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Sample records for equator

  1. Penetration equations

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.W.

    1997-10-01

    In 1967, Sandia National Laboratories published empirical equations to predict penetration into natural earth materials and concrete. Since that time there have been several small changes to the basic equations, and several more additions to the overall technique for predicting penetration into soil, rock, concrete, ice, and frozen soil. The most recent update to the equations was published in 1988, and since that time there have been changes in the equations to better match the expanding data base, especially in concrete penetration. This is a standalone report documenting the latest version of the Young/Sandia penetration equations and related analytical techniques to predict penetration into natural earth materials and concrete. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

  2. Beautiful equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljamaa, Panu; Jacobs, J. Richard; Chris; JamesHyman; Halma, Matthew; EricNolan; Coxon, Paul

    2014-07-01

    In reply to a Physics World infographic (part of which is given above) about a study showing that Euler's equation was deemed most beautiful by a group of mathematicians who had been hooked up to a functional magnetic-resonance image (fMRI) machine while viewing mathematical expressions (14 May, http://ow.ly/xHUFi).

  3. Marcus equation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1998-09-21

    In the late 1950s to early 1960s Rudolph A. Marcus developed a theory for treating the rates of outer-sphere electron-transfer reactions. Outer-sphere reactions are reactions in which an electron is transferred from a donor to an acceptor without any chemical bonds being made or broken. (Electron-transfer reactions in which bonds are made or broken are referred to as inner-sphere reactions.) Marcus derived several very useful expressions, one of which has come to be known as the Marcus cross-relation or, more simply, as the Marcus equation. It is widely used for correlating and predicting electron-transfer rates. For his contributions to the understanding of electron-transfer reactions, Marcus received the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. This paper discusses the development and use of the Marcus equation. Topics include self-exchange reactions; net electron-transfer reactions; Marcus cross-relation; and proton, hydride, atom and group transfers.

  4. Extended rate equations

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.

    1981-01-30

    The equations of motion are discussed which describe time dependent population flows in an N-level system, reviewing the relationship between incoherent (rate) equations, coherent (Schrodinger) equations, and more general partially coherent (Bloch) equations. Approximations are discussed which replace the elaborate Bloch equations by simpler rate equations whose coefficients incorporate long-time consequences of coherence.

  5. Basic lubrication equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Lubricants, usually Newtonian fluids, are assumed to experience laminar flow. The basic equations used to describe the flow are the Navier-Stokes equation of motion. The study of hydrodynamic lubrication is, from a mathematical standpoint, the application of a reduced form of these Navier-Stokes equations in association with the continuity equation. The Reynolds equation can also be derived from first principles, provided of course that the same basic assumptions are adopted in each case. Both methods are used in deriving the Reynolds equation, and the assumptions inherent in reducing the Navier-Stokes equations are specified. Because the Reynolds equation contains viscosity and density terms and these properties depend on temperature and pressure, it is often necessary to couple the Reynolds with energy equation. The lubricant properties and the energy equation are presented. Film thickness, a parameter of the Reynolds equation, is a function of the elastic behavior of the bearing surface. The governing elasticity equation is therefore presented.

  6. Chemical Equation Balancing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakley, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews mathematical techniques for solving systems of homogeneous linear equations and demonstrates that the algebraic method of balancing chemical equations is a matter of solving a system of homogeneous linear equations. FORTRAN programs using this matrix method to chemical equation balancing are available from the author. (JN)

  7. Kinetic energy equations for the average-passage equation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Adamczyk, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Important kinetic energy equations derived from the average-passage equation sets are documented, with a view to their interrelationships. These kinetic equations may be used for closing the average-passage equations. The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation used is formed by subtracting the mean kinetic energy equation from the averaged total instantaneous kinetic energy equation. The aperiodic kinetic energy equation, averaged steady kinetic energy equation, averaged unsteady kinetic energy equation, and periodic kinetic energy equation, are also treated.

  8. Reflections on Chemical Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Mel

    1981-01-01

    The issue of how much emphasis balancing chemical equations should have in an introductory chemistry course is discussed. The current heavy emphasis on finishing such equations is viewed as misplaced. (MP)

  9. Interpretation of Bernoulli's Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Robert P.; Schwaneberg, Rolf

    1994-01-01

    Discusses Bernoulli's equation with regards to: horizontal flow of incompressible fluids, change of height of incompressible fluids, gases, liquids and gases, and viscous fluids. Provides an interpretation, properties, terminology, and applications of Bernoulli's equation. (MVL)

  10. Functional BES equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Ivan; Serban, Didina; Volin, Dmytro

    2008-08-01

    We give a realization of the Beisert, Eden and Staudacher equation for the planar Script N = 4 supersymetric gauge theory which seems to be particularly useful to study the strong coupling limit. We are using a linearized version of the BES equation as two coupled equations involving an auxiliary density function. We write these equations in terms of the resolvents and we transform them into a system of functional, instead of integral, equations. We solve the functional equations perturbatively in the strong coupling limit and reproduce the recursive solution obtained by Basso, Korchemsky and Kotański. The coefficients of the strong coupling expansion are fixed by the analyticity properties obeyed by the resolvents.

  11. Einstein equation at singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Ovidiu-Cristinel

    2014-02-01

    Einstein's equation is rewritten in an equivalent form, which remains valid at the singularities in some major cases. These cases include the Schwarzschild singularity, the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker Big Bang singularity, isotropic singularities, and a class of warped product singularities. This equation is constructed in terms of the Ricci part of the Riemann curvature (as the Kulkarni-Nomizu product between Einstein's equation and the metric tensor).

  12. Solving Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.

    1987-01-01

    Initial-value ordinary differential equation solution via variable order Adams method (SIVA/DIVA) package is collection of subroutines for solution of nonstiff ordinary differential equations. There are versions for single-precision and double-precision arithmetic. Requires fewer evaluations of derivatives than other variable-order Adams predictor/ corrector methods. Option for direct integration of second-order equations makes integration of trajectory problems significantly more efficient. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  13. Reduced Braginskii equations

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, M.; Horton, W. )

    1994-07-01

    A set of reduced Braginskii equations is derived without assuming flute ordering and the Boussinesq approximation. These model equations conserve the physical energy. It is crucial at finite [beta] that the perpendicular component of Ohm's law be solved to ensure [del][center dot][bold j]=0 for energy conservation.

  14. Uniqueness of Maxwell's Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohn, Jack

    1978-01-01

    Shows that, as a consequence of two feasible assumptions and when due attention is given to the definition of charge and the fields E and B, the lowest-order equations that these two fields must satisfy are Maxwell's equations. (Author/GA)

  15. Octonic Massive Field Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Süleyman; Kekeç, Seray

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper we propose the octonic form of massive field equations based on the analogy with electromagnetism and linear gravity. Using the advantages of octon algebra the Maxwell-Dirac-Proca equations have been reformulated in compact and elegant way. The energy-momentum relations for massive field are discussed.

  16. The Effective Equation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksin, Sergei; Maiocchi, Alberto

    In this chapter we present a general method of constructing the effective equation which describes the behavior of small-amplitude solutions for a nonlinear PDE in finite volume, provided that the linear part of the equation is a hamiltonian system with a pure imaginary discrete spectrum. The effective equation is obtained by retaining only the resonant terms of the nonlinearity (which may be hamiltonian, or may be not); the assertion that it describes the limiting behavior of small-amplitude solutions is a rigorous mathematical theorem. In particular, the method applies to the three- and four-wave systems. We demonstrate that different possible types of energy transport are covered by this method, depending on whether the set of resonances splits into finite clusters (this happens, e.g. in case of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation), or is connected (this happens, e.g. in the case of the NLS equation if the space-dimension is at least two). For equations of the first type the energy transition to high frequencies does not hold, while for equations of the second type it may take place. Our method applies to various weakly nonlinear wave systems, appearing in plasma, meteorology and oceanography.

  17. Nonlinear gyrokinetic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, D.H.E.; Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.; Lee, W.W.

    1983-03-01

    Nonlinear gyrokinetic equations are derived from a systematic Hamiltonian theory. The derivation employs Lie transforms and a noncanonical perturbation theory first used by Littlejohn for the simpler problem of asymptotically small gyroradius. For definiteness, we emphasize the limit of electrostatic fluctuations in slab geometry; however, there is a straight-forward generalization to arbitrary field geometry and electromagnetic perturbations. An energy invariant for the nonlinear system is derived, and various of its limits are considered. The weak turbulence theory of the equations is examined. In particular, the wave kinetic equation of Galeev and Sagdeev is derived from an asystematic truncation of the equations, implying that this equation fails to consider all gyrokinetic effects. The equations are simplified for the case of small but finite gyroradius and put in a form suitable for efficient computer simulation. Although it is possible to derive the Terry-Horton and Hasegawa-Mima equations as limiting cases of our theory, several new nonlinear terms absent from conventional theories appear and are discussed.

  18. Nonlinear ordinary difference equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caughey, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    Future space vehicles will be relatively large and flexible, and active control will be necessary to maintain geometrical configuration. While the stresses and strains in these space vehicles are not expected to be excessively large, their cumulative effects will cause significant geometrical nonlinearities to appear in the equations of motion, in addition to the nonlinearities caused by material properties. Since the only effective tool for the analysis of such large complex structures is the digital computer, it will be necessary to gain a better understanding of the nonlinear ordinary difference equations which result from the time discretization of the semidiscrete equations of motion for such structures.

  19. Stochastic Gauss equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierret, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    We derived the equations of Celestial Mechanics governing the variation of the orbital elements under a stochastic perturbation, thereby generalizing the classical Gauss equations. Explicit formulas are given for the semimajor axis, the eccentricity, the inclination, the longitude of the ascending node, the pericenter angle, and the mean anomaly, which are expressed in term of the angular momentum vector H per unit of mass and the energy E per unit of mass. Together, these formulas are called the stochastic Gauss equations, and they are illustrated numerically on an example from satellite dynamics.

  20. Nonlinear differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1988-01-01

    This report is the text of a graduate course on nonlinear differential equations given by the author at the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the summer of 1987. The topics covered are: direction fields of first-order differential equations; the Lie (group) theory of ordinary differential equations; similarity solutions of second-order partial differential equations; maximum principles and differential inequalities; monotone operators and iteration; complementary variational principles; and stability of numerical methods. The report should be of interest to graduate students, faculty, and practicing scientists and engineers. No prior knowledge is required beyond a good working knowledge of the calculus. The emphasis is on practical results. Most of the illustrative examples are taken from the fields of nonlinear diffusion, heat and mass transfer, applied superconductivity, and helium cryogenics.

  1. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  2. SIMULTANEOUS DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION COMPUTER

    DOEpatents

    Collier, D.M.; Meeks, L.A.; Palmer, J.P.

    1960-05-10

    A description is given for an electronic simulator for a system of simultaneous differential equations, including nonlinear equations. As a specific example, a homogeneous nuclear reactor system including a reactor fluid, heat exchanger, and a steam boiler may be simulated, with the nonlinearity resulting from a consideration of temperature effects taken into account. The simulator includes three operational amplifiers, a multiplier, appropriate potential sources, and interconnecting R-C networks.

  3. Set Equation Transformation System.

    2002-03-22

    Version 00 SETS is used for symbolic manipulation of Boolean equations, particularly the reduction of equations by the application of Boolean identities. It is a flexible and efficient tool for performing probabilistic risk analysis (PRA), vital area analysis, and common cause analysis. The equation manipulation capabilities of SETS can also be used to analyze noncoherent fault trees and determine prime implicants of Boolean functions, to verify circuit design implementation, to determine minimum cost fire protectionmore » requirements for nuclear reactor plants, to obtain solutions to combinatorial optimization problems with Boolean constraints, and to determine the susceptibility of a facility to unauthorized access through nullification of sensors in its protection system. Two auxiliary programs, SEP and FTD, are included. SEP performs the quantitative analysis of reduced Boolean equations (minimal cut sets) produced by SETS. The user can manipulate and evaluate the equations to find the probability of occurrence of any desired event and to produce an importance ranking of the terms and events in an equation. FTD is a fault tree drawing program which uses the proprietary ISSCO DISSPLA graphics software to produce an annotated drawing of a fault tree processed by SETS. The DISSPLA routines are not included.« less

  4. Introducing Chemical Formulae and Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Chris; Rowell, Jack

    1979-01-01

    Discusses when the writing of chemical formula and equations can be introduced in the school science curriculum. Also presents ways in which formulae and equations learning can be aided and some examples for balancing and interpreting equations. (HM)

  5. The Bernoulli-Poiseuille Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badeer, Henry S.; Synolakis, Costas E.

    1989-01-01

    Describes Bernoulli's equation and Poiseuille's equation for fluid dynamics. Discusses the application of the combined Bernoulli-Poiseuille equation in real flows, such as viscous flows under gravity and acceleration. (YP)

  6. Parallel tridiagonal equation solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    Three parallel algorithms were compared for the direct solution of tridiagonal linear systems of equations. The algorithms are suitable for computers such as ILLIAC 4 and CDC STAR. For array computers similar to ILLIAC 4, cyclic odd-even reduction has the least operation count for highly structured sets of equations, and recursive doubling has the least count for relatively unstructured sets of equations. Since the difference in operation counts for these two algorithms is not substantial, their relative running times may be more related to overhead operations, which are not measured in this paper. The third algorithm, based on Buneman's Poisson solver, has more arithmetic operations than the others, and appears to be the least favorable. For pipeline computers similar to CDC STAR, cyclic odd-even reduction appears to be the most preferable algorithm for all cases.

  7. Nonlocal electrical diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.; Olivares-Peregrino, V. H.; Benavides-Cruz, M.; Calderón-Ramón, C.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis and modeling of the electrical diffusion equation using the fractional calculus approach. This alternative representation for the current density is expressed in terms of the Caputo derivatives, the order for the space domain is 0<β≤1 and for the time domain is 0<γ≤2. We present solutions for the full fractional equation involving space and time fractional derivatives using numerical methods based on Fourier variable separation. The case with spatial fractional derivatives leads to Levy flight type phenomena, while the time fractional equation is related to sub- or super diffusion. We show that the mathematical concept of fractional derivatives can be useful to understand the behavior of semiconductors, the design of solar panels, electrochemical phenomena and the description of anomalous complex processes.

  8. Stochastic differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sobczyk, K. )

    1990-01-01

    This book provides a unified treatment of both regular (or random) and Ito stochastic differential equations. It focuses on solution methods, including some developed only recently. Applications are discussed, in particular an insight is given into both the mathematical structure, and the most efficient solution methods (analytical as well as numerical). Starting from basic notions and results of the theory of stochastic processes and stochastic calculus (including Ito's stochastic integral), many principal mathematical problems and results related to stochastic differential equations are expounded here for the first time. Applications treated include those relating to road vehicles, earthquake excitations and offshore structures.

  9. Kepler Equation solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis

    1995-01-01

    Kepler's Equation is solved over the entire range of elliptic motion by a fifth-order refinement of the solution of a cubic equation. This method is not iterative, and requires only four transcendental function evaluations: a square root, a cube root, and two trigonometric functions. The maximum relative error of the algorithm is less than one part in 10(exp 18), exceeding the capability of double-precision computer arithmetic. Roundoff errors in double-precision implementation of the algorithm are addressed, and procedures to avoid them are developed.

  10. The Statistical Drake Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    We provide the statistical generalization of the Drake equation. From a simple product of seven positive numbers, the Drake equation is now turned into the product of seven positive random variables. We call this "the Statistical Drake Equation". The mathematical consequences of this transformation are then derived. The proof of our results is based on the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) of Statistics. In loose terms, the CLT states that the sum of any number of independent random variables, each of which may be ARBITRARILY distributed, approaches a Gaussian (i.e. normal) random variable. This is called the Lyapunov Form of the CLT, or the Lindeberg Form of the CLT, depending on the mathematical constraints assumed on the third moments of the various probability distributions. In conclusion, we show that: The new random variable N, yielding the number of communicating civilizations in the Galaxy, follows the LOGNORMAL distribution. Then, as a consequence, the mean value of this lognormal distribution is the ordinary N in the Drake equation. The standard deviation, mode, and all the moments of this lognormal N are also found. The seven factors in the ordinary Drake equation now become seven positive random variables. The probability distribution of each random variable may be ARBITRARY. The CLT in the so-called Lyapunov or Lindeberg forms (that both do not assume the factors to be identically distributed) allows for that. In other words, the CLT "translates" into our statistical Drake equation by allowing an arbitrary probability distribution for each factor. This is both physically realistic and practically very useful, of course. An application of our statistical Drake equation then follows. The (average) DISTANCE between any two neighboring and communicating civilizations in the Galaxy may be shown to be inversely proportional to the cubic root of N. Then, in our approach, this distance becomes a new random variable. We derive the relevant probability density

  11. Comparison of Kernel Equating and Item Response Theory Equating Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The kernel method of test equating is a unified approach to test equating with some advantages over traditional equating methods. Therefore, it is important to evaluate in a comprehensive way the usefulness and appropriateness of the Kernel equating (KE) method, as well as its advantages and disadvantages compared with several popular item…

  12. Accumulative Equating Error after a Chain of Linear Equatings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Hongwen

    2010-01-01

    After many equatings have been conducted in a testing program, equating errors can accumulate to a degree that is not negligible compared to the standard error of measurement. In this paper, the author investigates the asymptotic accumulative standard error of equating (ASEE) for linear equating methods, including chained linear, Tucker, and…

  13. Parallel Multigrid Equation Solver

    2001-09-07

    Prometheus is a fully parallel multigrid equation solver for matrices that arise in unstructured grid finite element applications. It includes a geometric and an algebraic multigrid method and has solved problems of up to 76 mullion degrees of feedom, problems in linear elasticity on the ASCI blue pacific and ASCI red machines.

  14. Do Differential Equations Swing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    One of the units of in a standard differential equations course is a discussion of the oscillatory motion of a spring and the associated material on forcing functions and resonance. During the presentation on practical resonance, the instructor may tell students that it is similar to when they take their siblings to the playground and help them on…

  15. Modelling by Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaachoua, Hamid; Saglam, Ayse

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to show the close relation between physics and mathematics taking into account especially the theory of differential equations. By analysing the problems posed by scientists in the seventeenth century, we note that physics is very important for the emergence of this theory. Taking into account this analysis, we show the…

  16. A Quadratic Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2010-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, we study examples of the forced quadratic spring equation [image omitted]. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, we demonstrate the existence of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions, investigate the resonance boundary in the [omega]…

  17. Generalized reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, S.E.

    1999-02-01

    A new derivation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations is presented. A multiple-time-scale expansion is employed. It has the advantage of clearly separating the three time scales of the problem associated with (1) MHD equilibrium, (2) fluctuations whose wave vector is aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, and (3) those aligned parallel to the magnetic field. The derivation is carried out without relying on a large aspect ratio assumption; therefore this model can be applied to any general configuration. By accounting for the MHD equilibrium and constraints to eliminate the fast perpendicular waves, equations are derived to evolve scalar potential quantities on a time scale associated with the parallel wave vector (shear-Alfven wave time scale), which is the time scale of interest for MHD instability studies. Careful attention is given in the derivation to satisfy energy conservation and to have manifestly divergence-free magnetic fields to all orders in the expansion parameter. Additionally, neoclassical closures and equilibrium shear flow effects are easily accounted for in this model. Equations for the inner resistive layer are derived which reproduce the linear ideal and resistive stability criterion of Glasser, Greene, and Johnson. The equations have been programmed into a spectral initial value code and run with shear flow that is consistent with the equilibrium input into the code. Linear results of tearing modes with shear flow are presented which differentiate the effects of shear flow gradients in the layer with the effects of the shear flow decoupling multiple harmonics.

  18. Structural Equation Model Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandmaier, Andreas M.; von Oertzen, Timo; McArdle, John J.; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-01-01

    In the behavioral and social sciences, structural equation models (SEMs) have become widely accepted as a modeling tool for the relation between latent and observed variables. SEMs can be seen as a unification of several multivariate analysis techniques. SEM Trees combine the strengths of SEMs and the decision tree paradigm by building tree…

  19. Brownian motion from Boltzmann's equation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1971-01-01

    Two apparently disparate lines of inquiry in kinetic theory are shown to be equivalent: (1) Brownian motion as treated by the (stochastic) Langevin equation and Fokker-Planck equation; and (2) Boltzmann's equation. The method is to derive the kinetic equation for Brownian motion from the Boltzmann equation for a two-component neutral gas by a simultaneous expansion in the density and mass ratios.

  20. Supersymmetric fifth order evolution equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, K.; Liu, Q. P.

    2010-03-08

    This paper considers supersymmetric fifth order evolution equations. Within the framework of symmetry approach, we give a list containing six equations, which are (potentially) integrable systems. Among these equations, the most interesting ones include a supersymmetric Sawada-Kotera equation and a novel supersymmetric fifth order KdV equation. For the latter, we supply some properties such as a Hamiltonian structures and a possible recursion operator.

  1. Nikolaevskiy equation with dispersion.

    PubMed

    Simbawa, Eman; Matthews, Paul C; Cox, Stephen M

    2010-03-01

    The Nikolaevskiy equation was originally proposed as a model for seismic waves and is also a model for a wide variety of systems incorporating a neutral "Goldstone" mode, including electroconvection and reaction-diffusion systems. It is known to exhibit chaotic dynamics at the onset of pattern formation, at least when the dispersive terms in the equation are suppressed, as is commonly the practice in previous analyses. In this paper, the effects of reinstating the dispersive terms are examined. It is shown that such terms can stabilize some of the spatially periodic traveling waves; this allows us to study the loss of stability and transition to chaos of the waves. The secondary stability diagram ("Busse balloon") for the traveling waves can be remarkably complicated. PMID:20365845

  2. Causal electromagnetic interaction equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zinoviev, Yury M.

    2011-02-15

    For the electromagnetic interaction of two particles the relativistic causal quantum mechanics equations are proposed. These equations are solved for the case when the second particle moves freely. The initial wave functions are supposed to be smooth and rapidly decreasing at the infinity. This condition is important for the convergence of the integrals similar to the integrals of quantum electrodynamics. We also consider the singular initial wave functions in the particular case when the second particle mass is equal to zero. The discrete energy spectrum of the first particle wave function is defined by the initial wave function of the free-moving second particle. Choosing the initial wave functions of the free-moving second particle it is possible to obtain a practically arbitrary discrete energy spectrum.

  3. Generalized reduced MHD equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, S.E.; Hegna, C.C.; Callen, J.D.

    1998-07-01

    A new derivation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations is presented. A multiple-time-scale expansion is employed. It has the advantage of clearly separating the three time scales of the problem associated with (1) MHD equilibrium, (2) fluctuations whose wave vector is aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, and (3) those aligned parallel to the magnetic field. The derivation is carried out without relying on a large aspect ratio assumption; therefore this model can be applied to any general toroidal configuration. By accounting for the MHD equilibrium and constraints to eliminate the fast perpendicular waves, equations are derived to evolve scalar potential quantities on a time scale associated with the parallel wave vector (shear-alfven wave time scale), which is the time scale of interest for MHD instability studies. Careful attention is given in the derivation to satisfy energy conservation and to have manifestly divergence-free magnetic fields to all orders in the expansion parameter. Additionally, neoclassical closures and equilibrium shear flow effects are easily accounted for in this model. Equations for the inner resistive layer are derived which reproduce the linear ideal and resistive stability criterion of Glasser, Greene, and Johnson.

  4. The Drake Equation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konesky, Gregory

    2009-08-01

    In the almost half century since the Drake Equation was first conceived, a number of profound discoveries have been made that require each of the seven variables of this equation to be reconsidered. The discovery of hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor, for example, as well as the ever-increasing extreme conditions in which life is found on Earth, suggest a much wider range of possible extraterrestrial habitats. The growing consensus that life originated very early in Earth's history also supports this suggestion. The discovery of exoplanets with a wide range of host star types, and attendant habitable zones, suggests that life may be possible in planetary systems with stars quite unlike our Sun. Stellar evolution also plays an important part in that habitable zones are mobile. The increasing brightness of our Sun over the next few billion years, will place the Earth well outside the present habitable zone, but will then encompass Mars, giving rise to the notion that some Drake Equation variables, such as the fraction of planets on which life emerges, may have multiple values.

  5. Double-Plate Penetration Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    This report compares seven double-plate penetration predictor equations for accuracy and effectiveness of a shield design. Three of the seven are the Johnson Space Center original, modified, and new Cour-Palais equations. The other four are the Nysmith, Lundeberg-Stern-Bristow, Burch, and Wilkinson equations. These equations, except the Wilkinson equation, were derived from test results, with the velocities ranging up to 8 km/sec. Spreadsheet software calculated the projectile diameters for various velocities for the different equations. The results were plotted on projectile diameter versus velocity graphs for the expected orbital debris impact velocities ranging from 2 to 15 km/sec. The new Cour-Palais double-plate penetration equation was compared to the modified Cour-Palais single-plate penetration equation. Then the predictions from each of the seven double-plate penetration equations were compared to each other for a chosen shield design. Finally, these results from the equations were compared with test results performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Because the different equations predict a wide range of projectile diameters at any given velocity, it is very difficult to choose the "right" prediction equation for shield configurations other than those exactly used in the equations' development. Although developed for various materials, the penetration equations alone cannot be relied upon to accurately predict the effectiveness of a shield without using hypervelocity impact tests to verify the design.

  6. Reduction operators of Burgers equation

    PubMed Central

    Pocheketa, Oleksandr A.; Popovych, Roman O.

    2013-01-01

    The solution of the problem on reduction operators and nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation is systematically treated and completed. A new proof of the theorem on the special “no-go” case of regular reduction operators is presented, and the representation of the coefficients of operators in terms of solutions of the initial equation is constructed for this case. All possible nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation to single ordinary differential equations are exhaustively described. Any Lie reduction of the Burgers equation proves to be equivalent via the Hopf–Cole transformation to a parameterized family of Lie reductions of the linear heat equation. PMID:23576819

  7. New application to Riccati equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taogetusang; Sirendaoerji; Li, Shu-Min

    2010-08-01

    To seek new infinite sequence of exact solutions to nonlinear evolution equations, this paper gives the formula of nonlinear superposition of the solutions and Bäcklund transformation of Riccati equation. Based on the tanh-function expansion method and homogenous balance method, new infinite sequence of exact solutions to Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation, Karamoto-Sivashinsky equation and the set of (2+1)-dimensional asymmetric Nizhnik-Novikov-Veselov equations are obtained with the aid of symbolic computation system Mathematica. The method is of significance to construct infinite sequence exact solutions to other nonlinear evolution equations.

  8. Evaluating Equating Results: Percent Relative Error for Chained Kernel Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Yanlin; von Davier, Alina A.; Chen, Haiwen

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a method for evaluating equating results. Within the kernel equating framework, the percent relative error (PRE) for chained equipercentile equating was computed under the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design. The method was applied to two data sets to obtain the PRE, which can be used to measure equating…

  9. Differential Equations Compatible with Boundary Rational qKZ Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeyama, Yoshihiro

    2011-10-01

    We give diffierential equations compatible with the rational qKZ equation with boundary reflection. The total system contains the trigonometric degeneration of the bispectral qKZ equation of type (Cěen, Cn) which in the case of type GLn was studied by van Meer and Stokman. We construct an integral formula for solutions to our compatible system in a special case.

  10. The compressible adjoint equations in geodynamics: equations and numerical assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghelichkhan, Siavash; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2016-04-01

    The adjoint method is a powerful means to obtain gradient information in a mantle convection model relative to past flow structure. While the adjoint equations in geodynamics have been derived for the conservation equations of mantle flow in their incompressible form, the applicability of this approximation to Earth is limited, because density increases by almost a factor of two from the surface to the Core Mantle Boundary. Here we introduce the compressible adjoint equations for the conservation equations in the anelastic-liquid approximation. Our derivation applies an operator formulation in Hilbert spaces, to connect to recent work in seismology (Fichtner et al (2006)) and geodynamics (Horbach et al (2014)), where the approach was used to derive the adjoint equations for the wave equation and incompressible mantle flow. We present numerical tests of the newly derived equations based on twin experiments, focusing on three simulations. A first, termed Compressible, assumes the compressible forward and adjoint equations, and represents the consistent means of including compressibility effects. A second, termed Mixed, applies the compressible forward equation, but ignores compressibility effects in the adjoint equations, where the incompressible equations are used instead. A third simulation, termed Incompressible, neglects compressibility effects entirely in the forward and adjoint equations relative to the reference twin. The compressible and mixed formulations successfully restore earlier mantle flow structure, while the incompressible formulation yields noticeable artifacts. Our results suggest the use of a compressible formulation, when applying the adjoint method to seismically derived mantle heterogeneity structure.

  11. Estimating Equating Error in Observed-Score Equating. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    Traditionally, error in equating observed scores on two versions of a test is defined as the difference between the transformations that equate the quantiles of their distributions in the sample and in the population of examinees. This definition underlies, for example, the well-known approximation to the standard error of equating by Lord (1982).…

  12. On Solving Kepler's Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taff, L. G.; Brennan, T. A.

    1989-06-01

    Intrigued by the recent advances in research on solving Kepler's equation, we have attacked the problem too. Our contributions emphasize the unified derivation of all known bounds and several starting values, a proof of the optimality of these bounds, a very thorough numerical exploration of a large variety of starting values and solution techniques in both mean anomaly/eccentricity space and eccentric anomaly/eccentricity space, and finally the best and simplest starting value/solution algorithm: M + e and Wegstein's secant modification of the method of successive substitutions. The very close second is Broucke's bounds coupled with Newton's second-order scheme.

  13. The Arrhenius equation revisited.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Micha; Normand, Mark D; Corradini, Maria G

    2012-01-01

    The Arrhenius equation has been widely used as a model of the temperature effect on the rate of chemical reactions and biological processes in foods. Since the model requires that the rate increase monotonically with temperature, its applicability to enzymatic reactions and microbial growth, which have optimal temperature, is obviously limited. This is also true for microbial inactivation and chemical reactions that only start at an elevated temperature, and for complex processes and reactions that do not follow fixed order kinetics, that is, where the isothermal rate constant, however defined, is a function of both temperature and time. The linearity of the Arrhenius plot, that is, Ln[k(T)] vs. 1/T where T is in °K has been traditionally considered evidence of the model's validity. Consequently, the slope of the plot has been used to calculate the reaction or processes' "energy of activation," usually without independent verification. Many experimental and simulated rate constant vs. temperature relationships that yield linear Arrhenius plots can also be described by the simpler exponential model Ln[k(T)/k(T(reference))] = c(T-T(reference)). The use of the exponential model or similar empirical alternative would eliminate the confusing temperature axis inversion, the unnecessary compression of the temperature scale, and the need for kinetic assumptions that are hard to affirm in food systems. It would also eliminate the reference to the Universal gas constant in systems where a "mole" cannot be clearly identified. Unless proven otherwise by independent experiments, one cannot dismiss the notion that the apparent linearity of the Arrhenius plot in many food systems is due to a mathematical property of the model's equation rather than to the existence of a temperature independent "energy of activation." If T+273.16°C in the Arrhenius model's equation is replaced by T+b, where the numerical value of the arbitrary constant b is substantially larger than T and T

  14. Young's equation revisited.

    PubMed

    Makkonen, Lasse

    2016-04-01

    Young's construction for a contact angle at a three-phase intersection forms the basis of all fields of science that involve wetting and capillary action. We find compelling evidence from recent experimental results on the deformation of a soft solid at the contact line, and displacement of an elastic wire immersed in a liquid, that Young's equation can only be interpreted by surface energies, and not as a balance of surface tensions. It follows that the a priori variable in finding equilibrium is not the position of the contact line, but the contact angle. This finding provides the explanation for the pinning of a contact line. PMID:26940644

  15. Conservational PDF Equations of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have revisited the traditional probability density function (PDF) equations for the velocity and species in turbulent incompressible flows. They are all unclosed due to the appearance of various conditional means which are modeled empirically. However, we have observed that it is possible to establish a closed velocity PDF equation and a closed joint velocity and species PDF equation through conditions derived from the integral form of the Navier-Stokes equations. Although, in theory, the resulted PDF equations are neither general nor unique, they nevertheless lead to the exact transport equations for the first moment as well as all higher order moments. We refer these PDF equations as the conservational PDF equations. This observation is worth further exploration for its validity and CFD application

  16. Solitons and nonlinear wave equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, Roger K.; Eilbeck, J. Chris; Gibbon, John D.; Morris, Hedley C.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion of the theory and applications of classical solitons is presented with a brief treatment of quantum mechanical effects which occur in particle physics and quantum field theory. The subjects addressed include: solitary waves and solitons, scattering transforms, the Schroedinger equation and the Korteweg-de Vries equation, and the inverse method for the isospectral Schroedinger equation and the general solution of the solvable nonlinear equations. Also considered are: isolation of the Korteweg-de Vries equation in some physical examples, the Zakharov-Shabat/AKNS inverse method, kinks and the sine-Gordon equation, the nonlinear Schroedinger equation and wave resonance interactions, amplitude equations in unstable systems, and numerical studies of solitons. 45 references.

  17. ``Riemann equations'' in bidifferential calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvartatskyi, O.; Müller-Hoissen, F.; Stoilov, N.

    2015-10-01

    We consider equations that formally resemble a matrix Riemann (or Hopf) equation in the framework of bidifferential calculus. With different choices of a first-order bidifferential calculus, we obtain a variety of equations, including a semi-discrete and a fully discrete version of the matrix Riemann equation. A corresponding universal solution-generating method then either yields a (continuous or discrete) Cole-Hopf transformation, or leaves us with the problem of solving Riemann equations (hence an application of the hodograph method). If the bidifferential calculus extends to second order, solutions of a system of "Riemann equations" are also solutions of an equation that arises, on the universal level of bidifferential calculus, as an integrability condition. Depending on the choice of bidifferential calculus, the latter can represent a number of prominent integrable equations, like self-dual Yang-Mills, as well as matrix versions of the two-dimensional Toda lattice, Hirota's bilinear difference equation, (2+1)-dimensional Nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS), Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation, and Davey-Stewartson equations. For all of them, a recent (non-isospectral) binary Darboux transformation result in bidifferential calculus applies, which can be specialized to generate solutions of the associated "Riemann equations." For the latter, we clarify the relation between these specialized binary Darboux transformations and the aforementioned solution-generating method. From (arbitrary size) matrix versions of the "Riemann equations" associated with an integrable equation, possessing a bidifferential calculus formulation, multi-soliton-type solutions of the latter can be generated. This includes "breaking" multi-soliton-type solutions of the self-dual Yang-Mills and the (2+1)-dimensional NLS equation, which are parametrized by solutions of Riemann equations.

  18. Solving Nonlinear Coupled Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, L.; David, J.

    1986-01-01

    Harmonic balance method developed to obtain approximate steady-state solutions for nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations. Method usable with transfer matrices commonly used to analyze shaft systems. Solution to nonlinear equation, with periodic forcing function represented as sum of series similar to Fourier series but with form of terms suggested by equation itself.

  19. Successfully Transitioning to Linear Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colton, Connie; Smith, Wendy M.

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010) asks students in as early as fourth grade to solve word problems using equations with variables. Equations studied at this level generate a single solution, such as the equation x + 10 = 25. For students in fifth grade, the Common Core standard for algebraic thinking expects them to…

  20. The Forced Hard Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, various examples of the Duffing type forced spring equation with epsilon positive, are studied. Since [epsilon] is positive, all solutions to the associated homogeneous equation are periodic and the same is true with the forcing applied. The damped equation exhibits steady state trajectories with the interesting…

  1. Equating with Miditests Using IRT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Joseph; Skorupski, William P.

    2016-01-01

    The equating performance of two internal anchor test structures--miditests and minitests--is studied for four IRT equating methods using simulated data. Originally proposed by Sinharay and Holland, miditests are anchors that have the same mean difficulty as the overall test but less variance in item difficulties. Four popular IRT equating methods…

  2. On stochastic diffusion equations and stochastic Burgers' equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truman, A.; Zhao, H. Z.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we construct a strong solution for the stochastic Hamilton Jacobi equation by using stochastic classical mechanics before the caustics. We thereby obtain the viscosity solution for a certain class of inviscid stochastic Burgers' equations. This viscosity solution is not continuous beyond the caustics of the corresponding Hamilton Jacobi equation. The Hopf-Cole transformation is used to identify the stochastic heat equation and the viscous stochastic Burgers' equation. The exact solutions for the above two equations are given in terms of the stochastic Hamilton Jacobi function under a no-caustic condition. We construct the heat kernel for the stochastic heat equation for zero potentials in hyperbolic space and for harmonic oscillator potentials in Euclidean space thereby obtaining the stochastic Mehler formula.

  3. Generalized Klein-Kramers equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, Kwok Sau

    2012-12-01

    A generalized Klein-Kramers equation for a particle interacting with an external field is proposed. The equation generalizes the fractional Klein-Kramers equation introduced by Barkai and Silbey [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 3866 (2000), 10.1021/jp993491m]. Besides, the generalized Klein-Kramers equation can also recover the integro-differential Klein-Kramers equation for continuous-time random walk; this means that it can describe the subdiffusive and superdiffusive regimes in the long-time limit. Moreover, analytic solutions for first two moments both in velocity and displacement (for force-free case) are obtained, and their dynamic behaviors are investigated.

  4. Multinomial Diffusion Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, Ariel I.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel stochastic, space/time discrete representation of particle diffusion (e.g. Brownian motion) based on discrete probability distributions. We show that in the limit of both very small time step and large concentration, our description is equivalent to the space/time continuous stochastic diffusion equation. Being discrete in both time and space, our model can be used as an extremely accurate, efficient, and stable stochastic finite-difference diffusion algorithm when concentrations are so small that computationally expensive particle-based methods are usually needed. Through numerical simulations, we show that our method can generate realizations that capture the statistical properties of particle simulations. While our method converges converges to both the correct ensemble mean and ensemble variance very quickly with decreasing time step, but for small concentration, the stochastic diffusion PDE does not, even for very small time steps.

  5. Elliptic scattering equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Carlos; Gomez, Humberto

    2016-06-01

    Recently the CHY approach has been extended to one loop level using elliptic functions and modular forms over a Jacobian variety. Due to the difficulty in manipulating these kind of functions, we propose an alternative prescription that is totally algebraic. This new proposal is based on an elliptic algebraic curve embedded in a mathbb{C}{P}^2 space. We show that for the simplest integrand, namely the n - gon, our proposal indeed reproduces the expected result. By using the recently formulated Λ-algorithm, we found a novel recurrence relation expansion in terms of tree level off-shell amplitudes. Our results connect nicely with recent results on the one-loop formulation of the scattering equations. In addition, this new proposal can be easily stretched out to hyperelliptic curves in order to compute higher genus.

  6. On nonautonomous Dirac equation

    SciTech Connect

    Hovhannisyan, Gro; Liu Wen

    2009-12-15

    We construct the fundamental solution of time dependent linear ordinary Dirac system in terms of unknown phase functions. This construction gives approximate representation of solutions which is useful for the study of asymptotic behavior. Introducing analog of Rayleigh quotient for differential equations we generalize Hartman-Wintner asymptotic integration theorems with the error estimates for applications to the Dirac system. We also introduce the adiabatic invariants for the Dirac system, which are similar to the adiabatic invariant of Lorentz's pendulum. Using a small parameter method it is shown that the change in the adiabatic invariants approaches zero with the power speed as a small parameter approaches zero. As another application we calculate the transition probabilities for the Dirac system. We show that for the special choice of electromagnetic field, the only transition of an electron to the positron with the opposite spin orientation is possible.

  7. Entwined paths, difference equations, and the Dirac equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ord, G.N.; Mann, R.B.

