydroxyl group substitution on phenol prior to the synthesis of the phenolic resin used in PICA. The detection of CH4 in combination with the methylated derivatives of phenol suggests that the phenol also has some degree of methyl substitution. The methodology developed is suitable for real-time measurements of PICA pyrolysis and should lend itself well to the validation of nonequilibrium models whose aim is to simulate the response of TPS materials during atmospheric entry of spacecraft.

  14. Fracture Resistance of Composite Fixed Partial Dentures Reinforced with Pre-impregnated and Non-impregnated Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Mosharraf, Ramin; Torkan, Sepideh

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims The mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures (FPDs) are af-fected by fiber impregnation. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the fracture resistance of composite fixed partialdentures reinforced with pre-impregnated and non-impregnated fibers. Materials and methods Groups (n=5) of three-unit fiber-reinforced composite FPDs (23 mm in length) from maxillary second premolar to maxillary second molar were fabricated on two abutments with pontic width of 12 mm. One group was fabricated as the control group with composite (Gradia) and the other two groups were fabricated with composite (Gradia) reinforced with pre-impregnated fiber (Fibrex ribbon) and non-impregnated fiber (Fiber braid), respectively. The specimens were stored in distilled water for one week at 37°C and then tested in a universal testing machine by means of a three-point bending test. Statistical analysis consisted of one-way ANOVA and a post hoc Scheffé’s test for the test groups (α=0.05). Results Fracture resistance (N) differed significantly between the control group and the other two groups (P<0.001), but there were no statistically significant differences between the pre-impregnated and non-impregnated groups (P=0.565). The degree of deflection measured (mm) did not differ significantly between the three groups (P=0.397), yet the mean deflection measured in pre-impregnated group was twice as that in the other two groups. Conclusion Reinforcement of composite with fiber might considerably increase the fracture resistance of FPDs; how-ever, the type of the fiber used resulted in no significant difference in fracture resistance of FPD specimens. PMID:22991628

  15. Impact resistance of composite fan blades. [fiber reinforced graphite and boron epoxy blades for STOL operating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premont, E. J.; Stubenrauch, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    The resistance of current-design Pratt and Whitney Aircraft low aspect ratio advanced fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composite fan blades to foreign object damage (FOD) at STOL operating conditions was investigated. Five graphite/epoxy and five boron/epoxy wide chord fan blades with nickel plated stainless steel leading edge sheath protection were fabricated and impact tested. The fan blades were individually tested in a vacuum whirlpit under FOD environments. The FOD environments were typical of those encountered in service operations. The impact objects were ice balls, gravel, stralings and gelatin simulated birds. Results of the damage sustained from each FOD impact are presented for both the graphite boron reinforced blades. Tests showed that the present design composite fan blades, with wrap around leading edge protection have inadequate FOD impact resistance at 244 m/sec (800 ft/sec) tip speed, a possible STOL operating condition.

  16. Recovery of materials from waste printed circuit boards by vacuum pyrolysis and vacuum centrifugal separation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yihui; Wu, Wenbiao; Qiu, Keqiang

    2010-11-01

    In this research, a two-step process consisting of vacuum pyrolysis and vacuum centrifugal separation was employed to treat waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs). Firstly, WPCBs were pyrolysed under vacuum condition at 600 °C for 30 min in a lab-scale reactor. Then, the obtained pyrolysis residue was heated under vacuum until the solder was melted, and then the molten solder was separated from the pyrolysis residue by the centrifugal force. The results of vacuum pyrolysis showed that the type-A of WPCBs (the base plates of which was made from cellulose paper reinforced phenolic resin) pyrolysed to form an average of 67.97 wt.% residue, 27.73 wt.% oil, and 4.30 wt.% gas; and pyrolysis of the type-B of WPCBs (the base plates of which was made from glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin) led to an average mass balance of 72.20 wt.% residue, 21.45 wt.% oil, and 6.35 wt.% gas. The results of vacuum centrifugal separation showed that the separation of solder was complete when the pyrolysis residue was heated at 400 °C, and the rotating drum was rotated at 1200 rpm for 10 min. The pyrolysis oil and gas can be used as fuel or chemical feedstock after treatment. The pyrolysis residue after solder separation contained various metals, glass fibers and other inorganic materials, which could be recycled for further processing. The recovered solder can be reused directly and it can also be a good resource of lead and tin for refining.

  17. Recovery of materials from waste printed circuit boards by vacuum pyrolysis and vacuum centrifugal separation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yihui; Wu, Wenbiao; Qiu, Keqiang

    2010-11-01

    In this research, a two-step process consisting of vacuum pyrolysis and vacuum centrifugal separation was employed to treat waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs). Firstly, WPCBs were pyrolysed under vacuum condition at 600 °C for 30 min in a lab-scale reactor. Then, the obtained pyrolysis residue was heated under vacuum until the solder was melted, and then the molten solder was separated from the pyrolysis residue by the centrifugal force. The results of vacuum pyrolysis showed that the type-A of WPCBs (the base plates of which was made from cellulose paper reinforced phenolic resin) pyrolysed to form an average of 67.97 wt.% residue, 27.73 wt.% oil, and 4.30 wt.% gas; and pyrolysis of the type-B of WPCBs (the base plates of which was made from glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin) led to an average mass balance of 72.20 wt.% residue, 21.45 wt.% oil, and 6.35 wt.% gas. The results of vacuum centrifugal separation showed that the separation of solder was complete when the pyrolysis residue was heated at 400 °C, and the rotating drum was rotated at 1200 rpm for 10 min. The pyrolysis oil and gas can be used as fuel or chemical feedstock after treatment. The pyrolysis residue after solder separation contained various metals, glass fibers and other inorganic materials, which could be recycled for further processing. The recovered solder can be reused directly and it can also be a good resource of lead and tin for refining. PMID:20655190

  18. Mechanical behaviors of hyberbranched epoxy toughened bisphenol F epoxy resin for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingwen; Wu, Zhixiong; Huang, Chuanjun; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Laifeng

    2014-01-01

    Epoxy resins have been widely employed in cryogenic engineering fields. In this work, bisphenol F epoxy resin was modified by an aromatic polyester hyperbranched epoxy resin (HTDE-2). Mechanical behaviors of the modified epoxy resins in terms of tensile properties and impact property were studied at both room and cryogenic temperatures. Moreover, the toughening mechanism was discussed by fracture surface morphology analysis. The results demonstrated that, the mechanical properties of composites initially increased until reaches the maximum value with increasing the mass content of the HTDE-2, and then decreased at both room temperature (RT) and 77K. Especially, the impact strength at 77 K was improved 40.7% compared with the pure epoxy matrix when 10 wt% HTDE-2 was introduced. The findings suggest that the HTDE-2 will be an effective toughener for the brittle bisphenol F epoxy resin for cryogenic applications.

  19. Epoxy Foam Encapsulants: Processing and Dielectric Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Domeier; Marion Hunter

    1999-01-01

    The dielectric performance of epoxy foams was investigated to determine if such materials might provide advantages over more standard polyurethane foams in the encapsulation of electronic assemblies. Comparisons of the dielectric characteristics of epoxy and urethane encapsulant foams found no significant differences between the two resin types and no significant difference between as-molded and machined foams. This study specifically evaluated the formulation and processing of epoxy foams using simple methylhydrosiloxanes as the flowing agent and compared the dielectric performance of those to urethane foams of similar density.

  20. Advanced resin systems for graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Jayarajan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The value of resin/carbon fiber composites as lightweight structures for aircraft and other vehicle applications is dependent on many properties: environmental stability, strength, toughness, resistance to burning, smoke produced when burning, raw material costs, and complexity of processing. A number of woven carbon fiber and epoxy resin composites were made. The epoxy resin was commercially available tetraglycidylmethylene dianiline. In addition, composites were made using epoxy resin modified with amine and carboxyl terminated butadiene acrylonitrile copolymer. Strength and toughness in flexure as well as oxygen index flammability and NBS smoke chamber tests of the composites are reported.

  1. Vacuum pump aids ejectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.E.

    1982-12-01

    The steam ejector/vacuum pump hybrid system has been operating satisfactorily since the summer of 1981. This system has essentially been as troublefree as the all-ejector system and, of course, has provided a substantial cost savings. Construction is currently under way to convert the vacuum system of another crude still which is equipped with steam ejectors and barometric condensers to the hybrid system of steam ejectors, surface condensers, and vacuum pumps. This current project is even more financially attractive because it allows a dirty water cooling tower which serves the barometric condensers to be shut down. Providing a vacuum for crude distillation vacuum towers with this hybrid system is by no means the only application of this technique. Any vacuum system consisting of all steam ejectors would be a candidate for this hybrid system and the resulting savings in energy.

  2. Structural/Radiation-Shielding Epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Hinkley, Jeffrey; Blattnig, Steve; Delozier, Donavon M.; Watson, Kent A.; Ghose, Sayata

    2009-01-01

    A development effort was directed toward formulating epoxy resins that are useful both as structural materials and as shielding against heavy-ion radiation. Hydrogen is recognized as the best element for absorbing heavy-ion radiation, and high-hydrogen-content polymers are now in use as shielding materials. However, high-hydrogen-content polymers (e.g. polyethylene) are typically not good structural materials. In contrast, aromatic polymers, which contain smaller amounts of hydrogen, often have the strength necessary for structural materials. Accordingly, the present development effort is based on the concept that an ideal structural/ heavy-ion-radiation-shielding material would be a polymer that contains sufficient hydrogen (e.g., in the form of aliphatic molecular groups) for radiation shielding and has sufficient aromatic content for structural integrity.

  3. [Vertebral vacuum phenomena].

    PubMed

    Hamzé, B; Leaute, F; Wybier, M; Laredo, J D

    1995-01-01

    The spinal vacuum phenomenon is a collection of gas within the disk space, the vertebral body, the apophyseal joint or the spinal canal. The intradiscal vacuum phenomenon is frequently observed in degenerative disk disease and crystal-induced diskopathy. This has obvious significance to the radiologist, who, on observing a narrowed disk space or collapsed vertebral body, might otherwise consider infectious or neoplastic spondylitis, a likely possibility. The presence of vacuum phenomenon militates against the diagnosis of infection or tumor.

  4. Vacuum probe surface sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahlava, B. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A vacuum probe surface sampler is described for rapidly sampling relatively large surface areas which possess relatively light loading densities of micro-organism, drug particles or the like. A vacuum head with a hollow handle connected to a suitable vacuum source is frictionally attached to a cone assembly terminating in a flared tip adapted to be passed over the surface to be sampled. A fine mesh screen carried by the vacuum head provides support for a membrane filter which collects the microorganisms or other particles. The head assembly is easily removed from the cone assembly without contacting the cone assembly with human hands.

  5. NSLS II Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, M.; Doom, L.; Hseuh, H.; Longo, C.; Settepani, P.; Wilson, K.; Hu, J.

    2009-09-13

    National Synchrotron Light Source II, being constructed at Brookhaven, is a 3-GeV, 500 mA, 3rd generation synchrotron radiation facility with ultra low emittance electron beams. The storage ring vacuum system has a circumference of 792 m and consists of over 250 vacuum chambers with a simulated average operating pressure of less than 1 x 10{sup -9} mbar. A summary of the update design of the vacuum system including girder supports of the chambers, gauges, vacuum pumps, bellows, beam position monitors and simulation of the average pressure will be shown. A brief description of the techniques and procedures for cleaning and mounting the chambers are given.

  6. Comparison of Efficacy and Cost of Iodine Impregnated Drape vs. Standard Drape in Cardiac Surgery: Study in 5100 Patients.

    PubMed

    Bejko, Jonida; Tarzia, Vincenzo; Carrozzini, Massimiliano; Gallo, Michele; Bortolussi, Giacomo; Comisso, Marina; Testolin, Luca; Guglielmi, Cosimo; De Franceschi, Marco; Bianco, Roberto; Gerosa, Gino; Bottio, Tomaso

    2015-10-01

    We sought to examine the efficacy in preventing surgical site infection (SSI) in cardiac surgery, using two different incise drapes (not iodine-impregnated and iodine-impregnated). A cost analysis was also considered. Between January 2008 and March 2015, 5100 consecutive cardiac surgery patients, who underwent surgery in our Institute, were prospectively collected. A total of 3320 patients received a standard not iodine-impregnated steri-drape (group A), and 1780 patients received Ioban(®) 2 drape (group B). We investigated, by a propensity matched analysis, whether the use of standard incise drape or iodine-impregnated drape would impact upon SSI rate. Totally, 808 patients for each group were matched for the available risk factors. Overall incidence of SSI was significantly higher in group A (6.5 versus 1.9 %) (p = 0.001). Superficial SSI incidence was significantly higher in group A (5.1 vs 1.6 %) (p = 0.002). Deep SSI resulted higher in group A (1.4 %) than in group B (0.4 %), although not significantly (p = 0.11). Consequently, the need for vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy use resulted 4.3 % in group A versus 1.2 % in group B (p = 0.001). Overall costs for groups A and B were 12.494.912 € and 11.721.417 €, respectively. The Ioban(®) 2 offered totally 773.495 € cost savings compared to standard steri-drape. Ioban 2 drape assured a significantly lower incidence of SSI. Additionally, Ioban(®) 2 drape proved to be cost-effective in cardiac surgery. PMID:26374143

  7. Evaluation of atomic oxygen resistant protective coatings for fiberglass-epoxy composites in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Brady, Joyce A.

    1989-01-01

    Fiberglass-epoxy composite masts are the prime structural members for the Space Station Freedom solar array. At the altitude where Space Station Freedom will operate, atomic oxygen atoms are the most predominant species. Atomic oxygen is highly reactive and has been shown to oxidize organic and some metallic materials. Tests with random and directed atomic oxygen exposure have shown that the epoxy is removed from the composite exposing brittle glass fibers which could be easily removed from the surface where they could contaminate Space Station Freedom Systems. Protection or fiber containment systems; inorganic based paints, aluminum braid, and a metal coating; were evaluated for resistance to atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and mechanical flexing. All appeared to protect well against atomic oxygen and provide fiber containment except for the single aluminum braid covering. UV radiation resistance was acceptable and in general, thermal cycling and flexure had little to no effect on the mass loss rate for most coatings.

  8. Physical aging in graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, E. S. W.

    1983-01-01

    Sub-Tg annealing has been found to affect the properties of graphite/epoxy composites. The network epoxy studied was based on the chemistry of tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diamino-diphenyl methane (TGDDM) crosslinked by 4,4'-diamino-diphenyl sulfone (DDS). Differential scanning calorimetry, thermal mechanical analysis, and solid-state cross-polarized magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been utilized in order to characterize this process of recovery towards thermodynamic equilibrium. The volume and enthalpy recovery as well as the 'thermoreversibility' aspects of the physical aging are discussed. This nonequilibrium and time-dependent behavior of network epoxies are considered in view of the increasingly wide applications of TGDDM-DDS epoxies as matrix materials of structural composites in the aerospace industry.

  9. Structure Property Relationships of Biobased Epoxy Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorana, Anthony Surraht

    The thesis is about the synthesis, characterization, development, and application of epoxy resins derived from sustainable feedstocks such as lingo-cellulose, plant oils, and other non-food feedstocks. The thesis can be divided into two main topics 1) the synthesis and structure property relationship investigation of new biobased epoxy resin families and 2) mixing epoxy resins with reactive diluents, nanoparticles, toughening agents, and understanding co-curing reactions, filler/matrix interactions, and cured epoxy resin thermomechanical, viscoelastic, and dielectric properties. The thesis seeks to bridge the gap between new epoxy resin development, application for composites and advanced materials, processing and manufacturing, and end of life of thermoset polymers. The structures of uncured epoxy resins are characterized through traditional small molecule techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, high resolution mass spectrometry, and infrared spectroscopy. The structure of epoxy resin monomers are further understood through the process of curing the resins and cured resins' properties through rheology, chemorheology, dynamic mechanical analysis, tensile testing, fracture toughness, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and notched izod impact testing. It was found that diphenolate esters are viable alternatives to bisphenol A and that the structure of the ester side chain can have signifi-cant effects on monomer viscosity. The structure of the cured diphenolate based epoxy resins also influence glass transition temperature and dielectric properties. Incorporation of reactive diluents and flexible resins can lower viscosity, extend gel time, and enable processing of high filler content composites and increase fracture toughness. Incorpora-tion of high elastic modulus nanoparticles such as graphene can provide increases in physical properties such as elastic modulus and fracture toughness. The synthesis

  10. Ultrasonic Mixing of Epoxy Curing Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    New ultrasonic mixing technique used to mix several curing agents/epoxy combinations. Major component of commercially available base epoxy resin used in tetraglycidylmethylenedianiline (TGMDA). In ultrasonic mixing system cup holds resin and curing agent during acoustic excitation. Samples placed in cup with top to ultrasonic horn forming bottom of cup. Ultrasonically treated until amber colored and transparent. Because ultrasonic agitation drives out entrapped air, degassing not necessary before cure.

  11. Electrical properties of epoxies and film resistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sergent, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The reliability of hybrid microcircuits has been enhanced in recent years by the use of organic adhesives as a replacement for solder and eutectics. The epoxies have been the most effective and widely used material for this application. Methods for measuring the electrical and mechanical properties of epoxies are developed. Data are given for selected conductive adhesives at high and low frequencies. The temperature coefficients of resistance of thick film resistors are presented.

  12. Cavitation in block copolymer modified epoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Declet-Perez, Carmelo; Francis, Lorraine; Bates, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Today, brittleness in epoxy networks limits most commercial applications. Significant toughness can be imparted by adding small amounts of micelle forming block copolymers (BCP) without compromising critical properties such as high use temperature and modulus. Curing the network locks in the self-assembled BCP micellar structures formed in the monomer resin providing control of the resulting morphology. Despite significant research over the last decade, a complete description of the parameters influencing toughness in block copolymer modified epoxies is still lacking. In this presentation we compare the ultimate mechanical behavior of epoxies modified with spherical micelle forming BCP's containing rubbery and glassy cores using real-time in-situ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) performed during tensile deformation. Striking differences in the 2D SAXS patterns were documented for epoxies modified with rubbery (PEP) versus glassy (PS) micelle cores. Rubbery cores dilate by 100% in volume upon specimen yielding, while the glassy micelle cores deform at approximately constant volume. These results provide direct evidence of a cavitation mediated mechanism for toughness in block copolymer modified epoxies. We further interpret characteristic butterfly features in the 2D SAXS patterns in terms of epoxy network deformation. Support was provided by the NSF sponsored MRSEC at the University of Minnesota

  13. Working in a Vacuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses several myths about vacuum cleaners and offers tips on evaluating and purchasing this essential maintenance tool. These myths are: (1) Amps mean performance; (2) Everyone needs high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA): (3) Picking up a "bowling ball" shows cleaning power; (4) All vacuum bags are the same; (5)…

  14. Nitric acid vapor removal by activated, impregnated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.O.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory and industrial workers can be exposed to vapors of nitric acid, especially in accidents, such as spills. Nitric acid can also be a product of incineration for energy production or waste (e.g., CW agent) disposal. Activated carbons containing impregnants for enhancing vapor and gas removal have been tested for effectiveness in removing vapors of nitric acid from air. The nitric acid vapor was generated from concentrated acid solutions and detected by trapping in a water bubbler for pH measurements. Both low and moderate relative humidity conditions were used. All carbons were effective at vapor contact times representative of air-purifying respirator use. One surprising observation was the desorption of low levels of ammonia from impregnated carbons. This was apparently due to residual ammonia from the impregnation processes.

  15. Impregnation of softwood cell walls with melamine-formaldehyde resin.

    PubMed

    Gindl, W; Zargar-Yaghubi, F; Wimmer, R

    2003-05-01

    Melamine-formaldehyde (MF) resin impregnation has shown considerable potential to improve a number of wood properties, such as surface hardness and weathering resistance. In this study, selected factors influencing the uptake of MF resin into the cell wall of softwood were studied. Using UV-microspectroscopy, it could be shown that water soluble MF diffused well into the secondary cell wall and the middle lamella. Concentrations as high as 24% (v/v) were achieved after an impregnation of 20 h. High cell wall moisture content, high water content of the resin used for impregnation, and low extractive content are factors which are favourable for MF resin uptake into the cell wall. For dry cell walls, solvent exchange drying improved resin uptake to a similar extent, as was the case when cell walls were soaked in water.

  16. Impregnation of softwood cell walls with melamine-formaldehyde resin.

    PubMed

    Gindl, W; Zargar-Yaghubi, F; Wimmer, R

    2003-05-01

    Melamine-formaldehyde (MF) resin impregnation has shown considerable potential to improve a number of wood properties, such as surface hardness and weathering resistance. In this study, selected factors influencing the uptake of MF resin into the cell wall of softwood were studied. Using UV-microspectroscopy, it could be shown that water soluble MF diffused well into the secondary cell wall and the middle lamella. Concentrations as high as 24% (v/v) were achieved after an impregnation of 20 h. High cell wall moisture content, high water content of the resin used for impregnation, and low extractive content are factors which are favourable for MF resin uptake into the cell wall. For dry cell walls, solvent exchange drying improved resin uptake to a similar extent, as was the case when cell walls were soaked in water. PMID:12507874

  17. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  18. ELETTRA vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, M.

    1991-08-01

    A status report of the vacuum system of ELETTRA, the 2 GeV, 400 mA light source under construction in Trieste, will be described. The Vacuum project, presented at ``Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop'' at Riken (Japan 22-24 March 1990) and more recently at EVC-2, the European Vacuum Conference at Trieste (Italy 21-26 May 1990), is now in the phase of testing a prototype sector, which is 1/24 of the ring circumference. Details and some technological aspects of the fabrication will be reviewed together with the vacuum performances. Results of laboratory experiments on components, standard or not, allowed us to finalize the main choices in light of the general philosophy of the project and will be properly summarized.

  19. Development of novel single-wall carbon nanotube epoxy composite ply actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Yeo-Heung; Shanov, Vesselin; Schulz, Mark J.; Narasimhadevara, Suhasini; Subramaniam, Srinivas; Hurd, Douglas; Boerio, F. J.

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes a carbon nanotube epoxy ply material that has electrochemical actuation properties. The material was formed by dispersing single-wall carbon nanotubes in a solvent and then solution casting a thin paper using a mold and vacuum oven. In order to take advantage of the high elastic modulus of carbon nanotubes for actuation, epoxy as a chemically inert polymer is considered. An epoxy layer was cast on the surface of the nanotube paper to make a two-layer ply. A wet electrochemical actuator was formed by placing the nanotube epoxy ply in a 2 M NaCl electrolyte solution. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were carried out to characterize the electrochemical properties of the actuator. The voltage-current relationship and power to drive the actuator material were also determined. Compared to previous single-wall carbon nanotube buckypaper tape actuators, which had poor adhesion between the nanotubes and tape, and other nanotube-thermal plastic polymer actuators, which could not provide high strength, the epoxy based actuator has a higher elastic modulus and strength, which will be useful for future structural applications. This demonstrates that a polymer layer can reinforce nanotube paper, which is an important step in building a new structural material that actuates. Further work is under way to develop a solid electrolyte to allow dry actuation. Finally, these actuator plies will be laminated to build a carbon nanocomposite material. This smart structural material will have potential applications that range from use in robotic surgical tools to use as structures that change shape.

  20. The modifications of epoxy resin and their crystalline polymer particle filled epoxies

    SciTech Connect

    Huei-Hsiung Wang

    1996-12-31

    The chemical linking of the modifier to the epoxy network was overcome by using Bisphenol A, 4,4`-diaminodiphenyl sulphone or benzophenone-tetracarboxylic dianhydride as a coupling agent between the PU and the epoxy oligomer. From the experimental results, it was shown that the values of fracture energy, G{sub IC} for PU-modified epoxy were dependent on the macroglycols and the coupling agents. Scanning electron microscopy and the glass transition temperature were used to assess the morphology and their compatibility of these modified epoxies. It revealed that the ether type (PTMG) of PU modified epoxy showed the present of an aggregated separated phase. However, the ester type (PBA) PU-modified epoxy resin showed a homogenous morphology. In addition, the {Beta}-relaxation of cured epoxy resin showed a more clear two-phase separation existed in Bis-A as a coupling agents. The additive of the semi-crystalline PBT powder was more efficient in fracture energies of epoxy network than that of the Nylon 6,6 powder.

  1. Gallocyanin-chrome alum counterstaining of Golgi-Kopsch impregnations.

    PubMed

    Tieman, S B

    1983-05-01

    A simple technique is described for counterstaining Golgi-Kopsch impregnations. The sections are first stabilized by the method of Geisert and Updyke and then stained in 0.15% gallocyanin and 5% chromium potassium sulfate for 45 minutes at 55-60 C. The sections are then rinsed, dehydrated to 70% ethanol, cleared in terpineol, mounted and coverslipped. This procedure results in a light to medium blue stain of those cells not impregnated by the silver chromate. The major advantages of this procedure over earlier methods are: (1) the counterstain does not fade and (2) since no differentiation is required, many sections may be stained simultaneously.

  2. Preparation and properties of polytetrafluoroethylene impregnated with rhenium oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H. F.; Easter, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The results of tests carried out to determine the properties of polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) impregnated with rhenium oxides are presented. The tests included measurement of physical properties of the impregnated material and investigation of the effects of preparation process variables. Based on the latter tests a mechanism to describe the permeation process is postulated which identifies the rate controlling step to be diffusion of ReF6 molecules into the solid during the initial ReF6 soak. Physical property tests indicated that the electronic conductance is increased by many orders of magnitude while the desirable properties of the PTFE remain virtually unchanged.

  3. Process for Preparing Epoxy-Reinforced Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    One-pot reaction process for preparing epoxy-reinforced monolithic silica aerogels comprising the reaction of at least one silicon compound selected from the group consisting of alkoxysilanes, orthosilicates and combination thereof in any ratio with effective amounts of an epoxy monomer and an aminoalkoxy silane to obtain an epoxy monomer-silica sol in solution, subsequently preparing an epoxy-monomer silica gel from said silica sol solution followed by initiating polymerization of the epoxy monomer to obtain the epoxy-reinforced monolithic silica aerogel.

  4. Molecular design of an epoxy for cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawa, Fumio; Nishijima, Shigehiro; Okada, Toichi

    The mechanical and thermal properties of several epoxy resins were measured to obtain guidelines for the molecular design of an epoxy resin for cryogenic temperatures. Two types of epoxy resin with different numbers of epoxy groups were mixed (with different mixing ratios) and cured. Fracture toughness, flexural strength and thermal contraction of the hybrid epoxy resins were measured down to cryogenic temperatures. The results suggest that epoxies with larger molecular weights between crosslinkings relaxed stress at the crack tip, even at cryogenic temperatures. Intermolecular forces and stress relaxation at the crack tip were found to be important for high fracture toughness.

  5. Physical aging and its influence on the reliability of network epoxies and epoxy-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.

    1983-01-01

    The matrix-dominated physical and mechanical properties of a carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite and a neat epoxy resin were found to be affected by sub-Tg annealing in nitrogen and dark atmosphere. Postcured specimens of Thornel 300 carbon-fiber/Fiberite 934 epoxy as well as Fiberite 934 epoxy resin were quenched from above Tg and given annealing at 140 C, 110 C, or 80 C, for time up to one-hundred thousand minutes. No weight loss was observed during annealing at these temperatures. Significant variations were found in density, modulus, hardness, damping, moisture absorption ability, thermal expansivity. Moisture-epoxy interactious were also studied. The kinetics of aging as well as the molecular aggregation during this densification process were monitored by differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis, density gradient column, microhardness tester, Instron, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  6. Impact and dynamic mechanical thermal properties of textile silk reinforced epoxy resin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, K.; Guan, J.

    2016-07-01

    Silk fabric reinforced epoxy resin composites (SFRPs) were prepared using simple techniques of hand lay-up, hot-press and vacuum treatment, and a series of volume fractions of silk reinforcements were achieved. The impact properties and dynamic mechanical properties of SFRPs were investigated using a pendulum impact testing method and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The results suggest that silk reinforcement could greatly enhance the mechanical performances of SFRPs. The impact strength reached a maximum of 71 kJ/m2 for 60%-silk SFRP, which demonstrated a potential of silk composites for defence and impact- resistant materials.

  7. Enhanced electrical properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotube-epoxy nanocomposites with high packing density.

    PubMed

    Souier, Tewfik; Santos, Sergio; Al Ghaferi, Amal; Stefancich, Marco; Chiesa, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    During their synthesis, multi-walled carbon nanotubes can be aligned and impregnated in a polymer matrix to form an electrically conductive and flexible nanocomposite with high backing density. The material exhibits the highest reported electrical conductivity of CNT-epoxy composites (350 S/m). Here, we show how conductive atomic force microscopy can be used to study the electrical transport mechanism in order to explain the enhanced electrical properties of the composite. The high spatial resolution and versatility of the technique allows us to further decouple the two main contributions to the electrical transport: (1) the intrinsic resistance of the tube and (2) the tunneling resistance due to nanoscale gaps occurring between the epoxy-coated tubes along the composite. The results show that the material behaves as a conductive polymer, and the electrical transport is governed by electron tunneling at interconnecting CNT-polymer junctions. We also point out the theoretical formulation of the nanoscale electrical transport between the AFM tip and the sample in order to derive both the composite conductivity and the CNT intrinsic properties. The enhanced electrical properties of the composite are attributed to high degree of alignment, the CNT purity, and the large tube diameter which lead to low junction resistance. By controlling the tube diameter and using other polymers, the nanocomposite electrical conductivity can be improved. PMID:23158381

  8. Thermophoretic vacuum wand

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John

    2000-01-01

    A thermophoretic vacuum wand that is particularly suited for transporting articles in a cleanroom environment so that potential particle contaminants in the air do not become adhered to the surface of the article is described. The wand includes a housing having a platen with a front surface with suction port(s) through the platen; a vacuum source for applying a negative pressure to the suction port(s); and heating device for the object. Heating the article when it is held by the vacuum wand affords thermophoretic protection that effectively prevents particles in the air from depositing onto the article.

