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Sample records for equilibrium molecular dynamics

  1. Pasta nucleosynthesis: Molecular dynamics simulations of nuclear statistical equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan, M. E.; Schneider, A. S.; Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.

    2015-06-01

    Background: Exotic nonspherical nuclear pasta shapes are expected in nuclear matter at just below saturation density because of competition between short-range nuclear attraction and long-range Coulomb repulsion. Purpose: We explore the impact nuclear pasta may have on nucleosynthesis during neutron star mergers when cold dense nuclear matter is ejected and decompressed. Methods: We use a hybrid CPU/GPU molecular dynamics (MD) code to perform decompression simulations of cold dense matter with 51 200 and 409 600 nucleons from 0.080 fm-3 down to 0.00125 fm-3 . Simulations are run for proton fractions YP= 0.05, 0.10, 0.20, 0.30, and 0.40 at temperatures T = 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 MeV. The final composition of each simulation is obtained using a cluster algorithm and compared to a constant density run. Results: Size of nuclei in the final state of decompression runs are in good agreement with nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) models for temperatures of 1 MeV while constant density runs produce nuclei smaller than the ones obtained with NSE. Our MD simulations produces unphysical results with large rod-like nuclei in the final state of T =0.5 MeV runs. Conclusions: Our MD model is valid at higher densities than simple nuclear statistical equilibrium models and may help determine the initial temperatures and proton fractions of matter ejected in mergers.

  2. Note: Local thermal conductivities from boundary driven non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bresme, F.; Armstrong, J.

    2014-01-07

    We report non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of heat transport in models of molecular fluids. We show that the “local” thermal conductivities obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations agree within numerical accuracy with equilibrium Green-Kubo computations. Our results support the local equilibrium hypothesis for transport properties. We show how to use the local dependence of the thermal gradients to quantify the thermal conductivity of molecular fluids for a wide range of thermodynamic states using a single simulation.

  3. Non-equilibrium phenomena and molecular reaction dynamics: mode space, energy space and conformer space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowacki, David R.; Lightfoot, Robert; Harvey, Jeremy N.

    2013-03-01

    The ability to characterise and control matter far away from equilibrium is a frontier challenge facing modern science. In this article, we sketch out a heuristic structure for thinking about the different ways in which non-equilibrium phenomena can impact molecular reaction dynamics. Our analytical schema includes three different regimes, organised according to increasing dynamical resolution: at the lowest resolution, we have conformer phase space, at an intermediate resolution, we have energy space; and at the highest resolution, we have mode space. Within each regime, we discuss practical definitions of non-equilibrium phenomena, mostly in terms of the corresponding relaxation timescales. Using this analytical framework, we discuss some recent non-equilibrium reaction dynamics studies spanning isolated small-molecule ensembles, gas-phase ensembles and solution-phase ensembles. This includes new results that provide insight into how non-equilibrium phenomena impact the solution-phase alkene-hydroboration reaction. We emphasise that interesting non-equilibrium dynamical phenomena often occur when the relaxation timescales characterising each regime are similar. In closing, we reflect on outstanding challenges and future research directions to guide our understanding of how non-equilibrium phenomena impact reaction dynamics.

  4. Thermal transport in porous Si nanowires from approach-to-equilibrium molecular dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartoixà, Xavier; Dettori, Riccardo; Melis, Claudio; Colombo, Luciano; Rurali, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    We study thermal transport in porous Si nanowires (SiNWs) by means of approach-to-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the presence of pores greatly reduces the thermal conductivity, κ, of the SiNWs as long mean free path phonons are suppressed. We address explicitly the dependence of κ on different features of the pore topology—such as the porosity and the pore diameter—and on the nanowire (NW) geometry—diameter and length. We use the results of the molecular dynamics calculations to tune an effective model, which is capable of capturing the dependence of κ on porosity and NW diameter. The model illustrates the failure of Matthiessen's rule to describe the coupling between boundary and pore scattering, which we account for by the inclusion of an additional empirical term.

  5. Molecular dynamics study of CO2 hydrate dissociation: Fluctuation-dissipation and non-equilibrium analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Niall J.; Clarke, Elaine T.

    2013-09-01

    Equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to investigate thermal-driven break-up of planar CO2 hydrate interfaces in liquid water at 300-320 K. Different guest compositions, at 85%, 95%, and 100% of maximum theoretical occupation, led to statistically-significant differences in the observed initial dissociation rates. The melting temperatures of each interface were estimated, and dissociation rates were observed to be strongly dependent on temperature, with higher dissociation rates at larger over-temperatures vis-à-vis melting. A simple coupled mass and heat transfer model developed previously was applied to fit the observed dissociation profiles, and this helps to identify clearly two distinct régimes of break-up; a second well-defined region is essentially independent of composition and temperature, in which the remaining nanoscale, de facto two-dimensional system's lattice framework is intrinsically unstable. From equilibrium MD of the two-phase systems at their melting point, the relaxation times of the auto-correlation functions of fluctuations in number of enclathrated guest molecules were used as a basis for comparison of the variation in the underlying, non-equilibrium, thermal-driven dissociation rates via Onsager's hypothesis, and statistically significant differences were found, confirming the value of a fluctuation-dissipation approach in this case.

  6. Equilibrium fractionation of H and O isotopes in water from path integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla, Carlos; Blanchard, Marc; Balan, Etienne; Ferlat, Guillaume; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Mauri, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    The equilibrium fractionation factor between two phases is of importance for the understanding of many planetary and environmental processes. Although thermodynamic equilibrium can be achieved between minerals at high temperature, many natural processes involve reactions between liquids or aqueous solutions and solids. For crystals, the fractionation factor α can be theoretically determined using a statistical thermodynamic approach based on the vibrational properties of the phases. These calculations are mostly performed in the harmonic approximation, using empirical or ab-initio force fields. In the case of aperiodic and dynamic systems such as liquids or solutions, similar calculations can be done using finite-size molecular clusters or snapshots obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) runs. It is however difficult to assess the effect of these approximate models on the isotopic fractionation properties. In this work we present a systematic study of the calculation of the D/H and 18O/16O equilibrium fractionation factors in water for the liquid/vapour and ice/vapour phases using several levels of theory within the simulations. Namely, we use a thermodynamic integration approach based on Path Integral MD calculations (PIMD) and an empirical potential model of water. Compared with standard MD, PIMD takes into account quantum effects in the thermodynamic modeling of systems and the exact fractionation factor for a given potential can be obtained. We compare these exact results with those of modeling strategies usually used, which involve the mapping of the quantum system on its harmonic counterpart. The results show the importance of including configurational disorder for the estimation of isotope fractionation in liquid phases. In addition, the convergence of the fractionation factor as a function of parameters such as the size of the simulated system and multiple isotope substitution is analyzed, showing that isotope fractionation is essentially a local effect in

  7. Efficient hybrid non-equilibrium molecular dynamics--Monte Carlo simulations with symmetric momentum reversal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjie; Roux, Benoît

    2014-09-21

    Hybrid schemes combining the strength of molecular dynamics (MD) and Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) offer a promising avenue to improve the sampling efficiency of computer simulations of complex systems. A number of recently proposed hybrid methods consider new configurations generated by driving the system via a non-equilibrium MD (neMD) trajectory, which are subsequently treated as putative candidates for Metropolis MC acceptance or rejection. To obey microscopic detailed balance, it is necessary to alter the momentum of the system at the beginning and/or the end of the neMD trajectory. This strict rule then guarantees that the random walk in configurational space generated by such hybrid neMD-MC algorithm will yield the proper equilibrium Boltzmann distribution. While a number of different constructs are possible, the most commonly used prescription has been to simply reverse the momenta of all the particles at the end of the neMD trajectory ("one-end momentum reversal"). Surprisingly, it is shown here that the choice of momentum reversal prescription can have a considerable effect on the rate of convergence of the hybrid neMD-MC algorithm, with the simple one-end momentum reversal encountering particularly acute problems. In these neMD-MC simulations, different regions of configurational space end up being essentially isolated from one another due to a very small transition rate between regions. In the worst-case scenario, it is almost as if the configurational space does not constitute a single communicating class that can be sampled efficiently by the algorithm, and extremely long neMD-MC simulations are needed to obtain proper equilibrium probability distributions. To address this issue, a novel momentum reversal prescription, symmetrized with respect to both the beginning and the end of the neMD trajectory ("symmetric two-ends momentum reversal"), is introduced. Illustrative simulations demonstrate that the hybrid neMD-MC algorithm robustly yields a correct

  8. A localized momentum constraint for non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Smith, E R; Heyes, D M; Dini, D; Zaki, T A

    2015-02-21

    A method which controls momentum evolution in a sub-region within a molecular dynamics simulation is derived from Gauss's principle of least constraint. The technique for localization is founded on the equations by Irving and Kirkwood [J. Chem. Phys. 18, 817 (1950)] expressed in a weak form according to the control volume (CV) procedure derived by Smith et al. [Phys. Rev. E. 85, 056705 (2012)]. A term for the advection of molecules appears in the derived constraint and is shown to be essential in order to exactly control the time evolution of momentum in the subvolume. The numerical procedure converges the total momentum in the CV to the target value to within machine precision in an iterative manner. The localized momentum constraint can prescribe essentially arbitrary flow fields in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The methodology also forms a rigorous mathematical framework for introducing coupling constraints at the boundary between continuum and discrete systems. This functionality is demonstrated with a boundary-driven flow test case.

  9. Conformational Equilibrium of CDK/Cyclin Complexes by Molecular Dynamics with Excited Normal Modes

    PubMed Central

    Floquet, Nicolas; Costa, Mauricio G.S.; Batista, Paulo R.; Renault, Pedro; Bisch, Paulo M.; Raussin, Florent; Martinez, Jean; Morris, May C.; Perahia, David

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and their associated regulatory cyclins are central for timely regulation of cell-cycle progression. They constitute attractive pharmacological targets for development of anticancer therapeutics, since they are frequently deregulated in human cancers and contribute to sustained, uncontrolled tumor proliferation. Characterization of their structural/dynamic features is essential to gain in-depth insight into structure-activity relationships. In addition, the identification of druggable pockets or key intermediate conformations yields potential targets for the development of novel classes of inhibitors. Structural studies of CDK2/cyclin A have provided a wealth of information concerning monomeric/heterodimeric forms of this kinase. There is, however, much less structural information for other CDK/cyclin complexes, including CDK4/cyclin D1, which displays an alternative (open) position of the cyclin partner relative to CDK, contrasting with the closed CDK2/cyclin A conformation. In this study, we carried out normal-mode analysis and enhanced sampling simulations with our recently developed method, molecular dynamics with excited normal modes, to understand the conformational equilibrium on these complexes. Interestingly, the lowest-frequency normal mode computed for each complex described the transition between the open and closed conformations. Exploration of these motions with an explicit-solvent representation using molecular dynamics with excited normal modes confirmed that the closed conformation is the most stable for the CDK2/cyclin A complex, in agreement with their experimentally available structures. On the other hand, we clearly show that an open↔closed equilibrium may exist in CDK4/cyclin D1, with closed conformations resembling that captured for CDK2/cyclin A. Such conformational preferences may result from the distinct distributions of frustrated contacts in each complex. Using the same approach, the putative roles of

  10. Rotational viscosity of fluids composed of linear molecules: An equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. J. D.; Hansen, J. S.; Todd, B. D.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the rotational viscosity for a chlorine fluid and for a fluid composed of small linear molecules by using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The rotational viscosity is calculated over a large range of state points. It is found that the rotational viscosity is almost independent of temperature in the range studied here but exhibits a power-law dependency on density. The rotational viscosity also shows a power-law relationship with the molecular length, and the ratio between the shear and rotational viscosities approaches 0.5 for the longest molecule studied here. By changing the number of atoms or united atomic units per molecule and by keeping the molecule length fixed, we show that fluids composed of molecules which have a rodlike shape have a lower rotational viscosity. We argue that this phenomenon is due to the reduction in intermolecular connectivity, which leads to larger fluctuations around the values possessed by the fluid on average. The conclusions here can be extended to fluids composed of uniaxial molecules of arbitrary length.

  11. Non-equilibrium dynamics in disordered materials: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmura, Satoshi; Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Yao, Makoto; Shimojo, Fuyuki

    2015-08-17

    The dynamic properties of liquid B{sub 2}O{sub 3} under pressure and highly-charged bromophenol molecule are studied by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on density functional theory (DFT). Diffusion properties of covalent liquids under high pressure are very interesting in the sense that they show unexpected pressure dependence. It is found from our simulation that the magnitude relation of diffusion coefficients for boron and oxygen in liquid B{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows the anomalous pressure dependence. The simulation clarified the microscopic origin of the anomalous diffusion properties. Our simulation also reveals the dissociation mechanism in the coulomb explosion of the highly-charged bromophenol molecule. When the charge state n is 6, hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl group dissociates at times shorter than 20 fs while all hydrogen atoms dissociate when n is 8. After the hydrogen dissociation, the carbon ring breaks at about 100 fs. There is also a difference on the mechanism of the ring breaking depending on charge states, in which the ring breaks with expanding (n = 6) or shrink (n = 8)

  12. Molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.J.C.

    1988-08-01

    The basic methodology of equilibrium molecular dynamics is described. Examples from the literature are used to illustrate how molecular dynamics has been used to resolve theoretical controversies, provide data to test theories, and occasionally to discover new phenomena. The emphasis is on the application of molecular dynamics to an understanding of the microscopic physics underlying the transport properties of simple fluids. 98 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Shear viscosity of molten alkali halides from equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galamba, N.; Nieto de Castro, C. A.; Ely, James F.

    2005-06-01

    The shear viscosity of molten NaCl and KCl was calculated through equilibrium (EMD) and nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics (NEMD) simulations in the canonical (N,V,T) ensemble. Two rigid-ion potentials were investigated, namely, the Born-Mayer-Huggins-Tosi-Fumi potential and the Michielsen-Woerlee-Graaf-Ketelaar potential with the parameters proposed by Ladd. The NEMD simulations were performed using the SLLOD equations of motion [D. J. Evans and G. P. Morriss, Phys. Rev. A 30, 1528 (1984)] with a Gaussian isokinetic thermostat and the results are compared with those obtained from Green-Kubo EMD (N,V,T) simulations and experimental shear viscosity data. The NEMD zero strain rate shear viscosity, η(0), was obtained by fitting a simplified Carreau-type equation and by application of mode-coupling theory, i.e., a η-γ1/2 linear relationship. The values obtained from the first method are found to be significantly lower than those predicted by the second. The agreement between the EMD and NEMD results with experimental data is satisfactory for the two potentials investigated. The ion-ion radial distribution functions obtained with the two rigid-ion potentials for both molten salts are discussed in terms of the differences between the two models.

  14. Shear viscosity of polar liquid mixtures via non-equilibrium molecular dynamics: water, methanol, and acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler Richard, Dean R.; Rowley, L.

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) with isobaric and isokinetic controls were used to simulate the shear viscosity for binary mixtures of water, methanol and acetone, and for ternary mixtures. In all, 22 different liquid composition points were simulated at 298.15 K and 0.1 MPa. A new set of acetone potential parameters was developed, while slight variants to existing water and methanol models were used. Long range Coulombic interactions were computed with the Ewald sum adapted to Lees-Edwards boundary conditions as formulated in Wheeler, D. R., Fuller, N. G., and Rowley, R. L., 1997, Molec. Phys., 92, 55. The attractive (dispersive) part of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions also was handled by a lattice sum. A hybrid mixing rule was used for the LJ cross interactions. Viscosities extrapolated to zero shear compared well with experimental results, having a mean absolute error of 14% and no errors greater than 30%. Although the simulations successfully predicted viscosity maxima for mixtures high in water content, the peak heights tended to be too low, probably due to the limitations of the water model. The results suggest that NEMD may be a viable means of estimating viscosities for polar liquid mixtures with an unrestricted number of components.

  15. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of the unstirred layer in the osmotically driven flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Keito; Itano, Tomoaki; Seki, Masako

    2015-11-01

    We studied the solvent flows driven by the osmotic pressure difference across the semi-permeable membrane. The flow penetrating from the low concentration side transports away solutes adjacent of the membrane, so that the concentration is reduced significantly only at the vicinity of the membrane. It is expected that the relatively low solute concentration develops into a thin boundary layer in the vicinity of the membrane in the case of absence of external stirring process, which is termed as un-stirred layer (USL). To investigate concentration distribution in USL, we carried out non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The flows driven by th osmotic pressure are idealized as 2 dimensional hard disk model, which is composed of solvent and solute molecules. The membrane is modeled as a medium composed of stationary parallel rods distributed by a spatial interval, which is less than the diameter of the solute molecules. The following results were obtained from the numerical simulation. First, the thickness of USL, which was estimated from the obtained concentration distribution, is on the order of a length determined by mean free path. Second, USL was semicircle the center of which is on the end of pore of membrane.

  16. Thermal transport properties of halide solid solutions: Experiments vs equilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gheribi, Aïmen E. Chartrand, Patrice; Salanne, Mathieu

    2015-03-28

    The composition dependence of thermal transport properties of the (Na,K)Cl rocksalt solid solution is investigated through equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations in the entire range of composition and the results are compared with experiments published in recent work [Gheribi et al., J. Chem. phys. 141, 104508 (2014)]. The thermal diffusivity of the (Na,K)Cl solid solution has been measured from 473 K to 823 K using the laser flash technique, and the thermal conductivity was deduced from critically assessed data of heat capacity and density. The thermal conductivity was also predicted at 900 K in the entire range of composition by a series of EMD simulations in both NPT and NVT statistical ensembles using the Green-Kubo theory. The aim of the present paper is to provide an objective analysis of the capability of EMD simulations in predicting the composition dependence of the thermal transport properties of halide solid solutions. According to the Klemens-Callaway [P. G. Klemens, Phys. Rev. 119, 507 (1960) and J. Callaway and H. C. von Bayer, Phys. Rev. 120, 1149 (1960)] theory, the thermal conductivity degradation of the solid solution is explained by mass and strain field fluctuations upon the phonon scattering cross section. A rigorous analysis of the consistency between the theoretical approach and the EMD simulations is discussed in detail.

  17. Shear viscosity for dense plasmas by equilibrium molecular dynamics in asymmetric Yukawa ionic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Haxhimali, Tomorr; Rudd, Robert E; Cabot, William H; Graziani, Frank R

    2015-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of shear viscosity for asymmetric mixed plasma for thermodynamic conditions relevant to astrophysical and inertial confinement fusion plasmas. Specifically, we consider mixtures of deuterium and argon at temperatures of 100-500 eV and a number density of 10^{25} ions/cc. The motion of 30,000-120,000 ions is simulated in which the ions interact via the Yukawa (screened Coulomb) potential. The electric field of the electrons is included in this effective interaction; the electrons are not simulated explicitly. Shear viscosity is calculated using the Green-Kubo approach with an integral of the shear stress autocorrelation function, a quantity calculated in the equilibrium MD simulations. We systematically study different mixtures through a series of simulations with increasing fraction of the minority high-Z element (Ar) in the D-Ar plasma mixture. In the more weakly coupled plasmas, at 500 eV and low Ar fractions, results from MD compare very well with Chapman-Enskog kinetic results. In the more strongly coupled plasmas, the kinetic theory does not agree well with the MD results. We develop a simple model that interpolates between classical kinetic theories at weak coupling and the Murillo Yukawa viscosity model at higher coupling. This hybrid kinetics-MD viscosity model agrees well with the MD results over the conditions simulated, ranging from moderately weakly coupled to moderately strongly coupled asymmetric plasma mixtures. PMID:26651805

  18. Length dependence of thermal conductivity by approach-to-equilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaoui, Hayat; Palla, Pier Luca; Cleri, Fabrizio; Lampin, Evelyne

    2016-08-01

    The length dependence of thermal conductivity over more than two orders of magnitude has been systematically studied for a range of materials, interatomic potentials, and temperatures using the atomistic approach-to-equilibrium molecular dynamics (AEMD) method. By comparing the values of conductivity obtained for a given supercell length and maximum phonon mean free path (MFP), we find that such values are strongly correlated, demonstrating that the AEMD calculation with a supercell of finite length actually probes the thermal conductivity corresponding to a maximum phonon MFP. As a consequence, the less pronounced length dependence usually observed for poorer thermal conductors, such as amorphous silica, is physically justified by their shorter average phonon MFP. Finally, we compare different analytical extrapolations of the conductivity to infinite length and demonstrate that the frequently used Matthiessen rule is not applicable in AEMD. An alternative extrapolation more suitable for transient-time, finite-supercell simulations is derived. This approximation scheme can also be used to classify the quality of different interatomic potential models with respect to their capability of predicting the experimental thermal conductivity.

  19. Equilibrium Limit of Boundary Scattering in Carbon Nanostructures: Molecular Dynamics Calculations of Thermal Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskins, Justin; Kinaci, Alper; Sevik, Cem; Cagin, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    It is widely known that graphene and many of its derivative nanostructures have exceedingly high reported thermal conductivities (up to 4000 W/mK at 300 K). Such attractive thermal properties beg the use of these structures in practical devices; however, to implement these materials while preserving transport quality, the influence of structure on thermal conductivity should be thoroughly understood. For graphene nanostructures, having average phonon mean free paths on the order of one micron, a primary concern is how size influences the potential for heat conduction. To investigate this, we employ a novel technique to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity from the Green-Kubo relations and equilibrium molecular dynamics in systems where phonon-boundary scattering dominates heat flow. Specifically, the thermal conductivities of graphene nanoribbons and carbon nanotubes are calculated in sizes up to 3 microns, and the relative influence of boundary scattering on thermal transport is determined to be dominant at sizes less than 1 micron, after which the thermal transport largely depends on the quality of the nanostructure interface. The method is also extended to carbon nanostructures (fullerenes) where phonon confinement, as opposed to boundary scattering, dominates, and general trends related to the influence of curvature on thermal transport in these materials are discussed.

  20. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gheribi, Aïmen E; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-28

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors.

  1. Simulating ionic thermal trasport by equilibrium ab-initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolongo, Aris; Umari, Paolo; Baroni, Stefano

    2014-03-01

    The Green-Kubo approach to thermal transport is often considered to be incompatible with ab-initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) because a suitable quantum-mechanical definition of the heat current is not readily available, due to the ill-definedness of the microscopic energy density to which it is related by the continuity equation. We argue that a similar difficulty actually exists in classical mechanics as well, and we address the conditions that have to be fulfilled in order for the physically well defined transport coefficients to be independent of the ill defined microscopic energy density from which they derive. We then provide two alternative approaches to calculating thermal conductivites from equilibrium AIMD. The first is based on the Green-Kubo formula, supplemented with an expression for the energy current, which is a generalization of Thouless' expression for the adiabatic charge current. The second approach, which avoids the recourse to an energy current altogether, rests on an efficient and accurate extrapolation to infinite wavelengths of the energy-density time correlation functions. The two methods are compared on a simple classical test bed, and their implementation in AIMD is demonstrated with the calculation of the thermal conductivity of simple fluids.

  2. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheribi, Aïmen E.; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors.

  3. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gheribi, Aïmen E; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-28

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors. PMID:26931711

  4. Near-microsecond human aquaporin 4 gating dynamics in static and alternating external electric fields: Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Niall J.; Garate, José-A.

    2016-08-01

    An extensive suite of non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation has been performed for ˜0.85-0.9 μs of human aquaporin 4 in the absence and presence of externally applied static and alternating electric fields applied along the channels (in both axial directions in the static case, taken as the laboratory z-axis). These external fields were of 0.0065 V/Å (r.m.s.) intensity (of the same order as physiological electrical potentials); alternating fields ranged in frequency from 2.45 to 500 GHz. In-pore gating dynamics was studied, particularly of the relative propensities for "open" and "closed" states of the conserved arginines in the arginine/aromatic area (itself governed in no small part by external-field response of the dipolar alignment of the histidine-201 residue in the selectivity filter). In such a manner, the intimate connection of field-response governing "two-state" histidine states was established statistically and mechanistically. Given the appreciable size of the energy barriers for histidine-201 alignment, we have also performed non-equilibrium metadynamics/local-elevation of static fields applied along both directions to construct the free-energy landscape thereof in terms of external-field direction, elucidating the importance of field direction on energetics. We conclude from direct measurement of deterministic molecular dynamics in conjunction with applied-field metadynamics that the intrinsic electric field within the channel points along the +z-axis, such that externally applied static fields in this direction serve to "open" the channel in the selectivity-filter and the asparagine-proline-alanine region.

  5. Near-microsecond human aquaporin 4 gating dynamics in static and alternating external electric fields: Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    English, Niall J; Garate, José-A

    2016-08-28

    An extensive suite of non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation has been performed for ∼0.85-0.9 μs of human aquaporin 4 in the absence and presence of externally applied static and alternating electric fields applied along the channels (in both axial directions in the static case, taken as the laboratory z-axis). These external fields were of 0.0065 V/Å (r.m.s.) intensity (of the same order as physiological electrical potentials); alternating fields ranged in frequency from 2.45 to 500 GHz. In-pore gating dynamics was studied, particularly of the relative propensities for "open" and "closed" states of the conserved arginines in the arginine/aromatic area (itself governed in no small part by external-field response of the dipolar alignment of the histidine-201 residue in the selectivity filter). In such a manner, the intimate connection of field-response governing "two-state" histidine states was established statistically and mechanistically. Given the appreciable size of the energy barriers for histidine-201 alignment, we have also performed non-equilibrium metadynamics/local-elevation of static fields applied along both directions to construct the free-energy landscape thereof in terms of external-field direction, elucidating the importance of field direction on energetics. We conclude from direct measurement of deterministic molecular dynamics in conjunction with applied-field metadynamics that the intrinsic electric field within the channel points along the +z-axis, such that externally applied static fields in this direction serve to "open" the channel in the selectivity-filter and the asparagine-proline-alanine region. PMID:27586951

  6. Reliable Viscosity Calculation from Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulations: A Time Decomposition Method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Otani, Akihito; Maginn, Edward J

    2015-08-11

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics is often used in conjunction with a Green-Kubo integral of the pressure tensor autocorrelation function to compute the shear viscosity of fluids. This approach is computationally expensive and is subject to a large amount of variability because the plateau region of the Green-Kubo integral is difficult to identify unambiguously. Here, we propose a time decomposition approach for computing the shear viscosity using the Green-Kubo formalism. Instead of one long trajectory, multiple independent trajectories are run and the Green-Kubo relation is applied to each trajectory. The averaged running integral as a function of time is fit to a double-exponential function with a weighting function derived from the standard deviation of the running integrals. Such a weighting function minimizes the uncertainty of the estimated shear viscosity and provides an objective means of estimating the viscosity. While the formal Green-Kubo integral requires an integration to infinite time, we suggest an integration cutoff time tcut, which can be determined by the relative values of the running integral and the corresponding standard deviation. This approach for computing the shear viscosity can be easily automated and used in computational screening studies where human judgment and intervention in the data analysis are impractical. The method has been applied to the calculation of the shear viscosity of a relatively low-viscosity liquid, ethanol, and relatively high-viscosity ionic liquid, 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane-sulfonyl)imide ([BMIM][Tf2N]), over a range of temperatures. These test cases show that the method is robust and yields reproducible and reliable shear viscosity values. PMID:26574439

  7. Phase equilibrium calculations of ternary liquid mixtures with binary interaction parameters and molecular size parameters determined from molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Oh, Suk Yung; Bae, Young Chan

    2010-07-15

    The method presented in this paper was developed to predict liquid-liquid equilibria in ternary liquid mixtures by using a combination of a thermodynamic model and molecular dynamics simulations. In general, common classical thermodynamic models have many parameters which are determined by fitting a model with experimental data. This proposed method, however, provides a simple procedure for calculating liquid-liquid equilibria utilizing binary interaction parameters and molecular size parameters determined from molecular dynamics simulations. This method was applied to mixtures containing water, hydrocarbons, alcohols, chlorides, ketones, acids, and other organic liquids over various temperature ranges. The predicted results agree well with the experimental data without the use of adjustable parameters.

  8. Monitoring equilibrium reaction dynamics of a nearly barrierless molecular rotor using ultrafast vibrational echoes.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Ian A; Osborne, Derek G; White, Aaron M; Anna, Jessica M; Kubarych, Kevin J

    2014-10-01

    Using rapidly acquired spectral diffusion, a recently developed variation of heterodyne detected infrared photon echo spectroscopy, we observe ∼3 ps solvent independent spectral diffusion of benzene chromium tricarbonyl (C6H6Cr(CO)3, BCT) in a series of nonpolar linear alkane solvents. The spectral dynamics is attributed to low-barrier internal torsional motion. This tripod complex has two stable minima corresponding to staggered and eclipsed conformations, which differ in energy by roughly half of kBT. The solvent independence is due to the relative size of the rotor compared with the solvent molecules, which create a solvent cage in which torsional motion occurs largely free from solvent damping. Since the one-dimensional transition state is computed to be only 0.03 kBT above the higher energy eclipsed conformation, this model system offers an unusual, nearly barrierless reaction, which nevertheless is characterized by torsional coordinate dependent vibrational frequencies. Hence, by studying the spectral diffusion of the tripod carbonyls, it is possible to gain insight into the fundamental dynamics of internal rotational motion, and we find some evidence for the importance of non-diffusive ballistic motion even in the room-temperature liquid environment. Using several different approaches to describe equilibrium kinetics, as well as the influence of reactive dynamics on spectroscopic observables, we provide evidence that the low-barrier torsional motion of BCT provides an excellent test case for detailed studies of the links between chemical exchange and linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy.

  9. Equilibrium magnesium isotope fractionation between aqueous Mg2+ and carbonate minerals: Insights from path integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla, Carlos; Blanchard, Marc; Balan, Etienne; Natarajan, Suresh K.; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Mauri, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    The theoretical determination of the isotopic fractionation between an aqueous solution and a mineral is of utmost importance in Earth sciences. While for crystals, it is well established that equilibrium isotopic fractionation factors can be calculated using a statistical thermodynamic approach based on the vibrational properties, several theoretical methods are currently used to model ions in aqueous solution. In this work, we present a systematic study to determine the reduced partition function ratio (β-factor) of aqueous Mg2+ using several levels of theory within the simulations. In particular, using an empirical force field, we compare and discuss the performance of the exact results obtained from path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations, with respect to the more traditional methods based on vibrational properties and the cluster approximation. The results show the importance of including configurational disorder for the estimation of the equilibrium isotope fractionation factor. We also show that using the vibrational frequencies computed from snapshots taken from equilibrated classical molecular dynamics represents a good approximation for the study of aqueous ions. Based on these conclusions, the β-factor of aqueous Mg2+ have been estimated from a Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulation with an ab initio force field, and combined with the β-factors of carbonate minerals (magnesite, dolomite, calcite and aragonite). Mg β-factor of Mg-bearing aragonite, calculated here for the first time, displays a lower value than the three other carbonate minerals. This is explained by a strong distortion of the cationic site leading to a decrease of the coordination number during Ca-Mg substitution. Overall, the equilibrium magnesium isotope fractionation factors between aqueous Mg2+ and carbonate minerals that derive from this methodological study support the previous theoretical results obtained from embedded cluster models.

