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Sample records for epoxy vacuum impregnation

  1. Managing Coil Epoxy Vacuum Impregnation Systems at the Manufacturing Floor Level To Achieve Ultimate Properties in State-of-the-Art Magnet Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Hubrig; G.H. Biallas

    2005-05-01

    Liquid epoxy resin impregnation systems remain a state-of-the-art polymer material for vacuum and vacuum/pressure impregnation applications in the manufacture of both advanced and conventional coil winding configurations. Epoxy resins inherent latitude in processing parameters accounts for their continued popularity in engineering applications, but also for the tendency to overlook or misinterpret the requisite processing parameters on the manufacturing floor. Resin system impregnation must be managed in detail in order to achieve device life cycle reliability. This closer look reveals how manufacturing floor level management of material acceptance, handling and storage, pre- and post- impregnation processing and cure can be built into a manufacturing plan to increase manufacturing yield, lower unit cost and ensure optimum life cycle performance of the coil.

  2. Impregnating magnetic components with MDA free epoxy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.O.; Domeier, L.; Gunewardena, S.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes the use of {open_quotes}Formula 456{close_quotes} an aliphatic amine cured epoxy for impregnating coils. Methylene dianiline (MDA) has been used for more than 20 years as the curing agent for various epoxy formulations throughout the Department of Energy. Sandia National Laboratories began the process of replacing MDA with other formulations because of regulations imposed by OSHA on the use of MDA.

  3. Degradation free epoxy impregnation of REBCO coils and cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, C.; Bagrets, N.; Weiss, K.-P.; Bayer, C. M.; Bast, T.

    2013-05-01

    In applications utilizing high-temperature superconductors (HTS) under high mechanical loads as high-field magnets or rotors of generators and motors, the rare-earth-barium-copper-oxide (REBCO) tapes have to be stabilized mechanically. This is achieved using support structures of structural materials and filling the voids in the support through the impregnation of the tapes. The impregnation prevents movement of the tapes and distributes mechanical loads evenly. With high mechanical strengths and low sensitivities to rapid temperature changes, epoxy resins are desired materials for the impregnation of superconductor tapes. However, a strong decrease of the current-carrying capabilities was observed in previous epoxy-impregnated REBCO coils. In this work the thermal expansion mismatches between epoxy resins and REBCO tapes are identified as the cause of these degradations. Fillers are used to reduce the thermal expansions of glues and resins. Mixtures with varying filler contents are analyzed systematically. Their thermal expansions and the corresponding degradations of short REBCO tape samples are measured. A mixture of epoxy resin and filler is found which allows degradation-free impregnation of REBCO tapes. This mixture is validated on a 1.2 m long 15 × 5 Roebel-assembled-coated-conductor (RACC) cable from Industrial Research Limited (IRL).

  4. Unanticipated Effects of Epoxy Impregnating Transformers

    SciTech Connect

    SANCHEZ,ROBERT O.; ARCHER,WENDEL E.

    2000-08-23

    Many Sandia components for military applications are designed for a 20-year life. In order to determine if magnetic components meet that requirement, the parts are subjected to selected destructive tests. This paper reviews the re-design of a power transformer and the tests required to prove-in the re-design. The re-design included replacing the Epon 828/Mica/methylenedianiline (curing agent Z) epoxy encapsulant with a recent Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) developed epoxy encapsulant. The new encapsulant reduces the Environmental Safety and Health (ES and H) hazards. Life testing of this re-designed transformer generated failures; an open secondary winding. An experimental program to determine the cause of the broken wires and an improved design to eliminate the problem was executed. This design weakness was corrected by reverting to the hazardous epoxy system.

  5. Enhancement of the transverse stress tolerance of REBCO Roebel cables by epoxy impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, S.; Dhallé, M.; Gao, P.; Wessel, W.; Kario, A.; Kling, A.; Goldacker, W.

    2015-06-01

    REBCO Roebel cables are considered for application in high-temperature superconducting inserts for accelerator magnets because of their fully transposed geometry, high-engineering current density, and adequate bending tolerance. In these magnets the cables experience Lorentz forces leading to transverse stresses up to 100-150 MPa. Previous reports have shown bare Roebel cables to degrade under such high stresses so that additional reinforcement is required. In this work, two identical Roebel cables are vacuum impregnated with a mixture of epoxy and fused silica in order to improve their tolerance to transverse stress. After impregnation, the critical current of the cables is measured under transverse mechanical loading at T = 4.2 K, {{B}\\bot }=10.5 T. A reference cable without impregnation is tested as well. Pressures up to 350 MPa are applied to a short (30 mm) section of each cable. No degradation was observed for pressures up to 250 MPa and 170 MPa in the two impregnated cables. The critical current of the non-impregnated cable, in contrast, started to decrease at stresses as low as 40 MPa.

  6. DGEBF epoxy blends for use in the resin impregnation of extremely large composite parts

    DOE PAGES

    Madhukar, M. S.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2015-01-16

    Large superconducting electromagnets used in fusion reactors utilize a large amount of glass/epoxy composite for electrical insulation and mechanical and thermal strengths. Moreover, the manufacture of these magnets involves wrapping each superconducting cable bundle with dry glass cloth followed by the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding of the entire magnet. Due to their enormous size (more than 100 tons), it requires more than 40 h for resin impregnation and the subsequent pressure cycles to ensure complete impregnation and removal of any trapped air pockets. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F epoxy resin cross-linked with methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride with an accelerator has been shownmore » to be a good candidate for use in composite parts requiring long impregnation cycles. Viscosity, gel time, and glass transition temperature of four resin-blends of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F resin system were monitored as a function of time and temperature with an objective to find the blend that provides a working window longer than 40h at low viscosity without lowering its glass transition temperature. A resin-blend in the weight ratios of resin:hardener:accelerator=100:82:0.125 is shown to provide more than 60h at low resin viscosity while maintaining the same glass transition temperature as obtained with previously used resin-blends, based on the results.« less

  7. DGEBF epoxy blends for use in the resin impregnation of extremely large composite parts

    SciTech Connect

    Madhukar, M. S.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2015-01-16

    Large superconducting electromagnets used in fusion reactors utilize a large amount of glass/epoxy composite for electrical insulation and mechanical and thermal strengths. Moreover, the manufacture of these magnets involves wrapping each superconducting cable bundle with dry glass cloth followed by the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding of the entire magnet. Due to their enormous size (more than 100 tons), it requires more than 40 h for resin impregnation and the subsequent pressure cycles to ensure complete impregnation and removal of any trapped air pockets. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F epoxy resin cross-linked with methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride with an accelerator has been shown to be a good candidate for use in composite parts requiring long impregnation cycles. Viscosity, gel time, and glass transition temperature of four resin-blends of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F resin system were monitored as a function of time and temperature with an objective to find the blend that provides a working window longer than 40h at low viscosity without lowering its glass transition temperature. A resin-blend in the weight ratios of resin:hardener:accelerator=100:82:0.125 is shown to provide more than 60h at low resin viscosity while maintaining the same glass transition temperature as obtained with previously used resin-blends, based on the results.

  8. Vacuum powder injector and method of impregnating fiber with powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Working, Dennis C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus uniformly impregnate stranded material with dry powder such as low solubility, high melt flow polymer powder to produce, for example, composite prepregs. The stranded material is expanded in an impregnation chamber by an influx of air so that the powder, which may enter through the same inlet as the air, penetrates to the center of the stranded material. The stranded material then is contracted for holding the powder therein. The stranded material and powder may be pulled through the impregnation chamber in the same direction by vacuum. Larger particles of powder which do not fully penetrate the stranded material may be combed into the stranded material and powder which does not impregnate the stranded material may be collected and reused.

  9. Thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy-impregnated Bi-2212/Ag composite

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Pei; Wang, Yang; Fermi National Accelerator Lab.; ...

    2014-11-26

    In this study, knowledge of the thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy/superconductor/insulation composite is important for designing, fabricating, and operating epoxy impregnated high field superconducting magnets near their ultimate potentials. We report measurements of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, and the coefficient of thermal contraction of epoxy-impregnated composite made from the state-of-the-art powder-in-tube multifilamentary Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox round wire at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. Stress-strain curves of samples made from single-strand and Rutherford cables were tested under both monotonic and cyclic compressive loads, with single strands insulated using a thin TiO2 insulation coating and the Rutherford cable insulated with a braided ceramicmore » sleeve.« less

  10. Thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy-impregnated Bi-2212/Ag composite

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pei; Wang, Yang; Godeke, Arno; Ye, Liyang; Flanagan, Gene; Shen, Tengming

    2014-11-26

    In this study, knowledge of the thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy/superconductor/insulation composite is important for designing, fabricating, and operating epoxy impregnated high field superconducting magnets near their ultimate potentials. We report measurements of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, and the coefficient of thermal contraction of epoxy-impregnated composite made from the state-of-the-art powder-in-tube multifilamentary Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox round wire at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. Stress-strain curves of samples made from single-strand and Rutherford cables were tested under both monotonic and cyclic compressive loads, with single strands insulated using a thin TiO2 insulation coating and the Rutherford cable insulated with a braided ceramic sleeve.

  11. Surface cooled, vacuum impregnated superconducting magnet systems: Design, construction, applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Pieterman, Karel

    The design and construction of three superconducting magnet systems for applications in the fields of medical imaging, plasma physics and nuclear physics are described. All three systems have vacuum impregnated, intrinsically stable coils with cooling at the outer surfaces of the winding package with liquid helium, and are all coupled in some way to closed cycle cooling systems. General theories are discussed. The techniques used in both the design and the construction of the different magnet systems, are given. The use of numerical methods for the calculation of thermal and mechanical properties of superconducting coil systems, is emphasized. The experimental results obtained with the Delft magnetic resonance imaging system are described and examples of images showing sagittal sections of the human head, successfully produced with this system, are given.

  12. Zinc enrichment of whole potato tuber by vacuum impregnation.

    PubMed

    Erihemu; Hironaka, Kazunori; Koaze, Hiroshi; Oda, Yuji; Shimada, Kenichiro

    2015-04-01

    Zinc is a nutritionally essential truce element, and thus zinc deficiency (ZD) severely affects human health. More than 25% of the world's population is at risk of ZD. This study was initiated to examine the use of the vacuum impregnation (VI) technique for enriching zinc content of whole potatoes; the effect of vacuum time, restoration time, steam-cooking and storage at 4 °C on the zinc content of VI whole potatoes was evaluated. Whole potato tubers were immersed in a 9 g/100 g zinc (zinc gluconate) solution. Vacuum pressure of 1,000 Pa was applied for 0-120 min, and atmospheric pressure restoration for 0-4 h. Experimental results showed that the zinc content of VI potatoes increased with vacuum and restoration time. Moreover, VI-cooked unpeeled or peeled potatoes had 63-94 times and 47-75 times higher zinc contents than un-VI-cooked unpeeled or peeled potatoes, respectively. The world daily potato consumption (86 g) of the VI-cooked unpeeled and peeled potatoes provided adult men with 130-148% and 100-135% of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of zinc, respectively. Also, the daily potato consumption of the unpeeled and peeled potatoes supplied adult women with 178-203% and 137-185% of the RDA level, respectively. In addition, the VI potatoes had 40 times higher zinc contents through 30 days of storage at 4 °C, compared with un-VI-treated potatoes. This study indicated that VI treatment of whole potatoes was useful for enriching the zinc content.

  13. Enhanced antimicrobial effect of organic acid washing against foodborne pathogens on broccoli by vacuum impregnation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun-Won; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-01-18

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of vacuum impregnation applied to the washing process for removal of Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes from broccoli surfaces. Broccoli was inoculated with the two foodborne pathogens and treated with simple dipping washing or with vacuum impregnation in 2% malic acid for 5, 10, 20, or 30 min. There were two methods of vacuum impregnation: continuous and intermittent. After 30 min of 101.3 kPa (=14.7 psi, simple dipping), 61.3 kPa (=8.9 psi), and 21.3 kPa (=3.1 psi) of continuous vacuum impregnation treatment, there were 1.6, 2.0, and 2.4 log 10 CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and 1.5, 1.7, and 2.3 log 10 CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes, respectively. After 30 min of 101.3, 61.3, and 21.3 kPa of intermittent vacuum impregnation treatment, there were 1.5, 2.3, and 3.7 log 10 CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and 1.6, 2.1, and 3.2 log 10 CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes, respectively. Scanning electron photomicrographs showed that bacteria tend to attach to or become entrapped in protective sites after simple wash processing (dipping). However, most bacteria were washed out of protective sites after intermittent treatment. Direct treatment of cell suspensions with vacuum impregnation showed that it had no inactivation capacity in itself since there were no significant differences (P ≥ 0.05) between the reduction rates of non- and vacuum impregnation treatment. These results demonstrate that the increased antimicrobial effect of vacuum impregnation can be attributed to increased accessibility of sanitizer and an enhanced washing effect in protected sites on produce. Color, texture and titratable acidity values of broccoli treated with intermittent vacuum impregnation in 2% malic acid for 30 min were not significantly (P ≥ 0.05) different from those of untreated samples even though a storage interval was needed for titratable acidity values to be reduced to levels comparable to those of

  14. Synthesis of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite platelets by vacuum impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manthina, Venkata; Agrios, Alexander G.

    2016-11-01

    In perovskite solar cells and optoelectronics, perovskite film morphology controls the performance of the device. Various methods have been developed to control the morphology and coverage of the perovskite films. In this article platelet type perovskite morphlogy was synthesized using low temperature vacuum impregnation of the perovskite solution CH3NH3PbI3 resulting in complete coverage on TiO2 film. Vacuum impregnation synthesis of perovskites has the advantage of low cost and low temperature which faciliates application in flexible electronics and solar cells.

  15. Effect of Strain Rate on Tensile Properties of Carbon Fiber Epoxy-Impregnated Bundle Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-03-01

    The tensile tests for high tensile strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB) carbon fiber epoxy-impregnated bundle composite at various strain rates ranging from 3.33 × 10-5 to 6.0 × 102 s-1 (various crosshead speeds ranging from 8.33 × 10-7 to 1.5 × 101 m/s) were investigated. The statistical distributions of the tensile strength were also evaluated. The results clearly demonstrated that the tensile strength of bundle composite slightly increased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed) and the Weibull modulus of tensile strength for the bundle composite decreased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed), there is a linear relation between the Weibull modulus and the average tensile strength on log-log scale.

  16. Measurement of inter-strand contact resistance in epoxy impregnated Nb3Sn Rutherford cables

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgio Ambrosio et al.

    2003-10-07

    An apparatus for the measurement, under transverse pressure, of the inter-strand contact resistance in epoxy-impregnated Nb{sub 3}Sn Rutherford cables has been recently assembled at Fermilab. Procedures have been developed to instrument and measure samples extracted from Nb{sub 3}Sn coils. Samples were extracted from coils fabricated with the Wind-and-React and the React-and-Wind technology, both presently under development at Fermilab. A ceramic binder is used to improve the insulation and to simplify the fabrication of coils using the Wind-and-React technology. Synthetic oil is used to prevent sintering during the heat treatment of coils to be wound after reaction. In order to evaluate the effects of the ceramic binder and of the synthetic oil on the inter-strand resistance, measurements of samples extracted from coils were compared with measurements of cable stacks with varying characteristics. In this paper we describe the apparatus, the sample preparation, the measurement procedure, and the results of the first series of tests.

  17. DC characterization and 3D modelling of a triangular, epoxy-impregnated high temperature superconducting coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, D.; Ainslie, M. D.; Rush, J. P.; Durrell, J. H.; Zou, J.; Raine, M. J.; Hampshire, D. P.

    2015-06-01

    The direct current (dc) characterization of high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils is important for applications, such as electric machines, superconducting magnetic energy storage and transformers. In this paper, the dc characterization of a triangular-shaped, epoxy-impregnated HTS coil wound with YBCO coated conductor intended for use in an axial-flux HTS motor is presented. Voltage was measured at several points along the coil to provide detailed information of its dc characteristics. The coil is modelled based on the H -formulation using a new three-dimensional (3D) technique that utilizes the real superconducting layer thickness, and this model allows simulation of the actual geometrical layout of the HTS coil structure. Detailed information on the critical current density’s dependence on the magnitude and orientation of the magnetic flux density, Jc(B,θ), determined from experimental measurement of a short sample of the coated conductor comprising the coil is included directly in the numerical model by a two-variable direct interpolation to avoid developing complicated equations for data fitting and greatly improve the computational speed. Issues related to meshing the finite elements of the real thickness 3D model are also discussed in detail. Based on a comparison of the measurement and simulation results, it is found that non-uniformity along the length exists in the coil, which implies imperfect superconducting properties in the coated conductor, and hence, coil. By evaluating the current-voltage (I-V) curves using the experimental data, and after taking into account a more practical n value and critical current for the non-uniform region, the modelling results show good agreement with the experimental results, validating this model as an appropriate tool to estimate the dc I-V relationship of a superconducting coil. This work provides a further step towards effective and efficient 3D modelling of superconducting devices for large

  18. Degradation of the performance of a YBCO-coated conductor double pancake coil due to epoxy impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takematsu, T.; Hu, R.; Takao, T.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Nakagome, H.; Uglietti, D.; Kiyoshi, T.; Takahashi, M.; Maeda, H.

    2010-09-01

    Now that YBCO-coated conductors have been commercialized, a number of YBCO coils have been developed. However, their basic performances have not been systematically investigated so far. Here, we demonstrate that of a YBCO double pancake coil. The critical current of an epoxy impregnated YBCO double pancake coil was substantially degraded, i.e. the normal voltage appears above 8 A, only 18% of that for the dry coil. It was inferred that degradation occurs if the cumulative radial stress developed during cool down exceeds the critical transverse stress for the YBCO-coated conductor (typically 10 MPa). Under these conditions, the conductor was debonded at the interface between the buffer layer and YBCO layers, or fractured in the YBCO layer itself, causing cracks on the YBCO layer, resulting in a significant decline of the critical current. These negative effects are suppressed if the coils are dry wound or impregnated with paraffin, as the bonding strengths between turns are negligible and therefore turns are separated if the cumulative radial stress tends to be tensile. For non-circular coils in which epoxy impregnation is inevitable, degradation due to cumulative tensile transverse stress is still the major problem.

  19. Microwave application on air drying of apple (var. Granny Smith). The influence of vacuum impregnation pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin Esparza, Maria Eugenia

    Combined hot air-microwave drying has been studied on apple (var. Granny Smith), with and without vacuum impregnation (VI) pretreatment with isotonic solution, respect to kinetics, microstructural and final quality items. In order to reach this objective, a drier has been designed and built, that allows to control and to register all the variables which take place during the drying process. Thermal and dielectric properties, that are very important characteristics when studying heat and mass transfer phenomena that occur during the combined drying process, have been related to temperature and/or moisture content throughout empirical equations. It could be observed that all these properties decreased with product moisture content. Respect to dielectric properties, a relationship among water binding forms to food structure and water molecules relaxation frequency has been found. On the other hand, the effect of drying treatment conditions (air rate, drying temperature, sample thickness and incident microwave power) on the drying rate, from an empirical model based on diffusional mechanisms with two kinetic parameters (k1 and k2), both function of the incident microwave power, has been studied. Microwave application to air drying implied a notable decrease on drying time, the higher the applied power the higher the reduction. Microstructural study by Cryo-Sem revealed fast water vaporization taking place when microwaves are applied. Vacuum impregnation did not implied an additional advantage for combined drying as drying rate was similar to that of NIV samples. Finally, it has been studied the influence of process conditions on the color and mechanical properties of the dried product (IV and NIV). Vacuum impregnation implied an increase on the fracture resistance and less purity and tone angle. Microwave application induced product browning with respect to air drying (tone decreased and purity increased).

  20. 2D/3D quench simulation using ANSYS for epoxy impregnated Nb3Sn high field magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2002-09-19

    A quench program using ANSYS is developed for the high field collider magnet for three-dimensional analysis. Its computational procedure is explained. The quench program is applied to a one meter Nb{sub 3}Sn high field model magnet, which is epoxy impregnated. The quench simulation program is used to estimate the temperature and mechanical stress inside the coil as well as over the whole magnet. It is concluded that for the one meter magnet with the presented cross section and configuration, the thermal effects due to the quench is tolerable. But we need much more quench study and improvements in the design for longer magnets.

  1. Antibacterial action of silver-doped activated carbon prepared by vacuum impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ying; Wang, Zi-qiang; Zhao, Xin; Li, Wei; Liu, Shou-xin

    2013-02-01

    Silver-containing activated carbon (Ag/AC) exhibiting controlled release of silver and antibacterial action was prepared by vacuum impregnation using acetate silver as a precursor. The antibacterial activity toward E. coli and resistance to water erosion were investigated with the view of water purification. N2 adsorption at 77 K, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the surface morphology and crystalline properties of the Ag/AC samples. As the concentration of CH3COOAg increased, the samples change from exhibiting no antibacterial activity to inhibition of bacteria growth and then to antibacterial activity because of the higher silver content and smaller size of the silver particles. The Ag/AC composites showed a lower release rate of silver than that of a composite prepared by a traditional AgNO3 impregnation method, which suggests a strong interaction between the silver particles and carbon. Because the Ag particles block the pores of AC, the BET surface area, total pore volume and average pore diameter of the Ag/AC samples decreased as the concentration of the CH3COOAg solution increased. The higher antibacterial activity and controlled release of silver by Ag/AC containing 1.65 wt % silver means that it shows promise for purification of drinking water.

  2. Applicability of Vacuum Impregnation to Modify Physico-Chemical, Sensory and Nutritive Characteristics of Plant Origin Products—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Radziejewska-Kubzdela, Elżbieta; Biegańska-Marecik, Róża; Kidoń, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum impregnation is a non-destructive method of introducing a solution with a specific composition to the porous matrices of fruit and vegetables. Mass transfer in this process is a result of mechanically induced differences in pressure. Vacuum impregnation makes it possible to fill large volumes of intercellular spaces in tissues of fruit and vegetables, thus modifying physico-chemical properties and sensory attributes of products. This method may be used, e.g., to reduce pH and water activity of the product, change its thermal properties, improve texture, color, taste and aroma. Additionally, bioactive compounds may be introduced together with impregnating solutions, thus improving health-promoting properties of the product or facilitating production of functional food. PMID:25244012

  3. Influence of vacuum impregnation and pulsed electric field on the freezing temperature and ice propagation rates of spinach leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efforts are currently directed towards improving the quality of sensitive tissues of fruits and vegetables after freezing and thawing. One of the methods under investigation is the combination of vacuum impregnation (VI) with cryoprotectants and pulsed electric field (PEF) applied to the plant tiss...

  4. Mechanical properties of CFF/MC/SF composite prepared using vacuum infusion impregnation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lixin; Jiang, Aixiong; Yang, Zhiwei; Guan, Houbing; Jia, Hong; Min, Mengyu

    Carbon fiber felt (CFF)/microfine cement (MC)/silica fume (SF) composite was fabricated by using vacuum infusion impregnation method to infiltrate mechanically stirred mixing slurry of MC, SF, and water into CFF. MC, SF, and water were mixed, with a water-cement ratio of 0.5, SF was used to in place of MC in percentages of 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, 30% and 35%. Drainage method was used to determine the density of CFF/MC/SF composite. The bending strength and compressive strength of CFF/MC/SF composite were characterized by universal testing machine. The microstructure of the fracture surface of CFF/MC/SF composite was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Toughening mechanism of CFF/MC/SF composite was also analyzed. The results show that the density and mechanical strength of CFF/MC/SF composites first increases and then decreases as SF content increases. Crack propagation process includes several toughening and reinforcing mechanisms, such as, fiber/matrix debonding, fiber bridging, fiber friction, crack deflection, and fiber pull-out. At 20% SF content, the compactness and mechanical strength of the CFF/MC/SF composite are optimum, with density, flexural strength, and compressive strength at 1.53 g/cm3, 51.08 MPa, and 53.56 MPa, respectively.

  5. Testing of machine wound second generation HTS tape Vacuum Pressure Impregnated coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaffield, D.; Lewis, C.; Eugene, J.; Ingles, M.; Peach, D.

    2014-05-01

    Delamination of second generation (2G) High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) tapes has previously been reported when using resin based insulation systems for wound coils. One proposed root cause is the differential thermal contraction between the coil former and the resin encapsulated coil turns resulting in the tape c-axis tensile stress being exceeded. Importantly, delamination results in unacceptable degradation of the superconductor critical current level. To mitigate the delamination risk and prove winding, jointing and Vacuum Pressure Impregnation (VPI) processes in the production of coils for superconducting rotating machines at GE Power Conversion two scaled trial coils have been wound and extensively tested. The coils are wound from 12mm wide 2G HTS tape supplied by AMSC onto stainless steel 'racetrack' coil formers. The coils are wound in two layers which include both in-line and layer-layer joints subject to in-process test. The resin insulation system chosen is VPI and oven cured. Tests included; insulation resistance, repeat quench and recovery of the superconductor, heat runs and measurement of n-value, before and after multiple thermal cycling between ambient and 35 Kelvin. No degradation of coil performance is evidenced.

  6. Optimization of Vacuum Impregnation with Calcium Lactate of Minimally Processed Melon and Shelf-Life Study in Real Storage Conditions.

    PubMed

    Tappi, Silvia; Tylewicz, Urszula; Romani, Santina; Siroli, Lorenzo; Patrignani, Francesca; Dalla Rosa, Marco; Rocculi, Pietro

    2016-10-05

    Vacuum impregnation (VI) is a processing operation that permits the impregnation of fruit and vegetable porous tissues with a fast and more homogeneous penetration of active compounds compared to the classical diffusion processes. The objective of this research was to investigate the impact on VI treatment with the addition of calcium lactate on qualitative parameters of minimally processed melon during storage. For this aim, this work was divided in 2 parts. Initially, the optimization of process parameters was carried out in order to choose the optimal VI conditions for improving texture characteristics of minimally processed melon that were then used to impregnate melons for a shelf-life study in real storage conditions. On the basis of a 2(3) factorial design, the effect of Calcium lactate (CaLac) concentration between 0% and 5% and of minimum pressure (P) between 20 and 60 MPa were evaluated on color and texture. Processing parameters corresponding to 5% CaLac concentration and 60 MPa of minimum pressure were chosen for the storage study, during which the modifications of main qualitative parameters were evaluated. Despite of the high variability of the raw material, results showed that VI allowed a better maintenance of texture during storage. Nevertheless, other quality traits were negatively affected by the application of vacuum. Impregnated products showed a darker and more translucent appearance on the account of the alteration of the structural properties. Moreover microbial shelf-life was reduced to 4 d compared to the 7 obtained for control and dipped samples.

  7. Expansion into vacuum of a shocked tungsten carbide-epoxy mixture.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III; Vogler, Tracy John; Alexander, C. Scott

    2009-03-01

    The behavior of a shocked tungsten carbide / epoxy mixture as it expands into a vacuum has been studied through a combination of experiments and simulations. X-ray radiography of the expanding material as well as the velocity measured for a stood-off witness late are used to understand the physics of the problem. The initial shock causes vaporization of the epoxy matrix, leading to a multi-phase flow situation as the epoxy expands rapidly at around 8 km/s followed by the WC particles moving around 3 km/s. There are also small amounts of WC moving at higher velocities, apparently due to jetting in the sample. These experiments provide important data about the multi-phase flow characteristics of this material.

  8. Removal of degradation of the performance of an epoxy impregnated YBCO-coated conductor double pancake coil by using a polyimide-electrodeposited YBCO-coated conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Y.; Sato, K.; Piao, R.; Nakagome, H.; Takematsu, T.; Takao, T.; Kamibayashi, H.; Takahashi, M.; Maeda, H.

    2012-06-01

    Degradation of the epoxy impregnated YBCO coil performance is due to tensile radial stress concentration on the outer edge of the conductor during cool down. This stress acts as a cleavage stress and opens the conductor edge, fracturing the YBCO layer. The fracture propagates to another edge of the conductor, resulting in degradation of the coil performance. Degradation of the epoxy impregnated YBCO coil is eliminated, if we use a polyimide-electrodeposited YBCO-coated conductor: tensile radial stress concentration on the outer edge of the conductor is reduced due to plastic deformation of the ductile polyimide. Polyimide electrodeposition onto the YBCO-coated conductor is reliable, uniform, easy to apply, and can be extended to larger YBCO magnets, removing the risk of coil degradation.

  9. Characterization of a graphite epoxy optical bench during thermal vacuum cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Patricia A.; Jenkins, Teresa K.; Maag, Carl R.; Taylor, Daniel M.

    1988-01-01

    In-situ monitoring of the Wide-Field/Planetary Camera, a Hubble Space Telescope science instrument, was performed in a vacuum environment to better understand the formation of ice on cooled optical detectors. Several diagnostic instruments were mounted on an access plate to view the interior of the instrument housing and the graphite epoxy optical bench. The instrumentation chosen and the rationale for choosing the instrumentation are discussed. In addition, the performance of the instrumentation during monitoring operations is discussed.

  10. Vacuum infusion manufacturing and experimental characterization of Kevlar/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardi, M. R.; Giordano, M.; Langella, A.; Nele, L.; Antonucci, V.

    2014-05-01

    Epoxy/Kevlar composites have been manufactured by conventional Vacuum Infusion process and the Pulse Infusion technique. Pulse Infusion allows to control the pressure of the vacuum bag on the dry fiber reinforcement by using a proper designed pressure distributor that induces a pulsed transverse action and promotes the through thickness resin flow. The realized composite panel have been mechanically characterized by performing tensile and short beam shear tests according with the ASTM D3039 and ASTM D2344/D 2344M standard respectively in order to investigate the effect of Pulse Infusion on the tensile strength and ILSS.

  11. Vacuum infusion manufacturing and experimental characterization of Kevlar/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciardi, M. R.; Giordano, M.; Antonucci, V.; Langella, A.; Nele, L.

    2014-05-15

    Epoxy/Kevlar composites have been manufactured by conventional Vacuum Infusion process and the Pulse Infusion technique. Pulse Infusion allows to control the pressure of the vacuum bag on the dry fiber reinforcement by using a proper designed pressure distributor that induces a pulsed transverse action and promotes the through thickness resin flow. The realized composite panel have been mechanically characterized by performing tensile and short beam shear tests according with the ASTM D3039 and ASTM D2344/D 2344M standard respectively in order to investigate the effect of Pulse Infusion on the tensile strength and ILSS.

  12. Silver Toxicity With the Use of Silver-Impregnated Dressing and Wound Vacuum-Assisted Closure in an Immunocompromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    LaRiviere, Cabrini A.; Goldin, Adam B.; Avansino, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Silver-containing topical agents are used to help prevent infectious complications in wound therapy. Toxicity from topical silver agent exposure was initially reported in 1975 and was clinically characterized by granulocytopenia. Currently, the data regarding potential toxicity associated with silver-impregnated devices are limited. A 23-year-old patient receiving chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with necrotizing fasciitis of the abdominal wall and scrotum from a Crohn disease–related psoas-enteric fistula. Surgical debridement of the soft-tissue and abdominal musculature was performed to the peritoneum. Silver-containing foam sponges and wound vacuum-assisted closure were applied directly to the peritoneum 2 weeks after initial debridement. Subsequently, the patient developed leukopenia, and workup revealed the serum silver level was 4 times normal level. Silver-impregnated sponges were discontinued and silver-free sponges and wound vacuum-assisted closure therapy resumed, followed by leukopenia resolution. Silver toxicity associated with routine application of silver-impregnated sponges has not been previously reported. PMID:24527160

  13. Investigation of alternative materials for impregnation of Nb3Sn accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Deepak Reddy Chichili, Jay Hoffman and Alexander Zlobin

    2003-11-17

    Insulation is one of the most important elements of magnet design, which determines the electrical, mechanical, and thermal performance as well as lifetime of the magnet. The exposure to high radiation loads especially for the proposed LHC second-generation interaction region Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles further limits the choices of the insulation materials. Traditionally Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets were impregnated with epoxy to improve both the mechanical and electrical properties. However, the acceptable radiation limit for epoxy is low which reduces the lifetime of the magnet. The paper presents the results of the feasibility study to replace epoxy with high radiation-resistant material during vacuum impregnation. The mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of samples impregnated with Matrimid were measured and compared with epoxy-impregnated samples.

  14. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, Roger P.

    1992-01-01

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput.

  15. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, R.P.

    1992-09-15

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput. 3 figs.

  16. Vacuum Sealing Drainage Treatment Combined with Antibiotic-Impregnated Bone Cement for Treatment of Soft Tissue Defects and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Liang, Jiulong; Zhao, Jun; Quan, Liangliang; Jia, Xunyuan; Li, Mingchao; Tao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the combined effect of vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) and antibiotic-loaded bone cement on soft tissue defects and infection. Material/Methods This prospective non-blinded study recruited 46 patients with soft tissue defects and infection from January 2010 to May 2014 and randomly divided them into experimental and control groups (n=23). Patients in the experimental group were treated with VSD and antibiotic-loaded bone cement, while the patients in the control group were treated with VSD only. Results In the experimental group, the wound was healed in 23 cases at 4 weeks postoperatively, of which direct suture was performed in 12 cases, and additional free flap transplantation or skin grafting was performed in 6 cases and 5 cases, respectively. No infection reoccurred in 1-year follow-up. In the control group, the wound was healed in 15 cases at 6 weeks postoperatively, of which direct suture was performed in 8 cases, and additional free flap transplantation or skin grafting was performed in 3 cases and 4 cases, respectively. In the other 8 cases the wound was healed at 8 weeks postoperatively. Infection reoccurred in 3 cases during the follow-up. The experimental group had significantly fewer VSD dressing renewals, shorter time needed until the wound was ready for surgery, shorter duration of antibiotic administration, faster wound healing, and shorter hospital stay than the control group (p<0.01). Conclusions The combination of VSD and antibiotic bone cement might be a better method for treatment of soft tissue defects and infection. PMID:27281233

  17. Low-temperature mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.; Madhukar, M.; Thaicharoenporn, B.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2014-01-01

    Selected mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminate candidates for use in the electrical turn and ground insulation of the ITER Central solenoid (CS) modules were measured. Short-beam shear and flexural tests have been conducted on various E-glass cloth weaves/epoxy laminates at 295 and 77 K. Types of glass weave include 1581, 7500, 7781, and 38050, which represent both satin and plain weaves. The epoxy, planned for use for vacuum-pressure impregnation of the CS module, consists of an anhydride-cured bisphenol F resin system. Inter-laminar shear strength, flexural elastic modulus, and flexural strength have been measured. The data indicate that these properties are dependent on the volume percent of glass. Short-beam shear strength was measured as a function of the span-to-thickness ratio for all laminates at 77 K. Comprehensive fractography was conducted to obtain the failure mode of each short-beam shear test sample.

  18. Low-temperature mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R. P.; Madhukar, M.; Thaicharoenporn, B.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2014-01-27

    Selected mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminate candidates for use in the electrical turn and ground insulation of the ITER Central solenoid (CS) modules were measured. Short-beam shear and flexural tests have been conducted on various E-glass cloth weaves/epoxy laminates at 295 and 77 K. Types of glass weave include 1581, 7500, 7781, and 38050, which represent both satin and plain weaves. The epoxy, planned for use for vacuum-pressure impregnation of the CS module, consists of an anhydride-cured bisphenol F resin system. Inter-laminar shear strength, flexural elastic modulus, and flexural strength have been measured. The data indicate that these properties are dependent on the volume percent of glass. Short-beam shear strength was measured as a function of the span-to-thickness ratio for all laminates at 77 K. Comprehensive fractography was conducted to obtain the failure mode of each short-beam shear test sample.

  19. Matrix Characterization and Development for the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, B. W.; Hubert, P.; Hou, T. H.; Cano, R. J.; Loos, A. C.; Pipes, R. B.

    2001-01-01

    The curing kinetics and viscosity of an epoxy resin system, SI-ZG-5A, have been characterized for application in the vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. Impregnation of a typical carbon fiber perform provided the test bed for the characterization. Process simulations were carried out using the process model, COMPRO, to examine heat transfer and curing kinetics for a fully impregnated panel, neglecting resin flow. The predicted viscosity profile and final degree of cure were found to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  20. Vacuum-bag-only processing of composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Shad

    Ultrasonic imaging in the C-scan mode in conjunction with the amplitude of the reflected signal was used to measure flow rates of an epoxy resin film penetrating through the thickness of single layers of woven carbon fabric. Assemblies, comprised of a single layer of fabric and film, were vacuum-bagged and ultrasonically scanned in a water tank during impregnation at 50°C, 60°C, 70°C, and 80°C. Measured flow rates were plotted versus inverse viscosity to determine the permeability in the thin film, non-saturated system. The results demonstrated that ultrasonic imaging in the C-scan mode is an effective method of measuring z-direction resin flow through a single layer of fabric. The permeability values determined in this work were consistent with permeability values reported in the literature. Capillary flow was not observed at the temperatures and times required for pressurized flow to occur. The flow rate at 65°C was predicted from the linear plot of flow rate versus inverse viscosity. The effects of fabric architecture on through-thickness flow rates during impregnation of an epoxy resin film were measured by ultrasonic imaging. Multilayered laminates comprised of woven carbon fabrics and epoxy films (prepregs) were fabricated by vacuum-bagging. Ultrasonic imaging was performed in a heated water tank (65°C) during impregnation. Impregnation rates showed a strong dependence on fabric architecture, despite similar areal densities. Impregnation rates are directly affected by inter-tow spacing and tow nesting, which depend on fabric architecture, and are indirectly affected by areal densities. A new method of predicting resin infusion rates in prepreg and resin film infusion processes was proposed. The Stokes equation was used to derive an equation to predict the impregnation rate of laminates as a function of fabric architecture. Flow rate data previously measured by ultrasound was analyzed with the new equation and the Kozeny-Carman equation. A fiber

  1. Rheological behavior and cryogenic properties of cyanate ester/epoxy insulation material for fusion superconducting magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Z. X.; Huang, C. J.; Li, L. F.; Li, J. W.; Tan, R.; Tu, Y. P.

    2014-01-27

    In a Tokamak fusion reactor device like ITER, insulation materials for superconducting magnets are usually fabricated by a vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) process. Thus these insulation materials must exhibit low viscosity, long working life as well as good radiation resistance. Previous studies have indicated that cyanate ester (CE) blended with epoxy has an excellent resistance against neutron irradiation which is expected to be a candidate insulation material for a fusion magnet. In this work, the rheological behavior of a CE/epoxy (CE/EP) blend containing 40% CE was investigated with non-isothermal and isothermal viscosity experiments. Furthermore, the cryogenic mechanical and electrical properties of the composite were evaluated in terms of interlaminar shear strength and electrical breakdown strength. The results showed that CE/epoxy blend had a very low viscosity and an exceptionally long processing life of about 4 days at 60 °C.

  2. Carbon Nanotube/Cu Nanowires/Epoxy Composite Mats with Improved Thermal and Electrical Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yajuan; Cao, Wei; Li, Wei; Chen, Hongyuan; Wang, Miao; Wei, Hanxing; Hu, Dongmei; Chen, Minghai; Li, Qingwen

    2015-04-01

    Polymer composites with carbon nanofillers have been regarded as a promising candidate for electronic package materials. The challenge for such materials is to increase the electrical and thermal conductivity of the composites. Herein, we reported an epoxy composite film with high thermal and electrical conductivity that were prepared by loading high volume fraction of well-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, around 50 nm in diameter, 1-10 µm in length) and copper nanowires (Cu NWs, 60-70 nm in diameter, 1-5 µm in length) in epoxy matrix. The MWCNT-Cu NW hybrid mats were prepared by a vacuum filtration method with an optimum Cu NW content of 50 wt%. The hybrid mats was then impregnated by epoxy solution to prepare epoxy composite films. The epoxy was modified by the toughening agent to make the composite films tough and flexible. The loading fraction of MWCNTs and Cu NWs was tuned by controlling the viscosity of epoxy solution. A remarkable synergetic effect between the MWCNTs and Cu NWs in improving the electrical and thermal conductivity of epoxy composites was demonstrated. The results showed that the electrical conductivity of nanocomposites with 42.5 wt% epoxy was 1500 S/m, and the thermal conductivity was 2.83 W/m K, which was 10.1 times of the neat epoxy. Its thermal resistance was as low as 1% of the pure epoxy. And the mechanical properties of composites were also investigated. These robust and flexible nanocomposites showed prospective applications as thermal interface materials (TIMs) in the electronic industry.

  3. Properties of Two Carbon Composite Materials Using LTM25 Epoxy Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juan R.; Shah, C. H.; Postyn, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, the properties of two carbon-epoxy prepreg materials are presented. The epoxy resin used in these two materials can yield lower manufacturing costs due to its low initial cure temperature, and the capability of being cured using vacuum pressure only. The two materials selected for this study are MR50/LTM25, and CFS003/LTM25 with Amoco T300 fiber; both prepregs are manufactured by The Advanced Composites Group. MR50/LTM25 is a unidirectional prepreg tape using Mitsubishi MR50 carbon fiber impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. CRS003/LTM25 is a 2 by 2 twill fabric using Amoco T300 fiber and impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. Among the properties presented in this report are strength, stiffness, bolt bearing, and damage tolerance. Many of these properties were obtained at three environmental conditions: cold temperature/dry (CTD), room temperature/dry (RTD), and elevated temperature/wet (ETW). A few properties were obtained at room temperature/wet (RTW), and elevated temperature/dry (ETD). The cold and elevated temperatures used for testing were -125 F and 180 F, respectively. In addition, several properties related to processing are presented.

  4. Evaluation of epoxy systems for use in SBASI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coultas, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of the test program was to evaluate the performance of different epoxy systems as replacements for existing epoxy systems in the SBASI. The three areas of investigation were the connector shell potting, the epoxy tape under the charge cup, and the epoxy impregnated fiberglass over the output charge. Factors considered, in addition to performance, were availability, shelf life, pot life, and effect on producibility and cost.

  5. Optimization of the rheological properties of epoxy resins for glass and carbon reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phyo Maung, Pyi; Malysheva, G.; Romanova, I.

    2016-10-01

    Vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding (VARTM) offers advantages such as simplicity, low cost of consumables, and the ability to carry out the impregnation process and curing without using expensive equipment and tooling. In the VARTM process, rheological properties of resin have a critical impact on the impregnation and curing process. In this article, the experimental results of viscosity are presented, including the glass transition temperature, and the tensile and bending strength of the epoxy binders with the amine hardener, which depend on the quantity of its active solvent composition. The active solvent used is diethylene glycol. It shows that for an increase in the content of the active solvent, a reduction in the viscosity and a reduction of the glass transition temperature and strength occurs. The optimum composition of the binder is selected by using the Pareto optimization criteria and the Cayley - Smorodinskaya method. By using the epoxy binder, the active solvent should not exceed 10-15% by weight. This approach helps to optimize the amount of active solvent added to the epoxy resins for the criterion of viscosity, strength, and heat resistance.

  6. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  7. Optimization of the Composite Repair Work using 5H Satin Dry Glass Fabric and Epoxy Resin LY5052/HY5052 Materials through the Vacuum Bagging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartono; Rifai, Mochammad; Subawi, Handoko

    2016-08-01

    In composite repair terminology, the intermingled fiber joints (IFJs) concept is clearly identified as the most effective in transferring stress. However, the practical application leads to apply the laminated fiber joints (LFJs) concept for composite repair. The LFJs become almost as strong as the IFJs as the jointed zone length increases. The LFJs concept was implemented to set up the repair configuration for this work. It is identified that fracture tendency as the result of crack propagation starts from the free edges. This tendency is alleviated by applying vacuum bag to compact the laminate system. If necessary, additional accelerated curing was performed at low temperature for short time. However, this repair work preferably applying natural overnight cure to ensure the structure stability. Additionally, the repair handling and waiting purposes take 40% out of the effectively repair time. The waiting time should be anticipated in the composite repair to reduce wasting time for unproductive output.

  8. Composite material impregnation unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, S. P.; Marchello, J. M.; Johnston, N. J.

    1993-01-01

    This memorandum presents an introduction to the NASA multi-purpose prepregging unit which is now installed and fully operational at the Langley Research Center in the Polymeric Materials Branch. A description of the various impregnation methods that are available to the prepregger are presented. Machine operating details and protocol are provided for its various modes of operation. These include, where appropriate, the related equations for predicting the desired prepreg specifications. Also, as the prepregger is modular in its construction, each individual section is described and discussed. Safety concerns are an important factor and a chapter has been included that highlights the major safety features. Initial experiences and observations for fiber impregnation are described. These first observations have given great insight into the areas of future work that need to be addressed. Future memorandums will focus on these individual processes and their related problems.