  9. Thermophoretic vacuum wand

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John

    2001-01-01

    A thermophoretic vacuum wand that is particularly suited for transporting articles in a cleanroom environment so that potential particle contaminants in the air do not become adhered to the surface of the article is described. The wand includes a housing having a platen with a front surface with suction port(s) through the platen; a vacuum source for applying a negative pressure to the suction port(s); and heating device for the object. Heating the article when it is held by the vacuum wand affords thermophoretic protection that effectively prevents particles in the air from depositing onto the article.

  10. Collapse of vacuum bubbles in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Wang, Shang-Yung

    2011-02-15

    We revisit the dynamics of a false vacuum bubble in a background de Sitter spacetime. We find that there exists a large parameter space that allows the bubble to collapse into a black hole or to form a wormhole. This may have interesting implications for the creation of a baby universe in the laboratory, the string landscape where the bubble nucleation takes place among a plenitude of metastable vacua, and the inflationary physics.

  11. Leaching of Silver from Silver-Impregnated Food Storage Containers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauri, James F.; Niece, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    The use of silver in commercial products has proliferated in recent years owing to its antibacterial properties. Food containers impregnated with micro-sized silver promise long food life, but there is some concern because silver can leach out of the plastic and into the stored food. This laboratory experiment gives students the opportunity to…

  12. X-ray initiated polymerization of wood impregnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Marshall R.; Galloway, Richard A.; Berejka, Anthony J.; Montoney, Daniel; Driscoll, Mark; Smith, Leonard; Scott Larsen, L.

    2009-07-01

    X-rays, derived from a high energy, high-current electron beam (EB), initiated in-situ polymerization of a unique class of monomers that were found to penetrate the cell walls of wood. X-rays initiated an auto-catalytic acrylic polymerization and penetrated through thick pieces of wood. The final cured product having the polymerizate, a polymer, both in the wood cell lumens and in the cell walls is called wood impregnated with a wood-polymer penetrant (WPP). The controlled lower dose rate of X-rays overcame disproportionation encountered when using higher dose-rate electron beam initiation. With X-rays, the in-situ polymerization took place in one exposure of modest dose. With EB, multiple passes were needed to avoid excessive heat build-up and monomer volatilization. Having entered the cell walls of the wood and then being polymerized within the cell walls, these radiation-cured unique monomers imparted outstanding dimensional stability upon exposure of the impregnated wood to humidity cycling. The preferred monomer system was also chemically modified prior to impregnation with agents that would remain in the wood and prevent the growth of fungi and other microbials. This technique differs from historic uses of monomers that merely filled the lumens of the wood (historic wood-polymer composites), which are only suitable for indoor use. The WPP impregnated wood that was either X-ray cured or EB cured demonstrated enhanced structural properties, dimensional stability, and decay resistance.

  13. Optical Imaging of Water Condensation on Lubricant Impregnated Micropillar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiya, Tadashi; Schellenberger, Frank; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    We explored the condensation of water drops on a lubricant-impregnated surface, i.e., a micropillar patterned surface impregnated with a ionic liquid. Growing drops were imaged in 3D using a laser scanning confocal microscope equipped with a temperature and humidity control. On a lubricant-impregnated hydrophobic micropillar array, different stages of condensation can be discriminated: - Nucleation on a lubricant surface. - Regular alignement between micropillars and formation of a three-phase contact line on a bottom of the substrate. - Deformation and bridging by coalescence, leading to a detachment of the drops from the bottom substrate to pillars'top faces. However, on a lubricant-impregnated hydrophilic micropillar array, the condensed water covers the micropillars by dewetting the lubricant. As a result, the surface loses its slippery property. Our results provide fundamental concepts how these solid/liquid hybrid surfaces can be applied for facile removal of condensed water, as well as necessity of the appropriate surface treatment. Financial support from ERC for the advanced grant 340391-SUPRO is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Improved method facilitates debulking and curing of phenolic impregnated asbestos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, P.

    1966-01-01

    Workpieces covered with phenolic impregnated asbestos tape and then wrapped with a specified thickness of nylon yarn under pressure, are debulked and cured in a standard oven. This method of debulking and curing is used in the fabrication of ablative chambers for the Gemini and Apollo attitude control engines.

  15. Vacuum mechatronics first international workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Belinski, S.E.; Shirazi, M.; Hackwood, S.; Beni, G. )

    1989-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: proposed epitaxial thin film growth in the ultra-vacuum of space; particle monitoring and control in vacuum processing equipment; electrostatic dust collector for use in vacuum systems; materials evaluation of an electrically noisy vacuum slip ring assembly; an overview of lubrication and associated materials for vacuum service; the usage of lubricants in a vacuum environment; guidelines and practical applications for lubrication in vacuum; recent development in leak detector and calibrator designs; the durability of ballscrews for ultrahigh vacuum; vacuum-compatible robot for self-contained manufacturing systems; the design, fabrication, and assembly of an advanced vacuum robotics system for space payload calibration; design criteria for mechanisms used in space; and concepts and requirements for semiconductor multiprocess integration in vacuum. These papers are indexed separately elsewhere.

  16. Vacuum Camera Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laugen, Geoffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Acquiring cheap, moving video was impossible in a vacuum environment, due to camera overheating. This overheating is brought on by the lack of cooling media in vacuum. A water-jacketed camera cooler enclosure machined and assembled from copper plate and tube has been developed. The camera cooler (see figure) is cup-shaped and cooled by circulating water or nitrogen gas through copper tubing. The camera, a store-bought "spy type," is not designed to work in a vacuum. With some modifications the unit can be thermally connected when mounted in the cup portion of the camera cooler. The thermal conductivity is provided by copper tape between parts of the camera and the cooled enclosure. During initial testing of the demonstration unit, the camera cooler kept the CPU (central processing unit) of this video camera at operating temperature. This development allowed video recording of an in-progress test, within a vacuum environment.

  17. Electrical properties of epoxies used in hybrid microelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    The electrical properties and basic characteristics of the structure of conductive epoxies were studied. The results of the experimental work performed to measure the electrical properties of epoxies are presented.

  18. Hollow cathodes with BaO impregnated, porous tungsten inserts and tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.; Weigand, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The technology of impregnated materials is described and some inherently advantageous characteristics of impregnated cathodes are discussed. Thermionic emission measurements are presented for oxide coated and impregnated cathodes. Five cathode configurations with barium oxide impregnated porous tungsten inserts and/or tips have been fabricated and tested. Reliability, durability, and stability of operation are characterized. One of the cathodes has accumulated over 9000 operational hours, another has been cycled on and off more than 800 times.

  19. TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.; Persons, R.

    1981-01-01

    The TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller (DVC) provides in conjunction with the Central Instrumentation Control and Data Acquisition System (CICADA), control and monitoring for the pumps, valves and gauges associated with each individual diagnostic vacuum system. There will be approximately 50 systems on TFTR. Two standard versions of the controller (A and B) wil be provided in order to meet the requirements of two diagnostic manifold arrangements. All pump and valve sequencing, as well as protection features, will be implemented by the controller.

  20. Hygienic relevance and risk assessment of antimicrobial-impregnated textiles.

    PubMed

    Kramer, A; Guggenbichler, P; Heldt, P; Jünger, M; Ladwig, A; Thierbach, H; Weber, U; Daeschlein, G

    2006-01-01

    The antimicrobial impregnation of textiles is intended to provide protection of textiles against microbial corrosion, prevention of malodor or prophylaxis and therapy of infections, respectively. For every biocidal product a careful risk assessment for humans and the environment has to be performed. The advantage of antimicrobially active textiles has to be documented for every agent as well as for every application, and a balance has to be found between a textile's quality rating and the potential risks, e.g. sensitization, disturbance of the ecology of the skin, toxic side effects by means of systemic absorption, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity and ecotoxicity. This article evaluates the applicability of silver compounds as well as the classic antimicrobials triclosan, quaternary ammonium compounds, copper and further new options like chitosan and zeolite. It has to be emphasized that there are no objections against the use of antimicrobially active textiles if their use is equal or superior to other preventive or therapeutic measures. This applies to the amelioration of the course of dermatological diseases with disturbed skin flora, in particular atopic dermatitis, the prevention and therapy of acute and chronic wound infections by wound dressings, the use of impregnated surgical suture material as well as special indications in the prevention of infection in medical facilities. The use of antimicrobial textiles for the prevention of dermatomycosis by antifungal impregnation is of questionable use; the antimicrobial impregnation of textiles for deodorization purposes has to be avoided. Presently, from a hygienic point of view, the following questions have to be clearly determined: declaration of any antimicrobial impregnation; development of international standards for in vitro testing and preclinical evaluation of efficacy and tolerance; evaluation of the advantage of the antimicrobial properties for the intended use including the

  1. Chromium Ions Improve Moisure Resistance of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Stoakley, D. M.; Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Broad spectrum of thermosetting epoxy resins used on commercial and military aircraft, primarily as composite matrices and adhesives. In new technique, chromium-ion containing epoxy with improved resistance to moisture produced where chromium ions believed to prevent absorption of water molecules by coordinating themselves to hydroxyl groups on epoxy chain. Anticipated that improved epoxy formulation useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft. Improvement made without sacrifice in mechanical properties of polymer.

  2. Thermal properties of epoxy composites filled with boric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visakh, P. M.; Nazarenko, O. B.; Amelkovich, Yu A.; Melnikova, T. V.

    2015-04-01

    The thermal properties of epoxy composites filled with boric acid fine powder at different percentage were studied. Epoxy composites were prepared using epoxy resin ED-20, boric acid as flame-retardant filler, hexamethylenediamine as a curing agent. The prepared samples and starting materials were examined using methods of thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. It was found that the incorporation of boric acid fine powder enhances the thermal stability of epoxy composites.

  3. Hygrothermal expansion of Kevlar 49/epoxy and S2-glass/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, S.Y.; Hahn, H.T.

    1982-11-01

    Ply failure occurred during preconditioning at 75/sup 0/C of (0/90)/sub 2S/ S2-glass/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy laminates. Wet specimens showed different thermal expansion beavior near and above the glass transition temperature. Various available theories can be used to predict the thermal expansion coefficients. Stress analysis showed that the compressive normal stress at the interface in Kevlar 49/epoxy after cure is very small compared with those in other composites. Significant and rapid changes in the transverse coefficient of thermal expansion occurs in the T/sub g/ region. The two-phase diffusion model is a good representation of the diffusion behavior. Desorption process reveals a higher diffusion coefficient than absorption. S2-glass/epoxy was found to be unstable under the conditions applied, with cracking and losses during desorption. Maximum moisture contents were approx. 0.31% at 75/sup 0/C/75% RH and approx. 0.412% at 75/sup 0/C/water. The composite swelled transversely up to about 0.11 and 0.16%. Kevlar 49/epoxy was more stable than S2-glass/epoxy; max moisture contents were approx. 2.47% at 75/sup 0/C/75% RH and approx. 5.5% at 75/sup 0/C/water. The composite swelled transversely up to 1.0 and 2.23%. Results indicate that Kevlar 49 fibers swell radially. Relation between swelling strain and moisture content undergoes hysteresis during moisture cycling. Relation between swelling strain and moisture concentration is fairly linear for S2-glass/epoxy, Kevlar 49/epoxy and AS 3501/5 graphite/epoxy and only weakly depends on the material system. The equilibrium moisture content in (+-45)/sub 2S/ laminate is higher than in unidirectional lamina. The equilibrium thickness swelling strain can be predicted by laminated plate theory.

  4. Biodegradable Epoxy Networks Cured with Polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shigeo; Kramer, Edward J.

    2006-03-01

    Epoxy resins are used widely for adhesives as well as coatings. However, once cured they are usually highly cross-linked and are not biodegradable. To obtain potentially biodegradable polypeptides that can cure with epoxy resins and achieve as good properties as the conventional phenol novolac hardeners, poly(succinimide-co-tyrosine) was synthesized by thermal polycondensation of L-aspartic acid and L-tyrosine with phosphoric acid under reduced pressure. The tyrosine/succinimide ratio in the polypeptide was always lower than the tyrosine/(aspartic acid) feed ratio and was influenced by the synthesis conditions. Poly(succinimide-tyrosine- phenylalanine) was also synthesized from L-aspartic acid, L- tyrosine and L-phenylalanine. The thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy resins cured with these polypeptides are comparable to those of similar resins cured with conventional hardeners. In addition, enzymatic degradability tests showed that Chymotrypsin or Subtilisin A could cleave cured films in an alkaline borate buffer.

  5. Free-volume characteristics of epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Shultz, William J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1992-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was used to measure free-volume characteristics of selected epoxies. Fluorene resins, a new family of high-temperature thermosetting resins, were selected as the test medium. Experimental results indicate that the free-volume cell size V sub f varies with the molecular weight between the cross-links M sub c according to an equation of the form V sub f = AM sub c sup B, where A and B are structural constants. In two of the samples, the concentration of bulky fluorene groups was increased in the network backbone by replacement of some of the conventional bisphenol A epoxy resin with fluorene-derived epoxy resin. This resulted in an increase in their glass transition temperature for a given level of cross-linking. It was found that in these samples, the Doppler broadening of the annihilation peak decreases with the increasing fluorene content, presumably due to enhanced damping of the chain motions.

  6. Epoxy coated reinforcement in bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, J.

    A review was conducted of methods relating to the use of epoxy coated reinforcing bars for bridge decks and their potential for use in the United Kingdom. A survey of work carried out in the USA was carried out and the analysis used in a preliminary cost study. The options of having either a hot rolled asphalt surfacing or a permanently exposed concrete wearing surface were considered. It was concluded that epoxy coating of the top steel in addition to current waterproofing practice would provide, at relatively little extra cost, additional assurance that the reinforcement would be adequately protected throughout the life of a bridge. Current design rules do not permit decks with permanently exposed concrete wearing surface without waterproofing. Epoxy coating may afford a means of introducing such decks but before a positive recommendation to delete waterproofing can be made further studies would have to be undertaken.

  7. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E

    2008-05-30

    Carbon fiber-reinforced bisphenol-A epoxy matrix composite was evaluated for gamma radiation resistance. The composite was exposed to total gamma doses of 50, 100, and 200 Mrad. Irradiated and baseline samples were tested for tensile strength, hardness and evaluated using FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) for structural changes. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate microstructural behavior. Mechanical testing of the composite bars revealed no apparent change in modulus, strain to failure, or fracture strength after exposures. However, testing of only the epoxy matrix revealed changes in hardness, thermal properties, and FTIR results with increasing gamma irradiation. The results suggest the epoxy within the composite can be affected by exposure to gamma irradiation.

  8. Physical aging in graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, E. S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The matrix dominated mechanical behavior of a graphite epoxy composite was found to be affected by sub Tg annealing. Postcured + or - 45 deg 4S specimens of Thornel 300 graphite/Narmco 5208 epoxy were quenched from above Tg and given a sub Tg annealing at 140 C for times up to 10 to the 5th power min. The ultimate tensile strength, strain to break, and toughness of the composite material were found to decrease as functions of sub Tg annealing time. No weight loss was observed during the sub Tg annealing. The time dependent change in mechanical behavior is explained on the basis of free volume changes that are related to the physical aging of the nonequilibrium glassy network epoxy. The results imply possible changes in composite properties with service time.

  9. Evaluation of Oven-Cured Solid Carbon/epoxy Composites with Various Porosity Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, M. A.

    2009-03-01

    Cirrus has developed a strong core competency fabricating composite components using oven cure vacuum bag technology. When using this process, porosity levels must be carefully managed and effects of porosity well understood. Excessive porosity negatively affects material performance and reduces the effectiveness of the ultrasonic NDI method. This paper will present material characterization results from carbon/epoxy composite panels produced with various levels of porosity. Panels were inspected using two different ultrasonic methods. Panels were destructively tested to correlate static mechanical and physical properties to ultrasonic absorption coefficients. The goal of this work is to characterize material behavior to allow ultrasonic inspection in a manufacturing environment on vacuum bag oven-cured parts where porosity may be a factor.

  10. EVALUATION OF OVEN-CURED, SOLID CARBON/EPOXY COMPOSITES WITH VARIOUS POROSITY LEVELS

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M. A.

    2009-03-03

    Cirrus has developed a strong core competency fabricating composite components using oven cure vacuum bag technology. When using this process, porosity levels must be carefully managed and effects of porosity well understood. Excessive porosity negatively affects material performance and reduces the effectiveness of the ultrasonic NDI method. This paper will present material characterization results from carbon/epoxy composite panels produced with various levels of porosity. Panels were inspected using two different ultrasonic methods. Panels were destructively tested to correlate static mechanical and physical properties to ultrasonic absorption coefficients. The goal of this work is to characterize material behavior to allow ultrasonic inspection in a manufacturing environment on vacuum bag oven-cured parts where porosity may be a factor.

  11. Effects of epoxy/hardener stoichiometry on structures and properties of a diethanolamine-cured epoxy encapsulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. F.; Xiao, M. Z.; Wu, Z.; Peng, K.; Han, C. M.; Xiang, W.; Dai, J. Y.

    2016-07-01

    For the epoxy encapsulant cured by diethanolamine, optimal epoxy/hardener stoichiometry could hardly be predicted due to the complex curing mechanisms. In this paper, the influences of stoichiometry were investigated by FTIR, DMA and tensile testing. The results showed that stoichiometry has a dominating effect on both Tg and tensile properties of the cured epoxy. The largest Tg , highest crosslink density as well as excellent ductility appeared in epoxy encapsulant cured with 14 wt% diethanolmine. When the content of diethanolamine was lower than 14 wt%, epoxy encapsulants showed smaller glycidyl conversion even with long-duration post-cure. Larger tensile strength and modulus were also observed in the glycidyl-rich epoxies, which could be explained by anti-plasticization effect. The amine-rich epoxy, however, had extremely high glycidyl conversion and presented brittle tensile behavior. A diethanolamine content of 12-14 wt% for the epoxy encapsulant is suggested to obtain optimal thermal and tensile properties.

  12. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  15. Epoxy-coated containers easily opened by wire band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Coy, J. W.

    1966-01-01

    Epoxy coating reduces punctures, abrasions, and contamination of synthetic cellular containers used for shipping and storing fragile goods and equipment. A wire band is wound around the closure joint, followed by the epoxy coating. The container can then be easily opened by pulling the wire through the epoxy around the joint.

  16. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  17. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  18. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  19. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  2. A new approach to raising heat resistance of epoxy nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobko, Anatoliy P.; Levakova, Irina V.; Krasheninnikov, Sergey V.

    2012-07-01

    A new approach to enhancing heat resistance of epoxy nanocomposites is offered. Complete exfoliation of montmorillonite particles into individual platelets (nanoparticles) is not sufficient condition for increasing the glass transition temperature of the epoxy nanocomposite. A much higher contribution to the increase in the heat resistance is ensured by grafting of epoxy molecular chains onto the surface of aluminosilicate platelets.

  3. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  4. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  5. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  6. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  7. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  8. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  10. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  11. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  13. 40 CFR 721.320 - Acrylamide-substituted epoxy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylamide-substituted epoxy. 721.320... Substances § 721.320 Acrylamide-substituted epoxy. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylamide-substituted epoxy (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.320 - Acrylamide-substituted epoxy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acrylamide-substituted epoxy. 721.320... Substances § 721.320 Acrylamide-substituted epoxy. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylamide-substituted epoxy (PMN...

  15. Interphase tailoring in graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, R. V.; Sanadi, A. R.; Crasto, A. S.

    1988-01-01

    The fiber-matrix interphase in graphite fiber-epoxy matrix composites is presently modified through the electrodeposition of a coating of the polymer poly(styrene-comaleic anhydride), or 'SMA' on the graphite fibers; optimum conditions have been established for the achievement of the requisite thin, uniform coatings, as verified by SEM. A single-fiber composite test has shown the SMA coating to result in an interfacial shear strength to improve by 50 percent over commercially treated fibers without sacrifice in impact strength. It is suggested that the epoxy resin's superior penetration into the SMA interphase results in a tougher fiber/matrix interface which possesses intrinsic energy-absorbing mechanisms.

  16. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Lee, Elizabeth; Kallam, Alekhya; Majumdar, Partha; Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J.; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Bahr, James; Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  17. Kevlar 49/Epoxy COPV Aging Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, James K.; Salem, Jonathan L.; Thesken, John C.; Russell, Richard W.; Littell, Justin; Ruggeri, Charles; Leifeste, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    NASA initiated an effort to determine if the aging of Kevlar 49/Epoxy composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPV) affected their performance. This study briefly reviews the history and certification of composite pressure vessels employed on NASA Orbiters. Tests to evaluate overwrap tensile strength changes compared 30 year old samples from Orbiter vessels to new Kevlar/Epoxy pressure vessel materials. Other tests include transverse compression and thermal analyses (glass transition and moduli). Results from these tests do not indicate a noticeable effect due to aging of the overwrap materials.

  18. Electroactive polymer gels based on epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samui, A. B.; Jayakumar, S.; Jayalakshmi, C. G.; Pandey, K.; Sivaraman, P.

    2007-04-01

    Five types of epoxy gels have been synthesized from common epoxy resins and hardeners. Fumed silica and nanoclay, respectively, were used as fillers and butyl methacrylate/acrylamide were used as monomer(s) for making interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) in three compositions. Swelling study, tensile property evaluation, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and electroactive property evaluation were done. The gels have sufficient mechanical strength and the time taken for bending to 20° was found to be 22 min for forward bias whereas it was just 12 min for reverse bias.

  19. The effects of space radiation on a chemically modified graphite-epoxy composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, S. M.; Herakovich, C. T.; Sykes, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the space environment on the engineering properties and chemistry of a chemically modified T300/934 graphite-epoxy composite system are characterized. The material was subjected to 1.0 x 10 to the 10th power rads of 1.0 MeV electron irradiation under vacuum to simulate 30 years in geosynchronous earth orbit. Monotonic tension tests were performed at room temperature (75 F/24 C) and elevated temperature (250 F/121 C) on 4-ply unidirectional laminates. From these tests, inplane engineering and strength properties (E sub 1, E sub 2, Nu sub 12, G sub 12, X sub T, Y sub T) were determined. Cyclic tests were also performed to characterize energy dissipation changes due to irradiation and elevated temperature. Large diameter graphite fibers were tested to determine the effects of radiation on their stiffness and strength. No significant changes were observed. Dynamic-mechanical analysis demonstrated that the glass transition temperature was reduced by 50 F(28 C) after irradiation. Thermomechanical analysis showed the occurrence of volatile products generated upon heating of the irradiated material. The chemical modification of the epoxy did not aid in producing a material which was more radiation resistant than the standard T300/934 graphite-epoxy system. Irradiation was found to cause crosslinking and chain scission in the polymer. The latter produced low molecular weight products which plasticize the material at elevated temperatures and cause apparent material stiffening at low stresses at room temperature.

  20. Research on the melt impregnation of continuous carbon fiber reinforced nylon 66 composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, M. Y.; Li, C. X.; Xue, P.; Chen, K.; Chen, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Impregnation mold of continuous carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites was designed and built in the article. Based on the theory of fluid mechanics and Darcy's law, a model of the melt impregnation was also established. The influences of fiber bundle width and impregnation pins’ diameter on the impregnation degree were studied by numerical simulation. Continuous carbon fiber reinforced nylon 66 composites were prepared. The effects of coated angle and impregnation mold temperature on the mechanical properties of the composites were also described.The agreement between the experimental data and prediction by the model was found to be satisfactory.

  1. ISABELLE vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H J

    1980-01-01

    The Intersecting Storage Accelerator (ISABELLE) consists of two rings having a circumference of 3.8 km each. In these rings superconducting magnets, held at 4 K, bend and focus the proton beam which is accelerated up to 400 GeV. Due to very different pressure requirements, ISABELLE has two completely independent vacuum systems. One, which operates at 1 x 10/sup -11/ Torr, provides a very clean environment for the circulating proton beam. Here only ion and titanium sublimation pumps are used to provide the vacuum. The other system maintains superconducting magnet vessels at a pressure below 1 x 10/sup -4/ Torr, since at this pressure the gas conduction becomes negligible. In this so-called insulating vacuum system, turbomolecular pumps pump the inadvertent small helium leaks. Other gases are cryocondensed on the cold surfaces of the cryogenic system. The basic element of ISABELLE known as Full Cell containing 45 meters of beam tube, 8 pumping stations, 8 superconducting magnets and complete instrumentation has been constructed, leak checked and tested. All design parameters have been achieved in both vacuum systems. The two vacuum systems are described with particular emphasis on the influence of superconducting magnets in the selection of materials and UHV components.

  2. Characterization of Epoxy Functionalized Graphite Nanoparticles and the Physical Properties of Epoxy Matrix Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Bauer, Jonathan L.; Maryanski, Michael J.; Heimann, Paula J.; Barlow, Jeremy P.; Gosau, Jan-Michael; Allred, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a novel approach to the functionalization of graphite nanoparticles. The technique provides a mechanism for covalent bonding between the filler and matrix, with minimal disruption to the sp2 hybridization of the pristine graphene sheet. Functionalization proceeded by covalently bonding an epoxy monomer to the surface of expanded graphite, via a coupling agent, such that the epoxy concentration was measured as approximately 4 wt.%. The impact of dispersing this material into an epoxy resin was evaluated with respect to the mechanical properties and electrical conductivity of the graphite-epoxy nanocomposite. At a loading as low as 0.5 wt.%, the electrical conductivity was increased by five orders of magnitude relative to the base resin. The material yield strength was increased by 30% and Young s modulus by 50%. These results were realized without compromise to the resin toughness.

  3. Salt exclusion in silane-laced epoxy coatings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Schaefer, Dale W

    2010-01-01

    The corrosion protection mechanism of a one-step silane-laced epoxy coating system was investigated using neutron reflectivity. Pure epoxy and silane-laced epoxy films were examined at equilibrium with saturated NaCl water solution. The results demonstrate that the addition of silane introduces a salt-exclusion effect to epoxy coating. Specifically, the addition of silane densifies the epoxy network, which leads to exclusion of hydrated salt ions by a size effect. The effect is particularly significant at the metal-coating interface. Exclusion of ions improves the corrosion resistance, particularly for metals susceptible to pitting.

  4. Effect of Liquid-Crystalline Epoxy Backbone Structure on Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy-Alumina Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giang, Thanhkieu; Kim, Jinhwan

    2016-06-01

    In a series of papers published recently, we clearly demonstrated that the most important factor governing the thermal conductivity of epoxy-Al2O3 composites is the backbone structure of the epoxy. In this study, three more epoxies based on diglycidyl ester-terminated liquid-crystalline epoxy (LCE) have been synthesized to draw conclusions regarding the effect of the epoxy backbone structure on the thermal conductivity of epoxy-alumina composites. The synthesized structures were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and optical microscopy were also employed to examine the thermal and optical properties of the synthesized LCEs and the cured composites. All three LCE resins exhibited typical liquid-crystalline behaviors: clear solid crystalline state below the melting temperature (T m), sharp crystalline melting at T m, and transition to nematic phase above T m with consequent isotropic phase above the isotropic temperature (T i). The LCE resins displayed distinct nematic liquid-crystalline phase over a wide temperature range and retained liquid-crystalline phase after curing, with high thermal conductivity of the resulting composite. The thermal conductivity values ranged from 3.09 W/m-K to 3.89 W/m-K for LCE-Al2O3 composites with 50 vol.% filler loading. The steric effect played a governing role in the difference. The neat epoxy resin thermal conductivity was obtained as 0.35 W/m-K to 0.49 W/m-K based on analysis using the Agari-Uno model. The results clearly support the objective of this study in that the thermal conductivity of the LCE-containing networks strongly depended on the epoxy backbone structure and the degree of ordering in the cured network.

  5. Improving Vacuum Cleaners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement between the Kirby company and Lewis Research Center, NASA technology was applied to a commercial vacuum cleaner product line. Kirby engineers were interested in advanced operational concepts, such as particle flow behavior and vibration, critical factors to improve vacuum cleaner performance. An evaluation of the company 1994 home care system, the Kirby G4, led to the refinement of the new G5 and future models. Under the cooperative agreement, Kirby had access to Lewis' holography equipment, which added insight into how long a vacuum cleaner fan would perform, as well as advanced computer software that can simulate the flow of air through fans. The collaboration resulted in several successes including fan blade redesign and continuing dialogue on how to improve air-flow traits in various nozzle designs.

  6. Atmospheric corrosion and epoxy-coated reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, H.G.

    1998-12-31

    Atmospheric corrosion can have a tremendous effect on the ability of epoxy-coated reinforcement to maintain its effectiveness. Corrosive conditions can result in the coating becoming brittle and more susceptible to damage from handling. Atmospheric conditions can also enhance localized corrosion at holidays on the bars. Efforts to minimize these effects will be discussed.

  7. Standards for Epoxies Used in Microelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, S. V.; Licari, J.; Weigand, B. L.; Soykin, C.