  10. Isobaric molecular dynamics version of the generalized replica exchange method (gREM): Liquid–vapor equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Secor, Maxim; Keyes, Tom

    2015-09-23

    A prescription for sampling isobaric generalized ensembles with molecular dynamics is presented and applied to the generalized replica exchange method (gREM), which was designed for simulating first-order phase transitions. The properties of the isobaric gREM ensemble are discussed and a study is presented of the liquid-vapor equilibrium of the guest molecules given for gas hydrate formation with the mW water model. As a result, phase diagrams, critical parameters, and a law of corresponding states are obtained.

  11. Isobaric Molecular Dynamics Version of the Generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM): Liquid-Vapor Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Secor, Maxim; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-22

    A prescription for sampling isobaric generalized ensembles with molecular dynamics is presented and applied to the generalized replica exchange method (gREM), which was designed to simulate first-order phase transitions. The properties of the isobaric gREM ensemble are discussed, and a study is presented for the liquid-vapor equilibrium of the guest molecules given for gas hydrate formation with the mW water model. Phase diagrams, critical parameters, and a law of corresponding states are obtained. PMID:26398582

  12. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of nanojet injection with adaptive-spatial decomposition parallel algorithm.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun-Ho; Yoon, Woong-Sup

    2008-07-01

    An Adaptive-Spatial Decomposition parallel algorithm was developed to increase computation efficiency for molecular dynamics simulations of nano-fluids. Injection of a liquid argon jet with a scale of 17.6 molecular diameters was investigated. A solid annular platinum injector was also solved simultaneously with the liquid injectant by adopting a solid modeling technique which incorporates phantom atoms. The viscous heat was naturally discharged through the solids so the liquid boiling problem was avoided with no separate use of temperature controlling methods. Parametric investigations of injection speed, wall temperature, and injector length were made. A sudden pressure drop at the orifice exit causes flash boiling of the liquid departing the nozzle exit with strong evaporation on the surface of the liquids, while rendering a slender jet. The elevation of the injection speed and the wall temperature causes an activation of the surface evaporation concurrent with reduction in the jet breakup length and the drop size.

  13. Monitoring equilibrium reaction dynamics of a nearly barrierless molecular rotor using ultrafast vibrational echoes

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, Ian A.; Osborne, Derek G.; White, Aaron M.; Anna, Jessica M.; Kubarych, Kevin J.

    2014-10-07

    Using rapidly acquired spectral diffusion, a recently developed variation of heterodyne detected infrared photon echo spectroscopy, we observe ∼3 ps solvent independent spectral diffusion of benzene chromium tricarbonyl (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}Cr(CO){sub 3}, BCT) in a series of nonpolar linear alkane solvents. The spectral dynamics is attributed to low-barrier internal torsional motion. This tripod complex has two stable minima corresponding to staggered and eclipsed conformations, which differ in energy by roughly half of k{sub B}T. The solvent independence is due to the relative size of the rotor compared with the solvent molecules, which create a solvent cage in which torsional motion occurs largely free from solvent damping. Since the one-dimensional transition state is computed to be only 0.03 k{sub B}T above the higher energy eclipsed conformation, this model system offers an unusual, nearly barrierless reaction, which nevertheless is characterized by torsional coordinate dependent vibrational frequencies. Hence, by studying the spectral diffusion of the tripod carbonyls, it is possible to gain insight into the fundamental dynamics of internal rotational motion, and we find some evidence for the importance of non-diffusive ballistic motion even in the room-temperature liquid environment. Using several different approaches to describe equilibrium kinetics, as well as the influence of reactive dynamics on spectroscopic observables, we provide evidence that the low-barrier torsional motion of BCT provides an excellent test case for detailed studies of the links between chemical exchange and linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy.

  14. Equilibrium moisture content of a crosslinked epoxy network via molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, M. T.; Staiger, M. P.; Bishop, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    This study presents molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods for determining the solubility limit of water in a crosslinked epoxy network. Procedures are first presented for dynamically crosslinking an epoxy network consisting of diglycidyl ether bisphenol a (DGEBA) and isophorone diamine (IPD). Water molecules are then introduced into the crosslinked DGEBA-IPD structure. The excess chemical potential for the absorbed water was determined through combining thermodynamic integration and Widom’s test particle insertion methods. The limiting moisture uptake of the epoxy structure was determined through comparing the reduced chemical potential of the water held within the epoxy to that of pure water. The DGEBA-IPD epoxy system was found to have a moisture solubility of 3.50-3.75 wt.% when immersed in water at 300 K.

  15. Conformational Equilibrium of N-Myristoylated cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase A by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Cembran, Alessandro; Masterson, Larry R.; McClendon, Christopher L.; Taylor, Susan S.; Gao, Jiali; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKA-C) is subject to several post- or co-translational modifications that regulate its activity both spatially and temporally. Among those, N-myristoylation increases the kinase affinity for membranes and might also be implicated in substrate recognition and allosteric regulation. Here, we investigated the effects of N-myristoylation on the structure, dynamics, and conformational equilibrium of PKA-C using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the myristoyl group inserts into the hydrophobic pocket and leads to a tighter packing of the A-helix against the core of the enzyme. As a result, the A-helix conformational dynamics are reduced and its motions are more coupled with the active site. Our simulations suggest that cation-π interactions between W30, R190, and R93 are responsible for coupling these motions. Two major conformations of the myristoylated N-terminus are the most populated: a long loop (LL conformation), similar to PDB:1CMK, and a helix-turn-helix (HTH conformation), similar to PDB:4DFX, which shows stronger coupling between the conformational dynamics observed at the A-helix and active site. The HTH conformation is stabilized by S10 phosphorylation of the kinase via ionic interactions between the protonated amine of K7 and the phosphate group on S10, further enhancing the dynamic coupling to the active site. These results support a role of N-myristoylation in the allosteric regulation of PKA-C. PMID:23205665

  16. In Silico Determination of Gas Permeabilities by Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics: CO2 and He through PIM-1

    PubMed Central

    Frentrup, Hendrik; Hart, Kyle E.; Colina, Coray M.; Müller, Erich A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the permeation dynamics of helium and carbon dioxide through an atomistically detailed model of a polymer of intrinsic microporosity, PIM-1, via non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. This work presents the first explicit molecular modeling of gas permeation through a high free-volume polymer sample, and it demonstrates how permeability and solubility can be obtained coherently from a single simulation. Solubilities in particular can be obtained to a very high degree of confidence and within experimental inaccuracies. Furthermore, the simulations make it possible to obtain very specific information on the diffusion dynamics of penetrant molecules and yield detailed maps of gas occupancy, which are akin to a digital tomographic scan of the polymer network. In addition to determining permeability and solubility directly from NEMD simulations, the results shed light on the permeation mechanism of the penetrant gases, suggesting that the relative openness of the microporous topology promotes the anomalous diffusion of penetrant gases, which entails a deviation from the pore hopping mechanism usually observed in gas diffusion in polymers. PMID:25764366

  17. Equilibrium fluctuations of liquid state static properties in a subvolume by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.; Dini, D.; Smith, E. R.

    2016-09-01

    System property fluctuations increasingly dominate a physical process as the sampling volume decreases. The purpose of this work is to explore how the fluctuation statistics of various thermodynamic properties depend on the sampling volume, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. First an examination of various expressions for calculating the bulk pressure of a bulk liquid is made, which includes a decomposition of the virial expression into two terms, one of which is the Method of Planes (MOP) applied to the faces of the cubic simulation cell. Then an analysis is made of the fluctuations of local density, temperature, pressure, and shear stress as a function of sampling volume (SV). Cubic and spherical shaped SVs were used within a spatially homogeneous LJ liquid at a state point along the melting curve. It is shown that the MD-generated probability distribution functions (PDFs) of all of these properties are to a good approximation Gaussian even for SV containing only a few molecules (˜10), with the variances being inversely proportional to the SV volume, Ω. For small subvolumes the shear stress PDF fits better to a Gaussian than the pressure PDF. A new stochastic sampling technique to implement the volume averaging definition of the pressure tensor is presented, which is employed for cubic, spherical, thin cubic, and spherical shell SV. This method is more efficient for less symmetric SV shapes.

  18. Equilibrium fluctuations of liquid state static properties in a subvolume by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Heyes, D M; Dini, D; Smith, E R

    2016-09-14

    System property fluctuations increasingly dominate a physical process as the sampling volume decreases. The purpose of this work is to explore how the fluctuation statistics of various thermodynamic properties depend on the sampling volume, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. First an examination of various expressions for calculating the bulk pressure of a bulk liquid is made, which includes a decomposition of the virial expression into two terms, one of which is the Method of Planes (MOP) applied to the faces of the cubic simulation cell. Then an analysis is made of the fluctuations of local density, temperature, pressure, and shear stress as a function of sampling volume (SV). Cubic and spherical shaped SVs were used within a spatially homogeneous LJ liquid at a state point along the melting curve. It is shown that the MD-generated probability distribution functions (PDFs) of all of these properties are to a good approximation Gaussian even for SV containing only a few molecules (∼10), with the variances being inversely proportional to the SV volume, Ω. For small subvolumes the shear stress PDF fits better to a Gaussian than the pressure PDF. A new stochastic sampling technique to implement the volume averaging definition of the pressure tensor is presented, which is employed for cubic, spherical, thin cubic, and spherical shell SV. This method is more efficient for less symmetric SV shapes. PMID:27634268

  19. Equilibrium fluctuations of liquid state static properties in a subvolume by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Heyes, D M; Dini, D; Smith, E R

    2016-09-14

    System property fluctuations increasingly dominate a physical process as the sampling volume decreases. The purpose of this work is to explore how the fluctuation statistics of various thermodynamic properties depend on the sampling volume, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. First an examination of various expressions for calculating the bulk pressure of a bulk liquid is made, which includes a decomposition of the virial expression into two terms, one of which is the Method of Planes (MOP) applied to the faces of the cubic simulation cell. Then an analysis is made of the fluctuations of local density, temperature, pressure, and shear stress as a function of sampling volume (SV). Cubic and spherical shaped SVs were used within a spatially homogeneous LJ liquid at a state point along the melting curve. It is shown that the MD-generated probability distribution functions (PDFs) of all of these properties are to a good approximation Gaussian even for SV containing only a few molecules (∼10), with the variances being inversely proportional to the SV volume, Ω. For small subvolumes the shear stress PDF fits better to a Gaussian than the pressure PDF. A new stochastic sampling technique to implement the volume averaging definition of the pressure tensor is presented, which is employed for cubic, spherical, thin cubic, and spherical shell SV. This method is more efficient for less symmetric SV shapes.

  20. Isomerization reaction dynamics and equilibrium at the liquid-vapor interface of water. A molecular-dynamics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, Ilan; Pohorille, Andrew

    1993-01-01

    The gauche-trans isomerization reaction of 1,2-dichloroethane at the liquid-vapor interface of water is studied using molecular-dynamics computer simulations. The solvent bulk and surface effects on the torsional potential of mean force and on barrier recrossing dynamics are computed. The isomerization reaction involves a large change in the electric dipole moment, and as a result the trans/gauche ratio is considerably affected by the transition from the bulk solvent to the surface. Reactive flux correlation function calculations of the reaction rate reveal that deviation from the transition-state theory due to barrier recrossing is greater at the surface than in the bulk water. This suggests that the system exhibits non-Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus behavior due to the weak solvent-solute coupling at the water liquid-vapor interface.

  1. Soft-spring wall based non-periodic boundary conditions for non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of dense fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatage, Dhairyashil; Tomar, Gaurav Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2015-03-28

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations require imposition of non-periodic boundary conditions (NPBCs) that seamlessly account for the effect of the truncated bulk region on the simulated MD region. Standard implementation of specular boundary conditions in such simulations results in spurious density and force fluctuations near the domain boundary and is therefore inappropriate for coupled atomistic-continuum calculations. In this work, we present a novel NPBC model that relies on boundary atoms attached to a simple cubic lattice with soft springs to account for interactions from particles which would have been present in an untruncated full domain treatment. We show that the proposed model suppresses the unphysical fluctuations in the density to less than 1% of the mean while simultaneously eliminating spurious oscillations in both mean and boundary forces. The model allows for an effective coupling of atomistic and continuum solvers as demonstrated through multiscale simulation of boundary driven singular flow in a cavity. The geometric flexibility of the model enables straightforward extension to nonplanar complex domains without any adverse effects on dynamic properties such as the diffusion coefficient.

  2. Prediction of the Chapman-Jouguet chemical equilibrium state in a detonation wave from first principles based reactive molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dezhou; Zybin, Sergey V; An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-01-21

    The combustion or detonation of reacting materials at high temperature and pressure can be characterized by the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state that describes the chemical equilibrium of the products at the end of the reaction zone of the detonation wave for sustained detonation. This provides the critical properties and product kinetics for input to macroscale continuum simulations of energetic materials. We propose the ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics to CJ point protocol (Rx2CJ) for predicting the CJ state parameters, providing the means to predict the performance of new materials prior to synthesis and characterization, allowing the simulation based design to be done in silico. Our Rx2CJ method is based on atomistic reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) using the QM-derived ReaxFF force field. We validate this method here by predicting the CJ point and detonation products for three typical energetic materials. We find good agreement between the predicted and experimental detonation velocities, indicating that this method can reliably predict the CJ state using modest levels of computation.

  3. Prediction of the Chapman-Jouguet chemical equilibrium state in a detonation wave from first principles based reactive molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dezhou; Zybin, Sergey V; An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-01-21

    The combustion or detonation of reacting materials at high temperature and pressure can be characterized by the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state that describes the chemical equilibrium of the products at the end of the reaction zone of the detonation wave for sustained detonation. This provides the critical properties and product kinetics for input to macroscale continuum simulations of energetic materials. We propose the ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics to CJ point protocol (Rx2CJ) for predicting the CJ state parameters, providing the means to predict the performance of new materials prior to synthesis and characterization, allowing the simulation based design to be done in silico. Our Rx2CJ method is based on atomistic reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) using the QM-derived ReaxFF force field. We validate this method here by predicting the CJ point and detonation products for three typical energetic materials. We find good agreement between the predicted and experimental detonation velocities, indicating that this method can reliably predict the CJ state using modest levels of computation. PMID:26688211

  4. A steady-state non-equilibrium molecular dynamics approach for the study of evaporation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianguo; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Yahia-Ouahmed, Méziane; Leroy, Frédéric

    2013-10-01

    Two non-equilibrium methods (called bubble method and splitting method, respectively) have been developed and tested to study the steady state evaporation of a droplet surrounded by its vapor, where the evaporation continuously occurs at the vapor-liquid interface while the droplet size remains constant. In the bubble method, gas molecules are continuously reinserted into a free volume (represented by a bubble) located at the centre of mass of the droplet to keep the droplet size constant. In the splitting method, a molecule close to the centre of mass of the droplet is split into two: In this way, the droplet size is also maintained during the evaporation. By additional local thermostats confined to the area of insertion, the effect of frequent insertions on properties such as density and temperature can be limited to the immediate insertion area. Perturbations are not observed in other parts of the droplet. In the end, both the bubble method and the splitting method achieve steady-state droplet evaporation. Although these methods have been developed using an isolated droplet, we anticipate that they will find a wide range of applications in the study of the evaporation of isolated films and droplets or thin films on heated substrates or under confinement. They can in principle also be used to study the steady-state of other physical processes, such as the diffusion or permeation of gas molecules or ions in a pressure gradient or a concentration gradient. PMID:24116576

  5. Partial molar enthalpies and reaction enthalpies from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Schnell, Sondre K.; Skorpa, Ragnhild; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; Simon, Jean-Marc

    2014-10-14

    We present a new molecular simulation technique for determining partial molar enthalpies in mixtures of gases and liquids from single simulations, without relying on particle insertions, deletions, or identity changes. The method can also be applied to systems with chemical reactions. We demonstrate our method for binary mixtures of Weeks-Chandler-Anderson particles by comparing with conventional simulation techniques, as well as for a simple model that mimics a chemical reaction. The method considers small subsystems inside a large reservoir (i.e., the simulation box), and uses the construction of Hill to compute properties in the thermodynamic limit from small-scale fluctuations. Results obtained with the new method are in excellent agreement with those from previous methods. Especially for modeling chemical reactions, our method can be a valuable tool for determining reaction enthalpies directly from a single MD simulation.

  6. Thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube—polyamide-6,6 nanocomposites: Reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghemandi, Mohammad; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Böhm, Michael C.

    2011-11-01

    The thermal conductivity of composites of carbon nanotubes and polyamide-6,6 has been investigated using reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in a full atomistic resolution. It is found, in line with experiments, that the composites have thermal conductivities, which are only moderately larger than that of pure polyamide. The composite conductivities are orders of magnitude less than what would be expected from naïve additivity arguments. This means that the intrinsic thermal conductivities of isolated nanotubes, which exceed the best-conducting metals, cannot be harnessed for heat transport, when the nanotubes are embedded in a polymer matrix. The main reason is the high interfacial thermal resistance between the nanotubes and the polymer, which was calculated in addition to the total composite thermal conductivity as well as that of the subsystem. It hinders heat to be transferred from the slow-conducting polymer into the fast-conducting nanotubes and back into the polymer. This interpretation is in line with the majority of recent simulation works. An alternative explanation, namely, the damping of the long-wavelength phonons in nanotubes by the polymer matrix is not supported by the present calculations. These modes provide most of the polymers heat conduction. An additional minor effect is caused by the anisotropic structure of the polymer phase induced by the nearby nanotube surfaces. The thermal conductivity of the polymer matrix increases slightly in the direction parallel to the nanotubes, whereas it decreases perpendicular to it.

  7. Modelling transient heat conduction in solids at multiple length and time scales: A coupled non-equilibrium molecular dynamics/continuum approach

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, Kenny; Gill, Simon P.A.

    2009-10-20

    A method for controlling the thermal boundary conditions of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations is presented. The method is simple to implement into a conventional molecular dynamics code and independent of the atomistic model employed. It works by regulating the temperature in a thermostatted boundary region by feedback control to achieve the desired temperature at the edge of an inner region where the true atomistic dynamics are retained. This is necessary to avoid intrinsic boundary effects in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Three thermostats are investigated: the global deterministic Nose-Hoover thermostat and two local stochastic thermostats, Langevin and stadium damping. The latter thermostat is introduced to avoid the adverse reflection of phonons that occurs at an abrupt interface. The method is then extended to allow atomistic/continuum models to be thermally coupled concurrently for the analysis of large steady state and transient heat conduction problems. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated for the example of heat flow down a three-dimensional atomistic rod of uniform cross-section subjected to a variety of boundary conditions.

  8. Intermolecular interactions of liquid dichloromethane and equilibrium properties of liquid{endash}vapor and liquid{endash}liquid interfaces: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, L.X.

    1999-05-01

    Extensive molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to study the molecular interactions, liquid states, and liquid/vapor properties of dichloromethane. The study is also extended to the equilibrium properties of the liquid/liquid interface of water-dichloromethane. The intermolecular interactions among water, dichloromethane, and water-dichloromethane are described using our polarizable potential models. The equilibrium properties of liquid dichloromethane, including the radial distribution functions, the intermolecular structural factor, the self-diffusion coefficient, and the dielectric constant, are evaluated. The dielectric constant is computed using Ewald summation techniques and the computed result compared reasonably well with the available experimental data. Properties such as surface tensions and density profiles of liquid/vapor dichloromethane are evaluated. We found that the computed surface tensions for several temperatures are in excellent agreement with experimental data. The computed density profile of the liquid/liquid interface of water-dichloromethane is averaged over 1 ns and we found the computed profile to be quite smooth and stable. The effect of polarization on the liquid/liquid interfacial equilibrium properties is evaluated by computing the dipole moments of water and dichloromethane molecules as a function of the distance normal to the interface. We found that these values deviated significantly from the simulations that are based on nonpolarizable potential models. We attribute these observations to the changes in the electric fields around the water and dichloromethane molecules near the interface. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Non-equilibrium Dynamics of DNA Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariadi, Rizal Fajar

    Can the fundamental processes that underlie molecular biology be understood and simulated by DNA nanotechnology? The early development of DNA nanotechnology by Ned Seeman was driven by the desire to find a solution to the protein crystallization problem. Much of the later development of the field was also driven by envisioned applications in computing and nanofabrication. While the DNA nanotechnology community has assembled a versatile tool kit with which DNA nanostructures of considerable complexity can be assembled, the application of this tool kit to other areas of science and technology is still in its infancy. This dissertation reports on the construction of non-equilibrium DNA nanotube dynamic to probe molecular processes in the areas of hydrodynamics and cytoskeletal behavior. As the first example, we used DNA nanotubes as a molecular probe for elongational flow measurement in different micro-scale flow settings. The hydrodynamic flow in the vicinity of simple geometrical objects, such as a rigid DNA nanotube, is amenable to rigorous theoretical investigation. We measured the distribution of elongational flows produced in progressively more complex settings, ranging from the vicinity of an orifice in a microfluidic chamber to within a bursting bubble of Pacific ocean water. This information can be used to constrain theories on the origin of life in which replication involves a hydrodynamically driven fission process, such as the coacervate fission proposed by Oparin. A second theme of this dissertation is the bottom-up construction of a de novo artificial cytoskeleton with DNA nanotubes. The work reported here encompasses structural, locomotion, and control aspects of non-equilibrium cytoskeletal behavior. We first measured the kinetic parameters of DNA nanotube assembly and tested the accuracy of the existing polymerization models in the literature. Toward recapitulation of non-equilibrium cytoskeletal dynamics, we coupled the polymerization of DNA

  10. Chlorodifluoromethane equilibrium on 13X molecular sieve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlile, Donna L.; Mahle, John J.; Buettner, Leonard C.; Tevault, David E.; Friday, David K.

    1994-08-01

    Adsorption phase equilibrium data are required for evaluating any adsorption-based gas separation process. The U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center is currently measuring adsorption phase equilibrium data for a variety of chemical warfare agents and their surrogates on adsorbent materials to correlate physical properties to filtration/separation efficiencies of each vapor on each adsorbent. This report details the adsorption phase equilibrium data measured for chlorodifluoromethane (R-22) on 13X Molecular Sieve. The 13X Molecular Sieve is a candidate adsorbent for future military air purification systems employing the pressure-swing adsorption separation process.

  11. Study of clathrate hydrates via equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation employing polarisable and non-polarisable, rigid and flexible water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, Christian J.; English, Niall J.

    2016-04-01

    Equilibrium molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on metastable sI and sII polymorphs of empty hydrate lattices, in addition to liquid water and ice Ih. The non-polarisable TIP4P-2005, simple point charge model (SPC), and polarisable Thole-type models (TTM): TTM2, TTM3, and TTM4 water models were used in order to survey the differences between models and to see what differences can be expected when polarisability is incorporated. Rigid and flexible variants were used of each model to gauge the effects of flexibility. Power spectra are calculated and compared to density-of-states spectra inferred from inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements. Thermodynamic properties were also calculated, as well as molecular-dipole distributions. It was concluded that TTM models offer optimal fidelity vis-à-vis INS spectra, together with thermodynamic properties, with the flexible TTM2 model offering optimal placement of vibrational modes.

  12. Study of clathrate hydrates via equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation employing polarisable and non-polarisable, rigid and flexible water models.

    PubMed

    Burnham, Christian J; English, Niall J

    2016-04-28

    Equilibrium molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on metastable sI and sII polymorphs of empty hydrate lattices, in addition to liquid water and ice Ih. The non-polarisable TIP4P-2005, simple point charge model (SPC), and polarisable Thole-type models (TTM): TTM2, TTM3, and TTM4 water models were used in order to survey the differences between models and to see what differences can be expected when polarisability is incorporated. Rigid and flexible variants were used of each model to gauge the effects of flexibility. Power spectra are calculated and compared to density-of-states spectra inferred from inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements. Thermodynamic properties were also calculated, as well as molecular-dipole distributions. It was concluded that TTM models offer optimal fidelity vis-à-vis INS spectra, together with thermodynamic properties, with the flexible TTM2 model offering optimal placement of vibrational modes. PMID:27131553

  13. Enhanced heat transfer through filler-polymer interface by surface-coupling agent in heat-dissipation material: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kouichi; Ogata, Shuji; Kobayashi, Ryo; Tamura, Tomoyuki; Kitsunezuka, Masashi; Shinma, Atsushi

    2013-11-01

    Developing a composite material of polymers and micrometer-sized fillers with higher heat conductance is crucial to realize modular packaging of electronic components at higher densities. Enhancement mechanisms of the heat conductance of the polymer-filler interfaces by adding the surface-coupling agent in such a polymer composite material are investigated through the non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. A simulation system is composed of α-alumina as the filler, bisphenol-A epoxy molecules as the polymers, and model molecules for the surface-coupling agent. The inter-atomic potential between the α-alumina and surface-coupling molecule, which is essential in the present MD simulation, is constructed to reproduce the calculated energies with the electronic density-functional theory. Through the non-equilibrium MD simulation runs, we find that the thermal resistance at the interface decreases significantly by increasing either number or lengths of the surface-coupling molecules and that the effective thermal conductivity of the system approaches to the theoretical value corresponding to zero thermal-resistance at the interface. Detailed analyses about the atomic configurations and local temperatures around the interface are performed to identify heat-transfer routes through the interface.

  14. Enhanced heat transfer through filler-polymer interface by surface-coupling agent in heat-dissipation material: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kouichi; Ogata, Shuji; Kobayashi, Ryo; Tamura, Tomoyuki; Kitsunezuka, Masashi; Shinma, Atsushi

    2013-11-21

    Developing a composite material of polymers and micrometer-sized fillers with higher heat conductance is crucial to realize modular packaging of electronic components at higher densities. Enhancement mechanisms of the heat conductance of the polymer-filler interfaces by adding the surface-coupling agent in such a polymer composite material are investigated through the non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. A simulation system is composed of α-alumina as the filler, bisphenol-A epoxy molecules as the polymers, and model molecules for the surface-coupling agent. The inter-atomic potential between the α-alumina and surface-coupling molecule, which is essential in the present MD simulation, is constructed to reproduce the calculated energies with the electronic density-functional theory. Through the non-equilibrium MD simulation runs, we find that the thermal resistance at the interface decreases significantly by increasing either number or lengths of the surface-coupling molecules and that the effective thermal conductivity of the system approaches to the theoretical value corresponding to zero thermal-resistance at the interface. Detailed analyses about the atomic configurations and local temperatures around the interface are performed to identify heat-transfer routes through the interface.

  15. Equilibrium molecular thermodynamics from Kirkwood sampling.

    PubMed

    Somani, Sandeep; Okamoto, Yuko; Ballard, Andrew J; Wales, David J

    2015-05-21

    We present two methods for barrierless equilibrium sampling of molecular systems based on the recently proposed Kirkwood method (J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 130, 134102). Kirkwood sampling employs low-order correlations among internal coordinates of a molecule for random (or non-Markovian) sampling of the high dimensional conformational space. This is a geometrical sampling method independent of the potential energy surface. The first method is a variant of biased Monte Carlo, where Kirkwood sampling is used for generating trial Monte Carlo moves. Using this method, equilibrium distributions corresponding to different temperatures and potential energy functions can be generated from a given set of low-order correlations. Since Kirkwood samples are generated independently, this method is ideally suited for massively parallel distributed computing. The second approach is a variant of reservoir replica exchange, where Kirkwood sampling is used to construct a reservoir of conformations, which exchanges conformations with the replicas performing equilibrium sampling corresponding to different thermodynamic states. Coupling with the Kirkwood reservoir enhances sampling by facilitating global jumps in the conformational space. The efficiency of both methods depends on the overlap of the Kirkwood distribution with the target equilibrium distribution. We present proof-of-concept results for a model nine-atom linear molecule and alanine dipeptide.

  16. Molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaolin; Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation holds the promise of revealing the mechanisms of biological processes in their ultimate detail. It is carried out by computing the interaction forces acting on each atom and then propagating the velocities and positions of the atoms by numerical integration of Newton's equations of motion. In this review, we present an overview of how the MD simulation can be conducted to address computational toxicity problems. The study cases will cover a standard MD simulation performed to investigate the overall flexibility of a cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme and a set of more advanced MD simulations to examine the barrier to ion conduction in a human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR).

  17. Instability of quantum equilibrium in Bohm's dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Colin, Samuel; Valentini, Antony

    2014-01-01

    We consider Bohm's second-order dynamics for arbitrary initial conditions in phase space. In principle, Bohm's dynamics allows for ‘extended’ non-equilibrium, with initial momenta not equal to the gradient of phase of the wave function (as well as initial positions whose distribution departs from the Born rule). We show that extended non-equilibrium does not relax in general and is in fact unstable. This is in sharp contrast with de Broglie's first-order dynamics, for which non-standard momenta are not allowed and which shows an efficient relaxation to the Born rule for positions. On this basis, we argue that, while de Broglie's dynamics is a tenable physical theory, Bohm's dynamics is not. In a world governed by Bohm's dynamics, there would be no reason to expect to see an effective quantum theory today (even approximately), in contradiction with observation. PMID:25383020

  18. Radiative-dynamical equilibrium states for Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, L. M.; Stone, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    In order to obtain accurate estimates of the radiative heating that drives motions in Jupiter's atmosphere, previous radiative equilibrium calculations are improved by including the NH3 opacities and updated results for the pressure-induced opacities. These additions increase the radiative lapse rate near the top of the statically unstable region and lead to a fairly constant radiative lapse rate below the tropopause. The radiative-convective equilibrium temperature structure consistent with these changes is calculated, but it differs only slightly from earlier calculations. The radiative equilibrium calculations are used to calculate whether equilibrium states can occur on Jupiter which are similar to the baroclinic instability regimes on the earth and Mars. The results show that Jupiter's dynamical regime cannot be of this kind, except possibly at very high latitudes, and that its regime must be a basically less stable one than this kind.