  9. GRAPHITE IMPREGNATION METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Kertesz, F.; Buttram, H.J.

    1962-04-24

    ABS>A method for impregnating a refractory material by filling its pores with a first salt having a high melting temperature is described. The salt is mixed with another, more volatile salt, giving the mixture a much lower melting temperature than that of the first salt. The material is coated with the mixture, then heated to drive off the volatile salt, leaving the first salt in place. (AEC)

  10. Effect of carbon nanotube addition on the wear behavior of basalt/epoxy woven composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, M T; Rhee, K Y; Lee, B H; Kim, C J

    2013-08-01

    The effect of acid-treated carbon nanotube (CNT) addition on the wear and dynamic mechanical thermal properties of basalt/epoxy woven composites was investigated in this study. Basalt/CNT/epoxy composites were fabricated by impregnating woven basalt fibers into epoxy resin mixed with 1 wt% CNTs which were acid-treated. Wear and DMA (dynamic mechanical analyzer) tests were performed on basalt/epoxy composites and basalt/CNT/epoxy composites. The results showed that the addition of the acid-treated CNTs improved the wear properties of basalt/epoxy woven composites. Specifically, the friction coefficient of the basalt/epoxy composite was stabilized in the range of 0.5-0.6 while it fell in the range of 0.3-0.4 for basalt/CNT/epoxy composites. The wear volume loss of the basalt/CNT/epoxy composites was approximately 68% lower than that of the basalt/epoxy composites. The results also showed that the glass transition temperature of basalt/CNT/epoxy composites was higher than that of basalt/epoxy composites. The improvement of wear properties of basalt/epoxy composites by the addition of acid-treated CNTs was caused by the homogeneous load transfer between basalt fibers and epoxy matrix due to the reinforcement of CNTs.

  11. Woven graphite epoxy composite test specimens with glass buffer strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnar, G. R.; Palmer, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Woven unidirectional graphite cloth with bands of fiberglass replacing the graphite in discrete lengthwise locations was impregnated with epoxy resin and used to fabricate a series of composite tensile and shear specimens. The finished panels, with the fiberglass buffer strips, were tested. Details of the fabrication process are reported.

  12. Apparatus Impregnates Weak Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanfield, Clarence E.; Wilson, Maywood L.

    1989-01-01

    Low-cost apparatus developed for use in conventional drum winding machine to impregnate fibrous materials having very low tensile strengths. Fiber fitted onto freely-spinning unwinding creel. Unwinds from creel between two tension bars onto guide spools, aligns fiber so properly enters sealed reservoir of resin. Stainless-steel metering die at entrance to reservoir aligns fiber and seals reservoir. Beneficial results obtained by use of reservoir made of polyethylene. Composite material made from resin matrices reinforced by fibers have great potential for solving challenging and often critical problems in design of spacecraft, space structures, and terrestrial structures.

  13. PROCESS OF PREPARING URANIUM-IMPREGNATED GRAPHITE BODY

    DOEpatents

    Kanter, M.A.

    1958-05-20

    A method for the fabrication of graphite bodies containing uniformly distributed uranium is described. It consists of impregnating a body of graphite having uniform porosity and low density with an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate preferably by a vacuum technique, thereafter removing excess aqueous solution from the surface of the graphite, then removing the solvent water from the body under substantially normal atmospheric conditions of temperature and pressure in the presence of a stream of dry inert gas, and finally heating the dry impregnated graphite body in the presence of inert gas at a temperature between 800 and 1400 d C to convert the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate to an oxide of uranium.

  14. Recent progress and tests of radiation resistant impregnation materials for Nb{sub 3}Sn coils

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.; Krave, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Nobrega, A.; Novitski, I.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2014-01-27

    Fermilab is collaborating with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) (US-LARP collaboration) to develop a large-aperture Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. An important component of this work is the development of materials that are sufficiently radiation resistant for use in critical areas of the upgrade. This paper describes recent progress in characterization of materials, including the baseline CTD101K epoxy, cyanate ester blends, and Matrimid 5292, a bismaleimide-based system. Structural properties of “ten stacks” of cable impregnated with these materials are tested at room and cryogenic temperatures and compared to the baseline CT-101K. Experience with potting 1 and 2 meter long coils with Matrimid 5292 are described. Test results of a single 1-m coil impregnated with Matrimid 5292 are reported and compared to similar coils impregnated with the traditional epoxy.

  15. Recent progress and tests of radiation resistant impregnation materials for Nb3Sn coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossert, R.; Krave, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Nobrega, A.; Novitski, I.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Fermilab is collaborating with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) (US-LARP collaboration) to develop a large-aperture Nb3Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. An important component of this work is the development of materials that are sufficiently radiation resistant for use in critical areas of the upgrade. This paper describes recent progress in characterization of materials, including the baseline CTD101K epoxy, cyanate ester blends, and Matrimid 5292, a bismaleimide-based system. Structural properties of "ten stacks" of cable impregnated with these materials are tested at room and cryogenic temperatures and compared to the baseline CT-101K. Experience with potting 1 and 2 meter long coils with Matrimid 5292 are described. Test results of a single 1-m coil impregnated with Matrimid 5292 are reported and compared to similar coils impregnated with the traditional epoxy.

  16. Adhesive, elastomeric gel impregnating composition

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, David Glenn; Pollard, John Randolph; Brooks, Robert Aubrey

    2002-01-01

    An improved capacitor roll with alternating film and foil layers is impregnated with an adhesive, elastomeric gel composition. The gel composition is a blend of a plasticizer, a polyol, a maleic anhydride that reacts with the polyol to form a polyester, and a catalyst for the reaction. The impregnant composition is introduced to the film and foil layers while still in a liquid form and then pressure is applied to aid with impregnation. The impregnant composition is cured to form the adhesive, elastomeric gel. Pressure is maintained during curing.

  17. Secondary polymer layered impregnated tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K. (Inventor); Rasky, Daniel J. (Inventor); Szalai, Christine E. (Inventor); Carroll, Joseph A. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-ta S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A low density organic polymer impregnated preformed fibrous ceramic article includes a plurality of layers. A front layer includes ceramic fibers or carbon fibers or combinations of ceramic fibers and carbon fibers, and is impregnated with an effective amount of at least one organic polymer. A middle layer includes polymer impregnated ceramic fibers. A back layer includes ceramic fibers or carbon fibers or combinations of ceramic fibers and carbon fibers, and is impregnated with an effective amount of at least one low temperature pyrolyzing organic polymer capable of decomposing without depositing residues.

  18. Analysis on the thermal and electrical characteristics of impregnating materials for the bifilar winding-type superconducting fault current limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seong Eun; Bae, Duck Kweon; Yoon, Kyung Yong; Yoon, Yong Soo; Ko, Tae Kuk; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2006-05-01

    The resistive type high temperature superconducting fault current limiter (HTSFCL) limits the fault current with the resistance that generated by fault current. The generated resistance by fault current makes large pulse power which makes the operation of HTSFCL unstable. So, the cryogenic cooling system of the resistive type HTSFCL must diffuse and eliminate the pulse energy very quickly. Although the best way is to make wide direct contact area between HTS winding and coolant as much as possible, HTS winding also need the impregnation layer which fixes and protects it from electromagnetic force. This paper deals with thermal conductivity and dielectric strength of some epoxy compounds for the impregnation of high temperature superconducting (HTS) winding at 77 K. The measured data can be used in the optimal design of impregnation for HTS winding. Aluminar filling increased the thermal conductivity of epoxy compounds. Hardener also affected the thermal conductivity and the dielectric strength of epoxy compounds.

  19. Analysis of two-dimensional flow of epoxy fluids through woven glass fabric

    SciTech Connect

    Schutz, J.B.; Smith, K.B.

    1997-06-01

    Fabrication of magnet coils for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will require vacuum pressure impregnation of epoxy resin into the glass fabric of the insulation system. Flow of a fluid through a packed bed of woven glass fabric is extremely complicated, and semiempirical methods must be used to analyze these flows. The previous one-dimensional model has been modified for analysis of two-dimensional isotropic flow of epoxy resins through woven glass fabric. Several two-dimensional flow experiments were performed to validate the analysis, and to determine permeabilities of several fabric weave types. The semiempirical permeability is shown to be a characteristic of the fabric weave, and once determined, may be used to analyze flow of fluids of differing viscosities. Plain weave has a lower permeability than satin weave fabric, possibly due to the increased tortuosity of the preferential flow paths along fiber tows. A flow radius of approximately 2 meters through satin weave fabric is predicted for fluid viscosities of 0.10 Pa s (100 cps) in 20 hours, characteristic of VPI resins.

  20. Curing kinetics and thermomechanical properties of latent epoxy/carbon fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalle Vacche, S.; Michaud, V.; Demierre, M.; Bourban, P.-E.; Månson, J.-A. E.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, resins based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy and a latent hardener, dicyandiamide (DICY), as well as carbon fiber (CF) composites based on them, were prepared with three commercial accelerators: a methylene bis (phenyl dimethyl urea), a cycloaliphatic substituted urea, and a modified polyamine. The curing kinetics of the three DGEBA/DICY/accelerator systems were investigated by chemorheology and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in isothermal and over temperature change conditions. Differences in the reaction onset temperature, and in the glass transition temperature (Tg) were highlighted. For curing of thick resin samples, a slow curing cycle at the lowest possible temperature was used, followed by high temperature (160 - 180 °C) post-curing. Indeed, fast curing at higher temperatures caused the formation of hot spots and led to local burning of the samples. The obtained thermomechanical properties, assessed by ultimate tensile testing and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) in single cantilever configuration, were all in the expected range for epoxy resins, with tensile moduli close to 3 GPa and Tg > 140 °C. The longterm stability of these resins at room temperature was verified by DSC. Composite samples were prepared by hand lay-up by manually impregnating four layers of 5-harness satin CF textile, and curing in vacuum bag. Impregnation quality and void content were assessed by optical microscopy. The flexural properties of the post-cured composites were assessed by three-point bending test at room temperature and showed no relevant differences, all composites having bending moduli of 45 - 50 GPa. Finally, composites cured with a faster high temperature curing cycle (20 min at 140 °C) were prepared with the DGEBA/DICY/ methylene bis (phenyl dimethyl urea) system, obtaining similar properties as with the slower curing cycle, showing that the prepreg system allowed more flexibility in terms of curing cycle than the bulk resin

  1. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  2. Epoxy resin

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Glenn R.; Salyer, Ival O.; Ball, III, George L.

    1976-07-13

    By mixing one part of a prepolymer containing a polyamine partially polymerized with an organic epoxide and subsequently reacted with a fatty acid containing from 8 to 32 carbon atoms, and then reacting this prepolymer mixture with 3 parts of an organic epoxide, a composition was obtained which made a gas frothable, shear-stable, room temperature curing, low density foam. A particularly advantageous prepolymer was prepared using a polyamine selected from the group consisting of diethylenetriamine, triethylenetetramine, and tetraethylenepentamine, partially polymerized with an organic epoxide having an average molecular weight of about 350 and having an epoxide equivalent of 185 to 192, and reacted with 2-10 weight percent linoleic acid. When one part of this prepolymer was reacted with about three parts of epoxy, and frothed by whipping in air or nitrogen an epoxy foam was produced which could be troweled onto surfaces and into corners or crevices, and subsequently cured, at near ambient temperature, to a strong dimensionally stable foam product.

  3. Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites and Methods of Making Same Without the Use of Oven or Autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnell, Thomas J. (Inventor); Rauscher, Michael D. (Inventor); Stienecker, Rick D. (Inventor); Nickerson, David M. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Method embodiments for producing a fiber-reinforced epoxy composite comprise providing a mold defining a shape for a composite, applying a fiber reinforcement over the mold, covering the mold and fiber reinforcement thereon in a vacuum enclosure, performing a vacuum on the vacuum enclosure to produce a pressure gradient, insulating at least a portion of the vacuum enclosure with thermal insulation, infusing the fiber reinforcement with a reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent under vacuum conditions, wherein the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent generates exothermic heat, and producing the fiber-reinforced epoxy composite having a glass transition temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. by curing the fiber reinforcement infused with the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent by utilizing the exothermically generated heat, wherein the curing is conducted inside the thermally insulated vacuum enclosure without utilization of an external heat source or an external radiation source.

  4. Boron impregnation treatment of Eucalyptus grandis wood.

    PubMed

    Dhamodaran, T K; Gnanaharan, R

    2007-08-01

    Eucalyptus grandis is suitable for small timber purposes, but its wood is reported to be non-durable and difficult to treat. Boron compounds being diffusible, and the vacuum-pressure impregnation (VPI) method being more suitable for industrial-scale treatment, the possibility of boron impregnation of partially dry to green timber was investigated using a 6% boric acid equivalent (BAE) solution of boric acid and borax in the ratio 1:1.5 under different treatment schedules. It was found that E. grandis wood, even in green condition, could be pressure treated to desired chemical dry salt retention (DSR) and penetration levels using 6% BAE solution. Up to a thickness of 50mm, in order to achieve a DSR of 5 kg/m(3) boron compounds, the desired DSR level as per the Indian Standard for perishable timbers for indoor use, it was found that neither the moisture content of wood nor the treatment schedule posed any problem as far as the treatability of E. grandis wood was concerned.

  5. Plasma impregnation of wood with fire retardants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabeliña, Karel G.; Lumban, Carmencita O.; Ramos, Henry J.

    2012-02-01

    The efficacy of chemical and plasma treatments with phosphate and boric compounds, and nitrogen as flame retardants on wood are compared in this study. The chemical treatment involved the conventional method of spraying the solution over the wood surface at atmospheric condition and chemical vapor deposition in a vacuum chamber. The plasma treatment utilized a dielectric barrier discharge ionizing and decomposing the flame retardants into innocuous simple compounds. Wood samples are immersed in either phosphoric acid, boric acid, hydrogen or nitrogen plasmas or a plasma admixture of two or three compounds at various concentrations and impregnated by the ionized chemical reactants. Chemical changes on the wood samples were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) while the thermal changes through thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Plasma-treated samples exhibit superior thermal stability and fire retardant properties in terms of highest onset temperature, temperature of maximum pyrolysis, highest residual char percentage and comparably low total percentage weight loss.

  6. Radiation curing of epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Lawrence W.; Singh, Ajit

    The literature on radiation polymerization of epoxy compounds has been reviewed to assess the potential use of radiation for curing these industrially important monomers. Chemical curing of epoxies may proceed by either cationic or anionic mechanisms depending on the nature of the curing agent, but most epoxies polymerize by cationic mechanisms under the influence of high-energy radiation. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of epoxy compounds is inhibited by trace quantities of water because of proton transfer from the chain-propagating epoxy cation to water. Several different methods with potential for obtaining high molecular weight polymers by curing epoxies with high-energy radiation have been studied. Polymeric products with epoxy-like properties have been produced by radiation curing of epoxy oligomers with terminal acrylate groups and mixtures of epoxies with vinyl monomers. Both of these types of resin have good potential for industrial-scale curing by radiation treatment.

  7. The Experimental Analysis on the Thermal and Electrical Characteristics of Impregnating Materials for Superconducting Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seong Eun; Kweon Bae, Duck; Kang, Hyoungku; Ahn, Min Cheol; Park, Dong Keun; Seok, Bok-Yeol; Myoung Jang, Ho; Kuk Ko, Tae

    2006-06-01

    In recent years, a development of Coated Conductor (CC) that is a called the second generation superconductor tape is opened out. Therefore a commercialization of superconducting power equipments will be realized presently. To realize a commercialization, it is necessary to develop a stable superconducting magnet. A superconducting magnet has to keep thermal stability as well as electrical stability. In this paper, thermal conductivity of impregnating materials, epoxy compounds, was measured at 65K, 77K, 100K and 200K. Dielectric Strength of superconducting magnet modeled electrode system with impregnating materials was also analyzed. Stycast blue/catalyst 23LV is good materials to apply to the superconducting magnets.

  8. Dynamic Impregnator Reactor System (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    IBRF poster developed for the IBRF showcase. Describes the multifarious system designed for complex feedstock impregnation and processing. IBRF feedstock system has several unit operations combined into one robust system that provides for flexible and staged process configurations, such as spraying, soaking, low-severity pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, concentration/evaporation, and distillation.

  9. Refractory-metal compound impregnation of polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H. F.

    1969-01-01

    Process impregnates polytetrafluoroethylene /PTFE/ with rhenium or molybdenum compounds. The refractory metals impregnated PTFE combines chemical inertness with electrical conductivity. They are useful for electro-chemical cells, chemical processing equipment, catalysts, electrostatic charge removal, RF gasketing, and cable shielding.

  10. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  11. Beneficiation of natural aggregates by polymer impregnation

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, R.P.; Fontana, J.J.

    1980-09-01

    The use of polymer impregnation as a means of upgrading natural aggregates has been investigated. The effect of polymer impregnation on the physical and mechanical properties was evaluated in a series of tests performed using four aggregates of varying quality. The strength of concrete cast with polymer impregnated coarse aggregate was also tested. Two monomer systems were used in the investigation; a methyl methacrylate-based system and a styrene-based system. In general, significant improvements in the physical and mechanical properties of each of the four aggregates resulted from polymer impregnation. The strength of concrete cast with impregnated aggregates varied, being increased in some cases and decreased in others.

  12. Antifungal activity of antimicrobial-impregnated devices.

    PubMed

    Darouiche, R O; Mansouri, M D; Kojic, E M

    2006-04-01

    The in-vitro and in-vivo efficacy against Candida albicans and Candida krusei of devices impregnated with chlorhexidine and chloroxylenol was examined. The impregnated devices produced large zones of inhibition against both organisms (mean size, 39 mm and 38 mm, respectively). In a rabbit model in which segments of silicone catheters were placed percutaneously, non-impregnated devices were twice as likely as impregnated devices to become colonised with either C. albicans or C. krusei. Impregnated devices also had significantly lower colony counts of C. albicans (58 vs. 1361 CFU; p 0.008) and C. krusei (19 vs. 764 CFU; p 0.008).

  13. Epoxy/Fluoroether Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Taylor, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Composite materials made from unfilled and glass-fiber-reinforced epoxy toughened by copolymerization with elastomeric prepolymers of perfluoroalkyl ether diacyl fluoride (EDAF). Improved properties due to hydrogen bonding between rubber phase and epoxy matrix, plus formation of rubberlike phase domains that molecularly interpenetrate with epoxy matrix. With optimum rubber content, particle size, and particle shape, entire molecular structure reinforced and toughened. Improved composites also show increased failure strength, stiffness, glass-transition temperature, and resistance to water.

  14. Pressure Venting Tests of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.; Knutson, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    A series of tests was devised to investigate the pressure venting behavior of one of the candidate ablators for the Orion capsule heat shield. Three different specimens of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) were instrumented with internal pressure taps and subjected to rapid pressure changes from near vacuum to one atmosphere and simulated Orion ascent pressure histories. The specimens vented rapidly to ambient pressure and sustained no detectable damage during testing. Peak pressure differences through the thickness of a 3-inch-thick specimen were less than 1 psi during a simulated ascent pressure history.

  15. Safe epoxy encapsulant for high voltage magnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.O.; Archer, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Formula 456, an aliphatic amine cured epoxy for impregnating coils and high voltage transformers. Sandia has evaluated a number of MDA-free epoxy encapsulants which relied on either anhydride or other aromatic amine curing agents. The use of aliphatic amine curing agents was more recently evaluated and has resulted in the definition of Formula 456 resin. Methylene dianiline (MDA) has been used for more than 20 years as the curing agent for various epoxy formulations throughout the Department of Energy and much of industry. Sandia National Laboratories began the process of replacing MDA with other formulations because of regulations imposed by OSHA on the use of MDA. OSHA has regulated MDA because it is a suspect carcinogen. Typically the elimination of OSHA-regulated materials provides a rare opportunity to qualify new formulations in a range of demanding applications. It was important to take full advantage of that opportunity, although the associated materials qualification effort was costly. Small high voltage transformers are one of those demanding applications. The successful implementation of the new formulation for high reliability transformers will be described. The test results that demonstrate the parts are qualified for use in DOE weapon systems will be presented.

  16. Void-free epoxy castings for cryogenic insulators and seals

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    The design of the Westinghouse Magnet for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Large Coil Program (LCP) incorporates a main lead bushing which transmits heat-leak loads by conduction to the supercritical helium stream. The bushing, which consists of epoxy resin cast about a copper conductor, must be electrically insulated, vacuum tight and be capable of withstanding the stresses encountered in cryognic service. The seal design of the bushing is especially important; leakage from either the helium system or the external environment into the vacuum will cause the magnet to quench. Additionally, the epoxy-resin casting must resist mechanical loads caused by the weight of leads attached to the bushing and thermal stresses transmitted to the epoxy via the conductor. The epoxy resin is cast about the conductor in such a way as to provide the required vacuum tight seal. The technique by which this is accomplished is reviewed. Equally important is the elimination of voids in the epoxy which will act as stress-concentrating discontinuities during cooling to or warming from 4K. The types of voids that could be expected and their causes are described. The paper reviews techniques employed to eliminate voids within the cast-resin portion of the bushing.

  17. DEGRADATION OF MAGNET EPOXY AT NSLS X-RAY RING.

    SciTech Connect

    HU,J.P.; ZHONG,Z.; HAAS,E.; HULBERT,S.; HUBBARD,R.

    2004-05-24

    Epoxy resin degradation was analyzed for NSLS X-ring magnets after two decades of 2.58-2.8 GeV continuous electron-beam operation, based on results obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeters irradiated along the NSLS ring and epoxy samples irradiated at the beamline target location. A Monte Carlo-based particle transport code, MCNP, was utilized to verify the dose from synchrotron radiation distributed along the axial- and transverse-direction in a ring model, which simulates the geometry of a ring quadrupole magnet and its central vacuum chamber downstream of the bending-magnet photon ports. The actual life expectancy of thoroughly vacuum baked-and-cured epoxy resin was estimated from radiation tests on similar polymeric materials using a radiation source developed for electrical insulation and mechanical structure studies.

  18. Epoxy + liquid crystalline epoxy coreacted network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punchaipetch, Prakaipetch

    2000-10-01

    Molecular reinforcement through in-situ polymerization of liquid crystalline epoxies (LCEs) and a non-liquid crystalline epoxy has been investigated. Three LCEs: diglycidyl ether of 4,4'-dihydroxybiphenol (DGE-DHBP) and digylcidyl ether of 4-hydroxyphenyl-4″-hydroxybiphenyl-4 '-carboxylate (DGE-HHC), were synthesized and blended with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBP-F) and subsequently cured with anhydride and amine curing agents. Curing kinetics were determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Parameters for autocatalytic curing kinetics of both pure monomers and blended systems were determined. The extent of cure for both monomers was monitored by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The glass transitions were evaluated as a function of composition using DSC and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The results show that the LC constituent affects the curing kinetics of the epoxy resin and that the systems are highly miscible. The effects of molecular reinforcement of DGEBP-F by DGE-DHBP and DGE-HHC were investigated. The concentration of the liquid crystalline moiety affects mechanical properties. Tensile, impact and fracture toughness tests results are evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surfaces shows changes in failure mechanisms compared to the pure components. Results indicate that mechanical properties of the blended samples are improved already at low concentration by weight of the LCE added into epoxy resin. The improvement in mechanical properties was found to occur irrespective of the absence of liquid crystallinity in the blended networks. The mechanism of crack study indicates that crack deflection and crack bridging are the mechanisms in case of LC epoxy. In case of LC modified epoxy, the crack deflection is the main mechanism. Moreover, the effect of coreacting an epoxy with a reactive monomer liquid crystalline epoxy as a matrix for glass fiber composites was investigated. Mechanical

  19. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, James A. [Livermore, CA; Newey, Herbert A. [Lafayette, CA

    1981-02-24

    Primary diamines of the formula ##STR1## wherein R is a straight chain saturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 4 carbons, a disubstituted benzene ring, or disubstituted dibenzo methane for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and pre-impregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses as room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  20. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, J.A.; Newey, H.A.

    1981-02-24

    Primary diamines are disclosed of the formula shown in a diagram wherein R is a straight chain saturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 4 carbons, a disubstituted benzene ring, or disubstituted dibenzomethane for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and pre-impregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses as room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  1. Rubberized, Brominated Epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W.; Kourtides, D.; Parker, J.; Nir, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy composite materials made with resins containing bromine and rubber additives. New composites tougher and more resistant to fire. Flame resistance increased by introducing bromine via commercial brominated flame-retartant polymeric additives.

  2. Investigation of the metabolic consequences of impregnating spinach leaves with trehalose and applying a pulsed electric field.

    PubMed

    Dymek, Katarzyna; Panarese, Valentina; Herremans, Els; Cantre, Dennis; Schoo, Rick; Toraño, Javier Sastre; Schluepmann, Henriette; Wadso, Lars; Verboven, Pieter; Nicolai, Bart M; Dejmek, Petr; Gómez Galindo, Federico

    2016-12-01

    The impregnation of leafy vegetables with cryoprotectants using a combination of vacuum impregnation (VI) and pulsed electric fields (PEF) has been proposed by our research group as a method of improving their freezing tolerance and consequently their general quality after thawing. In this study, we have investigated the metabolic consequences of the combination of these unit operations on spinach. The vacuum impregnated spinach leaves showed a drastic decrease in the porosity of the extracellular space. However, at maximum weight gain, randomly located air pockets remained, which may account for oxygen-consuming pathways in the cells being active after VI. The metabolic activity of the impregnated leaves showed a drastic increase that was further enhanced by the application of PEF to the impregnated tissue. Impregnating the leaves with trehalose by VI led to a significant accumulation of trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P), however, this was not further enhanced by PEF. It is suggested that the accumulation of T6P in the leaves may increase metabolic activity, and increase tissue resistance to abiotic stress.

  3. VACUUM TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  4. Qualification of a cyanate ester epoxy blend supplied by Japanese industry for the ITER TF coil insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.; Knaster, J.; Savary, F.

    2012-06-01

    During the last years, two cyanate ester epoxy blends supplied by European and US industry have been successfully qualified for the ITER TF coil insulation. The results of the qualification of a third CE blend supplied by Industrial Summit Technology (IST, Japan) will be presented in this paper. Sets of test samples were fabricated exactly under the same conditions as used before. The reinforcement of the composite consists of wrapped R-glass / polyimide tapes, which are vacuum pressure impregnated with the resin. The mechanical properties of this material were characterized prior to and after reactor irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 2×1022m-2 (E>0.1 MeV), i.e. twice the ITER design fluence. Static and dynamic tensile as well as static short beam shear tests were carried out at 77 K. In addition, stress strain relations were recorded to determine the Young's modulus at room temperature and at 77 K. The results are compared in detail with the previously qualified materials from other suppliers.

  5. Vacuum Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Biltoft, P J

    2004-10-15

    The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

  6. Manufacturing of REBCO coils strongly bonded to cooling members with epoxy resin aimed at its application to Maglev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2014-11-01

    The REBCO coated conductor has been attracted attention because of its high current density in the presence of high magnetic field. If the coated conductor is applied to Maglev, the operational temperature of the on-board magnets will be over 40 K and energy consumption of cryocoolers will be reduced. That high operational temperature also means the absence of liquid helium. Therefore, reliable thermal coupling is desirable for cooling the coils. We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. While the PTFE tape prevents the performance degradation of the coil, the epoxy resin bonds the coil to cooling members. We carried out three experiments to confirm that the coil structure which we propose has robust thermal coupling without the degradation. First, thermal resistances of paraffin and epoxy were measured varying the temperature from room temperature to 10 K. The measurement result indicates that paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. In another experiment, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape insulator prevented performance degradation of a small epoxy impregnated REBCO coil, while another REBCO coil with polyimide tape showed clear performance degradation. Finally, we produced a racetrack REBCO coil with the same outer dimension as a Maglev on-board magnet coil. Although the racetrack coil was installed in a GFRP coil case and tightly bonded to the case by epoxy impregnation, any performance degradation was not observed.

  7. Vacuum Virtues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2007-01-01

    Upright vacuums, like cars, vary in quality, features and performance. Like automobiles, some uprights are reliable, others may be problematic, and some become a problem as a result of neglect or improper use. So, how do education institutions make an informed choice and, having done so, ensure that an upright vacuum goes the distance? In this…

  8. Vacuum mechatronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackwood, Susan; Belinski, Steven E.; Beni, Gerardo

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of vacuum mechatronics is defined as the design and development of vacuum-compatible computer-controlled mechanisms for manipulating, sensing and testing in a vacuum environment. The importance of vacuum mechatronics is growing with an increased application of vacuum in space studies and in manufacturing for material processing, medicine, microelectronics, emission studies, lyophylisation, freeze drying and packaging. The quickly developing field of vacuum mechatronics will also be the driving force for the realization of an advanced era of totally enclosed clean manufacturing cells. High technology manufacturing has increasingly demanding requirements for precision manipulation, in situ process monitoring and contamination-free environments. To remove the contamination problems associated with human workers, the tendency in many manufacturing processes is to move towards total automation. This will become a requirement in the near future for e.g., microelectronics manufacturing. Automation in ultra-clean manufacturing environments is evolving into the concept of self-contained and fully enclosed manufacturing. A Self Contained Automated Robotic Factory (SCARF) is being developed as a flexible research facility for totally enclosed manufacturing. The construction and successful operation of a SCARF will provide a novel, flexible, self-contained, clean, vacuum manufacturing environment. SCARF also requires very high reliability and intelligent control. The trends in vacuum mechatronics and some of the key research issues are reviewed.

  9. Gravitational vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, L. S.; Saakyan, G. S.

    1984-09-01

    The existence of a special gravitational vacuum is considered in this paper. A phenomenological method differing from the traditional Einsteinian formalization is utilized. Vacuum, metric and matter form a complex determined by field equations and at great distances from gravitational masses vacuum effects are small but could be large in powerful fields. Singularities and black holes justify the approach as well as the Ambartsmyan theory concerning the existence of supermassive and superdense prestallar bodies that then disintegrate. A theory for these superdense bodies is developed involving gravitational field equations that describe the vacuum by an energy momentum tensor and define the field and mass distribution. Computations based on the theory for gravitational radii with incompressible liquid models adequately reflecting real conditions indicate that a gravitational vacuum could have considerable effects on superdense stars and could have radical effects for very large masses.

  10. Open vacuum tube in space.

    PubMed

    Gonfalone, A A; Arends, H J

    1979-11-01

    After having reviewed briefly the reliability of vacuum tubes on spacecraft, it is shown that the operation in space of a vacuum tube with an open structure is possible provided adequate measures are taken. The tube considered here is a multielectrode electron gun emitting electrons into space, in order to control the potential of a satellite. To avoid the failure of the most sensitive element of the gun, namely the impregnated tungsten cathode, the gun design includes such characteristics as a slow warming up of the heater element, a reactivation program used in case of cathode contamination, and a clean opening system which is not contaminant. Similarities with communication tubes are considered and the advantages of open tubes are mentioned.

  11. Imide Modified Epoxy Matrix Resin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    the bisimide amine cured epoxies (IME’s) were considerably lower than the state-of-the-art epoxies . The strain-to-failure of the control resin system ...nine epoxy resin systems which were prepared from tetraglycidyl methylenedianiline (MY 720) cured with a stoichiometric quantity of bisimide-amine and...graphite imide modified cured epoxy resin composites. The designation for each material is also listed in Table 1. The composition of each resin system

  12. Polytetrafluoroethylene-Impregnated Anodization For Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1990-01-01

    Technical memorandum describes experiments on ability of two commercial coatings and of standard hard anodization to protect aluminum against corrosion. Both commercial coatings, Polylube and Tufram, polytetrafluoroethylene-impregnated anodizations. Standard hard-anodized coating found to provide greatest protection.

  13. Curing of Furfuryl Alcohol-Impregnated Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, J. W.; Brayden, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    Delamination problem in reinforced carbon/carbon parts impregnated with oxalic acid-catalyzed furfuryl alcohol overcome by instituting two additional quality-control tests on alcohol and by changing curing conditions.

  14. Cobalt ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Varying concentrations of an organometallic cobalt complex were added to an epoxy system currently used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin. Methods for combining cobalt (III) acetylacetonate with a tetraglycidyl 4,4 prime - diaminodiphenylmethane-based epoxy were investigated. The effects of increasing cobalt ion concentration on the epoxy cure were demonstrated by epoxy gel times and differential scanning calorimetry cure exotherms. Analysis on cured cobalt-containing epoxy castings included determination of glass transition temperatures by thermomechanical analysis, thermooxidative stabilities by thermogravimetric analysis, and densities in a density gradient column. Flexural strength and stiffness were also measured on the neat resin castings.

  15. High Interlaminar Shear Strength Enhancement of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite through Fiber- and Matrix-Anchored Carbon Nanotube Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilei; Raman Pillai, Suresh Kumar; Che, Jianfei; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2017-03-15

    To improve the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite, networks of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were grown on micron-sized carbon fibers and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed into the epoxy matrix so that these two types of carbon nanotubes entangle at the carbon fiber (CF)/epoxy matrix interface. The MWNTs on the CF fiber (CF-MWNTs) were grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), while the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were finely dispersed in the epoxy matrix precursor with the aid of a dispersing agent polyimide-graft-bisphenol A diglyceryl acrylate (PI-BDA) copolymer. Using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding, the SWNT-laden epoxy matrix precursor was forced into intimate contact with the "hairy" surface of the CF-MWNT fiber. The tube density and the average tube length of the MWNT layer on CF was controlled by the CVD growth time. The ILSS of the CF-MWNT/epoxy resin composite was examined using the short beam shear test. With addition of MWNTs onto the CF surface as well as SWNTs into the epoxy matrix, the ILSS of CF/epoxy resin composite was 47.59 ± 2.26 MPa, which represented a ∼103% increase compared with the composite made with pristine CF and pristine epoxy matrix (without any SWNT filler). FESEM established that the enhanced composite did not fail at the CF/epoxy matrix interface.

  16. Application of In Situ Fiberization for fabrication of improved strain isolation pads and graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Seibold, R. W.; Basiulis, D. I.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of applying the in situ fiberization process to the fabrication of strain isolation pads (SIP) for the Space Shuttle and to the fabrication of graphite-epoxy composites was evaluated. The ISF process involves the formation of interconnected polymer fiber networks by agitation of dilute polymer solutions under controlled conditions. High temperature polymers suitable for SIP use were fiberized and a successful fiberization of polychloro trifluoroethylene, a relatively high melting polymer, was achieved. Attempts to fiberize polymers with greater thermal stability were unsuccessful, apparently due to characteristics caused by the presence of aromaticity in the backbone of such materials. Graphite-epoxy composites were fabricated by interconnecting two dimensional arrays of graphite fiber with polypropylene IS fibers with subsequent epoxy resin impregnation. Mechanical property tests were performed on laminated panels of this material to evaluate intralaminar and interlaminar shear strength, and thus fracture toughness. Test results were generally unpromising.

  17. Effects of Weathering on Impregnated Charcoal Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    4 A mixture of elemental iodine (0.5 wt.%) and an S" activated carbon (BC Type 177) from coconut shells was heated (6.70 C/min) in a flow of purified...Penetration of 1 3 1 ICH3 at 21°C for new (not used) Coconut Shell Commercial Carbons (impregnated) With and Without Prehumidification...Mixture of Elemental Iodine and Non-impregnated Coconut Activated Carbon . (Note: Y coordinate is logarithmic)... 87 29. Formation of Organic Iodides

  18. Process for epoxy foam production

    DOEpatents

    Celina, Mathias C.

    2011-08-23

    An epoxy resin mixture with at least one epoxy resin of between approximately 60 wt % and 90 wt %, a maleic anhydride of between approximately 1 wt % and approximately 30 wt %, and an imidazole catalyst of less than approximately 2 wt % where the resin mixture is formed from at least one epoxy resin with a 1-30 wt % maleic anhydride compound and an imidazole catalyst at a temperature sufficient to keep the maleic anhydride compound molten, the resin mixture reacting to form a foaming resin which can then be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form an epoxy foam.

  19. Metal ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of metallic and organometallic complexes to be used as potential additives for an epoxy used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin were investigated. A total of 9 complexes were screened for compatibility and for their ability to accelerate or inhibit the cure of a highly crosslinkable epoxy resin. Methods for combining the metallic complexes with the resin were investigated, gel times recorded, and cure exotherms studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition temperatures of cured metal ion containing epoxy castings were determined by thermomechanical analysis. Thermal stabilities of the castings were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. Mechanical strength and stiffness of these doped epoxies were also measured.

  20. Influence of gas composition of the modulus of elasticity of gas-impregnated anthracites

    SciTech Connect

    Vinokurova, E.B.; Ketslakh, A.I.

    1986-07-01

    A study of the elastic properties of anthracites under strain and high gas pressure is described. The tests were made on Class I and II anthracites after exposure to helium, nitrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and a mixture of these gases similar in composition to that of natural gas in worked anthracite strata. Each test sample was loaded in air at atmospheric pressure, and then subjected to vacuum treatment and impregnated with gas. Tables show strain on samples in air at atmospheric pressure in helium, nitrogen, methane and gas mixtures, and values of modulus of elasticity for anthracite in various gases. It was shown that impregnation with carbon dioxide under pressure has a destructive influence on the anthracite. The presence of 1.5% of carbon dioxide in a gas is sufficient to cause a reduction in the modulus of elasticity. During the working of a stratum, the consequential change in the gas content also alters the mechanical properties of the anthracite.

  1. Apparatus for coating and impregnating filament with resin

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, S.C.; Pollard, R.E.

    1986-12-17

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for evenly coating and impregnating a filament with binder material. Dimension control and repeatability of the coating and impregnating characteristics are obtained with the apparatus.

  2. Direct measurement of elastic modulus of Nb 3Sn using extracted filaments from superconducting composite wire and resin impregnation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojo, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Hashimoto, M.; Tanaka, M.; Sugano, M.; Ochiai, S.; Miyashita, K.

    2006-10-01

    Young's modulus of Nb3Sn filaments in Nb3Sn/Cu superconducting composite wire was investigated in detail. Nb3Sn filaments were first extracted from composite wire. Nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid were used to remove copper stabilizer, Nb3Sn/Nb barrier and bronze. Then, Nb3Sn filaments were impregnated with epoxy resin to form simple filament bundle composite rods. A large difference in Young's moduli of filaments and epoxy resin enhance the accuracy of the measurement of Nb3Sn filament modulus. The ratio of Nb3Sn to Nb in filaments and the number of filaments in the fiber bundle composite rods were used in the final calculation of the Young's modulus of Nb3Sn. The obtained modulus of 127 GPa was the lower bound of the already reported values.

  3. Synthesis of the supported catalysts by co-impregnation and sequential impregnation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwi Nugrahaningtyas, Khoirina; Hidayat, Yuniawan; Patiha; Prihastuti, Nina; Yelvi, Brigitta; Umami Nur Kalimah, Riza

    2017-02-01

    The non-sulfide catalysts Co-Mo/USY were prepared with three different methods, i.e. co-impregnation and two sequential impregnation procedures. The phases of the synthesized materials and their composition were characterized with X-ray diffraction. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction patterns were analyzed using Le Bail methods with Rietica software. Finally, an overview of the substitution effect of cobalt and molybdenum on the metal content and acidity of the catalyst were also investigated.

  4. Interaction of water with epoxy.

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Dana Auburn

    2009-07-01

    The chemistries of reactants, plasticizers, solvents and additives in an epoxy paint are discussed. Polyamide additives may play an important role in the absorption of molecular iodine by epoxy paints. It is recommended that the unsaturation of the polyamide additive in the epoxy cure be determined. Experimental studies of water absorption by epoxy resins are discussed. These studies show that absorption can disrupt hydrogen bonds among segments of the polymers and cause swelling of the polymer. The water absorption increases the diffusion coefficient of water within the polymer. Permanent damage to the polymer can result if water causes hydrolysis of ether linkages. Water desorption studies are recommended to ascertain how water absorption affects epoxy paint.

  5. Environmental effects on mechanical properties of a Kevlar 49/epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.T.; Chin, W.K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to determine the mechanical properties of a Kevlar 49/epoxy composite in a simulated flywheel service environment. The composite was filament-wound using an epoxy formulated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The temperature and vacuum chosen were 75/sup 0/C and approx. 7 x 10/sup -3/ torr, respectively. Specimens were preconditioned in the test environment for periods of 1 to 5 months before mechanical tests. The simulated service environment of 75/sup 0/C in vacuum was found to have little effect on static and fatigue properties. While the elevated temperature of 75/sup 0/C was not deleterious, the lack of air could be beneficial because it eliminates the possibility of oxidation. Thus, the elevated temperature of 75/sup 0/C is no deterrent to the application of the present Kevlar 49/epoxy in flywheels.

  6. Thermoplastic impact property improvement in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite bumper beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoodi, M. M.; Sapuan, S. M.; Ali, Aidy; Ahmad, D.; Khalina, A.

    2010-05-01

    Utilization of thermoset resin as a bumper beam composite matrix is currently more dominated in car manufacturer suppliers, because of availability, easy processing, low material cost and production equipment investment. Moreover, low viscosity, shrinkage and excellent flow facilitate better fibre impregnation and proper surface resin wetting. Three-dimensional cross linking curing increase impact, creep and environmental stress cracking resistance properties. Low impact properties of natural fibre epoxy composite, are main issues in its employment for automotive structural components. Impact properties in epoxy composite bumper beam could be increased by modifying the resin, reinforcement and manufacturing process as well as geometry parameters such as cross section, thickness, added ribs and fixing method optimizations could strengthen impact resistance. There are two main methods, flexibilisation and toughening, as modifying the resin in order to improve the impact properties of epoxy composite, which form single phase or two-phase morphology to make modifier as epoxy or from separate phase to keep the thermo-mechanical properties. Liquid rubber, thermoplastic, core shell particle and rigid particle are different methods of toughening improvements. In this research, thermoplastic toughening has used to improve impact properties in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite for automotive bumper beam and has achieved reasonable impact improvements.

  7. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.; Pater, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    High char yield epoxy using novel bisimide amines (BIA's) as curing agents with a state of the art epoxy resin was developed. Stoichiometric quantities of the epoxy resin and the BIA's were studied to determine the cure cycle required for preparation of resin specimens. The bisimide cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). The physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these novel resins were determined. The levels of moisture absorption exhibited by the bisimide amine cured expoxies (IME's) were considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies. The strain-to-failure of the control resin system was improved 25% by replacement of DDS with 6F-DDS. Each BIA containing resin exhibited twice the char yield of the control resin MY 720/DDS. Graphite fiber reinforced control (C) and IME resins were fabricated and characterized. Two of the composite systems showed superior properties compared to the other Celion 6000/IME composite systems and state of the art graphite epoxy systems. The two systems exhibited excellent wet shear and flexural strengths and moduli at 300 and 350 F.

  8. Impregnated Netting Slows Infestation by Triatoma infestans

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael Z.; Quíspe-Machaca, Victor R.; Ylla-Velasquez, Jose L.; Waller, Lance A.; Richards, Jean M.; Rath, Bruno; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; del Carpio, Juan G. Cornejo; Cordova-Benzaquen, Eleazar; McKenzie, F. Ellis; Wirtz, Robert A.; Maguire, James H.; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2008-01-01

    We used sentinel animal enclosures to measure the rate of infestation by the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, in an urban community of Arequipa, Peru, and to evaluate the effect of deltamethrin-impregnated netting on that rate. Impregnated netting decreased the rate of infestation of sentinel enclosures (rate ratio, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13–0.38; P < 0.001), controlling for the density of surrounding vector populations and the distance of these to the sentinel enclosures. Most migrant insects were early-stage nymphs, which are less likely to carry the parasitic agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. Spread of the vector in the city therefore likely precedes spread of the parasite. Netting was particularly effective against adult insects and late-stage nymphs; taking into account population structure, netting decreased the reproductive value of migrant populations from 443.6 to 40.5. Impregnated netting can slow the spread of T. infestans and is a potentially valuable tool in the control of Chagas disease. PMID:18840739

  9. Impregnated netting slows infestation by Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael Z; Quíspe-Machaca, Victor R; Ylla-Velasquez, Jose L; Waller, Lance A; Richards, Jean M; Rath, Bruno; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; del Carpio, Juan G Cornejo; Cordova-Benzaquen, Eleazar; McKenzie, F Ellis; Wirtz, Robert A; Maguire, James H; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2008-10-01

    We used sentinel animal enclosures to measure the rate of infestation by the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, in an urban community of Arequipa, Peru, and to evaluate the effect of deltamethrin-impregnated netting on that rate. Impregnated netting decreased the rate of infestation of sentinel enclosures (rate ratio, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-0.38; P < 0.001), controlling for the density of surrounding vector populations and the distance of these to the sentinel enclosures. Most migrant insects were early-stage nymphs, which are less likely to carry the parasitic agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. Spread of the vector in the city therefore likely precedes spread of the parasite. Netting was particularly effective against adult insects and late-stage nymphs; taking into account population structure, netting decreased the reproductive value of migrant populations from 443.6 to 40.5. Impregnated netting can slow the spread of T. infestans and is a potentially valuable tool in the control of Chagas disease.