    1983-01-01

    Improved qualification standards and test procedures for epoxy adhesives used in assembly of high-reliability hybrid microcircuits listed in new report. Objective of standards to resolve problems in areas of outgassing, bond shear strength, corrosivity, volume resistivity, ionic impurities, electrical stability, and frequency of qualification testing. pp

  8. Polymeric Additives For Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Nir, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental studies of properties of several graphite/epoxy composites containing polymeric additives as flexibilizing or toughening agents. Emphasizes effects of brominated polymeric additives (BPA's) with or without carboxy-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber. Reviews effects of individual and combined additives on fracture toughnesses, environmental stabilities, hot/wet strengths, thermomechanical behaviors, and other mechanical properties of composites.

  9. Epoxy resins produce improved plastic scintillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. W.

    1967-01-01

    Plastic scintillator produced by the substitution of epoxy resins for the commonly used polystyrene is easy to cast, stable at room temperature, and has the desirable properties of a thermoset or cross-linked system. Such scintillators can be immersed directly in strong solvents, an advantage in many chemical and biological experiments.

  10. Evaluation of Double-Vacuum-Bag Process For Composite Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, T. H.; Jensen, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    A non-autoclave vacuum bag process using atmospheric pressure alone that eliminates the need for external pressure normally supplied by an autoclave or a press is an attractive method for composite fabrication. This type of process does not require large capital expenditures for tooling and processing equipment. In the molding cycle (temperature/pressure profile) for a given composite system, the vacuum application point has to be carefully selected to achieve the final consolidated laminate net shape and resin content without excessive resin squeeze-out. The traditional single-vacuum- bag (SVB) process is best suited for molding epoxy matrix based composites because of their superior flow and the absence of reaction by-products or other volatiles. Other classes of materials, such as polyimides and phenolics, generate water during cure. In addition, these materials are commonly synthesized as oligomers using solvents to facilitate processability. Volatiles (solvents and reaction byproducts) management therefore becomes a critical issue. SVB molding, without additional pressure, normally fails to yield void-free quality composites for these classes of resin systems. A double-vacuum- bag (DVB) process for volatile management was envisioned, designed and built at the NASA Langley Research Center. This experimental DVB process affords superior volatiles management compared to the traditional SVB process. Void-free composites are consistently fabricated as measured by C-scan and optical photomicroscopy for high performance polyimide and phenolic resins.

  11. Thermal expansion and swelling of cured epoxy resin used in graphite/epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents results of experiments in which the thermal expansion and swelling behavior of an epoxy resin system and two graphite/epoxy composite systems exposed to water were measured. It was found that the cured epoxy resin swells by an amount slightly less than the volume of the absorbed water and that the swelling efficiency of the water varies with the moisture content of the polymer. Additionally, the thermal expansion of cured epoxy resin that is saturated with water is observed to be more than twice that of dry resin. Results also indicate that cured resin that is saturated with 7.1% water at 95 C will rapidly increase in moisture content to 8.5% when placed in 1 C water. The mechanism for this phenomenon, termed reverse thermal effect, is described in terms of a slightly modified free-volume theory in conjunction with the theory of polar molecule interaction. Nearly identical behavior was observed in two graphite/epoxy composite systems, thus establishing that this behavior may be common to all cured epoxy resins.

  12. Performance of Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator in Aerothermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Jeremy; Fan, Wendy; Stackpoole, Mairead; Kao, David; Skokova, Kristina; Chavez-Garcia, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, a cousin of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a lightweight thermal protection system under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. PICA is made using a brittle carbon substrate, which has a very low strain to failure. Conformable PICA is made using a flexible carbon substrate, a felt in this case. The flexible felt significantly increases the strain to failure of the ablator. PICA is limited by its thermal mechanical properties. Future NASA missions will require heatshields that are more fracture resistant than PICA and, as a result, NASA Ames is working to improve PICA's performance by developing conformable PICA to meet these needs. Research efforts include tailoring the chemistry of conformable PICA with varying amounts of additives to enhance mechanical properties and testing them in aerothermal environments. This poster shows the performance of conformable PICA variants in arc jets tests. Some mechanical and thermal properties will also be presented.

  13. Electrochemical impregnation of nickel hydroxide in porous electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Jorne, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    The electrochemical impregnation of nickel hydroxide in porous electrode was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The loading level and plaque expansion were the most important parameters to be considered. The effects of applied current density, stirring, ratio of solution to electrode volume and pH were identified. A novel flow through electrochemical impregnation is proposed in which the electrolyte is forced through the porous nickel plaque. The thickening of the plaque can be reduced while maintaining high loading capacity. A mathematical model is presented which describes the transport of the nitrate, nickel and hydroxyl ions and the consecutive heterogeneous electrochemical reduction of nitrate and the homogeneous precipitation reaction of nickel hydroxide. The distributions of precipitation rate and active material within the porous electrode are obtained. A semiempirical model is also proposed which takes into account the plugging of the pores.

  14. Enhanced arsenic removal using mixed metal oxide impregnated chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Yamani, Jamila S; Miller, Sarah M; Spaulding, Matthew L; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2012-09-15

    Mixed metal oxide impregnated chitosan beads (MICB) containing nanocrystalline Al₂O₃ and nanocrystalline TiO₂ were successfully developed. This adsorbent exploits the high capacity of Al₂O₃ for arsenate and the photocatalytic activity of TiO₂ to oxidize arsenite to arsenate, resulting in a removal capacity higher than that of either metal oxide alone. The composition of the beads was optimized for maximum arsenite removal in the presence of UV light. The mechanism of removal was investigated and a mode of action was proposed wherein TiO₂ oxidizes arsenite to arsenate which is then removed from solution by Al₂O₃. Pseudo-second order kinetics were used to validate the proposed mechanism. MICB is a more efficient and effective adsorbent for arsenic than TiO₂-impregnated chitosan beads (TICB), previously reported on, yet maintains a desirable life cycle, free of complex synthesis processes, toxic materials, and energy inputs. PMID:22743162

  15. Ni/YSZ and Ni-CeO 2/YSZ anodes prepared by impregnation for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jinshuo; Sun, Kening; Zhang, Naiqing; Sun, Bing; Kong, Jiangrong; Zhou, Derui

    In this paper, Ni/YSZ and Ni-CeO 2/YSZ anodes for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) were prepared by tape casting and vacuum impregnation. By this method, the Ni content in the anode could be reduced compared to the traditional tape casting method. It was found that adding CeO 2 into the Ni/YSZ anode by a Ni(NO 3) 2 and Ce(NO 3) 3 mixed impregnation could further enhance cell performance. This was investigated in H 2 at 1073 K. XRD patterns indicated that CeO 2 and Ni were separate phases, and the CeO 2 addition could enhance the Ni dispersion on the YSZ framework surface which was observed by SEM images. It was shown that adding CeO 2 into the Ni anodes could decrease the cell polarization resistance. The maximum power density for cells with 25 wt.% Ni, 5 wt.% CeO 2-25 wt.% Ni/YSZ, or 10 wt.% CeO 2-25 wt.% Ni/YSZ anode was 230 mW cm -2, 420 mW cm -2 and 530 mW cm -2, respectively, in H 2 at 1073 K. The OCV for these cells was 1.05-1.09 V, indicating that a dense electrolyte film was obtained by co-firing porous YSZ layer and dense YSZ layer.

  16. The Application of Perfluorocarbons as Impregnants for Plastic Film Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, G. H.

    1981-01-01

    A liquid impregnated, plastic film (wet) capacitor was developed that is thought to be the most reliable and space efficient capacitor of any type ever produced for high voltage, pulse discharge service. The initial design stores five times the energy of a premium quality dry capacitor of equivalent energy and reliability. The technology, as well as a production capacitor design using this technology are described.

  17. Review of electrochemical impregnation for nickel cadmium cells. [aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, S.

    1977-01-01

    A method of loading active material within the electrodes of nickel cadmium cells is examined. The basic process of electrochemical impregnation of these electrodes is detailed, citing the principle that when current is applied reactions occur which remove hydrogen ions from solution, making the interior of the plaque less acidic. Electrodes result which are superior in energy density, stability, and life. The technology is reviewed and illustrated with typical performance data. Recommendations are made for additional research and development.

  18. Insoluble polyelectrolyte and ion-exchange hollow fiber impregnated therewith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The number of quaternary sites and ion exchange capacity of a polyquaternary, cross linked, insoluble copolymer of a vinyl pyridine and a dihalo organic compound is increased by about 15-35% by reaction of the polymer with an amine followed by quaternization, if required. The polymer forms spontaneously in the presence of a substrate such as within the pores of a hollow fiber. The improved resin impregnated fiber may be utilized to remove ions from waste or process steams.

  19. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  20. K-130 Cyclotron vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhole, R. B.; Roy, Anindya; Pal, Sarbajit; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    The vacuum system for K-130 cyclotron has been operational since 1977. It consists of two sub-systems, main vacuum system and beam line vacuum system. The main vacuum system is designed to achieve and maintain vacuum of about 1 × 10-6 mbar inside the 23 m3 volume of acceleration chamber comprising the Resonator tank and the Dee tank. The beam line vacuum system is required for transporting the extracted beam with minimum loss. These vacuum systems consist of diffusion pumps backed by mechanical pumps like roots and rotary pumps. The large vacuum pumps and valves of the cyclotron vacuum system were operational for more than twenty five years. In recent times, problems of frequent failures and maintenance were occurring due to aging and lack of appropriate spares. Hence, modernisation of the vacuum systems was taken up in order to ensure a stable high voltage for radio frequency system and the extraction system. This is required for efficient acceleration and transportation of high intensity ion beam. The vacuum systems have been upgraded by replacing several pumps, valves, gauges and freon units. The relay based control system for main vacuum system has also been replaced by PLC based state of the art control system. The upgraded control system enables inclusion of additional operational logics and safety interlocks into the system. The paper presents the details of the vacuum system and describes the modifications carried out for improving the performance and reliability of the vacuum system.

  1. Mercury adsorption properties of sulfur-impregnated adsorbents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi, N.-C.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.; Chang, R.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous adsorbents were impregnated with elemental sulfur to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the adsorbents and their equilibrium mercury adsorption capacities. Simulated coal combustion flue gas conditions were used to determine the equilibrium adsorption capacities for Hg0 and HgCl2 gases to better understand how to remove mercury from gas streams generated by coal-fired utility power plants. Sulfur was deposited onto the adsorbents by monolayer surface deposition or volume pore filling. Sulfur impregnation increased the total sulfur content and decreased the total and micropore surface areas and pore volumes for all of the adsorbents tested. Adsorbents with sufficient amounts of active adsorption sites and sufficient microporous structure had mercury adsorption capacities up to 4,509 ??g Hg/g adsorbent. Elemental sulfur, organic sulfur, and sulfate were formed on the adsorbents during sulfur impregnation. Correlations were established with R2>0.92 between the equilibrium Hg0/HgCl2 adsorption capacities and the mass concentrations of elemental and organic sulfur. This result indicates that elemental and organic sulfur are important active adsorption sites for Hg0 and HgCl2.

  2. Dispersion type zirconium matrix fuels fabricated by capillary impregnation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, A.; Konovalov, I.; Vatulin, A.; Morozov, A.; Orlov, V.; Uferov, O.; Ershov, S.; Laushkin, A.; Kulakov, G.; Maranchak, S.; Petrova, Z.

    2007-05-01

    Several novel dispersion fuel compositions with a high uranium content fuel (U9Mo, U5Zr5Nb, U3Si) and a zirconium alloy matrix with low melting point (1063-1133 K) have been developed at A.A. Bochvar Institute using a capillary impregnation fabrication method. The capillary impregnation method introduces fuel granules and granules of a zirconium alloy into a fuel element followed by a short-term anneal at a temperature above the melting temperature of alloy. The alloy melts down and under capillary forces moves into the joints between the fuel element components to form metallurgical bonds. The volume ratios between the components are: 55-65% fuel, 10-20% matrix, and 15-30% pores. Fuel elements produced by capillary impregnation method have a high uranium content (9-10 g cm-3) and a high thermal conductivity (18-22 W m-1 K-1), which, when used as PWR or BWR fuels allow the fuel temperature to be lowered to 723-773 K. They also feature porosity to accommodate swelling. The metallurgical fuel-cladding bond makes the fuel elements serviceable in power transients. The primary advantages for PWR, BWR and CANDU use of these fuels elements, would be the high uranium content, low fuel temperature and serviceability under transient conditions. Consideration is given to their applicability in Floating Nuclear Power Plants (FNPP) as well as for the feasibility of burning civil and weapon grade plutonium.

  3. Cyanate Ester and Phthalonitrile Impregnated Carbon Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boghozian, Tane; Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Gasch, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic resin has extensive heritage as a TPS (Thermal Protection Systems) material, however, alternative resin systems such as Cyanate Ester and Phthalonitrile may offer improved performance compared to state-of-the-art phenolic resin. These alternative resin systems may have higher char yield, higher char strength, lower thermal conductivity and improved mechanical properties. In current work at NASA Ames alternative resin systems were uniformly infused into fibrous substrates and preliminary properties characterized. The density of the cyanate ester infused in fibrous substrate ranged from 0.25-0.3 grams per cubic centimeter compared to PICA (Phenolic resin impregnated carbon ablative) having a density of approximately 0.25 grams per cubic centimeter. The density of Phthalonitrile varies from 0.22-0.25 grams per cubic centimeter. Initial formulations of these new resin systems were recently tested at the LARC HyMETs (Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System) facility to evaluate their performance and data such as back face temperature, char yield, and recession are compared to PICA. Cyanate Ester and Phthalonitrile impregnated carbon ablative samples showed comparable performance to phenolic resin impregnated carbon ablative samples.

  4. Cation adsorption on manganese dioxide impregnated fibers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, S.; Stahel, E.P.

    1992-12-01

    Complete removal of radioactive cations by standard mixed bed ion exchange resins is sometimes not achieved in liquid radwaste systems. Based on a literature survey, acrylic fibers impregnated with manganese dioxide were chosen as a media warranting study of their ability to adsorb the cations present in radwaste systems in the hope of improving performance of such treatment processes. A system to produce impregnated fiber with a heavy MnO{sub 2} loading was designed, constructed, and operated. The system produced fiber at an average fiber loading of 22.5 percent MnO{sub 2} by weight. Leaching tests made on the MnO{sub 2} fiber exhibited no signs of soluble manganese, insoluble MnO{sub 2}, acrylonitrile leaching or fiber loss. Laboratory testing has been performed on the adsorption of calcium, cadmium, cesium, cobalt, iron, and manganese on MnO{sub 2} impregnated fiber. Removal of metals from solution was measured at levels specific for each metal tested. The removal efficiency when they were present in combination was also evaluated.

  5. VACUUM SEALING MEANS FOR LOW VACUUM PRESSURES

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1962-06-12

    S>A vacuum seal is designed in which the surface tension of a thin layer of liquid metal of low vapor pressure cooperates with adjacent surfaces to preclude passages of gases across pressure differentials as low as 10/sup -8/ mm Hg. Mating contiguous surfaces composed of copper, brass, stainless steel, nickel, molybdenum, tungsten, tantalum, glass, quartz, and/or synthetic mica are disposed to provide a maximum tolerance, D, expressed by 2 gamma /P/sub 1/, where gamma is the coefflcient of the surface tension of the metal sealant selected in dynes/cm/sub 2/. Means for heating the surfaces remotely is provided where temperatures drop below about 250 deg C. A sealant consisting of an alloy of gallium, indium, and tin, among other combinations tabulated, is disposed therebetween after treating the surfaces to improve wettability, as by ultrasonic vibrations, the surfaces and sealants being selected according to the anticipated experimental conditions of use. (AEC)

  6. Vacuum arc deposition devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxman, R. L.; Zhitomirsky, V. N.

    2006-02-01

    The vacuum arc is a high-current, low-voltage electrical discharge which produces a plasma consisting of vaporized and ionized electrode material. In the most common cathodic arc deposition systems, the arc concentrates at minute cathode spots on the cathode surface and the plasma is emitted as a hypersonic jet, with some degree of contamination by molten droplets [known as macroparticles (MPs)] of the cathode material. In vacuum arc deposition systems, the location and motion of the cathode spots are confined to desired surfaces by an applied magnetic field and shields around undesired surfaces. Substrates are mounted on a holder so that they intercept some portion of the plasma jet. The substrate often provides for negative bias to control the energy of depositing ions and heating or cooling to control the substrate temperature. In some systems, a magnetic field is used to guide the plasma around an obstacle which blocks the MPs. These elements are integrated with a deposition chamber, cooling, vacuum gauges and pumps, and power supplies to produce a vacuum arc deposition system.

  7. Gas injected vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Hardin, K. Dan

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a gas injected vacuum switch comprising a housing having an interior chamber, a conduit for evacuating the interior chamber, within the chamber an anode and a cathode spaced from the anode, and a detonator for injecting electrically conductive gas into the chamber between the anode and the cathode to provide a current path therebetween.

  8. Vacuum ultraviolet holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, G. C.; Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    The authors report the first demonstration of holographic techniques in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region. Holograms were produced with coherent 1182 A radiation. The holograms were recorded in polymethyl methacrylate and read out with an electron microscope. A holographic grating with a fringe spacing of 836 A was produced and far-field Fraunhofer holograms of sub-micron particles were recorded.

  9. Sorption vacuum trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrington, A. E.; Caruso, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Modified sorption trap for use in high vacuum systems contains provisions for online regeneration of sorbent material. Trap is so constructed that it has a number of encapsulated resistance heaters and a valving and pumping device for removing gases from heated sorbing material. Excessive downtime is eliminated with this trap.

  10. Langmuir vacuum and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Veklenko, B. A.

    2012-06-15

    It is shown that, in the 'jelly' model of cold electron-ion plasma, the interaction between electrons and the quantum electromagnetic vacuum of Langmuir waves involves plasma superconductivity with an energy gap proportional to the energy of the Langmuir quantum.

  11. Vacuum arc deposition devices

    SciTech Connect

    Boxman, R.L.; Zhitomirsky, V.N.

    2006-02-15

    The vacuum arc is a high-current, low-voltage electrical discharge which produces a plasma consisting of vaporized and ionized electrode material. In the most common cathodic arc deposition systems, the arc concentrates at minute cathode spots on the cathode surface and the plasma is emitted as a hypersonic jet, with some degree of contamination by molten droplets [known as macroparticles (MPs)] of the cathode material. In vacuum arc deposition systems, the location and motion of the cathode spots are confined to desired surfaces by an applied magnetic field and shields around undesired surfaces. Substrates are mounted on a holder so that they intercept some portion of the plasma jet. The substrate often provides for negative bias to control the energy of depositing ions and heating or cooling to control the substrate temperature. In some systems, a magnetic field is used to guide the plasma around an obstacle which blocks the MPs. These elements are integrated with a deposition chamber, cooling, vacuum gauges and pumps, and power supplies to produce a vacuum arc deposition system.

  12. Toughness in block copolymer modified epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Declet-Perez, Carmelo

    One of the major shortcomings preventing the widespread use of epoxy resins in engineering applications is the inherent brittleness of these materials. The incorporation of small amounts of amphiphilic block copolymers into the formulation is one of the most promising strategies to toughen epoxies. These molecules are known to form nanostructures in the epoxy resin that can be preserved upon curing. This strategy is very attractive since significant enhancements in toughness can be obtained without detrimental effects on other properties of the matrix. Despite many examples of successful implementation, an in-depth understanding of the factors that lead to toughness in block copolymer modified epoxies is still elusive. The goal of this dissertation is to understand, first, the deformation mechanisms leading to toughness and, second, how different formulation parameters affect these processes. In this work we used two types of block copolymer modifiers, which produced nanostructures with different physical properties. These block copolymers self-assembled into well-dispersed spherical micelles with either rubbery or glassy cores in various epoxy formulations. Both of these modifiers toughened different epoxy formulations, although to different extents. The rubbery core micelles consistently outperformed the glassy core micelles by roughly a factor of two. While the toughening afforded by the rubbery core micelles was consistent with the current understanding of toughening, the results from the glassy core micelles could not be explained with the same reasoning. In order to understand the deformation mechanisms leading to different levels of toughness, we performed small-angle x-ray scattering experiments while simultaneously deforming our material. This combination of techniques, referred to as in-situ SAXS, allowed us to monitor changes in the structure of the block copolymer micelles as a result of the applied load. With this technique, we showed that the rubbery

  13. Motor Brush Testing for Mars and Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noon, Don E.

    1999-01-01

    Brush motors have been qualified and flown successfully on Mars missions, but upcoming missions require longer life and higher power. A test program was therefore undertaken to identify the best brush material for operation in the Mars atmosphere. Six different brush materials were used in 18 identical motors and operated under various load conditions for a period of four weeks in low-pressure CO2. All motors performed acceptably, with accumulated motor revolutions between 98 and 144 million revolutions, depending on load. A proprietary silver-graphite material from Superior Carbon (SG54-27) appears to be the best choice for long life, but even the stock copper-graphite brushes performed reliably with acceptable wear. The motors from the CO2 test were then cleaned and run in vacuum for 2 weeks. The difference in results was dramatic, with 5 motors failing catastrophically and wear rates increasing by orders of magnitude for the SG54-27 material. Three brush materials survived the test with no failures: SG54-27 with a proprietary Ball Aerospace impregnation, a silver-graphite-molybdenum disulfide material from Superior Carbon (SG59), and a copper sulfide-graphite material also from Superior Carbon (BG91).

  14. Demonstrations with a Vacuum: Old Demonstrations for New Vacuum Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Explains mechanisms of 19th-century vacuum pumps. Describes demonstrations using the pump including guinea and feather tube, aurora tube, electric egg, Gassiots cascade, air mill, bell in vacuum, density and buoyancy of air, fountain in vacuum, mercury shower, palm and bladder glasses, Bacchus demonstration, pneumatic man-lifter, and Magdeburg…

  15. Research on the Mechanical and Thermal Properties of MWCNTs/CF Reinforced Epoxy Resin Matrix Composite Patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W.; Li, C. Q.; Lin, L.; Chen, Y.

    The mechanical and thermal properties of multi-walled carbon nano-tubes and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite patch were tested, which was prepared by the hand lay-up method. The results indicated that the imagination observed by SEM presented good resin-impregnation for both of the two kinds of composite patches, and the mechanical and thermal properties of composite patch could be effectively increased by improvement of the interface combination after adding MWCNTs. For the mechanical properties of composite patch reinforced with MWCNTs, the interlaminar shear strength, bend strength and impact-tolerance were separately increased by 3.1%, 51.66% and 60.7%; and heat-resistance obtained by DMA were shown better thermal stability.

  16. Tritium handling in vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.T.; Coffin, D.O.

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a course in Tritium handling in vacuum systems. Topics presented are: Properties of Tritium; Tritium compatibility of materials; Tritium-compatible vacuum equipment; and Tritium waste treatment.

  17. Vacuum Pickup for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frasch, W.

    1982-01-01

    Flexible vacuum cups that handle solar cells conform to shape or cell back surfaces. Cups lift vertically, without tilt that might cause stress on interconnections, inaccurate placement, or damage to cells. Vacuum source is venturi valve mounted on air manifold.

  18. Studies of Lubricating Materials in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Johnson, R. L.; Swikert, M. A.

    1964-01-01

    Lubricating materials for use in a vacuum environment have been the subject of a series of experimental investigations. Evaporation properties were evaluated for solid polymeric compositions. Friction and wear studies explored the behavior during sliding contact for series of polymeric compositions, binary alloys containing soft film-forming phases, complex alloys with film-forming materials, and a burnished MoS2 film. Friction and wear experiments were conducted at 10(exp-9)mm Hg with a 3/16-inch-radius-hemisphere rider specimen sliding on the flat surface of a rotating 2-1/2-inch-diameter disk specimen with materials that had low rates of evaporation. The influence of fillers in polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) on decomposition during vacuum friction studies was determined with a mass spectrometer. A real advantage in reducing decomposition and improving friction wear properties is gained by adding fillers (e.g., copper) that improve thermal conductivity through the composite materials. A polyimide and an epoxy-MoS2 composition material were found to have better friction and wear properties than PTFE compositions. A series of alloys (cast binary as well as more complex alloys) that contained microinclusions of potential film-forming material was studied. These materials replaced the normal surface oxides as they were worn away on sliding contact. Iron sulfide, nickel oxide, and tin are typical film-forming materials employed and were demonstrated to be effective in inhibiting surface welding and reducing friction. A burnished MoS2 film applied to type 440-C stainless steel in argon with a rotating soft wire brush had good endurance properties but somewhat higher friction than commercially available bonded films. An oil film applied to the burnished MoS2 markedly reduced its endurance life.

  19. A radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1988-07-19

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction. 3 figs.

  20. Portable vacuum object handling device

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon H.

    1983-08-09

    The disclosure relates to a portable device adapted to handle objects which are not to be touched by hand. A piston and bore wall form a vacuum chamber communicating with an adaptor sealably engageable with an object to be lifted. The piston is manually moved and set to establish vacuum. A valve is manually actuatable to apply the vacuum to lift the object.

  1. Surge-damping vacuum valve

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jack C.; Kelly, Benjamin E.

    1980-01-01

    A valve having a mechanism for damping out flow surges in a vacuum system which utilizes a slotted spring-loaded disk positioned adjacent the valve's vacuum port. Under flow surge conditions, the differential pressure forces the disk into sealing engagement with the vacuum port, thereby restricting the flow path to the slots in the disk damping out the flow surge.

  2. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  3. Boron epoxy rocket motor case program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stang, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    Three 28-inch-diameter solid rocket motor cases were fabricated using 1/8 inch wide boron/epoxy tape. The cases had unequal end closures (4-1/8-inch-diameter forward flanges and 13-inch-diameter aft flanges) and metal attachment skirts. The flanges and skirts were titanium 6Al-4V alloy. The original design for the first case was patterned after the requirements of the Applications Technology Satellite apogee kick motor. The second and third cases were designed and fabricated to approximate the requirements of a small Applications Technology Satellite apogee kick motor. The program demonstrated the feasibility of designing and fabricating large-scale filament-wound solid propellant rocket motor cases with boron/epoxy tape.

  4. Tensile properties of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H.; Trada, Mohan

    2013-08-01

    Kinetic epoxy resin was filled with nanoclay to increase tensile properties of the composite for civil and structural. This project manufactured samples with different percentages by weight of nanoclay in the composites in steps of 1 wt %, which were then post-cured in an oven. The samples were then subjected to tensile tests. The results showed that the composite with 3 wt % of nanoclay produced the highest yield and tensile strengths. However, the Young's modulus increased with increasing nanoparticulate loading. It is hoped that the discussion and results in this work would not only contribute towards the further development of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites with enhanced material properties, but also provide useful information for the studies of fracture toughness, tensile properties and flexural properties of other composites.

  5. Investigations of toughening mechanisms of epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, T.

    1986-01-01

    Composite material technology was applied to the solid rocket booster by the development of a carbon filament-epoxy resin case which yields a net increase of 4000 lbs. in payload in the shuttle. The question of reusability of the new composite tanks has not yet been answered and will depend on the toughness of the matrix resin. The present study was aimed at providing conditions whereby test specimens of the epoxy resin (EPON/85) and curing agents of systematically varied structures could be produced in a controlled manner. Three sets of conditions were found that might allow the isolation of the structural effects on toughness from the cure effects. The kinetic methods leading to the determination of these conditions are described.

  6. Microwave limb sounder, graphite epoxy support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pynchon, G.

    1980-01-01

    The manufacturing and processing procedures which were used to fabricate a precision graphite/epoxy support structure for a spherical microwave reflecting surface are described. The structure was made fromm GY-70/930 ultra high modulus graphite prepreg, laminated to achieve an isotropic in plane thermal expansion of less than + or - 0.1 PPM/F. The structure was hand assembled to match the interface of the reflective surface, which was an array of 18 flexure supported, aluminum, spherically contoured tiles. Structural adhesives were used in the final assembly to bond the elements into their final configuration. A eutectic metal coating was applied to the composite surface to reduce dimensional instabilities arising from changes in the composite epoxy moisture content due to environmental effects. Basic materials properties data are reported and the results of a finite element structural analysis are referenced.

  7. Glass/Epoxy Door Panel for Automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, J. L. JR.

    1985-01-01

    Lightweight panel cost-effective. Integrally-molded intrusion strap key feature of composite outer door panel. Strap replaces bulky and heavy steel instrusion beam of conventional door. Standard steel inner panel used for demonstration purposes. Door redesigned to exploit advantages of composite outer panel thinner. Outer panel for automobilie door, made of glass/epoxy composite material, lighter than conventional steel door panel, meets same strength requirements, and less expensive.

  8. Effect of autohydrolysis on the wettability, absorbility and further alkali impregnation of poplar wood chips.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ningpan; Liu, Wei; Hou, Qingxi; Wang, Peiyun; Yao, Zhirong

    2016-09-01

    Autohydrolysis with different severity factors was performed on poplar wood chips prior to pulping, and the wettability, absorbility and the following impregnation of NaOH solution for the poplar wood chips were then investigated. The results showed that after autohydrolysis pretreatment the porosity, shrinkage and fiber saturation point (FSP) of the poplar wood chips were increased, while the surface contact angle decreased as the severity factor was increased. The autohydrolyzed chips absorbed more NaOH in impregnation that resulted in a low NaOH concentration in the bulk impregnation liquor (i.e., the impregnation liquor outside wood chips), while the concentration in the entrapped liquor (i.e., the impregnation liquor inside wood chips) was increased. Autohydrolysis substantially improved the effectiveness of alkali impregnation. PMID:27259186

  9. Solar heated vacuum flask

    SciTech Connect

    Posnansky, M.