  19. Open boundary molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Buscalioni, R.; Sablić, J.; Praprotnik, M.

    2015-09-01

    This contribution analyzes several strategies and combination of methodologies to perform molecular dynamic simulations in open systems. Here, the term open indicates that the total system has boundaries where transfer of mass, momentum and energy can take place. This formalism, which we call Open Boundary Molecular Dynamics (OBMD), can act as interface of different schemes, such as Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS) and Hybrid continuum-particle dynamics to link atomistic, coarse-grained (CG) and continuum (Eulerian) fluid dynamics in the general framework of fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations. The core domain of the simulation box is solved using all-atom descriptions. The CG layer introduced using AdResS is located at the outer part of the open box to make feasible the insertion of large molecules into the system. Communications between the molecular system and the outer world are carried out in the outer layers, called buffers. These coupling preserve momentum and mass conservation laws and can thus be linked with Eulerian hydro- dynamic solvers. In its simpler form, OBMD allows, however, to impose a local pressure tensor and a heat flux across the system's boundaries. For a one component molecular system, the external normal pressure and temperature determine the external chemical potential and thus the independent parameters of a grand-canonical ensemble simulation. Extended ensembles under non-equilibrium stationary states can also be simulated as well as time dependent forcings (e.g. oscillatory rheology). To illustrate the robustness of the combined OBMD-AdResS method, we present simulations of star-polymer melts at equilibrium and in sheared flow.

  20. Interactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Daniel V.

    2015-03-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in html5 and javascript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  1. Are the Concepts of Dynamic Equilibrium and the Thermodynamic Criteria for Spontaneity, Nonspontaneity, and Equilibrium Compatible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Raff, Lionel M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic spontaneity-equilibrium criteria require that in a single-reaction system, reactions in either the forward or reverse direction at equilibrium be nonspontaneous. Conversely, the concept of dynamic equilibrium holds that forward and reverse reactions both occur at equal rates at equilibrium to the extent allowed by kinetic…

  2. The Dynamical Equilibrium of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, R. G.; Yee, H. K. C.; Ellingson, E.; Morris, S. L.; Abraham, R.; Gravel, P.; Pritchet, C. J.; Smecker-Hane, T.; Hartwick, F. D. A.; Hesser, J. E.; Hutchings, J. B.; Oke, J. B.

    1997-02-01

    If a galaxy cluster is effectively in dynamical equilibrium, then all galaxy populations within the cluster must have distributions in velocity and position that individually reflect the same underlying mass distribution, although the derived virial masses can be quite different. Specifically, within the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology cluster sample, the virial radius of the red galaxy population is, on the average, a factor of 2.05 +/- 0.34 smaller than that of the blue population. The red galaxies also have a smaller rms velocity dispersion, a factor of 1.31 +/- 0.13 within our sample. Consequently, the virial mass calculated from the blue galaxies is 3.5 +/- 1.3 times larger than from the red galaxies. However, applying the Jeans equation of stellar hydrodynamic equilibrium to the red and blue subsamples separately gives statistically identical cluster mass profiles. This is strong evidence that these clusters are effectively equilibrium systems and therefore demonstrates empirically that the masses in the virialized region are reliably estimated using dynamical techniques.

  3. Punctuated equilibrium dynamics in human communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dan; Han, Xiao-Pu; Wei, Zong-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2015-10-01

    A minimal model based on network incorporating individual interactions is proposed to study the non-Poisson statistical properties of human behavior: individuals in system interact with their neighbors, the probability of an individual acting correlates to its activity, and all the individuals involved in action will change their activities randomly. The model reproduces varieties of spatial-temporal patterns observed in empirical studies of human daily communications, providing insight into various human activities and embracing a range of realistic social interacting systems, particularly, intriguing bimodal phenomenon. This model bridges priority queueing theory and punctuated equilibrium dynamics, and our modeling and analysis is likely to shed light on non-Poisson phenomena in many complex systems.

  4. Dynamic Protonation Equilibrium of Solvated Acetic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Wei; Frigato, Tomaso; Straatsma, TP; Helms, Volkhard H.

    2007-04-13

    For the first time, the dynamic protonation equilibrium between an amino acid side chain analogue and bulk water as well as the diffusion properties of the excess proton were successfully reproduced through unbiased computer simulations. During a 50 ns Q-HOP MD simulation, two different regimes of proton transfer were observed. Extended phases of frequent proton swapping between acetic acid and nearby water were separated by phases where the proton freely diffuses in the simulation box until it is captured again by acetic acid. The pKa of acetic acid was calculated around 3.0 based on the relative population of protonated and deprotonated states and the diffusion coefficient of excess proton was computed from the average mean squared displacement in the simulation. Both calculated values agree well with the experimental measurements.

  5. Static and dynamic properties of large polymer melts in equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-04-01

    We present a detailed study of the static and dynamic behaviors of long semiflexible polymer chains in a melt. Starting from previously obtained fully equilibrated high molecular weight polymer melts [G. Zhang et al., ACS Macro Lett. 3, 198 (2014)], we investigate their static and dynamic scaling behaviors as predicted by theory. We find that for semiflexible chains in a melt, results of the mean square internal distance, the probability distributions of the end-to-end distance, and the chain structure factor are well described by theoretical predictions for ideal chains. We examine the motion of monomers and chains by molecular dynamics simulations using the ESPResSo++ package. The scaling predictions of the mean squared displacement of inner monomers, center of mass, and relations between them based on the Rouse and the reptation theory are verified, and related characteristic relaxation times are determined. Finally, we give evidence that the entanglement length Ne,PPA as determined by a primitive path analysis (PPA) predicts a plateau modulus, GN 0 = /4 5 ( ρ k B T / N e ) , consistent with stresses obtained from the Green-Kubo relation. These comprehensively characterized equilibrium structures, which offer a good compromise between flexibility, small Ne, computational efficiency, and small deviations from ideality, provide ideal starting states for future non-equilibrium studies.

  6. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2011-01-04

    The molecular dynamics method, although extremely powerful for materials simulations, is limited to times scales of roughly one microsecond or less. On longer time scales, dynamical evolution typically consists of infrequent events, which are usually activated processes. This course is focused on understanding infrequent-event dynamics, on methods for characterizing infrequent-event mechanisms and rate constants, and on methods for simulating long time scales in infrequent-event systems, emphasizing the recently developed accelerated molecular dynamics methods (hyperdynamics, parallel replica dynamics, and temperature accelerated dynamics). Some familiarity with basic statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics methods will be assumed.

  7. Internal Dynamics of Equilibrium Colloidal Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Rebecca Wood

    Colloidal clusters, aggregates of a few micrometer-sized spherical particles, are a model experimental system for understanding the physics of self-assembly and processes such as nucleation. Colloidal clusters are well suited for studies on these topics because they are the simplest colloidal system with internal degrees of freedom. Clusters made from particles that weakly attract one another continually rearrange between different structures. By characterizing these internal dynamics and the structures connected by the rearrangement pathways, we seek to understand the statistical physics underlying self-assembly and equilibration. In this thesis, we examine the rearrangement dynamics of colloidal clusters and analyze the equilibrium distributions of ground and excited states. We prepare clusters of up to ten microspheres bound by short-range depletion interactions that are tuned to allow equilibration between multiple isostatic arrangements. To study these clusters, we use bright-field and digital holographic microscopy paired with computational post-processing to amass ensemble-averaged and time-averaged probabilities. We study both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) clusters composed of either one or two species of particles. To learn about geometrical nucleation barriers, we track rearrangements of particles within freely rotating and translating 3D clusters. We show that rearrangements occur on a timescale of seconds, consistent with diffusion-dominated internal dynamics. To better understand excited states and transition pathways, we track hundreds of rearrangements between degenerate ground states in 2D clusters. We show that the rearrangement rates can be understood using a model with two parameters, which account for the diffusion coefficient along the excited-state rearrangement pathways and the interaction potential. To explore new methods to control self-assembly, we analyze clusters of two species with different masses and different

  8. Path integral Liouville dynamics for thermal equilibrium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jian

    2014-06-14

    We show a new imaginary time path integral based method—path integral Liouville dynamics (PILD), which can be derived from the equilibrium Liouville dynamics [J. Liu and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 104101 (2011)] in the Wigner phase space. Numerical tests of PILD with the simple (white noise) Langevin thermostat have been made for two strongly anharmonic model problems. Since implementation of PILD does not request any specific form of the potential energy surface, the results suggest that PILD offers a potentially useful approach for general condensed phase molecular systems to have the two important properties: conserves the quantum canonical distribution and recovers exact thermal correlation functions (of even nonlinear operators, i.e., nonlinear functions of position or momentum operators) in the classical, high temperature, and harmonic limits.

  9. Effect of the cosolutes trehalose and methanol on the equilibrium and phase-transition properties of glycerol-monopalmitate lipid bilayers investigated using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Laner, Monika; Horta, Bruno A C; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2014-11-01

    The influence of the cosolutes trehalose and methanol on the structural, dynamic and thermodynamic properties of a glycerol-1-monopalmitate (GMP) bilayer and on its main transition temperature [Formula: see text] is investigated using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations (600 ns) of a GMP bilayer patch (2 × 8 × 8 lipids) at different temperatures in the range of 302 to 338 K and considering three different cosolute concentrations. Depending on the environment and temperature, these simulations present no or a single GL[Formula: see text]LC, LC[Formula: see text]GL or LC[Formula: see text]ID transition, where LC, GL and ID are the liquid crystal, gel and interdigitated phases, respectively. The trehalose molecules form a coating layer at the bilayer surface, promote the hydrogen-bonded bridging of the lipid headgroups, preserve the interaction of the headgroups with trapped water and induce a slight lateral expansion of the bilayer in the LC phase, observations that may have implications for the phenomenon of anhydrobiosis. However, this cosolute does not affect [Formula: see text] and its dependence on hydration in the concentration range considered. On the other hand, methanol molecules intercalate between the lipid headgroups, promote a lateral expansion of the bilayer in the LC phase and induce a concentration dependent decrease of [Formula: see text], observations that may have implications for the phenomenon of anesthesia. The occurrence of an ID phase in the presence of this cosolute may be viewed as an extreme consequence of lateral expansion. The analysis of the simulations also suggests the existence of two basic conservation principles: (1) the hydrogen-bond saturation principle rests on the observation that for all species present in the different systems, the total numbers of hydrogen-bonds per molecule is essentially constant, the only factor of variability being their distribution among different partners; (2) the densest packing principle

  10. Non-equilibrium hot carrier dynamics in plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Prineha; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Jermyn, Adam; Cortes, Emiliano; Maier, Stefan A.; Goddard, William A., III

    Decay of surface plasmons to hot carriers is a new direction that has attracted considerable fundamental and application interest, yet a fundamental understanding of ultrafast plasmon decay processes and the underlying microscopic mechanisms remain incomplete. Ultrafast experiments provide insights into the relaxation of non-equilibrium carriers at the tens and hundreds of femtoseconds time scales, but do not yet directly probe shorter times with nanometer spatial resolution. Here we report the first ab initio calculations of non equilibrium transport of plasmonic hot carriers in metals and experimental observation of the injection of these carriers into molecules tethered to the metal surface. Specifically, metallic nanoantennas functionalized with a molecular monolayer allow for the direct probing of electron injection via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of the original and reduced molecular species. We combine first principles calculations of electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering rates with Boltzmann transport simulations to predict the ultrafast dynamics and transport of carriers in real materials. We also predict and compare the evolution of electron distributions in ultrafast experiments on noble metal nanoparticles.

  11. Matching pre-equilibrium dynamics and viscous hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mauricio; Strickland, Michael

    2010-02-15

    We demonstrate how to match pre-equilibrium dynamics of a 0+1-dimensional quark-gluon plasma to second-order viscous hydrodynamical evolution. The matching allows us to specify the initial values of the energy density and shear tensor at the initial time of hydrodynamical evolution as a function of the lifetime of the pre-equilibrium period. We compare two models for pre-equilibrium quark-gluon plasma, longitudinal free streaming and collisionally broadened longitudinal expansion, and present analytic formulas that can be used to fix the necessary components of the energy-momentum tensor. The resulting dynamical models can be used to assess the effect of pre-equilibrium dynamics on quark-gluon plasma observables. Additionally, we investigate the dependence of entropy production on pre-equilibrium dynamics and discuss the limitations of the standard definitions of nonequilibrium entropy.

  12. A concurrent multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaofan Tong, Qi

    2015-04-21

    In this work, we have derived a multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics (MMMD) from first principle to extend the (Andersen)-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics to mesoscale and continuum scale. The multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics is a con-current three-scale dynamics that couples a fine scale molecular dynamics, a mesoscale micromorphic dynamics, and a macroscale nonlocal particle dynamics together. By choosing proper statistical closure conditions, we have shown that the original Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics is the homogeneous and equilibrium case of the proposed multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics. In specific, we have shown that the Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics can be rigorously formulated and justified from first principle, and its general inhomogeneous case, i.e., the three scale con-current multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics can take into account of macroscale continuum mechanics boundary condition without the limitation of atomistic boundary condition or periodic boundary conditions. The discovered multiscale scale structure and the corresponding multiscale dynamics reveal a seamless transition from atomistic scale to continuum scale and the intrinsic coupling mechanism among them based on first principle formulation.

  13. Stochastic linearization of turbulent dynamics of dispersive waves in equilibrium and non-equilibrium state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shixiao W.; Lu, Haihao; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2016-08-01

    Characterizing dispersive wave turbulence in the long time dynamics is central to understanding of many natural phenomena, e.g., in atmosphere ocean dynamics, nonlinear optics, and plasma physics. Using the β-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam nonlinear system as a prototypical example, we show that in thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium steady state the turbulent state even in the strongly nonlinear regime possesses an effective linear stochastic structure in renormalized normal variables. In this framework, we can well characterize the spatiotemporal dynamics, which are dominated by long-wavelength renormalized waves. We further demonstrate that the energy flux is nearly saturated by the long-wavelength renormalized waves in non-equilibrium steady state. The scenario of such effective linear stochastic dynamics can be extended to study turbulent states in other nonlinear wave systems.

  14. Ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Laasonen, Kari

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, an introduction to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) has been given. Many of the basic concepts, like the Hellman-Feynman forces, the difference between the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and AIMD, have been explained. Also a very versatile AIMD code, the CP2K, has been introduced. On the application, the emphasis was on the aqueous systems and chemical reactions. The biochemical applications have not been discussed in depth.

  15. Equilibrium distribution of heavy quarks in fokker-planck dynamics

    PubMed

    Walton; Rafelski

    2000-01-01

    We obtain an explicit generalization, within Fokker-Planck dynamics, of Einstein's relation between drag, diffusion, and the equilibrium distribution for a spatially homogeneous system, considering both the transverse and longitudinal diffusion for dimension n>1. We provide a complete characterization of the equilibrium distribution in terms of the drag and diffusion transport coefficients. We apply this analysis to charm quark dynamics in a thermal quark-gluon plasma for the case of collisional equilibration.

  16. Radiation in molecular dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M

    2008-10-13

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The new technique passes a key test: it relaxes to a blackbody spectrum for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This new tool also provides a method for assessing the accuracy of energy and momentum exchange models in hot dense plasmas. As an example, we simulate the evolution of non-equilibrium electron, ion, and radiation temperatures for a hydrogen plasma using the new molecular dynamics simulation capability.

  17. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium dynamics of soft sphere fluids.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yajun; Mittal, Jeetain

    2015-07-14

    We use computer simulations to test the freezing-point scaling relationship between equilibrium transport coefficients (self-diffusivity, viscosity) and thermodynamic parameters for soft sphere fluids. The fluid particles interact via the inverse-power potential (IPP), and the particle softness is changed by modifying the exponent of the distance-dependent potential term. In the case of IPP fluids, density and temperature are not independent variables and can be combined to obtain a coupling parameter to define the thermodynamic state of the system. We find that the rescaled coupling parameter, based on its value at the freezing point, can approximately collapse the diffusivity and viscosity data for IPP fluids over a wide range of particle softness. Even though the collapse is far from perfect, the freezing-point scaling relationship provides a convenient and effective way to compare the structure and dynamics of fluid systems with different particle softness. We further show that an alternate scaling relationship based on two-body excess entropy can provide an almost perfect collapse of the diffusivity and viscosity data below the freezing transition. Next, we perform nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the shear-dependent viscosity and to identify the distinct role of particle softness in underlying structural changes associated with rheological properties. Qualitatively, we find a similar shear-thinning behavior for IPP fluids with different particle softness, though softer particles exhibit stronger shear-thinning tendency. By investigating the distance and angle-dependent pair correlation functions in these systems, we find different structural features in the case of IPP fluids with hard-sphere like and softer particle interactions. Interestingly, shear-thinning in hard-sphere like fluids is accompanied by enhanced translational order, whereas softer fluids exhibit loss of order with shear. Our results provide a systematic evaluation

  18. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamics simultaneously operate in the Galápagos islands.

    PubMed

    Valente, Luis M; Phillimore, Albert B; Etienne, Rampal S

    2015-08-01

    Island biotas emerge from the interplay between colonisation, speciation and extinction and are often the scene of spectacular adaptive radiations. A common assumption is that insular diversity is at a dynamic equilibrium, but for remote islands, such as Hawaii or Galápagos, this idea remains untested. Here, we reconstruct the temporal accumulation of terrestrial bird species of the Galápagos using a novel phylogenetic method that estimates rates of biota assembly for an entire community. We show that species richness on the archipelago is in an ascending phase and does not tend towards equilibrium. The majority of the avifauna diversifies at a slow rate, without detectable ecological limits. However, Darwin's finches form an exception: they rapidly reach a carrying capacity and subsequently follow a coalescent-like diversification process. Together, these results suggest that avian diversity of remote islands is rising, and challenge the mutual exclusivity of the non-equilibrium and equilibrium ecological paradigms.

  19. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamics simultaneously operate in the Galápagos islands.

    PubMed

    Valente, Luis M; Phillimore, Albert B; Etienne, Rampal S

    2015-08-01

    Island biotas emerge from the interplay between colonisation, speciation and extinction and are often the scene of spectacular adaptive radiations. A common assumption is that insular diversity is at a dynamic equilibrium, but for remote islands, such as Hawaii or Galápagos, this idea remains untested. Here, we reconstruct the temporal accumulation of terrestrial bird species of the Galápagos using a novel phylogenetic method that estimates rates of biota assembly for an entire community. We show that species richness on the archipelago is in an ascending phase and does not tend towards equilibrium. The majority of the avifauna diversifies at a slow rate, without detectable ecological limits. However, Darwin's finches form an exception: they rapidly reach a carrying capacity and subsequently follow a coalescent-like diversification process. Together, these results suggest that avian diversity of remote islands is rising, and challenge the mutual exclusivity of the non-equilibrium and equilibrium ecological paradigms. PMID:26105791

  20. Non-equilibrium many body dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.; Gyulassy, M.

    1997-09-22

    This Riken BNL Research Center Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Many Body Physics was held on September 23-25, 1997 as part of the official opening ceremony of the Center at Brookhaven National Lab. A major objective of theoretical work at the center is to elaborate on the full spectrum of strong interaction physics based on QCD, including the physics of confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, the parton structure of hadrons and nuclei, and the phenomenology of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions related to the up-coming experiments at RHIC. The opportunities and challenges of nuclear and particle physics in this area naturally involve aspects of the many body problem common to many other fields. The aim of this symposium was to find common theoretical threads in the area of non-equilibrium physics and modern transport theories. The program consisted of invited talks on a variety topics from the fields of atomic, condensed matter, plasma, astrophysics, cosmology, and chemistry, in addition to nuclear and particle physics. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the database for contributions to this workshop.

  1. Dynamic fracture toughness determined using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Swadener, J. G.; Baskes, M. I.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,

    2004-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of fracture in crystalline silicon are conducted in order to determine the dynamic fracture toughness. The MD simulations show how the potential energy released during fracture is partitioned into surface energy, energy stored in defects and kinetic energy. First, the MD fracture simulations are shown to produce brittle fracture and be in reasonable agreement with experimental results. Then dynamic hcture toughness is calculated as the sum of the surface energy and the energy stored as defects directly from the MD models. Models oriented to produce fracture on either (111) or (101) planes are used. For the (101) fracture orientation, equilibrium crack speeds of greater than 80% of the Rayleigh wave speed are obtained. Crack speeds initially show a steep increase with increasing energy release rate followed by a much more gradual increase. No plateau in crack speed is observed for static energy release rates up to 20 J/m{sup 2}. At the point where the change in crack speed behavior occur, the dynamic fracture toughness (J{sub d}) is still within 10% of two times the surface energy (2{gamma}{sub 0}) and changing very slowly. From these MD simulations, it appears that the change in crack speed behavior is due to a change in the kinetic energy generation during dynamic fracture. In addition, MD simulations of facture in silicon with defects were conducted. The addition of defects increases the inelastic dissipation and the energy stored in defects.

  2. Thermo-chemical dynamics and chemical quasi-equilibrium of plasmas in thermal non-equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Massot, Marc; Graille, Benjamin; Magin, Thierry E.

    2011-05-20

    We examine both processes of ionization by electron and heavy-particle impact in spatially uniform plasmas at rest in the absence of external forces. A singular perturbation analysis is used to study the following physical scenario, in which thermal relaxation becomes much slower than chemical reactions. First, electron-impact ionization is investigated. The dynamics of the system rapidly becomes close to a slow dynamics manifold that allows for defining a unique chemical quasi-equilibrium for two-temperature plasmas and proving that the second law of thermodynamics is satisfied. Then, all ionization reactions are taken into account simultaneously, leading to a surprising conclusion: the inner layer for short time scale (or time boundary layer) directly leads to thermal equilibrium. Global thermo-chemical equilibrium is reached within a short time scale, involving only chemical reactions, even if thermal relaxation through elastic collisions is assumed to be slow.

  3. Shear viscosity and out of equilibrium dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    El, Andrej; Xu Zhe; Greiner, Carsten; Muronga, Azwinndini

    2009-04-15

    Using Grad's method, we calculate the entropy production and derive a formula for the second-order shear viscosity coefficient in a one-dimensionally expanding particle system, which can also be considered out of chemical equilibrium. For a one-dimensional expansion of gluon matter with Bjorken boost invariance, the shear tensor and the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio {eta}/s are numerically calculated by an iterative and self-consistent prescription within the second-order Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics and by a microscopic parton cascade transport theory. Compared with {eta}/s obtained using the Navier-Stokes approximation, the present result is about 20% larger at a QCD coupling {alpha}{sub s}{approx}0.3 (with {eta}/s{approx_equal}0.18) and is a factor of 2-3 larger at a small coupling {alpha}{sub s}{approx}0.01. We demonstrate an agreement between the viscous hydrodynamic calculations and the microscopic transport results on {eta}/s, except when employing a small {alpha}{sub s}. On the other hand, we demonstrate that for such small {alpha}{sub s}, the gluon system is far from kinetic and chemical equilibrium, which indicates the break down of second-order hydrodynamics because of the strong nonequilibrium evolution. In addition, for large {alpha}{sub s} (0.3-0.6), the Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics formally breaks down at large momentum p{sub T} > or approx. 3 GeV but is still a reasonably good approximation.

  4. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  5. Sorption: Equilibrium partitioning and QSAR development using molecular predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Means, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    Sorption of chemical contaminants to sediments and soils has long been a subject of intensive investigation and QSAR development. Progressing the development of organic carbon-normalized, equilibrium partition constants (Koc) have greatly advanced the prediction of environmental fate. Integration of observed experimental results with thermodynamic modeling of compound behavior, based upon concepts of phase activities and fugacity have placed these QSARs on a firm theoretical base. An increasing spectrum of compound properties such as solubility, chemical activity, molecular surface area and other molecular topological indices have been evaluated for their utility as predictors of sorption properties. Questions concerning the effects of nonequilibrium states, hysteresis or irreversibility in desorption kinetics and equilibria, and particle-concentrations effects upon equilibrium constants as they affect fate predictions remain areas of contemporary investigation. These phenomena are considered and reviewed. The effects of modifying factors such as the effects of salinity or the presence of co-solvents may alter predicted fate of a compound. Competitive sorption with mobile microparticulate or colloidal phases may also impact OSAR predictions. Research on the role of both inorganic and organic-rich colloidal phases as a modifying influence on soil/sediment equilibrium partitioning theory is summarized.

  6. Strongly Non-equilibrium Dynamics of Nanochannel Confined DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, Walter

    Nanoconfined DNA exhibits a wide-range of fascinating transient and steady-state non-equilibrium phenomena. Yet, while experiment, simulation and scaling analytics are converging on a comprehensive picture regarding the equilibrium behavior of nanochannel confined DNA, non-equilibrium behavior remains largely unexplored. In particular, while the DNA extension along the nanochannel is the key observable in equilibrium experiments, in the non-equilibrium case it is necessary to measure and model not just the extension but the molecule's full time-dependent one-dimensional concentration profile. Here, we apply controlled compressive forces to a nanochannel confined molecule via a nanodozer assay, whereby an optically trapped bead is slid down the channel at a constant speed. Upon contact with the molecule, a propagating concentration ``shockwave'' develops near the bead and the molecule is dynamically compressed. This experiment, a single-molecule implementation of a macroscopic cylinder-piston apparatus, can be used to observe the molecule response over a range of forcings and benchmark theoretical description of non-equilibrium behavior. We show that the dynamic concentration profiles, including both transient and steady-state response, can be modelled via a partial differential evolution equation combining nonlinear diffusion and convection. Lastly, we present preliminary results for dynamic compression of multiple confined molecules to explore regimes of segregation and mixing for multiple chains in confinement.

  7. Evolution of specialization under non-equilibrium population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, Tuomas; Parvinen, Kalle

    2013-03-21

    We analyze the evolution of specialization in resource utilization in a mechanistically underpinned discrete-time model using the adaptive dynamics approach. We assume two nutritionally equivalent resources that in the absence of consumers grow sigmoidally towards a resource-specific carrying capacity. The consumers use resources according to the law of mass-action with rates involving trade-off. The resulting discrete-time model for the consumer population has over-compensatory dynamics. We illuminate the way non-equilibrium population dynamics affect the evolutionary dynamics of the resource consumption rates, and show that evolution to the trimorphic coexistence of a generalist and two specialists is possible due to asynchronous non-equilibrium population dynamics of the specialists. In addition, various forms of cyclic evolutionary dynamics are possible. Furthermore, evolutionary suicide may occur even without Allee effects and demographic stochasticity.

  8. Step-wise pulling protocols for non-equilibrium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Van Anh

    ensembles, which can be used to characterize non-equilibrium dynamics. Furthermore, we have applied the stepwise pulling protocols and Jarzynski's Equality to investigate the ion selectivity of potassium channels via molecular dynamics simulations. The mechanism of the potassium ion selectivity has remained poorly understood for over fifty years, although a Nobel Prize was awarded to the discovery of the molecular structure of a potassium-selective channel in 2003. In one year of performing simulations, we were able to reproduce the major results of ion selectivity accumulated in fifty years. We have been even boldly going further to propose a new model for ion selectivity based on the structural rearrangement of the selectivity filter of potassium-selective KcsA channels. This structural rearrangement has never been shown to play such a pivotal role in selecting and conducting potassium ions, but effectively rejecting sodium ions. Using the stepwise pulling protocols, we are also able to estimate conductance for ion channels, which remains elusive by using other methods. In the light of ion channels, we have also investigated how a synthetic channel of telemeric G-quadruplex conducts different types of ions. These two studies on ion selectivity not only constitute an interesting part of this dissertation, but also will enable us to further explore a new set of ion-selectivity principles. Beside the focus of my dissertation, I used million-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the mechanical properties of body-centered-cubic (BCCS) and face-centered-cubic (FCCS) supercrystals of DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles. These properties are valuable for examining whether these supercrystals can be used in gene delivery and gene therapy. The formation of such ordered supercrystals is useful to protect DNAs or RNAs from being attacked and destroyed by enzymes in cells. I also performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study a pure oleic acid (OA) membrane

  9. Non Equilibrium Quantum Transport in a model of molecular conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiro', Marco; Fabrizio, Michele

    2010-03-01

    We investigate non equilibrium effects in quantum transport through a simple model of molecular conductor where a single electronic level coupled to a vibrational mode is hybridized with biased metallic contacts. Using a recently developed numerical method [1] we compute the time dependent current and extract steady state properties such as I-V characteristic, differential conductance and phonon distribution function. We also discuss transient effects and comment on the onset of bistability in the strong coupling regime. [4pt] [1] M. Schiro', M. Fabrizio, Phys.Rev.B 79 153302 (2009)

  10. Towards Non-Equilibrium Dynamics with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbert, Ariel; Jubin, Sierra; Doret, Charlie

    2016-05-01

    Atomic systems are superbly suited to the study of non-equilibrium dynamics. These systems' exquisite isolation from environmental perturbations leads to long relaxation times that enable exploration of far-from-equilibrium phenomena. One example of particular relevance to experiments in trapped ion quantum information processing, metrology, and precision spectroscopy is the approach to thermal equilibrium of sympathetically cooled linear ion chains. Suitable manipulation of experimental parameters permits exploration of the quantum-to-classical crossover between ballistic transport and diffusive, Fourier's Law conduction, a topic of interest not only to the trapped ion community but also for the development of microelectronic devices and other nanoscale structures. We present progress towards trapping chains of multiple co-trapped calcium isotopes geared towards measuring thermal equilibration and discuss plans for future experiments in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. This work is supported by Cottrell College Science Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement and by Williams College.

  11. Non-Equilibrium Water-Glassy Polymer Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Eric; Minelli, Matteo; Baschetti, Marco; Sarti, Giulio; Elabd, Yossef

    2012-02-01

    For many applications (e.g., medical implants, packaging), an accurate assessment and fundamental understanding of the dynamics of water-glassy polymer interactions is of great interest. In this study, sorption and diffusion of pure water in several glassy polymers films, such as poly(styrene) (PS), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), poly(lactide) (PLA), were measured over a wide range of vapor activities and temperatures using several experimental techniques, including quartz spring microbalance (QSM), quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and time-resolved Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy. Non-Fickian behavior (diffusion-relaxation phenomena) was observed by all three techniques, while FTIR-ATR spectroscopy also provides information about the distribution of the states of water and water transport mechanisms on a molecular-level. Specifically, the states of water are significantly different in PS compared to PMMA and PLA. Additionally, a purely predictive non-equilibrium lattice fluid (NELF) model was applied to predict the sorption isotherms of water in these glassy polymers.