    2003-02-01

    Entwined space-time paths are bound pairs of trajectories which are traversed in opposite directions with respect to macroscopic time. In this paper, we show that ensembles of entwined paths on a discrete space-time lattice are simply described by coupled difference equations which are discrete versions of the Dirac equation. There is no analytic continuation, explicit or forced, involved in this description. The entwined paths are ''self-quantizing.'' We also show that simple classical stochastic processes that generate the difference equations as ensemble averages are stable numerically and converge at a rate governed by the details of the stochastic process. This result establishes the Dirac equation in one dimension as a phenomenological equation describing an underlying classical stochastic process, in the same sense that the diffusion and telegraph equations are phenomenological descriptions of stochastic processes.

  8. Mode decomposition evolution equations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) based methods have become some of the most powerful tools for exploring the fundamental problems in signal processing, image processing, computer vision, machine vision and artificial intelligence in the past two decades. The advantages of PDE based approaches are that they can be made fully automatic, robust for the analysis of images, videos and high dimensional data. A fundamental question is whether one can use PDEs to perform all the basic tasks in the image processing. If one can devise PDEs to perform full-scale mode decomposition for signals and images, the modes thus generated would be very useful for secondary processing to meet the needs in various types of signal and image processing. Despite of great progress in PDE based image analysis in the past two decades, the basic roles of PDEs in image/signal analysis are only limited to PDE based low-pass filters, and their applications to noise removal, edge detection, segmentation, etc. At present, it is not clear how to construct PDE based methods for full-scale mode decomposition. The above-mentioned limitation of most current PDE based image/signal processing methods is addressed in the proposed work, in which we introduce a family of mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs) for a vast variety of applications. The MoDEEs are constructed as an extension of a PDE based high-pass filter (Europhys. Lett., 59(6): 814, 2002) by using arbitrarily high order PDE based low-pass filters introduced by Wei (IEEE Signal Process. Lett., 6(7): 165, 1999). The use of arbitrarily high order PDEs is essential to the frequency localization in the mode decomposition. Similar to the wavelet transform, the present MoDEEs have a controllable time-frequency localization and allow a perfect reconstruction of the original function. Therefore, the MoDEE operation is also called a PDE transform. However, modes generated from the present approach are in the spatial or time domain and can be

  9. JWL Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-15

    The JWL equation of state (EOS) is frequently used for the products (and sometimes reactants) of a high explosive (HE). Here we review and systematically derive important properties. The JWL EOS is of the Mie-Grueneisen form with a constant Grueneisen coefficient and a constants specific heat. It is thermodynamically consistent to specify the temperature at a reference state. However, increasing the reference state temperature restricts the EOS domain in the (V, e)-plane of phase space. The restrictions are due to the conditions that P ≥ 0, T ≥ 0, and the isothermal bulk modulus is positive. Typically, this limits the low temperature regime in expansion. The domain restrictions can result in the P-T equilibrium EOS of a partly burned HE failing to have a solution in some cases. For application to HE, the heat of detonation is discussed. Example JWL parameters for an HE, both products and reactions, are used to illustrate the restrictions on the domain of the EOS.

  10. On the generalized Jacobi equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlick, Volker

    2008-05-01

    The standard text-book Jacobi equation (equation of geodesic deviation) arises by linearizing the geodesic equation around some chosen geodesic, where the linearization is done with respect to the coordinates and the velocities. The generalized Jacobi equation, introduced by Hodgkinson in 1972 and further developed by Mashhoon and others, arises if the linearization is done only with respect to the coordinates, but not with respect to the velocities. The resulting equation has been studied by several authors in some detail for timelike geodesics in a Lorentzian manifold. Here we begin by briefly considering the generalized Jacobi equation on affine manifolds, without a metric; then we specify to lightlike geodesics in a Lorentzian manifold. We illustrate the latter case by considering particular lightlike geodesics (a) in Schwarzschild spacetime and (b) in a plane-wave spacetime.

  11. Equations of the Randomizer's Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzałko, Jarosław; Grabski, Juliusz; Perlikowski, Przemysław; Stefanski, Andrzej; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    Basing on the Newton-Euler laws of mechanics we derive the equations which describe the dynamics of the coin toss, the die throw, and roulette run. The equations for full 3D models and for lower dimensional simplifications are given. The influence of the air resistance and energy dissipation at the impacts is described. The obtained equations allow for the numerical simulation of the randomizer's dynamics and define the mapping of the initial conditions into the final outcome.

  12. Solving Differential Equations in R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soetaert, Karline; Meysman, Filip; Petzoldt, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The open-source software R has become one of the most widely used systems for statistical data analysis and for making graphs, but it is also well suited for other disciplines in scientific computing. One of the fields where considerable progress has been made is the solution of differential equations. Here we first give an overview of the types of differential equations that R can solve, and then demonstrate how to use R for solving a 2-Dimensional partial differential equation.

  13. A note on "Kepler's equation".

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutka, J.

    1997-07-01

    This note briefly points out the formal similarity between Kepler's equation and equations developed in Hindu and Islamic astronomy for describing the lunar parallax. Specifically, an iterative method for calculating the lunar parallax has been developed by the astronomer Habash al-Hasib al-Marwazi (about 850 A.D., Turkestan), which is surprisingly similar to the iterative method for solving Kepler's equation invented by Leonhard Euler (1707 - 1783).

  14. Deformation of the Dirac equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal, Mir; Kruglov, Sergey I.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we will first clarify the physical meaning of having a minimum measurable time. Then we will combine the deformation of the Dirac equation due to the existence of minimum measurable length and time scales with its deformation due to the doubly special relativity. We will also analyze this deformed Dirac equation in curved spacetime, and observe that this deformation of the Dirac equation also leads to a nontrivial modification of general relativity. Finally, we will analyze the stochastic quantization of this deformed Dirac equation on curved spacetime.

  15. Quaternion Dirac Equation and Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Seema; Negi, O. P. S.

    2009-08-01

    Quaternion Dirac equation has been analyzed and its supersymmetrization has been discussed consistently. It has been shown that the quaternion Dirac equation automatically describes the spin structure with its spin up and spin down components of two component quaternion Dirac spinors associated with positive and negative energies. It has also been shown that the supersymmetrization of quaternion Dirac equation works well for different cases associated with zero mass, nonzero mass, scalar potential and generalized electromagnetic potentials. Accordingly we have discussed the splitting of supersymmetrized Dirac equation in terms of electric and magnetic fields.

  16. Electronic representation of wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veigend, Petr; Kunovský, Jiří; Kocina, Filip; Nečasová, Gabriela; Šátek, Václav; Valenta, Václav

    2016-06-01

    The Taylor series method for solving differential equations represents a non-traditional way of a numerical solution. Even though this method is not much preferred in the literature, experimental calculations done at the Department of Intelligent Systems of the Faculty of Information Technology of TU Brno have verified that the accuracy and stability of the Taylor series method exceeds the currently used algorithms for numerically solving differential equations. This paper deals with solution of Telegraph equation using modelling of a series small pieces of the wire. Corresponding differential equations are solved by the Modern Taylor Series Method.

  17. Graphical Solution of Polynomial Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grishin, Anatole

    2009-01-01

    Graphing utilities, such as the ubiquitous graphing calculator, are often used in finding the approximate real roots of polynomial equations. In this paper the author offers a simple graphing technique that allows one to find all solutions of a polynomial equation (1) of arbitrary degree; (2) with real or complex coefficients; and (3) possessing…

  18. Equations for nonbonded concrete overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Y. T.

    1985-09-01

    The nature of the design equations for the nonbonded concrete overlays currently used by the US Army Corps of Engineers was examined and the original source of the equation was also examined. Using simple mechanics, new overlay equations were developed which are suitable for different thicknesses and elastic properties in the overlay and base concrete slabs. The difference in the computed overlay thickness between the new and existing equations is not large when the overlay thickness is equal to or greater than the base slab. The difference can become excessive when the overlay thickness is much less than that of the base slab. The new equations were compared with the finite element computer program for concrete overlays with various combinations of slab thickness, elastic property, and subgrade modulus. The comparisons were very favorable, indicating that the overlay equations developed in this report are analytically correct. It was difficult to judge whether the new equations are superior to the existing equation. This conclusion was expected because for all the seven test sections analyzed, the overlay thicknesses were either equal to or greater than those of the base slabs.

  19. Uncertainty of empirical correlation equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistel, R.; Lovell-Smith, J. W.; Saunders, P.; Seitz, S.

    2016-08-01

    The International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS) has published a set of empirical reference equations of state, forming the basis of the 2010 Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater (TEOS-10), from which all thermodynamic properties of seawater, ice, and humid air can be derived in a thermodynamically consistent manner. For each of the equations of state, the parameters have been found by simultaneously fitting equations for a range of different derived quantities using large sets of measurements of these quantities. In some cases, uncertainties in these fitted equations have been assigned based on the uncertainties of the measurement results. However, because uncertainties in the parameter values have not been determined, it is not possible to estimate the uncertainty in many of the useful quantities that can be calculated using the parameters. In this paper we demonstrate how the method of generalised least squares (GLS), in which the covariance of the input data is propagated into the values calculated by the fitted equation, and in particular into the covariance matrix of the fitted parameters, can be applied to one of the TEOS-10 equations of state, namely IAPWS-95 for fluid pure water. Using the calculated parameter covariance matrix, we provide some preliminary estimates of the uncertainties in derived quantities, namely the second and third virial coefficients for water. We recommend further investigation of the GLS method for use as a standard method for calculating and propagating the uncertainties of values computed from empirical equations.

  20. Students' Understanding of Quadratic Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López, Jonathan; Robles, Izraim; Martínez-Planell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Action-Process-Object-Schema theory (APOS) was applied to study student understanding of quadratic equations in one variable. This required proposing a detailed conjecture (called a genetic decomposition) of mental constructions students may do to understand quadratic equations. The genetic decomposition which was proposed can contribute to help…

  1. Generalized Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Skrondal, Anders; Pickles, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    A unifying framework for generalized multilevel structural equation modeling is introduced. The models in the framework, called generalized linear latent and mixed models (GLLAMM), combine features of generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) and structural equation models (SEM) and consist of a response model and a structural model for the latent…

  2. Simplified Relativistic Force Transformation Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Benjamin U.

    1979-01-01

    A simplified relativistic force transformation equation is derived and then used to obtain the equation for the electromagnetic forces on a charged particle, calculate the electromagnetic fields due to a point charge with constant velocity, transform electromagnetic fields in general, derive the Biot-Savart law, and relate it to Coulomb's law.…

  3. Complete solution of Boolean equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapia, M. A.; Tucker, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    A method is presented for generating a single formula involving arbitary Boolean parameters, which includes in it each and every possible solution of a system of Boolean equations. An alternate condition equivalent to a known necessary and sufficient condition for solving a system of Boolean equations is given.

  4. Transport equations for oscillating neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunfan; Burrows, Adam

    2013-11-01

    We derive a suite of generalized Boltzmann equations, based on the density-matrix formalism, that incorporates the physics of neutrino oscillations for two- and three-flavor oscillations, matter refraction, and self-refraction. The resulting equations are straightforward extensions of the classical transport equations that nevertheless contain the full physics of quantum oscillation phenomena. In this way, our broadened formalism provides a bridge between the familiar neutrino transport algorithms employed by supernova modelers and the more quantum-heavy approaches frequently employed to illuminate the various neutrino oscillation effects. We also provide the corresponding angular-moment versions of this generalized equation set. Our goal is to make it easier for astrophysicists to address oscillation phenomena in a language with which they are familiar. The equations we derive are simple and practical, and are intended to facilitate progress concerning oscillation phenomena in the context of core-collapse supernova theory.

  5. The Equations of Oceanic Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Modeling and prediction of oceanographic phenomena and climate is based on the integration of dynamic equations. The Equations of Oceanic Motions derives and systematically classifies the most common dynamic equations used in physical oceanography, from large scale thermohaline circulations to those governing small scale motions and turbulence. After establishing the basic dynamical equations that describe all oceanic motions, M|ller then derives approximate equations, emphasizing the assumptions made and physical processes eliminated. He distinguishes between geometric, thermodynamic and dynamic approximations and between the acoustic, gravity, vortical and temperature-salinity modes of motion. Basic concepts and formulae of equilibrium thermodynamics, vector and tensor calculus, curvilinear coordinate systems, and the kinematics of fluid motion and wave propagation are covered in appendices. Providing the basic theoretical background for graduate students and researchers of physical oceanography and climate science, this book will serve as both a comprehensive text and an essential reference.

  6. Equation predicts diesel cloud points

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.Y.; Ker, V.S.F.; Miranda, R.D.; Wesch, J.C.

    1988-03-28

    Diesel fuel cloud points can be predicted by an empirical equation developed by NOCA/Husky Research Corp. The equation can accurately predict cloud points from feedstock and product data readily available in the refinery. The applicability of the equation to a full range of summer, winter, and arctic diesel blends was proven by studies conducted on data from four Canadian refineries that process a wide variety of conventional crude oils and synthetic crude from bitumen. Results of the studies show that the variance between equation predicted and measured cloud point values are within acceptable reproducibility of measured data. Considerable time can be saved in the refinery when the equation is used for optimizing diesel fuel blend formulations. Applicability ranges from daily blending calculations, to use in linear programs for long-term planning for distillate utilization.

  7. Extended Trial Equation Method for Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gepreel, Khaled A.; Nofal, Taher A.

    2015-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to use the extended trial equation method to construct a series of some new solutions for some nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) in mathematical physics. We will construct the solutions in many different functions such as hyperbolic function solutions, trigonometric function solutions, Jacobi elliptic function solutions, and rational functional solutions for the nonlinear PDEs when the balance number is a real number via the Zhiber-Shabat nonlinear differential equation. The balance number of this method is not constant as we shown in other methods, but it is changed by changing the trial equation derivative definition. This method allowed us to construct many new types of solutions. It is shown by using the Maple software package that all obtained solutions satisfy the original PDEs.

  8. Higher derivative gravity: Field equation as the equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Ramit; Liberati, Stefano; Mohd, Arif

    2016-08-01

    One of the striking features of general relativity is that the Einstein equation is implied by the Clausius relation imposed on a small patch of locally constructed causal horizon. The extension of this thermodynamic derivation of the field equation to more general theories of gravity has been attempted many times in the last two decades. In particular, equations of motion for minimally coupled higher-curvature theories of gravity, but without the derivatives of curvature, have previously been derived using a thermodynamic reasoning. In that derivation the horizon slices were endowed with an entropy density whose form resembles that of the Noether charge for diffeomorphisms, and was dubbed the Noetheresque entropy. In this paper, we propose a new entropy density, closely related to the Noetheresque form, such that the field equation of any diffeomorphism-invariant metric theory of gravity can be derived by imposing the Clausius relation on a small patch of local causal horizon.

  9. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, B. W.

    1987-06-01

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity.

  10. SETS. Set Equation Transformation System

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, R.B.

    1992-01-13

    SETS is used for symbolic manipulation of Boolean equations, particularly the reduction of equations by the application of Boolean identities. It is a flexible and efficient tool for performing probabilistic risk analysis (PRA), vital area analysis, and common cause analysis. The equation manipulation capabilities of SETS can also be used to analyze noncoherent fault trees and determine prime implicants of Boolean functions, to verify circuit design implementation, to determine minimum cost fire protection requirements for nuclear reactor plants, to obtain solutions to combinatorial optimization problems with Boolean constraints, and to determine the susceptibility of a facility to unauthorized access through nullification of sensors in its protection system.

  11. Pavement performance equations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, J.P.; Kay, R.K.; Jackson, N.C.

    1988-03-01

    The WSDOT PMS data base was used to develop regression equations for three pavement surface types: bituminous surface treatments, asphalt concrete, and portland-cement concrete. The primary regression equations developed were to predict Pavement Condition Rating (PCR) which is a measure of the pavement surface distress (ranges from 100 (no distress) to below 0 (extensive distress)). Overall, the equations fit the data rather well given the expected variation of pavement performance information. The relative effects of age (time since construction or reconstruction) were illustrated for the three surface types.

  12. Overdetermined Systems of Linear Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Gareth

    1990-01-01

    Explored is an overdetermined system of linear equations to find an appropriate least squares solution. A geometrical interpretation of this solution is given. Included is a least squares point discussion. (KR)

  13. Solving Differential Equations in R

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although R is still predominantly applied for statistical analysis and graphical representation, it is rapidly becoming more suitable for mathematical computing. One of the fields where considerable progress has been made recently is the solution of differential equations. Here w...

  14. The thermal-vortex equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1987-01-01

    The Boussinesq approximation is extended so as to explicitly account for the transfer of fluid energy through viscous action into thermal energy. Ideal and dissipative integral invariants are discussed, in addition to the general equations for thermal-fluid motion.

  15. Friedmann equation with quantum potential

    SciTech Connect

    Siong, Ch'ng Han; Radiman, Shahidan; Nikouravan, Bijan

    2013-11-27

    Friedmann equations are used to describe the evolution of the universe. Solving Friedmann equations for the scale factor indicates that the universe starts from an initial singularity where all the physical laws break down. However, the Friedmann equations are well describing the late-time or large scale universe. Hence now, many physicists try to find an alternative theory to avoid this initial singularity. In this paper, we generate a version of first Friedmann equation which is added with an additional term. This additional term contains the quantum potential energy which is believed to play an important role at small scale. However, it will gradually become negligible when the universe evolves to large scale.

  16. Parametric Equations, Maple, and Tubeplots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feicht, Louis

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity that establishes a graphical foundation for parametric equations by using a graphing output form called tubeplots from the computer program Maple. Provides a comprehensive review and exploration of many previously learned topics. (ASK)

  17. IKT for quantum hydrodynamic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessarotto, Massimo; Ellero, Marco; Nicolini, Piero

    2007-11-01

    A striking feature of standard quantum mechanics (SQM) is its analogy with classical fluid dynamics. In fact, it is well-known that the Schr"odinger equation is equivalent to a closed set of partial differential equations for suitable real-valued functions of position and time (denoted as quantum fluid fields) [Madelung, 1928]. In particular, the corresponding quantum hydrodynamic equations (QHE) can be viewed as the equations of a classical compressible and non-viscous fluid, endowed with potential velocity and quantized velocity circulation. In this reference, an interesting theoretical problem, in its own right, is the construction of an inverse kinetic theory (IKT) for such a type of fluids. In this note we intend to investigate consequences of the IKT recently formulated for QHE [M.Tessarotto et al., Phys. Rev. A 75, 012105 (2007)]. In particular a basic issue is related to the definition of the quantum fluid fields.

  18. Hidden Statistics of Schroedinger Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2011-01-01

    Work was carried out in determination of the mathematical origin of randomness in quantum mechanics and creating a hidden statistics of Schr dinger equation; i.e., to expose the transitional stochastic process as a "bridge" to the quantum world. The governing equations of hidden statistics would preserve such properties of quantum physics as superposition, entanglement, and direct-product decomposability while allowing one to measure its state variables using classical methods.

  19. Geometrical Solutions of Quadratic Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grewal, A. S.; Godloza, L.

    1999-01-01

    Demonstrates that the equation of a circle (x-h)2 + (y-k)2 = r2 with center (h; k) and radius r reduces to a quadratic equation x2-2xh + (h2 + k2 -r2) = O at the intersection with the x-axis. Illustrates how to determine the center of a circle as well as a point on a circle. (Author/ASK)

  20. Note on parallel processing techniques for algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Allidina, A.Y.; Malinowski, K.; Singh, M.G.

    1982-12-01

    The possibilities were explored for enhancing parallelism in the simulation of systems described by algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations. These techniques, using multiprocessors, were developed to speed up simulations, e.g. for nuclear accidents. Issues involved in their design included suitable approximations to bring the problem into a numerically manageable form and a numerical procedure to perform the computations necessary to solve the problem accurately. Parallel processing techniques used as simulation procedures, and a design of a simulation scheme and simulation procedure employing parallel computer facilities, were both considered.

  1. An Exact Mapping from Navier-Stokes Equation to Schr"odinger Equation via Riccati Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christianto, Vic; Smarandache, Florentin

    2010-03-01

    In the present article we argue that it is possible to write down Schr"odinger representation of Navier-Stokes equation via Riccati equation. The proposed approach, while differs appreciably from other method such as what is proposed by R. M. Kiehn, has an advantage, i.e. it enables us extend further to quaternionic and biquaternionic version of Navier-Stokes equation, for instance via Kravchenko's and Gibbon's route. Further observation is of course recommended in order to refute or verify this proposition.

  2. Optimization of one-way wave equations.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Suh, S.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of wave extrapolation is based on the square-root equation or one-way equation. The full wave equation represents waves which propagate in both directions. On the contrary, the square-root equation represents waves propagating in one direction only. A new optimization method presented here improves the dispersion relation of the one-way wave equation. -from Authors

  3. Turbulent fluid motion 3: Basic continuum equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1991-01-01

    A derivation of the continuum equations used for the analysis of turbulence is given. These equations include the continuity equation, the Navier-Stokes equations, and the heat transfer or energy equation. An experimental justification for using a continuum approach for the study of turbulence is given.

  4. A hyperbolic equation for turbulent diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Sandip; Keller, Joseph B.

    2000-09-01

    A hyperbolic equation, analogous to the telegrapher's equation in one dimension, is introduced to describe turbulent diffusion of a passive additive in a turbulent flow. The predictions of this equation, and those of the usual advection-diffusion equation, are compared with data on smoke plumes in the atmosphere and on heat flow in a wind tunnel. The predictions of the hyperbolic equation fit the data at all distances from the source, whereas those of the advection-diffusion equation fit only at large distances. The hyperbolic equation is derived from an integrodifferential equation for the mean concentration which allows it to vary rapidly. If the mean concentration varies sufficiently slowly compared with the correlation time of the turbulence, the hyperbolic equation reduces to the advection-diffusion equation. However, if the mean concentration varies very rapidly, the hyperbolic equation should be replaced by the integrodifferential equation.

  5. How to Obtain the Covariant Form of Maxwell's Equations from the Continuity Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heras, Jose A.

    2009-01-01

    The covariant Maxwell equations are derived from the continuity equation for the electric charge. This result provides an axiomatic approach to Maxwell's equations in which charge conservation is emphasized as the fundamental axiom underlying these equations.

  6. Differential Equations for Morphological Amoebas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welk, Martin; Breuß, Michael; Vogel, Oliver

    This paper is concerned with amoeba median filtering, a structure-adaptive morphological image filter. It has been introduced by Lerallut et al. in a discrete formulation. Experimental evidence shows that iterated amoeba median filtering leads to segmentation-like results that are similar to those obtained by self-snakes, an image filter based on a partial differential equation. We investigate this correspondence by analysing a space-continuous formulation of iterated median filtering. We prove that in the limit of vanishing radius of the structuring elements, iterated amoeba median filtering indeed approximates a partial differential equation related to self-snakes and the well-known (mean) curvature motion equation. We present experiments with discrete iterated amoeba median filtering that confirm qualitative and quantitative predictions of our analysis.

  7. Integration of quantum hydrodynamical equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulyanova, Vera G.; Sanin, Andrey L.

    2007-04-01

    Quantum hydrodynamics equations describing the dynamics of quantum fluid are a subject of this report (QFD).These equations can be used to decide the wide class of problem. But there are the calculated difficulties for the equations, which take place for nonlinear hyperbolic systems. In this connection, It is necessary to impose the additional restrictions which assure the existence and unique of solutions. As test sample, we use the free wave packet and study its behavior at the different initial and boundary conditions. The calculations of wave packet propagation cause in numerical algorithm the division. In numerical algorithm at the calculations of wave packet propagation, there arises the problem of division by zero. To overcome this problem we have to sew together discrete numerical and analytical continuous solutions on the boundary. We demonstrate here for the free wave packet that the numerical solution corresponds to the analytical solution.

  8. Students' understanding of quadratic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Jonathan; Robles, Izraim; Martínez-Planell, Rafael

    2016-05-01

    Action-Process-Object-Schema theory (APOS) was applied to study student understanding of quadratic equations in one variable. This required proposing a detailed conjecture (called a genetic decomposition) of mental constructions students may do to understand quadratic equations. The genetic decomposition which was proposed can contribute to help students achieve an understanding of quadratic equations with improved interrelation of ideas and more flexible application of solution methods. Semi-structured interviews with eight beginning undergraduate students explored which of the mental constructions conjectured in the genetic decomposition students could do, and which they had difficulty doing. Two of the mental constructions that form part of the genetic decomposition are highlighted and corresponding further data were obtained from the written work of 121 undergraduate science and engineering students taking a multivariable calculus course. The results suggest the importance of explicitly considering these two highlighted mental constructions.

  9. Fractional-calculus diffusion equation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sequel to the work on the quantization of nonconservative systems using fractional calculus and quantization of a system with Brownian motion, which aims to consider the dissipation effects in quantum-mechanical description of microscale systems. Results The canonical quantization of a system represented classically by one-dimensional Fick's law, and the diffusion equation is carried out according to the Dirac method. A suitable Lagrangian, and Hamiltonian, describing the diffusive system, are constructed and the Hamiltonian is transformed to Schrodinger's equation which is solved. An application regarding implementation of the developed mathematical method to the analysis of diffusion, osmosis, which is a biological application of the diffusion process, is carried out. Schrödinger's equation is solved. Conclusions The plot of the probability function represents clearly the dissipative and drift forces and hence the osmosis, which agrees totally with the macro-scale view, or the classical-version osmosis. PMID:20492677

  10. Maxwell's mixing equation revisited: characteristic impedance equations for ellipsoidal cells.

    PubMed

    Stubbe, Marco; Gimsa, Jan

    2015-07-21

    We derived a series of, to our knowledge, new analytic expressions for the characteristic features of the impedance spectra of suspensions of homogeneous and single-shell spherical, spheroidal, and ellipsoidal objects, e.g., biological cells of the general ellipsoidal shape. In the derivation, we combined the Maxwell-Wagner mixing equation with our expression for the Clausius-Mossotti factor that had been originally derived to describe AC-electrokinetic effects such as dielectrophoresis, electrorotation, and electroorientation. The influential radius model was employed because it allows for a separation of the geometric and electric problems. For shelled objects, a special axial longitudinal element approach leads to a resistor-capacitor model, which can be used to simplify the mixing equation. Characteristic equations were derived for the plateau levels, peak heights, and characteristic frequencies of the impedance as well as the complex specific conductivities and permittivities of suspensions of axially and randomly oriented homogeneous and single-shell ellipsoidal objects. For membrane-covered spherical objects, most of the limiting cases are identical to-or improved with respect to-the known solutions given by researchers in the field. The characteristic equations were found to be quite precise (largest deviations typically <5% with respect to the full model) when tested with parameters relevant to biological cells. They can be used for the differentiation of orientation and the electric properties of cell suspensions or in the analysis of single cells in microfluidic systems. PMID:26200856

  11. Explicit integration of Friedmann's equation with nonlinear equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shouxin; Gibbons, Gary W.; Yang, Yisong

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we study the integrability of the Friedmann equations, when the equation of state for the perfect-fluid universe is nonlinear, in the light of the Chebyshev theorem. A series of important, yet not previously touched, problems will be worked out which include the generalized Chaplygin gas, two-term energy density, trinomial Friedmann, Born-Infeld, two-fluid models, and Chern-Simons modified gravity theory models. With the explicit integration, we are able to understand exactly the roles of the physical parameters in various models play in the cosmological evolution which may also offer clues to a profound understanding of the problems in general settings. For example, in the Chaplygin gas universe, a few integrable cases lead us to derive a universal formula for the asymptotic exponential growth rate of the scale factor, of an explicit form, whether the Friedmann equation is integrable or not, which reveals the coupled roles played by various physical sectors and it is seen that, as far as there is a tiny presence of nonlinear matter, conventional linear matter makes contribution to the dark matter, which becomes significant near the phantom divide line. The Friedmann equations also arise in areas of physics not directly related to cosmology. We provide some examples ranging from geometric optics and central orbits to soap films and the shape of glaciated valleys to which our results may be applied.

  12. Universal soil loss equation and revised universal soil loss equation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erosion has long been recognized as a serious problem. Considerable efforts have been expended to address this problem. Thousands of plot years of data were summarized by ARS researchers in producing the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE). This technology has been used for conservation planni...

  13. Jourdain's variational equation and Appell's equation of motion for nonholonomic dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Sheng; Pao, Yih-Hsing

    2003-01-01

    Based on Jourdain's variational equation proposed in 1909, we deduce a minimal set of general equations of motion for nonholomic dynamical systems of particles and rigid bodies. This equation of motion for the system, which differs slightly from the Gibbs-Appell equation, appears to be the same as the equation derived by Kane in 1961. Since the same equation was established by Appell in 1903 on the basis of D'Alembert's principle, the newly derived equation is named Appell's equation.

  14. Transport equations in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Cole, A. J.

    2010-05-15

    Tokamak plasma transport equations are usually obtained by flux surface averaging the collisional Braginskii equations. However, tokamak plasmas are not in collisional regimes. Also, ad hoc terms are added for neoclassical effects on the parallel Ohm's law, fluctuation-induced transport, heating, current-drive and flow sources and sinks, small magnetic field nonaxisymmetries, magnetic field transients, etc. A set of self-consistent second order in gyroradius fluid-moment-based transport equations for nearly axisymmetric tokamak plasmas has been developed using a kinetic-based approach. The derivation uses neoclassical-based parallel viscous force closures, and includes all the effects noted above. Plasma processes on successive time scales and constraints they impose are considered sequentially: compressional Alfven waves (Grad-Shafranov equilibrium, ion radial force balance), sound waves (pressure constant along field lines, incompressible flows within a flux surface), and collisions (electrons, parallel Ohm's law; ions, damping of poloidal flow). Radial particle fluxes are driven by the many second order in gyroradius toroidal angular torques on a plasma species: seven ambipolar collision-based ones (classical, neoclassical, etc.) and eight nonambipolar ones (fluctuation-induced, polarization flows from toroidal rotation transients, etc.). The plasma toroidal rotation equation results from setting to zero the net radial current induced by the nonambipolar fluxes. The radial particle flux consists of the collision-based intrinsically ambipolar fluxes plus the nonambipolar fluxes evaluated at the ambipolarity-enforcing toroidal plasma rotation (radial electric field). The energy transport equations do not involve an ambipolar constraint and hence are more directly obtained. The 'mean field' effects of microturbulence on the parallel Ohm's law, poloidal ion flow, particle fluxes, and toroidal momentum and energy transport are all included self-consistently. The

  15. Transport Equations In Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callen, J. D.

    2009-11-01

    Tokamak plasma transport equations are usually obtained by flux surface averaging the collisional Braginskii equations. However, tokamak plasmas are not in collisional regimes. Also, ad hoc terms are added for: neoclassical effects on the parallel Ohm's law (trapped particle effects on resistivity, bootstrap current); fluctuation-induced transport; heating, current-drive and flow sources and sinks; small B field non-axisymmetries; magnetic field transients etc. A set of self-consistent second order in gyroradius fluid-moment-based transport equations for nearly axisymmetric tokamak plasmas has been developed recently using a kinetic-based framework. The derivation uses neoclassical-based parallel viscous force closures, and includes all the effects noted above. Plasma processes on successive time scales (and constraints they impose) are considered sequentially: compressional Alfv'en waves (Grad-Shafranov equilibrium, ion radial force balance); sound waves (pressure constant along field lines, incompressible flows within a flux surface); and ion collisions (damping of poloidal flow). Radial particle fluxes are driven by the many second order in gyroradius toroidal angular torques on the plasma fluid: 7 ambipolar collision-based ones (classical, neoclassical, etc.) and 8 non-ambipolar ones (fluctuation-induced, polarization flows from toroidal rotation transients etc.). The plasma toroidal rotation equation [1] results from setting to zero the net radial current induced by the non-ambipolar fluxes. The radial particle flux consists of the collision-based intrinsically ambipolar fluxes plus the non-ambipolar fluxes evaluated at the ambipolarity-enforcing toroidal plasma rotation (radial electric field). The energy transport equations do not involve an ambipolar constraint and hence are more directly obtained. The resultant transport equations will be presented and contrasted with the usual ones. [4pt] [1] J.D. Callen, A.J. Cole, C.C. Hegna, ``Toroidal Rotation In

  16. Transport equations in tokamak plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Cole, A. J.

    2010-05-01

    Tokamak plasma transport equations are usually obtained by flux surface averaging the collisional Braginskii equations. However, tokamak plasmas are not in collisional regimes. Also, ad hoc terms are added for neoclassical effects on the parallel Ohm's law, fluctuation-induced transport, heating, current-drive and flow sources and sinks, small magnetic field nonaxisymmetries, magnetic field transients, etc. A set of self-consistent second order in gyroradius fluid-moment-based transport equations for nearly axisymmetric tokamak plasmas has been developed using a kinetic-based approach. The derivation uses neoclassical-based parallel viscous force closures, and includes all the effects noted above. Plasma processes on successive time scales and constraints they impose are considered sequentially: compressional Alfvén waves (Grad-Shafranov equilibrium, ion radial force balance), sound waves (pressure constant along field lines, incompressible flows within a flux surface), and collisions (electrons, parallel Ohm's law; ions, damping of poloidal flow). Radial particle fluxes are driven by the many second order in gyroradius toroidal angular torques on a plasma species: seven ambipolar collision-based ones (classical, neoclassical, etc.) and eight nonambipolar ones (fluctuation-induced, polarization flows from toroidal rotation transients, etc.). The plasma toroidal rotation equation results from setting to zero the net radial current induced by the nonambipolar fluxes. The radial particle flux consists of the collision-based intrinsically ambipolar fluxes plus the nonambipolar fluxes evaluated at the ambipolarity-enforcing toroidal plasma rotation (radial electric field). The energy transport equations do not involve an ambipolar constraint and hence are more directly obtained. The "mean field" effects of microturbulence on the parallel Ohm's law, poloidal ion flow, particle fluxes, and toroidal momentum and energy transport are all included self-consistently. The

  17. Young's Equation at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seveno, David; Blake, Terence D.; De Coninck, Joël

    2013-08-01

    In 1805, Thomas Young was the first to propose an equation to predict the value of the equilibrium contact angle of a liquid on a solid. Today, the force exerted by a liquid on a solid, such as a flat plate or fiber, is routinely used to assess this angle. Moreover, it has recently become possible to study wetting at the nanoscale using an atomic force microscope. Here, we report the use of molecular-dynamics simulations to investigate the force distribution along a 15 nm fiber dipped into a liquid meniscus. We find very good agreement between the measured force and that predicted by Young’s equation.

  18. Investigation of the kinetic model equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sha; Zhong, Chengwen

    2014-03-01

    Currently the Boltzmann equation and its model equations are widely used in numerical predictions for dilute gas flows. The nonlinear integro-differential Boltzmann equation is the fundamental equation in the kinetic theory of dilute monatomic gases. By replacing the nonlinear fivefold collision integral term by a nonlinear relaxation term, its model equations such as the famous Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) equation are mathematically simple. Since the computational cost of solving model equations is much less than that of solving the full Boltzmann equation, the model equations are widely used in predicting rarefied flows, multiphase flows, chemical flows, and turbulent flows although their predictions are only qualitatively right for highly nonequilibrium flows in transitional regime. In this paper the differences between the Boltzmann equation and its model equations are investigated aiming at giving guidelines for the further development of kinetic models. By comparing the Boltzmann equation and its model equations using test cases with different nonequilibrium types, two factors (the information held by nonequilibrium moments and the different relaxation rates of high- and low-speed molecules) are found useful for adjusting the behaviors of modeled collision terms in kinetic regime. The usefulness of these two factors are confirmed by a generalized model collision term derived from a mathematical relation between the Boltzmann equation and BGK equation that is also derived in this paper. After the analysis of the difference between the Boltzmann equation and the BGK equation, an attempt at approximating the collision term is proposed.

  19. Sonar equations for planetary exploration.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Michael A; Leighton, Timothy G

    2016-08-01

    The set of formulations commonly known as "the sonar equations" have for many decades been used to quantify the performance of sonar systems in terms of their ability to detect and localize objects submerged in seawater. The efficacy of the sonar equations, with individual terms evaluated in decibels, is well established in Earth's oceans. The sonar equations have been used in the past for missions to other planets and moons in the solar system, for which they are shown to be less suitable. While it would be preferable to undertake high-fidelity acoustical calculations to support planning, execution, and interpretation of acoustic data from planetary probes, to avoid possible errors for planned missions to such extraterrestrial bodies in future, doing so requires awareness of the pitfalls pointed out in this paper. There is a need to reexamine the assumptions, practices, and calibrations that work well for Earth to ensure that the sonar equations can be accurately applied in combination with the decibel to extraterrestrial scenarios. Examples are given for icy oceans such as exist on Europa and Ganymede, Titan's hydrocarbon lakes, and for the gaseous atmospheres of (for example) Jupiter and Venus.

  20. Equations of motion for superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.G.; Elser, V.

    1995-06-01

    To the principles of least action and minimum error, for determining the time evolution of the parameters in a variational wave function, we add a third: continuous collapse dynamics. In this formulation, exact time evolution is applied for an infinitesimal time and is followed by projection of the state back into the variational manifold (``collapse``). All three principles lead to the same equations of motion when applied to complex parameters but take two distinct forms when the parameters are real. As an application of these principles, we study the time evolution of two variational wave functions for superfluids. The first wave function, containing real parameters, was considered by Kerman and Koonin [Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 100, 332 (1976)] and leads to the Euler equation in the hydrodynamic limit. The equation for our second wave function, a coherent state of Feynman excitations with complex parameters, has essentially the same hydrodynamic limit. The latter wave function, however, has a significant advantage in that the equation it generates is useful and meaningful on a microscopic scale as well.

  1. Duffing's Equation and Nonlinear Resonance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of nonlinear resonance (sometimes called the "jump phenomenon") is examined and second-order van der Pol plane analysis is employed to indicate that this phenomenon is not a feature of the equation, but rather the result of accumulated round-off error, truncation error and algorithm error that distorts the true bounded solution onto…

  2. Pendulum Motion and Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Thomas F.; King, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    A common example of real-world motion that can be modeled by a differential equation, and one easily understood by the student, is the simple pendulum. Simplifying assumptions are necessary for closed-form solutions to exist, and frequently there is little discussion of the impact if those assumptions are not met. This article presents a…

  3. The solution of transcendental equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, K. M.; Outlaw, R.

    1973-01-01

    Some of the existing methods to globally approximate the roots of transcendental equations namely, Graeffe's method, are studied. Summation of the reciprocated roots, Whittaker-Bernoulli method, and the extension of Bernoulli's method via Koenig's theorem are presented. The Aitken's delta squared process is used to accelerate the convergence. Finally, the suitability of these methods is discussed in various cases.

  4. Renaissance Learning Equating Study. Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, Julie; Sainsbury, Marian; Pyle, Katie; Keogh, Nikki; Styles, Ben

    2007-01-01

    An equating study was carried out in autumn 2006 by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) on behalf of Renaissance Learning, to provide validation evidence for the use of the Renaissance Star Reading and Star Mathematics tests in English schools. The study investigated the correlation between the Star tests and established tests.…

  5. Ordinary Differential Equation System Solver

    1992-03-05

    LSODE is a package of subroutines for the numerical solution of the initial value problem for systems of first order ordinary differential equations. The package is suitable for either stiff or nonstiff systems. For stiff systems the Jacobian matrix may be treated in either full or banded form. LSODE can also be used when the Jacobian can be approximated by a band matrix.

  6. Perceptions of the Schrodinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthimiades, Spyros

    2014-03-01

    The Schrodinger equation has been considered to be a postulate of quantum physics, but it is also perceived as the quantum equivalent of the non-relativistic classical energy relation. We argue that the Schrodinger equation cannot be a physical postulate, and we show explicitly that its second space derivative term is wrongly associated with the kinetic energy of the particle. The kinetic energy of a particle at a point is proportional to the square of the momentum, that is, to the square of the first space derivative of the wavefunction. Analyzing particle interactions, we realize that particles have multiple virtual motions and that each motion is accompanied by a wave that has constant amplitude. Accordingly, we define the wavefunction as the superposition of the virtual waves of the particle. In simple interaction settings we can tell what particle motions arise and can explain the outcomes in direct and tangible terms. Most importantly, the mathematical foundation of quantum mechanics becomes clear and justified, and we derive the Schrodinger, Dirac, etc. equations as the conditions the wavefunction must satisfy at each space-time point in order to fulfill the respective total energy equation.