  10. Impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, J.; Gotoh, Y.; Tsuji, H.; Takagi, T.

    We have developed an impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source whose tip is a sintered-porous structure made of a refractory metal such as tungsten. By this structure the ratio of the liquid metal surface area facing the vacuum to the volume is low, which decreases useless metal evaporation from the surface. The maximum vapour pressure of the metal in operation for this ion source is 10 -1-10 0 Torr, which is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than that for the needle type. Therefore, useful metal ions such as Ga +, Au +, Ag +, In +, Si 2+, Ge 2+, and Sb 2+ can be extracted from single element metals or alloys. The porous structure of the tip has also an effect on the positive control of the liquid metal flow rate to the tip head. Thus, a stable operation with a high current of a few hundreds of μA can be obtained together with a low current high brightness ion beam. Therefore, this ion source is suitable not only for microfocusing but also for a general use as a metal ion source.

  11. Evaluation of failure criterion for graphite/epoxy fabric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Wharram, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    The development and application of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for composite laminate analysis is described. Emphasis is given to the fabrication and testing of Narmco Rigidite 5208-WT300, a plain weave fabric of Thornel 300 Graphite fibers impregnated with Narmco 5208 Resin. The quadratic-failure criterion with F sub 12=0 provides accurate estimates of failure stresses for the graphite/epoxy investigated. The cubic failure criterion was recast into an operationally easier form, providing design curves that can be applied to laminates fabricated from orthotropic woven fabric prepregs. In the form presented, no interaction strength tests are required, although recourse to the quadratic model and the principal strength parameters is necessary. However, insufficient test data exist at present to generalize this approach for all prepreg constructions, and its use must be restricted to the generic materials and configurations investigated to date.

  12. New energetic epoxy binders

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, S.R.; Amanulla, S.

    1996-07-01

    A new class of epoxy resins having N{single_bond}N bonds in the backbone has been synthesized with a view to explore their properties as energetic binders. The N-epoxidation of bis-dicarbonylhydrazones of adipic, azelaic and sebacic dihydrazides results in the formation of viscous resins having epoxide end groups. The resins have been characterized by the elemental and end group analyses, IR and NMR spectra. Relevant properties for their use as binders in solid propellants, such as thermal stability, heat of combustion, burn rate and performance parameters of AP-based propellant systems, have been evaluated. A significant increase in the burn rate of AP-based propellants noticed, is perhaps related to the exothermicity of the binder decomposition and the reactivity of N{single_bond}N bonds with perchloric acid formed during the combustion of AP.

  13. Epoxy hydantoins as matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J.

    1983-01-01

    Tensile strength and fracture toughness of castings of the hydantoin resins cured with methylenedianiline are significantly higher than MY 720 control castings. Water absorption of an ethyl, amyl hydantoin formulation is 2.1 percent at equilibrium and Tg's are about 160 C, approximately 15 deg below the final cure temperature. Two series of urethane and ester-extended hydantoin epoxy resins were synthesized to determine the effect of crosslink density and functional groups on properties. Castings cured with methylenedianiline or with hexahydrophthalic anhydride were made from these compounds and evaluated. The glass transition temperatures, tensile strengths and moduli, and fracture toughness values were all much lower than that of the simple hydantoin epoxy resins. Using a methylene bishydantoin epoxy with a more rigid structure gave brittle, low-energy fractures, while a more flexible, ethoxy-extended hydantoin epoxy resin gave a very low Tg.

  14. Influence of impregnation method on metal retention of CCB-treated wood in slow pyrolysis process.

    PubMed

    Kinata, Silao Espérance; Loubar, Khaled; Bouslamti, Amine; Belloncle, Christophe; Tazerout, Mohand

    2012-09-30

    In the present work, the effects of copper, chromium and boron on the pyrolysis of wood and their distribution in the pyrolysis products were investigated. For this, the wood has been impregnated with chromium-copper-boron (CCB). In addition, to describe the effects of impregnation method, vacuum-pressure and dipping methods were also conducted. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) results show that an increase in the final residue and decrease in degradation temperature on both methods of treated wood compared to untreated wood. Then, slow pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a laboratory reactor. The mass balance of pyrolysis products is confirmed by TGA. Furthermore, the concentration of metals in the final residue is measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The results show that the final residue contains more than 45% of the initial amount of metal present in the treated wood. The phenomenon is more pronounced with vacuum-pressure treated wood. The heating values of pyrolysis products were analyzed. The heating value of charcoal obtained from treated and untreated wood is approximately same. But the heating value of tar from untreated wood is higher than the heating value of the tar from treated wood.

  15. Synthesis of polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Benjamin J

    2014-10-07

    The synthesis of a polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy uses a one-step cure by applying an external stimulus to release the acid from the polyoxometalate and thereby catalyze the cure reaction of the epoxy resin. Such polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites afford the cured epoxy unique properties imparted by the intrinsic properties of the polyoxometalate. For example, polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites can be used as corrosion resistant epoxy coatings, for encapsulation of electronics with improved dielectric properties, and for structural applications with improved mechanical properties.

  16. Thermocapillary motion on lubricant-impregnated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelobrk, Nada; Girard, Henri-Louis; Bengaluru Subramanyam, Srinivas; Kwon, Hyuk-Min; Quéré, David; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2016-10-01

    We show that thermocapillary-induced droplet motion is markedly enhanced when using lubricant-impregnated surfaces as compared to solid substrates. These surfaces provide weak pinning, which makes them ideal for droplet transportation and specifically for water transportation. Using a lubricant with viscosity comparable to that of water and temperature gradients as low as 2 K/mm, we observe that drops can propel at 6.5 mm/s, that is, at least 5 times quicker than reported on conventional substrates. Also in contrast with solids, the liquid nature of the different interfaces makes it possible to predict quantitatively the thermocapillary Marangoni force (and velocity) responsible for the propulsion.

  17. Multilayer Impregnated Fibrous Thermal Insulation Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Szalai, Christine e.; Hsu, Ming-ta; Carroll, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    The term "secondary polymer layered impregnated tile" ("SPLIT") denotes a type of ablative composite-material thermal- insulation tiles having engineered, spatially non-uniform compositions. The term "secondary" refers to the fact that each tile contains at least two polymer layers wherein endothermic reactions absorb considerable amounts of heat, thereby helping to prevent overheating of an underlying structure. These tiles were invented to afford lighter-weight alternatives to the reusable thermal-insulation materials heretofore variously used or considered for use in protecting the space shuttles and other spacecraft from intense atmospheric-entry heating.

  18. METHOD OF IMPREGNATING A POROUS MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Steele, G.N.

    1960-06-01

    A method of impregnating a porous body with an inorganic uranium- containing salt is outlined and comprises dissolving a water-soluble uranium- containing salt in water; saturating the intercommunicating pores of the porous body with the salt solution; infusing ammonia gas into the intercommunicating pores of the body, the ammonia gas in water chemically reacting with the water- soluble uranium-containing salt in the water solvent to form a nonwater-soluble uranium-containing precipitant; and evaporating the volatile unprecipitated products from the intercommunicating pores whereby the uranium-containing precipitate is uniformly distributed in the intercommunicating peres of the porous body.

  19. Fracture, failure and compression behaviour of a 3D interconnected carbon aerogel (Aerographite) epoxy composite

    DOE PAGES

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Liebig, W. V.; Mecklenberg, M.; ...

    2015-11-04

    Aerographite (AG) is a mechanically robust, lightweight synthetic cellular material, which consists of a 3D interconnected network of tubular carbon [1]. The presence of open channels in AG aids to infiltrate them with polymer matrices, thereby yielding an electrical conducting and lightweight composite. Aerographite produced with densities in the range of 7–15 mg/cm3 was infiltrated with a low viscous epoxy resin by means of vacuum infiltration technique. Detailed morphological and structural investigations on synthesized AG and AG/epoxy composite were performed by scanning electron microscopic techniques. Our present study investigates the fracture and failure of AG/epoxy composites and its energy absorptionmore » capacity under compression. The composites displayed an extended plateau region when uni-axially compressed, which led to an increase in energy absorption of ~133% per unit volume for 1.5 wt% of AG, when compared to pure epoxy. Preliminary results on fracture toughness showed an enhancement of ~19% in KIC for AG/epoxy composites with 0.45 wt% of AG. Furthermore, our observations of fractured surfaces under scanning electron microscope gives evidence of pull-out of arms of AG tetrapod, interface and inter-graphite failure as the dominating mechanism for the toughness improvement in these composites. These observations were consistent with the results obtained from photoelasticity experiments on a thin film AG/epoxy model composite.« less

  20. Fracture, failure and compression behaviour of a 3D interconnected carbon aerogel (Aerographite) epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Liebig, W. V.; Mecklenberg, M.; Fiedler, B.; Smazna, D.; Adelung, R.; Schulte, K.

    2015-11-04

    Aerographite (AG) is a mechanically robust, lightweight synthetic cellular material, which consists of a 3D interconnected network of tubular carbon [1]. The presence of open channels in AG aids to infiltrate them with polymer matrices, thereby yielding an electrical conducting and lightweight composite. Aerographite produced with densities in the range of 7–15 mg/cm3 was infiltrated with a low viscous epoxy resin by means of vacuum infiltration technique. Detailed morphological and structural investigations on synthesized AG and AG/epoxy composite were performed by scanning electron microscopic techniques. Our present study investigates the fracture and failure of AG/epoxy composites and its energy absorption capacity under compression. The composites displayed an extended plateau region when uni-axially compressed, which led to an increase in energy absorption of ~133% per unit volume for 1.5 wt% of AG, when compared to pure epoxy. Preliminary results on fracture toughness showed an enhancement of ~19% in KIC for AG/epoxy composites with 0.45 wt% of AG. Furthermore, our observations of fractured surfaces under scanning electron microscope gives evidence of pull-out of arms of AG tetrapod, interface and inter-graphite failure as the dominating mechanism for the toughness improvement in these composites. These observations were consistent with the results obtained from photoelasticity experiments on a thin film AG/epoxy model composite.

  1. Simultaneous acoustic and dielectric real time curing monitoring of epoxy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, G.; Saganas, Ch.; Grammatikos, S. A.; Aggelis, D. G.; Paipetis, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    The attainment of structural integrity of the reinforcing matrix in composite materials is of primary importance for the final properties of the composite structure. The detailed monitoring of the curing process on the other hand is paramount (i) in defining the optimal conditions for the impregnation of the reinforcement by the matrix (ii) in limiting the effects of the exotherm produced by the polymerization reaction which create unwanted thermal stresses and (iii) in securing optimal behavior in matrix controlled properties, such as off axis or shear properties and in general the durability of the composite. Dielectric curing monitoring is a well known technique for distinguishing between the different stages of the polymerization of a typical epoxy system. The technique successfully predicts the gelation and the vitrification of the epoxy and has been extended for the monitoring of prepregs. Recent work has shown that distinct changes in the properties of the propagated sound in the epoxy which undergoes polymerization is as well directly related to the gelation and vitrification of the resin, as well as to the attainment of the final properties of the resin system. In this work, a typical epoxy is simultaneously monitored using acoustic and dielectric methods. The system is isothermally cured in an oven to avoid effects from the polymerization exotherm. Typical broadband sensors are employed for the acoustic monitoring, while flat interdigital sensors are employed for the dielectric scans. All stages of the polymerization process were successfully monitored and the validity of both methods was cross checked and verified.

  2. Multifunctional epoxy composites with natural Moroccan clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsif, M.; Zerouale, A.; Kandri, N. Idrissi; Allali, F.; Sgarbossa, P.; Bartolozzi, A.; Tamburini, S.; Bertani, R.

    2016-05-01

    Two natural Moroccan clays, here firstly completely characterized, have been used as fillers without modification in epoxy composites. Mechanical properties resulted to be improved and a significant antibacterial activity is exhibited by the epoxy composite containing the C2 clay.

  3. Superconducting cyclotron and its vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, A.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2008-05-01

    A large superconducting cyclotron is under construction at this Centre and will be used to accelerate heavy ion beams to energy up to 80 MeV/A for light heavy ions and about 10 MeV/A for medium mass heavy ions. The vacuum system for this accelerator has several different aspects. The main acceleration chamber will be evacuated to a level of about 10-7 torr using both turbo molecular pumps and specially designed cryopanels. The surfaces exposed to this 'vacuum' are mostly made of OFE copper. The cryogenic transfer lines, to cool the cryopanels, are of several meters in length and they pass through RF resonators extending below the magnet. The cryostat that will house the superconducting coils has an annular vacuum chamber, which is evacuated to a level of approximately 10-5 torr using a turbo molecular pump. Cryopumping action starts once the coils are cooled to low temperatures. A differential pumping is provided below the RF liner that encloses the pole tip of the main magnet. The space that is pumped in this case contains epoxy-potted trim coils wound around the pole tips. Crucial interlocks are provided between the differential vacuum and the acceleration chamber vacuum to avoid distortion of the RF liner, which is made of thin copper sheets. The other important vacuum system provides thermal insulation for the liquid helium transfer lines. In this paper a brief description of the superconducting cyclotron will be given. Details of various vacuum aspects of the accelerator and the logistics of their operation will be presented. Introduction of some of the improved equipment now available and improved techniques are also discussed.

  4. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  5. Impregnation of Fenofibrate on mesoporous silica using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Bouledjouidja, Abir; Masmoudi, Yasmine; Van Speybroeck, Michiel; Schueller, Laurent; Badens, Elisabeth

    2016-02-29

    Low oral bioavailability can be circumvented by the formulation of the poorly water soluble drug in ordered mesoporous silica (OMS-L-7). Fenofibrate is an orally administered, poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), used clinically to lower lipid levels. Fenofibrate was loaded into silica using two methods: incipient wetness and supercritical impregnation. This study investigates the impact of loading and the impact of varying supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) processing conditions. The objective is to enhance Fenofibrate loading into silica while reducing degree of the drug crystallinity, so as to increase the drug's dissolution rate and its bioavailability. The comparison of both impregnation processes was made in terms of impregnation yields and duration as well as physical characterization of the drug. While incipient wetness method led to a Fenofibrate loading up to 300 mgdrug/gsilica in 48 h of impregnation, the supercritical impregnation method yielded loading up to 485 mgdrug/gsilica in 120 min of impregnation duration, at 16 MPa and 308 K, with a low degree of crystallinity (about 1%) comparable to the crystallinity observed via the solvent method. In addition to the enhancement of impregnation efficiency, the supercritical route provides a solvent-free alternative for impregnation.

  6. Note: Ultra-low birefringence dodecagonal vacuum glass cell

    SciTech Connect

    Brakhane, Stefan Alt, Wolfgang; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Moon, Geol; Alberti, Andrea

    2015-12-15

    We report on an ultra-low birefringence dodecagonal glass cell for ultra-high vacuum applications. The epoxy-bonded trapezoidal windows of the cell are made of SF57 glass, which exhibits a very low stress-induced birefringence. We characterize the birefringence Δn of each window with the cell under vacuum conditions, obtaining values around 10{sup −8}. After baking the cell at 150 °C, we reach a pressure below 10{sup −10} mbar. In addition, each window is antireflection coated on both sides, which is highly desirable for quantum optics experiments and precision measurements.

  7. Occupational skin diseases from epoxy compounds. Epoxy resin compounds, epoxy acrylates and 2,3-epoxypropyl trimethyl ammonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Jolanki, R

    1991-01-01

    Of a total of 3731 patients investigated between 1974 and 1990, 1844 (49.4%) had an occupational skin disease. Of them 142 (7.7%) had an occupational skin disease caused by epoxy compounds--135 patients (95%) had allergic contact dermatitis, five had irritant contact dermatitis, and two had contact urticaria. Apart from dermatoses, two patients had IgE-mediated asthma from exposure to DGEBA epoxy resins. Thus epoxy compounds are one of the main causes of occupational allergic contact dermatoses and can be considered potential causes of occupational asthma. The most frequent causes were epoxy resin compounds, which together induced 93% (132 cases) of all epoxy compound dermatoses. The three most common causative products were epoxy paints and their raw materials (31%, 41 cases), epoxy resin compounds used in electrical insulation (29%, 38 cases) and epoxy glues (18%, 24 cases). Fewer cases were caused by products containing epoxy acrylate and EPTMAC. The present study found that, in addition to contact allergy to DGEBA epoxy resins, contact allergy to epoxy hardeners, non-DGEBA resins and reactive diluents is common. Polyamine hardeners, most frequently MDA, DETA and TETA, rarely IPDA, tris-DMP, EDA, TMD and XDA, were the second commonest causes of contact allergy induced by epoxy resin compounds, after DGEBA epoxy resins. Cycloaliphatic epoxy resins and other non-DGEBA epoxy resins, including heterocyclic dimethyl hydantoin, phenol novolak and brominated epoxy resins, were the third commonest causes, and reactive diluents the fourth commonest cause of allergic dermatitis due to epoxy resin compounds. Most patients sensitized to reactive diluents were allergic to PGE, ortho-CGE, HDDGE and BDDGE, whereas fewer patients were sensitized to AGE, NPGDGE and BGE. Cross-sensitization between reactive diluents was common. Cardura E 10 and Epoxide 8 provoked no reactions. The present study also indicated that DGEBA epoxy resins with a high average MW ought to be regarded as

  8. Evaluation of Alternative Peel Ply Surface Preparation Methods of SC-15 Epoxy / Fiberglass Composite Surfaces for Secondary Bonding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    surface preparation, secondary bonding, peel ply, film adhesive, toughened epoxy, VARTM 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...for the VARTM process. .......................6 Figure 2. Vacuum-bagged laminate during the debulk process...processing temperature. .........................3 Table 2. ARL cure schedule for VARTM processing of SC-15

  9. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  10. Tobramycin-impregnated methylmethacrylate for mandible reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Goode, R L; Reynolds, B N

    1992-02-01

    Reconstruction of the mandible to restore continuity following resection is described in four cases using a tobramycin-impregnated methylmethacrylate implant fabricated at the time of surgery. Methylmethacrylate has excellent biocompatibility and strength and has been used in surgery for over 20 years. The technique uses readily available materials and is similar in concept to reconstruction with a metal plate. Potential advantages are: (1) the presence of a potent antibiotic within the implant that is released over a period of months to minimize postoperative infection and (2) the capability of the material to accurately fit any defect, either when used alone or in combination with a plate or rod. Three of the four patients whom we present are doing well; one implant became exposed following postoperative radiotherapy and had to be removed.

  11. Multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement for advanced epoxy composites.

    PubMed

    Bekyarova, E; Thostenson, E T; Yu, A; Kim, H; Gao, J; Tang, J; Hahn, H T; Chou, T-W; Itkis, M E; Haddon, R C

    2007-03-27

    We report an approach to the development of advanced structural composites based on engineered multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement. Electrophoresis was utilized for the selective deposition of multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on woven carbon fabric. The CNT-coated carbon fabric panels were subsequently infiltrated with epoxy resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to fabricate multiscale hybrid composites in which the nanotubes were completely integrated into the fiber bundles and reinforced the matrix-rich regions. The carbon nanotube/carbon fabric/epoxy composites showed approximately 30% enhancement of the interlaminar shear strength as compared to that of carbon fiber/epoxy composites without carbon nanotubes and demonstrate significantly improved out-of-plane electrical conductivity.

  12. Method of making thermally removable epoxies

    DOEpatents

    Loy, Douglas A.; Wheeler, David R.; Russick, Edward M.; McElhanon, James R.; Saunders, Randall S.

    2002-01-01

    A method of making a thermally-removable epoxy by mixing a bis(maleimide) compound to a monomeric furan compound containing an oxirane group to form a di-epoxy mixture and then adding a curing agent at temperatures from approximately room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a thermally-removable epoxy. The thermally-removable epoxy can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The epoxy material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

  13. Fire-Retardant Epoxy Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    Phosphorus-containing epoxy is fire-retardant and translucent. Intended as adhesive for laminated plastic sheets, new material bonds well to titanium dioxide-filled plastic film, which ordinarily shows little surface interaction with adhesives. Fire retardancy has been demonstrated, and smoke density is low enough to avoid smoke obscuration.

  14. Fire-retardant epoxy polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akawie, R. I.; Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.

    1978-01-01

    Phosphorus atoms in molecular structure of epoxies make them fire-retardant without degrading their adhesive strength. Moreover, polymers are transparent, unlike compounds that contain arsenic or other inorganics. They have been used to bond polyvinylfluoride and polyether sulfone films onto polyimide glass laminates.

  15. Epoxy Grout With Silica Thickener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Grout cures quickly, even in presence of hydraulic oil. Grout is mixture of aggregate particles, finely-divided silica, epoxy resin, and triethylenetetramine curing agent, with mixture containing about 85 percent silica and aggregate particle sand 15 percent resin and curing agent. Silica is thickening agent and keeps grout from sagging.

  16. Shelf Stable Epoxy Repair Adhesive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Epoxy Resin Adhesive WP-1763 viii FINAL REPORT List of Acronyms ACN Acetonitrile ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials BPA Bisphenol...the oven and immediately cooled to room temperature. Approximately 1.0 mL of acetonitrile ( ACN ) was added to each vial using a glass syringe. The

  17. Allergic contact dermatitis from a nonbisphenol A epoxy in a graphite fiber reinforced epoxy laminate.

    PubMed

    Mathias, C G

    1987-09-01

    An employee of the Composites Division of an aircraft engine manufacturing firm developed dermatitis associated with the handling of a graphite fiber reinforced epoxy laminate (epoxy prepreg). Patch test investigation demonstrated that the responsible causal agent was the nonbisphenol A epoxy binder, 4-glycidyloxy-N, N-diglycidylaniline. A patch test with bisphenol A epoxy from a standard patch test screening series was negative. Subsequent interviews with employees of the Composites Division suggested that a relative lack of awareness of the cutaneous hazards of fiber reinforced epoxy laminates, compared with liquid epoxy resin systems, may be an important risk factor for allergic sensitization to these composite materials.

  18. Fracture behavior of block copolymer and graphene nanoplatelet modified epoxy and fiber reinforced/epoxy polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamar, Nicholas T.

    are a single atomic layer of sp2 hybridized carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice. GnPs have excellent thermal, electrical and mechanical properties and are thus attractive fillers for composite materials. GnPs with a basal plane diameter of 5 microm were incorporated between lamina in GFRPs made via vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). At only 0.25 wt%, GnPs improved GFRP flexural strength and GIc by 29 and 25%, respectively. GnPs also improved the low velocity drop weight impact properties of the GFRP laminates. Ultrasonic C-scans and dye penetration experiments on impacted laminates showed that the impact-side damage area decreased with increasing concentration of GnPs, while the back-side damage area increased. The addition of GnPs improved absorption and dissipation of impact energy throughout GFRP laminates. Additionally, GnPs were investigated as toughening agents in epoxy and corresponding AS4-12k CFRPs. In epoxy and CFRPs, GnPs activate a crack deflection toughening mechanism, resulting in increased fracture surface area and fracture energy. Hybrid GnP/SBM modified epoxy and CFRPs were also investigated.

  19. Vacuum-assisted delivery

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000514.htm Vacuum-assisted delivery To use the sharing features on ... the baby through the birth canal. When is Vacuum-assisted Delivery Needed? Even after your cervix is ...

  20. Advanced Multifunctional Properties of Aligned Carbon Nanotube-Epoxy Composites from Carbon Nanotube Aerogel Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Thang; Liu, Peng; Fan, Zeng; Ngern, Nigel; Duong, Hai

    2015-03-01

    Unlike previous methods of making carbon nanotube (CNT) thin films, aligned CNT thin films in this work are synthesized directly from CNT aerogels in a CVD process. CH4/H2/He gases and ferrocene/thiophene catalysts are mixed and reacted in the reactor at 1200 °C to form CNT aerogel socks. By pulling out the socks with a metal rod, CNT thin films with 15-nm diameter MWNTs are aligned and produced continuously at a speed of a few meters per minute. The number of the aligned CNT thin film layers/ thickness can also be controlled well. The as-synthesized aligned CNT films are further condensed by acetone spray and post-treated by UV light. The aligned CNT films without any above post-treatment have a high electrical conductivity of 400S/cm. We also develop aligned CNT-epoxy composites by infiltrating epoxy into the above aligned CNT thin films using Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) method. Our cost-effective fabrication method of the aligned CNT films is more advanced for developing the composites having CNT orientation control. The mechanical, electrical and optical properties of the aligned CNT epoxy composites are measured. About 2% of the aligned CNTs can enhance significantly the electrical conductivity and hardness of aligned CNT-epoxy composite films. Effects of morphologies, volume fraction, and alignment of the CNTs on the advanced multifunctional properties of the aligned CNT-epoxy composites are also quantified.

  1. Drug loading of foldable commercial intraocular lenses using supercritical impregnation.

    PubMed

    Bouledjouidja, A; Masmoudi, Y; Sergent, M; Trivedi, V; Meniai, A; Badens, E

    2016-03-16

    The drug delivery through intraocular lenses (IOLs) allows the combination of cataract surgery act and postoperative treatment in a single procedure. In order to prepare such systems, "clean" supercritical CO2 processes are studied for loading commercial IOLs with ophthalmic drugs. Ciprofloxacin (CIP, an antibiotic) and dexamethasone 21-phosphate disodium (DXP, an anti-inflammatory drug) were impregnated into foldable IOLs made from poly-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (P-HEMA). A first pre-treatment step was conducted in order to remove absorbed conditioning physiological solution. Supercritical impregnations were then performed by varying the experimental conditions. In order to obtain transparent IOLs and avoid the appearance of undesirable foaming, it was necessary to couple slow pressurization and depressurization phases during supercritical treatments. The impregnation yields were determined through drug release studies. For both drugs, release studies show deep and reproducible impregnation for different diopters. For the system P-HEMA/CIP, a series of impregnations was performed to delimit the experimental range at two pressures (80 and 200 bar) in the presence or absence of ethanol as a co-solvent for two diopters (+5.0 D and +21.0 D). Increase in pressure in the absence of a co-solvent resulted in improved CIP impregnation. The addition of ethanol (5 mol%) produced impregnation yields comparable to those obtained at 200 bar without co-solvent. A response surface methodology based on experimental designs was used to study the influence of operating conditions on impregnation of IOLs (+21.0 D) in the absence of co-solvent. Two input variables with 5 levels each were considered; the pressure (80-200 bar) and the impregnation duration (30-240 min). CIP impregnation yields ranging between 0.92 and 3.83 μg CIP/mg IOL were obtained from these experiments and response surface indicated the pressure as a key factor in the process. The DXP impregnation in P-HEMA was

  2. Sealing of large leaks in high-vacuum systems subject to mechanical and thermal stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, J. D.; Gilbreath, W. P.

    1974-01-01

    The use of silicone rubber adhesive (particularly, G.E. RTV-108) for sealing large leaks in high vacuum systems subject to mechanical and thermal stresses is shown to be more effective than that of epoxy cements. The sealant is applied externally to the leak while the system is partially evacuated so that it is drawn into the hole.

  3. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-03-06

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  4. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  5. The Classical Vacuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    1985-01-01

    The classical vacuum of physics is not empty, but contains a distinctive pattern of electromagnetic fields. Discovery of the vacuum, thermal spectrum, classical electron theory, zero-point spectrum, and effects of acceleration are discussed. Connection between thermal radiation and the classical vacuum reveals unexpected unity in the laws of…

  6. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose; Pham, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside thermal protection materials. The focus of this research is on the class of materials known as phenolic impregnated carbon ablators. It has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and is the thermal protection system material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory and SpaceX Dragon spacecraft. Although it has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. To understand failure mechanisms in carbon ablators, fracture tests were performed on FiberForm(Registered TradeMark) (precursor), virgin, and charred ablator materials. Several samples of these materials were tested to investigate failure mechanisms at a microstructural scale. Stress-strain data were obtained simultaneously to estimate the tensile strength and toughness. It was observed that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred carbon ablators, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred carbon ablators showed greater strength values compared with FiberForm samples, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  7. Wood impregnation of yeast lees for winemaking.

    PubMed

    Palomero, Felipe; Bertani, Paolo; Fernández de Simón, Brígida; Cadahía, Estrella; Benito, Santiago; Morata, Antonio; Suárez-Lepe, José A

    2015-03-15

    This study develops a new method to produce more complex wines by means of an indirect diffusion of wood aromas from yeast cell-walls. An exogenous lyophilized biomass was macerated with an ethanol wood extract solution and subsequently dried. Different times were used for the adsorption of polyphenols and volatile compounds to the yeast cell-walls. The analysis of polyphenols and volatile compounds (by HPLC/DAD and GC-MS, respectively) demonstrate that the adsorption/diffusion of these compounds from the wood to the yeast takes place. Red wines were also aged with Saccharomyces cerevisiae lees that had been impregnated with wood aromas and subsequently dried. Four different types of wood were used: chestnut, cherry, acacia and oak. Large differences were observed between the woods studied with regards to their volatile and polyphenolic profiles. Sensory evaluations confirmed large differences even with short-term contact between the wines and the lees, showing that the method could be of interest for red wine making. In addition, the results demonstrate the potential of using woods other than oak in cooperage.

  8. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose F.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal protection materials used for spacecraft heat shields are subjected to various thermal-mechanical loads during an atmospheric reentry which can threaten the structural integrity of the system. This paper discusses the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside the thermal protection material, Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). PICA has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and was the TPS material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), that will fly in 2011. Although PICA has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. To thoroughly understand failure in PICA, experiments were performed using FiberForm(Registered TradeMark) (precursor of PICA), virgin and furnace-charred PICA. Several small samples were tested inside an electron microscope to investigate the failure mechanisms. Micrographs were obtained before and after the failure in order to study crack initiation and growth. Videos were obtained to capture failure mechanisms in real time. Stress-strain data was obtained simultaneously for all the samples with the help of a data acquisition system, integrated to the mechanical stages. It was found that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred PICA, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred PICA showed greater strength values compared to FiberForm coupons, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  9. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose F.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal protection materials used for spacecraft heat shields are subjected to various thermal-mechanical loads during an atmospheric entry which can threaten the structural integrity of the system. This paper discusses the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside thermal protection materials. The focus of research is Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). It has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and is the TPS material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and Dragon spacecraft. Although PICA has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. In order to thoroughly understand failure in PICA, fracture tests were performed on FiberForm* (precursor of PICA), virgin and charred PICA materials. Several samples of these materials were tested to investigate failure mechanisms at a microstructural scale. Stress-strain data were obtained simultaneously to estimate the fracture toughness. It was found that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred PICA, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred PICA showed greater strength values compared to FiberForm coupons, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  10. Analysis and measurement of thermal conductivity of polypropylene laminated paper impregnated with subcooled liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuse, Mitsuho; Fuchino, Shuichiro

    2014-09-01

    We measured the thermal conductivity of polypropylene laminated paper (PPLP) impregnated with subcooled liquid nitrogen. PPLP is widely used for the electrical insulation of high-Tc superconducting (HTS) power transmission cables. Although the thermal conductivity of PPLP is an important factor in the design of HTS cables, there has been very limited work on its measurement in subcooled liquid nitrogen. We prepared PPLP samples and symmetrically stacked them on both sides of a heater. The stacked samples were immersed in liquid nitrogen in an open cryostat. A cryocooler mounted on the cryostat was used to maintain the subcooled temperature of the liquid nitrogen. The thermal conductivity of the stacked PPLPs was measured by the steady state method at a bath temperature of 65-75 K and was found to be 0.23-0.26 W/m K, which is about five times that measured in a vacuum as presented in available literature. We also discuss possible mechanisms for boosting the thermal conductivity of PPLP by liquid nitrogen impregnation.

  11. Fabrication of dense (Th,U)O 2 pellets through microspheres impregnation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Rajesh V.; Dehadraya, J. V.; Bhattacharya, Shovit; Gupta, S. K.; Mukerjee, S. K.

    2008-11-01

    ThO 2 microspheres were prepared by internal gelation process using a pre-boiled hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA), urea solution. The microspheres were characterized with respect to tap density, specific surface area and pore size distribution. An indigenously designed and fabricated apparatus was used for the impregnation of uranium in thoria microspheres. The loading of uranium was found to vary with the concentration of uranyl nitrate solution, operational vacuum and the time of impregnation. These process conditions were optimized to obtain soft (Th,U)O 2 microspheres containing 3-4 mol% of uranium, which are readily amenable for pelletization. The green pellets could be sintered to ˜96% of T.D. by heating in air up to 1350 °C for a period of 2-4 h. The polished surface of the fractured pellets showed a smooth surface without any berry structure. The shrinkage behaviour of the pellets was also studied in air using a dilatometer. The SEM studies of the pellets indicated a uniform microstructure with average grain size of 1 μm. The elemental scanning by the EDX method showed the uniform distribution of uranium in the microspheres and pellets.

  12. Sealing Materials for Use in Vacuum at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Donald R.; Camarda, Charles J.; Lee Vaughn, Wallace

    2012-01-01

    Sealing materials that can be applied and left in place in vacuum over a wide range of temperatures (especially temperatures of a few thousand degrees Celsius) have been conceived and investigated for potential utility in repairing thermal-protection tiles on the space shuttles in orbit before returning to Earth. These materials are also adaptable to numerous terrestrial applications that involve vacuum processing and/or repair of structures that must withstand high temperatures. These materials can be formulated to have mechanical handling characteristics ranging from almost freely flowing liquid-like consistency through paste-like consistency to stiff puttylike consistency, and to retain these characteristics in vacuum until heated to high curing temperatures. A sealing material of this type can be formulated to be used in any of several different ways for example, to be impregnated into a high-temperature-fabric patch, impregnated into a high-temperature-fabric gasket for sealing a patch, applied under a patch, or applied alone in the manner of putty or wallboard compound. The sealing material must be formulated to be compatible with, and adhere to, the structural material(s) to be repaired. In general, the material consists of a vacuum-compatible liquid containing one or more dissolved compound(s) and/or mixed with suspended solid particles. Depending on the intended application, the liquid can be chosen to be of a compound that can remain in place in vacuum for a time long enough to be useful, and/or to evaporate or decompose in a controlled way to leave a useful solid residue behind. The evaporation rate is determined by proper choice of vapor pressure, application of heat, and/or application of ultraviolet light or other optical radiation. The liquid chosen for the original space shuttle application is a commercial silicone vacuum-pump oil.

  13. A Modeling Approach to Fiber Fracture in Melt Impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Feng; Zhang, Cong; Yu, Yang; Xin, Chunling; Tang, Ke; He, Yadong

    2017-02-01

    The effect of process variables such as roving pulling speed, melt temperature and number of pins on the fiber fracture during the processing of thermoplastic based composites was investigated in this study. The melt impregnation was used in this process of continuous glass fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites. Previous investigators have suggested a variety of models for melt impregnation, while comparatively little effort has been spent on modeling the fiber fracture caused by the viscous resin. Herein, a mathematical model was developed for impregnation process to predict the fiber fracture rate and describe the experimental results with the Weibull intensity distribution function. The optimal parameters of this process were obtained by orthogonal experiment. The results suggest that the fiber fracture is caused by viscous shear stress on fiber bundle in melt impregnation mold when pulling the fiber bundle.

  14. REDFORD CORE MAKING MACHINE. RESIN IMPREGNATED SAND IS BLOWN INTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REDFORD CORE MAKING MACHINE. RESIN IMPREGNATED SAND IS BLOWN INTO THE HEATED CORE BOX THAT SETS THE RESIN CREATING THE HARDENED CORE SHOWN HERE. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Core Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  15. Reducing Sliding Friction with Liquid-Impregnated Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Mohammad; Collier, C. Patrick; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team; CenterNanophase Materials Sciences Team

    2015-11-01

    Liquid-impregnated surfaces are fabricated by infusing a lubricating liquid into the micro/nano roughness of a textured substrate, such that the surface is slippery for any deposited liquid immiscible with the lubricant. To date, liquid-impregnated surfaces have almost exclusively focused on repelling liquids by minimizing the contact angle hysteresis. Here, we demonstrate that liquid-impregnated surfaces are also capable of reducing sliding friction for solid objects. Ordered arrays of silicon micropillars were infused with lubricating liquids varying in viscosity by two orders of magnitude. Five test surfaces were used: two different micropillared surfaces with and without liquid infusion and a smooth, dry control surface. The static and kinetic coefficients of friction were measured using a polished aluminum cube as the sliding object. Compared to the smooth control surface, the sliding friction was reduced by at least a factor of two on the liquid-impregnated surfaces.

  16. Characterization of Hybrid Epoxy Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Simcha, Shelly; Dotan, Ana; Kenig, Samuel; Dodiuk, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the effect of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) content and its surface treatment on thermo-mechanical properties of epoxy nanocomposites. MWCNTs were surface treated and incorporated into two epoxy systems. MWCNT's surface treatments were based on: (a) Titania coating obtained by sol-gel process and (b) a nonionic surfactant. Thermo-mechanical properties improvement was obtained following incorporation of treated MWCNT. It was noticed that small amounts of titania coated MWCNT (0.05 wt %) led to an increase in the glass transition temperature and stiffness. The best performance was achieved adding 0.3 wt % titania coated MWCNT where an increase of 10 °C in the glass transition temperature and 30% in storage modulus were obtained.

  17. EPOXI Trajectory and Maneuver Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Min-Kun J.; Bhaskaran, Shyamkumar; Chesley, Steven R.; Halsell, C. Allen; Helfrich, Clifford E.; Jefferson, David C.; McElrath, Timothy P.; Rush, Brian P.; Wang, Tseng-Chan M.; Yen, Chen-wan L.

    2011-01-01

    The EPOXI mission is a NASA Discovery Mission of Opportunity combining two separate investigations: Extrasolar Planet Observation and Characterization (EPOCh) and Deep Impact eXtended Investigation (DIXI). Both investigations reused the DI instruments and spacecraft that successfully flew by the comet Tempel-1 (4 July 2005). For EPOCh, the goal was to find exoplanets with the high resolution imager, while for DIXI it was to fly by the comet Hartley 2 (4 Nov 2010). This paper documents the navigation experience of the earlier ma-neuver analyses critical for the EPOXI mission including statistical ?V analyses and other useful analyses in designing maneuvers. It also recounts the trajectory design leading up to the final reference trajectory to Hartley 2.

  18. Evaluation of experimental epoxy monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St.clair, T. L.; Pratt, J. R.; Ficklin, R.

    1985-01-01

    Future generation aircraft need higher performance polymer matrices to fully achieve the weight savings possible with composite materials. New resins are being formulated in an effort to understand basic polymer behavior and to develop improved resins. Some polymer/curing agent combinations that could be useful are difficult to process. In the area of epoxies, a major problem is that some components have physical properties which make them difficult to utilize as matrix resins. A previous study showed that the use of ultrasonic energy can be advantageous in the mixing of curing agents into a standard epoxy resin, such as MY 720 (Ciba-Geigy designation). This work is expanded to include three novel epoxides.

  19. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy (IME) resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are presented. State of the art epoxy resin, MY720, was used. Three aromatic bisimide amines and one aromatic aliphatic BIA were evaluated. BIA's derived from 6F anhydride (3,3 prime 4,4 prime-(hexafluoro isopropyl idene) bis (phthalic anhydride) and diamines, 3,3 prime-diam nodiphenyl sulfone (3,3 prime-DDS), 4,4 prime-diamino diphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS), 1.12-dodecane diamine (1,12-DDA) were used. BIA's were abbreviated 6F-3,3 prime-DDS, 6F-4,4 prime-DDS, 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime DDS, and 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA corresponding to 6F anhydride and diamines mentioned. Epoxy resin and BIA's (MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA and a 50:50 mixture of a BIA and parent diamine, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA/3,3 prime-DDS were studied to determine effect of structure and composition. Effect of the addition of two commercial epoxies, glyamine 200 and glyamine 100 on the properties of several formulations was evaluated. Bisimide amine cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). Physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these resins were determined. Moisture absorption in boiling water exhibited by several of the IME's was considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies (from 3.2% for the control and state of the art to 2.0 wt% moisture absorption). Char yields are increased from 20% for control and state of the art epoxies to 40% for IME resins. Relative toughness characteristics of IME resins were measured by 10 deg off axis tensile tests of Celion 6000/IME composites. Results show that IME's containing 6F-3,3 prime-DDS or 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA improved the "toughness" characteristics of composites by about 35% (tensile strength), about 35% (intralaminar shear

  20. Flammability of Epoxy Resins Containing Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G.; Connell, J. W.; Hinkley, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire-resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial and general aviation aircraft, flame-retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured neat epoxy formulations were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis, microscale combustion calorimetry, and fire calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness and compressive strength of several cured formulations showed no detrimental effect due to phosphorus content. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  1. Epoxy resins in the construction industry.

    PubMed

    Spee, Ton; Van Duivenbooden, Cor; Terwoert, Jeroen

    2006-09-01

    Epoxy resins are used as coatings, adhesives, and in wood and concrete repair. However, epoxy resins can be highly irritating to the skin and are strong sensitizers. Some hardeners are carcinogenic. Based on the results of earlier Dutch studies, an international project on "best practices,"--Epoxy Code--with epoxy products was started. Partners were from Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK. The "Code" deals with substitution, safe working procedures, safer tools, and skin protection. The feasibility of an internationally agreed "ranking system" for the health risks of epoxy products was studied. Such a ranking system should inform the user of the harmfulness of different epoxies and stimulate research on less harmful products by product developers.

  2. High char imide-modified epoxy matrix resins. [for graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The synthesis of a class of bis(imide-amine) curing agents for epoxy matrix resins is discussed. Glass transition temperatures and char yield data of an epoxy cured with various bis(imide-amines) are presented. The room temperature and 350 F mechanical properties, and char yields of unidirectional graphite fiber laminates prepared with conventional epoxy and imide-modified epoxy resins are presented.

  3. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  4. A Model for Tow Impregnation and Consolidation for Partially Impregnated Thermoset Prepregs

    SciTech Connect

    John J. Gangloff Jr; Shatil Sinha; Suresh G. Advani

    2011-05-23

    The formation and transport of voids in composite materials remains a key research area in composite manufacturing science. Knowledge of how voids, resin, and fiber reinforcement propagate throughout a composite material continuum from green state to cured state during an automated tape layup process is key to minimizing defects induced by void-initiated stress concentrations under applied loads for a wide variety of composite applications. This paper focuses on modeling resin flow in a deforming fiber tow during an automated process of partially impregnated thermoset prepreg composite material tapes. In this work, a tow unit cell based model has been presented that determines the consolidation and impregnation of a thermoset prepreg tape under an input pressure profile. A parametric study has been performed to characterize the behavior of varying tow speed and compaction forces on the degree of consolidation. Results indicate that increased tow consolidation is achieved with slower tow speeds and higher compaction forces although the relationship is not linear. The overall modeling of this project is motivated to address optimization of the 'green state' composite properties and processing parameters to reduce or eliminate 'cured state' defects, such as porosity and de-lamination. This work is partially funded by the Department of Energy under Award number DE-EE0001367.

  5. Sticky superhydrophobic filter paper developed by dip-coating of fluorinated waterborne epoxy emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiangxuan; Wen, Xiufang; Cheng, Jiang; Yang, Zhuoru

    2012-09-01

    A superhydrophobic and superoleophilic coating for oil filter paper was synthesized based on waterborne bisphenol-A novolac epoxy emulsion. The benzoic acid (BA) and maleic anhydride (MA) were used as modification agents to give the epoxy resin hydrophilic groups (carboxyl) and Cdbnd C double bonds. And the fluorinated waterborne epoxy emulsion was prepared by free radical solution polymerization of dodecafluoroheptyl methacrylate (DFMA) monomer. The covalent bound low free energy fluorinated chains in the monomer reduce the surface energy of solidification polymers sufficiently to give rise to superhydrophobic behavior while conserving superoleophilicity. Surfaces prepared show a sticky property, which exhibits a static water contact angle of 152° for a 5 μL droplet that does not slid off even when the sample is held upside down. This synthetic emulsion is simple and convenient as impregnating agent for filter paper, which can be considered as a suitable candidate for various substrates such as cotton textiles, E-glass and artificial fiber, and so on.

  6. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  7. Pyrolysis of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA).

    PubMed

    Bessire, Brody K; Lahankar, Sridhar A; Minton, Timothy K

    2015-01-28

    Molar yields of the pyrolysis products of thermal protection systems (TPSs) are needed in order to improve high fidelity material response models. The volatile chemical species evolved during the pyrolysis of a TPS composite, phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA), have been probed in situ by mass spectrometry in the temperature range 100 to 935 °C. The relative molar yields of the desorbing species as a function of temperature were derived by fitting the mass spectra, and the observed trends are interpreted in light of the results of earlier mechanistic studies on the pyrolysis of phenolic resins. The temperature-dependent product evolution was consistent with earlier descriptions of three stages of pyrolysis, with each stage corresponding to a temperature range. The two main products observed were H2O and CO, with their maximum yields occurring at ∼350 °C and ∼450 °C, respectively. Other significant products were CH4, CO2, and phenol and its methylated derivatives; these products tended to desorb concurrently with H2O and CO, over the range from about 200 to 600 °C. H2 is presumed to be the main product, especially at the highest pyrolysis temperatures used, but the relative molar yield of H2 was not quantified. The observation of a much higher yield of CO than CH4 suggests the presence of significant hydroxyl group substitution on phenol prior to the synthesis of the phenolic resin used in PICA. The detection of CH4 in combination with the methylated derivatives of phenol suggests that the phenol also has some degree of methyl substitution. The methodology developed is suitable for real-time measurements of PICA pyrolysis and should lend itself well to the validation of nonequilibrium models whose aim is to simulate the response of TPS materials during atmospheric entry of spacecraft.