  12. Equilibrium and Disequilibrium Dynamics in Cobweb Models with Time Delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Luca; Guerrini, Luca; Sodini, Mauro

    2015-06-01

    This paper aims to study price dynamics in two different continuous time cobweb models with delays close to [Hommes, 1994]. In both cases, the stationary equilibrium may be not representative of the long-term dynamics of the model, since it is possible to observe endogenous and persistent fluctuations (supercritical Hopf bifurcations) even if a deterministic context without external shocks is considered. In the model in which markets are in equilibrium every time, we show that the existence of time delays in the expectations formation mechanism may cause chaotic dynamics similar to those obtained in [Hommes, 1994] in a discrete time context. From a mathematical point of view, we apply the Poincaré-Lindstedt perturbation method to study the local dynamic properties of the models. In addition, several numerical experiments are used to investigate global properties of the systems.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics has evolved from a niche method mainly applicable to model systems into a cornerstone in molecular biology. It provides us with a powerful toolbox that enables us to follow and understand structure and dynamics with extreme detail-literally on scales where individual atoms can be tracked. However, with great power comes great responsibility: Simulations will not magically provide valid results, but it requires a skilled researcher. This chapter introduces you to this, and makes you aware of some potential pitfalls. We focus on the two basic and most used methods; optimizing a structure with energy minimization and simulating motion with molecular dynamics. The statistical mechanics theory is covered briefly as well as limitations, for instance the lack of quantum effects and short timescales. As a practical example, we show each step of a simulation of a small protein, including examples of hardware and software, how to obtain a starting structure, immersing it in water, and choosing good simulation parameters. You will learn how to analyze simulations in terms of structure, fluctuations, geometrical features, and how to create ray-traced movies for presentations. With modern GPU acceleration, a desktop can perform μs-scale simulations of small proteins in a day-only 15 years ago this took months on the largest supercomputer in the world. As a final exercise, we show you how to set up, perform, and interpret such a folding simulation.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Erik R

    2008-01-01

    Molecular simulation is a very powerful toolbox in modern molecular modeling, and enables us to follow and understand structure and dynamics with extreme detail--literally on scales where motion of individual atoms can be tracked. This chapter focuses on the two most commonly used methods, namely, energy minimization and molecular dynamics, that, respectively, optimize structure and simulate the natural motion of biological macromolecules. The common theoretical framework based on statistical mechanics is covered briefly as well as limitations of the computational approach, for instance, the lack of quantum effects and limited timescales accessible. As a practical example, a full simulation of the protein lysozyme in water is described step by step, including examples of necessary hardware and software, how to obtain suitable starting molecular structures, immersing it in a solvent, choosing good simulation parameters, and energy minimization. The chapter also describes how to analyze the simulation in terms of potential energies, structural fluctuations, coordinate stability, geometrical features, and, finally, how to create beautiful ray-traced movies that can be used in presentations.

  15. Punctuated equilibrium and power law in economic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Abhijit Kar

    2012-02-01

    This work is primarily based on a recently proposed toy model by Thurner et al. (2010) [3] on Schumpeterian economic dynamics (inspired by the idea of economist Joseph Schumpeter [9]). Interestingly, punctuated equilibrium has been shown to emerge from the dynamics. The punctuated equilibrium and Power law are known to be associated with similar kinds of biologically relevant evolutionary models proposed in the past. The occurrence of the Power law is a signature of Self-Organised Criticality (SOC). In our view, power laws can be obtained by controlling the dynamics through incorporating the idea of feedback into the algorithm in some way. The so-called 'feedback' was achieved by introducing the idea of fitness and selection processes in the biological evolutionary models. Therefore, we examine the possible emergence of a power law by invoking the concepts of 'fitness' and 'selection' in the present model of economic evolution.

  16. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system. PMID:23249062

  17. Dynamics and Geometry of Equilibrium Laboratory Channels Well Above Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, G.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    The mechanisms governing the equilibrium channel geometry of alluvial rivers which transport sediment at well above the threshold of motion remain poorly understood. In nature, bed-load dominated gravel rivers are organized such that the channel-forming Shields stress is just at the threshold of motion on the banks. Most equilibrium channels created in laboratory experiments conform to this threshold geometry. However, sandy rivers in nature typically exhibit a Shields stress well above critical, and transport grains in suspension; this condition has not been replicated in the laboratory. The equilibrium geometry of these channels allow for sediment transport on the banks, leading to the stable channel paradox: bank stability seems incompatible with sediment transport. There must be a mechanism for delivering sediment back to the banks to counteract erosion. It is unclear whether bed-load and suspended-load rivers represent two unique stable equilibrium configurations, or whether there exists a continuum of possible geometries ranging from threshold to many times above threshold. Here we present laboratory experiments that produce a single-thread channel that transports grains at a Shields stress well above critical, using low-density acrylic sediment driven by a turbulent flow. Water and sediment are recirculated, and experiments are run at several different water discharge values to explore the transition from bed-load to suspension-dominated channels. Channel cross-section topographic scans and overhead images are used to quantify channel geometry and dynamics, and ensure that experiments reach a statistical steady state. Although statistical fluctuations are apparent, definite equilibrium channel geometries arise for each discharge. We relate channel geometry to dominant transport conditions using measured sediment flux and Shields stress values associated with steady-state dynamics, and characterize the nature of the transition from bed load to suspended load

  18. Generalized Metropolis acceptance criterion for hybrid non-equilibrium molecular dynamics—Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yunjie; Roux, Benoît

    2015-01-14

    A family of hybrid simulation methods that combines the advantages of Monte Carlo (MC) with the strengths of classical molecular dynamics (MD) consists in carrying out short non-equilibrium MD (neMD) trajectories to generate new configurations that are subsequently accepted or rejected via an MC process. In the simplest case where a deterministic dynamic propagator is used to generate the neMD trajectories, the familiar Metropolis acceptance criterion based on the change in the total energy ΔE, min[1,  exp( − βΔE)], guarantees that the hybrid algorithm will yield the equilibrium Boltzmann distribution. However, the functional form of the acceptance probability is more complex when the non-equilibrium switching process is generated via a non-deterministic stochastic dissipative propagator coupled to a heat bath. Here, we clarify the conditions under which the Metropolis criterion remains valid to rigorously yield a proper equilibrium Boltzmann distribution within hybrid neMD-MC algorithm.

  19. Non-equilibrium dynamics in AMO quantum simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Recently, the possibility to control and measure AMO systems time-dependently has generated a lot of progress in exploring out-of-equilibrium dynamics for strongly interacting many-particle systems. This connects directly to fundamental questions relating to the relaxation of such systems to equilibrium, as well as the spreading of correlations and build-up of entanglement. While ultracold atoms allow for exceptional microscopic control over quantum gases with short-range interactions, experiments with polar molecules and chains of trapped ions now also offer the possibility to investigate spin models with long-range interactions. I will give an introduction to the recent developments in this area, illustrated with two examples: (i) the possibility to measurement entanglement for many itinerant particles with ultracold atoms in optical lattices, and (ii) new opportunities to compare dynamics with short and long-range interactions, especially using systems of trapped ions, where it is possible to control the effective range of interactions.

  20. Non-equilibrium quantum phase transition via entanglement decoherence dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chen; Yang, Pei-Yun; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the decoherence dynamics of continuous variable entanglement as the system-environment coupling strength varies from the weak-coupling to the strong-coupling regimes. Due to the existence of localized modes in the strong-coupling regime, the system cannot approach equilibrium with its environment, which induces a nonequilibrium quantum phase transition. We analytically solve the entanglement decoherence dynamics for an arbitrary spectral density. The nonequilibrium quantum phase transition is demonstrated as the system-environment coupling strength varies for all the Ohmic-type spectral densities. The 3-D entanglement quantum phase diagram is obtained.

  1. Non-equilibrium quantum phase transition via entanglement decoherence dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Chen; Yang, Pei-Yun; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the decoherence dynamics of continuous variable entanglement as the system-environment coupling strength varies from the weak-coupling to the strong-coupling regimes. Due to the existence of localized modes in the strong-coupling regime, the system cannot approach equilibrium with its environment, which induces a nonequilibrium quantum phase transition. We analytically solve the entanglement decoherence dynamics for an arbitrary spectral density. The nonequilibrium quantum phase transition is demonstrated as the system-environment coupling strength varies for all the Ohmic-type spectral densities. The 3-D entanglement quantum phase diagram is obtained. PMID:27713556

  2. Introduction to Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2012-07-10

    Molecular Dynamics is the numerical solution of the equations of motion of a set of atoms, given an interatomic potential V and some boundary and initial conditions. Molecular Dynamics is the largest scale model that gives unbiased dynamics [x(t),p(t)] in full atomistic detail. Molecular Dynamics: is simple; is 'exact' for classical dynamics (with respect to a given V); can be used to compute any (atomistic) thermodynamical or dynamical properties; naturally handles complexity -- the system does the right thing at the right time. The physics derives only from the interatomic potential.

  3. Biological Implications of Dynamical Phases in Non-equilibrium Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Arvind; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan

    2016-03-01

    Biology achieves novel functions like error correction, ultra-sensitivity and accurate concentration measurement at the expense of free energy through Maxwell Demon-like mechanisms. The design principles and free energy trade-offs have been studied for a variety of such mechanisms. In this review, we emphasize a perspective based on dynamical phases that can explain commonalities shared by these mechanisms. Dynamical phases are defined by typical trajectories executed by non-equilibrium systems in the space of internal states. We find that coexistence of dynamical phases can have dramatic consequences for function vs free energy cost trade-offs. Dynamical phases can also provide an intuitive picture of the design principles behind such biological Maxwell Demons.

  4. Vegetation ecogeomorphology, dynamic equilibrium, and disturbance: chapter 7

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, Cliff R.

    2013-01-01

    Early ecologists understood the need to document geomorphic form and process to explain plant species distributions. Although this relationship has been acknowledged for over a century, with the exception of a few landmark papers, only the past few decades have experienced intensive research on this interdisciplinary topic. Here the authors provide a summary of the intimate relations between vegetation and geomorphic/process on hillslopes and fluvial systems. These relations are separated into systems (primarily fluvial) in dynamic equilibrium and those that are in nonequilibrium conditions including the impacts of various human disturbances affecting landforms, geomorphic processes, and interrelated, attendant vegetation patterns and processes. The authors conclude with a conceptual model of stream regime focusing on sediment deposition, erosion, and equilibrium that can be expanded to organize and predict vegetation patterns and life history strategies.

  5. Nash equilibrium and evolutionary dynamics in semifinalists' dilemma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seung Ki; Son, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Hyeong-Chai

    2015-04-01

    We consider a tournament among four equally strong semifinalists. The players have to decide how much stamina to use in the semifinals, provided that the rest is available in the final and the third-place playoff. We investigate optimal strategies for allocating stamina to the successive matches when players' prizes (payoffs) are given according to the tournament results. From the basic assumption that the probability to win a match follows a nondecreasing function of stamina difference, we present symmetric Nash equilibria for general payoff structures. We find three different phases of the Nash equilibria in the payoff space. First, when the champion wins a much bigger payoff than the others, any pure strategy can constitute a Nash equilibrium as long as all four players adopt it in common. Second, when the first two places are much more valuable than the other two, the only Nash equilibrium is such that everyone uses a pure strategy investing all stamina in the semifinal. Third, when the payoff for last place is much smaller than the others, a Nash equilibrium is formed when every player adopts a mixed strategy of using all or none of its stamina in the semifinals. In a limiting case that only last place pays the penalty, this mixed-strategy profile can be proved to be a unique symmetric Nash equilibrium, at least when the winning probability follows a Heaviside step function. Moreover, by using this Heaviside step function, we study the tournament by using evolutionary replicator dynamics to obtain analytic solutions, which reproduces the corresponding Nash equilibria on the population level and gives information on dynamic aspects.

  6. Non-equilibrium phase transition in mesoscopic biochemical systems: from stochastic to nonlinear dynamics and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hao; Qian, Hong

    2011-01-01

    A theory for an non-equilibrium phase transition in a driven biochemical network is presented. The theory is based on the chemical master equation (CME) formulation of mesoscopic biochemical reactions and the mathematical method of large deviations. The large deviations theory provides an analytical tool connecting the macroscopic multi-stability of an open chemical system with the multi-scale dynamics of its mesoscopic counterpart. It shows a corresponding non-equilibrium phase transition among multiple stochastic attractors. As an example, in the canonical phosphorylation-dephosphorylation system with feedback that exhibits bistability, we show that the non-equilibrium steady-state (NESS) phase transition has all the characteristics of classic equilibrium phase transition: Maxwell construction, a discontinuous first-derivative of the 'free energy function', Lee-Yang's zero for a generating function and a critical point that matches the cusp in nonlinear bifurcation theory. To the biochemical system, the mathematical analysis suggests three distinct timescales and needed levels of description. They are (i) molecular signalling, (ii) biochemical network nonlinear dynamics, and (iii) cellular evolution. For finite mesoscopic systems such as a cell, motions associated with (i) and (iii) are stochastic while that with (ii) is deterministic. Both (ii) and (iii) are emergent properties of a dynamic biochemical network.

  7. Non-equilibrium phase transition in mesoscopic biochemical systems: from stochastic to nonlinear dynamics and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Hao; Qian, Hong

    2011-01-01

    A theory for an non-equilibrium phase transition in a driven biochemical network is presented. The theory is based on the chemical master equation (CME) formulation of mesoscopic biochemical reactions and the mathematical method of large deviations. The large deviations theory provides an analytical tool connecting the macroscopic multi-stability of an open chemical system with the multi-scale dynamics of its mesoscopic counterpart. It shows a corresponding non-equilibrium phase transition among multiple stochastic attractors. As an example, in the canonical phosphorylation–dephosphorylation system with feedback that exhibits bistability, we show that the non-equilibrium steady-state (NESS) phase transition has all the characteristics of classic equilibrium phase transition: Maxwell construction, a discontinuous first-derivative of the ‘free energy function’, Lee–Yang's zero for a generating function and a critical point that matches the cusp in nonlinear bifurcation theory. To the biochemical system, the mathematical analysis suggests three distinct timescales and needed levels of description. They are (i) molecular signalling, (ii) biochemical network nonlinear dynamics, and (iii) cellular evolution. For finite mesoscopic systems such as a cell, motions associated with (i) and (iii) are stochastic while that with (ii) is deterministic. Both (ii) and (iii) are emergent properties of a dynamic biochemical network. PMID:20466813

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of supramolecular polymer rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenlong; Djohari, Hadrian; Dormidontova, Elena E.

    2010-11-01

    Using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we studied the equilibrium and rheological properties of dilute and semidilute solutions of head-to-tail associating polymers. In our simulation model, a spontaneous complementary reversible association between the donor and the acceptor groups at the ends of oligomers was achieved by introducing a combination of truncated pseudo-Coulombic attractive potential and Lennard Jones repulsive potential between donor, acceptor, and neighboring groups. We have calculated the equilibrium properties of supramolecular polymers, such as the ring/chain equilibrium, average molecular weight, and molecular weight distribution of self-assembled chains and rings, which all agree well with previous analytical and computer modeling results. We have investigated shear thinning of solutions of 8- and 20-bead associating oligomers with different association energies at different temperatures and oligomer volume fractions. All reduced viscosity data for a given oligomer length can be collapsed into one master curve, exhibiting two power-law regions of shear-thinning behavior with an exponent of -0.55 at intermediate ranges of the reduced shear rate β and -0.8 (or -0.9) at larger shear rates. The equilibrium viscosity of supramolecular solutions with different oligomer lengths and associating energies is found to obey a power-law scaling dependence on oligomer volume fraction with an exponent of 1.5, in agreement with the experimental observations for several dilute or semidilute solutions of supramolecular polymers. This implies that dilute and semidilute supramolecular polymer solutions exhibit high polydispersity but may not be sufficiently entangled to follow the reptation mechanism of relaxation.

  9. Simultaneous Computation of Dynamical and Equilibrium Information Using a Weighted Ensemble of Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Ernesto; Lettieri, Steven; Zwier, Matthew C; Stringer, Carsen A; Subramanian, Sundar Raman; Chong, Lillian T; Zuckerman, Daniel M

    2014-07-01

    Equilibrium formally can be represented as an ensemble of uncoupled systems undergoing unbiased dynamics in which detailed balance is maintained. Many nonequilibrium processes can be described by suitable subsets of the equilibrium ensemble. Here, we employ the "weighted ensemble" (WE) simulation protocol [Huber and Kim, Biophys. J. 1996, 70, 97-110] to generate equilibrium trajectory ensembles and extract nonequilibrium subsets for computing kinetic quantities. States do not need to be chosen in advance. The procedure formally allows estimation of kinetic rates between arbitrary states chosen after the simulation, along with their equilibrium populations. We also describe a related history-dependent matrix procedure for estimating equilibrium and nonequilibrium observables when phase space has been divided into arbitrary non-Markovian regions, whether in WE or ordinary simulation. In this proof-of-principle study, these methods are successfully applied and validated on two molecular systems: explicitly solvated methane association and the implicitly solvated Ala4 peptide. We comment on challenges remaining in WE calculations.

  10. Dynamic clonal equilibrium and predetermined cancer risk in Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pierre; Timmer, Margriet R; Lau, Chiu T; Calpe, Silvia; Sancho-Serra, Maria Del Carmen; Straub, Danielle; Baker, Ann-Marie; Meijer, Sybren L; Kate, Fiebo J W Ten; Mallant-Hent, Rosalie C; Naber, Anton H J; van Oijen, Arnoud H A M; Baak, Lubbertus C; Scholten, Pieter; Böhmer, Clarisse J M; Fockens, Paul; Bergman, Jacques J G H M; Maley, Carlo C; Graham, Trevor A; Krishnadath, Kausilia K

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance of Barrett's oesophagus allows us to study the evolutionary dynamics of a human neoplasm over time. Here we use multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization on brush cytology specimens, from two time points with a median interval of 37 months in 195 non-dysplastic Barrett's patients, and a third time point in a subset of 90 patients at a median interval of 36 months, to study clonal evolution at single-cell resolution. Baseline genetic diversity predicts progression and remains in a stable dynamic equilibrium over time. Clonal expansions are rare, being detected once every 36.8 patient years, and growing at an average rate of 1.58 cm(2) (95% CI: 0.09-4.06) per year, often involving the p16 locus. This suggests a lack of strong clonal selection in Barrett's and that the malignant potential of 'benign' Barrett's lesions is predetermined, with important implications for surveillance programs. PMID:27538785

  11. Dynamic clonal equilibrium and predetermined cancer risk in Barrett's oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Pierre; Timmer, Margriet R.; Lau, Chiu T.; Calpe, Silvia; Sancho-Serra, Maria del Carmen; Straub, Danielle; Baker, Ann-Marie; Meijer, Sybren L.; Kate, Fiebo J. W. ten; Mallant-Hent, Rosalie C.; Naber, Anton H. J.; van Oijen, Arnoud H. A. M.; Baak, Lubbertus C.; Scholten, Pieter; Böhmer, Clarisse J. M.; Fockens, Paul; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Maley, Carlo C.; Graham, Trevor A.; Krishnadath, Kausilia K

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance of Barrett's oesophagus allows us to study the evolutionary dynamics of a human neoplasm over time. Here we use multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization on brush cytology specimens, from two time points with a median interval of 37 months in 195 non-dysplastic Barrett's patients, and a third time point in a subset of 90 patients at a median interval of 36 months, to study clonal evolution at single-cell resolution. Baseline genetic diversity predicts progression and remains in a stable dynamic equilibrium over time. Clonal expansions are rare, being detected once every 36.8 patient years, and growing at an average rate of 1.58 cm2 (95% CI: 0.09–4.06) per year, often involving the p16 locus. This suggests a lack of strong clonal selection in Barrett's and that the malignant potential of ‘benign' Barrett's lesions is predetermined, with important implications for surveillance programs. PMID:27538785

  12. Equilibrium analysis of a yellow Fever dynamical model with vaccination.

    PubMed

    Martorano Raimundo, Silvia; Amaku, Marcos; Massad, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    We propose an equilibrium analysis of a dynamical model of yellow fever transmission in the presence of a vaccine. The model considers both human and vector populations. We found thresholds parameters that affect the development of the disease and the infectious status of the human population in the presence of a vaccine whose protection may wane over time. In particular, we derived a threshold vaccination rate, above which the disease would be eradicated from the human population. We show that if the mortality rate of the mosquitoes is greater than a given threshold, then the disease is naturally (without intervention) eradicated from the population. In contrast, if the mortality rate of the mosquitoes is less than that threshold, then the disease is eradicated from the populations only when the growing rate of humans is less than another threshold; otherwise, the disease is eradicated only if the reproduction number of the infection after vaccination is less than 1. When this reproduction number is greater than 1, the disease will be eradicated from the human population if the vaccination rate is greater than a given threshold; otherwise, the disease will establish itself among humans, reaching a stable endemic equilibrium. The analysis presented in this paper can be useful, both to the better understanding of the disease dynamics and also for the planning of vaccination strategies. PMID:25834634

  13. Shock and Laser Induced Non-Equilibrium Chemistry in Molecular Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Mitchell; Cherukara, Mathew; Kober, Edward; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we have used large scale reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study how contrasting initiation mechanisms from either shock or electromagnetic insults compare to traditional thermal initiation. We will show how insults of equal strength but different character can yield vastly different reaction profiles and thus the evolution of hot-spots. For shocked RDX (Up = 2km/s), we find that the collapse of a cylindrical 40 nm diameter pore leads to a significant amount of non-equilibrium reactions followed by the formation of a sustained deflagration wave. In contrast, a hot spot that is seeded into a statically compressed crystal with matching size and temperature will quench over the same timescale, highlighting the importance of insult type. Furthermore, MD simulations of electromagnetic insults coupled to intramolecular vibrations have shown, in some cases, mode specific initial chemistry and altered kinetics of the subsequent decomposition. By leveraging spectroscopic and chemical information gathered in our MD simulations, we have been able to identify and track non-equilibrium vibrational states of these materials and correlate them to these observed changes. Implications of insult dependent reactivity and non-equilibrium chemistry will be discussed.

  14. Model-based analysis of coupled equilibrium-kinetic processes: indirect kinetic studies of thermodynamic parameters using the dynamic data.

    PubMed

    Emami, Fereshteh; Maeder, Marcel; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2015-05-01

    Thermodynamic studies of equilibrium chemical reactions linked with kinetic procedures are mostly impossible by traditional approaches. In this work, the new concept of generalized kinetic study of thermodynamic parameters is introduced for dynamic data. The examples of equilibria intertwined with kinetic chemical mechanisms include molecular charge transfer complex formation reactions, pH-dependent degradation of chemical compounds and tautomerization kinetics in micellar solutions. Model-based global analysis with the possibility of calculating and embedding the equilibrium and kinetic parameters into the fitting algorithm has allowed the complete analysis of the complex reaction mechanisms. After the fitting process, the optimal equilibrium and kinetic parameters together with an estimate of their standard deviations have been obtained. This work opens up a promising new avenue for obtaining equilibrium constants through the kinetic data analysis for the kinetic reactions that involve equilibrium processes.

  15. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarman, S. S.; Cummings, P. T.; Evans, D. J.

    1994-11-01

    During the last 15 years, noneyuilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) has been successfully applied to study transport phenomena in fluids that are isotropic at equilibrium. A natural extension is therefore to study liquid crystals, which are anisotropic al equilibrium. The lower symmetry of these systems means that the linear transport coefficients are considerably more complicated than in an isotropic system. Part of the reason for this is that there are crosscouplings between tensors of different rank and parity. Such couplings arc symmetry-forbidden in isotropic phases. In this paper. we review some of fundamental theoretical results we have derived concerning the rheology of liquid crystals. report NEMD simulations of thermal conductivity and shear viscosity of liquid crystals, and present NEMD simulations of shear cessation phenomena. All of the NEMD results are presented for a model liquid crystal fluid which is a modification of the Gay-Borne fluid. The results obtained are in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements on liquid crystal systems.

  16. Molecular finite-size effects in stochastic models of equilibrium chemical systems.

    PubMed

    Cianci, Claudia; Smith, Stephen; Grima, Ramon

    2016-02-28

    The reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a standard modelling approach for understanding stochastic and spatial chemical kinetics. An inherent assumption is that molecules are point-like. Here, we introduce the excluded volume reaction-diffusion master equation (vRDME) which takes into account volume exclusion effects on stochastic kinetics due to a finite molecular radius. We obtain an exact closed form solution of the RDME and of the vRDME for a general chemical system in equilibrium conditions. The difference between the two solutions increases with the ratio of molecular diameter to the compartment length scale. We show that an increase in the fraction of excluded space can (i) lead to deviations from the classical inverse square root law for the noise-strength, (ii) flip the skewness of the probability distribution from right to left-skewed, (iii) shift the equilibrium of bimolecular reactions so that more product molecules are formed, and (iv) strongly modulate the Fano factors and coefficients of variation. These volume exclusion effects are found to be particularly pronounced for chemical species not involved in chemical conservation laws. Finally, we show that statistics obtained using the vRDME are in good agreement with those obtained from Brownian dynamics with excluded volume interactions.

  17. Molecular finite-size effects in stochastic models of equilibrium chemical systems.

    PubMed

    Cianci, Claudia; Smith, Stephen; Grima, Ramon

    2016-02-28

    The reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a standard modelling approach for understanding stochastic and spatial chemical kinetics. An inherent assumption is that molecules are point-like. Here, we introduce the excluded volume reaction-diffusion master equation (vRDME) which takes into account volume exclusion effects on stochastic kinetics due to a finite molecular radius. We obtain an exact closed form solution of the RDME and of the vRDME for a general chemical system in equilibrium conditions. The difference between the two solutions increases with the ratio of molecular diameter to the compartment length scale. We show that an increase in the fraction of excluded space can (i) lead to deviations from the classical inverse square root law for the noise-strength, (ii) flip the skewness of the probability distribution from right to left-skewed, (iii) shift the equilibrium of bimolecular reactions so that more product molecules are formed, and (iv) strongly modulate the Fano factors and coefficients of variation. These volume exclusion effects are found to be particularly pronounced for chemical species not involved in chemical conservation laws. Finally, we show that statistics obtained using the vRDME are in good agreement with those obtained from Brownian dynamics with excluded volume interactions. PMID:26931675

  18. Molecular photoionization dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Joseph L.

    1982-05-01

    This program seeks to develop both physical insight and quantitative characterization of molecular photoionization processes. Progress is briefly described, and some publications resulting from the research are listed. (WHK)

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Dynamic Response of Beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Aidan P.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Baskes, Michael I.; Desjarlais, Michael P.

    2009-06-01

    The response of beryllium to dynamic loading has been extensively studied, both experimentally and theoretically, due to its importance in several technological areas. Compared to other metals, it is quite challenging to accurately represent the various anomalous behaviors of beryllium using classical interatomic potentials. The spherically-symmetric EAM potential can not reproduce the observed c/a ratio for α-Be under ambient conditions, which is significantly smaller than the ideal HCP value. The directional-dependence of the MEAM potential overcomes this problem, but introduces additional complexity. We will compare predictions of these classical potentials to experimental measurements of beryllium at ambient conditions, and also to theoretical calculations at high temperatures and pressures. Finally, we will present initial results from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of beryllium under dynamic loading. This work is supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories.

  20. Microcomputer Calculation of Equilibrium Constants from Molecular Parameters of Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venugopalan, Mundiyath

    1989-01-01

    Lists a BASIC program which computes the equilibrium constant as a function of temperature. Suggests use by undergraduates taking a one-year calculus-based physical chemistry course. Notes the program provides for up to four species, typically two reactants and two products. (MVL)

  1. A steady-state equilibrium configuration in the dynamic analysis of a curved pipe conveying fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Duhan; Chung, Jintai

    2006-06-01

    This paper discusses a steady-state equilibrium configuration and a set of linearized equations of motion for the dynamic analysis of a semi-circular fluid-conveying pipe. Through application of the perturbation method to the equations of motion for a semi-circular pipe, new nonlinear equilibrium equations were derived and the equations of motion were linearized around the equilibrium configuration of the pipe. The equilibrium configurations obtained from the derived nonlinear equilibrium equations were compared to configurations from the linear equilibrium equations of other researchers. Additionally, the natural frequencies computed in this study were compared with the frequencies presented in a previous study. It was found that the steady-state equilibrium configuration should be determined using the proposed nonlinear equilibrium equations rather than previous linear equilibrium equations. Furthermore, it was shown that the natural frequencies computed with the proposed equilibrium equations were more accurate than the frequencies of other studies.

  2. Onset of Cooperative Dynamics in an Equilibrium Glass-Forming Metallic Liquid

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; O’Keeffe, Stephanie; Mills, Rebecca; Podlesynak, Andrey; Ehlers, Georg; Dmowski, Wojciech; Lokshin, Konstantin; Stevick, Joseph; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-22

    Onset of cooperative dynamics has been observed in many molecular liquids, colloids, and granular materials in the metastable regime on approaching their respective glass or jamming transition points, and is considered to play a significant role in the emergence of the slow dynamics. However, the nature of such dynamical cooperativity remains elusive in multicomponent metallic liquids characterized by complex many-body interactions and high mixing entropy. Herein, we report evidence of onset of cooperative dynamics in an equilibrium glass-forming metallic liquid (LM601: Zr51Cu36Ni4Al9). This is revealed by deviation of the mean effective diffusion coefficient from its high-temperature Arrhenius behavior below TAmore » ≈ 1300 K, i.e., a crossover from uncorrelated dynamics above TA to landscape-influenced correlated dynamics below TA. Moreover, the onset/ crossover temperature TA in such a multicomponent bulk metallic glass-forming liquid is observed at approximately twice of its calorimetric glass transition temperature (Tg ≈ 697 K) and in its stable liquid phase, unlike many molecular liquids.« less

  3. Onset of Cooperative Dynamics in an Equilibrium Glass-Forming Metallic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; O'Keeffe, Stephanie; Mills, Rebecca; Podlesynak, Andrey; Ehlers, Georg; Dmowski, Wojciech; Lokshin, Konstantin; Stevick, Joseph; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2016-02-18

    Onset of cooperative dynamics has been observed in many molecular liquids, colloids, and granular materials in the metastable regime on approaching their respective glass or jamming transition points, and is considered to play a significant role in the emergence of the slow dynamics. However, the nature of such dynamical cooperativity remains elusive in multicomponent metallic liquids characterized by complex many-body interactions and high mixing entropy. Herein, we report evidence of onset of cooperative dynamics in an equilibrium glass-forming metallic liquid (LM601: Zr51Cu36Ni4Al9). This is revealed by deviation of the mean effective diffusion coefficient from its high-temperature Arrhenius behavior below TA ≈ 1300 K, i.e., a crossover from uncorrelated dynamics above TA to landscape-influenced correlated dynamics below TA. Furthermore, the onset/crossover temperature TA in such a multicomponent bulk metallic glass-forming liquid is observed at approximately twice of its calorimetric glass transition temperature (Tg ≈ 697 K) and in its stable liquid phase, unlike many molecular liquids. PMID:26798946

  4. Adsorption equilibrium and dynamics of gasoline vapors onto polymeric adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lijuan; Yu, Weihua; Long, Chao; Li, Aimin

    2014-03-01

    The emission of gasoline vapors is becoming a significant environmental problem especially for the population-dense area and also results in a significant economic loss. In this study, adsorption equilibrium and dynamics of gasoline vapors onto macroporous and hypercrosslinked polymeric resins at 308 K were investigated and compared with commercial activated carbon (NucharWV-A 1100). The results showed that the equilibrium and breakthrough adsorption capacities of virgin macroporous and hypercrosslinked polymeric resins were lower than virgin-activated carbon. Compared with origin adsorbents, however, the breakthrough adsorption capacities of the regenerated activated carbon for gasoline vapors decreased by 58.5 % and 61.3 % when the initial concentration of gasoline vapors were 700 and 1,400 mg/L, while those of macroporous and hypercrosslinked resins decreased by 17.4 % and 17.5 %, and 46.5 % and 45.5 %, respectively. Due to the specific bimodal property in the region of micropore (0.5-2.0 nm) and meso-macropore (30-70 nm), the regenerated hypercrosslinked polymeric resin exhibited the comparable breakthrough adsorption capacities with the regenerated activated carbon at the initial concentration of 700 mg/L, and even higher when the initial concentration of gasoline vapors was 1,400 mg/L. In addition, 90 % of relative humidity had ignorable effect on the adsorption of gasoline vapors on hypercrosslinked polymeric resin. Taken together, it is expected that hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbent would be a promising adsorbent for the removal of gasoline vapors from gas streams.