  7. The Symbolism Of Chemical Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2005-01-01

    A question about the historical origin of equal sign and double arrow symbolism in balanced chemical equation is raised. The study shows that Marshall proposed the symbolism in 1902, which includes the use of currently favored double barb for equilibrium reactions.

  8. The Forced Soft Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, T. H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, this paper studies examples of the forced Duffing type spring equation with [epsilon] negative. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, the existence is demonstrated of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions. Subharmonic boundaries are…

  9. Scale Shrinkage in Vertical Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camilli, Gregory; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Three potential causes of scale shrinkage (measurement error, restriction of range, and multidimensionality) in item response theory vertical equating are discussed, and a more comprehensive model-based approach to establishing vertical scales is described. Test data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress are used to illustrate the…

  10. Mathematics and Reading Test Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Ong Kim; Wright, Benjamin D.

    As part of a larger project to assess changes in student learning resulting from school reform, this study equates levels 6 through 14 of the mathematics and reading comprehension components of Form 7 of the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (ITBS) with levels 7 through 14 of the mathematics and reading comprehension components of the CPS90 (another…

  11. Empirical equation estimates geothermal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Kutasov, I.M. )

    1995-01-02

    An empirical equation can estimate geothermal (natural) temperature profiles in new exploration areas. These gradients are useful for cement slurry and mud design and for improving electrical and temperature log interpretation. Downhole circulating temperature logs and surface outlet temperatures are used for predicting the geothermal gradients.

  12. Sonar equations for planetary exploration.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Michael A; Leighton, Timothy G

    2016-08-01

    The set of formulations commonly known as "the sonar equations" have for many decades been used to quantify the performance of sonar systems in terms of their ability to detect and localize objects submerged in seawater. The efficacy of the sonar equations, with individual terms evaluated in decibels, is well established in Earth's oceans. The sonar equations have been used in the past for missions to other planets and moons in the solar system, for which they are shown to be less suitable. While it would be preferable to undertake high-fidelity acoustical calculations to support planning, execution, and interpretation of acoustic data from planetary probes, to avoid possible errors for planned missions to such extraterrestrial bodies in future, doing so requires awareness of the pitfalls pointed out in this paper. There is a need to reexamine the assumptions, practices, and calibrations that work well for Earth to ensure that the sonar equations can be accurately applied in combination with the decibel to extraterrestrial scenarios. Examples are given for icy oceans such as exist on Europa and Ganymede, Titan's hydrocarbon lakes, and for the gaseous atmospheres of (for example) Jupiter and Venus. PMID:27586766

  13. Optimized solution of Kepler's equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohout, J. M.; Layton, L.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed description is presented of KEPLER, an IBM 360 computer program used for the solution of Kepler's equation for eccentric anomaly. The program KEPLER employs a second-order Newton-Raphson differential correction process, and it is faster than previously developed programs by an order of magnitude.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann equation method for the Cahn-Hilliard equation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lin; Zheng, Song; Zhai, Qinglan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method is designed that is different from the previous LBE for the Cahn-Hilliard equation (CHE). The starting point of the present CHE LBE model is from the kinetic theory and the work of Lee and Liu [T. Lee and L. Liu, J. Comput. Phys. 229, 8045 (2010)]; however, because the CHE does not conserve the mass locally, a modified equilibrium density distribution function is introduced to treat the diffusion term in the CHE. Numerical simulations including layered Poiseuille flow, static droplet, and Rayleigh-Taylor instability have been conducted to validate the model. The results show that the predictions of the present LBE agree well with the analytical solution and other numerical results. PMID:25679741

  15. A Versatile Technique for Solving Quintic Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkarni, Raghavendra G.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present a versatile technique to solve several types of solvable quintic equations. In the technique described here, the given quintic is first converted to a sextic equation by adding a root, and the resulting sextic equation is decomposed into two cubic polynomials as factors in a novel fashion. The resultant cubic equations are…

  16. A Bayesian Nonparametric Approach to Test Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karabatsos, George; Walker, Stephen G.

    2009-01-01

    A Bayesian nonparametric model is introduced for score equating. It is applicable to all major equating designs, and has advantages over previous equating models. Unlike the previous models, the Bayesian model accounts for positive dependence between distributions of scores from two tests. The Bayesian model and the previous equating models are…

  17. Local Linear Observed-Score Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiberg, Marie; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2011-01-01

    Two methods of local linear observed-score equating for use with anchor-test and single-group designs are introduced. In an empirical study, the two methods were compared with the current traditional linear methods for observed-score equating. As a criterion, the bias in the equated scores relative to true equating based on Lord's (1980)…

  18. On abstract degenerate neutral differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Eduardo; O'Regan, Donal

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a new abstract model of functional differential equations, which we call abstract degenerate neutral differential equations, and we study the existence of strict solutions. The class of problems and the technical approach introduced in this paper allow us to generalize and extend recent results on abstract neutral differential equations. Some examples on nonlinear partial neutral differential equations are presented.

  19. Simple Derivation of the Lindblad Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearle, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The Lindblad equation is an evolution equation for the density matrix in quantum theory. It is the general linear, Markovian, form which ensures that the density matrix is Hermitian, trace 1, positive and completely positive. Some elementary examples of the Lindblad equation are given. The derivation of the Lindblad equation presented here is…

  20. Multiple Test Equating Using the Rasch Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigman, S. Leellen; Bashaw, W. L.

    Procedures are presented for equating simultaneously several tests which have been calibrated by the Rasch Model. Three multiple test equating designs are described. A Full Matrix Design equates each test to all others. A Chain Design links tests sequentially. A Vector Design equates one test to each of the other tests. For each design, the Rasch…

  1. Isothermal Equation Of State For Compressed Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinet, Pascal; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    Same equation with three adjustable parameters applies to different materials. Improved equation of state describes pressure on solid as function of relative volume at constant temperature. Even though types of interatomic interactions differ from one substance to another, form of equation determined primarily by overlap of electron wave functions during compression. Consequently, equation universal in sense it applies to variety of substances, including ionic, metallic, covalent, and rare-gas solids. Only three parameters needed to describe equation for given material.

  2. Implementing Parquet equations using HPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellar, Samuel; Wagle, Bibek; Yang, Shuxiang; Tam, Ka-Ming; Kaiser, Hartmut; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    A new C++ runtime system (HPX) enables simulations of complex systems to run more efficiently on parallel and heterogeneous systems. This increased efficiency allows for solutions to larger simulations of the parquet approximation for a system with impurities. The relevancy of the parquet equations depends upon the ability to solve systems which require long runs and large amounts of memory. These limitations, in addition to numerical complications arising from stability of the solutions, necessitate running on large distributed systems. As the computational resources trend towards the exascale and the limitations arising from computational resources vanish efficiency of large scale simulations becomes a focus. HPX facilitates efficient simulations through intelligent overlapping of computation and communication. Simulations such as the parquet equations which require the transfer of large amounts of data should benefit from HPX implementations. Supported by the the NSF EPSCoR Cooperative Agreement No. EPS-1003897 with additional support from the Louisiana Board of Regents.

  3. Applications of film thickness equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1983-01-01

    A number of applications of elastohydrodynamic film thickness expressions were considered. The motion of a steel ball over steel surfaces presenting varying degrees of conformity was examined. The equation for minimum film thickness in elliptical conjunctions under elastohydrodynamic conditions was applied to roller and ball bearings. An involute gear was also introduced, it was again found that the elliptical conjunction expression yielded a conservative estimate of the minimum film thickness. Continuously variable-speed drives like the Perbury gear, which present truly elliptical elastohydrodynamic conjunctions, are favored increasingly in mobile and static machinery. A representative elastohydrodynamic condition for this class of machinery is considered for power transmission equipment. The possibility of elastohydrodynamic films of water or oil forming between locomotive wheels and rails is examined. The important subject of traction on the railways is attracting considerable attention in various countries at the present time. The final example of a synovial joint introduced the equation developed for isoviscous-elastic regimes of lubrication.

  4. Power equations in endurance sports.

    PubMed

    van Ingen Schenau, G J; Cavanagh, P R

    1990-01-01

    This paper attempts to clarify the formulation of power equations applicable to a variety of endurance activities. An accurate accounting of the relationship between the metabolic power input and the mechanical power output is still elusive, due to such issues as storage and recovery of strain energy and the differing energy costs of concentric and eccentric muscle actions. Nevertheless, an instantaneous approach is presented which is based upon the application of conventional Newtonian mechanics to a rigid segment model of the body, and does not contain assumptions regarding the exact nature of segmental interactions--such as energy transfer, etc. The application of the equation to running, cycling, speed skating, swimming and rowing is discussed and definitions of power, efficiency, and economy are presented.

  5. Differential equations in airplane mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carleman, M T

    1922-01-01

    In the following report, we will first draw some conclusions of purely theoretical interest, from the general equations of motion. At the end, we will consider the motion of an airplane, with the engine dead and with the assumption that the angle of attack remains constant. Thus we arrive at a simple result, which can be rendered practically utilizable for determining the trajectory of an airplane descending at a constant steering angle.

  6. Langevin Equation on Fractal Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satin, Seema; Gangal, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze random motion of a particle on a fractal curve, using Langevin approach. This involves defining a new velocity in terms of mass of the fractal curve, as defined in recent work. The geometry of the fractal curve, plays an important role in this analysis. A Langevin equation with a particular model of noise is proposed and solved using techniques of the Fα-Calculus.

  7. Experimental determination of circuit equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulman, Jason; Malatino, Frank; Widjaja, Matthew; Gunaratne, Gemunu H.

    2015-01-01

    Kirchhoff's laws offer a general, straightforward approach to circuit analysis. Unfortunately, their application becomes impractical for all but the simplest of circuits. This work presents an alternative procedure, based on an approach developed to analyze complex networks, thus making it appropriate for use on large, complicated circuits. The procedure is unusual in that it is not an analytic method but is based on experiment. Yet, this approach produces the same circuit equations obtained by more traditional means.

  8. Equation of State Project Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Scott

    2015-09-11

    A general overview of the Equation of State (EOS) Project will be presented. The goal is to provide the audience with an introduction of what our more advanced methods entail (DFT, QMD, etc.. ) and how these models are being utilized to better constrain the thermodynamic models. These models substantially reduce our regions of interpolation between the various thermodynamic limits. I will also present a variety example of recent EOS work.

  9. Linear superposition in nonlinear equations.

    PubMed

    Khare, Avinash; Sukhatme, Uday

    2002-06-17

    Several nonlinear systems such as the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and modified KdV equations and lambda phi(4) theory possess periodic traveling wave solutions involving Jacobi elliptic functions. We show that suitable linear combinations of these known periodic solutions yield many additional solutions with different periods and velocities. This linear superposition procedure works by virtue of some remarkable new identities involving elliptic functions. PMID:12059300

  10. The complex chemical Langevin equation.

    PubMed

    Schnoerr, David; Sanguinetti, Guido; Grima, Ramon

    2014-07-14

    The chemical Langevin equation (CLE) is a popular simulation method to probe the stochastic dynamics of chemical systems. The CLE's main disadvantage is its break down in finite time due to the problem of evaluating square roots of negative quantities whenever the molecule numbers become sufficiently small. We show that this issue is not a numerical integration problem, rather in many systems it is intrinsic to all representations of the CLE. Various methods of correcting the CLE have been proposed which avoid its break down. We show that these methods introduce undesirable artefacts in the CLE's predictions. In particular, for unimolecular systems, these correction methods lead to CLE predictions for the mean concentrations and variance of fluctuations which disagree with those of the chemical master equation. We show that, by extending the domain of the CLE to complex space, break down is eliminated, and the CLE's accuracy for unimolecular systems is restored. Although the molecule numbers are generally complex, we show that the "complex CLE" predicts real-valued quantities for the mean concentrations, the moments of intrinsic noise, power spectra, and first passage times, hence admitting a physical interpretation. It is also shown to provide a more accurate approximation of the chemical master equation of simple biochemical circuits involving bimolecular reactions than the various corrected forms of the real-valued CLE, the linear-noise approximation and a commonly used two moment-closure approximation.

  11. The complex chemical Langevin equation

    SciTech Connect

    Schnoerr, David; Sanguinetti, Guido; Grima, Ramon

    2014-07-14

    The chemical Langevin equation (CLE) is a popular simulation method to probe the stochastic dynamics of chemical systems. The CLE’s main disadvantage is its break down in finite time due to the problem of evaluating square roots of negative quantities whenever the molecule numbers become sufficiently small. We show that this issue is not a numerical integration problem, rather in many systems it is intrinsic to all representations of the CLE. Various methods of correcting the CLE have been proposed which avoid its break down. We show that these methods introduce undesirable artefacts in the CLE’s predictions. In particular, for unimolecular systems, these correction methods lead to CLE predictions for the mean concentrations and variance of fluctuations which disagree with those of the chemical master equation. We show that, by extending the domain of the CLE to complex space, break down is eliminated, and the CLE’s accuracy for unimolecular systems is restored. Although the molecule numbers are generally complex, we show that the “complex CLE” predicts real-valued quantities for the mean concentrations, the moments of intrinsic noise, power spectra, and first passage times, hence admitting a physical interpretation. It is also shown to provide a more accurate approximation of the chemical master equation of simple biochemical circuits involving bimolecular reactions than the various corrected forms of the real-valued CLE, the linear-noise approximation and a commonly used two moment-closure approximation.

  12. The Thin Oil Film Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, James L.; Naughton, Jonathan W.

    1999-01-01

    A thin film of oil on a surface responds primarily to the wall shear stress generated on that surface by a three-dimensional flow. The oil film is also subject to wall pressure gradients, surface tension effects and gravity. The partial differential equation governing the oil film flow is shown to be related to Burgers' equation. Analytical and numerical methods for solving the thin oil film equation are presented. A direct numerical solver is developed where the wall shear stress variation on the surface is known and which solves for the oil film thickness spatial and time variation on the surface. An inverse numerical solver is also developed where the oil film thickness spatial variation over the surface at two discrete times is known and which solves for the wall shear stress variation over the test surface. A One-Time-Level inverse solver is also demonstrated. The inverse numerical solver provides a mathematically rigorous basis for an improved form of a wall shear stress instrument suitable for application to complex three-dimensional flows. To demonstrate the complexity of flows for which these oil film methods are now suitable, extensive examination is accomplished for these analytical and numerical methods as applied to a thin oil film in the vicinity of a three-dimensional saddle of separation.

  13. ON THE GENERALISED FANT EQUATION

    PubMed Central

    Howe, M. S.; McGowan, R. S.

    2011-01-01

    An analysis is made of the fluid-structure interactions involved in the production of voiced speech. It is usual to avoid time consuming numerical simulations of the aeroacoustics of the vocal tract and glottis by the introduction of Fant’s ‘reduced complexity’ equation for the glottis volume velocity Q (G. Fant, Acoustic Theory of Speech Production, Mouton, The Hague 1960). A systematic derivation is given of Fant’s equation based on the nominally exact equations of aerodynamic sound. This can be done with a degree of approximation that depends only on the accuracy with which the time-varying flow geometry and surface-acoustic boundary conditions can be specified, and replaces Fant’s original ‘lumped element’ heuristic approach. The method determines all of the effective ‘source terms’ governing Q. It is illustrated by consideration of a simplified model of the vocal system involving a self-sustaining single-mass model of the vocal folds, that uses free streamline theory to account for surface friction and flow separation within the glottis. Identification is made of a new source term associated with the unsteady vocal fold drag produced by their oscillatory motion transverse to the mean flow. PMID:21603054

  14. On the generalised Fant equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, M. S.; McGowan, R. S.

    2011-06-01

    An analysis is made of the fluid-structure interactions involved in the production of voiced speech. It is usual to avoid time consuming numerical simulations of the aeroacoustics of the vocal tract and glottis by the introduction of Fant's 'reduced complexity' equation for the glottis volume velocity Q [G. Fant, Acoustic Theory of Speech Production, Mouton, The Hague 1960]. A systematic derivation is given of Fant's equation based on the nominally exact equations of aerodynamic sound. This can be done with a degree of approximation that depends only on the accuracy with which the time-varying flow geometry and surface-acoustic boundary conditions can be specified, and replaces Fant's original 'lumped element' heuristic approach. The method determines all of the effective 'source terms' governing Q. It is illustrated by consideration of a simplified model of the vocal system involving a self-sustaining single-mass model of the vocal folds, that uses free streamline theory to account for surface friction and flow separation within the glottis. Identification is made of a new source term associated with the unsteady vocal fold drag produced by their oscillatory motion transverse to the mean flow.

  15. The complex chemical Langevin equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnoerr, David; Sanguinetti, Guido; Grima, Ramon

    2014-07-01

    The chemical Langevin equation (CLE) is a popular simulation method to probe the stochastic dynamics of chemical systems. The CLE's main disadvantage is its break down in finite time due to the problem of evaluating square roots of negative quantities whenever the molecule numbers become sufficiently small. We show that this issue is not a numerical integration problem, rather in many systems it is intrinsic to all representations of the CLE. Various methods of correcting the CLE have been proposed which avoid its break down. We show that these methods introduce undesirable artefacts in the CLE's predictions. In particular, for unimolecular systems, these correction methods lead to CLE predictions for the mean concentrations and variance of fluctuations which disagree with those of the chemical master equation. We show that, by extending the domain of the CLE to complex space, break down is eliminated, and the CLE's accuracy for unimolecular systems is restored. Although the molecule numbers are generally complex, we show that the "complex CLE" predicts real-valued quantities for the mean concentrations, the moments of intrinsic noise, power spectra, and first passage times, hence admitting a physical interpretation. It is also shown to provide a more accurate approximation of the chemical master equation of simple biochemical circuits involving bimolecular reactions than the various corrected forms of the real-valued CLE, the linear-noise approximation and a commonly used two moment-closure approximation.

  16. Nonlocal Equations with Measure Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusi, Tuomo; Mingione, Giuseppe; Sire, Yannick

    2015-08-01

    We develop an existence, regularity and potential theory for nonlinear integrodifferential equations involving measure data. The nonlocal elliptic operators considered are possibly degenerate and cover the case of the fractional p-Laplacean operator with measurable coefficients. We introduce a natural function class where we solve the Dirichlet problem, and prove basic and optimal nonlinear Wolff potential estimates for solutions. These are the exact analogs of the results valid in the case of local quasilinear degenerate equations established by Boccardo and Gallouët (J Funct Anal 87:149-169, 1989, Partial Differ Equ 17:641-655, 1992) and Kilpeläinen and Malý (Ann Scuola Norm Sup Pisa Cl Sci (IV) 19:591-613, 1992, Acta Math 172:137-161, 1994). As a consequence, we establish a number of results that can be considered as basic building blocks for a nonlocal, nonlinear potential theory: fine properties of solutions, Calderón-Zygmund estimates, continuity and boundedness criteria are established via Wolff potentials. A main tool is the introduction of a global excess functional that allows us to prove a nonlocal analog of the classical theory due to Campanato (Ann Mat Pura Appl (IV) 69:321-381, 1965). Our results cover the case of linear nonlocal equations with measurable coefficients, and the one of the fractional Laplacean, and are new already in such cases.

  17. a Multiple Riccati Equations Rational-Exponent Method and its Application to Whitham-Broer Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Zi-Hua; Jia, Dong-Li

    2013-03-01

    According to two dependent solutions to a generalized Riccati equation together with the equation itself, a multiple Riccati equations rational-exponent method is proposed and applied to Whitham-Broer-Kaup equation. It shows that this method is a more concise and efficient approach and can uniformly derive many types of combined solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations.

  18. On the Inclusion of Difference Equation Problems and Z Transform Methods in Sophomore Differential Equation Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savoye, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, I started covering difference equations and z transform methods in my introductory differential equations course. This allowed my students to extend the "classical" methods for (ordinary differential equation) ODE's to discrete time problems arising in many applications.

  19. New Equating Methods and Their Relationships with Levine Observed Score Linear Equating under the Kernel Equating Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Haiwen; Holland, Paul

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a new curvilinear equating for the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design under the assumption of the classical test theory model, that we name curvilinear Levine observed score equating. In fact, by applying both the kernel equating framework and the mean preserving linear transformation of…

  20. Young’s equation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makkonen, Lasse

    2016-04-01

    Young’s construction for a contact angle at a three-phase intersection forms the basis of all fields of science that involve wetting and capillary action. We find compelling evidence from recent experimental results on the deformation of a soft solid at the contact line, and displacement of an elastic wire immersed in a liquid, that Young’s equation can only be interpreted by surface energies, and not as a balance of surface tensions. It follows that the a priori variable in finding equilibrium is not the position of the contact line, but the contact angle. This finding provides the explanation for the pinning of a contact line.

  1. Anyon Equation on a Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Choon-Lin; Hosotani, Yutaka

    Starting from the quantum field theory of nonrelativistic matter on a torus interacting with Chern-Simons gauge fields, we derive the Schrödinger equation for an anyon system. The nonintegrable phases of the Wilson line integrals on a torus play an essential role. In addition to generating degenerate vacua, they enter in the definition of a many-body Schrödinger wave function in quantum mechanics, which can be defined as a regular function of the coordinates of anyons. It obeys a non-Abelian representation of the braid group algebra, being related to Einarsson’s wave function by a singular gauge transformation.

  2. Germanium multiphase equation of state

    DOE PAGES

    Crockett, Scott D.; Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia De; Kress, Joel D.; Rudin, Sven P.

    2014-05-07

    A new SESAME multiphase germanium equation of state (EOS) has been developed using the best available experimental data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The equilibrium EOS includes the Ge I (diamond), the Ge II (β-Sn) and the liquid phases. The foundation of the EOS is based on density functional theory calculations which are used to determine the cold curve and the Debye temperature. Results are compared to Hugoniot data through the solid-solid and solid-liquid transitions. We propose some experiments to better understand the dynamics of this element

  3. Advanced lab on Fresnel equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova-Mayor, Anna; Gimbal, Scott

    2015-11-01

    This experimental and theoretical exercise is designed to promote students' understanding of polarization and thin-film coatings for the practical case of a scanning protected-metal coated mirror. We present results obtained with a laboratory scanner and a polarimeter and propose an affordable and student-friendly experimental arrangement for the undergraduate laboratory. This experiment will allow students to apply basic knowledge of the polarization of light and thin-film coatings, develop hands-on skills with the use of phase retarders, apply the Fresnel equations for metallic coating with complex index of refraction, and compute the polarization state of the reflected light.

  4. Scattering equations and Feynman diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baadsgaard, Christian; Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Bourjaily, Jacob L.; Damgaard, Poul H.

    2015-09-01

    We show a direct matching between individual Feynman diagrams and integration measures in the scattering equation formalism of Cachazo, He and Yuan. The connection is most easily explained in terms of triangular graphs associated with planar Feynman diagrams in φ 3-theory. We also discuss the generalization to general scalar field theories with φ p interactions, corresponding to polygonal graphs involving vertices of order p. Finally, we describe how the same graph-theoretic language can be used to provide the precise link between individual Feynman diagrams and string theory integrands.

  5. Linear superposition solutions to nonlinear wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu

    2012-11-01

    The solutions to a linear wave equation can satisfy the principle of superposition, i.e., the linear superposition of two or more known solutions is still a solution of the linear wave equation. We show in this article that many nonlinear wave equations possess exact traveling wave solutions involving hyperbolic, triangle, and exponential functions, and the suitable linear combinations of these known solutions can also constitute linear superposition solutions to some nonlinear wave equations with special structural characteristics. The linear superposition solutions to the generalized KdV equation K(2,2,1), the Oliver water wave equation, and the k(n, n) equation are given. The structure characteristic of the nonlinear wave equations having linear superposition solutions is analyzed, and the reason why the solutions with the forms of hyperbolic, triangle, and exponential functions can form the linear superposition solutions is also discussed.

  6. Difference equations and some of their solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakishiyev, Natig M.

    1996-04-01

    Some methods for solving difference equations are discussed. As particular examples we consider in detail the difference equations corresponding to the Kravchuk functions, q-harmonic oscillator wavefunctions, and the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for the quantum algebra suq(2).

  7. Model equations for high current transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.

    1985-06-01

    The use of distribution functions to model transverse beam dynamics is discussed. Emphasis is placed on envelope equations, moments, the Vlasov equation, and the Kapchinski-Vladimirskij distribution. 10 refs.

  8. Solving Equations of Multibody Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan; Lim, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Darts++ is a computer program for solving the equations of motion of a multibody system or of a multibody model of a dynamic system. It is intended especially for use in dynamical simulations performed in designing and analyzing, and developing software for the control of, complex mechanical systems. Darts++ is based on the Spatial-Operator- Algebra formulation for multibody dynamics. This software reads a description of a multibody system from a model data file, then constructs and implements an efficient algorithm that solves the dynamical equations of the system. The efficiency and, hence, the computational speed is sufficient to make Darts++ suitable for use in realtime closed-loop simulations. Darts++ features an object-oriented software architecture that enables reconfiguration of system topology at run time; in contrast, in related prior software, system topology is fixed during initialization. Darts++ provides an interface to scripting languages, including Tcl and Python, that enable the user to configure and interact with simulation objects at run time.

  9. Langevin Equation for DNA Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grych, David; Copperman, Jeremy; Guenza, Marina

    Under physiological conditions, DNA oligomers can contain well-ordered helical regions and also flexible single-stranded regions. We describe the site-specific motion of DNA with a modified Rouse-Zimm Langevin equation formalism that describes DNA as a coarse-grained polymeric chain with global structure and local flexibility. The approach has successfully described the protein dynamics in solution and has been extended to nucleic acids. Our approach provides diffusive mode analytical solutions for the dynamics of global rotational diffusion and internal motion. The internal DNA dynamics present a rich energy landscape that accounts for an interior where hydrogen bonds and base-stacking determine structure and experience limited solvent exposure. We have implemented several models incorporating different coarse-grained sites with anisotropic rotation, energy barrier crossing, and local friction coefficients that include a unique internal viscosity and our models reproduce dynamics predicted by atomistic simulations. The models reproduce bond autocorrelation along the sequence as compared to that directly calculated from atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The Langevin equation approach captures the essence of DNA dynamics without a cumbersome atomistic representation.

  10. Equations of state for hydrocodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomonosov, I.

    2013-06-01

    The equation of state (EOS) governing the system of gas dynamic equations defines significantly accuracy and reliability of results of numerical modeling. In our report, we will formulate main mathematical and physical demands to wide-range EOS for hydrocodes. Our semi-empirical EOS model fully assigns the free energy thermodynamic potential for metals over entire phase diagram region of practical interest. It accounts for solid, liquid, plasma states as well as two-phase regions of melting and evaporation. Available now are wide-range multi-phase EOS for 30 simple and transition metals of the most practical interest. Their direct usage in computer codes leads to complicated and not economy calculations, so they are usually involved in numerical modeling in tabular form. The EOS code for calculation of tables can produce the complete set of thermodynamic derivatives (such as pressure, sound velocity, heat capacity) using any one of input pairs: volume-temperature, volume-internal energy or volume-pressure. The input grid can be linear, logarithmic or arbitrary; each point in 2D output tables is marked by symbol which indicates the physical state, such as solid, liquid, gas, plasma or mesh. We also present in our talk estimations of shock melting and evaporating and importance of these effects for results of numerical modeling.

  11. Wave equation on spherically symmetric Lorentzian metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhari, Ashfaque H.; Al-Dweik, Ahmad Y.; Zaman, F. D.; Kara, A. H.; Karim, M.

    2011-06-15

    Wave equation on a general spherically symmetric spacetime metric is constructed. Noether symmetries of the equation in terms of explicit functions of {theta} and {phi} are derived subject to certain differential constraints. By restricting the metric to flat Friedman case the Noether symmetries of the wave equation are presented. Invertible transformations are constructed from a specific subalgebra of these Noether symmetries to convert the wave equation with variable coefficients to the one with constant coefficients.

  12. Bilinear approach to the supersymmetric Gardner equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babalic, C. N.; Carstea, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    We study a supersymmetric version of the Gardner equation (both focusing and defocusing) using the superbilinear formalism. This equation is new and cannot be obtained from the supersymmetric modified Korteweg-de Vries equation with a nonzero boundary condition. We construct supersymmetric solitons and then by passing to the long-wave limit in the focusing case obtain rational nonsingular solutions. We also discuss the supersymmetric version of the defocusing equation and the dynamics of its solutions.

  13. On a Equation in Finite Algebraically Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valcan, Dumitru

    2013-01-01

    Solving equations in finite algebraically structures (semigroups with identity, groups, rings or fields) many times is not easy. Even the professionals can have trouble in such cases. Therefore, in this paper we proposed to solve in the various finite groups or fields, a binomial equation of the form (1). We specify that this equation has been…

  14. Multi-time equations, classical and quantum

    PubMed Central

    Petrat, Sören; Tumulka, Roderich

    2014-01-01

    Multi-time equations are evolution equations involving several time variables, one for each particle. Such equations have been considered for the purpose of making theories manifestly Lorentz invariant. We compare their status and significance in classical and quantum physics. PMID:24711721

  15. Solving Absolute Value Equations Algebraically and Geometrically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiyuan, Wei

    2005-01-01

    The way in which students can improve their comprehension by understanding the geometrical meaning of algebraic equations or solving algebraic equation geometrically is described. Students can experiment with the conditions of the absolute value equation presented, for an interesting way to form an overall understanding of the concept.

  16. Equating Scores from Adaptive to Linear Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2006-01-01

    Two local methods for observed-score equating are applied to the problem of equating an adaptive test to a linear test. In an empirical study, the methods were evaluated against a method based on the test characteristic function (TCF) of the linear test and traditional equipercentile equating applied to the ability estimates on the adaptive test…

  17. Students' Equation Understanding and Solving in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barahmand, Ali; Shahvarani, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present article is to investigate how 15-year-old Iranian students interpret the concept of equation, its solution, and studying the relation between the students' equation understanding and solving. Data from two equation-solving exercises are reported. Data analysis shows that there is a significant relationship between…

  18. Local Observed-Score Kernel Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiberg, Marie; van der Linden, Wim J.; von Davier, Alina A.

    2014-01-01

    Three local observed-score kernel equating methods that integrate methods from the local equating and kernel equating frameworks are proposed. The new methods were compared with their earlier counterparts with respect to such measures as bias--as defined by Lord's criterion of equity--and percent relative error. The local kernel item response…

  19. The Effect of Repeaters on Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, HeeKyoung; Kolen, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Test equating might be affected by including in the equating analyses examinees who have taken the test previously. This study evaluated the effect of including such repeaters on Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) equating using a population invariance approach. Three-parameter logistic (3-PL) item response theory (IRT) true score and…

  20. The Effects of Repeaters on Test Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrulis, Richard S.; And Others

    The purpose of this investigation was to establish the effects of repeaters on test equating. Since consideration was not given to repeaters in test equating, such as in the derivation of equations by Angoff (1971), the hypothetical effect needed to be established. A case study was examined which showed results on a test as expected; overall mean…

  1. Boundary conditions for the subdiffusion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Shkilev, V. P.

    2013-04-15

    The boundary conditions for the subdiffusion equations are formulated using the continuous-time random walk model, as well as several versions of the random walk model on an irregular lattice. It is shown that the boundary conditions for the same equation in different models have different forms, and this difference considerably affects the solutions of this equation.

  2. The Riesz-Bessel Fractional Diffusion Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Anh, V.V. McVinish, R.

    2004-05-15

    This paper examines the properties of a fractional diffusion equation defined by the composition of the inverses of the Riesz potential and the Bessel potential. The first part determines the conditions under which the Green function of this equation is the transition probability density function of a Levy motion. This Levy motion is obtained by the subordination of Brownian motion, and the Levy representation of the subordinator is determined. The second part studies the semigroup formed by the Green function of the fractional diffusion equation. Applications of these results to certain evolution equations is considered. Some results on the numerical solution of the fractional diffusion equation are also provided.

  3. Binomial moment equations for stochastic reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Barzel, Baruch; Biham, Ofer

    2011-04-15

    A highly efficient formulation of moment equations for stochastic reaction networks is introduced. It is based on a set of binomial moments that capture the combinatorics of the reaction processes. The resulting set of equations can be easily truncated to include moments up to any desired order. The number of equations is dramatically reduced compared to the master equation. This formulation enables the simulation of complex reaction networks, involving a large number of reactive species much beyond the feasibility limit of any existing method. It provides an equation-based paradigm to the analysis of stochastic networks, complementing the commonly used Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:21568538

  4. Bogomol'nyi equations of classical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmaja, Ardian N.; Ramadhan, Handhika S.

    2014-11-01

    We review the Bogomol'nyi equations and investigate an alternative route in obtaining it. It can be shown that the known Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield equations can be derived directly from the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations via the separation of variables, without having to appeal to the Hamiltonian. We apply this technique to the Dirac-Born-Infeld solitons and obtain the corresponding equations and the potentials. This method is suitable for obtaining the first-order equations and determining the allowed potentials for noncanonical defects.

  5. Sparse dynamics for partial differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Hayden; Caflisch, Russel; Hauck, Cory D.; Osher, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the approximate dynamics of several differential equations when the solutions are restricted to a sparse subset of a given basis. The restriction is enforced at every time step by simply applying soft thresholding to the coefficients of the basis approximation. By reducing or compressing the information needed to represent the solution at every step, only the essential dynamics are represented. In many cases, there are natural bases derived from the differential equations, which promote sparsity. We find that our method successfully reduces the dynamics of convection equations, diffusion equations, weak shocks, and vorticity equations with high-frequency source terms. PMID:23533273

  6. Spectrum Analysis of Some Kinetic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tong; Yu, Hongjun

    2016-11-01

    We analyze the spectrum structure of some kinetic equations qualitatively by using semigroup theory and linear operator perturbation theory. The models include the classical Boltzmann equation for hard potentials with or without angular cutoff and the Landau equation with {γ≥q-2}. As an application, we show that the solutions to these two fundamental equations are asymptotically equivalent (mod time decay rate {t^{-5/4}}) as {tto∞} to that of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for initial data around an equilibrium state.

  7. The equations of medieval cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonanno, Roberto; Quercellini, Claudia

    2009-04-01

    In Dantean cosmography the Universe is described as a series of concentric spheres with all the known planets embedded in their rotation motion, the Earth located at the centre and Lucifer at the centre of the Earth. Beyond these "celestial spheres", Dante represents the "angelic choirs" as other nine spheres surrounding God. The rotation velocity increases with decreasing distance from God, that is with increasing Power (Virtù). We show that, adding Power as an additional fourth dimension to space, the modern equations governing the expansion of a closed Universe (i.e. with the density parameter Ω0 > 1) in the space-time, can be applied to the medieval Universe as imaged by Dante in his Divine Comedy. In this representation, the Cosmos acquires a unique description and Lucifer is not located at the centre of the hyperspheres.

  8. Evolution equation for quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming-Liang; Fan, Heng

    2016-07-01

    The estimation of the decoherence process of an open quantum system is of both theoretical significance and experimental appealing. Practically, the decoherence can be easily estimated if the coherence evolution satisfies some simple relations. We introduce a framework for studying evolution equation of coherence. Based on this framework, we prove a simple factorization relation (FR) for the l1 norm of coherence, and identified the sets of quantum channels for which this FR holds. By using this FR, we further determine condition on the transformation matrix of the quantum channel which can support permanently freezing of the l1 norm of coherence. We finally reveal the universality of this FR by showing that it holds for many other related coherence and quantum correlation measures.

  9. Evolution equation for quantum coherence

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ming-Liang; Fan, Heng

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of the decoherence process of an open quantum system is of both theoretical significance and experimental appealing. Practically, the decoherence can be easily estimated if the coherence evolution satisfies some simple relations. We introduce a framework for studying evolution equation of coherence. Based on this framework, we prove a simple factorization relation (FR) for the l1 norm of coherence, and identified the sets of quantum channels for which this FR holds. By using this FR, we further determine condition on the transformation matrix of the quantum channel which can support permanently freezing of the l1 norm of coherence. We finally reveal the universality of this FR by showing that it holds for many other related coherence and quantum correlation measures. PMID:27382933

  10. Evolution equation for quantum coherence.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming-Liang; Fan, Heng

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of the decoherence process of an open quantum system is of both theoretical significance and experimental appealing. Practically, the decoherence can be easily estimated if the coherence evolution satisfies some simple relations. We introduce a framework for studying evolution equation of coherence. Based on this framework, we prove a simple factorization relation (FR) for the l1 norm of coherence, and identified the sets of quantum channels for which this FR holds. By using this FR, we further determine condition on the transformation matrix of the quantum channel which can support permanently freezing of the l1 norm of coherence. We finally reveal the universality of this FR by showing that it holds for many other related coherence and quantum correlation measures. PMID:27382933

  11. Entropic corrections to Friedmann equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sheykhi, Ahmad

    2010-05-15

    Recently, Verlinde discussed that gravity can be understood as an entropic force caused by changes in the information associated with the positions of material bodies. In Verlinde's argument, the area law of the black hole entropy plays a crucial role. However, the entropy-area relation can be modified from the inclusion of quantum effects, motivated from the loop quantum gravity. In this note, by employing this modified entropy-area relation, we derive corrections to Newton's law of gravitation as well as modified Friedmann equations by adopting the viewpoint that gravity can be emerged as an entropic force. Our study further supports the universality of the log correction and provides a strong consistency check on Verlinde's model.

  12. Entropic corrections to Friedmann equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykhi, Ahmad

    2010-05-01

    Recently, Verlinde discussed that gravity can be understood as an entropic force caused by changes in the information associated with the positions of material bodies. In Verlinde’s argument, the area law of the black hole entropy plays a crucial role. However, the entropy-area relation can be modified from the inclusion of quantum effects, motivated from the loop quantum gravity. In this note, by employing this modified entropy-area relation, we derive corrections to Newton’s law of gravitation as well as modified Friedmann equations by adopting the viewpoint that gravity can be emerged as an entropic force. Our study further supports the universality of the log correction and provides a strong consistency check on Verlinde’s model.