    1980-04-08

    The wall of a protective jacket of a vacuum flask, containing a double-walled vessel whose walls are permeable to solar radiation , includes parts capable of being swung open. These parts and a wall part situated between them each have a reflective coating. The reflective surfaces of these coatings, viewed in crosssection, extend along a parabola when the movable wall parts are opened out, so that incident solar radiation is collected in the core zone of the vessel. A solar-radiation absorbing member may be disposed in this core zone, E.G., a metal tube having a black outer surface. Liquid contents of such a vacuum flask can be heated by means of solar energy.

  10. Vacuum tool manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1993-11-23

    Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm. 6 figures.

  11. Vacuum tool manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm.

  12. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  13. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  14. Edison's vacuum technology patents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waits, Robert K.

    2003-07-01

    During 1879 Thomas Edison's Menlo Park, New Jersey laboratory developed the means to evacuate glass lamp globes to less than a mTorr in 20 min and in mid-1880 began production of carbon-filament incandescent lamps. Among Edison's nearly 1100 U.S. patents are five for vacuum pump improvements, and at least eight others that are vacuum-related; all applied for between 1880 and 1886. Inspired by an 1878 article by De La Rue and Müller [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 169, 155 (1878)] on studies of glow discharges, Edison devised a combination pump using the Geissler pump as a rough pump and the Sprengel pump for continuous exhaustion. Edison's patents described means to control the mercury flow and automate the delivery of the mercury to banks of up to a hundred pumps. Other patents described various means to remove residual gases during lamp processing.

  15. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  16. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  17. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (such as the deuterium arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  18. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  19. Epoxy thermoset networks derived from vegetable oils and their blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Chang; Ravalli, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Epoxidized vegetable oils (EVOs), such as epoxidized soybean oil and linseed oils were prepared by the partial oxidation of the unsaturated double bonds in vegetable oils and used as monomers for preparing epoxy thermoset materials based on the cationic polymerization. These EVOs have been used to prepare epoxy thermosets of different network densities by cationic polymerization using onium salt catalyst. The crosslinked epoxy thermosets provide an ideal platform to study the structure-property-relationships of networked polymers. In particular, rheological studies on the epoxidized vegetable oil thermosets have been performed to measure the molecular weights between crosslinks (Mx) in the epoxy thermosets and to ultimately elucidate the role of functionality of epoxy groups in EVO on the mechanical and thermophysical properties of the epoxy thermoset materials. NSF DMR POLYMERS 1308617.

  20. Morphology development of rubber-modified epoxy thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, O.; Ward, T.C.

    1996-12-31

    Epoxy thermosets have been widely used as high performance adhesives and matrix resins for composites due to their outstanding mechanical and thermal properties, such as high modulus and tensile strength, high glass transition temperature, high thermal stability, and moisture resistance. Incorporation of a secondary rubbery phase into the glassy epoxy matrix can improve impact and fracture toughness of epoxy thermosets without sacrificing the other desirable properties of the neat epoxy thermoset. During the curing process, the initial homogeneous solution of epoxy resin-curing agent-rubber generally forms rubber-rich and epoxy-rich phases by a phase separation process which is arrested by gelation or vitrification. The final morphology developed by the cure depends on relative rates of cure reaction and phase separation. Cure conditions and the initial rubber composition control the morphology of the system and thus control the mechanical properties of the system.

  1. Effect of calcination on Co-impregnated active carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bekyarova, E.; Mehandjiev, D. . Inst. of General and Inorganic Chemistry)

    1993-11-01

    Active carbon (AC) from apricot shells with known characteristics has been impregnated with a 9.88% Co(NO[sub 3])[sub 2] [center dot] 6H[sub 2]O solution. The samples are destroyed in air at 200, 300, 400, and 550 C. The processes accompanying the thermal treatment are studied by DTA. Two processes are established during calcination of Co-impregnated active carbon: (i) destruction of the support as a result of oxidation catalyzed by the impregnated cobalt and (ii) interaction of the active phase (Co[sub 3]O[sub 4]) with the support (AC), during which Co[sub 3]O[sub 4] is reduced to CoO and Co. The presence of Co[sub 3]O[sub 4], and CoO phases is proved by X-ray measurements, while that of metal Co is established by magnetic measurements. The porous structure changes are investigated by adsorption studies. The characterization of the samples is performed by physical adsorption of N[sub 2] (77.4 K) and CO[sub 2] (273 K). The poresize distribution curves are plotted over the range 0.4--10 nm by the methods of Pierce (for the mesopores) and Medek (for the micropores). The micropore volume is determined by two independent methods: t/F method and D-R plot. The results from adsorption studies indicate a decrease of S[sub BET], V[sub mi], and, especially, the supermicropores of the samples.

  2. Implant infections and antibiotic-impregnated silicone rubber coating.

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, D N; Brindley, G S; Polkey, C E; Browning, G V

    1989-01-01

    A method is described for coating silicone rubber-encapsulated implant devices with an outer layer of silicone rubber impregnated with a mixture of gentamicin sulphate and diethanolamine fusidate. A coating of this sort provides bactericidal activity lasting for a few days in the film of fluid surrounding such an implant. When used for coating our implants, the retrospective rate of implant infections believed to have been introduced at the time of surgery was reduced to 0.7% (coated), compared with 10.0% (uncoated), a highly significant difference (p less than 0.001). Systemic perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis was not shown to confer any such benefit. PMID:2649641

  3. Rate dependent response and failure of a ductile epoxy and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Rae, Philip J; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Stahl, David B

    2010-01-01

    An extensive characterization suite has been performed on the response and failure of a ductile epoxy 55A and uniaxial carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite of IM7 fibers in 55A resin from the quasistatic to shock regime. The quasistatic and intermediate strain rate response, including elastic modulus, yield and failure have are characterized by quasistatic, SHPB, and DMA measurements as a function of fiber orientation and temperature. The high strain rate shock effect of fiber orientation in the composite and response of the pure resin are presented for plate impact experiments. It has previously been shown that at lower impact velocities the shock velocity is strongly dependent on fiber orientation but at higher impact velocity the in-plane and through thickness Hugoniots converge. The current results are compared with previous studies of the shock response of carbon fiber composites with more conventional brittle epoxy matrices. The spall response of the composite is measured and compared with quasistatic fracture toughness measurements.

  4. Air bearing vacuum seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1978-01-01

    An air bearing vacuum seal assembly capable of rotating at the speed of several thousand revolutions per minute using an air cushion to prevent the rotating and stationary parts from touching, and a two stage differential pumping arrangement to maintain the pressure gradient between the air cushion and the vacuum so that the leak rate into the vacuum is, for example, less than 1 .times. 10.sup.-4 Pa m.sup.3 /s. The air bearing vacuum seal has particular application for mounting rotating targets to an evacuated accelerator beam tube for bombardment of the targets with high-power charged particle beams in vacuum.

  5. Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate-Clay Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A clay-epoxy nanocomposite may be prepared by dispersing a layered clay in an alkoxy epoxy, such as a polypropylene oxide based epoxide before combining the mixture with an aromatic epoxy to improve the nanocomposite's thermal and mechanical properties.

  6. Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.

    1998-01-01

    Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

  7. Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, C.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Havens, S.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1998-03-10

    Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

  8. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  9. Space environmental effects on graphite-epoxy compressive properties and epoxy tensile properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Derek J.; Sykes, George F., Jr.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    This study characterizes the effects of electron radiation and temperature on a graphite-epoxy composite material. Compressive properties of the T300/934 material system were obtained at -250 F (-157 C), room temperature, and 250 F (121 C). Tensile specimens of the Fiberite 934 epoxy resin were fabricated and tested at room temperature and 250 F (121 C). Testing was conducted in the baseline (nonirradiated) and irradiated conditions. The radiation exposure was designed to simulate 30 year, worst-case exposure in geosynchronous Earth orbit. Mechanical properties tended to degrade at elevated temperature and improve at cryogenic temperature. Irradiation generally degraded properties at all temperatures.

  10. Reduction of polyester resin shrinkage by means of epoxy resin—I. Epoxy resin modified with acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, M.; Brzostowski, A.

    An attempt was made to decrease the shrinkage of unsaturated polyester resin, taking place during radiation-induced curing, by the addition of epoxy resin. In order to combine chemically both resins, the epoxy component was modified with cinnamic and acrylic acids. A composition of 90 parts of polyesster resin, 10 parts of epoxy resin modified with cinnamic acid, and 150 parts of a silica filler showed a volume shrinkage of 1.2%.

  11. Vapor-Gas Bubble Evolution and Growth in Extremely Viscous Fluids Under Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John; Balasubramaniam, R.; Nahra, Henry; Agui, Juan; Truong, Duc

    2008-01-01

    Formation of vapor and gas bubbles and voids is normal and expected in flow processes involving extremely viscous fluids in normal gravity. Practical examples of extremely viscous fluids are epoxy-like filler materials before the epoxy fluids cure to their permanent form to create a mechanical bond between two substrates. When these fluids flow with a free liquid interface exposed to vacuum, rapid bubble expansion process may ensue. Bubble expansion might compromise the mechanical bond strength. The potential sources for the origin of the gases might be incomplete out-gassing process prior to filler application; regasification due to seal leakage in the filler applicator; and/or volatiles evolved from cure reaction products formed in the hardening process. We embarked on a study that involved conducting laboratory experiments with imaging diagnostics in order to deduce the seriousness of bubbling caused by entrained air and volatile fluids under space vacuum and low gravity environment. We used clear fluids with the similar physical properties as the epoxy-like filler material to mimic the dynamics of bubbles. Another aspect of the present study was to determine the likelihood of bubbling resulting from dissolved gases nucleating from solution. These experimental studies of the bubble expansion are compared with predictions using a modified Rayleigh- Plesset equation, which models the bubble expansion.

  12. Modelling of volumetric composition and mechanical properties of unidirectional hemp/epoxy composites - Effect of enzymatic fibre treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Thygesen, A.; Meyer, AS; Madsen, B.

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present study is to assess the effect of enzymatic fibre treatments on the fibre performance in unidirectional hemp/epoxy composites by modelling the volumetric composition and mechanical properties of the composites. It is shown that the applied models can well predict the changes in volumetric composition and mechanical properties of the composites when differently treated hemp fibres are used. The decrease in the fibre correlated porosity factor with the enzymatic fibre treatments shows that the removal of pectin by pectinolytic enzymes results in a better fibre impregnation by the epoxy matrix, and the mechanical properties of the composites are thereby increased. The effective fibre stiffness and strength established from the modelling show that the enzymatic removal of pectin also leads to increased mechanical properties of the fibres. Among the investigated samples, the composites with hydrothermally pre-treated and enzymatically treated fibres have the lowest porosity factor of 0.08 and the highest mechanical properties. In these composites, the effective fibre stiffness and strength are determined to be 83 GPa and 667 MPa, respectively, when the porosity efficiency exponent is set equal to 2. Altogether, it is demonstrated that the applied models provide a concept to be used for the evaluation of performance of treated fibres in composites.

  13. Strontium-impregnated bioabsorbable composite for osteoporotic fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Chin; Kuo, Chih-Lin; Fan, Fang-Yu; Yang, Kai-Chiang

    2015-10-01

    Osteoporosis impairs the bone-healing process as well as bone fracture fixation. The intervention of osteoporosis is considered to be one part of bone fracture treatment. Thus, orthopedic fixators impregnated with antiosteoporosis regimens will improve fracture fixation in osteoporotic bone. In this study, the strontium (Sr) and calcium phosphate ceramic (CPC) were mixed first and then mixed with poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) to fabricate a bioactive and bioabsorbable bone fixators. The prepared Sr-CPC/PCL screws were implanted into the distal femur of ovariectomized rabbits. The results showed that Sr-CPC/PCL composite had the appropriate mechanical properties, good biocompatibility, and radio-opacity. The Sr addition created a porous structure and accelerated the degradation of bone screws, but the degradation products did not acidify the surrounding environment. For osteoporotic animals, favorable osteointegration around the Sr-CPC/PCL screws was found, and the total porosity of trabecular bone was decreased under the inspections of micro-computerized tomography. Compared with PCL or CPC/PCL screw, animals which received Sr-CPC/PCL were found to have better results in terms of trabecular number, thickness, and separation. This study reveals that the Sr-impregnated bone fixator improves osseointegration in osteoporotic animals. Sr-CPC/PCL composite is a good candidate material for osteofixation in osteoporotic patients.

  14. Strontium-impregnated bioabsorbable composite for osteoporotic fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Chin; Kuo, Chih-Lin; Fan, Fang-Yu; Yang, Kai-Chiang

    2015-10-01

    Osteoporosis impairs the bone-healing process as well as bone fracture fixation. The intervention of osteoporosis is considered to be one part of bone fracture treatment. Thus, orthopedic fixators impregnated with antiosteoporosis regimens will improve fracture fixation in osteoporotic bone. In this study, the strontium (Sr) and calcium phosphate ceramic (CPC) were mixed first and then mixed with poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) to fabricate a bioactive and bioabsorbable bone fixators. The prepared Sr-CPC/PCL screws were implanted into the distal femur of ovariectomized rabbits. The results showed that Sr-CPC/PCL composite had the appropriate mechanical properties, good biocompatibility, and radio-opacity. The Sr addition created a porous structure and accelerated the degradation of bone screws, but the degradation products did not acidify the surrounding environment. For osteoporotic animals, favorable osteointegration around the Sr-CPC/PCL screws was found, and the total porosity of trabecular bone was decreased under the inspections of micro-computerized tomography. Compared with PCL or CPC/PCL screw, animals which received Sr-CPC/PCL were found to have better results in terms of trabecular number, thickness, and separation. This study reveals that the Sr-impregnated bone fixator improves osseointegration in osteoporotic animals. Sr-CPC/PCL composite is a good candidate material for osteofixation in osteoporotic patients. PMID:25847487

  15. Bone impregnated hip screw in femoral neck fracture: Clinicoradiological results

    PubMed Central

    Sundar Raj, PK; Nuuman, Jiju A; Pattathil, Amish Sunder

    2015-01-01

    Background: Femoral neck fractures are treated either by internal fixation or arthroplasty. Usually, cannulated cancellous screws are used for osteosynthesis of fracture neck of femur. The bone impregnated hip screw (BIHS) is an alternative implant, where osteosyntehsis is required in femoral neck fracture. Materials and Methods: The BIHS is a hollow screw with thread diameter 8.3 mm, shank diameter 6.5 mm and wall thickness 2.2 mm and holes in the shaft of the screw with diameter 2 mm, placed in a staggered fashion. Biomechanical and animal experimental studies were done. Clinical study was done in two phases: Phase 1 in a group of volunteers, only with BIHS was used in a pilot study and phase 2 comparative study was done in a group with AO cannulated screws and the other group treated with BIHS. Results: In the phase 1 study, out of 15 patients, only one patient had delayed union. In phase 2, there were 78 patients, 44 patients in BIHS showed early union, compared to the rest 34 cases of AO cannulated screws Out of 44 patients with BIHS, 41 patients had an excellent outcome, 2 had nonunions and one implant breakage was noted. Conclusions: Bone impregnated hip screw has shown to provide early solid union since it incorporates the biomechanical principles and also increases the osteogenic potential and hence, found superior to conventional cannulated cancellous screw. PMID:26015608

  16. Zinc impregnated cellulose nanocomposites: Synthesis, characterization and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Attarad; Ambreen, Sidra; Maqbool, Qaisar; Naz, Sania; Shams, Muhammad Fahad; Ahmad, Madiha; Phull, Abdul Rehman; Zia, Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    Nanocomposite materials have broad applicability due to synergistic effect of combined components. In present investigation, cellulose isolated from citrus peel waste is used as a supporting material; impregnation of zinc oxide nanoparticles via co-precipitation method. The characterization of nano composite is carried out through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) resulting less than 10 μm cellulose fiber and approx. 50 nm ZnO NPs. Zinc oxide impregnated cellulose (ZnO-Cel) exhibited significant bacterial devastation property when compared to ZnO NPs or Cellulose via disc diffusion and colony forming unit methods. In addition, the ZnO-Cel exhibited significant total antioxidant, and minor DPPH free radical scavenging and total reducing power activities. The nano composite also showed time dependent increase in photocatalytic by effectively degrading methylene blue dye up to 69.5% under sunlight irradiation within 90 min. The results suggest effective utilization of cellulose obtained from citrus waste and synthesis of pharmacologically important nano-composites that can be exploited in wound dressing; defence against microbial attack and healing due to antioxidative property, furthermore can also be used for waste water treatment.

  17. Atomistic Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Nanotube Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasanella, Nicholas A.; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2016-05-01

    The Green-Kubo method was used to investigate the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature for epoxy/single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) nanocomposites. An epoxy network of DGEBA-DDS was built using the `dendrimer' growth approach, and conductivity was computed by taking into account long-range Coulombic forces via a k-space approach. Thermal conductivity was calculated in the direction perpendicular to, and along the SWNT axis for functionalized and pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposites. Inefficient phonon transport at the ends of nanotubes is an important factor in the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites, and for this reason discontinuous nanotubes were modeled in addition to long nanotubes. The thermal conductivity of the long, pristine SWNT/epoxy system is equivalent to that of an isolated SWNT along its axis, but there was a 27% reduction perpendicular to the nanotube axis. The functionalized, long SWNT/epoxy system had a very large increase in thermal conductivity along the nanotube axis (~700%), as well as the directions perpendicular to the nanotube (64%). The discontinuous nanotubes displayed an increased thermal conductivity along the SWNT axis compared to neat epoxy (103-115% for the pristine SWNT/epoxy, and 91-103% for functionalized SWNT/epoxy system). The functionalized system also showed a 42% improvement perpendicular to the nanotube, while the pristine SWNT/epoxy system had no improvement over epoxy. The thermal conductivity tensor is averaged over all possible orientations to see the effects of randomly orientated nanotubes, and allow for experimental comparison. Excellent agreement is seen for the discontinuous, pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. These simulations demonstrate there exists a threshold of the SWNT length where the best improvement for a composite system with randomly oriented nanotubes would transition from pristine SWNTs to functionalized SWNTs.

  18. Vacuum bell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sesia, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Background For specific therapy to correct pectus excavatum (PE), conservative treatment with the vacuum bell (VB) was introduced more than 10 years ago in addition to surgical repair. Preliminary results using the VB were encouraging. We report on our 13-year experience with the VB treatment including the intraoperative use during the Nuss procedure and present some technical innovations. Methods A VB with a patient-activated hand pump is used to create a vacuum at the anterior chest wall. Three different sizes of vacuum bells, as well as a model fitted for young women, exist. The appropriate size is selected according to the individual patient’s age and ventral surface. The device should be used at home for a minimum of 30 minutes (twice a day), and may be used up to a maximum of several hours daily. The intensity of the applied negative pressure can be evaluated with an integrated pressure gauge during follow-up visits. A prototype of an electronic model enables us to measure the correlation between the applied negative pressure and the elevation of the anterior chest wall. Results Since 2003, approx. 450 patients between 2 to 61 years of age started the VB therapy. Age and gender specific differences, depth of PE, symmetry or asymmetry, and concomitant malformations such as scoliosis and/or kyphosis influence the clinical course and success of VB therapy. According to our experience, we see three different groups of patients. Immediate elevation of the sternum was confirmed thoracoscopically during the Nuss procedure in every patient. Conclusions The VB therapy has been established as an alternative therapeutic option in selected patients suffering from PE. The initial results up to now are encouraging, but long-term results comprising more than 15 years are so far lacking, and further evaluation and follow-up studies are necessary. PMID:27747177

  19. Plasmons in QED vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, E. Yu.; Kudrin, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The problem of longitudinal oscillations of an electric field and a charge polarization density in a quantum electrodynamics (QED) vacuum is considered. Within the framework of semiclassical analysis, we calculate time-periodic solutions of bosonized (1 +1 )-dimensional QED (massive Schwinger model). Applying the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition, we determine the mass spectrum of charge-zero bound states (plasmons) which correspond in quantum theory to the found classical solutions. We show that the existence of such plasmons does not contradict any fundamental physical laws and study qualitatively their excitation in a (3 +1 )-dimensional real world.

  20. The fabrication, testing and delivery of boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy nondestructive test standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pless, W. M.; Lewis, W. H.

    1971-01-01

    A description is given of the boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy nondestructive test standards which were fabricated, tested and delivered to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Detailed design drawings of the standards are included to show the general structures and the types and location of simulated defects built into the panels. The panels were laminates with plies laid up in the 0 deg, + or - 45 deg, and 90 deg orientations and containing either titanium substrates or interlayered titanium perforated shims. Panel thickness was incrementally stepped from 2.36 mm (0.093 in.) to 12.7 mm (0.500 in.) for the graphite/epoxy standards, and from 2.36 mm (0.093 in.) to 6.35 mm (0.25 in.) for the boron/epoxy standards except for the panels with interlayered shims which were 2.9 mm (0.113 in.) maximum thickness. The panel internal conditions included defect free regions, resin variations, density/porosity variations, cure variations, delaminations/disbonds at substrate bondlines and between layers, inclusions, and interlayered shims. Ultrasonic pulse echo C-scan and low-kilovoltage X-ray techniques were used to evaluate and verify the internal conditions of the panels.

  1. Thermal Expansion and Swelling of Cured Epoxy Resin Used in Graphite/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal expansion and swelling of resin material as influenced by variations in temperature during moisture absorption is discussed. Comparison measurements using composites constructed of graphite fibers and each of two epoxy resin matrices are included. Polymer theory relative to these findings is discussed and modifications are proposed.

  2. R&D ERL: Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Weiss, D.; Steszyn, A.; Todd, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL Vacuum systems are depicted in a figure. ERL has eight vacuum volumes with various sets of requirements. A summary of vacuum related requirements is provided in a table. Five of the eight volumes comprise the electron beamline. They are the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity, Superconducting e-gun, injection, loop and beam dump. Two vacuum regions are the individual cryostats insulating the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity and the Superconducting e-gun structures. The last ERL vacuum volume not shown in the schematic is the laser transport line. The beamline vacuum regions are separated by electropneumatic gate valves. The beam dump is common with loop beamline but is considered a separate volume due to geometry and requirements. Vacuum in the 5-cell SRF cavity is maintained in the {approx}10{sup -9} torr range at room temperature by two 20 l/s ion pumps and in the e-gun SRF cavity by one 60 l/s ion pump. Vacuum in the SRF cavities operated at 2{sup o}K is reduced to low 10{sup -11} torr via cryopumping of the cavity walls. The cathode of the e-gun must be protected from poisoning, which can occur if vacuum adjacent to the e-gun in the injection line exceeds 10-11 torr range in the injection warm beamline near the e-gun exit. The vacuum requirements for beam operation in the loop and beam dump are 10-9 torr range. The beamlines are evacuated from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum level with a particulate free, oil free turbomolecular pumping cart. 25 l/s shielded ion pumps distributed throughout the beamlines maintain the vacuum requirement. Due to the more demanding vacuum requirement of the injection beamline proximate to the e-gun, a vacuum bakeout of the injection beamline is required. In addition, two 200 l/s diode ion pumps and supplemental pumping provided by titanium sublimation pumps are installed in the injection line just beyond the exit of the e-gun. Due to expected gas load a similar pumping arrangement is planned for the beam dump. The

  3. MOLECULAR VACUUM PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Eckberg, E.E.

    1960-09-27

    A multiple molecular vacuum pump capable of producing a vacuum of the order of 10/sup -9/ mm Hg is described. The pump comprises a casing of an aggregate of paired and matched cylindrical plates, a recessed portion on one face of each plate concentrically positioned formed by a radially extending wall and matching the similarly recessed portion of its twin plate of that pair of plates and for all paired and matched plates; a plurality of grooves formed in the radially extending walls of each and all recesses progressing in a spiral manner from their respective starting points out at the periphery of the recess inwardly to the central area; a plurality of rotors rotatably mounted to closely occupy the spaces as presented by the paired and matched recesses between all paired plates; a hollowed drive-shaft perforated at points adjacent to the termini of all spiral grooves; inlet ports at the starting points of all grooves and through all plates at common points to each respectively; and a common outlet passage presented by the hollow portion of the perforated hollowed drive-shaft of the molecular pump. (AEC)

  4. Vacuum vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, Richard M. (Inventor); Weeks, Jack L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for vapor deposition of a thin metallic film utilizing an ionized gas arc directed onto a source material spaced from a substrate to be coated in a substantial vacuum while providing a pressure differential between the source and the substrate so that, as a portion of the source is vaporized, the vapors are carried to the substrate. The apparatus includes a modified tungsten arc welding torch having a hollow electrode through which a gas, preferably inert, flows and an arc is struck between the electrode and the source. The torch, source, and substrate are confined within a chamber within which a vacuum is drawn. When the arc is struck, a portion of the source is vaporized and the vapors flow rapidly toward the substrate. A reflecting shield is positioned about the torch above the electrode and the source to ensure that the arc is struck between the electrode and the source at startup. The electrode and the source may be confined within a vapor guide housing having a duct opening toward the substrate for directing the vapors onto the substrate.

  5. Respiratory effects of exposure of shipyard workers to epoxy paints.

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, D; Jones, J; Atterbury, M; Balmes, J

    1991-01-01

    Epoxy resin systems have been associated with occupational asthma in several case reports, but medical publications contain little on the potential adverse respiratory effects of these chemicals in exposed worker populations. To further evaluate the association of workplace exposure to epoxy paints and respiratory dysfunction, the cross workshift changes in pulmonary function and symptoms of 32 shipyard painters exposed to epoxy paints were compared with 28 shipyard painters not exposed to epoxy paints. The prevalence of lower respiratory tract symptoms was significantly higher among painters exposed to epoxy paints compared with controls. Among exposed painters the mean cross workshift change in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (-3.4%) was greater than the decrement in the non-exposed group (-1.4%). A significant linear relation was seen between % decrement in FEV1 and hours of exposure to epoxy paints. This study suggests that epoxy resin coatings as used by shipyard painters are associated with increased lower respiratory tract symptoms and acute decrements in FEV1. Adequate respiratory protection and medical surveillance programmes should be established in workplaces where exposure to epoxy resin systems occurs. PMID:1954156

  6. Carbonation of epoxy methyl soyate at atmospheric pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbonated methyl soyates were prepared from epoxy methyl soyate by the introduction of carbon dioxide at the oxirane position. Carbonation was performed with carbon dioxide gas by sparging carbon dioxide through the epoxy esters at atmospheric pressure in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide...

  7. Impregnating unconsolidated pyroclastic sequences: A tool for detailed facies analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapper, D.; Kueppers, U.; Castro, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    The interpretation of volcanic eruptions is usually derived from direct observation and the thorough analysis of the deposits. Processes in vent-proximal areas are usually not directly accessible or likely to be obscured. Hence, our understanding of proximal deposits is often limited as they were produced by the simultaneous events stemming from primary eruptive, transportative, and meteorological conditions. Here we present a method that permits for a direct and detailed quasi in-situ investigation of loose pyroclastic units that are usually analysed in the laboratory for their 1) grain-size distribution, 2) componentry, and 3) grain morphology. As the clast assembly is altered during sampling, the genesis of a stratigraphic unit and the relative importance of the above mentioned deposit characteristics is hard to achieve. In an attempt to overcome the possible loss of information during conventional sampling techniques, we impregnated the cleaned surfaces of proximal, unconsolidated units of the 1957-58 Capelinhos eruption on Faial, Azores. During this basaltic, emergent eruption, fluxes in magma rise rate led to a repeated build-up and collapse of tuff cones and consequently to a shift between phreatomagmatic and magmatic eruptive style. The deposits are a succession of generally parallel bedded, cm- to dm-thick layers with a predominantly ashy matrix. The lapilli content is varying gradually; the content of bombs is enriched in discrete layers without clear bomb sags. The sample areas have been cleaned and impregnated with a two-component glue (EPOTEK 301). For approx. 10 * 10 cm, a volume of mixed glue of 20 ml was required. This low-viscosity, transparent glue allowed for an easy application on the target area by means of a syringe and permeated the deposit as deep as 5 mm. After > 24 h, the glue was sufficiently dry to enable the sample to be laid open. This impregnation method renders it possible to cut and polish the sample and investigate grain

  8. Impregnating unconsolidated pyroclastic sequences: A tool for detailed facies analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapper, Daniel; Kueppers, Ulrich; Castro, Jon M.; Pacheco, Jose M. R.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2010-05-01

    The interpretation of volcanic eruptions is usually derived from direct observation and the thorough analysis of the deposits. Processes in vent-proximal areas are usually not directly accessible or likely to be obscured. Hence, our understanding of proximal deposits is often limited as they were produced by the simultaneous events stemming from primary eruptive, transportative, and meteorological conditions. Here we present a method that permits for a direct and detailed quasi in-situ investigation of loose pyroclastic units that are usually analysed in the laboratory for their 1) grain-size distribution, 2) componentry, and 3) grain morphology. As the clast assembly is altered during sampling, the genesis of a stratigraphic unit and the relative importance of the above mentioned deposit characteristics is hard to achieve. In an attempt to overcome the possible loss of information during conventional sampling techniques, we impregnated the cleaned surfaces of proximal, unconsolidated units of the 1957-58 Capelinhos eruption on Faial, Azores. During this basaltic, emergent eruption, fluxes in magma rise rate led to a repeated build-up and collapse of tuff cones and consequently to a shift between phreatomagmatic and magmatic eruptive style. The deposits are a succession of generally parallel bedded, cm- to dm-thick layers with a predominantly ashy matrix. The lapilli content is varying gradually; the content of bombs is enriched in discrete layers without clear bomb sags. The sample areas have been cleaned and impregnated with two-component glue (EPOTEK 301). For approx. 10 * 10 cm, a volume of mixed glue of 20 ml was required. Using a syringe, this low-viscosity, transparent glue could be easily applied on the target area. We found that the glue permeated the deposit as deep as 5 mm. After > 24 h, the glue was sufficiently dry to enable the sample to be laid open. This impregnation method renders it possible to cut and polish the sample and investigate grain

  9. Drilling Holes in Graphite/Epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minlionica, Ronald

    1987-01-01

    Relatively long-lived bit produces high-quality holes. Effective combination of cutting-tool design, feed, and speed determined for drilling 3/16-and-1/4-in. (0.48-and 0.65-cm) diameter holes in 0.18 in. (0.46cm) thick GM3013A or equivalent graphite/epoxy corrugated spar without backup material and without coolant. Developed to produce holes in blind areas, optimal techniques yielded holes of high quality, with minimal or acceptable delamination and/or fiber extension on drill-exit side.