  5. Examining the Mechanical Equilibrium of Microscopic Stresses in Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Vanegas, Juan M; Arroyo, Marino

    2015-06-26

    The microscopic stress field provides a unique connection between atomistic simulations and mechanics at the nanoscale. However, its definition remains ambiguous. Rather than a mere theoretical preoccupation, we show that this fact acutely manifests itself in local stress calculations of defective graphene, lipid bilayers, and fibrous proteins. We find that popular definitions of the microscopic stress violate the continuum statements of mechanical equilibrium, and we propose an unambiguous and physically sound definition.

  6. Examining the Mechanical Equilibrium of Microscopic Stresses in Molecular Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Vanegas, Juan M.; Arroyo, Marino

    2015-06-01

    The microscopic stress field provides a unique connection between atomistic simulations and mechanics at the nanoscale. However, its definition remains ambiguous. Rather than a mere theoretical preoccupation, we show that this fact acutely manifests itself in local stress calculations of defective graphene, lipid bilayers, and fibrous proteins. We find that popular definitions of the microscopic stress violate the continuum statements of mechanical equilibrium, and we propose an unambiguous and physically sound definition.

  7. Chlorodifluoromethane equilibrium on 13X molecular sieve. Final report, September 1992-March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Carlile, D.L.; Mahle, J.J.; Buettner, L.C.; Tevault, D.E.; Friday, D.K.

    1994-08-01

    Adsorption phase equilibrium data are required for evaluating any adsorption-based gas separation process. The U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center is currently measuring adsorption phase equilibrium data for a variety of chemical warfare agents and their surrogates on adsorbent materials to correlate physical properties to filtration/separation efficiencies of each vapor on each adsorbent. This report details the adsorption phase equilibrium data measured for chlorodifluoromethane (R-22) on 13X Molecular Sieve. The 13X Molecular Sieve is a candidate adsorbent for future military air purification systems employing the pressure-swing adsorption separation process.

  8. Control-volume representation of molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Smith, E R; Heyes, D M; Dini, D; Zaki, T A

    2012-05-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) parallel to the control volume (CV) formulation of fluid mechanics is developed by integrating the formulas of Irving and Kirkwood [J. Chem. Phys. 18, 817 (1950)] over a finite cubic volume of molecular dimensions. The Lagrangian molecular system is expressed in terms of an Eulerian CV, which yields an equivalent to Reynolds' transport theorem for the discrete system. This approach casts the dynamics of the molecular system into a form that can be readily compared to the continuum equations. The MD equations of motion are reinterpreted in terms of a Lagrangian-to-control-volume (LCV) conversion function ϑ(i) for each molecule i. The LCV function and its spatial derivatives are used to express fluxes and relevant forces across the control surfaces. The relationship between the local pressures computed using the volume average [Lutsko, J. Appl. Phys. 64, 1152 (1988)] techniques and the method of planes [Todd et al., Phys. Rev. E 52, 1627 (1995)] emerges naturally from the treatment. Numerical experiments using the MD CV method are reported for equilibrium and nonequilibrium (start-up Couette flow) model liquids, which demonstrate the advantages of the formulation. The CV formulation of the MD is shown to be exactly conservative and is, therefore, ideally suited to obtain macroscopic properties from a discrete system.

  9. Control-volume representation of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. R.; Heyes, D. M.; Dini, D.; Zaki, T. A.

    2012-05-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) parallel to the control volume (CV) formulation of fluid mechanics is developed by integrating the formulas of Irving and Kirkwood [J. Chem. Phys.JCPSA60021-960610.1063/1.1747782 18, 817 (1950)] over a finite cubic volume of molecular dimensions. The Lagrangian molecular system is expressed in terms of an Eulerian CV, which yields an equivalent to Reynolds’ transport theorem for the discrete system. This approach casts the dynamics of the molecular system into a form that can be readily compared to the continuum equations. The MD equations of motion are reinterpreted in terms of a Lagrangian-to-control-volume (LCV) conversion function ϑi for each molecule i. The LCV function and its spatial derivatives are used to express fluxes and relevant forces across the control surfaces. The relationship between the local pressures computed using the volume average [Lutsko, J. Appl. Phys.JAPIAU0021-897910.1063/1.341877 64, 1152 (1988)] techniques and the method of planes [Todd , Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.52.1627 52, 1627 (1995)] emerges naturally from the treatment. Numerical experiments using the MD CV method are reported for equilibrium and nonequilibrium (start-up Couette flow) model liquids, which demonstrate the advantages of the formulation. The CV formulation of the MD is shown to be exactly conservative and is, therefore, ideally suited to obtain macroscopic properties from a discrete system.

  10. State-dependent molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ciann-Dong; Weng, Hung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new mixed quantum mechanics (QM)-molecular mechanics (MM) approach, where MM is replaced by quantum Hamilton mechanics (QHM), which inherits the modeling capability of MM, while preserving the state-dependent nature of QM. QHM, a single mechanics playing the roles of QM and MM simultaneously, will be employed here to derive the three-dimensional quantum dynamics of diatomic molecules. The resulting state-dependent molecular dynamics including vibration, rotation and spin are shown to completely agree with the QM description and well match the experimental vibration-rotation spectrum. QHM can be incorporated into the framework of a mixed quantum-classical Bohmian method to enable a trajectory interpretation of orbital-spin interaction and spin entanglement in molecular dynamics.

  11. Geomagnetotail dynamics: Different types of equilibriums and transitions between them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropotkin, A. P.; Domrin, V. I.

    2009-04-01

    Two time scales are distinguished in the geomagnetotail dynamics. The small scale ( T 1) corresponds to disturbances propagating in the tail lobes, which have a relatively strong magnetic field and low plasma density. The larger scale ( T 2) corresponds to plasma motions in the plasma sheet and has a relatively weak magnetic field and a relatively higher density. A disturbance, which is initiated by a localized burst of magnetic reconnection and appears in the geomagnetotail on the time scale T 1, generates the upset of equilibrium in the plasma sheet zones with intermediate spatial dimensions (about R E). The theoretical considerations and numerical simulation indicate that the relaxation process, which subsequently proceeds on the larger time scale ( T 2), results in the appearance of extremely thin embedded current sheets and in the generation of fast plasma flows. This process gives an effective mechanism by which the magnetic energy stored in the geomagnetotail is transformed into the plasma flow kinetic energy. Such fast flows can also generate eddy plasma motions on smaller spatial scales. On the one hand, fast MHD components of this process carry a disturbance in other plasma sheet zones, where new magnetic reconnection bursts can originate at a large distance from the zone of an initial nonlinear disturbance. As a result, new recurrent processes of relaxation originate on the T 2 time scale. Alternation originating in such a way is apparently the characteristic feature of eddy disturbances actually observed in the plasma sheet.

  12. A sampling of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindhikara, Daniel Jon

    The sheer vastness of the number of computations required to simulate a biological molecule puts incredible pressure on algorithms to be efficient while maintaining sufficient accuracy. This dissertation summarizes various projects whose purposes address the large span of types of problems in molecular dynamics simulations of biological systems including: increasing efficiency, measuring convergence, avoiding pitfalls, and an application and analysis of a biological system. Chapters 3 and 4 deal with an enhanced sampling algorithm called "replica exchange molecular dynamics" which is designed to speed-up molecular dynamics simulations. The optimization of a key parameter of these simulations is analyzed. In these successive projects, it was found conclusively that maximizing "exchange attempt frequency" is the most efficient way to run a replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation. Chapter 5 describes an enhanced metric for convergence in parallel simulations called the normalized ergodic measure. The metric is applied to several properties for several replica exchange simulations. Advantages of this metric over other methods are described. Chapter 6 describes the implementation and optimization of an enhanced sampling algorithm similar to replica exchange molecular dynamics called multicanonical algorithm replica exchange molecular dynamics. The algorithm was implemented into a biomolecular simulation suite called AMBER. Additionally several parameters were analyzed and optimized. In Chapter 7, a pitfall in molecular dynamics is observed in biological systems that is caused by negligent use of a simulation's "thermostat". It was found that if the same pseudorandom number seed were used for multiple systems, they eventually synchronize. In this project, synchronization was observed in biological molecules. Various negative effects including corruption of data are pointed out. Chapter 8 describes molecular dynamics simulation of NikR, a homotetrameric nickel

  13. On calculating the equilibrium structure of molecular crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet; Wixom, Ryan R.; Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene

    2010-03-01

    The difficulty of calculating the ambient properties of molecular crystals, such as the explosive PETN, has long hampered much needed computational investigations of these materials. One reason for the shortcomings is that the exchange-correlation functionals available for Density Functional Theory (DFT) based calculations do not correctly describe the weak intermolecular van der Waals' forces present in molecular crystals. However, this weak interaction also poses other challenges for the computational schemes used. We will discuss these issues in the context of calculations of lattice constants and structure of PETN with a number of different functionals, and also discuss if these limitations can be circumvented for studies at non-ambient conditions.

  14. Non-equilibrium dynamics and structure of interfacial ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreussi, Oliviero; Donadio, Davide; Parrinello, Michele; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2006-07-01

    Stimulated by recent experiments [C.-Y. Ruan et al. Science 304, (2004) 81], we have performed molecular dynamics and ab initio structural studies of the laser-induced heating and restructuring processes of nanometer-scale ice on a substrate of chlorine terminated Si(1 1 1). Starting from proton disordered cubic ice configurations the thin film behavior has been characterized at several temperatures up to the melting point. The surface induces order with crystallization in the Ic lattice, but with void amorphous regions. The structure changes on the ultrashort time scale and restructures by heat dissipation depending on the relaxation time and final temperature. Our results show the general behavior observed experimentally, thus providing the nature of forces in the atomic-scale description of interfacial ice.

  15. Molecular dynamics in high electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, M.; Cune, L. C.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular rotation spectra, generated by the coupling of the molecular electric-dipole moments to an external time-dependent electric field, are discussed in a few particular conditions which can be of some experimental interest. First, the spherical-pendulum molecular model is reviewed, with the aim of introducing an approximate method which consists in the separation of the azimuthal and zenithal motions. Second, rotation spectra are considered in the presence of a static electric field. Two particular cases are analyzed, corresponding to strong and weak fields. In both cases the classical motion of the dipoles consists of rotations and vibrations about equilibrium positions; this motion may exhibit parametric resonances. For strong fields a large macroscopic electric polarization may appear. This situation may be relevant for polar matter (like pyroelectrics, ferroelectrics), or for heavy impurities embedded in a polar solid. The dipolar interaction is analyzed in polar condensed matter, where it is shown that new polarization modes appear for a spontaneous macroscopic electric polarization (these modes are tentatively called "dipolons"); one of the polarization modes is related to parametric resonances. The extension of these considerations to magnetic dipoles is briefly discussed. The treatment is extended to strong electric fields which oscillate with a high frequency, as those provided by high-power lasers. It is shown that the effect of such fields on molecular dynamics is governed by a much weaker, effective, renormalized, static electric field.

  16. Collisional dynamics in a gas of molecular super-rotors.

    PubMed

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Steinitz, Uri; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Averbukh, Ilya Sh

    2015-01-01

    Recently, femtosecond laser techniques have been developed that are capable of bringing gas molecules to extremely fast rotation in a very short time, while keeping their translational motion relatively slow. Here we study collisional equilibration dynamics of this new state of molecular gases. We show that the route to equilibrium starts with a metastable 'gyroscopic stage' in the course of which the molecules maintain their fast rotation and orientation of the angular momentum through many collisions. The inhibited rotational-translational relaxation is characterized by a persistent anisotropy in the molecular angular distribution, and is manifested in the optical birefringence and anisotropic diffusion in the gas. After a certain induction time, the 'gyroscopic stage' is abruptly terminated by an explosive rotational-translational energy exchange, leading the gas towards the final equilibrium. We illustrate our conclusions by direct molecular dynamics simulation of several gases of linear molecules. PMID:26160223

  17. Collisional dynamics in a gas of molecular super-rotors

    PubMed Central

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Steinitz, Uri; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, femtosecond laser techniques have been developed that are capable of bringing gas molecules to extremely fast rotation in a very short time, while keeping their translational motion relatively slow. Here we study collisional equilibration dynamics of this new state of molecular gases. We show that the route to equilibrium starts with a metastable ‘gyroscopic stage' in the course of which the molecules maintain their fast rotation and orientation of the angular momentum through many collisions. The inhibited rotational–translational relaxation is characterized by a persistent anisotropy in the molecular angular distribution, and is manifested in the optical birefringence and anisotropic diffusion in the gas. After a certain induction time, the ‘gyroscopic stage' is abruptly terminated by an explosive rotational–translational energy exchange, leading the gas towards the final equilibrium. We illustrate our conclusions by direct molecular dynamics simulation of several gases of linear molecules. PMID:26160223

  18. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics: The first 25 years

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G. |

    1992-08-01

    Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics has been generalized to simulate Nonequilibrium systems by adding sources of thermodynamic heat and work. This generalization incorporates microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress, and augments atomistic forces with special boundary, constraint, and driving forces capable of doing work on, and exchanging heat with, an otherwise Newtonian system. The underlying Lyapunov instability of these nonequilibrium equations of motion links microscopic time-reversible deterministic trajectories to macroscopic time-irreversible hydrodynamic behavior as described by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Green-Kubo linear-response theory has been checked. Nonlinear plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, shockwave propagation, and nonequilibrium phase transformation have all been simulated. The nonequilibrium techniques, coupled with qualitative improvements in parallel computer hardware, are enabling simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments.

  19. Effective interactions in molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicane, Giuseppe; Sarkisov, Lev

    2014-09-01

    In this article we explore a problem of effective interactions between two rotationally restrained lysozyme molecules forming a crystal contact in aqueous solution. We perform non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in order to estimate the interaction energy as a function of the distance between the two proteins obtained from direct application of the Jarzynski equality (JE), and compare it with that calculated by means of another non-equilibrium approach (Forward-Reverse method) and constrained force methods. The performance of the JE equality when applied to solvated protein interactions is discussed. All of the equilibrium and non-equilibrium methods show clear evidence that the potentials of mean force (PMF) are short-ranged, do not exceed few kTs, and that there is an accumulation of anions in the presence of hydrophobic surfaces.

  20. Thomas-Fermi molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Clerouin, J.; Pollock, E.L. ); Zerah, G. )

    1992-10-15

    A three-dimensional density-functional molecular-dynamics code is developed for the Thomas-Fermi density functional as a prototype for density functionals using only the density. Following Car and Parrinello (Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2471 (1985)), the electronic density is treated as a dynamical variable. The electronic densities are verified against a multi-ion Thomas-Fermi algorithm due to Parker (Phys. Rev. A 38, 2205 (1988)). As an initial application, the effect of electronic polarization in enhancing ionic diffusion in strongly coupled plasmas is demonstrated.

  1. Studying non-equilibrium many-body dynamics using one-dimensional Bose gases

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, Tim; Gring, Michael; Kuhnert, Maximilian; Rauer, Bernhard; Geiger, Remi; Mazets, Igor; Smith, David Adu; Schmiedmayer, Jörg; Kitagawa, Takuya; Demler, Eugene

    2014-12-04

    Non-equilibrium dynamics of isolated quantum many-body systems play an important role in many areas of physics. However, a general answer to the question of how these systems relax is still lacking. We experimentally study the dynamics of ultracold one-dimensional (1D) Bose gases. This reveals the existence of a quasi-steady prethermalized state which differs significantly from the thermal equilibrium of the system. Our results demonstrate that the dynamics of non-equilibrium quantum many-body systems is a far richer process than has been assumed in the past.

  2. Available Instruments for Analyzing Molecular Dynamics Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Likhachev, I V; Balabaev, N K; Galzitskaya, O V

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories are the result of molecular dynamics simulations. Trajectories are sequential snapshots of simulated molecular system which represents atomic coordinates at specific time periods. Based on the definition, in a text format trajectory files are characterized by their simplicity and uselessness. To obtain information from such files, special programs and information processing techniques are applied: from molecular dynamics animation to finding characteristics along the trajectory (versus time). In this review, we describe different programs for processing molecular dynamics trajectories. The performance of these programs, usefulness for analyses of molecular dynamics trajectories, strong and weak aspects are discussed. PMID:27053964

  3. Available Instruments for Analyzing Molecular Dynamics Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Likhachev, I. V.; Balabaev, N. K.; Galzitskaya, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories are the result of molecular dynamics simulations. Trajectories are sequential snapshots of simulated molecular system which represents atomic coordinates at specific time periods. Based on the definition, in a text format trajectory files are characterized by their simplicity and uselessness. To obtain information from such files, special programs and information processing techniques are applied: from molecular dynamics animation to finding characteristics along the trajectory (versus time). In this review, we describe different programs for processing molecular dynamics trajectories. The performance of these programs, usefulness for analyses of molecular dynamics trajectories, strong and weak aspects are discussed. PMID:27053964

  4. From molecular dynamics to Brownian dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Erban, Radek

    2014-01-01

    Three coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) models are investigated with the aim of developing and analysing multi-scale methods which use MD simulations in parts of the computational domain and (less detailed) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations in the remainder of the domain. The first MD model is formulated in one spatial dimension. It is based on elastic collisions of heavy molecules (e.g. proteins) with light point particles (e.g. water molecules). Two three-dimensional MD models are then investigated. The obtained results are applied to a simplified model of protein binding to receptors on the cellular membrane. It is shown that modern BD simulators of intracellular processes can be used in the bulk and accurately coupled with a (more detailed) MD model of protein binding which is used close to the membrane. PMID:25002825

  5. Dynamic Processes of Conceptual Change: Analysis of Constructing Mental Models of Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Mei-Hung; Chou, Chin-Cheng; Liu, Chia-Ju

    2002-01-01

    Investigates students' mental models of chemical equilibrium using dynamic science assessments. Reports that students at various levels have misconceptions about chemical equilibrium. Involves 10th grade students (n=30) in the study doing a series of hands-on chemical experiments. Focuses on the process of constructing mental models, dynamic…

  6. NMR investigations of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful experimental approach for characterizing protein conformational dynamics on multiple time scales. The insights obtained from NMR studies are complemented and by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide full atomistic details of protein dynamics. Homologous mesophilic (E. coli) and thermophilic (T. thermophilus) ribonuclease H (RNase H) enzymes serve to illustrate how changes in protein sequence and structure that affect conformational dynamic processes can be monitored and characterized by joint analysis of NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations. A Gly residue inserted within a putative hinge between helices B and C is conserved among thermophilic RNases H, but absent in mesophilic RNases H. Experimental spin relaxation measurements show that the dynamic properties of T. thermophilus RNase H are recapitulated in E. coli RNase H by insertion of a Gly residue between helices B and C. Additional specific intramolecular interactions that modulate backbone and sidechain dynamical properties of the Gly-rich loop and of the conserved Trp residue flanking the Gly insertion site have been identified using MD simulations and subsequently confirmed by NMR spin relaxation measurements. These results emphasize the importance of hydrogen bonds and local steric interactions in restricting conformational fluctuations, and the absence of such interactions in allowing conformational adaptation to substrate binding.

  7. Dynamic field sampling of airborne organophosphate triesters using solid-phase microextraction under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions.

    PubMed

    Isetun, Sindra; Nilsson, Ulrika

    2005-01-01

    A simple setup for dynamic air sampling using a solid-phase microextraction (SPME) device designed for use in the field was evaluated for organophosphate triester vapour under both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The effects of varying the applied airflows in the sampling device were evaluated in order to optimise the system with respect to the Reynolds number and magnitude of the boundary layer that developed near the surface. Further, the storage stability of the analytes was studied for both capped and uncapped 100-microm PDMS fibres. Organophosphate triesters are utilized on large scales as flame-retardants and/or plasticizers, for instance in upholstered furniture. In indoor working environments these compounds have become common components in the surrounding air. Measurements were performed in a recently furnished working environment and the concentration of tris(2-choropropyl) phosphate was found to be 7 microg m(-3).

  8. Las Palmeras Molecular Dynamics: A flexible and modular molecular dynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Sergio; Loyola, Claudia; González, Felipe; Peralta, Joaquín

    2010-12-01

    Las Palmeras Molecular Dynamics (LPMD) is a highly modular and extensible molecular dynamics (MD) code using interatomic potential functions. LPMD is able to perform equilibrium MD simulations of bulk crystalline solids, amorphous solids and liquids, as well as non-equilibrium MD (NEMD) simulations such as shock wave propagation, projectile impacts, cluster collisions, shearing, deformation under load, heat conduction, heterogeneous melting, among others, which involve unusual MD features like non-moving atoms and walls, unstoppable atoms with constant-velocity, and external forces like electric fields. LPMD is written in C++ as a compromise between efficiency and clarity of design, and its architecture is based on separate components or plug-ins, implemented as modules which are loaded on demand at runtime. The advantage of this architecture is the ability to completely link together the desired components involved in the simulation in different ways at runtime, using a user-friendly control file language which describes the simulation work-flow. As an added bonus, the plug-in API (Application Programming Interface) makes it possible to use the LPMD components to analyze data coming from other simulation packages, convert between input file formats, apply different transformations to saved MD atomic trajectories, and visualize dynamical processes either in real-time or as a post-processing step. Individual components, such as a new potential function, a new integrator, a new file format, new properties to calculate, new real-time visualizers, and even a new algorithm for handling neighbor lists can be easily coded, compiled and tested within LPMD by virtue of its object-oriented API, without the need to modify the rest of the code. LPMD includes already several pair potential functions such as Lennard-Jones, Morse, Buckingham, MCY and the harmonic potential, as well as embedded-atom model (EAM) functions such as the Sutton-Chen and Gupta potentials. Integrators to

  9. NON-EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY OF DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING PRESTELLAR CORES. II. IONIZATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Willacy, Karen; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J.

    2012-07-20

    We study the effect that non-equilibrium chemistry in dynamical models of collapsing molecular cloud cores has on measurements of the magnetic field in these cores, the degree of ionization, and the mean molecular weight of ions. We find that OH and CN, usually used in Zeeman observations of the line-of-sight magnetic field, have an abundance that decreases toward the center of the core much faster than the density increases. As a result, Zeeman observations tend to sample the outer layers of the core and consistently underestimate the core magnetic field. The degree of ionization follows a complicated dependence on the number density at central densities up to 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} for magnetic models and 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} in non-magnetic models. At higher central densities, the scaling approaches a power law with a slope of -0.6 and a normalization which depends on the cosmic-ray ionization rate {zeta} and the temperature T as ({zeta}T){sup 1/2}. The mean molecular weight of ions is systematically lower than the usually assumed value of 20-30, and, at high densities, approaches a value of 3 due to the asymptotic dominance of the H{sup +}{sub 3} ion. This significantly lower value implies that ambipolar diffusion operates faster.

  10. Scalable Molecular Dynamics with NAMD

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, James C.; Braun, Rosemary; Wang, Wei; Gumbart, James; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Villa, Elizabeth; Chipot, Christophe; Skeel, Robert D.; Kalé, Laxmikant; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    NAMD is a parallel molecular dynamics code designed for high-performance simulation of large biomolecular systems. NAMD scales to hundreds of processors on high-end parallel platforms, as well as tens of processors on low-cost commodity clusters, and also runs on individual desktop and laptop computers. NAMD works with AMBER and CHARMM potential functions, parameters, and file formats. This paper, directed to novices as well as experts, first introduces concepts and methods used in the NAMD program, describing the classical molecular dynamics force field, equations of motion, and integration methods along with the efficient electrostatics evaluation algorithms employed and temperature and pressure controls used. Features for steering the simulation across barriers and for calculating both alchemical and conformational free energy differences are presented. The motivations for and a roadmap to the internal design of NAMD, implemented in C++ and based on Charm++ parallel objects, are outlined. The factors affecting the serial and parallel performance of a simulation are discussed. Next, typical NAMD use is illustrated with representative applications to a small, a medium, and a large biomolecular system, highlighting particular features of NAMD, e.g., the Tcl scripting language. Finally, the paper provides a list of the key features of NAMD and discusses the benefits of combining NAMD with the molecular graphics/sequence analysis software VMD and the grid computing/collaboratory software BioCoRE. NAMD is distributed free of charge with source code at www.ks.uiuc.edu. PMID:16222654

  11. Molecular dynamics modeling of a nanomaterials-water surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat Pishkenari, Hossein; Keramati, Ramtin; Abdi, Ahmad; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2016-04-01

    In this article, we study the formation of nanomeniscus around a nanoneedle using molecular dynamics simulation approach. The results reveal three distinct phases in the time-evolution of meniscus before equilibrium according to the contact angle, meniscus height, and potential energy. In addition, we investigated the correlation between the nanoneedle diameter and nanomeniscus characteristics. The results have applications in various fields such as scanning probe microscopy and rheological measurements.

  12. Better, Cheaper, Faster Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent, revolutionary progress in genomics and structural, molecular and cellular biology has created new opportunities for molecular-level computer simulations of biological systems by providing vast amounts of data that require interpretation. These opportunities are further enhanced by the increasing availability of massively parallel computers. For many problems, the method of choice is classical molecular dynamics (iterative solving of Newton's equations of motion). It focuses on two main objectives. One is to calculate the relative stability of different states of the system. A typical problem that has' such an objective is computer-aided drug design. Another common objective is to describe evolution of the system towards a low energy (possibly the global minimum energy), "native" state. Perhaps the best example of such a problem is protein folding. Both types of problems share the same difficulty. Often, different states of the system are separated by high energy barriers, which implies that transitions between these states are rare events. This, in turn, can greatly impede exploration of phase space. In some instances this can lead to "quasi non-ergodicity", whereby a part of phase space is inaccessible on time scales of the simulation. To overcome this difficulty and to extend molecular dynamics to "biological" time scales (millisecond or longer) new physical formulations and new algorithmic developments are required. To be efficient they should account for natural limitations of multi-processor computer architecture. I will present work along these lines done in my group. In particular, I will focus on a new approach to calculating the free energies (stability) of different states and to overcoming "the curse of rare events". I will also discuss algorithmic improvements to multiple time step methods and to the treatment of slowly decaying, log-ranged, electrostatic effects.

  13. Molecular dynamics of polymer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkermans, Reinier L. C.; Toxvaerd, Søren; Briels, W. J.

    1998-08-01

    The irreversible polymerization of a monomer liquid has been studied by molecular-dynamics simulation in two and three dimensions. The growth process is studied under good solvent conditions in the dilute regime and up to semidilute and concentrated regimes. In the dilute regime we observe a reaction limitation due to trapping of the growing centers, which is more pronounced in the lower dimension. At higher concentrations the presence of other chains decreases the monomer mobility and reaction rate. Conformational properties are studied by scaling analysis of end-to-end and gyration radii. A crossover from swollen conformations towards screened conformations is observed as growth proceeds.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of microscale fluid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Lopez, A.R.; Stevens, M.J.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1998-02-01

    Recent advances in micro-science and technology, like Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), have generated a group of unique liquid flow problems that involve characteristic length scales of a Micron. Also, in manufacturing processes such as coatings, current continuum models are unable to predict microscale physical phenomena that appear in these non-equilibrium systems. It is suspected that in these systems, molecular-level processes can control the interfacial energy and viscoelastic properties at the liquid/solid boundary. A massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code has been developed to better understand microscale transport mechanisms, fluid-structure interactions, and scale effects in micro-domains. Specifically, this MD code has been used to analyze liquid channel flow problems for a variety of channel widths, e.g. 0.005-0.05 microns. This report presents results from MD simulations of Poiseuille flow and Couette flow problems and addresses both scaling and modeling issues. For Poiseuille flow, the numerical predictions are compared with existing data to investigate the variation of the friction factor with channel width. For Couette flow, the numerical predictions are used to determine the degree of slip at the liquid/solid boundary. Finally, the results also indicate that shear direction with respect to the wall lattice orientation can be very important. Simulation results of microscale Couette flow and microscale Poiseuille flow for two different surface structures and two different shear directions will be presented.

  15. Molecular dynamics of interface rupture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1993-01-01

    Several situations have been studied in which a fluid-vapor or fluid-fluid interface ruptures, using molecular dynamics simulations of 3000 to 20,000 Lennard-Jones molecules in three dimensions. The cases studied are the Rayleigh instability of a liquid thread, the burst of a liquid drop immersed in a second liquid undergoing shear, and the rupture of a liquid sheet in an extensional flow. The late stages of the rupture process involve the gradual withdrawal of molecules from a thinning neck, or the appearance and growth of holes in a sheet. In all cases, it is found that despite the small size of the systems studied, tens of angstroms, the dynamics is in at least qualitative accord with the behavior expected from continuum calculations, and in some cases the agreement is to within tens of percent. Remarkably, this agreement occurs even though the Eulerian velocity and stress fields are essentially unmeasurable - dominated by thermal noise. The limitations and prospects for such molecular simulation techniques are assessed.