  13. Inferring Mathematical Equations Using Crowdsourcing.

    PubMed

    Wasik, Szymon; Fratczak, Filip; Krzyskow, Jakub; Wulnikowski, Jaroslaw

    2015-01-01

    Crowdsourcing, understood as outsourcing work to a large network of people in the form of an open call, has been utilized successfully many times, including a very interesting concept involving the implementation of computer games with the objective of solving a scientific problem by employing users to play a game-so-called crowdsourced serious games. Our main objective was to verify whether such an approach could be successfully applied to the discovery of mathematical equations that explain experimental data gathered during the observation of a given dynamic system. Moreover, we wanted to compare it with an approach based on artificial intelligence that uses symbolic regression to find such formulae automatically. To achieve this, we designed and implemented an Internet game in which players attempt to design a spaceship representing an equation that models the observed system. The game was designed while considering that it should be easy to use for people without strong mathematical backgrounds. Moreover, we tried to make use of the collective intelligence observed in crowdsourced systems by enabling many players to collaborate on a single solution. The idea was tested on several hundred players playing almost 10,000 games and conducting a user opinion survey. The results prove that the proposed solution has very high potential. The function generated during weeklong tests was almost as precise as the analytical solution of the model of the system and, up to a certain complexity level of the formulae, it explained data better than the solution generated automatically by Eureqa, the leading software application for the implementation of symbolic regression. Moreover, we observed benefits of using crowdsourcing; the chain of consecutive solutions that led to the best solution was obtained by the continuous collaboration of several players. PMID:26713846

  14. Inferring Mathematical Equations Using Crowdsourcing

    PubMed Central

    Wasik, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Crowdsourcing, understood as outsourcing work to a large network of people in the form of an open call, has been utilized successfully many times, including a very interesting concept involving the implementation of computer games with the objective of solving a scientific problem by employing users to play a game—so-called crowdsourced serious games. Our main objective was to verify whether such an approach could be successfully applied to the discovery of mathematical equations that explain experimental data gathered during the observation of a given dynamic system. Moreover, we wanted to compare it with an approach based on artificial intelligence that uses symbolic regression to find such formulae automatically. To achieve this, we designed and implemented an Internet game in which players attempt to design a spaceship representing an equation that models the observed system. The game was designed while considering that it should be easy to use for people without strong mathematical backgrounds. Moreover, we tried to make use of the collective intelligence observed in crowdsourced systems by enabling many players to collaborate on a single solution. The idea was tested on several hundred players playing almost 10,000 games and conducting a user opinion survey. The results prove that the proposed solution has very high potential. The function generated during weeklong tests was almost as precise as the analytical solution of the model of the system and, up to a certain complexity level of the formulae, it explained data better than the solution generated automatically by Eureqa, the leading software application for the implementation of symbolic regression. Moreover, we observed benefits of using crowdsourcing; the chain of consecutive solutions that led to the best solution was obtained by the continuous collaboration of several players. PMID:26713846

  15. Exact solution to fractional logistic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.

    2015-07-01

    The logistic equation is one of the most familiar nonlinear differential equations in the biological and social sciences. Herein we provide an exact solution to an extension of this equation to incorporate memory through the use of fractional derivatives in time. The solution to the fractional logistic equation (FLE) is obtained using the Carleman embedding technique that allows the nonlinear equation to be replaced by an infinite-order set of linear equations, which we then solve exactly. The formal series expansion for the initial value solution of the FLE is shown to be expressed in terms of a series of weighted Mittag-Leffler functions that reduces to the well known analytic solution in the limit where the fractional index for the derivative approaches unity. The numerical integration to the FLE provides an excellent fit to the analytic solution. We propose this approach as a general technique for solving a class of nonlinear fractional differential equations.

  16. Equating Multidimensional Tests under a Random Groups Design: A Comparison of Various Equating Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Eunjung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare the equating performance of various equating procedures for the multidimensional tests. To examine the various equating procedures, simulated data sets were used that were generated based on a multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) framework. Various equating procedures were examined, including…

  17. A Comparison of the Kernel Equating Method with Traditional Equating Methods Using SAT[R] Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jinghua; Low, Albert C.

    2008-01-01

    This study applied kernel equating (KE) in two scenarios: equating to a very similar population and equating to a very different population, referred to as a distant population, using SAT[R] data. The KE results were compared to the results obtained from analogous traditional equating methods in both scenarios. The results indicate that KE results…

  18. Solving Space-Time Fractional Differential Equations by Using Modified Simple Equation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Melike; Akbulut, Arzu; Bekir, Ahmet

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we establish new and more general traveling wave solutions of space-time fractional Klein–Gordon equation with quadratic nonlinearity and the space-time fractional breaking soliton equations using the modified simple equation method. The proposed method is so powerful and effective to solve nonlinear space-time fractional differential equations by with modified Riemann–Liouville derivative.

  19. Complex PT-symmetric nonlinear Schrödinger equation and Burgers equation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhenya

    2013-04-28

    The complex -symmetric nonlinear wave models have drawn much attention in recent years since the complex -symmetric extensions of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation were presented in 2007. In this review, we focus on the study of the complex -symmetric nonlinear Schrödinger equation and Burgers equation. First of all, we briefly introduce the basic property of complex symmetry. We then report on exact solutions of one- and two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equations (known as the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in Bose-Einstein condensates) with several complex -symmetric potentials. Finally, some complex -symmetric extension principles are used to generate some complex -symmetric nonlinear wave equations starting from both -symmetric (e.g. the KdV equation) and non- -symmetric (e.g. the Burgers equation) nonlinear wave equations. In particular, we discuss exact solutions of some representative ones of the complex -symmetric Burgers equation in detail. PMID:23509385

  20. Dust levitation about Itokawa's equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartzell, C.; Zimmerman, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    levitation about Itokawa, we must include accurate plasma and gravity models. We use a 2D PIC code (described in [8]) to model the plasma environment about Itokawa's equator. The plasma model includes photoemission and shadowing. Thus, we model the plasma environment for various solar incidence angles. The plasma model gives us the 2D electric field components and the plasma potential. We model the gravity field around the equatorial cross-section using an Interior Gravity model [9]. The gravity model is based on the shape model acquired by the Hayabusa mission team and, unlike other models, is quick and accurate close to the surface of the body. Due to the nonspherical shape of Itokawa, the electrostatic force and the gravity may not be collinear. Given our accurate plasma and gravity environments, we are able to simulate the trajectories of dust grains about the equator of Itokawa. When modeling the trajectories of the grains, the current to the grains is calculated using Nitter et al.'s formulation [10] with the plasma sheath parameters provided by our PIC model (i.e., the potential minimum, the potential at the surface, and the sheath type). Additionally, we are able to numerically locate the equilibria about which dust grains may levitate. Interestingly, we observe that equilibria exist for grains up to 20 microns in radius about Itokawa's equator when the Sun is illuminating Itokawa's 'otter tail'. This grain size is significantly larger than the stably levitating grains we observed using our 1D plasma and gravity models. Conclusions and Future Work: The possibility of dust levitation above asteroids has implications both for our understanding of their evolution and for the design of future missions to these bodies. Using detailed gravity and plasma models, we are above to propagate the trajectories of dust particles about Itokawa's equator and identify the equilibria about which these grains will levitate. Using these simulations, we see that grains up to 20 microns

  1. Exact and explicit solitary wave solutions to some nonlinear equations

    SciTech Connect

    Jiefang Zhang

    1996-08-01

    Exact and explicit solitary wave solutions are obtained for some physically interesting nonlinear evolutions and wave equations in physics and other fields by using a special transformation. These equations include the KdV-Burgers equation, the MKdV-Burgers equation, the combined KdV-MKdV equation, the Newell-Whitehead equation, the dissipative {Phi}{sup 4}-model equation, the generalized Fisher equation, and the elastic-medium wave equation.

  2. On some differential transformations of hypergeometric equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hounkonnou, M. N.; Ronveaux, A.

    2015-04-01

    Many algebraic transformations of the hypergeometric equation σ(x)z"(x) + τ(x)z'(x) + lz(x) = 0, where σ, τ, l are polynomial functions of degrees 2 (at most), 1, 0, respectively, are well known. Some of them involve x = x(t), a polynomial of degree r, in order to recover the Heun equation, extension of the hypergeometric equation by one more singularity. The case r = 2 was investigated by K. Kuiken (see 1979 SIAM J. Math. Anal. 10 (3) 655-657) and extended to r = 3,4, 5 by R. S. Maier (see 2005 J. Differ. Equat. 213 171 - 203). The transformations engendered by the function y(x) = A(x)z(x), also very popular in mathematics and physics, are used to get from the hypergeometric equation, for instance, the Schroedinger equation with appropriate potentials, as well as Heun and confluent Heun equations. This work addresses a generalization of Kimura's approach proposed in 1971, based on differential transformations of the hypergeometric equations involving y(x) = A(x)z(x) + B(x)z'(x). Appropriate choices of A(x) and B(x) permit to retrieve the Heun equations as well as equations for some exceptional polynomials. New relations are obtained for Laguerre and Hermite polynomials.

  3. The telegraph equation in charged particle transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, T. I.; Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J.; Lorencz, K.; Williams, L. L.

    1993-01-01

    We present a new derivation of the telegraph equation which modifies its coefficients. First, an infinite order partial differential equation is obtained for the velocity space solid angle-averaged phase-space distribution of particles which underwent at least a few collisions. It is shown that, in the lowest order asymptotic expansion, this equation simplifies to the well-known diffusion equation. The second-order asymptotic expansion for isotropic small-angle scattering results in a modified telegraph equation with a signal propagation speed of v(5/11) exp 1/2 instead of the usual v/3 exp 1/2. Our derivation of a modified telegraph equation follows from an expansion of the Boltzmann equation in the relevant smallness parameters and not from a truncation of an eigenfunction expansion. This equation is consistent with causality. It is shown that, under steady state conditions in a convecting plasma, the telegraph equation may be regarded as a diffusion equation with a modified transport coefficient, which describes a combination of diffusion and cosmic-ray inertia.

  4. Stability analysis of ecomorphodynamic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bärenbold, F.; Crouzy, B.; Perona, P.

    2016-02-01

    In order to shed light on the influence of riverbed vegetation on river morphodynamics, we perform a linear stability analysis on a minimal model of vegetation dynamics coupled with classical one- and two-dimensional Saint-Venant-Exner equations of morphodynamics. Vegetation is modeled as a density field of rigid, nonsubmerged cylinders and affects flow via a roughness change. Furthermore, vegetation is assumed to develop following a logistic dependence and may be uprooted by flow. First, we perform the stability analysis of the reduced one-dimensional framework. As a result of the competitive interaction between vegetation growth and removal through uprooting, we find a domain in the parameter space where originally straight rivers are unstable toward periodic longitudinal patterns. For realistic values of the sediment transport parameter, the dominant longitudinal wavelength is determined by the parameters of the vegetation model. Bed topography is found to adjust to the spatial pattern fixed by vegetation. Subsequently, the stability analysis is repeated for the two-dimensional framework, where the system may evolve toward alternate or multiple bars. On a fixed bed, we find instability toward alternate bars due to flow-vegetation interaction, but no multiple bars. Both alternate and multiple bars are present on a movable, vegetated bed. Finally, we find that the addition of vegetation to a previously unvegetated riverbed favors instability toward alternate bars and thus the development of a single course rather than braiding.

  5. Silicon Nitride Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Pazhayannur; Brown, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This report presents the development a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4) . Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonalβ-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products and then combined with the single component solid models to study the global phase diagram. Sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Living With a Star program office.

  6. Numerical experiments for advection equation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wen-Yih )

    1993-10-01

    We propose to combine the Crowley fourth-order scheme and the Gadd scheme for solving the linear advection equation. Two new schemes will be presented: the first is to integrate the Crowley scheme and the Gadd scheme alternately (referred to as New1); the second is to integrate the Crowley scheme twice before we apply the Gadd scheme once (referred to as New2). The new schemes are designed such that no additional restriction is placed on the CFL criterion in an integration. The performance of the new schemes is better than that of the original Crowley or Gadd schemes. It is noted that the amplitude obtained from New2 is more accurate than that from New1 for long waves, but less accurate for short waves. The phase speed calculated from New2 is very close to the real phase speed in most cases tested here, but the phase speed of New 1 is faster than the real phase speed. Hence, New2 is a better choice, especially for a model that includes horizontal smoothing to dampen the short waves. 9 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Double distributions and evolution equations

    SciTech Connect

    A.V. Radyushkin

    1998-05-01

    Applications of perturbative QCD to deeply virtual Compton scattering and hard exclusive meson electroproduction processes require a generalization of usual parton distributions for the case when long-distance information is accumulated in nonforward matrix elements < p{prime} {vert_bar}O(0,z){vert_bar}p > of quark and gluon light-cone operators. In their previous papers the authors used two types of nonperturbative functions parameterizing such matrix elements: double distributions F(x,y;t) and nonforward distribution functions F{sub {zeta}}(X;t). Here they discuss in more detail the double distributions (DD's) and evolution equations which they satisfy. They propose simple models for F(x,y;t=0) DD's with correct spectral and symmetry properties which also satisfy the reduction relations connecting them to the usual parton densities f(x). In this way, they obtain self-consistent models for the {zeta}-dependence of nonforward distributions. They show that, for small {zeta}, one can easily obtain nonforward distributions (in the X > {zeta} region) from the parton densities: F{sub {zeta}} (X;t=0) {approx} f(X{minus}{zeta}/2).

  8. Equation of state of polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, N. K.; Gray, G. T.

    2003-06-01

    The present drive to make munitions as safe as is feasible and to develop predictive models describing their constitutive response, has led to the development and production of plastic bonded explosives and propellants. There is a range of elastomers used as binder materials with the energetic components. One of these is known as Kel-F-800™ (poly-chloro-trifluroethylene) whose structure is in some ways analogous to that of poly-tetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon). Thus, it is of interest to assess the mechanical behavior of Teflon and to compare the response of five different production Teflon materials, two of which were produced in pedigree form, one as-received product, and two from previous in-depth literature studies. The equations of state of these variants were quantified by conducting a series of shock impact experiments in which both pressure-particle velocity and shock velocity-particle velocity dependencies were measured. The compressive behavior of Teflon, based upon the results of this study, appears to be independent of the production route and additives introduced.

  9. Solving equations through particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edvardsson, S.; Neuman, M.; Edström, P.; Olin, H.

    2015-12-01

    The present work evaluates a recently developed particle method (DFPM). The basic idea behind this method is to utilize a Newtonian system of interacting particles that through dissipation solves mathematical problems. We find that this second order dynamical system results in an algorithm that is among the best methods known. The present work studies large systems of linear equations. Of special interest is the wide eigenvalue spectrum. This case is common as the discretization of the continuous problem becomes dense. The convergence rate of DFPM is shown to be in parity with that of the conjugate gradient method, both analytically and through numerical examples. However, an advantage with DFPM is that it is cheaper per iteration. Another advantage is that it is not restricted to symmetric matrices only, as is the case for the conjugate gradient method. The convergence properties of DFPM are shown to be superior to the closely related approach utilizing only a first order dynamical system, and also to several other iterative methods in numerical linear algebra. The performance properties are understood and optimized by taking advantage of critically damped oscillators in classical mechanics. Just as in the case of the conjugate gradient method, a limitation is that all eigenvalues (spring constants) are required to be of the same sign. DFPM has no other limitation such as matrix structure or a spectral radius as is common among iterative methods. Examples are provided to test the particle algorithm's merits and also various performance comparisons with existent numerical algorithms are provided.

  10. Darboux transformation for the NLS equation

    SciTech Connect

    Aktosun, Tuncay; Mee, Cornelis van der

    2010-03-08

    We analyze a certain class of integral equations associated with Marchenko equations and Gel'fand-Levitan equations. Such integral equations arise through a Fourier transformation on various ordinary differential equations involving a spectral parameter. When the integral operator is perturbed by a finite-rank perturbation, we explicitly evaluate the change in the solution in terms of the unperturbed quantities and the finite-rank perturbation. We show that this result provides a fundamental approach to derive Darboux transformations for various systems of ordinary differential operators. We illustrate our theory by providing the explicit Darboux transformation for the Zakharov-Shabat system and show how the potential and wave function change when a simple discrete eigenvalue is added to the spectrum, and thus we also provide a one-parameter family of Darboux transformations for the nonlinear Schroedinger equation.

  11. Numerical solution of a tunneling equation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Carter, M.D.; Batchelor, D.B.; Jaeger, E.F.

    1994-04-01

    A numerical method is presented to solve mode conversion equations resulting from the use of radio frequency (rf) waves to heat plasmas. The solutions of the mode conversion equations contain exponentially growing modes, and ordinary numerical techniques give large errors. To avoid the unphysical growing modes, a set of boundary conditions are found, that eliminate the unphysical modes. The mode conversion equations are then solved with the boundary conditions as a standard two-point boundary value problem. A tunneling equation (one of the mode conversion equations without power absorption) is solved as a specific example of this numerical technique although the technique itself is very general and can be easily applied to solve any mode conversion equation. The results from the numerical calculation agree very well with those found from asymptotic analysis.

  12. Kinetic Equations for the Plasma Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Ian; Hammett, Greg

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid fluid-kinetic framework for studying large-amplitude fluctuations in the edge of tokamak plasmas is presented. We derive equations for the behavior of an anisotropic plasma in the presence of both large fluctuations and steep gradients. The system consists of kinetic equations for electrons and ions, supplemented with fluid equations for the electromagnetic fields. In this way it builds upon both kinetic MHD and from the use of vorticity equations in gyrokinetics. This framework, by including both Alfvénic (including current-driven modes) and drift wave dynamics, can handle fully nonlinear perturbations such as erupting ELM filaments and blob-based turbulence. We not only present equations for such fast behavior, but also develop higher order equations that describe pedestal equilibria and slow scrape-off-layer dynamics. The relationship between this framework and existing collisional edge models is made clear.

  13. Weak self-adjoint differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandarias, M. L.

    2011-07-01

    The concepts of self-adjoint and quasi self-adjoint equations were introduced by Ibragimov (2006 J. Math. Anal. Appl. 318 742-57 2007 Arch. ALGA 4 55-60). In Ibragimov (2007 J. Math. Anal. Appl. 333 311-28), a general theorem on conservation laws was proved. In this paper, we generalize the concept of self-adjoint and quasi self-adjoint equations by introducing the definition of weak self-adjoint equations. We find a class of weak self-adjoint quasi-linear parabolic equations. The property of a differential equation to be weak self-adjoint is important for constructing conservation laws associated with symmetries of the differential equation.

  14. Stochastic differential equation model to Prendiville processes

    SciTech Connect

    Granita; Bahar, Arifah

    2015-10-22

    The Prendiville process is another variation of the logistic model which assumes linearly decreasing population growth rate. It is a continuous time Markov chain (CTMC) taking integer values in the finite interval. The continuous time Markov chain can be approximated by stochastic differential equation (SDE). This paper discusses the stochastic differential equation of Prendiville process. The work started with the forward Kolmogorov equation in continuous time Markov chain of Prendiville process. Then it was formulated in the form of a central-difference approximation. The approximation was then used in Fokker-Planck equation in relation to the stochastic differential equation of the Prendiville process. The explicit solution of the Prendiville process was obtained from the stochastic differential equation. Therefore, the mean and variance function of the Prendiville process could be easily found from the explicit solution.

  15. Generalized Harnack Inequality for Nonhomogeneous Elliptic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julin, Vesa

    2015-05-01

    This paper is concerned with nonlinear elliptic equations in nondivergence form where F has a drift term which is not Lipschitz continuous. Under this condition the equations are nonhomogeneous and nonnegative solutions do not satisfy the classical Harnack inequality. This paper presents a new generalization of the Harnack inequality for such equations. As a corollary we obtain the optimal Harnack type of inequality for p( x)-harmonic functions which quantifies the strong minimum principle.

  16. Material equations for electromagnetism with toroidal polarizations.

    PubMed

    Dubovik, V M; Martsenyuk, M A; Saha, B

    2000-06-01

    With regard to the toroid contributions, a modified system of equations of electrodynamics moving continuous media has been obtained. Alternative formalisms to introduce the toroid moment contributions in the equations of electromagnetism has been worked out. The two four-potential formalism has been developed. Lorentz transformation laws for the toroid polarizations has been given. Covariant form of equations of electrodynamics of continuous media with toroid polarizations has been written. PMID:11088406

  17. Chandrasekhar equations for infinite dimensional systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, K.; Powers, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    Chandrasekhar equations are derived for linear time invariant systems defined on Hilbert spaces using a functional analytic technique. An important consequence of this is that the solution to the evolutional Riccati equation is strongly differentiable in time and one can define a strong solution of the Riccati differential equation. A detailed discussion on the linear quadratic optimal control problem for hereditary differential systems is also included.

  18. Exact solutions of population balance equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fubiao; Flood, Adrian E.; Meleshko, Sergey V.

    2016-07-01

    Population balance equations have been used to model a wide range of processes including polymerization, crystallization, cloud formation, and cell dynamics, but the lack of analytical solutions necessitates the use of numerical techniques. The one-dimensional homogeneous population balance equation with time dependent but size independent growth rate and time dependent nucleation rate is investigated. The corresponding system of equations is solved analytically in this paper.

  19. The Boltzmann equation in the difference formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Szoke, Abraham; Brooks III, Eugene D.

    2015-05-06

    First we recall the assumptions that are needed for the validity of the Boltzmann equation and for the validity of the compressible Euler equations. We then present the difference formulation of these equations and make a connection with the time-honored Chapman - Enskog expansion. We discuss the hydrodynamic limit and calculate the thermal conductivity of a monatomic gas, using a simplified approximation for the collision term. Our formulation is more consistent and simpler than the traditional derivation.

  20. Integral equations for flows in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromme, J. A.; Golberg, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper surveys recent work on the use of integral equations for the calculation of wind tunnel interference. Due to the large number of possible physical situations, the discussion is limited to two-dimensional subsonic and transonic flows. In the subsonic case, the governing boundary value problems are shown to reduce to a class of Cauchy singular equations generalizing the classical airfoil equation. The theory and numerical solution are developed in some detail. For transonic flows nonlinear singular equations result, and a brief discussion of the work of Kraft and Kraft and Lo on their numerical solution is given. Some typical numerical results are presented and directions for future research are indicated.

  1. Integral equations for resonance and virtual states

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, Y.V.; Turovtsev, V.V.

    1984-05-01

    Integral equations are derived for the resonance and virtual (antibound) states consisting of two or three bodies. The derivation is based on the analytic continuation of the integral equations of scattering theory to nonphysical energy sheets. The resulting equations can be used to exhibit the analytic properties of amplitudes that are necessary for practical calculations using the equations for the quasistationary levels and Gamov wave functions derived in this paper. The Fourier transformation and the normalization rule for the wave function are generalized to the case of nonstationary states. The energy of the antibound state of the tritium nucleus is calculated for a ''realistic'' local potential.

  2. Picard-Fuchs Equations for Feynman Integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Stach, Stefan; Weinzierl, Stefan; Zayadeh, Raphael

    2014-02-01

    We present a systematic method to derive an ordinary differential equation for any Feynman integral, where the differentiation is with respect to an external variable. The resulting differential equation is of Fuchsian type. The method can be used within fixed integer space-time dimensions as well as within dimensional regularisation. We show that finding the differential equation is equivalent to solving a linear system of equations. We observe interesting factorisation properties of the D-dimensional Picard-Fuchs operator when D is specialised to integer dimensions.

  3. Analytic solutions of the relativistic Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatta, Yoshitaka; Martinez, Mauricio; Xiao, Bo-Wen

    2015-04-01

    We present new analytic solutions to the relativistic Boltzmann equation within the relaxation time approximation. We first obtain spherically expanding solutions which are the kinetic counterparts of the exact solutions of the Israel-Stewart equation in the literature. This allows us to compare the solutions of the kinetic and hydrodynamic equations at an analytical level. We then derive a novel boost-invariant solution of the Boltzmann equation which has an unconventional dependence on the proper time. The existence of such a solution is also suggested in second-order hydrodynamics and fluid-gravity correspondence.

  4. Some remarks on unilateral matrix equations

    SciTech Connect

    Cerchiai, Bianca L.; Zumino, Bruno

    2001-02-01

    We briefly review the results of our paper LBNL-46775: We study certain solutions of left-unilateral matrix equations. These are algebraic equations where the coefficients and the unknown are square matrices of the same order, or, more abstractly, elements of an associative, but possibly noncommutative algebra, and all coefficients are on the left. Recently such equations have appeared in a discussion of generalized Born-Infeld theories. In particular, two equations, their perturbative solutions and the relation between them are studied, applying a unified approach based on the generalized Bezout theorem for matrix polynomials.

  5. Simple derivation of the Lindblad equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearle, Philip

    2012-07-01

    The Lindblad equation is an evolution equation for the density matrix in quantum theory. It is the general linear, Markovian, form which ensures that the density matrix is Hermitian, trace 1, positive and completely positive. Some elementary examples of the Lindblad equation are given. The derivation of the Lindblad equation presented here is ‘simple’ in that all it uses is the expression of a Hermitian matrix in terms of its orthonormal eigenvectors and real eigenvalues. Thus, it is appropriate for students who have learned the algebra of quantum theory. Where helpful, arguments are first given in a two-dimensional Hilbert space.

  6. Analytical solution of tt dilepton equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2006-03-01

    The top quark antiquark production system in the dilepton decay channel is described by a set of equations which is nonlinear in the unknown neutrino momenta. Its most precise and least time consuming solution is of major importance for measurements of top quark properties like the top quark mass and tt spin correlations. The initial system of equations can be transformed into two polynomial equations with two unknowns by means of elementary algebraic operations. These two polynomials of multidegree two can be reduced to one univariate polynomial of degree four by means of resultants. The obtained quartic equation is solved analytically.

  7. Exact Travelling Wave Solutions of the Nonlinear Evolution Equations by Auxiliary Equation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Melike; Akbulut, Arzu; Bekir, Ahmet

    2015-10-01

    The auxiliary equation method presents wide applicability to handling nonlinear wave equations. In this article, we establish new exact travelling wave solutions of the nonlinear Zoomeron equation, coupled Higgs equation, and equal width wave equation. The travelling wave solutions are expressed by the hyperbolic functions, trigonometric functions, and rational functions. It is shown that the proposed method provides a powerful mathematical tool for solving nonlinear wave equations in mathematical physics and engineering. Throughout the article, all calculations are made with the aid of the Maple packet program.

  8. Cylindrical nonlinear Schroedinger equation versus cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries equation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedele, Renato; De Nicola, Sergio; Grecu, Dan; Visinescu, Anca; Shukla, Padma K.

    2008-10-15

    A correspondence between the family of cylindrical nonlinear Schroedinger (cNLS) equations and the one of cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries (cKdV) equations is constructed. It associates non stationary solutions of the first family with the ones of the second family. This is done by using a correspondence, recently found, between the families of generalized NLS equation and generalized KdV equation, and their solutions in the form of travelling waves, respectively. In particular, non-stationary soliton-like solutions of the cNLS equation can be associated with non-stationary soliton-like solutions of cKdV equation.

  9. Extended generalized Riccati equation mapping method for the fifth-order Sawada-Kotera equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naher, Hasibun; Abdullah, Farah Aini; Mohyud-Din, Syed Tauseef

    2013-05-01

    In this article, the generalized Riccati equation mapping together with the basic (G'/G)-expansion method is implemented which is advance mathematical tool to investigate nonlinear partial differential equations. Moreover, the auxiliary equation G'(ϕ) = h + f G(ϕ) + g G2(ϕ) is used with arbitrary constant coefficients and called the generalized Riccati equation. By applying this method, we have constructed abundant traveling wave solutions in a uniform way for the Sawada-Kotera equation. The obtained solutions of this equation have vital and noteworthy explanations for some practical physical phenomena.

  10. Relation between the Rayleigh equation in diffraction theory and the equation based on Green's formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarskii, V. I.

    1995-06-01

    The steps necessary to produce the Rayleigh equation that is based on the Rayleigh hypothesis from the equation that is based on the Green's formula are shown. First a definition is given for the scattering amplitude that is true not only in the far zone of diffraction but also near the scattering surface. With this definition the Rayleigh equation coincides with the rigorous equation for the surface secondary sources that is based on Green's formula. The Rayleigh hypothesis is equivalent to substituting the far-zone expression of the scattering amplitude into this rigorous equation. In this case it turns out to be the equation not for the sources but directly for the scattering amplitude, which is the main advantage of this method. For comparing the Rayleigh equation with the initial rigorous equation, the Rayleigh equation is represented in terms of secondary sources. The kernel of this equation contains an integral that converges for positive and diverges for negative values of some parameter. It is shown that if we regularize this integral, defining it for the negative values of this parameter as an analytical continuation from the domain of positive values, this kernel becomes equal to the kernel of the initial rigorous equation. It follows that the formal perturbation series for the scattering amplitude obtained from the Rayleigh equation and from Green's equation always coincide. This means that convergence of the perturbation series is a sufficient condition

  11. Fitting Polynomial Equations to Curves and Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbuckle, P. D.; Sliwa, S. M.; Tiffany, S. H.

    1986-01-01

    FIT is computer program for interactively determining least-squares polynomial equations that fit user-supplied data. Finds leastsquares fits for functions of two independent variables. Interactive graphical and editing capabilities in FIT enables user to control polynomial equations to be fitted to data arising from most practical applications. FIT written in FORTRAN and COMPASS.

  12. Euler's Amazing Way to Solve Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flusser, Peter

    1992-01-01

    Presented is a series of examples that illustrate a method of solving equations developed by Leonhard Euler based on an unsubstantiated assumption. The method integrates aspects of recursion relations and sequences of converging ratios and can be extended to polynomial equation with infinite exponents. (MDH)

  13. The Specific Analysis of Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Roderick P.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional structural equation modeling fits a covariance structure implied by the equations of the model. This treatment of the model often gives misleading results because overall goodness of fit tests do not focus on the specific constraints implied by the model. An alternative treatment arising from Pearl's directed acyclic graph theory…

  14. Solving Cubic Equations by Polynomial Decomposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkarni, Raghavendra G.

    2011-01-01

    Several mathematicians struggled to solve cubic equations, and in 1515 Scipione del Ferro reportedly solved the cubic while participating in a local mathematical contest, but did not bother to publish his method. Then it was Cardano (1539) who first published the solution to the general cubic equation in his book "The Great Art, or, The Rules of…

  15. Equation solvers for distributed-memory computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, Olaf O.

    1994-01-01

    A large number of scientific and engineering problems require the rapid solution of large systems of simultaneous equations. The performance of parallel computers in this area now dwarfs traditional vector computers by nearly an order of magnitude. This talk describes the major issues involved in parallel equation solvers with particular emphasis on the Intel Paragon, IBM SP-1 and SP-2 processors.

  16. Qualitative permanence of Lotka-Volterra equations.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Josef; Kon, Ryusuke; Saito, Yasuhisa

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we consider permanence of Lotka-Volterra equations. We investigate the sign structure of the interaction matrix that guarantees the permanence of a Lotka-Volterra equation whenever it has a positive equilibrium point. An interaction matrix with this property is said to be qualitatively permanent. Our results provide both necessary and sufficient conditions for qualitative permanence.

  17. Entropy viscosity method applied to Euler equations

    SciTech Connect

    Delchini, M. O.; Ragusa, J. C.; Berry, R. A.

    2013-07-01

    The entropy viscosity method [4] has been successfully applied to hyperbolic systems of equations such as Burgers equation and Euler equations. The method consists in adding dissipative terms to the governing equations, where a viscosity coefficient modulates the amount of dissipation. The entropy viscosity method has been applied to the 1-D Euler equations with variable area using a continuous finite element discretization in the MOOSE framework and our results show that it has the ability to efficiently smooth out oscillations and accurately resolve shocks. Two equations of state are considered: Ideal Gas and Stiffened Gas Equations Of State. Results are provided for a second-order time implicit schemes (BDF2). Some typical Riemann problems are run with the entropy viscosity method to demonstrate some of its features. Then, a 1-D convergent-divergent nozzle is considered with open boundary conditions. The correct steady-state is reached for the liquid and gas phases with a time implicit scheme. The entropy viscosity method correctly behaves in every problem run. For each test problem, results are shown for both equations of state considered here. (authors)

  18. Equations for Automotive-Transmission Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chazanoff, S.; Aston, M. B.; Chapman, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Curve-fitting procedure ensures high confidence levels. Threedimensional plot represents performance of small automatic transmission coasting in second gear. In equation for plot, PL power loss, S speed and T torque. Equations applicable to manual and automatic transmissions over wide range of speed, torque, and efficiency.

  19. How Should Equation Balancing Be Taught?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Spencer K.

    1985-01-01

    Matrix methods and oxidation-number methods are currently advocated and used for balancing equations. This article shows how balancing equations can be introduced by a third method which is related to a fundamental principle, is easy to learn, and is powerful in its application. (JN)

  20. Hopf algebras and Dyson-Schwinger equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper I discuss Hopf algebras and Dyson-Schwinger equations. This paper starts with an introduction to Hopf algebras, followed by a review of the contribution and application of Hopf algebras to particle physics. The final part of the paper is devoted to the relation between Hopf algebras and Dyson-Schwinger equations.

  1. Congeneric Models and Levine's Linear Equating Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Robert L.

    In 1955, R. Levine introduced two linear equating procedures for the common-item non-equivalent populations design. His procedures make the same assumptions about true scores; they differ in terms of the nature of the equating function used. In this paper, two parameterizations of a classical congeneric model are introduced to model the variables…

  2. The Forced van der Pol Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a study of the forced van der Pol equation x + [epsilon](x[superscript 2] - 1)x + x = F cos[omega]t, by solving numerically the differential equation for a variety of values of the parameters [epsilon], F and [omega]. In doing so, many striking and interesting trajectories can be discovered and phenomena such as frequency entrainment,…

  3. Lie algebras and linear differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, R. W.; Rahimi, A.

    1972-01-01

    Certain symmetry properties possessed by the solutions of linear differential equations are examined. For this purpose, some basic ideas from the theory of finite dimensional linear systems are used together with the work of Wei and Norman on the use of Lie algebraic methods in differential equation theory.

  4. Topologies for neutral functional differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melvin, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Bounded topologies are considered for functional differential equations of the neutral type in which present dynamics of the system are influenced by its past behavior. A special bounded topology is generated on a collection of absolutely continuous functions with essentially bounded derivatives, and an application to a class of nonlinear neutral functional differential equations due to Driver (1965) is presented.

  5. Does the Wave Equation Really Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstead, Donald C.; Karls, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    The wave equation is a classic partial differential equation that one encounters in an introductory course on boundary value problems or mathematical physics, which can be used to describe the vertical displacement of a vibrating string. Using a video camera and Wave-in-Motion software to record displacement data from a vibrating string or spring,…

  6. Solving Differential Equations Using Modified Picard Iteration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, W. A.

    2010-01-01

    Many classes of differential equations are shown to be open to solution through a method involving a combination of a direct integration approach with suitably modified Picard iterative procedures. The classes of differential equations considered include typical initial value, boundary value and eigenvalue problems arising in physics and…

  7. STOCHASTIC SOLUTIONS FOR FRACTIONAL WAVE EQUATIONS

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, MARK M.; SCHILLING, RENÉ L.; SIKORSKII, ALLA

    2014-01-01

    A fractional wave equation replaces the second time derivative by a Caputo derivative of order between one and two. In this paper, we show that the fractional wave equation governs a stochastic model for wave propagation, with deterministic time replaced by the inverse of a stable subordinator whose index is one half the order of the fractional time derivative. PMID:26146456

  8. On solvable Dirac equation with polynomial potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Stachowiak, Tomasz

    2011-01-15

    One-dimensional Dirac equation is analyzed with regard to the existence of exact (or closed-form) solutions for polynomial potentials. The notion of Liouvillian functions is used to define solvability, and it is shown that except for the linear potentials the equation in question is not solvable.

  9. Structural Equation Modeling of Multivariate Time Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    du Toit, Stephen H. C.; Browne, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    The covariance structure of a vector autoregressive process with moving average residuals (VARMA) is derived. It differs from other available expressions for the covariance function of a stationary VARMA process and is compatible with current structural equation methodology. Structural equation modeling programs, such as LISREL, may therefore be…

  10. Improving the Bandwidth Selection in Kernel Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Björn; von Davier, Alina A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the current bandwidth selection methods in kernel equating and propose a method based on Silverman's rule of thumb for selecting the bandwidth parameters. In kernel equating, the bandwidth parameters have previously been obtained by minimizing a penalty function. This minimization process has been criticized by practitioners…

  11. The non-compact Weyl equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doikou, Anastasia; Ioannidou, Theodora

    2011-04-01

    A non-compact version of the Weyl equation is proposed, based on the infinite dimensional spin zero representation of the mathfrak{s}{mathfrak{l}_2} algebra. Solutions of the aforementioned equation are obtained in terms of the Kummer functions. In this context, we discuss the ADHMN approach in order to construct the corresponding non-compact BPS monopoles.

  12. The Effects of Repeaters on Test Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrulis, Richard S.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The effects of repeaters (testees included in both administrations of two forms of a test) on the test equating process are examined. It is shown that repeaters do effect test equating and tend to lower the cutoff point for passing the test. (JKS)

  13. Energy Equation Approximation in Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W.

    1959-01-01

    There is some confusion in the literature of fluid mechanics in regard to the correct form of the energy equation for the study of the flow of nearly incompressible fluids. Several forms of the energy equation and their use are therefore discussed in this note.

  14. Covariant Conformal Decomposition of Einstein Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgoulhon, E.; Novak, J.

    It has been shown1,2 that the usual 3+1 form of Einstein's equations may be ill-posed. This result has been previously observed in numerical simulations3,4. We present a 3+1 type formalism inspired by these works to decompose Einstein's equations. This decomposition is motivated by the aim of stable numerical implementation and resolution of the equations. We introduce the conformal 3-``metric'' (scaled by the determinant of the usual 3-metric) which is a tensor density of weight -2/3. The Einstein equations are then derived in terms of this ``metric'', of the conformal extrinsic curvature and in terms of the associated derivative. We also introduce a flat 3-metric (the asymptotic metric for isolated systems) and the associated derivative. Finally, the generalized Dirac gauge (introduced by Smarr and York5) is used in this formalism and some examples of formulation of Einstein's equations are shown.

  15. Turbulence kinetic energy equation for dilute suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abou-Arab, T. W.; Roco, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    A multiphase turbulence closure model is presented which employs one transport equation, namely the turbulence kinetic energy equation. The proposed form of this equation is different from the earlier formulations in some aspects. The power spectrum of the carrier fluid is divided into two regions, which interact in different ways and at different rates with the suspended particles as a function of the particle-eddy size ratio and density ratio. The length scale is described algebraically. A mass/time averaging procedure for the momentum and kinetic energy equations is adopted. The resulting turbulence correlations are modeled under less retrictive assumptions comparative to previous work. The closures for the momentum and kinetic energy equations are given. Comparisons of the predictions with experimental results on liquid-solid jet and gas-solid pipe flow show satisfactory agreement.

  16. Classical non-Markovian Boltzmann equation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexanian, Moorad

    2014-08-01

    The modeling of particle transport involves anomalous diffusion, (x²(t) ) ∝ t{sup α} with α ≠ 1, with subdiffusive transport corresponding to 0 < α < 1 and superdiffusive transport to α > 1. These anomalies give rise to fractional advection-dispersion equations with memory in space and time. The usual Boltzmann equation, with only isolated binary collisions, is Markovian and, in particular, the contributions of the three-particle distribution function are neglected. We show that the inclusion of higher-order distribution functions give rise to an exact, non-Markovian Boltzmann equation with resulting transport equations for mass, momentum, and kinetic energy with memory in both time and space. The two- and the three-particle distribution functions are considered under the assumption that the two- and the three-particle correlation functions are translationally invariant that allows us to obtain advection-dispersion equations for modeling transport in terms of spatial and temporal fractional derivatives.

  17. Theory of electrophoresis: fate of one equation.

    PubMed

    Gas, Bohuslav

    2009-06-01

    Electrophoresis utilizes a difference in movement of charged species in a separation channel or space for their spatial separation. A basic partial differential equation that results from the balance laws of continuous processes in separation sciences is the nonlinear conservation law or the continuity equation. Attempts at its analytical solution in electrophoresis go back to Kohlrausch's days. The present paper (i) reviews derivation of conservation functions from the conservation law as appeared chronologically, (ii) deals with theory of moving boundary equations and, mainly, (iii) presents the linear theory of eigenmobilities. It shows that a basic solution of the linearized continuity equations is a set of traveling waves. In particular cases the continuity equation can have a resonance solution that leads in practice to schizophrenic dispersion of peaks or a chaotic solution, which causes oscillation of electrolyte solutions.

  18. Planck-scale corrections to Friedmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Adel; Ali, Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Recently, Verlinde proposed that gravity is an emergent phenomenon which originates from an entropic force. In this work, we extend Verlinde's proposal to accommodate generalized uncertainty principles (GUP), which are suggested by some approaches to quantum gravity such as string theory, black hole physics and doubly special relativity (DSR). Using Verlinde's proposal and two known models of GUPs, we obtain modifications to Newton's law of gravitation as well as the Friedmann equation. Our modification to the Friedmann equation includes higher powers of the Hubble parameter which is used to obtain a corresponding Raychaudhuri equation. Solving this equation, we obtain a leading Planck-scale correction to Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) solutions for the p = ωp equation of state.