  8. Nonmetallic materials handbook. Volume 1: Epoxy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podlaseck, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    Thermochemical and other properties data is presented for the following types of epoxy materials: adhesives, coatings finishes, inks, electrical insulation, encapsulants, sealants, composite laminates, tapes, and thermal insulators.

  9. Curing of epoxy matrix composite in stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Kondyurina, Irina; Bilek, Marcela

    Large structures for habitats, greenhouses, space bases, space factories are needed for next stage of space exploitation. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the polymerization technology of fiber-filled composites with a curable polymer matrix applied in the free space environment. The polymerisation process is proposed for the material exposed to high vacuum, dramatic temperature changes, space plasma, sun irradiation and atomic oxygen (in low Earth orbit), micrometeorite fluence, electric charging and microgravitation. The stratospheric flight experiments are directed to an investigation of the curing polymer matrix under the stratospheric conditions on. The unique combination of low atmospheric pressure, high intensity UV radiation including short wavelength UV and diurnal temperature variations associated with solar irradiation strongly influences the chemical processes in polymeric materials. The first flight experiment with uncured composites was a part of the NASA scientific balloon flight program realised at the NASA stratospheric balloon station in Alice Springs, Australia. A flight cassette installed on payload was lifted with a “zero-pressure” stratospheric balloon filled with Helium. Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF) provided the launch, flight telemetry and landing of the balloon and payload. A cassette of uncured composite materials with an epoxy resin matrix was exposed 3 days in the stratosphere (40 km altitude). The second flight experiment was realised in South Australia in 2012, when the cassette was exposed in 27 km altitude. An analysis of the chemical structure of the composites showed, that the space irradiations are responsible for crosslinking of the uncured polymers exposed in the stratosphere. The first prepreg in the world was cured successfully in stratosphere. The investigations were supported by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, NASA and RFBR (12-08-00970) grants.

  10. Survivability of Affordable Aircraft Composite Structures. Volume 3: Characterization of Affordable Woven Carbon/Epoxy Composites Under Low-Velocity Impact Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    ultimate tensile strength of RTM and VARTM panels are comparable if the volume of the fibers is the same. The fatigue performance depends on the resin...content, and with the same amount of resin, the performance was comparable for both the above RTM and VARTM methods. 2.4.1 SC-15 Epoxy Resin...relative humidity RTM resin transfer molding SEM scanning electron micrograph (or microscope or microscopy) VARIM vacuum assisted resin infusion molding VARTM vacuum assisted resin transfer molding

  11. Vacuum pump aids ejectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.E.

    1982-12-01

    The steam ejector/vacuum pump hybrid system has been operating satisfactorily since the summer of 1981. This system has essentially been as troublefree as the all-ejector system and, of course, has provided a substantial cost savings. Construction is currently under way to convert the vacuum system of another crude still which is equipped with steam ejectors and barometric condensers to the hybrid system of steam ejectors, surface condensers, and vacuum pumps. This current project is even more financially attractive because it allows a dirty water cooling tower which serves the barometric condensers to be shut down. Providing a vacuum for crude distillation vacuum towers with this hybrid system is by no means the only application of this technique. Any vacuum system consisting of all steam ejectors would be a candidate for this hybrid system and the resulting savings in energy.

  12. Maintaining vacuum furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalewski, J.

    2000-04-01

    A preventive maintenance program is essential for safe and consistent vacuum furnace operation. The program should be developed in cooperation with safety, maintenance, and furnace operators, implemented as soon as the furnace is commissioned, and adhered to throughout the life of the furnace. This article serves as an introduction to the topic of vacuum furnace preventive maintenance. Basic information about installing a new vacuum furnace also is provided.

  13. Warping of unsymmetric cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.

    1981-01-01

    Warping in unsymmetric graphite/epoxy laminates was studied with particular attention given to the change of residual stresses resulting from long term environmental exposure. Square, cured prepreg sheets were measured for edge deflection with a cathetometer, then quartered and remeasured. Two postcuring durations were then used, 7.5 and one hr at 177 C; varying cooldown rates after curing were used for other samples, and one set was stored in vacuum at 75 C. Maximum deflections and weight changes were measured periodically at room temperature. Average curvatures, the effect of postcure, and the effect of long-term exposure were determined. Larger panels exhibited cylindrical warping and smaller panels underwent anticlastic warping. The deflections were related to weight changes, i.e. moisture absorption, and the lower the moisture content, the higher the deflection. Relaxation of residual stresses at 75 C was neglibible after 220 days.

  14. Experiments on stiffened conical shell structures using cast epoxy models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Davis, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a casting technique for fabricating high-quality plastic structural models, and review of results regarding the use of such specimens to parametrically study the effect of base ring stiffness on the critical buckling pressure of a ring-stiffened conical shell. The fabrication technique involves machining a metal mold to the desired configuration and vacuum-drawing the plastic material into the mold. A room-temperature curing translucent thermoset epoxy was the casting material selected. A shell of revolution computer program which employs a nonlinear axisymmetric prebuckling strain field to obtain a bifurcation buckling solution was used to guide the selection of congifurations tested. The shell experimentally exhibited asymmetric collapse behavior, and the ultimate load was considerably higher than the analytical bifurcation prediction. The asymmetric buckling mode shape, however, initially appeared at a pressure near the analysis bifurcation solution.

  15. Proceedings of the International Conference on Vacuum Microelectronics (2nd) Held in Bath England on 24-26 July 1989: Vacuum Microelectronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-26

    the film state change. The test result teaches u that some phenomena occur in between 1113 K and 1173 K. 4. Discussion The titanium interface layer...at lower .emperatures because of the choice of a thermochemistry that establishes these optimal emissive centers before the onset the onset of...absorber, during the activation and operation of the respective cathodes in a vacuum environment. Impregnant thermochemistry associated with the Philips

  16. Vacuum probe surface sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahlava, B. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A vacuum probe surface sampler is described for rapidly sampling relatively large surface areas which possess relatively light loading densities of micro-organism, drug particles or the like. A vacuum head with a hollow handle connected to a suitable vacuum source is frictionally attached to a cone assembly terminating in a flared tip adapted to be passed over the surface to be sampled. A fine mesh screen carried by the vacuum head provides support for a membrane filter which collects the microorganisms or other particles. The head assembly is easily removed from the cone assembly without contacting the cone assembly with human hands.

  17. Comparative properties of optically clear epoxy encapsulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Maury; Zhou, Yan

    2001-12-01

    Three epoxy systems were evaluated for physical dn optical properties. The three systems chosen for the study were selected on the basis of their optical clarity, color and chemistry. Three distinctly different chemistries were chosen, aromatic epoxy-amine cured. Aromatic epoxy- anhydride cured and cycloaliphatic epoxy-anhydride cured. All three systems remained optically clear and water-white after full cure. The three selected systems were tested for physical properties, adhesion and light transmission properties. Light transmission was measured after thermal and humidity exposure. Adhesion was measured after humidity exposure only. Both of the epoxy-anhydride systems performed well in optical properties but poorer in adhesion as compared to the epoxy-amine system. The aromatic epoxy- amine system discolored badly during thermal exposure at 100 C. Data generated from this work will be used in selecting clear encapsulating materials for photonics applications. No single system offers optimal performance in all areas. The best compromise material is the aromatic epoxy-anhydride system.

  18. Thermoset epoxy polymers from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    East, Anthony; Jaffe, Michael; Zhang, Yi; Catalani, Luiz H

    2009-11-17

    Novel thermoset epoxy polymers using the bisglycidyl ethers of anhydrosugars, such as isosorbide, isomannide, and isoidide, are disclosed. The bisglycidyl ethers are useful as substitutes for bisphenol A in the manufacture of thermoset epoxy ethers. The anhydrosugars are derived from renewable sources and the bisglycidyl ethers are not xenoestrogenic and the thermoset curing agents are likewise derived form renewable resources.

  19. Curing of Graphite/Epoxy Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    365-371 (1973). 21. Pappalardo , L. T., "DSC Evaluation of B-Stage Epoxy-Glass Prepregs For Multilayer Boards," SPE Technical Papers, 20, 13-16 (1974...Kamal, M. R., "Differential Scanning Calorimetry of Epoxy Cure: Isothermal Cure Kinetics," Thermochimica Acta, 14, 41-59 (1976). 24. Pappalardo , L. T

  20. EPOXI at Comet Hartley 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    A'Hearn, Michael F.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Delamere, W. Alan; Feaga, Lori M.; Hampton, Donald; Kissel, Jochen; Klaasen, Kenneth P.; McFadden, Jessica M.; Meech, Karen J.; Melosh, H. Jay; Schultz, Peter H.; Sunshine, Jessica M.; Thomas, Peter C.; Veverka, Joseph; Wellnitz, Dennis D.; Yeomans, Donald K.; Besse, Sebastien; Bodewits, Dennis; Bowling, Timothy J.; Carcish, Brian T.; Collins, Steven M.; Farnham, Tony F.; Groussin, Oliver; Hermalyn, Brendan; Kelley, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how comets work, i,e., what drives their activity, is crucial to using comets to study the early solar system. EPOXI flew past comet 103P/Hartley 2, one with an unusually small but very active nucleus. taking both images and spectra. Unlike large, relatively inactive nuclei, this nncleus is outgassing primarily due to CO2, which drags chnnks of ice out of the nnclens. It also shows significant differences in the relative abundance of volatiles from various parts of the nucleus.

  1. Novel Diels-Alder based self-healing epoxies for aerospace composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coope, T. S.; Turkenburg, D. H.; Fischer, H. R.; Luterbacher, R.; van Bracht, H.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Epoxy resins containing Diels-Alder (DA) furan and maleimide moieties are presented with the capability to self-heal after exposure to an external heat source. A conventional epoxy amine system has been combined with furfuryl and maleimide functional groups in a two-step process, to avoid major side-reactions, and the concentration of a thermo-reversibly binding cross-linker was considered to balance thermoset and thermoplastic behaviours, and the subsequent self-healing performance. In the context of self-repair technologies an inbuilt ‘intrinsic’ self-healing system is deemed favourable as the healing agent can be placed in known ‘hot spot’ regions (i.e. skin-stringer run outs, ply drops and around drilled holes) where operational damage predominately occurs in load bearing aerospace structures. In this study, the mechanical and self-healing performance of furan functionalised epoxy resins containing varying amounts (10, 20, 30 or 40 pph) of bismaleimide were investigated using a bulk epoxy polymer tapered double cantilever beam test specimen geometry. Two forms, a thin film and a bulk material, were evaluated to account for future integration methods into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. The highest healing efficiency, with respect to the obtained initial load value, was observed from the 20 pph bulk material derivative. The polymers were successful in achieving consistent multiple (three) healing cycles when heated at 150 °C for 5 min. This novel investigated DA material exhibits favourable processing characteristics for FRP composites as preliminary studies have shown successful coextrution with reinforcing fibres to form free standing films and dry fibre impregnation.

  2. Simulation of the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process and the development of light-weight composite bridging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Marc J.

    A continued desire for increased mobility in the aftermath of natural disasters, or on the battlefield, has lead to the need for improved light-weight bridging solutions. This research investigates the development of a carbon/epoxy composite bridging system to meet the needs for light-weight bridging. The research focuses on two main topics. The first topic is that of processing composite structures and the second is the design and testing of these structures. In recent years the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process has become recognized as a low-cost manufacturing alternative for large Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) composite structures for civil, military, and aerospace applications. The success of the VARTM process (complete wet-out) is very sensitive to the resin injection strategy used and the proper placement of flow distribution materials and inlet and vacuum ports. Predicting the flow front pattern, the time required for infusing a part with resin, and the time required to bleed excess resin at the end of filling, is critical to ensure that the part will become completely impregnated and desired fiber volume fractions achieved prior to the resin gelling (initiation of cure). In order to eliminate costly trial and error experiments to determine the optimal infusion strategy, this research presents a simulation model which considers in-plane flow as well as flow through the thickness of the preform. In addition to resin filling, the current model is able to simulate the bleeding of resin at the end of filling to predict the required bleeding time to reach desired fiber volume fractions for the final part. In addition to processing, the second portion of the dissertation investigates the design and testing of composite bridge deck sections which also serve as short-span bridging for gaps up to 4 m in length. The research focuses on the design of a light-weight core material for bridge decking as well as proof loading of short-span bridge

  3. Impact resistance of composite fan blades. [fiber reinforced graphite and boron epoxy blades for STOL operating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premont, E. J.; Stubenrauch, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    The resistance of current-design Pratt and Whitney Aircraft low aspect ratio advanced fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composite fan blades to foreign object damage (FOD) at STOL operating conditions was investigated. Five graphite/epoxy and five boron/epoxy wide chord fan blades with nickel plated stainless steel leading edge sheath protection were fabricated and impact tested. The fan blades were individually tested in a vacuum whirlpit under FOD environments. The FOD environments were typical of those encountered in service operations. The impact objects were ice balls, gravel, stralings and gelatin simulated birds. Results of the damage sustained from each FOD impact are presented for both the graphite boron reinforced blades. Tests showed that the present design composite fan blades, with wrap around leading edge protection have inadequate FOD impact resistance at 244 m/sec (800 ft/sec) tip speed, a possible STOL operating condition.

  4. Working in a Vacuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses several myths about vacuum cleaners and offers tips on evaluating and purchasing this essential maintenance tool. These myths are: (1) Amps mean performance; (2) Everyone needs high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA): (3) Picking up a "bowling ball" shows cleaning power; (4) All vacuum bags are the same; (5)…

  5. Fog-harvesting potential of lubricant-impregnated electrospun nanomats.

    PubMed

    Lalia, Boor Singh; Anand, Sushant; Varanasi, Kripa K; Hashaikeh, Raed

    2013-10-22

    Hydrophobic PVDF-HFP nanowebs were fabricated by a facile electrospinning method and proposed for harvesting fog from the atmosphere. A strong adhesive force between the surface and a water droplet has been observed, which resists the water being shed from the surface. The water droplets on the inhomogeneous nanomats showed high contact angle hysteresis. The impregnation of nanomats with lubricants (total quartz oil and Krytox 1506) decreased the contact angle hysteresis and hence improved the roll off of water droplets on the nanomat surface. It was found that water droplets of 5 μL size (diameter = 2.1 mm) and larger roll down on an oil-impregnated surface, held vertically, compared to 38 μL (diameter = 4.2 mm) on a plain nanoweb. The contact angle hysteresis decreased from ~95 to ~23° with the Krytox 1506 impregnation.

  6. Liquefaction of coal impregnated with catalyst during preswelling

    SciTech Connect

    Brannan, C.J.; Curtis, C.W.; Cronauer, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    The effect of impregnating coal with slurry phase catalysts during solvent preswelling on coal conversion was investigated. Black Thunder subbituminous coal which was either untreated or pretreated with aqueous SO{sub 2} was used. The coal was placed into the swelling solvents, THF, methanol or isopropanol, for 96 hr prior to liquefaction. Slurry phase catalysts, Mo naphthenate, Molyvan L and Ni octoate, were introduced into the swelling solvents; catalyst uptake by coal was 90 to 95% of the catalyst introduced. Coal conversions of these impregnated coals were obtained at 410{degrees}C in reaction solvents of 1-methylnaphthalene, coal-derived V1074, and dihydroanthracene, and were compared to those obtained with swelled and nonswelled coals. The swelling solvent and the SO{sub 2} pretreatment affected the amount of coal conversion obtained. Coal conversions achieved with impregnated coals were somewhat less than those achieved when the catalyst was added directly to the reactor.

  7. Starch-modified magnetite nanoparticles for impregnation into cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soshnikova, Yulia M.; Roman, Svetlana G.; Chebotareva, Natalia A.; Baum, Olga I.; Obrezkova, Mariya V.; Gillis, Richard B.; Harding, Stephen E.; Sobol, Emil N.; Lunin, Valeriy V.

    2013-11-01

    The paper presents preparation and characterization of starch-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous dispersion after impregnation into healthy and damaged types of cartilage. We show that starch-modified dispersion has a narrower size distribution than a non-stabilized one. The average hydrodynamic radius of magnetite NPs in a dispersion used for impregnation into cartilage is (48 ± 1) nm with the width of the distribution from 5 to 200 nm. We investigate stability of aqueous magnetite NPs dispersions during storage and with increase in temperature (up to 70 °C). We find that polydisperse magnetite NPs can penetrate into cartilage and the size and concentration of impregnated particles depend on the organization of the tissue structure. The results confirm the possibility of application of magnetite NPs in diagnostics and laser treatment of degenerative cartilage deceases.

  8. Effect of nano-sized oxide particles on thermal and electrical properties of epoxy silica composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Heon; Choi, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Polymer matrix composites were fabricated using a modified injection molding technique in which nano-sized silicon oxides, titanium oxides, and aluminium oxides were contained. Nano-sized oxides were uniformly distributed in the composites produced by modified injection molding combining vacuum degassing and curing at a moderate temperature. The thermal decomposition and evaporation of the epoxy resin matrix depended on the composition of the composites. The relative permittivity of the nano-sized silicon carbide-epoxy composites increased from 5.16 to 5.37 by adding 2.0 wt % titanium oxide. The addition of titanium oxide of up to 2.0 wt % had little influence on the permittivity. The addition of 2.0 wt % of titanium oxide to epoxy resin showed the maximum thermal properties. Both the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the silicon oxide-epoxy composites tended to increase with titanium oxide content. The maximum thermal conductivity was observed in the composites with 2.0 wt % titanium oxide.

  9. ELETTRA vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, M.

    1991-08-01

    A status report of the vacuum system of ELETTRA, the 2 GeV, 400 mA light source under construction in Trieste, will be described. The Vacuum project, presented at ``Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop'' at Riken (Japan 22-24 March 1990) and more recently at EVC-2, the European Vacuum Conference at Trieste (Italy 21-26 May 1990), is now in the phase of testing a prototype sector, which is 1/24 of the ring circumference. Details and some technological aspects of the fabrication will be reviewed together with the vacuum performances. Results of laboratory experiments on components, standard or not, allowed us to finalize the main choices in light of the general philosophy of the project and will be properly summarized.

  10. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  11. Cervical spine annulus vacuum.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, S P; Chen, Y M

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-eight annulus vacuums in 27 patients were analyzed with regard to location, configuration, and associated vertebral abnormalities such as degenerative changes, absent and compressed anterosuperior vertebral body corners, and annulus calcification. It is concluded that most annulus vacuums are a degenerative phenomenon at the attachment of the annulus to bone. These vacuums may be associated with other degenerative changes such as osteophytes and annulus calcification. Vacuums have a strong association with compressed anterosuperior corners. These deformed corners are thought to be early osteophytes and may be related to previous trauma, a vertebra with an absent corner, and/or normal motion. Small annulus vacuums adjacent to vertebral corners with a normal appearance are more likely to result from acute trauma.

  12. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are described. State-of-the-art epoxides MY720 and DER383 were used, and four bismide amines were evaluated. These were the BIA's derived from the 6F anhydride (4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(phthalic anhydride) and the diamines 3,3'-diaminodiphynyl sulfone, 4,4'-oxygianiline, 4,4'-methylene dianiline, and 1,12-dodecane diamine. A key intermediate, designated 6F anhydride, is required for the synthesis of the bisimide amines. Reaction parameters to synthesize a precursor to the 6F anhydride (6FHC) in high yields were investigated. The catalyst trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was studied. Although small scale runs yielded the 6FHC in 50 percent yield, efforts to ranslate these results to a larger scale synthesis gave the 6FHC in only 9 percent yield. Results show that the concept of using bisimide amine as curing agents to improve the toughness properties of epoxies is valid.

  13. Field evaluation of bednets impregnated with deltamethrin for malaria control.

    PubMed

    Wu, N; Qin, L; Liao, G; Zhou, W; Geng, W; Shi, Y; Tan, Y; Zhao, K

    1993-12-01

    Trials were undertaken in a hypoendemic area of malaria in an area bordering Vietnam, in Napo County of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. The aim was to compare the relative cost effectiveness of DDT residual spraying and of bednets impregnated with deltamethrin in the malaria control program. The trials were divided into three subgroups: (1) two farming areas and one coal mining area with a total population > 20,000, where the trial consisted of mass bednets impregnated with deltamethrin 15 mg/m2 net surface once a year, (2) one farming area with a population of approximately 3,600 where DDT residual spraying at 2g/m2 was carried out twice a year in May and August; (3) one farming area and one coal mining village with a population of > 4,000 were used as a control. The malaria vector population consisted mainly of Anopheles minimus and An. anthropophagus with a small contribution from An. sinensis. After bednets were impregnated with deltamethrin the mosquitos resting on the surface of the bednets decreased significantly, although there was less effect on the total vector population. The results showed that malaria incidence decreased significantly both in areas where impregnated bednets were used and in areas where residual spraying was undertaken. The positive IFAT rates of residents who slept under impregnated bednets decreased significantly in farming areas, especially in that area where bednet impregnation as a vector control measure had been undertaken for two years, but there was no change in the IFAT rate in DDT sprayed or control areas.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Preparation and properties of polytetrafluoroethylene impregnated with rhenium oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H. F.; Easter, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The results of tests carried out to determine the properties of polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) impregnated with rhenium oxides are presented. The tests included measurement of physical properties of the impregnated material and investigation of the effects of preparation process variables. Based on the latter tests a mechanism to describe the permeation process is postulated which identifies the rate controlling step to be diffusion of ReF6 molecules into the solid during the initial ReF6 soak. Physical property tests indicated that the electronic conductance is increased by many orders of magnitude while the desirable properties of the PTFE remain virtually unchanged.

  15. Housing protects laser in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canali, V. G.

    1978-01-01

    Airtight housing encloses laser for easy alinement and operation in high-vacuum chamber. Beam is transmitted through window into vacuum chamber. Flexible line runs through vacuum chamber to outside, maintaining laser enclosure at atmospheric pressure.

  16. Recognition of epoxy with phage displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2013-07-01

    The development of a general approach for non-destructive chemical and biological functionalization of epoxy could expand opportunities for both fundamental studies and creating various device platforms. Epoxy shows unique electrical, mechanical, chemical and biological compatibility and has been widely used for fabricating a variety of devices. Phage display has emerged as a powerful method for selecting peptides that possess enhanced selectivity and binding affinity toward a variety of targets. In this letter, we demonstrate for the first time a powerful yet benign approach for identifying binding motifs to epoxy via comprehensively screened phage displayed peptides. Our results show that the epoxy can be selectively recognized with peptide-displaying phages. Further, along with the development of epoxy-based microstructures; recognition of the epoxy with phage displayed peptides can be specifically localized in these microstructures. We anticipate that these results could open up exciting opportunities in the use of peptide-recognized epoxy in fundamental biochemical recognition studies, as well as in applications ranging from analytical devices, hybrid materials, surface and interface, to cell biology.

  17. Mechanical behaviors of hyberbranched epoxy toughened bisphenol F epoxy resin for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingwen; Wu, Zhixiong; Huang, Chuanjun; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Laifeng

    2014-01-01

    Epoxy resins have been widely employed in cryogenic engineering fields. In this work, bisphenol F epoxy resin was modified by an aromatic polyester hyperbranched epoxy resin (HTDE-2). Mechanical behaviors of the modified epoxy resins in terms of tensile properties and impact property were studied at both room and cryogenic temperatures. Moreover, the toughening mechanism was discussed by fracture surface morphology analysis. The results demonstrated that, the mechanical properties of composites initially increased until reaches the maximum value with increasing the mass content of the HTDE-2, and then decreased at both room temperature (RT) and 77K. Especially, the impact strength at 77 K was improved 40.7% compared with the pure epoxy matrix when 10 wt% HTDE-2 was introduced. The findings suggest that the HTDE-2 will be an effective toughener for the brittle bisphenol F epoxy resin for cryogenic applications.

  18. Comparative study regarding friction coefficient for three epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihu, G.; Mihalache, I.; Graur, I.; Ungureanu, C.; Bria, V.

    2017-02-01

    Three commercial epoxy diglycidylether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) were used in this study namely Epiphen RE4020-DE 4020 (Bostik), Epoxy Resin C (R&G Gmbh Waldenbuch), and Epoxy Resin HT-2 (R&G Gmbh Waldenbuch). Epoxy resins are often used for the friction purpose but their friction resistance is quite low and it is thus necessary to enhance their friction resistance. In this paper it is shown how load, sliding velocity, and distance affect friction coefficient of epoxy resins.

  19. Evaluation of an ionic liquid-based epoxy after exposure on the MISSE-8 Carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabenberg, Ellen; Brown, Arthur; Kaukler, William F.; Grugel, Richard N.

    An ionic liquid-based epoxy was evaluated after more than two years of continual nadir space exposure on the MISSE-8 sample rack outside of the International Space Station. In addition to space radiation, atomic oxygen and vacuum space exposure the samples also experienced approximately 12,500 thermal cycles between ∼-40 °C and +40 °C. The returned samples exhibited no cracking or de-bonding from the aluminum discs to which the epoxy was initially applied; there was a slight change in color, and a miniscule variance in before-and-after weight was measured. Microscopic examination revealed some slight deformities, dimpling, and deposits on the exposed surfaces. These are put into the context of an on-going effort to develop viable carbon-fiber based composite tanks for, but not inclusively, cryogenic liquid containment.

  20. Evaluation of atomic oxygen resistant protective coatings for fiberglass-epoxy composites in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Brady, Joyce A.

    1989-01-01

    Fiberglass-epoxy composite masts are the prime structural members for the Space Station Freedom solar array. At the altitude where Space Station Freedom will operate, atomic oxygen atoms are the most predominant species. Atomic oxygen is highly reactive and has been shown to oxidize organic and some metallic materials. Tests with random and directed atomic oxygen exposure have shown that the epoxy is removed from the composite exposing brittle glass fibers which could be easily removed from the surface where they could contaminate Space Station Freedom Systems. Protection or fiber containment systems; inorganic based paints, aluminum braid, and a metal coating; were evaluated for resistance to atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and mechanical flexing. All appeared to protect well against atomic oxygen and provide fiber containment except for the single aluminum braid covering. UV radiation resistance was acceptable and in general, thermal cycling and flexure had little to no effect on the mass loss rate for most coatings.

  1. Epoxy Foam Encapsulants: Processing and Dielectric Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Domeier; Marion Hunter

    1999-01-01

    The dielectric performance of epoxy foams was investigated to determine if such materials might provide advantages over more standard polyurethane foams in the encapsulation of electronic assemblies. Comparisons of the dielectric characteristics of epoxy and urethane encapsulant foams found no significant differences between the two resin types and no significant difference between as-molded and machined foams. This study specifically evaluated the formulation and processing of epoxy foams using simple methylhydrosiloxanes as the flowing agent and compared the dielectric performance of those to urethane foams of similar density.

  2. Thermophoretic vacuum wand

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John

    2001-01-01

    A thermophoretic vacuum wand that is particularly suited for transporting articles in a cleanroom environment so that potential particle contaminants in the air do not become adhered to the surface of the article is described. The wand includes a housing having a platen with a front surface with suction port(s) through the platen; a vacuum source for applying a negative pressure to the suction port(s); and heating device for the object. Heating the article when it is held by the vacuum wand affords thermophoretic protection that effectively prevents particles in the air from depositing onto the article.

  3. Thermophoretic vacuum wand

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John

    2000-01-01

    A thermophoretic vacuum wand that is particularly suited for transporting articles in a cleanroom environment so that potential particle contaminants in the air do not become adhered to the surface of the article is described. The wand includes a housing having a platen with a front surface with suction port(s) through the platen; a vacuum source for applying a negative pressure to the suction port(s); and heating device for the object. Heating the article when it is held by the vacuum wand affords thermophoretic protection that effectively prevents particles in the air from depositing onto the article.

  4. Delamination on GFRP laminates impacted at room and lower temperatures: Comparison between epoxy and vinylester resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresto, Valentina; Langella, Antonio; Papa, Ilaria

    2016-10-01

    Low velocity impact tests at three different impact energy values and three different temperatures, were performed on glass fibre composite laminates made by infusion technology. Two different resins, epoxy and vinylester, were considered to impregnate the fibres: the first is mainly of aeronautical interest whereas the second one is mainly applied in Naval field. The specimens were first completely destroyed to obtain the complete load-displacement curve. The latter allowed the evaluation of the increasing impact energies, 5, 10 and 20J, used to investigate about the start and propagation of the damage inside the laminates. The delamination was investigated by the very commonly used Ultra Sound technique and the results obtained on the different materials at different temperatures were compared. A general better behaviour of vinylester resin was noted.

  5. Exposure to creosote in the impregnation and handling of impregnated wood.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, P R; Hämeilä, M; Pyy, L; Raunu, P

    1987-10-01

    The major components of vapors and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particulate matter were identified and quantified in two creosote impregnation plants and in the handling of treated wood. The vapors were collected on XAD-2 resin (recovery in the range of 82-102%) and analyzed by gas chromatography. Particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were collected on glass fiber filters and analyzed with high-pressure liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector. The main components of the vapors were naphthalene, methyl naphthalenes, indene, phenol, and its methyl homologues, benzothiophene, diphenyl, acenaphthene and fluorene. The exposure of the workers to vapors varied between 0.1 and 11 mg/m3. The concentrations of particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons varied between 0.2 and 46 micrograms/m3. The benzo(a)pyrene concentration was under 0.03 micrograms/m3, except in manual metal-arc welding and in the boring of railroad ties, where it was 0.24-0.89 micrograms/m3. In the measurement of creosote vapors, naphthalene could be used as an indicator agent.

  6. Improved method facilitates debulking and curing of phenolic impregnated asbestos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, P.

    1966-01-01

    Workpieces covered with phenolic impregnated asbestos tape and then wrapped with a specified thickness of nylon yarn under pressure, are debulked and cured in a standard oven. This method of debulking and curing is used in the fabrication of ablative chambers for the Gemini and Apollo attitude control engines.

  7. Optical Imaging of Water Condensation on Lubricant Impregnated Micropillar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiya, Tadashi; Schellenberger, Frank; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    We explored the condensation of water drops on a lubricant-impregnated surface, i.e., a micropillar patterned surface impregnated with a ionic liquid. Growing drops were imaged in 3D using a laser scanning confocal microscope equipped with a temperature and humidity control. On a lubricant-impregnated hydrophobic micropillar array, different stages of condensation can be discriminated: - Nucleation on a lubricant surface. - Regular alignement between micropillars and formation of a three-phase contact line on a bottom of the substrate. - Deformation and bridging by coalescence, leading to a detachment of the drops from the bottom substrate to pillars'top faces. However, on a lubricant-impregnated hydrophilic micropillar array, the condensed water covers the micropillars by dewetting the lubricant. As a result, the surface loses its slippery property. Our results provide fundamental concepts how these solid/liquid hybrid surfaces can be applied for facile removal of condensed water, as well as necessity of the appropriate surface treatment. Financial support from ERC for the advanced grant 340391-SUPRO is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Leaching of Silver from Silver-Impregnated Food Storage Containers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauri, James F.; Niece, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    The use of silver in commercial products has proliferated in recent years owing to its antibacterial properties. Food containers impregnated with micro-sized silver promise long food life, but there is some concern because silver can leach out of the plastic and into the stored food. This laboratory experiment gives students the opportunity to…

  9. Tensile properties of epoxy encapsulants

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Wischmann, K.B.; Stavig, M.E.

    1993-02-01

    Tensile properties were measured for nineteen different formulations of epoxy encapsulating materials. Formulations were of different combinations of two neat resins (Epon 828 and Epon 826, with and without CTBN modification), three fillers (ALOX, GNM and mica) and four hardeners (Z, DEA, DETDA-SA and ANH-2). Five of the formulations were tested at -55, -20, 20 and 60C, one formulation at -55, 20 and 71C; and the remaining formulations at 20C. Complete stress-strain curves are presented along with tables of tensile strength, initial modulus and Poisson's ratio. The stress-strain responses are nonlinear and are temperature dependent. The reported data provide information for comparing the mechanical properties of encapsulants containing the suspected carcinogen Shell Z with the properties of encapsulants containing noncarcinogenic hardeners. Also, calculated shear moduli, based on measured tensile moduli and Poisson's ratio, are in very good agreement with reported shear moduli from experimental torsional pendulum tests.

  10. Tensile properties of epoxy encapsulants

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Wischmann, K.B.; Stavig, M.E.

    1993-02-01

    Tensile properties were measured for nineteen different formulations of epoxy encapsulating materials. Formulations were of different combinations of two neat resins (Epon 828 and Epon 826, with and without CTBN modification), three fillers (ALOX, GNM and mica) and four hardeners (Z, DEA, DETDA-SA and ANH-2). Five of the formulations were tested at -55, -20, 20 and 60C, one formulation at -55, 20 and 71C; and the remaining formulations at 20C. Complete stress-strain curves are presented along with tables of tensile strength, initial modulus and Poisson`s ratio. The stress-strain responses are nonlinear and are temperature dependent. The reported data provide information for comparing the mechanical properties of encapsulants containing the suspected carcinogen Shell Z with the properties of encapsulants containing noncarcinogenic hardeners. Also, calculated shear moduli, based on measured tensile moduli and Poisson`s ratio, are in very good agreement with reported shear moduli from experimental torsional pendulum tests.

  11. Structural/Radiation-Shielding Epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Hinkley, Jeffrey; Blattnig, Steve; Delozier, Donavon M.; Watson, Kent A.; Ghose, Sayata

    2009-01-01

    A development effort was directed toward formulating epoxy resins that are useful both as structural materials and as shielding against heavy-ion radiation. Hydrogen is recognized as the best element for absorbing heavy-ion radiation, and high-hydrogen-content polymers are now in use as shielding materials. However, high-hydrogen-content polymers (e.g. polyethylene) are typically not good structural materials. In contrast, aromatic polymers, which contain smaller amounts of hydrogen, often have the strength necessary for structural materials. Accordingly, the present development effort is based on the concept that an ideal structural/ heavy-ion-radiation-shielding material would be a polymer that contains sufficient hydrogen (e.g., in the form of aliphatic molecular groups) for radiation shielding and has sufficient aromatic content for structural integrity.

  12. Breakdown properties of epoxy nanodielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Cantoni, Claudia; More, Karren Leslie; James, David Randy; Polyzos, Georgios; Sauers, Isidor; Ellis, Alvin R

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in polymeric dielectric nanocomposites have shown that these novel materials can improve design of high voltage (hv) components and systems. Some of the improvements can be listed as reduction in size (compact hv systems), better reliability, high energy density, voltage endurance, and multifunctionality. Nanodielectric systems demonstrated specific improvements that have been published in the literature by different groups working with electrical insulation materials. In this paper we focus on the influence of in-situ synthesized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles on the dielectric breakdown characteristics of an epoxy-based nanocomposite system. The in-situ synthesis of the particles creates small nanoparticles on the order of 10 nm with narrow size distribution and uniform particle dispersion in the matrix. The breakdown strength of the nanocomposite was studied as a function of TiO{sub 2} concentration at cryogenic temperatures. It was observed that between 2 and 6wt% yields high breakdown values for the nanodielectric.

  13. Collapse of vacuum bubbles in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Wang, Shang-Yung

    2011-02-15

    We revisit the dynamics of a false vacuum bubble in a background de Sitter spacetime. We find that there exists a large parameter space that allows the bubble to collapse into a black hole or to form a wormhole. This may have interesting implications for the creation of a baby universe in the laboratory, the string landscape where the bubble nucleation takes place among a plenitude of metastable vacua, and the inflationary physics.

  14. Vacuum mechatronics first international workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Belinski, S.E.; Shirazi, M.; Hackwood, S.; Beni, G. )

    1989-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: proposed epitaxial thin film growth in the ultra-vacuum of space; particle monitoring and control in vacuum processing equipment; electrostatic dust collector for use in vacuum systems; materials evaluation of an electrically noisy vacuum slip ring assembly; an overview of lubrication and associated materials for vacuum service; the usage of lubricants in a vacuum environment; guidelines and practical applications for lubrication in vacuum; recent development in leak detector and calibrator designs; the durability of ballscrews for ultrahigh vacuum; vacuum-compatible robot for self-contained manufacturing systems; the design, fabrication, and assembly of an advanced vacuum robotics system for space payload calibration; design criteria for mechanisms used in space; and concepts and requirements for semiconductor multiprocess integration in vacuum. These papers are indexed separately elsewhere.

  15. The classical vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, T. H.

    1985-08-01

    The history of vacuum concepts is reviewed, noting that no way is known to physically produce a true void. Even at absolute zero, a pattern of electromagnetic wave fluctuations are still present. The fluctuations are called zero-point radiation (ZPR). To be invariant to Lorentz transformation, ZPR has a spectral intensity proportional to the cube of each frequency. ZPR does not change in response to compression and produces a force between objects that is inversely proportional to the 4th power of the separation distance. The ZPR scale value has been measured to be one-half of the Planck constant, and is the measure of the energy of a harmonic oscillator, such as the electron, in a vacuum. Finally, since gravitational accelerations always occur in the physical space, a minimum thermal radiation can also be found for the vacuum, implying that a fixed relationship exists between thermal radiation and the classical vacuum.

  16. Vacuum Camera Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laugen, Geoffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Acquiring cheap, moving video was impossible in a vacuum environment, due to camera overheating. This overheating is brought on by the lack of cooling media in vacuum. A water-jacketed camera cooler enclosure machined and assembled from copper plate and tube has been developed. The camera cooler (see figure) is cup-shaped and cooled by circulating water or nitrogen gas through copper tubing. The camera, a store-bought "spy type," is not designed to work in a vacuum. With some modifications the unit can be thermally connected when mounted in the cup portion of the camera cooler. The thermal conductivity is provided by copper tape between parts of the camera and the cooled enclosure. During initial testing of the demonstration unit, the camera cooler kept the CPU (central processing unit) of this video camera at operating temperature. This development allowed video recording of an in-progress test, within a vacuum environment.

  17. Hollow cathodes with BaO impregnated, porous tungsten inserts and tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.; Weigand, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The technology of impregnated materials is described and some inherently advantageous characteristics of impregnated cathodes are discussed. Thermionic emission measurements are presented for oxide coated and impregnated cathodes. Five cathode configurations with barium oxide impregnated porous tungsten inserts and/or tips have been fabricated and tested. Reliability, durability, and stability of operation are characterized. One of the cathodes has accumulated over 9000 operational hours, another has been cycled on and off more than 800 times.

  18. Hollow cathodes with BaO impregnated, porous tungsten inserts and tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.; Weigand, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The technology of impregnated materials is described and some inherently advantageous characteristics of impregnated cathodes are discussed. Thermionic emission measurements are presented for oxide coated and impregnated cathodes. Five cathode configurations with barium oxide impregnated porous tungsten inserts and/or tips have been fabricated and tested. Reliability, durability, and stability of operation are characterized. One of the cathodes has accumulated over 9000 operational hours, another has been cycled on and off more than 900 times.

  19. An X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Study of Activated Carbons Impregnated with some Organocopper Complexes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    AD-A282 721 l lllllll a Dfene Defence nationals AN X.RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY (XPS) STUDY OF ACTIVATED CARBONS IMPREGNATED WITH SOME... ammoniacal solution as a carrier into which all impregnants (except TEDA) were dissolved. Without a suitable carrier, and with the inherent low vapor...and will not be repeated here. All five complexes were synthesized at DREO using known methods. 2 2.2 IMPREGNATING PROCEDURES Two impregnating

  20. Modification of oil palm wood using acetylation and impregnation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subagiyo, Lambang; Rosamah, Enih; Hesim

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is chemical modification by process of acetylation and impregnation of oil palm wood to improve the dimensional stability. Acetylation process aimed at substituting the hydroxyl groups in a timber with an acetyl group. By increasing the acetyl groups in wood is expected to reduce the ability of wood to absorb water vapor which lead to the dimensions of the wood becomes more stable. Studies conducted on oil palm wood (Elaeis guineensis Jacq) by acetylation and impregnation method. The results showed that acetylated and impregnated wood oil palm (E. guineensis Jacq) were changed in their physical properties. Impregnation with coal ashfly provide the greatest response to changes in weight (in wet conditions) and after conditioning (dry) with the average percentage of weight gain of 198.16% and 66.41% respectively. Changes in volume indicates an increase of volume in the wet condition (imbibition) with the coal ashfly treatment gave highest value of 23.04 %, whereas after conditioning (dry) the highest value obtained in the treatment of gum rosin:ethanol with a volume increase of 13:44%. The highest changes of the density with the coal ashfly impregnation in wet condition (imbibition) in value of 142.32% and after conditioning (dry) of 57.87%. The result of reduction in water absorption (RWA) test showed that in the palm oil wood samples most stable by using of gum rosin : ethanol of 0.97%, whereas the increase in oil palm wood dimensional stability (ASE) is the best of 59.42% after acetylation with Acetic Anhydride: Xylene.

  1. TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.; Persons, R.

    1981-01-01

    The TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller (DVC) provides in conjunction with the Central Instrumentation Control and Data Acquisition System (CICADA), control and monitoring for the pumps, valves and gauges associated with each individual diagnostic vacuum system. There will be approximately 50 systems on TFTR. Two standard versions of the controller (A and B) wil be provided in order to meet the requirements of two diagnostic manifold arrangements. All pump and valve sequencing, as well as protection features, will be implemented by the controller.

  2. Physical aging in graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, E. S. W.

    1983-01-01

    Sub-Tg annealing has been found to affect the properties of graphite/epoxy composites. The network epoxy studied was based on the chemistry of tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diamino-diphenyl methane (TGDDM) crosslinked by 4,4'-diamino-diphenyl sulfone (DDS). Differential scanning calorimetry, thermal mechanical analysis, and solid-state cross-polarized magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been utilized in order to characterize this process of recovery towards thermodynamic equilibrium. The volume and enthalpy recovery as well as the 'thermoreversibility' aspects of the physical aging are discussed. This nonequilibrium and time-dependent behavior of network epoxies are considered in view of the increasingly wide applications of TGDDM-DDS epoxies as matrix materials of structural composites in the aerospace industry.

  3. Postbuckling behavior of graphite-epoxy panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, J. H., Jr.; Dickson, J. N.; Rouse, M.

    1984-01-01

    Structurally efficient fuselage panels are often designed to allow buckling to occur at applied loads below ultimate. Interest in applying graphite-epoxy materials to fuselage primary structure led to several studies of the post-buckling behavior of graphite-epoxy structural components. Studies of the postbuckling behavior of flat and curved, unstiffened and stiffened graphite-epoxy panels loaded in compression and shear were summarized. The response and failure characteristics of specimens studied experimentally were described, and analytical and experimental results were compared. The specimens tested in the studies described were fabricated from commercially available 0.005-inch-thick unidirectional graphite-fiber tapes preimpregnated with 350 F cure thermosetting epoxy resins.

  4. Structure Property Relationships of Biobased Epoxy Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorana, Anthony Surraht

    The thesis is about the synthesis, characterization, development, and application of epoxy resins derived from sustainable feedstocks such as lingo-cellulose, plant oils, and other non-food feedstocks. The thesis can be divided into two main topics 1) the synthesis and structure property relationship investigation of new biobased epoxy resin families and 2) mixing epoxy resins with reactive diluents, nanoparticles, toughening agents, and understanding co-curing reactions, filler/matrix interactions, and cured epoxy resin thermomechanical, viscoelastic, and dielectric properties. The thesis seeks to bridge the gap between new epoxy resin development, application for composites and advanced materials, processing and manufacturing, and end of life of thermoset polymers. The structures of uncured epoxy resins are characterized through traditional small molecule techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, high resolution mass spectrometry, and infrared spectroscopy. The structure of epoxy resin monomers are further understood through the process of curing the resins and cured resins' properties through rheology, chemorheology, dynamic mechanical analysis, tensile testing, fracture toughness, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and notched izod impact testing. It was found that diphenolate esters are viable alternatives to bisphenol A and that the structure of the ester side chain can have signifi-cant effects on monomer viscosity. The structure of the cured diphenolate based epoxy resins also influence glass transition temperature and dielectric properties. Incorporation of reactive diluents and flexible resins can lower viscosity, extend gel time, and enable processing of high filler content composites and increase fracture toughness. Incorpora-tion of high elastic modulus nanoparticles such as graphene can provide increases in physical properties such as elastic modulus and fracture toughness. The synthesis

  5. Development of novel single-wall carbon nanotube epoxy composite ply actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Yeo-Heung; Shanov, Vesselin; Schulz, Mark J.; Narasimhadevara, Suhasini; Subramaniam, Srinivas; Hurd, Douglas; Boerio, F. J.