  10. Optical Navigation for the EPOXI Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, Brian P.; Owen, William M. , Jr.; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Synnott, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    The Deep Impact spacecraft flew by comet Hartley 2 on November 4, 2010 as part of its extended mission called EPOXI. Successful navigation depended critically on the quality and timing of optical navigation data processing, since pictures of the comet provided the most precise comet-relative position of the spacecraft. This paper describes the planning, including the picture timing and pointing; the methods used to determine the center of the comet image in each picture; and the optical navigation results, which provided the necessary information to allow the cameras to accurately target the comet for science imaging at encounter.

  11. Compressive response of Kevlar/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, J.R.; Teply, J.L.

    1988-03-01

    A mathematical model is developed from the principle of minimum potential energy to determine the longitudinal compressive response of unidirectional fiber composites. A theoretical study based on this model is conducted to assess the influence of local fiber misalignment and the nonlinear shear deformation of the matrix. Numerical results are compared with experiments to verify this study; it appears that the predicted compressive response coincides well with experimental results. It is also shown that the compressive strength of Kevlar/epoxy is dominated by local shear failure. 12 references.

  12. 21 CFR 529.1003 - Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge... § 529.1003 Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge. (a) Specifications. Each vaginal sponge... ewes during their normal breeding season. (2) Limitations. Using applicator provided, insert...

  13. 21 CFR 529.1003 - Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge... § 529.1003 Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge. (a) Specifications. Each vaginal sponge... ewes during their normal breeding season. (2) Limitations. Using applicator provided, insert...

  14. 21 CFR 529.1003 - Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge... § 529.1003 Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge. (a) Specifications. Each vaginal sponge... ewes during their normal breeding season. (2) Limitations. Using applicator provided, insert...

  15. IN-FLIGHT CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY A CHLORINE-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the in-flight capture of elemental mercury (Hgo) by a chlorine (C1)-impregnated activated carbon. Efforts to develop sorbents for the control of Hg emissions have demonstrated that C1-impregnation of virgin activated carbons using dilute solutions of hydrogen ...

  16. Portable vacuum object handling device

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, G.H.

    1983-08-09

    The disclosure relates to a portable device adapted to handle objects which are not to be touched by hand. A piston and bore wall form a vacuum chamber communicating with an adaptor sealably engageable with an object to be lifted. The piston is manually moved and set to establish vacuum. A valve is manually actuatable to apply the vacuum to lift the object. 1 fig.

  17. Flow and Compaction During the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Hubert, Pascal; Song, Xiao-Lan; Cano, Roberto J.; Loos, Alfred C.; Pipes, R. Byron

    2001-01-01

    The flow of an epoxy resin and compaction behavior of carbon fiber preform during vacuum- assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) infiltration was measured using an instrumented tool. Composite panels were fabricated by the VARTM process using SAERTEX(R)2 multi-axial non- crimp carbon fiber fabric and the A.T.A.R.D. SI-ZG-5A epoxy resin. Resin pressure and preform thickness variation was measured during infiltration. The effects of the resin on the compaction behavior of the preform were measured. The local preform compaction during the infiltration is a combination of wetting and spring-back deformations. Flow front position computed by the 3DINFIL model was compared with the experimental data.

  18. Fabrication and Dielectric Properties of Lead-Free Inorganic Particles-Epoxy Resin Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobune, Masafumi; Takasaki, Keiko; Yazawa, Tetsuo

    2006-09-01

    Inorganic-organic composites with a 0-3 connectivity are fabricated from inorganic particles with a high relative permittivity (\\varepsilonr) and a low dielectric loss (\\tanδ), and epoxy resin. The compacted powder obtained by pulverizing BaZrO3-BaTiO3-Ba(Fe1/2Ta1/2)O3 (BZTFT) ceramics has 1/12th the \\varepsilonr and 72 times the \\tanδ of the ceramics. On the basis of the relationship between \\varepsilonr and BZTFT filler content, the experimental values of the composites are determined to be in good agreement with theoretical values calculated by following Nielsen’s complex rule in the filler content range of 50-80 vol %. The temperature dependence of the dielectric properties of BZTFT powder/epoxy resin (90/10, v/v) composites measured at different frequencies suggests that the temperature characteristics of the present materials correspond to the Z8T characteristics [Z8T; Electronic Industries Association (EIA) standard: Δ C/C25 {\\degC} is expressed as a rate of change within +22 and -33% in the temperature range from 10 to 150 °C] when represented by the temperature characteristics of surface-mounted capacitors. It is shown that the effect of the vacuum drying of the filler on the dielectric properties of the composites is larger than that of the silane coupling treatment and that the dielectric properties can be improved synergistically by performing both treatments.

  19. Design, fabrication, and test of a graphite/epoxy metering truss. [as applied to the LST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oken, S.; Skoumal, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A graphite/epoxy metering truss as applied to the large space telescope was investigated. A full-scale truss was designed, fabricated and tested. Tests included static limit loadings, a modal survey and thermal-vacuum distortion evaluation. The most critical requirement was the demonstration of the dimensional stability provided by the graphite/epoxy truss concept. Crucial to the attainment of this objective was the ability to make very sophisticated thermal growth measurements which was provided by a seven beam laser interferometer. The design of the basic truss elements were tuned to provide the high degree of dimensional stability and stiffness required by the truss. The struts and spider assembly were fabricated with Fiberite's AS/934 and HMS/934 broadgoods. The rings utilized T300 graphite fabricate with the same materials. The predicted performance of the truss was developed using the NASTRAN program. These results showed conformance with the critical stiffness and thermal distortion requirements and correlated well with the test results.

  20. Quantifying voids effecting delamination in carbon/epoxy composites: static and fatigue fracture behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakim, I.; May, D.; Abo Ras, M.; Meyendorf, N.; Donaldson, S.

    2016-04-01

    On the present work, samples of carbon fiber/epoxy composites with different void levels were fabricated using hand layup vacuum bagging process by varying the pressure. Thermal nondestructive methods: thermal conductivity measurement, pulse thermography, pulse phase thermography and lock-in-thermography, and mechanical testing: modes I and II interlaminar fracture toughness were conducted. Comparing the parameters resulted from the thermal nondestructive testing revealed that voids lead to reductions in thermal properties in all directions of composites. The results of mode I and mode II interlaminar fracture toughness showed that voids lead to reductions in interlaminar fracture toughness. The parameters resulted from thermal nondestructive testing were correlated to the results of mode I and mode II interlaminar fracture toughness and voids were quantified.

  1. Irradiation and annealing effects on delamination toughness in carbon/epoxy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekulic, D. R.; Gordic, M. V.; Djordjevic, I. M.; Petrovic, Z. S.; Stevanovic, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma irradiation to various doses (4.8-27.2 MGy) was performed on unidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy resin composite plates. Unidirectional composite coupons irradiated to various doses were annealed at 180 and 250 °C, in vacuum. The strain energy release rate GIC, as a measure of delamination fracture toughness, was determined by Mode I fracture testing on double cantilever beam coupons. The glass transition temperature ( Tg) of the tested coupons matrices was determined in DMA tests. The effects of irradiation and annealing on GIC values - the mean values of 10 propagation points ( GIC,mean) and that of fracture initiation ( GIC,init) - were established. These values were analyzed as a function of irradiation dose and annealing temperatures, having in mind glass transition temperature values changes, as well as the possible mechanisms and phenomena of irradiation and annealing.

  2. Vacuum leak detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Jr., David

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting leakage in a vacuum system involves a moisture trap chamber connected to the vacuum system and to a pressure gauge. Moisture in the trap chamber is captured by freezing or by a moisture adsorbent to reduce the residual water vapor pressure therein to a negligible amount. The pressure gauge is then read to determine whether the vacuum system is leaky. By directing a stream of carbon dioxide or helium at potentially leaky parts of the vacuum system, the apparatus can be used with supplemental means to locate leaks.

  3. Method for epoxy foam production using a liquid anhydride

    DOEpatents

    Celina, Mathias

    2012-06-05

    An epoxy resin mixture with at least one epoxy resin of between approximately 50 wt % and 100 wt %, an anhydride cure agent of between approximately 0 wt % and approximately 50 wt %, a tert-butoxycarbonyl anhydride foaming agent of between proximately 0.1-20 wt %, a surfactant and an imidazole or similar catalyst of less than approximately 2 wt %, where the resin mixture is formed from at least one epoxy resin with a 1-10 wt % tert-butoxycarbonyl anhydride compound and an imidazole catalyst at a temperature sufficient to keep the resin in a suitable viscosity range, the resin mixture reacting to form a foaming resin which in the presence of an epoxy curative can then be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form an epoxy foam.

  4. Fiber-optic epoxy composite cure sensor. II. Performance characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Kai-Yuen; Afromowitz, Martin A.

    1995-09-01

    The performance of a fiber-optic epoxy composite cure sensor, as previously proposed, depends on the optical properties and the reaction kinetics of the epoxy. The reaction kinetics of a typical epoxy system are presented. It is a third-order autocatalytic reaction with a peak observed in each isothermal reaction-rate curve. A model is derived to describe the performance characteristics of the epoxy cure sensor. If a composite coupon is cured at an isothermal temperature, the sensor signal can be used to predict the time when the gel point occurs and to monitor the cure process. The sensor is also shown to perform well in nonstoichiometric epoxy matrices. In addition the sensor can detect the end of the cure without calibration.

  5. Insights into Epoxy Network Nanostructural Heterogeneity Using AFM-IR.

    PubMed

    Morsch, Suzanne; Liu, Yanwen; Lyon, Stuart B; Gibbon, Simon R

    2016-01-13

    The first direct observation of a chemically heterogeneous nanostructure within an epoxy resin is reported. Epoxy resins comprise the matrix component of many high performance composites, coatings and adhesives, yet the molecular network structure that underpins the performance of these industrially essential materials is not well understood. Internal nodular morphologies have repeatedly been reported for epoxy resins analyzed using SEM or AFM, yet the origin of these features remains a contentious subject, and epoxies are still commonly assumed to be chemically homogeneous. Uniquely, in this contribution we use the recently developed AFM-IR technique to eliminate previous differences in interpretation, and establish that nodule features correspond to heterogeneous network connectivity within an epoxy phenolic formulation.

  6. Cationic cure kinetics of a polyoxometalate loaded epoxy nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Benjamin J.

    2012-08-06

    The reaction cure kinetics of a novel polyoxometalate (POM) loaded epoxy nanocomposite is described. The POM is dispersed in the epoxy resin up to volume fractions of 0.1. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements show the cure of the epoxy resin to be sensitive to the POM loading. A kinetics study of the cure exotherm confirms that POM acts as a catalyst promoting cationic homopolymerization of the epoxy resin. The cure reaction is shown to propagate through two cure regimes. A fast cure at short time is shown to be propagation by the activated chain end (ACE) mechanism. A slow cure at long time is shown to be propagation by the activated monomer (AM) mechanism. The activation energies for the fast and slow cure regimes agree well with other epoxy based systems that have been confirmed to propagate by the ACE and AM mechanisms.

  7. Physical aging of linear and network epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, E. S.-W.; Wilkes, G. L.; Mcgrath, J. E.; Banthia, A. K.; Mohajer, Y.; Tant, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    Network and linear epoxy resins principally based on the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A and its oligomers are prepared and studied using diamine and anhydride crosslinking agents. Rubber modified epoxies and a carbon fiber reinforced composite are also investigated. All materials display time-dependent changes when stored at temperatures below the glass transition temperature after quenching (sub-T/g/ annealing). Solvent sorption experiments initiated after different sub-T(g) annealing times demonstrate that the rate of solvent uptake can be indirectly related to the free volume of the epoxy resins. Residual thermal stresses and water are found to have little effect on the physical aging process, which affects the sub-T(g) properties of uniaxial carbon fiber reinforced epoxy material. Finally, the importance of the recovery phenomenon which affects the durability of epoxy glasses is considered.

  8. Toughening of epoxy resins by epoxidized soybean oil

    SciTech Connect

    Frischinger, I.; Dirlikov, S.

    1993-12-31

    Homogeneous mixtures of a liquid rubber based on prepolymers of epoxidized soybean oil with amines, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A epoxy resins, and commercial diamines form, under certain conditions, two-phase thermosetting materials that consist of a rigid epoxy matrix and randomly distributed small rubbery soybean particles (0.1-5 {mu}m). These two-phase thermosets have improved toughness, similar to that of other rubber-modified epoxies, low water absorption, and low sodium content. In comparison to the unmodified thermosets, the two-phase thermosets exhibit slightly lower glass-transition temperatures and Young`s moduli, but their dielectric properties do not change. The epoxidized soybean oil is available at a price below that of commercial epoxy resins and appears very attractive for epoxy toughening on an industrial scale. 15 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. A Mathematical Model for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Composite in Melt Impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Feng; Yu, Yang; Yang, Jianjun; Xin, Chunling; He, Yadong

    2016-10-01

    Through the combination of Reynolds equation and Darcy's law, a mathematical model was established to calculate the pressure distribution in wedge area, which contributed to the forecast effect of processing parameters on impregnation degree of the fiber bundle. The experiments were conducted to verify the capacity of the proposed model with satisfactory results, which means that the model is effective in predicting the influence of processing parameters on impregnation. From the mathematical model, it was known that the impregnation degree of the fiber bundle would be improved by increasing the processing temperature, number and radius of pins, or decreasing the pulling speed and the center distance of pins, which provided a possible solution to the difficulty of melt with high viscosity in melt impregnation and optimization of impregnation processing.

  10. Processing, properties and applications of composites using powder-coated epoxy towpreg technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayha, T. D.; Osborne, P. P.; Thrasher, T. P.; Hartness, J. T.; Johnston, N. J.; Marchello, J. M.; Hugh, M. K.

    1993-01-01

    Composite manufacturing using the current prepregging technology of impregnating liquid resin into three-dimensionally reinforced textile preforms can be a costly and difficult operation. Alternatively, using polymer in the solid form, grinding it into a powder, and then depositing it onto a carbon fiber tow prior to making a textile preform is a viable method for the production of complex textile shapes. The powder-coated towpreg yarn is stable, needs no refrigeration, contains no solvents and is easy to process into various woven and braided preforms for later consolidation into composite structures. NASA's Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) program has provided an avenue for developing the technology by which advanced resins and their powder-coated preforms may be used in aircraft structures. Two-dimensional braiding and weaving studies using powder-coated towpreg have been conducted to determine the effect of resin content, towpreg size and twist on textile composite properties. Studies have been made to customize the towpreg to reduce friction and bulk factor. Processing parameters have been determined for three epoxy resin systems on eight-harness satin fabric, and on more advanced 3-D preform architectures for the downselected resin system. Processing effects and the resultant mechanical properties of these textile composites will be presented and compared.

  11. Investigation of Performance Envelope for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Prabhu, Dinesh; Milos, Frank S.; Stackpoole, Mairead

    2016-01-01

    The present work provides the results of a short exploratory study on the performance of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, or PICA, at high heat flux and pressure in an arcjet facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The primary objective of the study was to explore the thermal response of PICA at cold-wall heat fluxes well in excess of 1500 W/cm (exp 2). Based on the results of a series of flow simulations, multiple PICA samples were tested at an estimated cold wall heat flux and stagnation pressure of 1800 W/cm (exp 2) and 130 kPa, respectively. All samples survived the test, and no failure was observed either during or after the exposure. The results indicate that PICA has a potential to perform well at environments with significantly higher heat flux and pressure than it has currently been flown.

  12. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Burrows, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  13. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1993-04-13

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  14. Development of metal oxide impregnated stilbite thick film ethanol sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabole, M. P.; Lakhane, M. A.; Choudhari, A. L.; Khairnar, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the study of the sensing efficiency of Titanium oxide/ Stilbite and Copper oxide /Stilbite composites towards detection of hazardous pollutants like ethanol. Stilbite based composites are prepared by physically mixing zeolite with metal oxides namely TiO2 and CuO with weight ratios of 25:75, 50:50 and 75:25. The resulting sensor materials are characterized by X-ray diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy techniques. Composite sensors are fabricated in the form of thick film by using screen printing technique. The effect of metal oxide concentration on various ethanol sensing parameters such as operating temperature, maximum uptake capacity and response/recovery time are investigated. The results indicate that metal oxide impregnated stilbite composites have great potential as low temperature ethanol sensor.

  15. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1991-03-13

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent tc the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  16. Turbulent drag reduction over air- and liquid- impregnated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Brian J.; Van Buren, Tyler; Fu, Matthew K.; Smits, Alexander J.

    2016-01-01

    Results on turbulent skin friction reduction over air- and liquid-impregnated surfaces are presented for aqueous Taylor-Couette flow. The surfaces are fabricated by mechanically texturing the inner cylinder and chemically modifying the features to make them either non-wetting with respect to water (air-infused, or superhydrophobic case), or wetting with respect to an oil that is immiscible with water (liquid-infused case). The drag reduction, which remains fairly constant over the Reynolds number range tested (100 ≤ Reτ ≤ 140), is approximately 10% for the superhydrophobic surface and 14% for the best liquid-infused surface. Our results suggest that liquid-infused surfaces may enable robust drag reduction in high Reynolds number turbulent flows without the shortcomings associated with conventional superhydrophobic surfaces, namely, failure under conditions of high hydrodynamic pressure and turbulent flow fluctuations.

  17. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1992-12-31

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  18. Impregnating a heated filler with a non-Newtonian fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Kosachevskii, L.A.; Kosachevskaya, E.A.; Syui, L.S.

    1992-04-01

    Here we examine an analogous problem of a power filtration law for arbitrary temperature-dependence of the non-Newtonian viscosity and for more general heat-transfer boundary conditions at the surface of the filler. We also use a parametric method, but with a different representation of the temperature profile, which allows us to obtain the solution in a compact form suitable for numerical computations. The problem is solved analytically in the particular cases of small and large pressure gradients, and also for weak temperature dependence of the non-Newtonian viscosity. An approximate parametric method is used to solve the planar temperature-dependent problem of continuously impregnating a heated filler with a fluid that has a power-law non-Newtonian viscosity. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Dried apples enriched with mandarin juice by vacuum impregnation improve antioxidant capacity and decrease inflammation in obese children.

    PubMed

    Codoñer-Franch, Pilar; Betoret, Ester; Betoret, Noelia; López-Jaén, Ana B; Valls-Bellés, Victoria; Fito, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Antecedentes: Una adecuada ingesta de vegetales previene el desarrollo de enfermedades degenerativas, principalmente debido a sus compuestos antioxidantes. Objetivo: Evaluamos el efecto in vivo en los niños obesos de un nuevo producto alimenticio hecho de manzanas deshidratadas enriquecidas con zumo de mandarina mediante impregnación a vacío. Métodos: Estudio prospectivo longitudinal de cuatro semanas de duración. Se estudiaron 41 niños obesos que suplementaron su dieta habitual con 40 g/día del producto desarrollado. Se determinaron parámetros antropométricos (índice de masa corporal, circunferencia de la cintura) y estimación de la de grasa corporal con impedancia bioeléctrica. La ingesta dietética se evaluó por cuestionario. Se registraron factores de riesgo metabólico (presión sanguínea, perfil lipídico, glucosa y resistencia insulínica). El estado oxidante se investigó mediante la capacidad antioxidante total del plasma y la 8-hydroxideoxiguanosina (marcador de daño oxidativo al ADN) y como marcadores de inflamación valoramos la proteína C-reactiva ultrasensible, el factor de necrosis tumoral-??y las interleukinas 6 y 1-?. Las mediciones se recogieron al inicio y al final del período de intervención. Resultados: Encontramos una mejoría significativa en la presión arterial sistólica y en el perfil lipídico después del período de intervención. Igualmente demostramos un aumento significativo de la capacidad antioxidante del plasma, una reducción del daño oxidativo del ADN y de los marcadores inflamatorios. Conclusión: La adición a la dieta del producto elaborado con manzana deshidratada, y enriquecido con zumo de mandarina mediante impregnación al vacío, contribuye a mejorar el estado oxidante e inflamatorio en los niños obesos, así como diversos factores de riesgo cardiometabólico.

  20. Fire-retardant coatings based on organic bromine/phenoxy or brominated epoxy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.M.; Chiu, Ing L.

    1989-06-01

    Thin phenoxy and brominated epoxy/curing agent films were prepared by solvent casting on Mylar and Kapton. Thicknesses were approximated assuming volume additivity. Important parameters were uniformity of thickness, distribution of the bromine-containing fire retardant, adhesion to carrier substrate (either Mylar or Kapton), and uniformity of the coating, i.e., absence of pinholes, blush, blistering, etc. Wetting behavior was modified using fluoro, silicone or polyurea surfactants. Several solvent systems were examined and a ternary solvent system was ultimately used. Distribution of fire-retardant bromine was analyzed using electron microprobe, x-ray fluorescence and wet chemical methods. Significant discrepancies in the /mu/m-scale analyses of the microprobe measurements have not been resolved. Some of the brominated fire retardants were insoluble in the resin systems and the phase separation was immediately obvious. Similarly, some of the crystallizable epoxies could not be cast easily into homogeneous, amorphous films. Castings were made on a standard 8'' /times/ 10'' aluminum vacuum plate polished with jeweler's rouge prior to every casting. Solvent was removed in a forced air or vacuum oven. Removal and/or curing was accelerated with temperature. The fire-retardant bromine was required to be stable in alcohol/salt solutions. Final formulation used after a significant amount of testing was phenoxy resin PKHC in a ternary solvent system composed of methylethyl ketone, cellosolve acetate and toluene. Tetrabromobisphenol A was used as the flame retardant with FC-430 as surfactant. The dying schedule was 30 minutes at 150/degree/C. 4 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Epoxy hydrogels as sensors and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, Paul; Patra, Prabir; Duggal, Deepak

    2007-04-01

    Most hydrogel actuators and sensors are made via acrylate polymerizations. Because these chain reactions are inhibited by oxygen, it is difficult to prepare thin films or dots with good control. Epoxy curing chemistry is much less sensitive to experimental conditions. We have previously shown that hydrogels formed from reaction between water-soluble amines and epoxides can be readily printed. If the gel is filled with conducting carbon at a level close to the percolation threshold, the resistance changes as water is taken up or removed from the gel. In particular, a pH decrease results in ionization of amine groups and drives swelling of the gel. By incorporating an enzyme, such as glucose oxidase, that releases hydrogen ions when its substrate is present, a resistance change can be used to measure substrate concentrations. These gels also respond to stress with a change in resistance. By making the gel the anode or cathode of an electrolytic cell, they can also be formed as actuators that expand or contract as the pH changes locally. Epoxy chemistry has been little explored for gels. It is very versatile and could be used to make a wide range of gel composites with one or more phases, varying water contents, varying functional groups and a range of electrical conductivity.

  2. Electrical properties of epoxy/silver nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonon, P.; Boudefel, A.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the electrical properties of nanocomposites made of epoxy resin filled with 70-nm-sized silver particles. These composites were studied for the fabrication of integrated capacitors in electronics packaging. The dc conductivity was studied as a function of the filler concentration and as a function of temperature. We also studied the ac conductivity and the permittivity in the 10-1-105 Hz range as a function of the filler concentration. Experimental properties were analyzed using standard percolation theories. The dc conductivity varies as (φ-φc)t, where φ is the filler concentration, φc is the percolation threshold, and t is the dc critical exponent. A very low percolation threshold is obtained (φc=1%) which is believed to be related to a segregated distribution of the fillers in the epoxy matrix. We also measured a very high dc critical exponent (t=5) probably related to the interparticle electrical contact. A universal scaling law is observed for σ(ω) and ɛ(ω). Above a cutoff frequency (ωc, which scales with the dc conductivity as ωc~σdcq) the conductivity and the permittivity follow the universal power laws (σ~ωu and V~ω-v) with critical exponents taking nonstandard values (q=0.83-0.98, u=0.79, and v=0.03).

  3. Epoxy Crosslinked Silica Aerogels (X-Aerogels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    fabrizio, Eve; Ilhan, Faysal; Meador, Mary Ann; Johnston, Chris; Leventis, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    NASA is interested in the development of strong lightweight materials for the dual role of thermal insulator and structural component for space vehicles; freeing more weight for useful payloads. Aerogels are very-low density materials (0.010 to 0.5 g/cc) that, due to high porosity (meso- and microporosity), can be, depending on the chemical nature of the network, ideal thermal insulators (thermal conductivity approx. 15 mW/mK). However, aerogels are extremely fragile. For practical application of aerogels, one must increase strength without compromising the physical properties attributed to low density. This has been achieved by templated growth of an epoxy polymer layer that crosslinks the "pearl necklace" network of nanoparticles: the framework of a typical silica aerogel. The requirement for conformal accumulation of the epoxy crosslinker is reaction both with the surface of silica and with itself. After cross-linking, the strength of a typical aerogel monolith increases by a factor of 200, in the expense of only a 2-fold increase in density. Strength is increased further by coupling residual unreacted epoxides with diamine.

  4. Ultrasonic mixing of epoxy curing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St.clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for mixing solid curing agents into liquid epoxy resins using ultrasonic energy was developed. This procedure allows standard curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents with very high melt temperatures such as 4,4 prime-diaminobenzophenone (4,4 prime-DABP) (242 C) to be mixed without premature curing. Four aromatic diamines were ultrasonically blended into MY-720 epoxy resin. These were 4,4 prime-DDS; 3,3 prime-DDA; 4,4 prime-DABP and 3,3 prime-DABP. Unfilled moldings were cast and cured for each system and their physical and mechanical properties compared.

  5. Ultrasonic mixing of epoxy curing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for mixing solid curing agents into liquid epoxy resins using ultrasonic energy was developed. This procedure allows standard curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents with very high melt temperatures such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents with very high melt temperatures such as 4,4 prime-diaminobenzophenone (4,4 prime-DABP) (242 C) to be mixed without premature curing. Four aromatic diamines were ultrasonically blended into MY-720 epoxy resin. These were 4, 4 prime-DDS; 3,3 prime-DDA; 4, 4 prime-DABP and 3,3 prime-DABP. Unfilled moldings were cast and cured for each system and their physical and mechanical properties compared. Previously announced in STAR as N83-27018

  6. Multiwall carbon nanotubes reinforced epoxy nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei

    The emergence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has led to myriad possibilities for structural polymer composites with superior specific modulus, strength, and toughness. While the research activities in carbon nanotube reinforced polymer composites (NRPs) have made enormous progress towards fabricating next-generation advanced structural materials with added thermal, optical, and electrical advantages, questions concerning the filler dispersion, interface, and CNT alignment in these composites remain partially addressed. In this dissertation, the key technical challenges related to the synthesis, processing, and reinforcing mechanics governing the effective mechanical properties of NRPs were introduced and reviewed in the first two chapters. Subsequently, issues on the dispersion, interface control, hierarchical structure, and multi-functionality of NRPs were addressed based on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced DGEBA epoxy systems (NREs). In chapter 3, NREs with enhanced flexural properties were discussed in the context of improved dispersion and in-situ formation of covalent bonds at the interface. In chapter 4, NREs with controlled interface and tailored thermomechanical properties were demonstrated through the judicious choice of surface functionality and resin chemistry. In chapter 5, processing-condition-induced CNT organization in hierarchical epoxy nanocomposites was analyzed. In Chapter 6, possibilities were explored for multi-functional NREs for underwater acoustic structural applications. Finally, the findings of this dissertation were concluded and future research was proposed for ordered carbon nanotube array reinforced nanocomposites in the last chapter. Four journal publications resulted from this work are listed in Appendix.

  7. ULTRA HIGH VACUUM VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Fry, W.A.

    1962-05-29

    A valve for high vacuum applications such as the CStellarator where chamber pressures as low as 2 x 10/sup -10/ mm Hg are necessary is designed with a line-of-sight path through the valve for visual inspection of the contents of reactants in such chambers. The valve comprises a turnable resilient metal ball having an aperture therethrough, means for selectively turning the ball to rotate the axis of its line-of-sight path, and soft, deformable opposing orifices that are movable relatively toward said ball to seal with opposite ball surfaces upon said movement of said axis of said line-of-sight path. The valve also includes a bellows seal connected between said orifices and internal actuating means that eliminates the requirement for gasketed turnable valve closing stems. (AEC)

  8. Pseudoredundant vacuum energy

    SciTech Connect

    Batra, Puneet; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Hui, Lam; Kabat, Daniel

    2008-08-15

    We discuss models that can account for today's dark energy. The underlying cosmological constant may be Planck scale but starts as a redundant coupling which can be eliminated by a field redefinition. The observed vacuum energy arises when the redundancy is explicitly broken, say by a nonminimal coupling to curvature. We give a recipe for constructing models, including R+1/R-type models, that realize this mechanism and satisfy all solar system constraints on gravity. A similar model, based on Gauss-Bonnet gravity, provides a technically natural explanation for dark energy and exhibits an interesting seesaw behavior: a large underlying cosmological constant gives rise to both low- and high-curvature solutions. Such models could be statistically favored in the string landscape.

