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  1. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of infectious mononucleosis by Epstein-Barr virus in Mexican children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Infectious mononucleosis (IM) or Mononucleosis syndrome is caused by an acute infection of Epstein-Barr virus. In Latin American countries, there are little information pertaining to the clinical manifestations and complications of this disease. For this reason, the purpose of this work was to describe the clinical and laboratory characteristics of infection by Epstein-Barr virus in Mexican children with infectious mononucleosis. Methods A descriptive study was carried out by reviewing the clinical files of patients less than 18 years old with clinical and serological diagnosis of IM by Epstein-Barr virus from November, 1970 to July, 2011 in a third level pediatric hospital in Mexico City. Results One hundred and sixty three cases of IM were found. The most frequent clinical signs were lymphadenopathy (89.5%), fever (79.7%), general body pain (69.3%), pharyngitis (55.2%), hepatomegaly (47.2%). The laboratory findings were lymphocytosis (41.7%), atypic lymphocytes (24.5%), and increased transaminases (30.9%), there were no rupture of the spleen and no deaths among the 163 cases. Conclusions Our results revealed that IM appeared in earlier ages compared with that reported in industrialized countries, where adolescents are the most affected group. Also, the order and frequency of the clinical manifestations were different in our country than in industrialized ones. PMID:22818256

  2. About Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Providers Laboratory Testing References & Resources About Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... Page Symptoms Transmission Diagnosis Prevention & Treatment Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), also known as human herpesvirus 4, is ...

  3. NIH scientists outline steps toward Epstein-Barr virus vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects nine out of ten people worldwide at some point during their lifetimes. Infections in early childhood often cause no disease symptoms, but people infected during adolescence or young adulthood may develop infectious mononuc

  4. Epstein-Barr virus antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    EBV antibody test; EBV serology ... a lab, where a lab specialist looks for antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus. In the first stages of an illness, little antibody may be detected. For this reason, the test ...

  5. [A Case of Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis During Infectious Mononucleosis Caused by the Epstein-Barr Virus in a Young Woman].

    PubMed

    Ono, Shiro; Kobayashi, Tadanao; Nishio, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    Infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a common disease and is mainly asymptomatic during childhood, whereas infectious mononucleosis with clinical signs such as fever, pharyngitis, lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly often occurs in adolescents and adults with primary infection. Acalculous cholecystitis has been reported as a rare complication. We report herein a case of acalculous cholecystitis accompanied by infectious mononucleosis by EBV, which was treated successfully by medical treatment. A 33-year-old woman who had been admitted by fever, pharyngitis and lymphadenopathy developed a right upper quadrant pain, that was diagnosed as acalculous cholecystitis based on an imaging study. Antibiotic treatment did not resolve the symptoms, and surgical intervention was considered. We diagnosed her as having infectious mononucleosis based on a typical physical presentation and seropositivity for the EBV viral capsid antigen, suggesting that the acalculous cholecystatis might have been a complication of the EBV infection. After the administration of glucocorticoid and acyclovir, the patient became afebrile and the abdominal pain disappeared. Though acalculous cholecystitis rarely accompanies infectious mononucleosis caused by EBV, clinicians should be aware of this complication to avoid unnecessary cholecystectomy. PMID:27529970

  6. Epstein-Barr virus-associated genital ulcers: an under-recognized disorder.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Cheryl J; Alió, Alessandra B; Cunningham, Bari B; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2007-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis is the best-known syndrome associated with primary Epstein-Barr virus infection. Although a variety of cutaneous and mucosal manifestations are recognized in infectious mononucleosis, genital ulcers have only rarely been described. We describe an otherwise healthy 14-year-old girl in whom painful genital ulcers developed during an episode of serologically-confirmed primary Epstein-Barr virus infection. Clinical, serologic, and histopathologic evaluation failed to disclose evidence of any other etiologic explanation for her lesions. The patient remains well, without recurrence. To date, only 13 instances of genital ulceration in females attributable to Epstein-Barr virus infection have been reported.

  7. Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Cycle Reactivation.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Jessica; El-Guindy, Ayman

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus, which mainly infects B cells and epithelial cells, has two modes of infection: latent and lytic. Epstein-Barr virus infection is predominantly latent; however, lytic infection is detected in healthy seropositive individuals and becomes more prominent in certain pathological conditions. Lytic infection is divided into several stages: early gene expression, DNA replication, late gene expression, assembly, and egress. This chapter summarizes the most recent progress made toward understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate the different lytic stages leading to production of viral progeny. In addition, the chapter highlights the potential role of lytic infection in disease development and current attempts to purposely induce lytic infection as a therapeutic approach.

  8. Primary Epstein-Barr-virus infections in acute neurologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Grose, C; Henle, W; Henle, G; Feorino, P M

    1975-02-20

    Infectious mononucleosis has been associated with Guillain--Barré syndrome, Bell's palsy, meningoencephalitis and transverse myelitis. Since it is not known that many children with infectious mononucleosis do not develop heterophil antibodies, we looked for evidence of current or recent Epstein-Barr virus infection in young patients with these neurologic diseases by using serodiagnostic procedures for detection and titration of antibodies to various antigens related to Epstein-Barr virus. Seven of 24 cases with Guillain-Barre syndrome and three of 16 with facial palsy were definitely associated with primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus as were two cases each of the other two neurologic diseases. Only one of these patients had obvious clinical infectious mononucleosis, and only a few demonstrated heterophil agglutinins. It is evident that the virus must be considered in the diagnosis of various acute neurologic diseases affecting children and young adults, even in the absence of heterophil-antibody response or other signs of infectious mononucleosis.

  9. Epstein-Barr virus encephalitis in children.

    PubMed

    Hung, K L; Liao, H T; Tsai, M L

    2000-01-01

    Fourteen children with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encephalitis admitted to our pediatric department during the period 1988 to 1998 were collected and reviewed to characterize the clinical, laboratory and neuroradiological findings. There were 7 boys and 7 girls. The age of onset ranged from 10 months to 14 years. Among them, 5 patients belonged to Alice in Wonderland syndrome, 5 were diagnosed as acute viral encephalitis, 1 presented with acute meningoencephalitis followed by cerebellitis, the remaining 3 cases attributed to acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. The main symptoms were fever (43%), seizure (36%), bizarre behavior (31%), headache (21%) and metamorphopsia (36%). The presenting signs included altered consciousness (50%), meningeal sign (14%), bulbar sign (14%), cerebellar sign (7%), and cranial nerve palsy (7%). Classic findings of infectious mononucleosis were obscure. The laboratory data showed the existence of atypical lymphocyte in only one case but positive serology for EBV infection in all patients. Pleocytosis was found in 3 (30%) of 10 patients examined. Eight (67%) of 12 patients had nonspecific electroencephalographic changes in the acute stage. Computed tomography (CT) scans were abnormal in 2 (40%) of 5 patients tested; while magnetic resonance image (MRI) disclosed lesions in 5 (56%) of 9 patients, with abnormal signals in various parts of the brain. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain scan showed abnormal perfusion lesions in 3 (75%) of 4 patients studied. The results demonstrate the diversity of neurological manifestations of EBV encephalitis. EBV should be considered in any acute neurological illness of uncertain etiology in the pediatric population. While MRI remains the image of choice in EBV encephalitis, SPECT detects the abnormal perfusion more precisely in a substantial number of patients. PMID:10920547

  10. Genital ulcers associated with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Jerdan, Kimberly; Aronson, Iris; Hernandez, Claudia; Fishman, Patricia M; Groth, John V

    2013-06-01

    Genital ulcerations are a rare clinical finding of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. We present the case of a 16-year-old adolescent girl who reported the onset of diarrhea, headaches, dysuria, and vaginal discharge along with vulvar ulcerations with edema. Laboratory studies revealed a high-quantitative EBV IgG and early antigen as well as a positive IgM antibody for EBV. Although the association between EBV and genital ulcerations is rare, physicians should be aware of this clinical presentation to exclude other infectious entities, to be reassured to accept negative testing, and to quell patient distress or concerns of abuse.

  11. RNA families in Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Moss, Walter N; Lee, Nara; Pimienta, Genaro; Steitz, Joan A

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a tumorigenic human γ-herpesvirus, which produces several known structured RNAs with functional importance: two are implicated in latency maintenance and tumorigenic phenotypes, EBER1 and EBER2; a viral small nucleolar RNA (v-snoRNA1) that may generate a small regulatory RNA; and an internal ribosomal entry site in the EBNA1 mRNA. A recent bioinformatics and RNA-Seq study of EBV identified two novel EBV non-coding (nc)RNAs with evolutionary conservation in lymphocryptoviruses and likely functional importance. Both RNAs are transcribed from a repetitive region of the EBV genome (the W repeats) during a highly oncogenic type of viral latency. One novel ncRNA can form a massive (586 nt) hairpin, while the other RNA is generated from a short (81 nt) intron and is found in high abundance in EBV-infected cells.

  12. Macular Amyloidosis and Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nahidi, Yalda; Tayyebi Meibodi, Naser; Meshkat, Zahra; Nazeri, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Background. Amyloidosis is extracellular precipitation of eosinophilic hyaline material of self-origin with special staining features and fibrillar ultrastructure. Macular amyloidosis is limited to the skin, and several factors have been proposed for its pathogenesis. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in this lesion suggests that this virus can play a role in pathogenesis of this disease. Objective. EBV DNA detection was done on 30 skin samples with a diagnosis of macular amyloidosis and 31 healthy skin samples in the margin of removed melanocytic nevi by using PCR. Results. In patients positive for beta-globin gene in PCR, BLLF1 gene of EBV virus was positive in 23 patients (8 patients in case and 15 patients in the control group). There was no significant difference in presence of EBV DNA between macular amyloidosis (3.8%) and control (23.8%) groups (P = 0.08). Conclusion. The findings of this study showed that EBV is not involved in pathogenesis of macular amyloidosis. PMID:26981113

  13. Targeting Epstein-Barr virus infection as an intervention against multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jons, D; Sundström, P; Andersen, O

    2015-02-01

    We here review contemporary data on genetic and environmental risk factors, particularly Epstein-Barr virus infection, for multiple sclerosis. There is an important immunogenetic etiological factor for multiple sclerosis. However, a general assumption is that immune defense genes are activated by the environment, basically by infections. We contend that the relationship between infectious mononucleosis and multiple sclerosis cannot be completely explained by genetics and inverse causality. Epstein-Barr infection as indicated by positive serology is an obligatory precondition for multiple sclerosis, which is a stronger attribute than a risk factor only. Data on events in the early pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis are cumulating from bio-banks with presymptomatic specimens, but there is only little information from the critical age when Epstein-Barr infection including infectious mononucleosis is acquired, nor on the detailed immunological consequences of this infection in individuals with and without multiple sclerosis. We discuss how focused bio-banking may elaborate a rationale for the development of treatment or vaccination against Epstein-Barr virus infection. A cohort in which intervention against Epstein-Barr infections was performed should be the object of neurological follow-up.

  14. Lytic Replication of Epstein-Barr Virus During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.; Barrett, A. D. T.

    1999-01-01

    Reactivation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) may be an important threat to crew health during extended space missions. Cellular immunity, which is decreased during and after space flight, is responsible for controlling EBV replication in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of short-term space flight on latent EBV reactivation.

  15. Descending Mediastinitis in Epstein-Barr Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    van Driel, E. M.; Janssen, M. J. F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Our case report describes a previously healthy 34-year-old male who develops a descending mediastinitis as a complication of an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. The mediastinitis was suspected to have developed by a breakthrough of a peritonsillar abscess through the space between the alar and prevertebral space. PMID:25740774

  16. Kawasaki disease onset during concomitant infections with varicella zoster and Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Turkay, Sadi; Odemis, Ender; Karadag, Ahmet

    2006-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute systemic vasculitis that predominantly affects preschool-aged children. It has a predilection to coronary arteries, and its precise etiology is still unknown. Many infectious agents, including viruses and bacteria, have been suggested as potential causes of the disease. Here, we report a patient who met the diagnostic criteria of Kawasaki disease during concomitant Epstein-Barr virus and varicella-zoster virus infections, and we discuss the possible roles of these viruses in etiology. PMID:16916136

  17. Tissue distribution of Epstein-Barr virus genotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H L; Lung, M L; Chan, K H; Griffin, B E; Ng, M H

    1996-01-01

    The genome of naturally occurring Epstein-Barr virus contains either two or three copies of a 29-bp tandem repeat sequence in the first intron of the BZLF gene. These genotypes differ markedly in their distribution between blood and epithelial tissues, presumably because they have adapted to separate life cycles in these sites. The genotype prevalent in the blood also appears to be better able to transform B lymphocytes. PMID:8794387

  18. Multiple Epstein-Barr virus infections in healthy individuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walling, Dennis M.; Brown, Abigail L.; Etienne, Wiguins; Keitel, Wendy A.; Ling, Paul D.; Butel, J. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We employed a newly developed genotyping technique with direct representational detection of LMP-1 gene sequences to study the molecular epidemiology of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in healthy individuals. Infections with up to five different EBV genotypes were found in two of nine individuals studied. These results support the hypothesis that multiple EBV infections of healthy individuals are common. The implications for the development of an EBV vaccine are discussed.

  19. Immune regulation in Epstein-Barr virus-associated diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, R; Burrows, S R; Moss, D J

    1995-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a member of the human herpesvirus family and, like many other herpesviruses, maintains a lifelong latent association with B lymphocytes and a permissive association with stratified epithelium in the oropharynx. Clinical manifestations of primary EBV infection range from acute infectious mononucleosis to an asymptomatic persistent infection. EBV is also associated with a number of malignancies in humans. This review discusses features of the biology of the virus, both in cell culture systems and in the natural host, before turning to the role of the immune system in controlling EBV infection in healthy individuals and in individuals with EBV-associated diseases. Cytotoxic T cells that recognize virally determined epitopes on infected cells make up the major effector arm and control the persistent infection. In contrast, the options for immune control of EBV-associated malignancies are more restricted. Not only is antigen expression restricted to a single nuclear antigen, EBNA1, but also these tumor cells are unable to process EBV latent antigens, presumably because of a transcriptional defect in antigen-processing genes (such as TAP1 and TAP2). The likelihood of producing a vaccine capable of controlling the acute viral infection and EBV-associated malignancies is also discussed. PMID:7565411

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis in an Immunocompetent Child: A Case Report and Management of Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Akkoc, Gulsen; Kadayifci, Eda Kepenekli; Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Yakut, Nurhayat; Ocal Demir, Sevliya; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) usually causes mild, asymptomatic, and self-limited infections in children and adults; however, it may occasionally lead to severe conditions such as neurological diseases, malignant diseases, hepatic failure, and myocarditis. Epstein-Barr virus-related neurological disorders include meningitis, encephalitis, and cranial or peripheral neuritis, which are mostly seen in immunocompromised patients. The therapeutic modalities for EBV-related severe organ damage including central nervous system manifestations are still uncertain. Herein, we describe a seven-year-old boy with EBV encephalitis who presented with prolonged fever, exudative pharyngitis, reduced consciousness, and neck stiffness. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed contrast enhancement in the bilateral insular cortex and the right hypothalamus. The diagnosis was made by EBV-DNA amplification in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. He was discharged with acyclovir therapy without any sequelae. PMID:27213062

  1. Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis in an Immunocompetent Child: A Case Report and Management of Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Akkoc, Gulsen; Kadayifci, Eda Kepenekli; Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Yakut, Nurhayat; Ocal Demir, Sevliya; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) usually causes mild, asymptomatic, and self-limited infections in children and adults; however, it may occasionally lead to severe conditions such as neurological diseases, malignant diseases, hepatic failure, and myocarditis. Epstein-Barr virus-related neurological disorders include meningitis, encephalitis, and cranial or peripheral neuritis, which are mostly seen in immunocompromised patients. The therapeutic modalities for EBV-related severe organ damage including central nervous system manifestations are still uncertain. Herein, we describe a seven-year-old boy with EBV encephalitis who presented with prolonged fever, exudative pharyngitis, reduced consciousness, and neck stiffness. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed contrast enhancement in the bilateral insular cortex and the right hypothalamus. The diagnosis was made by EBV-DNA amplification in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. He was discharged with acyclovir therapy without any sequelae. PMID:27213062

  2. A hybrid herpesvirus infectious vector based on Epstein-Barr virus and herpes simplex virus type 1 for gene transfer into human cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Vos, J M

    1996-12-01

    We have developed a miniviral vector, pH300, based on the human herpesviruses 1 and 4, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), carrying EBV sequences for plasmid episomal maintenance and HSV-1 sequences for amplification and packaging in multimeric form into HSV-1 capsids in the presence of a helper virus and helper cell line. A reporter gene, the bacterial lacZ gene, which expressed beta-galactosidase, was inserted into the multiple cloning site of pH300 to make pH300-lac. The packaged pH300-lac DNA was very efficient in infecting human cells in tissue culture. The pH300-lac miniviral stock was used to infect in vitro various human cell types derived from breast cancer, lung cancer, and liver cancer. Up to 95% of cells were infected and expressed beta-galactosidase activity after exposure to viral stock at a multiplicity of infection of 3. There was essentially no apparent cytotoxicity after infection of cultured cells in vitro. To test in vivo gene delivery, human liver tumor cells preimplanted subcutaneously in nude mice and injected in situ with pH300-lac showed high efficiency of ectopic gene expression. The pH300 miniviral vector is a simple and effective gene transfer system which shows potential for gene therapy of cancer and inherited diseases.

  3. Epstein-Barr virus and its interaction with the host.

    PubMed

    Wolf, H; Bogedain, C; Schwarzmann, F

    1993-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) as a member of the herpesvirus family persists lifelong in the human body and causes diseases associated with virus replication (infectious mononucleosis, oral hairy leukoplakia) as well as neoplastic conditions such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma, B-cell lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease associated with viral latency. This complex biology relates to a highly regulated control of the persisting virus. Still, EBV is lytically produced in certain compartments of the human body. Epithelial cells were found to be of key importance for this. Various routes (cell fusion, IgA receptor-mediated uptake) were described for EBV to enter epithelial cells in the absence of CR2 receptor. Viral entry into cells, however, via CR2 receptor fusion or IgA mediated was not found to be sufficient for viral production. The molecular mechanisms for the lack of viral production in most target cells are primarily the presence of silencer activities and the early elimination of cells entering the lytic cycle. Only terminally differentiated epithelial cells are capable of supporting an efficient lytic cycle of EBV replication. EBV-mediated suppression of apoptosis as well as down-regulation of cellular and viral gene products, such as HLA molecules, which mediate recognition by the immune system, are important contributing factors to the development of these neoplasias where viral genes, possibly via interaction with anti-oncogenes, such as p53, in context with genetic and environmental factors play a key role. Novel diagnostic tools and a vaccine have been developed which could help to control EBV-related diseases. PMID:8407248

  4. Depression correlated with cellular immunity in systemic immunodeficient Epstein-Barr virus syndrome (SIDES).

    PubMed

    Allen, A D; Tilkian, S M

    1986-03-01

    We conducted studies on the peripheral blood of 12 depressed patients with previous diagnoses of mood and/or personality disorders. These patients, and other depressives we observed informally, were resistant to infectious mononucleosis during an epidemic of that illness. All 12 had serologic evidence of a chronic or recrudescent viremia caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the infectious agent in infectious mononucleosis. Additional evidence that EBV viremia may be causally related to depression was provided by a strong correlation between the intensity of depressive symptoms and the cellular immune response to the EBV infection. PMID:3005245

  5. The other side of the coin: Leveraging Epstein-Barr virus in research and therapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fenggang; Tan, Wei Jian; Lu, Yanan; MacAry, Paul A; Loh, Kwok Seng

    2016-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus is (EBV) a ubiquitous virus prevalent in 90% of the human population. Transmitted through infected saliva, EBV is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis (IM) and is further implicated in malignancies of lymphoid and epithelial origins. In the past few decades, research efforts primarily focused on dissecting the mechanism of EBV-induced oncogenesis. Here, we present an alternate facet of the oncovirus EBV, on its applications in research and therapy. Finally, discussions on the prospective utilization of EBV in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) diagnosis and therapy will also be presented. PMID:27531881

  6. Immune Evasion by Epstein-Barr Virus.

    PubMed

    Ressing, Maaike E; van Gent, Michiel; Gram, Anna M; Hooykaas, Marjolein J G; Piersma, Sytse J; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Bar virus (EBV) is widespread within the human population with over 90% of adults being infected. In response to primary EBV infection, the host mounts an antiviral immune response comprising both innate and adaptive effector functions. Although the immune system can control EBV infection to a large extent, the virus is not cleared. Instead, EBV establishes a latent infection in B lymphocytes characterized by limited viral gene expression. For the production of new viral progeny, EBV reactivates from these latently infected cells. During the productive phase of infection, a repertoire of over 80 EBV gene products is expressed, presenting a vast number of viral antigens to the primed immune system. In particular the EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ memory T lymphocytes can respond within hours, potentially destroying the virus-producing cells before viral replication is completed and viral particles have been released. Preceding the adaptive immune response, potent innate immune mechanisms provide a first line of defense during primary and recurrent infections. In spite of this broad range of antiviral immune effector mechanisms, EBV persists for life and continues to replicate. Studies performed over the past decades have revealed a wide array of viral gene products interfering with both innate and adaptive immunity. These include EBV-encoded proteins as well as small noncoding RNAs with immune-evasive properties. The current review presents an overview of the evasion strategies that are employed by EBV to facilitate immune escape during latency and productive infection. These evasion mechanisms may also compromise the elimination of EBV-transformed cells, and thus contribute to malignancies associated with EBV infection.

  7. Detection of antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus capsid antigen by immune adherence hemagglutination.

    PubMed

    Lennette, E T; Ward, E; Henle, G; Henle, W

    1982-01-01

    The immune adherence hemagglutination assay was found to be as sensitive and specific as the indirect immunofluorescence technique for titration of antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus capsid antigen. Satisfactory virus capsid antigen-specific and negative control antigens for the immune adherence hemagglutination assay were prepared from cell extracts of the Epstein-Barr virus producer P3HR-1 and the Epstein-Barr virus genome-negative BJAB lymphoblastoid cell lines, respectively. As the immune adherence hemagglutination assay can be used to titrate antibodies to both the heterophil antigen of the Paul-Bunnell type and to virus capsid antigen, it offers a promising alternative to the immunofluorescence methods in the serodiagnosis of Epstein-Barr virus infections which can be performed by most diagnostic laboratories.

  8. Epstein-Barr virus at 50—future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Young, Lawrence S.

    2014-01-01

    The special November and December issues of the Chinese Journal of Cancer celebrate the 50th anniversary of the discovery of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with a series of reviews covering the association of the virus with various cancers, with special emphasis on the role of EBV in the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). The restricted geographic prevalence of NPC along with the tumor's consistent association with EBV infection has fascinated scientists and clinicians ever since it was first suggested in 1966. As in all cancers, NPC development reflects the complex interplay between host genes and environmental factors, but the essential role of EBV infection provides important insight into the etiology of this tumor. Indeed, it is this understanding that is now translating into exciting diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. PMID:25367333

  9. Alice in Wonderland syndrome as an initial manifestation of Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cinbis, M; Aysun, S

    1992-05-01

    We present a patient with serologically confirmed Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection who had illusions of size, shape, and colour of objects but none of the typical symptoms and signs peculiar to infectious mononucleosis (IM) except sore throat which developed 2 weeks after the initial visual disturbances. The bizarre feelings about the images of body and objects are called the 'Alice in Wonderland syndrome' due to the similarity with Alice's dreams. The same symptomatology including visual metamorphosia is defined in patients with migraine, epilepsy, intoxication due to hallucinogenic drugs, schizophrenia, hyperpyrexia, and cerebral lesions. Alice in Wonderland syndrome has also been reported in the course of IM. PMID:1390519

  10. Alice in Wonderland syndrome as an initial manifestation of Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Cinbis, M; Aysun, S

    1992-01-01

    We present a patient with serologically confirmed Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection who had illusions of size, shape, and colour of objects but none of the typical symptoms and signs peculiar to infectious mononucleosis (IM) except sore throat which developed 2 weeks after the initial visual disturbances. The bizarre feelings about the images of body and objects are called the 'Alice in Wonderland syndrome' due to the similarity with Alice's dreams. The same symptomatology including visual metamorphosia is defined in patients with migraine, epilepsy, intoxication due to hallucinogenic drugs, schizophrenia, hyperpyrexia, and cerebral lesions. Alice in Wonderland syndrome has also been reported in the course of IM. PMID:1390519

  11. Transient global amnesia as a manifestation of Epstein-Barr virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Pommer, B; Pilz, P; Harrer, G

    1983-01-01

    A 43-year-old man developed severe global amnesia with uncinate fits and a single generalised convulsion 10 days after a febrile infection. CSF pleocytosis and serological findings indicated an acute Epstein-Barr virus encephalitis. All of the symptoms cleared within 2 weeks except for occasional generalised seizures. This seems to be the first observation of Epstein-Barr virus encephalitis presenting predominantly as transient global amnesia.

  12. Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 mediates a DNA loop within the latent replication origin of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Frappier, L; O'Donnell, M

    1991-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) binds and activates the viral latent origin of DNA replication, oriP. We have used electron microscopy to examine the assembly of EBNA-1 onto oriP. The oriP region consists of two essential elements separated by approximately 1 kilobase pair of DNA. One element contains 20 tandom EBNA-1 binding sites [called the family of repeats (FR)] and serves to activate initiation of replication at the dyad symmetry (DS) element, which contains 4 EBNA-1 binding sites. Titration of homogeneous EBNA-1 produced in baculovirus (bEBNA-1) onto oriP DNA showed an order to the assembly of bEBNA-1 onto oriP. At low concentrations, bEBNA-1 was located exclusively on the FR element. As the level of bEBNA-1 was raised, a loop between the FR and DS elements became the most prevalent DNA-protein complex. These data suggest protein-mediated DNA looping may play a role in activating latent-phase replication of the Epstein-Barr virus.

  13. Systematic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease presenting as a persistent fever and cough: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative childhood disease is an extremely rare disorder and classically arises following primary acute or chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection. It is characterized by clonal proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus-infected T-cells with an activated cytotoxic phenotype. This disease has a rapid clinical course and is more frequent in Asia and South America, with relatively few cases being reported in Western countries. The clinical and pathological features of the disease overlap with other conditions including infectious mononucleosis, chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and natural killer cell malignancies. We describe the rare case of systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative childhood disease in a 16-year-old Malay boy. Case presentation He presented with a six-month history of fever and cough, with pulmonary and mediastinal lymphadenopathy and severe pancytopenia. Medium- to large-sized, CD8+ and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA-positive atypical lymphoid cells were present in the bone marrow aspirate. He subsequently developed fatal virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome and died due to sepsis and multiorgan failure. Conclusions Although systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative childhood disease is a disorder which is rarely encountered in clinical practice, our case report underlines the importance of a comprehensive diagnostic approach in the management of this disease. A high level of awareness of the disease throughout the diagnosis process for young patients who present with systemic illness and hemophagocytic syndrome may be of great help for the clinical diagnosis of this disease. PMID:25163591

  14. Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Ann K.; Currie, Margaret J.; Robinson, Bridget A.; Morrin, Helen; Phung, Yen; Pearson, John F.; Anderson, Trevor P.; Potter, John D.; Walker, Logan C.

    2015-01-01

    Findings of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) studies of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and breast cancer vary, making it difficult to determine whether either, both, or neither virus is causally associated with breast cancer. We investigated CMV and EBV in paired samples of breast cancer and normal breast tissue from 70 women using quantitative PCR. A serum sample from each woman was tested for CMV and EBV IgG. To place our results in context, we reviewed the existing literature and performed a meta-analysis of our results together with previous PCR studies of EBV, CMV, and breast cancer. Of the serology samples, 67 of 70 (96%) were EBV IgG positive and 49 of 70 (70%) were CMV IgG positive. QPCR detected EBV in 24 (34%) of the tumour and 9 (13%) of the paired normal specimens and CMV in 0 (0%) of the tumour and 2 (3%) of the paired normal specimens. Our findings, together with earlier results summarised in the meta-analysis, suggest several possibilities: variable findings may be due to limitations of molecular analyses; ‘hit and run’ oncogenesis may lead to inconsistent results; one or both viruses has a role at a later stage in breast cancer development; infection with multiple viruses increases breast cancer risk; or neither virus has a role. Future studies should focus on ways to investigate these possibilities, and should include comparisons of breast cancer tissue samples with appropriate normal tissue samples. PMID:25723522

  15. The Epigenetic Life Cycle of Epstein-Barr Virus.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) more than 50 years ago, this virus has been studied for its capacity to readily establish a latent infection, which is the prominent hallmark of this member of the herpesvirus family. EBV has become an important model for many aspects of herpesviral latency, but the molecular steps and mechanisms that lead to and promote viral latency have only emerged recently. It now appears that the virus exploits diverse facets of epigenetic gene regulation in the cellular host to establish a latent infection. Most viral genes are transcriptionally repressed, and viral chromatin is densely compacted during EBV's latent phase, but latent infection is not a dead end. In order to escape from this phase, epigenetic silencing must be reverted efficiently and quickly. It appears that EBV has perfected a clever strategy to overcome transcriptional repression of its many lytic genes to initiate virus de novo synthesis within a few hours after induction of its lytic cycle. This review tries to summarize the known molecular mechanisms, the current models, concepts, and ideas underlying this viral strategy. This review also attempts to identify and address gaps in our current understanding of EBV's epigenetic mechanisms within the infected cellular host. PMID:26424645

  16. The Epstein-Barr Virus BDLF4 Gene Is Required for Efficient Expression of Viral Late Lytic Genes.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takahiro; Narita, Yohei; Yoshida, Masahiro; Sato, Yoshitaka; Goshima, Fumi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Murata, Takayuki

    2015-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a gammaherpesvirus, associated with infectious mononucleosis and various types of malignancy. We focused here on the BDLF4 gene of EBV and identified it as a lytic gene, expressed with early kinetics. Viral late gene expression of the BDLF4 knockout strain was severely restricted; this could be restored by an exogenous supply of BDLF4. These results indicate that BDLF4 is important for the EBV lytic replication cycle, especially in late gene expression.

  17. Murine Models of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Elshafa Hassan; Baiocchi, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a B-lymphotropic gamma herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies. Most EBV-related cancers present complex medical management challenges; thus it has been essential to develop preclinical in vivo models allowing for the study of pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of these diseases. Early in vivo models used nonhuman primates; however, such models were limited by the inability of EBV to achieve viral latency, availability, and cost. Immunodeficient mouse strains emerged as efficient models that allow for engraftment of human mononuclear cells and controlled evaluation of EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). By using highly immunodeficient strains of mice such as severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) and NOD/LtSz-scid ILrg(-/-)(NOG) mice, investigators have developed efficient platforms for evaluating pathogenesis of benign (HLH) and malignant (EBV-LPD) diseases associated with EBV. Humanized murine chimeric models have been essential tools for evaluating preventive strategies with vaccine and adoptive cellular approaches, as well as development of experimental therapeutic strategies. Manipulation of the human immune cells before engraftment or mutation of viral lytic and latent genes has enhanced our understanding of the oncogenic nature of EBV and the complexity of human immune responses to EBV. In this review, we discuss how the EBV murine models have evolved to become essential tools for studying the virology of EBV as it relates to human EBV-LPD pathogenesis, the immunobiology of innate and adaptive responses, and limitations of these models. PMID:27034395

  18. Attachment anxiety is related to Epstein-Barr virus latency.

    PubMed

    Fagundes, Christopher P; Jaremka, Lisa M; Glaser, Ronald; Alfano, Catherine M; Povoski, Stephen P; Lipari, Adele M; Agnese, Doreen M; Yee, Lisa D; Carson, William E; Farrar, William B; Malarkey, William B; Chen, Min; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2014-10-01

    Attachment theory provides a framework for understanding individual differences in chronic interpersonal stress. Attachment anxiety, a type of relationship insecurity characterized by worry about rejection and abandonment, is a chronic interpersonal stressor. Stress impacts cellular immunity, including herpesvirus reactivation. We investigated whether attachment anxiety was related to the expression of a latent herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), when individuals were being tested for breast or colon cancer and approximately 1 year later. Participants (N=183) completed a standard attachment questionnaire and provided blood to assess EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) IgG antibody titers. Individuals with more attachment anxiety had higher EBV VCA IgG antibody titers than those with less attachment anxiety. The strength of the association between attachment anxiety and antibody titers was the same at both assessments. This study is the first to show an association between latent herpesvirus reactivation and attachment anxiety. Because elevated herpesvirus antibody titers reflect poorer cellular immune system control over the latent virus, these data suggest that high attachment anxiety is associated with cellular immune dysregulation. PMID:24945717

  19. Attachment anxiety is related to Epstein-Barr virus latency.

    PubMed

    Fagundes, Christopher P; Jaremka, Lisa M; Glaser, Ronald; Alfano, Catherine M; Povoski, Stephen P; Lipari, Adele M; Agnese, Doreen M; Yee, Lisa D; Carson, William E; Farrar, William B; Malarkey, William B; Chen, Min; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2014-10-01

    Attachment theory provides a framework for understanding individual differences in chronic interpersonal stress. Attachment anxiety, a type of relationship insecurity characterized by worry about rejection and abandonment, is a chronic interpersonal stressor. Stress impacts cellular immunity, including herpesvirus reactivation. We investigated whether attachment anxiety was related to the expression of a latent herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), when individuals were being tested for breast or colon cancer and approximately 1 year later. Participants (N=183) completed a standard attachment questionnaire and provided blood to assess EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) IgG antibody titers. Individuals with more attachment anxiety had higher EBV VCA IgG antibody titers than those with less attachment anxiety. The strength of the association between attachment anxiety and antibody titers was the same at both assessments. This study is the first to show an association between latent herpesvirus reactivation and attachment anxiety. Because elevated herpesvirus antibody titers reflect poorer cellular immune system control over the latent virus, these data suggest that high attachment anxiety is associated with cellular immune dysregulation.

  20. Epstein-Barr virus association with peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Mondragón, María G; Torres, Javier; Flores-Luna, Lourdes; Carreón-Talavera, Ricardo; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2015-01-01

    Background. Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) use are considered the main risk to develop peptic ulcer disease (PUD). However, PUD also occurs in the absence of HP infection and/or NSAID use. Recently, we have found evidence that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation increases the risk to develop premalignant and malignant gastric lesions. Objective. To study a possible association between EBV and PUD. Methods. Antibodies against an EBV reactivation antigen, HP, and the HP virulence factor CagA were measured in sera from 207 Mexican subjects, controls (healthy individuals, n = 129), and PUD patients (n = 78, 58 duodenal and 20 gastric ulcers). Statistical associations were estimated. Results. Duodenal PUD was significantly associated with high anti-EBV IgG titers (p = 0.022, OR = 2.5), while anti-EBV IgA was positively associated with gastric PUD (p = 0.002, OR = 10.1). Conclusions. Our study suggests that EBV reactivation in gastric and duodenal epithelium increases the risk to develop PUD.

  1. Epstein-barr virus induced cellular changes in nasal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Gelardi, Matteo; Tomaiuolo, Marilena; Cassano, Michele; Besozzi, Gaspare; Fiorella, Maria Luisa; Calvario, Agata; Castellano, Maria Antonia; Cassano, Pasquale

    2006-01-01

    A 21-year-old man presented with nasal obstruction of the right nasal fossa of 1 year duration. Nasal endoscopy revealed in the right inferior turbinate head a rounded neoplasm about 1 cm in diameter. Cytologic study of a nasal scraping specimen disclosed numerous clusters containing columnar cells with cytomegaly, prominent multinucleation, markedly sparse shortened cilia; the cytoplasm contained an acidophil area and a small round area that stained poorly; cells with a large intracytoplasmic vacuole that was acidophil and PAS+. Serology tests using the nested polymer chain reaction (PCR) technique on serum, nasal and pharyngeal smears revealed an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection that was confirmed at electron microscopy. The clinical and cytological features resolved 19 months after the initial evaluation. Conclusion The authors advise carrying out clinical (endoscopy, serology, etc.) evaluation of all endonasal neoplasms and to routinely perform cytological study on nasal scraping specimens. When samples test positive for EBV, nasal and nasopharyngeal endoscopy should be performed regularly to detect possible evidence for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). PMID:16451721

  2. An increased prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus infection in young patients suggests a possible etiology for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    James, J A; Kaufman, K M; Farris, A D; Taylor-Albert, E; Lehman, T J; Harley, J B

    1997-01-01

    An unknown environmental agent has been suspected to induce systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus) in man. Prompted by our recent immunochemical findings, we sought evidence for an association between Epstein-Barr virus infection and lupus. Because the vast majority of adults have been infected with Epstein-Barr virus, we chose to study children and young adults. Virtually all (116 of 117, or 99%) of these young patients had seroconverted against Epstein-Barr virus, as compared with only 70% (107 of 153) of their controls (odds ratio 49.9, 95% confidence interval 9.3-1025, P < 0. 00000000001). The difference in the rate of Epstein-Barr virus seroconversion could not be explained by serum IgG level or by cross-reacting anti-Sm/nRNP autoantibodies. No similar difference was found in the seroconversion rates against four other herpes viruses. An assay for Epstein-Barr viral DNA in peripheral blood lymphocytes established Epstein-Barr virus infection in the peripheral blood of all 32 of the lupus patients tested, while only 23 of the 32 matched controls were infected (odds ratio > 10, 95% confidence interval 2.53-infinity, P < 0.002). When considered with other evidence supporting a relationship between Epstein-Barr virus and lupus, these data are consistent with, but do not in themselves establish, Epstein-Barr virus infection as an etiologic factor in lupus. PMID:9399948

  3. Rational Design of an Epstein-Barr Virus Vaccine Targeting the Receptor-Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Kanekiyo, Masaru; Bu, Wei; Joyce, M Gordon; Meng, Geng; Whittle, James R R; Baxa, Ulrich; Yamamoto, Takuya; Narpala, Sandeep; Todd, John-Paul; Rao, Srinivas S; McDermott, Adrian B; Koup, Richard A; Rossmann, Michael G; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Nabel, Gary J

    2015-08-27

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) represents a major global health problem. Though it is associated with infectious mononucleosis and ∼200,000 cancers annually worldwide, a vaccine is not available. The major target of immunity is EBV glycoprotein 350/220 (gp350) that mediates attachment to B cells through complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21). Here, we created self-assembling nanoparticles that displayed different domains of gp350 in a symmetric array. By focusing presentation of the CR2-binding domain on nanoparticles, potent neutralizing antibodies were elicited in mice and non-human primates. The structurally designed nanoparticle vaccine increased neutralization 10- to 100-fold compared to soluble gp350 by targeting a functionally conserved site of vulnerability, improving vaccine-induced protection in a mouse model. This rational approach to EBV vaccine design elicited potent neutralizing antibody responses by arrayed presentation of a conserved viral entry domain, a strategy that can be applied to other viruses.

  4. Genital ulcers associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection (ulcus vulvae acutum).

    PubMed

    Sárdy, Miklós; Wollenberg, Andreas; Niedermeier, Andrea; Flaig, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection may rarely be associated with genital ulcers (ulcus vulvae acutum), a very painful manifestation. The aetiopathogenesis of the disease is not fully understood. We describe here a case of an adolescent virgin with multiple, deep genital ulcers associated with acute infectious mononucleosis. The diagnosis was supported by the clinical symptoms, atypical lymphocytosis, elevated circulating levels of liver enzymes, positive EBV serology, and the detection of EBV in a swab sample and a biopsy specimen by PCR. The virus could not be detected by immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization. After a short course of methylprednisolone as a supportive treatment, the ulcers healed within one month. No relapse occurred during the 2-year follow-up. Available data relating to the aetiopathogenesis of this condition are reviewed, and we speculate that it may have been caused by percutaneous autoinoculation through cervicovaginal fluid.

  5. Valpromide Inhibits Lytic Cycle Reactivation of Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gorres, Kelly L.; Daigle, Derek; Mohanram, Sudharshan; McInerney, Grace E.; Lyons, Danielle E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) from latency into the lytic phase of its life cycle allows the virus to spread among cells and between hosts. Valproic acid (VPA) inhibits initiation of the lytic cycle in EBV-infected B lymphoma cells. While VPA blocks viral lytic gene expression, it induces expression of many cellular genes, because it is a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Here we show, using derivatives of VPA, that blockade of EBV reactivation is separable from HDAC inhibition. Valpromide (VPM), an amide derivative of valproic acid that is not an HDAC inhibitor, prevented expression of two EBV genes, BZLF1 and BRLF1, that mediate lytic reactivation. VPM also inhibited expression of a viral late gene, but not early genes, when BZLF1 was exogenously expressed. Unlike VPA, VPM did not activate lytic expression of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Expression of cellular immediate-early genes, such as FOS and EGR1, is kinetically upstream of the EBV lytic cycle. VPM did not activate expression of these cellular immediate-early genes but decreased their level of expression when induced by butyrate, an HDAC inhibitor. VPM did not alter expression of several other cellular immediate-early genes, including STAT3, which were induced by the HDAC inhibitors in cells refractory to lytic induction. Therefore, VPM selectively inhibits both viral and cellular gene expression. VPA and VPM represent a new class of antiviral agents. The mechanism by which VPA and VPM block EBV reactivation may be related to their anticonvulsant activity. PMID:26933051

  6. Transient induction of a nuclear antigen unrelated to Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen in cells of two human B-lymphoma lines converted by Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Fresen, K O; zur Hausen, H

    1977-01-01

    Infection of cells of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative human B-lymphoma lines BJAB and Ramos with EBV preparations from P3HR-1 or B 95-8 cells converted these cells to EBV genome carriers expressing Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA) in almost 100% of these cells. Induction of these cells as well as of clones from P3HR-1 EBV-converted BJAB cells with iododeoxyuridine, aminopterin, and hypoxanthine resulted in the appearance of a nuclear antigen in about 1-6% of the cells 1-4 days after induction. The antigen is different from known EBV-induced antigens like EBNA, viral capsid antigen (VCA) or the D- and R-subspecificities of the early antigen (EA) complex. It is demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence and inactivated after acetone fixation. The antigen was not detectable after induction of uninfected BJAB and Ramos cells nor has it been found in noninduced or induced P3HR-1 and Raji cells. Thus, it appears that EBV-infection mediates the expression of this antigen, for which the name TINA (transiently induced nuclear antigen) is suggested. Sera reacting against TINA generally contained high antibody titers against EBV-induced EA. Only a limited number of highly EA-reactive sera, however, were also positive for TINA. Among 200 sera tested thus far, TINA reactivity was most frequently observed in sera of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (7 out of 28), in sera of the only two patients with immunoblastoma tested and occasionally in sera from patients with Hodgkin's disease and chronic lymphatic leukemia. Among 70 sera from nontumor patients, TINA reactivity was observed three times: two patients suffered from "chronic" infectious mononucleosis, the other revealed persistent splenomegaly. PMID:189313

  7. Replication of latent Epstein-Barr virus genomes in Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Adams, A

    1987-05-01

    The replication of the 50 to 60 latent, predominantly extrachromosomal, Epstein-Barr virus genomes maintained by the Burkitt-lymphoma-derived Raji cell line was investigated by using a Meselson-Stahl density transfer approach. Samples of DNA isolated from cells cultivated for different periods in bromodeoxyuridine-supplemented medium were fractionated according to density, and the distribution of viral and cellular DNAs among the heavy-, hybrid-, and light-density species was quantitated. The results indicate that the majority of latent Epstein-Barr virus DNA plasmids each replicate once during the cell cycle.

  8. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Chronically Inflamed Periapical Granulomas

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Kosuke; Takeichi, Osamu; Hatori, Keisuke; Imai, Kenichi; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogiso, Bunnai

    2015-01-01

    Periapical granulomas are lesions around the apex of a tooth caused by a polymicrobial infection. Treatment with antibacterial agents is normally performed to eliminate bacteria from root canals; however, loss of the supporting alveolar bone is typically observed, and tooth extraction is often selected if root canal treatment does not work well. Therefore, bacteria and other microorganisms could be involved in this disease. To understand the pathogenesis of periapical granulomas more precisely, we focused on the association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) using surgically removed periapical granulomas (n = 32). EBV DNA was detected in 25 of 32 periapical granulomas (78.1%) by real-time PCR, and the median number of EBV DNA copies was approximately 8,688.01/μg total DNA. In contrast, EBV DNA was not detected in healthy gingival tissues (n = 10); the difference was statistically significant according to the Mann-Whitney U test (p = 0.0001). Paraffin sections were also analyzed by in situ hybridization to detect EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER)-expressing cells. EBER was detected in the cytoplasm and nuclei of B cells and plasma cells in six of nine periapical granulomas, but not in healthy gingival tissues. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis for latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) of EBV using serial tissue sections showed that LMP-1-expressing cells were localized to the same areas as EBER-expressing cells. These data suggest that B cells and plasma cells in inflamed granulomas are a major source of EBV infection, and that EBV could play a pivotal role in controlling immune cell responses in periapical granulomas. PMID:25884725

  9. Epstein-Barr Virus Shedding by Astronauts During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Patterns of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation in 32 astronauts and 18 healthy age-matched control subjects were characterized by quantifying EBV shedding. Saliva samples were collected from astronauts before, during, and after 10 space shuttle missions of 5 to 14 d duration. Samples were collected on a similar schedule from control subjects. At one time point or another, EBV was detected in saliva from each of the astronauts. Of 1398 saliva specimens from 32 astronauts, polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that 314 (23%) were positive for EBV DNA. Examination by flight phase showed that 29% of the saliva specimens collected before flight were positive for EBV DNA, as were 16% of those collected during flight and 16% of those collected after flight. The mean number of copies of EBV DNA from samples taken during the flights was 417 plus or minus 31, significantly greater (p less than 0.05) than the number of copies from the preflight (40 plus or minus 2) and postflight (44 plus or minus 5) phases. In contrast, the control subjects shed EBV DNA with a frequency of 3.7% and a mean number of EBV DNA copies of 40 plus or minus 2 per mL of saliva. Ten days before flight and on landing day, titers of antibody to EBV viral capsid antigen were significantly (p less than 0.05) greater than baseline levels. On landing day, urinary levels of cortisol and catecholamines, and plasma levels of substance P and other neuropeptides, were increased over their preflight values. Increases in the number of viral copies and in the amount of EBV-specific antibody were consistent with the occurrence of EBV reactivation before, during, and after space flight.

  10. Epstein-Barr virus shedding by astronauts during space flight.

    PubMed

    Pierson, D L; Stowe, R P; Phillips, T M; Lugg, D J; Mehta, S K

    2005-05-01

    Patterns of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation in 32 astronauts and 18 healthy age-matched control subjects were characterized by quantifying EBV shedding. Saliva samples were collected from astronauts before, during, and after 10 space shuttle missions of 5-14 days duration. At one time point or another, EBV was detected in saliva from each of the astronauts. Of 1398 saliva specimens from 32 astronauts, polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that 314 (23%) were positive for EBV DNA. Examination by flight phase showed that 29% of the saliva specimens collected from 28 astronauts before flight were positive for EBV DNA, as were 16% of those collected from 25 astronauts during flight and 16% of those collected after flight from 23 astronauts. The mean number of EBV copies from samples taken during the flights was 417 per mL, significantly greater (p<.05) than the number of viral copies from the preflight (40) and postflight (44) phases. In contrast, the control subjects shed EBV DNA with a frequency of 3.7% and mean number of EBV copies of 40 per mL of saliva. Ten days before flight and on landing day, titers of antibody to EBV viral capsid antigen were significantly (p<.05) greater than baseline levels. On landing day, urinary levels of cortisol and catecholamines were greater than their preflight values. In a limited study (n=5), plasma levels of substance P and other neuropeptides were also greater on landing day. Increases in the number of viral copies and in the amount of EBV-specific antibody were consistent with EBV reactivation before, during, and after space flight.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus shedding by astronauts during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Stowe, R. P.; Phillips, T. M.; Lugg, D. J.; Mehta, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    Patterns of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation in 32 astronauts and 18 healthy age-matched control subjects were characterized by quantifying EBV shedding. Saliva samples were collected from astronauts before, during, and after 10 space shuttle missions of 5-14 days duration. At one time point or another, EBV was detected in saliva from each of the astronauts. Of 1398 saliva specimens from 32 astronauts, polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that 314 (23%) were positive for EBV DNA. Examination by flight phase showed that 29% of the saliva specimens collected from 28 astronauts before flight were positive for EBV DNA, as were 16% of those collected from 25 astronauts during flight and 16% of those collected after flight from 23 astronauts. The mean number of EBV copies from samples taken during the flights was 417 per mL, significantly greater (p<.05) than the number of viral copies from the preflight (40) and postflight (44) phases. In contrast, the control subjects shed EBV DNA with a frequency of 3.7% and mean number of EBV copies of 40 per mL of saliva. Ten days before flight and on landing day, titers of antibody to EBV viral capsid antigen were significantly (p<.05) greater than baseline levels. On landing day, urinary levels of cortisol and catecholamines were greater than their preflight values. In a limited study (n=5), plasma levels of substance P and other neuropeptides were also greater on landing day. Increases in the number of viral copies and in the amount of EBV-specific antibody were consistent with EBV reactivation before, during, and after space flight.

  12. Progress, prospects, and problems in Epstein-Barr virus vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Balfour, Henry H

    2014-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is responsible for a farrago of acute and chronic human diseases including cancer. A prophylactic vaccine could reduce this disease burden. Several EBV vaccines have been given to humans but none has been sufficiently studied to establish safety and efficacy. EBV vaccine development has been hampered by the lack of an animal model other than subhuman primates, proprietary issues, selection of an appropriate adjuvant, and failure to reach consensus on what an EBV vaccine could or should actually achieve. A recent conference at the U.S. National Institutes of Health emphasizing the global importance of EBV vaccine and advocating a phase 3 trial to prevent infectious mononucleosis should encourage research that could eventually lead to its licensure.

  13. A virus-like particle-based Epstein-Barr virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ruiss, Romana; Jochum, Simon; Wanner, Gerhard; Reisbach, Gilbert; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang; Zeidler, Reinhard

    2011-12-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is an ubiquitous human herpesvirus which can lead to infectious mononucleosis and different cancers. In immunocompromised individuals, this virus is a major cause for morbidity and mortality. Transplant patients who did not encounter EBV prior to immunosuppression frequently develop EBV-associated malignancies, but a prophylactic EBV vaccination might reduce this risk considerably. Virus-like particles (VLPs) mimic the structure of the parental virus but lack the viral genome. Therefore, VLPs are considered safe and efficient vaccine candidates. We engineered a dedicated producer cell line for EBV-derived VLPs. This cell line contains a genetically modified EBV genome which is devoid of all potential viral oncogenes but provides viral proteins essential for the assembly and release of VLPs via the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT). Human B cells readily take up EBV-based VLPs and present viral epitopes in association with HLA molecules to T cells. Consequently, EBV-based VLPs are highly immunogenic and elicit humoral and strong CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses in vitro and in a preclinical murine model in vivo. Our findings suggest that VLP formulations might be attractive candidates to develop a safe and effective polyvalent vaccine against EBV. PMID:21994444

  14. Emotional Disclosure through Writing or Speaking Modulates Latent Epstein-Barr Virus Antibody Titers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esterling, Brian A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Healthy Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) seropositive undergraduates (n=57) completed personality inventory, provided blood samples, and were randomly assigned to write/talk about stressful events, or to write about trivial events. Those assigned to verbal/stressful condition had significantly lower EBV antibody titers (suggesting better cellular immune…

  15. 21 CFR 866.3235 - Epstein-Barr virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Epstein-Barr virus serological reagents. 866.3235 Section 866.3235 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3235...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3235 - Epstein-Barr virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Epstein-Barr virus serological reagents. 866.3235 Section 866.3235 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3235...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3235 - Epstein-Barr virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Epstein-Barr virus serological reagents. 866.3235 Section 866.3235 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3235...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3235 - Epstein-Barr virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Epstein-Barr virus serological reagents. 866.3235 Section 866.3235 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3235...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3235 - Epstein-Barr virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Epstein-Barr virus serological reagents. 866.3235 Section 866.3235 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3235...

  20. Mannose-Binding Lectin Genotypes and Susceptibility to Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Infancy▿

    PubMed Central

    Friborg, Jeppe T.; Jarrett, Ruth F.; Koch, Anders; Garred, Peter; Freeland, June M. L.; Andersen, Andreas; Melbye, Mads

    2010-01-01

    In a cohort study of children <4 years of age in Greenland, mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) genotypes and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody levels were determined. EBV seropositivity was significantly lower and time to seroconversion increased in MBL-insufficient compared with MBL-sufficient children, indicating that MBL may be involved in primary EBV infection in infancy. PMID:20610664

  1. Immune responses to Epstein-Barr virus in atomic bomb survivors: study of precursor frequency of cytotoxic lymphocytes and titer levels of anti-Epstein-Barr virus-related antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, Y; Kyoizumi, S; Fukuda, Y; Huang, H; Saito, M; Ozaki, K; Hirai, Y; Akiyama, M

    1994-04-01

    Precursor frequencies of cytotoxic lymphocytes to autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells and serum titers of anti-Epstein-Barr virus-related antibodies were measured in 68 atomic bomb survivors to clarify the immune mechanism controlling Epstein-Barr virus infection. The precursor frequency was negatively correlated with the titer of anti-early antigen IgG, which is probably produced at the stage of viral reactivation. A positive correlation between the precursor frequency and titer of anti-Epstein-Barr virus-associated nuclear antigen antibody was also observed, indicating that the precursor frequency reflects the degree of in vivo destruction by T cells of the virus-infected cells. These results suggest that T-cell memory specific to Epstein-Barr virus keeps the virus under control and that the precursor frequency assay is useful for the evaluation of immune responses to Epstein-Barr virus. However, no significant effect of atomic bomb radiation on the precursor frequency was observed in the present study, probably due to the limited number of participants.

  2. Immune responses to epstein-barr virus in atomic bomb survivors: Study of precursor frequency of cytotoxic lymphocytes and titer levels of anti-Epstein-Barr virus-related antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Saito, Mayumi; Ozaki, Kyoko; Hirai, Yuko; Akiyama, Mitoshi ); Fukuda, Yasuko Children's Hospital Medical Center of Northern California, Oakland, CA ); Huang, Hua Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI )

    1994-04-01

    Precursor frequencies of cytotoxic lymphocytes to autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells and serum titers of anti-Epstein-Barr virus-related antibodies were measured in 68 atomic bomb survivors to clarify the immune mechanism controlling Epstein-Barr virus infection. The precursor frequency was negatively correlated with the titer of anti-early antigen lgG, which is probably produced at the stage of viral reactivation. A positive correlation between the precursor frequency and titer of anti-Epstein-Barr virus-associated nuclear antigen antibody was also observed, indicating that the precursor frequency reflects the degree of in vivo destruction by T cells of the virus-infected cells. These results suggest that T-cell memory specific to Epstein-Barr virus keeps the virus under control and that the precursor frequency assay is useful for the evaluation of immune responses to Epstein-Barr virus. However, no significant effect of atomic bomb radiation on the precursor frequency was observed in the present study, probably due to the limited number of participants. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Pancreatitis and cholecystitis in primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection - Systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kottanattu, Lisa; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Helbling, Rossana; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Bianchetti, Mario G; Milani, Gregorio P

    2016-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis have been occasionally reported in primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. We completed a review of the literature and retained 48 scientific reports published between 1966 and 2016 for the final analysis. Acute pancreatitis was recognized in 14 and acalculous cholecystitis in 37 patients with primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. In all patients, the features of acute pancreatitis or acalculous cholecystitis concurrently developed with those of primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. Acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis resolved following a hospital stay of 25days or less. Acalculous cholecystitis was associated with Gilbert-Meulengracht syndrome in two cases. In conclusion, this thorough analysis indicates that acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis are unusual but plausible complications of primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. Pancreatitis and cholecystitis deserve consideration in cases with severe abdominal pain. These complications are usually rather mild and resolve spontaneously without sequelae. PMID:27434148

  4. Spironolactone blocks Epstein-Barr virus production by inhibiting EBV SM protein function.

    PubMed

    Verma, Dinesh; Thompson, Jacob; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2016-03-29

    Clinically available drugs active against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and other human herpesviruses are limited to those targeting viral DNA replication. To identify compounds directed against other steps in the viral life cycle, we searched for drugs active against the EBV SM protein, which is essential for infectious virus production. SM has a highly gene-specific mode of action and preferentially enhances expression of several late lytic cycle EBV genes. Here we demonstrate that spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist approved for clinical use, inhibits SM function and infectious EBV production. Expression of EBV viral capsid antigen is highly SM dependent, and spironolactone inhibits viral capsid antigen synthesis and capsid formation, blocking EBV virion production at a step subsequent to viral DNA replication. In addition, spironolactone inhibits expression of other SM-dependent genes necessary for infectious virion formation. We further demonstrate that molecules structurally related to spironolactone with similar antimineralocorticoid blocking activity do not inhibit EBV production. These findings pave the way for development of antiherpesvirus drugs with new mechanisms of action directed against SM and homologous essential proteins in other herpesviruses. PMID:26976570

  5. Spironolactone blocks Epstein-Barr virus production by inhibiting EBV SM protein function.

    PubMed

    Verma, Dinesh; Thompson, Jacob; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2016-03-29

    Clinically available drugs active against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and other human herpesviruses are limited to those targeting viral DNA replication. To identify compounds directed against other steps in the viral life cycle, we searched for drugs active against the EBV SM protein, which is essential for infectious virus production. SM has a highly gene-specific mode of action and preferentially enhances expression of several late lytic cycle EBV genes. Here we demonstrate that spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist approved for clinical use, inhibits SM function and infectious EBV production. Expression of EBV viral capsid antigen is highly SM dependent, and spironolactone inhibits viral capsid antigen synthesis and capsid formation, blocking EBV virion production at a step subsequent to viral DNA replication. In addition, spironolactone inhibits expression of other SM-dependent genes necessary for infectious virion formation. We further demonstrate that molecules structurally related to spironolactone with similar antimineralocorticoid blocking activity do not inhibit EBV production. These findings pave the way for development of antiherpesvirus drugs with new mechanisms of action directed against SM and homologous essential proteins in other herpesviruses.

  6. EVIDENCE OF EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS ASSOCIATION WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCERS: A REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Soorebettu R; Wilson, David F

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is ubiquitous: over 90% of the adult population is infected with this virus. EBV is capable of infecting both B lymphocytes and epithelial cells throughout the body including the head and neck region. Transmission occurs mainly by exchange of saliva. The infection is asymptomatic or mild in children but, in adolescents and young adults, it causes infectious mononucleosis, a self-limiting disease characterized by lethargy, sore throat, fever and lymphadenopathy. Once established, the virus often remains latent and people become lifelong carriers without experiencing disease. However, in some people, the latent virus is capable of causing malignant tumours, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and various B- and T-cell lymphomas, at sites including the head, neck and oropharyngeal region. As lymphoma is the second-most common malignant disease of the head, neck and oral region after squamous cell carcinoma, oral health care workers including dentists and specialists have a responsibility to carry out a thorough clinical examination of this anatomical region with a view to identifying and diagnosing lesions that may represent lymphomas. Early detection allows early treatment resulting in better prognosis. The focus of this review is on the morphology, transmission and carcinogenic properties of EBV and clinical and diagnostic aspects of a range of EBV-associated malignancies occurring in the head, neck and oral region. As carcinogenic agents, viruses contribute to a significant proportion of the global cancer burden: approximately 15% of all human cancers, worldwide, are attributable to viruses.1,2 Serologic and epidemiologic studies are providing mounting evidence of an etiologic association between viruses and head and neck malignancies.3 To update oral and maxillofacial surgeons and oral medicine specialists and raise awareness of this association, we recently reviewed the evidence of the etiologic role of human papillomavirus in oral disease.4

  7. Acute Retinal Necrosis Associated with Epstein-Barr Virus in a Patient Undergoing Immunosuppressive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oe, Chiaki; Hiraoka, Miki; Tanaka, Sachie; Ohguro, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis (ARN) is a rapidly progressive and severe retinitis resulting in a poor visual outcome. Infections caused by herpes viruses such as herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 or the varicella zoster virus (VZV) are known to be implicated in the development of ARN. In the present study, an 80-year-old female with ARN was examined. She had been affected with rheumatoid arthritis and had taken methotrexate for over 10 years. Her right eye showed clinical features of ARN, and her left eye showed mild retinitis. The genomic DNA in the aqueous humor and vitreous fluid from her right eye were analyzed by a comprehensive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to screen infectious pathogens including viruses. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was detected from both specimens, but neither HSV or VZV nor cytomegalovirus was detected. She underwent intraocular surgery following systemic corticosteroid and acyclovir applications. However, although the retinitis of her right eye was extinguished, the final visual outcome was blindness due to optic nerve atrophy. There are few reports indicating that EBV is associated with ARN development. The present findings suggest that EBV alone can be the causative agent of ARN. PMID:27194989

  8. Acute Retinal Necrosis Associated with Epstein-Barr Virus in a Patient Undergoing Immunosuppressive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Oe, Chiaki; Hiraoka, Miki; Tanaka, Sachie; Ohguro, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis (ARN) is a rapidly progressive and severe retinitis resulting in a poor visual outcome. Infections caused by herpes viruses such as herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 or the varicella zoster virus (VZV) are known to be implicated in the development of ARN. In the present study, an 80-year-old female with ARN was examined. She had been affected with rheumatoid arthritis and had taken methotrexate for over 10 years. Her right eye showed clinical features of ARN, and her left eye showed mild retinitis. The genomic DNA in the aqueous humor and vitreous fluid from her right eye were analyzed by a comprehensive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to screen infectious pathogens including viruses. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was detected from both specimens, but neither HSV or VZV nor cytomegalovirus was detected. She underwent intraocular surgery following systemic corticosteroid and acyclovir applications. However, although the retinitis of her right eye was extinguished, the final visual outcome was blindness due to optic nerve atrophy. There are few reports indicating that EBV is associated with ARN development. The present findings suggest that EBV alone can be the causative agent of ARN.

  9. The interplay between Epstein-Barr virus and B lymphocytes: implications for infection, immunity, and disease.

    PubMed

    Hatton, Olivia L; Harris-Arnold, Aleishia; Schaffert, Steven; Krams, Sheri M; Martinez, Olivia M

    2014-05-01

    Human B cells are the primary targets of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. In most cases, EBV infection is asymptomatic because of a highly effective host immune response, but some individuals develop self-limiting infectious mononucleosis, while others develop EBV-associated lymphoid or epithelial malignancies. The viral and immune factors that determine the outcome of infection are not understood. The EBV life cycle includes a lytic phase, culminating in the production of new viral particles, and a latent phase, during which the virus remains largely silent for the lifetime of the host in memory B cells. Thus, in healthy individuals, there is a tightly orchestrated interplay between EBV and the host that allows the virus to persist. To promote viral persistence, EBV has evolved a variety of strategies to modulate the host immune response including inhibition of immune cell function, blunting of apoptotic pathways, and interfering with antigen processing and presentation pathways. In this article, we focus on mechanisms by which dysregulation of the host B cell and immune modulation by the virus can contribute to development of EBV+ B cell lymphomas. PMID:24619311

  10. Epstein-Barr virus and human diseases: recent advances in diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Okano, M; Thiele, G M; Davis, J R; Grierson, H L; Purtilo, D T

    1988-01-01

    Since the discovery of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) from a cultured Burkitt's lymphoma cell line in 1964, the virus has been associated with Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and infectious mononucleosis. During the recent decade, EBV has been etiologically implicated in a broad spectrum of human diseases. The precise role of this virus in these diseases is not well understood, but clearly, defective immunosurveillance against the virus may permit an uncontrolled proliferation of EBV-infected cells. As a result, a growing number of cases of EBV-associated B-cell proliferative diseases or lymphoma have been noted in patients with primary and acquired immunodeficiencies. These lymphoproliferative diseases and others, such as chronic mononucleosis syndrome, are leading to new areas of investigation which are providing information regarding the pathogenetic mechanisms of EBV-induced diseases. The early accurate diagnosis of EBV infection can be achieved by performing EBV-specific serology, detecting for EBV-determined nuclear antigen in tissues, establishing spontaneous lymphoid cell lines, and using molecular hybridization techniques for demonstrating the presence of viral genome in affected lesions. Images PMID:2848624

  11. Detection of human cytomegalovirus and epstein-barr virus in coronary atherosclerotic tissue.

    PubMed

    Imbronito, Ana Vitória; Marcelino, Silvia Linardi; Grande, Sabrina Rosa; Nunes, Fabio Daumas; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies indicated that patients with atherosclerosis are predominantly infected by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), but rarely infected by type 1 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-1). In this study, atheromas of 30 patients who underwent aortocoronary bypass surgery with coronary endartherectomy were tested for the presence of these two viruses. HCMV occurred in 93.3% of the samples and EBV-1 was present in 50% of them. Concurrent presence of both pathogens was detected in 43.3% of the samples.

  12. Enhanced expression of the Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein by a recombinant vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J P; Hampson, I N; Heinrich, H W; Mackett, M; Arrand, J R

    1989-05-01

    The complete coding sequence of the Epstein-Barr virus strain B95-8 latent membrane protein (LMP) was cloned using a Raji cell cDNA library and genomic B95-8 DNA. The clone was characterized by sequencing and then used to make a recombinant vaccinia virus. This virus (VLMP) was shown to express a relatively high level of LMP in an authentic fashion. Antisera raised in rabbits against VLMP were shown to react with B95-8 LMP as well as cross-reacting with a 50K cellular protein.

  13. [Epstein-Barr virus infection - life cycle, methods of diagnosis, associated diseases].

    PubMed

    Bocian, Joanna; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous virus that infects about 90–95% of the adult population. EBV establishes life-long latent persistence. The virus is found to be the major cause of infectious mononucleosis but it has also been associated with development of endemic Burkitt’s lymphoma. Result of EBV infection is the most common complication in patients after transplantation which is a post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. Strong associations between EBV infection and Hodgkin’s lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma and carcinomas derived from smooth muscle tissue also exist. There is a hypothesis that there is an association between EBV infection and autoimmune and allergic diseases. EBV is a Herpesvirus family member; its genetic material has dsDNA form. There are two strains of EBV: A and B. The only host for EBV is human with target cells: B cells and epithelial cells. The life cycle of EBV consists of lytic and latent phases. In the latent phase three different patterns of gene expression are possible. Due to some circumstances EBV can undergo reactivation, which is an important issue in transplantology. The main methods of diagnosis of EBV infections are serological methods that detect certain specific antibodies and recently more popular molecular biological methods such as PCR or in situ hybridization. PMID:21677354

  14. NK Cell Influence on the Outcome of Primary Epstein-Barr Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Chijioke, Obinna; Landtwing, Vanessa; Münz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was discovered as the first human candidate tumor virus in Burkitt's lymphoma more than 50 years ago. Despite its strong growth transforming capacity, more than 90% of the human adult population carries this virus asymptomatically under near perfect immune control. The mode of primary EBV infection is in part responsible for EBV-associated diseases, including Hodgkin's lymphoma. It is, therefore, important to understand which circumstances lead to symptomatic primary EBV infection, called infectious mononucleosis (IM). Innate immune control of lytic viral replication by early-differentiated natural killer (NK) cells was found to attenuate IM symptoms and continuous loss of the respective NK cell subset during the first decade of life might predispose for IM during adolescence. In this review, we discuss the evidence that NK cells are involved in the immune control of EBV, mechanisms by which they might detect and control lytic EBV replication, and compare NK cell subpopulations that expand during different human herpesvirus infections. PMID:27621731

  15. Resveratrol inhibits Epstein Barr Virus lytic cycle in Burkitt's lymphoma cells by affecting multiple molecular targets.

    PubMed

    De Leo, Alessandra; Arena, Giuseppe; Lacanna, Egidio; Oliviero, Giorgio; Colavita, Francesca; Mattia, Elena

    2012-11-01

    Resveratrol (RV), a polyphenolic natural product present in many plants and fruits, exhibits anti-inflammatory, cardio-protective and anti-proliferative properties. Moreover, RV affects a wide variety of viruses including members of the Herpesviridae family, retroviruses, influenza A virus and polyomavirus by altering cellular pathways that affect viral replication itself. Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis, is associated with different proliferative diseases in which it establishes a latent and/or a lytic infection. In this study, we examined the antiviral activity of RV against the EBV replicative cycle and investigated the molecular targets possibly involved. In a cellular context that allows in vitro EBV activation and lytic cycle progression through mechanisms closely resembling those that in vivo initiate and enable productive infection, we found that RV inhibited EBV lytic genes expression and the production of viral particles in a dose-dependent manner. We demonstrated that RV inhibited protein synthesis, decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and suppressed the EBV-induced activation of the redox-sensitive transcription factors NF-kB and AP-1. Further insights into the signaling pathways and molecular targets modulated by RV may provide the basis for exploiting the antiviral activity of this natural product on EBV replication.

  16. Effect of Pinus massoniana Lamb. bark extract on lytic cycle of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuxia; Zhang, Shimin; Wang, Xuedong; Gao, Yaqian; Qin, Xing; Wu, Kun

    2012-10-01

    Pinus massoniana bark extract (PMBE) at a concentration of 60 microg/mL or more inhibits the expression of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic proteins, such as Rta, Zta, and EA-D. EBV lytic cycle was blocked by inhibiting the transcription of immediate-early genes. The results suggest that the PMBE has anti-EBV activity. Thus, the extract is potentially useful in preventing the lytic development of EBV in vitro. PMID:23214264

  17. Effect of Pinus massoniana Lamb. bark extract on lytic cycle of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuxia; Zhang, Shimin; Wang, Xuedong; Gao, Yaqian; Qin, Xing; Wu, Kun

    2012-10-01

    Pinus massoniana bark extract (PMBE) at a concentration of 60 microg/mL or more inhibits the expression of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic proteins, such as Rta, Zta, and EA-D. EBV lytic cycle was blocked by inhibiting the transcription of immediate-early genes. The results suggest that the PMBE has anti-EBV activity. Thus, the extract is potentially useful in preventing the lytic development of EBV in vitro.

  18. Kinetics of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Neutralizing and Virus-Specific Antibodies after Primary Infection with EBV

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Wei; Hayes, Gregory M.; Liu, Hui; Gemmell, Lorraine; Schmeling, David O.; Radecki, Pierce; Aguilar, Fiona; Burbelo, Peter D.; Woo, Jennifer; Balfour, Henry H.

    2016-01-01

    Prospective studies of antibodies to multiple Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) proteins and EBV neutralizing antibodies in the same individuals before, during, and after primary EBV infection have not been reported. We studied antibody responses to EBV in college students who acquired primary EBV infection during prospective surveillance and correlated the kinetics of antibody response with the severity of disease. Neutralizing antibodies and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) antibodies to gp350, the major target of neutralizing antibody, reached peak levels at medians of 179 and 333 days after the onset of symptoms of infectious mononucleosis, respectively. No clear correlation was found between the severity of the symptoms of infectious mononucleosis and the peak levels of antibody to individual viral proteins or to neutralizing antibody. In summary, we found that titers of neutralizing antibody and antibodies to multiple EBV proteins increase over many months after primary infection with EBV. PMID:26888186

  19. Rational Design of an Epstein-Barr Virus Vaccine Targeting the Receptor-Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Kanekiyo, Masaru; Bu, Wei; Joyce, M Gordon; Meng, Geng; Whittle, James R R; Baxa, Ulrich; Yamamoto, Takuya; Narpala, Sandeep; Todd, John-Paul; Rao, Srinivas S; McDermott, Adrian B; Koup, Richard A; Rossmann, Michael G; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Nabel, Gary J

    2015-08-27

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) represents a major global health problem. Though it is associated with infectious mononucleosis and ∼200,000 cancers annually worldwide, a vaccine is not available. The major target of immunity is EBV glycoprotein 350/220 (gp350) that mediates attachment to B cells through complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21). Here, we created self-assembling nanoparticles that displayed different domains of gp350 in a symmetric array. By focusing presentation of the CR2-binding domain on nanoparticles, potent neutralizing antibodies were elicited in mice and non-human primates. The structurally designed nanoparticle vaccine increased neutralization 10- to 100-fold compared to soluble gp350 by targeting a functionally conserved site of vulnerability, improving vaccine-induced protection in a mouse model. This rational approach to EBV vaccine design elicited potent neutralizing antibody responses by arrayed presentation of a conserved viral entry domain, a strategy that can be applied to other viruses. PMID:26279189

  20. Stress-induced reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus in astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.; Feeback, D. L.; Barrett, A. D.

    2000-01-01

    Herpesviruses are leading causes of infectious blindness and death in immunocompromised individuals. Impaired cellular immunity, which is known to result in increased frequency and severity of herpesvirus infections, has been demonstrated both during and after spaceflight. Therefore, we examined whether Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a well-characterized latent herpesvirus, undergoes reactivation in astronauts. Sera from Shuttle astronauts, taken before and after spaceflight, were examined for evidence of EBV reactivation. The geometric mean antibody titer to EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) was significantly increased prior to flight compared to baseline (p = 0. 0001). After spaceflight, evidence of acute lytic replication was found in which 8- to 64-fold increases in EBV early antigen (EA) antibodies occurred without significant increases in antibodies to measles virus. Additionally, stress-induced shifts in circulating leukocytes and elevated levels of urinary cortisol and epinephrine were found. Overall, significant increases in EA or high VCA/EA antibody titers were found in 8 of 23 (35%) male astronauts and 3 of 5 (60%) female astronauts. These results indicate that stress reactivates EBV prior to flight and suggest that acute lytic replication of EBV occurs during spaceflight. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Computational discovery of Epstein-Barr virus targeted human genes and signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Suyu; Zhang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays important roles in the origin and the progression of human carcinomas, e.g. diffuse large B cell tumors, T cell lymphomas, etc. Discovering EBV targeted human genes and signaling pathways is vital to understand EBV tumorigenesis. In this study we propose a noise-tolerant homolog knowledge transfer method to reconstruct functional protein-protein interactions (PPI) networks between Epstein-Barr virus and Homo sapiens. The training set is augmented via homolog instances and the homolog noise is counteracted by support vector machine (SVM). Additionally we propose two methods to define subcellular co-localization (i.e. stringent and relaxed), based on which to further derive physical PPI networks. Computational results show that the proposed method achieves sound performance of cross validation and independent test. In the space of 648,672 EBV-human protein pairs, we obtain 51,485 functional interactions (7.94%), 869 stringent physical PPIs and 46,050 relaxed physical PPIs. Fifty-eight evidences are found from the latest database and recent literature to validate the model. This study reveals that Epstein-Barr virus interferes with normal human cell life, such as cholesterol homeostasis, blood coagulation, EGFR binding, p53 binding, Notch signaling, Hedgehog signaling, etc. The proteome-wide predictions are provided in the supplementary file for further biomedical research. PMID:27470517

  2. Effects of adenine arabinoside on lymphocytes infected with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Benz, W C; Siegel, P J; Baer, J

    1978-01-01

    Low concentrations of adenine arabinoside inhibited growth of two Epstein-Barr virus producer cell lines in culture, while not significantly affecting a nonproducer cell line and a B-cell-negative line. These observations were extended to include freshly infected cells. Mitogen-stimulated human umbilical cord blood lymphocytes were unaffected by the drug at concentration levels that inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into the DNA of Epstein-Barr virus-stimulated cells. DNA synthesis in Epstein-Barr virus-superinfected Raji cells was also adversely affected by adenine arabinoside. However, these same low concentrations of adenine arabinoside in the triphosphate form produced less effect on DNA synthesis in nuclear systems and DNA polymerase assays than on growth or DNA synthesis in whole cells. Therefore the effects reported here of low concentrations of the drug on whole cells may be only in part related to DNA polymerase inhibition. The work reported here suggests that adenine arabinoside has multiple sites of action in infected cells. PMID:212577

  3. Computational discovery of Epstein-Barr virus targeted human genes and signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Mei, Suyu; Zhang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays important roles in the origin and the progression of human carcinomas, e.g. diffuse large B cell tumors, T cell lymphomas, etc. Discovering EBV targeted human genes and signaling pathways is vital to understand EBV tumorigenesis. In this study we propose a noise-tolerant homolog knowledge transfer method to reconstruct functional protein-protein interactions (PPI) networks between Epstein-Barr virus and Homo sapiens. The training set is augmented via homolog instances and the homolog noise is counteracted by support vector machine (SVM). Additionally we propose two methods to define subcellular co-localization (i.e. stringent and relaxed), based on which to further derive physical PPI networks. Computational results show that the proposed method achieves sound performance of cross validation and independent test. In the space of 648,672 EBV-human protein pairs, we obtain 51,485 functional interactions (7.94%), 869 stringent physical PPIs and 46,050 relaxed physical PPIs. Fifty-eight evidences are found from the latest database and recent literature to validate the model. This study reveals that Epstein-Barr virus interferes with normal human cell life, such as cholesterol homeostasis, blood coagulation, EGFR binding, p53 binding, Notch signaling, Hedgehog signaling, etc. The proteome-wide predictions are provided in the supplementary file for further biomedical research. PMID:27470517

  4. Fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to immunoglobulin g autoantibody exacerbated by epstein-barr virus.