  19. Equation of state of tracker fields

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi

    2010-01-15

    We derive the equation of state of tracker fields, which are typical examples of freezing quintessence (quintessence with the equation of state approaching toward -1), taking into account of the late-time departure from the tracker solution due to the nonzero density parameter of dark energy {Omega}{sub {phi}.} We calculate the equation of state as a function of {Omega}{sub {phi}}for constant {Gamma}=VV{sup ''}/(V{sup '}){sup 2} (during matter era) models. The derived equation of state contains a single parameter, w{sub (0)}, which parametrizes the equation of state during the matter-dominated epoch. We derive observational constraints on w{sub (0)} and find that observational data are consistent with the cosmological constant: -1.11

  20. Completeness of solutions of Bethe's equations.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wenrui; Nepomechie, Rafael I; Sommese, Andrew J

    2013-11-01

    We consider the Bethe equations for the isotropic spin-1/2 Heisenberg quantum spin chain with periodic boundary conditions. We formulate a conjecture for the number of solutions with pairwise distinct roots of these equations, in terms of numbers of so-called singular (or exceptional) solutions. Using homotopy continuation methods, we find all such solutions of the Bethe equations for chains of length up to 14. The numbers of these solutions are in perfect agreement with the conjecture. We also discuss an indirect method of finding solutions of the Bethe equations by solving the Baxter T-Q equation. We briefly comment on implications for thermodynamical computations based on the string hypothesis. PMID:24329220

  1. Construction of Chained True Score Equipercentile Equatings under the Kernel Equating (KE) Framework and Their Relationship to Levine True Score Equating. Research Report. ETS RR-09-24

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Haiwen; Holland, Paul

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a new chained equipercentile equating procedure for the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design under the assumptions of the classical test theory model. This new equating is named chained true score equipercentile equating. We also apply the kernel equating framework to this equating design, resulting in a…

  2. Statistical Models and Inference for the True Equating Transformation in the Context of Local Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González, B. Jorge; von Davier, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Based on Lord's criterion of equity of equating, van der Linden (this issue) revisits the so-called local equating method and offers alternative as well as new thoughts on several topics including the types of transformations, symmetry, reliability, and population invariance appropriate for equating. A remarkable aspect is to define equating…

  3. Variational particle scheme for the porous medium equation and for the system of isentropic Euler equations

    SciTech Connect

    Westdickenberg, Michael; Wilkening, Jon

    2008-12-10

    We introduce variational particle schemes for the porous medium equation and the system of isentropic Euler equations in one space dimension. The methods are motivated by the interpretation of each of these partial differential equations as a 'steepest descent' on a suitable abstract manifold. We show that our methods capture very well the nonlinear features of the flows.

  4. Solution Methods for Certain Evolution Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Guzman, Jose Manuel

    Solution methods for certain linear and nonlinear evolution equations are presented in this dissertation. Emphasis is placed mainly on the analytical treatment of nonautonomous differential equations, which are challenging to solve despite the existent numerical and symbolic computational software programs available. Ideas from the transformation theory are adopted allowing one to solve the problems under consideration from a non-traditional perspective. First, the Cauchy initial value problem is considered for a class of nonautonomous and inhomogeneous linear diffusion-type equation on the entire real line. Explicit transformations are used to reduce the equations under study to their corresponding standard forms emphasizing on natural relations with certain Riccati(and/or Ermakov)-type systems. These relations give solvability results for the Cauchy problem of the parabolic equation considered. The superposition principle allows to solve formally this problem from an unconventional point of view. An eigenfunction expansion approach is also considered for this general evolution equation. Examples considered to corroborate the efficacy of the proposed solution methods include the Fokker-Planck equation, the Black-Scholes model and the one-factor Gaussian Hull-White model. The results obtained in the first part are used to solve the Cauchy initial value problem for certain inhomogeneous Burgers-type equation. The connection between linear (the Diffusion-type) and nonlinear (Burgers-type) parabolic equations is stress in order to establish a strong commutative relation. Traveling wave solutions of a nonautonomous Burgers equation are also investigated. Finally, it is constructed explicitly the minimum-uncertainty squeezed states for quantum harmonic oscillators. They are derived by the action of corresponding maximal kinematical invariance group on the standard ground state solution. It is shown that the product of the variances attains the required minimum value

  5. Turning Equations Into Stories: Using "Equation Dictionaries" in an Introductory Geophysics Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan-Auerbach, J.

    2008-12-01

    To students with math fear, equations can be intimidating and overwhelming. This discomfort is reflected in some of the frequent questions heard in introductory geophysics: "which equation should I use?" and "does T stand for travel time or period?" Questions such as these indicate that many students view equations as a series of variables and operators rather than as a representation of a physical process. To solve a problem they may simply look for an equation with the correct variables and assume that it meets their needs, rather than selecting an equation that represents the appropriate physical process. These issues can be addressed by encouraging students to think of equations as stories, and to describe them in prose. This is the goal of the Equation Dictionary project, used in Western Washington University's introductory geophysics course. Throughout the course, students create personal equation dictionaries, adding an entry each time an equation is introduced. Entries consist of (a) the equation itself, (b) a brief description of equation variables, (c) a prose description of the physical process described by the equation, and (d) any additional notes that help them understand the equation. Thus, rather than simply writing down the equations for the velocity of body waves, a student might write "The speed of a seismic body wave is controlled by the material properties of the medium through which it passes." In a study of gravity a student might note that the International Gravity Formula describes "the expected value of g at a given latitude, correcting for Earth's shape and rotation." In writing these definitions students learn that equations are simplified descriptions of physical processes, and that understanding the process is more useful than memorizing a sequence of variables. Dictionaries also serve as formula sheets for exams, which encourages students to write definitions that are meaningful to them, and to organize their thoughts clearly. Finally

  6. Electrostatic Charged Two-Phase Flow Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentao; Wen, Jianlong; Wang, Junfeng; Tang, Zhihua; Luo, Tiqian

    2007-06-01

    Electrostatic charged two-phase flows exit in electrostatic spray crop-dusting and fuel spray and so on. Electrostatic charged spray applying to FGD scrubber can improve desulfurization efficiency, decrease water usage. For the complexity of two-phase flow's structure in FGD scrubber, and there exit coupled action between non-uniform electric and flow field, also exit phase interaction between charged particles and continuous phase, which makes the flow more complex. So the complete theory has not formed at present. This paper adopts Lagrange and Euler method of combining together and takes the dispersed particle as fluid, and applies the Reynolds transport principle to set up a Reynolds transport equation, which suit electrostatic charged particle and liquid phase. Then based on Reynolds transport equation, equations for the volume average and instantaneous state of the electrostatic charged two-phase flow are obtained. Similar to equations for single phase turbulent flow, this paper applies Reynolds-average method, and develops equations for Reynolds-average equations for electrostatic charged two-phase flow. Finally, according to the model of single phase turbulent flow, equations for electrostatic charged two-phase flows has been closed. So the k - ɛ - kp model is obtained. Contrast of result by PIV and simulation has been finished.

  7. Exact solutions of the nonlinear Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Matthieu H.

    1984-03-01

    A review is given of research activities since 1976 on the nonlinear Boltzmann equation and related equations of Boltzmann type, in which several rediscoveries have been made and several conjectures have been disproved. Subjects are (i) the BKW solution of the Boltzmann equation for Maxwell molecules, first discovered by Krupp in 1967, and the Krook-Wu conjecture concerning the universal significance of the BKW solution for the large (v, t) behavior of the velocity distribution function f (v, t); (ii) moment equations and polynomial expansions of f (v, t); (iii) model Boltzmann equation for a spatially uniform system of very hard particles, that can be solved in closed form for general initial conditions; (iv) for Maxwell and non-Maxwell-type molecules there exist solutions of the nonlinear Boltzmann equation with algebraic decrease at υ→∞; connections with nonuniqueness and violation of conservation laws; (v) conjectured super- H-theorem and the BKW solution; (vi) exactly soluble one-dimensional Boltzmann equation with spatial dependence.

  8. A New Fractional Projective Riccati Equation Method for Solving Fractional Partial Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qing-Hua

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a new fractional projective Riccati equation method is proposed to establish exact solutions for fractional partial differential equations in the sense of modified Riemann—Liouville derivative. This method can be seen as the fractional version of the known projective Riccati equation method. For illustrating the validity of this method, we apply this method to solve the space-time fractional Whitham—Broer—Kaup (WBK) equations and the nonlinear fractional Sharma—Tasso—Olever (STO) equation, and as a result, some new exact solutions for them are obtained.

  9. The zero dispersion limits of nonlinear wave equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tso, T.

    1992-01-01

    In chapter 2 the author uses functional analytic methods and conservation laws to solve the initial-value problem for the Korteweg-de Vries equation, the Benjamin-Bona-Mahony equation, and the nonlinear Schroedinger equation for initial data that satisfy some suitable conditions. In chapter 3 the energy estimates are used to show that the strong convergence of the family of the solutions of the KdV equation obtained in chapter 2 in H[sup 3](R) as [epsilon] [yields] 0; also, it is shown that the strong L[sup 2](R)-limit of the solutions of the BBM equation as [epsilon] [yields] 0 before a critical time. In chapter 4 the author uses the Whitham modulation theory and averaging method to find the 2[pi]-periodic solutions and the modulation equations of the KdV equation, the BBM equation, the Klein-Gordon equation, the NLS equation, the mKdV equation, and the P-system. It is shown that the modulation equations of the KdV equation, the K-G equation, the NLS equation, and the mKdV equation are hyperbolic but those of the BBM equation and the P-system are not hyperbolic. Also, the relations are studied of the KdV equation and the mKdV equation. Finally, the author studies the complex mKdV equation to compare with the NLS equation, and then study the complex gKdV equation.

  10. Asymptotic analysis of the several competitive equations to solve the time-dependent neutron transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, U.; Miller, W.F. Jr. |; Morel, J.E.

    1994-10-01

    Using conventional diffusion limit analysis, we asymptotically compare three competitive time-dependent equations (the telegrapher`s equation, the time-dependent Simplified P{sub 2} (SP{sub 2}) equation, and the time-dependent Simplified Evcn-Parity (SEP) equation). The time-dependent SP{sub 2} equation contains higher order asymptotic approximations of the time-dependent transport equation than the other equations in a physical regime in which the time-dependent diffusion equation is the leading order approximation. In addition, we derive the multigroup modified time-dependent SP{sub 2} equation from the multigroup time-dependent transport equation by means of an asymptotic expansion in which the multigroup time-dependent diffusion equation is the leading, order approximation. Numerical comparisons of the timedependent diffusion, the telegrapher`s, the time-dependent SP{sub 2}, and S{sub 8} solutions in 2-D X-Y geometry show that, in most cases, the SP{sub 2} solutions contain most of the transport corrections for the diffusion approximation.

  11. Solutions of the coupled Higgs field equations.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Benoy; Ghosh, Swapan K; Saha, Aparna; Pal, Debabrata

    2013-07-01

    By an appropriate choice for the phase of the complex nucleonic field and going over to the traveling coordinate, we reduce the coupled Higgs equations to the Hamiltonian form and treat the resulting equation using the dynamical system theory. We present a phase-space analysis of its stable points. The results of our study demonstrate that the equation can support both traveling- and standing-wave solutions. The traveling-wave solution appears in the form of a soliton and resides in the midst of doubly periodic standing-wave solutions.

  12. Using worksheets to solve the Einstein equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas A.

    2016-05-01

    This article describes how one can use worksheets to guide undergraduate students through the process of finding solutions to specific cases of the Einstein equation of general relativity. The worksheets provide expressions for a metric's Christoffel symbols and Ricci tensor components for fairly general metrics. Students can use a worksheet to adapt these expressions to specific cases where symmetry or other considerations constrain the metric components' dependencies, and then use the worksheet's results to reduce the Einstein equation to a set of simpler differential equations that they can solve. This article illustrates the process for both a diagonal metric and a metric with one off-diagonal element.

  13. IRT test equating in complex linkage plans.

    PubMed

    Battauz, Michela

    2013-07-01

    Linkage plans can be rather complex, including many forms, several links, and the connection of forms through different paths. This article studies item response theory equating methods for complex linkage plans when the common-item nonequivalent group design is used. An efficient way to average equating coefficients that link the same two forms through different paths will be presented and the asymptotic standard errors of indirect and average equating coefficients are derived. The methodology is illustrated using simulations studies and a real data example. PMID:25106395

  14. Supersymmetric Ito equation: Bosonization and exact solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Bo; Yu Jun; Lin Ji

    2013-04-15

    Based on the bosonization approach, the N=1 supersymmetric Ito (sIto) system is changed to a system of coupled bosonic equations. The approach can effectively avoid difficulties caused by intractable fermionic fields which are anticommuting. By solving the coupled bosonic equations, the traveling wave solutions of the sIto system are obtained with the mapping and deformation method. Some novel types of exact solutions for the supersymmetric system are constructed with the solutions and symmetries of the usual Ito equation. In the meanwhile, the similarity reduction solutions of the model are also studied with the Lie point symmetry theory.

  15. Supersymmetric Ito equation: Bosonization and exact solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Bo; Lin, Ji; Yu, Jun

    2013-04-01

    Based on the bosonization approach, the N =1 N = 1 supersymmetric Ito (sIto) system is changed to a system of coupled bosonic equations. The approach can effectively avoid difficulties caused by intractable fermionic fields which are anticommuting. By solving the coupled bosonic equations, the traveling wave solutions of the sIto system are obtained with the mapping and deformation method. Some novel types of exact solutions for the supersymmetric system are constructed with the solutions and symmetries of the usual Ito equation. In the meanwhile, the similarity reduction solutions of the model are also studied with the Lie point symmetry theory.

  16. Green's Functions of Wave Equations in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shijin; Wang, Weike; Yu, Shih-Hsien

    2015-06-01

    We study the d'Alembert equation with a boundary. We introduce the notions of Rayleigh surface wave operators, delayed/advanced mirror images, wave recombinations, and wave cancellations. This allows us to obtain the complete and simple formula of the Green's functions for the wave equation with the presence of various boundary conditions. We are able to determine whether a Rayleigh surface wave is active or virtual, and study the lacunas of the wave equation in three dimensional with the presence of a boundary in the case of a virtual Rayleigh surface wave.

  17. Schrödinger equation revisited.

    PubMed

    Schleich, Wolfgang P; Greenberger, Daniel M; Kobe, Donald H; Scully, Marlan O

    2013-04-01

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is a cornerstone of quantum physics and governs all phenomena of the microscopic world. However, despite its importance, its origin is still not widely appreciated and properly understood. We obtain the Schrödinger equation from a mathematical identity by a slight generalization of the formulation of classical statistical mechanics based on the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. This approach brings out most clearly the fact that the linearity of quantum mechanics is intimately connected to the strong coupling between the amplitude and phase of a quantum wave. PMID:23509260

  18. Schrödinger equation revisited

    PubMed Central

    Schleich, Wolfgang P.; Greenberger, Daniel M.; Kobe, Donald H.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2013-01-01

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is a cornerstone of quantum physics and governs all phenomena of the microscopic world. However, despite its importance, its origin is still not widely appreciated and properly understood. We obtain the Schrödinger equation from a mathematical identity by a slight generalization of the formulation of classical statistical mechanics based on the Hamilton–Jacobi equation. This approach brings out most clearly the fact that the linearity of quantum mechanics is intimately connected to the strong coupling between the amplitude and phase of a quantum wave. PMID:23509260

  19. Fractional diffusion equations coupled by reaction terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenzi, E. K.; Menechini Neto, R.; Tateishi, A. A.; Lenzi, M. K.; Ribeiro, H. V.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the behavior for a set of fractional reaction-diffusion equations that extend the usual ones by the presence of spatial fractional derivatives of distributed order in the diffusive term. These equations are coupled via the reaction terms which may represent reversible or irreversible processes. For these equations, we find exact solutions and show that the spreading of the distributions is asymptotically governed by the same the long-tailed distribution. Furthermore, we observe that the coupling introduced by reaction terms creates an interplay between different diffusive regimes leading us to a rich class of behaviors related to anomalous diffusion.

  20. Integrability of BKP and Odderon equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, L. N.

    2013-04-01

    In QCD the gluon is reggeized. The Pomeron is a composite state of two reggeized gluons. Its wave function satisfies the BFKL equation. The BFKL Hamiltonian in LLA is invariant under the Möbius transformations. The wave function of the Odderon and other multi-gluon composite states satisfies the BKP equation. The corresponding Hamiltonian in the multi-color limit has the properties of the Möbius invariance, holomorphic separability, duality and integrability. We discuss various approaches applied to the solution of the BKP equation for the singlet and adjoint representations of the gauge group.

  1. Minimal relativistic three-particle equations

    SciTech Connect

    Lindesay, J.

    1981-07-01

    A minimal self-consistent set of covariant and unitary three-particle equations is presented. Numerical results are obtained for three-particle bound states, elastic scattering and rearrangement of bound pairs with a third particle, and amplitudes for breakup into states of three free particles. The mathematical form of the three-particle bound state equations is explored; constraints are set upon the range of eigenvalues and number of eigenstates of these one parameter equations. The behavior of the number of eigenstates as the two-body binding energy decreases to zero in a covariant context generalizes results previously obtained non-relativistically by V. Efimov.

  2. Some problems in fractal differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Weiyi

    2016-06-01

    Based upon the fractal calculus on local fields, or p-type calculus, or Gibbs-Butzer calculus ([1],[2]), we suggest a constructive idea for "fractal differential equations", beginning from some special examples to a general theory. However, this is just an original idea, it needs lots of later work to support. In [3], we show example "two dimension wave equations with fractal boundaries", and in this note, other examples, as well as an idea to construct fractal differential equations are shown.

  3. Fokker-Planck equation in mirror research

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    1983-08-11

    Open confinement systems based on the magnetic mirror principle depend on the maintenance of particle distributions that may deviate substantially from Maxwellian distributions. Mirror research has therefore from the beginning relied on theoretical predictions of non-equilibrium rate processes obtained from solutions to the Fokker-Planck equation. The F-P equation plays three roles: Design of experiments, creation of classical standards against which to compare experiment, and predictions concerning mirror based fusion power systems. Analytical and computational approaches to solving the F-P equation for mirror systems will be reviewed, together with results and examples that apply to specific mirror systems, such as the tandem mirror.

  4. Entanglement Equilibrium and the Einstein Equation.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Ted

    2016-05-20

    A link between the semiclassical Einstein equation and a maximal vacuum entanglement hypothesis is established. The hypothesis asserts that entanglement entropy in small geodesic balls is maximized at fixed volume in a locally maximally symmetric vacuum state of geometry and quantum fields. A qualitative argument suggests that the Einstein equation implies the validity of the hypothesis. A more precise argument shows that, for first-order variations of the local vacuum state of conformal quantum fields, the vacuum entanglement is stationary if and only if the Einstein equation holds. For nonconformal fields, the same conclusion follows modulo a conjecture about the variation of entanglement entropy.

  5. Entanglement Equilibrium and the Einstein Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Ted

    2016-05-01

    A link between the semiclassical Einstein equation and a maximal vacuum entanglement hypothesis is established. The hypothesis asserts that entanglement entropy in small geodesic balls is maximized at fixed volume in a locally maximally symmetric vacuum state of geometry and quantum fields. A qualitative argument suggests that the Einstein equation implies the validity of the hypothesis. A more precise argument shows that, for first-order variations of the local vacuum state of conformal quantum fields, the vacuum entanglement is stationary if and only if the Einstein equation holds. For nonconformal fields, the same conclusion follows modulo a conjecture about the variation of entanglement entropy.

  6. The Drake Equation in an astrobiological context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konesky, Gregory A.

    2010-09-01

    The Drake Equation was originally composed as an attempt to quantify the potential number of extraterrestrial civilizations in our Galaxy which we might be able to detect using a radio telescope. Since this equation was first formulated, nearly 50 years ago, we have discovered that life on Earth arose very early in its history, and has filled virtually every habitable, potentially extreme, niche available. This suggests that simple forms of life might be plentiful where possible, and can be observed remotely by atmospheric biosignatures in the host planet. We consider modifications to the Drake Equation to reflect this new understanding.

  7. Nonlinear gyrokinetic equations for tokamak microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.

    1988-05-01

    A nonlinear electrostatic gyrokinetic Vlasov equation, as well as Poisson equation, has been derived in a form suitable for particle simulation studies of tokamak microturbulence and associated anomalous transport. This work differs from the existing nonlinear gyrokinetic theories in toroidal geometry, since the present equations conserve energy while retaining the crucial linear and nonlinear polarization physics. In the derivation, the action-variational Lie perturbation method is utilized in order to preserve the Hamiltonian structure of the original Vlasov-Poisson system. Emphasis is placed on the dominant physics of the collective fluctuations in toroidal geometry, rather than on details of particle orbits. 13 refs.

  8. The gBL transport equations

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.

    1989-05-01

    The transport equations arising from the ''generalized Balescu- Lenard'' (gBL) collision operator are obtained, and some of their properties examined. The equations contain neoclassical and turbulent transport as two special cases, having the same structure. The resultant theory offers potential explanation for a number of results not well understood, including the anomalous pinch, observed ratios of Q/GAMMAT on TFTR, and numerical reproduction of ASDEX profiles by a model for turbulent transport invoked without derivation, but by analogy to neoclassical theory. The general equations are specialized to consideration of a number of particular transport mechanisms of interest. 10 refs.

  9. Klein-Gordon Equation in Hydrodynamical Form

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2010-01-01

    We follow and modify the Feshbach-Villars formalism by separating the Klein-Gordon equation into two coupled time-dependent Schroedinger equations for the particle and antiparticle wave functions with positive probability densities. We find that the equation of motion for the probability densities is in the form of relativistic hydrodynamics where various forces have their physical and classical counterparts. An additional element is the presence of the quantum stress tensor that depends on the derivatives of the amplitude of the wave function.

  10. Differential equations of time dependent order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludu, A.

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a special type of ordinary differential equations dx x/dtx = f (t, x) whose order of differentiation is a continuous variable depending on the dependent x or independent t variables. We show that such variable order of differentiation equations (VODE) can be solved as Volterra integral equations of second kind with singular integrable kernel. We find the conditions for existence and uniqueness of solutions of such VODE, and present some numeric solutions for particular cases exhibiting bifurcations and blow-up.

  11. Formulas for precession. [motion of mean equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinoshita, H.

    1975-01-01

    Literal expressions for the precessional motion of the mean equator referred to an arbitrary epoch are constructed. Their numerical representations, based on numerical values recommended at the working meeting of the International Astronomical Union Commission held in Washington in September 1974, are obtained. In constructing the equations of motion, the second-order secular perturbation and the secular perturbation due to the long-periodic terms in the motions of the moon and the sun are taken into account. These perturbations contribute more to the motion of the mean equator than does the term due to the secular perturbation of the orbital eccentricity of the sun.

  12. A generalized simplest equation method and its application to the Boussinesq-Burgers equation.

    PubMed

    Sudao, Bilige; Wang, Xiaomin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a generalized simplest equation method is proposed to seek exact solutions of nonlinear evolution equations (NLEEs). In the method, we chose a solution expression with a variable coefficient and a variable coefficient ordinary differential auxiliary equation. This method can yield a Bäcklund transformation between NLEEs and a related constraint equation. By dealing with the constraint equation, we can derive infinite number of exact solutions for NLEEs. These solutions include the traveling wave solutions, non-traveling wave solutions, multi-soliton solutions, rational solutions, and other types of solutions. As applications, we obtained wide classes of exact solutions for the Boussinesq-Burgers equation by using the generalized simplest equation method.

  13. A Generalized Simplest Equation Method and Its Application to the Boussinesq-Burgers Equation

    PubMed Central

    Sudao, Bilige; Wang, Xiaomin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a generalized simplest equation method is proposed to seek exact solutions of nonlinear evolution equations (NLEEs). In the method, we chose a solution expression with a variable coefficient and a variable coefficient ordinary differential auxiliary equation. This method can yield a Bäcklund transformation between NLEEs and a related constraint equation. By dealing with the constraint equation, we can derive infinite number of exact solutions for NLEEs. These solutions include the traveling wave solutions, non-traveling wave solutions, multi-soliton solutions, rational solutions, and other types of solutions. As applications, we obtained wide classes of exact solutions for the Boussinesq-Burgers equation by using the generalized simplest equation method. PMID:25973605

  14. Generalized Directional Gradients, Backward Stochastic Differential Equations and Mild Solutions of Semilinear Parabolic Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrman, Marco Tessitore, Gianmario

    2005-05-15

    We study a forward-backward system of stochastic differential equations in an infinite-dimensional framework and its relationships with a semilinear parabolic differential equation on a Hilbert space, in the spirit of the approach of Pardoux-Peng. We prove that the stochastic system allows us to construct a unique solution of the parabolic equation in a suitable class of locally Lipschitz real functions. The parabolic equation is understood in a mild sense which requires the notion of a generalized directional gradient, that we introduce by a probabilistic approach and prove to exist for locally Lipschitz functions.The use of the generalized directional gradient allows us to cover various applications to option pricing problems and to optimal stochastic control problems (including control of delay equations and reaction-diffusion equations),where the lack of differentiability of the coefficients precludes differentiability of solutions to the associated parabolic equations of Black-Scholes or Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman type.

  15. An analytic comparison of Herrnstein's equations and a multivariate rate equation.

    PubMed

    McDowell, J J

    1980-05-01

    Herrnstein's equations are approximations of the multivariate rate equation at ordinary rates of reinforcement and responding. The rate equation is the result of a linear system analysis of variable-interval performance. Rate equation matching is more comprehensive than ordinary matching because it predicts and specifies the nature of concurrent bias, and predicts a tendency toward undermatching, which is sometimes observed in concurrent situations. The rate equation contradicts one feature of Herrnstein's hyperbola, viz., the theoretically required constancy of k. According to the rate equation, Herrnstein's k should vary directly with parameters of reinforcement such as amount or immediacy. Because of this prediction, the rate equation asserts that the conceptual framework of matching does not apply to single alternative responding. The issue of the constancy of k provides empirical grounds for distinguishing between Herrnstein's account and a linear system analysis of single alternative variable-interval responding.

  16. Connecting Related Rates and Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Keith

    2012-01-01

    This article points out a simple connection between related rates and differential equations. The connection can be used for in-class examples or homework exercises, and it is accessible to students who are familiar with separation of variables.

  17. On Blowup in Supercritical Wave Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donninger, Roland; Schörkhuber, Birgit

    2016-03-01

    We study the blowup behavior for the focusing energy-supercritical semilinear wave equation in 3 space dimensions without symmetry assumptions on the data. We prove the stability in {H^2× H^1} of the ODE blowup profile.

  18. Wilson loop from a Dyson equation

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, M.; Reinhardt, H.

    2009-12-15

    The Dyson equation proposed for planar temporal Wilson loops in the context of supersymmetric gauge theories is critically analyzed thereby exhibiting its ingredients and approximations involved. We reveal its limitations and identify its range of applicability in nonsupersymmetric gauge theories. In particular, we show that this equation is applicable only to strongly asymmetric planar Wilson loops (consisting of a long and a short pair of loop segments) and as a consequence the Wilsonian potential can be extracted only up to intermediate distances. By this equation the Wilson loop is exclusively determined by the gluon propagator. We solve the Dyson equation in Coulomb gauge for the temporal Wilson loop with the instantaneous part of the gluon propagator and for the spatial Wilson loop with the static gluon propagator obtained in the Hamiltonian approach to continuum Yang-Mills theory and on the lattice. In both cases we find a linearly rising color potential.

  19. Cattaneo-type subdiffusion-reaction equation.

    PubMed

    Kosztołowicz, Tadeusz

    2014-10-01

    Subdiffusion in a system in which mobile particles A can chemically react with static particles B according to the rule A+B→B is considered within a persistent random-walk model. This model, which assumes a correlation between successive steps of particles, provides hyperbolic Cattaneo normal diffusion or fractional subdiffusion equations. Starting with the difference equation, which describes a persistent random walk in a system with chemical reactions, using the generating function method and the continuous-time random-walk formalism, we will derive the Cattaneo-type subdiffusion differential equation with fractional time derivatives in which the chemical reactions mentioned above are taken into account. We will also find its solution over a long time limit. Based on the obtained results, we will find the Cattaneo-type subdiffusion-reaction equation in the case in which mobile particles of species A and B can chemically react according to a more complicated rule.

  20. Writing Chemical Equations: An Introductory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMay, H. Eugene, Jr.; Kemp, Kenneth C.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which possible products of a series of reactions are tabulated together with properties which may be useful in identifying each substance. The student deduces the products and writes a balanced chemical equation for the reaction. (GS)

  1. Finite scale equations for compressible fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, Len G

    2008-01-01

    Finite-scale equations (FSE) describe the evolution of finite volumes of fluid over time. We discuss the FSE for a one-dimensional compressible fluid, whose every point is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations. The FSE contain new momentum and internal energy transport terms. These are similar to terms added in numerical simulation for high-speed flows (e.g. artificial viscosity) and for turbulent flows (e.g. subgrid scale models). These similarities suggest that the FSE may provide new insight as a basis for computational fluid dynamics. Our analysis of the FS continuity equation leads to a physical interpretation of the new transport terms, and indicates the need to carefully distinguish between volume-averaged and mass-averaged velocities in numerical simulation. We make preliminary connections to the other recent work reformulating Navier-Stokes equations.

  2. Viscous Boussinesq equations for internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chi-Min

    2016-04-01

    In this poster, Boussinesq wave equations for internal wave propagation in a two-fluid system bounded by two impermeable plates are derived and analyzed. Using the perturbation method as well as the Padé approximation, a set of three equations accurate up to the fourth order are derived and displayed by three unknowns: the interfacial elevation, upper and lower velocity potentials at arbitrary vertical positions. No limitation on nonlinearity is made while weakly dispersive effects are originally considered in the derivation. The derived equations are examined by comparing its dispersion relation with those of existing models to verify the accuracy. The results show that present model equations provide an excellent base for simulating internal waves not only in shallower configuration but also medium configuration.

  3. Approximate probability distributions of the master equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Philipp; Grima, Ramon

    2015-07-01

    Master equations are common descriptions of mesoscopic systems. Analytical solutions to these equations can rarely be obtained. We here derive an analytical approximation of the time-dependent probability distribution of the master equation using orthogonal polynomials. The solution is given in two alternative formulations: a series with continuous and a series with discrete support, both of which can be systematically truncated. While both approximations satisfy the system size expansion of the master equation, the continuous distribution approximations become increasingly negative and tend to oscillations with increasing truncation order. In contrast, the discrete approximations rapidly converge to the underlying non-Gaussian distributions. The theory is shown to lead to particularly simple analytical expressions for the probability distributions of molecule numbers in metabolic reactions and gene expression systems.

  4. Bayesian Lasso for Semiparametric Structural Equation Models

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ruixin; Zhu, Hongtu; Chow, Sy-Miin; Ibrahim, Joseph G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary There has been great interest in developing nonlinear structural equation models and associated statistical inference procedures, including estimation and model selection methods. In this paper a general semiparametric structural equation model (SSEM) is developed in which the structural equation is composed of nonparametric functions of exogenous latent variables and fixed covariates on a set of latent endogenous variables. A basis representation is used to approximate these nonparametric functions in the structural equation and the Bayesian Lasso method coupled with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm is used for simultaneous estimation and model selection. The proposed method is illustrated using a simulation study and data from the Affective Dynamics and Individual Differences (ADID) study. Results demonstrate that our method can accurately estimate the unknown parameters and correctly identify the true underlying model. PMID:22376150

  5. Reinforcing Net Ionic Equation Writing: Second Semester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wruck, Betty J.

    1996-02-01

    It is important to actively illustrate that total and net ionic equation writing is a way of learning and expressing an enormous amount of chemistry. There is, however, a major problem with students retaining their ability to write net ionic equations in the second semester. So, we start this semester with a review and a special, long range assignment. In the lecture, we stress net ionic equation writing in as many topics as possible such as hydrolysis, Ksp chemistry, and electrochemistry. In the laboratory, we have revised experiments such as metal chromatography and designed new experiments such as Relative Strengths of Hydroxides and Complex Ions, in which net ionic equation writing is the major tool used in interpreting and answering laboratory questions.

  6. THE BERNOULLI EQUATION AND COMPRESSIBLE FLOW THEORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The incompressible Bernoulli equation is an analytical relationship between pressure, kinetic energy, and potential energy. As perhaps the simplest and most useful statement for describing laminar flow, it buttresses numerous incompressible flow models that have been developed ...

  7. State Equations for Active Circuits with Memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasler, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamic circuits including memristors are considered. Graph-theoretical criteria are given as sufficient conditions for the existence of global state equations, with the capacitor and memristor charges as state variables (for convenience we do not consider inductors here). They are based on earlier work on circuits without memristors. Global state equations in these charges fail to exist when the charges are dependent or when singular points are present, socalled impasse points. The values of state variables at initial time uniquely determine a solution. Therefore, even for numerical circuit analysis that in general does not use state equations, the determination of a set of state variables is important, and to know whether, with the "canonical candidates" for states, global state equations exist, is the first and most important step. The graph-theoretical criteria are easy to check directly for simple circuits. We give a few simple examples that illustrate the various cases. Larger circuits have to be examined by combinatorial algorithms.

  8. Vacuum static non-spherical GR equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbanovski, V. V.; Beloushko, K. E.; Markov, V. N.; Kairov, T. V.; Melehina, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    The vacuum static non-spherical equations are considered. The new solutions, which not contain in class of the Schwarzschild-like metrics and also its generalization are obtain. The perspectives for further investigations are discussed.

  9. Modified Scattering for the Boson Star Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusateri, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    We consider the question of scattering for the boson star equation in three space dimensions. This is a semi-relativistic Klein-Gordon equation with a cubic nonlinearity of Hartree type. We combine weighted estimates, obtained by exploiting a special null structure present in the equation, and a refined asymptotic analysis performed in Fourier space, to obtain global solutions evolving from small and localized Cauchy data. We describe the behavior of such solutions at infinity by identifying a suitable nonlinear asymptotic correction to scattering. As a byproduct of the weighted energy estimates alone, we also obtain global existence and (linear) scattering for solutions of semi-relativistic Hartree equations with potentials decaying faster than Coulomb.

  10. A New Interptrtation of Drake-Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetesi, Z.; Regaly, Z.

    Some aspects of modern astrobiology that play an essential role in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) are critically investigated. Specifically the factors in the Drake equation are considered and proposals for modifications made. It is argued there may be a more civilized way of life than a communicative one. The impact on the equation of the probability of the existence of communicative civilizations in our Galaxy is investigated considering likelihood-theory and the possible channel of communication. The issues that arise are new elements in the probability equation (i.e. deviations from the traditional Drake equation factors). It is concluded that while the existence of Extraterrestrial Intelligence may be high the probability of communication maybe less than the results of former estimations.

  11. Geometric investigations of a vorticity model equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Kolev, Boris; Preston, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    This article consists of a detailed geometric study of the one-dimensional vorticity model equation which is a particular case of the generalized Constantin-Lax-Majda equation. Wunsch showed that this equation is the Euler-Arnold equation on Diff (S1) when the latter is endowed with the right-invariant homogeneous H ˙ 1 / 2-metric. In this article we prove that the exponential map of this Riemannian metric is not Fredholm and that the sectional curvature is locally unbounded. Furthermore, we prove a Beale-Kato-Majda-type blow-up criterion, which we then use to demonstrate a link to our non-Fredholmness result. Finally, we extend a blow-up result of Castro-Córdoba to the periodic case and to a much wider class of initial conditions, using a new generalization of an inequality for Hilbert transforms due to Córdoba-Córdoba.

  12. How Maxwell's equations came to light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahon, Basil

    2015-01-01

    The nineteenth-century Scottish physicist James Clerk Maxwell made groundbreaking contributions to many areas of science including thermodynamics and colour vision. However, he is best known for his equations that unified electricity, magnetism and light.

  13. Underwater photogrammetric theoretical equations and technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ya-bing; Huang, Guiping; Qin, Gui-qin; Chen, Zheng

    2011-12-01

    In order to have a high level of accuracy of measurement in underwater close-range photogrammetry, this article deals with a study of three varieties of model equations according to the way of imaging upon the water. First, the paper makes a careful analysis for the two varieties of theoretical equations and finds out that there are some serious limitations in practical application and has an in-depth study for the third model equation. Second, one special project for this measurement has designed correspondingly. Finally, one rigid antenna has been tested by underwater photogrammetry. The experimental results show that the precision of 3D coordinates measurement is 0.94mm, which validates the availability and operability in practical application with this third equation. It can satisfy the measurement requirements of refraction correction, improving levels of accuracy of underwater close-range photogrammetry, as well as strong antijamming and stabilization.

  14. Laplace and the era of differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Between about 1790 and 1850 French mathematicians dominated not only mathematics, but also all other sciences. The belief that a particular physical phenomenon has to correspond to a single differential equation originates from the enormous influence Laplace and his contemporary compatriots had in all European learned circles. It will be shown that at the beginning of the nineteenth century Newton's "fluxionary calculus" finally gave way to a French-type notation of handling differential equations. A heated dispute in the Philosophical Magazine between Challis, Airy and Stokes, all three of them famous Cambridge professors of mathematics, then serves to illustrate the era of differential equations. A remark about Schrödinger and his equation for the hydrogen atom finally will lead back to present times.

  15. Solar Cycle: Magnetized March to Equator

    NASA Video Gallery

    Bands of magnetized solar material – with alternating south and north polarity – march toward the sun's equator. Comparing the evolution of the bands with the sunspot number in each hemisphere over...

  16. Lie theoretic aspects of the Riccati equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermann, R.; Martin, C.

    1977-01-01

    Various features of the application of Lie theory to matrix Riccati equations, of basic importance in control and system theories, are discussed. Particular consideration is given to centralizer foliation, the Cartan decomposition, matrix Riccati equations as Lie systems on Grassmanians, local analysis near a zero point of a vector field, linearization in homogeneous space, the tangent bundle in terms of partitioned matrices, and stability properties of fixed points of Riccati vector fields.

  17. Numerical Solution for Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warsi, Z. U. A.; Weed, R. A.; Thompson, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    Carefully selected blend of computational techniques solves complete set of equations for viscous, unsteady, hypersonic flow in general curvilinear coordinates. New algorithm has tested computation of axially directed flow about blunt body having shape similar to that of such practical bodies as wide-body aircraft or artillery shells. Method offers significant computational advantages because of conservation-law form of equations and because it reduces amount of metric data required.

  18. Constraints on modern microscopic equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranto, G.; Baldo, M.; Burgio, G. F.

    2016-01-01

    We compare a set of equations of state derived within microscopic many-body approaches, and study their predictions as far as phenomenological data on nuclei from heavy ion collisions, and astrophysical observations on neutron stars are concerned. All the data, taken together, put strong constraints not easy to be fulfilled accurately. However the results provide an estimate of the uncertainty on the theoretical prediction at a microscopic level of the nuclear equation of state.

  19. Nonlinear quantum equations: Classical field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rego-Monteiro, M. A.; Nobre, F. D.

    2013-10-15

    An exact classical field theory for nonlinear quantum equations is presented herein. It has been applied recently to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation, and it is shown herein to hold also for a nonlinear generalization of the Klein-Gordon equation. These generalizations were carried by introducing nonlinear terms, characterized by exponents depending on an index q, in such a way that the standard, linear equations, are recovered in the limit q→ 1. The main characteristic of this field theory consists on the fact that besides the usual Ψ(x(vector sign),t), a new field Φ(x(vector sign),t) needs to be introduced in the Lagrangian, as well. The field Φ(x(vector sign),t), which is defined by means of an additional equation, becomes Ψ{sup *}(x(vector sign),t) only when q→ 1. The solutions for the fields Ψ(x(vector sign),t) and Φ(x(vector sign),t) are found herein, being expressed in terms of a q-plane wave; moreover, both field equations lead to the relation E{sup 2}=p{sup 2}c{sup 2}+m{sup 2}c{sup 4}, for all values of q. The fact that such a classical field theory works well for two very distinct nonlinear quantum equations, namely, the Schrödinger and Klein-Gordon ones, suggests that this procedure should be appropriate for a wider class nonlinear equations. It is shown that the standard global gauge invariance is broken as a consequence of the nonlinearity.