  9. THERMOCOUPLE VACUUM GAUGE

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.W.

    1954-08-01

    A protector device is described for use in controlling the pressure within a cyclotron. In particular, an electrical circuit functions to actuate a vacuum pump when a predetermined low pressure is reached and disconnect the pump when the pressure increases abcve a certain value. The principal feature of the control circuit lies in the use of a voltage divider network at the input to a relay control tube comprising two parallel, adjustable resistances wherein one resistor is switched into the circuit when the relay connects the pump to a power source. With this arrangement the relay is energized at one input level received from a sensing element within the cyclotron chamber and is de-energized when a second input level, representing the higher pressure limit, is reached.

  10. Breather cloth for vacuum curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1979-01-01

    Finely-woven nylon cloth that has been treated with Teflon improves vacuum adhesive bonding of coatings to substrates. Cloth is placed over coating; entire assembly, including substrate, coating, and cloth, is placed in plastic vacuum bag for curing. Cloth allows coating to "breathe" when bag is evacuated. Applications include bonding film coatings to solar concentrators and collectors.

  11. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Gross, Mark E.

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  12. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

    1997-10-28

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  13. Vacuum enhanced cutaneous biopsy instrument

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  14. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  15. Multipurpose Vacuum Induction Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, M.; Kulkarni, Deepak; Balasubramanian, K.

    2012-11-01

    Multipurpose vacuum processing systems are cost effective; occupy less space, multiple functional under one roof and user friendly. A multipurpose vacuum induction system was designed, fabricated and installed in a record time of 6 months time at NFTDC Hyderabad. It was designed to function as a) vacuum induction melting/refining of oxygen free electronic copper/pure metals, b) vacuum induction melting furnace for ferrous materials c) vacuum induction melting for non ferrous materials d) large vacuum heat treatment chamber by resistance heating (by detachable coil and hot zone) e) bottom discharge vacuum induction melting system for non ferrous materials f) Induction heat treatment system and g) directional solidification /investment casting. It contains provision for future capacity addition. The attachments require to manufacture multiple shaped castings and continuous rod casting can be added whenever need arises. Present capacity is decided on the requirement for 10years of development path; presently it has 1.2 ton liquid copper handling capacity. It is equipped with provision for capacity addition up to 2 ton liquid copper handling capacity in future. Provision is made to carry out the capacity addition in easy steps quickly. For easy operational maintenance and troubleshooting, design was made in easily detachable sections. High vacuum system is also is detachable, independent and easily movable which is first of its kind in the country. Detailed design parameters, advantages and development history are presented in this paper.

  16. Vacuum Enhanced Cutaneous Biopsy Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Joseph

    1999-06-25

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  17. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  18. Hadron Contribution to Vacuum Polarisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davier, M.; Hoecker, A.; Malaescu, B.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-10-01

    Precision tests of the Standard Theory require theoretical predictions taking into account higher-order quantum corrections. Among these vacuum polarisation plays a predominant role. Vacuum polarisation originates from creation and annihilation of virtual particle-antiparticle states. Leptonic vacuum polarisation can be computed from quantum electrodynamics. Hadronic vacuum polarisation cannot because of the non-perturbative nature of QCD at low energy. The problem is remedied by establishing dispersion relations involving experimental data on the cross section for e+ e- annihilation into hadrons. This chapter sets the theoretical and experimental scene and reviews the progress achieved in the last decades thanks to more precise and complete data sets. Among the various applications of hadronic vacuum polarisation calculations, two are emphasised: the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the running of the fine structure constant α to the Z mass scale. They are fundamental ingredients to high precision tests of the Standard Theory.

  19. Residual gas analysis (RGA) and shear strength characteristics of a silver-filled epoxy and polyimide under long-term, high-temperature storage conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    1994-04-01

    Introduction of organic materials into hermetically sealed electronic packages increases the risk of failure due to contamination. The contaminants of concern are moisture and ionics. This combination can lead to unwanted electrical pathways and/or corrosion. To minimize sealed-in moisture, packages are vacuum-baked for 16 hours at 200 C and Au/Sn solder-sealed i a glove box purged with dry nitrogen. Even following this procedure, the package plating and organic adhesive can still outgas moisture during high-temperature storage. Long-term aging characteristics for a silver-filled epoxy and a silver-filled polyimide were investigated. Leadless chip carriers (LCCs) containing die attached with epoxy or polyimide were aged at 25 C, 100 C, 150 C, and 200 C for up to six months. Residual gas analysis (RGA) and die shear testing were performed on each package. Results indicate that the epoxy can withstand storage at 150 C with no increase in internal moisture. The polyimide could only be stored at 100 C. No loss in shear strength for epoxy or polyimide was noted at any storage condition.

  20. Fracture behavior of nano-scale rubber-modified epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacigalupo, Lauren N.

    The primary focus of the first portion of this study is to compare physical and mechanical properties of a model epoxy that has been toughened with one of three different types of rubber-based modifier: a traditional telechelic oligomer (phase separates into micro-size particles), a core-shell latex particle (preformed nano-scale particles) and a triblock copolymer (self-assembles into nano-scale particles). The effect of modifier content on the physical properties of the matrix was determined using several thermal analysis methods, which provided insight into any inherent alterations of the epoxy matrix. Although the primary objective is to study the role of particle size on the fracture toughness, stiffness and strength were also determined since these properties are often reduced in rubber-toughened epoxies. It was found that since the CSR- and SBM-modified epoxies are composed of less rubber, thermal and mechanical properties of the epoxy were better maintained. In order to better understand the fracture behavior and mechanisms of the three types of rubber particles utilized in this study, extensive microscopy analysis was conducted. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) was used to quantify the volume fraction of particles, transmission optical microscopy (TOM) was used to determine plastic damage zone size, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to assess void growth in the plastic zone after fracture. By quantifying these characteristics, it was then possible to model the plastic damage zone size as well as the fracture toughness to elucidate the behavior of the rubber-modified epoxies. It was found that localized shear yielding and matrix void growth are the active toughening mechanisms in all rubber-modified epoxies in this study, however, matrix void growth was more prevalent. The second portion of this study investigated the use of three acrylate-based triblocks and four acrylate-based diblocks to modify a model epoxy system. By

  1. Progress toward Making Epoxy/Carbon-Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiano, Thomas; Roylance, Margaret; Gassner, John; Kyle, William

    2008-01-01

    A modicum of progress has been made in an effort to exploit single-walled carbon nanotubes as fibers in epoxy-matrix/fiber composite materials. Two main obstacles to such use of carbon nanotubes are the following: (1) bare nanotubes are not soluble in epoxy resins and so they tend to agglomerate instead of becoming dispersed as desired; and (2) because of lack of affinity between nanotubes and epoxy matrices, there is insufficient transfer of mechanical loads between the nanotubes and the matrices. Part of the effort reported here was oriented toward (1) functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with methyl methacrylate (MMA) to increase their dispersability in epoxy resins and increase transfer of mechanical loads and (2) ultrasonic dispersion of the functionalized nanotubes in tetrahydrofuran, which was used as an auxiliary solvent to aid in dispersing the functionalized nanotubes into a epoxy resin. In another part of this effort, poly(styrene sulfonic acid) was used as the dispersant and water as the auxiliary solvent. In one experiment, the strength of composite of epoxy with MMA-functionalized-nanotubes was found to be 29 percent greater than that of a similar composite of epoxy with the same proportion of untreated nanotubes.

  2. Experimental studies of graphite-epoxy and boron-epoxy angle ply laminates in compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, T.

    1977-01-01

    A test program aimed at studying the nonlinear/inelastic response under axial compression across a wide range of angle ply was graphite-epoxy and boron-epoxy laminates was presented and described. The strength allowables corresponding to the various laminate configurations were defined and the failure mechanisms which dictate their mode of failure were detected. The program involved two types of specimens for each laminate configuration: compression sandwich coupons and compression tubes. The test results indicate that the coupons perform better than the tubes displaying considerably high stress-strain allowables and mechanical properties relative to the tubes. Also, it is observed that depending on their dimensions the coupons are susceptible to very pronounced edge effects. This sensitivity results in assigning to the laminate conservative mechanical properties rather than the actual ones.

  3. Experimental studies of graphite-epoxy and boron-epoxy angle ply laminates in shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, T.

    1977-01-01

    The nonlinear/inelastic response under inplane shear of a large variety of graphite-epoxy and boron-epoxy angle-ply laminates was tested. Their strength allowables were obtained and the mechanisms which govern their mode of failure were determined. Two types of specimens for the program were chosen, tested, and evaluated: shear panels stabilized by an aluminum honeycomb core and shear tubes. A modified biaxially compression/tension loaded picture frame was designed and utilized in the test program with the shear panels. The results obtained with this test technique categorically prefer the shear panels, rather than the tubes, for adequate and satisfactory experimental definition of the objectives. Test results indicate the existence of a so-called core-effect which ought to be considered when reducing experimental data for weak in shear laminates.

  4. Tension fatigue of glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy tapered laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.; Obrien, T. Kevin; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1990-01-01

    Symmetric tapered laminates with internally dropped plies were tested with two different layups and two materials, S2/SP250 glass/epoxy and IM6/1827I graphite/epoxy. The specimens were loaded in cyclic tension until they delaminated unstably. Each combination of material and layup had a unique failure mode. Calculated values of strain energy release rate, G, from a finite element analysis model of delamination along the taper, and for delamination from a matrix ply crack, were used with mode I fatigue characterization data from tests of the tested materials to calculate expected delamination onset loads. Calculated values were compared to the experimental results. The comparison showed that when the calculated G was chosen according to the observed delamination failures, the agreement between the calculated and measured delamination onset loads was reasonable for each combination of layup and material.

  5. Electrical performance of nanostructured strontium-doped lanthanum manganite impregnated onto yttria-stabilized zirconia backbone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Jiangwei; Lin, Jie; Wang, Yusu; Zhang, Yanxiang; Xia, Changrong

    2016-01-01

    Strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) nanoparticles are deposited onto porous yttria-stabilized zirconia frameworks via an ion impregnation/infiltration process. The apparent conductivity of the impregnated LSM nanostructure is investigated regarding the fabricating parameters including LSM loading, heat treatment temperature, heating rate, and annealing at 750 °C for 400 h. Besides, the conductivity, the intrinsic conductivity as well as Bruggeman factor of the impregnated LSM is estimated from the apparent conductivity using the analytical model for the three-dimensional impregnate network. The conductivity increases with LSM loading while the interfacial polarization resistance exhibits the lowest value at an optimal loading of about 5 vol.%, which corresponds to the largest three-phase boundary as predicted using the numerical infiltration methodology. At the optimal loading, the area specific ohmic resistance of the impregnated LSM is about 0.032 Ω cm2 at 700 °C for a typical impregnated cathode of 30 μm thick. It is only 5.5% of the cathode interfacial polarization resistance and 3.3% of the total resistance for a single cell consisting of a Ni-YSZ support, a 10 μm thick electrolyte and a 30 μm thick cathode, demonstrating that the ohmic resistance is negligible in the LSM impregnated cathode for SOFCs.

  6. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  7. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  8. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  9. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  10. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  11. Curing of liquid crystalline epoxy resins with a biguanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepaniak, Barbara; Penczek, Piotr; Frisch, Kurt C.; Rejdych, Jerzy

    1998-01-01

    This work extends the authors' investigation son liquid crystalline epoxy resins prepared from diglycidyl ether of 4,4'-dihydroxybiphenyl and aliphatic dicarboxylic compounds or difunctional aromatic compounds. Syntheses and properties of these liquid crystalline epoxy resins are described elsewhere. In this paper a study on the curing reaction of two from the above mentioned liquid crystalline epoxy resins is presented. Ortho-tolylbiguanide was applied as the curing agent. The curing reactions were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, microscopic observations and IR spectroscopy. Depending upon the temperature program of curing, it was possible to obtain polymeric networks with liquid crystalline order.

  12. Temperature dependence of helium diffusion through common epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovinger, D. J.; Hallock, R. B.

    2012-12-01

    Helium gas at room temperature is known to diffuse through the epoxies commonly used in various low temperature applications, which can complicate leak detection. The helium flux typically decreases with decreasing temperature. We have measured the flux of helium that passes though thin sections of as-cast clear Stycast 1266, Stycast 2850FT (black) and TRA-BOND 2151 (blue) epoxies as a function of temperature in the range 130K < T < 300K. We analyze the data to create normalized (to constant sample thickness and pressure differential) data for comparison. We report the preliminary temperature-dependent fluxes we have measured, which show significant differences among the epoxies studied.

  13. Affinity Adsorbents Based on Carriers Activated by Epoxy-compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyashchitskii, B. A.; Kuznetsov, P. V.

    1984-10-01

    The review is devoted to the synthesis and applications of affinity adsorbents based on carriers activated by epoxy-compounds. The methods for the introduction of epoxy-groups into carriers of different chemical types are discussed and conditions for the immobilisation of three-dimensional spacers and low-molecular-weight and polymeric ligands on carriers containing epoxy-groups are considered. Data are presented on the properties and applications of adsorbents of this type in affinity chromatography. The bibliography includes 144 references.

  14. Effect of modified aminosilane interfaces in glass/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C.E.; Blum, F.D.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of the interfacial modification of glass/epoxy composites have been studied using 3-point bending tests. Hydrolyzed {gamma}-aminopropyltriethyoxysilane APS and {gamma}-aminobutyltriethoxysilane (ABS) were separately adsorbed onto E-glass and the treated fibers were then used in composites that used both a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A and a diglycidyl ether of polypropylene epoxy matrix. Mechanical tests were used to characterize the flexural strength of the composite as a function of the silane coupling agent and the flexibility of the epoxy used.

  15. Iron-impregnated granular activated carbon for arsenic removal from drinking water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Qigang

    A new multi-step iron impregnation method was developed in this study to impregnate GAC with a high amount of iron that possesses desired characteristics: stable, even distribution, and high arsenic adsorption capacity. Research was carried out to investigate the impact of the amount of impregnated iron on arsenic adsorption properties: capacity, affinity, and kinetics. Fe-GACs were characterized in terms of the amount, stability, distribution, morphology, and species of impregnated iron. It was found that a high amount of iron was stably impregnated in GAC. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis demonstrated that the impregnated iron was evenly distributed on the internal surface of GAC. Impregnated iron formed nano-size particles and existed in both crystalline (akaganeite) and amorphous iron. Arsenic adsorption tests were conducted using Fe-GACs with iron content of 1.64--28.90% in a low arsenic concentration that is typical for drinking water treatment. The amount of impregnated iron affects arsenic maximum adsorption capacity (qm) but has little impact on the Langmuir constant h (the affinity of adsorbent for adsorbate). The qm for both As(V) and As(III) adsorptions increased significantly with increase of the amount of impregnated iron up to 13.59%. Further increase of iron amounts caused a gradual decrease of qm for As(V). BET analysis indicated impregnated iron possesses the highest surface area at iron content of 13.59%. A new second-order kinetic model was developed to investigate the impact of the amounts of impregnated iron on arsenic adsorption kinetics. With iron content increased from 1.64% to 28.90%, the intrinsic adsorption rate constants reduced from 4.6x10-2 1/hr to 1.18x10 -3 1/hr, which indicates that impregnated iron slows arsenic intraparticle diffusion rate in Fe-GAC. The decreased arsenic intraparticle diffusion rate was most likely caused by reduced pore size of Fe-GACs. Column tests were

  16. Electrochemical properties of a lithium-impregnated metal foam anode for thermal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yu-Song; Yu, Hye-Ryeon; Cheong, Hae-Won

    2015-02-01

    Lithium-impregnated metal foam anodes (LIMFAs) are fabricated and investigated. The LIMFAs are prepared by the impregnation of lithium into molten-salt-coated nickel metal foam. A single cell with the LIMFA exhibits a specific capacity of 3009 As g-1. For comparison, a single cell with a LiSi alloy anode is also discharged, demonstrating a specific capacity of 1050 As g-1. These significant improvements can be attributed to the large amount of lithium impregnated into the metal foam as well as the molten lithium holding capability of the foam. Due to their excellent electrochemical properties, LIMFAs are suitable for use in thermal batteries.

  17. Investigation of silver-impregnated alumina for removal of radioactive methyl iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Funabashi, Kiyomi; Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1995-03-01

    The removal efficiency of methyl iodide for silver-impregnated alumina from gaseous waste has been experimentally evaluated as a function of atmospheric relative humidity. A new adsorbent has been developed for the iodine filter installed in the off-gas treatment system of a radioactive waste tank vent. To improve its removal efficiency under a highly humid atmosphere, the optimum average pore size of alumina was determined to be {approximately}60 nm, and the most effective chemical form of the impregnated silver was identified as silver nitrate. Holding capability of the impregnated silver was also improved by developing a double-pore-structure alumina.

  18. Contactless optoelectronic technique for monitoring epoxy cure.

    PubMed

    Cusano, A; Buonocore, V; Breglio, G; Calabrò, A; Giordano, M; Cutolo, A; Nicolais, L

    2000-03-01

    We describe a novel noninvasive optical technique to monitor the refractive-index variation in an epoxy-based resin that is due to the polymerization process. This kind of resin is widely used in polymer matrix composites. It is well known that the process of fabricating a thermoset-based composite involves mass and heat transfer coupled with irreversible chemical reactions that induce physical changes. To improve the quality and the reliability of these materials, monitoring the cure and optimization of the manufacturing process are of key importance. We discuss the basic operating principles of an optical system based on angle deflection measurements and present typical cure-monitoring results obtained from optical characterization. The method provides a flexible, high-sensitivity, material-independent, low-cost, noninvasive tool for monitoring real-time refractive-index variation.

  19. Epoxy coatings over latex block fillers

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, L.D.

    1997-12-01

    Failures of polymerized epoxy coatings applied over latex/acrylic block fillers continue to plague owners of commercial buildings, particularly those with high architectural content such as condominiums, high rise offices, etc. Water treatment facilities in paper mills are especially prone to this problem. The types of failures include delamination of the topcoats, blisters in both the block fillers and the topcoats and disintegration of the block filler itself. While the problem is well known, the approach to a solution is not. A study of several coatings manufacturer`s Product Data Sheets shows a wide variance in the recommendations for what are purportedly generically equivalent block fillers. While one manufacturer might take an essentially architectural approach, another will take a heavy-duty industrial approach. To the specifying architect or engineer who has little training in the complexities of protective coating systems, this presents a dilemma. Who does he believe? What does he specify? To whom can he turn for independent advice?

  20. Epoxy bond and stop etch fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Jerry A.; Weckwerth, Mark V.; Baca, Wes E.

    2000-01-01

    A class of epoxy bond and stop etch (EBASE) microelectronic fabrication techniques is disclosed. The essence of such techniques is to grow circuit components on top of a stop etch layer grown on a first substrate. The first substrate and a host substrate are then bonded together so that the circuit components are attached to the host substrate by the bonding agent. The first substrate is then removed, e.g., by a chemical or physical etching process to which the stop etch layer is resistant. EBASE fabrication methods allow access to regions of a device structure which are usually blocked by the presence of a substrate, and are of particular utility in the fabrication of ultrafast electronic and optoelectronic devices and circuits.

  1. Vacuum type D initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Parrado Gómez-Lobo, Alfonso

    2016-09-01

    A vacuum type D initial data set is a vacuum initial data set of the Einstein field equations whose data development contains a region where the space-time is of Petrov type D. In this paper we give a systematic characterisation of a vacuum type D initial data set. By systematic we mean that the only quantities involved are those appearing in the vacuum constraints, namely the first fundamental form (Riemannian metric) and the second fundamental form. Our characterisation is a set of conditions consisting of the vacuum constraints and some additional differential equations for the first and second fundamental forms These conditions can be regarded as a system of partial differential equations on a Riemannian manifold and the solutions of the system contain all possible regular vacuum type D initial data sets. As an application we particularise our conditions for the case of vacuum data whose data development is a subset of the Kerr solution. This has applications in the formulation of the nonlinear stability problem of the Kerr black hole.

  2. Vacuum type D initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Parrado Gómez-Lobo, Alfonso

    2016-09-01

    A vacuum type D initial data set is a vacuum initial data set of the Einstein field equations whose data development contains a region where the space–time is of Petrov type D. In this paper we give a systematic characterisation of a vacuum type D initial data set. By systematic we mean that the only quantities involved are those appearing in the vacuum constraints, namely the first fundamental form (Riemannian metric) and the second fundamental form. Our characterisation is a set of conditions consisting of the vacuum constraints and some additional differential equations for the first and second fundamental forms These conditions can be regarded as a system of partial differential equations on a Riemannian manifold and the solutions of the system contain all possible regular vacuum type D initial data sets. As an application we particularise our conditions for the case of vacuum data whose data development is a subset of the Kerr solution. This has applications in the formulation of the nonlinear stability problem of the Kerr black hole.

  3. Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajvir; Pant, K. K.; Lal, Shankar; Yadav, D. P.; Garg, S. R.; Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Mundra, G.

    2012-11-01

    Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

  4. Changing MFTF vacuum environment

    SciTech Connect

    Margolies, D.; Valby, L.

    1982-08-19

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) vaccum vessel will be about 60m long and 10m in diameter at the widest point. The allowable operating densities range from 2 x 10/sup 9/ to 5 x 10/sup 10/ particles per cc. The maximum leak rate of 10/sup -6/ tl/sec is dominated during operation by the deliberately injected cold gas of 250 tl/sec. This gas is pumped by over 1000 square meters of cryopanels, external sorbtion pumps and getters. The design and requirements have changed radically over the past several years, and they are still not in final form. The vacuum system design has also changed, but more slowly and less radically. This paper discusses the engineering effort necessary to meet these stringent and changing requirements. Much of the analysis of the internal systems has been carried out using a 3-D Monte Carlo computer code, which can estimate time dependent operational pressures. This code and its use will also be described.

  5. NCSX Vacuum Vessel Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, M. E.; Brown, T.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Malinowski, F.; Reiersen, W.; Sutton, L.; Goranson, P.; Nelson, B.; Cole, M.; Manuel, M.; McCorkle, D.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this experiment is to develop a device which has the steady state properties of a traditional stellarator along with the high performance characteristics of a tokamak. A key element of this device is its highly shaped Inconel 625 vacuum vessel. This paper describes the manufacturing of the vessel. The vessel is being fabricated by Major Tool and Machine, Inc. (MTM) in three identical 120º vessel segments, corresponding to the three NCSX field periods, in order to accommodate assembly of the device. The port extensions are welded on, leak checked, cut off within 1" of the vessel surface at MTM and then reattached at PPPL, to accommodate assembly of the close-fitting modular coils that surround the vessel. The 120º vessel segments are formed by welding two 60º segments together. Each 60º segment is fabricated by welding ten press-formed panels together over a collapsible welding fixture which is needed to precisely position the panels. The vessel is joined at assembly by welding via custom machined 8" (20.3 cm) wide spacer "spool pieces." The vessel must have a total leak rate less than 5 X 10-6 t-l/s, magnetic permeability less than 1.02μ, and its contours must be within 0.188" (4.76 mm). It is scheduled for completion in January 2006.

  6. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  7. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  8. Laser acceleration in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.L.; Katsouleas, T.; Mori, W.B.; Schroeder, C.B.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1997-02-01

    This paper explores the use of the large electric fields of high-brightness lasers (e.g., up to order TV/cm) to accelerate particles. Unfortunately, as is well known, it is difficult to couple the vacuum field of the laser to particles so as to achieve a net energy gain. In principle, the energy gain near the focus of the laser can be quite high, i.e., on the order of the work done in crossing the focus {Delta}{gamma}={radical}({pi})eEw{approximately}30MeV{radical}(P/1TW), where P is the laser power. In order to retain this energy, the particles must be in the highly nonlinear regime (Vosc/c{gt}1) or must be separated from the laser within a distance on the order of a Rayleigh length from the focus. In this work, we explore the acceleration and output energy distribution of an electron beam injected at various angles and injection energies into a focused laser beam. Insight into the physical mechanism of energy gain is obtained by separating the contributions from the longitudinal and transverse laser field components. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. The effect of co-impregnated acids on the performance of Zn-based broad spectrum respirator carbons.

    PubMed

    Smith, J W H; Romero, J V; Dahn, T R; Dunphy, K; Croll, L M; Dahn, J R

    2012-10-15

    Impregnated activated carbons (IACs) that are used in multi-gas respirator applications usually contain copper and/or zinc impregnants. Co-impregnating with properly selected acids can improve the distribution of the metallic impregnant on the carbon and improve the gas adsorption capacity of the IAC. In this work a comparative study of some common acids co-impregnated with a zinc nitrate (Zn(NO(3))(2)) precursor is performed. The IACs were heated in an inert atmosphere at temperatures which promoted the thermal decomposition of Zn(NO(3))(2) to zinc oxide (ZnO). The gas adsorption properties of the IACs were tested using ammonia (NH(3)), sulphur dioxide (SO(2)) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) challenge gases. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to identify the impregnant species present after heating and to study impregnant distribution. Gravimetric analysis was used to determine the impregnant loading, and help to identify the impregnant species after heating. The interactions between the co-impregnated acid and Zn(NO(3))(2) precursor during heating are discussed. The relationship between impregnant species and gas adsorption capacity is discussed.

  10. Understanding the role of each ingredient in a basic copper carbonate based impregnation recipe for respirator carbons.

    PubMed

    Smith, J W H; Westreich, P; Croll, L M; Reynolds, J H; Dahn, J R

    2009-09-15

    Basic copper carbonate (Cu(2)CO(3)(OH)(2)) is often used as an impregnant in activated carbons for respiratory filters. The mechanisms that allow adsorption of toxic gases by an activated carbon loaded with a Cu(2)CO(3)(OH)(2)-based impregnation recipe are studied here. Several samples were studied to determine the effect of ingredients added during impregnation, impregnant loading and drying temperature on performance. The filtering capacity of the samples is quantified by the stoichiometric ratio of reaction (SRR) between the impregnant and the challenge gas. X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) were used to characterize the impregnant both on and off the carbon as a function of loading and heat-treatment temperature. The influence of the phase and dispersion of the impregnant on the SRR is the focus of this report. PMID:19539946

  11. Dry dilute acid pretreatment by co-currently feeding of corn stover feedstock and dilute acid solution without impregnation.

    PubMed

    He, Yanqing; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2014-04-01

    Impregnation of lignocellulose materials with dilute acid solution is a routine operation in conventional dilute acid pretreatment. The dry dilute acid pretreatment (DDAP) at high solids content up to 70% is naturally considered to require longer impregnation time. In this study, a co-currently feeding operation of corn stover and dilute sulfuric acid solution without any impregnation was tested for DDAP. The DDAP pretreated corn stover without impregnation is found to be essentially no difference in pretreatment efficiency compared to those with impregnation in the helically agitated reactor. The yield from cellulose to ethanol in SSF again shows no obvious difference between the DDAP pretreated corn stover with and without impregnation. This study suggests that impregnation in DDAP was not necessary under the helical agitation mixing. The results provided a useful way of cost reduction and process simplification in pretreatment. PMID:24630497

  12. Dry dilute acid pretreatment by co-currently feeding of corn stover feedstock and dilute acid solution without impregnation.

    PubMed

    He, Yanqing; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2014-04-01

    Impregnation of lignocellulose materials with dilute acid solution is a routine operation in conventional dilute acid pretreatment. The dry dilute acid pretreatment (DDAP) at high solids content up to 70% is naturally considered to require longer impregnation time. In this study, a co-currently feeding operation of corn stover and dilute sulfuric acid solution without any impregnation was tested for DDAP. The DDAP pretreated corn stover without impregnation is found to be essentially no difference in pretreatment efficiency compared to those with impregnation in the helically agitated reactor. The yield from cellulose to ethanol in SSF again shows no obvious difference between the DDAP pretreated corn stover with and without impregnation. This study suggests that impregnation in DDAP was not necessary under the helical agitation mixing. The results provided a useful way of cost reduction and process simplification in pretreatment.

  13. Comparisons of NDT Methods to Inspect Cork and Cork filled Epoxy Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingbloom, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Sheet cork and cork filled epoxy provide external insulation for the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) on the Nation's Space Transportation System (STS). Interest in the reliability of the external insulation bonds has increased since the Columbia incident. A non-destructive test (NDT) method that will provide the best inspection for these bonds has been under evaluation. Electronic Shearography has been selected as the primary NDT method for inspection of these bond lines in the RSRM production flow. ATK Launch Systems Group has purchased an electronic shearography system that includes a vacuum chamber that is used for evaluation of test parts and custom vacuum windows for inspection of full-scale motors. Although the electronic shearography technology has been selected as the primary method for inspection of the external bonds, other technologies that exist continue to be investigated. The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) NDT department has inspected several samples for comparison with electronic shearography with various inspections systems in their laboratory. The systems that were evaluated are X-ray backscatter, terahertz imaging, and microwave imaging. The samples tested have some programmed flaws as well as some flaws that occurred naturally during the sample making process. These samples provide sufficient flaw variation for the evaluation of the different inspection systems. This paper will describe and compare the basic functionality, test method and test results including dissection for each inspection technology.