    PubMed

    Fadeyi, Emmanuel A; Simmons, Julie H; Jones, Mary Rose; Palavecino, Elizabeth L; Pomper, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Most cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) are caused by the production of an autoantibody that targets determinants on red blood cells (RBCs). This autoantibody can be immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgM, or IgA. Some autoantibodies react optimally at 0° to 4°C (ie, cold agglutinin) and usually are clinically insignificant. High-titer cold agglutinins are associated with IgM autoantibody and complement fixation induced by infectious agents, including the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). This case report describes a 31-year-old man who had jaundice, a hemoglobin of 6.0 gdL, and was diagnosed with a hemolytic crisis of AIHA. He received a total of 11 RBC transfusions during a 15-hour period without sustained response and later died. The direct antiglobulin test results for this patient were positive, whereas the cold-agglutinin-testing results were negative. We detected EBV DNA in blood via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We report a rare case of AIHA associated with an IgG autoantibody and exacerbated by EBV infection, causing a fatal hemolytic anemia.

  5. Epstein- Barr Virus: Clinical and Epidemiological Revisits and Genetic Basis of Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdelwahid Saeed; Al-Shraim, Mubarak; Al-Hakami, Ahmed Musa; Jones, Ian M

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is classified as a member in the order herpesvirales, family herpesviridae, subfamily gammaherpesvirinae and the genus lymphocytovirus. The virus is an exclusively human pathogen and thus also termed as human herpesvirus 4 (HHV4). It was the first oncogenic virus recognized and has been incriminated in the causation of tumors of both lymphatic and epithelial nature. It was reported in some previous studies that 95% of the population worldwide are serologically positive to the virus. Clinically, EBV primary infection is almost silent, persisting as a life-long asymptomatic latent infection in B cells although it may be responsible for a transient clinical syndrome called infectious mononucleosis. Following reactivation of the virus from latency due to immunocompromised status, EBV was found to be associated with several tumors. EBV linked to oncogenesis as detected in lymphoid tumors such as Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) and T-cell lymphomas (e.g. Peripheral T-cell lymphomas; PTCL and Anaplastic large cell lymphomas; ALCL). It is also linked to epithelial tumors such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinomas and oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL). In vitro, EBV many studies have demonstrated its ability to transform B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Despite these malignancies showing different clinical and epidemiological patterns when studied, genetic studies have suggested that these EBV- associated transformations were characterized generally by low level of virus gene expression with only the latent virus proteins (LVPs) upregulated in both tumors and LCLs. In this review, we summarize some clinical and epidemiological features of EBV- associated tumors. We also discuss how EBV latent genes may lead to oncogenesis in the different clinical malignancies PMID:26862355

  6. Role of Viral miRNAs and Epigenetic Modifications in Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, Aldo; D'Arena, Giovanni; Crispo, Anna; Tecce, Mario Felice; Nocerino, Flavia; Grimaldi, Maria; Rotondo, Emanuela; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Scrima, Mario; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Capunzo, Mario; Franci, Gianluigi; Barbieri, Antonio; Bimonte, Sabrina; Montella, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short (21–23 nucleotides), noncoding RNAs that typically silence posttranscriptional gene expression through interaction with target messenger RNAs. Currently, miRNAs have been identified in almost all studied multicellular eukaryotes in the plant and animal kingdoms. Additionally, recent studies reported that miRNAs can also be encoded by certain single-cell eukaryotes and by viruses. The vast majority of viral miRNAs are encoded by the herpesviruses family. These DNA viruses including Epstein-Barr virus encode their own miRNAs and/or manipulate the expression of cellular miRNAs to facilitate respective infection cycles. Modulation of the control pathways of miRNAs expression is often involved in the promotion of tumorigenesis through a specific cascade of transduction signals. Notably, latent infection with Epstein-Barr virus is considered liable of causing several types of malignancies, including the majority of gastric carcinoma cases detected worldwide. In this review, we describe the role of the Epstein-Barr virus in gastric carcinogenesis, summarizing the functions of the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded viral proteins and related epigenetic alterations as well as the roles of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded and virally modulated cellular miRNAs. PMID:26977250

  7. Role of Viral miRNAs and Epigenetic Modifications in Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giudice, Aldo; D'Arena, Giovanni; Crispo, Anna; Tecce, Mario Felice; Nocerino, Flavia; Grimaldi, Maria; Rotondo, Emanuela; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Scrima, Mario; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Capunzo, Mario; Franci, Gianluigi; Barbieri, Antonio; Bimonte, Sabrina; Montella, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short (21-23 nucleotides), noncoding RNAs that typically silence posttranscriptional gene expression through interaction with target messenger RNAs. Currently, miRNAs have been identified in almost all studied multicellular eukaryotes in the plant and animal kingdoms. Additionally, recent studies reported that miRNAs can also be encoded by certain single-cell eukaryotes and by viruses. The vast majority of viral miRNAs are encoded by the herpesviruses family. These DNA viruses including Epstein-Barr virus encode their own miRNAs and/or manipulate the expression of cellular miRNAs to facilitate respective infection cycles. Modulation of the control pathways of miRNAs expression is often involved in the promotion of tumorigenesis through a specific cascade of transduction signals. Notably, latent infection with Epstein-Barr virus is considered liable of causing several types of malignancies, including the majority of gastric carcinoma cases detected worldwide. In this review, we describe the role of the Epstein-Barr virus in gastric carcinogenesis, summarizing the functions of the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded viral proteins and related epigenetic alterations as well as the roles of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded and virally modulated cellular miRNAs. PMID:26977250

  8. Synergistic activation of cells by Epstein-Barr virus and B-cell growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Hutt-Fletcher, L M

    1987-01-01

    Infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is initiated by virus binding to the C3dg-C3d receptor CR2. Several workers have implicated this receptor in the control of B-cell activation by examining the effects of antibodies to CR2 and isolated C3d on B-cell proliferation and differentiation. We report here on the activating effects of irradiated EBV, which retains its capacity to bind to CR2 but loses its ability to function as a T-independent B-cell activator. EBV synergized with B-cell growth factor in the induction of uptake of tritiated thymidine by T cell-depleted leukocytes from seronegative donors but did not induce secretion of immunoglobulin. Synergism could be inhibited with an anti-viral antibody that inhibited binding of EBV to CR2. No similar synergism was found between EBV and recombinant interleukin 2, interleukin 1 alpha, or gamma interferon or with the lipid A fraction of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. EBV may thus initiate B-cell activation as it binds to CR2. Infectious virus may, under normal circumstances, induce the cell to make those growth factors necessary to support B-cell proliferation; the difficulty of transforming cells with transfected EBV DNA may in part reflect the absence of an activation event provided by intact virus as it attaches to CR2. The synergism of EBV and B-cell growth factor more clearly distinguishes the effects of B-cell growth factor from those of interleukin 1 and interleukin 2 in other models of B-cell activation. Thus, this may be a useful model for further delineation of unique effects of B-cell growth factor on B-cell function. PMID:3027404

  9. Detection of Epstein-Barr Virus DNA in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Khoddami, Maliheh; Nadji, Seyed Alireza; Dehghanian, Paria; Vahdatinia, Mahsa; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare histiocytic proliferation of unknown etiology. It is characterized by granuloma-like proliferation of Langerhans-type dendritic cells and mainly affects young children. Although multiple investigators have suggested the possible role of viruses, such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6), Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, and Cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the pathogenesis of LCH, it remains, however, debated. Objectives: The EBV infection is reported to be associated with LCH. Nevertheless, no report could be found about involved Iranian children in English medical literature. In this study, we investigated the presence of EBV in Iranian children with LCH. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, in which we investigated the prevalence of presence of EBV DNA in LCH, using paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 30 patients with LCH and 30 age and tissue-matched controls, who were operated for reasons other than infectious diseases (between the years 2002 and 2012), by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method, in the department of pediatric pathology. No ethical issues arose in the study, because only the pathology reports were reviewed, retrospectively, and the patients were anonymous. Results: There was a significant difference in prevalence of EBV presence between patients and controls. The EBV was found by RT-PCR in 19 (63.33%) out of 30 patients and only in eight (26.7%) of 30 control samples. The P = 0.004, was calculated using chi-square test (OR: 4.75; 95% CI: 1.58 ‒ 14.25). Conclusions: Our study is the first investigation performed on patients with LCH and its possible association with EBV in Iran. Considering the P = 0.004, which is statistically significant, the findings do support the hypothesis of a possible role for EBV in the pathogenesis of LCH. These results are in accordance with several previous investigations, with positive findings. PMID:26870310

  10. Detection of Human Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in Coronary Atherosclerotic Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Imbronito, Ana Vitória; Marcelino, Silvia Linardi; Grande, Sabrina Rosa; Nunes, Fabio Daumas; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that patients with atherosclerosis are predominantly infected by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), but rarely infected by type 1 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-1). In this study, atheromas of 30 patients who underwent aortocoronary bypass surgery with coronary endartherectomy were tested for the presence of these two viruses. HCMV occurred in 93.3% of the samples and EBV-1 was present in 50% of them. Concurrent presence of both pathogens was detected in 43.3% of the samples. PMID:24031529

  11. Epstein-Barr virus infection and replication in a human epithelial cell system.

    PubMed

    Li, Q X; Young, L S; Niedobitek, G; Dawson, C W; Birkenbach, M; Wang, F; Rickinson, A B

    1992-03-26

    Epstein-Barr virus, a human herpesvirus with oncogenic potential, infects two target tissues in vivo: B lymphocytes, where the infection is largely non-productive, and stratified squamous epithelium in which virus replication occurs. The interaction with B cells, initiated through virus binding to the B-cell surface molecule CR2 (ref. 4), has been studied in vitro and the virus 'latent' genes associated with B-cell growth transformation defined. By comparison, viral infection of epithelium remains poorly understood, reflecting the lack of an appropriate cell-culture model. Here we describe the development of such a model using as targets CR2-expressing transfected cells of two independent human epithelial lines. A high proportion of these cells bind virus and become actively infected, expressing the small EBER RNAs (small non-polyadenylated virus-coded RNAs) and the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 but not other latent proteins; thereafter, under conditions favouring epithelial differentiation, up to 30% of the cells can be induced to enter virus productive cycle with some progressing to full virus replication. We find significant differences between laboratory virus strains in their ability to infect epithelium that do not correlate with their B-cell growth-transforming activity. PMID:1312681

  12. Methylation of Epstein-Barr virus Rta promoter in EBV primary infection, reactivation and lymphoproliferation.

    PubMed

    Germi, Raphaële; Guigue, Nicolas; Lupo, Julien; Semenova, Touyana; Grossi, Laurence; Vermeulen, Odile; Epaulard, Olivier; de Fraipont, Florence; Morand, Patrice

    2016-10-01

    During Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency, the EBV genome is largely silenced by methylation. This silencing is overturned during the switch to the lytic cycle. A key event is the production of the viral protein Zta which binds to three Zta-response elements (ZRE) from the Rta promoter (Rp), two of which (ZRE2 and ZRE3) include three CpG motifs methylated in the latent genome. The bisulphite pyrosequencing reaction was used to quantify the methylation of ZRE2, ZRE3a, and ZRE3b in EBV-positive cell lines and in ex vivo samples of EBV-related diseases, in order to assess whether the level of methylation in these ZREs could provide additional information to viral DNA load and serology in the characterization of EBV-associated diseases. In PBMC from two patients with infectious mononucleosis, over time Rp became increasingly methylated whereas EBV load decreased. In tonsil from patients with chronic tonsillitis, the methylation was less than in EBV-associated tumors, regardless of the viral load. This was even more striking when only the ZRE3a and ZRE3b were considered since some samples presented unbalanced profiles on ZRE2. EBV reactivation in cell culture showed that the reduction in the overall level of methylation was closely related to the production of unmethylated virions. Thus, an assessment of the level of methylation may help to better characterize EBV replication in PBMC and in biopsies with high EBV load, during infectious mononucleosis and EBV-associated cancers. J. Med. Virol. 88:1814-1820, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990870

  13. Demonstration of Herpes Simplex Virus, Cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr Virus in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabani-Khasraghi, Sahar; Ameli, Mitra; Khalily, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present study sought to investigate molecular evidence for association between the presence of herpes simplex virus (HSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in CRC and colorectal polyp by using the PCR method in Iran. Methods: In this analytical case-control study, we selected 15 patients with CRC, 20 patients with colorectal polyp, and 35 patients without malignancy as controls. After DNA extraction, PCR was used to determine HSV, CMV, and EBV genome by specific primers. Statistical analysis was performed using χ2 tests. Results: Our findings demonstrated that there is no direct molecular evidence to support the association between HSV, CMV, and EBV and human colorectal malignancies. Conclusion: The results from this study do not exclude a possible oncogenic role of these viruses in neoplastic development of colon cells. PMID:26975327

  14. Barr humbug: acute cerebellar ataxia due to Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Davies, Benjamin; Machin, Nicholas; Lavin, Timothy; Ul Haq, Mian Ayaz

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with neurological sequellae, but rarely there is acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA) in an adult. We present a novel case of a 26-year-old man, who presented with ACA. He had normal MRI and CSF analysis. Serum testing confirmed active EBV. A course of oral prednisolone 1 mg/kg for 4 weeks, with a subsequent taper was started. He made a full recovery within 3 weeks of presentation. PMID:27558189

  15. Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus Complicating Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Filippo; Cocuzza, Maria Donatella; Smilari, Pierluigi; Sorge, Giovanni; Pavone, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Children with acute encephalopathy show prolonged electrographic seizure activity consistent with nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). Pediatric NCSE is a heterogeneous clinical entity with poor outcome and different etiologies, including central nervous system infection, stroke, toxic-metabolic syndrome, and epileptic syndrome. We report a 4-year-old girl with seizure and behavioral changes in whom the analysis of cerebrospinal fluid by polymerase chain reaction was positive for Epstein-Barr virus. We emphasize the importance of electroencephalography (EEG), and particularly, of continuous EEG monitoring for early recognition and appropriate treatment of this condition. PMID:24744940

  16. A Virtual Look at Epstein-Barr Virus Infection: Simulation Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, M.; Duca, K.A; Lee, K.; Delgado-Eckert, E.; Hawkins, J.; Jarrah, A.S.; Laubenbacher, R.; Polys, N.F.; Hadinoto, V.; Thorley-Lawson, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an important human pathogen that establishes a lifelong persistent infection and for which no precise animal model exists. In this paper we describe in detail an agent-based model and computer simulation of EBV infection. Agents representing EBV and sets of B and T lymphocytes move and interact on a three-dimensional grid approximating Waldeyer’s ring, together with abstract compartments for lymph and blood. The simulation allows us to explore the development and resolution of virtual infections in a manner not possible in actual human experiments. Specifically, we identify parameters capable of inducing clearance, persistent infection, or death. PMID:18371986

  17. Epstein-Barr virus-derived EBNA2 regulates STAT3 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Muromoto, Ryuta; Ikeda, Osamu; Okabe, Kanako; Togi, Sumihito; Kamitani, Shinya; Fujimuro, Masahiro; Harada, Shizuko; Oritani, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2009-01-16

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded latency protein EBNA2 is a nuclear transcriptional activator that is essential for EBV-induced cellular transformation. Here, we show that EBNA2 interacts with STAT3, a signal transducer for an interleukin-6 family cytokine, and enhances the transcriptional activity of STAT3 by influencing its DNA-binding activity. Furthermore, EBNA2 cooperatively acts on STAT3 activation with LMP1. These data demonstrate that EBNA2 acts as a transcriptional coactivator of STAT3.

  18. Nucleophosmin contributes to the transcriptional activation function of the Epstein-Barr virus EBNA1 protein.

    PubMed

    Malik-Soni, Natasha; Frappier, Lori

    2014-02-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) EBNA1 protein plays important roles in latent infection, including transcriptional activation of EBV latency genes by binding to the family-of-repeats (FR) element. Through a proteomic approach, we previously identified an interaction between EBNA1 and the histone chaperone nucleophosmin. Here we show that the EBNA1-nucleophosmin interaction is direct and requires the Gly-Arg-rich sequences that contribute to transactivation. Additionally, nucleophosmin is recruited by EBNA1 to the FR element and is required for EBNA1-mediated transcriptional activation.

  19. A Case of Epstein-Barr Virus-associated Hydroa Vacciniforme.

    PubMed

    Huh, Sun Young; Choi, Mira; Cho, Kwang Hyun

    2009-05-01

    Hydroa vacciniforme (HV) is a photosensitivity disorder characterized by recurrent necrotic vesiculopapules on sun-exposed areas, which heal spontaneously during adolescence. Recently, an association has been reported between latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and atypical HV-like eruption and malignant potential. However, latent EBV infection has also been reported in the setting of typical HV. An 11-year-old girl presented with recurrent, scattered, discrete vesicular eruptions with scarring on the face and the extensor surfaces of both forearms. In-situ hybridization was carried out to detect latent EBV infection. Based on the clinical and histopathological findings, typical EBV-associated HV was suspected. PMID:20523790

  20. Tracheal ulcer due to Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takeo; Fujisaki, Hideaki; Nishio, Suehiro; Hiroshige, Shigeo; Miyazaki, Eishi; Kadota, Jun-ichi

    2014-03-01

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a tracheal stenosis circumscribed with soft tissue density and a left pulmonary nodule. Open biopsy of a right submandibular lymph node revealed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and the malignant cells were positive for Epstein-Barr virus gene products. Bronchofiberscopy revealed a tracheal necrotizing ulcer. After chemotherapy, the tracheal ulcer resolved. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly with a tracheal ulcer.

  1. The Incubation Period of Primary Epstein-Barr Virus Infection: Viral Dynamics and Immunologic Events

    PubMed Central

    Dunmire, Samantha K.; Grimm, Jennifer M.; Schmeling, David O.; Balfour, Henry H.; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpesvirus that causes acute infectious mononucleosis and is associated with cancer and autoimmune disease. While many studies have been performed examining acute disease in adults following primary infection, little is known about the virological and immunological events during EBV’s lengthy 6 week incubation period owing to the challenge of collecting samples from this stage of infection. We conducted a prospective study in college students with special emphasis on frequent screening to capture blood and oral wash samples during the incubation period. Here we describe the viral dissemination and immune response in the 6 weeks prior to onset of acute infectious mononucleosis symptoms. While virus is presumed to be present in the oral cavity from time of transmission, we did not detect viral genomes in the oral wash until one week before symptom onset, at which time viral genomes were present in high copy numbers, suggesting loss of initial viral replication control. In contrast, using a sensitive nested PCR method, we detected viral genomes at low levels in blood about 3 weeks before symptoms. However, high levels of EBV in the blood were only observed close to symptom onset–coincident with or just after increased viral detection in the oral cavity. These data imply that B cells are the major reservoir of virus in the oral cavity prior to infectious mononucleosis. The early presence of viral genomes in the blood, even at low levels, correlated with a striking decrease in the number of circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells well before symptom onset, which remained depressed throughout convalescence. On the other hand, natural killer cells expanded only after symptom onset. Likewise, CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells decreased two fold, but only after symptom onset. We observed no substantial virus specific CD8 T cell expansion during the incubation period, although polyclonal CD8 activation was detected in concert with viral

  2. Increased presence of Epstein-Barr virus DNA in ocular fluid samples from HIV negative immunocompromised patients with uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Ongkosuwito, J.; Van der Lelij, A.; Bruinenberg, M.; Doorn, M. W.; Feron, E.; Hoyng, C.; de Keizer, R. J W; Klok, A.; Kijlstra, A.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To investigate whether routine testing for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is necessary in the examination of a patient with uveitis.
METHODS—Intraocular EBV DNA was determined in 183 ocular fluid samples taken from patients with AIDS and uveitis, HIV negative immunocompromised uveitis, acute retinal necrosis, toxoplasma chorioretinitis, intraocular lymphoma, anterior uveitis, and miscellaneous uveitis of unknown cause. In 82 samples from this group of patients paired serum/ocular fluid analysis was performed to detect local antibody production against EBV. Controls (n=46) included ocular fluid samples taken during surgery for diabetic retinopathy, macular pucker, or cataract.
RESULTS—Serum antibody titres to EBV capsid antigen proved to be significantly increased in HIV negative immunocompromised patients with uveitis (p<0.01) compared with controls. Local antibody production revealed only three positive cases out of 82 patients tested, two results were borderline positive and one patient had uveitis caused by VZV. EBV DNA was detected in three out of 46 control ocular fluid samples. In the different uveitis groups EBV DNA was noted, but was not significantly higher than in the controls, except in six out of 11 HIV negative immunocompromised patients (p=0.0008). In four out of these six cases another infectious agent (VZV, HSV, CMV, or Toxoplasma gondii) had previously been identified as the cause of the uveitis.
CONCLUSIONS—When comparing various groups of uveitis patients, EBV DNA was found more often in HIV negative immunocompromised patients with uveitis. Testing for EBV does not have to be included in the routine management of patients with uveitis, since indications for an important role of this virus were not found in the pathogenesis of intraocular inflammation.

 Keywords: Epstein-Barr virus; intraocular fluid; polymerase chain reaction; uveitis PMID:9602620

  3. [Alice in Wonderland syndrome due to Epstein-Barr virus infection].

    PubMed

    Pérez Méndez, C; Martín Mardomingo, M; Otero Martínez, B; Lagunilla Herrero, L; Fernández Zurita, C

    2001-06-01

    The Alice in Wonderland syndrome refers to distortions in body image and in the apparent sizes, shapes, and spatial relations of objects seen. The syndrome is usually associated with migraine headaches and has also been reported in several viral infections. We report a 6-year-old boy who presented to the emergency department complaining of several episodes in which the ceiling, the objects and the people around him seemed very small and far away. The child presented no alteration in the level of consciousness. The episodes provoked great fear in the child. Physical examination revealed no abnormalities except pharyngoamygdalitis. Serologic studies (IgM antibodies to viral capsid antigen) confirmed Epstein-Barr virus infection. The child's symptoms resolved spontaneously within 48 hours and he continued to be asymptomatic after a 4 -month follow-up. We consider that all children presenting a clinical picture consistent with the Alice in Wonderland syndrome should undergo serological testing for Epstein Barr virus infection. Diagnosis would enable physicians to reassure the family of the temporary and benign nature of this alarming condition. PMID:11412412

  4. A Study of Epstein-Barr Virus BRLF1 Activity in a Drosophila Model System

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Amy; LaJeunesse, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus, a member of the herpesvirus family, infects a large majority of the human population and is associated with several diseases, including cancer. We have created Drosophila model systems to study the interactions between host cellular proteins and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) immediate-early genes BRLF1 and BZLF1. BRLF1 and BZLF1 function as transcription factors for viral transcription and are also potent modifiers of host cell activity. Here we have used our model systems to identify host cell genes whose proteins modulate BRLF1 and BZLF1 functions. Via our GMR-R model system, we have found that BRLF1 expression results in overproliferation of fly tissue, unlike BZLF1, and does so through the interaction with known tumor suppressor genes. Through an additional genetic screen, we have identified several Drosophila genes, with human homologs, that may offer further insights into the pathways that BRLF1 interacts with in order to promote EBV replication. PMID:22629134

  5. Epstein-Barr virus in a CD8-positive T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Richel, D. J.; Lepoutre, J. M.; Kapsenberg, J. G.; Ooms, E. C.; Boom, W. R.; Boucher, C. A.; Kluin, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    In contrast to its role in B-lymphomagenesis, Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) only incidentally has been associated with T-cell lymphomas. In the present report we describe a fourth patient with EBV-related T-cell lymphoma. The patient presented with an angio-immunoblastic lymphadenopathy (AILD)-like T-cell lymphoma. Serology was compatible with chronic Epstein-Barr (EBV) infection. After a 1-year period of waxing and waning lymphadenopathy, this lymphoma evolved to an aggressive CD8+ Immunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. A relationship with the chronic EBV infection was indicated by the finding of EBV genome in the tumor tissue by Southern blot analysis. Moreover, EBV nuclear antigen (EBNA) was detected in situ within individually defined CD8+ tumor cells by two-color immunofluorescence. Two alternative possibilities, namely that EBV primarily played a role in lymphomagenesis of the AILD-like T-cell lymphoma or that the virus was an additional oncogenic event in the final process of tumor progression to the immunoblastic lymphoma, are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:2161617

  6. Plasmid-like replicative intermediates of the Epstein-Barr virus lytic origin of DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Pfüller, R; Hammerschmidt, W

    1996-01-01

    During the lytic phase of herpesviruses, intermediates of viral DNA replication are found as large concatemeric molecules in the infected cells. It is not known, however, what the early events in viral DNA replication that yield these concatemers are. In an attempt to identify these early steps of DNA replication, replicative intermediates derived from the lytic origin of Epstein-Barr virus, oriLyt, were analyzed. As shown by density shift experiments with bromodeoxyuridine, oriLyt replicated semiconservatively soon after induction of the lytic cycle and oriLyt-containing DNA is amplified to yield monomeric plasmid progeny DNA (besides multimeric forms and high-molecular-weight DNA). A new class of plasmid progeny DNA which have far fewer negative supercoils than do plasmids extracted from uninduced cells is present only in cells undergoing the lytic cycle of Epstein-Barr virus. This finding is consistent with plasmid DNAs having fewer nucleosomes before extraction. The newly replicated plasmid DNAs are dependent on a functional oriLyt in cis and support an efficient marker transfer into Escherichia coli as monomeric plasmids. Multimeric forms of presumably circular progeny DNA of oriLyt, as well as detected recombination events, indicate that oriLyt-mediated DNA replication is biphasic: an early theta-like mode is followed by a complex pattern which could result from rolling-circle DNA replication. PMID:8648674

  7. A familial syndrome of susceptibility to chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Joncas, J. H.; Ghibu, F.; Blagdon, M.; Montplaisir, S.; Stefanescu, I.; Menezes, J.

    1984-01-01

    In two members of a family (daughter and father) active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections persisted over periods of 4 and 3 years respectively (possibly 10 years in the father). Both had persistent splenomegaly and occasional bouts of unexplained fever but lived otherwise normal lives. The other members of the family (mother and son) were healthy. The titres of antibody to the EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) and early antigen (EA) were extremely high in the daughter's blood, whereas the titres of antibody to the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen were low in the daughter's blood and undetectable in the father's. Target cells of the EBV infection that were obtained from the daughter's blood were established in culture with great difficulty and showed increased expression of VCA and EA. Other immunologic investigations in the two patients revealed that the ratio of helper to suppressor T lymphocytes was inverted, natural killer-cell activity was abnormally low, lymphocyte responses to certain mitogens were depressed and there was a serum factor blocking mitogen-induced transformation. The possibility that the patients' unusual susceptibility to EBV infection represented an inherited syndrome (perhaps X-linked) is discussed. PMID:6318944

  8. Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen titer by immunofluorescence with microplates: new semiautomated method based on the microtiter system.

    PubMed

    Lamy, M E; Favart, A M; Burtonboy, G; Arana, A

    1977-07-01

    A semiautomated method of an indirect immunofluorescence technique for the titration of antibodies directed against viral capsid antigens of Epstein-Barr virus has been developed with Microtiter system units. By this method, a technician is able to titrate some hundred samples daily. The technique is safe, easy, and reproducible. The various procedures are described, and the sensitivity of the test is discussed.

  9. Activation of the Epstein-Barr virus replicative cycle by human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Flamand, L; Stefanescu, I; Ablashi, D V; Menezes, J

    1993-01-01

    One common attribute of herpesviruses is the ability to establish latent, life-long infections. The role of virus-virus interaction in viral reactivation between or among herpesviruses has not been studied. Preliminary experiments in our laboratory had indicated that infection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome-positive human lymphoid cell lines with human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) results in EBV reactivation in these cells. To further our knowledge of this complex phenomenon, we investigated the effect of HHV-6 infection on expression of the viral lytic cycle proteins of EBV. Our results indicate that HHV-6 upregulates, by up to 10-fold, expression of the immediate-early Zebra antigen and the diffuse and restricted (85 kDa) early antigens (EA-D and EA-R, respectively) in both EBV producer and nonproducer cell lines (i.e., P3HR1, Akata, and Raji). Maximal EA-D induction was observed at 72 h post-HHV-6 infection. Furthermore, expression of late EBV gene products, namely, the viral capsid antigen (125 kDa) and viral membrane glycoprotein gp350, was also increased in EBV producer cells (P3HR1 and Akata) following infection by HHV-6. By using dual-color membrane immunofluorescence, it was found that most of the cells expressing viral membrane glycoprotein gp350 were also positive for HHV-6 antigens, suggesting a direct effect of HHV-6 replication on induction of the EBV replicative cycle. No expression of late EBV antigens was observed in Raji cells following infection by HHV-6, implying a lack of functional complementation between the deleted form of EBV found in Raji cells and the superinfecting HHV-6. The susceptibility of the cell lines to infection by HHV-6 correlated with increased expression of various EBV proteins in that B95-8 cells, which are not susceptible to HHV-6 infection, did not show an increase in expression of EBV antigens following treatment with HHV-6. Moreover, UV light-irradiated or heat-inactivated HHV-6 had no upregulating effect on the Zebra

  10. Human papillomavirus promotes Epstein-Barr virus maintenance and lytic reactivation in immortalized oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Makielski, Kathleen R; Lee, Denis; Lorenz, Laurel D; Nawandar, Dhananjay M; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Kenney, Shannon C; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomaviruses are human tumor viruses that infect and replicate in upper aerodigestive tract epithelia and cause head and neck cancers. The productive phases of both viruses are tied to stratified epithelia highlighting the possibility that these viruses may affect each other's life cycles. Our lab has established an in vitro model system to test the effects of EBV and HPV co-infection in stratified squamous oral epithelial cells. Our results indicate that HPV increases maintenance of the EBV genome in the co-infected cells and promotes lytic reactivation of EBV in upper layers of stratified epithelium. Expression of the HPV oncogenes E6 and E7 were found to be necessary and sufficient to account for HPV-mediated lytic reactivation of EBV. Our findings indicate that HPV increases the capacity of epithelial cells to support the EBV life cycle, which could in turn increase EBV-mediated pathogenesis in the oral cavity. PMID:27179345

  11. Human papillomavirus promotes Epstein-Barr virus maintenance and lytic reactivation in immortalized oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Makielski, Kathleen R; Lee, Denis; Lorenz, Laurel D; Nawandar, Dhananjay M; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Kenney, Shannon C; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomaviruses are human tumor viruses that infect and replicate in upper aerodigestive tract epithelia and cause head and neck cancers. The productive phases of both viruses are tied to stratified epithelia highlighting the possibility that these viruses may affect each other's life cycles. Our lab has established an in vitro model system to test the effects of EBV and HPV co-infection in stratified squamous oral epithelial cells. Our results indicate that HPV increases maintenance of the EBV genome in the co-infected cells and promotes lytic reactivation of EBV in upper layers of stratified epithelium. Expression of the HPV oncogenes E6 and E7 were found to be necessary and sufficient to account for HPV-mediated lytic reactivation of EBV. Our findings indicate that HPV increases the capacity of epithelial cells to support the EBV life cycle, which could in turn increase EBV-mediated pathogenesis in the oral cavity.

  12. Use of simian virus 40 replication to amplify Epstein-Barr virus shuttle vectors in human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heinzel, S S; Krysan, P J; Calos, M P; DuBridge, R B

    1988-01-01

    We have increased the copy number of Epstein-Barr virus vectors that also carry the origin of replication of simian virus 40 (SV40) by providing a transient dose of SV40 T antigen. T antigen was supplied in trans by transfection of a nonreplicating plasmid which expresses T antigen into cells carrying Epstein-Barr virus-SV40 vectors. A significant increase in vector copy number occurred over the next few days. We also observed a high frequency of intramolecular recombination when the vector carried a repeat segment in direct orientation, but not when the repeat was in inverted orientation or absent. Furthermore, by following the mutation frequency for a marker on the vector after induction of SV40 replication, it was determined that SV40 replication generates a detectable increase in the deletion frequency but no measurable increase in the frequency of point mutations. Images PMID:2843671

  13. Epstein-Barr virus latency type and spontaneous reactivation predict lytic induction levels.

    PubMed

    Phan, An T; Fernandez, Samantha G; Somberg, Jessica J; Keck, Kristin M; Miranda, Jj L

    2016-05-20

    The human Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) evades the immune system by entering a transcriptionally latent phase in B cells. EBV in tumor cells expresses distinct patterns of genes referred to as latency types. Viruses in tumor cells also display varying levels of lytic transcription resulting from spontaneous reactivation out of latency. We measured this dynamic range of lytic transcription with RNA deep sequencing and observed no correlation with EBV latency types among genetically different viruses, but type I cell lines reveal more spontaneous reactivation than isogenic type III cultures. We further determined that latency type and spontaneous reactivation levels predict the relative amount of induced reactivation generated by cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs. Our work has potential implications for personalizing medicine against EBV-transformed malignancies. Identifying latency type or measuring spontaneous reactivation may provide predictive power in treatment contexts where viral production should be either avoided or coerced. PMID:27091426

  14. Coinfection with multiple strains of the Epstein-Barr virus in human immunodeficiency virus-associated hairy leukoplakia.

    PubMed Central

    Walling, D M; Edmiston, S N; Sixbey, J W; Abdel-Hamid, M; Resnick, L; Raab-Traub, N

    1992-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus DNA was analyzed from specimens of hairy leukoplakia, an oral lesion that occurs in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. The simultaneous presence of both type 1 and type 2 Epstein-Barr virus was demonstrated by Southern blot analysis and polymerase chain reaction assay. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms in the BamHI WYH region and in clones of the EcoRI C region suggested the presence of multiple strains of type 1 and type 2 viruses. The demonstration of multiple variably sized BamHI H fragments on Southern blot analysis and cloning of the EBNA-2 gene coding region also suggested the presence of multiple viral strains or variants coinfecting hairy leukoplakia. Recombination of the viral genome in and around the EBNA-2 gene apparently generated viral variants that replicated efficiently, one of which appeared to increase in abundance in a lesion over time. These data indicate that hairy leukoplakia involves coinfection with multiple strains of replicating Epstein-Barr virus and the endogenous generation of viral variants, some of which have mutations of the EBNA-2 gene. Images PMID:1321443

  15. [Laboratory diagnosis of Epstein-Barr virus infection].

    PubMed

    Siennicka, Joanna; Trzcińska, Agnieszka

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory confirmation of EBV infection requires proper methods and schema of investigation adequate to aim of diagnostic procedure. In paper the results of routine diagnostic tests of EBV infection performed in Department of Virology NIH in 2005-2006 years was included and also, evaluation of usefulness of different laboratory methods was done. Based on results of ELISA tests 10,7% routine investigated subjects was classified as primary EBV infection, 20,1% was seronegative, 7,4% was classified as reactivation of latent infection and serological markers in 45,6% subjects pointed past EBV infection. Positive result of PCR method was obtain in 11,2% samples subjected of routine laboratory investigation. Comparison of specific and non-specific serological methods results (ELISA versus tests of heterophile antibodies) showed the high percentage of false negative results in children tested by non-specific tests. PCR results in serum samples from patients with primary infection (confirmed by serological tests) were positive in 15% cases only. Based on analyzed results it could be stated that reliable confirmation of infectious mononucleosis, as primary EBV infection, is detection of specific IgM antibodies and in case of heterophile antibodies tests the possibility of false negative results, mainly in children, must be taken into account. The most proper samples for PCR method are whole blood, sections of tissue or cells from swabs. PMID:18078121

  16. Ascorbic acid kills Epstein-Barr virus positive Burkitt lymphoma cells and Epstein-Barr virus transformed B-cells in vitro, but not in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shatzer, Amber N; Espey, Michael Graham; Chavez, Mayra; Tu, Hongbin; Levine, Mark; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2013-05-01

    Ascorbic acid has been shown to kill various cancer cell lines at pharmacologic concentrations. We found that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells were more susceptible to ascorbic acid-induced cell killing than EBV-negative BL cells or EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs). Ascorbic acid did not induce apoptosis in any of the tested cells but did induce the production of reactive oxygen species and cell death. Previously, we showed that bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, induces cell death in LCLs and EBV-positive BL cells. We found that ascorbic acid is strongly antagonistic for bortezomib-induced cell death in LCLs and EBV-positive BL cells. Finally, ascorbic acid did not prolong survival of severe combined immunodefiency mice inoculated with LCLs either intraperitoneally or subcutaneously. Thus, while ascorbic acid was highly effective at killing EBV-positive BL cells and LCLs in vitro, it antagonized cell killing by bortezomib and was ineffective in an animal model.

  17. Space Flight-Induced Reactivation of Latent Epstein-Barr Virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, Raymond P.; Barrett, Alan D. T.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2001-01-01

    Reactivation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) may be an important threat to crew health during extended space missions. Decreased cellular immune function has been reported both during and after space flight. Preliminary studies have demonstrated increased EBV shedding in saliva as well as increased antibody titers to EBV lytic proteins. We hypothesize that the combined effects of microgravity along with associated physical and psychological stress will decrease EBV-specific T-cell immunity and reactivate latent EBV in infected B-lymphocytes. If increased virus production and clonal expansion of infected B-lymphocytes are detected, then pharmacological measures can be developed and instituted prior to onset of overt clinical disease. More importantly, we will begin to understand the basic mechanisms involved in stress-induced reactivation of EBV in circulating B-lymphocytes.

  18. Incidence of Epstein-Barr Virus in Astronaut Saliva During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, Deborah A.; Mehta, Satish K.; Tyring, Stephen K.; Stowe, Raymond P.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1998-01-01

    Astronauts experience psychological and physical stresses that may result in re-activation of latent viruses during spaceflight, potentially increasing the risk of disease among crew members. The shedding of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the saliva of astronauts will increase during spaceflight. A total of 534 saliva specimens were collected from 11 EBV-seropositive astronauts before, during, and after four space shuttle missions. The presence of EBV DNA in saliva, assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), was used to determine shedding patterns before, during, and after spaceflight. EBV DNA was detected more frequently before flight than during (p less than 0.001) or after (p less than 0.01) flight. No significant difference between the in-flight and postflight periods was detected in the frequency of occurrence of EBV DNA. The increased frequency of shedding of EBV before flight suggests that stress levels may be greater before launch than during or after spaceflight.

  19. Rare Presentations of Epstein-Barr Virus--Associated Smooth Muscle Tumor in Children.

    PubMed

    Arva, Nicoleta C; Schafernak, Kristian T

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has oncogenic potential and has been implicated in the etiology of a wide range of malignancies. Certain EBV-driven neoplasms, such as smooth muscle tumors (SMTs), manifest typically in immunocompromised patients. In children, these neoplasms have been encountered in the setting of primary immune disorders, specifically severe combined and common variable immunodeficiency syndromes. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and posttransplant immunosuppression, in particular liver and kidney transplantation, likewise increase the risk in the pediatric population. The location of these neoplasms appears related to the type of immunodeficiency: in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome they are frequently located intracranially or intraspinally, whereas after transplant they usually involve the liver or lung. We report 2 distinct cases of EBV-related SMT, unique through their coassociated immunosuppressive state or location: the 1st occurred in a patient with immunodeficiency secondary to NEMO gene mutation following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; the 2nd developed in the orbit after heart transplant.

  20. Identification of a glucocorticoid-responsive element in Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Kupfer, S R; Summers, W C

    1990-01-01

    Immortalization of B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is complex and poorly understood. However, some evidence suggests that glucocorticoids influence this process. We identified a glucocorticoid-responsive element in the BamHI C fragment of EBV which we call ES-1. In glucocorticoid-treated cells, ES-1 enhanced chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene expression from the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter, as well as the EBV Bam-C promoter, from which several latent viral gene products are transcribed. By Northern blot analysis, glucocorticoid treatment enhanced transcription from the Bam-C promoter in Jijoye cells, a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line. In addition, the DNA-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor bound specifically to the ES-1 region. These glucocorticoid effects on the Bam-C promoter region may provide some insight into the process of EBV immortalization. Images PMID:2157866

  1. Epstein-Barr virus early antigen titer by immunofluorescence in microplates. A new semi-automated method based on microtiter system.

    PubMed

    Favart, A M; Lamy, M E; Allemeersch, D; Burtonboy, G; Vanoverschelde, J

    1978-11-17

    For the titration of antibodies directed against Epstein-Barr Virus early antigen (EBV-EA) we describe a method in microplates with the Microtiter System (Cooke Engineering Co., Alexandria, Va). Using this technique, which allows rapid epidemiological investigations, we have titered anti-EBV-EA antibodies in different groups of patients and controls, and particularly in group which had recent contact with infectious mononucleosis. In this group the percentage of individuals having antibodies directed against the EBV-EA antigen was significantly higher than in the group of controls.

  2. Identification and functional analysis of the BIM interactome; new clues on its possible involvement in Epstein-Barr Virus-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Rouka, Erasmia; Kyriakou, Despoina

    2015-12-01

    Epigenetic deregulation is a common feature in the pathogenesis of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-related lymphomas and carcinomas. Previous studies have demonstrated a strong association between EBV latency in B-cells and epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor gene BIM. This study aimed to the construction and functional analysis of the BIM interactome in order to identify novel host genes that may be targeted by EBV. Fifty-nine unique interactors were found to compose the BIM gene network. Ontological analysis at the pathway level highlighted infectious diseases along with neuropathologies. These results underline the possible interplay between the BIM interactome and EBV-associated disorders.

  3. A novel tetrameric gp350 1-470 as a potential Epstein-Barr virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xinle; Cao, Zhouhong; Sen, Goutam; Chattopadhyay, Gouri; Fuller, Deborah H; Fuller, James T; Snapper, Dustin M; Snow, Andrew L; Mond, James J; Snapper, Clifford M

    2013-06-26

    Infectious mononucleosis and B-cell transformation in response to infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is dependent upon binding of the EBV envelope glycoprotein gp350 to CD21 on B-cells. Gp350-specific antibody comprises most of the EBV neutralizing activity in the serum of infected patients, making this protein a promising target antigen for a prophylactic EBV vaccine. We describe a novel, tetrameric gp350-based vaccine that exhibits markedly enhanced immunogenicity relative to its monomeric counterpart. Plasmid DNA was constructed for synthesis, within transfected CHO cells, of a tetrameric, truncated (a.a. 1-470) gp350 protein (gp350(1-470)). Tetrameric gp350(1-470) induced ≈ 20-fold higher serum titers of gp350(1-470)-specific IgG and >19-fold enhancements in neutralizing titers at the highest dose, and was >25-fold more immunogenic on a per-weight basis than monomeric gp350(1-470). Further, epidermal immunization with plasmid DNA encoding gp350(1-470) tetramer induced 8-fold higher serum titers of gp350(1-470)-specific IgG relative to monomer. Tetrameric gp350(1-470) binding to human CD21 was >24-fold more efficient on a per-weight basis than monomer, but neither tetramer nor monomer mediated polyclonal human B-cell activation. Finally, the introduction of strong, universal tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific CD4+ T-cell epitopes into the tetrameric gp350(1-470) had no effect on the gp350(1-470)-specific IgG response in naïve mice, and resulted in suppressed gp350(1-470)-specific IgG responses in TT-primed mice. Collectively, these data suggest that tetrameric gp350(1-470) is a potentially promising candidate for testing as a prophylactic EBV vaccine, and that protein multimerization, using the approach described herein, is likely to be clinically relevant for enhancing the immunogenicity of other proteins of vaccine interest.

  4. A novel tetrameric gp3501-470 as a potential Epstein-Barr virus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xinle; Cao, Zhouhong; Sen, Goutam; Chattopadhyay, Gouri; Fuller, Deborah H.; Fuller, James T.; Snapper, Dustin M.; Snow, Andrew; Mond, James J.; Snapper, Clifford M.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis and B-cell transformation in response to infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is dependent upon binding of the EBV envelope glycoprotein gp350 to CD21 on B-cells. Gp350-specific antibody comprises most of the EBV neutralizing activity in the serum of infected patients, making this protein a promising target antigen for a prophylactic EBV vaccine. We describe a novel, tetrameric gp350-based vaccine that exhibits markedly enhanced immunogenicity relative to its monomeric counterpart. Plasmid DNA was constructed for synthesis, within transfected CHO cells, of a tetrameric, truncated (a.a. 1-470) gp350 protein (gp3501-470). Tetrameric gp3501-470 induced ~20-fold higher serum titers of gp3501-470-specific IgG and >19-fold enhancements in neutralizing titers at the highest dose, and was >25-fold more immunogenic on a per-weight basis than monomeric gp3501-470. Further, epidermal immunization with plasmid DNA encoding gp3501-470 tetramer induced 8-fold higher serum titers of gp3501-470-specific IgG relative to monomer. Tetrameric gp3501-470 binding to human CD21 was >24-fold more efficient on a per-weight basis than monomer, but neither tetramer nor monomer mediated polyclonal human B-cell activation. Finally, the introduction of strong, universal tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific CD4+ T-cell epitopes into the tetrameric gp3501-470 had no effect on the gp3501-470-specific IgG response in naïve mice, and resulted in suppressed gp3501-470-specific IgG responses in TT-primed mice. Collectively, these data suggest that tetrameric gp3501-470 is a potentially promising candidate for testing as a prophylactic EBV vaccine, and that protein multimerization, using the approach described herein, is likely to be clinically relevant for enhancing the immunogenicity of other proteins of vaccine interest. PMID:23665339

  5. Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis by Epstein-Barr Virus Infection: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Maria; Couto, Cristiana; Coelho, Maria D.; Laranjeira, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is a rare complication of Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection, with only a few cases reported among pediatric population. This clinical condition is frequently associated with a favorable outcome and, usually, a surgical intervention is not required. We report a 16-year-old girl who presented with AAC following primary EBV infection. The diagnosis of AAC was documented by clinical and ultrasonographic examination, whereas EBV infection was confirmed serologically. A conservative treatment was performed, with a careful monitoring and serial ultrasonographic examinations, which led to the clinical improvement of the patient. Pediatricians should be aware of the possible association between EBV and AAC, in order to offer the patients an appropriate management strategy. PMID:26753086

  6. Characterization of two Epstein-Barr virus epitopes restricted by HLA-B7.

    PubMed

    Hill, A; Worth, A; Elliott, T; Rowland-Jones, S; Brooks, J; Rickinson, A; McMichael, A

    1995-01-01

    We have identified two epitopes for Epstein-Barr virus specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) restricted by the common allele HLA-B7. They are EBNA 3C 881-9 (QPRAPIRPI) and EBNA 3A 379-387 (RPPIFIRRL). The epitopes conform well to the recently described motif for HLA-B7-binding peptides (Huckzo et al., J. Immunol. 1993. 151:2572). Titration of the peptides in CTL assays and detergent lysate binding assays revealed that extending the peptides at either the N or C terminus did not reduce their affinity for HLA-B7. This behavior contrasted with HLA-B51, which binds peptides with a similar motif to B7, and has identical amino acid residues at sites expected to form the "F" pocket of the peptide-binding groove. HLA-B51 also bound the peptide EBNA 3C 881-9, but was unable to bind peptides extended at the C terminus.

  7. The effect of Astragalus polysaccharide on the Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q; Sun, X; Zhang, Z; Zhang, L; Yao, G; Li, F; Yang, X; Song, L; Jiang, G

    2014-01-01

    Effects of a polysacharide from Chinese herbal plant Astragalus membranaceus (APS) on the expression of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) immediate early proteins Zta, Rta and EA-D in Raji cells were examined. EBV switch from latent to lytic cycle in Raji cells was induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and sorbol butyrate (SB) and the effects of APS were examined by immunofluorescence, western blotting and flow cytometry. APS in a non-cytotoxic concentration of 30 μg/ml significantly suppressed the expression of Zta, Rta and EA-D during the EBV lytic cycle. Our observations indicate that APS is potentially useful as an anti-EBV drug.

  8. Hypersensitivity to mosquito bites as the primary clinical manifestation of an Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Tsu-Man; Lin, Yueh-Min; Wang, Shing-Chuang; Tsai, Yi-Giien

    2016-08-01

    Hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (HMB) is a rare disease characterized by intense local skin reactions with general symptoms, such as high fever and regional lymphadenopathy after mosquito bites. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) chronic infection and NK cell lymphoproliferative disease have been reported first in diagnosed HMB patients. Here, we present the case of a 6-year-old girl with 2 months' history of bullae and necrotic skin lesions, accompanied by a high temperature, visual hallucinations, and liver dysfunction after mosquito bites. A histopathologic examination of the skin lesion showed vasculitis and EBV infection. We could not detect any findings of hematologic malignancies or NK cell proliferative disease in the patient. Clinicians should closely evaluate HMB patients for possible development of lymphoproliferative status or hematologic malignant disorders.

  9. Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus during early infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M A; Kingsley, L A; Atchison, R W; Belle, S; Breinig, M C; Ho, M; Rinaldo, C R

    1991-01-01

    Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was investigated in 49 homosexual men who seroconverted to HIV (cases) as compared with 49 matched controls who remained seronegative to HIV during a longitudinal study. EBV infection was reactivated in cases 6 months, but not 12 months, prior to HIV seroconversion as compared with controls and remained reactivated during 18 months of follow-up after HIV seroconversion, as shown by increases in immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibody titers to EBV early antigen. Antibody titers to EBV viral capsid antigen did not differ between cases and controls prior to the time of seroconversion to HIV but were significantly increased among cases by the first seropositive study visit and remained elevated during the 18 months after HIV seroconversion. Total serum IgG levels were increased in cases at the visit of seroconversion, and during 18 months of follow-up, but did not correlate with enhanced IgG production specific for EBV antigens. Significant decreases in numbers of CD4+ cells and increases in numbers of CD8+ cells during this early phase of HIV infection were not associated with changes in patterns of EBV antibody responses. Reactivation of EBV beginning 6 months before HIV seroconversion may have implications regarding the role of this herpesvirus in the pathogenesis of HIV. PMID:1650790

  10. Persistent nonproductive infection of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human B lymphocytes by human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, K E; Burrage, T; Jones, F; Miller, G

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the interaction of different strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with an Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human B-lymphocyte line, X50-7. Previously we found that some HIV-1 strains replicated rapidly and were exclusively cytolytic; others induced persistent noncytopathic infection associated with continued shedding of extracellular virus (K. Dahl, K. Martin, and G. Miller, J. Virol. 61:1602-1608, 1987). We now describe a third form of cell-virus relationship in which infection by strain IIIB is maintained in a highly cell-associated state in a small subpopulation (less than 2%) of X50-7 cells. Neither viral subcomponents nor infectious virus was detectable in culture supernatants; however, the carrier lines were fusogenic and HIV-1 could be recovered following prolonged cocultivation with susceptible cells. In these chronic carrier cultures, virions were not seen budding at the cell surface, but a few were found within cytoplasmic vesicles. HIV-1 infection of first- and second-generation cell subclones of the carrier cell line rapidly evolved from a productive to a cell-associated state. There were low levels of HIV DNA, and RNA in the fusogenic secondary clones, but most clones lacked HIV-1 DNA, failed to express HIV-1 RNA, and exhibited no properties associated with HIV-1 infection. The experiments indicate that HIV-1 can be sequestered in human B lymphocytes. The cell cloning experiments introduce the possibility that the HIV-1 provirus may be lost from some lymphocytes. Images PMID:2157058

  11. A case report of Epstein-Barr virus-associated retinal vasculitis: successful treatment using only acyclovir therapy.

    PubMed

    Keorochana, Narumon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a presumed case of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated retinal vasculitis in a 42-year-old female with sudden unilateral vision loss and successful treatment with acyclovir therapy. Diagnostic vitreous biopsy of the right eye was performed to test for EBV and other known infectious causes of retinitis and evaluate vitreous cells and serological testing. Vitreous polymerase chain reaction viral DNA testing result was positive for EBV but negative for herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, and cytomegalovirus. Serologic testing was negative for toxoplasma gondii, syphilis, tuberculosis, and HIV. Histopathologic analysis of vitreous cells revealed atypical lymphocytes. Fluorescein angiography showed disk leakage, occluded retinal artery, peripheral vascular leakage, and ischemic area of the right eye. Intravenous acyclovir, 10 mg/kg/d, was prescribed for 14 days followed by oral acyclovir for 3 months. All lesions have become quiet. EBV may be a cause of retinal disease, and intravenous acyclovir is a successful treatment choice. PMID:27524923

  12. Undifferentiated carcinoma of the parotid gland in a white patient: detection of Epstein-Barr virus by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kotsianti, A; Costopoulos, J; Morgello, S; Papadimitriou, C

    1996-01-01

    Paraffin sections of an undifferentiated salivary gland carcinoma of lymphoepithelioma type, arising in a white (Greek) patient and confirmed by immunohistochemistry, were examined for the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), using in situ hybridization to detect EBV-specific EBER1 message. Epstein-Barr virus was detected in malignant epithelial cells, but was not found in lymphoid stroma or in residual benign salivary epithelium. These results confirm the existence of an association between EBV and tumor cells of undifferentiated carcinoma of parotid gland. This is the first demonstration of EBV in a salivary gland lymphoepithelioma arising in a non-Eskimo, white patient. This finding suggests that the association of EBV with undifferentiated salivary gland carcinoma may exist in geographic regions remote from Greenland.

  13. Expression of Epstein-Barr virus encoded latent genes in nasal T cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    van Gorp, J; Brink, A; Oudejans, J J; van den Brule, A J; van den Tweel, J G; Jiwa, N M; de Bruin, P C; Meijer, C J

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the expression of Epstein-Barr (EB) virus encoded latent genes in nasal T-cell lymphomas in The Netherlands. METHODS: Seven europid (Dutch) cases of nasal T cell lymphoma were investigated for the presence of EB virus by RNA in situ hybridisation (EBER). The expression of the EB virus encoded genes BARF0, EBNA1, EBNA2, LMP1, LMP2A, LMP2B, and ZEBRA was studied at the mRNA level using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. At the protein level the expression was investigated of EBNA2 and LMP1 by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: In all seven nasal T cell lymphomas EBER was detected in the nuclei of virtually all tumour cells. BARF0 mRNA was detected in all samples. EBNA1 mRNA was found in six cases, LMP1 mRNA in five, LMP2A mRNA in three, LMP2B mRNA in one, and ZEBRA mRNA in one. EBNA2 mRNA was not found in any case. At the protein level occasional LMP1 positive tumour cells were seen in only one case. The EBNA2 protein was not detected. CONCLUSIONS: Nasal T cell lymphomas in The Netherlands are strongly associated with EB virus. The virus shows a type II latency pattern (EBNA1+, LMP1+, EBNA2-) that seems to be similar to the EB virus associated nasal T cell lymphomas in oriental countries. Images PMID:8666691

  14. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) DNA in plasma is not encapsidated in patients with EBV-related malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Julie L; Fan, Hongxin; Swinnen, Lode J; Schichman, Steven A; Raab-Traub, Nancy; Covington, Mary; Elmore, Sandra; Gulley, Margaret L

    2004-06-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), a ubiquitous gamma herpes virus, infects more than 95% of the human population before adulthood. Life-long persistence, usually without adverse health consequences, relies on a balance between viral latency, viral replication, and host immune response. Patients with EBV-related disease often have high levels of EBV DNA in their plasma. This study addresses whether this circulating, cell-free EBV DNA is encapsidated in virions or exists as naked genomes. First, an assay was developed, combining DNase I and quantitative real-time PCR, to discriminate encapsidated from naked EBV DNA. EBV DNA was almost always naked in the plasma of AIDS-related lymphoma patients (n = 11) and immunosuppressed/posttransplantation patients (n = 8). In contrast, infectious mononucleosis patients (n = 30) often had a mixture of encapsidated and naked EBV DNA. These findings may be important in understanding how viral load relates to disease status and in predicting response to nucleoside analogs and other antiviral therapies. PMID:15167006

  15. Molecular genetic analysis of Epstein-Barr virus Cp promoter function.

    PubMed

    Evans, T J; Farrell, P J; Swaminathan, S

    1996-03-01

    The Cp promoter of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) directs most transcription of the EBNA genes in lymphoblastoid cell lines. The functions of two control regions in the Cp promoter have been studied by construction of recombinant EBV strains containing specific mutations in these elements. Mutation of the RBP-Jk (CBF1) binding site reduced but did not completely abolish EBNA-2-dependent Cp activity in transient transfection assays. The same mutation in recombinant virus gave only a modest average reduction in Cp function, ranging from full activity to almost no activity in different isolates. Separate deletion of a 262-bp region containing glucocorticoid response elements had little effect in a transient assay but caused a fivefold increase in the steady-state level of Cp RNA in recombinant virus. The results indicate that other elements in addition to the intensively studied RBP-Jk site are important in determining Cp activity in the whole virus. Clonal EBV-infected cell lines expressed RNA from both the Cp and Wp promoters, but the level of Wp RNA did not simply compensate for changes in the level of Cp RNA. The levels of EBNA proteins varied much less than the levels of Cp and Wp RNA, suggesting other types of control in addition to initiation of transcription. A survey of RNAs derived from the internal repeat region of the virus indicated that gene expression from this region of EBV in lymphoblastoid cell lines is accounted for by the known transcripts.

  16. Identification of Epstein-Barr Virus Replication Proteins in Burkitt's Lymphoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Traylen, Chris; Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Zuo, Jianmin; Rowe, Martin; Almohammad, Rajaei; Heesom, Kate; Sweet, Steve M M; Matthews, David A; Sinclair, Alison J

    2015-01-01

    The working model to describe the mechanisms used to replicate the cancer-associated virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is partly derived from comparisons with other members of the Herpes virus family. Many genes within the EBV genome are homologous across the herpes virus family. Published transcriptome data for the EBV genome during its lytic replication cycle show extensive transcription, but the identification of the proteins is limited. We have taken a global proteomics approach to identify viral proteins that are expressed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. We combined an enrichment method to isolate cells undergoing EBV lytic replication with SILAC-labeling coupled to mass-spectrometry and identified viral and host proteins expressed during the OPEN ACCESS Pathogens 2015, 4 740 EBV lytic replication cycle. Amongst the most frequently identified viral proteins are two components of the DNA replication machinery, the single strand DNA binding protein BALF2, DNA polymerase accessory protein BMRF1 and both subunits of the viral ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase enzyme (BORF2 and BaRF1). An additional 42 EBV lytic cycle proteins were also detected. This provides proteomic identification for many EBV lytic replication cycle proteins and also identifies post-translational modifications. PMID:26529022

  17. Structure of a trimeric variant of the Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein B

    SciTech Connect

    Backovic, Marija; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2009-03-16

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a herpesvirus that is associated with development of malignancies of lymphoid tissue. EBV infections are life-long and occur in >90% of the population. Herpesviruses enter host cells in a process that involves fusion of viral and cellular membranes. The fusion apparatus is comprised of envelope glycoprotein B (gB) and a heterodimeric complex made of glycoproteins H and L. Glycoprotein B is the most conserved envelope glycoprotein in human herpesviruses, and the structure of gB from Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is available. Here, we report the crystal structure of the secreted EBV gB ectodomain, which forms 16-nm long spike-like trimers, structurally homologous to the postfusion trimers of the fusion protein G of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Comparative structural analyses of EBV gB and VSV G, which has been solved in its pre and postfusion states, shed light on gB residues that may be involved in conformational changes and membrane fusion. Also, the EBV gB structure reveals that, despite the high sequence conservation of gB in herpesviruses, the relative orientations of individual domains, the surface charge distributions, and the structural details of EBV gB differ from the HSV-1 protein, indicating regions and residues that may have important roles in virus-specific entry.

  18. Elevated stress hormone levels relate to Epstein-Barr virus reactivation in astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.; Barrett, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of stress and spaceflight on levels of neuroendocrine hormones and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific antibodies in astronauts. METHODS: Antiviral antibody titers and stress hormones were measured in plasma samples collected from 28 astronauts at their annual medical exam (baseline), 10 days before launch (L-10), landing day (R+0), and 3 days after landing (R+3). Urinary stress hormones were also measured at L-10 and R+0. RESULTS: Significant increases (p <.01) in EBV virus capsid antigen antibodies were found at all three time points (L-10, R+0, and R+3) as compared with baseline samples. Anti-EBV nuclear antigen antibodies were significantly decreased at L-10 (p <.05) and continued to decrease after spaceflight (R+0 and R+3, p <.01). No changes were found in antibodies to the nonlatent measles virus. The 11 astronauts who showed evidence of EBV reactivation had significant increases in urinary epinephrine and norepinephrine as compared with astronauts without EBV reactivation. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that physical and psychological stresses associated with spaceflight resulted in decreased virus-specific T-cell immunity and reactivation of EBV.

  19. Immune-checkpoint expression in Epstein-Barr virus positive and negative plasmablastic lymphoma: a clinical and pathological study in 82 patients

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Camille; Fabiani, Bettina; Do, Catherine; Tchernonog, Emmanuelle; Cartron, Guillaume; Gravelle, Pauline; Amara, Nadia; Malot, Sandrine; Palisoc, Maryknoll Mawanay; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Glehen, Alexandra Traverse; Copin, Marie-Christine; Brousset, Pierre; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Coppo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare and aggressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma commonly associated with Epstein-Barr virus co-infection that most often occurs in the context of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Therefore, its immune escape strategy may involve the upregulation of immune-checkpoint proteins allowing the tumor immune evasion. However, the expression of these molecules was poorly studied in this lymphoma. We have investigated 82 plasmablastic lymphoma cases of whom half were Epstein-Barr virus positive. Although they harbored similar pathological features, Epstein-Barr virus positive plasmablastic lymphomas showed a significant increase in MYC gene rearrangement and had a better 2-year event-free survival than Epstein-Barr virus negative cases (P=0.049). Immunostains for programmed cell death-1, programmed cell death-ligand 1, indole 2,3-dioxygenase and dendritic cell specific C-type lectin showed a high or moderate expression by the microenvironment cells in 60%–72% of cases, whereas CD163 was expressed in almost all cases. Tumor cells also expressed programmed cell death-1 and its ligand in 22.5% and 5% of cases, respectively. Both Epstein-Barr virus positive and negative plasmablastic lymphomas exhibited a high immune-checkpoint score showing that it involves several pathways of immune escape. However, Epstein-Barr virus positive lymphomas exhibited a higher expression of programmed cell death-1 and its ligand in both malignant cells and microenvironment as compared to Epstein-Barr virus negative cases. In conclusion, plasmablastic lymphoma expresses immune-checkpoint proteins through both malignant cells and the tumor microenvironment. The expression of programmed cell death-1 and its ligand constitutes a strong rationale for testing monoclonal antibodies in this often chemoresistant disease. PMID:27175027

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus Utilizes Ikaros in Regulating Its Latent-Lytic Switch in B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iempridee, Tawin; Reusch, Jessica A.; Riching, Andrew; Johannsen, Eric C.; Dovat, Sinisa; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ikaros is a zinc finger DNA-binding protein that regulates chromatin remodeling and the expression of genes involved in the cell cycle, apoptosis, and Notch signaling. It is a master regulator of lymphocyte differentiation and functions as a tumor suppressor in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Nevertheless, no previous reports described effects of Ikaros on the life cycle of any human lymphotropic virus. Here, we demonstrate that full-length Ikaros (IK-1) functions as a major factor in the maintenance of viral latency in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive Burkitt's lymphoma Sal and MutuI cell lines. Either silencing of Ikaros expression by small hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown or ectopic expression of a non-DNA-binding isoform induced lytic gene expression. These effects synergized with other lytic inducers of EBV, including transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and the hypoxia mimic desferrioxamine. Data from chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-quantitative PCR (qPCR) and ChIP-sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses indicated that Ikaros did not bind to either of the EBV immediate early genes BZLF1 and BRLF1. Rather, Ikaros affected the expression of Oct-2 and Bcl-6, other transcription factors that directly inhibit EBV reactivation and plasma cell differentiation, respectively. IK-1 also complexed with the EBV immediate early R protein in coimmunoprecipitation assays and partially colocalized with R within cells. The presence of R alleviated IK-1-mediated transcriptional repression, with IK-1 then cooperating with Z and R to enhance lytic gene expression. Thus, we conclude that Ikaros plays distinct roles at different stages of EBV's life cycle: it contributes to maintaining latency via indirect mechanisms, and it may also synergize with Z and R to enhance lytic replication through direct association with R and/or R-induced alterations in Ikaros' functional activities via cellular signaling pathways. IMPORTANCE This is the first report showing that the cellular

  1. Asymmetric Arginine dimethylation of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 promotes DNA targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Henrik; Barth, Stephanie; Mamiani, Alfredo; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; West, Michelle J.; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Graesser, Friedrich A.

    2010-02-20

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) growth-transforms B-lymphocytes. The virus-encoded nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) is essential for transformation and activates gene expression by association with DNA-bound transcription factors such as RBPJkappa (CSL/CBF1). We have previously shown that EBNA2 contains symmetrically dimethylated Arginine (sDMA) residues. Deletion of the RG-repeat results in a reduced ability of the virus to immortalise B-cells. We now show that the RG repeat also contains asymmetrically dimethylated Arginines (aDMA) but neither non-methylated (NMA) Arginines nor citrulline residues. We demonstrate that only aDMA-containing EBNA2 is found in a complex with DNA-bound RBPJkappa in vitro and preferentially associates with the EBNA2-responsive EBV C, LMP1 and LMP2A promoters in vivo. Inhibition of methylation in EBV-infected cells results in reduced expression of the EBNA2-regulated viral gene LMP1, providing additional evidence that methylation is a prerequisite for DNA-binding by EBNA2 via association with the transcription factor RBPJkappa.

  2. Epstein-Barr virus infection and nasopharyngeal carcinoma: the other side of the coin.

    PubMed

    Perri, Francesco; Della Vittoria Scarpati, Giuseppina; Giuliano, Mario; D'Aniello, Carmine; Gnoni, Antonio; Cavaliere, Carla; Licchetta, Antonella; Pisconti, Salvatore

    2015-11-01

    Oncogenic viruses may have a significant impact on the therapeutic management of several malignancies besides their well-known role in tumor pathogenesis. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) induces neoplastic transformation of epithelial cells of the nasopharynx by various molecular mechanisms mostly involving activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor-suppressor genes. EBV infection can also induce the expression of several immunogenic peptides on the plasma membrane of the infected cells. Importantly, these virus-related antigens may be used as targets for antitumor immunotherapy-based treatment strategies. Two different immunotherapy strategies, namely adoptive and active immunotherapy, have been developed and strongly improved in the recent years. Furthermore, EBV infection may influence the use of targeted therapies for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) considering that the presence of EBV can induce important modifications in cell signaling. As an example, latent membrane protein type 1 is a viral transmembrane protein mainly involved in the cancerogenesis process, which can also mediate overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in NPC cells, rendering them more sensitive to anti-EGFR therapy. Finally, EBV may induce epigenetic changes in the infected cells, such as DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation, that can sustain tumor growth and can thus be considered potential targets for novel therapies. In conclusion, EBV infection can modify important biological features of NPC cells, rendering them more vulnerable to both immunotherapy and targeted therapy.

  3. [History of resaerch on Epstein-Barr virus--target cells of infection, and disease].

    PubMed

    Ohga, Shouichi

    2014-01-01

    Half a century has passed since Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) particles were isolated from the cultured lymphoblasts of Burkitt lymphoma. During the period, molecular biology, hematology/immunology, and transplantation medicine made amazing progress, that clarified the mode of infection and pathophysiology of the virus in human diseases. Research strategies on the relationship between EBV and human have expanded to the epidemiology, structures and functions of both genomes, regulatory genes including microRNA, and the nature of epigenetics. Although no animal models of EBV infection long hampered the completion of in vivo experiments, humanized mice have broken through a barrier of in vitro study on EBV-infected cell lines. Our understanding of the life cycle of EBV has continued to deepen about the infection via the CD21 receptor expressed on B cells, the latency, reactivation/reinfection, and transformation, and also the dynamics of T-cell immune response and the intracellular immunosurveillance beyond acquired and innate immunity. On the other hand, the disease entity of life-threatening lymphoproliferative disease of EBV-infected T cells or NK cells is on controversial. The other parts of this special issue include the recent topics of the basic and clinical researches of EBV as the oncogenic virus. Then, we herewith overview the research history of EBV with special reference to the infected cells and host immune responses in EBV-associated diseases. PMID:25765982

  4. Lymphoepithelial carcinoma of the salivary gland: in situ detection of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, S Y; Chung, L P; Yuen, S T; Ho, C M; Wong, M P; Chan, S Y

    1995-01-01

    AIM--To examine the role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in lymphoepithelial carcinoma of the salivary gland in Hong Kong Chinese. METHODS--Ten cases of lymphoepithelial carcinoma of the salivary gland (eight parotid and two submandibular) were examined. In situ hybridisation was used to localise EBER RNA, immunohistochemical methods to detect expression of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) in EBV positive tumours, and Southern blot analysis to examine the clonality of EBV in the two cases where frozen tissue was available. RESULTS--None of the cases had a history of Sjögren's syndrome or histological evidence of a benign lymphoepithelial lesion. The IgA antibody titre against EBV viral capsid antigen was elevated in four cases. All cases were EBV positive by in situ hybridisation, with a strong uniform positive signal in the epithelial cells, and all cases expressed LMP-1. Southern blot analysis revealed that the clonal episomal form of the virus was present. Two of the three female patients in this series also developed carcinoma of cervix. One of these carcinomas had histological features of a lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma but was EBV negative. CONCLUSIONS--A consistent association between EBV and lymphoepithelial carcinoma of the salivary gland was found. The presence of the virus in a clonal episomal form, and the expression of LMP-1 viral oncoprotein is further evidence of the role of EBV in the oncogenesis of this tumour. Images PMID:8543624

  5. Serum BAFF levels, Methypredsinolone therapy, Epstein-Barr Virus and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in Multiple Sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Mameli, Giuseppe; Cocco, Eleonora; Frau, Jessica; Arru, Giannina; Caggiu, Elisa; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Sechi, Leonardo A.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated B lymphocyte activating factor BAFF levels have been reported in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients; moreover, disease-modifying treatments (DMT) have shown to influence blood BAFF levels in MS patients, although the significance of these changes is still controversial. In addition, BAFF levels were reported increased during infectious diseases. In our study, we wanted to investigate on the serum BAFF concentrations correlated to the antibody response against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and their human homologous epitopes in MS and in patients affected with other neurological diseases (OND), divided in Inflammatory Neurological Diseases (IND), Non Inflammatory Neurological Diseases (NIND) and Undetermined Neurological Diseases (UND), in comparison to healthy controls (HCs). Our results confirmed a statistically significant high BAFF levels in MS and IND patients in comparison to HCs but not NIND and UND patients. Interestingly, BAFF levels were inversely proportional to antibodies level against EBV and MAP peptides and the BAFF levels significantly decreased in MS patients after methylprednisolone therapy. These results implicate that lower circulating BAFF concentrations were present in MS patients with humoral response against MAP and EBV. In conclusion MS patients with no IgGs against EBV and MAP may support the hypothesis that elevated blood BAFF levels could be associated with a more stable disease. PMID:27383531

  6. Serum BAFF levels, Methypredsinolone therapy, Epstein-Barr Virus and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in Multiple Sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Giuseppe; Cocco, Eleonora; Frau, Jessica; Arru, Giannina; Caggiu, Elisa; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Sechi, Leonardo A

    2016-01-01

    Elevated B lymphocyte activating factor BAFF levels have been reported in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients; moreover, disease-modifying treatments (DMT) have shown to influence blood BAFF levels in MS patients, although the significance of these changes is still controversial. In addition, BAFF levels were reported increased during infectious diseases. In our study, we wanted to investigate on the serum BAFF concentrations correlated to the antibody response against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and their human homologous epitopes in MS and in patients affected with other neurological diseases (OND), divided in Inflammatory Neurological Diseases (IND), Non Inflammatory Neurological Diseases (NIND) and Undetermined Neurological Diseases (UND), in comparison to healthy controls (HCs). Our results confirmed a statistically significant high BAFF levels in MS and IND patients in comparison to HCs but not NIND and UND patients. Interestingly, BAFF levels were inversely proportional to antibodies level against EBV and MAP peptides and the BAFF levels significantly decreased in MS patients after methylprednisolone therapy. These results implicate that lower circulating BAFF concentrations were present in MS patients with humoral response against MAP and EBV. In conclusion MS patients with no IgGs against EBV and MAP may support the hypothesis that elevated blood BAFF levels could be associated with a more stable disease. PMID:27383531

  7. Is there diagnostic value in detection of immunoglobulin g antibodies to the epstein-barr virus early antigen?

    PubMed

    Crowley, Andrea; Connell, Jeff; Schaffer, Kirsten; Hall, William; Hassan, Jaythoon

    2012-12-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV EA) complex consists of multiple proteins with potential significance for diagnosis of EBV-related diseases. In many individuals, detection of antibody to the early antigen (EA) is a sign of active infection, but 20% of healthy people may have this antibody for years. We studied the role of EA immunoglobulin G (IgG) in individuals with atypical antibody responses in the diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis (IM) and in EBV-infected transplant patients. EA IgG was present in 72% of confirmed IM patients. A trend was observed between high viral loads and the presence of EA IgG and between low viral loads and the absence of EA IgG in EBV-associated disease negative liver transplant recipients. Three assays that measure serum EA IgG were compared; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA), and immunoblot assay. The automated CLIA was found to be more accurate than the ELISA when using the immunoblot assay as a "gold standard" assay in the detection of EA IgG. There may be a potential role for EA IgG testing, together with EBV viral load, in the prediction of transplant recipients at risk of EBV-associated disease; however, EA IgG does not play a significant role in the differential diagnosis of EBV infection in immunocompetent individuals.