  20. Validating and improving interrill erosion equations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng-Bao; Wang, Zhan-Li; Yang, Ming-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Existing interrill erosion equations based on mini-plot experiments have largely ignored the effects of slope length and plot size on interrill erosion rate. This paper describes a series of simulated rainfall experiments which were conducted according to a randomized factorial design for five slope lengths (0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2 m) at a width of 0.4 m, five slope gradients (17%, 27%, 36%, 47%, and 58%), and five rainfall intensities (48, 62.4, 102, 149, and 170 mm h(-1)) to perform a systematic validation of existing interrill erosion equations based on mini-plots. The results indicated that the existing interrill erosion equations do not adequately describe the relationships between interrill erosion rate and its influencing factors with increasing slope length and rainfall intensity. Univariate analysis of variance showed that runoff rate, rainfall intensity, slope gradient, and slope length had significant effects on interrill erosion rate and that their interactions were significant at p = 0.01. An improved interrill erosion equation was constructed by analyzing the relationships of sediment concentration with rainfall intensity, slope length, and slope gradient. In the improved interrill erosion equation, the runoff rate and slope factor are the same as in the interrill erosion equation in the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP), with the weight of rainfall intensity adjusted by an exponent of 0.22 and a slope length term added with an exponent of -0.25. Using experimental data from WEPP cropland soil field interrill erodibility experiments, it has been shown that the improved interrill erosion equation describes the relationship between interrill erosion rate and runoff rate, rainfall intensity, slope gradient, and slope length reasonably well and better than existing interrill erosion equations.

  1. A Gallium multiphase equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Scott D; Greeff, Carl

    2009-01-01

    A new SESAME multiphase Gallium equation of state (EOS) has been developed. The equation of state includes three of the solid phases (Ga I, Ga II, Ga III) and a fluid phase (liquid/gas). The EOS includes consistent latent heat between the phases. We compare the results to the liquid Hugoniol data. We also explore the possibility of re-freezing via dynamic means such as isentropic and shock compression.

  2. Fisher equation for a decaying brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Debashis

    2011-12-01

    We consider the inhomogeneous decay of an unstable D-brane. The dynamical equation that describes this process (in light-cone time) is a variant of the non-linear reaction-diffusion equation that first made its appearance in the pioneering work of (Luther and) Fisher and appears in a variety of natural phenomena. We analyze its travelling front solution using singular perturbation theory.

  3. A Chebychev propagator for inhomogeneous Schroedinger equations

    SciTech Connect

    Ndong, Mamadou; Koch, Christiane P.; Tal-Ezer, Hillel; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2009-03-28

    A propagation scheme for time-dependent inhomogeneous Schroedinger equations is presented. Such equations occur in time dependent optimal control theory and in reactive scattering. A formal solution based on a polynomial expansion of the inhomogeneous term is derived. It is subjected to an approximation in terms of Chebychev polynomials. Different variants for the inhomogeneous propagator are demonstrated and applied to two examples from optimal control theory. Convergence behavior and numerical efficiency are analyzed.

  4. Classification of integrable B-equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Kamp, Peter H.

    We classify integrable equations which have the form u t=a 1u n+K(v 0,v 1,…), v t=a 2v n, where a 1,a 2∈ C, n∈ N and K a quadratic polynomial in derivatives of v. This is done using the symbolic calculus, biunit coordinates and the Lech-Mahler theorem. Furthermore we present a method, based on resultants, to determine whether an equation is in a hierarchy of lower order.

  5. Normal Forms for Nonautonomous Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    We extend Henry Poincarés normal form theory for autonomous differential equations x=f(x) to nonautonomous differential equations x=f(t, x). Poincarés nonresonance condition λj-∑ni=1 ℓiλi≠0 for eigenvalues is generalized to the new nonresonance condition λj∩∑ni=1 ℓiλi=∅ for spectral intervals.

  6. A class of neutral functional differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melvin, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    Formulation and study of the initial value problem for neutral functional differential equations. The existence, uniqueness, and continuation of solutions to this problem are investigated, and an analysis is made of the dependence of the solutions on the initial conditions and parameters, resulting in the derivation of a continuous dependence theorem in which the fundamental mathematical principles underlying the continuous dependence problem for a very general system of nonlinear neutral functional differential equations are separated out.

  7. Curvature tensors unified field equations on SEXn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kyung Tae; Lee, Il Young

    1988-09-01

    We study the curvature tensors and field equations in the n-dimensional SE manifold SEXn. We obtain several basic properties of the vectors S λ and U λ and then of the SE curvature tensor and its contractions, such as a generalized Ricci identity, a generalized Bianchi identity, and two variations of the Bianchi identity satisfied by the SE Einstein tensor. Finally, a system of field equations is discussed in SEXn and one of its particular solutions is constructed and displayed.

  8. Approximate Solutions Of Equations Of Steady Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    1992-01-01

    Rigorous analysis yields reliable criteria for "best-fit" functions. Improved "curve-fitting" method yields approximate solutions to differential equations of steady-state diffusion. Method applies to problems in which rates of diffusion depend linearly or nonlinearly on concentrations of diffusants, approximate solutions analytic or numerical, and boundary conditions of Dirichlet type, of Neumann type, or mixture of both types. Applied to equations for diffusion of charge carriers in semiconductors in which mobilities and lifetimes of charge carriers depend on concentrations.

  9. Nonlocal boundary value problem for telegraph equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Modanli, Mahmut

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the nonlocal boundary value problem for a telegraph equation in a Hilbert space is conceived. Stability estimates for the solution of this problem are obtained. The first and second order of accuracy difference schemes for the approximate solution of this problem are constructed. Stability estimates for the solution of these difference schemes are established. In implementations, two mixed problems for telegraph partial differential equations are investigated. The methods are showed by numerical experiments.

  10. Speaking rate effects on locus equation slope.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jeff; Weismer, Gary

    2013-11-01

    A locus equation describes a 1st order regression fit to a scatter of vowel steady-state frequency values predicting vowel onset frequency values. Locus equation coefficients are often interpreted as indices of coarticulation. Speaking rate variations with a constant consonant-vowel form are thought to induce changes in the degree of coarticulation. In the current work, the hypothesis that locus slope is a transparent index of coarticulation is examined through the analysis of acoustic samples of large-scale, nearly continuous variations in speaking rate. Following the methodological conventions for locus equation derivation, data pooled across ten vowels yield locus equation slopes that are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that locus equations vary systematically with coarticulation. Comparable analyses between different four-vowel pools reveal variations in the locus slope range and changes in locus slope sensitivity to rate change. Analyses across rate but within vowels are substantially less consistent with the locus hypothesis. Taken together, these findings suggest that the practice of vowel pooling exerts a non-negligible influence on locus outcomes. Results are discussed within the context of articulatory accounts of locus equations and the effects of speaking rate change.

  11. Forces Associated with Nonlinear Nonholonomic Constraint Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roithmayr, Carlos M.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    2010-01-01

    A concise method has been formulated for identifying a set of forces needed to constrain the behavior of a mechanical system, modeled as a set of particles and rigid bodies, when it is subject to motion constraints described by nonholonomic equations that are inherently nonlinear in velocity. An expression in vector form is obtained for each force; a direction is determined, together with the point of application. This result is a consequence of expressing constraint equations in terms of dot products of vectors rather than in the usual way, which is entirely in terms of scalars and matrices. The constraint forces in vector form are used together with two new analytical approaches for deriving equations governing motion of a system subject to such constraints. If constraint forces are of interest they can be brought into evidence in explicit dynamical equations by employing the well-known nonholonomic partial velocities associated with Kane's method; if they are not of interest, equations can be formed instead with the aid of vectors introduced here as nonholonomic partial accelerations. When the analyst requires only the latter, smaller set of equations, they can be formed directly; it is not necessary to expend the labor to form the former, larger set first and subsequently perform matrix multiplications.

  12. Iterative solution of the semiconductor device equations

    SciTech Connect

    Bova, S.W.; Carey, G.F.

    1996-12-31

    Most semiconductor device models can be described by a nonlinear Poisson equation for the electrostatic potential coupled to a system of convection-reaction-diffusion equations for the transport of charge and energy. These equations are typically solved in a decoupled fashion and e.g. Newton`s method is used to obtain the resulting sequences of linear systems. The Poisson problem leads to a symmetric, positive definite system which we solve iteratively using conjugate gradient. The transport equations lead to nonsymmetric, indefinite systems, thereby complicating the selection of an appropriate iterative method. Moreover, their solutions exhibit steep layers and are subject to numerical oscillations and instabilities if standard Galerkin-type discretization strategies are used. In the present study, we use an upwind finite element technique for the transport equations. We also evaluate the performance of different iterative methods for the transport equations and investigate various preconditioners for a few generalized gradient methods. Numerical examples are given for a representative two-dimensional depletion MOSFET.

  13. Oscillations and Rolling for Duffing's Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, I. Ya.; Piskovskiy, E. V.; Volovich, I. V.

    2013-01-01

    The Duffing equation has been used to model nonlinear dynamics not only in mechanics and electronics but also in biology and in neurology for the brain process modeling. Van der Pol's method is often used in nonlinear dynamics to improve perturbation theory results when describing small oscillations. However, in some other problems of nonlinear dynamics particularly in case of Duffing-Higgs equation in field theory, for the Einsten-Friedmann equations in cosmology and for relaxation processes in neurology not only small oscillations regime is of interest but also the regime of slow rolling. In the present work a method for approximate solution to nonlinear dynamics equations in the rolling regime is developed. It is shown that in order to improve perturbation theory in the rolling regime it turns out to be effective to use an expansion in hyperbolic functions instead of trigonometric functions as it is done in van der Pol's method in case of small oscillations. In particular the Duffing equation in the rolling regime is investigated using solution expressed in terms of elliptic functions. Accuracy of obtained approximation is estimated. The Duffing equation with dissipation is also considered.

  14. A closure scheme for chemical master equations.

    PubMed

    Smadbeck, Patrick; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2013-08-27

    Probability reigns in biology, with random molecular events dictating the fate of individual organisms, and propelling populations of species through evolution. In principle, the master probability equation provides the most complete model of probabilistic behavior in biomolecular networks. In practice, master equations describing complex reaction networks have remained unsolved for over 70 years. This practical challenge is a reason why master equations, for all their potential, have not inspired biological discovery. Herein, we present a closure scheme that solves the master probability equation of networks of chemical or biochemical reactions. We cast the master equation in terms of ordinary differential equations that describe the time evolution of probability distribution moments. We postulate that a finite number of moments capture all of the necessary information, and compute the probability distribution and higher-order moments by maximizing the information entropy of the system. An accurate order closure is selected, and the dynamic evolution of molecular populations is simulated. Comparison with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, which merely sample the probability distribution, demonstrates this closure scheme is accurate for several small reaction networks. The importance of this result notwithstanding, a most striking finding is that the steady state of stochastic reaction networks can now be readily computed in a single-step calculation, without the need to simulate the evolution of the probability distribution in time.

  15. Dynamical systems theory for the Gardner equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Aparna; Talukdar, B.; Chatterjee, Supriya

    2014-02-01

    The Gardner equation ut+auux+bu2ux+μuxxx=0 is a generic mathematical model for weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive wave propagation when the effects of higher-order nonlinearity become significant. Using the so-called traveling wave ansatz u (x,t)=φ(ξ), ξ =x-vt (where v is the velocity of the wave) we convert the (1+1)-dimensional partial differential equation to a second-order ordinary differential equation in ϕ with an arbitrary constant and treat the latter equation by the methods of the dynamical systems theory. With some special attention on the equilibrium points of the equation, we derive an analytical constraint for admissible values of the parameters a, b, and μ. From the Hamiltonian form of the system we confirm that, in addition to the usual bright soliton solution, the equation can be used to generate three different varieties of internal waves of which one is a dark soliton recently observed in water [A. Chabchoub et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 124101 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.124101].

  16. The Jeffcott equations in nonlinear rotordynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalik, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Jeffcott equations are a system of coupled differential equations representing the behavior of a rotating shaft. This is a simple model which allows investigation of the basic dynamic behavior of rotating machinery. Nolinearities can be introduced by taking into consideration deadband, side force, and rubbing, among others. The properties of the solutions of the Jeffcott equations with deadband are studied. In particular, it is shown how bounds for the solution of these equations can be obtained from bounds for the solutions of the linearized equations. By studying the behavior of the Fourier transforms of the solutions, we are also able to predict the onset of destructive vibrations. These conclusions are verified by means of numerical solutions of the equations, and of power spectrum density (PSD) plots. This study offers insight into a possible detection method to determine pump stability margins during flight and hot fire tests, and was motivated by the need to explain a phenomenon observed in the development phase of the cryogenic pumps of the Space Shuttle, during hot fire ground testing; namely, the appearance of vibrations at frequencies that could not be accounted for by means of linear models.

  17. Higher order equations of motion and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lämmerzahl, Claus; Rademaker, Patricia

    2012-12-01

    Standard fundamental equations of motion for point particles are of second order in the time derivative. Here we are exploring the consequences of fundamental equations of motion with an additional small even higher order term to the standard formulation. This is related to two issues: (i) higher order equations of motion will have influence on the definition of the structure of possible interactions and in particular of the gravitational interaction, and (ii) such equations of motion provide a framework to test the validity of Newton’s second law which is the basis for the definition of forces but which assumes from the very beginning that the fundamental equations of motion are of second order. We will show that starting with our generalized equations of motions it is possible to introduce the space-time metric describing the gravitational interaction by means of a standard gauge principle. Another main result within our model of even higher order derivatives is that for slowly varying and smooth fields the higher order derivatives either lead to runaway solutions or induces a zitterbewegung. We confront this higher order scheme with experimental data.

  18. New integral equation for simple fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hong Seok; Ree, Francis H.

    1995-09-01

    We present a new integral equation for the radial distribution function of classical fluids. It employs the bridge function for a short-range repulsive reference system which was used earlier in our dense fluid perturbation theory. The bridge function is evaluated using Ballone et al.'s closure relation. Applications of the integral equation to the Lennard-Jones and inverse nth-power (n=12, 9, 6, and 4) repulsive systems show that it can predict thermodynamic and structural properties in close agreement with results from computer simulations and the reference-hypernetted-chain equation. We also discuss thermodynamic consistency tests on the new equation and comparisons with the integral equations of Rogers and Young and of Zerah and Hansen. The present equation has no parameter to adjust. This unique feature offers a significant advantage as it eliminates a time-consuming search to optimize such parameters appearing in other theories. It permits practical applications needing complex intermolecular potentials and for multicomponent systems.

  19. Group Invariance Properties of the Inviscid Compressible Flow Equations for a Modified Tait Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Scott; Baty, Roy

    2015-11-01

    This work considers the group invariance properties of the inviscid compressible flow equations (Euler equations) under the assumptions of one-dimensional symmetry and a modified Tait equation of state (EOS) closure model. When written in terms of an adiabatic bulk modulus, a transformed version of these equations is found to be identical to that for an ideal gas EOS. As a result, the Lie group invariance structure of these equations - and their subsequent reduction to a lower-order system - is identical to the published results for the ideal gas case. Following the reduction of the Euler equations to a system of ordinary differential equations, a variety of elementary closed-form solutions are derived. These solutions are then used in conjunction with the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions to construct discontinuous shock wave and free surface solutions that are analogous to the classical Noh, Sedov, Guderley, and Hunter similarity solutions of the Euler equations for an ideal gas EOS. The versions of these problems for the modified Tait EOS are found to be semi-analytic in that a transcendental root extraction (and in some cases numerical integration of ordinary differential equations) enables solution of the relevant equations.

  20. Relations between nonlinear Riccati equations and other equations in fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Dieter

    2014-10-01

    Many phenomena in the observable macroscopic world obey nonlinear evolution equations while the microscopic world is governed by quantum mechanics, a fundamental theory that is supposedly linear. In order to combine these two worlds in a common formalism, at least one of them must sacrifice one of its dogmas. Linearizing nonlinear dynamics would destroy the fundamental property of this theory, however, it can be shown that quantum mechanics can be reformulated in terms of nonlinear Riccati equations. In a first step, it will be shown that the information about the dynamics of quantum systems with analytical solutions can not only be obtainable from the time-dependent Schrödinger equation but equally-well from a complex Riccati equation. Comparison with supersymmetric quantum mechanics shows that even additional information can be obtained from the nonlinear formulation. Furthermore, the time-independent Schrödinger equation can also be rewritten as a complex Riccati equation for any potential. Extension of the Riccati formulation to include irreversible dissipative effects is straightforward. Via (real and complex) Riccati equations, other fields of physics can also be treated within the same formalism, e.g., statistical thermodynamics, nonlinear dynamical systems like those obeying a logistic equation as well as wave equations in classical optics, Bose- Einstein condensates and cosmological models. Finally, the link to abstract "quantizations" such as the Pythagorean triples and Riccati equations connected with trigonometric and hyperbolic functions will be shown.

  1. Dark soliton solutions of (N+1)-dimensional nonlinear evolution equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiray, Seyma Tuluce; Bulut, Hasan

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigate exact solutions of (N+1)-dimensional double sinh-Gordon equation and (N+1)-dimensional generalized Boussinesq equation by using generalized Kudryashov method. (N+1)-dimensional double sinh-Gordon equation and (N+1)-dimensional generalized Boussinesq equation can be returned to nonlinear ordinary differential equation by suitable transformation. Then, generalized Kudryashov method has been used to seek exact solutions of the (N+1)-dimensional double sinh-Gordon equation and (N+1)-dimensional generalized Boussinesq equation. Also, we obtain dark soliton solutions for these (N+1)-dimensional nonlinear evolution equations. Finally, we denote that this method can be applied to solve other nonlinear evolution equations.

  2. Asymptotic-preserving Boltzmann model equations for binary gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Liang, Yihua

    2016-02-01

    An improved system of Boltzmann model equations is developed for binary gas mixture. This system of model equations has a complete asymptotic preserving property that can strictly recover the Navier-Stokes equations in the continuum limit with the correct constitutive relations and the correct viscosity, thermal conduction, diffusion, and thermal diffusion coefficients. In this equation system, the self- and cross-collision terms in Boltzmann equations are replaced by single relaxation terms. In monocomponent case, this system of equations can be reduced to the commonly used Shakhov equation. The conservation property and the H theorem which are important for model equations are also satisfied by this system of model equations. PMID:26986408

  3. A Regression Equation for Determining the Dimensionality of Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Kellie B.

    2000-01-01

    Developed a new regression equation to estimate the mean value of eigenvalues in parallel analysis and studied the performance of the equation in comparison with previously published regression equations through simulation. Performance of the new equation was comparable to that of the LCHF equation of G. Lautenschlager and others (1989). (SLD)

  4. A Graphical Approach to Evaluating Equating Using Test Characteristic Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Reckase, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    An essential concern in the application of any equating procedure is determining whether tests can be considered equated after the tests have been placed onto a common scale. This article clarifies one equating criterion, the first-order equity property of equating, and develops a new method for evaluating equating that is linked to this…

  5. Hydrodynamics of Collisionless Boltzmann Equation for a Highly Flattened Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, S.

    The collisionless Boltzmann equation is studied in order to be connected with hydrodynamic equations. Each of the later equations can be obtained by taking a moment of the former equation. The difficulty against the system of moment equations, called closure problem, can be overtaken by a trick of neglecting the terms of higher order moments under small-pressure assumption.

  6. An interpolation between the wave and diffusion equations through the fractional evolution equations Dirac like

    SciTech Connect

    Pierantozzi, T.; Vazquez, L.

    2005-11-01

    Through fractional calculus and following the method used by Dirac to obtain his well-known equation from the Klein-Gordon equation, we analyze a possible interpolation between the Dirac and the diffusion equations in one space dimension. We study the transition between the hyperbolic and parabolic behaviors by means of the generalization of the D'Alembert formula for the classical wave equation and the invariance under space and time inversions of the interpolating fractional evolution equations Dirac like. Such invariance depends on the values of the fractional index and is related to the nonlocal property of the time fractional differential operator. For this system of fractional evolution equations, we also find an associated conserved quantity analogous to the Hamiltonian for the classical Dirac case.

  7. A Comparison between Linear IRT Observed-Score Equating and Levine Observed-Score Equating under the Generalized Kernel Equating Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Haiwen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, linear item response theory (IRT) observed-score equating is compared under a generalized kernel equating framework with Levine observed-score equating for nonequivalent groups with anchor test design. Interestingly, these two equating methods are closely related despite being based on different methodologies. Specifically, when…

  8. Global well-posedness for the 2D dispersive SQG equation and inviscid Boussinesq equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Renhui; Chen, Jiecheng

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we obtain global well-posedness for the 2D dispersive SQG equation and inviscid Boussinesq equations. Our works are consistent with the corresponding works by Elgindi-Widmayer (SIAM J Math Anal 47:4672-4684, 2015) in the special case {A=κ=1}. In addition, our result concerning the SQG equation can be regarded as the borderline case of the work by Cannone et al. (Proc Lond Math Soc 106:650-674, 2013).

  9. On inter-tidal transport equation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Feng, Shizuo; Pangen, Xi

    1989-01-01

    The transports of solutes, sediments, nutrients, and other tracers are fundamental to the interactive physical, chemical, and biological processes in estuaries. The characteristic time scales for most estuarine biological and chemical processes are on the order of several tidal cycles or longer. To address the long-term transport mechanism meaningfully, the formulation of an inter-tidal conservation equation is the main subject of this paper. The commonly used inter-tidal conservation equation takes the form of a convection-dispersion equation in which the convection is represented by the Eulerian residual current, and the dispersion terms are due to the introduction of a Fickian hypothesis, unfortunately, the physical significance of this equation is not clear, and the introduction of a Fickian hypothesis is at best an ad hoc approximation. Some recent research results on the Lagrangian residual current suggest that the long-term transport problem is more closely related to the Lagrangian residual current than to the Eulerian residual current. With the aid of additional insight of residual current, the inter-tidal transport equation has been reformulated in this paper using a small perturbation method for a weakly nonlinear tidal system. When tidal flows can be represented by an M2 system, the new intertidal transport equation also takes the form of a convective-dispersion equation without the introduction of a Fickian hypothesis. The convective velocity turns out to be the first order Lagrangian residual current (the sum of the Eulerian residual current and the Stokes’ drift), and the correlation terms take the form of convection with the Stokes’ drift as the convective velocity. The remaining dispersion terms are perturbations of lower order solution to higher order solutions due to shear effect and turbulent mixing.

  10. Symmetries of the Euler compressible flow equations for general equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Zachary M.; Ramsey, Scott D.; Baty, Roy S.

    2015-10-15

    The Euler compressible flow equations exhibit different Lie symmetries depending on the equation of state (EOS) of the medium in which the flow occurs. This means that, in general, different types of similarity solution will be available in different flow media. We present a comprehensive classification of all EOS’s to which the Euler equations apply, based on the Lie symmetries admitted by the corresponding flow equations, restricting to the case of 1-D planar, cylindrical, or spherical geometry. The results are conveniently summarized in tables. This analysis also clarifies past work by Axford and Ovsiannikov on symmetry classification.

  11. Kane's equations and Appell's equations for high order nonholonomic variable mass systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zheng-Ming; Wang, Tzu-Jun

    1991-04-01

    Based on the universal D'Alembert-Lagrange's principle for variable mass systems, by means of the new method of high-ordered variation, two forms of extended equations of motion are obtained for the high-ordered nonholonomic variable mass systems of which the corresponding conventional forms of equations of motion are the special cases. Kane's equations for high-ordered nonholonomic variable mass system are derived more naturally than Kane's original derivation in which the coefficients of generalized velocities are introduced somewhat artificially. Appell's equations expressed in energy of acceleration are extended for high-ordered nonholonomic variable mass systems.

  12. Integrability of vortex equations on Riemann surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Alexander D.

    2009-11-01

    The Abelian Higgs model on a compact Riemann surface Σ of genus g is considered. We show that for g>1 the Bogomolny equations for multi-vortices at critical coupling can be obtained as compatibility conditions of two linear equations (Lax pair) which are written down explicitly. These vortices correspond precisely to SO(3)-symmetric Yang-Mills instantons on the (conformal) gravitational instanton Σ×S with a scalar-flat Kähler metric. Thus, the standard methods of constructing solutions and studying their properties by using Lax pairs (twistor approach, dressing method, etc.) can be applied to the vortex equations on Σ. In the twistor description, solutions of the integrable vortex equations correspond to rank-2 holomorphic vector bundles over the complex 3-dimensional twistor space of Σ×S. We show that in the general (nonintegrable) case there is a bijection between the moduli spaces of solutions to vortex equations on Σ and of pseudo-holomorphic bundles over the almost complex twistor space.

  13. Minimal length, Friedmann equations and maximum density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Adel; Ali, Ahmed Farag

    2014-06-01

    Inspired by Jacobson's thermodynamic approach [4], Cai et al. [5, 6] have shown the emergence of Friedmann equations from the first law of thermodynamics. We extend Akbar-Cai derivation [6] of Friedmann equations to accommodate a general entrop-yarea law. Studying the resulted Friedmann equations using a specific entropy-area law, which is motivated by the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), reveals the existence of a maximum energy density closed to Planck density. Allowing for a general continuous pressure p( ρ, a) leads to bounded curvature invariants and a general nonsingular evolution. In this case, the maximum energy density is reached in a finite time and there is no cosmological evolution beyond this point which leaves the big bang singularity inaccessible from a spacetime prospective. The existence of maximum energy density and a general nonsingular evolution is independent of the equation of state and the spacial curvature k. As an example we study the evolution of the equation of state p = ωρ through its phase-space diagram to show the existence of a maximum energy which is reachable in a finite time.

  14. Integral equation study of liquid hydrogen fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, C.; Lombardero, M.; Anta, J. A.; Lomba, E.

    2001-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen fluoride is a well-known hydrogen bonded substance, in many aspects related to liquid water, and for which a wide variety of interaction models have recently been proposed. We have studied two of these models by means of a reference hypernetted chain equation in order to assess the ability of this latter approach to describe the properties of this highly associative system. Our calculations, when compared with molecular dynamic results, show that the integral equation reproduces quantitatively both the structure and the thermodynamics of liquid hydrogen fluoride over a wide range of thermodynamic states. However, the integral equation approach is apparently unable to produce estimates for the phase diagram since the low-density (gas phase) side of the binodal curve lies inside the nonsolution region of the equation. This failure can be understood as the result of the inability of standard integral equation theories to account for the behavior of low density strongly associative systems like highly charged electrolytes or, in this case, the gaseous phase of hydrogen fluoride.

  15. Langevin equations for competitive growth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, F. A.; Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    2012-01-01

    Langevin equations for several competitive growth models in one dimension are derived. For models with crossover from random deposition (RD) to some correlated deposition (CD) dynamics, with small probability p of CD, the surface tension ν and the nonlinear coefficient λ of the associated equations have linear dependence on p due solely to this random choice. However, they also depend on the regularized step functions present in the analytical representations of the CD, whose expansion coefficients scale with p according to the divergence of local height differences when p→0. The superposition of those scaling factors gives ν˜p2 for random deposition with surface relaxation (RDSR) as the CD, and ν˜p, λ˜p3/2 for ballistic deposition (BD) as the CD, in agreement with simulation and other scaling approaches. For bidisperse ballistic deposition (BBD), the same scaling of RD-BD model is found. The Langevin equation for the model with competing RDSR and BD, with probability p for the latter, is also constructed. It shows linear p dependence of λ, while the quadratic dependence observed in previous simulations is explained by an additional crossover before the asymptotic regime. The results highlight the relevance of scaling of the coefficients of step function expansions in systems with steep surfaces, which is responsible for noninteger exponents in some p-dependent stochastic equations, and the importance of the physical correspondence of aggregation rules and equation coefficients.

  16. Formulation of equations of motion for complex spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, T. R.; Levinson, D. A.

    1980-04-01

    Seven methods of the formulation of motion equations for complex spacecraft are discussed: (1) the use of momentum principles, (2) D'Alembert principle, (3) Lagrange equations, (4) Hamilton's canonical equations, (5) the Boltzmann-Hamel equations, (6) the Gibbs equations, and (7) a method introduced by Kane and Wang in 1965. It is shown that the last method considered leads most directly to the simplest equations.

  17. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Quasi self-adjoint nonlinear wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimov, N. H.; Torrisi, M.; Tracinà, R.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we generalize the classification of self-adjoint second-order linear partial differential equation to a family of nonlinear wave equations with two independent variables. We find a class of quasi self-adjoint nonlinear equations which includes the self-adjoint linear equations as a particular case. The property of a differential equation to be quasi self-adjoint is important, e.g. for constructing conservation laws associated with symmetries of the differential equation.

  18. Differential equation models for sharp threshold dynamics.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Harrison C; Dimitrov, Nedialko B

    2014-01-01

    We develop an extension to differential equation models of dynamical systems to allow us to analyze probabilistic threshold dynamics that fundamentally and globally change system behavior. We apply our novel modeling approach to two cases of interest: a model of infectious disease modified for malware where a detection event drastically changes dynamics by introducing a new class in competition with the original infection; and the Lanchester model of armed conflict, where the loss of a key capability drastically changes the effectiveness of one of the sides. We derive and demonstrate a step-by-step, repeatable method for applying our novel modeling approach to an arbitrary system, and we compare the resulting differential equations to simulations of the system's random progression. Our work leads to a simple and easily implemented method for analyzing probabilistic threshold dynamics using differential equations. PMID:24184349

  19. Absorbing layers for the Dirac equation

    SciTech Connect

    Pinaud, Olivier

    2015-05-15

    This work is devoted to the construction of perfectly matched layers (PML) for the Dirac equation, that not only arises in relativistic quantum mechanics but also in the dynamics of electrons in graphene or in topological insulators. While the resulting equations are stable at the continuous level, some care is necessary in order to obtain a stable scheme at the discrete level. This is related to the so-called fermion doubling problem. For this matter, we consider the numerical scheme introduced by Hammer et al. [19], and combine it with the discretized PML equations. We state some arguments for the stability of the resulting scheme, and perform simulations in two dimensions. The perfectly matched layers are shown to exhibit, in various configurations, superior absorption than the absorbing potential method and the so-called transport-like boundary conditions.

  20. A thermal equation for flame quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A E , Jr; Berlad, A I

    1956-01-01

    An approximate thermal equation was derived for quenching distance based on a previously proposed diffusional treatment. The quenching distance was expressed in terms of the thermal conductivity, the fuel mole fraction, the heat capacity, the rate of the rate-controlling chemical reaction, a constant that depends on the geometry of the quenching surface, and one empirical constant. The effect of pressure on quenching distance was shown to be inversely proportional to the pressure dependence of the flame reaction, with small correction necessitated by the effect of pressure on flame temperature. The equation was used with the Semenov equation for burning velocity to show that the quenching distance was inversely proportional to burning velocity and pressure at any given initial temperature and equivalence ratio.

  1. Stokes equation in a toy CD hovercraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Izarra, Charles; de Izarra, Grégoire

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of a toy CD hovercraft used in the fluid mechanics course for undergraduate students to illustrate the lubrication theory described by the Stokes equation. An experimental characterization of the toy hovercraft (measurements of the air flow value, of the pressure in the balloon and of the thickness of the air film under the hovercraft) allows us to evaluate a reduced Reynolds number R*. Since R* < 1, it is possible to simplify the Navier-Stokes equation that is reduced to the Stokes equation, on the basis of the lubrication theory. The pressure gradient in the air flow is calculated, allowing us to establish the lifting force applied on the toy hovercraft. In addition, these results are applied to a larger scale hovercraft.

  2. A few remarks on ordinary differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, B.

    1996-12-31

    We present in this note existence and uniqueness results for solutions of ordinary differential equations and linear transport equations with discontinuous coefficients in a bounded open subset {Omega} of R{sup N} or in the whole space R{sup N} (N {ge} 1). R.J. Di Perna and P.L. Lions studied the case of vector fields b with coefficients in Sobolev spaces and bounded divergence. We want to show that similar results hold for more general b: we assume in the bounded autonomous case that b belongs to W{sup 1,1}({Omega}), b.n = 0 on {partial_derivative}{Omega}, and that there exists T{sub o} > O such that exp(T{sub o}{vert_bar}div b{vert_bar}) {element_of} L{sup 1}({Omega}). Furthermore, we establish results on transport equations with initial values in L{sup p} spaces (p > 1). 9 refs.

  3. Moment equations in spatial evolutionary ecology.

    PubMed

    Lion, Sébastien

    2016-09-21

    How should we model evolution in spatially structured populations? Here, I review an evolutionary ecology approach based on the technique of spatial moment equations. I first provide a mathematical underpinning to the derivation of equations for the densities of various spatial configurations in network-based models. I then show how this spatial ecological framework can be coupled with an adaptive dynamics approach to compute the invasion fitness of a rare mutant in a resident population at equilibrium. Under the additional assumption that mutations have small phenotypic effects, I show that the selection gradient can be expressed as a function of neutral measures of genetic and demographic structure. I discuss the connections between this approach and inclusive fitness theory, as well as the applicability and limits of this technique. My main message is that spatial moment equations can be used as a means to obtain compact qualitative arguments about the evolution of life-history traits for a variety of life cycles.

  4. Solvers for the Cardiac Bidomain Equations

    PubMed Central

    Vigmond, E.J.; Weber dos Santos, R.; Prassl, A.J.; Deo, M.; Plank, G.

    2010-01-01

    The bidomain equations are widely used for the simulation of electrical activity in cardiac tissue. They are especially important for accurately modelling extracellular stimulation, as evidenced by their prediction of virtual electrode polarization before experimental verification. However, solution of the equations is computationally expensive due to the fine spatial and temporal discretization needed. This limits the size and duration of the problem which can be modeled. Regardless of the specific form into which they are cast, the computational bottleneck becomes the repeated solution of a large, linear system. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the equations, and the methods by which they have been solved. Of particular note are recent developments in multigrid methods, which have proven to be the most efficient. PMID:17900668

  5. Braces and the Yang-Baxter Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedó, Ferran; Jespers, Eric; Okniński, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Several aspects of relations between braces and non-degenerate involutive set-theoretic solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation are discussed and many consequences are derived. In particular, for each positive integer n a finite square-free multipermutation solution of the Yang-Baxter equation with multipermutation level n and an abelian involutive Yang-Baxter group is constructed. This answers a problem of Gateva-Ivanova and Cameron. It is proved that finite non-degenerate involutive set-theoretic solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation whose associated involutive Yang-Baxter group is abelian are multipermutation solutions. Earlier the authors proved this with the additional square-free hypothesis on the solutions. It is also proved that finite square-free non-degenerate involutive set-theoretic solutions associated to a left brace are multipermutation solutions.

  6. Pdf - Transport equations for chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollmann, W.

    1989-01-01

    The closure problem for the transport equations for pdf and the characteristic functions of turbulent, chemically reacting flows is addressed. The properties of the linear and closed equations for the characteristic functional for Eulerian and Lagrangian variables are established, and the closure problem for the finite-dimensional case is discussed for pdf and characteristic functions. It is shown that the closure for the scalar dissipation term in the pdf equation developed by Dopazo (1979) and Kollmann et al. (1982) results in a single integral, in contrast to the pdf, where double integration is required. Some recent results using pdf methods obtained for turbulent flows with combustion, including effects of chemical nonequilibrium, are discussed.

  7. Lorentz Abraham Force and Power Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghjian, Arthur D.

    Toward the end of the nineteenth century Lorentz modeled the electron (“vibrating charged particle,” as he called it) by a spherical shell of uniform surface charge density and set about the difficult task of deriving the equation of motion of this electron model by determining, from Maxwell's equations and the Lorentz force law, the retarded self electromagnetic force that the fields of the accelerating charge distribution exert upon the charge itself [1]. (This initial work of Lorentz in 1892 on a moving charged sphere appeared five years before J.J. Thomson's “discovery” of the electron. It is summarized in English by J.Z. Buchwald [2, app. 7].) With the help of Abraham,1 a highly successful theory of the moving electron model was completed by the early 1900's [3, 4]. Before Einstein's papers [5, 6] on special relativity appeared in 1905, they had derived the following force equation of motion

  8. The Boltzmann equation in molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Jean-Marc; Ouanounou, Gilles; Rouzaire-Dubois, Béatrice

    2009-01-01

    In the 1870's, Ludwig Boltzmann proposed a simple equation that was based on the notion of atoms and molecules and that defined the probability of finding a molecule in a given state. Several years later, the Boltzmann equation was developed and used to calculate the equilibrium potential of an ion species that is permeant through membrane channels and to describe conformational changes of biological molecules involved in different mechanisms including: open probability of ion channels, effect of molecular crowding on protein conformation, biochemical reactions and cell proliferation. The aim of this review is to trace the history of the developments of the Boltzmann equation that account for the behaviour of proteins involved in molecular biology and physiology.

  9. Nondiffracting accelerating wave packets of Maxwell's equations.

    PubMed

    Kaminer, Ido; Bekenstein, Rivka; Nemirovsky, Jonathan; Segev, Mordechai

    2012-04-20

    We present the nondiffracting spatially accelerating solutions of the Maxwell equations. Such beams accelerate in a circular trajectory, thus generalizing the concept of Airy beams to the full domain of the wave equation. For both TE and TM polarizations, the beams exhibit shape-preserving bending which can have subwavelength features, and the Poynting vector of the main lobe displays a turn of more than 90°. We show that these accelerating beams are self-healing, analyze their properties, and find the new class of accelerating breathers: self-bending beams of periodically oscillating shapes. Finally, we emphasize that in their scalar form, these beams are the exact solutions for nondispersive accelerating wave packets of the most common wave equation describing time-harmonic waves. As such, this work has profound implications to many linear wave systems in nature, ranging from acoustic and elastic waves to surface waves in fluids and membranes. PMID:22680719

  10. Dynamic discretization method for solving Kepler's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinstein, Scott A.; McLaughlin, Craig A.

    2006-09-01

    Kepler’s equation needs to be solved many times for a variety of problems in Celestial Mechanics. Therefore, computing the solution to Kepler’s equation in an efficient manner is of great importance to that community. There are some historical and many modern methods that address this problem. Of the methods known to the authors, Fukushima’s discretization technique performs the best. By taking more of a system approach and combining the use of discretization with the standard computer science technique known as dynamic programming, we were able to achieve even better performance than Fukushima. We begin by defining Kepler’s equation for the elliptical case and describe existing solution methods. We then present our dynamic discretization method and show the results of a comparative analysis. This analysis will demonstrate that, for the conditions of our tests, dynamic discretization performs the best.

  11. Propagating Qualitative Values Through Quantitative Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Deepak

    1992-01-01

    In most practical problems where traditional numeric simulation is not adequate, one need to reason about a system with both qualitative and quantitative equations. In this paper, we address the problem of propagating qualitative values represented as interval values through quantitative equations. Previous research has produced exponential-time algorithms for approximate solution of the problem. These may not meet the stringent requirements of many real time applications. This paper advances the state of art by producing a linear-time algorithm that can propagate a qualitative value through a class of complex quantitative equations exactly and through arbitrary algebraic expressions approximately. The algorithm was found applicable to Space Shuttle Reaction Control System model.

  12. Nondiffracting accelerating wave packets of Maxwell's equations.

    PubMed

    Kaminer, Ido; Bekenstein, Rivka; Nemirovsky, Jonathan; Segev, Mordechai

    2012-04-20

    We present the nondiffracting spatially accelerating solutions of the Maxwell equations. Such beams accelerate in a circular trajectory, thus generalizing the concept of Airy beams to the full domain of the wave equation. For both TE and TM polarizations, the beams exhibit shape-preserving bending which can have subwavelength features, and the Poynting vector of the main lobe displays a turn of more than 90°. We show that these accelerating beams are self-healing, analyze their properties, and find the new class of accelerating breathers: self-bending beams of periodically oscillating shapes. Finally, we emphasize that in their scalar form, these beams are the exact solutions for nondispersive accelerating wave packets of the most common wave equation describing time-harmonic waves. As such, this work has profound implications to many linear wave systems in nature, ranging from acoustic and elastic waves to surface waves in fluids and membranes.