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes a carbon nanotube epoxy ply material that has electrochemical actuation properties. The material was formed by dispersing single-wall carbon nanotubes in a solvent and then solution casting a thin paper using a mold and vacuum oven. In order to take advantage of the high elastic modulus of carbon nanotubes for actuation, epoxy as a chemically inert polymer is considered. An epoxy layer was cast on the surface of the nanotube paper to make a two-layer ply. A wet electrochemical actuator was formed by placing the nanotube epoxy ply in a 2 M NaCl electrolyte solution. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were carried out to characterize the electrochemical properties of the actuator. The voltage-current relationship and power to drive the actuator material were also determined. Compared to previous single-wall carbon nanotube buckypaper tape actuators, which had poor adhesion between the nanotubes and tape, and other nanotube-thermal plastic polymer actuators, which could not provide high strength, the epoxy based actuator has a higher elastic modulus and strength, which will be useful for future structural applications. This demonstrates that a polymer layer can reinforce nanotube paper, which is an important step in building a new structural material that actuates. Further work is under way to develop a solid electrolyte to allow dry actuation. Finally, these actuator plies will be laminated to build a carbon nanocomposite material. This smart structural material will have potential applications that range from use in robotic surgical tools to use as structures that change shape.

  6. Electrical properties of epoxies and film resistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sergent, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The reliability of hybrid microcircuits has been enhanced in recent years by the use of organic adhesives as a replacement for solder and eutectics. The epoxies have been the most effective and widely used material for this application. Methods for measuring the electrical and mechanical properties of epoxies are developed. Data are given for selected conductive adhesives at high and low frequencies. The temperature coefficients of resistance of thick film resistors are presented.

  7. Cavitation in block copolymer modified epoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Declet-Perez, Carmelo; Francis, Lorraine; Bates, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Today, brittleness in epoxy networks limits most commercial applications. Significant toughness can be imparted by adding small amounts of micelle forming block copolymers (BCP) without compromising critical properties such as high use temperature and modulus. Curing the network locks in the self-assembled BCP micellar structures formed in the monomer resin providing control of the resulting morphology. Despite significant research over the last decade, a complete description of the parameters influencing toughness in block copolymer modified epoxies is still lacking. In this presentation we compare the ultimate mechanical behavior of epoxies modified with spherical micelle forming BCP's containing rubbery and glassy cores using real-time in-situ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) performed during tensile deformation. Striking differences in the 2D SAXS patterns were documented for epoxies modified with rubbery (PEP) versus glassy (PS) micelle cores. Rubbery cores dilate by 100% in volume upon specimen yielding, while the glassy micelle cores deform at approximately constant volume. These results provide direct evidence of a cavitation mediated mechanism for toughness in block copolymer modified epoxies. We further interpret characteristic butterfly features in the 2D SAXS patterns in terms of epoxy network deformation. Support was provided by the NSF sponsored MRSEC at the University of Minnesota

  8. Dry In-Line Thermoplastic Matrix Impregnation. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    grades supplied by Hoechst Celanese under their designations Fortran 0203B6 and 0205B4. Fibers tested included Owens - Corning S Glass with an epoxy...it was found that it had a much greater tendency to shred and jam when fed through the tensioning pin system than did the Owens Corning s glass

  9. Impact and dynamic mechanical thermal properties of textile silk reinforced epoxy resin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, K.; Guan, J.

    2016-07-01

    Silk fabric reinforced epoxy resin composites (SFRPs) were prepared using simple techniques of hand lay-up, hot-press and vacuum treatment, and a series of volume fractions of silk reinforcements were achieved. The impact properties and dynamic mechanical properties of SFRPs were investigated using a pendulum impact testing method and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The results suggest that silk reinforcement could greatly enhance the mechanical performances of SFRPs. The impact strength reached a maximum of 71 kJ/m2 for 60%-silk SFRP, which demonstrated a potential of silk composites for defence and impact- resistant materials.

  10. Design and Fabrication of E-Glass /carbon/graphite epoxy hybrid composite leaf spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, T.; Raja, M.; Jothi Prakash, V. M.; Gnanavel, C.

    2017-03-01

    The Automobile Industry has shown increase interest for replacement of steel leaf spring with that of composite leaf spring. Substituting composite materials for conventional metallic materials has many advantages because of higher specific stiffness, strength and fatigue resistance etc. This work deals with the replacement of conventional steel leaf spring with a hybrid Composite leaf spring using E -Glass/Carbon/Graphite/Epoxy. The hybrid composite is obtained by introducing more than one fiber in the reinforcement phase. The hybrid composite is fabricated by the vacuum bag technique. The result shows that introduction of carbon and graphite fiber in the reinforcement phase increases the stiffness of the composite.

  11. Process for Preparing Epoxy-Reinforced Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    One-pot reaction process for preparing epoxy-reinforced monolithic silica aerogels comprising the reaction of at least one silicon compound selected from the group consisting of alkoxysilanes, orthosilicates and combination thereof in any ratio with effective amounts of an epoxy monomer and an aminoalkoxy silane to obtain an epoxy monomer-silica sol in solution, subsequently preparing an epoxy-monomer silica gel from said silica sol solution followed by initiating polymerization of the epoxy monomer to obtain the epoxy-reinforced monolithic silica aerogel.

  12. Enhanced electrical properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotube-epoxy nanocomposites with high packing density

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    During their synthesis, multi-walled carbon nanotubes can be aligned and impregnated in a polymer matrix to form an electrically conductive and flexible nanocomposite with high backing density. The material exhibits the highest reported electrical conductivity of CNT-epoxy composites (350 S/m). Here, we show how conductive atomic force microscopy can be used to study the electrical transport mechanism in order to explain the enhanced electrical properties of the composite. The high spatial resolution and versatility of the technique allows us to further decouple the two main contributions to the electrical transport: (1) the intrinsic resistance of the tube and (2) the tunneling resistance due to nanoscale gaps occurring between the epoxy-coated tubes along the composite. The results show that the material behaves as a conductive polymer, and the electrical transport is governed by electron tunneling at interconnecting CNT-polymer junctions. We also point out the theoretical formulation of the nanoscale electrical transport between the AFM tip and the sample in order to derive both the composite conductivity and the CNT intrinsic properties. The enhanced electrical properties of the composite are attributed to high degree of alignment, the CNT purity, and the large tube diameter which lead to low junction resistance. By controlling the tube diameter and using other polymers, the nanocomposite electrical conductivity can be improved. PMID:23158381

  13. Research on the melt impregnation of continuous carbon fiber reinforced nylon 66 composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, M. Y.; Li, C. X.; Xue, P.; Chen, K.; Chen, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Impregnation mold of continuous carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites was designed and built in the article. Based on the theory of fluid mechanics and Darcy's law, a model of the melt impregnation was also established. The influences of fiber bundle width and impregnation pins’ diameter on the impregnation degree were studied by numerical simulation. Continuous carbon fiber reinforced nylon 66 composites were prepared. The effects of coated angle and impregnation mold temperature on the mechanical properties of the composites were also described.The agreement between the experimental data and prediction by the model was found to be satisfactory.

  14. Characteristics of activated carbon prepared from pistachio-nut shell by zinc chloride activation under nitrogen and vacuum conditions.

    PubMed

    Lua, Aik Chong; Yang, Ting

    2005-10-15

    Activated carbons with well-developed pore structures were prepared from pistachio-nut shells by chemical activation using zinc chloride under both nitrogen atmosphere and vacuum conditions. The effects of preparation parameters on the carbon pore structure were studied in order to optimize these parameters. It was found that under vacuum conditions, the characteristics of the activated carbons produced are better than those under nitrogen atmosphere. The impregnation ratio, the activation temperature, and the activation hold time are the important parameters that influence the characteristics of the activated carbons. The optimum experimental conditions for preparing predominantly microporous activated carbons with high pore surface area and micropore volume are an impregnation ratio of 0.75, an activation temperature of 400 degrees C, and a hold time of 1 h. Under these conditions, the BET surface areas of the carbons activated under nitrogen atmosphere and vacuum conditions were 1635.37 and 1647.16 m2/g, respectively. However, at a ZnCl2 impregnation ratio of 1.5, a furnace temperature of 500 degrees C, and a hold time of 2 h, the predominantly mesoporous activated carbon prepared under vacuum condition had a BET surface area of 2527 m2/g. Fourier transform infrared spectra were used to detect changes in the surface functional groups of the samples during the different preparation stages.

  15. Physical aging and its influence on the reliability of network epoxies and epoxy-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.

    1983-01-01

    The matrix-dominated physical and mechanical properties of a carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite and a neat epoxy resin were found to be affected by sub-Tg annealing in nitrogen and dark atmosphere. Postcured specimens of Thornel 300 carbon-fiber/Fiberite 934 epoxy as well as Fiberite 934 epoxy resin were quenched from above Tg and given annealing at 140 C, 110 C, or 80 C, for time up to one-hundred thousand minutes. No weight loss was observed during annealing at these temperatures. Significant variations were found in density, modulus, hardness, damping, moisture absorption ability, thermal expansivity. Moisture-epoxy interactious were also studied. The kinetics of aging as well as the molecular aggregation during this densification process were monitored by differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis, density gradient column, microhardness tester, Instron, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  16. ISABELLE vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H J

    1980-01-01

    The Intersecting Storage Accelerator (ISABELLE) consists of two rings having a circumference of 3.8 km each. In these rings superconducting magnets, held at 4 K, bend and focus the proton beam which is accelerated up to 400 GeV. Due to very different pressure requirements, ISABELLE has two completely independent vacuum systems. One, which operates at 1 x 10/sup -11/ Torr, provides a very clean environment for the circulating proton beam. Here only ion and titanium sublimation pumps are used to provide the vacuum. The other system maintains superconducting magnet vessels at a pressure below 1 x 10/sup -4/ Torr, since at this pressure the gas conduction becomes negligible. In this so-called insulating vacuum system, turbomolecular pumps pump the inadvertent small helium leaks. Other gases are cryocondensed on the cold surfaces of the cryogenic system. The basic element of ISABELLE known as Full Cell containing 45 meters of beam tube, 8 pumping stations, 8 superconducting magnets and complete instrumentation has been constructed, leak checked and tested. All design parameters have been achieved in both vacuum systems. The two vacuum systems are described with particular emphasis on the influence of superconducting magnets in the selection of materials and UHV components.

  17. Performance of Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator in Aerothermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Jeremy; Fan, Wendy; Stackpoole, Mairead; Kao, David; Skokova, Kristina; Chavez-Garcia, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, a cousin of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a lightweight thermal protection system under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. PICA is made using a brittle carbon substrate, which has a very low strain to failure. Conformable PICA is made using a flexible carbon substrate, a felt in this case. The flexible felt significantly increases the strain to failure of the ablator. PICA is limited by its thermal mechanical properties. Future NASA missions will require heatshields that are more fracture resistant than PICA and, as a result, NASA Ames is working to improve PICA's performance by developing conformable PICA to meet these needs. Research efforts include tailoring the chemistry of conformable PICA with varying amounts of additives to enhance mechanical properties and testing them in aerothermal environments. This poster shows the performance of conformable PICA variants in arc jets tests. Some mechanical and thermal properties will also be presented.

  18. Low solids content, coal tar based impregnating pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, A.S.; Bart, E.F.; Cook, G.R.; Horbachewski, D.M.

    1987-05-12

    A method is described of obtaining a coal tar based impregnant pitch characterized by having a sulfur content of less than 0.5 weight percent and a quinoline insoluble, QI, content of less than about 0.5 percent and enhanced impregnation property. This method comprises: selecting coal tar oil feedstock having: (1) a distillation residue at 355/sup 0/C > 30 weight percent; and (2) a QI < 0.5 weight percent; heating the feedstock to a temperature of between about 150/sup 0/C and 390/sup 0/C; and oxidizing and stripping the feedstock until: an ASTM D-3104-77 softening point between about 90/sup 0/C and 150/sup 0/C; a coking value of at least 45 weight percent according to ASTM D-2416-73; and a flashpoint of at least 200/sup 0/C according to ASTM D92-72 are obtained.

  19. Electrochemical impregnation of nickel hydroxide in porous electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Jorne, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    The electrochemical impregnation of nickel hydroxide in porous electrode was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The loading level and plaque expansion were the most important parameters to be considered. The effects of applied current density, stirring, ratio of solution to electrode volume and pH were identified. A novel flow through electrochemical impregnation is proposed in which the electrolyte is forced through the porous nickel plaque. The thickening of the plaque can be reduced while maintaining high loading capacity. A mathematical model is presented which describes the transport of the nitrate, nickel and hydroxyl ions and the consecutive heterogeneous electrochemical reduction of nitrate and the homogeneous precipitation reaction of nickel hydroxide. The distributions of precipitation rate and active material within the porous electrode are obtained. A semiempirical model is also proposed which takes into account the plugging of the pores.

  20. Improving Vacuum Cleaners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement between the Kirby company and Lewis Research Center, NASA technology was applied to a commercial vacuum cleaner product line. Kirby engineers were interested in advanced operational concepts, such as particle flow behavior and vibration, critical factors to improve vacuum cleaner performance. An evaluation of the company 1994 home care system, the Kirby G4, led to the refinement of the new G5 and future models. Under the cooperative agreement, Kirby had access to Lewis' holography equipment, which added insight into how long a vacuum cleaner fan would perform, as well as advanced computer software that can simulate the flow of air through fans. The collaboration resulted in several successes including fan blade redesign and continuing dialogue on how to improve air-flow traits in various nozzle designs.

  1. Effectiveness of Commercially-Available Antibiotic-Impregnated Implants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    were tested for tuberculosis, brucellosis and Q fever, and were healthy prior to the study. Study design. The goats were randomised into four...impregnated implants in the prevention of bone infection. We used a model of contaminated fracture in goats to evaluate four treatment groups: no...for the care and use of laboratory animals. Twenty-nine castrated male Spanish goats with a mean weight of 48.1 kg ( SD 0.68) were used. All

  2. The Application of Perfluorocarbons as Impregnants for Plastic Film Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, G. H.

    1981-01-01

    A liquid impregnated, plastic film (wet) capacitor was developed that is thought to be the most reliable and space efficient capacitor of any type ever produced for high voltage, pulse discharge service. The initial design stores five times the energy of a premium quality dry capacitor of equivalent energy and reliability. The technology, as well as a production capacitor design using this technology are described.

  3. Surrogate nits impregnated with white piedra--a case report.

    PubMed

    Ghorpade, A

    2004-07-01

    White piedral spores packed inside empty pedicular nits were accidentally found on microscopic examination in a 42-year-old Indian woman who presented with hair loss. The diagnosis of piedra was confirmed on culture. She responded to topical 2% miconazole nitrate solution and manual removal of the nits. This is the first case report of pedicular nits found to be impregnated with spores of white piedra.

  4. Insoluble polyelectrolyte and ion-exchange hollow fiber impregnated therewith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The number of quaternary sites and ion exchange capacity of a polyquaternary, cross linked, insoluble copolymer of a vinyl pyridine and a dihalo organic compound is increased by about 15-35% by reaction of the polymer with an amine followed by quaternization, if required. The polymer forms spontaneously in the presence of a substrate such as within the pores of a hollow fiber. The improved resin impregnated fiber may be utilized to remove ions from waste or process steams.

  5. Review of electrochemical impregnation for nickel cadmium cells. [aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, S.

    1977-01-01

    A method of loading active material within the electrodes of nickel cadmium cells is examined. The basic process of electrochemical impregnation of these electrodes is detailed, citing the principle that when current is applied reactions occur which remove hydrogen ions from solution, making the interior of the plaque less acidic. Electrodes result which are superior in energy density, stability, and life. The technology is reviewed and illustrated with typical performance data. Recommendations are made for additional research and development.

  6. Evaluation of Double-Vacuum-Bag Process For Composite Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, T. H.; Jensen, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    A non-autoclave vacuum bag process using atmospheric pressure alone that eliminates the need for external pressure normally supplied by an autoclave or a press is an attractive method for composite fabrication. This type of process does not require large capital expenditures for tooling and processing equipment. In the molding cycle (temperature/pressure profile) for a given composite system, the vacuum application point has to be carefully selected to achieve the final consolidated laminate net shape and resin content without excessive resin squeeze-out. The traditional single-vacuum- bag (SVB) process is best suited for molding epoxy matrix based composites because of their superior flow and the absence of reaction by-products or other volatiles. Other classes of materials, such as polyimides and phenolics, generate water during cure. In addition, these materials are commonly synthesized as oligomers using solvents to facilitate processability. Volatiles (solvents and reaction byproducts) management therefore becomes a critical issue. SVB molding, without additional pressure, normally fails to yield void-free quality composites for these classes of resin systems. A double-vacuum- bag (DVB) process for volatile management was envisioned, designed and built at the NASA Langley Research Center. This experimental DVB process affords superior volatiles management compared to the traditional SVB process. Void-free composites are consistently fabricated as measured by C-scan and optical photomicroscopy for high performance polyimide and phenolic resins.

  7. Stannic chloride impregnated chitosan for defluoridation of water.

    PubMed

    Kahu, Shashikant; Shekhawat, Anita; Saravanan, D; Jugade, Ravin

    2017-03-01

    Chitosan, a potent amino polysaccharide, has been impregnated with Sn(IV) chloride for effective adsorption of fluoride from water. The Sn(IV) chloride impregnated chitosan was synthesized using microwave assisted technique. The material was thoroughly characterized using FTIR, SEM, EDX and XRD. The increase in surface area and pore volume has been revealed from BET studies. Enhanced thermal stability of this material was ascertained by TGA-DTA studies. This Sn(IV) chloride impregnated chitosan(Sn-Ch) has been exploited for its defluoridation property. Various parameters like pH, amount of adsorbent, adsorption time etc have been optimized to achieve maximum defluoridation efficiency. Under optimum conditions, Sn-Ch was found to have adsorption capacity of 17. 63mg/g. The equilibrium studies showed that the data fits well with Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamics and kinetics parameters have been evaluated. The material has been applied for the defluoridation of real water sample. It was found to be recyclable material and can be regenerated and reused multiple times adding a greener dimension.

  8. Liquid-impregnated porous polypropylene surfaces for liquid repellency.

    PubMed

    Brown, Philip S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2017-02-01

    Polypropylene is a popular plastic material used in consumer packaging. It would be desirable if such plastic containers were liquid repellent and not so easily fouled by their contents. Superomniphobic surfaces typically work by keeping the fouling liquid in a metastable state, with trapped pockets of air between the substrate and the liquid. An alternative method with greater long-term stability utilizes liquid-impregnated surfaces, where the liquid being repelled slides over an immiscible liquid immobilized on a porous surface. Here, we report a method for creating porous polypropylene surfaces amenable to liquid-impregnation. A solvent-nonsolvent polypropylene solution was deposited at high temperature to achieve the necessary porosity. Such surfaces were further functionalized with fluorosilane and dipped in the lubricating liquid to result in a durable, liquid-repellent surface. It is believed these liquid-impregnated surfaces will be more industrially viable than previous examples due to the ease of fabrication and their durability. These surfaces were found to exhibit repellency towards water, oils, shampoo, and laundry detergent with extremely low tilt angles due to the smooth liquid-liquid contact between the lubricating liquid and the liquid being repelled.

  9. Cyanate Ester and Phthalonitrile Impregnated Carbon Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boghozian, Tane; Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Gasch, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic resin has extensive heritage as a TPS (Thermal Protection Systems) material, however, alternative resin systems such as Cyanate Ester and Phthalonitrile may offer improved performance compared to state-of-the-art phenolic resin. These alternative resin systems may have higher char yield, higher char strength, lower thermal conductivity and improved mechanical properties. In current work at NASA Ames alternative resin systems were uniformly infused into fibrous substrates and preliminary properties characterized. The density of the cyanate ester infused in fibrous substrate ranged from 0.25-0.3 grams per cubic centimeter compared to PICA (Phenolic resin impregnated carbon ablative) having a density of approximately 0.25 grams per cubic centimeter. The density of Phthalonitrile varies from 0.22-0.25 grams per cubic centimeter. Initial formulations of these new resin systems were recently tested at the LARC HyMETs (Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System) facility to evaluate their performance and data such as back face temperature, char yield, and recession are compared to PICA. Cyanate Ester and Phthalonitrile impregnated carbon ablative samples showed comparable performance to phenolic resin impregnated carbon ablative samples.

  10. Mercury adsorption properties of sulfur-impregnated adsorbents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi, N.-C.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.; Chang, R.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous adsorbents were impregnated with elemental sulfur to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the adsorbents and their equilibrium mercury adsorption capacities. Simulated coal combustion flue gas conditions were used to determine the equilibrium adsorption capacities for Hg0 and HgCl2 gases to better understand how to remove mercury from gas streams generated by coal-fired utility power plants. Sulfur was deposited onto the adsorbents by monolayer surface deposition or volume pore filling. Sulfur impregnation increased the total sulfur content and decreased the total and micropore surface areas and pore volumes for all of the adsorbents tested. Adsorbents with sufficient amounts of active adsorption sites and sufficient microporous structure had mercury adsorption capacities up to 4,509 ??g Hg/g adsorbent. Elemental sulfur, organic sulfur, and sulfate were formed on the adsorbents during sulfur impregnation. Correlations were established with R2>0.92 between the equilibrium Hg0/HgCl2 adsorption capacities and the mass concentrations of elemental and organic sulfur. This result indicates that elemental and organic sulfur are important active adsorption sites for Hg0 and HgCl2.

  11. Superoleophobicity under vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinjie; Wang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yongmin; Bell, Steven E. J.; Liu, Weimin; Zhou, Feng

    2011-05-01

    By using superoleophobic alumina and low vapor pressure oils we have been able to study wetting behavior at high vacuum. Here, we show that a superoleophobic state can exist for some probe liquids, even under high vacuum. However, with other liquids the surfaces are only superoloephobic because air is trapped beneath the droplet and the contact angle decreases dramatically (150°-120°) if this air is removed. These observations open up the possibility of designing materials which fully exploit the potential of physically trapped air to achieve extreme oleophobicity and/or hydrophobicity.

  12. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  13. K-130 Cyclotron vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhole, R. B.; Roy, Anindya; Pal, Sarbajit; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    The vacuum system for K-130 cyclotron has been operational since 1977. It consists of two sub-systems, main vacuum system and beam line vacuum system. The main vacuum system is designed to achieve and maintain vacuum of about 1 × 10-6 mbar inside the 23 m3 volume of acceleration chamber comprising the Resonator tank and the Dee tank. The beam line vacuum system is required for transporting the extracted beam with minimum loss. These vacuum systems consist of diffusion pumps backed by mechanical pumps like roots and rotary pumps. The large vacuum pumps and valves of the cyclotron vacuum system were operational for more than twenty five years. In recent times, problems of frequent failures and maintenance were occurring due to aging and lack of appropriate spares. Hence, modernisation of the vacuum systems was taken up in order to ensure a stable high voltage for radio frequency system and the extraction system. This is required for efficient acceleration and transportation of high intensity ion beam. The vacuum systems have been upgraded by replacing several pumps, valves, gauges and freon units. The relay based control system for main vacuum system has also been replaced by PLC based state of the art control system. The upgraded control system enables inclusion of additional operational logics and safety interlocks into the system. The paper presents the details of the vacuum system and describes the modifications carried out for improving the performance and reliability of the vacuum system.

  14. Evaluation of Oven-Cured Solid Carbon/epoxy Composites with Various Porosity Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, M. A.

    2009-03-01

    Cirrus has developed a strong core competency fabricating composite components using oven cure vacuum bag technology. When using this process, porosity levels must be carefully managed and effects of porosity well understood. Excessive porosity negatively affects material performance and reduces the effectiveness of the ultrasonic NDI method. This paper will present material characterization results from carbon/epoxy composite panels produced with various levels of porosity. Panels were inspected using two different ultrasonic methods. Panels were destructively tested to correlate static mechanical and physical properties to ultrasonic absorption coefficients. The goal of this work is to characterize material behavior to allow ultrasonic inspection in a manufacturing environment on vacuum bag oven-cured parts where porosity may be a factor.

  15. Fluorinated Alkyl Ether Epoxy Resin Compositions and Applications Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Gardner, John M. (Inventor); Palmieri, Frank M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Epoxy resin compositions prepared using amino terminated fluoro alkyl ethers. The epoxy resin compositions exhibit low surface adhesion properties making them useful as coatings, paints, moldings, adhesives, and fiber reinforced composites.

  16. Electrical properties of epoxies used in hybrid microelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    The electrical properties and basic characteristics of the structure of conductive epoxies were studied. The results of the experimental work performed to measure the electrical properties of epoxies are presented.

  17. VACUUM SEALING MEANS FOR LOW VACUUM PRESSURES

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1962-06-12

    S>A vacuum seal is designed in which the surface tension of a thin layer of liquid metal of low vapor pressure cooperates with adjacent surfaces to preclude passages of gases across pressure differentials as low as 10/sup -8/ mm Hg. Mating contiguous surfaces composed of copper, brass, stainless steel, nickel, molybdenum, tungsten, tantalum, glass, quartz, and/or synthetic mica are disposed to provide a maximum tolerance, D, expressed by 2 gamma /P/sub 1/, where gamma is the coefflcient of the surface tension of the metal sealant selected in dynes/cm/sub 2/. Means for heating the surfaces remotely is provided where temperatures drop below about 250 deg C. A sealant consisting of an alloy of gallium, indium, and tin, among other combinations tabulated, is disposed therebetween after treating the surfaces to improve wettability, as by ultrasonic vibrations, the surfaces and sealants being selected according to the anticipated experimental conditions of use. (AEC)

  18. Influence of Expanding Monomer on Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    copolymerize. Embedded single filament tensile test results were compared for samples containing DGEBA -epoxy cured with m-phenylene (mPDA) wi_% those for...stage before the DNSOC begins to copolymerize. Embedded single filament tensile test results were compared for samples containing DGEBA -epoxy cured...Dr. Piggott incorporated DNSOC into DGEBA (the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A) type epoxies and found that epoxy susceptibility to water was reduced

  19. Chromium Ions Improve Moisure Resistance of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Stoakley, D. M.; Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Broad spectrum of thermosetting epoxy resins used on commercial and military aircraft, primarily as composite matrices and adhesives. In new technique, chromium-ion containing epoxy with improved resistance to moisture produced where chromium ions believed to prevent absorption of water molecules by coordinating themselves to hydroxyl groups on epoxy chain. Anticipated that improved epoxy formulation useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft. Improvement made without sacrifice in mechanical properties of polymer.

  20. Thermal properties of epoxy composites filled with boric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visakh, P. M.; Nazarenko, O. B.; Amelkovich, Yu A.; Melnikova, T. V.

    2015-04-01

    The thermal properties of epoxy composites filled with boric acid fine powder at different percentage were studied. Epoxy composites were prepared using epoxy resin ED-20, boric acid as flame-retardant filler, hexamethylenediamine as a curing agent. The prepared samples and starting materials were examined using methods of thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. It was found that the incorporation of boric acid fine powder enhances the thermal stability of epoxy composites.

  1. The toughening mechanisms in epoxy-silica nanocomposites and hybrid epoxy-silica-rubber nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yi-Ling

    In order to improve the crack resistance of epoxy resins, either soft, micron size rubber particles or rigid, micron size spheres are commonly added as toughening agents. The toughening mechanisms induced by soft rubber particles and rigid spheres are different. The fracture behavior of toughened epoxy resins usually show a peak or plateau when the fraction of toughening agent reaches certain level. Therefore, epoxy resins modified by the incorporation of two types of toughening agents can be developed known as the hybrid composites with toughness greater than that when only one type toughening agent is used. Recently, a well dispersed, nanometer size silica spheres produced by sol-gel technology have been added into epoxy resin. The toughening behavior of the epoxy-silica nanocomposite (ESNs) is very interesting since it contradicts many conventional predictions. Moreover, a significant improvement of fracture behavior has been reported in hybrid epoxy-silica-rubber nanocomposite (HESRNs) when a small amount of nanosilica is used. However the toughening mechanisms in ESNs and HESRNs are not clear. The focus of this study is to understand the effect of nanosilica size as well as the nanosilica dispersion on the toughening behavior in ESNs and HESRNs. In addition, a system of hybrid epoxy-rubber?rubber blends (HERRBs) is developed to further elucidate the role of nanosilica in toughening mechanisms of ESNs, HESRNs.

  2. The effects of space radiation on a chemically modified graphite-epoxy composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, S. M.; Herakovich, C. T.; Sykes, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the space environment on the engineering properties and chemistry of a chemically modified T300/934 graphite-epoxy composite system are characterized. The material was subjected to 1.0 x 10 to the 10th power rads of 1.0 MeV electron irradiation under vacuum to simulate 30 years in geosynchronous earth orbit. Monotonic tension tests were performed at room temperature (75 F/24 C) and elevated temperature (250 F/121 C) on 4-ply unidirectional laminates. From these tests, inplane engineering and strength properties (E sub 1, E sub 2, Nu sub 12, G sub 12, X sub T, Y sub T) were determined. Cyclic tests were also performed to characterize energy dissipation changes due to irradiation and elevated temperature. Large diameter graphite fibers were tested to determine the effects of radiation on their stiffness and strength. No significant changes were observed. Dynamic-mechanical analysis demonstrated that the glass transition temperature was reduced by 50 F(28 C) after irradiation. Thermomechanical analysis showed the occurrence of volatile products generated upon heating of the irradiated material. The chemical modification of the epoxy did not aid in producing a material which was more radiation resistant than the standard T300/934 graphite-epoxy system. Irradiation was found to cause crosslinking and chain scission in the polymer. The latter produced low molecular weight products which plasticize the material at elevated temperatures and cause apparent material stiffening at low stresses at room temperature.

  3. Gas injected vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Hardin, K. Dan

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a gas injected vacuum switch comprising a housing having an interior chamber, a conduit for evacuating the interior chamber, within the chamber an anode and a cathode spaced from the anode, and a detonator for injecting electrically conductive gas into the chamber between the anode and the cathode to provide a current path therebetween.

  4. Sorption vacuum trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrington, A. E.; Caruso, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Modified sorption trap for use in high vacuum systems contains provisions for online regeneration of sorbent material. Trap is so constructed that it has a number of encapsulated resistance heaters and a valving and pumping device for removing gases from heated sorbing material. Excessive downtime is eliminated with this trap.

  5. Vacuum Kundt waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, David; Milson, Robert; Coley, Alan

    2013-03-01

    We discuss the invariant classification of vacuum Kundt waves using the Cartan-Karlhede algorithm and determine the upper bound on the number of iterations of the Karlhede algorithm to classify the vacuum Kundt waves (Collins (1991 Class. Quantum Grav. 8 1859-69), Machado Ramos (1996 Class. Quantum Grav. 13 1589)). By choosing a particular coordinate system we partially construct the canonical coframe used in the classification to study the functional dependence of the invariants arising at each iteration of the algorithm. We provide a new upper bound, q ⩽ 4, and show that this bound is sharp by analyzing the subclass of Kundt waves with invariant count beginning with (0, 1,…) to show that the class with invariant count (0, 1, 3, 4, 4) exists. This class of vacuum Kundt waves is shown to be unique as the only set of metrics requiring the fourth covariant derivatives of the curvature. We conclude with an invariant classification of the vacuum Kundt waves using a suite of invariants.

  6. Hygrothermal expansion of Kevlar 49/epoxy and S2-glass/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, S.Y.; Hahn, H.T.

    1982-11-01

    Ply failure occurred during preconditioning at 75/sup 0/C of (0/90)/sub 2S/ S2-glass/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy laminates. Wet specimens showed different thermal expansion beavior near and above the glass transition temperature. Various available theories can be used to predict the thermal expansion coefficients. Stress analysis showed that the compressive normal stress at the interface in Kevlar 49/epoxy after cure is very small compared with those in other composites. Significant and rapid changes in the transverse coefficient of thermal expansion occurs in the T/sub g/ region. The two-phase diffusion model is a good representation of the diffusion behavior. Desorption process reveals a higher diffusion coefficient than absorption. S2-glass/epoxy was found to be unstable under the conditions applied, with cracking and losses during desorption. Maximum moisture contents were approx. 0.31% at 75/sup 0/C/75% RH and approx. 0.412% at 75/sup 0/C/water. The composite swelled transversely up to about 0.11 and 0.16%. Kevlar 49/epoxy was more stable than S2-glass/epoxy; max moisture contents were approx. 2.47% at 75/sup 0/C/75% RH and approx. 5.5% at 75/sup 0/C/water. The composite swelled transversely up to 1.0 and 2.23%. Results indicate that Kevlar 49 fibers swell radially. Relation between swelling strain and moisture content undergoes hysteresis during moisture cycling. Relation between swelling strain and moisture concentration is fairly linear for S2-glass/epoxy, Kevlar 49/epoxy and AS 3501/5 graphite/epoxy and only weakly depends on the material system. The equilibrium moisture content in (+-45)/sub 2S/ laminate is higher than in unidirectional lamina. The equilibrium thickness swelling strain can be predicted by laminated plate theory.

  7. Free-volume characteristics of epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Shultz, William J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1992-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was used to measure free-volume characteristics of selected epoxies. Fluorene resins, a new family of high-temperature thermosetting resins, were selected as the test medium. Experimental results indicate that the free-volume cell size V sub f varies with the molecular weight between the cross-links M sub c according to an equation of the form V sub f = AM sub c sup B, where A and B are structural constants. In two of the samples, the concentration of bulky fluorene groups was increased in the network backbone by replacement of some of the conventional bisphenol A epoxy resin with fluorene-derived epoxy resin. This resulted in an increase in their glass transition temperature for a given level of cross-linking. It was found that in these samples, the Doppler broadening of the annihilation peak decreases with the increasing fluorene content, presumably due to enhanced damping of the chain motions.

  8. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E

    2008-05-30

    Carbon fiber-reinforced bisphenol-A epoxy matrix composite was evaluated for gamma radiation resistance. The composite was exposed to total gamma doses of 50, 100, and 200 Mrad. Irradiated and baseline samples were tested for tensile strength, hardness and evaluated using FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) for structural changes. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate microstructural behavior. Mechanical testing of the composite bars revealed no apparent change in modulus, strain to failure, or fracture strength after exposures. However, testing of only the epoxy matrix revealed changes in hardness, thermal properties, and FTIR results with increasing gamma irradiation. The results suggest the epoxy within the composite can be affected by exposure to gamma irradiation.

  9. Epoxy coated reinforcement in bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, J.

    A review was conducted of methods relating to the use of epoxy coated reinforcing bars for bridge decks and their potential for use in the United Kingdom. A survey of work carried out in the USA was carried out and the analysis used in a preliminary cost study. The options of having either a hot rolled asphalt surfacing or a permanently exposed concrete wearing surface were considered. It was concluded that epoxy coating of the top steel in addition to current waterproofing practice would provide, at relatively little extra cost, additional assurance that the reinforcement would be adequately protected throughout the life of a bridge. Current design rules do not permit decks with permanently exposed concrete wearing surface without waterproofing. Epoxy coating may afford a means of introducing such decks but before a positive recommendation to delete waterproofing can be made further studies would have to be undertaken.

  10. Physical aging in graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, E. S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The matrix dominated mechanical behavior of a graphite epoxy composite was found to be affected by sub Tg annealing. Postcured + or - 45 deg 4S specimens of Thornel 300 graphite/Narmco 5208 epoxy were quenched from above Tg and given a sub Tg annealing at 140 C for times up to 10 to the 5th power min. The ultimate tensile strength, strain to break, and toughness of the composite material were found to decrease as functions of sub Tg annealing time. No weight loss was observed during the sub Tg annealing. The time dependent change in mechanical behavior is explained on the basis of free volume changes that are related to the physical aging of the nonequilibrium glassy network epoxy. The results imply possible changes in composite properties with service time.

  11. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  13. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  14. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  15. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  16. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10113 - Thioether epoxy (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Thioether epoxy (generic). 721.10113... Substances § 721.10113 Thioether epoxy (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as thioether epoxy (PMN P-04-547) is subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10113 - Thioether epoxy (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Thioether epoxy (generic). 721.10113... Substances § 721.10113 Thioether epoxy (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as thioether epoxy (PMN P-04-547) is subject...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  5. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  6. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  7. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10113 - Thioether epoxy (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Thioether epoxy (generic). 721.10113... Substances § 721.10113 Thioether epoxy (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as thioether epoxy (PMN P-04-547) is subject...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10113 - Thioether epoxy (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Thioether epoxy (generic). 721.10113... Substances § 721.10113 Thioether epoxy (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as thioether epoxy (PMN P-04-547) is subject...

  11. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10113 - Thioether epoxy (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Thioether epoxy (generic). 721.10113... Substances § 721.10113 Thioether epoxy (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as thioether epoxy (PMN P-04-547) is subject...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  16. Atomistic modeling of thermomechanical properties of SWNT/Epoxy nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasanella, Nicholas; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2015-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to compute thermomechanical properties of cured epoxy resins reinforced with pristine and covalently functionalized carbon nanotubes. A DGEBA-DDS epoxy network was built using the ‘dendrimer’ growth approach where 75% of available epoxy sites were cross-linked. The epoxy model is verified through comparisons to experiments, and simulations are performed on nanotube reinforced cross-linked epoxy matrix using the CVFF force field in LAMMPS. Full stiffness matrices and linear coefficient of thermal expansion vectors are obtained for the nanocomposite. Large increases in stiffness and large decreases in thermal expansion were seen along the direction of the nanotube for both nanocomposite systems when compared to neat epoxy. The direction transverse to nanotube saw a 40% increase in stiffness due to covalent functionalization over neat epoxy at 1 K whereas the pristine nanotube system only saw a 7% increase due to van der Waals effects. The functionalized SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite showed an additional 42% decrease in thermal expansion along the nanotube direction when compared to the pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. The stiffness matrices are rotated over every possible orientation to simulate the effects of an isotropic system of randomly oriented nanotubes in the epoxy. The randomly oriented covalently functionalized SWNT/Epoxy nanocomposites showed substantial improvements over the plain epoxy in terms of higher stiffness (200% increase) and lower thermal expansion (32% reduction). Through MD simulations, we develop means to build simulation cells, perform annealing to reach correct densities, compute thermomechanical properties and compare with experiments.

  17. Epoxy-coated containers easily opened by wire band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Coy, J. W.

    1966-01-01

    Epoxy coating reduces punctures, abrasions, and contamination of synthetic cellular containers used for shipping and storing fragile goods and equipment. A wire band is wound around the closure joint, followed by the epoxy coating. The container can then be easily opened by pulling the wire through the epoxy around the joint.

  18. 40 CFR 721.320 - Acrylamide-substituted epoxy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acrylamide-substituted epoxy. 721.320... Substances § 721.320 Acrylamide-substituted epoxy. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylamide-substituted epoxy (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.320 - Acrylamide-substituted epoxy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acrylamide-substituted epoxy. 721.320... Substances § 721.320 Acrylamide-substituted epoxy. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylamide-substituted epoxy (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.320 - Acrylamide-substituted epoxy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylamide-substituted epoxy. 721.320... Substances § 721.320 Acrylamide-substituted epoxy. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylamide-substituted epoxy (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.320 - Acrylamide-substituted epoxy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylamide-substituted epoxy. 721.320... Substances § 721.320 Acrylamide-substituted epoxy. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylamide-substituted epoxy (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.320 - Acrylamide-substituted epoxy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylamide-substituted epoxy. 721.320... Substances § 721.320 Acrylamide-substituted epoxy. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylamide-substituted epoxy (PMN...

  3. Demonstrations with a Vacuum: Old Demonstrations for New Vacuum Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Explains mechanisms of 19th-century vacuum pumps. Describes demonstrations using the pump including guinea and feather tube, aurora tube, electric egg, Gassiots cascade, air mill, bell in vacuum, density and buoyancy of air, fountain in vacuum, mercury shower, palm and bladder glasses, Bacchus demonstration, pneumatic man-lifter, and Magdeburg…

  4. Tritium handling in vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.T.; Coffin, D.O.

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a course in Tritium handling in vacuum systems. Topics presented are: Properties of Tritium; Tritium compatibility of materials; Tritium-compatible vacuum equipment; and Tritium waste treatment.

  5. Furnace brazing under partial vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckown, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Brazing furnace utilizing partial-vacuum technique reduces tooling requirements and produces better bond. Benefit in that partial vacuum helps to dissociate metal oxides that inhibit metal flow and eliminates heavy tooling required to hold parts together during brazing.

  6. Gas bearing operates in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Bearing has restrictions to reduce air leaks and is connected to external pumpout facility which removes exhausted air. Token amount of air which is lost to vacuum is easily removed by conventional vacuum pump.

  7. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Lee, Elizabeth; Kallam, Alekhya; Majumdar, Partha; Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J.; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Bahr, James; Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  8. Kevlar 49/Epoxy COPV Aging Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, James K.; Salem, Jonathan L.; Thesken, John C.; Russell, Richard W.; Littell, Justin; Ruggeri, Charles; Leifeste, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    NASA initiated an effort to determine if the aging of Kevlar 49/Epoxy composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPV) affected their performance. This study briefly reviews the history and certification of composite pressure vessels employed on NASA Orbiters. Tests to evaluate overwrap tensile strength changes compared 30 year old samples from Orbiter vessels to new Kevlar/Epoxy pressure vessel materials. Other tests include transverse compression and thermal analyses (glass transition and moduli). Results from these tests do not indicate a noticeable effect due to aging of the overwrap materials.

  9. Experimental study of damping of graphite epoxy composite material of the Space Telescope truss system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. D.; Crocker, M. J.; Guest, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    The truss system of the Hubble Space Telescope is made of graphite epoxy tubes and beams that have very low material damping. This paper describes a systematic experimental evaluation of the damping capacity of the graphite epoxy material used in the telescope truss system. The damping capacity of the composite material was measured both under normal and elevated temperatures in atmospheric conditions and in vacuum. Both free decay and steady state methods were used to measure the damping ratio of different specimens under different boundary conditions. A method that involves an iterative least-squares curve-fitting technique for the measured frequency response data has been developed to improve the accuracy of the damping ratio estimation. A unique experimental setup was developed to measure the damping of the material in a vacuum chamber. It was found that outgassing (moisture desorption) has little effect on the damping of the specimen. On the other hand, it was observed that temperature has a significant effect on both the damping and resonance frequencies of the specimen.

  10. A radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1988-07-19

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction. 3 figs.

  11. Studies of Lubricating Materials in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Johnson, R. L.; Swikert, M. A.

    1964-01-01

    Lubricating materials for use in a vacuum environment have been the subject of a series of experimental investigations. Evaporation properties were evaluated for solid polymeric compositions. Friction and wear studies explored the behavior during sliding contact for series of polymeric compositions, binary alloys containing soft film-forming phases, complex alloys with film-forming materials, and a burnished MoS2 film. Friction and wear experiments were conducted at 10(exp-9)mm Hg with a 3/16-inch-radius-hemisphere rider specimen sliding on the flat surface of a rotating 2-1/2-inch-diameter disk specimen with materials that had low rates of evaporation. The influence of fillers in polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) on decomposition during vacuum friction studies was determined with a mass spectrometer. A real advantage in reducing decomposition and improving friction wear properties is gained by adding fillers (e.g., copper) that improve thermal conductivity through the composite materials. A polyimide and an epoxy-MoS2 composition material were found to have better friction and wear properties than PTFE compositions. A series of alloys (cast binary as well as more complex alloys) that contained microinclusions of potential film-forming material was studied. These materials replaced the normal surface oxides as they were worn away on sliding contact. Iron sulfide, nickel oxide, and tin are typical film-forming materials employed and were demonstrated to be effective in inhibiting surface welding and reducing friction. A burnished MoS2 film applied to type 440-C stainless steel in argon with a rotating soft wire brush had good endurance properties but somewhat higher friction than commercially available bonded films. An oil film applied to the burnished MoS2 markedly reduced its endurance life.

  12. Surge-damping vacuum valve

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jack C.; Kelly, Benjamin E.

    1980-01-01

    A valve having a mechanism for damping out flow surges in a vacuum system which utilizes a slotted spring-loaded disk positioned adjacent the valve's vacuum port. Under flow surge conditions, the differential pressure forces the disk into sealing engagement with the vacuum port, thereby restricting the flow path to the slots in the disk damping out the flow surge.

  13. Portable vacuum object handling device

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon H.

    1983-08-09

    The disclosure relates to a portable device adapted to handle objects which are not to be touched by hand. A piston and bore wall form a vacuum chamber communicating with an adaptor sealably engageable with an object to be lifted. The piston is manually moved and set to establish vacuum. A valve is manually actuatable to apply the vacuum to lift the object.

  14. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  15. Characterization of Epoxy Functionalized Graphite Nanoparticles and the Physical Properties of Epoxy Matrix Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Bauer, Jonathan L.; Maryanski, Michael J.; Heimann, Paula J.; Barlow, Jeremy P.; Gosau, Jan-Michael; Allred, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a novel approach to the functionalization of graphite nanoparticles. The technique provides a mechanism for covalent bonding between the filler and matrix, with minimal disruption to the sp2 hybridization of the pristine graphene sheet. Functionalization proceeded by covalently bonding an epoxy monomer to the surface of expanded graphite, via a coupling agent, such that the epoxy concentration was measured as approximately 4 wt.%. The impact of dispersing this material into an epoxy resin was evaluated with respect to the mechanical properties and electrical conductivity of the graphite-epoxy nanocomposite. At a loading as low as 0.5 wt.%, the electrical conductivity was increased by five orders of magnitude relative to the base resin. The material yield strength was increased by 30% and Young s modulus by 50%. These results were realized without compromise to the resin toughness.