  16. Osmosis : a molecular dynamics computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Thomas

    Osmosis is a phenomenon of critical importance in a variety of processes ranging from the transport of ions across cell membranes and the regulation of blood salt levels by the kidneys to the desalination of water and the production of clean energy using potential osmotic power plants. However, despite its importance and over one hundred years of study, there is an ongoing confusion concerning the nature of the microscopic dynamics of the solvent particles in their transfer across the membrane. In this thesis the microscopic dynamical processes underlying osmotic pressure and concentration gradients are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. I first present a new derivation for the local pressure that can be used for determining osmotic pressure gradients. Using this result, the steady-state osmotic pressure is studied in a minimal model for an osmotic system and the steady-state density gradients are explained using a simple mechanistic hopping model for the solvent particles. The simulation setup is then modified, allowing us to explore the timescales involved in the relaxation dynamics of the system in the period preceding the steady state. Further consideration is also given to the relative roles of diffusive and non-diffusive solvent transport in this period. Finally, in a novel modification to the classic osmosis experiment, the solute particles are driven out-of-equilibrium by the input of energy. The effect of this modification on the osmotic pressure and the osmotic ow is studied and we find that active solute particles can cause reverse osmosis to occur. The possibility of defining a new "osmotic effective temperature" is also considered and compared to the results of diffusive and kinetic temperatures..

  17. Chloride Regulation: A Dynamic Equilibrium Crucial for Synaptic Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Nicolas; Vinay, Laurent; Prescott, Steven A; De Koninck, Yves

    2016-03-16

    Fast synaptic inhibition relies on tight regulation of intracellular Cl(-). Chloride dysregulation is implicated in several neurological and psychiatric disorders. Beyond mere disinhibition, the consequences of Cl(-) dysregulation are multifaceted and best understood in terms of a dynamical system involving complex interactions between multiple processes operating on many spatiotemporal scales. This dynamical perspective helps explain many unintuitive manifestations of Cl(-) dysregulation. Here we discuss how taking into account dynamical regulation of intracellular Cl(-) is important for understanding how synaptic inhibition fails, how to best detect that failure, why Cl(-) regulation is energetically so expensive, and the overall consequences for therapeutics. PMID:26985723

  18. Chloride Regulation: A Dynamic Equilibrium Crucial for Synaptic Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Nicolas; Vinay, Laurent; Prescott, Steven A; De Koninck, Yves

    2016-03-16

    Fast synaptic inhibition relies on tight regulation of intracellular Cl(-). Chloride dysregulation is implicated in several neurological and psychiatric disorders. Beyond mere disinhibition, the consequences of Cl(-) dysregulation are multifaceted and best understood in terms of a dynamical system involving complex interactions between multiple processes operating on many spatiotemporal scales. This dynamical perspective helps explain many unintuitive manifestations of Cl(-) dysregulation. Here we discuss how taking into account dynamical regulation of intracellular Cl(-) is important for understanding how synaptic inhibition fails, how to best detect that failure, why Cl(-) regulation is energetically so expensive, and the overall consequences for therapeutics.

  19. Non-equilibrium dynamics of glass-forming liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Díaz, Luis Enrique; Lázaro-Lázaro, Edilio; Olais-Govea, José Manuel; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2014-06-01

    The non-equilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of irreversible processes in glass-forming liquids [P. Ramírez-González and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 82, 061503 (2010)] is extended here to multi-component systems. The resulting theory describes the statistical properties of the instantaneous local particle concentration profiles nα(r, t) of species α in terms of the coupled time-evolution equations for the mean value overline{n}_α ({r},t) and for the covariance σ _{α β }({r},{r}^' };t)equiv overline{δ n_α ({r},t)δ n_β ({r}^' },t)} of the fluctuations δ n_α ({r},t) = n_α ({r},t)- overline{n}_α ({r},t). As in the monocomponent case, these two coarse-grained equations involve a local mobility function bα(r, t) for each species, written in terms of the memory function of the two-time correlation function C_{α β }({r},{r}^' };t,t^' }) equiv overline{δ n_α ({r},t)δ n_β ({r}^' },t^' })}. If the system is constrained to remain spatially uniform and subjected to a non-equilibrium preparation protocol described by a given temperature and composition change program T(t) and overline{n}_α (t), these equations predict the irreversible structural relaxation of the partial static structure factors Sαβ(k; t) and of the (collective and self) intermediate scattering functions Fαβ(k, τ; t) and F^S_{α β }(k,τ ;t). We illustrate the applicability of the resulting theory with two examples involving simple model mixtures subjected to an instantaneous temperature quench: an electroneutral binary mixture of equally sized and oppositely charged hard-spheres, and a binary mixture of soft-spheres of moderate size-asymmetry.

  20. Nonequilibrium solvent effects in Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for ground and excited electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of solvent on molecular processes such as excited state relaxation and photochemical reaction often occurs in a nonequilibrium regime. Dynamic processes such as these can be simulated using excited state molecular dynamics. In this work, we describe methods of simulating nonequilibrium solvent effects in excited state molecular dynamics using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory and apparent surface charge methods. These developments include a propagation method for solvent degrees of freedom and analytical energy gradients for the calculation of forces. Molecular dynamics of acetaldehyde in water or acetonitrile are demonstrated where the solute-solvent system is out of equilibrium due to photoexcitation and emission.

  1. Imaging the equilibrium state and magnetization dynamics of partially built hard disk write heads

    SciTech Connect

    Valkass, R. A. J. Yu, W.; Shelford, L. R.; Keatley, P. S.; Loughran, T. H. J.; Hicken, R. J.; Cavill, S. A.; Laan, G. van der; Dhesi, S. S.; Bashir, M. A.; Gubbins, M. A.; Czoschke, P. J.; Lopusnik, R.

    2015-06-08

    Four different designs of partially built hard disk write heads with a yoke comprising four repeats of NiFe (1 nm)/CoFe (50 nm) were studied by both x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM) and time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy (TRSKM). These techniques were used to investigate the static equilibrium domain configuration and the magnetodynamic response across the entire structure, respectively. Simulations and previous TRSKM studies have made proposals for the equilibrium domain configuration of similar structures, but no direct observation of the equilibrium state of the writers has yet been made. In this study, static XPEEM images of the equilibrium state of writer structures were acquired using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism as the contrast mechanism. These images suggest that the crystalline anisotropy dominates the equilibrium state domain configuration, but competition with shape anisotropy ultimately determines the stability of the equilibrium state. Dynamic TRSKM images were acquired from nominally identical devices. These images suggest that a longer confluence region may hinder flux conduction from the yoke into the pole tip: the shorter confluence region exhibits clear flux beaming along the symmetry axis, whereas the longer confluence region causes flux to conduct along one edge of the writer. The observed variations in dynamic response agree well with the differences in the equilibrium magnetization configuration visible in the XPEEM images, confirming that minor variations in the geometric design of the writer structure can have significant effects on the process of flux beaming.

  2. Shear flow by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.

    1985-08-01

    A detailed comparison is made between a number of methods for generating shear flow in Molecular Dynamics computer simulation. Algorithms which closely mimic most experimental methods for producing shear flow are those by Trozzi and Ciccotti, and Ashurst and Hoover. They employ hard wall boundaries and fluid walls respectively (with sheared cell periodicity being only in two dimensions). The sheared fluid properties are therefore inextricably linked with interfacial effects. These problems are largely eliminated by the Lees and Edwards scheme which creates a pseudo-infinite sheared material. There are a number of derivatives of this model including one favoured by the author for investigating non-linear viscoelastic phenomena. A number of results from this scheme pertaining to the Lennard-Jones liquid are presented.

  3. Buckybomb: Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Fileti, Eudes Eterno; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-03-01

    Energetic materials, such as explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, are widely used in civilian and military applications. Nanoscale explosives represent a special group because of the high density of energetic covalent bonds. The reactive molecular dynamics (ReaxFF) study of nitrofullerene decomposition reported here provides a detailed chemical mechanism of explosion of a nanoscale carbon material. Upon initial heating, C60(NO2)12 disintegrates, increasing temperature and pressure by thousands of Kelvins and bars within tens of picoseconds. The explosion starts with NO2 group isomerization into C-O-N-O, followed by emission of NO molecules and formation of CO groups on the buckyball surface. NO oxidizes into NO2, and C60 falls apart, liberating CO2. At the highest temperatures, CO2 gives rise to diatomic carbon. The study shows that the initiation temperature and released energy depend strongly on the chemical composition and density of the material. PMID:26262672

  4. Emergent Phenomena via Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapaport, D. C.

    Emergent phenomena are unusual because they are not obvious consequences of the design of the systems in which they appear, a feature no less relevant when they are being simulated. Several systems that exhibit surprisingly rich emergent behavior, each studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, are described: (i) Modeling self-assembly processes associated with virus growth reveals the ability to achieve error-free assembly, where paradoxically, near-maximum yields are due to reversible bond formation. (ii) In fluids studied at the atomistic level, complex hydrodynamic phenomena in rotating and convecting fluids - the Taylor- Couette and Rayleigh-Bénard instabilities - can be reproduced, despite the limited length and time scales accessible by MD. (iii) Segregation studies of granular mixtures in a rotating drum reproduce the expected, but counterintuitive, axial and radial segregation, while for the case of a vertically vibrated layer a novel form of horizontal segregation is revealed.

  5. Buckybomb: Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Fileti, Eudes Eterno; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-03-01

    Energetic materials, such as explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, are widely used in civilian and military applications. Nanoscale explosives represent a special group because of the high density of energetic covalent bonds. The reactive molecular dynamics (ReaxFF) study of nitrofullerene decomposition reported here provides a detailed chemical mechanism of explosion of a nanoscale carbon material. Upon initial heating, C60(NO2)12 disintegrates, increasing temperature and pressure by thousands of Kelvins and bars within tens of picoseconds. The explosion starts with NO2 group isomerization into C-O-N-O, followed by emission of NO molecules and formation of CO groups on the buckyball surface. NO oxidizes into NO2, and C60 falls apart, liberating CO2. At the highest temperatures, CO2 gives rise to diatomic carbon. The study shows that the initiation temperature and released energy depend strongly on the chemical composition and density of the material.

  6. Finite Temperature Quasicontinuum: Molecular Dynamics without all the Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, L; Tadmor, E B; Miller, R E; Phillips, R

    2005-02-02

    Using a combination of statistical mechanics and finite-element interpolation, the authors develop a coarse-grained (CG) alternative to molecular dynamics (MD) for crystalline solids at constant temperature. The new approach is significantly more efficient than MD and generalizes earlier work on the quasi-continuum method. The method is validated by recovering equilibrium properties of single crystal Ni as a function of temperature. CG dynamical simulations of nanoindentation reveal a strong dependence on temperature of the critical stress to nucleate dislocations under the indenter.

  7. Near-equilibrium polymorphic phase transformations in Praseodymium under dynamic compression

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, M; Reisman, D

    2007-02-12

    We report the first experimental observation of sequential, multiple polymorphic phase transformations occurring in Praseodymium dynamically compressed using a ramp wave. The experiments also display the signatures of reverse transformations occuring upon pressure release and reveal the presence of small hysteresys loops. The results are in very good agreement with equilibrium hydrodynamic calculations performed using a thermodynamically consistent, multi-phase equation of state for Praseodymium, suggesting a near-equilibrium transformation behavior.

  8. Relaxation to equilibrium driven via indirect control in Markovian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Raffaele

    2007-11-15

    We prove that it is possible to modify the stationary states of a quantum dynamical semigroup, describing the irreversible evolution of a two-level system, by means of an auxiliary two-level system, a quantum probe that can be suitably prepared. The target system and the probe can be initially entangled or uncorrelated. We find that this indirect control of the stationary states is possible, even if there are no initial correlations, under suitable conditions on the dynamical parameters characterizing the evolution of the joint system.

  9. Molecular dynamics studies on nanoscale gas transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisik, Murat

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale gas flows are studied to reveal surface effects. A smart wall model that drastically reduces the memory requirements of MD simulations for gas flows is introduced. The smart wall molecular dynamics (SWMD) represents three-dimensional FCC walls using only 74 wall Molecules. This structure is kept in the memory and utilized for each gas molecule surface collision. Using SWMD, fluid behavior within nano-scale confinements is studied for argon in dilute gas, dense gas, and liquid states. Equilibrium MD method is employed to resolve the density and stress variations within the static fluid. Normal stress calculations are based on the Irving-Kirkwood method, which divides the stress tensor into its kinetic and virial parts. The kinetic component recovers pressure based on the ideal gas law. The particle-particle virial increases with increased density, while the surface-particle virial develops due to the surface force field effects. Normal stresses within nano-scale confinements show anisotropy induced primarily by the surface force-field and local variations in the fluid density near the surfaces. For dilute and dense gas cases, surface-force field that extends typically 1nm from each wall induces anisotropic normal stress. For liquid case, this effect is further amplified by the density fluctuations that extend beyond the three field penetration region. Outside the wall force-field penetration and density fluctuation regions the normal stress becomes isotropic and recovers the thermodynamic pressure, provided that sufficiently large force cut-off distances are utilized in the computations. Next, non-equilibrium SWMD is utilized to investigate the surface-gas interaction effects on nanoscale shear-driven gas flows in the transition and free molecular flow regimes. For the specified surface properties and gas-surface pair interactions, density and stress profiles exhibit a universal behavior inside the

  10. Non-Equilibrium Dynamics of Nano-channel Confined DNA: A Brownian Dynamics Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Aniket; Huang, Aiqun; Reisner, Walter

    We carry out Brownian dynamics (BD) simulation for a semi-flexible polymer chain characterized by a contour length Na and a persistence length lp confined inside a rectangular nanochannel to study its compression and retraction dynamics while being pushed on one end at a constant velocity by a ``nano-dozer''. We study the evolution of one dimensional concentration profile c (x , t) and the chain extension R along the channel axis (x-axis) during both the contracting as well as the retracting phases as a function of the velocity of the nano-dozer, both in steady states and in transients. Furthermore, we measure the transverse fluctuations of the chain under contraction and retraction, and the amplitude of the density profile, and compare these simulation results with those obtained from an analytical model proposed by Khorshid et al. Our studies are guided by recent experimental results by Khorshid et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett, 113, 268104 (2014)) and provide further justification to use a one dimensional PDE approach to understand the non-equilibrium dynamics of confined polymers.

  11. Modeling and Bio molecular Self-assembly via Molecular Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakesh, L.

    2009-09-01

    Surfactants like materials can be used to increase the solubility of poorly soluble drugs in water and to increase drug bioavailability. A typical case study will be demonstrated using DPD simulation to model the distribution of anti-inflammatory drug molecules. Computer simulation is a convenient approach to understand drug distribution and solubility concepts without much wastage and costly experiments in the laboratory. Often in molecular dynamics (MD) the atoms are represented explicitly and the equation of motion as described by Newtonian dynamics is integrated explicitly. MD has been used to study spontaneous formation of micelles by hydrophobic molecules with amphiphilic head groups in bulk water, as well as stability of pre-configured micelles and membranes. DPD is a state-of the- art mesoscale simulation, it is a more recent molecular dynamics technique, originally developed for simulating complex fluids but lately also applied to membrane dynamics, hemodynamic in biomedical applications. Such fluids pervade industrial research from paints to pharmaceuticals and from cosmetics to the controlled release of drugs. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) can provide structural and dynamic properties of fluids in equilibrium, under shear or confined to narrow cavities, at length- and time-scales beyond the scope of traditional atomistic molecular dynamics simulation methods. Mesoscopic particles are used to represent clusters of molecules. The interaction conserves mass and momentum and as a consequence the dynamics is consistent with Navier-Stokes equations. In addition to the conservative forces, stochastic drive and dissipation is introduced to represent internal degrees of freedom in the mesoscopic particles. In this research, an initial study is being conducted using the aqueous solubilization of the nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug is studied theoretically in micellar solution of nonionic (dodecyl hexa(ethylene oxide), C12E6) surfactants possessing the

  12. Molecular dynamics of membrane proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Woolf, Thomas B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the membrane protein rhodopsin will have broad implications for other membrane proteins and cellular signaling processes. Rhodopsin (Rho) is a light activated G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). When activated by ligands, GPCRs bind and activate G-proteins residing within the cell and begin a signaling cascade that results in the cell's response to external stimuli. More than 50% of all current drugs are targeted toward G-proteins. Rho is the prototypical member of the class A GPCR superfamily. Understanding the activation of Rho and its interaction with its Gprotein can therefore lead to a wider understanding of the mechanisms of GPCR activation and G-protein activation. Understanding the dark to light transition of Rho is fully analogous to the general ligand binding and activation problem for GPCRs. This transition is dependent on the lipid environment. The effect of lipids on membrane protein activity in general has had little attention, but evidence is beginning to show a significant role for lipids in membrane protein activity. Using the LAMMPS program and simulation methods benchmarked under the IBIG program, we perform a variety of allatom molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins.

  13. Dynamic combinatorial libraries: from exploring molecular recognition to systems chemistry.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianwei; Nowak, Piotr; Otto, Sijbren

    2013-06-26

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) is a subset of combinatorial chemistry where the library members interconvert continuously by exchanging building blocks with each other. Dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs) are powerful tools for discovering the unexpected and have given rise to many fascinating molecules, ranging from interlocked structures to self-replicators. Furthermore, dynamic combinatorial molecular networks can produce emergent properties at systems level, which provide exciting new opportunities in systems chemistry. In this perspective we will highlight some new methodologies in this field and analyze selected examples of DCLs that are under thermodynamic control, leading to synthetic receptors, catalytic systems, and complex self-assembled supramolecular architectures. Also reviewed are extensions of the principles of DCC to systems that are not at equilibrium and may therefore harbor richer functional behavior. Examples include self-replication and molecular machines.

  14. Dynamic processes of conceptual change: Analysis of constructing mental models of chemical equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Mei-Hung; Chou, Chin-Cheng; Liu, Chia-Ju

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate students' mental models of chemical equilibrium using dynamic science assessments. Research in chemical education has shown that students at various levels have misconceptions about chemical equilibrium. According to Chi's theory of conceptual change, the concept of chemical equilibrium has constraint-based features (e.g., random, simultaneous, uniform activities) that might prevent students from deeply understanding the nature of the concept of chemical equilibrium. In this study, we examined how students learned and constructed their mental models of chemical equilibrium in a cognitive apprenticeship context. Thirty 10th-grade students participated in the study: 10 in a control group and 20 in a treatment group. Both groups were presented with a series of hands-on chemical experiments. The students in the treatment group were instructed based on the main features of cognitive apprenticeship (CA), such as coaching, modeling, scaffolding, articulation, reflection, and exploration. However, the students in the control group (non-CA group) learned from the tutor without explicit CA support. The results revealed that the CA group significantly outperformed the non-CA group. The students in the CA group were capable of constructing the mental models of chemical equilibrium - including dynamic, random activities of molecules and interactions between molecules in the microworld - whereas the students in the non-CA group failed to construct similar correct mental models of chemical equilibrium. The study focuses on the process of constructing mental models, on dynamic changes, and on the actions of students (such as self-monitoring/self-correction) who are learning the concept of chemical equilibrium. Also, we discuss the implications for science education.

  15. Pinatubo Eruption Dynamics Inferred from Equilibrium and Kinetics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J. E.

    2001-12-01

    The 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo included dome growth, four vertical eruptions, multiple surge-producing collapsing fountains, a 9 hour climactic plinian event, caldera collapse and subsequent dome emplacement. In order to provide a more accurate picture of magma storage conditions prior to ascent and conduit processes during ascent, we conducted (1) a phase equilibria study of dacite magma storage conditions and (2) a series of decompression-induced crystallization experiments. Previous studies of the phenocryst-rich dacite erupted during the climactic phase of the 1991 Pinatubo eruption indicated that prior to eruption the magma was oxidized (NNO+1.7 +/-0.2), fairly cool (780 +/-10° C), and saturated with an H2O-rich volatile phase at a total pressure of ~220 +/-50 MPa. New phase equilibrium experiments at total pressures of 220 - 150 MPa (all vapor saturated with an H2O-rich fluid) define the isothermal liquid line of descent for multisaturated Pinatubo dacite as a function of PH2O. Experimental matrix glass compositions at 160 and 170 MPa bracket the natural compositions, indicating chemical equilibration occurred 50 MPa lower (or 2.8 km higher in the crust) than the storage level identified from melt inclusion volatile contents and Al-in-hornblende geobarometry (220 MPa). Decompression experiments with natural dacite were conducted to explore parameters controlling the kinetics of crystal nucleation with the goal of reproducing the microlite textures observed in erupted material from the pre-climactic events. Rapid isothermal decompressions of H2O-saturated dacite from 170 MPa to 10 MPa failed to generate the high crystal number densities observed in the natural rocks. Several methods were attempted to boost nucleation rates, including simultaneous heating or cooling with decompression, but feldspar nucleation rates were consistently at least 3 orders of magnitude lower than in nature. Only by introducing an intermediate decompression step were high rates of

  16. Equilibrium simulations of proteins using molecular fragment replacement and NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, Wouter; Tian, Pengfei; Frellsen, Jes; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Hamelryck, Thomas; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2014-09-23

    Methods of protein structure determination based on NMR chemical shifts are becoming increasingly common. The most widely used approaches adopt the molecular fragment replacement strategy, in which structural fragments are repeatedly reassembled into different complete conformations in molecular simulations. Although these approaches are effective in generating individual structures consistent with the chemical shift data, they do not enable the sampling of the conformational space of proteins with correct statistical weights. Here, we present a method of molecular fragment replacement that makes it possible to perform equilibrium simulations of proteins, and hence to determine their free energy landscapes. This strategy is based on the encoding of the chemical shift information in a probabilistic model in Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations. First, we demonstrate that with this approach it is possible to fold proteins to their native states starting from extended structures. Second, we show that the method satisfies the detailed balance condition and hence it can be used to carry out an equilibrium sampling from the Boltzmann distribution corresponding to the force field used in the simulations. Third, by comparing the results of simulations carried out with and without chemical shift restraints we describe quantitatively the effects that these restraints have on the free energy landscapes of proteins. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the molecular fragment replacement strategy can be used in combination with chemical shift information to characterize not only the native structures of proteins but also their conformational fluctuations.

  17. Non-equilibrium dynamics of an active colloidal ``chucker''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeriani, C.; Allen, R. J.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2010-05-01

    We report Monte Carlo simulations of the dynamics of a "chucker," a colloidal particle that emits smaller solute particles from its surface, isotropically and at a constant rate kc. We find that the diffusion constant of the chucker increases for small kc, as recently predicted theoretically. At large kc, the chucker diffuses more slowly due to crowding effects. We compare our simulation results to those of a "point particle" Langevin dynamics scheme in which the solute concentration field is calculated analytically, and in which hydrodynamic effects arising from colloid-solvent surface interactions can be accounted for in a coarse-grained way. By simulating the dragging of a chucker, we obtain an estimate of its apparent mobility coefficient which violates the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. We also characterize the probability density profile for a chucker which sediments onto a surface which either repels or absorbs the solute particles, and find that the steady state distributions are very different in the two cases. Our simulations are inspired by the biological example of exopolysaccharide-producing bacteria, as well as by recent experimental, simulation and theoretical work on phoretic colloidal "swimmers."

  18. Fire, flow and dynamic equilibrium in stream macroinvertebrate communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arkle, R.S.; Pilliod, D.S.; Strickler, K.

    2010-01-01

    The complex effects of disturbances on ecological communities can be further complicated by subsequent perturbations within an ecosystem. We investigated how wildfire interacts with annual variations in peak streamflow to affect the stability of stream macroinvertebrate communities in a central Idaho wilderness, USA. We conducted a 4-year retrospective analysis of unburned (n = 7) and burned (n = 6) catchments, using changes in reflectance values (??NBR) from satellite imagery to quantify the percentage of each catchment's riparian and upland vegetation that burned at high and low severity. For this wildland fire complex, increasing riparian burn severity and extent were associated with greater year-to-year variation, rather than a perennial increase, in sediment loads, organic debris, large woody debris (LWD) and undercut bank structure. Temporal changes in these variables were correlated with yearly peak flow in burned catchments but not in unburned reference catchments, indicating that an interaction between fire and flow can result in decreased habitat stability in burned catchments. Streams in more severely burned catchments exhibited increasingly dynamic macroinvertebrate communities and did not show increased similarity to reference streams over time. Annual variability in macroinvertebrates was attributed, predominantly, to the changing influence of sediment, LWD, riparian cover and organic debris, as quantities of these habitat components fluctuated annually depending on burn severity and annual peak streamflows. These analyses suggest that interactions among fire, flow and stream habitat may increase inter-annual habitat variability and macroinvertebrate community dynamics for a duration approaching the length of the historic fire return interval of the study area. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Entangled polymer dynamics in equilibrium and flow modeled through slip links.

    PubMed

    Schieber, Jay D; Andreev, Marat

    2014-01-01

    The idea that the dynamics of concentrated, high-molecular weight polymers are largely governed by entanglements is now widely accepted and typically understood through the tube model. Here we review alternative approaches, slip-link models, that share some similarities to and offer some advantages over tube models. Although slip links were proposed at the same time as tubes, only recently have detailed, quantitative mathematical models arisen based on this picture. In this review, we focus on these models, with most discussion limited to mathematically well-defined objects that conform to state-of-the-art beyond-equilibrium thermodynamics. These models are connected to each other through successive coarse graining, using nonequilibrium thermodynamics along the way, and with a minimal parameter set. In particular, the most detailed level of description has four parameters, three of which can be determined directly from atomistic simulations. Once the remaining parameter is determined for any system, all parameters for all members of the hierarchy are determined. We show how, using this hierarchy of slip-link models combined with atomistic simulations, we can make predictions about the nonlinear rheology of monodisperse homopolymer melts, polydisperse melts, or blends of different architectures. Mathematical details are given elsewhere, so these are limited here, and physical ideas are emphasized. We conclude with an outlook on remaining challenges that might be tackled successfully using this approach, including complex flow fields and polymer blends. PMID:24655135

  20. Dynamical Localization in Molecular Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xidi

    In the first four chapters of this thesis we concentrate on the Davydov model which describes the vibrational energy quanta of Amide I bonds (C=O bonds on the alpha -helix) coupled to the acoustic phonon modes of the alpha-helix backbone in the form of a Frohlich Hamiltonian. Following a brief introduction in chapter one, in chapter two we formulate the dynamics of vibrational quanta at finite temperature by using coherent state products. The fluctuation-dissipation relation is derived. At zero temperature, in the continuum limit, we recover the original results of Davydov. We also achieve good agreement with numerical simulations. In chapter three, the net contraction of the lattice is calculated exactly at any temperature, and its relation to the so -call "topological stability" of the Davydov soliton is discussed. In the second section of the chapter three we calculate the overtone spectra of crystalline acetanilide (according to some opinions ACN provides experimental evidence for the existence of Davydov solitons). Good agreement with experimental data has been obtained. In chapter four we study the self-trapped vibrational excitations by the Quantum Monte Carlo technique. For a single excitation, the temperature dependence of different physical observables is calculated. The quasi-particle which resembles the Davydov soliton has been found to be fairly narrow using the most commonly used data for the alpha -helix; at temperatures above a few Kelvin, the quasi-particle reaches its smallest limit (extends over three sites), which implies diffusive motion of the small polaron-like quasi-particle at high temperatures. For the multi-excitation case, bound pairs and clusters of excitations are found at low temperatures; they gradually dissociate when the temperature of the system is increased as calculated from the density-density correlation function. In the last chapter of this thesis, we study a more general model of dynamical local modes in molecular systems

  1. Molecular dynamics on APE100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Luciano Maria; Simonazzi, Riccardo; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    1995-09-01

    We have studied portability, efficiency and accuracy of a standard Molecular Dynamics simulation on the SIMD parallel computer APE100. Computing speed performance and physical system size range have been analyzed and compared with those of a conventional computer. Short range and long range potentials have been considered, and the comparative advantage of different simulation approaches has been assessed. For long range potentials, APE turns out to be faster than a conventional computer; large systems can be conveniently simulated using either the cloning approach (up to ˜ 10 5 particles) or a domain decomposition with the systolic method. In the case of short range potentials and systems with diffusion (like a liquid), APE is convenient only when using a large number of processors. In a special case (a crystal without diffusion), a specific domain decomposition technique with frames makes APE advantageous for intermediate and large systems. Using the latter technique we have studied in detail the effect of different numerical error sources, and compared the accuracy of APE with that of a conventional computer.

  2. Ultrafast dynamics of fluctuations in high-temperature superconductors far from equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, L; Sciolla, B; Biroli, G; van der Beek, C J; Piovera, C; Wolf, M; Kampfrath, T

    2015-02-13

    Despite extensive work on high-temperature superconductors, the critical behavior of an incipient condensate has so far been studied exclusively under equilibrium conditions. Here, we excite Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+δ) with a femtosecond laser pulse and monitor the subsequent nonequilibrium dynamics of the midinfrared conductivity. Our data allow us to discriminate temperature regimes where superconductivity is either coherent, fluctuating or vanishingly small. Above the transition temperature T(c), we make the striking observation that the relaxation to equilibrium exhibits power-law dynamics and scaling behavior, both for optimally and underdoped superconductors. Our findings can in part be modeled using time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory, and they provide strong indication of universality in systems far from equilibrium. PMID:25723240

  3. Equilibrium and dynamic design principles for binding molecules engineered for reagentless biosensors.

    PubMed

    de Picciotto, Seymour; Imperiali, Barbara; Griffith, Linda G; Wittrup, K Dane

    2014-09-01

    Reagentless biosensors rely on the interaction of a binding partner and its target to generate a change in fluorescent signal using an environment-sensitive fluorophore or Förster resonance energy transfer. Binding affinity can exert a significant influence on both the equilibrium and the dynamic response characteristics of such a biosensor. We here develop a kinetic model for the dynamic performance of a reagentless biosensor. Using a sinusoidal signal for ligand concentration, our findings suggest that it is optimal to use a binding moiety whose equilibrium dissociation constant matches that of the average predicted input signal, while maximizing both the association rate constant and the dissociation rate constant at the necessary ratio to create the desired equilibrium constant. Although practical limitations constrain the attainment of these objectives, the derivation of these design principles provides guidance for improved reagentless biosensor performance and metrics for quality standards in the development of biosensors. These concepts are broadly relevant to reagentless biosensor modalities.

  4. Stochastic and equilibrium pictures of the ultracold Fano-Feshbach-resonance molecular conversion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Tomotake; Watanabe, Shinichi; Zhang, Chen; Greene, Chris H.

    2013-05-01

    The ultracold molecular conversion rate occurring in an adiabatic ramp through a Fano-Feshbach resonance is studied and compared in two statistical models. One model, the so-called stochastic phase-space sampling (SPSS) [Hodby , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.94.120402 94, 120402 (2005)] evaluates the overlap of two atomic distributions in phase space by sampling atomic pairs according to a phase-space criterion. The other model, the chemical equilibrium theory (ChET) [Watabe and Nikuni, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.77.013616 77, 013616 (2008)] considers atomic and molecular distributions in the limit of the chemical and thermal equilibrium. The present study applies SPSS and ChET to a prototypical system of K+K→ K2 in all the symmetry combinations, namely Fermi-Fermi, Bose-Bose, and Bose-Fermi cases. To examine implications of the phase-space criterion for SPSS, the behavior of molecular conversion is analyzed using four distinct geometrical constraints. Our comparison of the results of SPSS with those of ChET shows that while they appear similar in most situations, the two models give rise to rather dissimilar behaviors when the presence of a Bose-Einstein condensate strongly affects the molecule formation.