  13. Differential equation models for sharp threshold dynamics.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Harrison C; Dimitrov, Nedialko B

    2014-01-01

    We develop an extension to differential equation models of dynamical systems to allow us to analyze probabilistic threshold dynamics that fundamentally and globally change system behavior. We apply our novel modeling approach to two cases of interest: a model of infectious disease modified for malware where a detection event drastically changes dynamics by introducing a new class in competition with the original infection; and the Lanchester model of armed conflict, where the loss of a key capability drastically changes the effectiveness of one of the sides. We derive and demonstrate a step-by-step, repeatable method for applying our novel modeling approach to an arbitrary system, and we compare the resulting differential equations to simulations of the system's random progression. Our work leads to a simple and easily implemented method for analyzing probabilistic threshold dynamics using differential equations.

  14. Unified constitutive equations of foam materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Fu S.; Song, Y.; Lu, D.X.; DeSilva, C.N.

    1998-07-01

    Foam materials, because of their energy absorbing and recovery behavior during impact as well as lightweight and moldable characteristics, have found more and more applications in the automotive industry. A unified constitutive equation with the effect of compression strain rate, tension strain, and shear strain for foam materials with very low Poisson`s ratio has been developed. The mathematical derivation of the constitutive equation is described in detail. The effect of each parameter in the constitutive equation is studied. Numerical formula and procedure are also included in the paper. The test data of two types of energy absorbing foam materials are used for correlation study: polyurethane foam, which was tested at five compressive strain rates, and polypropylene foam, which was tested for quasi-static compression, tension, and shear. Good correlations have been concluded for both cases.

  15. The HotQCD Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Soltz, R A

    2009-08-13

    We present results from recent calculations of the QCD equation of state by the HotQCD Collaboration and review the implications for hydrodynamic modeling. The equation of state of QCD at zero baryon density was calculated on a lattice of dimensions 32{sup 3} x 8 with m{sub l} = 0.1 m{sub s} (corresponding to a pion mass of {approx}220 MeV) using two improved staggered fermion actions, p4 and asqtad. Calculations were performed along lines of constant physics using more than 100M cpu-hours on BG/L supercomputers at LLNL, NYBlue, and SDSC. We present parameterizations of the equation of state suitable for input into hydrodynamics models of heavy ion collisions.

  16. Stochastic Differential Equation of Earthquakes Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Maria C.; Tweneboah, Osei K.; Gonzalez-Huizar, Hector; Serpa, Laura

    2016-07-01

    This work is devoted to modeling earthquake time series. We propose a stochastic differential equation based on the superposition of independent Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes driven by a Γ (α, β ) process. Superposition of independent Γ (α, β ) Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes offer analytic flexibility and provides a class of continuous time processes capable of exhibiting long memory behavior. The stochastic differential equation is applied to the study of earthquakes by fitting the superposed Γ (α, β ) Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model to earthquake sequences in South America containing very large events (Mw ≥ 8). We obtained very good fit of the observed magnitudes of the earthquakes with the stochastic differential equations, which supports the use of this methodology for the study of earthquakes sequence.

  17. Algebraic approach to solve tt dilepton equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2005-11-01

    The set of nonlinear equations describing the standard model kinematics of the top quark antiquark production system in the dilepton decay channel has at most a fourfold ambiguity due to two not fully reconstructed neutrinos. Its most precise solution is of major importance for measurements of top quark properties like the top quark mass and tt spin correlations. Simple algebraic operations allow one to transform the nonlinear equations into a system of two polynomial equations with two unknowns. These two polynomials of multidegree eight can in turn be analytically reduced to one polynomial with one unknown by means of resultants. The obtained univariate polynomial is of degree 16. The number of its real solutions is determined analytically by means of Sturm's theorem, which is as well used to isolate each real solution into a unique pairwise disjoint interval. The solutions are polished by seeking the sign change of the polynomial in a given interval through binary bracketing.

  18. Symmetry Breaking And The Nilpotent Dirac Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, Peter

    2004-08-01

    A multivariate 4-vector representation for space-time and a quaternion representation for mass and the electric, strong and weak charges leads to a nilpotent form of the Dirac equation, which packages the entire physical information available about a fermion state. The nilpotent state vector breaks the symmetry between the strong, electric and weak interactions, by associating their respective charges with vector, scalar and pseudoscalar operators, leading directly to the SU(3) × SU(2)L × U(1) symmetry, and to particle structures and mass-generating states. In addition, the nilpotent Dirac equation has just three solutions for spherically-symmetric distance-dependent potentials, and these correspond once again to those that would be expected for the three interactions: linear for the strong interaction; inverse linear for the electromagnetic; and a harmonic oscillator-type solution, which can be equated with the dipolar annihilation and creation mechanisms of the weak interaction.

  19. Efficient inverse solution of Kepler's equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boltz, Frederick W.

    1986-01-01

    A bicubic polynomial approximation to Kepler's equation for elliptic orbits is shown to provide accurate starting values for efficient numerical solution of this equation for eccentric anomaly. In the approximate equation, a cubic in mean anomaly is set equal to a cubic in eccentric anomaly. The coefficients in the two cubics are obtained as functions of eccentricity by specifying values of function and slope at the midpoint and the endpoint of the complete interval (0 to pi). The initial estimate of eccentric anomaly to use in an iteration formula is obtained by evaluating the cubic in mean anomaly and finding the single real root of the cubic in eccentric anomaly. Numerical results are presented which indicate that the estimate accuracy of this method is roughly an order of magnitude better than that of other recently-reported formulas.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann model for nonlinear convection-diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Baochang; Guo, Zhaoli

    2009-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model for convection-diffusion equation with nonlinear convection and isotropic-diffusion terms is proposed through selecting equilibrium distribution function properly. The model can be applied to the common real and complex-valued nonlinear evolutionary equations, such as the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, Burgers-Fisher equation, nonlinear heat conduction equation, and sine-Gordon equation, by using a real and complex-valued distribution function and relaxation time. Detailed simulations of these equations are performed, and it is found that the numerical results agree well with the analytical solutions and the numerical solutions reported in previous studies.

  1. Finding solutions to the Einstein equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millward, Robert Steven

    2004-07-01

    This dissertation is a description of a variety of methods of solving the Einstein equations describing the gravitational interaction in different mathematical and astrophysical settings. We begin by discussing a numerical study of the Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs system in spherical symmetry. The equations are presented along with boundary and initial conditions. An explanation of the numerical scheme is then given. This is followed by a discussion of the solutions obtained together with an interpretation in the context of gravitational collapse and critical phenomena at the threshold of black hole formation. Following this, we generalize the same system to axisymmetry. The full, gravitational equations are presented along with a short discussion of the problems we encountered in trying to solve these. As a first step we consider evolving the matter fields in flat space. The simplified equations are given and the numerical scheme implemented to solve them discussed. We then consider some analytic techniques to understanding the Einstein equations and the gravitating systems they should describe. One such is to change the spacetime dimension. This we do in considering magnetic solutions to the (2 + 1) Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton system with nonzero cosmological constant. The solutions are investigated to determine whether these correspond to “soliton”-like solutions or black holes. As another example of this general approach, we introduce an extra timelike coordinate into the spherically symmetric vacuum system, and attempt to find a solution comparing the result to the more well known Schwarzschild solution. Finally, we give a short description of some preliminary work which will combine some of these numerical and analytical techniques. This approach simply takes the matter fields as weak and propagates them on a fixed spacetime background. In our particular case, we intend to study the evolution of Maxwell fields in the Schwarzschild geometry. We provide

  2. What physics is encoded in Maxwell's equations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosyakov, B. P.

    2005-08-01

    We reconstruct Maxwell's equations showing that a major part of the information encoded in them is taken from topological properties of spacetime, and the residual information, divorced from geometry, which represents the physical contents of electrodynamics, %these equations, translates into four assumptions:(i) locality; (ii) linearity; %of the dynamical law; (iii) identity of the charge-source and the charge-coupling; and (iv) lack of magnetic monopoles. However, a closer inspection of symmetries peculiar to electrodynamics shows that these assumptions may have much to do with geometry. Maxwell's equations tell us that we live in a three-dimensional space with trivial (Euclidean) topology; time is a one-dimensional unidirectional and noncompact continuum; and spacetime is endowed with a light cone structure readable in the conformal invariance of electrodynamics. Our geometric feelings relate to the fact that Maxwell's equations are built in our brain, hence our space and time orientation, our visualization and imagination capabilities are ensured by perpetual instinctive processes of solving Maxwell's equations. People are usually agree in their observations of angle relations, for example, a right angle is never confused with an angle slightly different from right. By contrast, we may disagree in metric issues, say, a colour-blind person finds the light wave lengths quite different from those found by a man with normal vision. This lends support to the view that conformal invariance of Maxwell's equations is responsible for producing our notion of space. Assuming that our geometric intuition is guided by our innate realization of electrodynamical laws, some abnormal mental phenomena, such as clairvoyance, may have a rational explanation.

  3. PREFACE: Symmetries and Integrability of Difference Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doliwa, Adam; Korhonen, Risto; Lafortune, Stéphane

    2007-10-01

    The notion of integrability was first introduced in the 19th century in the context of classical mechanics with the definition of Liouville integrability for Hamiltonian flows. Since then, several notions of integrability have been introduced for partial and ordinary differential equations. Closely related to integrability theory is the symmetry analysis of nonlinear evolution equations. Symmetry analysis takes advantage of the Lie group structure of a given equation to study its properties. Together, integrability theory and symmetry analysis provide the main method by which nonlinear evolution equations can be solved explicitly. Difference equations (DE), like differential equations, are important in numerous fields of science and have a wide variety of applications in such areas as mathematical physics, computer visualization, numerical analysis, mathematical biology, economics, combinatorics, and quantum field theory. It is thus crucial to develop tools to study and solve DEs. While the theory of symmetry and integrability for differential equations is now largely well-established, this is not yet the case for discrete equations. Although over recent years there has been significant progress in the development of a complete analytic theory of difference equations, further tools are still needed to fully understand, for instance, the symmetries, asymptotics and the singularity structure of difference equations. The series of SIDE meetings on Symmetries and Integrability of Difference Equations started in 1994. Its goal is to provide a platform for an international and interdisciplinary communication for researchers working in areas associated with integrable discrete systems, such as classical and quantum physics, computer science and numerical analysis, mathematical biology and economics, discrete geometry and combinatorics, theory of special functions, etc. The previous SIDE meetings took place in Estérel near Montréal, Canada (1994), at the University of

  4. Linear partial difference equations of hypergeometric type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodal, J.; Area, I.; Godoy, E.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper a systematic study of the orthogonal polynomial solutions of a second order partial difference equation of hypergeometric type of two variables is done. The Pearson's systems for the orthogonality weight of the solutions and also for the difference derivatives of the solutions are presented. The orthogonality property in subspaces is treated in detail, which leads to an analog of the Rodrigues-type formula for orthogonal polynomials of two discrete variables. A classification of the admissible equations as well as some examples related with bivariate Hahn, Kravchuk, Meixner, and Charlier families, and their algebraic and difference properties are explicitly given.

  5. Generating solutions to the Einstein field equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contopoulos, I. G.; Esposito, F. P.; Kleidis, K.; Papadopoulos, D. B.; Witten, L.

    2016-11-01

    Exact solutions to the Einstein field equations may be generated from already existing ones (seed solutions), that admit at least one Killing vector. In this framework, a space of potentials is introduced. By the use of symmetries in this space, the set of potentials associated to a known solution is transformed into a new set, either by continuous transformations or by discrete transformations. In view of this method, and upon consideration of continuous transformations, we arrive at some exact, stationary axisymmetric solutions to the Einstein field equations in vacuum, that may be of geometrical or/and physical interest.

  6. Thermoelastic constitutive equations for chemically hardening materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, B. W.; Levitsky, M.

    1974-01-01

    Thermoelastic constitutive equations are derived for a material undergoing solidification or hardening as the result of a chemical reaction. The derivation is based upon a two component model whose composition is determined by the degree of hardening, and makes use of strain-energy considerations. Constitutive equations take the form of stress rate-strain rate relations, in which the coefficients are time-dependent functions of the composition. Specific results are developed for the case of a material of constant bulk modulus which undergoes a transition from an initial liquidlike state into an isotropic elastic solid. Potential applications are discussed.

  7. Constitutive equations of ageing polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, S. T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The constitutive equation for the relaxation behavior of time-dependent, chemically unstable materials developed by Valanis and Peng (1983), which used the irreversible thermodynamics of internal variables in Eyring's absolute reaction theory and yielded a theoretical expression for the effect of chemical crosslink density on the relaxation rate, is presently applied to the creep behavior of a network polymer which is undergoing a scission process. In particular, two equations are derived which may for the first time show the relations between mechanical models and internal variables in the creep expressions, using a three-element model with a Maxwell element.

  8. Mesoscopic virial equation for nonequilibrium statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falasco, G.; Baldovin, F.; Kroy, K.; Baiesi, M.

    2016-09-01

    We derive a class of mesoscopic virial equations governing energy partition between conjugate position and momentum variables of individual degrees of freedom. They are shown to apply to a wide range of nonequilibrium steady states with stochastic (Langevin) and deterministic (Nosé-Hoover) dynamics, and to extend to collective modes for models of heat-conducting lattices. A macroscopic virial theorem ensues upon summation over all degrees of freedom. It allows for the derivation of generalised (nonequilibrium) equations of state that involve average dissipative heat flows besides genuine state variables, as exemplified for inertial Brownian motion with solid friction and overdamped active Brownian particles subject to inhomogeneous pressure.

  9. General surface equations for glancing incidence telescopes.

    PubMed

    Saha, T T

    1987-02-15

    A generalized set of equations are derived for two mirror glancing incidence telescopes using Fermat's principle, a differential form of the law of reflection, the generalized sine condition, and a ray propagation equation described in vector form as a theoretical basis. The resulting formulation groups the possible telescope configurations into three distinct classes which are the Wolter, Wolter-Schwarzschild, and higherorder telescopes in which the Hettrick-Bowyer types are a subset. Eight configurations are possible within each class depending on the sign and magnitude of the parameters. PMID:20454195

  10. A multigrid method for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    A multigrid algorithm has been developed for the numerical solution of the steady two-dimensional Euler equations. Flux vector splitting and one-sided differencing are employed to define the spatial discretization. Newton's method is used to solve the nonlinear equations, and a multigrid solver is used on each linear problem. The relaxation scheme for the linear problems is symmetric Gauss-Seidel. Standard restriction and interpolation operators are employed. Local mode analysis is used to predict the convergence rate of the multigrid process on the linear problems. Computed results for transonic flows over airfoils are presented.

  11. Noise-proof inversion of lidar equation.

    PubMed

    Balin, Y S; Kavkyanov, S I; Krekov, G M; Razenkov, I A

    1987-01-01

    The reasons for instability of the lidar equation solution are investigated. An effective method of recovering the attenuation coefficient profile and transmittance of an optically thick atmosphere from the data of single-frequency laser sounding is suggested. The method enables one to obtain stable solutions of the lidar equation for sounding paths adjacent to the horizontal ones withoutthe use of absolute calibration of the lidar. A comparison is made with the known algorithms of processing. The results of experimental tests of the method when sounding fogs in the boundary atmospheric layer are described.

  12. Multiverse rate equation including bubble collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Michael P.

    2013-03-01

    The volume fractions of vacua in an eternally inflating multiverse are described by a coarse-grain rate equation, which accounts for volume expansion and vacuum transitions via bubble formation. We generalize the rate equation to account for bubble collisions, including the possibility of classical transitions. Classical transitions can modify the details of the hierarchical structure among the volume fractions, with potential implications for the staggering and Boltzmann-brain issues. Whether or not our vacuum is likely to have been established by a classical transition depends on the detailed relationships among transition rates in the landscape.

  13. Algorithms For Integrating Nonlinear Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Walker, K. P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved algorithms developed for use in numerical integration of systems of nonhomogenous, nonlinear, first-order, ordinary differential equations. In comparison with integration algorithms, these algorithms offer greater stability and accuracy. Several asymptotically correct, thereby enabling retention of stability and accuracy when large increments of independent variable used. Accuracies attainable demonstrated by applying them to systems of nonlinear, first-order, differential equations that arise in study of viscoplastic behavior, spread of acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) virus and predator/prey populations.

  14. Solving a specific Thue-Mahler equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanakis, N.; de Weger, B. M. M.

    1991-10-01

    The diophantine equation {x^3} - 3x{y^2} - {y^3} = ± {3^{{n_0}}}{17^{{n_1}}}{19^{{n_2}}} is completely solved as follows. First, a large upper bound for the variables is obtained from the theory of linear forms in p-adic and real logarithms of algebraic numbers. Then this bound is reduced to a manageable size by p-adic and real computational diophantine approximation, based on the {L^3} -algorithm. Finally the complete list of solutions is found in a sieving process. The method is in principle applicable to any Thue-Mahler equation, as the authors will show in a forthcoming paper.

  15. Space station rotational equations of motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rheinfurth, M. H.; Carroll, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic equations of motion are developed which describe the rotational motion for a large space structure having rotating appendages. The presence of the appendages produce torque coupling terms which are dependent on the inertia properties of the appendages and the rotational rates for both the space structure and the appendages. These equations were formulated to incorporate into the Space Station Attitude Control and Stabilization Test Bed to accurately describe the influence rotating solar arrays and thermal radiators have on the dynamic behavior of the Space Station.

  16. Inverse source problems for eddy current equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso Rodríguez, Ana; Camaño, Jessika; Valli, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    We study the inverse source problem for the eddy current approximation of Maxwell equations. As for the full system of Maxwell equations, we show that a volume current source cannot be uniquely identified by knowledge of the tangential components of the electromagnetic fields on the boundary, and we characterize the space of non-radiating sources. On the other hand, we prove that the inverse source problem has a unique solution if the source is supported on the boundary of a subdomain or if it is the sum of a finite number of dipoles. We address the applicability of this result for the localization of brain activity from electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography measurements.

  17. Space Time Defined by Stress Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, H.

    2004-07-01

    Time can never be measured directly. Time is calculated from changed lengths and angles by using all clocks. In addition, an atomic absolute clock and an atomic absolute telemeter have a contradictory relation to depend on each other. Of course, there is no absolute time. The time of all clocks are changed by energy states such as gravity or temperature. Here, I report an equation relating time to energy. It was deduced from my stress equation (dE/dt=kE). t=log E(t)/E(0)/k The relation of time to changed energy was shown.

  18. Relativistic wave equations: an operational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattoli, G.; Sabia, E.; Górska, K.; Horzela, A.; Penson, K. A.

    2015-03-01

    The use of operator methods of an algebraic nature is shown to be a very powerful tool to deal with different forms of relativistic wave equations. The methods provide either exact or approximate solutions for various forms of differential equations, such as relativistic Schrödinger, Klein-Gordon, and Dirac. We discuss the free-particle hypotheses and those relevant to particles subject to non-trivial potentials. In the latter case we will show how the proposed method leads to easily implementable numerical algorithms.

  19. Riccati equations for bounded radiating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharaj, S. D.; Tiwari, A. K.; Mohanlal, R.; Narain, R.

    2016-09-01

    We systematically analyze the nonlinear partial differential equation that determines the behaviour of a bounded radiating spherical mass in general relativity. Four categories of solution are possible. These are identified in terms of restrictions on the gravitational potentials. One category of solution can be related to the horizon function transformation which was recently introduced. A Lie symmetry analysis of the resulting Riccati equation shows that several new classes of exact solutions are possible. The relationship between the horizon function, Euclidean star models, and other earlier investigations is clarified.

  20. Initialization procedures for primitive equation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. K. F.; Kalnay Derivas, E.

    1975-01-01

    A linear analysis and comparison of the damping properties of six dynamic initialization schemes is presented, indicating that the Okamura-Rivas scheme has the most efficient damping properties over the whole frequency range, and suggesting that it should be faster than the other methods and given more stable results. The results obtained with a nonlinear shallow water equations model agree well with the linear analysis. The Okamura-Rivas scheme attains complete balance in the equivalent of 5 to 6 hours of leapfrog forecasting, and requires in this model an order of magnitude less computation than the balance equation solution.

  1. Fractional field equations for highly improbable events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, H.

    2013-06-01

    Free and weakly interacting particles perform approximately Gaussian random walks with collisions. They follow a second-quantized nonlinear Schrödinger equation, or relativistic versions of it. By contrast, the fields of strongly interacting particles extremize more involved effective actions obeying fractional wave equations with anomalous dimensions. Their particle orbits perform universal Lévy walks with heavy tails, in which rare events are much more frequent than in Gaussian random walks. Such rare events are observed in exceptionally strong windgusts, monster or rogue waves, earthquakes, and financial crashes. While earthquakes may destroy entire cities, the latter have the potential of devastating entire economies.

  2. Integrability of Lie Systems Through Riccati Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariñena, José F.; de Lucas, Javier

    Integrability conditions for Lie systems are related to reduction or transformation processes. We here analyse a geometric method to construct integrability conditions for Riccati equations following these approaches. This approach provides us with a unified geometrical viewpoint that allows us to analyse some previous works on the topic and explain new properties. Moreover, this new approach can be straightforwardly generalised to describe integrability conditions for any Lie system. Finally, we show the usefulness of our treatment in order to study the problem of the linearisability of Riccati equations.

  3. Dispersion relation equation preserving FDTD method for nonlinear cubic Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Tony W. H.; Le Lin

    2015-10-01

    In this study we aim to solve the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger (CNLS) equation by the method of fractional steps. Over a time step from tn to tn+1, the linear part of the Schrödinger equation is solved firstly through four time integration steps. In this part of the simulation, the explicit symplectic scheme of fourth order accuracy is adopted to approximate the time derivative term. The second-order spatial derivative term in the linear Schrödinger equation is approximated by centered scheme. The resulting symplectic and space centered difference scheme renders an optimized numerical dispersion relation equation. In the second part of the simulation, the solution of the nonlinear equation is computed exactly thanks to the embedded invariant nature within each time increment. The proposed semi-discretized difference scheme underlying the modified equation analysis of second kind and the method of dispersion error minimization has been assessed in terms of the spatial modified wavenumber or the temporal angular frequency resolution. Several problems have been solved to show that application of this new finite difference scheme for the calculation of one- and two-dimensional Schrödinger equations can deemed conserve Hamiltonian quantities and preserve dispersion relation equation (DRE).

  4. Derivation of kinetic equations from non-Wiener stochastic differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basharov, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Kinetic differential-difference equations containing terms with fractional derivatives and describing α -stable Levy processes with 0 < α < 1 have been derived in a unified manner in terms of one-dimensional stochastic differential equations controlled merely by the Poisson processes.

  5. Equation of state for hard convex body fluids from the equation of state of the hard sphere fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeso, M. J.; Solana, J. R.

    1994-02-01

    A simple and accurate equation of state for fluids of hard convex molecules is derived from the pressure equation and the equation of state of the hard sphere fluid. The equation of state provides theoretical support to some equations of state used in perturbation theories for real molecular liquids. The equation of state reproduces the simulation data with an accuracy comparable to that derived from density functional theory.

  6. Transport equations for a general class of evolution equations with random perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Maozheng; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    1999-10-01

    We derive transport equations from a general class of equations of form iut=H(X,D)u+V(X,D)u where H(X,D) and V(X,D) are pseudodifferential operators (Weyl operator) with symbols H(x,k) and V(x,k), where H(x,k) being polynomial in k and smooth in x,V(x,k) is a mean zero random function and is stationary in space variable. We also consider system of equations in the above form. Such equations cover many of the equations that arise in wave propagations, such as those considered in a paper by Ryzhik, Papanicolaou, and Keller [Wave Motion 24, 327-370 (1996)]. Our results generalize those by Ryzhik, Papanicolau, and Keller.

  7. A theorem allowing to derive deterministic evolution equations from stochastic evolution equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza, G.

    2011-05-01

    The deterministic evolution equations of classical as well as quantum mechanical models are derived from a set of stochastic evolution equations after taking an average over realizations using a theorem. Examples are given that show that deterministic quantum mechanical evolution equations, obtained initially by R.P. Feynman and subsequently studied by Boghosian and Taylor IV [B.M. Boghosian, W. Taylor IV, Phys. Rev. E 57 (1998) 54. See also arXiv:quant-ph/9904035] and Meyer [D.A. Meyer, Phys. Rev. E 55 (1997) 5261], among others, are derived from a set of stochastic evolution equations. In addition, a deterministic classical evolution equation for the diffusion of monomers, similar to the second Fick law, is also obtained.

  8. Parallels between control PDE's (Partial Differential Equations) and systems of ODE's (Ordinary Differential Equations)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Villarreal, Ramiro

    1987-01-01

    System theorists understand that the same mathematical objects which determine controllability for nonlinear control systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) also determine hypoellipticity for linear partial differentail equations (PDEs). Moreover, almost any study of ODE systems begins with linear systems. It is remarkable that Hormander's paper on hypoellipticity of second order linear p.d.e.'s starts with equations due to Kolmogorov, which are shown to be analogous to the linear PDEs. Eigenvalue placement by state feedback for a controllable linear system can be paralleled for a Kolmogorov equation if an appropriate type of feedback is introduced. Results concerning transformations of nonlinear systems to linear systems are similar to results for transforming a linear PDE to a Kolmogorov equation.

  9. Nonhydrostatic correction for shallow water equations with quadratic vertical pressure distribution: A Boussinesq-type equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschke, Anja; Behrens, Jörn

    2015-04-01

    In tsunami modeling, two different systems of dispersive long wave equations are common: The nonhydrostatic pressure correction for the shallow water equations derived out of the depth-integrated 3D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, and the category of Boussinesq-type equations obtained by an expansion in the nondimensional parameters for nonlinearity and dispersion in the Euler equations. The first system uses as an assumption a linear vertical interpolation of the nonhydrostatic pressure, whereas the second system's derivation includes an quadratic vertical interpolation for the nonhydrostatic pressure. In this case the analytical dispersion relations do not coincide. We show that the nonhydrostatic correction with a quadratic vertical interpolation yields an equation set equivalent to the Serre equations, which are 1D Boussinesq-type equations for the case of a horizontal bottom. Now, both systems yield the same analytical dispersion relation according up to the first order with the reference dispersion relation of the linear wave theory. The adjusted model is also compared to other Boussinesq-type equations. The numerical model with the nonhydrostatic correction for the shallow water equations uses Leapfrog timestepping stabilized with the Asselin filter and the P1-PNC1 finite element space discretization. The numerical dispersion relations are computed and compared by employing a testcase of a standing wave in a closed basin. All numerical values match their theoretical expectations. This work is funded by project ASTARTE - Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe - FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3, Grant 603839. We acknowledge the support given by Geir K. Petersen from the University of Oslo.

  10. Ballistic Limit Equation for Single Wall Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratliff, J. M.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Bryant, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests and hydrocode simulations were used to determine the ballistic limit equation (BLE) for perforation of a titanium wall, as a function of wall thickness. Two titanium alloys were considered, and separate BLEs were derived for each. Tested wall thicknesses ranged from 0.5mm to 2.0mm. The single-wall damage equation of Cour-Palais [ref. 1] was used to analyze the Ti wall's shielding effectiveness. It was concluded that the Cour-Palais single-wall equation produced a non-conservative prediction of the ballistic limit for the Ti shield. The inaccurate prediction was not a particularly surprising result; the Cour-Palais single-wall BLE contains shield material properties as parameters, but it was formulated only from tests of different aluminum alloys. Single-wall Ti shield tests were run (thicknesses of 2.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.5 mm) on Ti 15-3-3-3 material custom cut from rod stock. Hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were used to establish the failure threshold empirically, using the additional constraint that the damage scales with impact energy, as was indicated by hydrocode simulations. The criterion for shield failure was defined as no detached spall from the shield back surface during HVI. Based on the test results, which confirmed an approximately energy-dependent shield effectiveness, the Cour-Palais equation was modified.

  11. A Unified Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutzer, Carl V.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes how a presentation from the point of view of differential operators can be used to (partially) unify the myriad techniques in an introductory course in ordinary differential equations by providing students with a powerful, flexible paradigm that extends into (or from) linear algebra. (Contains 1 footnote.)

  12. Computational Differential Equations: A Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roubides, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    The following article presents a proposal for the redesign of a traditional course in Differential Equations at Middle Georgia College. The redesign of the course involves a new approach to teaching traditional concepts: one where the understanding of the physical aspects of each problem takes precedence over the actual mechanics of solving the…

  13. The constitutive equation for membrane tether extraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Yao, Da-Kang; Shao, Jin-Yu

    2010-12-01

    Membrane tethers or nanotubes play a critical role in a variety of cellular and subcellular processes such as leukocyte rolling and intercellular mass transport. The current constitutive equations that describe the relationship between the pulling force and the tether velocity during tether extraction have serious limitations. In this article, we propose a new phenomenological constitutive equation that captures all known characteristics of nanotube formation, including nonlinearity, nonzero threshold force, and possible negative tether velocity. We used tether extraction from endothelial cells as a prototype to illustrate how to obtain the material constants in the constitutive equation. With the micropipette aspiration technique, we measured tether pulling forces at both positive and negative tether velocities. We also determined the threshold force of 55 pN experimentally for the first time. This new constitutive equation unites two established ones and provides us a unified platform to better understand not only the physiological role of tether extraction during leukocyte rolling and intercellular or intracellular transport, but also the physics of membrane tether growth or retraction.

  14. 'Footballs', conical singularities, and the Liouville equation

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, Michele

    2005-02-15

    We generalize the football shaped extra dimensions scenario to an arbitrary number of branes. The problem is related to the solution of the Liouville equation with singularities, and explicit solutions are presented for the case of three branes. The tensions of the branes do not need to be tuned with each other but only satisfy mild global constraints.

  15. Hedonic Wage Equations for Higher Education Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Philip E.; Marchand, James R.; Sexton, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses theoretical models of department and faculty choice. Models imply a hedonic wage equation for faculty with wages dependent on productivity, departmental amenities, and locational amenities. Empirical study finds that increased teaching loads and secretaries per faculty member tend to decrease salaries, while hotter than average summers,…

  16. Integrable hierarchies of Heisenberg ferromagnet equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugmanova, G.; Azimkhanova, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we consider the coupled Kadomtsev-Petviashvili system. From compatibility conditions we obtain the form of matrix operators. After using a gauge transformation, obtained a new type of Lax representation for the hierarchy of Heisenberg ferromagnet equation, which is equivalent to the gauge coupled Kadomtsev-Petviashvili system.

  17. Does Unit Analysis Help Students Construct Equations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Stephen K.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has shown that students construct equations for word problems in which many of the terms have no referents. Experiment 1 attempted to eliminate some of these errors by providing instruction on canceling units. The failure of this method was attributed to the cognitive overload (Sweller, 2003) imposed by adding units to the…

  18. Systems of Linear Equations on a Spreadsheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosch, William W.; Strickland, Jeff

    1998-01-01

    The Optimizer in Quattro Pro and the Solver in Excel software programs make solving linear and nonlinear optimization problems feasible for business mathematics students. Proposes ways in which the Optimizer or Solver can be coaxed into solving systems of linear equations. (ASK)

  19. Optimal trajectories based on linear equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    The Principal results of a recent theory of fuel optimal space trajectories for linear differential equations are presented. Both impulsive and bounded-thrust problems are treated. A new form of the Lawden Primer vector is found that is identical for both problems. For this reason, starting iteratives from the solution of the impulsive problem are highly effective in the solution of the two-point boundary-value problem associated with bounded thrust. These results were applied to the problem of fuel optimal maneuvers of a spacecraft near a satellite in circular orbit using the Clohessy-Wiltshire equations. For this case two-point boundary-value problems were solved using a microcomputer, and optimal trajectory shapes displayed. The results of this theory can also be applied if the satellite is in an arbitrary Keplerian orbit through the use of the Tschauner-Hempel equations. A new form of the solution of these equations has been found that is identical for elliptical, parabolic, and hyperbolic orbits except in the way that a certain integral is evaluated. For elliptical orbits this integral is evaluated through the use of the eccentric anomaly. An analogous evaluation is performed for hyperbolic orbits.

  20. The Use of Transformations in Solving Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libeskind, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Many workshops and meetings with the US high school mathematics teachers revealed a lack of familiarity with the use of transformations in solving equations and problems related to the roots of polynomials. This note describes two transformational approaches to the derivation of the quadratic formula as well as transformational approaches to…

  1. Dilations and the Equation of a Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yopp, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Students engage in proportional reasoning when they use covariance and multiple comparisons. Without rich connections to proportional reasoning, students may develop inadequate understandings of linear relationships and the equations that model them. Teachers can improve students' understanding of linear relationships by focusing on realistic…

  2. Chiral dynamics from Dyson-Schwinger equations.

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagwat, M. S.; Roberts, C. D.; Physics

    2006-01-01

    A strongly momentum-dependent dressed-quark mass function is basic to QCD. It is central to the appearance of a constituent-quark mass-scale and an existential prerequisite for Goldstone modes. Dyson-Schwinger equation (DSE) studies have long emphasized these facts and are a natural way to exploit them.

  3. Dynamical equation of the effective gluon mass

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, A. C.; Binosi, D.; Papavassiliou, J.

    2011-10-15

    In this article, we derive the integral equation that controls the momentum dependence of the effective gluon mass in the Landau gauge. This is accomplished by means of a well-defined separation of the corresponding ''one-loop dressed'' Schwinger-Dyson equation into two distinct contributions, one associated with the mass and one with the standard kinetic part of the gluon. The entire construction relies on the existence of a longitudinally coupled vertex of nonperturbative origin, which enforces gauge invariance in the presence of a dynamical mass. The specific structure of the resulting mass equation, supplemented by the additional requirement of a positive-definite gluon mass, imposes a rather stringent constraint on the derivative of the gluonic dressing function, which is comfortably satisfied by the large-volume lattice data for the gluon propagator, both for SU(2) and SU(3). The numerical treatment of the mass equation, under some simplifying assumptions, is presented for the aforementioned gauge groups, giving rise to a gluon mass that is a nonmonotonic function of the momentum. Various theoretical improvements and possible future directions are briefly discussed.

  4. Interpreting Abstract Interpretations in Membership Equational Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Bernd; Rosu, Grigore

    2001-01-01

    We present a logical framework in which abstract interpretations can be naturally specified and then verified. Our approach is based on membership equational logic which extends equational logics by membership axioms, asserting that a term has a certain sort. We represent an abstract interpretation as a membership equational logic specification, usually as an overloaded order-sorted signature with membership axioms. It turns out that, for any term, its least sort over this specification corresponds to its most concrete abstract value. Maude implements membership equational logic and provides mechanisms to calculate the least sort of a term efficiently. We first show how Maude can be used to get prototyping of abstract interpretations "for free." Building on the meta-logic facilities of Maude, we further develop a tool that automatically checks and abstract interpretation against a set of user-defined properties. This can be used to select an appropriate abstract interpretation, to characterize the specified loss of information during abstraction, and to compare different abstractions with each other.

  5. Magnetic monopoles, Galilean invariance, and Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.S. . Physics Department)

    1992-02-01

    Maxwell's equations have space reserved for magnetic monopoles. Whether or not they exist in our part of the universe, monopoles provide a useful didactic tool to help us recognize relations among Maxwell's equations less easily apparent in the approach followed by many introductory textbooks, wherein Coulomb's law, Biot and Savart's law, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, Maxwell's displacement current, etc., are introduced independently, as demanded by experiment.'' Instead a conceptual path that deduces all of Maxwell's equations from the near-minimal set of assumptions: (a) Inertial frames exist, in which Newton's laws hold, to a first approximation; (b) the laws of electrodynamics are Galilean invariant---i.e., they have the same form in every inertial frame, to a first approximation; (c) magnetic poles (as well as the usual electric charges) exist; (d) the complete Lorentz force on an electric charge is known; (e) the force on a monopole at rest is known; (f) the Coulomb-like field produced by a resting electric charge and by a resting monopole are known. Everything else is deduced. History is followed in the assumption that Newtonian mechanics have been discovered, but not special relativity. (Only particle velocities {ital v}{much lt}{ital c} are considered.) This ends up with Maxwell's equations (Maxwell did not need special relativity, so why should we,) but facing Einstein's paradox, the solution of which is encapsulated in the Einstein velocity-addition formula.

  6. Analytic Solutions of the Vector Burgers Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerney, Steven; Schmahl, Edward J.; Musielak, Z. E.

    1996-01-01

    The well-known analytical solution of Burgers' equation is extended to curvilinear coordinate systems in three dimensions by a method that is much simpler and more suitable to practical applications than that previously used. The results obtained are applied to incompressible flow with cylindrical symmetry, and also to the decay of an initially linearly increasing wind.

  7. Optimal polarisation equations in FLRW universes

    SciTech Connect

    Tram, Thomas; Lesgourgues, Julien E-mail: Julien.Lesgourgues@cern.ch

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents the linearised Boltzmann equation for photons for scalar, vector and tensor perturbations in flat, open and closed FLRW cosmologies. We show that E- and B-mode polarisation for all types can be computed using only a single hierarchy. This was previously shown explicitly for tensor modes in flat cosmologies but not for vectors, and not for non-flat cosmologies.

  8. Quantum simulation of the Dirac equation.

    PubMed

    Gerritsma, R; Kirchmair, G; Zähringer, F; Solano, E; Blatt, R; Roos, C F

    2010-01-01

    The Dirac equation successfully merges quantum mechanics with special relativity. It provides a natural description of the electron spin, predicts the existence of antimatter and is able to reproduce accurately the spectrum of the hydrogen atom. The realm of the Dirac equation-relativistic quantum mechanics-is considered to be the natural transition to quantum field theory. However, the Dirac equation also predicts some peculiar effects, such as Klein's paradox and 'Zitterbewegung', an unexpected quivering motion of a free relativistic quantum particle. These and other predicted phenomena are key fundamental examples for understanding relativistic quantum effects, but are difficult to observe in real particles. In recent years, there has been increased interest in simulations of relativistic quantum effects using different physical set-ups, in which parameter tunability allows access to different physical regimes. Here we perform a proof-of-principle quantum simulation of the one-dimensional Dirac equation using a single trapped ion set to behave as a free relativistic quantum particle. We measure the particle position as a function of time and study Zitterbewegung for different initial superpositions of positive- and negative-energy spinor states, as well as the crossover from relativistic to non-relativistic dynamics. The high level of control of trapped-ion experimental parameters makes it possible to simulate textbook examples of relativistic quantum physics. PMID:20054392

  9. Numerical Solvers for Generalized Algebraic Riccati Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. G.; Rusinova, R. I.

    2009-10-01

    We consider a new type nonlinear matrix equation. We investigate the existence a positive definite solution and two iterative methods for computing this solution. The first method is the classical Newton procedure and the second is a new Stein iteration. In this paper it is proved that a new Stein iteration has convergence properties to those of the Newton iteration.

  10. Variational integrators for nonvariational partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Michael; Maj, Omar

    2015-08-01

    Variational integrators for Lagrangian dynamical systems provide a systematic way to derive geometric numerical methods. These methods preserve a discrete multisymplectic form as well as momenta associated to symmetries of the Lagrangian via Noether's theorem. An inevitable prerequisite for the derivation of variational integrators is the existence of a variational formulation for the considered problem. Even though for a large class of systems this requirement is fulfilled, there are many interesting examples which do not belong to this class, e.g., equations of advection-diffusion type frequently encountered in fluid dynamics or plasma physics. On the other hand, it is always possible to embed an arbitrary dynamical system into a larger Lagrangian system using the method of formal (or adjoint) Lagrangians. We investigate the application of the variational integrator method to formal Lagrangians, and thereby extend the application domain of variational integrators to include potentially all dynamical systems. The theory is supported by physically relevant examples, such as the advection equation and the vorticity equation, and numerically verified. Remarkably, the integrator for the vorticity equation combines Arakawa's discretisation of the Poisson brackets with a symplectic time stepping scheme in a fully covariant way such that the discrete energy is exactly preserved. In the presentation of the results, we try to make the geometric framework of variational integrators accessible to non specialists.