  8. Transient elevation of triiodothyronine caused by triiodothyronine autoantibody associated with acute Epstein-Barr-virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shimon, Ilan; Pariente, Clara; Shlomo-David, Jaffa; Grossman, Zehava; Sack, Joseph

    2003-02-01

    A unique 16-year old female patient presented after acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection with severe primary hypothyroidism. Her thyroid test results were thyrotropin level (TSH) of 198 mU/L (normal, 0.4-4 mU/L), free thyroxine [FT(4)], 2.5 pmol/L (normal, 10-25 pmol/L), total triiodothyronine (TT(3)) > 19.5 nmol/L (normal, 1.3-2.7 nmol/L), and free triiodothyronine (FT(3)), 0.77 pmol/L (normal, 3.3-6.3 pmol/L). She had high titers of thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies. In vitro triiodothyronine (T(3))-binding measured by radioimmunoprecipitation was 86% (normal, up to 8.5%) and thyroxine (T(4))-binding 8.2% (normal, 6.4%). Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) absorption, achieved by protein-G Sepharose beads, decreased TT(3) toward normal. Levothyroxine treatment normalized the low baseline FT(4) and FT(3) values, and suppressed TSH to normal. However, TT(3) remained highly elevated and returned to normal after 20 months, while T(3 )binding gradually decreased. Thus, her severe hypothyroidism was masked by this unusual phenomenon. Thirty-four patients with EBV infection (15 with acute disease and 19 with previous infection) were tested for thyroid hormone levels. EBV antibodies (early antigen immunoglobulin M [IgM] and IgG and anti-Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen [EBNA] IgG) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In 15 patients with acute EBV the mean TT(3) level was 2.47 +/- 0.39 nmol/L (5 had TT(3) values above normal) compared to a mean TT(3) of 1.70 +/- 0.53 nmol/L in 19 subjects with previous infection (p < 0.0005; only 1 had a TT(3) result above normal), with no differences in FT(4) and TSH concentrations between the two groups. Acute EBV infection may be associated with transient mild to severe TT(3) elevation as a result of assay interference by anti-T(3) autoantibodies.

  9. Epstein-Barr Virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorders: experimental and clinical developments

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingyun; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), the first human virus related to oncogenesis, was initially identified in a Burkitt lymphoma cell line in 1964. EBV infects over 90% of the world’s population. Most infected people maintain an asymptomatic but persistent EBV infection lifelong. However, in some individuals, EBV infection has been involved in the development of cancer and autoimmune disease. Nowadays, oncogenic potential of EBV has been intensively studied in a wide range of human neoplasms, including Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinoma (GC), etc. EBV encodes a series of viral protein and miRNAs, promoting its persistent infection and the transformation of EBV-infected cells. Although the exact role of EBV in the oncogenesis remains to be clarified, novel diagnostic and targeted therapeutic approaches are encouraging for the management of EBV-related malignancies. This review mainly focuses on the experimental and clinical advances of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:26628948

  10. Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation Associated with Diminished Cell-Mediated Immunity in Antarctic Expeditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Mehta, Satish K.; Cooley, Helen; Dubow, Robin; Lugg, Desmond

    1999-01-01

    Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at two Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, which was evaluated two times before winter isolation and three times during isolation. At all five evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished. CMI response. Diminished CMI was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal CMI responses for all five tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, after, and during the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least one occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (p=0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (p<0.0005) when CMI responsiveness was diminished than when CMI status was normal. The findings indicate that the psychosocial, physical, and other stresses associated with working and living in physical isolation during the Antarctic winter results in diminished CMI and an accompanying increased reactivation and shedding of latent viruses.

  11. Control of Cell Cycle Entry and Apoptosis in B Lymphocytes Infected by Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Spender, Lindsay C.; Cannell, Emma J.; Hollyoake, Martine; Wensing, Barbara; Gawn, Jonathan M.; Brimmell, Matthew; Packham, Graham; Farrell, Paul J.

    1999-01-01

    Infection of human B cells with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) results in activation of the cell cycle and cell growth. To interpret the mechanisms by which EBV activates the cell, we have assayed many proteins involved in control of the G0 and G1 phases of the cell cycle and regulation of apoptosis. In EBV infection most of the changes, including the early induction of cyclin D2, are dependent on expression of EBV genes, but an alteration in the E2F-4 profile was partly independent of viral gene expression, presumably occurring in response to signal transduction activated when the virus binds to its receptor, CD21. By comparing the expression of genes controlling apoptosis, including those encoding several members of the BCL-2 family of proteins, the known relative resistance of EBV-immortalized B-cell lines to apoptosis induced by low serum was found to correlate with expression of both BCL-2 and A20. A20 can be regulated by the NF-κB transcription factor, which is known to be activated by the EBV LMP-1 protein. Quantitative assays demonstrated a direct temporal relationship between LMP-1 protein levels and active NF-κB during the time course of infection. PMID:10233927

  12. Epstein-Barr Virus and Gastric Carcinoma – Viral Carcinogenesis through Epigenetic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Uozaki, Hiroshi; Fukayama, Masashi

    2008-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric carcinoma (GC) is the monoclonal growth of EBV-infected epithelial cells, and the entity was recognized only recently. EBV-associated GC is distributed worldwide and more than 90,000 patients are estimated to develop GC annually in association with EBV (10% of total GC). EBV-associated GC occurs in two forms in terms of the histological features, i.e., lymphoepithelioma-like GC and ordinary type of GC. Both share characteristic clinicopathological features, such as the preferential occurrence as multiple cancer and remnant stomach cancer. While the expression of EBV-latent genes is restricted to several in the infected cells (Latency I), EBV-associated GC shows gastric cell phenotype, resistance to apoptosis, and the production of immunomodulator molecules. Recently, global and non-random CpG island methylation of the promoter region of many cancer-related genes has been demonstrated with their decreased expression, such as p16 INK4A, p73 and E-cadherin. This abnormality is accompanied by methylation of the EBV genome itself, suggesting a process of virus-driven hypermethylation in the development of neoplastic cells. Further studies are necessary to determine the precise sequence of EBV infection, methylation, transformation and selection of the predominant clone within the stomach mucosa. Future studies are also desirable for the target and strategy of therapy, such as initiating viral replication or reversing the DNA methylation of cellular genes. PMID:18784828

  13. Epstein-Barr virus reactivation associated with diminished cell-mediated immunity in antarctic expeditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.; Cooley, H.; Dubow, R.; Lugg, D.

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at 2 Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, that was evaluated 2 times before winter isolation and 3 times during isolation. At all 5 evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished CMI response. Diminished DTH was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal DTH responses for all 5 tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, during, and after the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least 1 occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (P = 0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (P < 0.0005) when DTH response was diminished than when DTH was normal. The findings indicate that the psychosocial, physical, and other stresses associated with working and living in physical isolation during the Antarctic winter result in diminished CMI and an accompanying increased reactivation and shedding of latent viruses.

  14. Sequence variation of cytotoxic T cell epitopes in different isolates of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Apolloni, A; Moss, D; Stumm, R; Burrows, S; Suhrbier, A; Misko, I; Schmidt, C; Sculley, T

    1992-01-01

    Previous results have identified two distinct cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes encoded by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), TETA (ORF BLRF3/BERF1 residues 329-353) and EENL (ORF BERF3/BERF4 residues 290-309). Measurement of the specificities of CTL clones (TETA-specific clone 13 and EENL-specific clone 7) directed against these epitopes indicated that the EENL epitope is conserved in all strains of EBV tested while the TETA epitope varied between individual virus strains. Sequencing of the DNA regions encoding these two CTL epitopes in different EBV isolates confirmed these interpretations and demonstrated that different TETA epitope sequences were encoded by B-type EBV strains and by the B95-8 isolate of EBV compared to the other A-type EBV strains. Titration of synthetic variants of the TETA epitope revealed that the epitope encoded by B95-8 was 15-fold less efficient as a T cell epitope than the sequence encoded by other A-type viral strains while the TETA variant encoded by the B-type strains displayed essentially no activity as a T cell epitope.

  15. Stealth technology: how Epstein-Barr virus utilizes DNA methylation to cloak itself from immune detection.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qian; Robertson, Keith D

    2003-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a large lymphotrophic DNA virus that establishes life-long residency in the infected host and is associated with a number of human tumors. The EBV genome encodes proteins essential for persistence, an oncoprotein, and proteins that render it vulnerable to the host's immune system; therefore, EBV gene transcription is tightly regulated. One critically important regulatory mechanism utilized by EBV is DNA methylation. Methylation of cytosines within CpG dinucleotides at promoter regions is important for gene silencing and genome integrity. Although most parasitic elements are methylated in mammalian cells never to be reactivated again, EBV has evolved to utilize DNA methylation to maximize persistence and cloak itself from immune detection. EBV's reliance on DNA methylation also provides a unique therapeutic strategy for the treatment of EBV-associated tumors. DNA demethylating agents are capable of reactivating transcription of highly immunogenic viral proteins, rendering tumor cells susceptible to killing by the host immune system, and inducing the viral lytic cycle which culminates in cell lysis.

  16. Visualization of episomal and integrated Epstein-Barr virus DNA by fiber fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Jürgen; Rumpler, Silvia; Lion, Thomas; Ambros, Peter F

    2006-04-01

    For many Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated malignancies, it is still a matter of controversy whether infected cells harbor episomal or chromosomally integrated EBV genomes or both. It is well established that the expression of EBV genes per se carries oncogenic potential, but the discrimination between episomal and integrated forms is of great relevance because integration events can contribute to the oncogenic properties of EBV, whereas host cells that exclusively harbor viral episomes may not carry the risks mediated by chromosomal integration. This notion prompted us to establish a reliable technique that not only allows to unequivocally discriminate episomal from integrated EBV DNA, but also provides detailed insights into the genomic organization of the virus. Here, we show that dynamic molecular combing of host cell DNA combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using EBV-specific DNA probes facilitate unambiguous discrimination of episomal from integrated viral DNA. Furthermore, the detection of highly elongated internal repeat 1 (IR1) sequences provides evidence that this method permits detection of major genomic alterations within the EBV genome. Thus, fiber FISH may also provide valuable insights into the genomic organization of viral genomes other than EBV. PMID:16217752

  17. Characterization of cytomegalovirus and epstein-barr virus infection in cervical lesions in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Marinho-Dias, Joana; Ribeiro, Joana; Monteiro, Paula; Loureiro, Joana; Baldaque, Inês; Medeiros, Rui; Sousa, Hugo

    2013-08-01

    Infection by high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is considered necessary but not sufficient for the development of cervical cancer. Previous studies suggested that cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-barr virus (EBV) could be co-factors of HPV-associated carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to characterize the prevalence of CMV and EBV and evaluate its association with the development cervical lesions in Portugal. The prevalence of CMV and EBV infections was determined by real-time PCR in 89 cervical samples from women with different histological lesions, who attended the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Porto. This study revealed an overall prevalence of 4.5% for CMV and 10.1% for EBV. Age-stratified analysis revealed that CMV infection was present in individuals <30 and >60 years old, while EBV infection was present in all age groups. CMV was detected in 9.5% of low-grade lesions and in 22.2% of in situ/invasive carcinomas, while EBV infection was found in all different types of lesions. In addition, data revealed that CMV infection was associated with an increased risk of in situ/invasive carcinoma development (OR=1.28; P=0.035). The study reveals a low prevalence for both viruses; nevertheless, these results are important for knowledge on the shedding of EBV and CMV in cervical samples.

  18. Association of Epstein-Barr virus with sinonasal angiocentric T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, G; Kennedy, S M

    1995-01-01

    AIM--To investigate whether non-Hodgkin's lymphomas arising in the sinonasal region or Waldeyer's ring contain the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome in lesional tissue. METHOD--Sections from paraffin wax blocks of 22 lymphoid proliferations arising in the sinonasal region or Waldeyer's ring were studied with EBV encoded RNAs (EBER-1 and -2) using in situ hybridisation. RESULTS--EBV was detected in nuclei of tumour cells of five of seven T cell lymphomas and in nuclei of two of seven diffuse, large cell immunoblastic lymphomas of B phenotype in the sinonasal region. Of tumours arising in Waldeyer's ring, two of 10 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (both large cell) were positive, as was a single case of Hodgkin's disease. Lymphoma of other types, including Western type Burkitt's lymphoma, and nodular and diffuse small cleaved cell lymphoma, were negative. CONCLUSION--EBV is highly associated with large cell lymphomas especially T cell lymphomas of sinonasal origin in the indigenous Irish population, underlining the importance of this virus in nasopharyngeal lymphomas in Northern European as well as Asian populations. Images PMID:8537496

  19. Human neonatal lymphocytes immortalized after microinjection of Epstein-Barr virus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, C; Raab-Traub, N

    1987-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a highly efficient acute transforming agent in human cells, provided that the intact virus is used. To investigate the ability of viral DNA alone to transform cells, we introduced the EBV genome into human lymphocytes. After microinjection of EBV DNA into neonatal B lymphocytes, we established a cell line that in early passages contained multiple viral fragments. This cell line retained sequences from the short, unique (Us) region of the EBV genome and sequences from EcoRI-E. The viral sequences were not expressed; however, the cells expressed a 2.3-kilobase polyadenylated message homologous to the c-fgr oncogene, a cellular locus believed to be activated by EBV infection [M. S. C. Cheah, T. J. Ley, S. R. Tronick, and K. C. Robbins, Nature (London) 319:238-240.]. The cell line was monoclonal with rearrangement at the immunoglobulin locus and had a reciprocal translocation t(1;7)(p34;q34) and a deletion of sequences within the locus for the beta chain of the T-cell receptor. The close proximity of the translocation to the chromosomal loci for c-fgr on chromosome 1 and the T-cell receptor beta chain on chromosome 7 suggests that structural alteration of these genes was critical to this transformation event. Images PMID:3033282

  20. Epstein-Barr virus in nasal lymphomas contains multiple ongoing mutations in the EBNA-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M I; Spangler, G; Kingma, D; Raffeld, M; Guerrero, I; Misad, O; Jaffe, E S; Magrath, I T; Bhatia, K

    1998-07-15

    We have described 5 major subtypes of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) based on variations in EBNA-1 sequences. These include P-ala (identical to the prototype B95.8 virus), P-thr, V-pro, V-leu, and V-val. Normal individuals often carry multiple EBV subtypes, the most common being P-ala, whereas EBV-associated tumors examined to date always contain a single subtype, which only on rare occasion is P-ala. The primary hypotheses that these observations generate are as follows: (1) Each of these EBV subtypes are naturally occurring, and in normal individuals the multiplicity of subtypes results from multiple infections. (2) EBV subtypes in normal individuals are generated in vivo from a single infecting virus subtype by mutations in EBNA-1. The second hypothesis essentially excludes the possibilities that the nonrandom association of certain subtypes with lymphomas is secondary to the geographic distribution of EBV subtypes and, if proven correct, could provide strong support for a direct role of EBV in tumorigenesis. In this report, we provide evidence for the latter hypothesis. We show that the P-ala EBV subtype present in most nasal lymphomas undergoes and accumulates multiple mutations consistent with the generation of variant species of EBNA-1 in vivo. This phenomenon is similar to the generation of quasispecies in RNA viruses and is the first description of in vivo generation of subtypes in DNA viruses. In RNA-based viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus, the emergence of quasispecies is linked to replication infidelity and significantly influences disease processes through its effect on viral tropism, the emergence of viruses resistant to the host defenses or to therapy, and pathogenicity. The present data thus raise important questions relating to the mechanisms whereby these mutations are generated in EBV and their relevance to the pathogenicity of EBV-associated lymphomas. PMID:9657761

  1. Determination of Roles of Microgravity and Ionizing Radiation on the Reactivation of Epstein-Barr Virus In Vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Satish K; Renner, Ashlie; Stowe, Raymond; Bloom, David; Pierson, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts experience symptomatic and asymptomatic herpes virus reactivation during spaceflight. We have shown increases in reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) and shedding in body fluids (saliva and urine) in astronauts during space travel. Alterations in immunity, increased stress hormone levels, microgravity, increased radiation, and other conditions unique to spaceflight may promote reactivation of latent herpes viruses. Unique mechanico-physico forces associated with spaceflight can have profound effects on cellular function, especially immune cells. In space flight analog studies such as Antarctica, bed rest studies, and NASA's undersea habitat (Aquarius), reactivation of these viruses occurred, but to a lesser extent than spaceflight. Spaceflight analogs model some spaceflight factors, but none of the analogs recreates all factors experienced in space. Most notably, microgravity and radiation are not included in many analogs. Stress, processed through the HPA axis and SAM systems, induces viral reactivation. However, the respective roles of microgravity and increased space radiation levels or if any synergy exists are not known. Therefore, we studied the effect of modeled space radiation and/or microgravity, independent of the immune system on the changes in cellular gene expression that results in viral (EBV) reactivation. The effects of modeled microgravity and low shear on EBV replication and cellular and EBV gene expression were studied in human B-lymphocyte cell cultures. Latently infected B-lymphocytes were propagated in the rotating wall bioreactor and irradiated with the various dosages of gamma irradiation. At specific time intervals following exposure to modeled microgravity, the cells and supernatant were harvested and reactivation of EBV were assessed by measuring EBV and gene expression, DNA methylation, and infectious virus production.

  2. Determinants of Epstein-Barr virus-positive gastric cancer: an international pooled analysis

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, M C; Murphy, G; Koriyama, C; Pfeiffer, R M; Kim, W H; Herrera-Goepfert, R; Corvalan, A H; Carrascal, E; Abdirad, A; Anwar, M; Hao, Z; Kattoor, J; Yoshiwara-Wakabayashi, E; Eizuru, Y; Rabkin, C S; Akiba, S

    2011-01-01

    Background: Meta-analyses of the published literature indicate that about 9% of gastric cancers contain Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), with consistent and significant differences by sex and anatomic subsite. This study aimed to identify additional determinants of EBV positivity and their joint effects. Methods: From 15 international populations with consistent laboratory testing for EBV, we pooled individual-level data for 5081 gastric cancer cases including information on age, sex, subsite, histologic type, diagnostic stage, geographic region, and period of diagnosis. First, we combined population-specific EBV prevalence estimates using random effects meta-analysis. We then aggregated individual-level data to estimate odds ratios of EBV positivity in relation to all variables, accounting for within-population clustering. Results: In unadjusted analyses, EBV positivity was significantly higher in males, young subjects, non-antral subsites, diffuse-type histology, and in studies from the Americas. Multivariable analyses confirmed significant associations with histology and region. Sex interacted with age (P=0.003) and subsite (P=0.002) such that male predominance decreased with age for both subsites. The positivity of EBV was not significantly associated with either stage or time period. Conclusion: Aggregating individual-level data provides additional information over meta-analyses. Distinguishing histologic and geographic features as well as interactions among age, sex, and subsite further support classification of EBV-associated gastric cancer as a distinct aetiologic entity. PMID:21654677

  3. Epstein-Barr virus as a marker of biological aggressiveness in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazouni, C; Fina, F; Romain, S; Ouafik, L; Bonnier, P; Brandone, J-M; Martin, P-M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Although a potential role of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of breast cancer (BC) has been underlined, results remain conflicting. Particularly, the impact of EBV infection on biological markers of BC has received little investigation. Methods: In this study, we established the frequency of EBV-infected BC using real-time quantitative PCR (RT–PCR) in 196 BC specimens. Biological and pathological characteristics according to EBV status were evaluated. Results: EBV DNA was present in 65 of the 196 (33.2%) cases studied. EBV-positive BCs tended to be tumours with a more aggressive phenotype, more frequently oestrogen receptor negative (P=0.05) and with high histological grade (P=0.01). Overexpression of thymidine kinase activity was higher in EBV-infected BC (P=0.007). The presence of EBV was weakly associated with HER2 gene amplification (P=0.08). Conclusion: Our study provides evidence for EBV-associated BC undergoing distinct carcinogenic processes, with more aggressive features. PMID:21179039

  4. In situ detection of Epstein-Barr virus in gastric and colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yuen, S T; Chung, L P; Leung, S Y; Luk, I S; Chan, S Y; Ho, J

    1994-11-01

    The association of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma in the nasopharynx, which is common in Chinese from the southern region, is well established. Recently, EBV has also been found to be associated with lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas (LELCs) and carcinomas with prominent lymphoid infiltrates in the stomach. We investigated for the presence of EBV in 74 cases of gastric adenocarcinoma and 36 cases of colorectal adenocarcinoma from Chinese patients by in situ hybridization (ISH) using an antisense EBER probe. In seven cases (9.5%) of gastric carcinoma, EBER was highly expressed in the adenocarcinoma cells and metastatic tumor cells in regional lymph nodes. In all these cases, the normal gastric epithelium was EBV negative. None of the colorectal carcinomas showed a positive signal. Isolated positive lymphoid cells were frequently found in both tumors. Of the seven positive cases, only one was LELC, and the others were conventional adenocarcinomas of the intestinal type. Five showed expression of the viral RNA in all tumor cells as well as the surrounding dysplastic epithelium. Interestingly, the sixth case showed distinct negative islands of dysplastic glands adjacent to strongly positive dysplastic glands and invasive carcinoma cells. This pattern of positivity, together with negative normal gastric epithelium and positive metastatic tumor, suggested that EBV infection occurred in the dysplastic phase and that an apparent growth advantage was conferred by the EBV infection.

  5. Development of a robust method for establishing B cell lines using Epstein-Barr Virus.

    PubMed

    Danjoh, Inaho; Sone, Hiyori; Shirota, Ryoko; Hiroyama, Takashi; Nakamura, Yukio

    2012-08-01

    B lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCLs) are generally established from B lymphocytes by infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). As their genomic structure is stable in culture, B-LCLs are a valuable resource for many types of analysis. The efficiency of establishing B-LCLs from freshly obtained blood samples from healthy individuals is almost 100 %; however, for blood samples stored inappropriately after collection or held in long-term storage as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in liquid nitrogen, the efficiency of B-LCL establishment can be considerably lower. To date, we have established more than 550 B-LCLs from 685 PBMC samples that have been stored in liquid nitrogen for over 20 yr. The PBMCs were prepared from blood samples donated by individuals belonging to native minority ethnic groups in outlying regions of South America and elsewhere. The establishment of B-LCLs from this material is difficult, and failure results in the waste of valuable and rare samples. We sought to improve our success rate for establishing B-LCLs from these difficult and irreplaceable samples by a detailed examination of each step of the process. The analysis showed that two parameters were particularly critical to the success rate: the density of the PBMCs plated after EBV infection and the EBV titer. These observations shed light on cases where establishment of B-LCLs was hard due to the small number of PBMCs or damage to the cells.

  6. [Expression of Epstein-Barr virus membrane antigen in CHO cell].

    PubMed

    Ye, P; Li, Y; Gu, S

    1998-12-01

    A recombinant plasmid, pCMV/MA, was generated by isolating the Epstein-Barr Virus(EBV) membrane antigen(MA) gene with anchor sequence removed from pSV40/MA and cloning it into pcDNA3, with MA gene and Neomycin gene under the control of CMV promoter and SV40 promoter respectively. CHO cells were transfected with pCMV/MA using liposome and then grown in DMEM medium in the presence of G418. Two clones highly expressing MA were obtained. EBV-MA was purified from the medium of CHO cells by ammonium sulfate precipitation. Western-blot showed that the molecular weight of proteins expressed were about 340 kD and 220 kD. It could specifically react with anti-MA monoclonal antibody in indirect immunofluorescent and immunodot assay. The yield of MA was estimated to be 1.9 micrograms/ml per day by SDS-PAGE scanning and Lowry methods. The optimal culture condition of the CHO cells was to use medium supplemented with 10% serum until 80% cell confluence, then with 2%-5% serum and collected medium continually. The genetic stability of the cells was confirmed by freeze--revival and culture without G418. The purified MA was used to immunize mice and the geometric mean titer of the specific antibody was 1:180, while the positive rate of antibody was 100%.

  7. Neurological complications of acute and persistent Epstein-Barr virus infection in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Häusler, Martin; Ramaekers, Vincent Thomas; Doenges, Martin; Schweizer, Klaus; Ritter, Klaus; Schaade, Lars

    2002-10-01

    Neurological complications of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) have been reported almost exclusively in the course of acute primary infections. The role of EBV in paediatric neurological disease was investigated prospectively over a 2-year period, searching for acute primary, chronic, and reactivated EBV infections. Active EBV infections were diagnosed in 10/48 patients, including two with acute primary EBV infections (cranial neuritis and cerebellitis), one with chronic active infection (T/NK cell lymphoma with cranial neuritis), and seven with reactivated infections. Among these seven patients, three showed "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome, one facial nerve palsy, one progressive macrocephaly, and two prolonged encephalitic illness. The prognosis was good except for the patient with lethal T/NK cell lymphoma and the two girls with encephalitic illness. Despite steroid treatment, these girls suffered prolonged cognitive impairment and epileptic seizures. Both developed left-sided hippocampal atrophy, and one of them hippocampal sclerosis. Like primary infections, reactivated EBV infections cause neurological complications in a considerable number of paediatric patients, lead to serious long-term complications, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of hippocampal lesions. PMID:12210416

  8. Enhancement of Zta-activated lytic transcription of Epstein-Barr virus by Ku80.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Yang, Ya-Chun; Wang, Wen-Hung; Chen, Chien-Sin; Chang, Li-Kwan

    2011-03-01

    Zta, encoded by the BZLF1 gene of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), is a transcription factor that is expressed during the immediate-early stage of the lytic cycle. The expression of Zta is crucial to viral lytic development. Earlier studies showed that Ku80 is a binding partner of Zta in ZKO-293 cells and is co-purified with Zta. This study verifies the interaction between Ku80 and Zta by using glutathione S-transferase-pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays, and also by indirect immunofluorescence analysis. This investigation also reveals that Ku80 binds to Zta on Zta-response elements in the BHLF1 promoter, enhancing the promoter activity. This study also reveals that the interaction between Zta and Ku80 involves the C-terminal region of Zta and the 425 aa N-terminal region of Ku80. The interaction between these two proteins and the enhancement of transcription that is activated by Zta suggest that Ku80 is important to EBV lytic development. PMID:21123545

  9. Epstein-Barr virus and multiple sclerosis. From evidence to therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Menéndez, Santiago; Fernández-Morán, Marta; Fernández-Vega, Iván; Pérez-Álvarez, Angel; Villafani-Echazú, Javier

    2016-02-15

    Multiple sclerosis is caused by a complex interaction between genetic predisposition and environmental factors. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an environmental risk factor that is strongly related to multiple sclerosis (MS), since EBV seropositivity is linked to a significant risk of developing MS. EBV may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease and it is possibly a prerequisite for the development of MS. EBV infection persists in B-cells during the lifetime of the host and can modulate their function. In addition, MS patients might have a deficient capacity to eliminate latent EBV infection in the central nervous system and this would promote the accumulation of infected B cells. Several mechanisms of pathogenesis, including a direct and indirect function of infected B cells, have been postulated in inflammation and neurodegeneration. A relationship between EBV and human endogenous retroviruses in the pathogenesis of MS has also been reported. If EBV is important in the pathogenesis of MS, different therapeutic strategies seem possible for MS treatment. PMID:26810546

  10. Epstein-Barr virus genomes in undifferentiated and squamous cell nasopharyngeal carcinomas in Italian patients.

    PubMed

    Della Torre, G; Pilotti, S; Donghi, R; Pasquini, G; Longoni, A; Grandi, C; Salvatori, P; Pierotti, M A; Rilke, F

    1994-03-01

    Although undifferentiated carcinoma (UC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the nasopharynx are regarded as two distinct histopathologic and clinical entities, it is unclear whether, like UC, SCC carries Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomes. We used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens to test for the presence of EBV DNA in 20 cases of UC and 9 cases of SCC. Multiple copies of the viral genome were regularly detected in all UCs; however, of the nine cases of SCC, seven had no detectable EBV DNA and two contained viral genomes in a low copy number. In parallel, a marked difference in the serum levels of anti-EBV antibodies between patients with UC and SCC was found. Our findings provide evidence for the specific association of EBV with UC in Italian patients and prove by means of a highly sensitive molecular technique that SCC is occasionally related to EBV DNA. Because of the absence of EBV DNA in most cases of SCC and the minimal viral DNA copy number in the few EBV-associated cases of SCC, a different pathway of oncogenic transformation and growth of the nasopharyngeal epithelium is suggested for SCC and UC.

  11. Bortezomib induction of C/EBPβ mediates Epstein-Barr virus lytic activation in Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Courtney M; Chen, Jianmeng; Shamay, Meir; Li, Huili; Zahnow, Cynthia A; Hayward, S Diane; Ambinder, Richard F

    2011-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a variety of lymphoid malignancies. Bortezomib activates EBV lytic gene expression. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, leads to increased levels of CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteinβ (C/EBPβ) in a variety of tumor cell lines. C/EBPβ activates the promoter of the EBV lytic switch gene ZTA. Bortezomib treatment leads to increased binding of C/EBP to previously recognized binding sites in the ZTA promoter. Knockdown of C/EBPβ inhibits bortezomib activation of EBV lytic gene expression. Bortezomib also induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), as evidenced by increases in ATF4, CHOP10, and XBP1s and cleavage of ATF6. Thapsigargin, an inducer of the UPR that does not interfere with proteasome function, also induces EBV lytic gene expression. The effects of thapsigargin on EBV lytic gene expression are also inhibited by C/EBPβ knock-down. Therefore, C/EBPβ mediates the activation of EBV lytic gene expression associated with bortezomib and another UPR inducer. PMID:21447826

  12. Atypical prediagnosis Epstein-Barr virus serology restricted to EBV-positive Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ellen T.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Lennette, Evelyne T.; Rubertone, Mark V.; Mann, Risa B.; Borowitz, Michael; Weir, Edward G.; Abbondanzo, Susan L.; Mueller, Nancy E.

    2012-01-01

    An altered anti–Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serologic profile preceding diagnosis is associated with an increased risk of Hodgkin lymphoma. It is unknown whether this atypical pattern predicts Hodgkin lymphoma risk further subdivided by determination of EBV in tumor cells. A nested case-control study of 128 incident Hodgkin lymphoma cases and 368 matched controls from active-duty military personnel with archived serum in the US Department of Defense Serum Repository was conducted to determine whether a panel of anti-EBV antibody titers differed in EBV+ and EBV− Hodgkin lymphoma. Among 40 EBV+ Hodgkin lymphoma cases and matched controls, statistically significant increased risks were associated with elevated anti-EBV VCA IgG antibody titers (relative risk = 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-8.7), and an anti–EBNA-1/anti–EBNA-2 antibody ratio ≤ 1.0 versus > 1.0 (relative risk = 4.7; 95% CI, 1.6-13.8). In contrast, no significant associations were found among 88 EBV− Hodgkin lymphoma cases relative to their matched controls. In case-case analysis, EBV+ disease was significantly associated with a low anti–EBNA-1/anti–EBNA-2 antibody ratio. This distinc-tive serologic response to EBV latent antigens, indicative of immune dysfunction in other clinical settings, is associated with an increased risk of developing EBV+ but not EBV− Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:22972983

  13. [Investigation of Epstein-Barr virus DNA and RNA in tissues of patients with lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Zeytinoğlu, Ayşin; Hekimgil, Mine; Erensoy, Selda; Aydemir, Söhret; Berber, Sahir; Cağirgan, Seçkin; Soydan, Saliha; Bilgiç, Altinay

    2005-10-01

    Relation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and nasopharyngeal carsinoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, and lymphomas in immunosupressed patients have been shown previously in different studies. The same relationship was also shown in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) by some researchers. The aim of this study was to demonstrate EBV nucleic acids in tissue sections of adult patients with lymphoma. The presence of EBV encoded RNA (EBER) were investigated with in situ hybridization and EBV-DNA with PCR method in 29 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections (19 lymph nodes, the others being gastric, orbital, skin, salivary gland, testicle, small intestinal, tongue root, bone marrow and gingival tissues) of 8 patients with HL and 21 patients with NHL who were followed-up in Haematology Clinics of our university hospital. EBER and EBV-DNA positivity rates were found as follows respectively; 50% (n: 4) and 37.5% (n: 3) of 8 HL patients, and 23.8% (n: 5) and 47.6% (n: 10) of 21 NHL patients. In total evaluation EBER and/or EBV-DNA were positive in 5 of 8 (62.5%) HL, and 12 of 21 (57.1%) NHL tissue sections. There was no significant difference in EBER and EBV-DNA positivity between HL and NHL groups. As a result, our study emphasize a possible EBV related aetiology in HL and NHL. PMID:16544549

  14. Role of Akata cell membrane fluidity in susceptibility to Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, D; Lisi, A; Grimaldi, S

    1995-01-01

    Infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a B lymphotropic human herpesvirus, of its target cells is initiated by the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp350/220 to a 145-kDa cell membrane glycoprotein (CD21, CR2) which also serves as the receptor for the complement fragment C3d (Fingeroth et al., 1984; Nemerow et al., 1987). We used the fluorescent probe 1-6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH), extremely sensitive to the polar environment, in order to analyse the membrane viscosity distribution in single cells of two lymphoid cell lines, Raji and Akata. Lipid analysis on both cell lines showed a slightly lower cholesterol:phospholipid molar ratio on Akata than on Raji cells. Measurements of cell fluidity by DPH polarization in native cells and after cholesterol enrichment indicated that the apparent Akata membrane viscosity was lower than the viscosity of Raji cells. To examine the possibility that this difference could be correlated to a difference in the behaviour of Akata and Raji cells in expressing EBV early antigens, both lines were superinfected with the EBV non-transforming P3HR1 strain. We report here evidence that lipid composition can regulate EBV entry into cells. PMID:8539494

  15. Latent and lytic Epstein-Barr virus gene expression in the peripheral blood of astronauts.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Raymond P; Kozlova, Elena V; Sams, Clarence F; Pierson, Duane L; Walling, Dennis M

    2011-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent and replicative gene transcription was analyzed in peripheral blood B-lymphocytes from astronauts who flew on short-duration (∼11 days) Shuttle missions and long-duration (∼180 days) International Space Station (ISS) missions. Latent, immediate-early, and early gene replicative viral transcripts were detected in samples from six astronauts who flew on short-duration Shuttle missions, whereas viral gene transcription was mostly absent in samples from 24 healthy donors. Samples from six astronauts who flew on long-duration ISS missions were characterized by expanded expression of latent, immediate-early, and early gene transcripts and new onset expression of late replicative transcription upon return to Earth. These data indicate that EBV-infected cells are no longer expressing the restricted set of viral genes that characterize latency but are expressing latent and lytic gene transcripts. These data also suggest the possibility of EBV-related complications in future long-duration missions, in particular interplanetary travel.

  16. Detection of a Specific Biomarker for Epstein-Barr Virus Using a Polymer-Based Genosensor

    PubMed Central

    Balvedi, Renata P. A.; Castro, Ana C. H.; Madurro, João M.; Brito-Madurro, Ana G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes methodology for direct and indirect detections of a specific oligonucleotide for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) using electrochemical techniques. The sequence of oligonucleotide probe (EBV1) revealed a high sequence identity (100%) with the EBV genome. For the development of the genosensor, EBV1 was grafted to the platform sensitized with poly(4-aminothiophenol). After that, the hybridization reaction was carried out with the complementary target (EBV2) on the modified electrode surface using ethidium bromide as DNA intercalator. The oxidation peak currents of ethidium bromide increased linearly with the values of the concentration of the complementary sequences in the range from 3.78 to 756 μmol·L−1. In nonstringent experimental conditions, this genosensor can detect 17.32 nmol·L−1 (three independent experiments) of oligonucleotide target, discriminating between complementary and non-complementary oligonucleotides, as well as differentiating one-base mismatch, as required for detection of genetic diseases caused by point mutations. The biosensor also displayed high specificity to the EBV target with elimination of interference from mix (alanine, glucose, uric acid, ascorbic acid, bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamate and glycine) and good stability (120 days). In addition, it was possible to observe differences between hybridized and non-hybridized surfaces through atomic force microscopy. PMID:24853286

  17. LMP1-deficient Epstein-Barr virus mutant requires T cells for lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shi-Dong; Xu, Xuequn; Plowshay, Julie; Ranheim, Erik A.; Burlingham, William J.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Asimakopoulos, Fotis; Tang, Weihua; Gulley, Margaret L.; Cesarman, Ethel; Gumperz, Jenny E.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection transforms B cells in vitro and is associated with human B cell lymphomas. The major EBV oncoprotein, latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), mimics constitutively active CD40 and is essential for outgrowth of EBV-transformed B cells in vitro; however, EBV-positive diffuse large B cell lymphomas and Burkitt lymphomas often express little or no LMP1. Thus, EBV may contribute to the development and maintenance of human lymphomas even in the absence of LMP1. Here, we found that i.p. injection of human cord blood mononuclear cells infected with a LMP1-deficient EBV into immunodeficient mice induces B cell lymphomas. In this model, lymphoma development required the presence of CD4+ T cells in cord blood and was inhibited by CD40-blocking Abs. In contrast, LMP1-deficient EBV established persistent latency but did not induce lymphomas when directly injected into mice engrafted with human fetal CD34+ cells and human thymus. WT EBV induced lymphomas in both mouse models and did not require coinjected T cells in the cord blood model. Together, these results demonstrate that LMP1 is not essential for EBV-induced lymphomas in vivo and suggest that T cells supply signals that substitute for LMP1 in EBV-positive B cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:25485679

  18. Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Gastric Carcinoma and Specific Features of the Accompanying Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Junhun; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) is one of the four subtypes of gastric carcinoma (GC), as defined by the novel classification recently proposed by The Cancer Genome Atlas. EBVaGC has several clinicopathological features such as longer survival and higher frequency of lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELC) and carcinoma with Crohn's disease-like lymphoid reaction that distinguish it from EBV-negative GC. The intensity and pattern of host cellular immune response in GC have been found to significantly correlate with the prognosis of patients with GC, suggesting that immune reaction and tumor microenvironment have critical roles in the progression of GC, and in particular, EBVaGC. Here, we reviewed the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying prominent immune reactions in patients with EBVaGC. In EBVaGC, deregulation of the expression of immune response-related genes promotes marked intra- or peritumoral immune cell infiltration. The expression of programmed death receptor-ligand 1 is known to be increased in EBVaGC, and therefore, it has been proposed as a favorable prognostic factor for patients with EBVaGC, albeit some data supporting this claim are controversial. Overall, the underlying mechanisms and clinical significance of the host cellular immune response in patients with EBVaGC have not been thoroughly elucidated. Therefore, further research is necessary to better understand the role of tumor microenvironment in EBVaGC. PMID:27104020

  19. Impaired Cytokine Responses to Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Draborg, Anette Holck; Sandhu, Noreen; Larsen, Nanna; Lisander Larsen, Janni; Jacobsen, Søren; Houen, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed cytokine responses against latent and lytic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and healthy controls (HCs) to obtain an overview of the distinctive immune regulatory response in SLE patients and to expand the previously determined impaired EBV-directed T-cell response. The concentrations of 14 cytokines (IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL10, IL12, IL17, IL18, IL1β, IFNγ, TNFα, TNFβ, TGFβ, and GM-CSF) were quantified upon stimulation of whole blood with latent state antigen EBNA1, lytic cycle antigen EBV-EA/D, and the superantigen SEB. To avoid results affected by lack of lymphocytes, we focused on SLE patients with normal levels. Decreased induction of IL12, IFNγ, IL17, and IL6 upon EBNA1 stimulation and that of IFNγ, IL6, TNFβ, IL1β, and GM-CSF upon EBV-EA/D stimulation were detected in SLE patients compared to HCs. IFNγ responses, especially, were shown to be reduced. Induction of several cytokines was furthermore impaired in SLE patients upon SEB stimulation, but no difference was observed in basic levels. Results substantiate the previously proposed impaired regulation of the immune response against latent and lytic cycle EBV infection in SLE patients without lymphopenia. Furthermore, results indicate general dysfunction of leukocytes and their cytokine regulations in SLE patients. PMID:27110576

  20. Lymphomas of the oral cavity: histology, immunologic type, and incidence of Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Solomides, Charalambos C; Miller, Arthur S; Christman, Robert A; Talwar, Jotica; Simpkins, Henry

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the histologic class and immunologic phenotype of lymphomas presenting initially in the oral cavity and whether this correlated to a high incidence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection as has been reported with lymphomas in the nasal cavity. Seventy-one cases of oral lymphomas from the oral pathology referral service were analyzed retrospectively. They were classified according to the Revised European American Lymphoma (REAL) classification system using routine immunohistochemistry. EBV infection was determined by detection of early viral RNA sequences (EBER) and latent membrane protein (LMP-1) expression. Only non-Hodgkin's lymphomas were observed, with a female predominance of 2:1. They were primarily of B-cell origin and histologically classified mainly as large B-cell type (68%); T-cell lymphomas were rare (8%). EBV infection was observed in 14% of the B-cell lymphomas, an incidence rate higher than that reported in studies of B-cell lymphomas not located in the oral cavity but not as high as that observed in pleomorphic T-cell lymphomas (all sites, 36%) or nasal cavity T-cell lymphomas (nearly 100%). Interestingly, EBV proliferation did not correlate with expression of either Bcl-2 or p53. PMID:11957138

  1. Identification of genes specifically methylated in Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Okada, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Munetaka; Nishikawa, Jun; Sakai, Kouhei; Zhang, Yibo; Saito, Mari; Morishige, Akihiro; Oga, Atsunori; Sasaki, Kosuke; Suehiro, Yutaka; Hinoda, Yuji; Sakaida, Isao

    2013-10-01

    We studied the comprehensive DNA methylation status in the naturally derived gastric adenocarcinoma cell line SNU-719, which was infected with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) by methylated CpG island recovery on chip assay. To identify genes specifically methylated in EBV-associated gastric carcinomas (EBVaGC), we focused on seven genes, TP73, BLU, FSD1, BCL7A, MARK1, SCRN1, and NKX3.1, based on the results of methylated CpG island recovery on chip assay. We confirmed DNA methylation of the genes by methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing in SNU-719. The expression of the genes, except for BCL7A, was upregulated by a combination of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A treatment in SNU-719. After the treatment, unmethylated DNA became detectable in all seven genes by methylation-specific PCR. We verified DNA methylation of the genes in 75 primary gastric cancer tissues from 25 patients with EBVaGC and 50 EBV-negative patients who were controls. The methylation frequencies of TP73, BLU, FSD1, BCL7A, MARK1, SCRN1, and NKX3.1 were significantly higher in EBVaGC than in EBV-negative gastric carcinoma. We identified seven genes with promoter regions that were specifically methylated in EBVaGC. Inactivation of these genes may suppress their function as tumor suppressor genes or tumor-associated antigens and help to develop and maintain EBVaGC. PMID:23829175

  2. Viral studies in burkitt lymphoma: association with Epstein-Barr virus but not HHV-8.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, Eduardo M; Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Harrington, William J; Araujo, Iguaracyra; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2008-08-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma, composed of a monomorphic population of medium-sized B cells with a high proliferation rate and a consistent MYC translocation. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with BL with different frequencies depending on the clinical variant. Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), infects a wide range of normal cells, having a well-established role in the pathogenesis of various neoplasms, including Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) and MCD-associated plasmablastic lymphoma. In secondary immunodeficiencies, such as HIV-1 infection and organ transplantation, HHV-8 is considered an opportunistic pathogen linked to the development of lymphomas in patients with AIDS and HIV + patients. We studied the association of EBV and HHV-8 by immunohistochemical analysis, in situ hybridization, and polymerase chain reaction in a large number of well-characterized BLs. EBV was present in 45.0% of all BL cases with higher incidence in the pediatric group; most cases were EBV type A. We found no association of BL with HHV-8 in EBV + BL or in EBV-cases, including the HIV + BL group.

  3. Immunotherapy for Epstein-Barr virus-associated cancers in children.

    PubMed

    Straathof, Karin C M; Bollard, Catherine M; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E

    2003-01-01

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with several malignancies, including Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (LPD). The presence of EBV antigens in these tumors provides a target for immunotherapy approaches, and immunotherapy with EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) has proved effective in post-transplant LPDs, which are highly immunogenic tumors expressing type III latency. The malignant cells in Hodgkin's disease and nasopharyngeal carcinoma express type II latency and hence a more restricted pattern of EBV antigens. Trials with autologous EBV-specific CTL responses are under way in both of these diseases, and while some activity has been seen, no patient has yet been cured. This reduced CTL efficacy may reflect either downregulation of immunodominant EBV proteins, which are major CTL targets, or the ability of these tumors to evade the immune response by secreting inhibitory cytokines. Further improvement of EBV-specific CTL therapy for these type II latency tumors will require improved methods to activate and expand CTLs specific for the subdominant EBV genes expressed and to genetically modify the expanded CTLs to render them resistant to inhibitory cytokines. If these strategies to improve the therapeutic potential of immunotherapy for EBV-associated tumors prove successful, this type of treatment may be adapted to other tumors expressing known (viral) antigens. PMID:12604735

  4. Shutoff of BZLF1 gene expression is necessary for immortalization of primary B cells by Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xianming; McCarthy, Patrick J; Wang, Zhenxun; Gorlen, Daniel A; Mertz, Janet E

    2012-08-01

    The BZLF1 gene controls the switch between latent and lytic infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We previously reported that both the ZV and ZIIR elements within the BZLF1 promoter, Zp, are potent transcription silencers within the context of an intact EBV genome. We report here identification of another sequence element, ZV', which synergized with ZV in repressing Zp via binding ZEB1 or ZEB2. We then determined the phenotype of a variant of EBV strain B95.8 in which the ZV, ZV', and ZIIR elements were concurrently mutated. HEK293 cell lines infected with this triple mutant (tmt) virus spontaneously synthesized 6- to 10-fold more viral BZLF1, BRLF1, BMRF1, and BLLF1 RNAs, 3- to 6-fold more viral Zta, Rta, and EAD proteins, 3- to 5-fold more viral DNA, and 7- to 9-fold more infectious virus than did 293 cell lines latently infected with either the ZV ZV' double mutant (dmt) or ZIIR mutant (mt) virus. While ZV ZV' ZIIR tmt EBV efficiently infected human primary blood B cells in vitro, it was highly defective in immortalizing them. Instead of the nearly complete silencing of BZLF1 gene expression that occurs within 4 days after primary infection with wild-type EBV, the ZV ZV' ZIIR tmt-infected cells continued to synthesize BZLF1 RNA, with 90% of them dying within 9 days postinfection. BL41 cells infected with this "superlytic" virus also exhibited increased synthesis of BZLF1 and BMRF1 RNAs. Thus, we conclude that the ZV, ZV', and ZIIR silencing elements act synergistically to repress transcription from Zp, thereby tightly controlling BZLF1 gene expression, which is crucial for establishing and maintaining EBV latency.

  5. Age-related Epstein-Barr virus-positive cutaneous ulcer arising after a self-limited subcutaneous abscess: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Epstein-Barr virus-positive mucocutaneous ulcer is a newly recognized clinicopathologic entity in the spectrum of Epstein-Barr virus-positive lymphoproliferative disorders. This entity is characterized by a self-limited, indolent course. Case presentation We report the case of a 74-year-old, type 2 diabetic man who presented with an ulceroinfiltrative skin lesion on the left side of his neck. Histological examination showed that the lesion consisted of large atypical cells, some with Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg-like morphology, in the midst of reactive lymphocytes, plasma cells, eosinophils and histiocytes. The atypical cells were partially positive for CD45, CD20, CD79a, CD30, B-cell lymphoma 2 and latent membrane protein 1 (CS.1-4), and negative for CD15, B-cell lymphoma 6 and CD10. In situ hybridization for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded ribonucleic acid was positive. Two years before, the patient had been diagnosed with a self-limited subcutaneous abscess in the same anatomic area that healed after antibiotic therapy. Conclusion Older patients with positive Epstein-Barr virus serology may develop B-cell lymphoproliferations due to age-related immune suppression. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded ribonucleic acid testing and clonality analysis, eventually complemented with close clinical follow-up, should be performed for suspicious inflammatory lesions in older patients. PMID:22967962

  6. [Epstein-Barr, hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infections and their oncogenic potentials].

    PubMed

    Jovanović, J; Brkić, S; Klasnja, B; Fabri, M

    1997-01-01

    There are two ways of connecting Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with the uncontrolled growth of EBV infected B lymphocytes: in case of evident immunosuppression when the control by cellular immunity is missing or in the case of pathological growth of malignant clone as a result of genetic translocations. Today, EBV is linked with the development of lymphomas in immunosuppressed patients, Hodgkin's and Burkitt's lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The presence of EBV genome in these patients can be confirmed in malignant cells, in lower or higher percent, as well as the high titers of antibodies against specific virus antigens. Hepatitis B viral infection (HBVI) of specific chronic course and associated with intensified inflammation and mitotic activity is of one of the most important factors in the appearance of hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the integration of viral DNA in DNA of hepatocytes has been one of the possible preconditions for carcinogenesis, recently a great attention has been paid to the inactivation of p53 suppressor gene, being a transcriptive transactivator. Other possible cofactors of carcinogenesis imply long-lasting viral replication, coinfection with HVB, HCV or HDV, interaction with other chemical carcinogens (hormones, aflatoxin, alcohol and similar). In distinction from other human DNA viruses, Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a RNA virus which is not integrated in genome of hepatocyte and active replication of virus is maintained even when hepatocellular carcinoma is detected. It has been assumed that HCV inactivate or mutate the gene of tumor suppression p53 in an early stage of hepatocellular carcinoma development. PMID:9471511

  7. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing of Epstein-Barr virus in human cells.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Kit-San; Chan, Chi-Ping; Wong, Nok-Hei Mickey; Ho, Chau-Ha; Ho, Ting-Hin; Lei, Ting; Deng, Wen; Tsao, Sai Wah; Chen, Honglin; Kok, Kin-Hang; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2015-03-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated 9) system is a highly efficient and powerful tool for RNA-guided editing of the cellular genome. Whether CRISPR/Cas9 can also cleave the genome of DNA viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which undergo episomal replication in human cells, remains to be established. Here, we reported on CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the EBV genome in human cells. Two guide RNAs (gRNAs) were used to direct a targeted deletion of 558 bp in the promoter region of BART (BamHI A rightward transcript) which encodes viral microRNAs (miRNAs). Targeted editing was achieved in several human epithelial cell lines latently infected with EBV, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma C666-1 cells. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the EBV genome was efficient. A recombinant virus with the desired deletion was obtained after puromycin selection of cells expressing Cas9 and gRNAs. No off-target cleavage was found by deep sequencing. The loss of BART miRNA expression and activity was verified, supporting the BART promoter as the major promoter of BART RNA. Although CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the multicopy episome of EBV in infected HEK293 cells was mostly incomplete, viruses could be recovered and introduced into other cells at low m.o.i. Recombinant viruses with an edited genome could be further isolated through single-cell sorting. Finally, a DsRed selectable marker was successfully introduced into the EBV genome during the course of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing. Taken together, our work provided not only the first genetic evidence that the BART promoter drives the expression of the BART transcript, but also a new and efficient method for targeted editing of EBV genome in human cells.

  8. Epstein-Barr virus receptor expression on human CD8+ (cytotoxic/suppressor) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sauvageau, G; Stocco, R; Kasparian, S; Menezes, J

    1990-02-01

    In 1977 we showed that cells of a human lymphocytic leukaemia-derived T line (Molt-4) have receptors for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). More recently, EBV-positive human T cell lymphomas have been recognized and human T cell lines containing the EBV genome have been established in vitro. To understand better the interaction of EBV with T cells, we decided to determine first whether human peripheral blood T lymphocytes express receptors for EBV. Using flow cytometry we examined the binding of both lymphocyte-transforming (B95-8) and non-transforming (P3HR-1) strains of EBV to T lymphocyte subpopulations, using a double labelling technique with T cell-specific phycoerythrinated monoclonal antibodies (Leu 2a) and fluoresceinated viral preparation. Our results suggest that, in general, about 50% of the CD8+ (or suppressor/cytotoxic) T cell subpopulation from both EBV-seropositive and -seronegative individuals can bind EBV. EBV receptor expression on these T cells was about 10 and 51 times less than that on Molt-4 and Raji (an EBV receptor-positive B cell line) cells, respectively. The specificity of this binding was demonstrated by the inhibition of attachment of viral preparations preincubated with a monoclonal antibody directed against the viral ligand (gp240/350), and by preincubating these target T cells with unlabelled virus. We were unable to detect EBV-induced antigens in infected T cells, suggesting that, as in Molt-4 cells, virus internalization may not occur in fresh T cells and/or that the virus receptor may not be completely functional. We were also unable to detect C3d (or CR2) receptors on these T cells, or to inhibit virus attachment by treating the targets with an anti-CR2 monoclonal antibody (OKB7), suggesting that the EBV receptor on CD8+ peripheral blood lymphocytes is different from that on B cells. PMID:2155291

  9. Detection and characterization of Epstein-Barr virus in clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Ambinder, R. F.; Mann, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a wide spectrum of benign and malignant diseases. Recent additions to the list include oral hairy leukoplakia; a subset of Hodgkin's lymphomas, particularly those with mixed cellularity histology or those occurring in underdeveloped countries; a subset of diffuse large cell/immunoblastic lymphoma in the immunocompromised, particularly primary central nervous system lymphoma; a subset of peripheral T cell lymphomas; and a subset of gastric carcinomas, particularly undifferentiated carcinomas. There are several distinctive aspects of the biology of the virus that are important in investigations of virus in clinical specimens. The presence of repeated elements in the genome facilitates detection of viral nucleic acids by a variety of hybridization techniques as well as the characterization of the clonality of virus-infected tissues. Latent viral infection is associated with several different patterns of viral gene expression in infected cells. Latent gene products are important because of their growth-regulating and -transforming properties as well as the potent cytotoxic T cell response they elicit. The abundant expression of the EBER RNA transcripts makes possible the sensitive detection of latent infection in EBV-associated tumors. Lytic infection can be inhibited by antiviral nucleoside analogues. Two lytic gene products are of special interest because of their homology to the cellular proteins BCL-2 and interleukin-10. Two viral biotypes or strains with different properties in terms of lymphocyte immortalization and transformation have recently been characterized. Current evidence suggests a differential biotype association with particular malignancies. Characterization of the association of EBV with various disease processes promises to be important for diagnosis and treatment as well as for a better understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of these diabetes. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8053485

  10. No association between Epstein-Barr Virus and Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus with Breast Cancer in Mexican Women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Molina-Muñoz, Tzindilú; Martínez-López, Juan L. E.; Hernández-Sancén, Paulina; Mantilla, Alejandra; Leal, Yelda A.; Torres, Javier; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy affecting women worldwide. It has been suggested that infection by Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus or a similar virus, MMTV-like virus (MMTV-LV), play a role in the etiology of the disease. However, studies looking at the presence of these viruses in breast cancer have produced conflicting results, and this possible association remains controversial. Here, we used polymerase chain reaction assay to screen specific sequences of EBV and MMTV-LV in 86 tumor and 65 adjacent tissues from Mexican women with breast cancer. Neither tumor samples nor adjacent tissue were positive for either virus in a first round PCR and only 4 tumor samples were EBV positive by a more sensitive nested PCR. Considering the study's statistical power, these results do not support the involvement of EBV and MMTV-LV in the etiology of breast cancer.

  11. No association between Epstein-Barr Virus and Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus with Breast Cancer in Mexican Women

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Molina-Muñoz, Tzindilú; Martínez-López, Juan L. E.; Hernández-Sancén, Paulina; Mantilla, Alejandra; Leal, Yelda A.; Torres, Javier; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy affecting women worldwide. It has been suggested that infection by Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus or a similar virus, MMTV-like virus (MMTV-LV), play a role in the etiology of the disease. However, studies looking at the presence of these viruses in breast cancer have produced conflicting results, and this possible association remains controversial. Here, we used polymerase chain reaction assay to screen specific sequences of EBV and MMTV-LV in 86 tumor and 65 adjacent tissues from Mexican women with breast cancer. Neither tumor samples nor adjacent tissue were positive for either virus in a first round PCR and only 4 tumor samples were EBV positive by a more sensitive nested PCR. Considering the study's statistical power, these results do not support the involvement of EBV and MMTV-LV in the etiology of breast cancer. PMID:24131889

  12. Virus and Cell RNAs Expressed during Epstein-Barr Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Cahir-McFarland, Ellen; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott

    2006-01-01

    Changes in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cell RNA levels were assayed following immunoglobulin G (IgG) cross-linking-induced replication in latency 1-infected Akata Burkitt B lymphoblasts. EBV replication as assayed by membrane gp350 expression was ∼5% before IgG cross-linking and increased to more than 50% 48 h after induction. Seventy-two hours after IgG cross-linking, gp350-positive cells excluded propidium iodide as well as gp350-negative cells. EBV RNA levels changed temporally in parallel with previously defined sensitivity to inhibitors of protein or viral DNA synthesis. BZLF1 immediate-early RNA levels doubled by 2 h and reached a peak at 4 h, whereas BMLF1 doubled by 4 h with a peak at 8 h, and BRLF1 doubled by 8 h with peak at 12 h. Early RNAs peaked at 8 to 12 h, and late RNAs peaked at 24 h. Hybridization to intergenic sequences resulted in evidence for new EBV RNAs. Surprisingly, latency III (LTIII) RNAs for LMP1, LMP2, EBNALP, EBNA2, EBNA3A, EBNA3C, and BARTs were detected at 8 to 12 h and reached maxima at 24 to 48 h. EBNA2 and LMP1 were at full LTIII levels by 48 h and localized to gp350-positive cells. Thus, LTIII expression is a characteristic of late EBV replication in both B lymphoblasts and epithelial cells in immune-comprised people (J. Webster-Cyriaque, J. Middeldorp, and N. Raab-Traub, J. Virol. 74:7610-7618, 2000). EBV replication significantly altered levels of 401 Akata cell RNAs, of which 122 RNAs changed twofold or more relative to uninfected Akata cells. Mitogen-activated protein kinase levels were significantly affected. Late expression of LTIII was associated with induction of NF-κB responsive genes including IκBα and A20. The exclusion of propidium, expression of EBV LTIII RNAs and proteins, and up-regulation of specific cell RNAs are indicative of vital cell function late in EBV replication. PMID:16474161

  13. Epstein-Barr virus negative primary hepatic leiomyoma: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xian-Zhang; Ming, Chang-Sheng; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Gong, Nian-Qiao

    2013-01-01

    Primary hepatic leiomyoma is a neoplasm of mesenchymal origin and occurs only rarely. Secondary to benign smooth muscle proliferation, it is usually found in adult women and is associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Here, we report the 29th case of primary hepatic leiomyoma with its unique features related to diagnosis, treatment and developmental biology. A 48-year-old man, with an immunocompromised status, complained of pain in the upper quadrant of the abdomen. Serological analysis indicated no presence of hepatitis virus, no human immunodeficiency virus, and no EBV infection. The levels of α-fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen were normal. A mass was detected in segment III of the hepatic lobe by ultrasonography and an abdominal computed tomography scan. Endoscopy had negative findings. Exploratory laparotomy found no existing extrahepatic tumor and left lateral lobectomy was performed. Pathological examination showed the mass to be a typical leiomyoma. The cells were positive for α-smooth muscle actin and desmin, and negative for the makers of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), including CD117, CD34 and DOG1 (discovered on GIST1). In situ hybridization revealed negative status for EBV-encoded small RNA. After left lateral lobectomy, the patient was not given chemotherapy or radiotherapy. During a 2-year follow-up, no sign of local recurrence or distant metastasis was observed. In conclusion, we report a rare case of primary hepatic leiomyoma in a male patient without EBV infection. Hepatic resection was curative. This case presents data to expand our knowledge concerning the complex and heterogeneous nature of primary liver leiomyoma, indicating that EBV infection is important but neither necessary nor sufficient for the development of primary liver leiomyoma. PMID:23840159

  14. BZLF1 governs CpG-methylated chromatin of Epstein-Barr Virus reversing epigenetic repression.

    PubMed

    Woellmer, Anne; Arteaga-Salas, Jose M; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang

    2012-09-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are essential for the regulation of all genes in mammalian cells but transcriptional repression including DNA methylation are also major epigenetic mechanisms of defense inactivating potentially harmful pathogens. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), however, has evolved to take advantage of CpG methylated DNA to regulate its own biphasic life cycle. We show here that latent EBV DNA has an extreme composition of methylated CpG dinucleotides with a bimodal distribution of unmethylated or fully methylated DNA at active latent genes or completely repressed lytic promoters, respectively. We find this scenario confirmed in primary EBV-infected memory B cells in vivo. Extensive CpG methylation of EBV's DNA argues for a very restricted gene expression during latency. Above-average nucleosomal occupancy, repressive histone marks, and Polycomb-mediated epigenetic silencing further shield early lytic promoters from activation during latency. The very tight repression of viral lytic genes must be overcome when latent EBV enters its lytic phase and supports de novo virus synthesis in infected cells. The EBV-encoded and AP-1 related transcription factor BZLF1 overturns latency and initiates virus synthesis in latently infected cells. Paradoxically, BZLF1 preferentially binds to CpG-methylated motifs in key viral promoters for their activation. Upon BZLF1 binding, we find nucleosomes removed, Polycomb repression lost, and RNA polymerase II recruited to the activated early promoters promoting efficient lytic viral gene expression. Surprisingly, DNA methylation is maintained throughout this phase of viral reactivation and is no hindrance to active transcription of extensively CpG methylated viral genes as thought previously. Thus, we identify BZLF1 as a pioneer factor that reverses epigenetic silencing of viral DNA to allow escape from latency and report on a new paradigm of gene regulation. PMID:22969425

  15. Epstein-Barr virus protein kinase BGLF4 targets the nucleus through interaction with nucleoporins.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chou-Wei; Lee, Chung-Pei; Huang, Yu-Hao; Yang, Pei-Wen; Wang, Jiin-Tarng; Chen, Mei-Ru

    2012-08-01

    BGLF4 of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates multiple viral and cellular substrates to optimize the cellular environment for viral DNA replication and the nuclear egress of viral nucleocapsids. BGLF4 is expressed predominantly in the nucleus at early and late stages of virus replication, while a small portion of BGLF4 is distributed in the cytoplasm at the late stage of virus replication and packaged into the virion. Here, we analyzed systematically the functional domains crucial for nuclear localization of BGLF4 and found that both the N and C termini play important modulating roles. Analysis of amino acid substitution mutants revealed that the C terminus of BGLF4 does not contain a conventional nuclear localization signal (NLS). Additionally, deletion of the C-terminal putative helical regions at amino acids 386 to 393 and 410 to 419 diminished the nuclear translocation of BGLF4, indicating that the secondary structure of the C terminus is important for the localization of BGLF4. The green fluorescent protein-fused wild-type or C-terminal helical regions of BGLF4 associate with phenylalanine/glycine repeat-containing nucleoporins (Nups) in nuclear envelope fractionation. Both coimmunoprecipitation and in vitro pull-down assays further demonstrated that BGLF4 binds to Nup62 and Nup153. Remarkably, nuclear import assay with permeabilized HeLa cells demonstrated that BGLF4 translocated into nucleus independent of cytosolic factors. Data presented here suggest that BGLF4 employs a novel mechanism through direct interactions with nucleoporins for its nuclear targeting.

  16. Transcriptional activation of Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 by USF1 and Rta.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chen-Chia; Kuo, Chung-Wen; Wang, Wen-Hung; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Chang, Pey-Jium; Chang, Li-Kwan; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2015-09-01

    During its lytic cycle, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) expresses Rta, a factor encoded by BRLF1 that activates the transcription of viral lytic genes. We found that upstream stimulating factor (USF) binds to E1, one of the five E boxes located at - 79 in the BRLF1 promoter (Rp), to activate BRLF1 transcription. Furthermore, Rta was shown to interact with USF1 in coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST)-pulldown assays, and confocal laser-scanning microscopy further confirmed that these two proteins colocalize in the nucleus. Rta was also found to bind with the E1 sequence in a biotin-labelled E1 probe, but only in the presence of USF1, suggesting that these two proteins likely form a complex on E1. We subsequently constructed p188mSZ, a reporter plasmid that contained the sequence from - 188 to +5 in Rp, within which the Sp1 site and Zta response element were mutated. In EBV-negative Akata cells cotransfected with p188mSZ and plasmids expressing USF1 and Rta, synergistic activation of Rp transcription was observed. However, after mutating the E1 sequence in p188mSZ, USF1 and Rta were no longer able to transactivate Rp, indicating that Rta autoregulates BRLF1 transcription via its interaction with USF1 on E1. This study showed that pUSF1 transfection after EBV lytic induction in P3HR1 cells increases Rta expression, indicating that USF1 activates Rta expression after the virus enters the lytic cycle. Together, these results reveal a novel mechanism by which USF interacts with Rta to promote viral lytic development, and provide additional insight into the viral-host interactions of EBV. PMID:26297580

  17. Increased Epstein-Barr virus in breast milk occurs with subclinical mastitis and HIV shedding.

    PubMed

    Sanosyan, Armen; Rutagwera, David G; Molès, Jean-Pierre; Bollore, Karine; Peries, Marianne; Kankasa, Chipepo; Mwiya, Mwiya; Tylleskär, Thorkild; Nagot, Nicolas; Van De Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in breast milk and subclinical mastitis (SCM) are both associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) shedding and possibly with postnatal HIV transmission. The objective of this nested case-control study was to investigate the interplay between SCM and EBV replication in breast milk of HIV-infected mothers.The relationships between EBV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) shedding, HIV-1 ribonucleic acid (RNA) level, and SCM were explored in breast milk samples of Zambian mothers participating in the ANRS 12174 trial. Mammary gland inflammation was defined as a breast milk sodium to potassium ratio (Na/K) greater than 0.6 and further subclassified as either "possible SCM" (Na/K ratio 0.6-1.0) or SCM (Na/K ratio ≥ 1.0). Breast milk interleukin 8 (IL-8) was measured as a surrogate marker of mammary gland inflammation.EBV DNA was detected in breast milk samples from 42 out of 83 (51%) participants and was associated with HIV-1 shedding in breast milk (P = 0.006). EBV DNA levels were higher in samples with SCM and "possible SCM" compared to non-SCM breast milk samples (P = 0.06; P = 0.007). An EBV DNA level of >200 copies/mL was independently associated with SCM and "possible SCM" (OR: 2.62; 95%: 1.13-6.10). In patients with SCM, higher EBV replication in the mammary gland was associated with a lower induction of IL-8 (P = 0.013). Resistance to DNase treatment suggests that EBV DNA in lactoserum is encapsidated.SCM and decreased IL-8 responses are associated with an increased EBV shedding in breast milk which may in turn facilitate HIV replication in the mammary gland. PMID:27399077

  18. Sensitive, microliter PCR with consensus degenerate primers for Epstein Barr virus amplification

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kyudam; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D. Curtis; Conrardy, Christina; Landers, James P.; Tong, Suxiang; Forest, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive identification of the etiology of viral diseases is key to implementing appropriate prevention and treatment. The gold standard for virus identification is the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a technique that allows for highly specific and sensitive detection of pathogens by exponentially amplifying a specific region of DNA from as little as a single copy through thermocycling a biochemical cocktail. Today, molecular biology laboratories use commercial instruments that operate in 0.5–2 h/analysis using reaction volumes of 5–50 μL contained within polymer tubes or chambers. Towards reducing this volume and maintaining performance, we present a semi-quantitative, systematic experimental study of how PCR yield is affected by tube/chamber substrate, surface-area-to-volume ratio (SA:V), and passivation methods. We perform PCR experiments using traditional PCR tubes as well as using disposable polymer microchips with 1 μL reaction volumes thermocycled using water baths. We report the first oil encapsulation microfluidic PCR method without fluid flow and its application to the first microfluidic amplification of Epstein Barr virus using consensus degenerate primers, a powerful and broad PCR method to screen for both known and novel members of a viral family. The limit of detection is measured as 140 starting copies of DNA from a starting concentration of 3×105 copies/mL, regarded as an accepted sensitivity threshold for diagnostic purposes, and reaction specificity was improved as compared to conventional methods. Also notable, these experiments were conducted with conventional reagent concentrations, rather than commonly spiked enzyme and/or template mixtures. This experimental study of the effects of substrate, SA:V, and passivation, together with sensitive and specific microfluidic PCR with consensus degenerate primers represent advances towards lower cost and higher throughput pathogen screening. PMID:23080522

  19. Transcriptional activation of Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 by USF1 and Rta.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chen-Chia; Kuo, Chung-Wen; Wang, Wen-Hung; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Chang, Pey-Jium; Chang, Li-Kwan; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2015-09-01

    During its lytic cycle, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) expresses Rta, a factor encoded by BRLF1 that activates the transcription of viral lytic genes. We found that upstream stimulating factor (USF) binds to E1, one of the five E boxes located at - 79 in the BRLF1 promoter (Rp), to activate BRLF1 transcription. Furthermore, Rta was shown to interact with USF1 in coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST)-pulldown assays, and confocal laser-scanning microscopy further confirmed that these two proteins colocalize in the nucleus. Rta was also found to bind with the E1 sequence in a biotin-labelled E1 probe, but only in the presence of USF1, suggesting that these two proteins likely form a complex on E1. We subsequently constructed p188mSZ, a reporter plasmid that contained the sequence from - 188 to +5 in Rp, within which the Sp1 site and Zta response element were mutated. In EBV-negative Akata cells cotransfected with p188mSZ and plasmids expressing USF1 and Rta, synergistic activation of Rp transcription was observed. However, after mutating the E1 sequence in p188mSZ, USF1 and Rta were no longer able to transactivate Rp, indicating that Rta autoregulates BRLF1 transcription via its interaction with USF1 on E1. This study showed that pUSF1 transfection after EBV lytic induction in P3HR1 cells increases Rta expression, indicating that USF1 activates Rta expression after the virus enters the lytic cycle. Together, these results reveal a novel mechanism by which USF interacts with Rta to promote viral lytic development, and provide additional insight into the viral-host interactions of EBV.

  20. Phosphoproteomic Profiling Reveals Epstein-Barr Virus Protein Kinase Integration of DNA Damage Response and Mitotic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Renfeng; Liao, Gangling; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Pinto, Sneha M; Shaw, Patrick G; Huang, Tai-Chung; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Gowda, Harsha; Wu, Xinyan; Lv, Dong-Wen; Zhang, Kun; Manda, Srikanth S; Pandey, Akhilesh; Hayward, S Diane

    2015-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is etiologically linked to infectious mononucleosis and several human cancers. EBV encodes a conserved protein kinase BGLF4 that plays a key role in the viral life cycle. To provide new insight into the host proteins regulated by BGLF4, we utilized stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics to compare site-specific phosphorylation in BGLF4-expressing Akata B cells. Our analysis revealed BGLF4-mediated hyperphosphorylation of 3,046 unique sites corresponding to 1,328 proteins. Frequency analysis of these phosphosites revealed a proline-rich motif signature downstream of BGLF4, indicating a broader substrate recognition for BGLF4 than its cellular ortholog cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). Further, motif analysis of the hyperphosphorylated sites revealed enrichment in ATM, ATR and Aurora kinase substrates while functional analyses revealed significant enrichment of pathways related to the DNA damage response (DDR), mitosis and cell cycle. Phosphorylation of proteins associated with the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) indicated checkpoint activation, an event that inactivates the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome, APC/C. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGLF4 binds to and directly phosphorylates the key cellular proteins PP1, MPS1 and CDC20 that lie upstream of SAC activation and APC/C inhibition. Consistent with APC/C inactivation, we found that BGLF4 stabilizes the expression of many known APC/C substrates. We also noted hyperphosphorylation of 22 proteins associated the nuclear pore complex, which may contribute to nuclear pore disassembly and SAC activation. A drug that inhibits mitotic checkpoint activation also suppressed the accumulation of extracellular EBV virus. Taken together, our data reveal that, in addition to the DDR, manipulation of mitotic kinase signaling and SAC activation are mechanisms associated with lytic EBV replication. All MS data have been deposited in

  1. Phosphoproteomic Profiling Reveals Epstein-Barr Virus Protein Kinase Integration of DNA Damage Response and Mitotic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Renfeng; Pinto, Sneha M.; Shaw, Patrick G.; Huang, Tai-Chung; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Gowda, Harsha; Wu, Xinyan; Lv, Dong-Wen; Zhang, Kun; Manda, Srikanth S.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Hayward, S. Diane

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is etiologically linked to infectious mononucleosis and several human cancers. EBV encodes a conserved protein kinase BGLF4 that plays a key role in the viral life cycle. To provide new insight into the host proteins regulated by BGLF4, we utilized stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics to compare site-specific phosphorylation in BGLF4-expressing Akata B cells. Our analysis revealed BGLF4-mediated hyperphosphorylation of 3,046 unique sites corresponding to 1,328 proteins. Frequency analysis of these phosphosites revealed a proline-rich motif signature downstream of BGLF4, indicating a broader substrate recognition for BGLF4 than its cellular ortholog cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). Further, motif analysis of the hyperphosphorylated sites revealed enrichment in ATM, ATR and Aurora kinase substrates while functional analyses revealed significant enrichment of pathways related to the DNA damage response (DDR), mitosis and cell cycle. Phosphorylation of proteins associated with the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) indicated checkpoint activation, an event that inactivates the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome, APC/C. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGLF4 binds to and directly phosphorylates the key cellular proteins PP1, MPS1 and CDC20 that lie upstream of SAC activation and APC/C inhibition. Consistent with APC/C inactivation, we found that BGLF4 stabilizes the expression of many known APC/C substrates. We also noted hyperphosphorylation of 22 proteins associated the nuclear pore complex, which may contribute to nuclear pore disassembly and SAC activation. A drug that inhibits mitotic checkpoint activation also suppressed the accumulation of extracellular EBV virus. Taken together, our data reveal that, in addition to the DDR, manipulation of mitotic kinase signaling and SAC activation are mechanisms associated with lytic EBV replication. All MS data have been deposited in

  2. Identification of acidic and aromatic residues in the Zta activation domain essential for Epstein-Barr virus reactivation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z; Chen, C J; Zerby, D; Delecluse, H J; Lieberman, P M

    2001-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle transcription and DNA replication require the transcriptional activation function of the viral immediate-early protein Zta. We describe a series of alanine substitution mutations in the Zta activation domain that reveal two functional motifs based on amino acid composition. Alanine substitution of single or paired hydrophobic aromatic amino acid residues resulted in modest transcription activation defects, while combining four substitutions of aromatic residues (F22/F26/W74/F75) led to more severe transcription defects. Substitution of acidic amino acid residue E27, D35, or E54 caused severe transcription defects on most viral promoters. Promoter- and cell-specific defects were observed for some substitution mutants. Aromatic residues were required for Zta interaction with TFIIA-TFIID and the CREB-binding protein (CBP) and for stimulation of CBP histone acetyltransferase activity in vitro. In contrast, acidic amino acid substitution mutants interacted with TFIIA-TFIID and CBP indistinguishably from the wild type. The nuclear domain 10 (ND10) protein SP100 was dispersed by most Zta mutants, but acidic residue mutations led to reduced, while aromatic substitution mutants led to increased SP100 nuclear staining. Acidic residue substitution mutants had more pronounced defects in transcription activation of endogenous viral genes in latently infected cells and for viral replication, as measured by the production of infectious virus. One mutant, K12/F13, was incapable of stimulating EBV lytic replication but had only modest transcription defects. These results indicate that Zta stimulates viral reactivation through two nonredundant structural motifs, one of which interacts with general transcription factors and coactivators, and the other has an essential but as yet not understood function in lytic transcription.