  5. A Simple System for Observing Dynamic Phase Equilibrium via an Inquiry-Based Laboratory or Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Carrie A.; Andrew, Julie A.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an activity that can be used as an inquiry-based laboratory or demonstration for either high school or undergraduate chemistry students to provide a basis for understanding both vapor pressure and the concept of dynamic phase equilibrium. The activity includes a simple setup to create a closed system of only water liquid and…

  6. Communication: Relation of centroid molecular dynamics and ring-polymer molecular dynamics to exact quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hele, Timothy J H; Willatt, Michael J; Muolo, Andrea; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2015-05-21

    We recently obtained a quantum-Boltzmann-conserving classical dynamics by making a single change to the derivation of the "Classical Wigner" approximation. Here, we show that the further approximation of this "Matsubara dynamics" gives rise to two popular heuristic methods for treating quantum Boltzmann time-correlation functions: centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD). We show that CMD is a mean-field approximation to Matsubara dynamics, obtained by discarding (classical) fluctuations around the centroid, and that RPMD is the result of discarding a term in the Matsubara Liouvillian which shifts the frequencies of these fluctuations. These findings are consistent with previous numerical results and give explicit formulae for the terms that CMD and RPMD leave out.

  7. Non-equilibrium dynamics and floral trait interactions shape extant angiosperm diversity

    PubMed Central

    O'Meara, Brian C.; Smith, Stacey D.; Armbruster, W. Scott; Harder, Lawrence D.; Hardy, Christopher R.; Hileman, Lena C.; Hufford, Larry; Litt, Amy; Magallón, Susana; Smith, Stephen A.; Stevens, Peter F.; Fenster, Charles B.; Diggle, Pamela K.

    2016-01-01

    Why are some traits and trait combinations exceptionally common across the tree of life, whereas others are vanishingly rare? The distribution of trait diversity across a clade at any time depends on the ancestral state of the clade, the rate at which new phenotypes evolve, the differences in speciation and extinction rates across lineages, and whether an equilibrium has been reached. Here we examine the role of transition rates, differential diversification (speciation minus extinction) and non-equilibrium dynamics on the evolutionary history of angiosperms, a clade well known for the abundance of some trait combinations and the rarity of others. Our analysis reveals that three character states (corolla present, bilateral symmetry, reduced stamen number) act synergistically as a key innovation, doubling diversification rates for lineages in which this combination occurs. However, this combination is currently less common than predicted at equilibrium because the individual characters evolve infrequently. Simulations suggest that angiosperms will remain far from the equilibrium frequencies of character states well into the future. Such non-equilibrium dynamics may be common when major innovations evolve rarely, allowing lineages with ancestral forms to persist, and even outnumber those with diversification-enhancing states, for tens of millions of years. PMID:27147092

  8. Non-equilibrium dynamics and floral trait interactions shape extant angiosperm diversity.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Brian C; Smith, Stacey D; Armbruster, W Scott; Harder, Lawrence D; Hardy, Christopher R; Hileman, Lena C; Hufford, Larry; Litt, Amy; Magallón, Susana; Smith, Stephen A; Stevens, Peter F; Fenster, Charles B; Diggle, Pamela K

    2016-05-11

    Why are some traits and trait combinations exceptionally common across the tree of life, whereas others are vanishingly rare? The distribution of trait diversity across a clade at any time depends on the ancestral state of the clade, the rate at which new phenotypes evolve, the differences in speciation and extinction rates across lineages, and whether an equilibrium has been reached. Here we examine the role of transition rates, differential diversification (speciation minus extinction) and non-equilibrium dynamics on the evolutionary history of angiosperms, a clade well known for the abundance of some trait combinations and the rarity of others. Our analysis reveals that three character states (corolla present, bilateral symmetry, reduced stamen number) act synergistically as a key innovation, doubling diversification rates for lineages in which this combination occurs. However, this combination is currently less common than predicted at equilibrium because the individual characters evolve infrequently. Simulations suggest that angiosperms will remain far from the equilibrium frequencies of character states well into the future. Such non-equilibrium dynamics may be common when major innovations evolve rarely, allowing lineages with ancestral forms to persist, and even outnumber those with diversification-enhancing states, for tens of millions of years.

  9. Non-equilibrium dynamics and floral trait interactions shape extant angiosperm diversity.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Brian C; Smith, Stacey D; Armbruster, W Scott; Harder, Lawrence D; Hardy, Christopher R; Hileman, Lena C; Hufford, Larry; Litt, Amy; Magallón, Susana; Smith, Stephen A; Stevens, Peter F; Fenster, Charles B; Diggle, Pamela K

    2016-05-11

    Why are some traits and trait combinations exceptionally common across the tree of life, whereas others are vanishingly rare? The distribution of trait diversity across a clade at any time depends on the ancestral state of the clade, the rate at which new phenotypes evolve, the differences in speciation and extinction rates across lineages, and whether an equilibrium has been reached. Here we examine the role of transition rates, differential diversification (speciation minus extinction) and non-equilibrium dynamics on the evolutionary history of angiosperms, a clade well known for the abundance of some trait combinations and the rarity of others. Our analysis reveals that three character states (corolla present, bilateral symmetry, reduced stamen number) act synergistically as a key innovation, doubling diversification rates for lineages in which this combination occurs. However, this combination is currently less common than predicted at equilibrium because the individual characters evolve infrequently. Simulations suggest that angiosperms will remain far from the equilibrium frequencies of character states well into the future. Such non-equilibrium dynamics may be common when major innovations evolve rarely, allowing lineages with ancestral forms to persist, and even outnumber those with diversification-enhancing states, for tens of millions of years. PMID:27147092

  10. Radiative interactions in molecular gases under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Jha, M. K.

    1993-01-01

    Basic formulations, analyses, and numerical procedures are presented to investigate radiative heat interactions in diatomic and polyatomic gases under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Essential governing equations are presented for both gray and nongray gases. Information is provided on absorption models, relaxation times, and transfer equations. Radiative flux equations are developed which are applicable under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. The problem is solved for fully developed laminar incompressible flows between two parallel plates under the boundary condition of a uniform surface heat flux. For specific applications, three diatomic and three polyatomic gases are considered. The results are obtained numerically by employing the method of variation of parameters. The results are compared under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions at different temperature and pressure conditions. Both gray and nongray studies are conducted extensively for all molecular gases considered. The particular gases selected for this investigation are CO, NO, OH, CO2, H2O, and CH4. The temperature and pressure range considered are 300-2000 K and 0.1-10 atmosphere, respectively. In general, results demonstrate that the gray gas approximation overestimates the effect of radiative interaction for all conditions. The conditions of NLTE, however, result in underestimation of radiative interactions. The method developed for this study can be extended to solve complex problems of radiative heat transfer involving nonequilibrium phenomena.

  11. Floodplain persistence and dynamic-equilibrium conditions in a canyon environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranmer, Andrew W.; Tonina, Daniele; Benjankar, Rohan; Tiedemann, Matthew; Goodwin, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Canyon river systems are laterally constrained by steep walls, strath terraces, and bedrock intrusions; however, semialluvial reaches are nested within these environments as discontinuous floodplains along the river margins. These semialluvial floodplains provide an example of dynamic-equilibrium set within high-energy fluvial systems, marking areas where the river is free to alter its boundary conditions. Most research has focused on hydraulic conditions necessary for floodplain formation and persistence in unconfined systems, whereas little is known about canyon streams. This paper focuses on (1) characterizing dynamic-equilibrium, (2) describing the controls on floodplain formation and distribution, and (3) evaluating the performance of extremal hypotheses to identify dynamic-equilibrium and floodplain persistence in high-energy, semiconfined canyon environments. These objectives were addressed with field and numerical data derived from a one-dimensional hydraulic model for bankfull and 100-year return interval flood events, supported by closely spaced cross sections for the lower 38-km canyon reach of the Deadwood River (Idaho). Under bankfull conditions, critical energy thresholds for equilibrium floodplain persistence at this study site present the upper limits of: slope = 0.018, shear stress = 175 N/m2, and specific stream power = 400 W/m2. Channel and floodplains near equilibrium, quantified with a near-zero sediment transport divergence (Exner equation), were successfully identified by the minimum unit stream power extremal hypothesis and to a lesser degree by the other extremal hypotheses that minimize energy expenditure (minimum specific stream power, minimum total stream power, and minimum Froude number), provided backwater environments and major tributaries could be identified. Extremal results were compared to hydraulic geometry relations to evaluate how closely equilibrium floodplains approached values for unconfined alluvial river systems.

  12. Time-Dependent Molecular Reaction Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öhrn, Yngve

    2007-11-01

    This paper is a brief review of a time-dependent, direct, nonadiabatic theory of molecular processes called Electron Nuclear Dynamics (END). This approach to the study of molecular reaction dynamics is a hierarchical theory that can be applied at various levels of approximation. The simplest level of END uses classical nuclei and represents all electrons by a single, complex, determinantal wave function. The wave function parameters such as average nuclear positions and momenta, and molecular orbital coefcients carry the time dependence and serve as dynamical variables. Examples of application are given of the simplest level of END to ion-atom and ion-molecule reactions.

  13. Molecular dynamic study of pressure fluctuations spectrum in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystryi, R. G.

    2015-11-01

    Pressure of plasma is calculated by using classical molecular dynamics method. The formula based on virial theorem was used. Spectrum pressure's fluctuations of singly ionized non-ideal plasma are studied. 1/f-like spectrum behavior is observed. In other words, flicker noise is observed in fluctuations of pressure equilibrium non-ideal plasma. Relations between the obtained result and pressure fluctuations within the Gibbs and Einstein approaches are discussed. Special attention is paid to features of calculating the pressure in strongly coupled systems.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Models of Shaped Particles Using Filling Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Carolyn L.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    Algorithms such as molecular dynamics are useful computational methods for generating trajectories for studying kinetics and nonequilibrium, as well as equilibrium, problems involving ensembles of nano- and colloidal particles. Highly coarse-grained representations of complex particles can be created by rigidly connecting beads into a compos- ite particle. Here we show that by permitting the beads to vary in radii and to overlap, particles can be modeled with more complicated shapes, approaching perfect polygons and polyhedra in two and three dimensions, respectively. The positions and radii of the beads correspond to afilling solution of the very short-range repulsive shape of the modeled nanoparticle.

  15. Molecular kinetic theory of strongly nonequilibrium processes of mass, momentum, and energy transfer: Local equilibrium criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2015-09-01

    Consequences of the complete system of transfer equations of the properties (momentum, energy, and mass) of particles and their pairs are considered under local equilibrium conditions with regard to the Bogoliubov hierarchy of relaxation times between the first and second distribution functions (DFs) and distinctions in the characteristic relaxation times of particle momentum, energy, and mass. It is found that even under the local equilibrium condition in the Bogoliubov hierarchy of relaxation times between the first and second DFs, pair correlations are maintained between all dynamic variables (velocity, temperature, and density) whose values are proportional to the gradients of transferable properties. A criterion is introduced requiring there be no local equilibrium condition upon reaching the critical value at which the description of the transfer process becomes incorrect in classical nonequilibrium thermodynamics. External forces are considered in the equations for strongly nonequilibrium processes. Along with allowing for intermolecular potentials, it becomes possible to discuss the concept of passive forces (introduced in thermodynamics by Gibbs) from the standpoint of the kinetic theory. It is shown that use of this concept does not reflect modern representations of real processes.

  16. Communication: Relation of centroid molecular dynamics and ring-polymer molecular dynamics to exact quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hele, Timothy J. H.; Willatt, Michael J.; Muolo, Andrea; Althorpe, Stuart C.

    2015-05-21

    We recently obtained a quantum-Boltzmann-conserving classical dynamics by making a single change to the derivation of the “Classical Wigner” approximation. Here, we show that the further approximation of this “Matsubara dynamics” gives rise to two popular heuristic methods for treating quantum Boltzmann time-correlation functions: centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD). We show that CMD is a mean-field approximation to Matsubara dynamics, obtained by discarding (classical) fluctuations around the centroid, and that RPMD is the result of discarding a term in the Matsubara Liouvillian which shifts the frequencies of these fluctuations. These findings are consistent with previous numerical results and give explicit formulae for the terms that CMD and RPMD leave out.

  17. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  18. Calculation of transport properties of liquid metals and their alloys via molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherne, Frank Joseph, III

    The advanced casting modeler requires accurate viscosity and diffusivity data of liquid metals and their alloys. The present work discusses the use of equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics techniques to obtain such data without having to rely on oversimplified phenomenological expressions or difficult and expensive experiments. Utilizing the embedded atom method (EAM), the viscosities and diffusivities for a series of equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of nickel, aluminum, and nickel-aluminum alloys are presented. A critical comparison between the equilibrium and non-equilibrium methods is presented. Besides the transport properties, structural data for the liquids are also evaluated. EAM does a poor job of describing the transport properties of nickel-aluminum alloys, particularly near the equiatomic concentration. It has been suggested that charge transfer between nickel and aluminum atoms is responsible for the discrepancy between numerical calculations and available experimental data. A modified electronic distribution function has been developed to simulate the charge transfer associated with compound formation. The effects of such a "charge transfer" modification to the embedded atom method are evaluated. The results of these simulations indicate that the embedded atom method combined with molecular dynamics may be used as a method to predict reasonably the transport properties.

  19. Piecewise Smooth Dynamical Systems Theory: The Case of the Missing Boundary Equilibrium Bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, S. J.; Homer, M. E.; Jeffrey, M. R.; Szalai, R.

    2016-10-01

    We present two codimension-one bifurcations that occur when an equilibrium collides with a discontinuity in a piecewise smooth dynamical system. These simple cases appear to have escaped recent classifications. We present them here to highlight some of the powerful results from Filippov's book Differential Equations with Discontinuous Righthand Sides (Kluwer, 1988). Filippov classified the so-called boundary equilibrium collisions without providing their unfolding. We show the complete unfolding here, for the first time, in the particularly interesting case of a node changing its stability as it collides with a discontinuity. We provide a prototypical model that can be used to generate all codimension-one boundary equilibrium collisions, and summarize the elements of Filippov's work that are important in achieving a full classification.

  20. Collective Flocking Dynamics: Long Rang Order in a Non-Equilibrium 2D XY Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yuhai

    1996-03-01

    We propose and study a non-equilibrium continuum dynamical model for the collective motion of large groups of biological organisms (e.g., flocks of birds, slime molds, schools of fishs, etc.) (J. Toner and Y. Tu, Phys. Rev. Lett.), 75(23), 4326(1995) Our model becomes highly non-trivial, and different from the equilibrium model, for dequilibrium systems, our model exhibits a broken continuous symmetry even in d=2. Our model describes a large universality class of microscopic rules, including those recently simulated by Vicsek et. al.( T. Vicsek et. al. , Phys. Rev. Lett.) 75, 1226(95).

  1. Influence of annealing on chain entanglement and molecular dynamics in weak dynamic asymmetry polymer blends.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu; Tan, Yeqiang; Qiu, Biwei; Shangguan, Yonggang; Harkin-Jones, Eileen; Zheng, Qiang

    2013-01-17

    The influence of annealing above the glass transition temperature (T(g)) on chain entanglement and molecular dynamics of solution-cast poly(methyl methacrylate)/poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) (PMMA/SMA) blends was investigated via a combination of dynamic rheological measurement and broadband dielectric spectroscopy. Chain entanglement density increases when the annealing temperature and/or time increases, resulting from the increased efficiency of chain packing and entanglement recovery. The results of the annealing treatment without cooling revealed that the increase of the entanglement density occurred during the annealing process instead of the subsequent cooling procedure. Annealing above T(g) exerts a profound effect on segmental motion, including the transition temperature and dynamics. Namely, T(g) shifts to higher temperatures and the relaxation time (τ(max)) increases due to the increased entanglement density and decreased molecular mobility. Either T(g) or τ(max) approaches an equilibrium value gradually, corresponding to the equilibrium entanglement density that might be obtained through the theoretical predictions. However, no obvious distribution broadening is observed due to the unchanged heterogeneous dynamics. Furthermore, side group rotational motion could be freely achieved without overcoming the chain entanglement resistance. Hence, neither the dynamics nor the distribution width of the subglass relaxation (β- and γ-relaxation) processes is affected by chain entanglement resulting from annealing, indicating that the local environment of the segments is unchanged.

  2. Dynamical characterization of inactivation path in voltage-gated Na(+) ion channel by non-equilibrium response spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pal, Krishnendu; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2016-11-01

    Inactivation path of voltage gated sodium channel has been studied here under various voltage protocols as it is the main governing factor for the periodic occurrence and shape of the action potential. These voltage protocols actually serve as non-equilibrium response spectroscopic tools to study the ion channel in non-equilibrium environment. In contrast to a lot of effort in finding the crystal structure based molecular mechanism of closed-state(CSI) and open-state inactivation(OSI); here our approach is to understand the dynamical characterization of inactivation. The kinetic flux as well as energetic contribution of the closed and open- state inactivation path is compared here for voltage protocols, namely constant, pulsed and oscillating. The non-equilibrium thermodynamic quantities used in response to these voltage protocols serve as improved characterization tools for theoretical understanding which not only agrees with the previously known kinetic measurements but also predict the energetically optimum processes to sustain the auto-regulatory mechanism of action potential and the consequent inactivation steps needed. The time dependent voltage pattern governs the population of the conformational states which when couple with characteristic rate parameters, the CSI and OSI selectivity arise dynamically to control the inactivation path. Using constant, pulsed and continuous oscillating voltage protocols we have shown that during depolarization the OSI path is more favored path of inactivation however, in the hyper-polarized situation the CSI is favored. It is also shown that the re-factorisation of inactivated sodium channel to resting state occurs via CSI path. Here we have shown how the subtle energetic and entropic cost due to the change in the depolarization magnitude determines the optimum path of inactivation. It is shown that an efficient CSI and OSI dynamical profile in principle can characterize the open-state drug blocking phenomena.

  3. Full characterization of GPCR monomer-dimer dynamic equilibrium by single molecule imaging.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Rinshi S; Suzuki, Kenichi G N; Prossnitz, Eric R; Koyama-Honda, Ikuko; Nakada, Chieko; Fujiwara, Takahiro K; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2011-02-01

    Receptor dimerization is important for many signaling pathways. However, the monomer-dimer equilibrium has never been fully characterized for any receptor with a 2D equilibrium constant as well as association/dissociation rate constants (termed super-quantification). Here, we determined the dynamic equilibrium for the N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR), a chemoattractant G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), in live cells at 37°C by developing a single fluorescent-molecule imaging method. Both before and after liganding, the dimer-monomer 2D equilibrium is unchanged, giving an equilibrium constant of 3.6 copies/µm(2), with a dissociation and 2D association rate constant of 11.0 s(-1) and 3.1 copies/µm(2)s(-1), respectively. At physiological expression levels of ∼2.1 receptor copies/µm(2) (∼6,000 copies/cell), monomers continually convert into dimers every 150 ms, dimers dissociate into monomers in 91 ms, and at any moment, 2,500 and 3,500 receptor molecules participate in transient dimers and monomers, respectively. Not only do FPR dimers fall apart rapidly, but FPR monomers also convert into dimers very quickly.

  4. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jungen, Ch.

    2015-01-22

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering.

  5. Modeling the Hydrogen Bond within Molecular Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykos, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen bond is elucidated within the framework of molecular dynamics based on the model of Rahman and Stillinger (R-S) liquid water treatment. Thus, undergraduates are exposed to the powerful but simple use of classical mechanics to solid objects from a molecular viewpoint.

  6. Protein dynamics: Moore's law in molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M

    2011-01-25

    The millisecond barrier has been broken in molecular dynamics simulations of proteins. Such simulations are increasingly revealing the inner workings of biological systems by generating atomic-level descriptions of their behaviour that make testable predictions about key molecular processes.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Owner F.; Wengerter, Brian C.; Taylor, Ramona S.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment, in which students were given the opportunity to perform molecular dynamics simulations on a series of molecular liquids using the Amber suite of programs, is presented. They were introduced to both physical theories underlying classical mechanics simulations and to the atom-atom pair distribution function.

  8. The overshoot and phenotypic equilibrium in characterizing cancer dynamics of reversible phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiufang; Wang, Yue; Feng, Tianquan; Yi, Ming; Zhang, Xingan; Zhou, Da

    2016-02-01

    The paradigm of phenotypic plasticity indicates reversible relations of different cancer cell phenotypes, which extends the cellular hierarchy proposed by the classical cancer stem cell (CSC) theory. Since it is still questionable if the phenotypic plasticity is a crucial improvement to the hierarchical model or just a minor extension to it, it is worthwhile to explore the dynamic behavior characterizing the reversible phenotypic plasticity. In this study we compare the hierarchical model and the reversible model in predicting the cell-state dynamics observed in biological experiments. Our results show that the hierarchical model shows significant disadvantages over the reversible model in describing both long-term stability (phenotypic equilibrium) and short-term transient dynamics (overshoot) in cancer cell populations. In a very specific case in which the total growth of population due to each cell type is identical, the hierarchical model predicts neither phenotypic equilibrium nor overshoot, whereas the reversible model succeeds in predicting both of them. Even though the performance of the hierarchical model can be improved by relaxing the specific assumption, its prediction to the phenotypic equilibrium strongly depends on a precondition that may be unrealistic in biological experiments. Moreover, it still does not show as rich dynamics as the reversible model in capturing the overshoots of both CSCs and non-CSCs. By comparison, it is more likely for the reversible model to correctly predict the stability of the phenotypic mixture and various types of overshoot behavior.

  9. Parallel Molecular Dynamics Program for Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Plimpton, Steve

    1995-03-07

    ParBond is a parallel classical molecular dynamics code that models bonded molecular systems, typically of an organic nature. It uses classical force fields for both non-bonded Coulombic and Van der Waals interactions and for 2-, 3-, and 4-body bonded (bond, angle, dihedral, and improper) interactions. It integrates Newton''s equation of motion for the molecular system and evaluates various thermodynamical properties of the system as it progresses.

  10. Gliding flight in snakes: non-equilibrium trajectory dynamics and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socha, Jake; Miklasz, Kevin; Jafari, Farid; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2010-11-01

    For animal gliders that live in trees, a glide trajectory begins in free fall and, given sufficient space, transitions to equilibrium gliding with no net forces on the body. However, the dynamics of non-equilibrium gliding are not well understood. Of any terrestrial animal glider, snakes may exhibit the most complicated glide patterns resulting from their highly active undulatory behavior. Our aim was to determine the characteristics of snake gliding during the transition to equilibrium. We launched "flying" snakes (Chrysopelea paradisi) from a 15 m tower and recorded the mid-to-end portion of trajectories with four videocameras to reconstruct the snake's 3D body position. Additionally, we developed a simple analytical model of gliding assuming only steady-state forces of lift, drag and weight acting on the body and used it to explore effects of wing loading, lift-to-drag ratio, and initial velocity on trajectory dynamics. Despite the vertical space provided to transition to steady-state gliding, snakes did not exhibit equilibrium gliding and in fact displayed a net positive acceleration in the vertical axis.

  11. Nonequilibrium solvent effects in Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for ground and excited electronic states.

    PubMed

    Bjorgaard, J A; Velizhanin, K A; Tretiak, S

    2016-04-21

    The effects of solvent on molecular processes such as excited state relaxation and photochemical reaction often occurs in a nonequilibrium regime. Dynamic processes such as these can be simulated using excited statemolecular dynamics. In this work, we describe methods of simulating nonequilibrium solvent effects in excited statemolecular dynamics using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory and apparent surface charge methods. These developments include a propagation method for solvent degrees of freedom and analytical energy gradients for the calculation of forces. Molecular dynamics of acetaldehyde in water or acetonitrile are demonstrated where the solute-solvent system is out of equilibrium due to photoexcitation and emission. PMID:27389206

  12. Scaling of Langevin and molecular dynamics persistence times of nonhomogeneous fluids.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Rivas, Wilmer; Colmenares, Pedro J

    2012-01-01

    The existing solution for the Langevin equation of an anisotropic fluid allowed the evaluation of the position-dependent perpendicular and parallel diffusion coefficients, using molecular dynamics data. However, the time scale of the Langevin dynamics and molecular dynamics are different and an ansatz for the persistence probability relaxation time was needed. Here we show how the solution for the average persistence probability obtained from the backward Smoluchowski-Fokker-Planck equation (SE), associated to the Langevin dynamics, scales with the corresponding molecular dynamics quantity. Our SE perpendicular persistence time is evaluated in terms of simple integrals over the equilibrium local density. When properly scaled by the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, it gives a good match with that obtained from molecular dynamics. PMID:22400522

  13. Scaling of Langevin and molecular dynamics persistence times of nonhomogeneous fluids.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Rivas, Wilmer; Colmenares, Pedro J

    2012-01-01

    The existing solution for the Langevin equation of an anisotropic fluid allowed the evaluation of the position-dependent perpendicular and parallel diffusion coefficients, using molecular dynamics data. However, the time scale of the Langevin dynamics and molecular dynamics are different and an ansatz for the persistence probability relaxation time was needed. Here we show how the solution for the average persistence probability obtained from the backward Smoluchowski-Fokker-Planck equation (SE), associated to the Langevin dynamics, scales with the corresponding molecular dynamics quantity. Our SE perpendicular persistence time is evaluated in terms of simple integrals over the equilibrium local density. When properly scaled by the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, it gives a good match with that obtained from molecular dynamics.

  14. Star formation and molecular hydrogen in dwarf galaxies: a non-equilibrium view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chia-Yu; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie; Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.

    2016-06-01

    We study the connection of star formation to atomic (H I) and molecular hydrogen (H2) in isolated, low-metallicity dwarf galaxies with high-resolution (mgas = 4 M⊙, Nngb = 100) smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. The model includes self-gravity, non-equilibrium cooling, shielding from a uniform and constant interstellar radiation field, the chemistry of H2 formation, H2-independent star formation, supernova feedback and metal enrichment. We find that the H2 mass fraction is sensitive to the adopted dust-to-gas ratio and the strength of the interstellar radiation field, while the star formation rate is not. Star formation is regulated by stellar feedback, keeping the gas out of thermal equilibrium for densities n < 1 cm-3. Because of the long chemical time-scales, the H2 mass remains out of chemical equilibrium throughout the simulation. Star formation is well correlated with cold (T ≤ 100 K) gas, but this dense and cold gas - the reservoir for star formation - is dominated by H I, not H2. In addition, a significant fraction of H2 resides in a diffuse, warm phase, which is not star-forming. The interstellar medium is dominated by warm gas (100 K < T ≤ 3 × 104 K) both in mass and in volume. The scaleheight of the gaseous disc increases with radius while the cold gas is always confined to a thin layer in the mid-plane. The cold gas fraction is regulated by feedback at small radii and by the assumed radiation field at large radii. The decreasing cold gas fractions result in a rapid increase in depletion time (up to 100 Gyr) for total gas surface densities Σ _{H I+H_2} ≲ 10 M⊙ pc-2, in agreement with observations of dwarf galaxies in the Kennicutt-Schmidt plane.

  15. Dynamic molecular crystals with switchable physical properties.

    PubMed

    Sato, Osamu

    2016-06-21

    The development of molecular materials whose physical properties can be controlled by external stimuli - such as light, electric field, temperature, and pressure - has recently attracted much attention owing to their potential applications in molecular devices. There are a number of ways to alter the physical properties of crystalline materials. These include the modulation of the spin and redox states of the crystal's components, or the incorporation within the crystalline lattice of tunable molecules that exhibit stimuli-induced changes in their molecular structure. A switching behaviour can also be induced by changing the molecular orientation of the crystal's components, even in cases where the overall molecular structure is not affected. Controlling intermolecular interactions within a molecular material is also an effective tool to modulate its physical properties. This Review discusses recent advances in the development of such stimuli-responsive, switchable crystalline compounds - referred to here as dynamic molecular crystals - and suggests how different approaches can serve to prepare functional materials. PMID:27325090

  16. The dynamics of single protein molecules is non-equilibrium and self-similar over thirteen decades in time

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Xiaohu; Hong, Liang; Smith, Micholas Dean; Neusius, Thomas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2015-11-23

    Here, internal motions of proteins are essential to their function. The time dependence of protein structural fluctuations is highly complex, manifesting subdiffusive, non-exponential behavior with effective relaxation times existing over many decades in time, from ps up to ~102s (refs 1-4). Here, using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that, on timescales from 10–12 to 10–5s, motions in single proteins are self-similar, non-equilibrium and exhibit ageing. The characteristic relaxation time for a distance fluctuation, such as inter-domain motion, is observation-time-dependent, increasing in a simple, power-law fashion, arising from the fractal nature of the topology and geometry of the energy landscape explored.more » Diffusion over the energy landscape follows a non-ergodic continuous time random walk. Comparison with single-molecule experiments suggests that the non-equilibrium self-similar dynamical behavior persists up to timescales approaching the in vivo lifespan of individual protein molecules.« less

  17. The dynamics of single protein molecules is non-equilibrium and self-similar over thirteen decades in time

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaohu; Hong, Liang; Smith, Micholas Dean; Neusius, Thomas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2015-11-23

    Here, internal motions of proteins are essential to their function. The time dependence of protein structural fluctuations is highly complex, manifesting subdiffusive, non-exponential behavior with effective relaxation times existing over many decades in time, from ps up to ~102s (refs 1-4). Here, using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that, on timescales from 10–12 to 10–5s, motions in single proteins are self-similar, non-equilibrium and exhibit ageing. The characteristic relaxation time for a distance fluctuation, such as inter-domain motion, is observation-time-dependent, increasing in a simple, power-law fashion, arising from the fractal nature of the topology and geometry of the energy landscape explored. Diffusion over the energy landscape follows a non-ergodic continuous time random walk. Comparison with single-molecule experiments suggests that the non-equilibrium self-similar dynamical behavior persists up to timescales approaching the in vivo lifespan of individual protein molecules.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed. PMID:26604800

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed.