  11. Multiplicity Control in Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cribbie, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Researchers conducting structural equation modeling analyses rarely, if ever, control for the inflated probability of Type I errors when evaluating the statistical significance of multiple parameters in a model. In this study, the Type I error control, power and true model rates of famsilywise and false discovery rate controlling procedures were…

  12. Computer Applications in Balancing Chemical Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, David D.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses computer-based approaches to balancing chemical equations. Surveys 13 methods, 6 based on matrix, 2 interactive programs, 1 stand-alone system, 1 developed in algorithm in Basic, 1 based on design engineering, 1 written in HyperCard, and 1 prepared for the World Wide Web. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/YDS)

  13. Solves the Multigroup Neutron Diffusion Equation

    1995-06-23

    GNOMER is a program which solves the multigroup neutron diffusion equation in 1D, 2D and 3D cartesian geometry. The program is designed to calculate the global core power distributions (with thermohydraulic feedbacks), as well as power distribution and homogenized cross sections over a fuel assembly.

  14. On the Burgers-Poisson equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunert, K.; Nguyen, Khai T.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we prove the existence and uniqueness of weak entropy solutions to the Burgers-Poisson equation for initial data in L1 (R). In addition an Oleinik type estimate is established and some criteria on local smoothness and wave breaking for weak entropy solutions are provided.

  15. Stochastic thermodynamics for linear kinetic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Broeck, C.; Toral, R.

    2015-07-01

    Stochastic thermodynamics is formulated for variables that are odd under time reversal. The invariance under spatial rotation of the collision rates due to the isotropy of the heat bath is shown to be a crucial ingredient. An alternative detailed fluctuation theorem is derived, expressed solely in terms of forward statistics. It is illustrated for a linear kinetic equation with kangaroo rates.

  16. Nonlinear Resonance and Duffing's Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2006-01-01

    This note discusses the boundary in the frequency--amplitude plane for boundedness of solutions to the forced spring Duffing type equation. For fixed initial conditions and fixed parameter [epsilon] results are reported of a systematic numerical investigation on the global stability of solutions to the initial value problem as the parameters F and…

  17. Kranc: Cactus modules from Mathematica equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husa, Sascha; Hinder, Ian; Lechner, Christiane; Schnetter, Erik; Wardell, Barry

    2016-09-01

    Kranc turns a tensorial description of a time dependent partial differential equation into a module for the Cactus Computational Toolkit (ascl:1102.013). This Mathematica application takes a simple continuum description of a problem and generates highly efficient and portable code, and can be used both for rapid prototyping of evolution systems and for high performance supercomputing.

  18. Nonlinear Resonance and Duffing's Spring Equation II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, T. H.; Joubert, Stephan V.

    2007-01-01

    The paper discusses the boundary in the frequency-amplitude plane for boundedness of solutions to the forced spring Duffing type equation x[umlaut] + x + [epsilon]x[cubed] = F cos[omega]t. For fixed initial conditions and for representative fixed values of the parameter [epsilon], the results are reported of a systematic numerical investigation…

  19. On the use of the Price equation.

    PubMed

    van Veelen, Matthijs

    2005-12-21

    This paper distinguishes two categories of questions that the Price equation can help us answer. The two different types of questions require two different disciplines that are related, but nonetheless move in opposite directions. These disciplines are probability theory on the one hand and statistical inference on the other. In the literature on the Price equation this distinction is not made. As a result of this, questions that require a probability model are regularly approached with statistical tools. In this paper, we examine the possibilities of the Price equation for answering questions of either type. By spending extra attention on mathematical formalities, we avoid the two disciplines to get mixed up. After that, we look at some examples, both from kin selection and from group selection, that show how the inappropriate use of statistical terminology can put us on the wrong track. Statements that are 'derived' with the help of the Price equation are, therefore, in many cases not the answers they seem to be. Going through the derivations in reverse can, however, be helpful as a guide how to build proper (probabilistic) models that do give answers. PMID:15953618

  20. Equating Test Scores (without IRT). Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    This booklet grew out of a half-day class on equating that author Samuel Livingston teaches for new statistical staff at Educational Testing Service (ETS). The class is a nonmathematical introduction to the topic, emphasizing conceptual understanding and practical applications. The class consists of illustrated lectures, interspersed with…

  1. Relations Among Systems of Electromagnetic Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    page, Chester H.

    1970-01-01

    Contends that the equations of electromagnetism, whether in rationalized or non-rationalized form, express an invariant set of physical relationships. The relationships among corresponding symbols are given and applied to precise statements about the relation between the oersted and the amphere per meter, the abampere and the ampere, etc.…

  2. Equation of State for Detonation Product Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro

    2013-06-01

    Based on the empirical linear relationship between detonation velocity and loading density, an approximate description for the Chapman-Jouguet state for detonation product gases of solid phase high explosives has been developed. Provided that the Grüneisen parameter is a function only of volume, systematic and closed system of equations for the Grüneisen parameter and CJ volume have been formulated. These equations were obtained by combining this approximation with the Jones-Stanyukovich-Manson relation together with JWL isentrope for detonation of crystal density PETN. A thermodynamic identity between the Grüneisen parameter and another non-dimensional material parameter introduced by Wu and Jing can be used to derive the enthalpy-pressure-volume equation of state for detonation gases. This Wu-Jing parameter is found to be the ratio of the Grüneisen parameter and the adiabatic index. Behavior of this parameter as a function of pressure was calculated and revealed that their change with pressure is very gradual. By using this equation of state, several isentropes down from the Chapman-Jouguet states reached by four different lower initial density PETN have been calculated and compared with available cylinder expansion tests.

  3. Observed Score Linear Equating with Covariates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branberg, Kenny; Wiberg, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This paper examined observed score linear equating in two different data collection designs, the equivalent groups design and the nonequivalent groups design, when information from covariates (i.e., background variables correlated with the test scores) was included. The main purpose of the study was to examine the effect (i.e., bias, variance, and…

  4. Controlled-aperture wave-equation migration

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Fehler, Michael C.; Sun, H.; Li, Z.

    2003-01-01

    We present a controlled-aperture wave-equation migration method that no1 only can reduce migration artiracts due to limited recording aperlurcs and determine image weights to balance the efl'ects of limited-aperture illumination, but also can improve thc migration accuracy by reducing the slowness perturbations within thc controlled migration regions. The method consists of two steps: migration aperture scan and controlled-aperture migration. Migration apertures for a sparse distribution of shots arc determined using wave-equation migration, and those for the other shots are obtained by interpolation. During the final controlled-aperture niigration step, we can select a reference slowness in c;ontrollecl regions of the slowness model to reduce slowncss perturbations, and consequently increase the accuracy of wave-equation migration inel hods that makc use of reference slownesses. In addition, the computation in the space domain during wavefield downward continuation is needed to be conducted only within the controlled apertures and therefore, the computational cost of controlled-aperture migration step (without including migration aperture scan) is less than the corresponding uncontrolled-aperture migration. Finally, we can use the efficient split-step Fourier approach for migration-aperture scan, then use other, more accurate though more expensive, wave-equation migration methods to perform thc final controlled-apertio.ee migration to produce the most accurate image.

  5. From Arithmetic Sequences to Linear Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuura, Ryota; Harless, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The first part of the article focuses on deriving the essential properties of arithmetic sequences by appealing to students' sense making and reasoning. The second part describes how to guide students to translate their knowledge of arithmetic sequences into an understanding of linear equations. Ryota Matsuura originally wrote these lessons for…

  6. Maxwell Equations for Slow-Moving Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozov, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, the Minkowski equations obtained on the basis of theory of relativity are used to describe electromagnetic fields in moving media. But important electromagnetic processes run under non-relativistic conditions of slow-moving media. Therefore, one should carry out its description in terms of classical mechanics. Hertz derived electrodynamic equations for moving media within the frame of classical mechanics on the basis of the Maxwell theory. His equations disagree with the experimental data concerned with the moving dielectrics. In the paper, a way of description of electromagnetic fields in slow-moving media on the basis of the Maxwell theory within the frame of classical mechanics is offered by combining the Hertz approach and the experimental data concerned with the movement of dielectrics in electromagnetic fields. Received Maxwell equations lack asymmetry in the description of the reciprocal electrodynamic action of a magnet and a conductor and conform to known experimental data. Comparative analysis of the Minkowski and Maxwell models is carried out.

  7. A Brief Guide to Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Rebecca; Gore, Paul A., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    To complement recent articles in this journal on structural equation modeling (SEM) practice and principles by Martens and by Quintana and Maxwell, respectively, the authors offer a consumer's guide to SEM. Using an example derived from theory and research on vocational psychology, the authors outline six steps in SEM: model specification,…

  8. Power Series Solution to the Pendulum Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benacka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    This note gives a power series solution to the pendulum equation that enables to investigate the system in an analytical way only, i.e. to avoid numeric methods. A method of determining the number of the terms for getting a required relative error is presented that uses bigger and lesser geometric series. The solution is suitable for modelling the…

  9. Undular bore theory for the Gardner equation.

    PubMed

    Kamchatnov, A M; Kuo, Y-H; Lin, T-C; Horng, T-L; Gou, S-C; Clift, R; El, G A; Grimshaw, R H J

    2012-09-01

    We develop modulation theory for undular bores (dispersive shock waves) in the framework of the Gardner, or extended Korteweg-de Vries (KdV), equation, which is a generic mathematical model for weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive wave propagation, when effects of higher order nonlinearity become important. Using a reduced version of the finite-gap integration method we derive the Gardner-Whitham modulation system in a Riemann invariant form and show that it can be mapped onto the well-known modulation system for the Korteweg-de Vries equation. The transformation between the two counterpart modulation systems is, however, not invertible. As a result, the study of the resolution of an initial discontinuity for the Gardner equation reveals a rich phenomenology of solutions which, along with the KdV-type simple undular bores, include nonlinear trigonometric bores, solibores, rarefaction waves, and composite solutions representing various combinations of the above structures. We construct full parametric maps of such solutions for both signs of the cubic nonlinear term in the Gardner equation. Our classification is supported by numerical simulations. PMID:23031043

  10. A Discussion of Population Invariance of Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Nancy S.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the five studies included in this issue. Each article addressed the same topic, population invariance of equating. They all used data from major standardized testing programs, and they all used essentially the same statistics to evaluate their results, namely, the root mean square difference and root expected mean square…

  11. Direct finite element equation solving algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R. J.; Utku, S.; Salama, M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents and examines direct solution algorithms for the linear simultaneous equations that arise when finite element models represent an engineering system. It identifies the mathematical processing of four solution methods and assesses their data processing implications using concurrent processing.

  12. Parallel Algorithm Solves Coupled Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, A.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical methods adapted to concurrent processing. Algorithm solves set of coupled partial differential equations by numerical integration. Adapted to run on hypercube computer, algorithm separates problem into smaller problems solved concurrently. Increase in computing speed with concurrent processing over that achievable with conventional sequential processing appreciable, especially for large problems.

  13. Structural Equation Modeling in Special Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Alan D.

    1995-01-01

    This article suggests the use of structural equation modeling in special education research, to analyze multivariate data from both nonexperimental and experimental research. It combines a structural model linking latent variables and a measurement model linking observed variables with latent variables. (Author/DB)

  14. Synthesizing Strategies Creatively: Solving Linear Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponce, Gregorio A.; Tuba, Imre

    2015-01-01

    New strategies can ignite teachers' imagination to create new lessons or adapt lessons created by others. In this article, the authors present the experience of an algebra teacher and his students solving linear and literal equations and explain how the use of ideas found in past NCTM journals helped bring this lesson to life. The…

  15. Stokes Equation in a Toy CD Hovercraft

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Izarra, Charles; de Izarra, Gregoire

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of a toy CD hovercraft used in the fluid mechanics course for undergraduate students to illustrate the lubrication theory described by the Stokes equation. An experimental characterization of the toy hovercraft (measurements of the air flow value, of the pressure in the balloon and of the thickness of the air film…

  16. Structural Equation Modeling in Rehabilitation Counseling Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Fong; Lee, Gloria K.; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Kubota, Coleen; Allen, Chase A.

    2007-01-01

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) has become increasingly popular in counseling, psychology, and rehabilitation research. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the basic concepts and applications of SEM in rehabilitation counseling research using the AMOS statistical software program.

  17. Aspheric surface testing by irradiance transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shomali, Ramin; Darudi, Ahmad; Nasiri, Sadollah; Asgharsharghi Bonab, Armir

    2010-10-01

    In this paper a method for aspheric surface testing is presented. The method is based on solving the Irradiance Transport Equation (ITE).The accuracy of ITE normally depends on the amount of the pick to valley of the phase distribution. This subject is investigated by a simulation procedure.

  18. Riccati equations for holographic 2-point functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, Ioannis; Taliotis, Anastasios

    2014-04-01

    Any second order homogeneous linear ordinary differential equation can be transformed into a first order non-linear Riccati equation. We argue that the Riccati form of the linearized fluctuation equations that determine the holographic 2-point functions simplifies considerably the numerical computation of such 2-point functions and of the corresponding transport coefficients by computing directly the response functions, eliminating the arbitrary source from the start. Moreover, it provides a neat criterion for the infrared regularity of the fluctuations. In particular, it is shown that the infrared regularity conditions for scalar and tensor fluctuations coincide, and hence they are either both regular or both singular. We demonstrate our numerical recipe based on the Riccati equations by computing the holographic 2-point functions for the stress tensor and a scalar operator in a number of asymptotically anti de Sitter backgrounds of bottom up scalar-gravity models. Analytical results are obtained for the 2-point function of the transverse traceless part of the stress tensor in two confining geometries, including a geometry that belongs to the class of IHQCD. We find that in this background the spin-2 spectrum is linear and, as expected, the position space 2-point function decays exponentially at large distances at a rate proportional to the confinement scale.

  19. Zakharov equations in quantum dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sayed, F.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Ishihara, O.

    2015-08-15

    By generalizing the formalism of modulational interactions in quantum dusty plasmas, we derive the kinetic quantum Zakharov equations in dusty plasmas that describe nonlinear coupling of high frequency Langmuir waves to low frequency plasma density variations, for cases of non-degenerate and degenerate plasma electrons.

  20. Equations For Designing Superconducting Transmission Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antsos, Dimitrios

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of microwave circuits predicted accurately. Equations for propagation of quasitransverse electric and magnetic (TEM) waves along thin films of high-critical-temperature superconductors constitute basis of mathematical model useful in design of coplanar-waveguide, microstrip, and stripline microwave circuits. Model incorporated into older commercial software for computer-aided design of microwave circuit.

  1. Ultra Deep Wave Equation Imaging and Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander M. Popovici; Sergey Fomel; Paul Sava; Sean Crawley; Yining Li; Cristian Lupascu

    2006-09-30

    In this project we developed and tested a novel technology, designed to enhance seismic resolution and imaging of ultra-deep complex geologic structures by using state-of-the-art wave-equation depth migration and wave-equation velocity model building technology for deeper data penetration and recovery, steeper dip and ultra-deep structure imaging, accurate velocity estimation for imaging and pore pressure prediction and accurate illumination and amplitude processing for extending the AVO prediction window. Ultra-deep wave-equation imaging provides greater resolution and accuracy under complex geologic structures where energy multipathing occurs, than what can be accomplished today with standard imaging technology. The objective of the research effort was to examine the feasibility of imaging ultra-deep structures onshore and offshore, by using (1) wave-equation migration, (2) angle-gathers velocity model building, and (3) wave-equation illumination and amplitude compensation. The effort consisted of answering critical technical questions that determine the feasibility of the proposed methodology, testing the theory on synthetic data, and finally applying the technology for imaging ultra-deep real data. Some of the questions answered by this research addressed: (1) the handling of true amplitudes in the downward continuation and imaging algorithm and the preservation of the amplitude with offset or amplitude with angle information required for AVO studies, (2) the effect of several imaging conditions on amplitudes, (3) non-elastic attenuation and approaches for recovering the amplitude and frequency, (4) the effect of aperture and illumination on imaging steep dips and on discriminating the velocities in the ultra-deep structures. All these effects were incorporated in the final imaging step of a real data set acquired specifically to address ultra-deep imaging issues, with large offsets (12,500 m) and long recording time (20 s).

  2. Equations of motion in an Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.; Petrov, Alexander N.

    2015-06-01

    We make use of an effective field-theoretical approach to derive post-Newtonian equations of motion of hydrodynamical inhomogeneities in cosmology. The matter Lagrangian for the perturbed cosmological model includes dark matter, dark energy, and ordinary baryonic matter. The Lagrangian is expanded in an asymptotic Taylor series around a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker background. The small parameter of the decomposition is the magnitude of the metric tensor perturbation. Each term of the expansion series is gauge-invariant and all of them together form a basis for the successive post-Newtonian approximations around the background metric. The approximation scheme is covariant and the asymptotic nature of the Lagrangian decomposition does not require the post-Newtonian perturbations to be small though computationally it works the most effectively when the perturbed metric is close enough to the background metric. Temporal evolution of the background metric is governed by dark matter and dark energy and we associate the large-scale inhomogeneities of matter as those generated by the primordial cosmological perturbations in these two components with δρ/ρ ≤ 1. The small scale inhomogeneities are generated by the baryonic matter which is considered as a bare perturbation of the background gravitational field, dark matter and energy. Mathematically, the large scale structure inhomogeneities are given by the homogeneous solution of the post-Newtonian equations while the small scale inhomogeneities are described by a particular solution of these equations with the stress-energy tensor of the baryonic matter that admits δρ/ρ ≫ 1. We explicitly work out the field equations of the first post-Newtonian approximation in cosmology and derive the post-Newtonian equations of motion of the large and small scale inhomogeneities which generalize the covariant law of conservation of stress-energy-momentum tensor of matter in asymptotically-flat spacetime.

  3. Numerical solution of the electron transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Mark

    The electron transport equation has been solved many times for a variety of reasons. The main difficulty in its numerical solution is that it is a very stiff boundary value problem. The most common numerical methods for solving boundary value problems are symmetric collocation methods and shooting methods. Both of these types of methods can only be applied to the electron transport equation if the boundary conditions are altered with unrealistic assumptions because they require too many points to be practical. Further, they result in oscillating and negative solutions, which are physically meaningless for the problem at hand. For these reasons, all numerical methods for this problem to date are a bit unusual because they were designed to try and avoid the problem of extreme stiffness. This dissertation shows that there is no need to introduce spurious boundary conditions or invent other numerical methods for the electron transport equation. Rather, there already exists methods for very stiff boundary value problems within the numerical analysis literature. We demonstrate one such method in which the fast and slow modes of the boundary value problem are essentially decoupled. This allows for an upwind finite difference method to be applied to each mode as is appropriate. This greatly reduces the number of points needed in the mesh, and we demonstrate how this eliminates the need to define new boundary conditions. This method is verified by showing that under certain restrictive assumptions, the electron transport equation has an exact solution that can be written as an integral. We show that the solution from the upwind method agrees with the quadrature evaluation of the exact solution. This serves to verify that the upwind method is properly solving the electron transport equation. Further, it is demonstrated that the output of the upwind method can be used to compute auroral light emissions.

  4. Construction and accuracy of partial differential equation approximations to the chemical master equation.

    PubMed

    Grima, Ramon

    2011-11-01

    The mesoscopic description of chemical kinetics, the chemical master equation, can be exactly solved in only a few simple cases. The analytical intractability stems from the discrete character of the equation, and hence considerable effort has been invested in the development of Fokker-Planck equations, second-order partial differential equation approximations to the master equation. We here consider two different types of higher-order partial differential approximations, one derived from the system-size expansion and the other from the Kramers-Moyal expansion, and derive the accuracy of their predictions for chemical reactive networks composed of arbitrary numbers of unimolecular and bimolecular reactions. In particular, we show that the partial differential equation approximation of order Q from the Kramers-Moyal expansion leads to estimates of the mean number of molecules accurate to order Ω(-(2Q-3)/2), of the variance of the fluctuations in the number of molecules accurate to order Ω(-(2Q-5)/2), and of skewness accurate to order Ω(-(Q-2)). We also show that for large Q, the accuracy in the estimates can be matched only by a partial differential equation approximation from the system-size expansion of approximate order 2Q. Hence, we conclude that partial differential approximations based on the Kramers-Moyal expansion generally lead to considerably more accurate estimates in the mean, variance, and skewness than approximations of the same order derived from the system-size expansion.

  5. Laurent phenomenon algebras and the discrete BKP equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Naoto

    2016-09-01

    We construct the Laurent phenomenon algebras the cluster variables of which satisfy the discrete BKP equation, the discrete Sawada-Kotera equation and other difference equations obtained by its reduction. These Laurent phenomenon algebras are constructed from seeds with a generalization of mutation-period property. We show that a reduction of a seed corresponds to a reduction of a difference equation.

  6. Tangent Lines without Derivatives for Quadratic and Cubic Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, William J.

    2009-01-01

    In the quadratic equation, y = ax[superscript 2] + bx + c, the equation y = bx + c is identified as the equation of the line tangent to the parabola at its y-intercept. This is extended to give a convenient method of graphing tangent lines at any point on the graph of a quadratic or a cubic equation. (Contains 5 figures.)

  7. The study of dual integral equations with generalized Legendre functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. M.; Rokne, J.; Dhaliwal, R. S.

    2005-04-01

    Closed form solutions for dual integral equations involving generalized Legendre functions as kernels are obtained. Connected to these dual integral equations an exact solution for dual integral equations involving sine functions as kernels is also obtained. Properties of generalized Legendre functions and the inversion theorem for the generalized Mehler-Fock transforms are used to obtain the solution of dual integral equations

  8. 40 CFR 60.3076 - What equations must I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What equations must I use? 60.3076... Rule-Equations § 60.3076 What equations must I use? (a) Percent oxygen. Adjust all pollutant concentrations to 7 percent oxygen using Equation 1 of this section. ER16dE05.002 Where: Cadj =...

  9. Cognitive Load in Algebra: Element Interactivity in Solving Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngu, Bing Hiong; Chung, Siu Fung; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing

    2015-01-01

    Central to equation solving is the maintenance of equivalence on both sides of the equation. However, when the process involves an interaction of multiple elements, solving an equation can impose a high cognitive load. The balance method requires operations on both sides of the equation, whereas the inverse method involves operations on one side…

  10. Nominal Weights Mean Equating: A Method for Very Small Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, Ben; Albano, Anthony; Raymond, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The authors introduced nominal weights mean equating, a simplified version of Tucker equating, as an alternative for dealing with very small samples. The authors then conducted three simulation studies to compare nominal weights mean equating to six other equating methods under the nonequivalent groups anchor test design with sample sizes of 20,…

  11. On the Solutions of Some Linear Complex Quaternionic Equations

    PubMed Central

    İpek, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Some complex quaternionic equations in the type AX − XB = C are investigated. For convenience, these equations were called generalized Sylvester-quaternion equations, which include the Sylvester equation as special cases. By the real matrix representations of complex quaternions, the necessary and sufficient conditions for the solvability and the general expressions of the solutions are obtained. PMID:25101318

  12. Standard Errors of Equating Differences: Prior Developments, Extensions, and Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Tim; Zhang, Wenmin

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to extend the use of standard errors for equated score differences (SEEDs) to traditional equating functions. The SEEDs are described in terms of their original proposal for kernel equating functions and extended so that SEEDs for traditional linear and traditional equipercentile equating functions can be computed.…

  13. Teaching Modeling with Partial Differential Equations: Several Successful Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Joseph; Trubatch, David; Winkel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the introduction and teaching of partial differential equations (heat and wave equations) via modeling physical phenomena, using a new approach that encompasses constructing difference equations and implementing these in a spreadsheet, numerically solving the partial differential equations using the numerical differential equation…

  14. On the solutions of some linear complex quaternionic equations.

    PubMed

    Bolat, Cennet; İpek, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Some complex quaternionic equations in the type AX - XB = C are investigated. For convenience, these equations were called generalized Sylvester-quaternion equations, which include the Sylvester equation as special cases. By the real matrix representations of complex quaternions, the necessary and sufficient conditions for the solvability and the general expressions of the solutions are obtained. PMID:25101318

  15. Deriving average soliton equations with a perturbative method

    SciTech Connect

    Ballantyne, G.J.; Gough, P.T.; Taylor, D.P. )

    1995-01-01

    The method of multiple scales is applied to periodically amplified, lossy media described by either the nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS) equation or the Korteweg--de Vries (KdV) equation. An existing result for the NLS equation, derived in the context of nonlinear optical communications, is confirmed. The method is then applied to the KdV equation and the result is confirmed numerically.

  16. Laurent phenomenon algebras and the discrete BKP equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Naoto

    2016-09-01

    We construct the Laurent phenomenon algebras the cluster variables of which satisfy the discrete BKP equation, the discrete Sawada–Kotera equation and other difference equations obtained by its reduction. These Laurent phenomenon algebras are constructed from seeds with a generalization of mutation-period property. We show that a reduction of a seed corresponds to a reduction of a difference equation.

  17. A two-sided fractional conservation of mass equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Jeffrey S.; Mortensen, Jeff; Telyakovskiy, Aleksey S.

    2016-05-01

    A two-sided fractional conservation of mass equation is derived by using left and right fractional Mean Value Theorems. This equation extends the one-sided fractional conservation of mass equation of Wheatcraft and Meerschaert. Also, a two-sided fractional advection-dispersion equation is derived. The derivations are based on Caputo fractional derivatives.

  18. On Szebehely's equation and its connection with Dainelli's-Whittaker's equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Gascon, F.; Gonzalez-Lopez, A.; Pascual-Broncano, P. J.

    1984-05-01

    The authors prove that Szebehely's equation is not only a necessary condition to be satisfied by the potential U(x→) but that it is also a sufficient condition. This was shown by Broucke and Lass (1977) using a different procedure. The authors obtain also a first order partial differential equation for the function g2(x→) appearing in the paper of Broucke and Lass. This equation, being of a quite simple structure, is quite adequate for its integration, and this is shown by examples.

  19. Analysis of discrete reaction-diffusion equations for autocatalysis and continuum diffusion equations for transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chi-Jen

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we analyze both the spatiotemporal behavior of: (A) non-linear “reaction” models utilizing (discrete) reaction-diffusion equations; and (B) spatial transport problems on surfaces and in nanopores utilizing the relevant (continuum) diffusion or Fokker-Planck equations. Thus, there are some common themes in these studies, as they all involve partial differential equations or their discrete analogues which incorporate a description of diffusion-type processes. However, there are also some qualitative differences, as shall be discussed below.

  20. A discrete model of a modified Burgers' partial differential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, R. E.; Shoosmith, J. N.

    1990-01-01

    A new finite-difference scheme is constructed for a modified Burger's equation. Three special cases of the equation are considered, and the 'exact' difference schemes for the space- and time-independent forms of the equation are presented, along with the diffusion-free case of Burger's equation modeled by a difference equation. The desired difference scheme is then obtained by imposing on any difference model of the initial equation the requirement that, in the appropriate limits, its difference scheme must reduce the results of the obtained equations.

  1. From differential to difference equations for first order ODEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Walker, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    When constructing an algorithm for the numerical integration of a differential equation, one should first convert the known ordinary differential equation (ODE) into an ordinary difference equation. Given this difference equation, one can develop an appropriate numerical algorithm. This technical note describes the derivation of two such ordinary difference equations applicable to a first order ODE. The implicit ordinary difference equation has the same asymptotic expansion as the ODE itself, whereas the explicit ordinary difference equation has an asymptotic that is similar in structure but different in value when compared with that of the ODE.

  2. Static gravitational equations of general relativity and "the fifth force"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A.

    2015-10-01

    Einstein's static field equations are investigated in various coordinate charts. After comparing Newtonian gravitational theory (in a curvilinear coordinate chart) with various charts of Einstein's static gravitational equations, the most appropriate choice of the coordinate chart for Einstein's static field equations is made. As a consequence, Einstein's equations imply the non-linear potential equation instead of the usual Poisson's equation of the Newtonian theory. Investigating the non-linear potential equation above in the spherically symmetric cases, the corresponding potentials yield scenarios comparable to "the fifth force". Next, static gravitational and electric fields generated by an incoherent charged dust are investigated. The corresponding non-linear potential equation is derived. Finally, the static Einstein-Maxwell-Klein-Gordon equations are explored and again, the corresponding non-linear potential equation is obtained. This potential resembles the static Higgs boson field.

  3. Equation Of State With Temperature Effects For Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinet, Pascal; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.; Rose, James H.

    1989-01-01

    Behavior at high temperature predicted from only four parameters. Equations derived to express thermodynamical properties of compressed solids at high temperatures. New equations based on fundamental considerations of thermodynamics, isothermal equation of state, and assumption thermal pressure independent of volume and varies linearly with temperature near and about Debye temperature. Using only four parameters (three are those of isothermal equation of state), new equations describe thermodynamic behavior of material over range of temperatures from approximately Debye temperature to melting point.

  4. A study of dynamic energy equations for Stirling cycle analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, V. H.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical and computer study of the dynamic energy equations that describe the physical phenomena that occurs in a Stirling cycle engine. The basic problem is set up in terms of a set o hyperbolic partial differential equations. The characteristic lines are determined. The equations are then transformed to ordinary differential equations that are valid along characteristic lines. Computer programs to solve the differential equations and to plot pertinent factors are described.

  5. Master Equation for a Quantum Particle in a Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hornberger, Klaus

    2006-08-11

    The equation for the quantum motion of a Brownian particle in a gaseous environment is derived by means of S-matrix theory. This quantum version of the linear Boltzmann equation accounts nonperturbatively for the quantum effects of the scattering dynamics and describes decoherence and dissipation in a unified framework. As a completely positive master equation it incorporates both the known equation for an infinitely massive Brownian particle and the classical linear Boltzmann equation as limiting cases.

  6. Master equation for a quantum particle in a gas.

    PubMed

    Hornberger, Klaus

    2006-08-11

    The equation for the quantum motion of a Brownian particle in a gaseous environment is derived by means of S-matrix theory. This quantum version of the linear Boltzmann equation accounts nonperturbatively for the quantum effects of the scattering dynamics and describes decoherence and dissipation in a unified framework. As a completely positive master equation it incorporates both the known equation for an infinitely massive Brownian particle and the classical linear Boltzmann equation as limiting cases.

  7. A possible generalization of the field-theoretical Hamilton's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Savchin, V.M. )

    1988-11-01

    The development of classical dynamics as well as many branches of physics shows that the solution or analysis of variety of problems can be greatly simplified if the basic equations admit an analytic representation in terms of Hamilton's equations. The author proposes a generalization of Hamilton's equations in field theory which is applicable to partial differential equations of physical relevance. It is shown that the equations constitute a conceivable basis for the generalization of the theory of contact transformations and of Poisson's method.

  8. A system of nonlinear algebraic equations connected with the multisoliton solution of the Benjamin-Ono equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuno, Yoshimasa

    2004-02-01

    The multisoliton solution of the Benjamin-Ono equation is derived from the system of nonlinear algebraic equations. This finding is unexpected from the scheme of the inverse scattering transform method, which constructs the multisoliton solution through the system of linear algebraic equations. The anlaysis developed here is also applied to the rational multisoliton solution of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation.

  9. Standard Errors of Equating for the Percentile Rank-Based Equipercentile Equating with Log-Linear Presmoothing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Tianyou

    2009-01-01

    Holland and colleagues derived a formula for analytical standard error of equating using the delta-method for the kernel equating method. Extending their derivation, this article derives an analytical standard error of equating procedure for the conventional percentile rank-based equipercentile equating with log-linear smoothing. This procedure is…

  10. A Comparison of Kernel Equating and Traditional Equipercentile Equating Methods and the Parametric Bootstrap Methods for Estimating Standard Errors in Equipercentile Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Sae Il

    2009-01-01

    This study used simulation (a) to compare the kernel equating method to traditional equipercentile equating methods under the equivalent-groups (EG) design and the nonequivalent-groups with anchor test (NEAT) design and (b) to apply the parametric bootstrap method for estimating standard errors of equating. A two-parameter logistic item response…

  11. Taming the nonlinearity of the Einstein equation.

    PubMed

    Harte, Abraham I

    2014-12-31

    Many of the technical complications associated with the general theory of relativity ultimately stem from the nonlinearity of Einstein's equation. It is shown here that an appropriate choice of dynamical variables may be used to eliminate all such nonlinearities beyond a particular order: Both Landau-Lifshitz and tetrad formulations of Einstein's equation are obtained that involve only finite products of the unknowns and their derivatives. Considerable additional simplifications arise in physically interesting cases where metrics become approximately Kerr or, e.g., plane waves, suggesting that the variables described here can be used to efficiently reformulate perturbation theory in a variety of contexts. In all cases, these variables are shown to have simple geometrical interpretations that directly relate the local causal structure associated with the metric of interest to the causal structure associated with a prescribed background. A new method to search for exact solutions is outlined as well.

  12. Algorithm refinement for stochastic partial differential equations.

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, F. J.; Garcia, Alejandro L.,; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid particle/continuum algorithm is formulated for Fickian diffusion in the fluctuating hydrodynamic limit. The particles are taken as independent random walkers; the fluctuating diffusion equation is solved by finite differences with deterministic and white-noise fluxes. At the interface between the particle and continuum computations the coupling is by flux matching, giving exact mass conservation. This methodology is an extension of Adaptive Mesh and Algorithm Refinement to stochastic partial differential equations. A variety of numerical experiments were performed for both steady and time-dependent scenarios. In all cases the mean and variance of density are captured correctly by the stochastic hybrid algorithm. For a non-stochastic version (i.e., using only deterministic continuum fluxes) the mean density is correct, but the variance is reduced except within the particle region, far from the interface. Extensions of the methodology to fluid mechanics applications are discussed.

  13. Altered Maxwell equations in the length gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, H. R.

    2013-09-01

    The length gauge uses a scalar potential to describe a laser field, thus treating it as a longitudinal field rather than as a transverse field. This distinction is manifested by the fact that the Maxwell equations that relate to the length gauge are not the same as those for transverse fields. In particular, a source term is necessary in the length-gauge Maxwell equations, whereas the Coulomb-gauge description of plane waves possesses the basic property of transverse fields that they propagate with no source terms at all. This difference is shown to be importantly consequential in some previously unremarked circumstances; and it explains why the Göppert-Mayer gauge transformation does not provide the security that might be expected of full gauge equivalence.

  14. Enthalpy damping for the steady Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    For inviscid steady flow problems where the enthalpy is constant at steady state, it was previously proposed to use the difference between the local enthalpy and the steady state enthalpy as a driving term to accelerate convergence of iterative schemes. This idea is analyzed, both on the level of the partial differential equation and on the level of a particular finite difference scheme. It is shown that for the two-dimensional unsteady Euler equations, a hyperbolic system with eigenvalues on the imaginary axis, there is no enthalpy damping strategy which moves all the eigenvalues into the open left half plane. For the numerical scheme, however, the analysis shows and examples verify that enthalpy damping is potentially effective in accelerating convergence to steady state.

  15. Enthalpy damping for the steady Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    For inviscid steady flow problems where the enthalpy is constant at steady state, it was previously proposed to use the difference between the local enthalpy and the steady state enthalpy as a driving term to accelerate convergence of iterative schemes. This idea is analyzed, both on the level of the partial differential equation and on the level of a particular finite difference scheme. It is shown that for the two-dimensional unsteady Euler equations, a hyperbolic system with eigenvalues on the imaginary axis, there is no enthalpy damping strategy which moves all the eigenvalues into the open left half plane. For the numerical scheme, however, the analysis shows and examples verify that enthalpy damping is potentially effective in accelerating convergence to steady state.

  16. Dirac equation on a curved surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, F. T.; Sánchez-Monroy, J. A.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of Dirac particles confined to a curved surface is examined employing the thin-layer method. We perform a perturbative expansion to first-order and split the Dirac field into normal and tangential components to the surface. In contrast to the known behavior of second order equations like Schrödinger, Maxwell and Klein-Gordon, we find that there is no geometric potential for the Dirac equation on a surface. This implies that the non-relativistic limit does not commute with the thin-layer method. Although this problem can be overcome when second-order terms are retained in the perturbative expansion, this would preclude the decoupling of the normal and tangential degrees of freedom. Therefore, we propose to introduce a first-order term which rescues the non-relativistic limit and also clarifies the effect of the intrinsic and extrinsic curvatures on the dynamics of the Dirac particles.

  17. Equations, tables, and charts for compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    This report, which is a revision and extension of NACA-TN-1428, presents a compilation of equations, tables, and charts useful in the analysis of high-speed flow of a compressible fluid. The equations provide relations for continuous one-dimensional flow, normal and oblique shock waves, and Prandtl-Meyer expansions for both perfect and imperfect gases. The tables present useful dimensionless ratios for continuous one-dimensional flow and for normal shock waves as functions of Mach number for air considered as a perfect gas. One series of charts presents the characteristics of the flow of air (considered a perfect gas) for oblique shock waves and for cones in a supersonic air stream. A second series shows the effects of caloric imperfections on continuous one-dimensional flow and on the flow through normal and oblique shock waves. (author)

  18. From Boltzmann equations to steady wall velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Konstandin, Thomas; Nardini, Germano; Rues, Ingo E-mail: germano.nardini@desy.de

    2014-09-01

    By means of a relativistic microscopic approach we calculate the expansion velocity of bubbles generated during a first-order electroweak phase transition. In particular, we use the gradient expansion of the Kadanoff-Baym equations to set up the fluid system. This turns out to be equivalent to the one found in the semi-classical approach in the non-relativistic limit. Finally, by including hydrodynamic deflagration effects and solving the Higgs equations of motion in the fluid, we determine velocity and thickness of the bubble walls. Our findings are compared with phenomenological models of wall velocities. As illustrative examples, we apply these results to three theories providing first-order phase transitions with a particle content in the thermal plasma that resembles the Standard Model.

  19. Productivity equation for reclaiming surface mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burley, Jon Bryan; Thomsen, Charles H.; Kenkel, Norm

    1989-09-01

    This article addresses the development of an agricultural productivity equation for predicting new soil (neo-sol) plant growth potential in Clay County, Minnesota, USA. Soil factors examined in the study include percent organic matter, percent slope, percent rock fragments, hydraulic conductivity, electrical conductivity, pH, topographic position, available water-holding capacity, bulk density, and percent clay. Squared terms and two-factor interaction terms were also examined as possible regressors. A best equation was selected that had a multiple coefficient of determination of 0.7399 and has five significant regressors and intercept with P.0001. The regressors are hydraulic conductivity, percent slope squared, bulk density times percent rock fragments, electrical conductivity times percent rock fragments, and electrical conductivity times percent organic matter. The regressors predict soil suitability for a general crop model. The crops included in the model are wheat, oats, barley, soybeans, sugar beets, sunflowers, and grasses/legumes.

  20. Biaxial constitutive equation development for single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    Current gas turbine engines utilize large single crystal superalloy components in the hot section. Structural analysis of these components requires a valid stress strain temperature constitutive equation. The goal of the program described is to create one or more models and verify these models. A constitutive equation based on an assumed slip behavior of a single slip system was formulated, programmed, and debugged. Specifically, the basic theory for a model based on aggravating slip behavior on individual slip systems was formulated and programmed and some simulations were run using assumed values of constants. In addition, a formulation allowing strain controlled simulations was completed. An approach to structural analysis of the specimen was developed. This approach uses long tube consistancy conditions and finite elements specially formulated to take advantage of the symmetry of 100 oriented specimens.