  3. Epstein-Barr Virus: From the Detection of Sequence Polymorphisms to the Recognition of Viral Types.

    PubMed

    Feederle, Regina; Klinke, Olaf; Kutikhin, Anton; Poirey, Remy; Tsai, Ming-Han; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus is etiologically linked with the development of benign and malignant diseases, characterized by their diversity and a heterogeneous geographic distribution across the world. The virus possesses a 170-kb-large genome that encodes for multiple proteins and non-coding RNAs. Early on there have been numerous attempts to link particular diseases with particular EBV strains, or at least with viral genetic polymorphisms. This has given rise to a wealth of information whose value has been difficult to evaluate for at least four reasons. First, most studies have looked only at one particular gene and missed the global picture. Second, they usually have not studied sufficient numbers of diseased and control cases to reach robust statistical significance. Third, the functional significance of most polymorphisms has remained unclear, although there are exceptions such as the 30-bp deletion in LMP1. Fourth, different biological properties of the virus do not necessarily equate with a different pathogenicity. This was best illustrated by the type 1 and type 2 viruses that markedly differ in terms of their transformation abilities, yet do not seem to cause different diseases. Reciprocally, environmental and genetic factors in the host are likely to influence the outcome of infections with the same virus type. However, with recent developments in recombinant virus technology and in the availability of high throughput sequencing, the tide is now turning. The availability of 23 complete or nearly complete genomes has led to the recognition of viral subtypes, some of which possess nearly identical genotypes. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that some genetic polymorphisms among EBV strains markedly influence the biological and clinical behavior of the virus. Some virus strains are endowed with biological properties that explain crucial clinical features of patients with EBV-associated diseases. Although we now have a better overview of the genetic

  4. [Hemophagocytic syndrome associated with Epstein-Barr virus. Presentation of a case and treatment in the Resuscitation Unit].

    PubMed

    Figueiredo González, O; Iglesias Fernández, M; Río Gómez, A; Ulibarrena Redondo, C; Casas García, M L

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 17 year old male patient, who was admitted to the Resuscitation Unit with the diagnosis of hemophagocytic syndrome, associated with infection by Epstein-Barr virus with unfavorable outcome. Hemophagocytic syndrome is a pathological immune activation syndrome due to the production/uncontrolled modulation of some cytokines. Its clinical signs and symptoms, defined by consensus criteria HLH-2004, are not pathognomonic, and often appear sequentially, thus suspicion should be followed by aggressive supportive therapy combined with early specific treatment of the triggering factor, as it is the only way to improve survival in patients with multiple organic failure as a result.

  5. Inhibitory effect of flavonoid derivatives on Epstein-Barr virus activation and two-stage carcinogenesis of skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Y; Takemura, Y; Ju-ichi, M; Mukainaka, T; Ichiishi, E; Ito, C; Furukawa, H; Yano, M; Tokuda, H; Nishino, H

    2001-11-28

    To search for possible anti-tumor promoters, ten flavonoid derivatives (1-10) synthesized from morin and quercetin were examined for their inhibitory effects on the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation by a short-term in vitro assay. Of these compounds, pentaallyl ethers (9, 10) showed significant inhibitory effects on EBV-EA activation induced by the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate. Further, quercetin pentaallyl ether (10) exhibited remarkable inhibitory effects on mouse skin tumor promotion in an in vivo two-stage carcinogenesis test.

  6. 18F-FDG PET/CT Findings in Acute Epstein-Barr Virus Infection Mimicking Malignant Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ørbæk, Mathilde; Graff, Jesper; Markova, Elena; Kronborg, Gitte; Lebech, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    We present a case demonstrating the diagnostic work-up and follow-up of a patient with acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in which the clinical picture and imaging on 18F-FDG PET/CT mimicked malignant lymphoma. Follow-up 18F-FDG PET/CT scan in the patient performed 7 weeks after the abnormal scan revealed complete resolution of the metabolically active disease in the neck, axillas, lung hili, and spleen. This case highlights inflammation as one of the most well established false positives when interpreting 18F-FDG PET/CT scans. PMID:27187482

  7. (18)F-FDG PET/CT Findings in Acute Epstein-Barr Virus Infection Mimicking Malignant Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ørbæk, Mathilde; Graff, Jesper; Markova, Elena; Kronborg, Gitte; Lebech, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    We present a case demonstrating the diagnostic work-up and follow-up of a patient with acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in which the clinical picture and imaging on (18)F-FDG PET/CT mimicked malignant lymphoma. Follow-up (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan in the patient performed 7 weeks after the abnormal scan revealed complete resolution of the metabolically active disease in the neck, axillas, lung hili, and spleen. This case highlights inflammation as one of the most well established false positives when interpreting (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans. PMID:27187482

  8. Elevated antinuclear antibodies and altered anti-Epstein-Barr virus immune responses.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Laura; Cirone, Mara; Di Gregorio, Ana Oliva; Vitillo, Marina; Cattivelli, Marina; Magliocca, Vittoria; Maiorano, Silvana; Meledandri, Marcello; Scagnolari, Carolina; La Rocca, Sebastiano; Trivedi, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is able to alter the immune response towards self-antigens and may enhance risk of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in genetically predisposed individuals. In this study, we evaluated the specific antibody immune response against EBV in patients with anti-nuclear autoantibodies (ANA) in comparison with ANA-negative healthy controls. For this purpose, 92 patients with an high anti-ANA reactivity with or without concomitant extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) or double stranded DNA (dsDNA) positivity were selected and compared with 146 healthy donors. We found that anti-EBV-VCA and EA IgG concentrations were significantly higher in ANA-positive patients in comparison to the controls (VCA P<0.0001 and EA P<0,03) as well as in those ANA-positive patients that showed a concomitant ENA positivity (P=0.0002). Interestingly, elevated anti-EBNA-1 IgG was found in a group of patients who had anti SSA/Ro antibodies. Anti-VCA IgM Abs were more frequently found in those patients with a very high titer of ANA (P=0.06); moreover detection of anti-VCA IgM/IgG in absence of anti-EBNA-1 IgG was more frequent in the patient than in the control group. Both these conditions correlate with a recent EBV infection or reactivation. The data suggest that EBV, particularly during acute infection or in its reactivation phase, could be involved in the ANA and ENA autoantibody formation.

  9. Human Papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus co-infection in Cervical Carcinoma in Algerian women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that the implication of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the carcinogenesis and prognosis of cervical cancer is well established, the impact of a co-infection with high risk HPV (HR-HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is still not fully understood. Methods Fifty eight randomly selected cases of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the uterine cervix, 14 normal cervices specimens, 21 CIN-2/3 and 16 CIN-1 cases were examined for EBV and HPV infections. Detection of HR-HPV specific sequences was carried out by PCR amplification using consensus primers of Manos and by Digene Hybrid Capture. The presence of EBV was revealed by amplifying a 660 bp specific EBV sequence of BALF1. mRNA expression of LMP-1 in one hand and protein levels of BARF-1, LMP-1 and EBNA-1 in the other hand were assessed by RT-PCR and immunoblotting and/or immunohischemistry respectively. Results HR-HPV infection was found in patients with SCC (88%), low-grade (75%) and high grade (95%) lesions compared to only 14% of normal cervix cases. However, 69%, 12.5%, 38.1%, and 14% of SCC, CIN-1, CIN-2/3 and normal cervix tissues, respectively, were EBV infected. The highest co-infection (HR-HPV and EBV) was found in squamous cell carcinoma cases (67%). The latter cases showed 27% and 29% expression of EBV BARF-1 and LMP-1 oncogenes respectively. Conclusion The high rate of HR-HPV and EBV co-infection in SCC suggests that EBV infection is incriminated in cervical cancer progression. This could be taken into account as bad prognosis in this type of cancer. However, the mode of action in dual infection in cervical oncogenesis needs further investigation. PMID:24252325

  10. The expression of renal Epstein-Barr virus markers in patients with lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    YU, XIAO-XIA; YAO, CUI-WEI; TAO, JING-LI; YANG, CHEN; LUO, MIAN-NA; LI, SHANG-MEI; LIU, HUA-FENG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of renal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN). A total of 58 renal tissue samples from patients with LN, seven normal renal tissue samples from patients with non-glomerular hematuria and 37 renal tissue samples from patients with minimal change nephropathy were collected. The expression of EBV-latent membrane protein-1 (EBV-LMP1) and EBV-encoded RNA 1 (EBER-1) in the renal tissue was examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH), respectively. The sera levels of anti-nuclear antibody as well as antibodies to extractable nuclear antigen in patients with LN were also measured. An equivalence test showed that the results from the IHC and the ISH analyses had strong agreement. The positive rates of renal EBER-1 and EBV-LMP1 in the LN patients were significantly higher than those of the normal and minimal change nephropathy patients (P<0.001), while no significant difference was identified between those of the normal and minimal change nephropathy groups (P>0.05). The positive rates of EBV-LMP1 and EBER-1 in the renal tissues of patients with LN were not determined to be significantly different between the relapse (immunosuppressant-treated) and initial onset (non-treated) patients, between the patients with and without concurrent infection, and among the patients with different age ranges (P>0.05). The proportion of LN patients positive for anti-Sm antibody was significantly higher in the renal EBV-positive group than in the EBV-negative group (P<0.05), while the proportions of LN patients positive for the other autoantibodies that were examined were not identified to be significantly different between these two groups (P>0.05). The present study shows that renal EBV infection may contribute to the pathogenesis of LN by inducing anti-Sm antibody production. PMID:24940399

  11. Dynamic chromatin environment of key lytic cycle regulatory regions of the Epstein-Barr virus genome.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Flower, Kirsty; Sinclair, Alison J

    2012-02-01

    The ability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to establish latency allows it to evade the immune system and to persist for the lifetime of its host; one distinguishing characteristic is the lack of transcription of the majority of viral genes. Entry into the lytic cycle is coordinated by the viral transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, and EB1), and downstream effectors, while viral genome replication requires the concerted action of Zta and six other viral proteins at the origins of lytic replication. We explored the chromatin context at key EBV lytic cycle promoters (BZLF1, BRLF1, BMRF1, and BALF5) and the origins of lytic replication during latency and lytic replication. We show that a repressive heterochromatin-like environment (trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 [H3K9me3] and lysine 27 [H3K27me3]), which blocks the interaction of some transcription factors with DNA, encompasses the key early lytic regulatory regions. Epigenetic silencing of the EBV genome is also imposed by DNA methylation during latency. The chromatin environment changes during the lytic cycle with activation of histones H3, H4, and H2AX occurring at both the origins of replication and at the key lytic regulatory elements. We propose that Zta is able to reverse the effects of latency-associated repressive chromatin at EBV early lytic promoters by interacting with Zta response elements within the H3K9me3-associated chromatin and demonstrate that these interactions occur in vivo. Since the interaction of Zta with DNA is not inhibited by DNA methylation, it is clear that Zta uses two routes to overcome epigenetic silencing of its genome. PMID:22090141

  12. Whole-genome sequencing of the Akata and Mutu Epstein-Barr virus strains.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhen; Wang, Xia; Strong, Michael J; Concha, Monica; Baddoo, Melody; Xu, Guorong; Baribault, Carl; Fewell, Claire; Hulme, William; Hedges, Dale; Taylor, Christopher M; Flemington, Erik K

    2013-01-01

    Using a simple viral genome enrichment approach, we report the de novo assembly of the Akata and Mutu Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomes from a single lane of next-generation sequencing (NGS) reads. The Akata and Mutu viral genomes are type I EBV strains of approximately 171 kb in length. Evidence for genome heterogeneity was found for the Akata but not for the Mutu strain. A comparative analysis of Akata with another four completely sequenced EBV strains, B95-8/Raji, AG876, Mutu, and GD1, demonstrated that the Akata strain is most closely related to the GD1 strain and exhibits the greatest divergence from the type II strain, AG876. A global comparison of latent and lytic gene sequences showed that the four latency genes, EBNA2, EBNA3A, EBNA3B, and EBNA3C, are uniquely defining of type I and type II strain differences. Within type I strains, LMP1, the latency gene, is among the most divergent of all EBV genes, with three insertion or deletion loci in its CTAR2 and CTAR3 signaling domains. Analysis of the BHLF1 and LF3 genes showed that the reading frames identified in the B95-8/Raji genome are not conserved in Akata (or Mutu, for BHLF1), suggesting a primarily non-protein-coding function in EBV's life cycle. The Akata and Mutu viral-genome sequences should be a useful resource for homology-based functional prediction and for molecular studies, such as PCR, RNA-seq, recombineering, and transcriptome studies. As an illustration, we identified novel RNA-editing events in ebv-miR-BART6 antisense transcripts using the Akata and Mutu reference genomes. PMID:23152513

  13. Dynamic Epstein-Barr virus gene expression on the path to B-cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Price, Alexander M; Luftig, Micah A

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic human herpesvirus in the γ-herpesvirinae subfamily that contains a 170-180kb double-stranded DNA genome. In vivo, EBV commonly infects B and epithelial cells and persists for the life of the host in a latent state in the memory B-cell compartment of the peripheral blood. EBV can be reactivated from its latent state, leading to increased expression of lytic genes that primarily encode for enzymes necessary to replicate the viral genome and structural components of the virion. Lytic cycle proteins also aid in immune evasion, inhibition of apoptosis, and the modulation of other host responses to infection. In vitro, EBV has the potential to infect primary human B cells and induce cellular proliferation to yield effectively immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines, or LCLs. EBV immortalization of B cells in vitro serves as a model system for studying EBV-mediated lymphomagenesis. While much is known about the steady-state viral gene expression within EBV-immortalized LCLs and other EBV-positive cell lines, relatively little is known about the early events after primary B-cell infection. It was previously thought that upon latent infection, EBV only expressed the well-characterized latency-associated transcripts found in LCLs. However, recent work has characterized the early, but transient, expression of lytic genes necessary for efficient transformation and delayed responses in the known latency genes. This chapter summarizes these recent findings that show how dynamic and controlled expression of multiple EBV genes can control the activation of B cells, entry into the cell cycle, the inhibition of apoptosis, and innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:24373315

  14. Changing patterns in the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)and Hodgkin lymphoma association in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Dhiab, Myriam Ben; Ziadi, Sonia; Saad, Hanene; Louhichi, Teheni; Trimeche, Mounir

    2016-09-01

    We compared the features of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) association in Tunisia in two periods of time, 1991-2001 (111 cases) and 2002-2012 (122 cases). The investigation of the EBV status by EBER in situ hybridization showed a significant decrease in the prevalence of EBV-positive HL from 69.3 % for the period 1991-2001 to 40.1 % for the 2002-2012 period (p = 0.00001). EBV positivity has decreased in all age groups but was more pronounced among young patients, in the 15-24-year age group (46.1 vs 10.3 %, p = 0.003), in the 25-34-year age group (56.2 vs 25 %, p = 0.04), and among children (88.4 vs 59.2 %, p = 0.01). This decrease in EBV-positive HL over time contrasted with a remarkable increase in EBV-negative HL in young adults aged 15-34 years (51.2 vs 83 %; p = 0.001), especially among women (59.1 vs 91.2 %; p = 0.01). The decrease in EBV-positive HL over time concerns particularly the nodular sclerosis histological subtype (69.2 vs 31.6 %, p = 0.000001). These results indicate that the epidemiology of HL and its association with EBV are changing over time, with a trend toward a Western profile, and point toward the emergence of other environmental causative factors, especially among young women, which remain to be identified. PMID:27378019

  15. Development of Drugs for Epstein - Barr virus using High-Throughput in silico Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Thompson, Scott; Jiang, Hualiang; Lieberman, Paul M.; Luo, Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitious human herpesvirus that is causally associated with endemic forms of Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and lymphoproliferative disease in immunosuppressed individuals. On a global scale, EBV infects over 90% of the adult population and is responsible for ~1% of all human cancers. To date, there is no efficacious drug or therapy for the treatment of EBV infection and EBV-related diseases. Areas covered in this review In this review, we discuss the existing anti-EBV inhibitors and those under development. We discuss the value of different molecular targets, including EBV lytic DNA replication enzymes, as well as proteins that are expressed exclusively during latent infection, like EBNA1 and LMP1. Since the atomic structure of the EBNA1 DNA binding domain has been described, it is an attractive target for in silico methods of drug design and small molecule screening. We discuss the use of computational methods that can greatly facilitate the development of novel inhibitors and how in silico screening methods can be applied to target proteins with known structures, like EBNA1, to treat EBV infection and disease. What the reader will gain The reader will be familiarized with the problems in targeting of EBV for inhibition by small molecules and how computational methods can greatly facilitate this process. Take home message Despite the impressive efficacy of nucleoside analogues for the treatment of herpesvirus lytic infection, there remain few effective treatments for latent infections. Since EBV-latent infection persists within and contributes to the formation of EBV-associated cancers, targeting EBV latent proteins is an unmet medical need. High throughput in silico screening can accelerate the process of drug discovery for novel and selective agents that inhibit EBV latent infection and associated disease. PMID:22822721

  16. The Dyad Symmetry Element of Epstein-Barr Virus Is a Dominant but Dispensable Replication Origin

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Elisabeth; Norio, Paolo; Ritzi, Marion; Schildkraut, Carl; Schepers, Aloys

    2011-01-01

    OriP, the latent origin of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), consists of two essential elements: the dyad symmetry (DS) and the family of repeats (FR). The function of these elements has been predominantly analyzed in plasmids transfected into transformed cells. Here, we examined the molecular functions of DS in its native genomic context and at an ectopic position in the mini-EBV episome. Mini-EBV plasmids contain 41% of the EBV genome including all information required for the proliferation of human B cells. Both FR and DS function independently of their genomic context. We show that DS is the most active origin of replication present in the mini-EBV genome regardless of its location, and it is characterized by the binding of the origin recognition complex (ORC) allowing subsequent replication initiation. Surprisingly, the integrity of oriP is not required for the formation of the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) at or near DS. In addition we show that initiation events occurring at sites other than the DS are also limited to once per cell cycle and that they are ORC-dependent. The deletion of DS increases initiation from alternative origins, which are normally used very infrequently in the mini-EBV genome. The sequence-independent distribution of ORC-binding, pre-RC-assembly, and initiation patterns indicates that a large number of silent origins are present in the mini-EBV genome. We conclude that, in mini-EBV genomes lacking the DS element, the absence of a strong ORC binding site results in an increase of ORC binding at dispersed sites. PMID:21603652

  17. Physical activity, sedentary behaviors, and Epstein-Barr virus antibodies in young adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul H

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the associations between physical activity, sedentary behaviors, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody levels (as an indirect marker of cell-mediated immunity, CMI). This study made use of a 14-year longitudinal study with a representative sample of adolescents in the US. A total of 3361 participants (42.1% male) aged 11 to 21years at baseline who completed Wave I (1994-1995), Wave III (2001-2002), and Wave IV (2008) surveys of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) were analyzed. Physical activity and sedentary behaviors at Waves I and III were assessed using interviewer-administered questionnaire. EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) IgG antibody levels at Wave IV were analyzed from dried blood spot assays. Adjusted for confounders, among males, one additional day spent per week on strenuous sports at Wave III were associated with a decrease of 4.09AU/ml in EBV antibody levels (p=0.012), while one additional hour spent per week viewing videos at Wave I was associated with an increase of 0.83AU/ml in EBV antibody levels (p=0.026). Among females, one additional day spent per week on individual sports at Wave III were associated with a decrease of 4.63AU/ml in EBV antibody levels (p=0.014), while sedentary behaviors were not associated with EBV antibody levels. To conclude, physical activity and sedentary behaviors were associated with CMI among males and physical activity was associated with CMI among females. PMID:27342426

  18. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into the Tropism of Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Möhl, Britta S.; Chen, Jia; Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Longnecker, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the prototypical γ-herpesvirus and an obligate human pathogen that infects mainly epithelial cells and B cells, which can result in malignancies. EBV infects these target cells by fusing with the viral and cellular lipid bilayer membranes using multiple viral factors and host receptor(s) thus exhibiting a unique complexity in its entry machinery. To enter epithelial cells, EBV requires minimally the conserved core fusion machinery comprised of the glycoproteins gH/gL acting as the receptor-binding complex and gB as the fusogen. EBV can enter B cells using gp42, which binds tightly to gH/gL and interacts with host HLA class II, activating fusion. Previously, we published the individual crystal structures of EBV entry factors, such as gH/gL and gp42, the EBV/host receptor complex, gp42/HLA-DR1, and the fusion protein EBV gB in a postfusion conformation, which allowed us to identify structural determinants and regions critical for receptor-binding and membrane fusion. Recently, we reported different low resolution models of the EBV B cell entry triggering complex (gHgL/gp42/HLA class II) in “open” and “closed” states based on negative-stain single particle electron microscopy, which provide further mechanistic insights. This review summarizes the current knowledge of these key players in EBV entry and how their structures impact receptor-binding and the triggering of gB-mediated fusion. PMID:27094060

  19. Classification of Epstein-Barr virus-positive gastric cancers by definition of DNA methylation epigenotypes.

    PubMed

    Matsusaka, Keisuke; Kaneda, Atsushi; Nagae, Genta; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Kikuchi, Yasuko; Hino, Rumi; Uozaki, Hiroshi; Seto, Yasuyuki; Takada, Kenzo; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Fukayama, Masashi

    2011-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with Burkitt lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, opportunistic lymphomas in immunocompromised hosts, and a fraction of gastric cancers. Aberrant promoter methylation accompanies human gastric carcinogenesis, though the contribution of EBV to such somatic methylation changes has not been fully clarified. We analyzed promoter methylation in gastric cancer cases with Illumina's Infinium BeadArray and used hierarchical clustering analysis to classify gastric cancers into 3 subgroups: EBV(-)/low methylation, EBV(-)/high methylation, and EBV(+)/high methylation. The 3 epigenotypes were characterized by 3 groups of genes: genes methylated specifically in the EBV(+) tumors (e.g., CXXC4, TIMP2, and PLXND1), genes methylated both in EBV(+) and EBV(-)/high tumors (e.g., COL9A2, EYA1, and ZNF365), and genes methylated in all of the gastric cancers (e.g., AMPH, SORCS3, and AJAP1). Polycomb repressive complex (PRC) target genes in embryonic stem cells were significantly enriched among EBV(-)/high-methylation genes and commonly methylated gastric cancer genes (P = 2 × 10(-15) and 2 × 10(-34), respectively), but not among EBV(+) tumor-specific methylation genes (P = 0.2), suggesting a different cause for EBV(+)-associated de novo methylation. When recombinant EBV was introduced into the EBV(-)/low-methylation epigenotype gastric cancer cell, MKN7, 3 independently established subclones displayed increases in DNA methylation. The promoters targeted by methylation were mostly shared among the 3 subclones, and the new methylation changes caused gene repression. In summary, DNA methylation profiling classified gastric cancer into 3 epigenotypes, and EBV(+) gastric cancers showed distinct methylation patterns likely attributable to EBV infection.

  20. Epstein-Barr virus-positive gastric cancer: a distinct molecular subtype of the disease?

    PubMed

    Jácome, Alexandre Andrade Dos Anjos; Lima, Enaldo Melo de; Kazzi, Ana Izabela; Chaves, Gabriela Freitas; Mendonça, Diego Cavalheiro de; Maciel, Marina Mara; Santos, José Sebastião Dos

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 90% of the world population is infected by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Usually, it infects B lymphocytes, predisposing them to malignant transformation. Infection of epithelial cells occurs rarely, and it is estimated that about to 10% of gastric cancer patients harbor EBV in their malignant cells. Given that gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, with a global annual incidence of over 950,000 cases, EBV-positive gastric cancer is the largest group of EBV-associated malignancies. Based on gene expression profile studies, gastric cancer was recently categorized into four subtypes; EBV-positive, microsatellite unstable, genomically stable and chromosomal instability. Together with previous studies, this report provided a more detailed molecular characterization of gastric cancer, demonstrating that EBV-positive gastric cancer is a distinct molecular subtype of the disease, with unique genetic and epigenetic abnormalities, reflected in a specific phenotype. The recognition of characteristic molecular alterations in gastric cancer allows the identification of molecular pathways involved in cell proliferation and survival, with the potential to identify therapeutic targets. These findings highlight the enormous heterogeneity of gastric cancer, and the complex interplay between genetic and epigenetic alterations in the disease, and provide a roadmap to implementation of genome-guided personalized therapy in gastric cancer. The present review discusses the initial studies describing EBV-positive gastric cancer as a distinct clinical entity, presents recently described genetic and epigenetic alterations, and considers potential therapeutic insights derived from the recognition of this new molecular subtype of gastric adenocarcinoma.

  1. Secretion of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded BARF1 oncoprotein from latently infected B cells.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Sylvie; Ooka, Tadamasa

    2008-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encodes two oncogenes, LMP1(Latent Membrane Protein-1) and BARF1 (BamH1-A Reading Frame-1). LMP1 belongs to latent gene family and BARF1 is considered so far as one of early gene family. However BARF1 oncogene was expressed highly in Nasopharyngeal (NPC) and gastric (GC) carcinoma as a type II latency, and in EBV-positive Akata cell and primary epithelial cell infected in vitro by EBV as type I latency. Its expression was also reported in Burkitt's lymphoma's biopsy frequent in Malawi in Africa as well as in nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma. We recently observed a massive secretion of BARF1 protein in serum and saliva of NPC patients. NPC-derived c666-1 epithelial cells also expressed and secreted BARF1 protein without other lytic genes expression. We asked whether this oncogene belongs to latent gene family. To investigate, we examined its transcriptional and translational expression in IB4 and Akata B cells where both cell lines belong to latent cell family. Transcriptional expression was analyzed by RT-PCR. As BARF1 protein is one of secreted proteins, its translational expression was analyzed by immunoblot after concentration of culture medium. Secreted BARF1 protein was futher purified by concanavalin A affinity column. BARF1 was transcribed in both EBV-positive AKATA and IB4 cells, and BARF1 protein was secreted from these latently infected human B cells. Its secretion does not depend EBV genome form in infected cells. Both episomal and integrated form of EBV genome were capable of expressing BARF1 gene. These results suggests that BARF1 is expressed in latent stage and increases its expression during lytic stage.

  2. Evidence of Epstein-Barr Virus Association with Gastric Cancer and Non-Atrophic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-López, Juan L.E.; Torres, Javier; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Mantilla, Alejandra; Leal, Yelda A.; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2014-01-01

    Different lines of evidence support an association between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and gastric cancer (GC). The main understood risk factor to develop GC is infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which triggers a local inflammatory response critical for progression from gastritis to GC. The role of EBV in early inflammatory gastric lesions has been poorly studied. A recent study proposed a cutoff value of 2000 EBV particles to identify patients with increased chances of infection of the gastric epithelium, which may favor the inflammatory process. To better understand the role of EBV in cancer progression, we analyzed 75 samples of GC, 147 control samples of non-tumor gastric tissue derived from GC patients and 75 biopsies from patients with non-atrophic gastritis (NAG). A first-round PCR was used for EBV detection in tumor and non-tumor controls and a more sensitive nested PCR for gastritis samples; both PCRs had lower detection limits above the proposed cutoff value. With this strategy 10.67% of GC, 1.3% of non-tumor controls and 8% of gastritis samples were found positive. An EBER1 in situ hybridization showed EBV infection of epithelial cells in GC and in a third of NAG samples, while in the other NAGs infection was restricted to the mononuclear cell infiltrate. EBV-positive GCs were enriched in lace and cribriform patterns, while these rare patterns were not observed in EBV negative samples. Our results support a role for EBV in GC and early precursor lesions, either as directly oncogenic infecting epithelial cells or indirectly as an inflammatory trigger. PMID:24448220

  3. Integrated miRNA-mRNA analysis of Epstein-Barr virus-positive nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L H; Miao, X T; Wang, N Y

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify the crucial miRNAs in Epstein-Barr virus-positive nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and their target genes. Gene expression profile data (GSE12452) that included 31 NPC and 10 normal nasopharyngeal tissue specimens were downloaded. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using significance analysis of microarrays. The underlying function of DEGs was predicted via Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analyses. The miRNA sequencing dataset GSE14738 was also downloaded, and expression levels of miRNA were calculated by the number of reads mapped to each miRNA. The selected miRNAs were integrated into the miRecords database to obtain their target genes. Target genes associated with DEGs were used to construct the interaction network via Cytoscape. A total of 1437 DEGs between NPC and control were identified, most of which were enriched in cell cycle and extracellular matrix-receptor interaction signaling pathways. Furthermore, 112 miRNAs were considered upregulated in NPC samples. A total of 2228 relationships between 39 miRNAs and 1247 target genes were obtained, of which 182 relationships between 32 miRNAs and 97 target genes were chosen to construct an interaction network. The interactions between DEGs and the let-7 or miR-29 families appeared strongest in this network, where CDC25A, COL3A1, and COL1A1 were regulated by several let-7 family members, while COL4A1 and COL5A2 were regulated by several miR-29 family members. The let-7 and miR-29 families may be related to the development of NPC by regulating the genes involved in cell cycle and ECM-receptor interaction. PMID:26125802

  4. Metabolic stress is a barrier to Epstein-Barr virus-mediated B-cell immortalization.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Karyn; Hafez, Amy Y; Kishton, Rigel; Messinger, Joshua E; Nikitin, Pavel A; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; Luftig, Micah A

    2016-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic herpesvirus that has been causally linked to the development of B-cell and epithelial malignancies. Early after infection, EBV induces a transient period of hyperproliferation that is suppressed by the activation of the DNA damage response and a G1/S-phase growth arrest. This growth arrest prevents long-term outgrowth of the majority of infected cells. We developed a method to isolate and characterize infected cells that arrest after this early burst of proliferation and integrated gene expression and metabolic profiling to gain a better understanding of the pathways that attenuate immortalization. We found that the arrested cells have a reduced level of mitochondrial respiration and a decrease in the expression of genes involved in the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. Indeed, the growth arrest in early infected cells could be rescued by supplementing the TCA cycle. Arrested cells were characterized by an increase in the expression of p53 pathway gene targets, including sestrins leading to activation of AMPK, a reduction in mTOR signaling, and, consequently, elevated autophagy that was important for cell survival. Autophagy was also critical to maintain early hyperproliferation during metabolic stress. Finally, in assessing the metabolic changes from early infection to long-term outgrowth, we found concomitant increases in glucose import and surface glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) levels, leading to elevated glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and suppression of basal autophagy. Our study demonstrates that oncogene-induced senescence triggered by a combination of metabolic and genotoxic stress acts as an intrinsic barrier to EBV-mediated transformation.

  5. Evidence of Epstein-Barr virus association with gastric cancer and non-atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-López, Juan L E; Torres, Javier; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Mantilla, Alejandra; Leal, Yelda A; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2014-01-20

    Different lines of evidence support an association between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and gastric cancer (GC). The main understood risk factor to develop GC is infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which triggers a local inflammatory response critical for progression from gastritis to GC. The role of EBV in early inflammatory gastric lesions has been poorly studied. A recent study proposed a cutoff value of 2000 EBV particles to identify patients with increased chances of infection of the gastric epithelium, which may favor the inflammatory process. To better understand the role of EBV in cancer progression, we analyzed 75 samples of GC, 147 control samples of non-tumor gastric tissue derived from GC patients and 75 biopsies from patients with non-atrophic gastritis (NAG). A first-round PCR was used for EBV detection in tumor and non-tumor controls and a more sensitive nested PCR for gastritis samples; both PCRs had lower detection limits above the proposed cutoff value. With this strategy 10.67% of GC, 1.3% of non-tumor controls and 8% of gastritis samples were found positive. An EBER1 in situ hybridization showed EBV infection of epithelial cells in GC and in a third of NAG samples, while in the other NAGs infection was restricted to the mononuclear cell infiltrate. EBV-positive GCs were enriched in lace and cribriform patterns, while these rare patterns were not observed in EBV negative samples. Our results support a role for EBV in GC and early precursor lesions, either as directly oncogenic infecting epithelial cells or indirectly as an inflammatory trigger.

  6. Role of DNA methylation in the development of Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mari; Nishikawa, Jun; Okada, Toshiyuki; Morishige, Akihiro; Sakai, Kouhei; Nakamura, Munetaka; Kiyotoki, Shu; Hamabe, Kouichi; Okamoto, Takeshi; Oga, Atsunori; Sasaki, Kohsuke; Suehiro, Yutaka; Hinoda, Yuji; Sakaida, Isao

    2013-01-01

    The frequencies of DNA methylation of certain tumor-related genes are higher in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric carcinomas than in EBV-negative gastric carcinomas. EBV-associated gastric carcinomas have distinct clinicopathological features; however, there are no case-control studies comparing methylation frequency between EBV-associated gastric carcinomas and controls that have been adjusted according to the clinicopathological features of EBV-associated gastric carcinomas. This study evaluated 25 EBV-associated gastric carcinomas that were positive for EBV-encoded small RNA 1 (EBER-1) by in situ hybridization and 50 EBV-negative gastric carcinomas that were matched with the EBV-associated gastric carcinomas by age, sex, histology, depth of tumor invasion, and stage. Methylation status of 16 loci associated with tumor-related genes was analyzed by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify genes in which DNA methylation specifically occurred in EBV-associated gastric carcinomas. Methylation frequencies of 12 of the 16 genes were higher in EBV-associated gastric carcinomas than in EBV-negative controls, and the frequency of methylation of 6 specific loci (MINT2, MINT31, p14, p16, p73, and RUNX3) was significantly higher in EBV-associated gastric carcinomas than in EBV-negative controls. There were no significant differences in the methylation frequencies of the other genes. The mean methylation index in EBV-associated gastric carcinomas was significantly higher than that in EBV-negative controls. DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes that regulate the cell cycle and apoptosis specifically occurred in EBV-associated gastric carcinomas. Aberrant DNA methylation might lead to the development and progression of EBV-associated gastric carcinoma. PMID:23073987

  7. Differentiation-Dependent KLF4 Expression Promotes Lytic Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nawandar, Dhananjay M.; Wang, Anqi; Makielski, Kathleen; Lee, Denis; Ma, Shidong; Barlow, Elizabeth; Reusch, Jessica; Jiang, Ru; Wille, Coral K.; Greenspan, Deborah; Greenspan, John S.; Mertz, Janet E.; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey; Johannsen, Eric C.; Lambert, Paul F.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpesvirus associated with B-cell and epithelial cell malignancies. EBV lytically infects normal differentiated oral epithelial cells, where it causes a tongue lesion known as oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) in immunosuppressed patients. However, the cellular mechanism(s) that enable EBV to establish exclusively lytic infection in normal differentiated oral epithelial cells are not currently understood. Here we show that a cellular transcription factor known to promote epithelial cell differentiation, KLF4, induces differentiation-dependent lytic EBV infection by binding to and activating the two EBV immediate-early gene (BZLF1 and BRLF1) promoters. We demonstrate that latently EBV-infected, telomerase-immortalized normal oral keratinocyte (NOKs) cells undergo lytic viral reactivation confined to the more differentiated cell layers in organotypic raft culture. Furthermore, we show that endogenous KLF4 expression is required for efficient lytic viral reactivation in response to phorbol ester and sodium butyrate treatment in several different EBV-infected epithelial cell lines, and that the combination of KLF4 and another differentiation-dependent cellular transcription factor, BLIMP1, is highly synergistic for inducing lytic EBV infection. We confirm that both KLF4 and BLIMP1 are expressed in differentiated, but not undifferentiated, epithelial cells in normal tongue tissue, and show that KLF4 and BLIMP1 are both expressed in a patient-derived OHL lesion. In contrast, KLF4 protein is not detectably expressed in B cells, where EBV normally enters latent infection, although KLF4 over-expression is sufficient to induce lytic EBV reactivation in Burkitt lymphoma cells. Thus, KLF4, together with BLIMP1, plays a critical role in mediating lytic EBV reactivation in epithelial cells. PMID:26431332

  8. Dynamic chromatin environment of key lytic cycle regulatory regions of the Epstein-Barr virus genome.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Flower, Kirsty; Sinclair, Alison J

    2012-02-01

    The ability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to establish latency allows it to evade the immune system and to persist for the lifetime of its host; one distinguishing characteristic is the lack of transcription of the majority of viral genes. Entry into the lytic cycle is coordinated by the viral transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, and EB1), and downstream effectors, while viral genome replication requires the concerted action of Zta and six other viral proteins at the origins of lytic replication. We explored the chromatin context at key EBV lytic cycle promoters (BZLF1, BRLF1, BMRF1, and BALF5) and the origins of lytic replication during latency and lytic replication. We show that a repressive heterochromatin-like environment (trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 [H3K9me3] and lysine 27 [H3K27me3]), which blocks the interaction of some transcription factors with DNA, encompasses the key early lytic regulatory regions. Epigenetic silencing of the EBV genome is also imposed by DNA methylation during latency. The chromatin environment changes during the lytic cycle with activation of histones H3, H4, and H2AX occurring at both the origins of replication and at the key lytic regulatory elements. We propose that Zta is able to reverse the effects of latency-associated repressive chromatin at EBV early lytic promoters by interacting with Zta response elements within the H3K9me3-associated chromatin and demonstrate that these interactions occur in vivo. Since the interaction of Zta with DNA is not inhibited by DNA methylation, it is clear that Zta uses two routes to overcome epigenetic silencing of its genome.

  9. Identification of genes involved in Epstein-Barr virus-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junguo; Mei, Fang; Gao, Xia; Wang, Shoulin

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the most common cancer originating from the nasopharynx, and can be induced by infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). To study the mechanisms of EBV-associated NPC, a microarray of the GSE12452 dataset was analyzed. GSE12452 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus and consisted of 31 NPC samples and 10 normal healthy nasopharyngeal tissue samples. The differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) were screened using the linear models for microarray data package in R. Using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery software, potential functions of the DEGs were predicted by Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses. With the information from the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins database, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was visualized by Cytoscape. Furthermore, modules of the PPI network were searched using ClusterONE in Cytoscape. A total of 951 DEGs were screened in the NPC samples compared with the normal healthy nasopharyngeal tissue samples. Function enrichment indicated that the upregulated genes were associated with the cell cycle, cytoskeleton organization and DNA metabolism. Meanwhile, the downregulated genes were mainly associated with cell differentiation, hormone metabolism, inflammatory response and immune response. PPI networks for the DEGs suggested that upregulated mitotic arrest deficient 2-like 1 (MAD2L1; degree=133), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA; degree=125) and cyclin B1 (CCNB1; degree=115), and downregulated member A1 of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1A1; degree=15) may be of great importance as they exhibited higher degrees on interaction. Mucin 1 (MUC1) was a key node of module 4. Overall, the study indicated that MAD2L1, CCNB1, PCNA, ALDH1A1 and MUC1 may have a correlation with EBV-associated NPC.

  10. Opportunistic DNA Recombination With Epstein-Barr Virus at Sites of Control Region Rearrangements Mediating JC Virus Neurovirulence.

    PubMed

    Wortman, Margaret J; Lundberg, Patric S; Dagdanova, Ayuna V; Venkataraman, Pranav; Daniel, Dianne C; Johnson, Edward M

    2016-05-01

    We document a unique DNA recombination between polyomavirus JC (JC virus [JCV]) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) at sequences of JCV found infecting the brain. Archetype JCV is present in bone marrow and uroepithelial cells of most adults. During immunosuppression, JCV can infect the brain, causing a demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Rearrangements in the archetype noncoding control region are necessary for neurovirulence. Two NCCR deletions and a duplication occur at sequences of homology with EBV, present latently in B cells, which may be coinfected with both viruses. Recombination between JCV and EBV occurs in B lymphoblasts at a sequence essential for JCV neurovirulence and in cerebrospinal fluid of immunosuppressed patients with multiple sclerosis, those susceptible to progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Interviral recombination is a model for conferring advantages on JCV in the brain. It can alter a critical noncoding control region sequence and potentially facilitate use of EBV DNA abilities to transfer among different cell types.

  11. Structure of the Epstein-Barr virus gp42 protein bound to the MHC class II recepter HLA-DR1

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, M.; Haan, K.M.; Longnecker, R.; Jardetzky, T.

    2010-03-08

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes infectious mononucleosis, establishes long-term latent infections, and is associated with a variety of human tumors. The EBV gp42 glycoprotein binds MHC class II molecules, playing a critical role in infection of B lymphocytes. EBV gp42 belongs to the C-type lectin superfamily, with homology to NK receptors of the immune system. We report the crystal structure of gp42 bound to the human MHC class II molecule HLA-DR1. The gp42 binds HLA-DR1 using a surface site that is distinct from the canonical lectin and NK receptor ligand binding sites. At the canonical ligand binding site, gp42 forms a large hydrophobic groove, which could interact with other ligands necessary for EBV entry, providing a mechanism for coupling MHC recognition and membrane fusion.

  12. Expression of epstein-barr virus encoded nuclear antigen 1 in benign and malignant tissues harbouring EBV.

    PubMed Central

    Oudejans, J J; Dukers, D F; Jiwa, N M; van den Brule, A J; Grässer, F A; de Bruin, P C; Horstman, A; Vos, W; van Gorp, J; Middeldorp, J M; Meijer, C J

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To determine levels of expression of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) in benign and malignant tissues harbouring EBV in relation to EBNA1 promoter usage. METHODS: Expression of EBNA1 was investigated by means of immunohistochemistry using a mixture of two EBNA1 specific monoclonal antibodies, 1H4-1 and 2B4-1. The presence of EBV was detected by EBER1/2 RNA in situ hybridisation. Detection of promoter specific EBNA1 transcripts was by RT-PCR analysis. RESULTS: EBNA1 positive cells were detected in all 20 EBV associated B cell lymphomas, 18 of which had arisen in immunocompromised patients; in eight of nine EBV associated T cell lymphomas; in 11 of 27 EBV positive cases of Hodgkin's disease; and in reactive lymphoid tissue harbouring EBV, including four cases of infectious mononucleosis. A diffuse EBNA1 staining pattern was observed in most of the EBV associated B cell lymphomas and was comparable with the EBER1/2 staining pattern. In the T cell lymphomas the number of EBNA1 positive cells was usually considerably less than the number of EBER1/2 positive ones. RT-PCR analysis revealed that in tumours with restricted EBNA1 expression-that is, T cell lymphomas and Hodgkin's disease lesions, EBNA1 transcripts were usually generated only by the F/Q promoter, whereas in B cell lymphomas EBNA1 transcripts were usually generated by both the C/W and F/Q promoters. CONCLUSIONS: EBNA1 is expressed in all types of tissue harbouring EBV, but the level of expression varies greatly. This may be the result of differential promoter usage. Images PMID:8944608

  13. Early T Cell Recognition of B Cells following Epstein-Barr Virus Infection: Identifying Potential Targets for Prophylactic Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Jill M.; Long, Heather M.; Tierney, Rose J.; Shannon-Lowe, Claire; Leese, Alison M.; Fitzpatrick, Martin; Taylor, Graham S.; Rickinson, Alan B.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus, a B-lymphotropic herpesvirus, is the cause of infectious mononucleosis, has strong aetiologic links with several malignancies and has been implicated in certain autoimmune diseases. Efforts to develop a prophylactic vaccine to prevent or reduce EBV-associated disease have, to date, focused on the induction of neutralising antibody responses. However, such vaccines might be further improved by inducing T cell responses capable of recognising and killing recently-infected B cells. In that context, EBNA2, EBNA-LP and BHRF1 are the first viral antigens expressed during the initial stage of B cell growth transformation, yet have been poorly characterised as CD8+ T cell targets. Here we describe CD8+ T cell responses against each of these three “first wave” proteins, identifying target epitopes and HLA restricting alleles. While EBNA-LP and BHRF1 each contained one strong CD8 epitope, epitopes within EBNA2 induced immunodominant responses through several less common HLA class I alleles (e.g. B*3801 and B*5501), as well as subdominant responses through common class I alleles (e.g. B7 and C*0304). Importantly, such EBNA2-specific CD8+ T cells recognised B cells within the first day post-infection, prior to CD8+ T cells against well-characterised latent target antigens such as EBNA3B or LMP2, and effectively inhibited outgrowth of EBV-transformed B cell lines. We infer that “first wave” antigens of the growth-transforming infection, especially EBNA2, constitute potential CD8+ T cell immunogens for inclusion in prophylactic EBV vaccine design. PMID:27096949

  14. Epstein-Barr and human immunodeficiency viruses in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Morgello, S.

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma was examined. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from 12 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors was used as substrate for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Targets for amplification were the EBNA-1 region of EBV, the gag region of HIV, and a single copy cellular sequence as a control. The cases studied were autopsy and surgical specimens collected between the years 1985 and 1989. By the working formulation for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, five had large cell, four had mixed large and small cleaved cell, two had small cleaved cell, and one had an unclassified histology. Epstein-Barr virus was detected in 6 of 12 tumors studied. Human immunodeficiency virus was not detected in any of the tumors. The presence of EBV was not correlated with any particular histologic tumor type. It is concluded that EBV, not HIV, can be detected in a large percentage (50%) of AIDS-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphomas. This viral association may be significant in light of the demonstrated ability of EBV to induce lymphoid tumors in experimental mammalian systems. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1323221

  15. EBNA-2 transactivates a lymphoid-specific enhancer in the BamHI C promoter of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, N S; Kenney, S; Gutsch, D; Pagano, J S

    1991-01-01

    Among the few Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genes expressed during latency are the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigens (EBNAs), at least one of which contributes to the ability of the virus to transform B lymphocytes. We have analyzed a promoter located in the BamHI-C fragment of EBV which is responsible for the expression of EBNA-1 in some cell lines. Deletion analysis of a 1.4-kb region 5' of the RNA start site has identified a 700-bp fragment that is required for optimal promoter activity in latently infected B lymphocytes, as shown by promoter constructs linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene. This fragment is also able to enhance activity, in an orientation-independent manner, of the simian virus 40 early promoter linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. The enhancer element has some constitutive activity in EBV-negative lymphoid cells, which is increased in the presence of the EBNA-2 gene product. Further deletions have shown that the EBNA-2-responsive region requires a 98-bp region that contains a degenerate octamer-binding motif. In epithelial cells there was no enhancer activity regardless of the presence of EBNA-2. These results demonstrate that BamHI-C promoter activity may be dependent not on an enhancer contained in the ori-P, as was previously assumed, but rather on EBNA-2 transactivation of this more proximal enhancer located in the upstream region of the BamHI C promoter itself. Images PMID:1850003

  16. Transcriptional repression by sumoylation of Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 protein correlates with association of histone deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Murata, Takayuki; Hotta, Naoe; Toyama, Shigenori; Nakayama, Sanae; Chiba, Shigeki; Isomura, Hiroki; Ohshima, Takayuki; Kanda, Teru; Tsurumi, Tatsuya

    2010-07-30

    The transition from latent to lytic phases of the Epstein-Barr virus life cycle is triggered by expression of a viral transactivator, BZLF1, that then induces expression of the viral immediate-early and early genes. The BZLF1 protein is post-translationally modified by a small ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (SUMO-1). Here we found that BZLF1 is conjugated at lysine 12 not only by SUMO-1 but also by SUMO-2 and 3. The K12R mutant of BZLF1, which no longer becomes sumoylated, exhibits stronger transactivation than the wild-type BZLF1 in a reporter assay system as well as in the context of virus genome with nucleosomal structures. Furthermore, exogenous supply of a SUMO-specific protease, SENP, caused de-sumoylation of BZLF1 and enhanced BZLF1-mediated transactivation. Immunoprecipitation experiments proved that histone deacetylase 3 preferentially associated with the sumoylated form of BZLF1. Levels of the sumoylated BZLF1 increased as lytic replication progressed. Based on these observations, we conclude that sumoylation of BZLF1 regulates its transcriptional activity through histone modification during Epstein-Barr virus productive replication. PMID:20516063

  17. Intravenous anti-D immune globulin-induced intravascular hemolysis in Epstein-Barr virus-related thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Levendoglu-Tugal, O; Jayabose, S

    2001-10-01

    RhoD immune globulin intravenous (anti-D IGIV) increases platelet counts in patients who have not undergone splenectomy and are positive for RhoD with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. After treatment, in most patients, anemia develops as a result of immune-mediated red cell destruction in the spleen. Although intravascular hemolysis (IVH) is not expected, life-threatening IVH has been recently reported by the Food and Drug Administration, and physicians are encouraged to report their experience with patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in whom IVH develops after anti-D administration. Severe IVH was observed after treatment with anti-D IGIV in two adolescent girls with acute thrombocytopenia related to Epstein-Barr virus. They did not have hemolytic anemia before treatment. The authors believe that anti-D IGIV triggered an unusual virus-induced immune response causing hemolysis; therefore, anti-D IGIV should not be used in patients with Epstein-Barr virus-related thrombocytopenia, particularly during the acute phase of infection.

  18. Notch1, Notch2, and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen 2 signaling differentially affects proliferation and survival of Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells.

    PubMed

    Kohlhof, Hella; Hampel, Franziska; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Burtscher, Helmut; Weidle, Ulrich H; Hölzel, Michael; Eick, Dirk; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; Strobl, Lothar J

    2009-05-28

    The canonical mode of transcriptional activation by both the Epstein-Barr viral protein, Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2), and an activated Notch receptor (Notch-IC) requires their recruitment to RBPJ, suggesting that EBNA2 uses the Notch pathway to achieve B-cell immortalization. To gain further insight into the biologic equivalence between Notch-IC and EBNA2, we performed a genome-wide expression analysis, revealing that Notch-IC and EBNA2 exhibit profound differences in the regulation of target genes. Whereas Notch-IC is more potent in regulating genes associated with differentiation and development, EBNA2 is more potent in inducing viral and cellular genes involved in proliferation, survival, and chemotaxis. Because both EBNA2 and Notch-IC induced the expression of cell cycle-associated genes, we analyzed whether Notch1-IC or Notch2-IC can replace EBNA2 in B-cell immortalization. Although Notch-IC could drive quiescent B cells into the cell cycle, B-cell immortalization was not maintained, partially due to an increased apoptosis rate in Notch-IC-expressing cells. Expression analysis revealed that both EBNA2 and Notch-IC induced the expression of proapoptotic genes, but only in EBNA2-expressing cells were antiapoptotic genes strongly up-regulated. These findings suggest that Notch signaling in B cells and B-cell lymphomas is only compatible with proliferation if pathways leading to antiapototic signals are active. PMID:19339697

  19. B-lymphocyte subpopulations are equally susceptible to Epstein-Barr virus infection, irrespective of immunoglobulin isotype expression.

    PubMed

    Ehlin-Henriksson, Barbro; Gordon, John; Klein, George

    2003-04-01

    While Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is known to establish latency in the memory B-cell compartment, there is controversy as to whether the memory or the naïve B cell is the initial target for infection. Here we have explored the infectability of the B-cell subsets contained in peripheral blood and tonsils, as distinguished by their surface expression of the immunoglobulin isotypes that help to define naïve and memory pools. First we show that both CD21 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules--respectively, the major receptor and co-receptor for EBV on B cells--are expressed at similar levels on blood and tonsillar B cells, irrespective of surface immunoglobulin class, indicating that each of the subsets demonstrate an equal potential, at least for infection. Then, following in vitro infection of total tonsillar B cells, we found that the relative frequencies of immunoglobulin (Ig)M-, IgG- and IgA-positive cells containing EBV-encoded Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 5 (EBNA5) protein at 48 hr were similar to those of the starting population. However, IgD expression was uniformly decreased, probably as a consequence of cellular activation. These data indicate that recirculating B cells have both the potential for, and susceptibility to, initial infection by EBV, irrespective of the immunoglobulin isotype expressed.

  20. Discrimination-related stress, blood pressure and epstein-barr virus antibodies among latin american immigrants in Oregon, us.

    PubMed

    McClure, Heather H; Martinez, Charles R; Snodgrass, J Josh; Eddy, J Mark; Jiménez, Roberto A; Isiordia, Laura E; McDade, Thomas W

    2010-07-01

    Perceived discrimination has been linked to poor health outcomes among ethnic and racial minorities in the United States, though the relationship of discrimination-related stress to immigrant health is not well understood. This article reports findings from a preliminary study that examined blood pressure and Epstein-Barr virus antibody levels in relation to self-reported indicators of stress, acculturation and social support among 79 adult immigrant Latino farm workers in Oregon, US. Findings show that increases in discrimination-related stress predicted elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) and Epstein-Barr virus antibody levels among male participants. Though female participants reported similar levels of discrimination stress, this perceived stress was not reflected in biological measures. Among women, greater English language engagement was linked to higher SBP, and more years in the US was associated with higher diastolic blood pressure. Study results suggest that male and female immigrants' physiological responses to stress may be influenced in distinctive ways by processes of adjustment to life in the US. If replicated, the finding that discrimination stress predicts elevated SBP may have clinical and public health implications given that elevated SBP is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. PMID:20178683

  1. A Genome-Wide Integrative Genomic Study Localizes Genetic Factors Influencing Antibodies against Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA-1)

    PubMed Central

    Rubicz, Rohina; Yolken, Robert; Drigalenko, Eugene; Carless, Melanie A.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Bauman, Lara; Melton, Phillip E.; Kent, Jack W.; Harley, John B.; Curran, Joanne E.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Cole, Shelley A.; Almasy, Laura; Moses, Eric K.; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V.; Kraig, Ellen; Blangero, John; Leach, Charles T.; Göring, Harald H. H.

    2013-01-01

    Infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly prevalent worldwide, and it has been associated with infectious mononucleosis and severe diseases including Burkitt lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, nasopharyngeal lymphoma, and lymphoproliferative disorders. Although EBV has been the focus of extensive research, much still remains unknown concerning what makes some individuals more sensitive to infection and to adverse outcomes as a result of infection. Here we use an integrative genomics approach in order to localize genetic factors influencing levels of Epstein Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) IgG antibodies, as a measure of history of infection with this pathogen, in large Mexican American families. Genome-wide evidence of both significant linkage and association was obtained on chromosome 6 in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region and replicated in an independent Mexican American sample of large families (minimum p-value in combined analysis of both datasets is 1.4×10−15 for SNPs rs477515 and rs2516049). Conditional association analyses indicate the presence of at least two separate loci within MHC class II, and along with lymphocyte expression data suggest genes HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 as the best candidates. The association signals are specific to EBV and are not found with IgG antibodies to 12 other pathogens examined, and therefore do not simply reveal a general HLA effect. We investigated whether SNPs significantly associated with diseases in which EBV is known or suspected to play a role (namely nasopharyngeal lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, systemic lupus erythematosus, and multiple sclerosis) also show evidence of associated with EBNA-1 antibody levels, finding an overlap only for the HLA locus, but none elsewhere in the genome. The significance of this work is that a major locus related to EBV infection has been identified, which may ultimately reveal the underlying mechanisms by which the immune system regulates infection with this pathogen

  2. Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Yoshiwara, E; Koriyama, C; Akiba, S; Itoh, T; Minakami, Y; Chirinos, J L; Watanabe, J; Takano, J; Miyagui, J; Hidalgo, H; Chacon, P; Linares, V; Eizuru, Y

    2005-03-01

    We examined 254 gastric carcinomas (GCs) diagnosed in four hospitals in Lima, Peru, and its suburban area during the period between 1994-2001. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) was identified by the in situ hybridization (ISH) technique to detect EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) in gastric tissue. EBVaGCs, where EBER ISH staining was observed in all carcinoma cells, accounted for 3.9% (10/254) of gastric adenocarcinomas, the lowest frequency ever reported in Latin American countries. EBVaGC incidence rates in Peru, which we estimated on the basis of the present study and cancer incidence in Lima, were 0.8 per 100,000 among men and 0.5 per 100,000 among women. These estimates are much lower than those reported in our previous studies in Colombia (4.1 and 1.4 per 100,000 among men and women, respectively), a neighboring country, and in Japan (6.4 and 1.1 per 100,000 among men among women, respectively). Interestingly, EBVaGC in Peru showed no evident male predominance, as opposed to the findings reported in a majority of studies. Other clinicopathological features of EBVaGC in Peru were similar to those found in literature: EBVaGC showed no age dependence, a predominance in the non-antrum part of the stomach, and high frequencies in histological subtypes of moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma and solid poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. There was a case of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma showing a partial EBER-1-positive staining. In this carcinoma, the tumor in the body (middle third of the stomach) was EBER-1 positive but the tumor in the stomach antrum showed no noticeable EBER-1 ISH staining. We suspect this was a case of synchronous double carcinomas. Further studies are needed to identify the cause of the low frequency and lack of male predominance of EBVaGC in Peru.

  3. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A; Kieff, Elliott; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)'s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459-607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-J{kappa} binding to the J{kappa} site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560-574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated with

  4. Epstein-Barr Virus and Human Papillomavirus Infections and Genotype Distribution in Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zeyi; Uehara, Takayuki; Maeda, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Matayoshi, Sen; Kiyuna, Asanori; Agena, Shinya; Pan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chunlin; Yamashita, Yukashi; Xie, Minqiang; Suzuki, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence, genotypes, and prognostic values of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in Japanese patients with different types of head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials HPV and EBV DNA, EBV genotypes and LMP-1 variants, and HPV mRNA expression were detected by PCR from fresh-frozen HNC samples. HPV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing, and EBV encoded RNA (EBER) was examined by in situ hybridization. Results Of the 209 HNC patients, 63 (30.1%) had HPV infection, and HPV-16 was the most common subtype (86.9%). HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression was found in 23 of 60 (38.3%) HPV DNA-positive cases detected. The site of highest prevalence of HPV was the oropharynx (45.9%). Among 146 (69.9%) HNCs in which EBV DNA was identified, 107 (73.3%) and 27 (18.5%) contained types A and B, respectively, and 124 (84.9%) showed the existence of del-LMP-1. However, only 13 (6.2%) HNCs were positive for EBER, 12 (92.3%) of which derived from the nasopharynx. Co-infection of HPV and EBER was found in only 1.0% of HNCs and 10.0% of NPCs. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significantly better disease-specific and overall survival in the HPV DNA+/mRNA+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPC) patients than in the other OPC patients (P = 0.027 and 0.017, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that stage T1–3 (P = 0.002) and HPV mRNA-positive status (P = 0.061) independently predicted better disease-specific survival. No significant difference in disease-specific survival was found between the EBER-positive and -negative NPC patients (P = 0.155). Conclusions Our findings indicate that co-infection with HPV and EBV is rare in HNC. Oropharyngeal SCC with active HPV infection was related to a highly favorable outcome, while EBV status was not prognostic in the NPC cohort. PMID:25405488

  5. Identification and Characterization of the Physiological Gene Targets of the Essential Lytic Replicative Epstein-Barr Virus SM Protein

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jacob; Verma, Dinesh; Li, DaJiang; Mosbruger, Tim

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) SM protein is an essential lytic cycle protein with multiple posttranscriptional mechanisms of action. SM binds RNA and increases accumulation of specific EBV transcripts. Previous studies using microarrays and PCR have shown that SM-null mutants fail to accumulate several lytic cycle mRNAs and proteins at wild-type levels. However, the complete effect of SM on the EBV transcriptome has been incompletely characterized. Here we precisely identify the effects of SM on all EBV transcripts by high-throughput RNA sequencing, quantitative PCR (qPCR), and Northern blotting. The effect of SM on EBV mRNAs was highly skewed and was most evident on 13 late genes, demonstrating why SM is essential for infectious EBV production. EBV DNA replication was also partially impaired in SM mutants, suggesting additional roles for SM in EBV DNA replication. While it has been suggested that SM specificity is based on recognition of either RNA sequence motifs or other sequence properties, no such unifying property of SM-responsive targets was discernible. The binding affinity of mRNAs for SM also did not correlate with SM responsiveness. These data suggest that while target RNA binding by SM may be required for its effect, specific activation by SM is due to differences in inherent properties of individual transcripts. We therefore propose a new model for the mechanism of action and specificity of SM and its homologs in other herpesviruses: that they bind many RNAs but only enhance accumulation of those that are intrinsically unstable and poorly expressed. IMPORTANCE This study examines the mechanism of action of EBV SM protein, which is essential for EBV replication and infectious virus production. Since SM protein is not similar to any cellular protein and has homologs in all other human herpesviruses, it has potential importance as a therapeutic target. Here we establish which EBV RNAs are most highly upregulated by SM, allowing us to understand why it

  6. Epstein-barr virus coinfection in cerebrospinal fluid is associated with increased mortality in Malawian adults with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Matthew J; Benjamin, Laura A; Cartwright, Katharine; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine M B; Cohen, Danielle B; Menyere, Mavis; Galbraith, Sareen; Guiver, Malcolm; Neuhann, Florian; Solomon, Tom; Lalloo, David G; Heyderman, Robert S

    2012-01-01

    Mortality from adult bacterial meningitis exceeds 50% in sub-Saharan Africa. We postulated that-particularly in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contribute to poor outcome. CSF from 149 Malawian adults with bacterial meningitis and 39 controls were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction. EBV was detected in 79 of 149 bacterial meningitis patients. Mortality (54%) was associated with higher CSF EBV load when adjusted for HIV (P = .01). CMV was detected in 11 of 115 HIV-infected patients, 8 of whom died. The mechanisms by which EBV and CMV contribute to poor outcome require further investigation.

  7. [Abnormal magnetic resonance imaging in a child with Alice in Wonderland syndrome following Epstein-Barr virus infection].

    PubMed

    Kamei, Atsushi; Sasaki, Makoto; Akasaka, Manami; Chida, Shoichi

    2002-07-01

    Characteristic pathologic changes of cranial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have never been reported in "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome (AIWS) caused by Epstein-Barr (EB) virus infection. We present here a 10-year-old girl with AIWS with an abnormal MR finding. During the course of serologically confirmed EB virus encephalopathy, she had distortion of the body image, visual hallucinations and depersonalization characteristic of AIWS. MRI demonstrated transient T2 prolongation and swelling of the cerebral cortex, especially at the bilateral temporal lobes, bilateral cingulate gyrus, right upper frontal gyrus, bilateral caudate nucleus, and bilateral putamen, whereas CT showed no abnormalities. Transient MRI lesions were occasionally reported in patients with EB virus encephalopathy/encephalitis who presented visual illusions and psychotic reactions, although the diagnosis of AIWS was not described. We consider that any patient with symptoms of AIWS should have MRI because the abnormal MRI findings may disappear in a short period. PMID:12134688

  8. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) do not modulate interferon effects in infected lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, S; Huneycutt, B S; Reiss, C S; Kieff, E

    1992-01-01

    The recent derivation of otherwise isogenic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) recombinants carrying or lacking the EBV small RNA (EBER) genes enabled us to test whether EBERs are similar to adenovirus VA RNAs in modulating interferon (IFN) effects on virus infection. EBER-positive and -negative EBV recombinants did not differ in their sensitivity to alpha interferon (IFN-alpha)- or IFN-gamma-mediated inhibition of lymphocyte growth transformation. In addition, EBERs did not decrease the inhibitory effects of IFN on vesicular stomatitis virus replication in EBV-transformed lymphocytes. EBER deletion also did not render EBV-transformed B lymphocytes susceptible to an IFN effect on cell proliferation or EBV replication. Images PMID:1321292

  9. Malignant NK/T-cell lymphoma associated with simian Epstein-Barr virus infection in a Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Juri; Goto, Shunji; Kato, Akino; Hashimoto, Chihiro; Miwa, Norikatsu; Takao, Satomi; Ishida, Takafumi; Fukuoka, Ayumi; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Doi, Kunio; Isowa, Koichi

    2005-01-01

    A case of spontaneous malignant lymphoma in a Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) was pathologically, etiologically and virologically studied. Nasal cavity was involved in the neoplastic lesions in addition to lymphoid and visceral tissues. Histopathological analyses revealed the presence of neoplastic cells classified into histiocytic Hodgkin-like cells and Reed-Sternberg-like cells. Histiocytic Hodgkin-like cells were CD16+ and CD20+, and the CD16+ cells were also positive for simian Epstein-Barr virus (sEBV)-encoded early RNA transcripts. RS-like cells were negative for CD3, CD16 and CD20. Antibodies to early antigen of sEBV were detected, while antibodies to simian T-cell leukemia virus-1 were negative. The case may correspond to EBV-associated nasal type NK/T-cell lymphoma in humans rather than Hodgkin lymphoma.

  10. Co-prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus and high-risk human papillomaviruses in Syrian women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Al Moustafa, Ala-Eddin; Al-Antary, Noor; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Akil, Nizar; Batist, Gerald; Yasmeen, Amber

    2016-07-01

    ABSTRAT We recently performed 2 studies viewing the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) types 16, 18, 31, 33 and 35 in human breast cancer in the Syrian population. Herein, we report that EBV and high-risk HPVs are co-present in breast cancer in Syrian women. Therefore, and based on our previous studies and present data, we reveal that 35 (32%) of 108 cancer samples are positive for both EBV and high-risk HPVs and their co-presence is associated with high grade invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) with at least one positive lymph nodes, in comparison with EBV and high-risk HPVs-positive samples, which are low to intermediate grade IDCs, respectively. Future studies are needed to confirm the co-presence and the cooperation effect of these onco-viruses in human breast carcinogenesis and metastasis.

  11. Co-prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus and high-risk human papillomaviruses in Syrian women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Al Moustafa, Ala-Eddin; Al-Antary, Noor; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Akil, Nizar; Batist, Gerald; Yasmeen, Amber

    2016-07-01

    ABSTRAT We recently performed 2 studies viewing the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) types 16, 18, 31, 33 and 35 in human breast cancer in the Syrian population. Herein, we report that EBV and high-risk HPVs are co-present in breast cancer in Syrian women. Therefore, and based on our previous studies and present data, we reveal that 35 (32%) of 108 cancer samples are positive for both EBV and high-risk HPVs and their co-presence is associated with high grade invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) with at least one positive lymph nodes, in comparison with EBV and high-risk HPVs-positive samples, which are low to intermediate grade IDCs, respectively. Future studies are needed to confirm the co-presence and the cooperation effect of these onco-viruses in human breast carcinogenesis and metastasis. PMID:27082145

  12. The circular intracellular form of Epstein-Barr virus DNA is amplified by the virus-associated DNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, J E

    1985-01-01

    Selective DNA extraction and hybridization procedures were used to estimate the relative number of covalently closed circular viral genomes in cultures of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed cells. In virus-producing P3HR-1 cultures that were exposed for 11 days to phosphonoacetic acid or to acyclovir, the content of covalently closed circular EBV DNA was reduced ca. 70% relative to a control culture without drug. The EBV plasmid content of Raji, a virus nonproducer cell line, was not reduced by exposure to these compounds. When P3HR-1 cultures were exposed to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, the number of circular genomes per cell increased. These findings indicate that two enzyme activities synthesize circular EBV DNA and that the virus-associated DNA polymerase synthesizes most of the circular EBV DNA in a virus producer culture. It is suggested that the circular genomes synthesized by the viral enzyme are intermediates in the syntheses of linear virus DNA. PMID:2983082

  13. Epstein-Barr Virus, Human Papillomavirus and Mouse Mammary Tumour Virus as Multiple Viruses in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Wendy K.; Heng, Benjamin; Delprado, Warick; Iacopetta, Barry; Whitaker, Noel J.; Lawson, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this investigation is to determine if Epstein Barr virus (EBV), high risk human papillomavirus (HPV), and mouse mammary tumour viruses (MMTV) co-exist in some breast cancers. Materials and Methods All the specimens were from women residing in Australia. For investigations based on standard PCR, we used fresh frozen DNA extracts from 50 unselected invasive breast cancers. For normal breast specimens, we used DNA extracts from epithelial cells from milk donated by 40 lactating women. For investigations based on in situ PCR we used 27 unselected archival formalin fixed breast cancer specimens and 18 unselected archival formalin fixed normal breast specimens from women who had breast reduction surgery. Thirteen of these fixed breast cancer specimens were ductal carcinoma in situ (dcis) and 14 were predominantly invasive ductal carcinomas (idc). Results EBV sequences were identified in 68%, high risk HPV sequences in 50%, and MMTV sequences in 78% of DNA extracted from 50 invasive breast cancer specimens. These same viruses were identified in selected normal and breast cancer specimens by in situ PCR. Sequences from more than one viral type were identified in 72% of the same breast cancer specimens. Normal controls showed these viruses were also present in epithelial cells in human milk – EBV (35%), HPV, 20%) and MMTV (32%) of 40 milk samples from normal lactating women, with multiple viruses being identified in 13% of the same milk samples. Conclusions We conclude that (i) EBV, HPV and MMTV gene sequences are present and co-exist in many human breast cancers, (ii) the presence of these viruses in breast cancer is associated with young age of diagnosis and possibly an increased grade of breast cancer. PMID:23183846

  14. Concentrations of organochlorines related to titers to Epstein-Barr virus early antigen IgG as risk factors for hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, M; Hardell, L; Lindström, G; Wingfors, H; Hardell, K; Linde, A

    2000-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a rare chronic B-cell malignancy that, according to modern classifications, is a subgroup of non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs). A rapid increase in incidence of NHL has been reported in many countries. The reasons for this increase are largely unknown, but exposure to organochlorines has been suggested as a risk factor. Epstein-Barr virus is a human herpesvirus that has been associated with certain subgroups of NHL. In this study, we measured lipid adjusted blood concentrations (in nanogram per gram) of 36 congeners of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), p, p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and four subgroups of chlordanes (trans-nonachlor, cis-nonachlor, MC6, and oxychlordane) in incident cases of HCL and controls from the general population. We obtained results on organochlorines and antibodies for 54 cases and 54 controls. Titers of antibodies to the Epstein-Barr early antigen and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen, measured as P107, were correlated to concentrations of organochlorines to evaluate the possibility of an interaction between these factors in the pathogenesis of HCL. We found no significant difference in lipid-adjusted blood concentrations of total PCBs, p,p'-DDE, HCB, or the sum of the chlordanes between cases and controls. Titers of antibodies to Epstein-Barr early antigen IgG [Greater and equal to] 40 were correlated to an increased risk for HCL. This risk was further increased in those with a level above the median value of p,p'-DDE, HCB, or the sum of the chlordanes, suggesting an interaction between Epstein-Barr virus and a higher concentration of these chemicals. We also found increased risk for the sum of immunotoxic PCB group. PMID:10811571

  15. A model for persistent infection with Epstein-Barr virus: the stealth virus of human B cells.

    PubMed

    Thorley-Lawson, D A; Babcock, G J

    1999-01-01

    Most adult humans are infected benignly and for life with the herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus. EBV has been a focus of research because of its status as a candidate tumor virus for a number of lymphomas and carcinomas. In vitro EBV has the ability to establish a latent infection in proliferating B lymphoblasts. This is the only system available for studying human herpesvirus latency in culture and has been extremely useful for elucidating how EBV promotes cellular growth. However, to understand how EBV survives in the healthy host and what goes awry, leading to disease, it is essential to know how EBV establishes and maintains a persistent infection in vivo. Early studies on the mechanism of EBV persistence produced inconclusive and often contradictory results because the techniques available were crude and insensitive. Recent advances in PCR technology and the application of sophisticated cell fractionation techniques have now provided new insights into the behavior of the virus. Most dramatically it has been shown that EBV in vivo does not establish latency in a proliferating lymphoblast, but in a resting memory B cell. The contrasting behaviors of being able to establish a latent infection in proliferating B blasts and resting memory B cells can be resolved in terms of a model where EBV performs its complete life cycle in B lymphocytes. The virus achieves this not by disrupting normal B cell biology but by using it.

  16. Antigenic cross-reactions among herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, N; Oba, D E; Hutt-Fletcher, L M

    1987-01-01

    Polyvalent rabbit antisera against herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), monospecific antisera against affinity-purified HSV-2 glycoproteins gB and gG, and a panel of monoclonal antibodies against HSV and EBV proteins were used to analyze cross-reactive molecules in cells infected with the four herpesviruses. A combination of immunoprecipitation and Western blotting with these reagents was used to determine that all four viruses coded for a glycoprotein that cross-reacted with HSV-1 gB. CMV coded for proteins that cross-reacted with HSV-2 gC, gD, and gE. Both CMV and EBV coded for proteins that cross-reacted with HSV-2 gG. Antigenic counterparts to the p45 nucleocapsid protein of HSV-2 were present in HSV-1 and CMV, and counterparts of the major DNA-binding protein and the ribonucleotide reductase of HSV-1 were present in all the viruses. The EBV virion glycoprotein gp85 was immunoprecipitated by antisera to HSV-1, HSV-2, and CMV. Antisera to CMV and EBV neutralized the infectivity of both HSV-1 and HSV-2 at high concentrations. This suggests that cross-reactivity between these four human herpesviruses may have pathogenic as well as evolutionary significance. Images PMID:3029407

  17. An Epstein-Barr Virus Encoded Inhibitor of Colony Stimulating Factor-1 Signaling Is an Important Determinant for Acute and Persistent EBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Makoto; Fogg, Mark H.; Orlova, Nina; Quink, Carol; Wang, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is the most common cause of Infectious Mononucleosis. Nearly all adult humans harbor life-long, persistent EBV infection which can lead to development of cancers including Hodgkin Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, and lymphomas in immunosuppressed patients. BARF1 is an EBV replication-associated, secreted protein that blocks Colony Stimulating Factor 1 (CSF-1) signaling, an innate immunity pathway not targeted by any other virus species. To evaluate effects of BARF1 in acute and persistent infection, we mutated the BARF1 homologue in the EBV-related herpesvirus, or lymphocryptovirus (LCV), naturally infecting rhesus macaques to create a recombinant rhLCV incapable of blocking CSF-1 (ΔrhBARF1). Rhesus macaques orally challenged with ΔrhBARF1 had decreased viral load indicating that CSF-1 is important for acute virus infection. Surprisingly, ΔrhBARF1 was also associated with dramatically lower virus setpoints during persistent infection. Normal acute viral load and normal viral setpoints during persistent rhLCV infection could be restored by Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-induced immunosuppression prior to oral inoculation with ΔrhBARF1 or infection of immunocompetent animals with a recombinant rhLCV where the rhBARF1 was repaired. These results indicate that BARF1 blockade of CSF-1 signaling is an important immune evasion strategy for efficient acute EBV infection and a significant determinant for virus setpoint during persistent EBV infection. PMID:23300447

  18. Epstein-Barr virus infection induces bone resorption in apical periodontitis via increased production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Aleksandar; Andric, Miroslav; Miletic, Maja; Beljic-Ivanovic, Katarina; Knezevic, Aleksandra; Mojsilovic, Slavko; Milasin, Jelena

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory processes in periapical tissues caused by etiological agents of endodontic origin lead to apical periodontitis. Apart from bacteria, two herpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) are recognized as putative pathogens in apical periodontitis. Although previous reports suggest the involvement of EBV in the pathogenesis of apical periodontitis, its exact role in periapical bone resorption has not yet been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that EBV infection in apical periodontitis is capable of inducing periapical bone resorption via stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction. Increased levels of ROS induce expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL). RANKL binding to receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) present on the surface of preosteoclasts induces their maturation and activation which consequently leads to bone resorption. The potential benefit of antiviral and antioxidant-based therapies in periapical bone resorption treatment remains to be assessed. PMID:27515196

  19. Composite Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated B-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder and Tubular Adenoma in a Rectal Polyp.