  16. Effect of autohydrolysis on the wettability, absorbility and further alkali impregnation of poplar wood chips.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ningpan; Liu, Wei; Hou, Qingxi; Wang, Peiyun; Yao, Zhirong

    2016-09-01

    Autohydrolysis with different severity factors was performed on poplar wood chips prior to pulping, and the wettability, absorbility and the following impregnation of NaOH solution for the poplar wood chips were then investigated. The results showed that after autohydrolysis pretreatment the porosity, shrinkage and fiber saturation point (FSP) of the poplar wood chips were increased, while the surface contact angle decreased as the severity factor was increased. The autohydrolyzed chips absorbed more NaOH in impregnation that resulted in a low NaOH concentration in the bulk impregnation liquor (i.e., the impregnation liquor outside wood chips), while the concentration in the entrapped liquor (i.e., the impregnation liquor inside wood chips) was increased. Autohydrolysis substantially improved the effectiveness of alkali impregnation.

  17. Electron-beam-initiated polymerization of poly(ethylene glycol)-based wood impregnants.

    PubMed

    Trey, Stacy M; Netrval, Julia; Berglund, Lars; Johansson, Mats

    2010-11-01

    The current study demonstrates that methacrylate and acrylate poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) functional oligomers can be effectively impregnated into wood blocks, and cured efficiently to high conversions without catalyst by e-beam radiation, allowing for less susceptibility to leaching, and favorable properties including higher Brinell hardness values. PEG based monomers were chosen because there is a long history of this water-soluble monomer being able to penetrate the cell wall, thus bulking it and decreasing the uptake of water which further protects the wood from fungal attack. Diacrylate, dimethacrylate, and dihydroxyl functional PEG of M(w) 550-575, of concentrations 0, 30, 60, and 100 wt % in water, were vacuum pressure impregnated into Scots Pine blocks of 15 × 25 × 50 mm in an effort to bulk the cell wall. The samples were then irradiated and compared with nonirradiated samples. It was shown by IR, DSC that the acrylate polymers were fully cured to much higher conversions than can be reached with conventional methods. Leaching studies indicated a much lower amount of oligomer loss from the cured vinyl functional PEG chains in comparison to hydroxyl functional PEG indicating a high degree of fastening of the polymer in the wood. The Brinell hardness indicated a significant increase in hardness to hardwood levels in the modified samples compared to the samples of hydroxyl functional PEG and uncured vinyl PEG samples, which actually became softer than the untreated Scots Pine. By monitoring the dimensions of the sample it was found by weight percent gain calculations (WPG %) that water helps to swell the wood structure and allow better access of the oligomers into the cell wall. Further, the cure shrinkage of the wood samples demonstrated infiltration of the oligomers into the cell wall as this was not observed for methyl methacrylate which is well-documented to remain in the lumen. However, dimensional stability of the vinyl polymer modified blocks when

  18. Effect of calcination on Co-impregnated active carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bekyarova, E.; Mehandjiev, D. . Inst. of General and Inorganic Chemistry)

    1993-11-01

    Active carbon (AC) from apricot shells with known characteristics has been impregnated with a 9.88% Co(NO[sub 3])[sub 2] [center dot] 6H[sub 2]O solution. The samples are destroyed in air at 200, 300, 400, and 550 C. The processes accompanying the thermal treatment are studied by DTA. Two processes are established during calcination of Co-impregnated active carbon: (i) destruction of the support as a result of oxidation catalyzed by the impregnated cobalt and (ii) interaction of the active phase (Co[sub 3]O[sub 4]) with the support (AC), during which Co[sub 3]O[sub 4] is reduced to CoO and Co. The presence of Co[sub 3]O[sub 4], and CoO phases is proved by X-ray measurements, while that of metal Co is established by magnetic measurements. The porous structure changes are investigated by adsorption studies. The characterization of the samples is performed by physical adsorption of N[sub 2] (77.4 K) and CO[sub 2] (273 K). The poresize distribution curves are plotted over the range 0.4--10 nm by the methods of Pierce (for the mesopores) and Medek (for the micropores). The micropore volume is determined by two independent methods: t/F method and D-R plot. The results from adsorption studies indicate a decrease of S[sub BET], V[sub mi], and, especially, the supermicropores of the samples.

  19. Vacuum tool manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprising a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm.

  20. Edison's vacuum technology patents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waits, Robert K.

    2003-07-01

    During 1879 Thomas Edison's Menlo Park, New Jersey laboratory developed the means to evacuate glass lamp globes to less than a mTorr in 20 min and in mid-1880 began production of carbon-filament incandescent lamps. Among Edison's nearly 1100 U.S. patents are five for vacuum pump improvements, and at least eight others that are vacuum-related; all applied for between 1880 and 1886. Inspired by an 1878 article by De La Rue and Müller [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 169, 155 (1878)] on studies of glow discharges, Edison devised a combination pump using the Geissler pump as a rough pump and the Sprengel pump for continuous exhaustion. Edison's patents described means to control the mercury flow and automate the delivery of the mercury to banks of up to a hundred pumps. Other patents described various means to remove residual gases during lamp processing.

  1. Vacuum tool manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1993-11-23

    Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm. 6 figures.

  2. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  3. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  4. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  5. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  6. Vacuum tool manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm.

  7. Integrated structure vacuum tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Kerwin, W. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    High efficiency, multi-dimensional thin film vacuum tubes suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments are described. The tubes are fabricated by placing thin film electrode members in selected arrays on facing interior wall surfaces of an alumina substrate envelope. Cathode members are formed using thin films of triple carbonate. The photoresist used in photolithography aids in activation of the cathodes by carbonizing and reacting with the reduced carbonates when heated in vacuum during forming. The finely powdered triple carbonate is mixed with the photoresist used to delineate the cathode locations in the conventional solid state photolithographic manner. Anode and grid members are formed using thin films of refractory metal. Electron flow in the tubes is between grid elements from cathode to anode as in a conventional three-dimensional tube.

  8. An automated vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, W.H. ); Vaughn, G.D. ); Bridgman, C. )

    1991-01-01

    Software tools available with the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) control system provide the capability to express a control problem as a finite state machine. System states and transitions are expressed in terms of accelerator parameters and actions are taken based on state transitions. This is particularly useful for sequencing operations which are modal in nature or are unwieldy when implemented with conventional programming. State diagrams are automatically translated into code which is executed by the control system. These tools have been applied to the vacuum system for the GTA accelerator to implement automatic sequencing of operations. With a single request, the operator may initiate a complete pump-down sequence. He can monitor the progress and is notified if an anomaly occurs requiring intervention. The operator is not required to have detailed knowledge of the vacuum system and is protected from taking inappropriate actions. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  9. High-current carbon-epoxy capillary cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleizer, J. Z.; Queller, T.; Bliokh, Yu.; Yatom, S.; Vekselman, V.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Bernshtam, V.

    2012-07-01

    The results of experiments on the reproducible generation of an electron beam having a high current density of up to 300 A/cm2 and a satisfactorily uniform cross-sectional distribution of current density in a ˜200 kV, ˜450 ns vacuum diode with a carbon-epoxy capillary cathode are presented. It was found that the source of the electrons is the plasma formed as a result of flashover inside the capillaries. It is shown that the plasma formation occurs at an electric field ≤15 kV/cm and that the cathode sustains thousands of pulses without degradation in its emission properties. Time- and space-resolved visible light observation and spectroscopy analyses were used to determine the cathode plasma's density, temperature, and expansion velocity. It was found that the density of the cathode plasma decreases rapidly in relation to the distance from the cathode. In addition, it was found that the main reason for the short-circuiting of the accelerating gap is the formation and expansion of the anode plasma. Finally, it was shown that when an external guiding magnetic field is present, the injection of the electron beam into the drift space with a current amplitude exceeding its critical value changes the radial distribution of the current density of the electron beam because the inner electrons are reflected from the virtual cathode.

  10. A Point Spread Function for the EPOXI Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K.

    2010-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planet Observation Characterization and the Deep Impact Extended Investigation missions (EPOXI) are currently observing the transits of exoplanets, two comet nuclei at short range, and the Earth and Mars using the High Resolution Instrument (HRI) - a 0.3 m f/35 telescope on the Deep Impact probe. The HRI is in a permanently defocused state with the instrument pOint of focus about 0.6 cm before the focal plane due to the use of a reference flat mirror that took a power during ground thermal-vacuum testing. Consequently, the point spread function (PSF) covers approximately nine pixels FWHM and is characterized by a patch with three-fold symmetry due to the three-point support structures of the primary and secondary mirrors. The PSF is also strongly color dependent varying in shape and size with change in filtration and target color. While defocus is highly desirable for exoplanet transit observations to limit sensitivity to intra-pixel variation, it is suboptimal for observations of spatially resolved targets. Consequently, all images used in our analysis of such objects were deconvolved with an instrument PSF. The instrument PSF is also being used to optimize transit analysis. We discuss development and usage of an instrument PSF for these observations.

  11. Effect of Liquid-Crystalline Epoxy Backbone Structure on Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy-Alumina Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giang, Thanhkieu; Kim, Jinhwan

    2017-01-01

    In a series of papers published recently, we clearly demonstrated that the most important factor governing the thermal conductivity of epoxy-Al2O3 composites is the backbone structure of the epoxy. In this study, three more epoxies based on diglycidyl ester-terminated liquid-crystalline epoxy (LCE) have been synthesized to draw conclusions regarding the effect of the epoxy backbone structure on the thermal conductivity of epoxy-alumina composites. The synthesized structures were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and optical microscopy were also employed to examine the thermal and optical properties of the synthesized LCEs and the cured composites. All three LCE resins exhibited typical liquid-crystalline behaviors: clear solid crystalline state below the melting temperature ( T m), sharp crystalline melting at T m, and transition to nematic phase above T m with consequent isotropic phase above the isotropic temperature ( T i). The LCE resins displayed distinct nematic liquid-crystalline phase over a wide temperature range and retained liquid-crystalline phase after curing, with high thermal conductivity of the resulting composite. The thermal conductivity values ranged from 3.09 W/m-K to 3.89 W/m-K for LCE-Al2O3 composites with 50 vol.% filler loading. The steric effect played a governing role in the difference. The neat epoxy resin thermal conductivity was obtained as 0.35 W/m-K to 0.49 W/m-K based on analysis using the Agari-Uno model. The results clearly support the objective of this study in that the thermal conductivity of the LCE-containing networks strongly depended on the epoxy backbone structure and the degree of ordering in the cured network.

  12. Vacuum: From Art to Exact Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafferty, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the history of vacuum technology. Includes vacuum pump developments (mechanical, ion, and cyrogenic pumps), measurement techniques, the development of the American Vacuum Society, and electronics in vacuum technology. (JN)

  13. Implant infections and antibiotic-impregnated silicone rubber coating.

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, D N; Brindley, G S; Polkey, C E; Browning, G V

    1989-01-01

    A method is described for coating silicone rubber-encapsulated implant devices with an outer layer of silicone rubber impregnated with a mixture of gentamicin sulphate and diethanolamine fusidate. A coating of this sort provides bactericidal activity lasting for a few days in the film of fluid surrounding such an implant. When used for coating our implants, the retrospective rate of implant infections believed to have been introduced at the time of surgery was reduced to 0.7% (coated), compared with 10.0% (uncoated), a highly significant difference (p less than 0.001). Systemic perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis was not shown to confer any such benefit. PMID:2649641

  14. Marking excision margins of surgical specimens by silver impregnation.

    PubMed

    Feit, J

    2005-07-01

    Marking excision margins of surgical specimens by silver impregnation has several advantages over commonly used Indian ink: during the slicing the tissue preserves its natural color, the staining is permanent, and the pigment does not smudge over cutting surfaces. The pigment is clearly visible in tissue sections. The tissue specimen is shortly dipped into a 10% water solution of argent nitrate (AgNO3 with HNO3). After slicing, the tissue specimens are developed in common black & white developer for several seconds and paraffin processed as usual. The method is suitable for formaldehyde fixed as well as fresh tissue specimens.

  15. Separation of uranium on polyurethane foam impregnated with trioctylphosphine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Korkisch, J.; Steffan, I.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for the quantitative separation of uranium from practically all other elements in 1M hydrochloric acid solution containing ascorbic acid. From such a solution uranium is retained selectively by a column containing open-cell polyurethane foam impregnated with tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO). The uranium together with TOPO is eluted with ethanol and then it is adsorbed on a column of Dowex 1 anion exchange resin from a HCl-organic solvent system. Uranium is eluted with 1M hydrochloric acid. 5 tables.

  16. Air bearing vacuum seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1978-01-01

    An air bearing vacuum seal assembly capable of rotating at the speed of several thousand revolutions per minute using an air cushion to prevent the rotating and stationary parts from touching, and a two stage differential pumping arrangement to maintain the pressure gradient between the air cushion and the vacuum so that the leak rate into the vacuum is, for example, less than 1 .times. 10.sup.-4 Pa m.sup.3 /s. The air bearing vacuum seal has particular application for mounting rotating targets to an evacuated accelerator beam tube for bombardment of the targets with high-power charged particle beams in vacuum.

  17. Thermal expansion and swelling of cured epoxy resin used in graphite/epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents results of experiments in which the thermal expansion and swelling behavior of an epoxy resin system and two graphite/epoxy composite systems exposed to water were measured. It was found that the cured epoxy resin swells by an amount slightly less than the volume of the absorbed water and that the swelling efficiency of the water varies with the moisture content of the polymer. Additionally, the thermal expansion of cured epoxy resin that is saturated with water is observed to be more than twice that of dry resin. Results also indicate that cured resin that is saturated with 7.1% water at 95 C will rapidly increase in moisture content to 8.5% when placed in 1 C water. The mechanism for this phenomenon, termed reverse thermal effect, is described in terms of a slightly modified free-volume theory in conjunction with the theory of polar molecule interaction. Nearly identical behavior was observed in two graphite/epoxy composite systems, thus establishing that this behavior may be common to all cured epoxy resins.

  18. Microcracking in Graphite-Epoxy Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    ply Pabric 350 -100 to -320 Kirlin/ Pynchon GY 70/X30 (0/45190/135)s 250 -170 General Dynamics/Convair Division CY 70/934 0. 350 -16 Aerospace...and Glass Matrices," J. Mat. Sci. 7, 676-681 (1972). 17. R. L. Kirlin and G. E. Pynchon , "Dimensional Stability Investigation - Graphite/Epoxy Truss

  19. Polymeric Additives For Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Nir, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental studies of properties of several graphite/epoxy composites containing polymeric additives as flexibilizing or toughening agents. Emphasizes effects of brominated polymeric additives (BPA's) with or without carboxy-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber. Reviews effects of individual and combined additives on fracture toughnesses, environmental stabilities, hot/wet strengths, thermomechanical behaviors, and other mechanical properties of composites.

  20. Atmospheric corrosion and epoxy-coated reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, H.G.

    1998-12-31

    Atmospheric corrosion can have a tremendous effect on the ability of epoxy-coated reinforcement to maintain its effectiveness. Corrosive conditions can result in the coating becoming brittle and more susceptible to damage from handling. Atmospheric conditions can also enhance localized corrosion at holidays on the bars. Efforts to minimize these effects will be discussed.

  1. Thermal modeling of an epoxy encapsulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, R.G.; Schutt, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The encapsulation of components is a widely used process at Sandia National Laboratories for packaging components to withstand structural loads. Epoxy encapsulants are also used for their outstanding dielectric strength characteristics. The production of high voltage assemblies requires the encapsulation of ceramic and electrical components (such as transformers). Separation of the encapsulant from internal contact surfaces or voids within the encapsulant itself in regions near the mold base have caused high voltage breakdown failures during production testing. In order to understand the failure mechanisms, a methodology was developed to predict both the thermal response and gel front progression of the epoxy the encapsulation process. A thermal model constructed with PATRAN Plus (1) and solved with the P/THERMAL (2) analysis system was used to predict the thermal response of the encapsulant. This paper discusses the incorporation of an Arrhenius kinetics model into Q/TRAN (2) to model the complex volumetric heat generation of the epoxy during the encapsulation process. As the epoxy begins to cure, it generates heat and shrinks. The total cure time of the encapsulant (transformation from a viscous liquid to solid) is dependent on both the initial temperature and the entire temperature history. Because the rate of cure is temperature dependent, the cure rate accelerates with a temperature increase and, likewise, the cure rate is quenched if the temperature is reduced. The temperature and conversion predictions compared well against experimental data. The thermal simulation results were used to modify the temperature cure process of the encapsulant and improve production yields.

  2. Epoxy resins produce improved plastic scintillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. W.

    1967-01-01

    Plastic scintillator produced by the substitution of epoxy resins for the commonly used polystyrene is easy to cast, stable at room temperature, and has the desirable properties of a thermoset or cross-linked system. Such scintillators can be immersed directly in strong solvents, an advantage in many chemical and biological experiments.

  3. Alkali impregnated teflon as a filter for atmospheric SO 2 PIXE analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yatsuka; Cahill, Thomas A.

    1985-02-01

    In order to collect SO 2 gas on a stretched Teflon filter impregnated with an alkali solution for a PIXE analysis, an impregnation method has been developed. In this article, the following points are presented. a) It has been found to be necessary to replace the air trapped in filter pores by methanol, and then to replace the methanol by an alkali solution, b) The resistance for air flow through an impregnated Teflon filter is not high and it has been checked that an ordinary pump can be used for the air sampling with the impregnated filter, with the usual flow rate aerosol sampling, c) The impurity levels of the reagents used for impregnants were small enough for sulfur analysis, d) The collection efficiencies of the impregnants, 20%NaOH + 10%glycerin and 20%NaOH + 10%TEA, which are the most suitable ones, did not decrease with flow rate in the range of 0-10 {1}/{min} per filter of 25 mm in diameter. A cross check experiment on the collection of ambient SO 2 gas with the three kinds of filter (A: 5%NaOH + 5%glycerin impregnated Whatman-41 filter, B: 20%NaOH + 10%TEA coated Nuclepore filter, C: 20%NaOH + 10%TEA impregnated stretched Teflon filter) was done. The results showed a satisfactory tolerance for the practical use of Teflon impregnated filter.

  4. Impregnation of tubular self-assemblies into dextran hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guoming; Chu, Chih-Chang

    2010-02-16

    Amine groups are the building units of proteins. The incorporation of amine groups into polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel through dextran-allyl isocyanate-ethylamine (Dex-AE) enhances sustained protein release by introducing effective interactions. To investigate such an interaction effect and to improve protein release, we impregnated self-assembled tubular structures from dextran-bromoethylamine (Dex-BH) and dextran-chloroacetic acid (Dex-CA) into Dex-AE/PEGDA hydrogel. The morphology data obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal that pure PEGDA hydrogel had no effect on the distribution of the self-assembled tubules; the introduction of Dex-AE brought about the dispersion of these tubules, and an increase in Dex-AE content led to more evenly distributed structures. Moreover, the implantation of the self-assembled tubules had no distinct effect on the swelling capacity of the hybrid self-assembly embedded hydrogels. The in vitro albumin release study was carried out in a pH 7.4 buffer solution; the results show that the implantation of the self-assembly into the hydrogels reduced the burst release and prolonged the protein release time. These findings demonstrate that the impregnation of tubular self-assembly into hydrogel makes the hybrid hydrogel an excellent protein delivery system.

  5. Impact properties of shear thickening fluid impregnated foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soutrenon, M.; Michaud, V.

    2014-03-01

    Concentrated colloidal suspensions of silica particles in polyethylene glycol exhibit a shear thickening behavior: above a critical shear rate in a confined environment, they show a steep increase of viscosity. This reversible transition from a low to a high viscosity state is associated with a large energy absorption that could be harnessed for impact protection. As these suspensions are liquid at rest, however, shear thickening fluids (STFs) are difficult to use in practical applications. Furthermore, their specific rheological properties exist within a narrow range of concentration, so they tend to disappear when the material is in contact with air and humidity. In this work, a soft foam scaffold was impregnated with STF to provide a three-dimensional shape to the assembly at rest, while a silicone was cast around it to serve as a physical barrier to the external environment. A method to quickly impregnate the foam was proposed. Impact tests were carried out on the STF/foam/silicone composite pads using a free fall impact tower. Compared to rubber or pure silicone, larger energy absorptions, up to 85%, were observed, which could be repeated for multiple impacts. The transmitted shock waves were also reduced, showing the potential of this system for impact protection of structures.

  6. Zinc impregnated cellulose nanocomposites: Synthesis, characterization and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Attarad; Ambreen, Sidra; Maqbool, Qaisar; Naz, Sania; Shams, Muhammad Fahad; Ahmad, Madiha; Phull, Abdul Rehman; Zia, Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    Nanocomposite materials have broad applicability due to synergistic effect of combined components. In present investigation, cellulose isolated from citrus peel waste is used as a supporting material; impregnation of zinc oxide nanoparticles via co-precipitation method. The characterization of nano composite is carried out through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) resulting less than 10 μm cellulose fiber and approx. 50 nm ZnO NPs. Zinc oxide impregnated cellulose (ZnO-Cel) exhibited significant bacterial devastation property when compared to ZnO NPs or Cellulose via disc diffusion and colony forming unit methods. In addition, the ZnO-Cel exhibited significant total antioxidant, and minor DPPH free radical scavenging and total reducing power activities. The nano composite also showed time dependent increase in photocatalytic by effectively degrading methylene blue dye up to 69.5% under sunlight irradiation within 90 min. The results suggest effective utilization of cellulose obtained from citrus waste and synthesis of pharmacologically important nano-composites that can be exploited in wound dressing; defence against microbial attack and healing due to antioxidative property, furthermore can also be used for waste water treatment.

  7. Vapor-Gas Bubble Evolution and Growth in Extremely Viscous Fluids Under Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John; Balasubramaniam, R.; Nahra, Henry; Agui, Juan; Truong, Duc

    2008-01-01

    Formation of vapor and gas bubbles and voids is normal and expected in flow processes involving extremely viscous fluids in normal gravity. Practical examples of extremely viscous fluids are epoxy-like filler materials before the epoxy fluids cure to their permanent form to create a mechanical bond between two substrates. When these fluids flow with a free liquid interface exposed to vacuum, rapid bubble expansion process may ensue. Bubble expansion might compromise the mechanical bond strength. The potential sources for the origin of the gases might be incomplete out-gassing process prior to filler application; regasification due to seal leakage in the filler applicator; and/or volatiles evolved from cure reaction products formed in the hardening process. We embarked on a study that involved conducting laboratory experiments with imaging diagnostics in order to deduce the seriousness of bubbling caused by entrained air and volatile fluids under space vacuum and low gravity environment. We used clear fluids with the similar physical properties as the epoxy-like filler material to mimic the dynamics of bubbles. Another aspect of the present study was to determine the likelihood of bubbling resulting from dissolved gases nucleating from solution. These experimental studies of the bubble expansion are compared with predictions using a modified Rayleigh- Plesset equation, which models the bubble expansion.

  8. Vacuum bell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sesia, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Background For specific therapy to correct pectus excavatum (PE), conservative treatment with the vacuum bell (VB) was introduced more than 10 years ago in addition to surgical repair. Preliminary results using the VB were encouraging. We report on our 13-year experience with the VB treatment including the intraoperative use during the Nuss procedure and present some technical innovations. Methods A VB with a patient-activated hand pump is used to create a vacuum at the anterior chest wall. Three different sizes of vacuum bells, as well as a model fitted for young women, exist. The appropriate size is selected according to the individual patient’s age and ventral surface. The device should be used at home for a minimum of 30 minutes (twice a day), and may be used up to a maximum of several hours daily. The intensity of the applied negative pressure can be evaluated with an integrated pressure gauge during follow-up visits. A prototype of an electronic model enables us to measure the correlation between the applied negative pressure and the elevation of the anterior chest wall. Results Since 2003, approx. 450 patients between 2 to 61 years of age started the VB therapy. Age and gender specific differences, depth of PE, symmetry or asymmetry, and concomitant malformations such as scoliosis and/or kyphosis influence the clinical course and success of VB therapy. According to our experience, we see three different groups of patients. Immediate elevation of the sternum was confirmed thoracoscopically during the Nuss procedure in every patient. Conclusions The VB therapy has been established as an alternative therapeutic option in selected patients suffering from PE. The initial results up to now are encouraging, but long-term results comprising more than 15 years are so far lacking, and further evaluation and follow-up studies are necessary. PMID:27747177

  9. Rolling through a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schaar, Jan Pieter; Yang, I.-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    We clarify under what conditions slow-roll inflation can continue almost undisturbed, while briefly evolving through a (semi-classically) metastable false vacuum. Furthermore, we look at potential signatures in the primordial power spectrum that could point towards the existence of traversed metastable false vacua. Interestingly, the theoretical constraints for the existence of traversable metastable vacua imply that Planck should be able to detect the resulting features in the primordial power spectrum. In other words, if Planck does not see features this immediately implies the non-existence of metastable false vacua rolled through during the inflationary epoch.

  10. Avoiding Death by Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso, A.; Ferreira, P. M.; Ivanov, I.; Santos, R.; Silva, João P.

    2013-07-01

    The two-Higgs doublet model (2HDM) can have two electroweak breaking, CP-conserving, minima. The possibility arises that the minimum which corresponds to the known elementary particle spectrum is metastable, a possibility we call the "panic vacuum". We present analytical bounds on the parameters of the softly broken Peccei-Quinn 2HDM which are necessary and sufficient conditions to avoid this possibility. We also show that, for this particular model, the current LHC data already tell us that we are necessarily in the global minimum of the theory, regardless of any cosmological considerations about the lifetime of the false vacua.

  11. Vacuum Beat Wave Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. I.; Hafizi, B.; Ting, A.; Burris, H. R.; Sprangle, P.; Esarey, E.; Ganguly, A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    1997-11-01

    The Vacuum Beat Wave Accelerator (VBWA) is a particle acceleration scheme which uses the non-linear ponderomotive beating of two different frequency laser beams to accelerate electrons. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate the VBWA is underway at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). This experiment will use the beating of a 1054 nm and 527 nm laser pulse from the NRL T-cubed laser to generate the beat wave and a 4.5 MeV RF electron gun as the electron source. Simulation results and the experimental design will be presented. The suitability of using axicon or higher order Gaussian laser beams will also be discussed.

  12. Thermal Vacuum Test Facility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-31

    tne power has a rear terminal sensor input for this Probe, use it. Otherwiseq connect the probe to the front panel. The end of the sensor should be...outlet on the front panel of the vacuum chamber. BUS CONNECTtONS: Plug the 1/0 expander card into one of the three calculator slots. Cover the other two...mating cable. Soth connectors on the slave disk are identical, so either one can be used. This cable also locks into place at each end . Connect the other

  13. R&D ERL: Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Weiss, D.; Steszyn, A.; Todd, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL Vacuum systems are depicted in a figure. ERL has eight vacuum volumes with various sets of requirements. A summary of vacuum related requirements is provided in a table. Five of the eight volumes comprise the electron beamline. They are the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity, Superconducting e-gun, injection, loop and beam dump. Two vacuum regions are the individual cryostats insulating the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity and the Superconducting e-gun structures. The last ERL vacuum volume not shown in the schematic is the laser transport line. The beamline vacuum regions are separated by electropneumatic gate valves. The beam dump is common with loop beamline but is considered a separate volume due to geometry and requirements. Vacuum in the 5-cell SRF cavity is maintained in the {approx}10{sup -9} torr range at room temperature by two 20 l/s ion pumps and in the e-gun SRF cavity by one 60 l/s ion pump. Vacuum in the SRF cavities operated at 2{sup o}K is reduced to low 10{sup -11} torr via cryopumping of the cavity walls. The cathode of the e-gun must be protected from poisoning, which can occur if vacuum adjacent to the e-gun in the injection line exceeds 10-11 torr range in the injection warm beamline near the e-gun exit. The vacuum requirements for beam operation in the loop and beam dump are 10-9 torr range. The beamlines are evacuated from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum level with a particulate free, oil free turbomolecular pumping cart. 25 l/s shielded ion pumps distributed throughout the beamlines maintain the vacuum requirement. Due to the more demanding vacuum requirement of the injection beamline proximate to the e-gun, a vacuum bakeout of the injection beamline is required. In addition, two 200 l/s diode ion pumps and supplemental pumping provided by titanium sublimation pumps are installed in the injection line just beyond the exit of the e-gun. Due to expected gas load a similar pumping arrangement is planned for the beam dump. The

  14. Impregnating unconsolidated pyroclastic sequences: A tool for detailed facies analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapper, Daniel; Kueppers, Ulrich; Castro, Jon M.; Pacheco, Jose M. R.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2010-05-01

    The interpretation of volcanic eruptions is usually derived from direct observation and the thorough analysis of the deposits. Processes in vent-proximal areas are usually not directly accessible or likely to be obscured. Hence, our understanding of proximal deposits is often limited as they were produced by the simultaneous events stemming from primary eruptive, transportative, and meteorological conditions. Here we present a method that permits for a direct and detailed quasi in-situ investigation of loose pyroclastic units that are usually analysed in the laboratory for their 1) grain-size distribution, 2) componentry, and 3) grain morphology. As the clast assembly is altered during sampling, the genesis of a stratigraphic unit and the relative importance of the above mentioned deposit characteristics is hard to achieve. In an attempt to overcome the possible loss of information during conventional sampling techniques, we impregnated the cleaned surfaces of proximal, unconsolidated units of the 1957-58 Capelinhos eruption on Faial, Azores. During this basaltic, emergent eruption, fluxes in magma rise rate led to a repeated build-up and collapse of tuff cones and consequently to a shift between phreatomagmatic and magmatic eruptive style. The deposits are a succession of generally parallel bedded, cm- to dm-thick layers with a predominantly ashy matrix. The lapilli content is varying gradually; the content of bombs is enriched in discrete layers without clear bomb sags. The sample areas have been cleaned and impregnated with two-component glue (EPOTEK 301). For approx. 10 * 10 cm, a volume of mixed glue of 20 ml was required. Using a syringe, this low-viscosity, transparent glue could be easily applied on the target area. We found that the glue permeated the deposit as deep as 5 mm. After > 24 h, the glue was sufficiently dry to enable the sample to be laid open. This impregnation method renders it possible to cut and polish the sample and investigate grain

  15. Impregnating unconsolidated pyroclastic sequences: A tool for detailed facies analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapper, D.; Kueppers, U.; Castro, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    The interpretation of volcanic eruptions is usually derived from direct observation and the thorough analysis of the deposits. Processes in vent-proximal areas are usually not directly accessible or likely to be obscured. Hence, our understanding of proximal deposits is often limited as they were produced by the simultaneous events stemming from primary eruptive, transportative, and meteorological conditions. Here we present a method that permits for a direct and detailed quasi in-situ investigation of loose pyroclastic units that are usually analysed in the laboratory for their 1) grain-size distribution, 2) componentry, and 3) grain morphology. As the clast assembly is altered during sampling, the genesis of a stratigraphic unit and the relative importance of the above mentioned deposit characteristics is hard to achieve. In an attempt to overcome the possible loss of information during conventional sampling techniques, we impregnated the cleaned surfaces of proximal, unconsolidated units of the 1957-58 Capelinhos eruption on Faial, Azores. During this basaltic, emergent eruption, fluxes in magma rise rate led to a repeated build-up and collapse of tuff cones and consequently to a shift between phreatomagmatic and magmatic eruptive style. The deposits are a succession of generally parallel bedded, cm- to dm-thick layers with a predominantly ashy matrix. The lapilli content is varying gradually; the content of bombs is enriched in discrete layers without clear bomb sags. The sample areas have been cleaned and impregnated with a two-component glue (EPOTEK 301). For approx. 10 * 10 cm, a volume of mixed glue of 20 ml was required. This low-viscosity, transparent glue allowed for an easy application on the target area by means of a syringe and permeated the deposit as deep as 5 mm. After > 24 h, the glue was sufficiently dry to enable the sample to be laid open. This impregnation method renders it possible to cut and polish the sample and investigate grain

  16. 21 CFR 529.1003 - Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge. 529.1003 Section 529.1003 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 529.1003 Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge. (a) Specifications. Each vaginal...

  17. 21 CFR 529.1003 - Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge. 529.1003 Section 529.1003 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 529.1003 Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge. (a) Specifications. Each vaginal...

  18. 21 CFR 529.1003 - Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge. 529.1003 Section 529.1003 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 529.1003 Flurogestone acetate-impregnated vaginal sponge. (a) Specifications. Each vaginal...

  19. IN-FLIGHT CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY A CHLORINE-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the in-flight capture of elemental mercury (Hgo) by a chlorine (C1)-impregnated activated carbon. Efforts to develop sorbents for the control of Hg emissions have demonstrated that C1-impregnation of virgin activated carbons using dilute solutions of hydrogen ...

  20. Preparation of sulfurized powdered activated carbon from waste tires using an innovative compositive impregnation process.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chung-Shin; Lin, Hsun-Yu; Wu, Chun-Hsin; Liu, Ming-Han; Hung, Chung-Hsuang

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an innovative compositive impregnation process for preparing sulfurized powdered activated carbon (PAC) from waste tires. An experimental apparatus, including a pyrolysis and activation system and a sulfur (S) impregnation system, was designed and applied to produce sulfurized PAC with a high specific surface area. Experimental tests involved the pyrolysis, activation, and sulfurization of waste tires. Waste-tire-derived PAC (WPAC) was initially produced in the pyrolysis and activation system. Experimental results indicated that the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of WPAC increased, and the average pore radius of WPAC decreased, as water feed rate and activation time increased. In this study, a conventional direct impregnation process was used to prepare the sulfurized PAC by impregnating WPAC with sodium sulfide (Na2S) solution. Furthermore, an innovative compositive impregnation process was developed and then compared with the conventional direct impregnation process. Experimental results showed that the compositive impregnation process produced the sulfurized WPAC with high BET surface area and a high S content. A maximum BET surface area of 886 m2/g and the S content of 2.61% by mass were obtained at 900 degrees C and at the S feed ratio of 2160 mg Na2S/g C. However, the direct impregnation process led to a BET surface area of sulfurized WPAC that decreased significantly as the S content increased.

  1. Kl-impregnated Oyster Shells as a Solid Catalyst for Soybean Oil Transesterificaton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research on inexpensive and green catalysts is needed for economical production of biodiesel. The goal of the research was to test KI-impregnated oyster shell as a solid catalyst for transesterification of soybean oil. Specific objectives were to characterize KI-impregnated oyster shell, determine t...

  2. MOLECULAR VACUUM PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Eckberg, E.E.

    1960-09-27

    A multiple molecular vacuum pump capable of producing a vacuum of the order of 10/sup -9/ mm Hg is described. The pump comprises a casing of an aggregate of paired and matched cylindrical plates, a recessed portion on one face of each plate concentrically positioned formed by a radially extending wall and matching the similarly recessed portion of its twin plate of that pair of plates and for all paired and matched plates; a plurality of grooves formed in the radially extending walls of each and all recesses progressing in a spiral manner from their respective starting points out at the periphery of the recess inwardly to the central area; a plurality of rotors rotatably mounted to closely occupy the spaces as presented by the paired and matched recesses between all paired plates; a hollowed drive-shaft perforated at points adjacent to the termini of all spiral grooves; inlet ports at the starting points of all grooves and through all plates at common points to each respectively; and a common outlet passage presented by the hollow portion of the perforated hollowed drive-shaft of the molecular pump. (AEC)

  3. Motor actuated vacuum door

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanagud, A. V.

    1986-10-01

    Doors that allow scientific instruments to record and retrieve the observed data are often required to be designed and installed as a part of sounding rocket hardware. The motor-actuated vacuum door was designed to maintain a medium vacuum of the order of 0.0001 torr or better while closed, and to provide an opening 15 inches long x 8.5 inches wide while open for cameras to image Halley's comet. When the electric motor receives the instruction to open the door through the payload battery, timer, and relay circuit, the first operation is to unlock the door. After unlatching, the torque transmitted by the motor to the main shaft through the links opens the door. A microswitch actuator, which rides on the linear motion conversion mechanism, is adjusted to trip the limit switch at the end of the travel. The process is repeated in the reverse order to close the door. 'O' rings are designed to maintain the seal. Door mechanisms similar to the one described have flown on Aerobee 17.018 and Black Brant 27.047 payloads.

  4. Portable vacuum object handling device

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, G.H.

    1983-08-09

    The disclosure relates to a portable device adapted to handle objects which are not to be touched by hand. A piston and bore wall form a vacuum chamber communicating with an adaptor sealably engageable with an object to be lifted. The piston is manually moved and set to establish vacuum. A valve is manually actuatable to apply the vacuum to lift the object. 1 fig.

  5. Vacuum leak detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Jr., David

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting leakage in a vacuum system involves a moisture trap chamber connected to the vacuum system and to a pressure gauge. Moisture in the trap chamber is captured by freezing or by a moisture adsorbent to reduce the residual water vapor pressure therein to a negligible amount. The pressure gauge is then read to determine whether the vacuum system is leaky. By directing a stream of carbon dioxide or helium at potentially leaky parts of the vacuum system, the apparatus can be used with supplemental means to locate leaks.

  6. Investigations of toughening mechanisms of epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, T.

    1986-01-01

    Composite material technology was applied to the solid rocket booster by the development of a carbon filament-epoxy resin case which yields a net increase of 4000 lbs. in payload in the shuttle. The question of reusability of the new composite tanks has not yet been answered and will depend on the toughness of the matrix resin. The present study was aimed at providing conditions whereby test specimens of the epoxy resin (EPON/85) and curing agents of systematically varied structures could be produced in a controlled manner. Three sets of conditions were found that might allow the isolation of the structural effects on toughness from the cure effects. The kinetic methods leading to the determination of these conditions are described.

  7. Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin coating for capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Roopa S; Wang, Qinggang; Lee, Milton L

    2002-04-05

    Coating the interior surface of a fused-silica capillary with a polymeric material has long been used in capillary electrophoresis (CE) to reduce or eliminate electroosmotic flow and suppress adsorption. A cycloaliphatic epoxide-based resin was bonded to silane treated capillaries and crosslinked with a curing agent. The epoxy resin coating significantly reduced electroosmotic flow over a pH range of 3-10. This coating was sufficiently hydrophilic to suppress protein adsorption. The epoxy resin coated capillary was used to separate several acidic and basic proteins and peptides. Separation efficiencies greater than 400,000 theoretical plates were achieved. The relative standard deviations in migration times for proteins were <0.8%. Speed and simplicity are important advantages of the coating procedure compared to other published coating methods.

  8. Microwave limb sounder, graphite epoxy support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pynchon, G.

    1980-01-01

    The manufacturing and processing procedures which were used to fabricate a precision graphite/epoxy support structure for a spherical microwave reflecting surface are described. The structure was made fromm GY-70/930 ultra high modulus graphite prepreg, laminated to achieve an isotropic in plane thermal expansion of less than + or - 0.1 PPM/F. The structure was hand assembled to match the interface of the reflective surface, which was an array of 18 flexure supported, aluminum, spherically contoured tiles. Structural adhesives were used in the final assembly to bond the elements into their final configuration. A eutectic metal coating was applied to the composite surface to reduce dimensional instabilities arising from changes in the composite epoxy moisture content due to environmental effects. Basic materials properties data are reported and the results of a finite element structural analysis are referenced.

  9. A Mathematical Model for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Composite in Melt Impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Feng; Yu, Yang; Yang, Jianjun; Xin, Chunling; He, Yadong

    2016-10-01

    Through the combination of Reynolds equation and Darcy's law, a mathematical model was established to calculate the pressure distribution in wedge area, which contributed to the forecast effect of processing parameters on impregnation degree of the fiber bundle. The experiments were conducted to verify the capacity of the proposed model with satisfactory results, which means that the model is effective in predicting the influence of processing parameters on impregnation. From the mathematical model, it was known that the impregnation degree of the fiber bundle would be improved by increasing the processing temperature, number and radius of pins, or decreasing the pulling speed and the center distance of pins, which provided a possible solution to the difficulty of melt with high viscosity in melt impregnation and optimization of impregnation processing.

  10. Biobased Epoxy Nanocomposites Derived from Lignin-Based Monomers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shou; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2015-07-13

    Biobased epoxy nanocomposites were synthesized based on 2-methoxy-4-propylphenol (dihydroeugenol, DHE), a molecule that has been obtained from the lignin component of biomass. To increase the content of hydroxyl groups, DHE was o-demethylated using aqueous HBr to yield propylcatechol (DHEO), which was subsequently glycidylated to epoxy monomer. Optimal conditions in terms of yield and epoxy equivalent weight were found to be 60 °C with equal NaOH/phenolic hydroxyl molar ratio. The structural evolution from DHE to cured epoxy was followed by (1)H NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The nano-montmorillonite modified DHEO epoxy exhibited improved storage modulus and thermal stability as determined from dynamic mechanical analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. This study widens the synthesis routes of biobased epoxy thermosets from lignin-based molecules.

  11. Morphology development of rubber-modified epoxy thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, O.; Ward, T.C.

    1996-12-31

    Epoxy thermosets have been widely used as high performance adhesives and matrix resins for composites due to their outstanding mechanical and thermal properties, such as high modulus and tensile strength, high glass transition temperature, high thermal stability, and moisture resistance. Incorporation of a secondary rubbery phase into the glassy epoxy matrix can improve impact and fracture toughness of epoxy thermosets without sacrificing the other desirable properties of the neat epoxy thermoset. During the curing process, the initial homogeneous solution of epoxy resin-curing agent-rubber generally forms rubber-rich and epoxy-rich phases by a phase separation process which is arrested by gelation or vitrification. The final morphology developed by the cure depends on relative rates of cure reaction and phase separation. Cure conditions and the initial rubber composition control the morphology of the system and thus control the mechanical properties of the system.

  12. Epoxy thermoset networks derived from vegetable oils and their blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Chang; Ravalli, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Epoxidized vegetable oils (EVOs), such as epoxidized soybean oil and linseed oils were prepared by the partial oxidation of the unsaturated double bonds in vegetable oils and used as monomers for preparing epoxy thermoset materials based on the cationic polymerization. These EVOs have been used to prepare epoxy thermosets of different network densities by cationic polymerization using onium salt catalyst. The crosslinked epoxy thermosets provide an ideal platform to study the structure-property-relationships of networked polymers. In particular, rheological studies on the epoxidized vegetable oil thermosets have been performed to measure the molecular weights between crosslinks (Mx) in the epoxy thermosets and to ultimately elucidate the role of functionality of epoxy groups in EVO on the mechanical and thermophysical properties of the epoxy thermoset materials. NSF DMR POLYMERS 1308617.

  13. Mechanism of fatigue failure of clay-epoxy nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Juwono, Ariadne; Edward, Graham

    2006-12-01

    This work investigates the fatigue behaviour and the mechanism of fatigue failure of an epoxy resin with a dispersion of modified layered silicates in the polymer matrix. The fatigue properties are very important for structural application of nanocomposite materials. Clay-epoxy nanocomposites were successfully synthesized with a commercially available 1-Methylimidazole curing agent. The XRD and TEM findings demonstrated a pattern of clay morphology typically found in nanocomposite systems. The fatigue performance and fatigue failure mechanism of the clay-epoxy materials were studied under repetitive bending loads. The results showed that the fatigue life of filled epoxy improved significantly at strain amplitudes below a threshold value. The E-SEM observations of the epoxy and the clay-epoxy fracture surfaces showed different patterns. In conclusion, the addition of silicate strongly determines the fracture mechanism and enhances the fatigue performance.

  14. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1991-03-13

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent tc the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  15. Development of metal oxide impregnated stilbite thick film ethanol sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabole, M. P.; Lakhane, M. A.; Choudhari, A. L.; Khairnar, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the study of the sensing efficiency of Titanium oxide/ Stilbite and Copper oxide /Stilbite composites towards detection of hazardous pollutants like ethanol. Stilbite based composites are prepared by physically mixing zeolite with metal oxides namely TiO2 and CuO with weight ratios of 25:75, 50:50 and 75:25. The resulting sensor materials are characterized by X-ray diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy techniques. Composite sensors are fabricated in the form of thick film by using screen printing technique. The effect of metal oxide concentration on various ethanol sensing parameters such as operating temperature, maximum uptake capacity and response/recovery time are investigated. The results indicate that metal oxide impregnated stilbite composites have great potential as low temperature ethanol sensor.