  14. Alcohol-impregnated wipes as an alternative in hand hygiene.

    PubMed

    Butz, A M; Laughon, B E; Gullette, D L; Larson, E L

    1990-04-01

    The antimicrobial effectiveness of four hand-wash products for health care personnel included three liquid soaps that contained 4% chlorhexidine gluconate, 1% triclosan, or no antiseptic ingredient, respectively, and a 30% w/w ethyl alcohol-impregnated hand wipe. These products were evaluated for reduction in bacterial counts on hands after extended use of 15 handwashes per day for 5 consecutive days. The order of greatest to least log reduction among products at the end of the 5-day test period was chlorhexidine gluconate (2.01), triclosan (1.52), alcohol wipe (0.04), and control soap (0.03). Skin condition before and after handwash was assessed for each treatment group. Subjects reported less skin irritation with alcohol wipes than with the two antiseptic products. Repeated washing with alcohol wipes results in reductions in bacterial colony counts comparable with nonmedicated soap, sufficient to prevent transmission of pathogens by the hands in most situations that arise in nonacute health care settings. This evidence, in addition to increased user acceptability reported by the subjects who used alcohol wipes, suggests that alcohol wipes are an acceptable alternative to soap-and-water handwashing in nonacute health care settings.

  15. The effect of preparation under vacuum and microwave drying on the mechanical properties of porcelain ceramic foam via polymeric sponge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahatha, S. H.; Mohammed, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper was demonstrated the effect of preparation condition under vacuum and microwave drying on the mechanical properties of porcelain ceramic foam. The study was based on five different polymeric foam templates with thickness ranging from 0.5 to 4 cm. The templates were impregnated in ceramic slurry with solid loading ranging from 35 to 55 wt. % under vacuum pressure 10-1 Torr and then sintered to 1250°C. Effects of polymeric foam template thickness and solid loading quantity were evaluated based on porosity, density and mechanical properties (compressive and flexural strengths) of the ceramic foam.

  16. Aging and quality assurance of Kevlar 49-epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, R.J.

    1981-05-15

    The aging of Kevlar 49-epoxy composites under the service environment conditions expected by ESA will be insignificant to the best of our knowledge at this time. However, certain precautions in materials acceptance criteria and composite fabrication should be followed.

  17. Epoxy injection repairs to concrete in 225-B Building

    SciTech Connect

    Vollert, F.R.

    1996-09-19

    In 1982, the damaged anchor areas (67 total) in the Operating Gallery and cold manipulator shop ceiling reinforced concrete slabs were epoxy injection repaired by Construction Technology Laboratories (CTL), Portland Cement Association. The through depth vertical cracks (10 total) in the ceiling slabs in the galleries and manipulator shops were sealed and structurally repaired using epoxy injection procedures. The details of the epoxy reRair are reported. Sonic nondestructive (NDT) testing before and after the epoxy injection repairs were made by CTL to confirm that the repairs are structurally effective. CTL recommended to expedite the installation of lateral bracing for the manipulator monorail in order to avoid re-darnage to the repaired anchor areas.

  18. Magnetism in graphene oxide induced by epoxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dongwook; Seo, Jiwon; Zhu, Xi; Su, Haibin; Cole, Jacqueline M.

    2015-04-27

    We have engineered magnetism in graphene oxide. Our approach transforms graphene into a magnetic insulator while maintaining graphene's structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra reveal that graphene oxide has various chemical groups (including epoxy, ketone, hydroxyl, and C-O groups) on its surface. Destroying the epoxy group with heat treatment or chemical treatment diminishes magnetism in the material. Local density approximation calculation results well reproduce the magnetic moments obtained from experiments, and these results indicate that the unpaired spin induced by the presence of epoxy groups is the origin of the magnetism. The calculation results also explain the magnetic properties, which are generated by the interaction between separated magnetic regions and domains. Our results demonstrate tunable magnetism in graphene oxide based on controlling the epoxy group with heat or chemical treatment.

  19. Exit Presentation: Infrared Thermography on Graphite/Epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comeaux, Kayla

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reports on the internship project that was accomplished during the summer of 2010. The objectives of the project were to: (1) Simulate Flash Thermography on Graphite/Epoxy Flat Bottom hole Specimen and thin void specimens, (2) Obtain Flash Thermography data on Graphite/Epoxy flat bottom hole specimens, (3) Compare experimental results with simulation results, Compare Flat Bottom Hole Simulation with Thin Void Simulation to create a graph to determine size of IR Thermography detected defects

  20. Epoxy Nanocomposites - Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Ilyin, S. O.; Kotomin, S. V.; Kulichikhin, V. G.

    2010-06-02

    Epoxy nanocomposites considered as challenging polymeric matrix for advanced reinforced plastics. Nanofillers change rheokinetics of epoxy resin curing, affect wetting and adhesion to aramid and carbon fibers. In all cases extreme dependence of adhesive strength vs filler content in the binder was observed. New experimental techniques were developed to study wettability and fiber-matrix adhesion interaction, using yarn penetration path length, aramid fiber knot pull-up test and electrical admittance of the fracture surface of CFRP.

  1. Fabrication of graphite/epoxy cases for orbit insertion motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, W. W.

    1973-01-01

    The fabrication procedures are described for filament-wound rocket motor cases, approximately 26.25 inches long by 25.50 inches diameter, utilizing graphite fibers. The process utilized prepreg tape which consists of Fortafil 4-R fibers in the E-759 epoxy resin matrix. This fabrication effect demonstrated an ability to fabricate high quality graphite/epoxy rocket motor cases in the 26.25 inch by 25.50 inch size range.

  2. Fiber/epoxy filament-wound vessels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chiao, T.T.; Moore, R.L.

    1986-08-14

    The present investigation has provided a valuable insight into the design, fabrication and performance of filament-wound pressure vessels. The long-term stress rupture data generated under the contract is perhaps the only available lifetime data of its kind for Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels. Now, it is clear that Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels can be made to last at least 9 years at 50% of the static burst pressure.

  3. Droplet condensation and growth on nanotextured surfaces impregnated with an immiscible liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Sushant; Paxson, Adam; Smith, Jonathan; Dhiman, Rajeev; Varanasi, Kripa

    2012-02-01

    For effective dropwise condensation, a surface that sheds droplets easily is desirable due to the enhancement in accompanying heat transfer. Incorporating nano-textures on the surface can enhance the droplet shedding or spreading. We demonstrate that droplet shedding can be further influenced by impregnating the nano-textured surface with a liquid which is immiscible with respect to the droplet. In this study, the dynamics of dropwise condensation on such immiscible liquid impregnated nano-textured surfaces have been investigated in pure quiescent water vapor conditions. Condensation experiments were conducted using an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope by controlling the chamber water vapor pressure and substrate temperature. We show preferential sites for condensation and different modes under which droplets grow, depending upon the surface chemistry, surface texture, and the impregnating liquid properties. Concurrently, we show an evolution of apparent contact angles during the condensation process on the impregnated surfaces.

  4. Effect of high energy electron radiation on MIPB-impregnated polypropylene film

    SciTech Connect

    Hammoud, A.N.; Laghari, J.R.; Krishnakumar, B.

    1988-08-01

    This work examines the effect of impregnating capacitor-grade polypropylene film with an aromatic hydrocarbon fluid with a view towards assessing the response under radiation of the relevant properties of the film. Monoisopropyl biphenyl (MIPB)-impregnated polypropylene film was exposed in air to 1 MeV electrons to different doses and the post-radiation effects on the electrical, mechanical, morphological and chemical properties were evaluated. The results obtained indicate that the oil-impregnated films remain relatively stable even at the highest dose of 10/sup 8/ rads. This is in contrast to the results reported earlier for dry polypropylene films which underwent degradation primarily due to chain scission and oxidation. In the present instance, it is believed that impregnation of the film has inhibited the diffusion of oxygen and consequently favored crosslinking. The chemical characterizations as well as the changes in some of the measured properties of the film seem to corroborate this belief.

  5. Fundamental studies of methyl iodide adsorption in DABCO impregnated activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Herdes, Carmelo; Prosenjak, Claudia; Román, Silvia; Müller, Erich A

    2013-06-11

    Methyl iodide capture from a water vapor stream using 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO)-impregnated activated carbons is, for the first time, fundamentally described here on the atomic level by means of both molecular dynamics and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. A molecular dynamics annealing strategy was adopted to mimic the DABCO experimental impregnation procedure in a selected slitlike carbon pore. Predictions, restricted to the micropore region, are made about the adsorption isotherms of methyl iodide, water, and nitrogen on both impregnated and bare activated carbon models. Experimental and simulated nitrogen adsorption isotherms are compared for the validation of the impregnation strategy. Selectivity analyses of the preferential adsorption toward methyl iodide over water are also reported. These simulated adsorption isotherms sum up to previous experimental studies to provide an enhanced picture for this adsorption system of widespread use at nuclear plant HVAC facilities for the capture of radioactive iodine compounds. PMID:23679202

  6. Multistep impregnation method for incorporation of high amount of titania into SBA-15

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Wei; Song Mo . E-mail: m.song@lboro.ac.uk

    2006-02-02

    A multistep impregnation method was employed to incorporate high amount of titania into the mesoporous SBA-15 silica. No damage to the SBA-15 silica mesostructures was caused by the loading of titania in every cycle. The existence of titania small nanodomains were confirmed to be present by Raman spectra and UV-vis DRS measurements. High dispersion of them was realized via this method according to the results of low-angle X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N{sub 2} sorption measurements. Importantly, no blockage of mesostructures was acknowledged with titania content up to 24.4 wt.%. In comparison, normally used one-step impregnation method led to serious blockage of mesopores as the results of formation of bulk titania particles in the mesochannels. Photo-activity test for the removal of oestrogen showed the superiority of the materials synthesized by multistep impregnation method to one-step impregnation method.

  7. A new rapid silver impregnation for neuronal bodies on methacrylate sections.

    PubMed

    Tolivia, D; Tolivia, J

    1991-02-01

    A simple and rapid method for the impregnation of neuronal bodies applicable to methacrylate embedded sections is described in the present paper. Sections of 10-12 microns in thickness were attached to slides, placed in mordant for 1 min, rinsed in distilled water and impregnated in ammoniacal silver solution for 1 min. They were then rinsed in absolute ethanol for 30 s and developed in 50% formalin. Sections were toned in 0.25% gold chloride, reduced in 10% oxalic acid and fixed in 5% sodium thiosulfate. After washing, the sections were dehydrated through 90% and absolute ethanol, cleared in eucalyptol, and mounted in the usual way. When this method is used most of the neuronal somata and proximal dendritic trees are impregnated. Frequently some glial cell are also weakly impregnated but their density does not obscure the neurons.

  8. Fabrication of Impregnated-Electrode-Type Polyatomic Ion Source with Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Ryuto, Hiromichi; Takaoka, Gikan H.

    2011-01-07

    Three types of ionic liquid ion source characterized by needle-type, capillary-needle-type and impregnated-electrode-type emitters were fabricated and demonstrated. The ion emission of a pure ionic liquid was demonstrated for the capillary-needle- and impregnated-electrode-type emitters. The emission stability of the impregnated-electrode-type emitter is currently insufficient for the shallow implantation of carbon due to occasional discharge. However, the impregnated-electrode-type emitter showed the largest emission current of 14 {mu}A at 6 kV among these emitters. This was considered to be caused by the relatively high feedability of the ionic liquid obtained from the emitter tip made of porous copper.

  9. Evaluation of reagent-impregnated coagulase-mannitol test strip for speciation of staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Washington, J A; Yu, P K

    1970-04-01

    A new coagulase-mannitol reagent-impregnated strip test has been evaluated with 322 Micrococcaceae. Mannitol fermentation was determined accurately by this test; however, the coagulase reaction was difficult to interpret and was subject to significant error.

  10. [The prevention of malaria with impregnated mosquito netting: impact of a social mobilization day in Brazzaville].

    PubMed

    Talani, P; Biahouila-Satounkazi, F; Moyen, G

    2002-06-01

    A study of malaria prevention was conducted in two areas of Brazzaville: Makelekele and Bacongo, 10-12 November 1997, following a day of mobilisation. The study included 111 households in each area. In Makelekele, people were informed about the use of impregnated mosquito nets. Bacongo was used as a control area. The answers to the questionnaire indicated that 56.7% of households in the informed area knew about impregnated mosquito nets versus 30.6% in the control area. Likewise, 47.7% of the households in the informed area versus 10.8% in the control area knew where to locate centers for impregnating the nets. From these findings we conclude that information concerning the use of impregnated bed nets as prevention for malaria needs to be spread to all areas of Brazzaville.

  11. IRIS Leaves Thermal Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows the transportation of the IRIS observatory from the thermal vacuum chamber back to the clean tent for final testing and preparations for delivery to the launch site at Vandenberg A...

  12. Vacuum lamination of photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Vacuum lamination of terrestrial photovoltaic modules is a new high volume process requiring new equipment and newly develop materials. Equipment development, materials research, and some research in related fields and testing methods are discussed.

  13. APS storage ring vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Benaroya, R.; Choi, M.; Dortwegt, R.J.; Goeppner, G.A.; Gonczy, J.; Krieger, C.; Howell, J.; Nielsen, R.W.; Roop, B.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source synchrotron radiation facility, under construction at the Argonne National Laboratory, incorporates a large ring for the storage of 7 GeV positrons for the generation of photon beams for the facility's experimental program. The Storage Ring's 1104 m circumference is divided into 40 functional sectors. The sectors include vacuum, beam transport, control, acceleration and insertion device components. The vacuum system, which is designed to operate at a pressure of 1 n Torr, consists of 240 connected sections, the majority of which are fabricated from an aluminum alloy extrusion. The sections are equipped with distributed NeG pumping, photon absorbers with lumped pumping, beam position monitors, vacuum diagnostics and valving. The details of the vacuum system design, selected results of the development program and general construction plans are presented. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Silicon source for vacuum deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, G. W.; Rutecki, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    Device using two independent silicon sources for ultra-high-vacuum deposition on large substrates can deposit P and N types of silicon simultaneously. Efficient water cooled copper shield supports and cools structure and isolates two filaments.

  15. Vacuum Studies of a Prototype Composite Coil Dewar for HTSC Transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenterly, S W; Zhang, Y.; Pleva, E. F.; Rufer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collaborating with Waukesha Electric Systems (WES) to develop a high-temperature superconducting (HTSC) utility power transformer with primary and secondary coils cooled by liquid nitrogen. Since the vacuum-insulated cryogenic coil dewar surrounds the magnetic core limb and cannot form a shorted turn, non-conductive materials are required. Two test vessels and a small prototype dewar have been fabricated by Scorpius Space Launch Company with epoxy/fiberglass composites, using their proprietary PRESSURMAXX vessel technology. The effects of pumping time, bakeout temperature, and cryogenic vessel temperature on vacuum outgassing rates have been investigated. Outgassing rates of the individual materials used in vessel construction have also been measured. The results will be scaled up to determine the required pumping capacity for a full-size 25-MVA commercial transformer dewar.

  16. Vacuum Studies of a Prototype Composite Coil Dewar for Htsc Transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenterly, S. W.; Zhang, Y.; Pleva, E. F.; Rufer, M.

    2010-04-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collaborating with Waukesha Electric Systems (WES) to develop a high-temperature superconducting (HTSC) utility power transformer with primary and secondary coils cooled by liquid nitrogen. Since the vacuum-insulated cryogenic coil dewar surrounds the magnetic core limb and cannot form a shorted turn, non-conductive materials are required. Two test vessels and a small prototype dewar have been fabricated by Scorpius Space Launch Company with epoxy/fiberglass composites, using their proprietary PRESSURMAXX vessel technology. The effects of pumping time, bakeout temperature, and cryogenic vessel temperature on vacuum outgassing rates have been investigated. Outgassing rates of the individual materials used in vessel construction have also been measured. The results will be scaled up to determine the required pumping capacity for a full-size 25-MVA commercial transformer dewar.

  17. Investigation of the effects of cobalt ions on epoxy properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of Co(acac)sub x complexes on MY-720 epoxy properties have been investigated. It appears that Co2(+) ions form antibonding or nonbonding orbitals which increase the free volume and also reduce the cohesiveness of the host epoxy. The effects of Co2(+) ions, on the other hand, seem to result in increased Cohesiveness of the epoxy. The experimental values of magnetic moments of both types of ions in MY-720 suggest that the orbital momentum contributions of the (3d) electrons are partially conserved, though the effect is more pronounced for Co2(+) ions. The coordination environment of the cobalt ions in the host epoxy does not appear to be uniquely defined. These results indicate that the effects of metal ions on resin properties cannot be easily predicted on the basis of ligand field theory argument alone. Complex interactions between metal ions and host epoxy molecular structure suggest the desirability of parallel experimental investigations of electronic, magnetic, and mechanical properties of metal ion-containing epoxy samples for comparison with theory.

  18. Application of Silver and Silver Oxide Nanoparticles Impregnated on Activated Carbon to the Degradation of Bromate.

    PubMed

    Choi, J S; Lee, H; Park, Y K; Kim, S J; Kim, B J; An, K H; Kim, B H; Jung, S C

    2016-05-01

    Silver and silver oxide nanoparticles were impregnated on the surface of powdered activated carbon (PAC) using a single-step liquid phase plasma (LPP) method. Spherical silver and silver oxide nanoparticles of 20 to 100 nm size were dipersed evenly on the surface of PAC. The impregnated PAC exhibited a higher activity for the decomposition of bromate than bare PAC. The XPS, Raman and EDX analyses showed that the Ag/PAC composites synthesized by the LPP process. PMID:27483780

  19. Ketoprofen-eluting biodegradable ureteral stents by CO2 impregnation: In vitro study.

    PubMed

    Barros, Alexandre A; Oliveira, Carlos; Reis, Rui L; Lima, Estevão; Duarte, Ana Rita C

    2015-11-30

    Ureteral stents are indispensable tools in urologic practice. The main complications associated with ureteral stents are dislocation, infection, pain and encrustation. Biodegradable ureteral stents are one of the most attractive designs with the potential to eliminate several complications associated with the stenting procedure. In this work we hypothesize the impregnation of ketoprofen, by CO2-impregnation in a patented biodegradable ureteral stent previously developed in our group. The biodegradable ureteral stents with each formulation: alginate-based, gellan gum-based were impregnated with ketoprofen and the impregnation conditions tested were 100 bar, 2 h and three different temperatures (35 °C, 40 °C and 50 °C). The impregnation was confirmed by FTIR and DSC demonstrated the amorphization of the drug upon impregnation. The in vitro elution profile in artificial urine solution (AUS) during degradation of a biodegradable ureteral stent loaded with ketoprofen was evaluated. According to the kinetics results these systems have shown to be very promising for the release ketoprofen in the first 72 h, which is the necessary time for anti-inflammatory delivery after the surgical procedure. The in vitro release studied revealed an influence of the temperature on the impregnation yield, with a higher impregnation yield at 40 °C. Higher yields were also obtained for gellan gum-based stents. The non-cytotoxicity characteristic of the developed ketoprofen-eluting biodegradable ureteral stents was evaluated in L929 cell line by MTS assay which demonstrated the feasibility of this product as a medical device.

  20. Edge conduction in vacuum glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Simko, T.M.; Collins, R.E.; Beck, F.A.; Arasteh, D.

    1995-03-01

    Vacuum glazing is a form of low-conductance double glazing using in internal vacuum between the two glass sheets to eliminate heat transport by gas conduction and convection. An array of small support pillars separates the sheets; fused solder glass forms the edge seal. Heat transfer through the glazing occurs by radiation across the vacuum gap, conduction through the support pillars, and conduction through the bonded edge seal. Edge conduction is problematic because it affects stresses in the edge region, leading to possible failure of the glazing; in addition, excessive heat transfer because of thermal bridging in the edge region can lower overall window thermal performance and decrease resistance to condensation. Infrared thermography was used to analyze the thermal performance of prototype vacuum glazings, and, for comparison, atmospheric pressure superwindows. Research focused on mitigating the edge effects of vacuum glazings through the use of insulating trim, recessed edges, and framing materials. Experimentally validated finite-element and finite-difference modeling tools were used for thermal analysis of prototype vacuum glazing units and complete windows. Experimental measurements of edge conduction using infrared imaging were found to be in good agreement with finite-element modeling results for a given set of conditions. Finite-element modeling validates an analytic model developed for edge conduction.

  1. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C.

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  2. Technical specification for vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Khaw, J.

    1987-01-01

    The vacuum systems at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) are primarily of all-metal construction and operate at pressures from 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -11/ Torr. The primary gas loads during operation result from thermal desorption and beam-induced desorption from the vacuum chamber walls. These desorption rates can be extremely high in the case of hydrocarbons and other contaminants. These specifications place a major emphasis on eliminating contamination sources. The specifications and procedures have been written to insure the cleanliness and vacuum integrity of all SLAC vacuum systems, and to assist personnel involved with SLAC vacuum systems in choosing and designing components that are compatible with existing systems and meet the quality and reliability of SLAC vacuum standards. The specification includes requirements on design, procurement, fabrication, chemical cleaning, clean room practices, welding and brazing, helium leak testing, residual gas analyzer testing, bakeout, venting, and pumpdown. Also appended are specifications regarding acceptable vendors, isopropyl alcohol, bakeable valve cleaning procedure, mechanical engineering safety inspection, notes on synchrotron radiation, and specifications of numerous individual components. (LEW)

  3. Thermal and mechanical properties of advanced impregnation materials for HTS cables and coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrets, N.; Otten, S.; Weiss, K.-P.; Kario, A.; Goldacker, W.

    2015-12-01

    In the growing field of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) applications, finding an appropriate impregnation material for cables and coils remains a challenging task. In HTS cables and coils, tapes have to be able to withstand mechanical loads during operation. Impregnation is playing a role as mechanical stabilization. However, material properties usually change significantly when going to low temperatures which can decrease performance of superconducting devices. For example, a large mismatch in thermal expansion between a conductor and impregnation material at low temperatures can lead to delamination and to degradation of the critical current. Impregnation materials can insulate tapes thermally which can lead to damage of the superconducting device in case of quench. Thus, thermal conductivity is an important property which is responsible for the temperature distribution in a superconducting cable or in a coil. Due to Lorentz forces acting on structural materials in a superconducting device, the mechanical properties of these materials should be investigated at operating temperatures of this device. Therefore, it is important to identify an advanced impregnation material meeting all specific requirements. In this paper, thermal and mechanical properties of impregnation material candidates with added fillers are presented in a temperature range from 300 K to 4 K.

  4. Preparation of functionalized and metal-impregnated activated carbon by a single-step activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dastgheib, Seyed A.; Ren, Jianli; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud; Chang, Ramsay

    2014-01-01

    A rapid method to prepare functionalized and metal-impregnated activated carbon from coal is described in this paper. A mixture of ferric chloride and a sub-bituminous coal was used to demonstrate simultaneous coal activation, chlorine functionalization, and iron/iron oxides impregnation in the resulting porous carbon products. The FeCl3 concentration in the mixture, the method to prepare the FeCl3-coal mixture (solid mixing or liquid impregnation), and activation atmosphere and temperature impacted the surface area and porosity development, Cl functionalization, and iron species impregnation and dispersion in the carbon products. Samples activated in nitrogen or a simulated flue gas at 600 or 1000 °C for 1-2 min had surface areas up to ∼800 m2/g, bulk iron contents up to 18 wt%, and surface chlorine contents up to 27 wt%. Potential catalytic and adsorption application of the carbon materials was explored in catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol and adsorption of ionic mercury from aqueous solutions. Results indicated that impregnated activated carbons outperformed their non-impregnated counterparts in both the CWAO and adsorption tests.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of aluminosilicate catalyst impregnated by nickel oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulida, Iffana Dani; Sriatun, Taslimah

    2015-09-01

    Aluminosilicate as a catalyst has been synthesized by pore-engineering using CetylTrimethylAmmonium-Bromide (CTAB) as templating agent. It can produce bigger aluminosilicate pore therefore it will be more suitable for bulky molecule. The aims of this research are to synthesize aluminosilicate supported by Nickel, using CTAB surfactant as templating agent for larger pore radius than natural zeolite and characterize the synthesis product, consist of total acid sites and surface area characteristic. This research has been done with following steps. First, making sodium silicate and sodium aluminate. Second, aluminosilicate was synthesized by direct methods, calcined at 550, 650 and 750°C variation temperature, characterized product by X-RD and FTIR spectrometer. Third, NiCl2 was impregnated to the aluminosilicate that has the best cristallinity and main TO4 functional groups product (550 sample). Variation of NiCl2:aluminosilicate (w/w) ratio were 25%:75%, 50%:50% and 75%:25%. Last but not least characterization of catalytic properties was performed. It comprised total acidity test (gravimetric method) and Surface Area Analyzer. The result shows that the product synthesized by direct method at 550oC calcination temperature has the best cristallinity and main functional groups of TO4. The highest total acid sites was 31.6 mmole/g (Imp-A sample). Surface Area Analyzer shows that Imp-B sample has the best pore distribution and highest total pore volume and specific surface area with value 32.424 cc/g and 46.8287 m2/g respectively. We can draw the conclusion that the most potential catalyst is Imp-A sample compared to Imp-B and Imp-C because it has the highest total acid sites. However the most effective catalyst used for product selectivity was Imp-B sample among all samples.

  6. Application of sulfur impregnated activated carbons for the control of mercury emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Vidic, R.D.; Liu, W.; Brown, T.D.

    1998-12-31

    The dynamics of granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorbers for the uptake of vapor-phase mercury was evaluated as a function of temperature, influent mercury concentration, and empty bed contact time. Sulfur-impregnated carbons exhibited enhanced mercury removal efficiency over virgin carbon due to formation of mercuric sulfide on the carbon surface. The effect of the sulfur impregnation method on mercury removal efficiency was examined through experiments conducted on commercially available sulfur-impregnated carbon (HGR) and carbon impregnated with sulfur in the laboratory (BPL-S). Although HGR and BPL-S possess similar sulfur contents, BPL-S is impregnated at a higher temperature which promotes a more uniform distribution of sulfur in the GAC pore structure. At low influent mercury concentrations and low temperatures, HGR and BPL-S performed similarly in the removal of mercury vapor. However, as the temperature was increased above the melting point of sulfur, the performance of HGR deteriorated significantly, while the performance of BPL-S slightly improved. For both HGR and BPL-S, the observed dynamic mercury adsorptive capacities were far below the capacities predicted by the stoichiometry of mercuric sulfide formation. In HGR carbon the sulfur is very accessible, but agglomeration which occurs at high temperatures causes the sulfur to become relatively unreactive. In BPL-S carbon, on the other hand, the sulfur remains in a highly reactive form, but its location deep in the internal pores makes it relatively inaccessible and susceptible to blockage by HgS formation. Impregnation temperature and the initial sulfur to carbon ratio (SCR) during the impregnation are the two key control parameters for the preparation of these new (BPL-S) sorbents. Higher impregnation temperatures can significantly enhance mercury removal capacity for adsorbents derived either from virgin or re-generated activated carbons. Large fraction of active sulfur atoms that are created at

  7. Probability distribution of the vacuum energy density

    SciTech Connect

    Duplancic, Goran; Stefancic, Hrvoje; Glavan, Drazen

    2010-12-15

    As the vacuum state of a quantum field is not an eigenstate of the Hamiltonian density, the vacuum energy density can be represented as a random variable. We present an analytical calculation of the probability distribution of the vacuum energy density for real and complex massless scalar fields in Minkowski space. The obtained probability distributions are broad and the vacuum expectation value of the Hamiltonian density is not fully representative of the vacuum energy density.

  8. Viscoelastic properties of graphene-based epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Fierro, Annalisa; Rosolia, Salvatore; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Lafdi, Khalid; Guadagno, Liberata

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the viscoelastic properties of an epoxy resin filled with graphene-based nanoparticles have been investigated in the liquid state, before curing, by means of a rotational rheometer equipped with a parallel plate geometry. Exfoliated graphite was prepared using traditional acid intercalation followed by a sudden treatment at high temperature (900°C). The percentage of exfoliated graphite was found to be 56%. The epoxy matrix was prepared by mixing a tetrafunctional precursor with a reactive diluent which produces a significant decrease in the viscosity of the epoxy precursor so that the dispersion step of nanofillers in the matrix can easily occur. The hardener agent, the 4,4-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), was added at a stoichiometric concentration with respect to all the epoxy rings. The inclusion of the partially exfoliated graphite (pEG) in the formulated epoxy mixture significantly modifies the rheological behaviour of the mixture itself. The epoxy mixture, indeed, shows a Newtonian behaviour while, at 3 wt % pEG content, the complex viscosity of the nanocomposite clearly shows a shear thinning behaviour with η* values much higher at the lower frequencies. The increase in complex viscosity with the increasing of the partially exfoliated graphite content was mostly caused by a dramatic increase in the storage modulus. All the graphene-based epoxy mixtures were cured by a two-stage curing cycles: a first isothermal stage was carried out at the lower temperature of 125°C for 1 hour while the second isothermal stage was performed at the higher temperature of 200°C for 3 hours. The mechanical properties of the cured nanocomposites show high values in the storage modulus and glass transition temperature.

  9. Measurement of partial pressures in vacuum technology and vacuum physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, W. K.

    1986-01-01

    It is pointed out that the measurement of gaseous pressures of less than 0.0001 torr is based on the ionization of gas atoms and molecules due to collisions with electrons. The particle density is determined in place of the pressure. The ionization cross sections for molecules of various gases are discussed. It is found that the true pressure in a vacuum system cannot be determined with certainty if it is unknown which gas is present. Effects of partial pressure determination on the condition of the vacuum system are discussed together with ion sources, systems of separation, and ion detection.