    PubMed

    Lo, Amy A; Gao, Juehua; Rao, M Sambasivia; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-02-01

    Composite tumors are formed when there is intermingling between two components of separate tumors seen histologically. Cases demonstrating composite tubular adenoma with other types of tumors in the colon are rare. Composite tubular adenomas with nonlymphoid tumors including carcinoids, microcarcinoids, and small cell undifferentiated carcinoma have been reported in the literature. The occurrence of composite lymphoma and tubular adenoma within the colorectal tract is extremely rare. Only three cases have been reported and include one case of mantle cell lymphoma and two cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma arising in composite tubular adenomas. We present the first case of composite Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder and tubular adenoma in a rectal polyp with a benign endoscopic appearance.

  20. Clonal rearrangement for immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes in systemic Castleman's disease. Association with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, C. A.; Frizzera, G.; Patton, D. F.; Peterson, B. A.; McClain, K. L.; Gajl-Peczalska, K. J.; Kersey, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Castleman's disease is a morphologically and clinically heterogeneous lymphoproliferative disorder. Both a localized benign variant and an aggressive form with systemic manifestations have been described. To investigate the differences between these variants of Castleman's disease, the authors analyzed lymph node DNA from 4 patients with the localized type and 4 with the systemic type of Castleman's disease for immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. The role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) was also studied by viral genomic DNA probes. They detected clonal rearrangements in 3 of the 4 patients with the systemic variant of Castleman's; no patients with localized disease had rearrangements. Copies of EBV genome were also detected in 2 of the 3 patients with clonal rearrangements. These results suggest that systemic Castleman's disease is a disorder distinct from the classical localized variant in that it may evolve into a clonal lymphoproliferation. Images Figure 1 PMID:2833104

  1. Prevalence of salivary epstein-barr virus in potentially malignant oral disorders and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ocete-Monchon, María-Dolores; Leopoldo-Rodado, Manuel; Murillo-Cortes, Judith; Díaz-Fernández, Jose-M.; Medina-Gonzalez, Rafael; Gimeno-Cardona, Concepción; Bagan, Jose-V.

    2016-01-01

    Background To analyze the presence of salivary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in oral squamous cell carcinoma and potentially malignant oral disorders. Material and Methods Three groups were studied: Group 1 (12 oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC)), Group 2 (12 potentially malignant oral disorders (PMD)) and Group 3 (47 healthy controls). EBV DNA salivary analysis was performed by PCR. Results The highest percentage of positive salivary EBV DNA corresponded to the OSCC group (58.3%), followed by the PMD group (41.7%) and the controls (40.4%). The differences between groups were not statistically significant, however (p>0.05). Conclusions Salivary EBV DNA was more prevalent in OSCC than in PMD or the controls. Key words:EBV DNA, saliva, oral squamous cell carcinoma, oral leukoplakia. PMID:26827058

  2. Epstein-Barr virus positive inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver: report of a challenging case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    You, Yan; Shao, Haipeng; Bui, Katherine; Bui, Marilyn; Klapman, Jason; Cui, Quancai; Coppola, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is an uncommon, benign lesion of unclear etiology, which is sometimes associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this study, we discuss a case of hepatic EBV positive IPT and discuss mimickers, prognosis, and treatment. The case we describe was located in the liver and composed of a mixture of spindle cells and polymorphic inflammatory cells with areas of necrosis. The spindle cells were negative for CAM5.2, ALK1, CD21, CD23, CD35, actin, S-100, and CD34. EBV-encoded small RNA in situ hybridization showed a large number of EBV positive cells. The diagnosis of hepatic EBV positive IPT with uncertain biological behavior was issued, presenting numerous difficulties with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. PMID:25361938

  3. Epstein Barr virus in relation to apoptosis markers and patients' outcome in pediatric B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chabay, P; Lara, J; Lorenzetti, M; Cambra, P; Acosta Haab, G; Aversa, L; De Matteo, E; Preciado, M V

    2011-08-28

    In this study, we investigated Epstein Barr virus (EBV) presence, associated to proliferation and apoptosis proteins in pediatric B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). EBERs, Ki67, active caspase 3, Bax and Bcl2 were analyzed on B-NHL tissue from 40 patients. Forty percent showed EBV expression, significantly higher among patients ⩽10years (P=0.027), and associated with immunosuppression (P=0.020), but not associated apotosis markers. However, EBV was associated with a worse event-free survival (P=0.016), particularly under immunosuppression. Even though EBV did not seem to alter apoptotic pathways, it exhibited survival disadvantage and could be an important cofactor in B-cell lymphomagenesis in younger children. PMID:21546156

  4. Unusual Indolent Course of a Chronic Active Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Natural Killer Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Farsi, Khalil; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Al-Huneini, Mohammed; Al-Hadabbi, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell lymphoproliferative disorders are uncommon and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays an important aetiological role in their pathogenesis. We report a 20-year-old male with a chronic active EBV infection associated with a NK cell lymphoproliferative disorder which had an unusual indolent course. He presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in December 2011 with a history of intermittent fever and coughing. Examinations revealed generalised lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, leukocytosis, transaminitis, diffuse bilateral lung infiltrates and bone marrow lymphocyte involvement. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test revealed a high EBV viral load in the peripheral blood cells. The patient received a course of piperacillin-tazobactam for Klebsiella pneumoniae, but no active treatment for the lymphoproliferative disorder. However, his lymphocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase and liver enzymes dropped spontaneously. In addition, EBV PCR copies fluctuated and then decreased significantly. He remained clinically asymptomatic over the following four years. PMID:27226916

  5. Epstein-Barr virus infection in vitro can rescue germinal center B cells with inactivated immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Chaganti, Sridhar; Bell, Andrew I; Pastor, Noelia Begue; Milner, Anne E; Drayson, Mark; Gordon, John; Rickinson, Alan B

    2005-12-15

    Immunoglobulin genotyping of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease has suggested that such lesions often arise from atypical post-germinal center B cells, in some cases carrying functionally inactivated immunoglobulin genes. To investigate whether EBV can rescue cells that are failed products of the somatic hypermutation process occurring in germinal centers (GCs), we isolated GC cells from tonsillar cell suspensions and exposed them to EBV in vitro. Screening more than 100 EBV-transformed cell lines of GC origin identified 6 lines lacking surface immunoglobulin, a phenotype never seen among lines derived from circulating naive or memory B cells. Furthermore, 3 of the 6 surface immunoglobulin-negative GC lines carried inactivating mutations in the immunoglobulin H (IgH) variable gene sequence. The ability of EBV to rescue aberrant products of the germinal center reaction in vitro strengthens the probability that a parallel activity contributes to EBV's lymphomagenic potential in vivo.

  6. Transcriptional expression of Epstein-Barr virus genes and proto-oncogenes in north African nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sbih-Lammali, F; Djennaoui, D; Belaoui, H; Bouguermouh, A; Decaussin, G; Ooka, T

    1996-05-01

    Cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) from North Africa show an unusual bimodal age distribution. As elsewhere, the tumor is closely associated with the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The expression of EBV genes and c-onc genes was studied in biopsy specimens from tumors at different clinical stages from 11 young (10 to 30-year-old) and 11 adult (30 to 65-year-old) patients. It was found that the two age groups do not differ in their pattern of gene expression, that there is a tendency for later stage biopsies to express more viral and c-onc transcripts, and that samples expressing larger numbers of EBV genes also tend to express many different c-onc specificities. PMID:8732865

  7. Expression of c-myc and PCNA in Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, SHIGUANG; SUN, PING; ZHANG, YINGXIN; YAN, LIPING; LUO, BING

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the expression of proliferatng cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and c-myc in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) and EBV-negative gastric carcinoma (EBVnGC), as well as the expression of EBV-encoded proteins in EBVaGC and their effect on carcinogenesis and the development of gastric cancer. The PCNA and c-myc protein levels were assessed by immunohistochemistry in 13 EBVaGC and 45 EBVnGC specimens. The expression of related genes of EBV, including EB nuclear antigen (NA)-1 and EBNA2 genes, latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) and early genes BARF1 and BHRF1 were tested by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and southern blotting. The PCNA labeling index (LI) of EBVaGCs, EBVnGCs and the corresponding adjacent tissues of EBVaGCs were 49.3768±12.1832, 14.839±7.1847, 35.613±8.3831 and 24.2735±10.1332, respectively. The PCNA LI was significantly different between EBVaGC and EBVnGC of EBVaGC (t=4.686, P<0.01). The difference between EBVaGC and corresponding adjacent tissues of EBVaGC was also significant (t=8.805, P<0.01). The expression of c-myc protein was detected in 33 of 58 (55.39%) gastric carcinomas and in 21 of 58 (36.21%) adjacent tissues. There was a significant difference between the two groups (χ2=4.989, P<0.05). The expression of the c-myc protein was detected in 8 of 13 (61.54%) EBVaGCs and in 25 of 45 (55.56%) EBVnGCs. The difference between the two groups was not significant (χ2=0.147, P>0.05). EBNA1 mRNA was detected in all 13 EBVaGC cases, while EBNA2 and LMP1 mRNA was not detected in these cases. Of the 13 EBV-positive samples, 6 exhibited BARF1 transcripts and 2 exhibited BHRF1 transcripts. c-myc expression did not correlate with the presence of EBV in EBVaGC. EBV infection may induce PCNA expression. The lack of EBNA2 and LMP1 protein expression in EBVaGC suggests that EBNA2 and LMP1 do not correlate with cell apoptosis and c-myc expression. Early genes BARF1 and BHRF1

  8. Induction of Epstein-Barr Virus Oncoprotein LMP1 by Transcription Factors AP-2 and Early B Cell Factor

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Chieko; Narita, Yohei; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yoshida, Masahiro; Ashio, Keiji; Sato, Yoshitaka; Goshima, Fumi; Kanda, Teru; Yoshiyama, Hironori; Tsurumi, Tatsuya; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is a major oncogene essential for primary B cell transformation by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Previous studies suggested that some transcription factors, such as PU.1, RBP-Jκ, NF-κB, and STAT, are involved in this expression, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we identified binding sites for PAX5, AP-2, and EBF in the proximal LMP1 promoter (ED-L1p). We first confirmed the significance of PU.1 and POU domain transcription factor binding for activation of the promoter in latency III. We then focused on the transcription factors AP-2 and early B cell factor (EBF). Interestingly, among the three AP-2-binding sites in the LMP1 promoter, two motifs were also bound by EBF. Overexpression, knockdown, and mutagenesis in the context of the viral genome indicated that AP-2 plays an important role in LMP1 expression in latency II in epithelial cells. In latency III B cells, on the other hand, the B cell-specific transcription factor EBF binds to the ED-L1p and activates LMP1 transcription from the promoter. IMPORTANCE Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is crucial for B cell transformation and oncogenesis of other EBV-related malignancies, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and T/NK lymphoma. Its expression is largely dependent on the cell type or condition, and some transcription factors have been implicated in its regulation. However, these previous reports evaluated the significance of specific factors mostly by reporter assay. In this study, we prepared point-mutated EBV at the binding sites of such transcription factors and confirmed the importance of AP-2, EBF, PU.1, and POU domain factors. Our results will provide insight into the transcriptional regulation of the major oncogene LMP1. PMID:26819314

  9. MHC II tetramers visualize human CD4+ T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus infection and demonstrate atypical kinetics of the nuclear antigen EBNA1 response.

    PubMed

    Long, Heather M; Chagoury, Odette L; Leese, Alison M; Ryan, Gordon B; James, Eddie; Morton, Laura T; Abbott, Rachel J M; Sabbah, Shereen; Kwok, William; Rickinson, Alan B

    2013-05-01

    Virus-specific CD4(+) T cells are key orchestrators of host responses to viral infection yet, compared with their CD8(+) T cell counterparts, remain poorly characterized at the single cell level. Here we use nine MHC II-epitope peptide tetramers to visualize human CD4(+) T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis (IM), a disease associated with large virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. We find that, while not approaching virus-specific CD8(+) T cell expansions in magnitude, activated CD4(+) T cells specific for epitopes in the latent antigen EBNA2 and four lytic cycle antigens are detected at high frequencies in acute IM blood. They then fall rapidly to values typical of life-long virus carriage where most tetramer-positive cells display conventional memory markers but some, unexpectedly, revert to a naive-like phenotype. In contrast CD4(+) T cell responses to EBNA1 epitopes are greatly delayed in IM patients, in line with the well-known but hitherto unexplained delay in EBNA1 IgG antibody responses. We present evidence from an in vitro system that may explain these unusual kinetics. Unlike other EBNAs and lytic cycle proteins, EBNA1 is not naturally released from EBV-infected cells as a source of antigen for CD4(+) T cell priming. PMID:23569328

  10. Absence of Epstein-Barr virus in medullary carcinoma of the breast as demonstrated by immunophenotyping, in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Lespagnard, L; Cochaux, P; Larsimont, D; Degeyter, M; Velu, T; Heimann, R

    1995-04-01

    Medullary carcinoma of the breast is an epithelial malignant proliferation that shares many characteristics (macroscopic, microscopic, epidemiologic, and prognostic) with lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas of various sites. The authors hypothesized that they could also share the same etiologic agent, the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Epstein-Barr virus, a virus of the herpesvirus family, is to be associated with lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas of the nasopharynx, stomach, lung, thymus, and salivary gland. Therefore, the authors looked for the virus in a series of 10 medullary carcinomas of the breast. Using immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction, this investigation failed to show evidence of EBV. Similar negative results have been reported in lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas arising in the skin and in the uterine cervix, which like the breast do not originate in the foregut. These results suggest that the pathogenesis of these tumors is not unique, implicating probably different etiopathogenic entities. PMID:7726142

  11. Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads in adult human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Paul D.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; Peng, Rong Sheng; White, Zoe S.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are at high risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoma. However, little is known of the EBV DNA loads in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that significantly more HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART than HIV-1-uninfected volunteers had detectable EBV DNA in blood (57 [81%] of 70 vs. 11 [16%] of 68 patients; P=.001) and saliva (55 [79%] of 68 vs. 37 [54%] of 68 patients; P=.002). The mean EBV loads in blood and saliva samples were also higher in HIV-1-infected patients than in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers (P=.001). The frequency of EBV detection in blood was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts (P=.03) among HIV-1-infected individuals, although no differences were observed in the EBV DNA loads in blood or saliva samples in the HIV-1-infected group. Additional studies are needed to determine whether EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells play a role in the pathogenesis of EBV in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART.

  12. Structure of Epstein-Barr Virus Glycoprotein 42 Suggests a Mechanism for Triggering Receptor-Activated Virus Entry

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, Austin N.; Sorem, Jessica; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2009-05-26

    Epstein-Barr virus requires glycoproteins gH/gL, gB, and gp42 to fuse its lipid envelope with B cells. Gp42 is a type II membrane protein consisting of a flexible N-terminal region, which binds gH/gL, and a C-terminal lectin-like domain that binds to the B-cell entry receptor human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II. Gp42 triggers membrane fusion after HLA binding, a process that requires simultaneous binding to gH/gL and a functional hydrophobic pocket in the lectin domain adjacent to the HLA binding site. Here we present the structure of gp42 in its unbound form. Comparisons to the previously determined structure of a gp42:HLA complex reveals additional N-terminal residues forming part of the gH/gL binding site and structural changes in the receptor binding domain. Although the core of the lectin domain remains similar, significant shifts in two loops and an {alpha} helix bordering the essential hydrophobic pocket suggest a structural mechanism for triggering fusion.

  13. Immunologic difference between hypersensitivity to mosquito bite and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-I; Lin, Jainn-Jim; Hsieh, Meng-Ying; Lin, Syh-Jae; Jaing, Tang-Her; Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Hung, Iou-Jih; Yang, Chao-Ping; Chen, Chin-Jung; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Li, Shin-Pai; Huang, Jing-Long

    2013-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening, virus-triggered immune disease. Hypersensitivity to mosquito bite (HMB), a presentation of Chronic Active Epstein-Barr Virus infection (CAEBV), may progress to HLH. This study aimed to investigate the immunologic difference between the HMB episodes and the HLH episodes associated with EBV infection. Immunologic changes of immunoglobulins, lymphocyte subsets, cytotoxicity, intracellular perforin and granzyme expressions, EBV virus load and known candidate genes for hereditary HLH were evaluated and compared. In 12 HLH episodes (12 patients) and 14 HMB episodes (4 patients), there were both decreased percentages of CD4+ and CD8+ and increased memory CD4+ and activated (CD2+HLADR+) lymphocytes. In contrast to HMB episodes that had higher IgE levels and EBV virus load predominantly in NK cells, those HLH episodes with virus load predominantly in CD3+ lymphocyte had decreased perforin expression and cytotoxicity that were recovered in the convalescence period. However, there was neither significant difference of total virus load in these episodes nor candidate genetic mutations responsible for hereditary HLH. In conclusion, decreased perforin expression in the HLH episodes with predominant-CD3+ EBV virus load is distinct from those HMB episodes with predominant-NK EBV virus load. Whether the presence of non-elevated memory CD4+ cells or activated lymphocytes (CD2+HLADR+) increases the mortality rate in the HLH episodes remains to be further warranted through larger-scale studies.

  14. Undifferentiated carcinoma of the salivary gland in Greenlandic Eskimos: demonstration of Epstein-Barr virus DNA by in situ nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hamilton-Dutoit, S J; Therkildsen, M H; Neilsen, N H; Jensen, H; Hansen, J P; Pallesen, G

    1991-08-01

    Paraffin sections of 11 undifferentiated salivary gland carcinomas of lymphoepithelioma type (malignant lymphoepithelial lesion) arising in Greenlandic Eskimos (Inuit) were examined for the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) using in situ nucleic acid hybridization with a 35S-labeled EBV-specific probe. Epstein-Barr virus genomes were detected in each case in malignant epithelial cells, but were not found in lymphoid stroma or in residual benign salivary epithelium. Eight undifferentiated salivary gland carcinomas from non-Eskimo patients (including two with lymphoepithelioma-like features) were negative for EBV-DNA. Our results confirm the existence of a consistent and specific association between EBV and tumor cells of undifferentiated salivary gland carcinoma of lymphoepithelioma type arising in Greenlandic Eskimos.

  15. Effects of mTOR and calcineurin inhibitors combined therapy in Epstein-Barr virus positive and negative Burkitt lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wowro, Sylvia J; Schmitt, Katharina R L; Tong, Giang; Berger, Felix; Schubert, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a severe complication in solid organ transplant recipients, which is highly associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection in pediatric patients and occasionally presents as Burkitt- or Burkitt-like lymphoma. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been described as a possible antitumor target whose inhibition may influence lymphoma development and proliferation after pediatric transplantation. We treated Epstein-Barr virus positive (Raji and Daudi) and negative (Ramos) human Burkitt lymphoma derived cells with mTOR inhibitor everolimus alone and in combination with clinically relevant immunosuppressive calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus or cyclosporin A). Cell proliferation, toxicity, and mitochondrial metabolic activity were analyzed. The effect on mTOR Complex 1 downstream targets p70 S6 kinase, eukaryotic initiation factor 4G, and S6 ribosomal protein activation was also investigated. We observed that treatment with everolimus alone significantly decreased Burkitt lymphoma cell proliferation and mitochondrial metabolic activity. Everolimus in combination with cyclosporin A had a stronger suppressive effect in Epstein-Barr virus negative but not in Epstein-Barr virus positive cells. In contrast, tacrolimus completely abolished the everolimus-mediated suppressive effects. Moreover, we showed a significant decrease in activation of mTOR Complex 1 downstream targets after treatment with everolimus that was attenuated when combined with tacrolimus, but not with cyclosporin A. For the first time we showed the competitive effect between everolimus and tacrolimus when used as combination therapy on Burkitt lymphoma derived cells. Thus, according to our in vitro data, the combination of calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A with everolimus is preferred to the combination of tacrolimus and everolimus. PMID:26613512

  16. Human papilloma virus, herpes simplex virus and epstein barr virus in oral squamous cell carcinoma from eight different countries.

    PubMed

    Jalouli, Jamshid; Jalouli, Miranda M; Sapkota, Dipak; Ibrahim, Salah O; Larsson, Per-Anders; Sand, Lars

    2012-02-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a major health problem in many parts of the world, and the major causative agents are thought to be the use of alcohol and tobacco. Oncogenic viruses have also been suggested to be involved in OSCC development. This study investigated the prevalence of human papillomaviruses (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in 155 OSCC from eight different countries from different ethnic groups, continents and with different socioeconomic backgrounds. 41 A total of OSCCs were diagnosed in the tongue (26%) and 23 in the floor of the mouth (15%); the other 91 OSCCs were diagnosed in other locations (59%). The patients were also investigated regarding the use of alcohol and smoking and smokeless tobacco habits. Tissue samples were obtained from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of the OSCC. DNA was extracted and the viral genome was examined by single, nested and semi-nested PCR assays. Sequencing of double-stranded DNA from the PCR product was carried out. Following sequencing of the HPV-, HSV- and EBV-positive PCR products, 100% homology between the sampels was found. Of all the 155 OSCCs examined, 85 (55%) were positive for EBV, 54 (35%) for HPV and 24 (15%) for HSV. The highest prevalence of HPV was seen in Sudan (65%), while HSV (55%) and EBV (80%) were most prevalent in the UK. In 34% (52/155) of all the samples examined, co-infection by two (46/155=30%) or three (6/155=4%) virus specimens was detected. The most frequent double infection was HPV with EBV in 21% (32/155) of all OSCCs. There was a statistically significant higher proportion of samples with HSV (p=0.026) and EBV (p=0.015) in industrialized countries (Sweden, Norway, UK and USA) as compared to developing countries (Sudan, India, Sri Lanka and Yemen). Furthermore, there was a statistically significant higher co-infection of HSV and EBV in samples from industrialized countries (p=0.00031). No firm conclusions could be drawn regarding the

  17. Epstein-Barr virus-driven lymphomagenesis in the context of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Petrara, Maria R; Freguja, Riccardo; Gianesin, Ketty; Zanchetta, Marisa; De Rossi, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous human γ-herpes virus which establishes a life-long asymptomatic infection in immunocompetent hosts. In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected patients, the impaired immunosurveillance against EBV may favor the development of EBV-related diseases, ranging from lymphoproliferative disorders to B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has significantly modified the natural course of HIV-1 infection, resulting in decreased HIV-1 plasmaviremia, increased CD4 lymphocytes, and decreased opportunistic infections, indicating a restoration of immune functions. However, the impact of ART appears to be less favorable on EBV-related malignancies than on other AIDS-defining tumors, such as Kaposi's sarcoma, and NHL remains the most common cancer during the ART era. EBV-driven tumors are associated with selective expression of latent oncogenic proteins, but uncontrolled lytic cycle with virus replication and/or reactivation may favor cell transformation, at least in the early phases. Several host's factors may promote EBV reactivation and replication; besides immunodepression, inflammation/chronic immune stimulation may play an important role. Microbial pathogen-associated molecular patterns and endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns, through Toll-like receptors, activate the immune system and may promote EBV reactivation and/or polyclonal expansion of EBV-infected cells. A body of evidence suggests that chronic immune stimulation is a hallmark of HIV-1 pathogenesis and may persist even in ART-treated patients. This review focuses on lymphomagenesis driven by EBV both in the context of the natural history of HIV-1 infection and in ART-treated patients. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the expansion of EBV-infected cells is a premise for the identification of prognostic markers of EBV-associated malignancies. PMID:24151490

  18. Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Gastric Carcinoma: Use of Host Cell Machineries and Somatic Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Atsushi; Fukayama, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) is a distinct subtype of gastric carcinoma, consisting of clonal growth of EBV-infected epithelial cells. Its unique characteristics have been demonstrated by epidemiological, clinical and pathological studies using in situ hybridization for EBV-encoded small RNAs. An oncogenic process for EBVaGC has also been revealed. EBV uses various host-cell machineries, including cell division machinery to propagate clonal virus genomes, DNA-methylation machinery to epigenetically control infected cells, and microRNA and exosome machineries to modify the behavior and microenvironment of infected cells. Recent comprehensive molecular analyses from The Cancer Genome Atlas project demonstrate that EBVaGC is a representative molecular subtype that is distinct from microsatellite unstable, genomically stable and chromosome unstable subtypes. In addition to having the highest level of DNA methylation in CpG islands of promoter regions, EBVaGC harbors particular gene alterations, including a high frequency of mutations in PIK3CA and ARID1A, mutation in BCOR, and amplification of PD-L1 and PD-L2. Although currently undetermined, the virus might use the altered cellular functions that are induced by these somatic mutations. Further investigation of virus-driven oncogenesis will enable hitherto unknown functions of stomach epithelial cell machineries to be elucidated, which may reveal potential therapeutic targets for EBVaGC. PMID:26337667

  19. Detection of Active Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Duodenal Mucosa of Patients With Refractory Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, Vittorio; Baldanti, Fausto; Lenti, Marco Vincenzo; Vanoli, Alessandro; Biagi, Federico; Gatti, Marta; Riboni, Roberta; Dallera, Elena; Paulli, Marco; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2016-08-01

    Refractory celiac disease is characterized by mucosal damage in patients with celiac disease despite a gluten-free diet. Little is known about the mechanisms that cause persistent intestinal inflammation in these patients. We performed a case-control study of 17 consecutive patients diagnosed with refractory celiac disease from 2001 through 2014 (median age, 51 y; 10 women) and 24 patients with uncomplicated celiac disease (controls) to determine whether refractory disease is associated with infection by lymphotropic oncogenic viruses. We performed real-time PCR analyses of duodenal biopsy samples from all patients to detect Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus-8, and human T-cell lymphotropic virus-I, -II, or -III. We used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses to identify infected cells and viral proteins. We did not detect human herpesvirus-8 or human T-cell lymphotropic viruses in any of the biopsy specimens. However, 12 of 17 (70.5%) biopsy specimens from patients with refractory celiac disease were positive for EBV, compared with 4 of 24 (16.6%) biopsy specimens from controls (P < .001). EBV was detected in inflammatory cells and enterocytes. An analysis of latency- and replication-associated proteins confirmed active infection. Further studies are needed to determine whether EBV infection contributes to the pathogenesis of refractory celiac disease and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma.

  20. Immune Surveillance and Therapy of Lymphomas Driven by Epstein-Barr -Virus Protein LMP1 in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Baochun; Kracker, Sven; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Casola, Stefano; Vanneman, Matthew; Hömig-Hölzel, Cornelia; Wang, Zhe; Derudder, Emmanuel; Li, Shuang; Chakraborty, Tirtha; Cotter, Shane E.; Koyama, Shohei; Currie, Treeve; Freeman, Gordon J.; Kutok, Jeffery L.; Rodig, Scott J.; Dranoff, Glenn; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY B cells infected by Epstein-Barr-Virus (EBV), a transforming virus endemic in humans, are rapidly cleared by the immune system, but some cells harboring the virus persist for life. Under conditions of immunosuppression EBV can spread from these cells and cause life threatening pathologies. We have generated mice expressing the transforming EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), mimicking a constitutively active CD40 coreceptor, specifically in B cells. Like human EBV infected cells, LMP1+ B cells were efficiently eliminated by T cells, and breaking immune surveillance resulted in rapid, fatal lymphoproliferation and lymphomagenesis. The lymphoma cells expressed ligands for a natural killer (NK) cell receptor, NKG2D, and could be targeted by an NKG2D-Fc fusion protein. These experiments indicate a central role for LMP1 in the surveillance and transformation of EBV infected B cells in vivo, establish a pre-clinical model for B cell lymphomagenesis in immunosuppressed patients, and validate a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:22341446

  1. The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in T Cell and NK Cell Lymphomas: Time for a Reassessment

    PubMed Central

    Gru, A. A.; Haverkos, B. H.; Freud, A. G.; Hastings, J.; Nowacki, N. B.; Barrionuevo, C.; Vigil, C. E.; Rochford, R.; Natkunam, Y.; Baiocchi, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    While Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was initially discovered and characterized as an oncogenic virus in B cell neoplasms, it also plays a complex and multifaceted role in T/NK cell lymphomas. In B cell lymphomas, EBV-encoded proteins have been shown to directly promote immortalization and proliferation through stimulation of the NF-κB pathway and increased expression of anti-apoptotic genes. In the context of mature T/NK lymphomas (MTNKL), with the possible exception on extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma (ENKTL), the virus likely plays a more diverse and nuanced role. EBV has been shown to shape the tumor microenvironment by promoting Th2-skewed T cell responses and by increasing the expression of the immune checkpoint ligand PD-L1. The type of cell infected, the amount of plasma EBV DNA, and the degree of viral lytic replication have all been proposed to have prognostic value in T/NK cell lymphomas. Latency patterns of EBV infection have been defined using EBV-infected B cell models and have not been definitively established in T/NK cell lymphomas. Identifying the expression profile of EBV lytic proteins could allow for individualized therapy with the use of antiviral medications. More work needs to be done to determine whether EBV-associated MTNKL have distinct biological and clinical features, which can be leveraged for risk stratification, disease monitoring, and therapeutic purposes. PMID:26449716

  2. Host genetic variants and gene expression patterns associated with Epstein-Barr virus copy number in lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J; Petrova, Velislava; Liu, Jimmy Z; Frampton, Dan; Anderson, Carl A; Gall, Astrid; Kellam, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) are commonly used in molecular genetics, supplying DNA for the HapMap and 1000 Genomes Projects, used to test chemotherapeutic agents, and informing the basis of a number of population genetics studies of gene expression. The process of transforming human B cells into LCLs requires the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a double-stranded DNA virus which through B-cell immortalisation maintains an episomal virus genome in every cell of an LCL at variable copy numbers. Previous studies have reported that EBV alters host-gene expression and EBV copy number may be under host genetic control. We performed a genome-wide association study of EBV genome copy number in LCLs and found the phenotype to be highly heritable, although no individual SNPs achieved a significant association with EBV copy number. The expression of two host genes (CXCL16 and AGL) was positively correlated and expression of ADARB2 was negatively correlated with EBV copy number in a genotype-independent manner. This study shows an association between EBV copy number and the gene expression profile of LCLs, and suggests that EBV copy number should be considered as a covariate in future studies of host gene expression in LCLs.

  3. Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G; Sinclair, Alison J

    2015-04-20

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  4. High-resolution FISH of the entire integrated Epstein-Barr virus genome on extended human DNA.

    PubMed

    Lestou, V S; Strehl, S; Lion, T; Gadner, H; Ambros, P F

    1996-01-01

    Here we report a high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of the integrated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome in chromosomes, decondensed interphase nuclear chromatin, and linearly extended chromatin fibers. We analyzed the EBV DNA integrated into the human genome in the well-characterized Burkitt's lymphoma cell line Namalwa, which contains two complete EBV genomes. The integration occurs via the terminal repeats of the virus and was always detectable at chromosome band 1p35. Using the biotinylated BamHIW fragment of the viral DNA, we observed distinct pairs of signals or small nuclear RNA "tracks" within interphase nuclei. FISH to stretched DNA fibers has a higher resolving power and; therefore, enables analysis of the structural organization of DNA. Application of this methodology to linearly extended chromatin of Namalwa cells using different EBV fragments allowed us to visualize the ordered arrangement of the integrated virus. Based on the predicted span of 0.34 nm per base pair for relaxed DNA, length measurements of 30 images showed a good correlation between the mean physical length of hybridized EBV DNA of 52.8 microns (158 kb) without the terminal repeats, and the EBV genomic length of 172 kb, including the terminal repeats. This DNA mapping procedure represents a useful tool for studying the structural organization of integrated viral genomes, and its application will have implications for the understanding of integration processes. PMID:8941376

  5. Diabetes, Epstein-Barr virus and extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma in India: Unravelling the plausible nexus

    PubMed Central

    Spadigam, Anita; Dhupar, Anita; Syed, Shaheen; Saluja, Tajindra Singh

    2016-01-01

    The International Diabetes Federation Diabetes Atlas estimates a staggering 590 million people affected with diabetes mellitus (DM) within the next two decades globally, of which Type 2 DM will constitute more than 90%. The associated insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperglycemia pose a further significant risk for developing diverse malignant neoplasms. Diabetes and malignancy are multifactorial heterogeneous diseases. The immune dysfunction secondary to Type 2 diabetes also reactivates latent infections with high morbidity and mortality rates. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous human herpes virus-4, is an oncogenic virus; its recrudescence in the immunocompromised condition activates the expression of EBV latency genes, thus immortalizing the infected cell and giving rise to lymphomas and carcinomas. Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTCL), common in South-East Asia and Latin America; is a belligerent type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) almost invariably associated with EBV. An analysis of articles sourced from the PubMed database and Google Scholar web resource until February 2014, suggests an increasing incidence of NHL in Asia/India and of ENKTCL in India, over the last few decades. This article reviews the epidemiological evidence linking various neoplasms with Type 2 DM and prognosticates the emergence of ENKTCL as a common lymphoreticular malignancy secondary to Type 2 diabetes, in the Indian population in the next few decades. PMID:27051150

  6. Promiscuous trans activation of gene expression by an Epstein-Barr virus-encoded early nuclear protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, P M; O'Hare, P; Hayward, G S; Hayward, S D

    1986-01-01

    We identified an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) gene product which functions in transient-expression assays as a nonspecific trans activator. In Vero cells, cotransfection of the BglII J DNA fragment of EBV together with recombinant constructs containing the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene gave up to a 100-fold increased expression of CAT activity over that in cells transfected with the recombinant CAT constructs alone. The BglII J fragment acted promiscuously, in that increased CAT synthesis was observed regardless of whether the promoter sequences driving the CAT gene were of EBV, simian virus 40, adenovirus, or herpes simplex virus origin. Cleavage of cloned BglII-J plasmid DNA before transfection revealed that activation was dependent upon the presence of an intact BMLF1 open reading frame. This was confirmed with subclones of BglII-J and with hybrid promoter-open reading frame constructs. This region of the genome is also present in the rearranged P3HR-1-defective DNA species, and defective DNA clones containing these sequences produced a similar activation of CAT expression in cotransfection experiments. The heterogeneous 45-60-kilodalton polypeptide product of BMLF1 may play an important regulatory role in expression of lytic-cycle proteins in EBV-infected lymphocytes. Images PMID:3018281

  7. Epstein-Barr Virus BZLF1-Mediated Downregulation of Proinflammatory Factors Is Essential for Optimal Lytic Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuqing; Long, Xubing; Huang, Lu; Yang, Mengtian; Yuan, Yan; Wang, Yan; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Elevated secretion of inflammatory factors is associated with latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and the pathology of EBV-associated diseases; however, knowledge of the inflammatory response and its biological significance during the lytic EBV cycle remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the immediate early transcriptional activator BZLF1 suppresses the proinflammatory factor tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) by binding to the promoter of TNF-α and preventing NF-κB activation. A BZLF1Δ207-210 mutant with a deletion of 4 amino acids (aa) in the protein-protein binding domain was not able to inhibit the proinflammatory factors TNF-α and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and reduced viral DNA replication with complete transcriptional activity during EBV lytic gene expression. TNF-α depletion restored the viral replication mediated by BZLF1Δ207-210. Furthermore, a combination of TNF-α- and IFN-γ-neutralizing antibodies recovered BZLF1Δ207-210-mediated viral replication, indicating that BZLF1 attenuates the antiviral response to aid optimal lytic replication primarily through the inhibition of TNF-α and IFN-γ secretion during the lytic cycle. These results suggest that EBV BZLF1 attenuates the proinflammatory responses to facilitate viral replication. IMPORTANCE The proinflammatory response is an antiviral and anticancer strategy following the complex inflammatory phenotype. Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection strongly correlates with an elevated secretion of inflammatory factors in a variety of severe diseases, while the inflammatory responses during the lytic EBV cycle have not been established. Here, we demonstrate that BZLF1 acts as a transcriptional suppressor of the inflammatory factors TNF-α and IFN-γ and confirm that BZLF1-facilitated escape from the TNF-α and IFN-γ response during the EBV lytic life cycle is required for optimal viral replication. This finding implies that the EBV lytic cycle employs a distinct strategy to

  8. Epstein-Barr virus patterns in US Burkitt lymphoma tumors from the SEER residual tissue repository during 1979-2009.

    PubMed

    Mbulaiteye, Sam M; Pullarkat, Sheeja T; Nathwani, Bharat N; Weiss, Lawrence M; Rao, Nagesh; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Lynch, Charles F; Hernandez, Brenda; Neppalli, Vishala; Hawes, Debra; Cockburn, Myles G; Kim, Andre; Williams, Makeda; Altekruse, Sean; Bhatia, Kishor; Goodman, Marc T; Cozen, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) occurs at all ages, but the patterns of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positivity in relation to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), immunoprofiles and age have not been fully explored. BL tissues from residual tissue repositories, and two academic centers in the United States were examined by expert hematopathologists for morphology, immunohistochemistry, MYC rearrangement, EBV-encoded RNA (EBER), and diagnosed according to the 2008 WHO lymphoma classification. Analysis was done using frequency tables, Chi-squared statistics, and Student's t-test. Of 117 cases examined, 91 were confirmed as BL. The age distribution was 26%, 15%, 19%, and 29% for 0-19, 20-34, 35-59, 60+ years, and missing in 11%. MYC rearrangement was found in 89% and EBER positivity in 29% of 82 cases with results. EBER positivity varied with age (from 13% in age group 0-19 to 55% in age group 20-34, and fell to 25% in age group 60+ years, p = 0.08); with race (56% in Blacks/Hispanics vs 21% in Whites/Asians/Pacific Islanders, p = 0.006); and by HIV status (64% in HIV positive vs 22% in HIV negative cases, p = 0.03). EBER positivity was demonstrated in about one-third of tumors and it was strongly associated with race and HIV status, and marginally with age-group. PMID:23607450

  9. ERK/c-Jun Recruits Tet1 to Induce Zta Expression and Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation through DNA Demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Han, Dongjie; Wan, Pin; Pan, Pan; Cao, Yanhua; Liu, Yingle; Wu, Kailang; Wu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    DNA demethylation plays an essential role in the reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) from latency infection. However, it is unclear how epigenetic modification is initiated in responding to stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that ERK/c-Jun signaling is involved in DNA demethylation of EBV immediate early (IE) gene Zta in response to 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) stimulation. Remarkably, Ser73 phosphorylation of c-Jun facilitates Zta promoter demethylation and EBV reactivation, whereas knockdown of c-Jun attenuates Zta demethylation and viral reactivation. More importantly, we reveal for the first time that c-Jun interacts with DNA dioxygenase Tet1 and facilitates Tet1 to bind to Zta promoter. The binding of c-Jun and Tet1 to Zta enhances promoter demethylation, resulting in the activation of Zta, the stimulation of BHRF1 (a lytic early gene) and gp350/220 (a lytic late gene), and ultimately the reactivation of EBV. Knockdown of Tet1 attenuates TPA-induced Zta demethylation and EBV reactivation. Thus, TPA activates ERK/c-Jun signaling, which subsequently facilitates Tet1 to bind to Zta promoter, leading to DNA demethylation, gene expression, and EBV reactivation. This study reveals important roles of ERK/c-Jun signaling and Tet1 dioxygenase in epigenetic modification, and provides new insights into the mechanism underlying the regulation of virus latent and lytic infection. PMID:27708396

  10. Microtubule depolymerization activates the Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle through protein kinase C pathways in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Ru; Huang, Sheng-Yen; Chen, Jen-Yang; Wang, Lily Hui-Ching

    2013-12-01

    Elevated levels of antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and the presence of viral DNA in plasma are reliable biomarkers for the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in high-prevalence areas, such as South-East Asia. The presence of these viral markers in the circulation suggests that a minimal level of virus reactivation may have occurred in an infected individual, although the underlying mechanism of reactivation remains to be elucidated. Here, we showed that treatment with nocodazole, which provokes the depolymerization of microtubules, induces the expression of two EBV lytic cycle proteins, Zta and EA-D, in EBV-positive NPC cells. This effect was independent of mitotic arrest, as viral reactivation was not abolished in cells synchronized at interphase. Notably, the induction of Zta by nocodazole was mediated by transcriptional upregulation via protein kinase C (PKC). Pre-treatment with inhibitors for PKC or its downstream signalling partners p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) abolished the nocodazole-mediated induction of Zta and EA-D. Interestingly, the effect of nocodazole, as well as colchicine and vinblastine, on lytic gene expression occurred only in NPC epithelial cells but not in cells derived from lymphocytes. These results establish a novel role of microtubule integrity in controlling the EBV life cycle through PKC and its downstream pathways, which represents a tissue-specific mechanism for controlling the life-cycle switch of EBV. PMID:24062531

  11. Repression of CIITA by the Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor Zta is independent of its dimerization and DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Balan, Nicolae; Osborn, Kay; Sinclair, Alison J

    2016-03-01

    Repression of the cellular CIITA gene is part of the immune evasion strategy of the γherpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) during its lytic replication cycle in B-cells. In part, this is mediated through downregulation of MHC class II gene expression via the targeted repression of CIITA, the cellular master regulator of MHC class II gene expression. This repression is achieved through a reduction in CIITA promoter activity, initiated by the EBV transcription and replication factor, Zta (BZLF1, EB1, ZEBRA). Zta is the earliest gene expressed during the lytic replication cycle. Zta interacts with sequence-specific elements in promoters, enhancers and the replication origin (ZREs), and also modulates gene expression through interaction with cellular transcription factors and co-activators. Here, we explore the requirements for Zta-mediated repression of the CIITA promoter. We find that repression by Zta is specific for the CIITA promoter and can be achieved in the absence of other EBV genes. Surprisingly, we find that the dimerization region of Zta is not required to mediate repression. This contrasts with an obligate requirement of this region to correctly orientate the DNA contact regions of Zta to mediate activation of gene expression through ZREs. Additional support for the model that Zta represses the CIITA promoter without direct DNA binding comes from promoter mapping that shows that repression does not require the presence of a ZRE in the CIITA promoter. PMID:26653871

  12. Regulation of Autophagic Activation by Rta of Epstein-Barr Virus via the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lee-Wen; Wang, Wen-Hung; Chang, Pey-Jium; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Hung, Chen-Chia; Lin, Ying-Ju; Liou, Jieh-Yuan; Tsai, Wan-Ju; Hung, Chia-Ling

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is an intracellular degradation pathway that provides a host defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens. However, many viruses exploit this mechanism to promote their replication. This study shows that lytic induction of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) increases the membrane-bound form of LC3 (LC3-II) and LC3-containing punctate structures in EBV-positive cells. Transfecting 293T cells with a plasmid that expresses Rta also induces autophagy, revealing that Rta is responsible for autophagic activation. The activation involves Atg5, a key component of autophagy, but not the mTOR pathway. The expression of Rta also activates the transcription of the genes that participate in the formation of autophagosomes, including LC3A, LC3B, and ATG9B genes, as well as those that are involved in the regulation of autophagy, including the genes TNF, IRGM, and TRAIL. Additionally, treatment with U0126 inhibits the Rta-induced autophagy and the expression of autophagy genes, indicating that the autophagic activation is caused by the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling by Rta. Finally, the inhibition of autophagic activity by an autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine, or Atg5 small interfering RNA, reduces the expression of EBV lytic proteins and the production of viral particles, revealing that autophagy is critical to EBV lytic progression. This investigation reveals how an EBV-encoded transcription factor promotes autophagy to affect viral lytic development. PMID:25122800

  13. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus in children and adolescents with Burkitt's lymphoma by in situ hybridization using tissue microarrays.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Maria; Bruniera, Paula; Luporini, Silvia Maria; Marcelino da Silva, Helena Reis; Borsato, Maria Luisa; de Castro, Helaine Cristina; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Paes, Roberto Antoônio Pinto

    2008-04-01

    In this retrospective study, we evaluated 53 patients diagnosed with Burkitt's lymphoma (BL). Patients were admitted to the Pediatric Department of Santa Casa de São Paulo, Brazil from August 1988 to September 2006. The male gender was found more frequently in the proportion of three males to one female. At the time of the diagnosis, the mean age was 6 years. The most frequent clinical presentation was abdominal (extra nodal) in 42 (79.2%) cases. The patients were treated with chemotherapy using two different treatment methods, 30 cases until September 1994 with BGLTI -87 and the other 23 until September of 2006 with BGLTI -96. According to Murphy's classification, 90.2% of the patients were diagnosed as stages III and VI showing an advanced disease at time of diagnosis. Using Tissue Microarrays (TMA); we searched for the expression of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) RNA in 50 patients. The presence of EBV using in situ hybridization was found in 33/50 (66%) and there was no association between the presence of the virus in the tumor cells or patient age, as well as the survival rate. There was 74.5% global survival rate until September, 2005 of 12 years and 8 months. The disease free survival rate was 86.5%. The frequency of the EBV association with this neoplasia in Brazil is intermediate between the endemic and sporadic forms of disease.

  14. Viral interleukin 10 is critical for the induction of B cell growth transformation by Epstein-Barr virus

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have used an efficient cDNA subtraction library procedure to identify newly induced genes in human B lymphocytes infected for 6 h with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Among the genes identified by automated sequencing of a random subset of clones from this library, one coded the EBV BCRF1 open reading frame, which specifies the viral interleukin 10 gene (vIL-10). This molecule is highly homologous to human (h)IL-10 and was previously thought to represent a "late" viral gene expressed only during the lytic phase of virus replication. Using gene amplification by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction of B cell RNA obtained at varying times after infection, we detected vIL-10 expression within a few hours of EBV infection, followed, 20-30 h later by expression of hIL-10. Expression of both genes continued beyond the initial transformation phase (5-10 d) and was present in all transformed cell lines tested. When added at the time of viral infection, antisense (but not sense) oligonucleotides for vIL-10 mRNA (cytosolic half-life, approximately 6 h) prevented subsequent B cell transformation. The antisense effect was highly specific, leaving the expression levels of other transformation-related genes intact. Addition of exogenous (h)IL-10 rescued the transformation process in antisense-treated cells. Our observations establish vIL-10 as a new latency gene with a directly transformation-prerequisite function. PMID:8393476

  15. Analysis of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA 1 expression in benign lymphoepithelial salivary gland lesions.

    PubMed

    DiGiuseppe, J A; Wu, T C; Corio, R L

    1994-06-01

    Salivary gland enlargement resulting from benign lymphoepithelial lesions may be seen in patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and in the early stages of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although the pathogenesis of these lesions is thought to differ in SS and HIV infection, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been suggested as a pathogenetic agent in both cases. We have assessed the presence of latent EBV infection in a series of 15 lymphoepithelial salivary gland lesions using RNA-RNA in situ hybridization with digoxigenin-labeled riboprobes complementary to the abundantly-expressed EBV-encoded small RNA 1 (EBER1). Two of four benign lymphoepithelial lesions (BLEL) from patients seropositive for HIV expressed EBER1 in lymphocyte nuclei in a fashion similar to that described previously in HIV-associated persistent generalized lymphadenopathy (PGL). By contrast, EBER1 was not expressed in any of four BLEL from patients with SS, or seven lymphoepithelial cysts (LEC) and BLEL from patients with neither HIV infection nor SS. These data suggest that latent EBV infection does not play a major pathogenetic role in the lymphoepithelial salivary gland lesions associated with SS or those seen in patients without systemic disease. In the case of HIV-associated salivary gland lesions, the data are consistent with earlier proposals that these BLEL result from the involvement of intraparotid lymph nodes by PGL.

  16. Specific association of Epstein-Barr virus with lymphoepithelial carcinoma among tumors and tumorlike lesions of the salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Chan, J K; Yip, T T; Tsang, W Y; Poon, Y F; Wong, C S; Ma, V W

    1994-10-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded RNAs in situ localization procedure is a convenient, highly sensitive, and highly specific technique that is applicable to routinely fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections; this technique can be used for the study of the association and, hence, the possible causal role of EBV in tumors. This study was performed to elucidate whether EBV plays a role in the pathogenesis of tumors that arise in the salivary glands, since the salivary gland is known to be a reservoir for EBV replication. Cases that were selected included 61 examples of various benign and malignant neoplasms, as well as tumorlike conditions of the major and minor salivary glands. Only the five cases of lymphoepithelial carcinoma (so-called malignant lymphoepithelial lesion) and the single case of metastatic nasopharyngeal undifferentiated carcinoma showed staining with EBV-encoded RNAs, whereas negative findings were found in all of the other cases. In the cases with positive results, all of the neoplastic epithelial cells showed strong nuclear signals, but the lymphoid cells were negative. The consistent association of EBV with lymphoepithelial carcinoma of the salivary gland suggests that the virus probably plays a causal role in this tumor, at least in the Asian population, whereas there is no evidence for a causal role of EBV in other primary tumors of the salivary gland.

  17. Luteolin inhibits Epstein-Barr virus lytic reactivation by repressing the promoter activities of immediate-early genes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Chun; Fang, Chih-Yeu; Hsu, Hui-Yu; Chen, Yen-Ju; Chou, Sheng-Ping; Huang, Sheng-Yen; Cheng, Yu-Jhen; Lin, Su-Fang; Chang, Yao; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Chen, Jen-Yang

    2016-08-01

    The lytic reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been reported to be strongly associated with several human diseases, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Inhibition of the EBV lytic cycle has been shown to be of great benefit in the treatment of EBV-associated diseases. The administration of dietary compounds is safer and more convenient than other approaches to preventing EBV reactivation. We screened several dietary compounds for their ability to inhibit EBV reactivation in NPC cells. Among them, the flavonoid luteolin showed significant inhibition of EBV reactivation. Luteolin inhibited protein expression from EBV lytic genes in EBV-positive epithelial and B cell lines. It also reduced the numbers of EBV-reactivating cells detected by immunofluorescence analysis and reduced the production of virion. Furthermore, luteolin reduced the activities of the promoters of the immediate-early genes Zta (Zp) and Rta (Rp) and also inhibited Sp1-luc activity, suggesting that disruption of Sp1 binding is involved in the inhibitory mechanism. CHIP analysis revealed that luteolin suppressed the activities of Zp and Rp by deregulating Sp1 binding. Taken together, luteolin inhibits EBV reactivation by repressing the promoter activities of Zp and Rp, suggesting luteolin is a potential dietary compound for prevention of virus infection.

  18. Microtubule depolymerization activates the Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle through protein kinase C pathways in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Ru; Huang, Sheng-Yen; Chen, Jen-Yang; Wang, Lily Hui-Ching

    2013-12-01

    Elevated levels of antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and the presence of viral DNA in plasma are reliable biomarkers for the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in high-prevalence areas, such as South-East Asia. The presence of these viral markers in the circulation suggests that a minimal level of virus reactivation may have occurred in an infected individual, although the underlying mechanism of reactivation remains to be elucidated. Here, we showed that treatment with nocodazole, which provokes the depolymerization of microtubules, induces the expression of two EBV lytic cycle proteins, Zta and EA-D, in EBV-positive NPC cells. This effect was independent of mitotic arrest, as viral reactivation was not abolished in cells synchronized at interphase. Notably, the induction of Zta by nocodazole was mediated by transcriptional upregulation via protein kinase C (PKC). Pre-treatment with inhibitors for PKC or its downstream signalling partners p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) abolished the nocodazole-mediated induction of Zta and EA-D. Interestingly, the effect of nocodazole, as well as colchicine and vinblastine, on lytic gene expression occurred only in NPC epithelial cells but not in cells derived from lymphocytes. These results establish a novel role of microtubule integrity in controlling the EBV life cycle through PKC and its downstream pathways, which represents a tissue-specific mechanism for controlling the life-cycle switch of EBV.

  19. Epstein-Barr virus and human immunodeficiency virus serological responses and viral burdens in HIV-infected patients treated with HAART

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Sullivan, Cathal E.; Peng, RongSheng; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Sturgeon, Timothy; Jenson, Hal B.; Ling, Paul D.; Butel, J. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma is recognized as a complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Little is known regarding the influence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the biology of EBV in this population. To characterize the EBV- and HIV-specific serological responses together with EBV DNA levels in a cohort of HIV-infected adults treated with HAART, a study was conducted to compare EBV and HIV serologies and EBV DNA copy number (DNAemia) over a 12-month period after the commencement of HAART. All patients were seropositive for EBV at baseline. Approximately 50% of patients had detectable EBV DNA at baseline, and 27/30 had detectable EBV DNA at some point over the follow-up period of 1 year. Changes in EBV DNA copy number over time for any individual were unpredictable. Significant increases in the levels of Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA) and Epstein-Barr early antigen (EA) antibodies were demonstrated in the 17 patients who had a good response to HAART. Of 29 patients with paired samples tested, four-fold or greater increases in titers were detected for EA in 12/29 (41%), for EBNA in 7/29 (24%), for VCA-IgG in 4/29 (14%); four-fold decreases in titers were detected in 2/29 (7%) for EA and 12/29 (41%) for EBNA. A significant decline in the titer of anti-HIV antibodies was also demonstrated. It was concluded that patients with advanced HIV infection who respond to HAART have an increase in their EBV specific antibodies and a decrease in their HIV-specific antibodies. For the cohort overall, there was a transient increase in EBV DNA levels that had declined by 12 months. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Host shutoff during productive Epstein-Barr virus infection is mediated by BGLF5 and may contribute to immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Martin; Glaunsinger, Britt; van Leeuwen, Daphne; Zuo, Jianmin; Sweetman, David; Ganem, Don; Middeldorp, Jaap; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Ressing, Maaike E

    2007-02-27

    Relatively little is known about immune evasion during the productive phase of infection by the gamma(1)-herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The use of a unique system to isolate cells in lytic cycle allowed us to identify a host shutoff function operating in productively EBV-infected B cells. This impairment of protein synthesis results from mRNA degradation induced upon expression of the early lytic-cycle gene product BGLF5. Recently, a gamma(2)-herpesvirus, Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus, has also been shown to encode a host shutoff function, indicating that host shutoff appears to be a general feature of gamma-herpesviruses. One of the consequences of host shutoff is a block in the synthesis of HLA class I and II molecules, reflected by reduced levels of these antigen-presenting complexes at the surface of cells in EBV lytic cycle. This effect could lead to escape from T cell recognition and elimination of EBV-producing cells, thereby allowing generation of viral progeny in the face of memory T cell responses.

  1. Treatment options for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder and other Epstein-Barr virus-associated malignancies.

    PubMed

    Davis, J E; Moss, D J

    2004-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a range of malignancies that largely arise from a defect in EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immunity and function. Much work has focused on the reconstitution of CTL immunity to EBV in transplant patients, in whom immunosuppression modalities render them susceptible to post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD). Adoptive transfer of autologous CTLs is effective at both preventing and curing PTLD in solid organ transplant recipients and can produce a long-term memory response and protection against recurring disease. In this review, the benefits and restrictions of administering EBV-specific CTLs for the treatment of PTLD are discussed and compared with emerging therapies including the generation of allogeneic human leukocyte antigen-matched CTL banks and the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy, MabThera. Furthermore, studies involving other EBV-associated disorders have described the potential benefit of adoptive transfer of EBV-specific CTLs for Hodgkin's disease, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, chronic active EBV infection, and Burkitt's lymphoma. The challenges of tailor-making therapies for individual diseases and EBV antigen expression latencies are highlighted, in addition to considering vaccination strategies for optimal treatment. PMID:15009802

  2. Targeting Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B lymphoblastoid cells using antibodies with T-cell receptor-like specificities.

    PubMed

    Lai, Junyun; Tan, Wei Jian; Too, Chien Tei; Choo, Joanna Ai Ling; Wong, Lan Hiong; Mustafa, Fatimah Bte; Srinivasan, Nalini; Lim, Angeline Pei Chiew; Zhong, Youjia; Gascoigne, Nicholas R J; Hanson, Brendon J; Chan, Soh Ha; Chen, Jianzhu; MacAry, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncovirus associated with several human malignancies including posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease in immunosuppressed patients. We show here that anti-EBV T-cell receptor-like monoclonal antibodies (TCR-like mAbs) E1, L1, and L2 bound to their respective HLA-A*0201-restricted EBV peptides EBNA1562-570, LMP1125-133, and LMP2A426-434 with high affinities and specificities. These mAbs recognized endogenously presented targets on EBV B lymphoblastoid cell lines (BLCLs), but not peripheral blood mononuclear cells, from which they were derived. Furthermore, these mAbs displayed similar binding activities on several BLCLs, despite inherent heterogeneity between different donor samples. A single weekly administration of the naked mAbs reduced splenomegaly, liver tumor spots, and tumor burden in BLCL-engrafted immunodeficient NOD-SCID/Il2rg(-/-) mice. In particular, mice that were treated with the E1 mAb displayed a delayed weight loss and significantly prolonged survival. In vitro, these TCR-like mAbs induced early apoptosis of BLCLs, thereby enhancing their Fc-dependent phagocytic uptake by macrophages. These data provide evidence for TCR-like mAbs as potential therapeutic modalities to target EBV-associated diseases. PMID:27338099

  3. Characterization of the restricted component of Epstein-Barr virus early antigens as a cytoplasmic filamentous protein.

    PubMed Central

    Luka, J; Miller, G; Jörnvall, H; Pearson, G R

    1986-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies produced against the restricted component of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) early antigen (EA-R) precipitated a polypeptide with an approximate molecular weight of 85,000. Three of these antibodies prepared against the native 85,000-molecular-weight protein (85K protein) reacted by immunofluorescence with acetone-fixed smears but not methanol-fixed smears of EBV-producing cells activated with tumor-promoting agent and sodium butyrate. The fourth monoclonal antibody which was produced against the denatured 85K protein reacted with both acetone-fixed cells and methanol-fixed cells. Blocking of direct immunofluorescence by the different monoclonal antibodies established that these monoclonal antibodies were directed against three different epitopes expressed on the 85K protein. The cytoplasmic staining pattern produced by each antibody was granular during the first 24 to 28 h after induction, developed into filamentous structures about 36 h after induction, and then began to aggregate after 48 h. Similar structures were observed in human placental cells transfected by EBV DNA and stained with three of the monoclonal antibodies. These results suggest that the EA-R polypeptide is assembled into filaments during the EBV lytic cycle. The significance of this in regards to replication has yet to be determined. Biochemical characterization of this major EA-R component did not reveal any major differences in this protein isolated from different cell lines. Images PMID:2422401

  4. Inflammation and Epstein-Barr Virus Infection Are Common Features of Myasthenia Gravis Thymus: Possible Roles in Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, Paola; Maggi, Lorenzo; Colleoni, Lara; Caldara, Rosa; Motta, Teresio; Giardina, Carmelo; Antozzi, Carlo; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato

    2011-01-01

    The thymus plays a major role in myasthenia gravis (MG). Our recent finding of a persistent Epstein-Barr (EBV) virus infection in some MG thymuses, combined with data showing that the thymus is in a proinflammatory state in most patients, supports a viral contribution to the pathogenesis of MG. Aim of this study was to gain further evidence for intrathymic chronic inflammation and EBV infection in MG patients. Transcriptional profiling by low density array and real-time PCR showed overexpression of genes involved in inflammatory and immune response in MG thymuses. Real-time PCR for EBV genome, latent (EBER1, EBNA1, LMP1) and lytic (BZLF1) transcripts, and immunohistochemistry for LMP1 and BZLF1 proteins confirmed an active intrathymic EBV infection, further supporting the hypothesis that EBV might contribute to onset or perpetuation of the autoimmune response in MG. Altogether, our results support a role of inflammation and EBV infection as pathogenic features of MG thymus. PMID:21961056

  5. Cell surface phenotyping and cytokine production of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs).

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Joanne M; Copple, Angela; Batson, Lydia P; Landers, Cheri D; Yannelli, John R

    2002-06-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (EBV-LCLs) are routinely used for the in vitro expansion of T cells. However, these cell lines are reported to produce the cytokine IL-10, which is inhibitory for T cells. We, therefore, characterized a panel of 37 EBV-LCLs for a variety of cell surface markers, for secretion of various cytokines including IL-10 and for immunoglobulin production. These cell lines were derived from normal donors or patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer, acute myelogenous leukemia, melanoma or colon cancer. Overall, 26 lines were positive for CD19 and CD20, and 11 were negative for both. All of the lines were strongly HLA-DR+, while CD40 expression was variable. Twenty-four (65%) were both CD23+ and secreted immunoglobulin, and 33 expressed kappa and/or lambda light chains. Additionally, all of the EBV-LCLs were negative for T cell (CD3), NK cell (CD16, CD56), monocyte (CD14) and granulocyte (CD66b) surface markers. Some level of IL-10, IL-6, IL-12p40 and TNF-alpha cytokine production was detected in 33, 18, 19 and 12 EBV-LCLs, respectively. Together, these data reflect the heterogeneity of EBV-LCLs, which cautions their use nondiscriminately in various immunologic assays.

  6. Identification and Characterization of Epstein-Barr Virus Genomes in Lung Carcinoma Biopsy Samples by Next-Generation Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanshan; Xiong, Hongchao; Yan, Shi; Wu, Nan; Lu, Zheming

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been detected in the tumor cells of several cancers, including some cases of lung carcinoma (LC). However, the genomic characteristics and diversity of EBV strains associated with LC are poorly understood. In this study, we sequenced the EBV genomes isolated from four primary LC tumor biopsy samples, designated LC1 to LC4. Comparative analysis demonstrated that LC strains were more closely related to GD1 strain. Compared to GD1 reference genome, a total of 520 variations in all, including 498 substitutions, 12 insertions, and 10 deletions were found. Latent genes were found to harbor the most numbers of nonsynonymous mutations. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all LC strains were closely related to Asian EBV strains, whereas different from African/American strains. LC2 genome was distinct from the other three LC genomes, suggesting at least two parental lineages of EBV among the LC genomes may exist. All LC strains could be classified as China 1 and V-val subtype according to the amino acid sequence of LMP1 and EBNA1, respectively. In conclusion, our results showed the genomic diversity among EBV genomes isolated from LC, which might facilitate to uncover the previously unknown variations of pathogenic significance. PMID:27189712

  7. NF-kappaB inhibitors induce lytic cytotoxicity in Epstein-Barr virus-positive nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su-Fang; Wang, Hai; Lin, Xu-Chi; Xiang, Hui; Deng, Xi-Yun; Li, Wei; Tang, Min; Cao, Ya

    2008-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in tumor cells is generally restricted to the latent forms of viral infection. Switching the latent form of viral infection into the lytic form may induce tumor cell death. An important nuclear factor, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, is thought to play an essential role in EBV lytic infection; high levels of NF-kappaB can inhibit EBV lytic replication. In this study, we tested the effect of inducing EBV lytic replication using two NF-kappaB inhibitors: Bay11-7082 and Z-LLF-CHO, to reveal the possibility of targeting EBV-positive cancer therapy with these two NF-kappaB inhibitors. Our results showed that Bay11-7082 and Z-LLF-CHO reactivated EBV in a dose-dependent manner, thus resulting in EBV-positive 5-8F cell death. In contrast, there was no significant effect on EBV-negative HNE3 cells. When ganciclovir was used in combination with either Bay11-7082 or Z-LLF-CHO to treat 5-8F cells, the cytotoxic effect of the NF-kappaB inhibitor was amplified. The finding indicates that inhibiting the NF-kappaB activity of EBV-positive cells can induce lytic replication of EBV and cause lytic cytotoxicity against these cells.

  8. MCAF1 and synergistic activation of the transcription of Epstein-Barr virus lytic genes by Rta and Zta.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Kwan; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2010-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) expresses two transcription factors, Rta and Zta, during the immediate-early stage of the lytic cycle. The two proteins often collaborate to activate the transcription of EBV lytic genes synergistically. This study demonstrates that Rta and Zta form a complex via an intermediary protein, MCAF1, on Zta response element (ZRE) in vitro. The interaction among these three proteins in P3HR1 cells is also verified via coimmunoprecipitation, CHIP analysis and confocal microscopy. The interaction between Rta and Zta in vitro depends on the region between amino acid 562 and 816 in MCAF1. In addition, overexpressing MCAF1 enhances and introducing MCAF1 siRNA into the cells markedly reduces the level of the synergistic activation in 293T cells. Moreover, the fact that the synergistic activation depends on ZRE but not on Rta response element (RRE) originates from the fact that Rta and Zta are capable of activating the BMRF1 promoter synergistically after an RRE but not ZREs in the promoter are mutated. The binding of Rta-MCAF1-Zta complex to ZRE but not RRE also explains why Rta and Zta do not use RRE to activate transcription synergistically. Importantly, this study elucidates the mechanism underlying synergistic activation, which is important to the lytic development of EBV. PMID:20385599

  9. Chlorpyrifos Induces the Expression of the Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Cycle Activator BZLF-1 via Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling; Xie, Fei; Wang, Ting-ting; Liu, Meng-yu; Li, Jia-la; Shang, Lei; Deng, Zi-xuan; Zhao, Peng-xiang; Ma, Xue-mei

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are among the most widely used synthetic chemicals for the control of a wide variety of pests, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by OPs may be involved in the toxicity of various pesticides. Previous studies have demonstrated that a reactivation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) could be induced by oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether OPs could reactivate EBV through ROS accumulation. The Raji cells were treated with chlorpyrifos (CPF), one of the most commonly used OPs. Oxidative stress indicators and the expression of the EBV immediate-early gene BZLF-1 were determined after CPF treatment. Our results show that CPF induces oxidative stress as evidenced by decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level, accompanied by an increase in ROS production, DNA damage, glutathione (GSH) level, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity. Moreover, CPF treatment significantly enhances the expression of BZLF-1, and the increased BZLF-1 expression was ameliorated by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) incubation. These results suggest that OPs could contribute to the reactivation of the EBV lytic cycle through ROS induction, a process that may play an important role in the development of EBV-associated diseases. PMID:26257840

  10. Host-cell-determined methylation of specific Epstein-Barr virus promoters regulates the choice between distinct viral latency programs.

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, B C; Strominger, J L; Speck, S H

    1997-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is capable of adopting three distinct forms of latency: the type III latency program, in which six EBV-encoded nuclear antigens (EBNAs) are expressed, and the type I and type II latency programs, in which only a single viral nuclear protein, EBNA1, is produced. Several groups have reported heavy CpG methylation of the EBV genome in Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines which maintain type I latency, and loss of viral genome methylation in tumor cell lines has been correlated with a switch to type III latency. Here, evidence that the type III latency program must be inactivated by methylation to allow EBV to enter the type I or type II restricted latency program is provided. The data demonstrates that the EBNA1 gene promoter, Qp, active in types I and II latency, is encompassed by a CpG island which is protected from methylation. CpG methylation inactivates the type III latency program and consequently allows the type I or II latency program to operate by alleviating EBNA1-mediated repression of Qp. Methylation of the type III latency EBNA gene promoter, Cp, appears to be essential to prevent type III latency, since EBNA1 is expressed in all latently infected cells and, as shown here, is the only viral antigen required for activation of Cp. EBV is thus a pathogen which subverts host-cell-determined methylation to regulate distinct genetic programs. PMID:8972217

  11. Repression by RAZ of Epstein-Barr virus bZIP transcription factor EB1 is dimerization independent.

    PubMed

    Segouffin, C; Gruffat, H; Sergeant, A

    1996-07-01

    The hallmark of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is the establishment of a viral genome transcription pattern called latency. The EBV BZLF1 gene product EB1 (also known as ZEBRA or Zta) is a transcription factor which is essential for the switch from latency to the lytic cycle. It has been proposed that latency is maintained (i) by the inhibition of EB1 translation via antisense hybridization of EBNA1 and EB1 hnRNAs, or (ii) by the inactivation of the EB1 activating function via the direct interaction of EB1 with RelA, the retinoic acid receptor and p53, or via the titration of EB1 in RAZ:EB1 inactive heterodimers that are unable to bind to DNA. RAZ, a fusion protein which contains the EB1 C-terminal dimerization and DNA-binding domains fused to the N-terminal 86 amino acids of the EBV BRLF1 gene product R, has been described as a trans-dominant negative regulator of EB1-activated transcription. We demonstrate here that although RAZ efficiently represses EB1-mediated transcriptional activation, the amount of RAZ protein expressed is incompatible with repression through the titration of EB1 in inactive EB1:RAZ heterodimers. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that RAZ efficiently represses transcription activated by an EB1 mutant carrying the GCN4 homodimerization domain (EB1 gcn4), despite the inability of RAZ and EB1 gcn4 to form stable heterodimers.

  12. Epstein Barr Virus and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis peptides are recognized in sera and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients

    PubMed Central

    Mameli, Giuseppe; Cocco, Eleonora; Frau, Jessica; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Sechi, Leonardo Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) epitopes elicit a consistent humoral response in serum of multiple sclerosis patients, but the cross reactivity against the homologous myelin basic protein (MBP) and human interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has not been searched within the Cerebral Spinal Fluid (CSF). We evaluated in sera and CSF of patients with MS and with other neurological diseases (OND) the humoral response against EBV/MAP peptides and the IRF5/MBP. Our data showed that EBV and MAP peptides are able to induce a specific humoral immune response in MS patients compared to OND controls both in serum and in CSF. An intrathecal specific synthesis of IgG against MBP and their EBV and MAP homologous as indicated by the antibody index was observed in MS patients. The humoral response against EBV, MAP, MBP and IRF5 was significantly higher in MS patients compared to OND both in serum and in CSF. The higher presence of antibodies against MBP and their MAP and EBV homologous in CSF during relapses suggests a possible role of the pathogens in enhancing inflammation. PMID:26956729

  13. Chronic Physical Stress Does Not Interact with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-Encoded Dutpase to Alter the Sickness Response

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Zachary M.; Abi Salloum, Bachir; Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Williams, Marshall; Reader, Brenda; Glaser, Ronald; Sheridan, John; Nelson, Randy J.

    2016-01-01

    Most adult humans have been infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which is thought to contribute to the development of chronic fatigue syndrome. Stress is known to influence the immune system and can exacerbate the sickness response. Although a role for psychological stress in the sickness response, particularly in combination with EBV-encoded deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) has been established, and the role of physical stressors in these interactions remains unspecified. In this study, we seek to determine the interaction of chronic physical (swim) stress and EBV-encoded dUTPase injection. We hypothesize that a chronic physical stressor will exacerbate the sickness response following EBV-encoded dUTPase injection. To test this hypothesis mice receive daily injections of EBV-encoded dUTPase or vehicle and are subjected to 15 min of swim stress each day for 14 days or left unmanipulated. On the final evening of injections mice undergo behavioral testing. EBV-encoded dUTPase injection alone produces some sickness behaviors. The physical swimming stress does not alter the sickness response. PMID:27175311

  14. The long-lasting love affair between the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Lista, María José; Voisset, Cécile; Contesse, Marie-Astrid; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Daskalogianni, Chrysoula; Bihel, Frédéric; Fåhraeus, Robin; Blondel, Marc

    2015-09-01

    The Epstein-Barr gammaherpesvirus (EBV) is the first oncogenic virus discovered in human. Indeed, EBV has been known for more than 50 years to be tightly associated with certain human cancers. As such, EBV has been the subject of extensive studies aiming at deciphering various aspects of its biological cycle, ranging from the regulation of its genome replication and maintenance to the induction of its lytic cycle, including the mechanisms that allow its immune evasion or that are related to its tumorogenicity. For more than 30 years the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has fruitfully contributed to a number of these studies. The aim of this article is to review the various aspects of EBV biology for which yeast has been instrumental, and to propose new possible applications for these yeast-based assays, as well as the creation of further yeast models dedicated to EBV. This review article illustrates the tremendous potential of S. cerevisiae in integrated chemobiological approaches for the biomedical research.

  15. Age-related Epstein-Barr Virus-positive lymphoproliferative disorders of the orbit and maxillary sinus : a case report.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takeki; Mawatari, Momoko; Koiso, Hiromi; Yokohama, Akihiko; Uchiumi, Hideki; Saitoh, Takayuki; Handa, Hiroshi; Hirato, Junko; Karasawa, Masamitsu; Murakami, Hirokazu; Kojima, Masaru; Nakamura, Shigeo; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Tsukamoto, Norifumi

    2012-01-01

    We report a rare case of age-related Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (aEBVBLPD) primarily involving the orbit and maxillary sinus. Lesions in the left orbit and maxillary sinus were observed in a 59-year-old man presenting with pain in the left orbit and maxilla. Owing to the presence of Reed-Sternberg-like cells, the initial diagnosis was nodular sclerosis-type Hodgkin's lymphoma. Clinical stage was IIAE, and response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy was favorable. Further immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization analyses of the Reed-Sternberg-like giant cells revealed CD30, CD15, CD20, Bob-1, Oct-2, EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs) and latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) expression. The characteristics of the present case, which included immunohistochemical findings, sites of primary lesions, absence of other lymph node lesions and relatively old age, suggested aEBVBLPD. Owing to the similarity in morphology, higher frequency at extranodal sites and poor prognosis, aEBVBLPD represents a differential diagnostic issue from classical Hodgkin's lymphoma when Reed-Sternberg cells are positive for EBV.