  16. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1992-12-31

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles impregnated wound dressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, V. V.; Jadhav, P. R.; Patil, P. S.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, silver nanoparticles were synthesized by simple wet chemical reduction method. The silver nitrate was reduced by Sodium borohydride used as reducing agent and Poly (vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) as stabilizing agent. The formation of silver nanoparticles was evaluated by UV-visible spectroscope and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Absorption spectrum consist two plasmon peaks at 410 and 668 nm revels the formation of anisotropic nanoparticles confirmed by TEM. The formation of silver nanoparticles was also evidenced by dynamic light scattering (DLS) study. DLS showed polydisperse silver nanoparticles with hydrodynamic size 32 nm. Protecting mechanism of PVP was manifested by FT-Raman study. Silver nanoparticles were impregnated into wound dressing by sonochemical method. The Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion methods were used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The antimicrobial activity of the samples has been tested against gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus.

  18. SILVER IMPREGNATION OF ULTRATHIN SECTIONS FOR ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Marinozzi, Vittorio

    1961-01-01

    A new procedure is described for silver impregnation of thin sections for electron microscopy. Sections of various tissues, fixed in OsO4 and embedded in methacrylate, were treated with an ammoniacal silver solution, directly or after oxidation with periodic acid or hydrogen peroxide. After OsO4 fixation all cellular membranous systems exhibit a primary argentaffinity probably due to the reduction of ammoniacal silver solution by the reduced osmium bound to unsaturated lipids. Bleaching the sections with hydrogen peroxide removes the argentaffinity of protoplasmic structures. Treatment of the sections with periodic acid results in decreased argentaffinity of protoplasmic components while the argentaffinity of metaplasmic structures is greatly enhanced. The latter procedure appears particularly useful for enhancing the contrast of basement membranes. PMID:13766855

  19. Investigation of Performance Envelope for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Prabhu, Dinesh; Milos, Frank S.; Stackpoole, Mairead

    2016-01-01

    The present work provides the results of a short exploratory study on the performance of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, or PICA, at high heat flux and pressure in an arcjet facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The primary objective of the study was to explore the thermal response of PICA at cold-wall heat fluxes well in excess of 1500 W/cm (exp 2). Based on the results of a series of flow simulations, multiple PICA samples were tested at an estimated cold wall heat flux and stagnation pressure of 1800 W/cm (exp 2) and 130 kPa, respectively. All samples survived the test, and no failure was observed either during or after the exposure. The results indicate that PICA has a potential to perform well at environments with significantly higher heat flux and pressure than it has currently been flown.

  20. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Burrows, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  1. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1993-04-13

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  2. Glass/Epoxy Door Panel for Automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, J. L. JR.

    1985-01-01

    Lightweight panel cost-effective. Integrally-molded intrusion strap key feature of composite outer door panel. Strap replaces bulky and heavy steel instrusion beam of conventional door. Standard steel inner panel used for demonstration purposes. Door redesigned to exploit advantages of composite outer panel thinner. Outer panel for automobilie door, made of glass/epoxy composite material, lighter than conventional steel door panel, meets same strength requirements, and less expensive.

  3. Metallic Coatings for Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    Aero Structures Dept -. Radomes Section B-2 DISTRIBUTION (cont.)K COPIES * U. S. Army Air Mobility R&D Laboratory 1II 1Fort Eustis, VA ATTN: SAVDL-EU...for graphite/epoxy laminated aircraft structures were developed to provide protection against moisture penetration, electro’)- magnetic interference...performance * aircraft. Utilization of advanced composite structures to their design limits neces- sitates the protection of these structures against

  4. Epoxy Pipelining Composition and Method of Manufacture.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-14

    corrosion and erosion. The pipelining 10 composition forms a barrier which prevents the leaching of, for example, metals from 11 pipes. This invention...invention, 13 more particularly, relates to an epoxy resin/curing agent corrosion -resistant network 14 pipelining composition suitable for the in...hydrochloric acid, hydrogen sulfide, sulfuric acid, and other corrosive 21 products of bacterial activity. Excessively high flow rates also erode the metal

  5. High Temperature Epoxy Nanocomposites for Aerospace Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-10

    weak molecular interaction between non-polar alkyl chain of ammonium modified clay and polar group of epoxy resin. This was confirmed by the X- ray...polymer matrix. Several functionalized imidazolium clays , functionalized anionic clays , and silylated apophylites were synthesized and characterized by...XRD and TGA. Thermal studies of functionalized clay have shown that the onset decomposition temperature of imidazolium functionalized clay (>325oC

  6. [The working environment control of anhydride hardeners from an epoxy resin system].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Naomi; Yokota, Kozo; Johyama, Yasushi; Takakura, Toshiyuki

    2003-07-01

    Epoxy resins are widely used in adhesives, coatings, materials for molds and composites, and encapsulation. Acid anhydrides such as methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride are being used as curing agents for epoxy resins. The anhydride hardeners are well-known industrial inhalant allergens, inducing predominantly type I allergies. In the electronic components industry, these substances have been consumed in large quantities. Therefore, safe use in the industry demands control of the levels of exposure causing allergic diseases in the workshop. We conducted a prospective survey of two electronics plants to clarify how to control the atmospheric level of the anhydrides in the work environment. Measurements of the levels of the anhydrides in air started according to the Working Environment Measurement Standards (Ministry of Labour Notification No. 46, 1976) in April 2000, along with improvements in the work environment. A value of 40 micrograms/m3 was adopted as the administrative control level to judge the propriety of the working environment control. A total of 2 unit work areas in both plants belonged to Control Class III. The exposure originated from manual loading, casting, uncured hot resins, and leaks in an impregnating-machine or curing ovens. In order to achieve the working environment control, complete enclosure of the source, installation of local exhaust ventilation, and improvement or maintenance of the local exhaust ventilation system were performed on the basis of the results of the working environment measurement, with the result that the work environment was improved (Control Class I). It became evident that these measures were effective just like other noxious substances.

  7. Mechanical behavior of silica nanoparticle-impregnated Kevlar fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhaoxu

    Plain woven Kevlar fabrics are widely used as body protection materials. The present study investigated the impact performance of five styles of Kevlar fabrics K310, K706, K720, K745 and K779 from Hexcel. The fabrics are different in many aspects, i.e., weight per square meter, yarn counts, yarn size, Kevlar fiber type, friction and breaking strength. Silica nanoparticles were impregnated into the fabric to enhance the ballistic impact performance. The fabric impregnated with nanoparticles exhibit significant enhancement in impact performance over their neat counterparts. Fabrics experience large deformation under impact. More or less yarn pull-out was observed on all the fabrics. The in-plane yarn pull-out force has good correlation to the impact performance: fabrics with higher pull-out force performed better in impact tests. A two-dimensional finite element model was proposed to simulate the single yarn pull-out procedure and predict the maximum pull-out force. The most important fabric features are included in this model: yarn count, yarn size, fabric thickness, yarn waviness, fiber modulus, fiber diameter and coefficients of friction et al. The numerical results show good agreement with the experimentally measured pull-out forces. To understand the impact process, a constitutive model was developed to characterize the nonlinear anisotropic properties of the fabric in large deformation. The nanoparticles largely increase the shear stiffness, while only slightly affect the tension behavior along warp and weft yarn directions. This constitutive model was incorporated in the commercial FEA software ABAQUS through the user-defined material subroutine and used to simulate deformations with various loads. Finally the out-of-plane yarn pull-out force was predicted from the in-plane yarn pull-out results using finite element method and the proposed constitutive model.

  8. Dried apples enriched with mandarin juice by vacuum impregnation improve antioxidant capacity and decrease inflammation in obese children.

    PubMed

    Codoñer-Franch, Pilar; Betoret, Ester; Betoret, Noelia; López-Jaén, Ana B; Valls-Bellés, Victoria; Fito, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Antecedentes: Una adecuada ingesta de vegetales previene el desarrollo de enfermedades degenerativas, principalmente debido a sus compuestos antioxidantes. Objetivo: Evaluamos el efecto in vivo en los niños obesos de un nuevo producto alimenticio hecho de manzanas deshidratadas enriquecidas con zumo de mandarina mediante impregnación a vacío. Métodos: Estudio prospectivo longitudinal de cuatro semanas de duración. Se estudiaron 41 niños obesos que suplementaron su dieta habitual con 40 g/día del producto desarrollado. Se determinaron parámetros antropométricos (índice de masa corporal, circunferencia de la cintura) y estimación de la de grasa corporal con impedancia bioeléctrica. La ingesta dietética se evaluó por cuestionario. Se registraron factores de riesgo metabólico (presión sanguínea, perfil lipídico, glucosa y resistencia insulínica). El estado oxidante se investigó mediante la capacidad antioxidante total del plasma y la 8-hydroxideoxiguanosina (marcador de daño oxidativo al ADN) y como marcadores de inflamación valoramos la proteína C-reactiva ultrasensible, el factor de necrosis tumoral-??y las interleukinas 6 y 1-?. Las mediciones se recogieron al inicio y al final del período de intervención. Resultados: Encontramos una mejoría significativa en la presión arterial sistólica y en el perfil lipídico después del período de intervención. Igualmente demostramos un aumento significativo de la capacidad antioxidante del plasma, una reducción del daño oxidativo del ADN y de los marcadores inflamatorios. Conclusión: La adición a la dieta del producto elaborado con manzana deshidratada, y enriquecido con zumo de mandarina mediante impregnación al vacío, contribuye a mejorar el estado oxidante e inflamatorio en los niños obesos, así como diversos factores de riesgo cardiometabólico.

  9. Flow and Compaction During the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Hubert, Pascal; Song, Xiao-Lan; Cano, Roberto J.; Loos, Alfred C.; Pipes, R. Byron

    2001-01-01

    The flow of an epoxy resin and compaction behavior of carbon fiber preform during vacuum- assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) infiltration was measured using an instrumented tool. Composite panels were fabricated by the VARTM process using SAERTEX(R)2 multi-axial non- crimp carbon fiber fabric and the A.T.A.R.D. SI-ZG-5A epoxy resin. Resin pressure and preform thickness variation was measured during infiltration. The effects of the resin on the compaction behavior of the preform were measured. The local preform compaction during the infiltration is a combination of wetting and spring-back deformations. Flow front position computed by the 3DINFIL model was compared with the experimental data.

  10. Evaluation of Coatings for FR-4 Fiberglass Epoxy Composite Probes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    The probe is fabricated from a composite material ( FR -4) composed of woven fiberglass cloth with a flame-resistant epoxy resin binder. FR -4 is a...Evaluation of Coatings for FR -4 Fiberglass Epoxy Composite Probes by Faye R. Toulan, David P. Flanagan, John J. La Scala, and Daniel M. De...5069 ARL-TR-6771 January 2014 Evaluation of Coatings for FR -4 Fiberglass Epoxy Composite Probes Faye R. Toulan Dynamic Science, Inc

  11. Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate-Clay Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A clay-epoxy nanocomposite may be prepared by dispersing a layered clay in an alkoxy epoxy, such as a polypropylene oxide based epoxide before combining the mixture with an aromatic epoxy to improve the nanocomposite's thermal and mechanical properties.

  12. Rate dependent response and failure of a ductile epoxy and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Rae, Philip J; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Stahl, David B

    2010-01-01

    An extensive characterization suite has been performed on the response and failure of a ductile epoxy 55A and uniaxial carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite of IM7 fibers in 55A resin from the quasistatic to shock regime. The quasistatic and intermediate strain rate response, including elastic modulus, yield and failure have are characterized by quasistatic, SHPB, and DMA measurements as a function of fiber orientation and temperature. The high strain rate shock effect of fiber orientation in the composite and response of the pure resin are presented for plate impact experiments. It has previously been shown that at lower impact velocities the shock velocity is strongly dependent on fiber orientation but at higher impact velocity the in-plane and through thickness Hugoniots converge. The current results are compared with previous studies of the shock response of carbon fiber composites with more conventional brittle epoxy matrices. The spall response of the composite is measured and compared with quasistatic fracture toughness measurements.

  13. Modelling of volumetric composition and mechanical properties of unidirectional hemp/epoxy composites - Effect of enzymatic fibre treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Thygesen, A.; Meyer, AS; Madsen, B.

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present study is to assess the effect of enzymatic fibre treatments on the fibre performance in unidirectional hemp/epoxy composites by modelling the volumetric composition and mechanical properties of the composites. It is shown that the applied models can well predict the changes in volumetric composition and mechanical properties of the composites when differently treated hemp fibres are used. The decrease in the fibre correlated porosity factor with the enzymatic fibre treatments shows that the removal of pectin by pectinolytic enzymes results in a better fibre impregnation by the epoxy matrix, and the mechanical properties of the composites are thereby increased. The effective fibre stiffness and strength established from the modelling show that the enzymatic removal of pectin also leads to increased mechanical properties of the fibres. Among the investigated samples, the composites with hydrothermally pre-treated and enzymatically treated fibres have the lowest porosity factor of 0.08 and the highest mechanical properties. In these composites, the effective fibre stiffness and strength are determined to be 83 GPa and 667 MPa, respectively, when the porosity efficiency exponent is set equal to 2. Altogether, it is demonstrated that the applied models provide a concept to be used for the evaluation of performance of treated fibres in composites.

  14. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  15. Stress Concentration in Glass-Epoxy Composite Plates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES, * GLASS REINFORCED PLASTICS, *STRESS CONCENTRATION, STRESS STRAIN RELATIONS, LOAD DISTRIBUTION, FIBERGLASS , MANUFACTURING, THESES, HOLES(OPENINGS), STRAIN GAGES, EPOXY COMPOUNDS, WEAR RESISTANCE.

  16. Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.

    1998-01-01

    Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

  17. Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, C.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Havens, S.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1998-03-10

    Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

  18. LIGO vacuum system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Moore, Boude C.

    1988-01-01

    A laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory (LIGO) is being developed with sensitivities which will have a high probability of detecting gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. A major component of LIGO is a total of 16 km of 1.2 m (48 inch) diameter tube at a pressure of less than 10 to the minus 8th power torr. It will be of 304L stainless steel procured directly from the steel mills with the initial hydrogen content specially reduced. Projections of the outgassing rates of hydrogen and of water vapor as a function of time are given and the uncertainties discussed. Based on these, a preliminary analysis of the vacuum system is presented.

  19. ULTRA HIGH VACUUM VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Fry, W.A.

    1962-05-29

    A valve for high vacuum applications such as the CStellarator where chamber pressures as low as 2 x 10/sup -10/ mm Hg are necessary is designed with a line-of-sight path through the valve for visual inspection of the contents of reactants in such chambers. The valve comprises a turnable resilient metal ball having an aperture therethrough, means for selectively turning the ball to rotate the axis of its line-of-sight path, and soft, deformable opposing orifices that are movable relatively toward said ball to seal with opposite ball surfaces upon said movement of said axis of said line-of-sight path. The valve also includes a bellows seal connected between said orifices and internal actuating means that eliminates the requirement for gasketed turnable valve closing stems. (AEC)

  20. THERMOCOUPLE VACUUM GAUGE

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.W.

    1954-08-01

    A protector device is described for use in controlling the pressure within a cyclotron. In particular, an electrical circuit functions to actuate a vacuum pump when a predetermined low pressure is reached and disconnect the pump when the pressure increases abcve a certain value. The principal feature of the control circuit lies in the use of a voltage divider network at the input to a relay control tube comprising two parallel, adjustable resistances wherein one resistor is switched into the circuit when the relay connects the pump to a power source. With this arrangement the relay is energized at one input level received from a sensing element within the cyclotron chamber and is de-energized when a second input level, representing the higher pressure limit, is reached.

  1. Space environmental effects on graphite-epoxy compressive properties and epoxy tensile properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Derek J.; Sykes, George F., Jr.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    This study characterizes the effects of electron radiation and temperature on a graphite-epoxy composite material. Compressive properties of the T300/934 material system were obtained at -250 F (-157 C), room temperature, and 250 F (121 C). Tensile specimens of the Fiberite 934 epoxy resin were fabricated and tested at room temperature and 250 F (121 C). Testing was conducted in the baseline (nonirradiated) and irradiated conditions. The radiation exposure was designed to simulate 30 year, worst-case exposure in geosynchronous Earth orbit. Mechanical properties tended to degrade at elevated temperature and improve at cryogenic temperature. Irradiation generally degraded properties at all temperatures.

  2. Vacuum Energy Sequestering and Graviton Loops.

    PubMed

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio

    2017-02-10

    We recently formulated a local mechanism of vacuum energy sequester. This mechanism automatically removes all matter loop contributions to vacuum energy from the stress energy tensor which sources the curvature. Here we adapt the local vacuum energy sequestering mechanism to also cancel all the vacuum energy loops involving virtual gravitons, in addition to the vacuum energy generated by matter fields alone.

  3. Vacuum Energy Sequestering and Graviton Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    We recently formulated a local mechanism of vacuum energy sequester. This mechanism automatically removes all matter loop contributions to vacuum energy from the stress energy tensor which sources the curvature. Here we adapt the local vacuum energy sequestering mechanism to also cancel all the vacuum energy loops involving virtual gravitons, in addition to the vacuum energy generated by matter fields alone.

  4. Breather cloth for vacuum curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1979-01-01

    Finely-woven nylon cloth that has been treated with Teflon improves vacuum adhesive bonding of coatings to substrates. Cloth is placed over coating; entire assembly, including substrate, coating, and cloth, is placed in plastic vacuum bag for curing. Cloth allows coating to "breathe" when bag is evacuated. Applications include bonding film coatings to solar concentrators and collectors.

  5. Multipurpose Vacuum Induction Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, M.; Kulkarni, Deepak; Balasubramanian, K.

    2012-11-01

    Multipurpose vacuum processing systems are cost effective; occupy less space, multiple functional under one roof and user friendly. A multipurpose vacuum induction system was designed, fabricated and installed in a record time of 6 months time at NFTDC Hyderabad. It was designed to function as a) vacuum induction melting/refining of oxygen free electronic copper/pure metals, b) vacuum induction melting furnace for ferrous materials c) vacuum induction melting for non ferrous materials d) large vacuum heat treatment chamber by resistance heating (by detachable coil and hot zone) e) bottom discharge vacuum induction melting system for non ferrous materials f) Induction heat treatment system and g) directional solidification /investment casting. It contains provision for future capacity addition. The attachments require to manufacture multiple shaped castings and continuous rod casting can be added whenever need arises. Present capacity is decided on the requirement for 10years of development path; presently it has 1.2 ton liquid copper handling capacity. It is equipped with provision for capacity addition up to 2 ton liquid copper handling capacity in future. Provision is made to carry out the capacity addition in easy steps quickly. For easy operational maintenance and troubleshooting, design was made in easily detachable sections. High vacuum system is also is detachable, independent and easily movable which is first of its kind in the country. Detailed design parameters, advantages and development history are presented in this paper.

  6. Vacuum Enhanced Cutaneous Biopsy Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Joseph

    1999-06-25

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  7. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  8. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

    1997-10-28

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  9. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Gross, Mark E.

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  10. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  11. Vacuum enhanced cutaneous biopsy instrument

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Epoxy Resins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-07

    chromatography, recrystallization and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) with C18 , phenyl, and nitrile functionality columns proved unsuccessful...degassed in a vacuum oven until all air bubbling ceased. The mixture was then poured into either flexible silicone rubber molds (G.E. type RTV 664 silicone...mixture could be achieved easily. The mixture was vacuum pumped to remove trapped air and was then poured into silicone rubber molds to produce 3.2 mm

  13. Bubbling the false vacuum away

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiser, M.; Rogers, B.; Thorarinson, J.

    2008-01-15

    We investigate the role of nonperturbative, bubblelike inhomogeneities on the decay rate of false-vacuum states in two- and three-dimensional scalar field theories. The inhomogeneities are induced by setting up large-amplitude oscillations of the field about the false vacuum, as, for example, after a rapid quench or in certain models of cosmological inflation. We show that, for a wide range of parameters, the presence of large-amplitude bubblelike inhomogeneities greatly accelerates the decay rate, changing it from the well-known exponential suppression of homogeneous nucleation to a power-law suppression. It is argued that this fast, power-law vacuum decay--known as resonant nucleation--is promoted by the presence of long-lived oscillons among the nonperturbative fluctuations about the false vacuum. A phase diagram is obtained distinguishing three possible mechanisms for vacuum decay: homogeneous nucleation, resonant nucleation, and crossover. Possible applications are briefly discussed.

  14. Hadron Contribution to Vacuum Polarisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davier, M.; Hoecker, A.; Malaescu, B.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-10-01

    Precision tests of the Standard Theory require theoretical predictions taking into account higher-order quantum corrections. Among these vacuum polarisation plays a predominant role. Vacuum polarisation originates from creation and annihilation of virtual particle-antiparticle states. Leptonic vacuum polarisation can be computed from quantum electrodynamics. Hadronic vacuum polarisation cannot because of the non-perturbative nature of QCD at low energy. The problem is remedied by establishing dispersion relations involving experimental data on the cross section for e+ e- annihilation into hadrons. This chapter sets the theoretical and experimental scene and reviews the progress achieved in the last decades thanks to more precise and complete data sets. Among the various applications of hadronic vacuum polarisation calculations, two are emphasised: the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the running of the fine structure constant α to the Z mass scale. They are fundamental ingredients to high precision tests of the Standard Theory.

  15. Preparation of iron-impregnated granular activated carbon for arsenic removal from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qigang; Lin, Wei; Ying, Wei-chi

    2010-12-15

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) was impregnated with iron through a new multi-step procedure using ferrous chloride as the precursor for removing arsenic from drinking water. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis demonstrated that the impregnated iron was distributed evenly on the internal surface of the GAC. Impregnated iron formed nano-size particles, and existed in both crystalline (akaganeite) and amorphous iron forms. Iron-impregnated GACs (Fe-GACs) were treated with sodium hydroxide to stabilize iron in GAC and impregnated iron was found very stable at the common pH range in water treatments. Synthetic arsenate-contaminated drinking water was used in isotherm tests to evaluate arsenic adsorption capacities and iron use efficiencies of Fe-GACs with iron contents ranging from 1.64% to 12.13% (by weight). Nonlinear regression was used to obtain unbiased estimates of Langmuir model parameters. The arsenic adsorption capacity of Fe-GAC increased significantly with impregnated iron up to 4.22% and then decreased with more impregnated iron. Fe-GACs synthesized in this study exhibited higher affinity for arsenate as compared with references in literature and shows great potential for real implementations.

  16. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  17. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  18. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  19. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  20. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  1. Quantifying voids effecting delamination in carbon/epoxy composites: static and fatigue fracture behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakim, I.; May, D.; Abo Ras, M.; Meyendorf, N.; Donaldson, S.

    2016-04-01

    On the present work, samples of carbon fiber/epoxy composites with different void levels were fabricated using hand layup vacuum bagging process by varying the pressure. Thermal nondestructive methods: thermal conductivity measurement, pulse thermography, pulse phase thermography and lock-in-thermography, and mechanical testing: modes I and II interlaminar fracture toughness were conducted. Comparing the parameters resulted from the thermal nondestructive testing revealed that voids lead to reductions in thermal properties in all directions of composites. The results of mode I and mode II interlaminar fracture toughness showed that voids lead to reductions in interlaminar fracture toughness. The parameters resulted from thermal nondestructive testing were correlated to the results of mode I and mode II interlaminar fracture toughness and voids were quantified.

  2. Design, fabrication, and test of a graphite/epoxy metering truss. [as applied to the LST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oken, S.; Skoumal, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A graphite/epoxy metering truss as applied to the large space telescope was investigated. A full-scale truss was designed, fabricated and tested. Tests included static limit loadings, a modal survey and thermal-vacuum distortion evaluation. The most critical requirement was the demonstration of the dimensional stability provided by the graphite/epoxy truss concept. Crucial to the attainment of this objective was the ability to make very sophisticated thermal growth measurements which was provided by a seven beam laser interferometer. The design of the basic truss elements were tuned to provide the high degree of dimensional stability and stiffness required by the truss. The struts and spider assembly were fabricated with Fiberite's AS/934 and HMS/934 broadgoods. The rings utilized T300 graphite fabricate with the same materials. The predicted performance of the truss was developed using the NASTRAN program. These results showed conformance with the critical stiffness and thermal distortion requirements and correlated well with the test results.

  3. Thermal Expansion and Swelling of Cured Epoxy Resin Used in Graphite/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal expansion and swelling of resin material as influenced by variations in temperature during moisture absorption is discussed. Comparison measurements using composites constructed of graphite fibers and each of two epoxy resin matrices are included. Polymer theory relative to these findings is discussed and modifications are proposed.

  4. Iron-impregnated granular activated carbon for arsenic removal from drinking water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Qigang

    A new multi-step iron impregnation method was developed in this study to impregnate GAC with a high amount of iron that possesses desired characteristics: stable, even distribution, and high arsenic adsorption capacity. Research was carried out to investigate the impact of the amount of impregnated iron on arsenic adsorption properties: capacity, affinity, and kinetics. Fe-GACs were characterized in terms of the amount, stability, distribution, morphology, and species of impregnated iron. It was found that a high amount of iron was stably impregnated in GAC. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis demonstrated that the impregnated iron was evenly distributed on the internal surface of GAC. Impregnated iron formed nano-size particles and existed in both crystalline (akaganeite) and amorphous iron. Arsenic adsorption tests were conducted using Fe-GACs with iron content of 1.64--28.90% in a low arsenic concentration that is typical for drinking water treatment. The amount of impregnated iron affects arsenic maximum adsorption capacity (qm) but has little impact on the Langmuir constant h (the affinity of adsorbent for adsorbate). The qm for both As(V) and As(III) adsorptions increased significantly with increase of the amount of impregnated iron up to 13.59%. Further increase of iron amounts caused a gradual decrease of qm for As(V). BET analysis indicated impregnated iron possesses the highest surface area at iron content of 13.59%. A new second-order kinetic model was developed to investigate the impact of the amounts of impregnated iron on arsenic adsorption kinetics. With iron content increased from 1.64% to 28.90%, the intrinsic adsorption rate constants reduced from 4.6x10-2 1/hr to 1.18x10 -3 1/hr, which indicates that impregnated iron slows arsenic intraparticle diffusion rate in Fe-GAC. The decreased arsenic intraparticle diffusion rate was most likely caused by reduced pore size of Fe-GACs. Column tests were

  5. Effect of nanoparticles on charge transport in nanofluid-impregnated pressboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yuefan; Lv, Yuzhen; Li, Chengrong; Chen, Mutian; Zhong, Yuxiang; Zhang, Shengnan; Zhou, You

    2012-06-01

    Transformer pressboard impregnated in mineral oil modified by nanoparticles (nanofluid) exhibits substantially higher AC and DC breakdown voltage than that of the pure oil-impregnated pressboard (OP). Charge transport and decay characteristics of both pressboards were measured by pulse electroacoustic technique. It reveals that nanofluid-impregnated pressboard (NP) has a more uniform internal electric field and a higher charge decay rate compared to OP, which is caused by an increase of shallow trap density in NP related to the difference of internal structures, based on the test results of thermally stimulated current and Fourier transformed infra-red spectroscopy.

  6. A silver impregnation method for nervous tissue suitable for routine use with mounted sections.

    PubMed

    Loots, J M; Loots, G P; Joubert, W S

    1977-03-01

    A simple, reliable silver impregnation method for nervous tissue is described for tissues fixed in various fixatives including formalin, Bouin, and Susa. Sections are impregnated in a solution containing 1 g Protargol, 2 ml of a 1% Cu(NO3)2 solution, 2 ml of a 1% AgNO3 solution, and 2-4 drops 30% H2O2 in 100 ml distilled water. Sections are impregnated 2-5 days at 37 C and thereafter reduced in a hydroquinone-formalin solution. This is followed by gold toning and subsequent reduction, dehydration and mounting. This method has been found to be very reliable and selective.

  7. Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajvir; Pant, K. K.; Lal, Shankar; Yadav, D. P.; Garg, S. R.; Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Mundra, G.

    2012-11-01

    Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

  8. Processing, properties and applications of composites using powder-coated epoxy towpreg technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayha, T. D.; Osborne, P. P.; Thrasher, T. P.; Hartness, J. T.; Johnston, N. J.; Marchello, J. M.; Hugh, M. K.

    1993-01-01

    Composite manufacturing using the current prepregging technology of impregnating liquid resin into three-dimensionally reinforced textile preforms can be a costly and difficult operation. Alternatively, using polymer in the solid form, grinding it into a powder, and then depositing it onto a carbon fiber tow prior to making a textile preform is a viable method for the production of complex textile shapes. The powder-coated towpreg yarn is stable, needs no refrigeration, contains no solvents and is easy to process into various woven and braided preforms for later consolidation into composite structures. NASA's Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) program has provided an avenue for developing the technology by which advanced resins and their powder-coated preforms may be used in aircraft structures. Two-dimensional braiding and weaving studies using powder-coated towpreg have been conducted to determine the effect of resin content, towpreg size and twist on textile composite properties. Studies have been made to customize the towpreg to reduce friction and bulk factor. Processing parameters have been determined for three epoxy resin systems on eight-harness satin fabric, and on more advanced 3-D preform architectures for the downselected resin system. Processing effects and the resultant mechanical properties of these textile composites will be presented and compared.

  9. Alcohol-Sensitive Epoxy Formulations for Temporary or Repairable Embedment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    10,000 and 40,000 mol wt, respectively A conformal coating epoxy, bisphenol-A type epoxy cured with polyamide and others; toluene as solvent; conforming...COMPOSITES BR ATTN LNE, ELASTOMERS & COATINGS BR 25 DISTRIBUTION (Cont’d) HARRY DIAMOND LABORATORIES ATTN MCGREGOR, THOMAS, COL, COMMANDING

  10. Respiratory effects of exposure of shipyard workers to epoxy paints.

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, D; Jones, J; Atterbury, M; Balmes, J

    1991-01-01

    Epoxy resin systems have been associated with occupational asthma in several case reports, but medical publications contain little on the potential adverse respiratory effects of these chemicals in exposed worker populations. To further evaluate the association of workplace exposure to epoxy paints and respiratory dysfunction, the cross workshift changes in pulmonary function and symptoms of 32 shipyard painters exposed to epoxy paints were compared with 28 shipyard painters not exposed to epoxy paints. The prevalence of lower respiratory tract symptoms was significantly higher among painters exposed to epoxy paints compared with controls. Among exposed painters the mean cross workshift change in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (-3.4%) was greater than the decrement in the non-exposed group (-1.4%). A significant linear relation was seen between % decrement in FEV1 and hours of exposure to epoxy paints. This study suggests that epoxy resin coatings as used by shipyard painters are associated with increased lower respiratory tract symptoms and acute decrements in FEV1. Adequate respiratory protection and medical surveillance programmes should be established in workplaces where exposure to epoxy resin systems occurs. PMID:1954156

  11. Fire-retardant coatings based on organic bromine/phenoxy or brominated epoxy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.M.; Chiu, Ing L.

    1989-06-01

    Thin phenoxy and brominated epoxy/curing agent films were prepared by solvent casting on Mylar and Kapton. Thicknesses were approximated assuming volume additivity. Important parameters were uniformity of thickness, distribution of the bromine-containing fire retardant, adhesion to carrier substrate (either Mylar or Kapton), and uniformity of the coating, i.e., absence of pinholes, blush, blistering, etc. Wetting behavior was modified using fluoro, silicone or polyurea surfactants. Several solvent systems were examined and a ternary solvent system was ultimately used. Distribution of fire-retardant bromine was analyzed using electron microprobe, x-ray fluorescence and wet chemical methods. Significant discrepancies in the /mu/m-scale analyses of the microprobe measurements have not been resolved. Some of the brominated fire retardants were insoluble in the resin systems and the phase separation was immediately obvious. Similarly, some of the crystallizable epoxies could not be cast easily into homogeneous, amorphous films. Castings were made on a standard 8'' /times/ 10'' aluminum vacuum plate polished with jeweler's rouge prior to every casting. Solvent was removed in a forced air or vacuum oven. Removal and/or curing was accelerated with temperature. The fire-retardant bromine was required to be stable in alcohol/salt solutions. Final formulation used after a significant amount of testing was phenoxy resin PKHC in a ternary solvent system composed of methylethyl ketone, cellosolve acetate and toluene. Tetrabromobisphenol A was used as the flame retardant with FC-430 as surfactant. The dying schedule was 30 minutes at 150/degree/C. 4 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Vacuum phenomenon: Clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gohil, Ishan; Vilensky, Joel A; Weber, Edward C

    2014-04-01

    Vacuum phenomenon (VP) is an anatomical entity of potential confusion in the diagnosis and evaluation of joint pathology. Observation of this phenomenon has been demonstrated on basic radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Although VP is most often associated with degenerative joint disease, it is observed with other pathologies. Two problematic scenarios can occur: a false-positive diagnosis of serious pathology instead of benign VP and a false-negative diagnosis of benign VP with a more serious underlying process Despite this potential for confusion, criteria for distinguishing VP from other causes of joint pain and for evaluating a suspected case of VP have not been fully established. We reviewed the literature to determine underlying mechanism, symptomology, associated pathologies, and clinical importance of VP. The formation of VP can be explained by gas solubility, pressure-volume relationships, and human physiology. CT, GRE-MRI, and multipositional views are the best imaging studies to view VP. Although most cases of VP are benign, it can be associated with clinical signs and symptoms. VP outside the spine is an underreported finding on imaging studies. VP should be on the differential diagnosis for joint pain, especially in the elderly. We have proposed criteria for diagnosing VP and generated a basic algorithm for its workup. Underreporting of this phenomenon shows a lack of awareness of VP on the part of physicians. By identifying true anatomic VP, we can prevent harm from suboptimal treatment of patients.

  13. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  14. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  15. Quantum Vacuum Pathway Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habegger, Eric John

    2005-02-01

    It is theorized that the quantum vacuum is a random electromagnetic field that permeates the universe. It will be shown that acceleration between a quark and a random electromagnetic energy field is an analog of the reaction between a charge moving at constant velocity with respect to an organized electromagnetic field. The difference is that with a quark any natural perpendicular deflection during that motion, as predicted by Lorentz, is contained by the strong force, which results in a change in the angular momentum of the spin of a quark. The first derivative of the equations of motion of charges in an organized electromagnetic field may be used when applied to a random electromagnetic field to invoke the same fields modeled by Maxwell's equations. Mass is intimately bound up with a quark's spin angular momentum and the energy for that increase comes directly from the local field. The underlying randomness of the local field normally remains intact through these energy exchanges but it is speculated that in a quantum entanglement, an absolute level of order is imposed on the field along a path between two particles. This causes the non local effects seen in quantum entanglement. The mechanism that may cause this effect is discussed and a simple experiment is proposed that can test the hypothesis. Also discussed are new theoretical constructs for electromagnetic radiation, mass, the skin effect, self-inductance, superposition, and gravity. The emphasis will be on an intuitive and logical approach more than a mathematical approach.

  16. Precooler Ring Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Moenich, J.

    1980-10-02

    The precooler vacuum system, as proposed by FNAL, is based on a suitable modification of the existing Electron Cooling Ring System. Because of the magnetic cycle of the bending magnets, distributed ion pumping, as exists in the Electron Cooling Ring, is not applicable. Instead, the proposed pumping will be done with commercial appendage ion pumps mounted approximately every two meters around the circumference of the ring. The loss of effective pumping speed and non-uniformity of system pressure with appendage pumps may not be major considerations but the large number required does effect experimental and analytical equipment placement considerations. There is a distributed pumping technique available which: (1) is not affected by the magnetic cycle of the bending magnets; (2) will provide a minimum of four times the hydrogen pumping speed of the proposed appendage ion pumps; (3) will require no power during pumping after the strip is activated; (4) will provide the heat source for bakeout; (5) is easily replaceable; and (6) can be purchased, installed, and operated at a generous economic advantage over the presently proposed ion pumped system. The pumping technique referred to is non-evaporable gettering with ST101 Zr/Al pumping strip. A technical description of this pumping strip is given on Data Sheet 1 and 2 attached to this report.

  17. KEKB vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, K.; Kato, S.; Suetsugu, Y.; Hisamatsu, H.; Shimamoto, M.; Sato, M.; Shirai, M.

    2001-01-01

    For KEK B-factory (KEKB), two rings with a circumference of 3016 m, mainly made of copper have been constructed. One ring stores a maximum of 2.6 A positron beam with the energy at 3.5 GeV, the other stores 1.1 A, 8 GeV electron beam. These stored currents far exceed those of existing electron storage rings. The inside of a beam duct is designed to minimize an effect of beam induced fields. A gap between flanges is filled using Helicoflex as a vacuum seal. Contact force of a RF finger in a bellows is assured by the use of a spring finger. Pumping slots are backed by crossing bars to prevent the penetration of beam induced fields. To obtain a pressure of 10 -7 Pa with beam, a pumping speed is designed to realize 0.1 m 3 s -1 m -1 assuming that the photodesorption coefficient reaches 10 -6 molecules/photon. The NEG strip is used as a main pump element. Chemical polishing is applied to clean the extruded surface of copper chambers. Almost all chambers are baked before installation. Only ion pumps are baked in situ. From beginning to end, a completely oil free pumping system is used. The photodesorption coefficient at the start of the commissioning was slightly higher than expected, but the decrease of the coefficient is as expected on the whole. There is no trouble on the RF contact for bellows.

  18. Vacuum still bottoms viscometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dinsmore, T.V.; Wilson, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    A viscometer system that is capable of measuring VSB viscosity on-line has been designed, constructed, and tested. The viscometer will not only provide continuous on-line measurements for process control purposes, but will also determine viscosity as functions of temperature and shear rate. The latter results may be used to verify design-base information for direct coal liquefaction demonstration plants. The viscosities of Wilsonville samples of VSB and LSRC were determined as functions of shear rate and, in the case of LSRC, temperature. The VSB viscosity was found to be shear-rate sensitive, while the LSRC viscosity was temperature sensitive. A 24-h test run was unsuccessful, apparently because the check valves in the pump plugged; however, all other mechanical, electrical, and electronic equipment operated satisfactorily. The source of the plugging was thought to be degradation products, which should not cause difficulties in the pilot plant where fresh vacuum bottoms feed is always available. In summary, the results obtained in this study indicate that the viscometer system is ready to be transported to a plant such as Wilsonville and operated on-line. 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Photoelectron backscattering in vacuum phototubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Vasiliev, R. V.; Vyatchin, Y. E.; Shaibonov, B. A. J.

    2006-11-01

    In this article we describe results of studies of a photoelectron backscattering effect in vacuum phototubes: classical photomultipliers (PMT) and hybrid phototubes (PH). Late pulses occurring in PMTs are attributed to the photoelectron backscattering and distinguished from pulses due to an anode glow effect. The late pulses are measured in a number of PMTs and HPs with various photocathode sizes covering 1 50 cm range and different types of the first dynode materials and construction designs. It is shown that the late pulses are a generic feature of all vacuum photodetectors—PMTs and PHs—and they do not deteriorate dramatically amplitude and timing responses of vacuum phototubes.

  20. Drilling Holes in Graphite/Epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minlionica, Ronald

    1987-01-01

    Relatively long-lived bit produces high-quality holes. Effective combination of cutting-tool design, feed, and speed determined for drilling 3/16-and-1/4-in. (0.48-and 0.65-cm) diameter holes in 0.18 in. (0.46cm) thick GM3013A or equivalent graphite/epoxy corrugated spar without backup material and without coolant. Developed to produce holes in blind areas, optimal techniques yielded holes of high quality, with minimal or acceptable delamination and/or fiber extension on drill-exit side.

  1. Epoxy resin cure. [Phenyl glycidyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Woodburn, G.L.

    1986-07-01

    The reactions that occur between the model epoxy, phenyl glycidyl ether, and the cure agent dicyandiamide (DICY) have been investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) techniques. It is shown that the reaction at 130/sup 0/C requires 90 min for completion when catalyzed by boron trifluoride monoethyl amine (BF/sub 3/-MEA). At least three major products are formed. The identity of these products is based on previously published spectroscopic data. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Compressive response of Kevlar/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, J.R.; Teply, J.L.

    1988-03-01

    A mathematical model is developed from the principle of minimum potential energy to determine the longitudinal compressive response of unidirectional fiber composites. A theoretical study based on this model is conducted to assess the influence of local fiber misalignment and the nonlinear shear deformation of the matrix. Numerical results are compared with experiments to verify this study; it appears that the predicted compressive response coincides well with experimental results. It is also shown that the compressive strength of Kevlar/epoxy is dominated by local shear failure. 12 references.

  3. The effect of co-impregnated acids on the performance of Zn-based broad spectrum respirator carbons.

    PubMed

    Smith, J W H; Romero, J V; Dahn, T R; Dunphy, K; Croll, L M; Dahn, J R

    2012-10-15

    Impregnated activated carbons (IACs) that are used in multi-gas respirator applications usually contain copper and/or zinc impregnants. Co-impregnating with properly selected acids can improve the distribution of the metallic impregnant on the carbon and improve the gas adsorption capacity of the IAC. In this work a comparative study of some common acids co-impregnated with a zinc nitrate (Zn(NO(3))(2)) precursor is performed. The IACs were heated in an inert atmosphere at temperatures which promoted the thermal decomposition of Zn(NO(3))(2) to zinc oxide (ZnO). The gas adsorption properties of the IACs were tested using ammonia (NH(3)), sulphur dioxide (SO(2)) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) challenge gases. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to identify the impregnant species present after heating and to study impregnant distribution. Gravimetric analysis was used to determine the impregnant loading, and help to identify the impregnant species after heating. The interactions between the co-impregnated acid and Zn(NO(3))(2) precursor during heating are discussed. The relationship between impregnant species and gas adsorption capacity is discussed.

  4. Coating properties which increase the vacuum flashover strength of insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Leiker, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    The surface flashover strengths in vacuum for several common insulators, including Lexan, Lucite, polyethylene, Macor, quartz, alumina, and an alumina-filled epoxy, have been increased using a vacuum spark discharge treatment. Analysis of the treated surfaces using Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) show them to be coated with a thin hydrocarbon/metal oxide layer. The formation of this high-flashover coating is strongly dependent on the amount of water vapor in the chamber during treatment. Measurements of the secondary electron emission coefficient (SEEC) show that the treated surfaces produced many more secondary electrons at energies of a few keV than do untreated samples. In current theories of electrical breakdown, an avalanche of monoenergetic secondary electrons along the dielectric surface from the cathode to the anode is believed to cause gas desorption and initiate a surface flashover. A new theory is proposed in which the monoenergetic nature of this secondary electron avalanche is destroyed due to electron-gas molecule collisions before the onset of breakdown. This phenomenon, coupled with the larger number of secondaries produced at high energies, could lead to a modified charge distribution on the surface of the treated insulators, which delays the breakdown process.

  5. Coating Properties which Increase the Vacuum Flashover Strength of Insulators.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiker, Gary Robert

    The surface flashover strengths in vacuum for several common insulators, including Lexan, Lucite, polyethylene, Macor, quartz, alumina, and an alumina-filled epoxy, have been increased using a vacuum spark discharge treatment. Analysis of the treated surfaces using Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) show them to be coated with a thin hydrocarbon/metal oxide layer. The formation of this high-flashover coating is strongly dependent on the amount of water vapor in the chamber during treatment. Measurements of the secondary electron emission coefficient (SEEC) show that the treated surfaces produce many more secondary electrons at energies of a few keV than do untreated samples. In current theories of electrical breakdown, an avalanche of monoenergetic secondary electrons along the dielectric surface from the cathode to the anode is believed to cause gas desorption and initiate a surface flashover. A new theory is proposed in which the monoenergetic nature of this secondary electron avalanche is destroyed due to electron -gas molecule collisions before the onset of breakdown. This phenomenon, coupled with the larger number of secondaries produced at high energies, could lead to a modified charge distribution on the surface of the treated insulators, which delays the breakdown process.

  6. Designing of epoxy resin systems for cryogenic use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueki, T.; Nishijima, S.; Izumi, Y.

    2005-02-01

    The mechanical and thermal properties of several types of epoxy systems were designed based on the chemical structure, network structure and morphology aiming at cryogenic application. In this research di-epoxies or multifunctional epoxies were cured by several kinds of hardeners such as anhydride, amine or phenol and were blended with polycarbonate, carboxyl-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile copolymer or phenoxy. The mechanical properties and thermal properties of these cured epoxies were measured at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. It was found that the two-dimensional network structured linear polymer shows high performance even at cryogenic temperature. It was concluded that the controls of the structures are very important to optimize epoxy systems for cryogenic application.

  7. Cationic cure kinetics of a polyoxometalate loaded epoxy nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Benjamin J.

    2012-08-06

    The reaction cure kinetics of a novel polyoxometalate (POM) loaded epoxy nanocomposite is described. The POM is dispersed in the epoxy resin up to volume fractions of 0.1. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements show the cure of the epoxy resin to be sensitive to the POM loading. A kinetics study of the cure exotherm confirms that POM acts as a catalyst promoting cationic homopolymerization of the epoxy resin. The cure reaction is shown to propagate through two cure regimes. A fast cure at short time is shown to be propagation by the activated chain end (ACE) mechanism. A slow cure at long time is shown to be propagation by the activated monomer (AM) mechanism. The activation energies for the fast and slow cure regimes agree well with other epoxy based systems that have been confirmed to propagate by the ACE and AM mechanisms.