  10. VACUUM TRAP AND VALVE COMBINATION

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.; Levenson, L.

    1963-02-19

    This patent relates to a vacuum trap and valve combination suitable for use in large ultra-high vacuum systems. The vacuum trap is a chamber having an inlet and outlet opening which may be made to communicate with a chamber to be evacuated and a diffusion pump, respectively. A valve is designed to hermeticaliy seal with inlet opening and, when opened, block the line-of- sight'' between the inlet and outlet openings, while allowing a large flow path between the opened vaive and the side walls of the trap. The interior of the trap and the side of the valve facing the inlet opening are covered with an impurity absorbent, such as Zeolite or activated aluminum. Besides the advantage of combining two components of a vacuum system into one, the present invention removes the need for a baffle between the pump and the chamber to be evacuated. In one use of a specific embodiment of this invention, the transmission probability was 45 and the partial pressure of the pump fluid vapor in the vacuum chamber was at least 100 times lower than its vapor pressure. (AEC)

  11. Reduce costs with vacuum excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Vitale, S.A.

    1983-09-01

    Although vacuum excavation equipment and methods are in their infancy, this developing technology offers tremendous promise for the future. The author explains Brooklyn Union Gas Co.'s experience with five vacuum trucks and the procedures that are used. In recent years, the higher cost of natural gas has increased the need for gas utilities to reduce their operating expenses. One way, which has been successful at Brooklyn Union Gas, is the use of vacuum excavation. Although vacuum excavation equipment and techniques are in their infancy, this developing technology offers substantial savings today and tremendous promise for the future. Brooklyn Union started its vacuum digging program by locating keyhole cutoffs--small surface openings ranging from 1 ft by 1 ft to 1 1/2 ft by 1 1/2 ft (0.3 m to 0.45 m square). It is no easy task to accurately locate a service that was installed 60 years ago. Reading the street indications, locating an existing curb valve or repair opening, gaining access to the building, making a physical lineup, and using an M-scope, plus any other tools available, have produced a high success rate.

  12. Vacuum Refining of Molten Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarian, Jafar; Tangstad, Merete

    2012-12-01

    Metallurgical fundamentals for vacuum refining of molten silicon and the behavior of different impurities in this process are studied. A novel mass transfer model for the removal of volatile impurities from silicon in vacuum induction refining is developed. The boundary conditions for vacuum refining system—the equilibrium partial pressures of the dissolved elements and their actual partial pressures under vacuum—are determined through thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. It is indicated that the vacuum removal kinetics of the impurities is different, and it is controlled by one, two, or all the three subsequent reaction mechanisms—mass transfer in a melt boundary layer, chemical evaporation on the melt surface, and mass transfer in the gas phase. Vacuum refining experimental results of this study and literature data are used to study the model validation. The model provides reliable results and shows correlation with the experimental data for many volatile elements. Kinetics of phosphorus removal, which is an important impurity in the production of solar grade silicon, is properly predicted by the model, and it is observed that phosphorus elimination from silicon is significantly increased with increasing process temperature.

  13. Evaluation of inter-laminar shear strength of GFRP composed of bonded glass/polyimide tapes and cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resin for ITER TF coils

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmi, T.; Matsui, K.; Koizumi, N.; Nishimura, A.; Nishijima, S.; Shikama, T.

    2014-01-27

    The insulation system of the ITER TF coils consists of multi-layer glass/polyimide tapes impregnated a cyanate-ester/epoxy resin. The ITER TF coils are required to withstand an irradiation of 10 MGy from gamma-ray and neutrons since the ITER TF coils is exposed by fast neutron (>0.1 MeV) of 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} during the ITER operation. Cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resins and bonded glass/polyimide tapes are developed as insulation materials to realize the required radiation-hardness for the insulation of the ITER TF coils. To evaluate the radiation-hardness of the developed insulation materials, the inter-laminar shear strength (ILSS) of glass-fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) fabricated using developed insulation materials is measured as one of most important mechanical properties before/after the irradiation in a fission reactor of JRR-3M. As a result, it is demonstrated that the GFRPs using the developed insulation materials have a sufficient performance to apply for the ITER TF coil insulation.

  14. Evaluation of inter-laminar shear strength of GFRP composed of bonded glass/polyimide tapes and cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resin for ITER TF coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmi, T.; Nishimura, A.; Matsui, K.; Koizumi, N.; Nishijima, S.; Shikama, T.

    2014-01-01

    The insulation system of the ITER TF coils consists of multi-layer glass/polyimide tapes impregnated a cyanate-ester/epoxy resin. The ITER TF coils are required to withstand an irradiation of 10 MGy from gamma-ray and neutrons since the ITER TF coils is exposed by fast neutron (>0.1 MeV) of 1022 n/m2 during the ITER operation. Cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resins and bonded glass/polyimide tapes are developed as insulation materials to realize the required radiation-hardness for the insulation of the ITER TF coils. To evaluate the radiation-hardness of the developed insulation materials, the inter-laminar shear strength (ILSS) of glass-fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) fabricated using developed insulation materials is measured as one of most important mechanical properties before/after the irradiation in a fission reactor of JRR-3M. As a result, it is demonstrated that the GFRPs using the developed insulation materials have a sufficient performance to apply for the ITER TF coil insulation.

  15. Friction and wear behavior of nanosilica-filled epoxy resin composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yingke; Chen, Xinhua; Song, Shiyong; Yu, Laigui; Zhang, Pingyu

    2012-06-01

    Hydrophilic silica nanoparticles (abridged as nano-SiO2) surface-capped with epoxide were dispersed in the solution of epoxy resin (abridged as EP) in tetrahydrofuran under magnetic stirring. Resultant suspension of nano-SiO2 in EP was then coated onto the surface of glass slides and dried at 80 °C in a vacuum oven for 2 h, generating epoxy resin-nanosilica composite coatings (coded as EP/nano-SiO2). EP coating without nano-SiO2 was also prepared as a reference in the same manner. A water contact angle meter and a surface profiler were separately performed to measure the water contact angles and surface roughness of as-prepared EP/nano-SiO2 composite coatings. The friction and wear behavior of as-prepared EP/nano-SiO2 composite coatings sliding against steel in a ball-on-plate contact configuration under unlubricated condition was evaluated. Particularly, the effect of coating composition on the friction and wear behavior of the composite coatings was highlighted in relation to their microstructure and worn surface morphology examined by means of scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate that EP/nano-SiO2 composite coatings have a higher surface roughness and water contact angle than EP coating. The EP-SiO2 coatings doped with a proper amount of hydrophilic SiO2 nanoparticles show lower friction coefficient than EP coating. However, the introduction of surface-capped nanosilica as the filler results in inconsistent change in the friction coefficient and wear rate of the filled EP-matrix composites; and it needs further study to achieve well balanced friction-reducing and antiwear abilities of the composite coatings for tribological applications.

  16. Composite Bombcase Program: Static tests on Kevlar/epoxy and graphite/epoxy plates and rings

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.

    1986-10-01

    An experimental study supporting the Composite Bombcase Program is described. The purpose of the study was to generate mechanical properties and structural response data on composite plates and cylinders. This data base is now available to assist in the evaluation of composite materials for bombcase applications. Two composites, Kevlar 49/epoxy and IM6 graphite/epoxy, were chosen for testing. The mechanical properties from flat unidirectional specimens were used to predict the elastic response of thick quasi-isotropic laminates in four-point bending and the elastic response of 18.0 inch diameter quasi-isotropic rings to diametral compressive loading. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental values of elastic response was obtained for both geometries. Load-deflection and load-strain curves in the elastic, post-yield, and failure regions were obtained for composite and aluminum rings. Delamination between plies was the principal failure mode in the QI composite plate and ring specimens. Even with many delaminations at large deflections, composite rings continued to carry load and retain some structural integrity.

  17. CO2 adsorption properties of char produced from brown coal impregnated with alcohol amine solutions.

    PubMed

    Baran, Paweł; Zarębska, Katarzyna; Czuma, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction is critical to mitigating climate change. Power plants for heating and industry are significant sources of CO2 emissions. There is a need for identifying and developing new, efficient methods to reduce CO2 emissions. One of the methods used is flue gas purification by CO2 capture through adsorption. This study aimed to develop CO2 adsorbent out of modified brown coal impregnated with solutions of first-, second-, and third-order amines. Low-temperature nitrogen adsorption isotherms and CO2 isotherms were measured for the prepared samples. The results of experiments unexpectedly revealed that CO2 sorption capacity decreased after impregnation. Due to lack of strait trends in CO2 sorption capacity decrease, the results were closely analyzed to find the reason for the inconsistencies. It was revealed that different amines represent different affinities for CO2 and that the size and structure of impregnating factor has influence on the CO2 sorption capacity of impregnated material. The character of a support was also noticeable as well for impregnation results as for the affinity to CO2. The influence of amine concentration used was investigated along with the comparison on how the theoretical percentage of the impregnation on the support influenced the results. The reaction mechanism of tertiary amine was taken into consideration in connection to no presence of water vapor during the experiments. Key findings were described in the work and provide a strong basis for further studies on CO2 adsorption on amine-impregnated support. PMID:27317051

  18. Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial and corrosion protective properties of epoxies, epoxy-polyols and epoxy-polyurethane coatings from linseed and Pongamia glabra seed oils.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Eram; Ashraf, S M; Ahmad, Sharif

    2007-04-10

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the structures and properties of epoxidized linseed and Pongamia glabra oils (LOE/POE), their derived products-epoxy-polyols (HLOE/HPOE), epoxy-polyurethanes (EU=LOPU/POPU) and EU coatings. Changes in epoxy equivalent, iodine value, hydroxyl value and percent saturation of oil backbone in due course of epoxidation and hydroxylation reactions, were plotted as a function of time. Spectral (IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR), physico-chemical and thermal (TGA and DSC) analyses of aforementioned resins were performed by standard methods. Physico-mechanical and chemical resistance tests reveal that coatings of LOPUs perform better than those of POPUs. It was found that properties of oil epoxy-polyurethane coatings are mainly governed by: (i) fatty acid composition and nature of starting oils, (ii) extent of epoxidation, (iii) number and location of hydroxyls and residual double bonds in the final product and (iv) the presence of long dangling chains. PO, HLOE and LOPUs exhibit good antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli at very small MIC. These EU systems can be safely employed unto 220 degrees C.

  19. Gravity-Induced Vacuum Dominance

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, William C. C.; Vanzella, Daniel A. T.

    2010-04-23

    It has been widely believed that, except in very extreme situations, the influence of gravity on quantum fields should amount to just small, subdominant contributions. This view seemed to be endorsed by the seminal results obtained over the last decades in the context of renormalization of quantum fields in curved spacetimes. Here, however, we argue that this belief is false by showing that there exist well-behaved spacetime evolutions where the vacuum energy density of free quantum fields is forced, by the very same background spacetime, to become dominant over any classical energy-density component. By estimating the time scale for the vacuum energy density to become dominant, and therefore for backreaction on the background spacetime to become important, we argue that this (infrared) vacuum dominance may bear unexpected astrophysical and cosmological implications.

  20. Microscale Digital Vacuum Electronic Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Mojarradi, Mohammed M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement microscale digital vacuum electronic gates. In one embodiment, a microscale digital vacuum electronic gate includes: a microscale field emitter that can emit electrons and that is a microscale cathode; and a microscale anode; where the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode are disposed within at least a partial vacuum; where the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode are separated by a gap; and where the potential difference between the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode is controllable such that the flow of electrons between the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode is thereby controllable; where when the microscale anode receives a flow of electrons, a first logic state is defined; and where when the microscale anode does not receive a flow of electrons, a second logic state is defined.

  1. Gas-fired vacuum technology

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, T.J.; Bender, J.W.

    2000-04-01

    The modern phase of gas-fired vacuum furnace development began in 1986 under two programs sponsored by the Gas Research Institute . Since then, a tremendous amount of gas industry and private money and time have been spent on the development of this important technology. A key barrier has been the temperature capability of gas-fired designs. Recognizing this, Surface Combustion first began commercial development for low temperature applications and designs. This work resulted in several US patents and ultimately the VacuDraw vacuum tempering furnace. Other commercial configurations and larger sizes subsequently evolved from this successful effort. The most recent development in gas-fired vacuum furnace technology, and perhaps the most significant to date, is the installation and operation of the first multichamber, 1,065 C (1,950 F) system designed for tool steel heat treatment. This article provides an overview of this equipment and describes its key design and performance features.

  2. Impedances of Laminated Vacuum Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-22

    First publications on impedance of laminated vacuum chambers are related to early 70s: those are of S. C. Snowdon [1] and of A. G. Ruggiero [2]; fifteen years later, a revision paper of R. Gluckstern appeared [3]. All the publications were presented as Fermilab preprints, and there is no surprise in that: the Fermilab Booster has its laminated magnets open to the beam. Being in a reasonable mutual agreement, these publications were all devoted to the longitudinal impedance of round vacuum chambers. The transverse impedance and the flat geometry case were addressed in more recent paper of K. Y. Ng [4]. The latest calculations of A. Macridin et al. [5] revealed some disagreement with Ref. [4]; this fact stimulated us to get our own results on that matter. Longitudinal and transverse impendances are derived for round and flat laminated vacuum chambers. Results of this paper agree with Ref. [5].

  3. D-Zero Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Wintercorn, S.J.; /Fermilab

    1986-04-07

    The system pumping speed was calculated by taking the reciprocal of the sum of the reciprocal pump speed and the reciprocal line conductances. The conductances of the pipe were calculated from the following formulas taken from the Varian vacuum manual. This report updates the original to reflect the pumping curves and basic vacuum system characteristics for the purchased components and installed piping of the D-Zero vacuum system. The system consists of two Edward's E2M275 two stage mechanical pumps, a Leybold-Heraeus WSU2000 Blower and three Varian 4' diffusion pumps (one for each cryostat). Individual pump and system pumping speed curves and a diagram of the system is included.

  4. Toughening Mechanisms in Silica-Filled Epoxy Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Binay S.

    Epoxies are widely used as underfill resins throughout the microelectronics industry to mechanically couple and protect various components of flip-chip assemblies. Generally rigid materials largely surround underfill resins. Improving the mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy resins to better match those of their rigid counterparts can help extend the service lifetime of flip-chip assemblies. Recently, researchers have demonstrated that silica nanoparticles are effective toughening agents for lightly-crosslinked epoxies. Improvements in the fracture toughness of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites have primarily been attributed to two toughening mechanisms: particle debonding with subsequent void growth and matrix shear banding. Various attempts have been made to model the contribution of these toughening mechanisms to the overall fracture energy observed in silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites. However, disparities still exist between experimental and modeled fracture energy results. In this dissertation, the thermal, rheological and mechanical behavior of eight different types of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites was investigated. Each nanocomposite consisted of up to 10 vol% of silica nanoparticles with particle sizes ranging from 20 nm to 200 nm, with a variety of surface treatments and particle structures. Fractographical analysis was conducted with new experimental approaches in order to accurately identify morphological evidence for each proposed toughening mechanism. Overall, three major insights into the fracture behavior of real world silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites were established. First, microcracking was observed as an essential toughening mechanism in silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites. Microcracking was observed on the surface and subsurface of fractured samples in each type of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposite. The additional toughening contribution of microcracking to overall fracture energy yielded excellent agreement between experimental

  5. New thermal and microbial resistant metal-containing epoxy polymers.

    PubMed

    Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M

    2010-01-01

    A series of metal-containing epoxy polymers have been synthesized by the condensation of epichlorohydrin (1-chloro-2,3-epoxy propane) with Schiff base metal complexes in alkaline medium. Schiff base was initially prepared by the reaction of 2,6 dihydroxy 1-napthaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine in 1 : 2 molar ratio and then with metal acetate. All the synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental, spectral, and thermal analysis. The physicochemical properties, viz., epoxy value, hydroxyl content, and chlorine content [mol/100 g] were measured by standard procedures. The antimicrobial activities of these metal-containing epoxy polymers were carried out by using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) methods against S. aureus, B. subtilis (Gram-positive bacteria), and E. coli, P. aeruginosa (Gram-negative bacteria). It was found that the ECu(II) showed higher antibacterial activity than other metal-chelated epoxy resin while EMn(II) exhibited reduced antibacterial activity against all bacteria. PMID:20689716

  6. Dynamic Mechanical Behavior of Nickel-Aluminum Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Morgana; Hanagud, Sathyanaraya; Thadhani, Naresh

    2005-07-01

    Epoxy-based composites reinforced with a mixture of micron-sized Ni and micron or nano-sized Al powders were fabricated as bulk materials by cast/curing. The structural/mechanical behavior of these materials was evaluated using elastic and plastic property measurements via static and dynamic compression tests performed on rod shaped samples. Reverse Taylor anvil-on-rod impact tests combined with velocity interferometry gave qualitative and quantitative information about the transient deformation and failure response of the composites. The material containing 20wt% epoxy and nano-sized Al powder showed the most superior mechanical properties in terms of elastic modulus, and static and dynamic compressive strength, and strain before fracture, as compared to the other reinforced cast materials. The results illustrate that nano-sized Al particles provide significant enhancement to strength of epoxy composites by dispersing in the epoxy and generating a nano-Al containing epoxy matrix with embedded Ni particles. Funding for this research was provided by AFOSR/MURI Grant No. F49620-02-1-0382.

  7. Electron beam curing of epoxy resins by cationic polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Havens, S.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1995-10-01

    Preliminary investigations have determined that conventional epoxy resins can be cured at selectable temperatures with high glass transition temperatures (essentially the same as with thermal curing), while still exhibiting equivalent or comparable mechanical properties. A cationic photoinitiator at a concentration of 1--3 parts per hundred of the epoxy resin is required for this process. Gamma cell screening of cationic photoinitiators with bisphenol A, bisphenol F, and cycloaliphatic epoxies demonstrated that diaryliodonium salts of weakly nucleophilic anions such as hexafluoroantimonate are most effective. Diaryliodonium salts were also found to be most effective initiators for the cationic polymerization of epoxy resins when a high energy/power electron beam accelerator was used as the source of ionizing radiation. For example Dow Tactix 123 (bisphenol A epoxy) containing 3 phr (4-octyloxyphenyl)phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate was irradiated at a total dosage of 100 kGy. Glass transition temperature (tan delta) of the cured material as determined by dynamic mechanical analysis was 182 C as compared to 165 C thermally cured material.

  8. Fiber-Reinforced Reactive Nano-Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2011-01-01

    An ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene/ matrix interface based on the fabrication of a reactive nano-epoxy matrix with lower surface energy has been improved. Enhanced mechanical properties versus pure epoxy on a three-point bend test include: strength (25 percent), modulus (20 percent), and toughness (30 percent). Increased thermal properties include higher Tg (glass transition temperature) and stable CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion). Improved processability for manufacturing composites includes faster wetting rates on macro-fiber surfaces, lower viscosity, better resin infusion rates, and improved rheological properties. Improved interfacial adhesion properties with Spectra fibers by pullout tests include initial debonding force of 35 percent, a maximum pullout force of 25 percent, and energy to debond at 65 percent. Improved mechanical properties of Spectra fiber composites (tensile) aging resistance properties include hygrothermal effects. With this innovation, high-performance composites have been created, including carbon fibers/nano-epoxy, glass fibers/nano-epoxy, aramid fibers/ nano-epoxy, and ultra-high-molecularweight polyethylene fiber (UHMWPE).

  9. High-performance fiber/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, T. T.; Hamstad, M. A.; Jessop, E. S.; Toland, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Activities described include: (1) determining the applicability of an ultrahigh-strength graphite fiber to composite pressure vessels; (2) defining the fatigue performance of thin-titanium-lined, high-strength graphite/epoxy pressure vessel; (3) selecting epoxy resin systems suitable for filament winding; (4) studying the fatigue life potential of Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels; and (5) developing polymer liners for composite pressure vessels. Kevlar 49/epoxy and graphite fiber/epoxy pressure vessels, 10.2 cm in diameter, some with aluminum liners and some with alternation layers of rubber and polymer were fabricated. To determine liner performance, vessels were subjected to gas permeation tests, fatigue cycling, and burst tests, measuring composite performance, fatigue life, and leak rates. Both the metal and the rubber/polymer liner performed well. Proportionately larger pressure vessels (20.3 and 38 cm in diameter) were made and subjected to the same tests. In these larger vessels, line leakage problems with both liners developed the causes of the leaks were identified and some solutions to such liner problems are recommended.

  10. New Thermal and Microbial Resistant Metal-Containing Epoxy Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M.

    2010-01-01

    A series of metal-containing epoxy polymers have been synthesized by the condensation of epichlorohydrin (1-chloro-2,3-epoxy propane) with Schiff base metal complexes in alkaline medium. Schiff base was initially prepared by the reaction of 2,6 dihydroxy 1-napthaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine in 1  :  2 molar ratio and then with metal acetate. All the synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental, spectral, and thermal analysis. The physicochemical properties, viz., epoxy value, hydroxyl content, and chlorine content [mol/100 g] were measured by standard procedures. The antimicrobial activities of these metal-containing epoxy polymers were carried out by using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) methods against S. aureus, B. subtilis (Gram-positive bacteria), and E. coli, P. aeruginosa (Gram-negative bacteria). It was found that the ECu(II) showed higher antibacterial activity than other metal-chelated epoxy resin while EMn(II) exhibited reduced antibacterial activity against all bacteria. PMID:20689716

  11. Vacuum Plasma Spraying Replaces Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Power, Chris; Burns, David H.; Daniel, Ron; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spraying used to fabricate large parts with complicated contours and inner structures, without uninspectable welds. Reduces time, and expense of fabrication. Wall of combustion chamber built up inside of outer nickel-alloy jacket by plasma spraying. Particles of metal sprayed partially melted in plasma gun and thrown at supersonic speed toward deposition surface. Vacuum plasma-spray produces stronger bond between the grooves and covering layer completing channels and wall of combustion chamber. In tests, bond withstood pressure of 20 kpsi, three times allowable limit by old method.

  12. Method for vacuum fusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Ackler, Harold D.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Tarte, Lisa A.; Hicks, Randall K.

    2001-01-01

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  13. Statistical analysis of Kevlar 49/epoxy composite stress-rupture data

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, R.E.

    1983-09-01

    Statistical analyses are presented for LLNL stress-rupture data sets involving kevlar 49/epoxy strands and NASA Kevlar 49/epoxy spherical pressure vessels subjected to sustained loading. Raw data, summarized inferences, and figures are included.

  14. ETV Program Report: Coatings for Wastewater Collection Systems - Standard Cement Materials, Epoxy Coating 4553

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Standard Cement Materials, Inc. Standard Epoxy Coating 4553™ (SEC 4553) epoxy coating used for wastewater collection system rehabilitation was evaluated by EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program under laboratory conditions at the Center for Innovative Grouting Ma...

  15. Toughened epoxy resins: Preformed particles as tougheners for adhesives and matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Riew, C.K.; Siebert, A.R.; Smith, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    Free-flowing,preformed,rigid,multilayer acrylic core-shell polymers were used to enhance the toughness of epoxy resins. The glass transition temperatures of the cured epoxys were over 190 degrees centigrade.

  16. Shrinkage of renal tissue after impregnation via the cold Biodur plastination technique.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Sampaio, Marco A; Marques-Sampaio, Beatriz P S; Sampaio, Francisco J B; Henry, Robert W

    2011-08-01

    Thorough dehydration is a key for good plastination and invariably it leads to shrinkage. Shrinkage during plastination has been studied to lesser extent. Shrinkage was studied in 10 pig kidneys including regional shrinkage (cortex, medulla, sinus) and at which stages of the process (dehydration, impregnation, curing) shrinkage occurred. Kidneys were fixation by perfusion of 10% neutral buffered formalin solution via the renal artery. The vessels and ureter were filled with colored silicone (Dow Corning, Silastic E RTV Silicone Rubber) and the kidneys were cut into one centimeter transverse slices. Two slices of each kidney were plastinated via the classic von Hagens' method. Slices were photographed at the same focal length after preparation and at the end of each stage of plastination. Slice surface area was determined by a point-counting planimetry method. Post dehydration shrinkage of the kidney was 10.21% while post impregnation 10.11%. After completion of plastination, total area of kidney slice shrinkage was 19.72%. Cortical area shrunk 12.81% after dehydration and 13.16% after impregnation. After plastination, cortical area had shrunk 24.28%. No significant shrinkage occurred in the medulla and sinus. Results demonstrate that kidney shrinkage during impregnation is as intense as during dehydration. Significant shrinkage occurred in the renal cortex but not in the medulla and sinus. This demonstrates that different tissue types, even in the same specimen, have different rates of shrinkage during dehydration and impregnation. Therefore, plastinated specimens should be used carefully in research where obtaining measures is important.

  17. Phosphate adsorption on aluminum-impregnated mesoporous silicates: surface structure and behavior of adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun Woo; Han, James S; Jang, Min; Min, Soo-Hong; Park, Jae Kwang; Rowell, Roger M

    2004-02-01

    Phosphorus from excess fertilizers and detergents ends up washing into lakes, creeks, and rivers. This overabundance of phosphorus causes excessive aquatic plant and algae growth and depletes the dissolved oxygen supply in the water. In this study, aluminum-impregnated mesoporous adsorbents were tested for their ability to remove phosphate from water. The surface structure of the materials was investigated with X-ray diffraction (XRD), a N2 adsorption-desorption technique, Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to understand the effect of surface properties on the adsorption behavior of phosphate. The mesoporous materials were loaded with Al components by reaction with surface silanol groups. In the adsorption test, the Al-impregnated mesoporous materials showed fast adsorption kinetics as well as high adsorption capacities, compared with activated alumina. The uniform mesopores of the Al-impregnated mesoporous materials caused the diffusion rate in the adsorption process to increase, which in turn caused the fast adsorption kinetics. High phosphate adsorption capacities of the Al-impregnated mesoporous materials were attributed to not only the increase of surface hydroxyl density on Al oxide due to well-dispersed impregnation of Al components but also the decrease in stoichiometry of surface hydroxyl ions to phosphate by the formation of monodentate surface complexes. PMID:14968882

  18. Fractionation of oil palm frond hemicelluloses by water or alkaline impregnation and steam explosion.

    PubMed

    Sabiha-Hanim, Saleh; Mohd Noor, Mohd Azemi; Rosma, Ahmad

    2015-01-22

    Steam explosion of oil palm frond has been carried out under different temperatures between 180 and 210°C for 4 min (severity of 2.96-3.84) after impregnation of the frond chips with water or KOH solution. The effects of impregnation and steam explosion conditions of oil palm fronds on the water soluble fraction and insoluble fraction were investigated. The maximum yield of hemicelluloses in water soluble fractions recovered was 23.49% and 25.33% for water and KOH impregnation, treated with steam explosion at temperature of 210°C (severity of 3.84) with a fractionation efficiency of 77.30% and 83.32%, respectively. Under this condition, the water insoluble fractions contained celluloses at 60.83% and 64.80% for water and KOH impregnation, respectively. The steam explosion temperature of 210°C for 4 min (logR(o) 3.84) was found to be the best condition in the extraction of hemicelluloses from OPF for both types of impregnation.

  19. Viscoelasticity of Epoxy nano-composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2013-03-01

    Nanocomposites have been modeled in a multiscale covering from molecular scale (e.g., molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo), microscale (e.g., Brownian dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics, lattice Boltzmann, time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau method, dynamic density functional theory method) to mesoscale and macroscale (e.g., micromechanics, equivalent-continuum and self-similar approaches, finite element method) The presence of layered silicates in nonaqueous polymers changes the viscoelastic behavior of the unfilled matrix from liquid-like to solid-like because of the formation of a three-dimensional percolating network of exfoliated or intercalated stacks. This gel-like behavior is a direct consequence of the highly anisotropic nature of the nanoclays which prevents their free rotation and the dissipation of stress. Particle to particle interactions is the dominant mechanism in fumed silica nanocomposites whereas particle to polymer interaction is the dominant one in colloidal silica nanocomposites at identical filler concentrations. These interactions are balanced in each nanocomposite systems by the silica surface treatments (chain grafting, silane modification) and the molecular weight of the matrix. Two different types of nanocomposite structures exist namely, intercalated nanocomposites where the polymer chains are sandwiched between silicate layers and exfoliated nanocomposites where the layers can be considered individually but remain more or less dispersed in the polymer matrix. Yield stress from Carreau-Yasuda model has been correlated to exfoliation. Also, equilibrium modulus and zero shear rate viscosity has been used to analyze percolation threshold and sol-gel transition. Nano clays organically functionalized were mixed with Epoxy in a high shear mixer.

  20. The effect of fluoride impregnated dental floss on enamel fluoride uptake in vitro and streptococcus mutans colonization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chaet, R; Wei, S H

    1977-01-01

    The conclusions reached from this investigation can be summarized as follows: Fluoride can be incorporated into unwaxed dental floss. Placement of the fluoride impregnated dental floss in acid-buffer solution results in the release of most of the fluoride in the floss. Interproximal surfaces of teeth treated in vitro with fluoride impregnated dental floss acquired significantly (approximately three fold) more enamel fluoride than those treated with plain dental floss. The number of in vivo interproximal areas harboring Streptococcus mutans was reduced significantly after treatment with fluoride impregnated dental floss. Further studies should be done to establish the biological, physiochemical, manufacturing, and practical aspects of fluoride impregnated dental floss.