  16. Genome-wide analyses of Epstein-Barr virus reveal conserved RNA structures and a novel stable intronic sequence RNA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpesvirus implicated in cancer and autoimmune disorders. Little is known concerning the roles of RNA structure in this important human pathogen. This study provides the first comprehensive genome-wide survey of RNA and RNA structure in EBV. Results Novel EBV RNAs and RNA structures were identified by computational modeling and RNA-Seq analyses of EBV. Scans of the genomic sequences of four EBV strains (EBV-1, EBV-2, GD1, and GD2) and of the closely related Macacine herpesvirus 4 using the RNAz program discovered 265 regions with high probability of forming conserved RNA structures. Secondary structure models are proposed for these regions based on a combination of free energy minimization and comparative sequence analysis. The analysis of RNA-Seq data uncovered the first observation of a stable intronic sequence RNA (sisRNA) in EBV. The abundance of this sisRNA rivals that of the well-known and highly expressed EBV-encoded non-coding RNAs (EBERs). Conclusion This work identifies regions of the EBV genome likely to generate functional RNAs and RNA structures, provides structural models for these regions, and discusses potential functions suggested by the modeled structures. Enhanced understanding of the EBV transcriptome will guide future experimental analyses of the discovered RNAs and RNA structures. PMID:23937650

  17. Analysis of Epstein-Barr virus infection models in a series of pediatric carriers from a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Vistarop, Aldana G.; Cohen, Melina; De Matteo, Elena; Preciado, María Victoria; Chabay, Paola A.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a B lymphotropic human herpesvirus. Two models, germinal center (GC) and direct infection, describe how EBV infects B-cells. Since in Argentina primary infection is mostly subclinical at young ages, children represent an interesting population where to analyze EBV infection, especially considering that most studies are usually performed in adults. Tonsil biopsies from pediatric carriers were studied to describe infection characteristics. EBV+ lymphocytes at the interfollicular region were mainly observed. Latency III pattern in subepithelial (SubEp) lymphocytes was observed at young ages, probably indicating a recent infection. In older patients EBV was mostly detected in epithelial cells, suggesting that they could have been infected some time ago. This finding was sustained by tonsillar viral load, which was higher in cases with LMP1+SubEp cells vs. LMP1+nonSubEp cells (p = 0.0237, Mann-Whiney test). Latency III was prevalent and related to the GC, while latency II was associated with non-GC (p = 0.0159, χ2 test). EBERs+/IgD+ cells were statistically prevalent over EBERs+/CD27+ cells (p = 0.0021, χ2 test). These findings indicated that both EBV infection models are not mutually exclusive and provide some basis for further understanding of EBV infection dynamics. Moreover, we provide a more accurate explanation of EBV infection in pediatric asymptomatic carriers from a developing country. PMID:26988293

  18. Chlorpyrifos Induces the Expression of the Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Cycle Activator BZLF-1 via Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling; Xie, Fei; Wang, Ting-ting; Liu, Meng-yu; Li, Jia-la; Shang, Lei; Deng, Zi-xuan; Zhao, Peng-xiang; Ma, Xue-mei

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are among the most widely used synthetic chemicals for the control of a wide variety of pests, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by OPs may be involved in the toxicity of various pesticides. Previous studies have demonstrated that a reactivation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) could be induced by oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether OPs could reactivate EBV through ROS accumulation. The Raji cells were treated with chlorpyrifos (CPF), one of the most commonly used OPs. Oxidative stress indicators and the expression of the EBV immediate-early gene BZLF-1 were determined after CPF treatment. Our results show that CPF induces oxidative stress as evidenced by decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level, accompanied by an increase in ROS production, DNA damage, glutathione (GSH) level, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity. Moreover, CPF treatment significantly enhances the expression of BZLF-1, and the increased BZLF-1 expression was ameliorated by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) incubation. These results suggest that OPs could contribute to the reactivation of the EBV lytic cycle through ROS induction, a process that may play an important role in the development of EBV-associated diseases. PMID:26257840

  19. Epstein-Barr virus miR-BART20-5p regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis by targeting BAD.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoji; Choi, Hoyun; Lee, Suk Kyeong

    2015-01-28

    Although Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BamHI A rightward transcript (BART) microRNAs (miRNAs) are ubiquitously expressed in EBV-associated tumors, the role of most BART miRNAs is unclear. In this study, we showed that Bcl-2-associated death promoter (BAD) expression was significantly lower in EBV-infected AGS-EBV cells than in EBV-negative AGS cells and investigated whether BART miRNAs target BAD. Using bioinformatics analysis, five BART miRNAs showing seed match with the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) of BAD were selected. Of these, only miR-BART20-5p reduced BAD expression when individually transfected into AGS cells. A luciferase assay revealed that miR-BART20-5p directly targets BAD. The expression of BAD mRNA and protein was decreased by miR-BART20-5p and increased by an inhibitor of miR-BART20-5p. PE-Annexin V staining and cell proliferation assays showed that miR-BART20-5p reduced apoptosis and enhanced cell growth. Furthermore, miR-BART20-5p increased chemoresistance to 5-fluorouracil and docetaxel. Our data suggest that miR-BART20-5p contributes to tumorigenesis of EBV-associated gastric carcinoma by directly targeting the 3'-UTR of BAD. PMID:25449437

  20. Identification of three gp350/220 regions involved in Epstein-Barr virus invasion of host cells.

    PubMed

    Urquiza, Mauricio; Lopez, Ramses; Patiño, Helena; Rosas, Jaiver E; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2005-10-21

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) invasion of B-lymphocytes involves EBV gp350/220 binding to B-lymphocyte CR2. The anti-gp350 monoclonal antibody (mAb)-72A1 Fab inhibits this binding and therefore blocks EBV invasion of target cells. However, gp350/220 regions interacting with mAb 72A1 and involved in EBV invasion of target cells have not yet been identified. This work reports three gp350/220 regions, defined by peptide 11382, 11389, and 11416 sequences, that are involved in EBV binding to B-lymphocytes. Peptides 11382, 11389, and 11416 bound to CR2(+) but not to CR2(-) cells, inhibited EBV invasion of cord blood lymphocytes (CBLs), were recognized by mAb 72A1, and inhibited mAb 72A1 binding to EBV. Peptides 11382 and 11416 binding to peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) induced interleukin-6 protein synthesis in these cells, this phenomenon being inhibited by mAb 72A1. The same behavior has been reported for gp350/220 binding to PBLs. Anti-peptide 11382, 11389, and 11416 antibodies inhibited EBV binding and EBV invasion of PBLs and CBLs. Peptide 11382, 11389, and 11416 sequences presented homology with the C3dg regions coming into contact with CR2 (C3dg and gp350 bound to similar CR2 regions). These peptides could be used in designing strategies against EBV infection. PMID:16087675

  1. Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection with marked pericardial effusion successfully treated with allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Shinichiro; Takeda, Yusuke; Isshiki, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Atsuko; Nakao, Sanshiro; Takaishi, Koji; Nagao, Yuhei; Hasegawa, Nagisa; Togasaki, Emi; Shimizu, Ryoh; Kawajiri, Chika; Sakai, Shio; Mimura, Naoya; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Ohwada, Chikako; Sakaida, Emiko; Iseki, Tohru; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Nakaseko, Chiaki

    2016-05-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with a persistent fever and shortness of breath. Computed tomography showed marked pericardial effusion, hepatosplenomegaly, and cervical and mediastinal lymph node swelling. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody titers were abnormally elevated, and the copy number of EBV-DNA was increased in peripheral blood. Based on these observations, she was diagnosed with chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV). The EBV-infected cells in her peripheral blood were CD4(+)T lymphocytes. Fever and pericardial effusion improved following treatment with a combination of prednisolone, etoposide, and cyclosporine; however, peripheral blood EBV-DNA levels remained high. The patient underwent allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from an EBV-seronegative, HLA-matched sibling donor, with fludarabine and melphalan conditioning. The post-transplantation course was uneventful, except for mild skin acute graft-versus-host disease (grade 2). EBV-DNA became undetectable in peripheral blood 98 days post transplantation. She has since been in good health without disease recurrence. CAEBV is a potentially fatal disease caused by persistent EBV infection of T lymphocytes or natural killer cells, thus requiring prompt treatment and allogeneic transplantation. Pericardial effusion is rarely observed in CAEBV and can impede its diagnosis. Therefore, we should be aware that patients may present with marked pericardial effusion as an initial manifestation of CAEBV. PMID:27263789

  2. Genital ulcers as initial manifestation of Epstein-Barr virus infection: two new cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, Jon Anders; Brevig, Trine; Aas, Torkild; Skar, Anne Grete; Slevolden, Ellen Margrethe; Moi, Harald

    2006-01-01

    Genital ulceration is an uncommon manifestation of primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. We present here two cases of genital ulcers probably caused by EBV. The first case is a 12-year-old girl with a genital ulcer appearing before specific EBV serology could identify a primary infection. However, serology was positive 13 days after the ulcer appeared. Polymerase chain reaction for EBV was positive in the biopsy from the ulcer as well. The second case is an 18-year-old female in whom the specific EBV serology was positive 8 days after appearance of the ulcer. The ulcers in both cases healed after 21 days. We reviewed the literature and a total of 26 cases of EBV-associated genital ulcers in females are now published. Median age of the 26 cases is 14.5 years of whom only 6 reports previous sexual contact. Mean healing time for the ulcers is 18 days. Our two cases correspond well with clinical reports of 24 EBV-associated genital ulcers in the literature.

  3. Epstein-Barr virus interactions with the Bcl-2 protein family and apoptosis in human tumor cells*

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qin; He, Chen; Mao, Zheng-rong

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human gammaherpesvirus carried by more than 90% of the world’s population, is associated with malignant tumors such as Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL), Hodgkin lymphoma, post-transplant lymphoma, extra-nodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma, and nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas in immune-compromised patients. In the process of infection, EBV faces challenges: the host cell environment is harsh, and the survival and apoptosis of host cells are precisely regulated. Only when host cells receive sufficient survival signals may they immortalize. To establish efficiently a lytic or long-term latent infection, EBV must escape the host cell immunologic mechanism and resist host cell apoptosis by interfering with multiple signaling pathways. This review details the apoptotic pathway disrupted by EBV in EBV-infected cells and describes the interactions of EBV gene products with host cellular factors as well as the function of these factors, which decide the fate of the host cell. The relationships between other EBV-encoded genes and proteins of the B-cell leukemia/lymphoma (Bcl) family are unknown. Still, EBV seems to contribute to establishing its own latency and the formation of tumors by modifying events that impact cell survival and proliferation as well as the immune response of the infected host. We discuss potential therapeutic drugs to provide a foundation for further studies of tumor pathogenesis aimed at exploiting novel therapeutic strategies for EBV-associated diseases. PMID:23303627

  4. Targeted therapy for Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma using low-dose gemcitabine-induced lytic activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jung; Park, Pil-Gu; Dong, Seung Myung; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Hyunki; Chong, Curtis R.; Liu, Jun O.; Chen, Jianmeng; Ambinder, Richard F.; Hayward, S. Diane; Park, Jeon Han; Lee, Jae Myun

    2015-01-01

    The constant presence of the viral genome in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric cancers (EBVaGCs) suggests the applicability of novel EBV-targeted therapies. The antiviral nucleoside drug, ganciclovir (GCV), is effective only in the context of the viral lytic cycle in the presence of EBV-encoded thymidine kinase (TK)/protein kinase (PK) expression. In this study, screening of the Johns Hopkins Drug Library identified gemcitabine as a candidate for combination treatment with GCV. Pharmacological induction of EBV-TK or PK in EBVaGC-originated tumor cells were used to study combination treatment with GCV in vitro and in vivo. Gemcitabine was found to be a lytic inducer via activation of the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)/p53 genotoxic stress pathway in EBVaGC. Using an EBVaGC mouse model and a [125I] fialuridine (FIAU)-based lytic activation imaging system, we evaluated gemcitabine-induced lytic activation in an in vivo system and confirmed the efficacy of gemcitabine-GCV combination treatment. This viral enzyme-targeted anti-tumor strategy may provide a new therapeutic approach for EBVaGCs. PMID:26427042

  5. Epstein-Barr virus miR-BART20-5p regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis by targeting BAD.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoji; Choi, Hoyun; Lee, Suk Kyeong

    2015-01-28

    Although Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BamHI A rightward transcript (BART) microRNAs (miRNAs) are ubiquitously expressed in EBV-associated tumors, the role of most BART miRNAs is unclear. In this study, we showed that Bcl-2-associated death promoter (BAD) expression was significantly lower in EBV-infected AGS-EBV cells than in EBV-negative AGS cells and investigated whether BART miRNAs target BAD. Using bioinformatics analysis, five BART miRNAs showing seed match with the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) of BAD were selected. Of these, only miR-BART20-5p reduced BAD expression when individually transfected into AGS cells. A luciferase assay revealed that miR-BART20-5p directly targets BAD. The expression of BAD mRNA and protein was decreased by miR-BART20-5p and increased by an inhibitor of miR-BART20-5p. PE-Annexin V staining and cell proliferation assays showed that miR-BART20-5p reduced apoptosis and enhanced cell growth. Furthermore, miR-BART20-5p increased chemoresistance to 5-fluorouracil and docetaxel. Our data suggest that miR-BART20-5p contributes to tumorigenesis of EBV-associated gastric carcinoma by directly targeting the 3'-UTR of BAD.

  6. Association of Epstein-Barr virus and passive smoking with the risk of breast cancer among Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Qi, Mei-Ling; Xi, Jing; Chen, Li-Juan; Su, Yi; Cen, Yu-Ling; Su, Feng-Xi; Lin, Ying; Zhuang, Zhi-Xiong; Tang, Lu-Ying; Ren, Ze-Fang

    2014-09-01

    Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), as indexed by the higher immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody titers, was reported to be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Passive smoking plays a role in host immune responses and may modify the association of EBV with breast cancer. We carried out a case-control study using data from 349 incident breast cancer cases and 500 age-matched controls in the Guangzhou Breast Cancer Study to investigate the interactions of EBV antibodies and passive smoking on breast cancer risk. A higher risk of breast cancer was observed in passive smokers who were seropositive for EBV viral capsid antigen IgA or nuclear antigen-1 IgA in serum compared with those with the seronegativity and no passive smoking [odds ratio 3.13 (95% confidence interval, 1.76-5.56)]. There was a significant linear trend for the risk of breast cancer from IgA seropositivity with passive smoking, only IgA seropositivity, only passive smoking, to seronegativity without passive smoking (P<0.001), but the interaction in either multiplicative or additive models was not significant. No significant association was found between passive smoking and EBV IgA seropositivity. The present study confirmed the associations of EBV IgA antibodies and passive smoking with the risk of breast cancer and suggested that there was no synergic action between passive smoking and EBV IgA seropositivity on the risk of breast cancer. PMID:25010836

  7. Epstein-barr virus-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases: three distinct cases from a single center.

    PubMed

    Bakanay, Sule Mine; Kaygusuz, Gülşah; Topçuoğlu, Pervin; Sengül, Sule; Tunçalı, Timur; Keven, Kenan; Kuzu, Işınsu; Uysal, Akın; Arat, Mutlu

    2014-03-01

    Three cases of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease that occurred 6 to 8 years after renal transplantation are reported. The patients respectively had gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and atypical Burkitt lymphoma. Absence of EBV in the tissue samples was demonstrated by both in situ hybridization for EBV early RNA and polymerase chain reaction for EBV DNA. Patients were treated with reduction in immunosuppression and combined chemotherapy plus an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab. Despite the reduction in immunosuppression, patients had stable renal functions without loss of graft functions. The patient with atypical Burkitt lymphoma had an abnormal karyotype, did not respond to treatment completely, and died due to disease progression. The other patients are still alive and in remission 5 and 3 years after diagnosis, respectively. EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases are usually late-onset and are reported to have poor prognosis. Thus, reduction in immunosuppression is usually not sufficient for treatment and more aggressive approaches like rituximab with combined chemotherapy are required.

  8. Identifying predictive factors for posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric solid organ transplant recipients with Epstein-Barr virus viremia.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Lauren; Weiner, Chana; Miloh, Tamir; Tomaino, Juli; Joashi, Umesh; Benchimol, Corinne; Strauchen, James; Roth, Michael; Wistinghausen, Birte

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viremia (EV) in pediatric solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients is a significant risk factor for posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) but not all patients with EV develop PTLD. We identify predictive factors for PTLD in patients with EV. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all pediatric SOT recipients (0 to 21 y) at a single institution between 2001 and 2009. A total of 350 pediatric patients received a SOT and 90 (25.7%) developed EV. Of EV patients, 28 (31%) developed PTLD. The median age at transplant was 11.5 months in the PTLD group and 21.5 months in the EV-only group (P=0.003). Twenty-three (37%) EV-only patients had immunosuppression increased before EV, compared with 28 (100%) of PTLD patients (P<0.001). The median peak EBV level was 3212 EBV copies/10 lymphocytes for EV-only and 8392.5 EBV copies/10 lymphocytes for PTLD (P=0.005). All patients who developed PTLD had ≥1 clinical symptoms. Younger age at transplant, increased immunosuppression before EV, higher peak EBV level, and presence of clinical symptoms have predictive value in the development of PTLD in SOT patients with EV.

  9. Easily unwound DNA sequences and hairpin structures in the Epstein-Barr virus origin of plasmid replication.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D L; Kowalski, D

    1993-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) origin of plasmid replication (oriP) includes two known cis-acting components, the dyad symmetry region and the family of repeats. We used P1 nuclease, a single-strand-specific endonuclease, to probe EBV oriP for DNA sequences that are intrinsically easy to unwind on a negatively supercoiled plasmid. Selective nuclease hypersensitivity was detected in the family of repeats on an oriP-containing plasmid and in the dyad symmetry region on a plasmid that lacks the family of repeats, indicating that the DNA in both cis-acting components is intrinsically easy to unwind. The hierarchy of nuclease hypersensitivity indicates that the family of repeats is more easily unwound than the dyad symmetry region, consistent with the hierarchy of helical stability predicted by computer analysis of the DNA sequence. A specific subset of the family of repeats is nuclease hypersensitive, and the DNA structure deduced from nucleotide-level analysis of the P1 nuclease nicks is a cruciform near a single-stranded bubble. The dyad symmetry region unwinds to form a broad single-stranded bubble containing hairpins in the 65-bp dyad sequence. We propose that the intrinsic ease of unwinding the dyad symmetry region, the actual origin of DNA replication, is an important component in the mechanism of initiation. Images PMID:8386273

  10. Single-stranded structures are present within plasmids containing the Epstein-Barr virus latent origin of replication.

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, R; Miller, G

    1991-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent origin of plasmid replication (oriP) contains two essential regions, a family of repeats with 20 imperfect copies of a 30-bp sequence and a dyad symmetry element with four similar 30-bp repeats. Each of the repeats has an internal palindromic sequence and can bind EBNA 1, a protein that together with oriP constitutes the only viral element necessary for EBV maintenance and replication. Using single-strand-specific nucleases, we have probed plasmids containing oriP-derived sequences for the presence of secondary structural elements. Multiple single-stranded structures were detected within the oriP region. Of the two essential elements of oriP, the family of repeats seemed to extrude these structures at a much higher frequency than did sequences within the dyad symmetry region. Though negative supercoiling was found to stabilize the single-stranded structures, they showed significant stability even after linearization of the oriP plasmids. Two major single-stranded structures detected involved approximately 12 bp of DNA. These loci could be transiently unwound regions that form because of negative supercoiling and the high A + T content of this region of DNA, or they could be cruciform structures extruded within the palindromic sequences of oriP that may be important sites for protein-DNA interactions in the EBV oriP. Images PMID:1846191

  11. Contrasts in codon usage of latent versus productive genes of Epstein-Barr virus: data and hypotheses.

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, S; Blaisdell, B E; Schachtel, G A

    1990-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has two different modes of existence: latent and productive. There are eight known genes expressed during latency (and hardly at all during the productive phase) and about 70 other ("productive") genes. It is shown that the EBV genes known to be expressed during latency display codon usage strikingly different from that of genes that are expressed during lytic growth. In particular, the percentage of S3 (G or C in codon site 3) is persistently lower (about 20%) in all latent genes than in nonlatent genes. Moreover, S3 is lower in each multicodon amino acid form. Also, the percentage of S in silent codon sites 1 of leucine and arginine is lower in latent than in nonlatent genes. The largest absolute differences in amino acid usage between latent and nonlatent genes emphasize codon types SSN and WWN (W means nucleotide A or T and N is any nucleotide). Two principal explanations to account for the EBV latent versus productive gene codon disparity are proposed. Latent genes have codon usage substantially different from that of host cell genes to minimize the deleterious consequences to the host of viral gene expression during latency. (Productive genes are not so constrained.) It is also proposed that the latency genes of EBV were acquired recently by the viral genome. Evidence and arguments for these proposals are presented. PMID:2166815

  12. Mature proteins derived from Epstein-Barr virus fail to feed into the MHC class I antigenic pool.

    PubMed

    Fiebiger, Benjamin M; Moosmann, Andreas; Behrends, Uta; Mautner, Josef

    2012-12-01

    The immediate presentation of peptide epitopes on MHC class I (MHC I) after antigen expression has led to the concept that MHC I ligands are mostly derived from defective ribosomal products (DRiPs), a subset of newly synthesized proteins that are rapidly degraded by the proteasome. Whether and to what extent mature proteins contribute to the antigenic pool, however, has remained elusive. Here, we developed a conditional antigen expression system that allows studying antigen presentation from mature proteins by inducing their rapid proteasomal degradation in the absence of further antigen synthesis. Target cells in which expression of two Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigens was induced were rapidly recognized by antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in a time- and dosage-dependent manner, demonstrating that antigen presentation was linked to antigen synthesis. By contrast, T cells failed to recognize target cells containing large amounts of mature protein even after induction of their rapid proteasomal degradation. Thus, the presentation of these antigens proved to be strictly dependent on protein synthesis whereas mature proteins failed to furnish the antigenic pool. These results have implications for the design of immunotherapeutic strategies that aim at targeting proteins with increased half-lives and are hence overexpressed in tumors.

  13. Clonal Epstein-Barr virus genome in T-cell-rich lymphomas of B or probable B lineage.

    PubMed Central

    Loke, S. L.; Ho, F.; Srivastava, G.; Fu, K. H.; Leung, B.; Liang, R.

    1992-01-01

    Seventeen nodal lymphomas (originally diagnosed as T-cell lymphomas based on histological features and immunohistochemical staining results) were studied for the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome, and the results correlated with immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangement analyses performed on the same tissue samples. All four EBV positive cases had clonal rearrangement of the joining region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgJH) gene without clonal T-cell receptor beta-chain (TCR beta) gene rearrangement. Of these, two cases also showed clonally rearranged light chain gene, and they were reclassified as T-cell rich B-cell lymphomas (TRBL). The other two cases lacked clonal kappa or lambda light chain rearrangement and they were reclassified as T-cell rich lymphomas of probable B lineage, based on their isolated IgJH clonal rearrangement. These B-cell lymphomas may be easily misdiagnosed as T-cell lymphomas owing to the presence of an abundant reactive T-cell infiltrate masking the tumor population. The florid T-cell reaction may represent an unusual host response towards a clonal proliferation of EBV bearing B cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 44 Figure 5 PMID:1314029

  14. Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Acute Liver Failure Present in a 67-Year-Old Immunocompetent Female

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Betty; Chen, Yongxin; Chamberland, Robin; Fider-Whyte, Alexa; Craig, Julia; Varma, Chintalapati; Befeler, Alex S.; Bisceglie, Adrian M. Di; Horton, Peter; Lai, Jin-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare illness with a high mortality rate. The only favorable management is emergent liver transplantation. About 13% of ALF cases have no clear etiology. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated ALF accounts for less than 1% of all ALF cases, and is seen mostly in adults younger than 40 years. There are only a few cases of EBV-associated ALF in elderly immunocompromised adults. We report a case of ALF in an immunocompetent 67-year-old woman caused by EBV infection that was treated by orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The diagnosis of EBV-associated ALF was established by EBV-DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and EBV-encoded RNA (EBER-RNA) in situ hybridization (EBER-RISH). The patient is currently doing well 6 months after transplantation without any evidence of clinical EBV infection. This case illustrates the importance of early recognition and diagnosis of EBV-associated ALF by detection of EBV from liver biopsy, especially when patients are immunocompetent and other causes are excluded. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of EBV-associated ALF present in an immunocompetent elderly female. PMID:27785330

  15. Chlorpyrifos Induces the Expression of the Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Cycle Activator BZLF-1 via Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling; Xie, Fei; Wang, Ting-ting; Liu, Meng-yu; Li, Jia-la; Shang, Lei; Deng, Zi-xuan; Zhao, Peng-xiang; Ma, Xue-mei

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are among the most widely used synthetic chemicals for the control of a wide variety of pests, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by OPs may be involved in the toxicity of various pesticides. Previous studies have demonstrated that a reactivation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) could be induced by oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether OPs could reactivate EBV through ROS accumulation. The Raji cells were treated with chlorpyrifos (CPF), one of the most commonly used OPs. Oxidative stress indicators and the expression of the EBV immediate-early gene BZLF-1 were determined after CPF treatment. Our results show that CPF induces oxidative stress as evidenced by decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level, accompanied by an increase in ROS production, DNA damage, glutathione (GSH) level, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity. Moreover, CPF treatment significantly enhances the expression of BZLF-1, and the increased BZLF-1 expression was ameliorated by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) incubation. These results suggest that OPs could contribute to the reactivation of the EBV lytic cycle through ROS induction, a process that may play an important role in the development of EBV-associated diseases.

  16. Targeted therapy for Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma using low-dose gemcitabine-induced lytic activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Gyu; Kim, Hyemi; Kim, Eun Jung; Park, Pil-Gu; Dong, Seung Myung; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Hyunki; Chong, Curtis R; Liu, Jun O; Chen, Jianmeng; Ambinder, Richard F; Hayward, S Diane; Park, Jeon Han; Lee, Jae Myun

    2015-10-13

    The constant presence of the viral genome in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric cancers (EBVaGCs) suggests the applicability of novel EBV-targeted therapies. The antiviral nucleoside drug, ganciclovir (GCV), is effective only in the context of the viral lytic cycle in the presence of EBV-encoded thymidine kinase (TK)/protein kinase (PK) expression. In this study, screening of the Johns Hopkins Drug Library identified gemcitabine as a candidate for combination treatment with GCV. Pharmacological induction of EBV-TK or PK in EBVaGC-originated tumor cells were used to study combination treatment with GCV in vitro and in vivo. Gemcitabine was found to be a lytic inducer via activation of the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)/p53 genotoxic stress pathway in EBVaGC. Using an EBVaGC mouse model and a [125I] fialuridine (FIAU)-based lytic activation imaging system, we evaluated gemcitabine-induced lytic activation in an in vivo system and confirmed the efficacy of gemcitabine-GCV combination treatment. This viral enzyme-targeted anti-tumor strategy may provide a new therapeutic approach for EBVaGCs.

  17. The microRNAs of Epstein-Barr Virus are expressed at dramatically differing levels among cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Zachary L.; Kuzembayeva, Malika; Sengupta, Srikumar; Sugden, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) encodes multiple microRNAs (miRNAs) from two primary transcripts, BHRF1 and the BARTs. The expression of BHRF1 miRNAs is dependent on the type of viral latency, whereas the BART miRNAs are expressed in cells during all forms of latency. It is not known how these miRNAs are otherwise regulated, though. We have used quantitative, stem-loop, real-time PCR to measure the expression of EBV’s miRNAs and found them to differ nearly 50- and 25-fold among all tested cell lines and among EBV-positive Burkitt’s lymphomas, respectively. In addition, the expression of individual BART miRNAs within a cell can differ by 50-fold or more despite the fact these miRNAs are likely transcribed together as a single primary transcript. These measurements are illuminating: they indicate that few of EBV’s miRNAs are expressed at levels comparable to those of cellular miRNAs in most cell lines and therefore likely function interdependently. PMID:19217135

  18. Expression of the DNase encoded by the BGLF5 gene of Epstein-Barr virus in nasopharyngeal carcinoma epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sbih-Lammali, F; Berger, F; Busson, P; Ooka, T

    1996-08-01

    In contrast with most Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected healthy carriers, nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients frequently have increased serum levels of antibodies directed against EBV-DNase. These antibodies are potentially interesting serological markers for the diagnosis and the follow-up of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In this context, it is important to determine whether malignant EBV-infected cells are the source of significant amounts of EBV-DNase contributing to antigenic stimulation. Therefore EBV-DNase expression has been investigated in several NPC specimens. A significant expression of this viral enzyme was demonstrated in both fresh biopsies and transplanted tumor lines. The DNase isolated from tumor has a molecular weight varying between 52 and 60 kDa and its activity eluted from a single-stranded DNA affinity column was specifically inhibited by both NPC sera and the rabbit polyclonal antibody against EBV-DNase. The enzyme activity was functional in the presence of 300 mM KCl, with which cellular DNases are completely inhibited. The DNase was mainly localized in epithelial tumor cells of both NPC biopsies and nude mice-derived NPC cells. PMID:8806488

  19. Rabbits immunized with Epstein-Barr virus gH/gL or gB recombinant proteins elicit higher serum virus neutralizing activity than gp350.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xinle; Cao, Zhouhong; Chen, Quanyi; Arjunaraja, Swadhinya; Snow, Andrew L; Snapper, Clifford M

    2016-07-25

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the primary cause of infectious mononucleosis and has been strongly implicated in the etiology of multiple epithelial and lymphoid cancers, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. There is currently no licensed prophylactic vaccine for EBV. Most efforts to develop prophylactic vaccines have focused on EBV gp350, which binds to CD21/CD35 to gain entry into B cells, and is a major target of serum neutralizing antibody in EBV seropositive humans. However, a recombinant monomeric gp350 protein failed to prevent EBV infection in a phase II clinical trial. Thus, alternative or additional target antigens may be necessary for a successful prophylactic vaccine. EBV gH/gL and gB proteins coordinately mediate EBV fusion and entry into B cells and epithelial cells, strongly suggesting that vaccination with these proteins might elicit antibodies that will prevent EBV infection. We produced recombinant trimeric and monomeric EBV gH/gL heterodimeric proteins and a trimeric EBV gB protein, in addition to tetrameric and monomeric gp350(1-470) proteins, in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We demonstrated that vaccination of rabbits with trimeric and monomeric gH/gL, trimeric gB, and tetrameric gp350(1-470) induced serum EBV-neutralizing titers, using cultured human B cells, that were >100-fold, 20-fold, 18-fold, and 4-fold higher, respectively, than monomeric gp350(1-470). These data strongly suggest a role for testing EBV gH/gL and EBV gB in a future prophylactic vaccine to prevent EBV infection of B cells, as well as epithelial cells.

  20. Secreted Oral Epithelial Cell Membrane Vesicles Induce Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation in Latently Infected B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Swan, Kenneth; Zhang, Xin; Cao, Subing; Brett, Zoe; Drury, Stacy; Fewell, Claire; Puetter, Adriane; Wang, Xia; Ferris, MaryBeth; Sullivan, Deborah E.; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the oral epithelium, peripheral stores of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are transmitted from infiltrating B cells to epithelial cells. Once the virus is transmitted to epithelial cells, the highly permissive nature of this cell type for lytic replication allows virus amplification and exchange to other hosts. Since the initial transfer of EBV from B cells to epithelial cells requires transitioning of the B-cell to a state that induces virus reactivation, we hypothesized that there might be epithelium-specific signals that allow the infiltrating B cells to sense the appropriate environment to initiate reactivation and begin this exchange process. We previously found that the epithelium-specific miR-200 family of microRNAs promotes EBV lytic replication. Here we show that there are high levels of miR-200 family members in oral and tonsillar epithelia and in saliva. Analysis of cultured oral epithelial cells (OKF6) showed that they actively secrete membrane vesicles (exosomes) that are enriched with miR-200 family members. Coculturing of EBV-positive B cells with OKF6 cells induced viral reactivation. Further, treatment of EBV-positive B cells with OKF6 cell-derived membrane vesicles promoted reactivation. Using a cell system that does not naturally express miR-200 family members, we found that enforced expression of a miR-200 family member produced membrane vesicles that were able to induce the lytic cascade in EBV-positive B cells. We propose that membrane vesicles secreted by oral and tonsillar epithelial cells may serve as a tissue-specific environmental cue that initiates reactivation in B cells, promoting the transfer of virus from peripheral B-cell stores to the oral epithelium to facilitate virus amplification and exchange to other hosts. IMPORTANCE Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an important human pathogen that is causally associated with several lymphomas and carcinomas. The switch from latency to the lytic cycle is critical for successful host infection

  1. A survey of Epstein-Barr virus gene expression in sporadic non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus in a subset of peripheral T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton-Dutoit, S. J.; Pallesen, G.

    1992-01-01

    This study analyzes the association of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) arising in patients without pre-existing overt immunodeficiency. The authors examined 201 lymphomas (105 high-grade B-cell, 82 peripheral T-cell, 7 high-grade non-B-cell, non-T-cell, and 7 hairy-cell leukemia) for EBV gene expression by immunohistologic procedures using monoclonal antibodies to EBV latent, immediate early, and replicative infection antigens. Transformation-associated EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP 1) was detected in 13 (6%) NHL, comprising 4 (4%) high-grade B-cell, 8 (10%) peripheral T-cell, and 1 non-B-cell, non-T-cell lymphomas. Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma of T-cell type was consistently LMP 1-negative. EBV nuclear antigen 2 was demonstrated in only three (1%) cases. Induction of replication as defined by expression of the immediate early BamHI Z leftward reading frame 1 (BZLF1) protein was detected in five cases, but early (EA) and late (VCA and MA) lytic cycle antigens were only found in two cases and in one case, respectively. The presence of EBV was confirmed by in situ DNA hybridization in 9 of 11 EBV antigen-positive lymphomas. This study shows the surprisingly frequent presence of EBV in peripheral T-cell NHL in European patients without pre-existing overt immunodeficiency. Interestingly, most sporadic B-cell NHL are not associated with the virus. Furthermore, the usefulness of selected monoclonal antibodies for the routine immunohistological diagnosis of EBV infection was confirmed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1318639

  2. [Epstein-Barr virus-specific immunity in asymptomatic carriers of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1].

    PubMed

    Kwon, K W

    1995-03-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) patients are immunosuppressed as evidenced by anergy to recall antigens and the occurrence of opportunistic infections. The immunosuppression appears to be a critical factor or a predictive sign for the development of ATL in carriers of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). This study was aimed at assessing the immune status of asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers with the immunity specific to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous human herpesvirus with oncogenic potential. Forty-three asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers were examined for their EBV serology and EBV-specific cytotoxic T-cell (EBV-CTL) activity, in comparison with 10 HTLV-I-non-infected normal controls. Both carriers and controls were all positive for EBV capsid antigen (VCA) IgG. Significantly elevated titer of VCAIgG and lower titer of EBV-determined nuclear antigen (EBNA) antibodies were observed in asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers, suggesting reactivation of EBV. Among the HTLV-I carriers, 9 (20.9%) had reduced activity of EBV-CTL as revealed by lower incidence of regression of in vitro EBV-induced B-cell transformation. Accordingly, asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers were divided into three groups: the carriers with reduced EBV-specific cellular immunity (group I), the carriers showing normal cellular immunity but aberrant EBV-specific antibody titers (group II), and the carriers with normal EBV-specific cellular immunity and serology (group III). Higher positive rate of anti-HTLV-I Tax antibody was found in the former two groups (44.4% and 56.5%, respectively) compared with group III (18.2%). An immunosuppressive agent, 4-deoxyphorbol ester induced a remarkable decrease of EBV-CTL activity in the carriers of group II and III at the concentration that affected none of the normal controls. These findings indicate that asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers suffer stepwise impairment of EBV-specific immunities, which may be caused by HTLV-I infection.

  3. In-cell infection: a novel pathway for Epstein-Barr virus infection mediated by cell-in-cell structures

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Chao; Chen, Yuhui; Zeng, Musheng; Pei, Rongjuan; Du, Yong; Tang, Linquan; Wang, Mengyi; Hu, Yazhuo; Zhu, Hanyu; He, Meifang; Wei, Xiawei; Wang, Shan; Ning, Xiangkai; Wang, Manna; Wang, Jufang; Ma, Li; Chen, Xinwen; Sun, Qiang; Tang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoning

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can infect both susceptible B lymphocytes and non-susceptible epithelial cells (ECs). Viral tropism analyses have revealed two intriguing means of EBV infection, either by a receptor-mediated infection of B cells or by a cell-to-cell contact-mediated infection of non-susceptible ECs. Herein, we report a novel “in-cell infection” mechanism for EBV infection of non-susceptible ECs through the formation of cell-in-cell structures. Epithelial CNE-2 cells were invaded by EBV-infected Akata B cells to form cell-in-cell structures in vitro. Such unique cellular structures could be readily observed in the specimens of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Importantly, the formation of cell-in-cell structures led to the autonomous activation of EBV within Akata cells and subsequent viral transmission to CNE-2 cells, as evidenced by the expression of viral genes and the presence of virion particles in CNE-2 cells. Significantly, EBV generated from in-cell infected ECs displayed altered tropism with higher infection efficacy to both B cells and ECs. In addition to CNE-2 tumor cells, cell-in-cell structure formation could also mediate EBV infection of NPEC1-Bmi1 cells, an immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line. Furthermore, efficient infection by this mechanism involved the activation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Thus, our study identified “in-cell infection” as a novel mechanism for EBV infection. Given the diversity of virus-infected cells and the prevalence of cell-in-cell structures during chronic infection, we speculate that “in-cell infection” is likely a general mechanism for EBV and other viruses to infect non-susceptible ECs. PMID:25916549

  4. The Epstein-Barr Virus Protein BRLF1 Activates S Phase Entry through E2F1 Induction

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Jennifer J.; Mauser, Amy E.; Kaufmann, William K.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    1999-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) immediate-early protein BRLF1 is one of two transactivators which mediate the switch from latent to lytic replication in EBV-infected cells. DNA viruses often modulate the function of critical cell cycle proteins to maximize the efficiency of virus replication. Here we have examined the effect of BRLF1 on cell cycle progression. A replication-deficient adenovirus expressing BRLF1 (AdBRLF1) was used to infect normal human fibroblasts and various epithelial cell lines. BRLF1 expression induced S phase entry in contact-inhibited fibroblasts and in the human osteosarcoma cell line U-2 OS. AdBRLF1 infection produced a dramatic increase in the level of E2F1 but not E2F4. In contrast, the levels of Rb, p107, and p130 were decreased in AdBRLF1-infected cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed an increased level of free E2F1 in the AdBRLF1-infected human fibroblasts. Consistent with the previously described effect of E2F1, AdBRLF1-infected fibroblasts had increased levels of p53 and p21 and died by apoptosis. BRLF1-induced activation of E2F1 may be required for efficient EBV lytic replication, since at least one critical viral replication gene (the viral DNA polymerase) is activated by E2F (C. Liu, N. D. Sista, and J. S. Pagano, J. Virol. 70:2545–2555, 1996). PMID:10400750

  5. [Encephalitis due to the Epstein-Barr virus: a description of a clinical case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Barón, Johanna; Herrero-Velázquez, Sonia; Ruiz-Piñero, Marina; Pedraza, M Isabel; Rojo-Rello, Silvia; Guerrero-Peral, Ángel Luis

    2013-11-16

    INTRODUCTION. Infection by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) -either as a primary infection, a reactivation or an active chronic infection- can give rise to several clinical forms of involvement of the central nervous system. We report a case of encephalitis due to EBV produced by viral reactivation in an immunocompetent patient which initially mimicked, from the clinical and electroencephalographic point of view, encephalitis due to type 1 herpes simplex virus (HSV-1). CASE REPORT. A 51-year-old male who had reported the presence of dorsal herpes zoster some days earlier. The patient visited the emergency department after suffering a holocranial oppressive headache and febricula for seven days; 24 hours before admission to hospital, he was suffering from drowsiness and language disorder. The neurological examination revealed stiffness in the back of the neck and dysphasia. An analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid revealed pleocytosis (422 cells/mm(3)) with 98% of mononuclear cells and normal protein and glucose concentration levels in cerebrospinal fluid. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and electroencephalogram readings were normal with periodic lateralised epileptiform discharges in the left temporal region. Intravenous acyclovir treatment was initiated, but renal failure meant it had to be changed to oral valaciclovir with clinical resolution and improvement of the liquoral parameters. Polymerase chain reaction in the cerebrospinal fluid was positive for EBV and negative for the other neurotropic viruses. In blood, the serology test for EBV with IgG was positive, while IgM and heterophile antibody tests were negative. CONCLUSIONS. EBV infection can give rise to acute disseminated encephalomyelitis or affect several locations in the central nervous system, especially the cerebellum. Clinical pictures mimicking HSV-1 are less frequent. When encephalitis is related to viral reactivation, precipitating factors can be detected, as in our case.

  6. [Factors involved in host-pathogen interaction for the risk of Hodgkin lymphoma induced by Epstein Barr virus].

    PubMed

    Torres Espíndola, Luz María; Arellano Galindo, José; Velazquez Cruz, Rafael; Castillejos López, Manuel de Jesús

    2013-09-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a neoplasm characterized by malignant cells called Reed Sternberg and Hodgkin's cells in the lymphatic system. Such cells comprise 1% of the tumor while the remainder is made up of lymphocytes, histiocytes, eosinophils and plasma non-neoplastic cells. The annual global incidence of HL is 3-10/100,000 inhabitants and is most commonly found in young adults. The mechanism by which cell transformation is accomplished is not entirely clear; however, some evidences suggest that oncogenic viruses like the Epstein Barr virus (EBV) may have a high impact on the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferation. Genetic and environmental factors could be involved, since it has been found a high incidence of HL among members of the same family. In Mexico, there have been studies to determine the prevalence of EBV in patients with HL and found the presence of this virus in up to 64.2% of the cases. EBV has been detected in the Reed Sternberg cells and Hodgkin cells in 50% of cases of classical HL. There is not a satisfactory explanation for this, but it has been proposed that geographic and immunological variabilities play a role in the positivity of EBV in HL. However, despite recent advances in the field, there is insufficient evidence to show a clear association between host factors, environment and pathogens, and the risk of lymphoproliferation leading to the development of HL. This review aims to give an overview about the risk factors that influence the interaction of host, pathogens and environment in the etiology of HL.

  7. Epstein-Barr virus genetic variation in Vietnamese patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma: full-length analysis of LMP1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Van, Do; Ernberg, Ingemar; Enrberg, Ingemar; Phan-Thi Phi, Phi; Tran-Thi, Chinh; Hu, LiFu

    2008-10-01

    Genetic variation in tumor virus genes and its impact on function might contribute to the understanding of geographic differences in risks for virus-associated tumors. This is particularly true for the genes known to contribute to the biology of the tumor. It is has been proposed that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) gene variation has a role in the high risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in South-East Asia. NPC is among the five most common cancers in Vietnam. EBV-NPC cells always express EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) and also frequently latent membrane protein 1 and 2 (LMP1 & LMP2). To investigate EBV gene variation in Vietnamese NPC patients we analyzed the full length of LMP1 gene including its promoter region, and the N-termini of both EBNA1 and LMP2A genes from five NPC biopsies. We detected two EBV variants V1 and V2 based on the LMP1 nucleotide sequence pattern compared with the prototype B95-8 and some available sequences including Chinese variants. The V1 variant shows strong similarity to a variant dominant in Southern China (China 1), while the V2 variant is similar to a Thai variant SEA 2 and partly identity with GD1 in the C-terminus. The promoter region and transmembrane domain of the SEA 2-like samples contained some specific differences compared with previously published variants. In contrast, analysis of EBNA1 N- and LMP2A N-termini only revealed minor changes. Our findings reinforces that the polymorphisms of whole LMP1 sequence should be considered in future EBV molecular epidemiology studies in different geographic populations.

  8. DNA of Epstein-Barr virus. I. Comparative studies of the DNA of Epstein-Barr virus from HR-1 and B95-8 cells: size, structure, and relatedness.

    PubMed Central

    Pritchett, R F; Hayward, S D; Kieff, E D

    1975-01-01

    We have compared the properties of the DNA of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) purified from HR-1 (EBV HR-1 DNA) and B95-8 (EBV B95-8 DNA) continuous lymphoblast cultures. Our data indicate that (i) the S suc of native EBV DNA relative to T4D DNA is 55S. Using the modified Burgi-Hershey relationship (5), we estimate the molecular weight of native EBV DNA is 101 (plus or minus the molecular weight of native FBV DNA by measurement of the length of 3) times 106. Estimation of the molecule relative to form II PM2 DNA yields a value of 105 (plus or minus 3) times 106. (ii) After alkali denaturation, less than 50% of EBV DNA sediments as a single band in alkaline sucrose gradients in the region expected for DNA of 50 times 406 daltons. (iii) Intact EBV HR-1 and EBV B 95-8 DNAs band at 1.718 g/cm3 and a smaller band (approximately 25% of the DNA) AT 1.720 G/CM3. (IV) EBV HR-1 DNA possesses greater than 97% of the sequences of EBV B95-8 DNA. Hybrid DNA molecules formed between (3H)EBV HR-1 DNA and EBV HR-1 DNA or EBV B95-8 DNA had identical thermal stability. EBV B95-8 DNA lacks approximately 15% of the DNA sequences of EBV HR-1 DNA. We interpret these data to mean that EBV B95-8 is derived from a parental EBV through loss of genetic complexity. This defect may be linked to the ability of EBV B95-8 to "transform" lymphocytes invitro. Images PMID:163373

  9. Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in children: a disease reminiscent of Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Uccini, Stefania; Al-Jadiry, Mazin F; Scarpino, Stefania; Ferraro, Daniela; Alsaadawi, Adel R; Al-Darraji, Amir F; Moleti, Maria Luisa; Testi, Anna Maria; Al-Hadad, Salma A; Ruco, Luigi

    2015-05-01

    Pediatric Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (EBV+ DLBCL) is a rare disease in nonimmunocompromised hosts. In a review of 231 cases of malignant lymphoma (87 Hodgkin lymphoma and 144 non-Hodgkin lymphoma) occurring in Iraqi children, 7 cases (5% of NHLs) were classified as EBV+ DLBCL. Six children presented with nodal disease, and 1 presented with extranodal localization (bone). In all cases, the disease was at an advanced clinical stage (III/IV). Evidence of immunodeficiency (Evans syndrome and selective IgA deficiency) was observed in a single case. Two cases were "monomorphic" with immunoblastic histology, and 5 cases were "polymorphic" with histologic aspects reminiscent of nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (2 cases) and of CD30+ classical Hodgkin lymphoma (3 cases). In all cases, tumor cells were EBV infected (EBER+/LMP-1+), were medium-large B-cells (CD20+/CD79a+/PAX-5+/BOB-1+/OCT-2+) of non-germinal center (non-GC) origin (CD10-/MUM-1+), and had high proliferative activity (50%-70%). Chromosomal translocations involving BCL2, MYC, and IGH genes were not observed. IGH monoclonality could be demonstrated in 3 of 3 investigated cases. Six cases of EBV-negative DLBCL (4% of NHL) were present in the same series. All had monomorphic histology with centroblastic/immunoblastic morphology; 3 cases were of GC type and 3 of non-GC type. Our findings indicate that in Iraq, DLBCLs are 9% of NHLs. Moreover, 2 different types of the disease do exist; the EBV-positive cases, with strong histologic and immunohistochemical resemblance with EBV+ DLBCL of the elderly, and the EBV-negative cases, which are similar to the pediatric DLBCL usually observed in Western populations. PMID:25704629

  10. MicroRNA Profiling of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated NK/T-Cell Lymphomas by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Motsch, Natalie; Alles, Julia; Imig, Jochen; Zhu, Jiayun; Barth, Stephanie; Reineke, Tanja; Tinguely, Marianne; Cogliatti, Sergio; Dueck, Anne; Meister, Gunter

    2012-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic human Herpes virus involved in the pathogenesis of nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma. EBV encodes microRNAs (miRNAs) and induces changes in the host cellular miRNA profile. MiRNAs are short non-coding RNAs of about 19–25 nt length that regulate gene expression by post-transcriptional mechanisms and are frequently deregulated in human malignancies including cancer. The microRNA profiles of EBV-positive NK/T-cell lymphoma, non-infected T-cell lymphoma and normal thymus were established by deep sequencing of small RNA libraries. The comparison of the EBV-positive NK/T-cell vs. EBV-negative T-cell lymphoma revealed 15 up- und 16 down-regulated miRNAs. In contrast, the majority of miRNAs was repressed in the lymphomas compared to normal tissue. We also identified 10 novel miRNAs from known precursors and two so far unknown miRNAs. The sequencing results were confirmed for selected miRNAs by quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR). We show that the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 1 alpha (IL1A) is a target for miR-142-3p and the oncogenic BCL6 for miR-205. MiR-142-3p is down-regulated in the EBV-positive vs. EBV-negative lymphomas. MiR-205 was undetectable in EBV-negative lymphoma and strongly down-regulated in EBV-positive NK/T-cell lymphoma as compared to thymus. The targets were confirmed by reporter assays and by down-regulation of the proteins by ectopic expression of the cognate miRNAs. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the relevance of deregulated miRNAs for the post-transcriptional gene regulation in nasal NK/T-cell lymphomas. PMID:22870299

  11. Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disease After Solid Organ Transplantation: Pathogenesis, Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis, and Management.

    PubMed

    Nijland, Marieke L; Kersten, Marie José; Pals, Steven T; Bemelman, Frederike J; Ten Berge, Ineke J M

    2016-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a potentially fatal complication after (solid organ) transplantation, which is highly associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The EBV-specific cytotoxic T cell response that is essential in controlling the virus in healthy individuals is suppressed in transplant recipients using immunosuppressive drugs. A primary EBV infection in EBV-seronegative patients receiving an EBV-seropositive donor organ or a reactivation in those who are already latently infected pretransplantation can lead to uninhibited growth of EBV-infected B cells and subsequently to PTLD. Effective preventive strategies, such as vaccines and antiviral agents, are lacking. Because not every transplant recipient with increasing EBV viral load develops PTLD, it is hard to decide how intensively these patients should be monitored and how and when a preemptive intervention should take place. There is a need for other tools to help predict the development of PTLD in patients at risk to make timing and strategy of preemptive intervention easier and more reliable. The cornerstone of the treatment of patients with PTLD is restoring the host's immunity by reduction of immunosuppressive drug therapy. American and British guidelines recommend to add rituximab monotherapy or rituximab in combination with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone, depending on histology and clinical characteristics. Although response to these therapies is good, toxicity is a problem, and PTLD still has a relatively high mortality rate. An evolving therapy, especially in PTLD occurring in allogeneic stem cell transplantation, is restoring the host's immune response with infusion of EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells. This may also play a role in the future in both prevention and treatment of PTLD in SOT. PMID:27500242

  12. Hemophagocytic syndrome following an Epstein-Barr virus infection: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Eakle, J F; Bressoud, P F

    2000-04-01

    Hemophagocytosis is an uncommon disorder characterized by proliferation of histiocytes that actively engulf other hematopoietic cells causing cytopenia. Reactive or secondary hemophagocytosis is very rare in healthy adults in the US. Various infectious, as well as neoplastic and immunologic etiologies of reactive hemophagocytosis have been reported. It is a non-malignant, reactive disorder characterized by hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow and reticuloendothelial system (RES) resulting in pancytopenia, fever, hepatic dysfunction, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). No consensus exists in the literature regarding optimal treatment of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (VAHS). We report a case of VAHS in a previously healthy immunocompetent male and review the diagnosis and management of this rare disorder. PMID:10816985

  13. Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 3 (EBNA3) Proteins Regulate EBNA2 Binding to Distinct RBPJ Genomic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Anqi; Welch, Rene; Zhao, Bo; Ta, Tram; Keleş, Sündüz

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent infection of B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in vitro results in their immortalization into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs); this latency program is controlled by the EBNA2 viral transcriptional activator, which targets promoters via RBPJ, a DNA binding protein in the Notch signaling pathway. Three other EBNA3 proteins (EBNA3A, EBNA3B, and EBNA3C) interact with RBPJ to regulate cell gene expression. The mechanism by which EBNAs regulate different genes via RBPJ remains unclear. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation with deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis of the EBNA3 proteins analyzed in concert with prior EBNA2 and RBPJ data demonstrated that EBNA3A, EBNA3B, and EBNA3C bind to distinct, partially overlapping genomic locations. Although RBPJ interaction is critical for EBNA3A and EBNA3C growth effects, only 30 to 40% of EBNA3-bound sites colocalize with RBPJ. Using LCLs conditional for EBNA3A or EBNA3C activity, we demonstrate that EBNA2 binding at sites near EBNA3A- or EBNA3C-regulated genes is specifically regulated by the respective EBNA3. To investigate EBNA3 binding specificity, we identified sequences and transcription factors enriched at EBNA3A-, EBNA3B-, and EBNA3C-bound sites. This confirmed the prior observation that IRF4 is enriched at EBNA3A- and EBNA3C-bound sites and revealed IRF4 enrichment at EBNA3B-bound sites. Using IRF4-negative BJAB cells, we demonstrate that IRF4 is essential for EBNA3C, but not EBNA3A or EBNA3B, binding to specific sites. These results support a model in which EBNA2 and EBNA3s compete for distinct subsets of RBPJ sites to regulate cell genes and where EBNA3 subset specificity is determined by interactions with other cell transcription factors. IMPORTANCE Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent gene products cause human cancers and transform B lymphocytes into immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines in vitro. EBV nuclear antigens (EBNAs) and membrane proteins constitutively activate pathways important for

  14. Synthesis of novel polyphenols consisted of ferulic and gallic acids, and their inhibitory effects on phorbol ester-induced Epstein-Barr virus activation and superoxide generation.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Eisaku; Hosoda, Asao; Morishita, Hideko; Murakami, Akira; Koshimizu, Koichi; Ohigashi, Hajime; Taniguchi, Hisaji

    2002-04-01

    We prepared novel polyphenols which were esters composed of two naturally occurring products, ferulic and gallic acids, and investigated their inhibitory effects on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) activation and superoxide (O2-) generation. Most of these compounds exhibited significant EBV activation suppression at a concentration of 20 microM and in particular, the ester 5f having 2-methyl-1-butyl group showed high activity. The suppressive effects on O2- generation were also observed in most of the esters.

  15. Three Rwandan Children With Massive Splenomegaly and Epstein-Barr Virus-associated Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Case Presentations and the Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Friedman-Klabanoff, DeAnna; Ball, Allison; Rutare, Samuel; McCall, Natalie; Blackall, Douglas P

    2016-07-01

    This report describes 3 Rwandan children with massive splenomegaly and pancytopenia who underwent splenectomy. Each was diagnosed with Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder (EBV LPD) based on lymphocyte morphology, lymphocyte immunophenotype, and the results of EBV in situ hybridization studies. The differential diagnosis of splenomegaly, with a special emphasis on the sub-Saharan African context, is discussed along with EBV and associated disorders. These cases serve as a call to consider EBV LPD in the differential diagnosis of splenomegaly in children in whom common causes have been ruled out. PMID:27352192

  16. Latent Expression of the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-Encoded Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I TAP Inhibitor, BNLF2a, in EBV-Positive Gastric Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Michael J.; Laskow, Thomas; Nakhoul, Hani; Blanchard, Eugene; Liu, Yaozhong; Wang, Xia; Baddoo, Melody; Lin, Zhen; Yin, Qinyan

    2015-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BNLF2a gene product provides immune evasion properties to infected cells through inhibition of transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP)-mediated transport of antigen peptides. Although BNLF2a is considered to be a lytic gene, we demonstrate that it is expressed in nearly half of the EBV-associated gastric carcinomas analyzed. Further, we show that BNLF2a expression is dissociated from lytic gene expression. BNLF2a is therefore expressed in this latency setting, potentially helping protect the infected tumor cells from immunosurveillance. PMID:26178981

  17. RUNX super-enhancer control through the Notch pathway by Epstein-Barr virus transcription factors regulates B cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Gunnell, Andrea; Webb, Helen M.; Wood, C. David; McClellan, Michael J.; Wichaidit, Billy; Kempkes, Bettina; Jenner, Richard G.; Osborne, Cameron; Farrell, Paul J.; West, Michelle J.

    2016-01-01

    In B cells infected by the cancer-associated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), RUNX3 and RUNX1 transcription is manipulated to control cell growth. The EBV-encoded EBNA2 transcription factor (TF) activates RUNX3 transcription leading to RUNX3-mediated repression of the RUNX1 promoter and the relief of RUNX1-directed growth repression. We show that EBNA2 activates RUNX3 through a specific element within a −97 kb super-enhancer in a manner dependent on the expression of the Notch DNA-binding partner RBP-J. We also reveal that the EBV TFs EBNA3B and EBNA3C contribute to RUNX3 activation in EBV-infected cells by targeting the same element. Uncovering a counter-regulatory feed-forward step, we demonstrate EBNA2 activation of a RUNX1 super-enhancer (−139 to −250 kb) that results in low-level RUNX1 expression in cells refractory to RUNX1-mediated growth inhibition. EBNA2 activation of the RUNX1 super-enhancer is also dependent on RBP-J. Consistent with the context-dependent roles of EBNA3B and EBNA3C as activators or repressors, we find that these proteins negatively regulate the RUNX1 super-enhancer, curbing EBNA2 activation. Taken together our results reveal cell-type-specific exploitation of RUNX gene super-enhancers by multiple EBV TFs via the Notch pathway to fine tune RUNX3 and RUNX1 expression and manipulate B-cell growth. PMID:26883634

  18. The "Bridge" in the Epstein-Barr virus alkaline exonuclease protein BGLF5 contributes to shutoff activity during productive infection.

    PubMed

    Horst, Daniëlle; Burmeister, Wim P; Boer, Ingrid G J; van Leeuwen, Daphne; Buisson, Marlyse; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Ressing, Maaike E

    2012-09-01

    Replication of the human herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus drastically impairs cellular protein synthesis. This shutoff phenotype results from mRNA degradation upon expression of the early lytic-phase protein BGLF5. Interestingly, BGLF5 is the viral DNase, or alkaline exonuclease, homologues of which are present throughout the herpesvirus family. During productive infection, this DNase is essential for processing and packaging of the viral genome. In contrast to this widely conserved DNase activity, shutoff is only mediated by the alkaline exonucleases of the subfamily of gammaherpesviruses. Here, we show that BGLF5 can degrade mRNAs of both cellular and viral origin, irrespective of polyadenylation. Furthermore, shutoff by BGLF5 induces nuclear relocalization of the cytosolic poly(A) binding protein. Guided by the recently resolved BGLF5 structure, mutants were generated and analyzed for functional consequences on DNase and shutoff activities. On the one hand, a point mutation destroying DNase activity also blocks RNase function, implying that both activities share a catalytic site. On the other hand, other mutations are more selective, having a more pronounced effect on either DNA degradation or shutoff. The latter results are indicative of an oligonucleotide-binding site that is partially shared by DNA and RNA. For this, the flexible "bridge" that crosses the active-site canyon of BGLF5 appears to contribute to the interaction with RNA substrates. These findings extend our understanding of the molecular basis for the shutoff function of BGLF5 that is conserved in gammaherpesviruses but not in alpha- and betaherpesviruses.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) isolated from EBV-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjun; Pan, Yaqi; Ji, Jiafu; Ke, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is linked to the development of a variety of malignancies, including EBV-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC). In this study, EBVaGC was detected in 15 (7.3%) of 206 GC cases. To identify the EBV genomic variation, EBV genomic sequences isolated from 9 EBVaGC biopsy specimens were successfully retrieved, designated EBVaGC1 to EBVaGC9. By comparative analysis of these strains with another 6 completely sequenced EBV strains, EBV-wild type, B95–8, AG876, GD1, GD2, and HKNPC1, it was demonstrated that EBVaGC1 to 9 were most closely related to the GD1 strain. Phylogenetic analysis of the GC biopsy specimen-derived EBV (GC-EBV) genomes was subsequently performed to assess their genomic diversity and it exhibited the greatest divergence from the type 2 strain, AG876. Compared with the reference EBV strain GD1, they harbored 961 variations in total, including 919 substitutions, 23 insertions, and 19 deletions. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density varied substantially across all known open reading frames and was highest in latency-associated genes. Moreover, we identified 2 interstrain recombinants at the EBNA1 locus, which provided a further mechanism for the generation of diversity. Some T-cell epitope sequences in EBNA1 and LMP2A genes showed extensive variation across strains, which implied their importance in the development of vaccines and T-cell therapy. In conclusion, we reported the first genome-wide view of sequence variation of EBV isolated from primary EBVaGC biopsy specimens, which might serve as an effective method for further understanding the genomic variations contribute to EBVaGC carcinogenesis and treatment. PMID:26716899

  20. Lymphocytic Arteritis in Epstein-Barr Virus Vulvar Ulceration (Lipschütz Disease): A Report of 7 Cases.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Mary M; Sangüeza, Martin; Werner, Betina; Kutzner, Heinz; Carlson, John A

    2015-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection can rarely present as painful genital ulcers, mostly in young female adolescents. Typically diagnosed by clinical findings, EBV vulvar ulceration (EBVVU) is rarely biopsied. Herein, the authors report the histopathology in 8 biopsies from 7 EBVVU patients, all serologically confirmed for acute (4/7) or reactivated-chronic (3/7) EBV infection. The 7 women all presented with 1 or more painful, punched-out vulvar ulcers. Only patients with acute EBV infection showed other clinical findings: fever and/or atypical lymphocytosis affected 75% (3/4); lymphadenopathy in 50%; and malaise/fatigue, dysuria and/or hepatomegaly in 25%. All reactivated-chronic EBVVU had a solitary ulcer, and 2 had history of a similar episode of vulvar ulceration (aphthosis). Histopathologically, lymphocytic arteritis was identified in 88% (7/8); a submucosal scar was found in the eighth specimen. Other histopathologies included venulitis (62%), endarteritis obliterans (38%), thrombosis (25%), neutrophilic sebaceous adenitis (25%), and mucosal lymphoid hyperplasia (12%). Dense angiocentric CD3 CD4 T-cell lymphocyte-predominant infiltrates were found, regionally or diffusely. In 2 specimens, neutrophils compromised half of the infiltrate. Minor components of CD8, CD20, and CD30 lymphocytes, CD123 plasmacytoid monocytes, CD68 macrophages, and plasma cells were present. Small-vessel endothelium and smooth muscle adjacent to the ulcers faintly expressed cytoplasmic EBV latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1). In situ hybridization for early EBV mRNA (EBER) identified rare solitary or scattered clustered positive lymphocytes in 38%. Polymerase chain reaction for EBV DNA was positive in one EBER positive biopsy. EBV infection has been documented in muscular vessel vasculitis. Based on the aforementioned, EBVVU appears to be the consequence of localized lymphocytic arteritis.

  1. Identification of a novel protein encoded by the BamHI A region of the Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Fries, K L; Sculley, T B; Webster-Cyriaque, J; Rajadurai, P; Sadler, R H; Raab-Traub, N

    1997-01-01

    An unusual set of 3' coterminal, spliced mRNAs transcribed through the BamHI A fragment have been previously identified in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) tissues. These RNAs have also been detected at low levels in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell lines and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphocytes. Sequence analyses of clones from a cDNA library derived from the C15 NPC tumor indicated that the primary transcripts are differentially spliced, giving rise to a family of related transcripts, all of which encompass the BARF0 open reading frame (ORF) at the 3' end of the transcripts. One cDNA was identified that extended the BARF0 ORF at the 5' end, forming the RK-BARF0 ORF. In this study, a rabbit antiserum to a synthetic peptide representing an amino acid sequence encoded by the BARF0 ORF was prepared. This antiserum detected a glutathione S-transferase-BARF0 fusion protein and both BARF0 and RK-BARF0 proteins expressed from transfected constructs in H1299 cells. The serum also immunoprecipitated the 20-kDa BARF0 and 30-kDa RK-BARF0 in vitro-translated proteins. Immunoblot analyses identified a protein doublet of 30 and 35 kDa in all of the EBV-infected cell lines tested. Cellular fractionation studies revealed that the proteins were membrane associated. The sizes of the proteins detected in cell lines and their association with membranes suggests that they are likely encoded by the RK-BARF0 transcript, which is predicted to contain a membrane localization signal. The proteins were also detected in protein extracts prepared from NPC biopsies and a BL biopsy but not from hairy leukoplakia, a permissive EBV infection. These results reveal that the rightward RNA transcripts from the BamHI A region of EBV encode one or more proteins that are expressed in latently infected cells and in tumor tissue. PMID:9060630

  2. Survival analysis of patients with advanced-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma according to the Epstein-Barr virus status

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Rui; Li, Wen-Fei; Mao, Yan-Ping; Tan, Ling-Long; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Li-Zhi; Tian, Li; Lin, Ai-Hua; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The main aim of this study is to analyze the prognostic differences in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients who are positive and negative for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Results Of the 1106 patients, 248 (22.4%) had undetectable pre-treatment plasma EBV DNA levels. The total distant metastasis rate for EBV-negative group vs. EBV-positive group were 3.6% (9/248) vs. 15.0% (128/858) (P < 0.001). The estimated 4-year disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and locoregional relapse-free survival (LRRFS) for EBV-negative group vs. EBV-positive group were 88.9% vs. 76.9% (P < 0.001), 93.6% vs. 85.9% (P = 0.001), 96.7% vs. 84.8% (P < 0.001) and 94.1% vs. 90.0% (P = 0.1), respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the EBV status was an independent prognostic factor for DFS (HR, 1.813; 95% CI, 1.219-2.695; P = 0.003), OS (HR, 1.828; 95% CI, 1.075-3.107; P = 0.026) and DMFS (HR, 3.678; 95% CI, 1.859-7.277; P <0.001), and overall stage still remained the most important prognostic factor in patients with stage III-IVB NPC. Methods and Materials Data on 1106 patients with non-metastatic, histologically proven advanced-stage (III-IVB) NPC who underwent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were retrospectively reviewed. Patient survival between different EBV status groups were compared. Conclusions EBV status was an independent prognostic factor for patients with stage III–IVB NPC. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) plus concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) should be better treatment regimen for EBV-positive patients since distant metastasis was the main failure pattern, and CCRT may be enough for EBV-negative patients. PMID:27008701

  3. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related lymphoproliferative disorder with subsequent EBV-negative T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tao, Q; Srivastava, G; Loke, S L; Liang, R H; Liu, Y T; Ho, F C

    1994-07-01

    A 58-year-old Chinese man presented initially with generalized lymphadenopathy, and lymph-node biopsy showed disturbed architecture with preponderance of large B-blasts mixed with numerous CD8+ T lymphocytes, consistent with an acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Immunohistological and gene rearrangement studies confirmed the absence of clonal T or B cells. Polyclonal EBV with lytic infection was detected by Southern blot hybridization (SoBH). Expression of EBV proteins (EBNA2, LMP and ZEBRA) was detected in a proportion of cells by immunostaining. EBV-lytic proteins EA-D, VCA, MA were also detected in rare scattered cells. Double immunostaining showed that the LMP-positive cells were of B and of T phenotype: 73% CD19+, 26% CD2+, 23% CD3+, 8% CD4+, 17% CD8+. After biopsy, there was spontaneous regression of lymph-node enlargement, but lymphadenopathy recurred 8 months later, and the second lymph-node biopsy showed T-cell lymphoma, confirmed by detection of clonally rearranged T-cell-receptor beta-chain gene. However, EBV genome could not be detected in the second biopsy by SoBH, in situ hybridization for EBV-encoded EBER RNA, and immunostaining for EBNA2, LMP and ZEBRA was also negative. This case is of special interest because an EBV-negative T-cell lymphoma developed shortly after an acute episode of EBV-related lymphoproliferation, even though many EBV-positive T cells were detected during the acute episode. EBV was apparently not a direct cause of the lymphoma, but the close temporal association of the 2 lesions supports the hypothesis that EBV can act as a co-factor in lymphomagenesis.

  4. Epstein-Barr virus DNA load in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an independent predictor of clinical course and survival

    PubMed Central

    Visco, Carlo; Falisi, Erika; Young, Ken H.; Pascarella, Michela; Perbellini, Omar; Carli, Giuseppe; Novella, Elisabetta; Rossi, Davide; Giaretta, Ilaria; Cavallini, Chiara; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; De Rossi, Anita; D'Amore, Emanuele Stefano Giovanni; Rassu, Mario; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Ambrosetti, Achille; Rodeghiero, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The relation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA load and clinical course of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is unknown. We assessed EBV DNA load by quantitative PCR at CLL presentation in mononuclear cells (MNC) of 220 prospective patients that were enrolled and followed-up in two major Institutions. In 20 patients EBV DNA load was also assessed on plasma samples. Forty-one age-matched healthy subjects were tested for EBV DNA load on MNC. Findings were validated in an independent retrospective cohort of 112 patients with CLL. EBV DNA load was detectable in 59%, and high (≥2000 copies/µg DNA) in 19% of patients, but it was negative in plasma samples. EBV DNA load was significantly higher in CLL patients than in healthy subjects (P < .0001). No relation was found between high EBV load and clinical stage or biological variables, except for 11q deletion (P = .004), CD38 expression (P = .003), and NOTCH1 mutations (P = .05). High EBV load led to a 3.14-fold increase in the hazard ratio of death and to a shorter overall survival (OS; P = .001). Poor OS was attributable, at least in part, to shorter time-to-first-treatment (P = .0008), with no higher risk of Richter's transformation or second cancer. Multivariate analysis selected high levels of EBV load as independent predictor of OS after controlling for confounding clinical and biological variables. EBV DNA load at presentation is an independent predictor of OS in patients with CLL. PMID:26087198

  5. Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma with Positive Epstein-Barr Virus Status is Associated with More FOXP3 Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Antonia; Glavina Durdov, Merica; Capkun, Vesna; Jakelic Pitesa, Jasminka; Bozic Sakic, Maja

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is characterized by sparse malignant Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells dispersed in an inflammatory microenvironment. Immune evasion of malignant cells is partially due to the existence of a subpopulation of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Treg). The aim of this study was to analyze T cell composition in cHL with special emphasis on Treg in regard to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) status, subtype, and patient age. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study included 102 patients with cHL diagnosed during a 12-year period. EBV status of cHL was assessed immunohistochemically using antibodies directed to the EBV- encoded LMP1. To define T lymphocyte populations, slides were double-stained with FOXP3 for Treg, and CD4 or CD8 for T cells. In each case the number of single- and/or double-positive cells was counted on an image analyzer in 10 high-power fields. Statistical analysis was performed and differences were considered significant at P<0.05. RESULTS EBV-positive status of cHL was confirmed in 30 (29%) cases, mainly in patients older than 54 years and in mixed cellularity subtype. In EBV-positive cHL, higher numbers of CD8+ cells were found. In cHL with positive EBV status, more FOXP3+ Treg were found, as well as higher numbers of FOXP3+CD4+ Treg compared with EBV-negative cHL. The number of CD4+ cells decreased with age. The frequency of FOXP3+CD8+ Treg was variable, without a statistically significant association with age or EBV status. CONCLUSIONS EBV status has an impact on composition of T cell populations in the cHL microenvironment. PMID:27377121

  6. Identification and characterization of the conserved nucleoside-binding sites in the Epstein-Barr virus thymidine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chung-Chun; Chen, Min-Che; Chang, Ya-Ru; Hsu, Tsuey-Ying; Chen, Jen-Yang

    2004-01-01

    Thymidine kinase (TK), encoded by EBV (Epstein-Barr virus), is an attractive target for antiviral therapy and provides a novel approach to the treatment of EBV-associated malignancies. Despite the extensive use of nucleoside analogues for the treatment of viral infections and cancer, the structure-function relationship of EBV TK has been addressed rarely. In the absence of any structural information, we sought to identify and elucidate the functional roles of amino acids in the nucleoside-binding site using site-directed mutagenesis. Through alignment with other human herpesviral TK protein sequences, we predicted that certain conserved regions comprise the nucleoside-binding site of EBV TK and, through site-directed mutagenesis, showed significant changes in activity and binding affinity for thymidine of site 3 (-DRH-) and 4 (-VFP-) mutants. For site 3, only mutants D392E (Asp392-->Glu) and R393H retain activity, indicating that a negative charge is important for Asp392 and a positive charge is required for Arg393. The increased binding affinities of these two mutants for 3'-deoxy-2',3'-didehydrothymidine suggest that the two residues are also important for substrate selection. Interestingly, the changed metal-ion usage pattern of D392E reveals that Asp392 plays multiple roles in this region. His394 cannot be compensated by other amino acids, also indicating a crucial role. In site 4, the F402Y mutant retains full activity; however, F402S retains only 60% relative activity. Strikingly, when Phe402 is substituted with serine residue, the original preferred pyrimidine substrates, such as 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine, iododeoxyuridine and beta-L-5-iododioxolane uracil (L-form substrate), have decreased competitiveness with thymidine, suggesting that Phe402 plays a crucial role in substrate specificity and that the aromatic ring is important for function. PMID:14705959

  7. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 limits Epstein-Barr virus lytic activation in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hill, Erik R; Koganti, Siva; Zhi, Jizu; Megyola, Cynthia; Freeman, Alexandra F; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Tangye, Stuart G; Farrell, Paul J; Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita

    2013-11-01

    Lytic activation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is central to its life cycle and to most EBV-related diseases. However, not every EBV-infected B cell is susceptible to lytic activation. This lack of uniform susceptibility to lytic activation also directly impacts the success of viral oncolytic therapy for EBV cancers, yet determinants of susceptibility to lytic induction signals are not well understood. To determine if host factors influence susceptibility to EBV lytic activation, we developed a technique to separate lytic from refractory cells and reported that EBV lytic activation occurs preferentially in cells with lower levels of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Using this tool to detect single cells, we now extend the correlation between STAT3 and lytic versus refractory states to EBV-infected circulating B cells in patients with primary EBV infection, leading us to investigate whether STAT3 controls susceptibility to EBV lytic activation. In loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies in EBV-positive B lymphoma and lymphoblastoid cells, we found that the levels of functional STAT3 regulate susceptibility to EBV lytic activation. This prompted us to identify a pool of candidate cellular genes that might be regulated by STAT3 to limit EBV lytic activation. From this pool, we confirmed increases in transcript levels in refractory cells of a set of genes known to participate in transcription repression. Taken together, our findings place STAT3 at a critical crossroads between EBV latency and lytic activation, processes fundamental to EBV lymphomagenesis. PMID:23966384

  8. Roles of cell signaling pathways in cell-to-cell contact-mediated Epstein-Barr virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Nanbo, Asuka; Terada, Haruna; Kachi, Kunihiro; Takada, Kenzo; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2012-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human gamma herpesvirus, establishes a life-long latent infection in B lymphocytes and epithelial cells following primary infection. Several lines of evidence indicate that the efficiency of EBV infection in epithelial cells is accelerated up to 10(4)-fold by coculturing with EBV-infected Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cells compared to infection with cell-free virions, indicating that EBV infection into epithelial cells is mainly mediated via cell-to-cell contact. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this pathway are poorly understood. Here, we establish a novel assay to assess cell-to-cell contact-mediated EBV transmission by coculturing an EBV-infected BL cell line with an EBV-negative epithelial cell line under stimulation for lytic cycle induction. By using this assay, we confirmed that EBV was transmitted from BL cells to epithelial cells via cell-to-cell contact but not via cell-to-cell fusion. The inhibitor treatments of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathways blocked EBV transmission in addition to lytic induction. The blockage of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway impaired EBV transmission coupled with the inhibition of lytic induction. Knockdown of the RelA/p65 subunit of NF-κB reduced viral transmission. Moreover, these signaling pathways were activated in cocultured BL cells and in epithelial cells. Finally, we observed that viral replication was induced in cocultured BL cells. Taken together, our data suggest that cell-to-cell contact induces multiple cell signaling pathways in BL cells and epithelial cells, contributing to the induction of the viral lytic cycle in BL cells and the enhancement of viral transmission to epithelial cells. PMID:22718812

  9. Epstein-Barr virus-positive nodal peripheral T cell lymphomas: clinicopathologic and gene expression profiling study.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sang Yun; Sung, Jiyeon; Ju, Hyunjung; Karube, Kennosuke; Kim, Soek Jin; Kim, Won Seog; Seto, Masao; Ko, Young-Hyeh

    2013-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-positive peripheral T cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (EBV+ PTCL-NOS), in which virtually all neoplastic T cells harbor EBV, is a very rare disease with poor prognosis. To analyze the clinicopathologic characteristics and gene expression profile, we retrospectively collected six cases of EBV+ PTCL-NOS with no known primary immunodeficiency. The patients were 5 men and 1 woman, their age ranging from 48 years to 88 years (median 61.5 years). Lymphadenopathy was the most common presentation. Four patients had underlying disease, including HBV carrier, HCV infection, diabetes mellitus, and prostate cancer. All patients showed fatal clinical course in spite of chemotherapy. Histopathologically, monotonous infiltration of atypical lymphocytes of small to medium size was shown in four patients and medium to large tumor cells in two patients. Five patients showed CD4-/CD8+/bF-1+ phenotype with TIA-1 expression. In gene expression analysis using mRNA microarray, genes differentially expressed in EBV+ PTCL-NOS compared to normal reactive lymph nodes included 1515 genes (Mann-Whitney U-test p<0.05, folder change ≥4 times). Enriched functional annotation terms by DAVID were mostly related to immune response, defense response, cell-to-cell signaling, and membrane signaling. Especially, the genes involved in B cell differentiation or activation were mostly down-regulated, and T cell activation was mostly suppressed by down-regulation of activation genes and up-regulation of regulatory genes. Genes associated with cytotoxic activity were mostly up-regulated. Based on its peculiar clinical, histopathologic, and gene expression findings in EBV+ PTCL-NOS, we suggest EBV+ PTCL-NOS as a distinct disease entity from PTCL-NOS. In this study, the finding that most significantly enriched the functional term was immune response, suggesting a specific relation between EBV infection and alteration of immune response in the patients with EBV+ PTCL-NOS.