  8. Method for epoxy foam production using a liquid anhydride

    DOEpatents

    Celina, Mathias [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-06-05

    An epoxy resin mixture with at least one epoxy resin of between approximately 50 wt % and 100 wt %, an anhydride cure agent of between approximately 0 wt % and approximately 50 wt %, a tert-butoxycarbonyl anhydride foaming agent of between proximately 0.1-20 wt %, a surfactant and an imidazole or similar catalyst of less than approximately 2 wt %, where the resin mixture is formed from at least one epoxy resin with a 1-10 wt % tert-butoxycarbonyl anhydride compound and an imidazole catalyst at a temperature sufficient to keep the resin in a suitable viscosity range, the resin mixture reacting to form a foaming resin which in the presence of an epoxy curative can then be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form an epoxy foam.

  9. Enhanced condensation on lubricant-impregnated nanotextured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sushant; Paxson, Adam T; Dhiman, Rajeev; Smith, J David; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2012-11-27

    Nanotextured superhydrophobic surfaces have received significant attention due to their ability to easily shed liquid drops. However, water droplets have been shown to condense within the textures of superhydrophobic surfaces, impale the vapor pockets, and strongly pin to the surface. This results in poor droplet mobility and degrades condensation performance. In this paper, we show that pinning of condensate droplets can be drastically reduced by designing a hierarchical micro-nanoscale texture on a surface and impregnating it with an appropriate lubricant. The choice of lubricant must take into account the surface energies of all phases present. A lubricant will cloak the condensate and inhibit growth if the spreading coefficient is positive. If the lubricant does not fully wet the solid, we show how condensate-solid pinning can be reduced by proper implementation of nanotexture. On such a surface, condensate droplets as small as 100 μm become highly mobile and move continuously at speeds that are several orders of magnitude higher than those on identically textured superhydrophobic surfaces. This remarkable mobility produces a continuous sweeping effect that clears the surface for fresh nucleation and results in enhanced condensation.

  10. Auger spectroscopy investigations of various types of impregnated cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brion, D.; Tonnerre, J. C.; Shroff, A. M.

    The formation of a complete oxygen and barium monolayer on a tungsten surface has been followed by Auger spectroscopy. At 1300 K, the coverage for an S-type cathode is approximatively half of a monolayer. The surface composition and the state of oxidation of barium are studied and their variations are also observed as a function of the temperature on new cathodes and on cathodes after long operation time. The decrease of surface barium concentration and the important increase in the oxidation of barium lead to an increase of the work function. Between 1100 and 1500 K, the activation energy for the rate of coverage variation of barium is relatively low (0.15 eV). It has been found that when aluminum is present at the surface of impregnated cathodes, it modifies the chemical environment of the barium atoms and leads frequently to the increase of barium coverage. During activation of M-type cathodes, tungsten diffuses towards the surface. For osmium films having a thickness between 3000 and 15000 Å, the surface composition after activation is near to 35% tungsten. The barium concentration is 20% higher compared to an S-type cathode while the oxygen concentration is slightly lower. The oxidation state of barium is about the same for both cathode types.

  11. High activity redox catalysts synthesized by chemical vapor impregnation.

    PubMed

    Forde, Michael M; Kesavan, Lokesh; Bin Saiman, Mohd Izham; He, Qian; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Lopez-Sanchez, Jose Antonio; Jenkins, Robert L; Taylor, Stuart H; Kiely, Christopher J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2014-01-28

    The use of precious metals in heterogeneous catalysis relies on the preparation of small nanoparticles that are stable under reaction conditions. To date, most conventional routes used to prepare noble metal nanoparticles have drawbacks related to surface contamination, particle agglomeration, and reproducibility restraints. We have prepared titania-supported palladium (Pd) and platinum (Pt) catalysts using a simplified vapor deposition technique termed chemical vapor impregnation (CVI) that can be performed in any standard chemical laboratory. These materials, composed of nanoparticles typically below 3 nm in size, show remarkable activity under mild conditions for oxidation and hydrogenation reactions of industrial importance. We demonstrate the preparation of bimetallic Pd-Pt homogeneous alloy nanoparticles by this new CVI method, which show synergistic effects in toluene oxidation. The versatility of our CVI methodology to be able to tailor the composition and morphology of supported nanoparticles in an easily accessible and scalable manner is further demonstrated by the synthesis of Pdshell-Aucore nanoparticles using CVI deposition of Pd onto preformed Au nanoparticles supported on titania (prepared by sol immobilization) in addition to the presence of monometallic Au and Pd nanoparticles.

  12. The effect of preparation under vacuum and microwave drying on the mechanical properties of porcelain ceramic foam via polymeric sponge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahatha, S. H.; Mohammed, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper was demonstrated the effect of preparation condition under vacuum and microwave drying on the mechanical properties of porcelain ceramic foam. The study was based on five different polymeric foam templates with thickness ranging from 0.5 to 4 cm. The templates were impregnated in ceramic slurry with solid loading ranging from 35 to 55 wt. % under vacuum pressure 10-1 Torr and then sintered to 1250°C. Effects of polymeric foam template thickness and solid loading quantity were evaluated based on porosity, density and mechanical properties (compressive and flexural strengths) of the ceramic foam.

  13. Bolted Joints in Three Axially Braided Carbon Fibre/Epoxy Textile Composites with Moulded-in and Drilled Fastener Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataş, Akın; Gautam, Mayank; Soutis, Constantinos; Potluri, Prasad

    2016-10-01

    Experimental behaviour of bolted joints in triaxial braided (0°/±45°) carbon fibre/epoxy composite laminates with drilled and moulded-in fastener holes has been investigated in this paper. Braided laminates were manufactured by vacuum infusion process using 12 K T700S carbon fibres (for bias and axial tows) and Araldite LY-564 epoxy resin. Moulded-in fastener holes were formed using guide pins which were inserted in the braided structure prior to the vacuum infusion process. The damage mechanism of the specimens was investigated using ultrasonic C-Scan technique. The specimens were dimensioned to obtain a bearing mode of failure. The bearing strength of the specimens with moulded-in hole was reduced in comparison to the specimens with drilled hole, due to the increased fibre misalignment angle following the pin insertion procedure. An improvement on the bearing strength of moulded-in hole specimens might be developed if the specimen dimensions would be prepared for a net-tension mode of failure where the fibre misalignment would not have an effect as significant as in the case of bearing failure mode, but this mode should be avoided since it leads to sudden catastrophic failures.

  14. Bolted Joints in Three Axially Braided Carbon Fibre/Epoxy Textile Composites with Moulded-in and Drilled Fastener Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataş, Akın; Gautam, Mayank; Soutis, Constantinos; Potluri, Prasad

    2017-04-01

    Experimental behaviour of bolted joints in triaxial braided (0°/±45°) carbon fibre/epoxy composite laminates with drilled and moulded-in fastener holes has been investigated in this paper. Braided laminates were manufactured by vacuum infusion process using 12 K T700S carbon fibres (for bias and axial tows) and Araldite LY-564 epoxy resin. Moulded-in fastener holes were formed using guide pins which were inserted in the braided structure prior to the vacuum infusion process. The damage mechanism of the specimens was investigated using ultrasonic C-Scan technique. The specimens were dimensioned to obtain a bearing mode of failure. The bearing strength of the specimens with moulded-in hole was reduced in comparison to the specimens with drilled hole, due to the increased fibre misalignment angle following the pin insertion procedure. An improvement on the bearing strength of moulded-in hole specimens might be developed if the specimen dimensions would be prepared for a net-tension mode of failure where the fibre misalignment would not have an effect as significant as in the case of bearing failure mode, but this mode should be avoided since it leads to sudden catastrophic failures.

  15. Fabrication of Impregnated-Electrode-Type Polyatomic Ion Source with Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Ryuto, Hiromichi; Takaoka, Gikan H.

    2011-01-07

    Three types of ionic liquid ion source characterized by needle-type, capillary-needle-type and impregnated-electrode-type emitters were fabricated and demonstrated. The ion emission of a pure ionic liquid was demonstrated for the capillary-needle- and impregnated-electrode-type emitters. The emission stability of the impregnated-electrode-type emitter is currently insufficient for the shallow implantation of carbon due to occasional discharge. However, the impregnated-electrode-type emitter showed the largest emission current of 14 {mu}A at 6 kV among these emitters. This was considered to be caused by the relatively high feedability of the ionic liquid obtained from the emitter tip made of porous copper.

  16. Polishing is made cheaper by disposable diamond-impregnated abrasive cloth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    Diamond impregnated abrasive cloth eliminated expensive diamond pastes and was economically disposed of to avoid contamination. Cloth was spunbonded nylon, but any napless fabric could be used. Cloth was sprayed with diamond abrasive gel.

  17. Cost/benefit analysis of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine-impregnated venous catheters for femoral access.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo; Lecuona, María; Jiménez, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Lisset; Diosdado, Sara; Marca, Lucía; Mora, María L

    2014-10-01

    Sixty-four patients with chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters had a lower rate of catheter-related bloodstream infection and lower central venous catheter-related costs per catheter day than 190 patients with a standard catheter.

  18. Study of use of ultrasound technology to prepare polymer-impregnated concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Han Wu; Brooman, E.W. )

    1993-05-01

    Low intensity ultrasound waves (20 kHz, 0.19 to 0.57 W/cm[sup 2] based on concrete area) have been applied to enhance the efficiency of impregnating a monomer into hardened concrete, without prior drying, for subsequent in situ polymerization. It was found that methyl methacrylate could be impregnated into partly air-dried Portland cement concrete, without removing the free water in the specimen, to approximately 80% of the depth of that into a similar, previously oven-dried specimen. A systematic study has been carried out to assess the relationship between impregnation depth and the following parameters: ultrasound energy density, impregnation time, gap distance between the ultrasound horn and the specimen surface, and the applied DC voltage gradient. The results of the experiments and a proposed mechanism for the ultrasound enhancement are presented in this paper.

  19. Radiation-curable impregnants for the consolidation of wooden finds and art objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaudy, R.

    During the last decade a large number of radiation-curable monomers and oligomers have been investigated in order to determine whether they are suitable for the impregnation and consolidation of porous materials, especially of old wooden objects like archaeological finds, farmer's tools, furniture or art objects. Criteria for suitability are mainly the viscosity of the impregnant, curing behaviour, shrinkage upon curing, hardness and elasticity of the cured product, compatibility with the wood matrix and ageing properties. Selected impregnants have been applied to standardized sound and artificially decayed wood, and the interaction has been studied. Apparently the properties of the consolidated wood can only to a limited extent be derived from the behaviour of the pure polymeric material. Predictions are therefore difficult. Some selected impregnants have been applied to archaeological and ethnological objects with good success.

  20. Multistep impregnation method for incorporation of high amount of titania into SBA-15

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Wei; Song Mo . E-mail: m.song@lboro.ac.uk

    2006-02-02

    A multistep impregnation method was employed to incorporate high amount of titania into the mesoporous SBA-15 silica. No damage to the SBA-15 silica mesostructures was caused by the loading of titania in every cycle. The existence of titania small nanodomains were confirmed to be present by Raman spectra and UV-vis DRS measurements. High dispersion of them was realized via this method according to the results of low-angle X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N{sub 2} sorption measurements. Importantly, no blockage of mesostructures was acknowledged with titania content up to 24.4 wt.%. In comparison, normally used one-step impregnation method led to serious blockage of mesopores as the results of formation of bulk titania particles in the mesochannels. Photo-activity test for the removal of oestrogen showed the superiority of the materials synthesized by multistep impregnation method to one-step impregnation method.

  1. Alumina barrier for vacuum brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    Heating platens of vacuum-brazing press will not stick to workpiece if aluminum oxide "paper" is interposed. Paper does not disintegrate in press, will not contaminate braze alloy, and helps form smoothly contoured, regular fillet at brazed edges.

  2. APS storage ring vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Benaroya, R.; Choi, M.; Dortwegt, R.J.; Goeppner, G.A.; Gonczy, J.; Krieger, C.; Howell, J.; Nielsen, R.W.; Roop, B.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source synchrotron radiation facility, under construction at the Argonne National Laboratory, incorporates a large ring for the storage of 7 GeV positrons for the generation of photon beams for the facility's experimental program. The Storage Ring's 1104 m circumference is divided into 40 functional sectors. The sectors include vacuum, beam transport, control, acceleration and insertion device components. The vacuum system, which is designed to operate at a pressure of 1 n Torr, consists of 240 connected sections, the majority of which are fabricated from an aluminum alloy extrusion. The sections are equipped with distributed NeG pumping, photon absorbers with lumped pumping, beam position monitors, vacuum diagnostics and valving. The details of the vacuum system design, selected results of the development program and general construction plans are presented. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Vacuum lamination of photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Vacuum lamination of terrestrial photovoltaic modules is a new high volume process requiring new equipment and newly develop materials. Equipment development, materials research, and some research in related fields and testing methods are discussed.

  4. IRIS Leaves Thermal Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows the transportation of the IRIS observatory from the thermal vacuum chamber back to the clean tent for final testing and preparations for delivery to the launch site at Vandenberg A...

  5. [Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure].

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer, J; Lankisch, T

    2013-03-01

    Anastomotic leakage in the upper and lower intestinal tract is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Within the last 10 years endoscopic treatment options have been accepted as sufficient treatment option of these surgical complications. Endoscopic vacuum assisted closure (E-VAC) is a new innovative endoscopic therapeutic option in this field. E-VAC transfers the positive effects of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) on infected cutaneous wounds to infected cavities that can only be reached endoscopically. A sponge connected to a drainage tube is endoscopically placed in the leakage and a continuous vacuum is applied. Sponge and vacuum allow removal of infected fluids and promote granulation of the leakage. This results in clean wound grounds and finally allows wound closure. Meanwhile the method was also successfully used in the treatment of necrotic pancreatitis.

  6. Residual gas analysis (RGA) and shear strength characteristics of a silver-filled epoxy and polyimide under long-term, high-temperature storage conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    1994-04-01

    Introduction of organic materials into hermetically sealed electronic packages increases the risk of failure due to contamination. The contaminants of concern are moisture and ionics. This combination can lead to unwanted electrical pathways and/or corrosion. To minimize sealed-in moisture, packages are vacuum-baked for 16 hours at 200 C and Au/Sn solder-sealed i a glove box purged with dry nitrogen. Even following this procedure, the package plating and organic adhesive can still outgas moisture during high-temperature storage. Long-term aging characteristics for a silver-filled epoxy and a silver-filled polyimide were investigated. Leadless chip carriers (LCCs) containing die attached with epoxy or polyimide were aged at 25 C, 100 C, 150 C, and 200 C for up to six months. Residual gas analysis (RGA) and die shear testing were performed on each package. Results indicate that the epoxy can withstand storage at 150 C with no increase in internal moisture. The polyimide could only be stored at 100 C. No loss in shear strength for epoxy or polyimide was noted at any storage condition.

  7. Determination of interlaminar shear strength for glass/epoxy and carbon/epoxy laminates at impact rates of strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, J.; Li, Y. L.

    A new technique is proposed for determining the interlaminar shear strength of fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites using a double-lap shear specimen in which failure occurs on a predetermined plane. by using different ply layups in the double-lap shear specimen, the effect of loading rate on the interfacial shear strength is determined for (1) two plain-weave carbon/epoxy plies, (2) two plain-weave glass/epoxy plies, and (3) a plain-weave carbon/epoxy ply and a plain-weave carbon/epoxy ply and a plain-weave glass/epoxy ply. An increase in loading rate of about six orders of magnitude is found to raise the average value of the shear stress on the failure plane by about 70 percent for the carbon/carbon and glass/glass interfaces and by about 50 percent for the hybrid carbon/glass interface.

  8. VACUUM DEPOSITION OF THIN FILMS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The book deals with methods of obtaining and processing thin films , methods of measuring the deposition rate and thickness of thin-film layers, and...the main fields of application of thin films . Vacuum requirements and the requirements for the composition of the residual medium in thermal...evaporation and cathode sputtering are given, and modern methods of producing and measuring vacuums and the equipment used in obtaining thin films are described. (Author)

  9. Ketoprofen-eluting biodegradable ureteral stents by CO2 impregnation: In vitro study.

    PubMed

    Barros, Alexandre A; Oliveira, Carlos; Reis, Rui L; Lima, Estevão; Duarte, Ana Rita C

    2015-11-30

    Ureteral stents are indispensable tools in urologic practice. The main complications associated with ureteral stents are dislocation, infection, pain and encrustation. Biodegradable ureteral stents are one of the most attractive designs with the potential to eliminate several complications associated with the stenting procedure. In this work we hypothesize the impregnation of ketoprofen, by CO2-impregnation in a patented biodegradable ureteral stent previously developed in our group. The biodegradable ureteral stents with each formulation: alginate-based, gellan gum-based were impregnated with ketoprofen and the impregnation conditions tested were 100 bar, 2 h and three different temperatures (35 °C, 40 °C and 50 °C). The impregnation was confirmed by FTIR and DSC demonstrated the amorphization of the drug upon impregnation. The in vitro elution profile in artificial urine solution (AUS) during degradation of a biodegradable ureteral stent loaded with ketoprofen was evaluated. According to the kinetics results these systems have shown to be very promising for the release ketoprofen in the first 72 h, which is the necessary time for anti-inflammatory delivery after the surgical procedure. The in vitro release studied revealed an influence of the temperature on the impregnation yield, with a higher impregnation yield at 40 °C. Higher yields were also obtained for gellan gum-based stents. The non-cytotoxicity characteristic of the developed ketoprofen-eluting biodegradable ureteral stents was evaluated in L929 cell line by MTS assay which demonstrated the feasibility of this product as a medical device.

  10. Impregnated Metal-Organic Frameworks for the Removal of Toxic Industrial Chemicals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    with various chemicals for enhanced reactivity. Specifically, MOF-5 (IRMOF- l ) was impregnated with citric acid, copper acetate, copper oxide, and...177, MOF-199, and ZIF-8 and provided recommendations for future material syntheses . The present report describes an initial effort aimed at...PROCESS 2.1 Materials MOF-5 (IRMOF-1) was synthesized at UCLA and subsequently sent to Guild Associates, Inc. (Dublin, Ohio) for impregnation. The

  11. Ultrasonic mixing of epoxy curing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St.clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for mixing solid curing agents into liquid epoxy resins using ultrasonic energy was developed. This procedure allows standard curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents with very high melt temperatures such as 4,4 prime-diaminobenzophenone (4,4 prime-DABP) (242 C) to be mixed without premature curing. Four aromatic diamines were ultrasonically blended into MY-720 epoxy resin. These were 4,4 prime-DDS; 3,3 prime-DDA; 4,4 prime-DABP and 3,3 prime-DABP. Unfilled moldings were cast and cured for each system and their physical and mechanical properties compared.

  12. Bolted joints in graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    All-graphite/epoxy laminates and hybrid graphite-glass/epoxy laminates were tested. The tests encompassed a range of geometries for each laminate pattern to cover the three basic failure modes - net section tension failure through the bolt hole, bearing and shearout. Static tensile and compressive loads were applied. A constant bolt diameter of 6.35 mm (0.25 in.) was used in the tests. The interaction of stress concentrations associated with multi-row bolted joints was investigated by testing single- and double-row bolted joints and open-hole specimens in tension. For tension loading, linear interaction was found to exist between the bearing stress reacted at a given bolt hole and the remaining tension stress running by that hole to be reacted elsewhere. The interaction under compressive loading was found to be non-linear. Comparative tests were run using single-lap bolted joints and double-lap joints with pin connection. Both of these joint types exhibited lower strengths than were demonstrated by the corresponding double-lap joints. The analysis methods developed here for single bolt joints are shown to be capable of predicting the behavior of multi-row joints.

  13. Epoxy Crosslinked Silica Aerogels (X-Aerogels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    fabrizio, Eve; Ilhan, Faysal; Meador, Mary Ann; Johnston, Chris; Leventis, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    NASA is interested in the development of strong lightweight materials for the dual role of thermal insulator and structural component for space vehicles; freeing more weight for useful payloads. Aerogels are very-low density materials (0.010 to 0.5 g/cc) that, due to high porosity (meso- and microporosity), can be, depending on the chemical nature of the network, ideal thermal insulators (thermal conductivity approx. 15 mW/mK). However, aerogels are extremely fragile. For practical application of aerogels, one must increase strength without compromising the physical properties attributed to low density. This has been achieved by templated growth of an epoxy polymer layer that crosslinks the "pearl necklace" network of nanoparticles: the framework of a typical silica aerogel. The requirement for conformal accumulation of the epoxy crosslinker is reaction both with the surface of silica and with itself. After cross-linking, the strength of a typical aerogel monolith increases by a factor of 200, in the expense of only a 2-fold increase in density. Strength is increased further by coupling residual unreacted epoxides with diamine.

  14. Electrical properties of epoxy/silver nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonon, P.; Boudefel, A.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the electrical properties of nanocomposites made of epoxy resin filled with 70-nm-sized silver particles. These composites were studied for the fabrication of integrated capacitors in electronics packaging. The dc conductivity was studied as a function of the filler concentration and as a function of temperature. We also studied the ac conductivity and the permittivity in the 10-1-105 Hz range as a function of the filler concentration. Experimental properties were analyzed using standard percolation theories. The dc conductivity varies as (φ-φc)t, where φ is the filler concentration, φc is the percolation threshold, and t is the dc critical exponent. A very low percolation threshold is obtained (φc=1%) which is believed to be related to a segregated distribution of the fillers in the epoxy matrix. We also measured a very high dc critical exponent (t=5) probably related to the interparticle electrical contact. A universal scaling law is observed for σ(ω) and ɛ(ω). Above a cutoff frequency (ωc, which scales with the dc conductivity as ωc~σdcq) the conductivity and the permittivity follow the universal power laws (σ~ωu and V~ω-v) with critical exponents taking nonstandard values (q=0.83-0.98, u=0.79, and v=0.03).

  15. Technical specification for vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Khaw, J.

    1987-01-01

    The vacuum systems at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) are primarily of all-metal construction and operate at pressures from 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -11/ Torr. The primary gas loads during operation result from thermal desorption and beam-induced desorption from the vacuum chamber walls. These desorption rates can be extremely high in the case of hydrocarbons and other contaminants. These specifications place a major emphasis on eliminating contamination sources. The specifications and procedures have been written to insure the cleanliness and vacuum integrity of all SLAC vacuum systems, and to assist personnel involved with SLAC vacuum systems in choosing and designing components that are compatible with existing systems and meet the quality and reliability of SLAC vacuum standards. The specification includes requirements on design, procurement, fabrication, chemical cleaning, clean room practices, welding and brazing, helium leak testing, residual gas analyzer testing, bakeout, venting, and pumpdown. Also appended are specifications regarding acceptable vendors, isopropyl alcohol, bakeable valve cleaning procedure, mechanical engineering safety inspection, notes on synchrotron radiation, and specifications of numerous individual components. (LEW)

  16. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C.

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  17. Preparation of functionalized and metal-impregnated activated carbon by a single-step activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dastgheib, Seyed A.; Ren, Jianli; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud; Chang, Ramsay

    2014-01-01

    A rapid method to prepare functionalized and metal-impregnated activated carbon from coal is described in this paper. A mixture of ferric chloride and a sub-bituminous coal was used to demonstrate simultaneous coal activation, chlorine functionalization, and iron/iron oxides impregnation in the resulting porous carbon products. The FeCl3 concentration in the mixture, the method to prepare the FeCl3-coal mixture (solid mixing or liquid impregnation), and activation atmosphere and temperature impacted the surface area and porosity development, Cl functionalization, and iron species impregnation and dispersion in the carbon products. Samples activated in nitrogen or a simulated flue gas at 600 or 1000 °C for 1-2 min had surface areas up to ∼800 m2/g, bulk iron contents up to 18 wt%, and surface chlorine contents up to 27 wt%. Potential catalytic and adsorption application of the carbon materials was explored in catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol and adsorption of ionic mercury from aqueous solutions. Results indicated that impregnated activated carbons outperformed their non-impregnated counterparts in both the CWAO and adsorption tests.

  18. Carbonization of heavy metal impregnated sewage sludge oriented towards potential co-disposal.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiaomin; Chen, Dezhen; Hu, Yuyan; Feng, Yuheng; Dai, Xiaohu

    2017-01-05

    Sewage sludge (SS) is adopted as a stabilizer to immobilize externally impregnated heavy metals through carbonization oriented towards the co-disposal of SS and some hazardous wastes. Firstly Cu and Pb were impregnated into SS to ascertain the impregnating capacity and leaching behaviours of heavy metals in the resulting sewage sludge char (SSC). Meanwhile, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to detect the heavy metal phase in the SSC. The results showed that within 400-800°C and an impregnating concentration ≨0.5wt%, more than 90% of the externally impregnated Cu and Pb were remained in the SSC and immobilized. And higher temperatures helped produce non-hazardous SSC. In addition, SEM and XRD analyses revealed that externally impregnated heavy metals could be converted into stable forms and evenly distributed throughout the SSC. In the second step municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (FA) was kneaded into SS and subjected to carbonization; it has been proved that the heavy metals in FA can be well immobilized in the resulting char when FA: SS mass ratio is 1:5. Those results show that sewage sludge can be co-carbonized with wastes contaminated with heavy metals to achieve co-disposal.

  19. The effect of silver impregnation of surgical scrub suits on surface bacterial contamination.

    PubMed

    Freeman, A I; Halladay, L J; Cripps, P

    2012-06-01

    Silver-impregnated fabrics are widely used for their antibacterial and antifungal effects, including for clinical clothing such as surgical scrub suits (scrubs). This study investigated whether silver impregnation reduces surface bacterial contamination of surgical scrubs during use in a veterinary hospital. Using agar contact plates, abdominal and lumbar areas of silver-impregnated nylon or polyester/cotton scrubs were sampled for surface bacterial contamination before (0 h) and after 4 and 8h of use. The number of bacterial colonies on each contact plate was counted after 24 and 48 h incubation at 37°C. Standard basic descriptive statistics and mixed-effects linear regression were used to investigate the association of possible predictors of the level of bacterial contamination of the scrubs with surface bacterial counts. Silver-impregnated scrubs had significantly lowered bacterial colony counts (BCC) at 0 h compared with polyester/cotton scrubs. However, after 4 and 8h of wear, silver impregnation had no effect on BCC. Scrub tops with higher BCC at 0 h had significantly higher BCC at 4 and 8h, suggesting that contamination present at 0 h persisted during wear. Sampling from the lumbar area was associated with lower BCC at all three time points. Other factors (contamination of the scrub top with a medication/drug, restraint of patients, working in the anaesthesia recovery area) also affected BCC at some time points. Silver impregnation appeared to be ineffective in reducing bacterial contamination of scrubs during use in a veterinary hospital.

  20. Vacuum-Gauge Connection For Shipping Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    External connector enables measurement of vacuum in stored part. Remote-readout connector added to shipping container and connected to thermo-couple vacuum gauge in vacuum-insulated cryogenic line packed in container. Enables monitoring of condition of vacuum without opening container.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of aluminosilicate catalyst impregnated by nickel oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulida, Iffana Dani; Sriatun, Taslimah

    2015-09-01

    Aluminosilicate as a catalyst has been synthesized by pore-engineering using CetylTrimethylAmmonium-Bromide (CTAB) as templating agent. It can produce bigger aluminosilicate pore therefore it will be more suitable for bulky molecule. The aims of this research are to synthesize aluminosilicate supported by Nickel, using CTAB surfactant as templating agent for larger pore radius than natural zeolite and characterize the synthesis product, consist of total acid sites and surface area characteristic. This research has been done with following steps. First, making sodium silicate and sodium aluminate. Second, aluminosilicate was synthesized by direct methods, calcined at 550, 650 and 750°C variation temperature, characterized product by X-RD and FTIR spectrometer. Third, NiCl2 was impregnated to the aluminosilicate that has the best cristallinity and main TO4 functional groups product (550 sample). Variation of NiCl2:aluminosilicate (w/w) ratio were 25%:75%, 50%:50% and 75%:25%. Last but not least characterization of catalytic properties was performed. It comprised total acidity test (gravimetric method) and Surface Area Analyzer. The result shows that the product synthesized by direct method at 550oC calcination temperature has the best cristallinity and main functional groups of TO4. The highest total acid sites was 31.6 mmole/g (Imp-A sample). Surface Area Analyzer shows that Imp-B sample has the best pore distribution and highest total pore volume and specific surface area with value 32.424 cc/g and 46.8287 m2/g respectively. We can draw the conclusion that the most potential catalyst is Imp-A sample compared to Imp-B and Imp-C because it has the highest total acid sites. However the most effective catalyst used for product selectivity was Imp-B sample among all samples.

  2. Fracture behavior of nano-scale rubber-modified epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacigalupo, Lauren N.

    The primary focus of the first portion of this study is to compare physical and mechanical properties of a model epoxy that has been toughened with one of three different types of rubber-based modifier: a traditional telechelic oligomer (phase separates into micro-size particles), a core-shell latex particle (preformed nano-scale particles) and a triblock copolymer (self-assembles into nano-scale particles). The effect of modifier content on the physical properties of the matrix was determined using several thermal analysis methods, which provided insight into any inherent alterations of the epoxy matrix. Although the primary objective is to study the role of particle size on the fracture toughness, stiffness and strength were also determined since these properties are often reduced in rubber-toughened epoxies. It was found that since the CSR- and SBM-modified epoxies are composed of less rubber, thermal and mechanical properties of the epoxy were better maintained. In order to better understand the fracture behavior and mechanisms of the three types of rubber particles utilized in this study, extensive microscopy analysis was conducted. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) was used to quantify the volume fraction of particles, transmission optical microscopy (TOM) was used to determine plastic damage zone size, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to assess void growth in the plastic zone after fracture. By quantifying these characteristics, it was then possible to model the plastic damage zone size as well as the fracture toughness to elucidate the behavior of the rubber-modified epoxies. It was found that localized shear yielding and matrix void growth are the active toughening mechanisms in all rubber-modified epoxies in this study, however, matrix void growth was more prevalent. The second portion of this study investigated the use of three acrylate-based triblocks and four acrylate-based diblocks to modify a model epoxy system. By

  3. Progress toward Making Epoxy/Carbon-Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiano, Thomas; Roylance, Margaret; Gassner, John; Kyle, William

    2008-01-01

    A modicum of progress has been made in an effort to exploit single-walled carbon nanotubes as fibers in epoxy-matrix/fiber composite materials. Two main obstacles to such use of carbon nanotubes are the following: (1) bare nanotubes are not soluble in epoxy resins and so they tend to agglomerate instead of becoming dispersed as desired; and (2) because of lack of affinity between nanotubes and epoxy matrices, there is insufficient transfer of mechanical loads between the nanotubes and the matrices. Part of the effort reported here was oriented toward (1) functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with methyl methacrylate (MMA) to increase their dispersability in epoxy resins and increase transfer of mechanical loads and (2) ultrasonic dispersion of the functionalized nanotubes in tetrahydrofuran, which was used as an auxiliary solvent to aid in dispersing the functionalized nanotubes into a epoxy resin. In another part of this effort, poly(styrene sulfonic acid) was used as the dispersant and water as the auxiliary solvent. In one experiment, the strength of composite of epoxy with MMA-functionalized-nanotubes was found to be 29 percent greater than that of a similar composite of epoxy with the same proportion of untreated nanotubes.

  4. Measurement of residual strains in boron-epoxy and glass-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.; Chamis, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    Embedded-strain-gage techniques were developed and used for measuring strains in composite angle-ply laminates during curing and thermal cycling. The specimens were 2.54 by 22.9 cm eight-ply boron-epoxy and S-glass-epoxy laminates. Unidirectional specimens were used for control purposes. Strain readings were corrected for the purely thermal output of the gages obtained from an instrument quartz reference specimen. The strains measured during the cooling part of the curing cycle were in agreement with those recorded during subsequent thermal cycling, indicating that residual stresses induced during curing are primarily caused by differential thermal expansions of the various plies. Restraint strains were computed for the 0-deg and 45-deg plies of the angle-ply laminates tested, and the residual stresses obtained using the anisotropic constitutive relations and taking into account the temperature dependence of stiffnesses and strains.

  5. Tension fatigue of glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy tapered laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.; Obrien, T. Kevin; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1990-01-01

    Symmetric tapered laminates with internally dropped plies were tested with two different layups and two materials, S2/SP250 glass/epoxy and IM6/1827I graphite/epoxy. The specimens were loaded in cyclic tension until they delaminated unstably. Each combination of material and layup had a unique failure mode. Calculated values of strain energy release rate, G, from a finite element analysis model of delamination along the taper, and for delamination from a matrix ply crack, were used with mode I fatigue characterization data from tests of the tested materials to calculate expected delamination onset loads. Calculated values were compared to the experimental results. The comparison showed that when the calculated G was chosen according to the observed delamination failures, the agreement between the calculated and measured delamination onset loads was reasonable for each combination of layup and material.

  6. Experimental studies of graphite-epoxy and boron-epoxy angle ply laminates in shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, T.

    1977-01-01

    The nonlinear/inelastic response under inplane shear of a large variety of graphite-epoxy and boron-epoxy angle-ply laminates was tested. Their strength allowables were obtained and the mechanisms which govern their mode of failure were determined. Two types of specimens for the program were chosen, tested, and evaluated: shear panels stabilized by an aluminum honeycomb core and shear tubes. A modified biaxially compression/tension loaded picture frame was designed and utilized in the test program with the shear panels. The results obtained with this test technique categorically prefer the shear panels, rather than the tubes, for adequate and satisfactory experimental definition of the objectives. Test results indicate the existence of a so-called core-effect which ought to be considered when reducing experimental data for weak in shear laminates.

  7. Viscoelastic Characterization of a Nonlinear, Glass/Epoxy Composite Including the Effects of Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    Schapery Isothermal creep and recovery tests were conducted on an epoxy resin and a glass fiber-reiiforced composite made from the same bulk resin ...Contracted Notations ... ......... ... 43 2 Ingredients of Shell 58-68R Epoxy Resin [181]. . 9 3 Fiber Content of S-901 Glass/Shell 58-68R Epoxy Resin ...Epoxy Resin .......... ................... 154 i0 Shift Factors, aT, for Shell 58-68R Epoxy Resin .......... ................... 164 11 Shell 58-68R

  8. Vacuum Packaging for Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    The Vacuum Packaging for MEMS Program focused on the development of an integrated set of packaging technologies which in totality provide a low cost...high volume product-neutral vacuum packaging capability which addresses all MEMS vacuum packaging requirements. The program balanced the need for...near term component and wafer-level vacuum packaging with the development of advanced high density wafer-level packaging solutions. Three vacuum

  9. Probability distribution of the vacuum energy density

    SciTech Connect

    Duplancic, Goran; Stefancic, Hrvoje; Glavan, Drazen

    2010-12-15

    As the vacuum state of a quantum field is not an eigenstate of the Hamiltonian density, the vacuum energy density can be represented as a random variable. We present an analytical calculation of the probability distribution of the vacuum energy density for real and complex massless scalar fields in Minkowski space. The obtained probability distributions are broad and the vacuum expectation value of the Hamiltonian density is not fully representative of the vacuum energy density.

  10. Cure-dependent Viscoelastic Poisson’s Ratio of Epoxy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-26

    Faivre S, Roy LE, Trotignon JP, Verdu J (1996) Mechanical properties of thermosets. Part I. Tensile properties of an anhydride cured epoxy . J Mater...Experimental Mechanics (2007) 47: 237–249 DOI 10.1007/s11340-006-9013-9 Cure -dependent Viscoelastic Poisson’s Ratio of Epoxy D.J. O’Brien · N.R...Abstract The evolution of the lateral contraction ratio of two commercial (high and low temperature cure ) epoxy resins is studied in uniaxial tension

  11. Wear behaviour of epoxy resin filled with hard powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formisano, A.; Boccarusso, L.; Minutolo, F. Capece; Carrino, L.; Durante, M.; Langella, A.

    2016-10-01

    The development of high performance materials based on epoxy resin finds a growing number of applications in which high wear resistance is required. One major drawback in many of these applications is the relatively poor wear resistance of the epoxy resin. Therefore, in order to investigate on the possibility of increasing wear resistance of thermoset polymers filled with hard powders, sliding tests are carried out by means of a pin on disc apparatus. In particular, composite resins, constituted by an epoxy resin filled with different contents and sizes of Silicon Carbide powder, are analyzed; the wear resistance, in terms of volume loss, is measured for different abrasive counterfaces and loads.

  12. Comparisons of NDT Methods to Inspect Cork and Cork filled Epoxy Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingbloom, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Sheet cork and cork filled epoxy provide external insulation for the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) on the Nation's Space Transportation System (STS). Interest in the reliability of the external insulation bonds has increased since the Columbia incident. A non-destructive test (NDT) method that will provide the best inspection for these bonds has been under evaluation. Electronic Shearography has been selected as the primary NDT method for inspection of these bond lines in the RSRM production flow. ATK Launch Systems Group has purchased an electronic shearography system that includes a vacuum chamber that is used for evaluation of test parts and custom vacuum windows for inspection of full-scale motors. Although the electronic shearography technology has been selected as the primary method for inspection of the external bonds, other technologies that exist continue to be investigated. The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) NDT department has inspected several samples for comparison with electronic shearography with various inspections systems in their laboratory. The systems that were evaluated are X-ray backscatter, terahertz imaging, and microwave imaging. The samples tested have some programmed flaws as well as some flaws that occurred naturally during the sample making process. These samples provide sufficient flaw variation for the evaluation of the different inspection systems. This paper will describe and compare the basic functionality, test method and test results including dissection for each inspection technology.

  13. Measurement of partial pressures in vacuum technology and vacuum physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, W. K.

    1986-01-01

    It is pointed out that the measurement of gaseous pressures of less than 0.0001 torr is based on the ionization of gas atoms and molecules due to collisions with electrons. The particle density is determined in place of the pressure. The ionization cross sections for molecules of various gases are discussed. It is found that the true pressure in a vacuum system cannot be determined with certainty if it is unknown which gas is present. Effects of partial pressure determination on the condition of the vacuum system are discussed together with ion sources, systems of separation, and ion detection.

  14. Vacuum-assisted cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    McQuivey, Ross W; Block, Jon E

    2017-01-01

    There has been a dramatic rise in the frequency of cesarean sections, surpassing 30% of all deliveries in the US. This upsurge, coupled with a decreasing willingness to allow vaginal birth after cesarean section, has resulted in an expansion of the use of vacuum assistance to safely extract the fetal head. By avoiding the use of a delivering hand or forceps blade, the volume being delivered through the uterine incision can be decreased when the vacuum is used properly. Reducing uterine extensions with their associated complications (eg, excessive blood loss) in difficult cases is also a theoretical advantage of vacuum delivery. Maternal discomfort related to excessive fundal pressure may also be lessened. To minimize the risk of neonatal morbidity, proper cup placement over the “flexion point” remains essential to maintain vacuum integrity and reduce the chance of inadvertent detachment and uterine extensions. Based on the published literature and pragmatic clinical experience, utilization of the vacuum device is a safe and effective technique to assist delivery during cesarean section. PMID:28331371

  15. VACUUM TRAP AND VALVE COMBINATION

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.; Levenson, L.

    1963-02-19

    This patent relates to a vacuum trap and valve combination suitable for use in large ultra-high vacuum systems. The vacuum trap is a chamber having an inlet and outlet opening which may be made to communicate with a chamber to be evacuated and a diffusion pump, respectively. A valve is designed to hermeticaliy seal with inlet opening and, when opened, block the line-of- sight'' between the inlet and outlet openings, while allowing a large flow path between the opened vaive and the side walls of the trap. The interior of the trap and the side of the valve facing the inlet opening are covered with an impurity absorbent, such as Zeolite or activated aluminum. Besides the advantage of combining two components of a vacuum system into one, the present invention removes the need for a baffle between the pump and the chamber to be evacuated. In one use of a specific embodiment of this invention, the transmission probability was 45 and the partial pressure of the pump fluid vapor in the vacuum chamber was at least 100 times lower than its vapor pressure. (AEC)

  16. CO2 adsorption properties of char produced from brown coal impregnated with alcohol amine solutions.

    PubMed

    Baran, Paweł; Zarębska, Katarzyna; Czuma, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction is critical to mitigating climate change. Power plants for heating and industry are significant sources of CO2 emissions. There is a need for identifying and developing new, efficient methods to reduce CO2 emissions. One of the methods used is flue gas purification by CO2 capture through adsorption. This study aimed to develop CO2 adsorbent out of modified brown coal impregnated with solutions of first-, second-, and third-order amines. Low-temperature nitrogen adsorption isotherms and CO2 isotherms were measured for the prepared samples. The results of experiments unexpectedly revealed that CO2 sorption capacity decreased after impregnation. Due to lack of strait trends in CO2 sorption capacity decrease, the results were closely analyzed to find the reason for the inconsistencies. It was revealed that different amines represent different affinities for CO2 and that the size and structure of impregnating factor has influence on the CO2 sorption capacity of impregnated material. The character of a support was also noticeable as well for impregnation results as for the affinity to CO2. The influence of amine concentration used was investigated along with the comparison on how the theoretical percentage of the impregnation on the support influenced the results. The reaction mechanism of tertiary amine was taken into consideration in connection to no presence of water vapor during the experiments. Key findings were described in the work and provide a strong basis for further studies on CO2 adsorption on amine-impregnated support.

  17. Epoxy bond and stop etch fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Jerry A.; Weckwerth, Mark V.; Baca, Wes E.

    2000-01-01

    A class of epoxy bond and stop etch (EBASE) microelectronic fabrication techniques is disclosed. The essence of such techniques is to grow circuit components on top of a stop etch layer grown on a first substrate. The first substrate and a host substrate are then bonded together so that the circuit components are attached to the host substrate by the bonding agent. The first substrate is then removed, e.g., by a chemical or physical etching process to which the stop etch layer is resistant. EBASE fabrication methods allow access to regions of a device structure which are usually blocked by the presence of a substrate, and are of particular utility in the fabrication of ultrafast electronic and optoelectronic devices and circuits.

  18. Measurement of damping of graphite epoxy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The design of an experiment to measure the damping of a cylindrical graphite-epoxy specimen with a three point support and a knife edge support is described as well as equipment used in tests conducted to determine the influence of the support at the two ends of the specimen and to simulate an idealized free-free boundary condition at the two edges. A curve fitting technique is being used to process the frequency response data obtained. Experiments conducted on the thin plate specimen also reveal the influence of the end support condition on the damping ratio of the specimen. The damping ratio values measured for both specimens appear to be strongly influenced by the shape of the specimen and appear to depend on length and fiber orientation as well as the presence of discontinuities such as sharp bends, corners, and notches.

  19. Epoxy coatings over latex block fillers

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, L.D.

    1997-12-01

    Failures of polymerized epoxy coatings applied over latex/acrylic block fillers continue to plague owners of commercial buildings, particularly those with high architectural content such as condominiums, high rise offices, etc. Water treatment facilities in paper mills are especially prone to this problem. The types of failures include delamination of the topcoats, blisters in both the block fillers and the topcoats and disintegration of the block filler itself. While the problem is well known, the approach to a solution is not. A study of several coatings manufacturer`s Product Data Sheets shows a wide variance in the recommendations for what are purportedly generically equivalent block fillers. While one manufacturer might take an essentially architectural approach, another will take a heavy-duty industrial approach. To the specifying architect or engineer who has little training in the complexities of protective coating systems, this presents a dilemma. Who does he believe? What does he specify? To whom can he turn for independent advice?

  20. Cellulose whisker/epoxy resin nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liming; Weder, Christoph

    2010-04-01

    New nanocomposites composed of cellulose nanofibers or "whiskers" and an epoxy resin were prepared. Cellulose whiskers with aspect ratios of approximately 10 and approximately 84 were isolated from cotton and sea animals called tunicates, respectively. Suspensions of these whiskers in dimethylformamide were combined with an oligomeric difunctional diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A with an epoxide equivalent weight of 185-192 and a diethyl toluenediamine-based curing agent. Thin films were produced by casting these mixtures and subsequent curing. The whisker content was systematically varied between 4 and 24% v/v. Electron microscopy studies suggest that the whiskers are evenly dispersed within the epoxy matrix. Dynamic mechanical thermoanalysis revealed that the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the materials was not significantly influenced by the incorporation of the cellulose filler. Between room temperature and 150 degrees C, i.e., below T(g), the tensile storage moduli (E') of the nanocomposites increased modestly, for example from 1.6 GPa for the neat polymer to 4.9 and 3.6 GPa for nanocomposites comprising 16% v/v tunicate or cotton whiskers. The relative reinforcement was more significant at 185 degrees C (i.e., above T(g)), where E' was increased from approximately 16 MPa (neat polymer) to approximately 1.6 GPa (tunicate) or approximately 215 MPa (cotton). The mechanical properties of the new materials are well-described by the percolation model and are the result of the formation of a percolating whisker network in which stress transfer is facilitated by strong interactions between the whiskers.