  10. Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma with Positive Epstein-Barr Virus Status is Associated with More FOXP3 Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Antonia; Durdov, Merica Glavina; Capkun, Vesna; Pitesa, Jasminka Jakelic; Sakic, Maja Bozic

    2016-01-01

    Background Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is characterized by sparse malignant Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells dispersed in an inflammatory microenvironment. Immune evasion of malignant cells is partially due to the existence of a subpopulation of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Treg). The aim of this study was to analyze T cell composition in cHL with special emphasis on Treg in regard to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) status, subtype, and patient age. Material/Methods The study included 102 patients with cHL diagnosed during a 12-year period. EBV status of cHL was assessed immunohistochemically using antibodies directed to the EBV- encoded LMP1. To define T lymphocyte populations, slides were double-stained with FOXP3 for Treg, and CD4 or CD8 for T cells. In each case the number of single- and/or double-positive cells was counted on an image analyzer in 10 high-power fields. Statistical analysis was performed and differences were considered significant at P<0.05. Results EBV-positive status of cHL was confirmed in 30 (29%) cases, mainly in patients older than 54 years and in mixed cellularity subtype. In EBV-positive cHL, higher numbers of CD8+ cells were found. In cHL with positive EBV status, more FOXP3+ Treg were found, as well as higher numbers of FOXP3+CD4+ Treg compared with EBV-negative cHL. The number of CD4+ cells decreased with age. The frequency of FOXP3+CD8+ Treg was variable, without a statistically significant association with age or EBV status. Conclusions EBV status has an impact on composition of T cell populations in the cHL microenvironment. PMID:27377121

  11. Reactive Oxygen Species Mediate Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation by N-Methyl-N’-Nitro-N-Nitrosoguanidine

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sheng-Yen; Fang, Chih-Yeu; Wu, Chung-Chun; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Lin, Su-Fang; Chen, Jen-Yang

    2013-01-01

    N-nitroso compounds (NOCs) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation have been suggested to play a role in the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Although chemicals have been shown to be a risk factor contributing to the carcinogenesis of NPC, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. We demonstrated recently that N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) enhances the genomic instability and tumorigenicity of NPC cells via induction of EBV reactivation. However, the mechanisms that trigger EBV reactivation from latency remain unclear. Here, we address the role of ROS in induction of EBV reactivation under MNNG treatment. EBV reactivation was induced in over 70% of EBV-positive NA cells and the promoter of Rta (Rp) was activated after MNNG treatment. Inhibitor experiments revealed ATM, p38 MAPK and JNK were activated by ROS and involved in MNNG-induced EBV reactivation. Significantly, ROS scavengers N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), catalase and reduced glutathione inhibited EBV reactivation under MNNG and H2O2 treatment, suggesting ROS mediate EBV reactivation. The p53 was essential for EBV reactivation and the Rp activation by MNNG. Moreover, the p53 was phosphorylated, translocated into nucleus, and bound to Rp following ROS stimulation. The results suggest ROS play an important role in initiation of EBV reactivation by MNNG through a p53-dependent mechanism. Our findings demonstrate novel signaling mechanisms used by NOCs to induce EBV reactivation and provide a novel insight into NOCs link the EBV reactivation in the contribution to the development of NPC. Notably, this study indicates that antioxidants might be effective for inhibiting N-nitroso compound-induced EBV reactivation and therefore could be promising preventive and therapeutic agents for EBV reactivation-associated malignancies. PMID:24376853

  12. Host SHP1 phosphatase antagonizes Helicobacter pylori CagA and can be downregulated by Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Saju, Priya; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Hayashi, Takeru; Senda, Yoshie; Nagase, Lisa; Noda, Saori; Matsusaka, Keisuke; Funata, Sayaka; Kunita, Akiko; Urabe, Masayuki; Seto, Yasuyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Kaneda, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Most if not all gastric cancers are associated with chronic infection of the stomach mucosa with Helicobacter pylori cagA-positive strains(1-4). Approximately 10% of gastric cancers also harbour Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the cancer cells(5,6). Following delivery into gastric epithelial cells via type IV secretion(7,8), the cagA-encoded CagA protein undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation on the Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) motifs initially by Src family kinases (SFKs) and then by c-Abl(9,10). Tyrosine-phosphorylated CagA binds to the pro-oncogenic protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 and thereby deregulates the phosphatase activity(11,12), which has been considered to play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis(13). Here we show that the SHP2 homologue SHP1 interacts with CagA independently of the EPIYA motif. The interaction potentiates the phosphatase activity of SHP1 that dampens the oncogenic action of CagA by dephosphorylating the CagA EPIYA motifs. In vitro infection of gastric epithelial cells with EBV induces SHP1 promoter hypermethylation, which strengthens phosphorylation-dependent CagA action via epigenetic downregulation of SHP1 expression. Clinical specimens of EBV-positive gastric cancers also exhibit SHP1 hypermethylation with reduced SHP1 expression. The results reveal that SHP1 is the long-sought phosphatase that can antagonize CagA. Augmented H. pylori CagA activity, via SHP1 inhibition, might also contribute to the development of EBV-positive gastric cancer. PMID:27572445

  13. Efficient replication of Epstein-Barr virus-derived plasmids requires tethering by EBNA1 to host chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Hodin, Theresa L; Najrana, Tanbir; Yates, John L

    2013-12-01

    The EBNA1 protein of Epstein-Barr virus enables plasmids carrying oriP both to duplicate and to segregate efficiently in proliferating cells. EBNA1 recruits the origin recognition complex (ORC) to establish a replication origin at one element of oriP, DS (dyad symmetry); at another element, FR (family of repeats), EBNA1 binds to an array of sites from which it tethers plasmids to host chromosomes for mitotic stability. We report experiments leading to the conclusion that tethering by EBNA1 to host chromosomes is also needed within interphase nuclei in order for plasmids to be replicated efficiently from oriP. The DNA-binding domain of EBNA1, which lacks chromosome-binding ability, was found to support weak, DS-specific replication in HEK293 cells after transient transfection, being 17% as active as wild-type EBNA1. The low efficiency of replication was not due to the failure of the DNA-binding domain to retain plasmids within nuclei, because plasmids were recovered in similar amounts and entirely from the nuclear fraction of these transiently transfected cells. A derivative of EBNA1 with its chromosome-tethering domains replaced by a 22-amino-acid nucleosome-binding domain was fully active in supporting oriP functions. The implication is that EBNA1's DNA-binding domain is able to recruit ORC to DS, but either this step or subsequent replication is only efficient if the plasmid is tethered to a host chromosome. Finally, with some cell lines, DS can hardly support even transient plasmid replication without FR. A loss of plasmids lacking FR from nuclei cannot account for this requirement, suggesting that the stronger tethering to chromosomes by FR is needed for plasmid replication within the nuclei of such cells.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus antibodies mark systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma patients negative for anti-DNA.

    PubMed

    Fattal, Ittai; Shental, Noam; Molad, Yair; Gabrielli, Armando; Pokroy-Shapira, Elisheva; Oren, Shirly; Livneh, Avi; Langevitz, Pnina; Pauzner, Rachel; Sarig, Ofer; Gafter, Uzi; Domany, Eytan; Cohen, Irun R

    2014-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that can attack many different body organs; the triggering event is unknown. SLE has been associated with more than 100 different autoantibody reactivities - anti-dsDNA is prominent. Nevertheless, autoantibodies to dsDNA occur in only two-thirds of SLE patients. We previously reported the use of an antigen microarray to characterize SLE serology. We now report the results of an expanded study of serology in SLE patients and scleroderma (SSc) patients compared with healthy controls. The analysis validated and extended previous findings: two-thirds of SLE patients reacted to a large spectrum of self-molecules that overlapped with their reactivity to dsDNA; moreover, some SLE patients manifested a deficiency of natural IgM autoantibodies. Most significant was the finding that many SLE patients who were negative for autoantibodies to dsDNA manifested abnormal antibody responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV): these subjects made IgG antibodies to EBV antigens to which healthy subjects did not respond or they failed to make antibodies to EBV antigens to which healthy subjects did respond. This observation suggests that SLE may be associated with a defective immune response to EBV. The SSc patients shared many of these serological abnormalities with SLE patients, but differed from them in increased IgG autoantibodies to topoisomerase and centromere B; 84% of SLE patients and 58% of SSc patients could be detected by their abnormal antibodies to EBV. Hence an aberrant immune response to a ubiquitous viral infection such as EBV might set the stage for an autoimmune disease.

  15. Pretreatment whole blood Epstein-Barr virus-DNA is a significant prognostic marker in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Kim, Shin; Park, Jung Sun; Park, Chan-Sik; Sung, Heungsup; Lee, Sang-Wook; Huh, Jooryung; Suh, Cheolwon

    2016-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the peripheral blood has become a significant predictor of clinical outcomes in EBV-associated Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). However, due to its relative rarity, prevalence and prognostic role of circulating EBV-DNA has not been well established in Asian patients. Seventy patients with newly diagnosed HL were prospectively registered between October 2007 and January 2013, and underwent pretreatment whole blood (WB) EBV-DNA quantitation using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). WB EBV-DNA in baseline and serial RT-PCR within 1 year were investigated. Clinicopathologic parameters of the patients according to pretreatment WB EBV-DNA were also explored. Twelve patients (17.1 %) demonstrated WB EBV-DNA(+), which was significantly associated to older age, advanced stages, frequent involvements of extranodal sites, low serum albumin and hemoglobin levels, and high international prognostic scores ≥2. Three-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were significantly inferior in patients with pretreatment WB EBV-DNA(+) (53.5 vs 67.0 and 65.6 vs 90.2 %) (p < 0.032 and <0.01). Negatively conversed EBV-DNA within 1 year after chemotherapy also significantly affected favorable EFS (p < 0.01). Taken together, pretreatment WB EBV-DNA(+) may be a significant predictor of inferior EFS and OS over EBV-encoded RNA in situ hybridization (EBER-ISH)(+) in Korean patients with HL. Serial EBV-DNA monitoring following chemotherapy also seems helpful to predict survival outcomes. PMID:26883027

  16. Epstein-Barr Virus-positive T-cell Lymphoproliferative Disease Following Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yui, Shunsuke; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Imadome, Ken-ichi; Arai, Ayako; Takahashi, Mikiko; Ohashi, Ryuji; Tamai, Hayato; Moriya, Keiichi; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Shimizu, Akira; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of the extremely rare condition Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) which occurred after umbilical cord blood transplantation. A 25-year-old Japanese man underwent cord blood transplantation from a male human leukocyte antigen 4/6-matched donor due to acute myeloid leukemia with trisomy 8. Bone marrow examination on day 30 showed chimerism with at least 90% donor cells and complete hematological response. Chronic symptoms of graft-versus-host disease appeared only on the skin and were successfully treated with cyclosporine alone. Three years later, however, the patient experienced repeated cold-like symptoms and was hospitalized with liver dysfunction. A high fever developed and was followed by significant edema of the right side of the face. The EBV DNA copy number in whole peripheral blood was 2×10(4)/mL. Liver biopsy showed invasion of EBV-infected CD8-positive T cells. Southern blotting analysis of the whole peripheral blood showed that the T-cell receptor Cβ1 rearrangement was positive. On the basis of these results, EBV-positive T-cell LPD was diagnosed and treated with prednisolone, cyclosporine, and etoposide, followed by cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone. However, the patient died of cardiac function failure, pneumonia, and pulmonary hemorrhage, all of unidentified cause. Most cases of EBV-related LPD after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation consist of EBV-positive B-cell LPD, and, to our knowledge, de novo EBV-positive T-cell LPD subsequent to transplantation has not been previously reported. PMID:26960588

  17. Prognostic impact of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-DNA copy number at diagnosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yi; Gale, Robert Peter; Chen, Rui-Ze; Yang, Yu-Qiong; Wang, Li; Qu, Xiao-Yan; Qiu, Hai-Rong; Cao, Lei; Hong, Min; Wang, Rong; Wang, Yan; Fan, Lei; Chen, Yao-Yu; Hu, Zhi-Bin; Li, Jian-Yong; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-DNA is detected in the blood of some persons with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at diagnosis. Whether this is important in the development or progression of CLL is controversial. We interrogated associations between blood EBV-DNA copy number and biological and clinical variables in 243 new-diagnosed consecutive subjects with CLL. Quantification of EBV-DNA copies was done by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR). All subjects had serological evidence of prior EBV-infection. However, only 24 subjects (10%) had a EBV-DNA-positive test at diagnosis. EBV-DNA-positive subjects at diagnosis had lower hemoglobin concentrations and platelet levels, higher thymidine kinase-1 and serum ferritin levels, un-mutated IGHV genes and a greater risk of Richter transformation compared with EBV-DNA-negative subjects. Percent CD20-, CD148- and ZAP70-positive cells and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of each cluster designation were also increased in EBV-DNA-positive subjects at diagnosis. EBV-DNA test positivity was associated with a briefer time-to-treatment interval (HR 1.85; [95% confidence interval, 1.13, 3.03]; P=0.014) and worse survival (HR 2.77; [1.18, 6.49]; P=0.019). Reduction in EBV copies was significantly associated with therapy-response. A positive blood EBV-DNA test at diagnosis and sequential testing of EBV copies during therapy were significantly associated with biological and clinical variables, time-to-treatment, therapy-response and survival. If validated these data may be added to CLL prognostic scoring systems. PMID:26539641

  18. Correlation between DNA methyltransferases expression and Epstein-Barr virus, JC polyomavirus and Helicobacter pylori infections in gastric carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ksiaa, F; Ziadi, S; Gacem, R B; Dhiab, M B; Trimeche, M

    2014-01-01

    It' is accepted that aberrant expression of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) is responsible for hypermethylation in genes. However, there are limited data related to factors inducing aberrant expression of DNMTs. A total of 43 surgically resected gastrc carcinomas (GC) samples were analysed. Using immunohistochemistry assay we have determined expression level of DNMT1 and 3b. The presence of H.pylori was evaluated by histology, whereas JC polyomavirus (JCV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) detection were carried out by PCR and in situ hybridization techniques, respectively. High expression of DNMT1 and 3b were detected in 46.5% and 53.5% of GC cases, respectively. Co-expression of DNMT1 and 3b were found in 37.2% of cases. Using different techniques, H. pylori, JCV and EBV were detected in 55.8%, 32.6% and 9%, respectively. Moreover, in 37% of cases, we noted the presence of JCV and/or EBV infections. H.pylori co-infection was found in 64.3% (9/14) of JCV positive cases and in 50% of EBV positive GC, without a reliable significant relationship. Correlation analyses have showed a marked increase in DNMT1 expression in EBV associated GC (P= 0.02). Also, co-expression of DNMT1 and 3b was significantly associated with EBV infection in GC (P=0.05). Similarly, JCV associated GC mostly displayed DNMT1 positive status, but the difference did not reach the significant threshold. Nevertheless, infection with JCV and/or EBV was significantly correlated with increased expression of DNMT1 in GC (P= 0.05). Our study suggests that EBV and JCV infections in GC correlated with deregulation of DNA methyltransferases. PMID:25341997

  19. Antitumor activities of valproic acid on Epstein-Barr virus-associated T and natural killer lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Seiko; Saito, Takashi; Ito, Yoshinori; Kamakura, Maki; Gotoh, Kensei; Kawada, Jun-Ichi; Nishiyama, Yukihiro; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which infects B cells, T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells, is associated with multiple lymphoid malignancies. Recently, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been reported to have anticancer effects against various tumor cells. In the present study, we evaluated the killing effect of valproic acid (VPA), which acts as an HDAC inhibitor, on EBV-positive and -negative T and NK lymphoma cells. Treatment of multiple T and NK cell lines (SNT13, SNT16, Jurkat, SNK6, KAI3 and KHYG1) with 0.1-5 mM of VPA inhibited HDAC, increased acetylated histone levels and reduced cell viability. No significant differences were seen between EBV-positive and -negative cell lines. Although VPA induced apoptosis in some T and NK cell lines (SNT16, Jurkat and KHYG1) and cell cycle arrest, it did not induce lytic infection in EBV-positive T or NK cell lines. Because the killing effect of VPA was modest (1 mM VPA reduced cell viability by between 22% and 56%), we tested the effects of the combination of 1 mM of VPA and 0.01 μM of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. The combined treated of cells with VPA and bortezomib had an additive killing effect. Finally, we administered VPA to peripheral blood mononuclear cells from three patients with EBV-associated T or NK lymphoproliferative diseases. In these studies, VPA had a greater killing effect against EBV-infected cells than uninfected cells, and the effect was increased when VPA was combined with bortezomib. These results indicate that VPA has antitumor effects on T and NK lymphoma cells and that VPA and bortezomib may have synergistic effects, irrespective of the presence of EBV. PMID:22017376

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus Promotes Epithelial Cell Growth in the Absence of EBNA2 and LMP1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Jun; Imai, Shosuke; Oda, Takanori; Kojima, Toshichika; Okita, Kiwamu; Takada, Kenzo

    1999-01-01

    We attempted to infect primary gastric epithelia (PGE) with recombinant Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) carrying a selectable marker that made it possible to select EBV-infected cells. Cells dually positive for EBV-determined nuclear antigen (EBNA) and cytokeratin were detected in 3 of 21 primary cultures after 3 days of EBV inoculation. From one culture, EBV-infected cell clones were repeatedly obtained at a frequency of 3 to 5 cell clones per 106 cells. EBV-infected clones had enhanced population doubling and grew to attain a highly increased saturation density, together with acquisition of marked anchorage independence. The infected clones retained the ultrastructural morphology characteristic of gastric mucosal epithelium and have been growing stably for more than 18 months (corresponding to at least 300 generations) so far, in clear contrast to the parental PGE cells, which ceased growth after 60 generations. The p53 gene of the parental PGE cells was found to be overexpressed, perhaps thereby conferring the basal potential for long-term survival in vitro. Moreover, EBV infection accelerated, to a significant extent, the growth rate and agar clonability of NU-GC-3 cells, an established EBV-negative but EBV-susceptible human gastric carcinoma cell line. Both EBV-converted PGE and NU-GC-3 clones, like EBV-positive gastric carcinoma biopsy specimens, expressed a restricted set of EBV latent infection genes characterized by the absence of EBNA2 and latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) expression. These results indicate that EBV infection causes a transformed phenotype on PGE in the setting of possible unregulated cell cycling and renders even established gastric carcinoma cells more malignant via a limited spectrum of viral latent-gene expression. This study may reflect an in vivo scenario illustrating multiphasic involvement of EBV in carcinogenesis of gastric or other epithelial cancers. PMID:9882333

  1. RUNX super-enhancer control through the Notch pathway by Epstein-Barr virus transcription factors regulates B cell growth.

    PubMed

    Gunnell, Andrea; Webb, Helen M; Wood, C David; McClellan, Michael J; Wichaidit, Billy; Kempkes, Bettina; Jenner, Richard G; Osborne, Cameron; Farrell, Paul J; West, Michelle J

    2016-06-01

    In B cells infected by the cancer-associated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), RUNX3 and RUNX1 transcription is manipulated to control cell growth. The EBV-encoded EBNA2 transcription factor (TF) activates RUNX3 transcription leading to RUNX3-mediated repression of the RUNX1 promoter and the relief of RUNX1-directed growth repression. We show that EBNA2 activates RUNX3 through a specific element within a -97 kb super-enhancer in a manner dependent on the expression of the Notch DNA-binding partner RBP-J. We also reveal that the EBV TFs EBNA3B and EBNA3C contribute to RUNX3 activation in EBV-infected cells by targeting the same element. Uncovering a counter-regulatory feed-forward step, we demonstrate EBNA2 activation of a RUNX1 super-enhancer (-139 to -250 kb) that results in low-level RUNX1 expression in cells refractory to RUNX1-mediated growth inhibition. EBNA2 activation of the RUNX1 super-enhancer is also dependent on RBP-J. Consistent with the context-dependent roles of EBNA3B and EBNA3C as activators or repressors, we find that these proteins negatively regulate the RUNX1 super-enhancer, curbing EBNA2 activation. Taken together our results reveal cell-type-specific exploitation of RUNX gene super-enhancers by multiple EBV TFs via the Notch pathway to fine tune RUNX3 and RUNX1 expression and manipulate B-cell growth. PMID:26883634

  2. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 limits Epstein-Barr virus lytic activation in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hill, Erik R; Koganti, Siva; Zhi, Jizu; Megyola, Cynthia; Freeman, Alexandra F; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Tangye, Stuart G; Farrell, Paul J; Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita

    2013-11-01

    Lytic activation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is central to its life cycle and to most EBV-related diseases. However, not every EBV-infected B cell is susceptible to lytic activation. This lack of uniform susceptibility to lytic activation also directly impacts the success of viral oncolytic therapy for EBV cancers, yet determinants of susceptibility to lytic induction signals are not well understood. To determine if host factors influence susceptibility to EBV lytic activation, we developed a technique to separate lytic from refractory cells and reported that EBV lytic activation occurs preferentially in cells with lower levels of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Using this tool to detect single cells, we now extend the correlation between STAT3 and lytic versus refractory states to EBV-infected circulating B cells in patients with primary EBV infection, leading us to investigate whether STAT3 controls susceptibility to EBV lytic activation. In loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies in EBV-positive B lymphoma and lymphoblastoid cells, we found that the levels of functional STAT3 regulate susceptibility to EBV lytic activation. This prompted us to identify a pool of candidate cellular genes that might be regulated by STAT3 to limit EBV lytic activation. From this pool, we confirmed increases in transcript levels in refractory cells of a set of genes known to participate in transcription repression. Taken together, our findings place STAT3 at a critical crossroads between EBV latency and lytic activation, processes fundamental to EBV lymphomagenesis.

  3. Correlations between cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, anti-ganglioside antibodies, electrodiagnostic findings and functional status in Guillain-Barré syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Taheraghdam, Aliakbar; Pourkhanjar, Peyman; Talebi, Mahnaz; Bonyadi, Mohammadreza; Pashapour, Ali; Rikhtegar, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to underlying autoimmune background of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), the possible role of infectious agents cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and also due to association of anti-ganglioside antibodies with GBS, the present study aimed to investigate the associations between serum anti-ganglioside antibodies (AGA) level, type of infection and electrodiagnostic (ED) findings with the severity and three-month functional outcome of patients with GBS. Methods In a prospective study, 30 patients with GBS were selected and before starting the treatment, baseline serum samples of patients were obtained for measuring the serum AGA including the antibodies against GQ1b, GT1b, GD1a, GD1b, GM1, GM2, GM3 and strains of CMV and EBV. All the patients were precisely examined for ED findings. Functional status of patients on admission and three months after admission were recorded according to the modified Rankin scale (mRS). Results The results of patients’ serum assessment revealed that CMV IgM was positive in one patient (3.3%), CMV IgG in 29 patients (96.7%) and EBV IgG in 27 patients (90%). Anti-GM1 was found in 3 patients (10%) and anti-GM3 was found only in one patient (3.3%). However, no statistical significant association was found between the AGA and strain of the disease and ED findings. Conclusion Despite the coexistence of AGA and serum antibodies against CMV and EBV in some GBS patients, there was not clear association in this regard. However, the AGA was positive in patients who suffered from severe phase of the disease. PMID:24800041

  4. Genome-wide analysis of wild-type Epstein-Barr virus genomes derived from healthy individuals of the 1,000 Genomes Project.

    PubMed

    Santpere, Gabriel; Darre, Fleur; Blanco, Soledad; Alcami, Antonio; Villoslada, Pablo; Mar Albà, M; Navarro, Arcadi

    2014-04-01

    Most people in the world (∼90%) are infected by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which establishes itself permanently in B cells. Infection by EBV is related to a number of diseases including infectious mononucleosis, multiple sclerosis, and different types of cancer. So far, only seven complete EBV strains have been described, all of them coming from donors presenting EBV-related diseases. To perform a detailed comparative genomic analysis of EBV including, for the first time, EBV strains derived from healthy individuals, we reconstructed EBV sequences infecting lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from the 1000 Genomes Project. As strain B95-8 was used to transform B cells to obtain LCLs, it is always present, but a specific deletion in its genome sets it apart from natural EBV strains. After studying hundreds of individuals, we determined the presence of natural EBV in at least 10 of them and obtained a set of variants specific to wild-type EBV. By mapping the natural EBV reads into the EBV reference genome (NC007605), we constructed nearly complete wild-type viral genomes from three individuals. Adding them to the five disease-derived EBV genomic sequences available in the literature, we performed an in-depth comparative genomic analysis. We found that latency genes harbor more nucleotide diversity than lytic genes and that six out of nine latency-related genes, as well as other genes involved in viral attachment and entry into host cells, packaging, and the capsid, present the molecular signature of accelerated protein evolution rates, suggesting rapid host-parasite coevolution.

  5. Laser-capture microdissection of oropharyngeal epithelium indicates restriction of Epstein-Barr virus receptor/CD21 mRNA to tonsil epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ru; Gu, Xin; Nathan, Cherie-Ann; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey

    2008-01-01

    Background: Epstein-Barr virus colonizes the oropharynx of a majority of individuals. It infects B lymphocytes and epithelial cells and can contribute to the development of both lymphoid and epithelial tumors. The virus uses CD21 for attachment to B cells which constitutively express the protein. Infection of epithelial cells in vitro is also more efficient if CD21 is available. However, its potential contribution to infection in vivo has been difficult to evaluate as discrepant results with antibodies have made it difficult to determine which, if any, epithelial cells in the oropharynx express CD21. Methods: To reevaluate CD21 expression by an alternative method, epithelial cells were isolated by laser-capture microdissection from formalin-fixed sections of tissues from various parts of the oropharynx and mRNA was amplified with primers specific for the exons of CD21 which code for the Epstein-Barr virus binding site. Results: CD21 mRNA was expressed in tonsil epithelium, but not in epithelium from buccal mucosa, uvula, soft palate or tongue. Conclusions: CD21 does not contribute to infection of most normal epithelial tissues in the oropharynx, but may contribute to infection of epithelial cells in the tonsil, where virus has been demonstrated in healthy carriers. PMID:18710421

  6. Cell-to-Cell Contact as an Efficient Mode of Epstein-Barr Virus Infection of Diverse Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Shosuke; Nishikawa, Jun; Takada, Kenzo

    1998-01-01

    We show clear evidence for direct infection of various human epithelial cells by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in vitro. The successful infection was achieved by using recombinant EBV (Akata strain) carrying a selective marker gene but without any other artificial operations, such as introduction of the known EBV receptor (CD21) gene or addition of polymeric immunoglobulin A against viral gp350 in culture. Of 21 human epithelial cell lines examined, 18 became infected by EBV, as ascertained by the detection of EBV-determined nuclear antigen (EBNA) 1 expression in the early period after virus exposure, and the following selection culture easily yielded a number of EBV-infected clones from 15 cell lines. None of the human fibroblasts and five nonhuman-derived cell lines examined was susceptible to the infection. By comparison, cocultivation with virus producers showed ≈800-fold-higher efficiency of infection than cell-free infection did, suggesting the significance of direct cell-to-cell contact as a mode of virus spread in vivo. Most of the epithelial cell lines infectable with EBV were negative for CD21 expression at the protein and mRNA levels. The majority of EBV-infected clones established from each cell line invariably expressed EBNA1, EBV-encoded small RNAs, rightward transcripts from the BamHI-A region of the virus genome, and latent membrane protein (LMP) 2A, but not the other EBNAs or LMP1. This restricted form of latent viral gene expression, which is a central issue for understanding epithelial oncogenesis by EBV, resembled that seen in EBV-associated gastric carcinoma and LMP1-negative nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The results indicate that direct infection of epithelial cells by EBV may occur naturally in vivo, and this could be mediated by an unidentified, epithelium-specific binding receptor for EBV. The EBV convertants are viewed, at least in terms of viral gene expression, as in vitro analogs of EBV-associated epithelial tumor cells, thus facilitating

  7. Peptides Designed To Spatially Depict the Epstein-Barr Virus Major Virion Glycoprotein gp350 Neutralization Epitope Elicit Antibodies That Block Virus-Neutralizing Antibody 72A1 Interaction with the Native gp350 Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Jerome E.; Coinçon, Mathieu; Leblond, Valérie; Hu, Jing; Fang, Janey M.; Sygusch, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the etiologic agent of infectious mononucleosis and the root cause of B-cell lymphoproliferative disease in individuals with a weakened immune system, as well as a principal cofactor in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, various lymphomas, and other cancers. The EBV major virion surface glycoprotein gp350 is viewed as the best vaccine candidate to prevent infectious mononucleosis in healthy EBV-naive persons and EBV-related cancers in at-risk individuals. Previous epitope mapping of gp350 revealed only one dominant neutralizing epitope, which has been shown to be the target of the monoclonal antibody 72A1. Computer modeling of the 72A1 antibody interaction with the gp350 amino terminus was used to identify gp350 amino acids that could form strong ionic, electrostatic, or hydrogen bonds with the 72A1 antibody. Peptide DDRTTLQLAQNPVYIPETYPYIKWDN (designated peptide 2) and peptide GSAKPGNGSYFASVKTEMLGNEID (designated peptide 3) were designed to spatially represent the gp350 amino acids predicted to interact with the 72A1 antibody paratope. Peptide 2 bound to the 72A1 antibody and blocked 72A1 antibody recognition of the native gp350 molecule. Peptide 2 and peptide 3 were recognized by human IgG and shown to elicit murine antibodies that could target gp350 and block its recognition by the 72A1 antibody. This work provides a structural mapping of the interaction between the EBV-neutralizing antibody 72A1 and the major virion surface protein gp350. gp350 mimetic peptides that spatially depict the EBV-neutralizing epitope would be useful as a vaccine to focus the immune system exclusively to this important virus epitope. IMPORTANCE The production of virus-neutralizing antibodies targeting the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) major surface glycoprotein gp350 is important for the prevention of infectious mononucleosis and EBV-related cancers. The data presented here provide the first in silico map of the gp350 interaction with a virus-blocking monoclonal

  8. Routine detection of Epstein-Barr virus specific T-cells in the peripheral blood by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, B. E.; Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to detect cytomegalovirus-specific T-cells (CD4(+)) in the peripheral blood by flow cytometry has been recently described by Picker et al. In this method, cells are incubated with viral antigen and responding (cytokine producing) T-cells are then identified by flow cytometry. To date, this technique has not been reliably used to detect Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific T-cells primarily due to the superantigen/mitogenic properties of the virus which non-specifically activate T-cells. By modifying culture conditions under which the antigens are presented, we have overcome this limitation and developed an assay to detect and quantitate EBV-specific T-cells. The detection of cytokine producing T-cells by flow cytometry requires an extremely strong signal (such as culture in the presence of PMA and ionomycin). Our data indicate that in modified culture conditions (early removal of viral antigen) the non-specific activation of T-cells by EBV is reduced, but antigen presentation will continue uninhibited. Using this method, EBV-specific T-cells may be legitimately detected using flow cytometry. No reduction in the numbers of antigen-specific T-cells was observed by the early removal of target antigen when verified using cytomegalovirus antigen (a virus with no non-specific T-cell activation properties). In EBV-seropositive individuals, the phenotype of the EBV-specific cytokine producing T-cells was evaluated using four-color flow cytometry and found to be CD45(+), CD3(+), CD4(+), CD45RA(-), CD69(+), CD25(-). This phenotype indicates the stimulation of circulating previously unactivated memory T-cells. No cytokine production was observed in CD4(+) T-cells from EBV-seronegative individuals, confirming the specificity of this assay. In addition, the use of four color cytometry (CD45, CD3, CD69, IFNgamma/IL-2) allows the total quantitative assessment of EBV-specific T-cells while monitoring the interference of EBV non-specific mitogenic activity. This method may

  9. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation as an Epigenetic Consequence of Epstein-Barr Virus Infection of Immortalized Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Birdwell, Christine E.; Queen, Krista J.; Kilgore, Phillip C. S. R.; Rollyson, Phoebe; Trutschl, Marjan; Cvek, Urska

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The oral cavity is a persistent reservoir for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with lifelong infection of resident epithelial and B cells. Infection of these cell types results in distinct EBV gene expression patterns regulated by epigenetic modifications involving DNA methylation and chromatin structure. Regulation of EBV gene expression relies on viral manipulation of the host epigenetic machinery that may result in long-lasting host epigenetic reprogramming. To identify epigenetic events following EBV infection, a transient infection model was established to map epigenetic changes in telomerase-immortalized oral keratinocytes. EBV-infected oral keratinocytes exhibited a predominantly latent viral gene expression program with some lytic or abortive replication. Calcium and methylcellulose-induced differentiation was delayed in EBV-positive clones and in clones that lost EBV compared to uninfected controls, indicating a functional consequence of EBV epigenetic modifications. Analysis of global cellular DNA methylation identified over 13,000 differentially methylated CpG residues in cells exposed to EBV compared to uninfected controls, with CpG island hypermethylation observed at several cellular genes. Although the vast majority of the DNA methylation changes were silent, 65 cellular genes that acquired CpG methylation showed altered transcript levels. Genes with increased transcript levels frequently acquired DNA methylation within the gene body while those with decreased transcript levels acquired DNA methylation near the transcription start site. Treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, decitabine, restored expression of some hypermethylated genes in EBV-infected and EBV-negative transiently infected clones. Overall, these observations suggested that EBV infection of keratinocytes leaves a lasting epigenetic imprint that can enhance the tumorigenic phenotype of infected cells. IMPORTANCE Here, we show that EBV infection of oral keratinocytes led to

  10. Antibody responses to defined epitopes in the Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1-encoded transactivator protein among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Tedeschi, R; Dillner, J; De Paoli, P

    1996-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1-encoded replication activator (ZEBRA) is a key mediator of reactivation from latency to the viral productive cycle. In the present study, the serum antibody responses against three defined ZEBRA epitopes (designated ZEBRA-1, -19, and -22) were determined for 50 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive patients and 100 matched healthy control subjects. The anti-ZEBRA responses were more commonly found among HIV-seropositive patients than among healthy controls for all the three ZEBRA epitopes tested (P < 0.0003, P < 0.003, and P < 0.001, respectively). Comparison of ZEBRA antibody levels with the degree of immunodeficiency (CD4 cell counts), CDC grouping, and HIV p24 antigen positivity showed little association, suggesting that induction of ZEBRA antibodies is an early event after HIV infection. PMID:8705686

  11. Generation and characterization of a novel recombinant antibody against LMP1-TES1 of Epstein-Barr virus isolated by phage display.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; Mao, Yuan; Cao, Qing; Xiong, Lin; Wen, Juan; Chen, Renjie; Zhu, Jin

    2013-04-22

    Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) is a primary target for controlling tumorigenesis in Epstein-Barr virus related malignancies; in this study, we aimed to develop a specific antibody against the TES1 domain of the oncogenic LMP1. We screened a full human naïve Fab phage library against TES1 peptide, which consisted of C terminal-activating regions proximal 44 amino acids. After three rounds of panning, enrichment and testing by phage ELISA and further analyzed by DNA sequencing, we selected a phage clone with the highest affinity to LMP1-TES1 and designated it as htesFab. The positive clone was expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified htesFab was characterized for its binding specificity and affinity to LMP1. ELISA, immunofluorescence and FACS analysis confirmed that htesFab could recognize LMP1 TES1 both in vitro and in LMP1 expressing HNE2-LMP1 cells. Furthermore, MTT assay showed that htesFab inhibited the proliferation of HNE2-LMP1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, this study reported the isolation and characterization of human Fab, which specifically targets the C terminal region/TES1 of LMP1, and has potential to be developed as novel tool for the diagnosis and therapy of Epstein-Barr virus related carcinoma.

  12. Role for a region of helically unstable DNA within the Epstein-Barr virus latent cycle origin of DNA replication oriP in origin function

    SciTech Connect

    Polonskaya, Zhanna; Benham, Craig J.; Hearing, Janet . E-mail: jhearing@ms.cc.sunysb.edu

    2004-10-25

    The minimal replicator of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent cycle origin of DNA replication oriP is composed of two binding sites for the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and flanking inverted repeats that bind the telomere repeat binding factor TRF2. Although not required for minimal replicator activity, additional binding sites for EBNA-1 and TRF2 and one or more auxiliary elements located to the right of the EBNA-1/TRF2 sites are required for the efficient replication of oriP plasmids. Another region of oriP that is predicted to be destabilized by DNA supercoiling is shown here to be an important functional component of oriP. The ability of DNA fragments of unrelated sequence and possessing supercoiled-induced DNA duplex destabilized (SIDD) structures, but not fragments characterized by helically stable DNA, to substitute for this component of oriP demonstrates a role for the SIDD region in the initiation of oriP-plasmid DNA replication.

  13. Redefining the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen EBNA-1 gene promoter and transcription initiation site in group I Burkitt lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, B C; Strominger, J L; Speck, S H

    1995-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen EBNA-1 gene promoter for the restricted Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency program operating in group I Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cell lines was previously identified incorrectly. Here we present evidence from RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) cloning, reverse transcription-PCR, and S1 nuclease analyses, which demonstrates that the EBNA-1 gene promoter in group I BL cell lines is located in the viral BamHI Q fragment, immediately upstream of two low-affinity EBNA-1 binding sites. Transcripts initiated from this promoter, referred to as Qp, have the previously reported Q/U/K exon splicing pattern. Qp is active in group I BL cell lines but not in group III BL cell lines or in EBV immortalized B-lymphoblastoid cell lines. In addition, transient transfection of Qp-driven reporter constructs into both an EBV-negative BL cell line and a group I BL cell line gave rise to correctly initiated transcripts. Inspection of Qp revealed that it is a TATA-less promoter whose architecture is similar to the promoters of housekeeping genes, suggesting that Qp may be a default promoter which ensures EBNA-1 expression in cells that cannot run the full viral latency program. Elucidation of the genetic mechanism responsible for the EBNA-1-restricted program of EBV latency is an essential step in understanding control of viral latency in EBV-associated tumors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7479841

  14. Interference of fisetin with targets of the nuclear factor-κB signal transduction pathway activated by Epstein-Barr virus encoded latent membrane protein 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Liang, Hong-Ying; Li, Ming-Yong; Lin, Chun-Yan; Shi, Meng-Jie; Zhang, Xiu-Juan

    2014-01-01

    Fisetin is an effective compound extracted from lacquer which has been used in the treatment of various diseases. Preliminary data indicate that it also exerts specific anti-cancer effects. However, the manner in which fisetin regulates cancer growth remains unknown. In this study, we elucidated interference of fisetin with targets of the nuclear factorκB signal transduction pathway activated by Epstein-Barr virus encoding latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1)in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells, Results showed that fisetin inhibited the survival rate of CNE-LMP1 cells and NF-κB activation caused by LMP1. Fisetin also suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65) and IκBα phosphorylation, while inhibiting CyclinD1, all key targets of the NF-κB signal transduction pathway. It was suggested that interference effects of fisetin with signal transduction activated by LMP1 encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus may play an important role in its anticancer potential.

  15. Establishment and characterization of Epstein-Barr virus gp350-expressing transfected human lymphoid (Raji) cell clones.

    PubMed

    Khyatti, M; Patel, P C; Menezes, J

    1991-06-19

    Gp350, a late Epstein-Barr-virus (EBV) glycoprotein expressed on both the envelope of viral particles and EBV-producing cells, is also the candidate for the development of an anti-EBV subunit vaccine. This glycoprotein is thought to play an important role in anti-EBV immunity. However, studies on the role of this viral antigen in cellular cytotoxicity and other immune functions have been hampered by the lack of a suitable model expressing gp350. We describe here a study in which we successfully transfected a gp350-negative cell line resistant to natural-killer(NK)-cell activity (i.e., Raji) with a recombinant plasmid (pZIP-MA) containing the EBV-gp350 and the neomycin resistance gene. Three clones with a stable and strong expression of gp350 on their surface membrane, as demonstrated using a gp350-specific (i.e., 2LI0) monoclonal antibody (MAb) were isolated, characterized and used as targets in an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay. However, gp350 expression on 2 of the 3 isolated clones was not recognized by an anti-gp350 MAb (72AI) which is specific to a unique gp350 epitope with a dual function (i.e., involved in both EBV binding to its target cell receptors and in inducing virus-neutralizing antibody). We have also found that gp350 expression on our 3 selected clones does not affect EBV-receptor (CR2) density. Our model of gp350-expressing, NK-cell-activity-resistant targets revealed very useful in determining that gp350 serves as a target antigen for EBV-specific ADCC. These gp350-expressing cell clones appear to represent a valuable tool for diagnostic purposes (i.e., for detecting and titrating gp350 antibodies in patients with EBV-associated diseases). Our approach should also prove useful for studying the expression of other cell-surface-associated viral and tumor antigens and their role in specific cellular immunity and immunosurveillance. PMID:1646179

  16. Evaluation of Measles Vaccine Virus as a Vector to Deliver Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein or Epstein-Barr Virus Glycoprotein gp350

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Hoyin; Cheng, Xing; Xu, Qi; Zengel, James R; Parhy, Bandita; Zhao, Jackie; Wang, C. Kathy; Jin, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Live attenuated recombinant measles vaccine virus (MV) Edmonston-Zagreb (EZ) strain was evaluated as a viral vector to express the ectodomains of fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV F) or glycoprotein 350 of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV gp350) as candidate vaccines for prophylaxis of RSV and EBV. The glycoprotein gene was inserted at the 1st or the 3rd position of the measles virus genome and the recombinant viruses were generated. Insertion of the foreign gene at the 3rd position had a minimal impact on viral replication in vitro. RSV F or EBV gp350 protein was secreted from infected cells. In cotton rats, EZ-RSV F and EZ-EBV gp350 induced MV- and insert-specific antibody responses. In addition, both vaccines also induced insert specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ) secreting T cell response. EZ-RSV F protected cotton rats from pulmonary replication of RSV A2 challenge infection. In rhesus macaques, although both EZ-RSV F and EZ-EBV gp350 induced MV specific neutralizing antibody responses, only RSV F specific antibody response was detected. Thus, the immunogenicity of the foreign antigens delivered by measles vaccine virus is dependent on the nature of the insert and the animal models used for vaccine evaluation. PMID:22383906

  17. Genome-wide analysis of host-chromosome binding sites for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1) protein is required for the establishment of EBV latent infection in proliferating B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein that stimulates DNA replication at the viral origin of plasmid replication (OriP), regulates transcription of viral and cellular genes, and tethers the viral episome to the cellular chromosome. EBNA1 also provides a survival function to B-lymphocytes, potentially through its ability to alter cellular gene expression. To better understand these various functions of EBNA1, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the viral and cellular DNA sites associated with EBNA1 protein in a latently infected Burkitt lymphoma B-cell line. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) combined with massively parallel deep-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) was used to identify cellular sites bound by EBNA1. Sites identified by ChIP-Seq were validated by conventional real-time PCR, and ChIP-Seq provided quantitative, high-resolution detection of the known EBNA1 binding sites on the EBV genome at OriP and Qp. We identified at least one cluster of unusually high-affinity EBNA1 binding sites on chromosome 11, between the divergent FAM55 D and FAM55B genes. A consensus for all cellular EBNA1 binding sites is distinct from those derived from the known viral binding sites, suggesting that some of these sites are indirectly bound by EBNA1. EBNA1 also bound close to the transcriptional start sites of a large number of cellular genes, including HDAC3, CDC7, and MAP3K1, which we show are positively regulated by EBNA1. EBNA1 binding sites were enriched in some repetitive elements, especially LINE 1 retrotransposons, and had weak correlations with histone modifications and ORC binding. We conclude that EBNA1 can interact with a large number of cellular genes and chromosomal loci in latently infected cells, but that these sites are likely to represent a complex ensemble of direct and indirect EBNA1 binding sites. PMID

  18. Characterization of the Variability of Epstein-Barr Virus Genes in Nasopharyngeal Biopsies: Potential Predictors for Carcinoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Banko, Ana V.; Lazarevic, Ivana B.; Folic, Miljan M.; Djukic, Vojko B.; Cirkovic, Andja M.; Karalic, Danijela Z.; Cupic, Maja D.; Jovanovic, Tanja P.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is a significant factor in the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, especially in the undifferentiated carcinoma of nasopharyngeal type (UCNT, World Health Organization type III), which is the dominant histopathological type in high-risk areas. The major EBV oncogene is latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1). LMP1 gene shows variability with different tumorigenic and immunogenic potentials. EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) regulates progression of EBV-related tumors; however, the influence of EBNA1 sequence variability on tumor pathogenesis is controversial. The aims of this study were to characterize polymorphisms of EBV genes in non-endemic nasopharyngeal carcinoma biopsies and to investigate potential sequence patterns that correlate with the clinical presentation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In total, 116 tumor biopsies of undifferentiated carcinoma of nasopharyngeal type (UCNT), collected from 2008 to 2014, were evaluated in this study. The genes EBNA2, LMP1, and EBNA1 were amplified using nested-PCR. EBNA2 genotyping was performed by visualization of PCR products using gel electrophoresis. Investigation of LMP1 and EBNA1 included sequence, phylogenetic, and statistical analyses. The presence of EBV DNA was significantly distributed between TNM stages. LMP1 variability showed six variants, with the detection of the first China1 and North Carolina variants in European nasopharyngeal carcinoma biopsies. Newly discovered variants Srb1 and Srb2 were UCNT-specific LMP1 polymorphisms. The B95-8 and North Carolina variants are possible predictors for favorable TNM stages. In contrast, deletions in LMP1 are possible risk factors for the most disfavorable TNM stage, independent of EBNA2 or EBNA1 variability. A newly discovered EBNA1 subvariant, P-thr-sv-5, could be a potential diagnostic marker, as it represented a UCNT-specific EBNA1 subvariant. A particular combination of EBNA2, LMP1, and EBNA1 polymorphisms, type 1/Med/P-thr was

  19. Human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection in inflammatory bowel disease: Need for mucosal viral load measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Racca, Francesca; Paolucci, Stefania; Campanini, Giulia; Pozzi, Lodovica; Betti, Elena; Riboni, Roberta; Vanoli, Alessandro; Baldanti, Fausto; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the best diagnostic technique and risk factors of the human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: A cohort of 40 IBD patients (17 refractory) and 40 controls underwent peripheral blood and endoscopic colonic mucosal sample harvest. Viral infection was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, and correlations with clinical and endoscopic indexes of activity, and risk factors were investigated. RESULTS: All refractory patients carried detectable levels of HCMV and/or EBV mucosal load as compared to 13/23 (56.5%) non-refractory and 13/40 (32.5%) controls. The median DNA value was significantly higher in refractory (HCMV 286 and EBV 5.440 copies/105 cells) than in non-refractory (HCMV 0 and EBV 6 copies/105 cells; P < 0.05 and < 0.001) IBD patients and controls (HCMV and EBV 0 copies/105 cells; P < 0.001 for both). Refractory patients showed DNA peak values ≥ 103 copies/105 cells in diseased mucosa in comparison to non-diseased mucosa (P < 0.0121 for HCMV and < 0.0004 for EBV), while non-refractory patients and controls invariably displayed levels below this threshold, thus allowing us to differentiate viral colitis from mucosal infection. Moreover, the mucosal load positively correlated with the values found in the peripheral blood, whilst no correlation with the number of positive cells at immunohistochemistry was found. Steroid use was identified as a significant risk factor for both HCMV (P = 0.018) and EBV (P = 0.002) colitis. Finally, a course of specific antiviral therapy with ganciclovir was successful in all refractory patients with HCMV colitis, whilst refractory patients with EBV colitis did not show any improvement despite steroid tapering and discontinuation of the other medications. CONCLUSION: Viral colitis appeared to contribute to mucosal lesions in refractory IBD, and its correct diagnosis and management require

  20. Proteomics and Transcriptomics of BJAB Cells Expressing the Epstein-Barr Virus Noncoding RNAs EBER1 and EBER2

    PubMed Central

    Pimienta, Genaro; Fok, Victor; Haslip, Maria; Nagy, Maria; Takyar, Seyedtaghi; Steitz, Joan A

    2015-01-01

    In Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent infection, the EBV-encoded RNAs EBER1 and EBER2 accumulate in the host cell nucleus to ~106 copies. While the expression of EBERs in cell lines is associated with transformation, a mechanistic explanation of their roles in EBV latency remains elusive. To identify EBER-specific gene expression features, we compared the proteome and mRNA transcriptome from BJAB cells (an EBV-negative B lymphoma cell line) stably transfected with an empty plasmid or with one carrying both EBER genes. We identified ~1800 proteins with at least 2 SILAC pair measurements, of which only 8 and 12 were up- and downregulated ≥ 2-fold, respectively. One upregulated protein was PIK3AP1, a B-cell specific protein adapter known to activate the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway, which regulates alternative splicing and translation in addition to its pro-survival effects. In the mRNA-seq data, the mRNA levels for some of the proteins changing in the SILAC data did not change. We instead observed isoform switch events. We validated the most relevant findings with biochemical assays. These corroborated the upregulation of PIK3AP1 and AKT activation in BJAB cells expressing high levels of both EBERs and EBNA1 (a surrogate of Burkitt’s lymphoma EBV latency I) relative to those expressing only EBNA1. The mRNA-seq data in these cells showed multiple upregulated oncogenes whose mRNAs are enriched for 3´-UTR AU-rich elements (AREs), such as ccl3, ccr7, il10, vegfa and zeb1. The CCL3, CCR7, IL10 and VEGFA proteins promote cell proliferation and are associated with EBV-mediated lymphomas. In EBV latency, ZEB1 represses the transcription of ZEBRA, an EBV lytic phase activation factor. We previously found that EBER1 interacts with AUF1 in vivo and proposed stabilization of ARE-containing mRNAs. Thus, the ~106 copies of EBER1 may promote not only cell proliferation due to an increase in the levels of ARE-containing genes like ccl3, ccr7, il10, and vegfa, but also the

  1. Proteomics and Transcriptomics of BJAB Cells Expressing the Epstein-Barr Virus Noncoding RNAs EBER1 and EBER2.

    PubMed

    Pimienta, Genaro; Fok, Victor; Haslip, Maria; Nagy, Maria; Takyar, Seyedtaghi; Steitz, Joan A

    2015-01-01

    In Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent infection, the EBV-encoded RNAs EBER1 and EBER2 accumulate in the host cell nucleus to ~10(6) copies. While the expression of EBERs in cell lines is associated with transformation, a mechanistic explanation of their roles in EBV latency remains elusive. To identify EBER-specific gene expression features, we compared the proteome and mRNA transcriptome from BJAB cells (an EBV-negative B lymphoma cell line) stably transfected with an empty plasmid or with one carrying both EBER genes. We identified ~1800 proteins with at least 2 SILAC pair measurements, of which only 8 and 12 were up- and downregulated ≥ 2-fold, respectively. One upregulated protein was PIK3AP1, a B-cell specific protein adapter known to activate the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway, which regulates alternative splicing and translation in addition to its pro-survival effects. In the mRNA-seq data, the mRNA levels for some of the proteins changing in the SILAC data did not change. We instead observed isoform switch events. We validated the most relevant findings with biochemical assays. These corroborated the upregulation of PIK3AP1 and AKT activation in BJAB cells expressing high levels of both EBERs and EBNA1 (a surrogate of Burkitt's lymphoma EBV latency I) relative to those expressing only EBNA1. The mRNA-seq data in these cells showed multiple upregulated oncogenes whose mRNAs are enriched for 3´-UTR AU-rich elements (AREs), such as ccl3, ccr7, il10, vegfa and zeb1. The CCL3, CCR7, IL10 and VEGFA proteins promote cell proliferation and are associated with EBV-mediated lymphomas. In EBV latency, ZEB1 represses the transcription of ZEBRA, an EBV lytic phase activation factor. We previously found that EBER1 interacts with AUF1 in vivo and proposed stabilization of ARE-containing mRNAs. Thus, the ~10(6) copies of EBER1 may promote not only cell proliferation due to an increase in the levels of ARE-containing genes like ccl3, ccr7, il10, and vegfa, but also the

  2. Characterization of the Variability of Epstein-Barr Virus Genes in Nasopharyngeal Biopsies: Potential Predictors for Carcinoma Progression.

    PubMed

    Banko, Ana V; Lazarevic, Ivana B; Folic, Miljan M; Djukic, Vojko B; Cirkovic, Andja M; Karalic, Danijela Z; Cupic, Maja D; Jovanovic, Tanja P

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is a significant factor in the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, especially in the undifferentiated carcinoma of nasopharyngeal type (UCNT, World Health Organization type III), which is the dominant histopathological type in high-risk areas. The major EBV oncogene is latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1). LMP1 gene shows variability with different tumorigenic and immunogenic potentials. EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) regulates progression of EBV-related tumors; however, the influence of EBNA1 sequence variability on tumor pathogenesis is controversial. The aims of this study were to characterize polymorphisms of EBV genes in non-endemic nasopharyngeal carcinoma biopsies and to investigate potential sequence patterns that correlate with the clinical presentation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In total, 116 tumor biopsies of undifferentiated carcinoma of nasopharyngeal type (UCNT), collected from 2008 to 2014, were evaluated in this study. The genes EBNA2, LMP1, and EBNA1 were amplified using nested-PCR. EBNA2 genotyping was performed by visualization of PCR products using gel electrophoresis. Investigation of LMP1 and EBNA1 included sequence, phylogenetic, and statistical analyses. The presence of EBV DNA was significantly distributed between TNM stages. LMP1 variability showed six variants, with the detection of the first China1 and North Carolina variants in European nasopharyngeal carcinoma biopsies. Newly discovered variants Srb1 and Srb2 were UCNT-specific LMP1 polymorphisms. The B95-8 and North Carolina variants are possible predictors for favorable TNM stages. In contrast, deletions in LMP1 are possible risk factors for the most disfavorable TNM stage, independent of EBNA2 or EBNA1 variability. A newly discovered EBNA1 subvariant, P-thr-sv-5, could be a potential diagnostic marker, as it represented a UCNT-specific EBNA1 subvariant. A particular combination of EBNA2, LMP1, and EBNA1 polymorphisms, type 1/Med/P-thr was

  3. Expression of LMP and EBNA genes in Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphomas in Hu-PBL/SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yunlian; Lu, Suli; Gan, Xiaoning; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Yang; Luo, Chunyan; Pan, Yuxia; Hong, Li; Gan, Ruliang

    2016-02-01

    Transplantation of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from healthy humans with latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice results in development of EBV-associated human B-cell lymphoma. However, the expression of EBV genes in relation to lymphoma development has not been reported. We investigated latent membrane protein (LMP) and EBV nuclear antigen (EBNA) gene expression in PBLs from EBV-positive blood donors and induced-lymphoma cells from SCID mice to elucidate the functions and effects of the EBV genome in the occurrence and development of lymphoma. PBLs were isolated from 9 healthy blood donors and transplanted into SCID mice. Gene expression levels of LMP-1, LMP-2A, and LMP-2B and EBNA-1, EBNA-2, EBNA-3A, EBNA-3B, EBNA-3C and EBNA-LP were monitored by real-time quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in cells from nine EBV-induced lymphomas and in matched lymphocytes from healthy subjects. LMP-1, EBNA-1 and EBNA-2 protein levels were detected by western blotting. As a result, LMP-1, LMP-2A and LMP-2B mRNA levels were upregulated 256-, 38- and 331-fold, respectively, in the EBV-induced lymphoma cells compared with the controls, while EBNA-1 and EBNA-3A mRNA levels were upregulated 1157- and 1154-fold, respectively. EBNA-2, EBNA-3B, EBNA-3C and EBNA-LP mRNAs were detected in lymphoma cells, but not in lymphocytes from EBV-positive blood donors. LMP-1 and EBNA-2 proteins were not expressed in lymphocytes from EBV-positive blood donors, according to western blotting. Weak EBNA-1 expression was observed in lymphocytes from blood donors with latent EBV infection, while LMP-1, EBNA-1 and EBNA-2 protein levels were significantly upregulated in EBV-induced lymphoma cells, consistent with mRNA expression levels detected by qRT-PCR. In conclusion, LMP-1, LMP-2A, LMP-2B, EBNA-1 and EBNA-3A were upregulated in EBV-induced lymphoma cells, while EBNA-2, EBNA-3B, EBNA-3C and EBNA-LP were absent in lymphocytes from

  4. Modulation of innate immunity system by Epstein-Barr virus-encoded non-coding RNA and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Mrinal; Takada, Kenzo

    2010-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) are polyA-, non-coding RNAs that are expressed abundantly in all forms of cells latently infected with EBV. EBERs (EBER1 and EBER2) contribute to the clonal proliferation of EBV-negative Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cells in soft agar, tumorigenicity in SCID mice, up-regulation of the bcl-2 oncoprotein, resistance to apoptosis, and maintenance of malignant phenotypes in BL cells. EBERs induce the expression of interleukin (IL)-10 in BL cells, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) in gastric and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells, IL-9 in T cells, and IL-6 in lymphoblastoid cell lines. Additionally, each of these cytokines acts as an autocrine growth factor. In BL cells, EBERs bind the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase PKR, inhibit its phosphorylation, and thereby prevent IFN-alpha-mediated apoptosis. In epithelial cells, EBERs confer resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis by blocking PKR activity. EBERs form complexes with PKR, ribosomal protein L22, lupus erythematosis-associated antigen (La), and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). In BL cells, EBERs activate RIG-I signaling and induce the expression of type-I IFNs and interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) through the activation of RIG-I substrates, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB), and IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), and anti-inflamatory cytokine IL-10 through IRF-3 but not NF-kappaB signaling. EBERs also play critical roles in the growth transformation of B lymphocytes. Although EBER1 and EBER2 exhibit similarities in their primary (54%) and secondary structures, recent findings have shown that recombinant EBVs carrying only the EBER2 gene play a greater role in the growth transformation of B lymphocytes than EBVs carrying only the EBER1 gene. Thus, EBERs play multiple roles in various cell types, and we present a model that highlights the functions of EBERs in EBV-mediated oncogenesis in BL cells.

  5. The synergistic effect of chemical carcinogens enhances Epstein-Barr virus reactivation and tumor progression of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chih-Yeu; Huang, Sheng-Yen; Wu, Chung-Chun; Hsu, Hui-Yu; Chou, Sheng-Ping; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Chang, Yao; Takada, Kenzo; Chen, Jen-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Seroepidemiological studies imply a correlation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). N-nitroso compounds, phorbols, and butyrates are chemicals found in food and herb samples collected from NPC high-risk areas. These chemicals have been reported to be risk factors contributing to the development of NPC, however, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. We have demonstrated previously that low dose N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG, 0.1 µg/ml) had a synergistic effect with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and sodium butyrate (SB) in enhancing EBV reactivation and genome instability in NPC cells harboring EBV. Considering that residents in NPC high-risk areas may contact regularly with these chemical carcinogens, it is vital to elucidate the relation between chemicals and EBV and their contributions to the carcinogenesis of NPC. In this study, we constructed a cell culture model to show that genome instability, alterations of cancer hallmark gene expression, and tumorigenicity were increased after recurrent EBV reactivation in NPC cells following combined treatment of TPA/SB and MNNG. NPC cells latently infected with EBV, NA, and the corresponding EBV-negative cell, NPC-TW01, were periodically treated with MNNG, TPA/SB, or TPA/SB combined with MNNG. With chemically-induced recurrent reactivation of EBV, the degree of genome instability was significantly enhanced in NA cells treated with a combination of TPA/SB and MNNG than those treated individually. The Matrigel invasiveness, as well as the tumorigenicity in mouse, was also enhanced in NA cells after recurrent EBV reactivation. Expression profile analysis by microarray indicates that many carcinogenesis-related genes were altered after recurrent EBV reactivation, and several aberrations observed in cell lines correspond to alterations in NPC lesions. These results indicate that cooperation between chemical carcinogens can

  6. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Gastric Remnant Carcinoma and Recurrent Gastric Carcinoma in Qingdao of Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuzhen; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Han, Lu; Liu, Song; Luo, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a subset of gastric carcinoma which was defined as EBV associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC). The proportion of EBVaGC in gastric remnant carcinoma (GRC) which occurs in the intact stomach five or more years after gastric surgery for benign disease is significantly higher than that in conventional gastric carcinoma (CGC). The infection of EBV in recurrent gastric carcinoma (RGC) with local anastomotic recurrence is poorly understood. Methods 53 cases of GRC and 58 cases of RGC were analyzed for the presence of EBV, and the variants of EBV Encoded RNAs (EBER), EBV Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1) and Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) gene in both groups were investigated. Results Thirteen (24.5%) out of 53 GRC cases and 3 (5.2%) out of 58 RGC cases were identified as EBVaGCs. In 17 paired RGC cases, only one case was classified as EBVaGC in both times specimen. Another one case was identified as EBVaGC in the primary gastroectomy specimen while the recurrent gastric cancer was not. The third EBVaGC in RGC was identified while the primary gastric cancer was not EBVaGC. In GRC and RGC cases, type 1, type F, EB-6m, V-val subtype, del-LMP1 were predominant type or variants, accounting for 10(76.9%) and 2(66.7%), 13(100%) and 3(100%), 13(100%) and 3(100%), 9(69.2%) and 3(100%), 12(92.3%) and 3(100%), respectively. However, Type C was the predominant type in GRC accounting for 9(69.2%) cases while type D was the predominant one accounting for 2(66.7%) cases in RGC. Conclusions The prevalence of EBVaGc in GRC and RGC was significantly different. The distributions of these variants were similar to each other in the two groups which indicated that there were no more aggressive EBV variants in EBVaGC in GRC compared with that in RGC. PMID:26859565

  7. Molecular Characterization of Oxysterol Binding to the Epstein-Barr Virus-induced Gene 2 (GPR183)*

    PubMed Central

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Norn, Christoffer; Laurent, Stephane; Madsen, Christian M.; Larsen, Hjalte M.; Arfelt, Kristine N.; Wolf, Romain M.; Frimurer, Thomas; Sailer, Andreas W.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.

    2012-01-01

    Oxysterols are oxygenated cholesterol derivates that are emerging as a physiologically important group of molecules. Although they regulate a range of cellular processes, only few oxysterol-binding effector proteins have been identified, and the knowledge of their binding mode is limited. Recently, the family of G protein-coupled seven transmembrane-spanning receptors (7TM receptors) was added to this group. Specifically, the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2 or GPR183) was shown to be activated by several oxysterols, most potently by 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α,25-OHC). Nothing is known about the binding mode, however. Using mutational analysis, we identify here four key residues for 7α,25-OHC binding: Arg-87 in TM-II (position II:20/2.60), Tyr-112 and Tyr-116 (positions III:09/3.33 and III:13/3.37) in TM-III, and Tyr-260 in TM-VI (position VI:16/6.51). Substituting these residues with Ala and/or Phe results in a severe decrease in agonist binding and receptor activation. Docking simulations suggest that Tyr-116 interacts with the 3β-OH group in the agonist, Tyr-260 with the 7α-OH group, and Arg-87, either directly or indirectly, with the 25-OH group, although nearby residues likely also contribute. In addition, Tyr-112 is involved in 7α,25-OHC binding but via hydrophobic interactions. Finally, we show that II:20/2.60 constitutes an important residue for ligand binding in receptors carrying a positively charged residue at this position. This group is dominated by lipid- and nucleotide-activated receptors, here exemplified by the CysLTs, P2Y12, and P2Y14. In conclusion, we present the first molecular characterization of oxysterol binding to a 7TM receptor and identify position II:20/2.60 as a generally important residue for ligand binding in certain 7TM receptors. PMID:22875855

  8. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Sero-Epidemiological Association between Epstein Barr Virus and Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Almohmeed, Yahya H.; Avenell, Alison; Aucott, Lorna; Vickers, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Background A role for Epstein Barr virus (EBV) in multiple sclerosis (MS) has been postulated. Previous systematic reviews found higher prevalences of anti-EBV antibodies in MS patients compared to controls, but many studies have since been published, and there is a need to apply more rigorous systematic review methods. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the link between EBV and MS by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis of case-control and cohort studies that examined the prevalence of anti-EBV antibodies in the serum of cases and controls. We searched Medline and Embase databases from 1960 to 2012, with no language restriction. The Mantel-Haenszel odds ratios (OR) for anti-EBV antibodies sero-positivity were calculated, and meta-analysis conducted. Quality assessment was performed using a modified version of the Newcastle Ottawa scale. Thirty-nine studies were included. Quality assessment found most studies reported acceptable selection and comparability of cases and controls. However the majority had poor reporting of ascertainment of exposure. Most studies found a higher sero-prevalence of anti-EBNA IgG and anti-VCA IgG in cases compared to controls. The results for anti-EA IgG were mixed with only half the studies finding a higher sero-prevalence in cases. The meta-analysis showed a significant OR for sero-positivity to anti-EBNA IgG and anti-VCA IgG in MS cases (4.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.3 to 6.6, p<0.00001] and 4.5 [95% CI 2.8 to 7.2, p<0.00001] respectively). However, funnel plot examination suggested publication bias for the reporting of the anti-EBNA IgG. No significant difference in the OR for sero-positivity to anti-EA IgG was found (1.4 [95% CI 0.9 to 2.1, p = 0.09]). Conclusion/Significance These findings support previous systematic reviews, however publication bias cannot be excluded. The methodological conduct of studies could be improved, particularly with regard to reporting and conduct of laboratory analyses

  9. Changes in Expression Induced by Epstein-Barr Virus LMP1-CTAR1: Potential Role of bcl3

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Rachel Hood; Marquitz, Aron R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Epstein-Barr virus protein latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) has two NF-κB activating domains within its intracellular carboxy terminus (carboxy-terminal activating region 1 [CTAR1] and CTAR2). LMP1-CTAR1 is required for B-lymphocyte transformation, is capable of transforming rodent fibroblasts, and uniquely activates phosphoinositol (PI3) kinase, the noncanonical NF-κB pathway, and expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this study, the effects of LMP1-CTAR1 on cellular gene expression were determined by high-throughput sequencing. Additionally, the binding of bcl3 was determined using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and sequencing. LMP1-CTAR1 induced few changes in transcription with more genes showing decreased expression. Ingenuity pathway analysis indicated significant enrichment for genes involved in cancer and cellular movement, survival, growth, and proliferation pathways. ChIP in combination with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq) identified bcl3 binding for more than 2,000 genes in LMP1-CTAR1-expressing cells with more than 90% of the peaks at genes detected within the probable promoter region. Only a small subset of the genes with significant changes in expression had corresponding peaks in the bcl3 ChIP. However, both NFKB2 and PI3 kinase were identified in the bcl3 ChIP. Additionally, many of the predicted upstream regulators for the changes in expression were identified in the bcl3 ChIP. Analysis of the proteins in the NF-κB pathway revealed many changes identified by the high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and bcl3 ChIP that would likely activate noncanonical NF-κB signaling and possibly inhibit canonical NF-κB signaling. These findings suggest that the two LMP1 signaling domains modulate their combined activity and that the bcl3 transcription factor is likely responsible for some of the unique effects of CTAR1 on cellular expression. PMID:25873381

  10. Reactive oxygen species production and antioxidant enzyme expression after Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle induction in Raji cell line.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Bochra; Nasr, Rihab; ben Mansour, Riadh; Lassoued, Saloua; Mseddi, Malek; Attia, Hammadi; El Feki, Abd el Fatteh; Van Pelt, Jos

    2011-12-01

    In a previous study, we have described oxidative stress during Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle induction. Oxidative stress was evidenced by the observed high MDA levels and the decreased activities of antioxidant enzymes. We hypothesised that the lower activities of the antioxidant enzymes decrease were the result of either the excessive production of reactive oxygen radical species (ROS) or a negative regulation of the antioxidant enzyme gene expressions. In an attempt to clarify this situation, EBV lytic cycle was induced in Raji cell line by a non-stressing dose of 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. BZLF-1, superoxide dismutase, and catalase gene expressions were then analysed using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, simultaneously at a kinetic of 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h. ROS production was evaluated by chemiluminescence. A study was conducted to establish whether ROS production, BZLF-1, and the expression of antioxidant genes were inter-correlated. Induction of the lytic cycle resulted in increased expressions of the genes of superoxide dismutase and catalase, which began at 24 h (p < 0.05) and reached a peak at 48 h (p < 0.05). Significant increases of the ROS levels were observed in TPA-treated Raji cell line at 12 h, as compared with untreated cells, reaching a peak at 48 h after EBV lytic cycle induction. ROS production correlates positively with BZLF-1, SOD, and CAT gene expressions (p < 0.05; r = 0.913, r = 0.978, and r = 0.955, respectively). A positive correlation was also observed between BZLF-1 and antioxidant gene expressions (p < 0.05; r = 0.961 and r = 0.987, respectively). In conclusion, the observed increases of the SOD and CAT gene expressions eliminate the hypothesis of a repression of the respective genes during the induction of the lytic cycle. On the other hand, the observed direct correlation between the BZLF-1 gene expression and the ROS production is indicative of a role of this gene in oxidative stress.

  11. The role of microRNAs in Epstein-Barr virus latency and lytic reactivation.

    PubMed

    Forte, Eleonora; Luftig, Micah A

    2011-12-01

    Oncogenic viruses reprogram host gene expression driving proliferation, ensuring survival, and evading the immune response. The recent appreciation of microRNAs (miRNAs) as small non-coding RNAs that broadly regulate gene expression has provided new insight into this complex scheme of host control. This review highlights the role of viral and cellular miRNAs during the latent and lytic phases of the EBV life cycle. PMID:21835261

  12. Prevalence of Polyoma BK Virus (BKPyV), Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Polz-Gruszka, Dorota; Morshed, Kamal; Jarzyński, Adrian; Polz-Dacewicz, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of BK virus, Human Papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus in oropharyngeal cancer, and to test our hypothesis that BKV/HPV/EBV co-infection plays a role in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The correlation between viral infection, OSCC, anatomic location, pre-treatment staging, evidence of metastases to lymph nodes, and grading was also investigated. The examination samples were collected from 62 patients from paraffin tissue blocks. Males (90.3%) with, smoking (83.9%) and alcohol abuse (67.7%) problems prevailed in the studied group. G2 histological type was recognized in 80.6% cases. T4 (77.4%) and N2 (56.5%) traits occurred in the majority of patients. No cases of metastasis were observed (M0 100%). HPV - 24.2%, EBV - 27.4% and BKV 17.7% were detected in the studied samples. We observed co-infection EBV/BKV in 8% of cases, HPV/BKV in 4.8%, and HPV/EBV in 9% cases. Only in two cases co-infection of all three viruses was found.

  13. Multipronged attenuation of macrophage-colony stimulating factor signaling by Epstein-Barr virus BARF1

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; Chang, Rhoda Ahn; Chen, Xiaoyan; Longnecker, Richard; He, Xiaolin

    2014-10-02

    The ubiquitous EBV causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with several types of cancers. The EBV genome encodes an early gene product, BARF1, which contributes to pathogenesis, potentially through growth-altering and immune-modulating activities, but the mechanisms for such activities are poorly understood. We have determined the crystal structure of BARF1 in complex with human macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), a hematopoietic cytokine with pleiotropic functions in development and immune response. BARF1 and M-CSF form a high-affinity, stable, ring-like complex in both solution and the crystal, with a BARF1 hexameric ring surrounded by three M-CSF dimers in triangular array. The binding of BARF1 to M-CSF dramatically reduces but does not completely abolish M-CSF binding and signaling through its cognate receptor FMS. A three-pronged down-regulation mechanism is proposed to explain the biological effect of BARF1 on M-CSF:FMS signaling. These prongs entail control of the circulating and effective local M-CSF concentration, perturbation of the receptor-binding surface of M-CSF, and imposition of an unfavorable global orientation of the M-CSF dimer. Each prong may reduce M-CSF:FMS signaling to a limited extent but in combination may alter M-CSF:FMS signaling dramatically. The downregulating mechanism of BARF1 underlines a viral modulation strategy, and provides a basis for understanding EBV pathogenesis.

  14. CD8-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder associated with Epstein-Barr virus-infected B-cells in a rheumatoid arthritis patient under methotrexate treatment.

    PubMed

    Koji, Hitoshi; Yazawa, Takuya; Nakabayashi, Kimimasa; Fujioka, Yasunori; Kamma, Hiroshi; Yamada, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We report a 48-year-old female who developed lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) during treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with methotrexate (MTX). She presented with multiple tumors in the cervical lymph nodes (LNs), multiple lung shadows and round shadows in both kidneys with pancytopenia and a high CRP level. The LN showed CD8-positive T-cell LPD associated with Epstein-Barr (EB) virus-infected B-cells. Clonality assays for immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain and T-cell receptor gamma (TCRγ) were negative. The cessation of MTX without chemotherapy resulted in the complete disappearance of the tumors and abnormal clinical features. We compared this case with previously published ones and discuss the pathological findings, presuming that the proliferation of CD8 T-cells was a reactive manifestation to reactivated EB virus-infected B-cells.

  15. The Role of Epstein-Barr Virus LMP-1 Immunohistochemical Staining in Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanyildiz, Hikmet Gulsah; Yildiz, Inci; Bassullu, Nuray; Tuzuner, Nukhet; Ozkan, Alp; Celkan, Tiraje; Apak, Hilmi

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are a few published studies about prognostic markers of Epstein-B virus (EBV) related to outcomes in pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL). Objectives: We aimed to investigate the prognostic value and effect of EBV on survival by using biopsy materials in children and adolescents diagnosed with HL. Patients and Methods: EBV LMP-1 expression was examined using immunohistochemical methods in 58 tumor samples. Clinical features, overall survival (OS) and failure free survival time (FFS) were compared between EBV LMP-1 positive and negative patients. Results: In 20 (35%) patients tumors were LMP-1 positive. When compared with patients above 10 years old, EBV LMP-1 was often positive in patients under 10 years old (30% vs. 70%, P = 0.02). In our most cases having B symptoms and advanced stage, EBV positiveness in Hodgkin Reed-Stenberg cells (H-RS) was not a significant determinant for survival (P = 0.78). Half of the past clinical trials in childhood HL reported longer survival rates in EBV LMP-1 positive patients. In some trials similar to our results there was no significant relationship between EBV and prognosis. Conclusions: The reason of diminished EBV positiviness may be related to technical methods such as not using immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization for EBER antigen but in laboratory conditions painting of control tissues with EBV impair this probability. In addition, cases enrolled to our study were living in Istanbul where social and economical factors are improved rather than generally. PMID:26635935

  16. Detection of human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in symptomatic and asymptomatic apical periodontitis lesions by real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Ozbek, Selcuk M.; Yavuz, Muhammed S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent studies have investigated the occurrence of human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in samples from apical periodontitis lesions and a role in the pathogenesis of this disease has been suggested. Because genotype distribution and seroprevalence of EBV and HCMV differ among populations, it is important to determine the presence of these viruses in endodontic periapical lesions of different populations. The aims of this study were to determine the presence of HCMV and EBV DNAs in samples from Turkish patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic apical periodontitis lesions using real-time polymerase chain reaction method and to evaluate their presence in both symptomatic and asymptomatic apical periodontitis lesions. Study Design: Periapical samples were collected from 12 asymptomatic and 16 symptomatic periapical lesions in conjunction with apicectomy. HCMV and EBV DNAs were identified in the samples by real-time PCR. The chi-squared test with Yates’s correction or the Fisher’s exact test was used to analyse the significance of differences. Results: HCMV DNA was detected in 10 of the 16 (62.5%) symptomatic and in five of the 12 (41.7 %) asymptomatic periapical study lesions. The EBV DNA was identified in seven of the 16 (43.7 %) symptomatic and three of the 12 (25 %) asymptomatic periapical lesions. The difference in occurrence of HCMV and EBV DNA between symptomatic and asymptomatic periapical lesions was not statistically significant. (All comparisons have p > 0.05). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that HCMV and EBV is a frequent inhabitant of both symptomatic and asymptomatic apical periodontitis lesions of endodontic origin in Turkish population. Key words:Human cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr Virus, apical periodontitis, Polymerase chain reaction method. PMID:23722135

  17. Epstein-Barr virus antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid from multiple sclerosis, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nociti, V; Frisullo, G; Marti, A; Luigetti, M; Iorio, R; Patanella, A K; Bianco, A; Tonali, P A; Grillo, R L; Sabatelli, M; Batocchi, A P

    2010-08-25

    Elevated anti-Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody levels are present in serum of Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients but literature lacks of studies comparing anti-EBV antibody levels between MS and other neurological diseases. We evaluate anti-VCA IgG and IgM, anti-EBNA1 IgG, anti-Cytomegalovirus IgG and IgM titres in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 267 MS, 50 Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and 88 Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) patients. We found increased titres of anti-EBV-IgG in serum and CSF of MS subjects as compared to CIDP and ALS patients thus providing additional evidence for a possible involvement of EBV in MS.

  18. Interaction of Epstein-Barr Virus BZLF1 C-Terminal Tail Structure and Core Zipper Is Required for DNA Replication but Not for Promoter Transactivation ▿

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Carol M.; Petosa, Carlo; Farrell, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) protein BZLF1 contains a bZIP DNA binding domain in which C-terminal tail residues fold back against a zipper region that forms a coiled coil and mediates dimerization. Point mutagenesis in the zipper region reveals the importance of individual residues within the 208SSENDRLR215 sequence that is conserved in C/EBP for transactivation and EBV DNA replication. The restoration of BZLF1 DNA replication activity by the complementation of two deleterious mutations (S208E and D236K) indicates that the interaction of the C-terminal tail and the core zipper is required for DNA replication, identifying a functional role for this structural feature unique to BZLF1. PMID:19144704

  19. Consideration of Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Noncoding RNAs EBER1 and EBER2 as a Functional Backup of Viral Oncoprotein Latent Membrane Protein 1.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Kristina M; Pimienta, Genaro

    2016-01-19

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded noncoding RNAs EBER1 and EBER2 are highly abundant through all four latency stages of EBV infection (III-II-I-0) and have been associated with an oncogenic phenotype when expressed in cell lines cultured in vitro. In vivo, EBV-infected B cells derived from freshly isolated lymphocytes show that EBER1/2 deletion does not impair viral latency. Based on published quantitative proteomics data from BJAB cells expressing EBER1 and EBER2, we propose that the EBERs, through their activation of AKT in a B-cell-specific manner, are a functionally redundant backup of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1)-an essential oncoprotein in EBV-associated malignancies, with a main role in AKT activation. Our proposed model may explain the lack of effect on viral latency establishment in EBER-minus EBV infection.

  20. Consideration of Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Noncoding RNAs EBER1 and EBER2 as a Functional Backup of Viral Oncoprotein Latent Membrane Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded noncoding RNAs EBER1 and EBER2 are highly abundant through all four latency stages of EBV infection (III-II-I-0) and have been associated with an oncogenic phenotype when expressed in cell lines cultured in vitro. In vivo, EBV-infected B cells derived from freshly isolated lymphocytes show that EBER1/2 deletion does not impair viral latency. Based on published quantitative proteomics data from BJAB cells expressing EBER1 and EBER2, we propose that the EBERs, through their activation of AKT in a B-cell-specific manner, are a functionally redundant backup of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1)—an essential oncoprotein in EBV-associated malignancies, with a main role in AKT activation. Our proposed model may explain the lack of effect on viral latency establishment in EBER-minus EBV infection. PMID:26787829

  1. Inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle by an ethyl acetate subfraction separated from Polygonum cuspidatum root and its major component, emodin.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Ching-Yi; Chen, Shih-Ying; Yang, Tsai-Hsiu; Chang, Che-Jung; Yeh, Dong-Bor; Chen, Yi-Jie; Lin, Tsuey-Pin

    2014-01-01

    Polygonum cuspidatum is widely used as a medicinal herb in Asia. In this study, we examined the ethyl acetate subfraction F3 obtained from P. cuspidatum root and its major component, emodin, for their capacity to inhibit the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle. The cell viability was determined by the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] method. The expression of EBV lytic proteins was analyzed by immunoblot, indirect immunofluorescence and flow cytometric assays. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to assess the EBV DNA replication and the transcription of lytic genes, including BRLF1 and BZLF1. Results showed that the F3 and its major component emodin inhibit the transcription of EBV immediate early genes, the expression of EBV lytic proteins, including Rta, Zta, and EA-D and reduces EBV DNA replication, showing that F3 and emodin are potentially useful as an anti-EBV drug. PMID:24448066

  2. [RS3PE syndrome associated with senile Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B cell lymphoma of a patient with colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Saori; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Usami, Makoto; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Yamada, Michiko; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Fujita, Miri; Nakano, Tatsumi; Kanari, Yusuke; Iyama, Satoshi; Kato, Junji

    2015-11-01

    A 75-year-old woman consulted her doctor in January 2014 because of pain in the dorsum of the hands, elbows, shoulders, and knees, bilaterally, and was diagnosed as having remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) syndrome. Although the joint pain improved with low-dose prednisolone administration, she was referred to our department in April of 2014 because she had become aware of swelling of the right cervical lymph node. Biopsy of the lymph node demonstrated that she had Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the elderly, and colonoscopy revealed early colon cancer. Also, both the lymphoma and colon cancer stained positive for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Complete remission was achieved after two courses of R-CHOP, and RS3PE syndrome did not relapse. This case suggested the involvement of VEGF produced by EBV-positive DLBCL in the pathogenesis of RS3PE syndrome.

  3. Isolation and expression of human cytokine synthesis inhibitory factor cDNA clones: Homology to Epstein-Barr virus open reading frame BCRFI

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, P.; De Waal-Malefyt, R.; Dang, M.N.; Johnson, K.E.; Kastelein, R.; Fiorentino, D.F.; DeVries, J.E.; Roncarolo, M.G.; Mosmann, T.R.; Moore, K.W. )

    1991-02-15

    The authors demonstrated the existence of human cytokine synthesis inhibitory factor (DSIF) (interleukin 10 (IL-10)). cDNA clones encoding human IL-10 (hIL-10) were isolated from a tetanus toxin-specific human T-cell clone. Like mouse IL-10, hIL-10 exhibits strong DNA and amino acid sequence homology to an open reading frame in the Epstein-Barr virus, BDRFL. hIL-10 and the BCRFI product inhibit cytokine synthesis by activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and by a mouse Th1 clone. Both hIL-10 and mouse IL-10 sustain the viability of a mouse mast cell line in culture, but BCRFI lacks comparable activity in this way, suggesting that BCRFI may have conserved only a subset of hIL-10 activities.

  4. Inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle by an ethyl acetate subfraction separated from Polygonum cuspidatum root and its major component, emodin.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Ching-Yi; Chen, Shih-Ying; Yang, Tsai-Hsiu; Chang, Che-Jung; Yeh, Dong-Bor; Chen, Yi-Jie; Lin, Tsuey-Pin

    2014-01-01

    Polygonum cuspidatum is widely used as a medicinal herb in Asia. In this study, we examined the ethyl acetate subfraction F3 obtained from P. cuspidatum root and its major component, emodin, for their capacity to inhibit the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle. The cell viability was determined by the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] method. The expression of EBV lytic proteins was analyzed by immunoblot, indirect immunofluorescence and flow cytometric assays. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to assess the EBV DNA replication and the transcription of lytic genes, including BRLF1 and BZLF1. Results showed that the F3 and its major component emodin inhibit the transcription of EBV immediate early genes, the expression of EBV lytic proteins, including Rta, Zta, and EA-D and reduces EBV DNA replication, showing that F3 and emodin are potentially useful as an anti-EBV drug.

  5. Prognostic Value of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Locoregionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma with Low Pre-treatment Epstein-Barr Virus DNA: a Propensity-matched Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Chen, Lei; Li, Wen-Fei; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Li-Zhi; Tian, Li; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic value of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with low pre-treatment Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in the era of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: Data on 1099 locoregionally advanced NPC patients treated with IMRT were retrospectively reviewed. Propensity score matching (PSM) method was adopted to balance influence of covariates. Patient survival between NCT and non-NCT groups were compared. Results: The cut-off value of pre-treatment Epstein-Barr virus DNA (pre-DNA) was 1550 copies/ml for DMFS (area under curve [AUC], 0.655; sensitivity, 0.819; specificity, 0.445). For the 145 pairs selected by PSM, the 3-year distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and locoregional relapse-free survival (LRRFS) rates were 98.6% vs. 93.7% (P = 0.101), 95.8% vs. 94.4% (P = 0.881), 91.7% vs. 87.5% (P = 0.309) and 94.4% vs. 95.0% (P = 0.667), respectively. Multivariate analysis did not identify NCT as an independent prognostic factor (P > 0.05 for all rates), and stratified analysis based on overall stage (III and IV) and N category (N0-1 and N2-3) also got the same results. Conclusion: NCT was not established as an independent prognostic factor, and it should not be used in locoregionally advanced NPC with low pre-DNA. PMID:27471562

  6. A probable identical Epstein-Barr virus clone-positive composite lymphoma with aggressive natural killer-cell leukemia and cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Kei-Ji; Shimada, Asami; Wakabayashi, Mutsumi; Imai, Hidenori; Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Nakamura, Noriko; Sawada, Tomohiro; Ota, Yasunori; Takeuchi, Kengo; Ito, Yoshinori; Kimura, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Norio; Noguchi, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 52-year old woman with a history of mosquito-bite hypersensitivity since childhood. In July 2011, she developed pyrexia, headaches, and nausea, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive aggressive natural killer leukemia (ANKL) was diagnosed on the basis of both a peripheral blood and bone marrow examination. An inguinal lymph node biopsy, on the other hand, revealed EBV-positive cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma plus the presence of a small number of EBV-positive ANKL cells, and a diagnosis of EBV-positive composite lymphoma was made. Both the cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma and ANKL exhibited EBV terminal repeat (Southern blot analysis) monoclonal patterns, and they were almost the same size, approximately 9.0 kb. If it was the identical EBV clone, it is possible that EBV infected progenitor cells common to both NK cells and T cells, that the progenitor cells then differentiated into NK cells and T cells, a chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection developed, and neoplastic transformation occurred. If it was not the identical EBV clone, fairly similar EBVs must have infected NK cells and T cells separately, and they then underwent neoplastic transformation. Because the mechanism by which EBV infects NK cells or T cells is still unknown, we concluded that this case is also important from the standpoint of elucidating it. We are currently in the process of conducting gene analyses to determine whether the fairly similar EBVs that infected the ANKL and cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma are the identical clone. PMID:24427365

  7. Nucleic acid renaturation and restriction endonuclease cleavage analyses show that the DNAs of a transforming and a nontransforming strain of Epstein-Barr virus share approximately 90% of their nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, B; Summers, W C; Klein, G

    1976-01-01

    Viral DNA molecules were purified from a nontransforming and a transforming strain of Epstein-Barr virus. Each viral DNA was labeled in vitro and renatured in the presence of an excess of either one or the other unlabeled viral DNA. Both viral DNAs were also digested with the Eco R1 restriction endonuclease and subsequently labeled by using avian myeloblastosis virus DNA polymerase to repair either the EcoR1 nuclease-generated single-stranded ends of the DNAs or their single-stranded ends produced by a second digestion with exonuclease III after the first EcoR1 nuclease digestion. The results of these experiments support three general conclusions: (i) the DNAs of these two strains of Epstein-Barr virus share approximately 90% of their nucleotide sequences; (ii) both viral DNA populations are reasonably homogenous; and (iii) both DNAs contain repetitions or inverted repetitions of some of their nucleotide sequences. Images PMID:178907

  8. Hsp90 inhibitor 17-DMAG decreases expression of conserved herpesvirus protein kinases and reduces virus production in Epstein-Barr virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoping; Bristol, Jillian A; Iwahori, Satoko; Hagemeier, Stacy R; Meng, Qiao; Barlow, Elizabeth A; Fingeroth, Joyce D; Tarakanova, Vera L; Kalejta, Robert F; Kenney, Shannon C

    2013-09-01

    All eight human herpesviruses have a conserved herpesvirus protein kinase (CHPK) that is important for the lytic phase of the viral life cycle. In this study, we show that heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) interacts directly with each of the eight CHPKs, and we demonstrate that an Hsp90 inhibitor drug, 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), decreases expression of all eight CHPKs in transfected HeLa cells. 17-DMAG also decreases expression the of the endogenous Epstein-Barr virus protein kinase (EBV PK, encoded by the BGLF4 gene) in lytically infected EBV-positive cells and inhibits phosphorylation of several different known EBV PK target proteins. Furthermore, 17-DMAG treatment abrogates expression of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) kinase UL97 in HCMV-infected human fibroblasts. Importantly, 17-DMAG treatment decreased the EBV titer approximately 100-fold in lytically infected AGS-Akata cells without causing significant cellular toxicity during the same time frame. Increased EBV PK expression in 17-DMAG-treated AGS-Akata cells did not restore EBV titers, suggesting that 17-DMAG simultaneously targets multiple viral and/or cellular proteins required for efficient viral replication. These results suggest that Hsp90 inhibitors, including 17-DMAG, may be a promising group of drugs that could have profound antiviral effects on herpesviruses. PMID:23843639

  9. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  10. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged.

  11. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P.; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  12. HCF1 and OCT2 Cooperate with EBNA1 To Enhance OriP-Dependent Transcription and Episome Maintenance of Latent Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Sentana-Lledo, Daniel; Cassel, Joel; Messick, Troy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) establishes latent infections as multicopy episomes with complex patterns of viral gene transcription and chromatin structure. The EBV origin of plasmid replication (OriP) has been implicated as a critical control element for viral transcription, as well as viral DNA replication and episome maintenance. Here, we examine cellular factors that bind OriP and regulate histone modification, transcription regulation, and episome maintenance. We found that OriP is enriched for histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methylation in multiple cell types and latency types. Host cell factor 1 (HCF1), a component of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) histone methyltransferase complex, and transcription factor OCT2 (octamer-binding transcription factor 2) bound cooperatively with EBNA1 (Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1) at OriP. Depletion of OCT2 or HCF1 deregulated latency transcription and histone modifications at OriP, as well as the OriP-regulated latency type-dependent C promoter (Cp) and Q promoter (Qp). HCF1 depletion led to a loss of histone H3K4me3 (trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4) and H3 acetylation at Cp in type III latency and Qp in type I latency, as well as an increase in heterochromatic H3K9me3 at these sites. HCF1 depletion resulted in the loss of EBV episomes from Burkitt's lymphoma cells with type I latency and reactivation from lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs) with type III latency. These findings indicate that HCF1 and OCT2 function at OriP to regulate viral transcription, histone modifications, and episome maintenance. As HCF1 is best known for its function in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) immediate early gene transcription, our findings suggest that EBV latency transcription shares unexpected features with HSV gene regulation. IMPORTANCE EBV latency is associated with several human cancers. Viral latent cycle gene expression is regulated by the epigenetic control of the OriP enhancer region. Here, we show that cellular factors

  13. K1 and K15 of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Are Partial Functional Homologues of Latent Membrane Protein 2A of Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Steinbrück, Lisa; Gustems, Montse; Medele, Stephanie; Schulz, Thomas F.; Lutter, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human herpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are associated with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and Primary effusion lymphomas (PEL), respectively, which are B cell malignancies that originate from germinal center B cells. PEL cells but also a quarter of EBV-positive HL tumor cells do not express the genuine B cell receptor (BCR), a situation incompatible with survival of normal B cells. EBV encodes LMP2A, one of EBV's viral latent membrane proteins, which likely replaces the BCR's survival signaling in HL. Whether KSHV encodes a viral BCR mimic that contributes to oncogenesis is not known because an experimental model of KSHV-mediated B cell transformation is lacking. We addressed this uncertainty with mutant EBVs encoding the KSHV genes K1 or K15 in lieu of LMP2A and infected primary BCR-negative (BCR−) human B cells with them. We confirmed that the survival of BCR– B cells and their proliferation depended on an active LMP2A signal. Like LMP2A, the expression of K1 and K15 led to the survival of BCR− B cells prone to apoptosis, supported their proliferation, and regulated a similar set of cellular target genes. K1 and K15 encoded proteins appear to have noncomplementing, redundant functions in this model, but our findings suggest that both KSHV proteins can replace LMP2A's key activities contributing to the survival, activation and proliferation of BCR– PEL cells in vivo. IMPORTANCE Several herpesviruses encode oncogenes that are receptor-like proteins. Often, they are constitutively active providing important functions to the latently infected cells. LMP2A of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is such a receptor that mimics an activated B cell receptor, BCR. K1 and K15, related receptors of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) expressed in virus-associated tumors, have less obvious functions. We found in infection experiments that both viral receptors of KSHV can replace LMP2A and deliver functions

  14. The ESCRT Machinery Is Recruited by the Viral BFRF1 Protein to the Nucleus-Associated Membrane for the Maturation of Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Hsiu-Ni; Su, Mei-Tzu; Chua, Huey-Huey; Chang, Yu-Hsin; Chang, Chou-Wei; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Liu, Fu-Tong; Chen, Mei-Ru

    2012-01-01

    The cellular endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery participates in membrane scission and cytoplasmic budding of many RNA viruses. Here, we found that expression of dominant negative ESCRT proteins caused a blockade of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) release and retention of viral BFRF1 at the nuclear envelope. The ESCRT adaptor protein Alix was redistributed and partially colocalized with BFRF1 at the nuclear rim of virus replicating cells. Following transient transfection, BFRF1 associated with ESCRT proteins, reorganized the nuclear membrane and induced perinuclear vesicle formation. Multiple domains within BFRF1 mediated vesicle formation and Alix recruitment, whereas both Bro and PRR domains of Alix interacted with BFRF1. Inhibition of ESCRT machinery abolished BFRF1-induced vesicle formation, leading to the accumulation of viral DNA and capsid proteins in the nucleus of EBV-replicating cells. Overall, data here suggest that BFRF1 recruits the ESCRT components to modulate nuclear envelope for the nuclear egress of EBV. PMID:22969426

  15. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded dUTPase and chronic restraint induce impaired learning and memory and sickness responses.

    PubMed

    Aubrecht, Taryn G; Weil, Zachary M; Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Williams, Marshall; Reader, Brenda F; Glaser, Ronald; Sheridan, John F; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-10-01

    Most adult humans have been infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and carry the latent virus. The EBV genome codes for several proteins that form an early antigen complex important for viral replication; one of these proteins is deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase). The EBV-encoded dUTPase can induce sickness responses in mice. Because stress can increase latent virus reactivation, we hypothesized that chronic restraint would exacerbate sickness behaviors elicited by EBV-encoded dUTPase. Male Swiss-Webster mice were injected daily for 15 days with either saline or EBV-encoded dUTPase. Additionally, half of the mice from each condition were either restrained for 3h daily or left undisturbed. Restraint stress impaired learning and memory in the passive avoidance chamber; impaired learning and memory was due to EBV-encoded dUTPase injected into restrained mice. EBV-encoded dUTPase induced sickness responses and restraint stress interacts with EBV-encoded dUTPase to exacerbate the sickness response. These data support a role for EBV-encoded dUTPase and restraint stress in altering the pathophysiology of EBV independent of viral replication.

  16. miR-190 is upregulated in Epstein-Barr Virus type I latency and modulates cellular mRNAs involved in cell survival and viral reactivation.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Elizabeth M; Shao, Ying; Wang, Yan; Yuan, Yan

    2014-09-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is a prevalent human pathogen infecting over 90% of the population. Much of the success of the virus is attributed to its ability to maintain latency. The detailed mechanisms underlying the establishment and maintenance of EBV latency remain poorly understood. A microRNA profiling study revealed differential expression of many cellular miRNAs between types I and III latency cells, suggesting cellular miRNAs may play roles in regulating EBV latency. mir-190 is the most differentially up-regulated miRNA in type I latency cells as compared with type III latency cells and the up-regulation appears to be attributed to EBER RNAs that express in higher levels in type I latency cells than type III cells. With the aide of a lentiviral overexpression system and microarray analysis, several cellular mRNAs are identified as potential targets of mir-190. By targeting TP53INP1, miR-190 enhances cell survival by preventing apoptosis and relieving G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Additionally, miR-190 down-regulates NR4A3, a cellular immediate-early gene for EBV reactivation, and inhibits the expression of the viral immediate-early gene bzlf1 and viral lytic DNA replication. Taken together, our data revealed a mechanism that EBV utilizes a cellular microRNA to promote host cell survival and prevent virus from entering lytic life cycle for latency maintenance. PMID:25086243

  17. Assessment of Epstein-Barr virus nucleic acids in gastric but not in breast cancer by next-generation sequencing of pooled Mexican samples.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Larios-Serrato, Violeta; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Arias, Carlos F; Torres, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Gastric (GC) and breast (BrC) cancer are two of the most common and deadly tumours. Different lines of evidence suggest a possible causative role of viral infections for both GC and BrC. Wide genome sequencing (WGS) technologies allow searching for viral agents in tissues of patients with cancer. These technologies have already contributed to establish virus-cancer associations as well as to discovery new tumour viruses. The objective of this study was to document possible associations of viral infection with GC and BrC in Mexican patients. In order to gain idea about cost effective conditions of experimental sequencing, we first carried out an in silico simulation of WGS. The next-generation-platform IlluminaGallx was then used to sequence GC and BrC tumour samples. While we did not find viral sequences in tissues from BrC patients, multiple reads matching Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) sequences were found in GC tissues. An end-point polymerase chain reaction confirmed an enrichment of EBV sequences in one of the GC samples sequenced, validating the next-generation sequencing-bioinformatics pipeline. PMID:26910355

  18. Assessment of Epstein-Barr virus nucleic acids in gastric but not in breast cancer by next-generation sequencing of pooled Mexican samples

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Larios-Serrato, Violeta; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Arias, Carlos F; Torres, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Gastric (GC) and breast (BrC) cancer are two of the most common and deadly tumours. Different lines of evidence suggest a possible causative role of viral infections for both GC and BrC. Wide genome sequencing (WGS) technologies allow searching for viral agents in tissues of patients with cancer. These technologies have already contributed to establish virus-cancer associations as well as to discovery new tumour viruses. The objective of this study was to document possible associations of viral infection with GC and BrC in Mexican patients. In order to gain idea about cost effective conditions of experimental sequencing, we first carried out an in silico simulation of WGS. The next-generation-platform IlluminaGallx was then used to sequence GC and BrC tumour samples. While we did not find viral sequences in tissues from BrC patients, multiple reads matching Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) sequences were found in GC tissues. An end-point polymerase chain reaction confirmed an enrichment of EBV sequences in one of the GC samples sequenced, validating the next-generation sequencing-bioinformatics pipeline. PMID:26910355

  19. Assessment of Epstein-Barr virus nucleic acids in gastric but not in breast cancer by next-generation sequencing of pooled Mexican samples.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Larios-Serrato, Violeta; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Arias, Carlos F; Torres, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Gastric (GC) and breast (BrC) cancer are two of the most common and deadly tumours. Different lines of evidence suggest a possible causative role of viral infections for both GC and BrC. Wide genome sequencing (WGS) technologies allow searching for viral agents in tissues of patients with cancer. These technologies have already contributed to establish virus-cancer associations as well as to discovery new tumour viruses. The objective of this study was to document possible associations of viral infection with GC and BrC in Mexican patients. In order to gain idea about cost effective conditions of experimental sequencing, we first carried out an in silico simulation of WGS. The next-generation-platform IlluminaGallx was then used to sequence GC and BrC tumour samples. While we did not find viral sequences in tissues from BrC patients, multiple reads matching Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) sequences were found in GC tissues. An end-point polymerase chain reaction confirmed an enrichment of EBV sequences in one of the GC samples sequenced, validating the next-generation sequencing-bioinformatics pipeline.

  20. Roles of Epstein-Barr virus BGLF3.5 gene and two upstream open reading frames in lytic viral replication in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takahiro; Fuse, Kenshiro; Takano, Takahiro; Narita, Yohei; Goshima, Fumi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Murata, Takayuki

    2015-09-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) predominantly establishes a latent infection in B lymphocytes, but a small percentage of infected cells switch from the latent state to the lytic cycle, leading to potent viral DNA replication and progeny viruses production. We here focused on a lytic gene BGLF3.5, and first established BGLF3.5 mutants by marker cassette insertion. Unexpectedly, this insertion mutant failed to produce BGLF4 protein and thus progeny production was severely inhibited. Then we carefully made two point mutant viruses (stop codon insertion or frame-shift mutation) and found that BGLF3.5 is not essential for EBV lytic replication processes, such as viral gene expression, DNA replication, or progeny production in the HEK293 cells although its homolog in murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) was reported to be essential. In addition, we examined the roles of two short, upstream open reading frames within the 5'UTR of BGLF3.5 gene in translation of BGLF4.

  1. Chemopreventive effect of resveratrol, sesamol, sesame oil and sunflower oil in the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation assay and the mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Govind J; Azuine, Magnus A; Tokuda, Harukuni; Takasaki, Midori; Mukainaka, Teruo; Konoshima, Takao; Nishino, Hoyoku

    2002-06-01

    Resveratrol, sesamol, sesame oil and sunflower oil are known natural dietary components with intrinsic cancer chemopreventive potentials. As a part of our study of dietary constituents as potential cancer chemopreventive agents, we have assessed the anti-cancer potentials of these products in the promotion stage of cancer development employing the in vitro Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation assay induced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Further, we studied the activities of these compounds in the brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay as well as on the stable 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging bioassay with a view to comparing some of the mechanisms of their anti-cancer activity. Finally, we compared the observed chemoprotective capabilities of the four products in the in vivo 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene initiated and TPA-promoted mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis protocols. All the products tested showed a profound inhibitory effect on the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen induction using Raji cells. Comparatively, sesame oil was the most potent followed by sesamol and then resveratrol. Only sesamol and resveratrol showed a remarkable cytotoxic activity in the brine shrimp lethality assays as well as profound free radical scavenging activity in the DPPH bioassay. In both test systems, sesamol exhibited a more remarkable activity than resveratrol while sesame oil and sunflower oil did not exhibit any appreciable activity even at the highest concentrations tested (4000 microg ml(-1) ). In our in vivo assay at a 50-fold molar ratio to TPA, sesamol offered 50% reduction in mouse skin papillomas at 20 weeks after promotion with TPA. Under an identical molar ratio to TPA, resveratrol offered a 60% reduction in the papillomas in mouse at 20 weeks. Thus sesamol seems to be an almost equally potent chemopreventive agent. Sesame oil and sunflower oil offered 20 and 40% protection, respectively, in the mouse

  2. Chemopreventive effect of resveratrol, sesamol, sesame oil and sunflower oil in the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation assay and the mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Govind J; Azuine, Magnus A; Tokuda, Harukuni; Takasaki, Midori; Mukainaka, Teruo; Konoshima, Takao; Nishino, Hoyoku

    2002-06-01

    Resveratrol, sesamol, sesame oil and sunflower oil are known natural dietary components with intrinsic cancer chemopreventive potentials. As a part of our study of dietary constituents as potential cancer chemopreventive agents, we have assessed the anti-cancer potentials of these products in the promotion stage of cancer development employing the in vitro Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation assay induced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Further, we studied the activities of these compounds in the brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay as well as on the stable 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging bioassay with a view to comparing some of the mechanisms of their anti-cancer activity. Finally, we compared the observed chemoprotective capabilities of the four products in the in vivo 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene initiated and TPA-promoted mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis protocols. All the products tested showed a profound inhibitory effect on the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen induction using Raji cells. Comparatively, sesame oil was the most potent followed by sesamol and then resveratrol. Only sesamol and resveratrol showed a remarkable cytotoxic activity in the brine shrimp lethality assays as well as profound free radical scavenging activity in the DPPH bioassay. In both test systems, sesamol exhibited a more remarkable activity than resveratrol while sesame oil and sunflower oil did not exhibit any appreciable activity even at the highest concentrations tested (4000 microg ml(-1) ). In our in vivo assay at a 50-fold molar ratio to TPA, sesamol offered 50% reduction in mouse skin papillomas at 20 weeks after promotion with TPA. Under an identical molar ratio to TPA, resveratrol offered a 60% reduction in the papillomas in mouse at 20 weeks. Thus sesamol seems to be an almost equally potent chemopreventive agent. Sesame oil and sunflower oil offered 20 and 40% protection, respectively, in the mouse

  3. Identification of two T-cell epitopes on the candidate Epstein-Barr virus vaccine glycoprotein gp340 recognized by CD4+ T-cell clones.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L E; Wright, J; Ulaeto, D O; Morgan, A J; Rickinson, A B

    1991-01-01

    Current efforts to develop an Epstein-Barr virus subunit vaccine are based on the major envelope glycoprotein gp340. Given the central role of CD4+ T cells in regulating immune responses to subunit vaccine antigens, the present study has begun the work of identifying linear epitopes which are recognized by human CD4+ T cells within the 907-amino-acid sequence of gp340. A panel of gp340-specific CD4+ T-cell clones from an Epstein-Barr virus-immune donor were first assayed for their proliferative responses to a series of truncated gp340 molecules expressed from recombinant DNA vectors in rat GH3 cells, by using an autologous B lymphoblastoid cell line as a source of antigen-presenting cells. The first four T-cell clones analyzed all responded to a truncated form of gp340 which contained only the first 260 N-terminal amino acids. These clones were subsequently screened for responses to each of a panel of overlapping synthetic peptides (15-mers) corresponding to the primary amino acid sequence of the first 260 N-terminal amino acids of gp340. One clone (CG2.7) responded specifically to peptides from the region spanning amino acids 61 to 81, while three other clones (CG5.15, CG5.24, and CG5.36) responded specifically to peptides from the region spanning amino acids 163 to 183. Work with individual peptides from these regions allowed finer mapping of the T-cell epitopes and also revealed the highly dose-dependent nature of peptide-induced responses, with inhibitory effects apparent when the most antigenic peptides were present at supraoptimal concentrations. Experiments using homozygous typing B lymphoblastoid cell lines as antigen-presenting cells showed that the T-cell clones with different epitope specificities were restricted through different HLA class II antigens; clone CG2.7 recognized epitope 61-81 in the context of HLA DRw15, whereas clones CG5.15, CG5.24, and CG5.36 recognized epitope 163-183 in the context of HLA DRw11. The present protocol therefore makes a

  4. Counteracting Effects of Cellular Notch and Epstein-Barr Virus EBNA2: Implications for Stromal Effects on Virus-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Martin; Raithatha, Sweta

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A number of diverse environmental cues have been linked to B lymphocyte differentiation and activation. One such cue, Notch-2, may be particularly relevant to the biology of infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which colonizes the B cell compartment. Activated Notch and EBV nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) both function as transcriptional activators by virtue of their interactions with the transcription factor RBP-Jκ. Although EBNA2 and activated Notch appear to have partially overlapping functions, we now report that activated Notch counteracts a crucial EBNA2 function both in newly infected primary B cells and in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). EBNA2 is directly responsible for the initiation of transcription of the majority of EBV proteins associated with type III latency, leading to the outgrowth of LCLs. One of the key proteins driving this outgrowth is latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), which is regulated by an EBNA2-responsive element within its ED-L1 promoter. Activation of Notch-2 via Delta-like ligand 1 inhibits EBNA2-mediated initiation of LMP1 transcription. Furthermore, ligated Notch-2 also efficiently turns off LMP1 expression from the ED-L1 promoter in LCLs already expressing LMP1. Modulation of EBV gene expression by Notch was not confined to EBNA2-dependent events. Activated Notch-2 also inhibited EBV entry into the lytic cycle in a B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma line by upregulating the cellular transcription factor Zeb2, which represses the transcription of BZLF1. These results support the concept that in vivo, cumulative signals from the microenvironment downregulate EBV gene expression in B cells to the latency 0 gene expression profile observed in B cells entering the peripheral blood. IMPORTANCE Experimental infection of resting B cells by Epstein-Barr virus leads to the growth transformation program of virus gene expression and the outgrowth of lymphoblastoid cell lines. Previous studies at the single-cell level revealed complex

  5. The fusion loops and membrane proximal region of Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein B (gB) can function in the context of herpes simplex virus 1 gB when substituted individually but not in combination.

    PubMed

    Zago, Anna; Connolly, Sarah A; Spear, Patricia G; Longnecker, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Among the herpesvirus glycoprotein B (gB) fusion proteins, the hydrophobic content of fusion loops and membrane proximal regions (MPRs) are inversely correlated with each other. We examined the functional importance of the hydrophobicity of these regions by replacing them in herpes simplex virus type 1 gB with corresponding regions from Epstein-Barr virus gB. We show that fusion activity is dependent on the structural context in which the specific loops and MPR sequences exist, rather than a simple hydrophobic relationship.

  6. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) A*1101-Restricted Epstein-Barr Virus-Specific T-cell Receptor Gene Transfer to Target Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong; Parsonage, Greg; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Machado, Lee R; James, Christine H; Salman, Asmaa; Searle, Peter F; Hui, Edwin P; Chan, Anthony T C; Lee, Steven P

    2015-10-01

    Infusing virus-specific T cells is effective treatment for rare Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated posttransplant lymphomas, and more limited success has been reported using this approach to treat a far more common EBV-associated malignancy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, current approaches using EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines to reactivate EBV-specific T cells for infusion take 2 to 3 months of in vitro culture and favor outgrowth of T cells targeting viral antigens expressed within EBV(+) lymphomas, but not in NPC. Here, we explore T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer to rapidly and reliably generate T cells specific for the NPC-associated viral protein LMP2. We cloned a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) A*1101-restricted TCR, which would be widely applicable because 40% of NPC patients carry this HLA allele. Studying both the wild-type and modified forms, we have optimized expression of the TCR and demonstrated high-avidity antigen-specific function (proliferation, cytotoxicity, and cytokine release) in both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. The engineered T cells also inhibited LMP2(+) epithelial tumor growth in a mouse model. Furthermore, transduced T cells from patients with advanced NPC lysed LMP2-expressing NPC cell lines. Using this approach, within a few days large numbers of high-avidity LMP2-specific T cells can be generated reliably to treat NPC, thus providing an ideal clinical setting to test TCR gene transfer without the risk of autoimmunity through targeting self-antigens.

  7. Striking similarities are exhibited by two small Epstein-Barr virus-encoded ribonucleic acids and the adenovirus-associated ribonucleic acids VAI and VAII

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, M.D.; Gottlieb, E.; Lerner, M.R.; Steitz, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the region of the Epstein-Barr virus genome that specified two small ribonucleic acids (RNAs), EBER 1 and EBER 2, has been determined. Both of these RNAs are encoded by the right-hand 1,000 base pairs of the EcoRI J fragment of EBV deoxyribonucleic acid. EBER 1 is 166 (167) nucleotides long and EBER 2 is 172 +- 1 nucleotides long; the heterogeneity resides at the 3' termini. The EBER genes are separated by 161 base pairs and are transcribed from the same deoxyribonucleic acid strand. In vitro, both EBER genes can be transcribed by RNA polymerase III; sequences homologous to previously identified RNA polymerase III intragenic transcription control regions are present. Striking similarities are therefore apparent both between the EBERs and the two adenovirus-associated RNAs, VAI and VAII, and between the regions of the two viral genomes that specify these small RNAs. We have shown that VAII RNA as well as VAI RNA and the EBERs exist in ribonucleoprotein complexes which are precipitable by anti-La antibodies associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Finally the authors have demonstrated that the binding of protein(s) from uninfected cells confers antigenicity on each of the four virus-encoded small RNAs.

  8. Epstein-Barr virus infection of CR2-transfected epithelial cells reveals the presence of MHC class II on the virion.

    PubMed

    Knox, P G; Young, L S

    1995-10-20

    Epithelial cell lines transfected with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) receptor CR2 are susceptible to infection by EBV. Following infection with certain EBV strains we found that these cells became positive for MHC class II. The class II was confirmed as being of viral and not target cell origin by immunostaining with HLA-specific monoclonal antibodies. Electron microscopic immunogold staining confirmed the presence of MHC class II on the surface of the virion. While some MHC class I was also found on the EB virion, other cell surface molecules were absent. Dual color immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy analysis demonstrated colocalization of class II with EBV-encoded structural proteins (MA and VCA) in infected epithelial cells. However, preincubation of EBV with antibodies against either MHC class I or MHC class II failed to affect either EBV binding or EBV infection. The presence of MHC on the surface of the EB virion may be a consequence of the intracellular pathways through which productive virus exits from the cell and may influence the target cell tropism of EBV. PMID:7483258

  9. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded microRNA BART1 induces tumour metastasis by regulating PTEN-dependent pathways in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cai, Longmei; Ye, Yanfen; Jiang, Qiang; Chen, Yuxiang; Lyu, Xiaoming; Li, Jinbang; Wang, Shuang; Liu, Tengfei; Cai, Hongbing; Yao, Kaitai; Li, Ji-Liang; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), aetiologically linked to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), is the first human virus found to encode many miRNAs. However, how these viral miRNAs precisely regulate the tumour metastasis in NPC remains obscure. Here we report that EBV-miR-BART1 is highly expressed in NPC and closely associated with pathological and advanced clinical stages of NPC. Alteration of EBV-miR-BART1 expression results in an increase in migration and invasion of NPC cells in vitro and causes tumour metastasis in vivo. Mechanistically, EBV-miR-BART1 directly targets the cellular tumour suppressor PTEN. Reduction of PTEN dosage by EBV-miR-BART1 activates PTEN-dependent pathways including PI3K-Akt, FAK-p130(Cas) and Shc-MAPK/ERK1/2 signalling, drives EMT, and consequently increases migration, invasion and metastasis of NPC cells. Reconstitution of PTEN rescues all phenotypes generated by EBV-miR-BART1, highlighting the role of PTEN in EBV-miR-BART-driven metastasis in NPC. Our findings provide new insights into the metastasis of NPC regulated by EBV and advocate for developing clinical intervention strategies against NPC. PMID:26135619

  10. Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 inhibits transcription of IRF3 and IRF7 and suppresses induction of interferon-{beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Gretchen L.; Liu Renshui; Hahn, Angela M.; Shackelford, Julia; Pagano, Joseph S.

    2010-06-20

    Activation of interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) 3 and 7 is essential for the induction of Type I interferons (IFN) and innate antiviral responses, and herpesviruses have evolved mechanisms to evade such responses. We previously reported that Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1, an immediate-early (IE) protein, inhibits the function of IRF7, but the role of BRLF1, the other IE transactivator, in IRF regulation has not been examined. We now show that BRLF1 expression decreased induction of IFN-{beta}, and reduced expression of IRF3 and IRF7; effects were dependent on N- and C-terminal regions of BRLF1 and its nuclear localization signal. Endogenous IRF3 and IRF7 RNA and protein levels were also decreased during cytolytic EBV infection. Finally, production of IFN-{beta} was decreased during lytic EBV infection and was associated with increased susceptibility to superinfection with Sendai virus. These data suggest a new role for BRLF1 with the ability to evade host innate immune responses.

  11. The nuclear and adherent junction complex component protein ubinuclein negatively regulates the productive cycle of Epstein-Barr virus in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gruffat, Henri; Lupo, Julien; Morand, Patrice; Boyer, Véronique; Manet, Evelyne

    2011-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) productive cycle is initiated by the expression of the viral trans-activator EB1 (also called Zebra, Zta, or BZLF1), which belongs to the basic leucine zipper transcription factor family. We have previously identified the cellular NACos (nuclear and adherent junction complex components) protein ubinuclein (Ubn-1) as a partner for EB1, but the function of this complex has never been studied. Here, we have evaluated the consequences of this interaction on the EBV productive cycle and find that Ubn-1 overexpression represses the EBV productive cycle whereas Ubn-1 downregulation by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) increases virus production. By a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, we show that Ubn-1 blocks EB1-DNA interaction. We also show that in epithelial cells, relocalization and sequestration of Ubn-1 to the tight junctions of nondividing cells allow increased activation of the productive cycle. We propose a model in which Ubn-1 is a modulator of the EBV productive cycle: in proliferating epithelial cells, Ubn-1 is nuclear and inhibits activation of the productive cycle, whereas in differentiated cells, Ubn-1 is sequestrated to tight junctions, thereby allowing EB1 to fully function in the nucleus.

  12. The Nuclear and Adherent Junction Complex Component Protein Ubinuclein Negatively Regulates the Productive Cycle of Epstein-Barr Virus in Epithelial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Gruffat, Henri; Lupo, Julien; Morand, Patrice; Boyer, Véronique; Manet, Evelyne

    2011-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) productive cycle is initiated by the expression of the viral trans-activator EB1 (also called Zebra, Zta, or BZLF1), which belongs to the basic leucine zipper transcription factor family. We have previously identified the cellular NACos (nuclear and adherent junction complex components) protein ubinuclein (Ubn-1) as a partner for EB1, but the function of this complex has never been studied. Here, we have evaluated the consequences of this interaction on the EBV productive cycle and find that Ubn-1 overexpression represses the EBV productive cycle whereas Ubn-1 downregulation by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) increases virus production. By a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, we show that Ubn-1 blocks EB1-DNA interaction. We also show that in epithelial cells, relocalization and sequestration of Ubn-1 to the tight junctions of nondividing cells allow increased activation of the productive cycle. We propose a model in which Ubn-1 is a modulator of the EBV productive cycle: in proliferating epithelial cells, Ubn-1 is nuclear and inhibits activation of the productive cycle, whereas in differentiated cells, Ubn-1 is sequestrated to tight junctions, thereby allowing EB1 to fully function in the nucleus. PMID:21084479

  13. Two phenylalanines in the C-terminus of Epstein-Barr virus Rta protein reciprocally modulate its DNA binding and transactivation function

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.-W.; Raghavan, Vineetha; Chang, Pey-Jium; Shedd, Duane; Heston, Lee; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Miller, George

    2009-04-10

    The Rta (R transactivator) protein plays an essential role in the Epstein-Barr viral (EBV) lytic cascade. Rta activates viral gene expression by several mechanisms including direct and indirect binding to target viral promoters, synergy with EBV ZEBRA protein, and stimulation of cellular signaling pathways. We previously found that Rta proteins with C-terminal truncations of 30 aa were markedly enhanced in their capacity to bind DNA (Chen, L.W., Chang, P.J., Delecluse, H.J., and Miller, G., (2005). Marked variation in response of consensus binding elements for the Rta protein of Epstein-Barr virus. J. Virol. 79(15), 9635-9650.). Here we show that two phenylalanines (F600 and F605) in the C-terminus of Rta play a crucial role in mediating this DNA binding inhibitory function. Amino acids 555 to 605 of Rta constitute a functional DNA binding inhibitory sequence (DBIS) that markedly decreased DNA binding when transferred to a minimal DNA binding domain of Rta (aa 1-350). Alanine substitution mutants, F600A/F605A, abolished activity of the DBIS. F600 and F605 are located in the transcriptional activation domain of Rta. Alanine substitutions, F600A/F605A, decreased transcriptional activation by Rta protein, whereas aromatic substitutions, such as F600Y/F605Y or F600W/F605W, partially restored transcriptional activation. Full-length Rta protein with F600A/F605A mutations were enhanced in DNA binding compared to wild-type, whereas Rta proteins with F600Y/F605Y or F600W/F605W substitutions were, like wild-type Rta, relatively poor DNA binders. GAL4 (1-147)/Rta (416-605) fusion proteins with F600A/F605A mutations were diminished in transcriptional activation, relative to GAL4/Rta chimeras without such mutations. The results suggest that, in the context of a larger DBIS, F600 and F605 play a role in the reciprocal regulation of DNA binding and transcriptional activation by Rta. Regulation of DNA binding by Rta is likely to be important in controlling its different modes of

  14. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded protein kinase, EBV-PK, but not the thymidine kinase (EBV-TK), is required for ganciclovir and acyclovir inhibition of lytic viral production.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qiao; Hagemeier, Stacy R; Fingeroth, Joyce D; Gershburg, Edward; Pagano, Joseph S; Kenney, Shannon C

    2010-05-01

    Ganciclovir (GCV) and acyclovir (ACV) are guanine nucleoside analogues that inhibit lytic herpesvirus replication. GCV and ACV must be monophosphorylated by virally encoded enzymes to be converted into nucleotides and incorporated into viral DNA. However, whether GCV and/or ACV phosphorylation in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells is mediated primarily by the EBV-encoded protein kinase (EBV-PK), the EBV-encoded thymidine kinase (EBV-TK), or both is controversial. To examine this question, we constructed EBV mutants containing stop codons in either the EBV-PK or EBV-TK open reading frame and selected for stable 293T clones latently infected with wild-type EBV or each of the mutant viruses. Cells were induced to the lytic form of viral replication with a BZLF1 expression vector in the presence and absence of various doses of GCV and ACV, and infectious viral titers were determined by a green Raji cell assay. As expected, virus production in wild-type EBV-infected 293T cells was inhibited by both GCV (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)] = 1.5 microM) and ACV (IC(50) = 4.1 microM). However, the EBV-PK mutant (which replicates as well as the wild-type (WT) virus in 293T cells) was resistant to both GCV (IC(50) = 19.6 microM) and ACV (IC(50) = 36.4 microM). Expression of the EBV-PK protein in trans restored GCV and ACV sensitivity in cells infected with the PK mutant virus. In contrast, in 293T cells infected with the TK mutant virus, viral replication remained sensitive to both GCV (IC(50) = 1.2 microM) and ACV (IC(50) = 2.8 microM), although susceptibility to the thymine nucleoside analogue, bromodeoxyuridine, was reduced. Thus, EBV-PK but not EBV-TK mediates ACV and GCV susceptibilities.

  15. Detection and quantification of Epstein-Barr virus EBER1 in EBV-infected cells by fluorescent in situ hybridization and flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Cubbage, M. L.; Sams, C. F.; Pierson, D. L.; Barrett, A. D.

    1998-01-01

    A rapid and highly sensitive fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assay was developed to detect Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells in peripheral blood. Multiple fluorescein-labeled antisense oligonucleotide probes were designed to hybridize to the EBER1 transcript, which is highly expressed in latently infected cells. After a rapid (30 min) hybridization, the cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. EBER1 was detected in several positive control cell lines that have variable numbers of EBV genome copies. No EBER1 was detected in two known EBV-negative cell lines. Northern blot analyses confirmed the presence and quantity of EBER1 transcripts in each cell line. This method was used to quantify the number of EBV-infected cells in peripheral blood from a patient with chronic mononucleosis. These results indicate that EBV-infected cells can be detected at the single cell level, and that this assay can be used to quantify the number of EBV-infected cells in clinical samples.

  16. A role for the nucleosome assembly proteins TAF-Iβ and NAP1 in the activation of BZLF1 expression and Epstein-Barr virus reactivation.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Sheila; Wang, Shan; Frappier, Lori

    2013-01-01

    The reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) from latent to lytic infection begins with the expression of the viral BZLF1 gene, leading to a subsequent cascade of viral gene expression and amplification of the EBV genome. Using RNA interference, we show that nucleosome assembly proteins NAP1 and TAF-I positively contribute to EBV reactivation in epithelial cells through the induction of BZLF1 expression. In addition, overexpression of NAP1 or the β isoform of TAF-I (TAF-Iβ) in AGS cells latently infected with EBV was sufficient to induce BZLF1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments performed in AGS-EBV cells showed that TAF-I associated with the BZLF1 promoter upon lytic induction and affected local histone modifications by increasing H3K4 dimethylation and H4K8 acetylation. MLL1, the host protein known to dimethylate H3K4, was found to associate with the BZLF1 promoter upon lytic induction in a TAF-I-dependent manner, and MLL1 depletion decreased BZLF1 expression, confirming its contribution to lytic reactivation. The results indicate that TAF-Iβ promotes BZLF1 expression and subsequent lytic infection by affecting chromatin at the BZLF1 promoter. PMID:23691099

  17. Epstein-Barr virus in gastric carcinoma is associated with location in the cardia and with a diffuse histology: a study in one area of Chile.

    PubMed

    Corvalan, A; Koriyama, C; Akiba, S; Eizuru, Y; Backhouse, C; Palma, M; Argandoña, J; Tokunaga, M

    2001-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with the most common form of stomach neoplasms, the gastric carcinoma (GC). The presence of EBV-encoded small RNAtype-1 (EBER-1), a marker for EBV infection was analyzed by in situ hybridization (ISH) in 185 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded cases of GC from a high risk region. We found 31 (16.8%) EBV-positive cases with no relationship to age. Although male predominance (19% in males and 12.5% in females) was observed, the gender difference did not achieve statistical significance. Odds ratio (OR) for cardia location was 5.4 (95% CI 1.7-17.3) when antrum was used as referent category and the effects of gender and age were taken into account. The proportion of EBV-positive cases in diffuse histology was higher than intestinal type (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 2.0-11.1). Our findings are contrary to a previously accepted hypothesis, that high-risk countries for GC have low rates of EBV-associated GC. In addition, our findings regarding location, histology and weak male predominance are different from what has been described in Asian and European countries, but similar to those described in Mexico and Mexican descendants living in the U.S. suggesting unique characteristics of EBV-associated GC in Latin-America.

  18. Identification of a purified complement-fixing antigen as the Epstein-Barr-virus determined nuclear antigen (EBNA) by its binding to metaphase chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ohno, S; Luka, J; Lindahl, T; Klein, G

    1977-04-01

    A soluble complement-fixing antigen carried by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed human cells has been previously extracted from cell nuclei and purified by DNA-cellulose chromatography [Luka, J., Siegert, W. & Klein, G. (1977) J. Virol., in press]. On addition of this antigen to methanol/acetic acid-fixed metaphase chrmosomes, followed by exposure to human sera containing antibodies against the EBV-determined nuclear antigen (EBNA), brilliant positive staining was obtained by anti-complement immunofluorescence. There was no staining after exposure to EBV-negative sera. Moreover, a nuclear protein fraction, prepared from an EBV-negative cell line in an analogous fashion, failed to induce the staining reaction. These data identify the soluble purified antigen as the EBV-determined nuclear antigen. The purified antigen has a molecular weight of 174,000 +/- 15,000, as determined by sucrose gradient centrifugation and gel filtration experiments. In neutral buffers containing 0.5-1.0 M NaCl, the antigen dissociates into a form of approximately one-half the original molecular weight with retained complement-fixing activity. This "monomer" has a molecular weight of 98,000 +/- 8,000. PMID:67603

  19. The mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 stimulates Epstein-Barr virus-induced B-cell transformation in in vitro and in vivo experimental models.

    PubMed

    Accardi, Rosita; Gruffat, Henri; Sirand, Cécilia; Fusil, Floriane; Gheit, Tarik; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Cosset, François-Loïc; Manet, Evelyne; Wild, Christopher P; Tommasino, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Although Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is widely distributed, certain EBV-driven malignancies are geographically restricted. EBV-associated Burkitt's lymphoma (eBL) is endemic in children living in sub-Saharan Africa. This population is heavily exposed to food contaminated with the mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). Here, we show that exposure to AFB1 in in vitro and in vivo models induces activation of the EBV lytic cycle and increases EBV load, two events that are associated with an increased risk of eBL in vivo. AFB1 treatment leads to the alteration of cellular gene expression, with consequent activations of signaling pathways, e.g. PI3K, that in turn mediate reactivation of the EBV life cycle. Finally, we show that AFB1 triggers EBV-driven cellular transformation both in primary human B cells and in a humanized animal model. In summary, our data provide evidence for a role of AFB1 as a cofactor in EBV-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:26424750

  20. Flow cytometric analysis of skin blister fluid induced by mosquito bites in a patient with chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wada, Taizo; Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Nakagawa, Hiroyasu; Asai, Erika; Toga, Akiko; Sakakibara, Yasuhisa; Shibata, Fumie; Tone, Yumi; Shimizu, Masaki; Toma, Tomoko; Yachie, Akihiro

    2009-12-01

    In chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection (CAEBV), ectopic EBV infection has been described in T or natural killer (NK) cells. NK cell-type infection (NK-CAEBV) is characterized by large granular lymphocytosis, high IgE levels and unusual reactions to mosquito bites, including severe local skin reactions, fever and liver dysfunction. However, the mechanisms underlying these reactions remain undetermined. Herein, we describe a patient with NK-CAEBV whose blister fluid after mosquito bites was analyzed. The patient exhibited significant increases in the percentage of CD56(+) NK cells in the fluid compared with a simple mosquito allergy, in which the majority of infiltrated cells were CD203c(+) cells, indicating basophils and/or mast cells. His fluid also contained CD203c(+) cells, and his circulating basophils were activated by mosquito extracts in vitro. These results suggest that CD203c(+) cells as well as NK cells may play pathogenic roles in the severe skin reactions to mosquito bites in NK-CAEBV.

  1. Antibody to Epstein-Barr virus specific DNase in sera of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and other nine most common cancer patients in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, M M; Chen, J Y; Liu, M Y; Lynn, T C; Tu, S M; Yang, C S

    1984-08-01

    Sera from 119 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), 33 patients with other cancers of the head and neck, 220 normal subjects and various numbers of patients with each of the other nine most common cancers in Taiwan were examined for their serum antibody response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific DNase. The positive rate (neutralizing activity greater than 2 units) in normal subjects was 5.5%; 12.1% in patients with other cancers of the head and neck, 87.4% in NPC patients and 0% (colon or rectal cancer) to 30% (lung cancer) in the other nine cancer patients. There is statistically significant difference of positive rates between NPC patients and lung cancer patients (p less than 0.001). Briefly, the test has 87% sensitivity and 95% specificity for NPC patients. Therefore titration of the serum antibody reactivity to EBV-specific DNase can be used as a method for massive screening for the early diagnosis of NPC.

  2. Constitutive autophagy contributes to resistance to TP53-mediated apoptosis in Epstein-Barr virus-positive latency III B-cell lymphoproliferations.

    PubMed

    Pujals, Anaïs; Favre, Loëtitia; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Robert, Aude; Meurice, Guillaume; Le Gentil, Marion; Chelouah, Sonia; Martin-Garcia, Nadine; Le Cam, Eric; Guettier, Catherine; Raphaël, Martine; Vassilev, Lyubomir T; Gaulard, Philippe; Codogno, Patrice; Lipinski, Marc; Wiels, Joëlle

    2015-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with various lymphoproliferative disorders and lymphomas. We have previously demonstrated that treating wild-type TP53-expressing B cell lines with the TP53 pathway activator nutlin-3 induced apoptosis in EBV-negative and EBV-positive latency I cells whereas EBV-positive latency III cells remained much more apoptosis-resistant. Here, we report a constitutively high level of autophagy in these resistant cells which express high levels of the proautophagic protein BECN1/Beclin 1 based, at least in part, on the activation of the NFKB signaling pathway by the viral protein LMP1. Following treatment with nutlin-3, several autophagy-stimulating genes were upregulated both in EBV-negative and EBV-positive latency III cells. However the process of autophagy was only triggered in the latter and was associated with an upregulation of SESN1/sestrin 1 and inhibition of MTOR more rapid than in EBV-negative cells. A treatment with chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy, potentiated the apoptotic effect of nutlin-3, particularly in those EBV-positive cells which were resistant to apoptosis induced by nutlin-3 alone, thereby showing that autophagy participates in this resistant phenotype. Finally, using immunohistochemical staining, clinical samples from various B cell lymphoproliferations with the EBV-positive latency II or III phenotype were found to harbor a constitutively active autophagy.

  3. Regulation of the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase PKR by RNAs encoded by a repeated sequence in the Epstein-Barr virus genome.

    PubMed Central

    Elia, A; Laing, K G; Schofield, A; Tilleray, V J; Clemens, M J

    1996-01-01

    During the initial infection of B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) only a few viral genes are expressed, six of which encode the EBV nuclear antigens, EBNAs 1-6. The majority of EBNA mRNAs share common 5'-ends containing a variable number of two alternating and repeated exons transcribed from the BamHI W major internal repeats of the viral DNA. These sequences can also exist as independent small RNA species in some EBV-infected cell types. We present evidence that transcripts from these W repeat regions can exert a trans-acting effect on protein synthesis, through their ability to activate the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase PKR. UV cross-linking and filter binding assays have demonstrated that the W transcripts bind specifically to PKR and can compete with another EBV-encoded small RNA, EBER-1, which was shown previously to bind this kinase. In the reticulocyte lysate system the W RNAs shut off protein synthesis through an ability to activate PKR. In contrast to EBER-1, the W RNAs are unable to block the dsRNA-dependent activation of PKR. Using a purified preparation of the protein kinase we have shown that the W transcripts directly activate PKR in vitro. The results suggest that EBV has the ability both to activate and to inhibit PKR through the actions of different products of viral transcription. PMID:8948637

  4. Rare Circulating Cells in Familial Waldenström Macroglobulinemia Displaying the MYD88 L265P Mutation Are Enriched by Epstein-Barr Virus Immortalization.

    PubMed

    Pertesi, Maroulio; Galia, Perrine; Nazaret, Nicolas; Vallée, Maxime; Garderet, Laurent; Leleu, Xavier; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Foll, Matthieu; Byrnes, Graham; Lachuer, Joel; McKay, James D; Dumontet, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The MYD88 L265P is a recurrent somatic mutation in neoplastic cells from patients with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia (WM). We identified the MYD88 L265P mutation in three individuals from unrelated families, but its presence did not explain the disease segregation within these WM pedigrees. We observed the mutation in these three individuals at high allele fractions in DNA extracted from EBV-immortalized Lymphoblastoid cell lines established from peripheral blood (LCL), but at much lower allele fractions in DNA extracted directly from peripheral blood, suggesting that this mutation is present in a clonal cell subpopulation rather than of germ-line origin. Furthermore, we observed that the MYD88 L265P mutation is enriched in WM families, detected in 40.5% of patients with familial WM or MGUS (10/22 WM, 5/15 MGUS), compared to 3.5% of patients with familial MM or MGUS (0/72 MM, 4/41 MGUS) (p = 10-7). The mutant allele frequency increased with passages in vitro after immortalization with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) consistent with the MYD88 L265P described gain-of-function proposed for this mutation. The MYD88 L265P mutation appears to be frequently present in circulating cells in patients with WM, and MGUS, and these cells are amenable to immortalization by EBV.

  5. Mapping regions of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein B (gB) important for fusion function with gH/gL

    SciTech Connect

    Plate, Aileen E.; Reimer, Jessica J.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Longnecker, Richard

    2011-04-25

    Glycoproteins gB and gH/gL are required for entry of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) into cells, but the role of each glycoprotein and how they function together to mediate fusion is unclear. Analysis of the functional homology of gB from the closely related primate gammaherpesvirus, rhesus lymphocryptovirus (Rh-LCV), showed that EBV gB could not complement Rh gB due to a species-specific dependence between gB and gL. To map domains of gB required for this interaction, we constructed a panel of EBV/Rh gB chimeric proteins. Analysis showed that insertion of Rh gB from residues 456 to 807 restored fusion function of EBV gB with Rh gH/gL, suggesting this region of gB is important for interaction with gH/gL. Split YFP bimolecular complementation (BiFC) provided evidence of an interaction between EBV gB and gH/gL. Together, our results suggest the importance of a gB-gH/gL interaction in EBV-mediated fusion with B cells requiring the region of EBV gB from 456 to 807.

  6. Investigation of the function of the putative self-association site of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein 42 (gp42)

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Cynthia L.; Matsuura, Hisae; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Longnecker, Richard

    2011-07-05

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein 42 (gp42) is a type II membrane protein essential for entry into B cells but inhibits entry into epithelial cells. X-ray crystallography suggests that gp42 may form dimers when bound to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II receptor (Mullen et al., 2002) or multimerize when not bound to HLA class II (Kirschner et al., 2009). We investigated this self-association of gp42 using several different approaches. We generated soluble mutants of gp42 containing mutations within the self-association site and found that these mutants have a defect in fusion. The gp42 mutants bound to gH/gL and HLA class II, but were unable to bind wild-type gp42 or a cleavage mutant of gp42. Using purified gp42, gH/gL, and HLA, we found these proteins associate 1:1:1 by gel filtration suggesting that gp42 dimerization or multimerization does not occur or is a transient event undetectable by our methods.

  7. AUF1/hnRNP D is a novel protein partner of the EBER1 noncoding RNA of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nara; Pimienta, Genaro; Steitz, Joan A

    2012-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells express two noncoding RNAs called EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) 1 and EBER2. Despite their high abundance in the nucleus (about 10(6) copies), the molecular function of these noncoding RNAs has remained elusive. Here, we report that the insertion into EBER1 of an RNA aptamer that binds the bacteriophage MS2 coat protein allows the isolation of EBER1 and associated protein partners. By combining MS2-mediated selection with stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and analysis by mass spectrometry, we identified AUF1 (AU-rich element binding factor 1)/hnRNP D (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D) as an interacting protein of EBER1. AUF1 exists as four isoforms generated by alternative splicing and is best known for its role in destabilizing mRNAs upon binding to AU-rich elements (AREs) in their 3' untranslated region (UTR). Using UV crosslinking, we demonstrate that predominantly the p40 isoform of AUF1 interacts with EBER1 in vivo. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays show that EBER1 can compete for the binding of the AUF1 p40 isoform to ARE-containing RNA. Given the high abundance of EBER1 in EBV-positive cells, EBER1 may disturb the normal homeostasis between AUF1 and ARE-containing mRNAs or compete with other AUF1-interacting targets in cells latently infected by EBV.

  8. AUF1/hnRNP D is a novel protein partner of the EBER1 noncoding RNA of Epstein-Barr virus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nara; Pimienta, Genaro; Steitz, Joan A.

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)–infected cells express two noncoding RNAs called EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) 1 and EBER2. Despite their high abundance in the nucleus (about 106 copies), the molecular function of these noncoding RNAs has remained elusive. Here, we report that the insertion into EBER1 of an RNA aptamer that binds the bacteriophage MS2 coat protein allows the isolation of EBER1 and associated protein partners. By combining MS2-mediated selection with stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and analysis by mass spectrometry, we identified AUF1 (AU-rich element binding factor 1)/hnRNP D (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D) as an interacting protein of EBER1. AUF1 exists as four isoforms generated by alternative splicing and is best known for its role in destabilizing mRNAs upon binding to AU-rich elements (AREs) in their 3′ untranslated region (UTR). Using UV crosslinking, we demonstrate that predominantly the p40 isoform of AUF1 interacts with EBER1 in vivo. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays show that EBER1 can compete for the binding of the AUF1 p40 isoform to ARE-containing RNA. Given the high abundance of EBER1 in EBV-positive cells, EBER1 may disturb the normal homeostasis between AUF1 and ARE-containing mRNAs or compete with other AUF1-interacting targets in cells latently infected by EBV. PMID:23012480

  9. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway is critical for cell transformation by the latent membrane protein 1 of Epstein-Barr virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kutz, Helmut; Reisbach, Gilbert; Schultheiss, Ute; Kieser, Arnd

    2008-02-20

    The latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transforms cells activating signal transduction pathways such as NF-{kappa}B, PI3-kinase, or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Here, we investigated the functional role of the LMP1-induced JNK pathway in cell transformation. Expression of a novel dominant-negative JNK1 allele caused a block of proliferation in LMP1-transformed Rat1 fibroblasts. The JNK-specific inhibitor SP600125 reproduced this effect in Rat1-LMP1 cells and efficiently interfered with proliferation of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs). Inhibition of the LMP1-induced JNK pathway in LCLs caused the downregulation of c-Jun and Cdc2, the essential G2/M cell cycle kinase, which was accompanied by a cell cycle arrest of LCLs at G2/M phase transition. Moreover, SP600125 retarded tumor growth of LCLs in a xenograft model in SCID mice. Our data support a critical role of the LMP1-induced JNK pathway for proliferation of LMP1-transformed cells and characterize JNK as a potential target for intervention against EBV-induced malignancies.

  10. Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Gene 3 (EBI3): A Novel Diagnosis Marker in Burkitt Lymphoma and Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bastard, Christian; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Couturier, Jérôme; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Dietrich, Céline; Brousse, Nicole; Vacher-Lavenu, Marie-Cécile; Devergne, Odile

    2011-01-01

    The distinction between Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), two types of mature aggressive B-cell lymphomas that require distinct treatments, can be difficult because of forms showing features intermediate between DLBCL and BL (here called BL/DLBCL). They can be discriminated by the presence of c-myc translocations characteristic of BL. However, these are not exclusive of BL and when present in DLBCL are associated with lower survival. In this study, we show that Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) is differentially expressed among BL and DLBCL. Analysis of gene expression data from 502 cases of aggressive mature B-cell lymphomas available on Gene Expression Omnibus and immunohistochemical analysis of 184 cases of BL, BL/DLBCL or DLBCL, showed that EBI3 was not expressed in EBV-positive or -negative BL cases, whereas it was expressed by over 30% of tumoral cells in nearly 80% of DLBCL cases, independently of their subtypes. In addition, we show that c-myc overexpression represses EBI3 expression, and that DLBCL or BL/DLBCL cases with c-myc translocations have lower expression of EBI3. Thus, EBI3 immunohistochemistry could be useful to discriminate BL from DLBCL, and to identify cases of BL/DLBCL or DLBCL with potential c-myc translocations. PMID:21931777

  11. Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 2A enhances MYC-driven cell cycle progression in a mouse model of B lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Kamonwan; Chen, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Elevated expression of MYC is a shared property of many human cancers. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with lymphoid malignancies, yet collaborative roles between MYC and EBV in lymphomagenesis are unclear. EBV latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) functions as a B-cell receptor (BCR) mimic known to provide survival signals to infected B cells. Co-expression of human MYC and LMP2A in mice (LMP2A/λ-MYC) accelerates B lymphoma onset compared with mice expressing human MYC alone (λ-MYC mice). Here we show a novel role of LMP2A in potentiating MYC to promote G1-S transition and hyperproliferation by downregulating cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27kip1 in a proteasome-dependent manner. Expressing a gain-of-function S10A mutant of p27kip1 has minor effect on tumor latency. However, pretumor B cells from λ-MYC mice expressing homozygous S10A mutant show a significant decrease in the percentage of S-phase cells. Interestingly, LMP2A is able to counteract the antiproliferative effect of the S10A mutant to promote S-phase entry. Finally, we show that LMP2A expression correlates with higher levels of MYC expression and suppression of p27kip1 before lymphoma onset. Our study demonstrates a novel function of EBV LMP2A in maximizing MYC expression, resulting in hyperproliferation and cellular transformation into cancer cells in vivo. PMID:24174629

  12. Rapid and combined detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Epstein-Barr virus and human cytomegalovirus using AllGlo quadruplex quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; He, Hui; Pan, Ping; He, Songzhe; Dong, Xueyan; Chen, Yueming; Wang, Shuying; Yu, Daojun

    2016-07-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) cause substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. The causes of ARI are dynamic, and co-infections of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Epstein-Barr virus and human cytomegalovirus are recently developed causes of ARI. Here, we established a quadruplex quantitative PCR (qPCR) method to rapidly identify and simultaneously detect a single infection or co-infection of these three pathogens and an internal control in a single tube using AllGlo probes. The analysis demonstrated a wide linear range of detection from 101 to 108 copies per test and a low coefficient of variation of less than 5 %. The amplification efficiencies were all close to 1, and the correlation coefficients (r2) were all greater than 0.99. We found no significant difference in a comparative reagent test (P >0.05). Moreover, the results of tests on clinical samples using AllGlo quadruplex qPCR and TaqMan uniplex qPCR were in near-perfect agreement (κ =0.97). Clinically, the availability of this method will enable better differential diagnosis, disease surveillance and controlled outcomes. PMID:27093597

  13. [RS3PE syndrome associated with senile Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B cell lymphoma of a patient with colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Saori; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Usami, Makoto; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Yamada, Michiko; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Fujita, Miri; Nakano, Tatsumi; Kanari, Yusuke; Iyama, Satoshi; Kato, Junji

    2015-11-01

    A 75-year-old woman consulted her doctor in January 2014 because of pain in the dorsum of the hands, elbows, shoulders, and knees, bilaterally, and was diagnosed as having remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) syndrome. Although the joint pain improved with low-dose prednisolone administration, she was referred to our department in April of 2014 because she had become aware of swelling of the right cervical lymph node. Biopsy of the lymph node demonstrated that she had Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the elderly, and colonoscopy revealed early colon cancer. Also, both the lymphoma and colon cancer stained positive for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Complete remission was achieved after two courses of R-CHOP, and RS3PE syndrome did not relapse. This case suggested the involvement of VEGF produced by EBV-positive DLBCL in the pathogenesis of RS3PE syndrome. PMID:26666720

  14. Silencing the shutoff protein of Epstein-Barr virus in productively infected B cells points to (innate) targets for immune evasion.

    PubMed

    van Gent, Michiel; Gram, Anna M; Boer, Ingrid G J; Geerdink, Ruben J; Lindenbergh, Marthe F S; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Wiertz, Emmanuel J; Ressing, Maaike E

    2015-04-01

    During productive infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a dramatic suppression of cellular protein expression is caused by the viral alkaline exonuclease BGLF5. Among the proteins downregulated by BGLF5 are multiple immune components. Here, we show that shutoff reduces expression of the innate EBV-sensing Toll-like receptor-2 and the lipid antigen-presenting CD1d molecule, thereby identifying these proteins as novel targets of BGLF5. To silence BGLF5 expression in B cells undergoing productive EBV infection, we employed an shRNA approach. Viral replication still occurred in these cells, albeit with reduced late gene expression. Surface levels of a group of proteins, including immunologically relevant molecules such as CD1d and HLA class I and class II, were only partly rescued by depletion of BGLF5, suggesting that additional viral gene products interfere with their expression. Our combined approach thus provides a means to unmask novel EBV (innate) immune evasion strategies that may operate in productively infected B cells.

  15. Evaluation of skin cancer chemoprevention potential of sunscreen agents using the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation in vitro assay.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, G J; Rao, G S; Takayasu, J; Takasaki, M; Iida, A; Suzuki, N; Konoshima, T; Tokuda, H

    2013-04-01

    In our continuing search for novel cancer chemopreventive compounds of natural and synthetic origin, we have evaluated 14 commonly used ultraviolet (UV) sunscreen agents (designated UV-1 to UV-14) for their skin cancer chemoprevention potential. They belong to 8 different chemical categories: aminobenzoate (UV-5, UV-7, UV-8 and UV-14), benzophenone (UV-1, UV-2, UV-3 and UV-13), benzotriazole (UV-10), benzyloxyphenol (UV-9), cinnamate (UV-6), quinolone (UV-4), salicylate (UV-11) and xanthone (UV-12). In the in vitro assay employed, the sunscreens were assessed by their inhibition of the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation induced by the tumour promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in human lymphoblastoid Raji cells. All sunscreens tested were found to exhibit anti-tumour promoting activity: listed in decreasing order, moderate (UV-11, UV-2, UV-7, UV-12, UV-3, UV-9 and UV-14) to weak (UV-1, UV-6, UV-8, UV-16, UV-5, UV-4 and UV-10) with octyl salicylate (UV-11) as the most potent and drometrizole (UV-10) as the least potent among the compounds evaluated. A plausible relationship between the antioxidant property of sunscreens and their ability to promote anti-tumour activity was noted. The results call for a comprehensive analysis of skin cancer chemoprevention potential of currently used UV sunscreen agents around the globe to identify those with the best clinical profile.

  16. Profiling of Epstein-Barr virus latent RNA expression in clinical specimens by gene-specific multiprimed cDNA synthesis and PCR.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Servi J C; Brink, Antoinette A T P; Middeldorp, Jaap M

    2005-01-01

    We describe a two-step RT-PCR method for simultaneous detection of EBNA-1 (QK and Y3K splice variants), EBNA-2, LMP-1, LMP-2a and -2b, ZEBRA, and BARTs RNA encoded by Epstein-Barr virus. As a control for RNA integrity, the low-copy-number transcript derived from U1A snRNP, a cellular housekeeping gene, is coamplified. Copy DNA (cDNA) for these nine targets is simultaneously synthesized in a gene-specific, multiprimed cDNA reaction, which strongly reduces the amount of required clinical specimen and allows more sensitive detection than random hexamer or oligo-dT priming. For amplification, cDNA synthesis is followed by nine separate PCRs for the mentioned targets. Primers were designed either as intron-flanking, to avoid background DNA amplification, or in different exons, allowing identification of differentially spliced RNA molecules. To increase specificity, PCR products are detected by autoradiography after hybridization with radiolabeled internal oligonucleotide probes. The method described is highly suitable for profiling EBV latent RNA expression in tissue biopsies, cultured or isolated cells, and unfractionated whole blood and for definition of EBV latency type I, II, or III gene expression in these samples.

  17. Three different histological subtypes of Epstein-Barr virus-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in a patient with hepatitis C infecti