  20. HTMD: High-Throughput Molecular Dynamics for Molecular Discovery.

    PubMed

    Doerr, S; Harvey, M J; Noé, Frank; De Fabritiis, G

    2016-04-12

    Recent advances in molecular simulations have allowed scientists to investigate slower biological processes than ever before. Together with these advances came an explosion of data that has transformed a traditionally computing-bound into a data-bound problem. Here, we present HTMD, a programmable, extensible platform written in Python that aims to solve the data generation and analysis problem as well as increase reproducibility by providing a complete workspace for simulation-based discovery. So far, HTMD includes system building for CHARMM and AMBER force fields, projection methods, clustering, molecular simulation production, adaptive sampling, an Amazon cloud interface, Markov state models, and visualization. As a result, a single, short HTMD script can lead from a PDB structure to useful quantities such as relaxation time scales, equilibrium populations, metastable conformations, and kinetic rates. In this paper, we focus on the adaptive sampling and Markov state modeling features. PMID:26949976

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of large macromolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Perilla, Juan R.; Goh, Boon Chong; Cassidy, C. Keith; Liu, Bo; Bernardi, Rafael C.; Rudack, Till; Yu, Hang; Wu, Zhe; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Connecting dynamics to structural data from diverse experimental sources, molecular dynamics simulations permit the exploration of biological phenomena in unparalleled detail. Advances in simulations are moving the atomic resolution descriptions of biological systems into the million-to-billion atom regime, in which numerous cell functions reside. In this opinion, we review the progress, driven by large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, in the study of viruses, ribosomes, bioenergetic systems, and other diverse applications. These examples highlight the utility of molecular dynamics simulations in the critical task of relating atomic detail to the function of supramolecular complexes, a task that cannot be achieved by smaller-scale simulations or existing experimental approaches alone. PMID:25845770

  2. Static versus dynamic analysis of the influence of gravity on concentration non-equilibrium fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Croccolo, Fabrizio; Bataller, Henri; Scheffold, Frank

    2014-11-01

    In a binary fluid mixture subject to gravity and a stabilizing concentration gradient, concentration non-equilibrium fluctuations are long-ranged. While the gradient leads to an enhancement of the respective equilibrium fluctuations, the effect of gravity is a damping of fluctuations larger than a "characteristic" size. This damping is visible both in the fluctuation power spectrum probed by static and the temporal correlation function probed by dynamic light scattering. One aspect of the "characteristic" size can be appreciated by the dynamic analysis; in fact at the corresponding "characteristic" wave vector q* one can observe a maximum of the fluctuation time constant indicating the more persistent fluctuation of the system. Also in the static analysis a "characteristic" size can be extracted from the crossover wave vector. According to common theoretical concepts, the result should be the same in both cases. In the present work we provide evidence for a systematic difference in the experimentally observed "characteristic" size as obtained by static and dynamic measurements. Our observation thus points out the need for a more refined theory of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations.

  3. Is the microscopic stress computed from molecular simulations in mechanical equilibrium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Vanegas, Juan M.; Arroyo, Marino

    The microscopic stress field connects atomistic simulations with the mechanics of materials at the nano-scale through statistical mechanics. However, its definition remains ambiguous. In a recent work we showed that this is not only a theoretical problem, but rather that it greatly affects local stress calculations from molecular simulations. We find that popular definitions of the local stress, which are continuously being employed to understand the mechanics of various systems at the nanoscale, violate the continuum statements of mechanical equilibrium. We exemplify these facts in local stress calculations of defective graphene, lipid bilayers, and fibrous proteins. Furthermore, we propose a new physical and sound definition of the microscopic stress that satisfies the continuum equations of balance, irrespective of the many-body nature of the inter-atomic potential. Thus, our proposal provides an unambiguous link between discrete-particle models and continuum mechanics at the nanoscale.

  4. Non-equilibrium Dynamics in Zeeman-Limited Superconducting Al Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestigiacomo, J. C.; Adams, P. W.

    2016-05-01

    We report non-equilibrium dynamics in the tunneling density of states of ultra-thin Al films in high Zeeman fields. We have measured the transport and tunneling density of states of the films through the first-order Zeeman critical field transition. Films with sheet resistances of a few hundred ohms exhibit slow, non-exponential relaxation in the hysteretic critical field region. The relaxation traces are interspersed with abrupt avalanche-like collapses of the condensate on the superheating branch of the critical field hysteresis loop but not on the supercooling branch. We believe that film dynamics reflects an inhomogeneous order parameter that emerges in the critical field region.

  5. Using novel variable transformations to enhance conformational sampling in molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhongwei; Tuckerman, Mark E; Samuelson, Shane O; Martyna, Glenn J

    2002-03-11

    One of the computational "grand challenges" is to develop methodology capable of sampling conformational equilibria in systems with rough energy landscapes. Here, a significant step forward is made by combining molecular dynamics with a novel variable transformation designed to enhance sampling by reducing barriers without introducing bias and, thus, to preserve, perfectly, equilibrium properties.

  6. Dynamical passage to approximate equilibrium shapes for spinning, gravitating rubble asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ishan; Jenkins, James T.; Burns, Joseph A.

    2009-03-01

    Many asteroids are thought to be particle aggregates held together principally by self-gravity. Here we study — for static and dynamical situations — the equilibrium shapes of spinning asteroids that are permitted for rubble piles. As in the case of spinning fluid masses, not all shapes are compatible with a granular rheology. We take the asteroid to always be an ellipsoid with an interior modeled as a rigid-plastic, cohesion-less material with a Drucker-Prager yield criterion. Using an approximate volume-averaged procedure, based on the classical method of moments, we investigate the dynamical process by which such objects may achieve equilibrium. We first collapse our dynamical approach to its statical limit to derive regions in spin-shape parameter space that allow equilibrium solutions to exist. At present, only a graphical illustration of these solutions for a prolate ellipsoid following the Drucker-Prager failure law is available [Sharma, I., Jenkins, J.T., Burns, J.A., 2005a. Bull. Am. Astron. Soc. 37, 643; Sharma, I., Jenkins, J.T., Burns, J.A., 2005b. Equilibrium shapes of ellipsoidal soil asteroids. In: García-Rojo, R., Hermann, H.J., McNamara, S. (Eds.), Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Micromechanics of Granular Media, vol. 1. A.A. Balkema, UK; Holsapple, K.A., 2007. Icarus 187, 500-509]. Here, we obtain the equilibrium landscapes for general triaxial ellipsoids, as well as provide the requisite governing formulae. In addition, we demonstrate that it may be possible to better interpret the results of Richardson et al. [Richardson, D.C., Elankumaran, P., Sanderson, R.E., 2005. Icarus 173, 349-361] within the context of a Drucker-Prager material. The graphical result for prolate ellipsoids in the static limit is the same as those of Holsapple [Holsapple, K.A., 2007. Icarus 187, 500-509] because, when worked out, his final equations will match ours. This is because, though the formalisms to reach these expressions differ, in statics

  7. NON-EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY OF DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING PRESTELLAR CORES. I. BASIC MAGNETIC AND NON-MAGNETIC MODELS AND PARAMETER STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Willacy, Karen; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J.

    2012-07-01

    We combine dynamical and non-equilibrium chemical modeling of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores and investigate the evolution of molecular abundances in the contracting core. We model both magnetic cores, with varying degrees of initial magnetic support, and non-magnetic cores, with varying collapse delay times. We explore, through a parameter study, the competing effects of various model parameters in the evolving molecular abundances, including the elemental C/O ratio, the temperature, and the cosmic-ray ionization rate. We find that different models show their largest quantitative differences at the center of the core, whereas the outer layers, which evolve slower, have abundances which are severely degenerate among different dynamical models. There is a large range of possible abundance values for different models at a fixed evolutionary stage (central density), which demonstrates the large potential of chemical differentiation in prestellar cores. However, degeneracies among different models, compounded with uncertainties induced by other model parameters, make it difficult to discriminate among dynamical models. To address these difficulties, we identify abundance ratios between particular molecules, the measurement of which would have maximal potential for discrimination among the different models examined here. In particular, we find that the ratios between NH{sub 3} and CO, NH{sub 2} and CO, and NH{sub 3} and HCO{sup +} are sensitive to the evolutionary timescale, and that the ratio between HCN and OH is sensitive to the C/O ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that measurements of the central deviation (central depletion or enhancement) of abundances of certain molecules are good indicators of the dynamics of the core.

  8. Exploiting molecular dynamics in Nested Sampling simulations of small peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkoff, Nikolas S.; Baldock, Robert J. N.; Várnai, Csilla; Wild, David L.; Csányi, Gábor

    2016-04-01

    Nested Sampling (NS) is a parameter space sampling algorithm which can be used for sampling the equilibrium thermodynamics of atomistic systems. NS has previously been used to explore the potential energy surface of a coarse-grained protein model and has significantly outperformed parallel tempering when calculating heat capacity curves of Lennard-Jones clusters. The original NS algorithm uses Monte Carlo (MC) moves; however, a variant, Galilean NS, has recently been introduced which allows NS to be incorporated into a molecular dynamics framework, so NS can be used for systems which lack efficient prescribed MC moves. In this work we demonstrate the applicability of Galilean NS to atomistic systems. We present an implementation of Galilean NS using the Amber molecular dynamics package and demonstrate its viability by sampling alanine dipeptide, both in vacuo and implicit solvent. Unlike previous studies of this system, we present the heat capacity curves of alanine dipeptide, whose calculation provides a stringent test for sampling algorithms. We also compare our results with those calculated using replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) and find good agreement. We show the computational effort required for accurate heat capacity estimation for small peptides. We also calculate the alanine dipeptide Ramachandran free energy surface for a range of temperatures and use it to compare the results using the latest Amber force field with previous theoretical and experimental results.

  9. High temperature phonon dispersion in graphene using classical molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anees, P. Panigrahi, B. K.; Valsakumar, M. C.

    2014-04-24

    Phonon dispersion and phonon density of states of graphene are calculated using classical molecular dynamics simulations. In this method, the dynamical matrix is constructed based on linear response theory by computing the displacement of atoms during the simulations. The computed phonon dispersions show excellent agreement with experiments. The simulations are done in both NVT and NPT ensembles at 300 K and found that the LO/TO modes are getting hardened at the Γ point. The NPT ensemble simulations capture the anharmonicity of the crystal accurately and the hardening of LO/TO modes is more pronounced. We also found that at 300 K the C-C bond length reduces below the equilibrium value and the ZA bending mode frequency becomes imaginary close to Γ along K-Γ direction, which indicates instability of the flat 2D graphene sheets.

  10. Quantum simulation of non-equilibrium dynamical maps with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Philipp; Müller, Markus; Nigg, Daniel; Monz, Thomas; Barreiro, Julio; Martinez, Esteban; Hennrich, Markus; Diehl, Sebastian; Zoller, Peter; Blatt, Rainer

    2013-03-01

    Dynamical maps are central for the understanding of general state transformations of physical systems. Prime examples include classical nonlinear systems undergoing transitions to chaos, or single particle quantum mechanical counterparts showing intriguing phenomena such as dynamical localization. Here, we extend the concept of dynamical maps to an open-system, many-particle context and experimentally explore the stroboscopic dynamics of a complex many-body spin model in a universal quantum simulator using up to five ions. We generate quantum mechanical long range order by an iteration of purely dissipative maps, reveal the characteristic features of a combined coherent and dissipative non-equilibrium evolution, and develop and implement various error detection and reduction techniques that will facilitate the faithful quantum simulation of larger systems.

  11. Potential and flux field landscape theory. II. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of spatially inhomogeneous stochastic dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2014-09-14

    We have established a general non-equilibrium thermodynamic formalism consistently applicable to both spatially homogeneous and, more importantly, spatially inhomogeneous systems, governed by the Langevin and Fokker-Planck stochastic dynamics with multiple state transition mechanisms, using the potential-flux landscape framework as a bridge connecting stochastic dynamics with non-equilibrium thermodynamics. A set of non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations, quantifying the relations of the non-equilibrium entropy, entropy flow, entropy production, and other thermodynamic quantities, together with their specific expressions, is constructed from a set of dynamical decomposition equations associated with the potential-flux landscape framework. The flux velocity plays a pivotal role on both the dynamic and thermodynamic levels. On the dynamic level, it represents a dynamic force breaking detailed balance, entailing the dynamical decomposition equations. On the thermodynamic level, it represents a thermodynamic force generating entropy production, manifested in the non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and more specific examples, the spatial stochastic neuronal model, in particular, are studied to test and illustrate the general theory. This theoretical framework is particularly suitable to study the non-equilibrium (thermo)dynamics of spatially inhomogeneous systems abundant in nature. This paper is the second of a series.

  12. Potential and flux field landscape theory. II. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of spatially inhomogeneous stochastic dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2014-09-01

    We have established a general non-equilibrium thermodynamic formalism consistently applicable to both spatially homogeneous and, more importantly, spatially inhomogeneous systems, governed by the Langevin and Fokker-Planck stochastic dynamics with multiple state transition mechanisms, using the potential-flux landscape framework as a bridge connecting stochastic dynamics with non-equilibrium thermodynamics. A set of non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations, quantifying the relations of the non-equilibrium entropy, entropy flow, entropy production, and other thermodynamic quantities, together with their specific expressions, is constructed from a set of dynamical decomposition equations associated with the potential-flux landscape framework. The flux velocity plays a pivotal role on both the dynamic and thermodynamic levels. On the dynamic level, it represents a dynamic force breaking detailed balance, entailing the dynamical decomposition equations. On the thermodynamic level, it represents a thermodynamic force generating entropy production, manifested in the non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and more specific examples, the spatial stochastic neuronal model, in particular, are studied to test and illustrate the general theory. This theoretical framework is particularly suitable to study the non-equilibrium (thermo)dynamics of spatially inhomogeneous systems abundant in nature. This paper is the second of a series.

  13. A Hierarchy of Dynamic Equilibria and a View of a Fly's Equilibrium Reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. Jane

    Understanding structures within a structure is a topic that has fascinated Leo throughout his life, and we are now benefiting from his fundamental insights when we think about living organisms. A living organism is far from statistical equilibrium and it does not have a single critical parameter. Nevertheless, each organism has a hierarchical structure within itself. Recently, asking how often a fly must sense its orientation in order to balance in air has led us to suggest one of the fly's 17 steering muscles, the first basalar muscle, is responsible for maintaining flight stability. Here I suggest that the chain of events associated with flight equilibrium reflex can be viewed as a succession of local linear transformation about a set of dynamic equilibria. Each of the functionally different parts, the sensors, motor neurons, muscles, wing-hinges, flapping wings, and the thorax, operates near its own dynamic equilibrium, often close to the boundary between stability and instability. Locomotion rises as an organism responds to a small perturbation from these equilibria. Kadanoff session.

  14. Non-equilibrium disordered Bose gases: condensation, superfluidity and dynamical Bose glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Liang, Zhaoxin; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Zhidong

    2016-01-01

    In an equilibrium three-dimensional (3D) disordered condensate, it is well established that disorder can generate an amount of normal fluid ρ n equaling to 4/3 of ρ ex , where ρ ex is a sum of interaction-induced quantum depletion and disorder-induced condensate deformation. The concept that the superfluid is more volatile to the existence of disorder than the condensate is crucial to the understanding of the Bose glass phase. In this work, we show that, by bringing a weakly disordered 3D condensate to non-equilibrium regime via a quantum quench in the interaction, disorder can destroy superfluid significantly more, leading to a steady state of Hamiltonian H f in which the ρ n far exceeds 4/3 of the ρ ex . This suggests the possibility of engineering Bose glass in the dynamic regime. Here, we refer to the dynamical Bose glass as the case where in the steady state of quenched condensate, the superfluid density goes to zero while the condensate density remains finite. As both the ρ n and ρ ex are measurable quantities, our results allow an experimental demonstration of the dramatized interplay between the disorder and interaction in the non-equilibrium scenario.

  15. Molecular beacon-equilibrium cyclization detection of DNA-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Vitko, Jason; Rujan, Iulian; Androga, Lagu; Mukerji, Ishita; Bolton, Philip H

    2007-11-01

    Molecular beacon detection of equilibrium cyclization (MBEC) is a novel, high sensitivity technique that can allow DNA-protein complex formation to be studied under diverse conditions in a cost effective and rapid manner that can be adapted to high throughput screening. To demonstrate the ease and utility of applying MBEC to the investigation of the K(D) values of protein-DNA complexes, the sequence-specific Escherichia coli integration host factor (IHF) protein has been used as a test system. Competition between a labeled MBEC DNA construct and unlabeled duplex DNA for IHF binding allows the determination of K(D) values as a function of the DNA duplex sequence. This allows sequence specificity to be monitored while using only a single molecular beacon-labeled DNA. The robustness of MBEC for monitoring protein-DNA complex formation has been further demonstrated by determining the K(D) values as a function of salt concentration to investigate the net number of salt bridges formed in sequence-specific and -nonspecific IHF-DNA complexes. These MBEC results have been compared with those from other approaches.

  16. Studying the unfolding kinetics of proteins under pressure using long molecular dynamic simulation runs.

    PubMed

    Chara, Osvaldo; Grigera, José Raúl; McCarthy, Andrés N

    2007-12-01

    The usefulness of computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulation has been extensively established for studying systems in equilibrium. Nevertheless, its application to complex non-equilibrium biological processes such as protein unfolding has been generally regarded as producing results which cannot be interpreted straightforwardly. In the present study, we present results for the kinetics of unfolding of apomyoglobin, based on the analysis of long simulation runs of this protein in solution at 3 kbar (1 atm = 1.01325, bar = 101,325 Pa). We hereby demonstrate that the analysis of the data collected within a simulated time span of 0.18 mus suffices for producing results, which coincide remarkably with the available unfolding kinetics experimental data. This not only validates molecular dynamics simulation as a valuable alternative for studying non-equilibrium processes, but also enables a detailed analysis of the actual structural mechanism which underlies the unfolding process of proteins under elusive denaturing conditions such as high pressure.

  17. Dynamical evolution of twisted magnetic flux tubes. I - Equilibrium and linear stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Schnack, Dalton D.; Van Hoven, Gerard

    1990-01-01

    The three-dimensional dynamical evolution of twisted magnetic flux tubes is studied using a time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. The flux tubes are intended to model solar coronal loops, and include the stabilizing effect of photospheric line tying. The model permits the complete evolution of flux tubes to be followed self-consistently, including the formation, equilibrium, linear instability, and nonlinear behavior. Starting from an initial uniform background magnetic field, a twisted flux tube is created by the application of slow, localized photospheric vortex flows. The flux tube evolves quasi-statically through sequences of equilibria with increasing twist, until it becomes linearly unstable to an ideal MHD kink mode. In this paper, the equilibrium properties and the linear stability behavior are discussed. The application of the method to the uniform-twist, Gold-Hoyle field confirms the previous stability threshold for kink instability and provides estimates of the resulting growth rate.

  18. Molecular scale dynamics of large ring polymers.

    PubMed

    Gooßen, S; Brás, A R; Krutyeva, M; Sharp, M; Falus, P; Feoktystov, A; Gasser, U; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W; Wischnewski, A; Richter, D

    2014-10-17

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture. PMID:25361284

  19. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, C E; Self, J L; Copley, J R D; Faraone, A

    2016-07-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD3OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids. PMID:27394112

  20. Molecular scale dynamics of large ring polymers.

    PubMed

    Gooßen, S; Brás, A R; Krutyeva, M; Sharp, M; Falus, P; Feoktystov, A; Gasser, U; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W; Wischnewski, A; Richter, D

    2014-10-17

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture.

  1. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, C. E.; Self, J. L.; Copley, J. R. D.; Faraone, A.

    2016-07-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD3OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids.

  2. Numerical methods for molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Skeel, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes our research progress to date on the use of multigrid methods for three-dimensional elliptic partial differential equations, with particular emphasis on application to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics. This research is motivated by the need for fast and accurate numerical solution techniques for three-dimensional problems arising in physics and engineering. In many applications these problems must be solved repeatedly, and the extremely large number of discrete unknowns required to accurately approximate solutions to partial differential equations in three-dimensional regions necessitates the use of efficient solution methods. This situation makes clear the importance of developing methods which are of optimal order (or nearly so), meaning that the number of operations required to solve the discrete problem is on the order of the number of discrete unknowns. Multigrid methods are generally regarded as being in this class of methods, and are in fact provably optimal order for an increasingly large class of problems. The fundamental goal of this research is to develop a fast and accurate numerical technique, based on multi-level principles, for the solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics and similar equations occurring in other applications. An outline of the report is as follows. We first present some background material, followed by a survey of the literature on the use of multigrid methods for solving problems similar to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. A short description of the software we have developed so far is then given, and numerical results are discussed. Finally, our research plans for the coming year are presented.

  3. Semiclassical guided optimal control of molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kondorskiy, A.; Mil'nikov, G.; Nakamura, H.

    2005-10-15

    An efficient semiclassical optimal control theory applicable to multidimensional systems is formulated for controlling wave packet dynamics on a single adiabatic potential energy surface. The approach combines advantages of different formulations of optimal control theory: quantum and classical on one hand and global and local on the other. Numerical applications to the control of HCN-CNH isomerization demonstrate that this theory can provide an efficient tool to manipulate molecular dynamics of many degrees of freedom by laser pulses.

  4. Phase-field investigation on the non-equilibrium interface dynamics of rapid alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jeong

    2011-01-01

    The research program reported here is focused on critical issues that represent conspicuous gaps in current understanding of rapid solidification, limiting our ability to predict and control microstructural evolution (i.e. morphological dynamics and microsegregation) at high undercooling, where conditions depart significantly from local equilibrium. More specifically, through careful application of phase-field modeling, using appropriate thin-interface and anti-trapping corrections and addressing important details such as transient effects and a velocity-dependent (i.e. adaptive) numerics, the current analysis provides a reasonable simulation-based picture of non-equilibrium solute partitioning and the corresponding oscillatory dynamics associated with single-phase rapid solidification and show that this method is a suitable means for a self-consistent simulation of transient behavior and operating point selection under rapid growth conditions. Moving beyond the limitations of conventional theoretical/analytical treatments of non-equilibrium solute partitioning, these results serve to substantiate recent experimental findings and analytical treatments for single-phase rapid solidification. The departure from the equilibrium solid concentration at the solid-liquid interface was often observed during rapid solidification, and the energetic associated non-equilibrium solute partitioning has been treated in detail, providing possible ranges of interface concentrations for a given growth condition. Use of these treatments for analytical description of specific single-phase dendritic and cellular operating point selection, however, requires a model for solute partitioning under a given set of growth conditions. Therefore, analytical solute trapping models which describe the chemical partitioning as a function of steady state interface velocities have been developed and widely utilized in most of the theoretical investigations of rapid solidification. However, these

  5. Steered Molecular Dynamics Methods Applied to Enzyme Mechanism and Energetics.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, C L; Martí, M A; Roitberg, A E

    2016-01-01

    One of the main goals of chemistry is to understand the underlying principles of chemical reactions, in terms of both its reaction mechanism and the thermodynamics that govern it. Using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM)-based methods in combination with a biased sampling scheme, it is possible to simulate chemical reactions occurring inside complex environments such as an enzyme, or aqueous solution, and determining the corresponding free energy profile, which provides direct comparison with experimental determined kinetic and equilibrium parameters. Among the most promising biasing schemes is the multiple steered molecular dynamics method, which in combination with Jarzynski's Relationship (JR) allows obtaining the equilibrium free energy profile, from a finite set of nonequilibrium reactive trajectories by exponentially averaging the individual work profiles. However, obtaining statistically converged and accurate profiles is far from easy and may result in increased computational cost if the selected steering speed and number of trajectories are inappropriately chosen. In this small review, using the extensively studied chorismate to prephenate conversion reaction, we first present a systematic study of how key parameters such as pulling speed, number of trajectories, and reaction progress are related to the resulting work distributions and in turn the accuracy of the free energy obtained with JR. Second, and in the context of QM/MM strategies, we introduce the Hybrid Differential Relaxation Algorithm, and show how it allows obtaining more accurate free energy profiles using faster pulling speeds and smaller number of trajectories and thus smaller computational cost.

  6. Steered Molecular Dynamics Methods Applied to Enzyme Mechanism and Energetics.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, C L; Martí, M A; Roitberg, A E

    2016-01-01

    One of the main goals of chemistry is to understand the underlying principles of chemical reactions, in terms of both its reaction mechanism and the thermodynamics that govern it. Using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM)-based methods in combination with a biased sampling scheme, it is possible to simulate chemical reactions occurring inside complex environments such as an enzyme, or aqueous solution, and determining the corresponding free energy profile, which provides direct comparison with experimental determined kinetic and equilibrium parameters. Among the most promising biasing schemes is the multiple steered molecular dynamics method, which in combination with Jarzynski's Relationship (JR) allows obtaining the equilibrium free energy profile, from a finite set of nonequilibrium reactive trajectories by exponentially averaging the individual work profiles. However, obtaining statistically converged and accurate profiles is far from easy and may result in increased computational cost if the selected steering speed and number of trajectories are inappropriately chosen. In this small review, using the extensively studied chorismate to prephenate conversion reaction, we first present a systematic study of how key parameters such as pulling speed, number of trajectories, and reaction progress are related to the resulting work distributions and in turn the accuracy of the free energy obtained with JR. Second, and in the context of QM/MM strategies, we introduce the Hybrid Differential Relaxation Algorithm, and show how it allows obtaining more accurate free energy profiles using faster pulling speeds and smaller number of trajectories and thus smaller computational cost. PMID:27497165

  7. Polymer Brushes under Shear: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Compared to Experiments.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjesh K; Ilg, Patrick; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M; Kröger, Martin; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2015-04-28

    Surfaces coated with polymer brushes in a good solvent are known to exhibit excellent tribological properties. We have performed coarse-grained equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate dextran polymer brushes in an aqueous environment in molecular detail. In a first step, we determined simulation parameters and units by matching experimental results for a single dextran chain. Analyzing this model when applied to a multichain system, density profiles of end-tethered polymer brushes obtained from equilibrium MD simulations compare very well with expectations based on self-consistent field theory. Simulation results were further validated against and correlated with available experimental results. The simulated compression curves (normal force as a function of surface separation) compare successfully with results obtained with a surface forces apparatus. Shear stress (friction) obtained via nonequilibrium MD is contrasted with nanoscale friction studies employing colloidal-probe lateral force microscopy. We find good agreement in the hydrodynamic regime and explain the observed leveling-off of the friction forces in the boundary regime by means of an effective polymer-wall attraction.

  8. Kinetic theory molecular dynamics and hot dense matter: theoretical foundations.

    PubMed

    Graziani, F R; Bauer, J D; Murillo, M S

    2014-09-01

    Electrons are weakly coupled in hot, dense matter that is created in high-energy-density experiments. They are also mildly quantum mechanical and the ions associated with them are classical and may be strongly coupled. In addition, the dynamical evolution of plasmas under these hot, dense matter conditions involve a variety of transport and energy exchange processes. Quantum kinetic theory is an ideal tool for treating the electrons but it is not adequate for treating the ions. Molecular dynamics is perfectly suited to describe the classical, strongly coupled ions but not the electrons. We develop a method that combines a Wigner kinetic treatment of the electrons with classical molecular dynamics for the ions. We refer to this hybrid method as "kinetic theory molecular dynamics," or KTMD. The purpose of this paper is to derive KTMD from first principles and place it on a firm theoretical foundation. The framework that KTMD provides for simulating plasmas in the hot, dense regime is particularly useful since current computational methods are generally limited by their inability to treat the dynamical quantum evolution of the electronic component. Using the N-body von Neumann equation for the electron-proton plasma, three variations of KTMD are obtained. Each variant is determined by the physical state of the plasma (e.g., collisional versus collisionless). The first variant of KTMD yields a closed set of equations consisting of a mean-field quantum kinetic equation for the electron one-particle distribution function coupled to a classical Liouville equation for the protons. The latter equation includes both proton-proton Coulombic interactions and an effective electron-proton interaction that involves the convolution of the electron density with the electron-proton Coulomb potential. The mean-field approach is then extended to incorporate equilibrium electron-proton correlations through the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander (STLS) ansatz. This is the second variant of KTMD

  9. Kinetic theory molecular dynamics and hot dense matter: theoretical foundations.

    PubMed

    Graziani, F R; Bauer, J D; Murillo, M S

    2014-09-01

    Electrons are weakly coupled in hot, dense matter that is created in high-energy-density experiments. They are also mildly quantum mechanical and the ions associated with them are classical and may be strongly coupled. In addition, the dynamical evolution of plasmas under these hot, dense matter conditions involve a variety of transport and energy exchange processes. Quantum kinetic theory is an ideal tool for treating the electrons but it is not adequate for treating the ions. Molecular dynamics is perfectly suited to describe the classical, strongly coupled ions but not the electrons. We develop a method that combines a Wigner kinetic treatment of the electrons with classical molecular dynamics for the ions. We refer to this hybrid method as "kinetic theory molecular dynamics," or KTMD. The purpose of this paper is to derive KTMD from first principles and place it on a firm theoretical foundation. The framework that KTMD provides for simulating plasmas in the hot, dense regime is particularly useful since current computational methods are generally limited by their inability to treat the dynamical quantum evolution of the electronic component. Using the N-body von Neumann equation for the electron-proton plasma, three variations of KTMD are obtained. Each variant is determined by the physical state of the plasma (e.g., collisional versus collisionless). The first variant of KTMD yields a closed set of equations consisting of a mean-field quantum kinetic equation for the electron one-particle distribution function coupled to a classical Liouville equation for the protons. The latter equation includes both proton-proton Coulombic interactions and an effective electron-proton interaction that involves the convolution of the electron density with the electron-proton Coulomb potential. The mean-field approach is then extended to incorporate equilibrium electron-proton correlations through the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander (STLS) ansatz. This is the second variant of KTMD

  10. Error suppression and error correction in adiabatic quantum computation: non-equilibrium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarovar, Mohan; Young, Kevin C.

    2013-12-01

    While adiabatic quantum computing (AQC) has some robustness to noise and decoherence, it is widely believed that encoding, error suppression and error correction will be required to scale AQC to large problem sizes. Previous works have established at least two different techniques for error suppression in AQC. In this paper we derive a model for describing the dynamics of encoded AQC and show that previous constructions for error suppression can be unified with this dynamical model. In addition, the model clarifies the mechanisms of error suppression and allows the identification of its weaknesses. In the second half of the paper, we utilize our description of non-equilibrium dynamics in encoded AQC to construct methods for error correction in AQC by cooling local degrees of freedom (qubits). While this is shown to be possible in principle, we also identify the key challenge to this approach: the requirement of high-weight Hamiltonians. Finally, we use our dynamical model to perform a simplified thermal stability analysis of concatenated-stabilizer-code encoded many-body systems for AQC or quantum memories. This work is a companion paper to ‘Error suppression and error correction in adiabatic quantum computation: techniques and challenges (2013 Phys. Rev. X 3 041013)’, which provides a quantum information perspective on the techniques and limitations of error suppression and correction in AQC. In this paper we couch the same results within a dynamical framework, which allows for a detailed analysis of the non-equilibrium dynamics of error suppression and correction in encoded AQC.

  11. Orbital dynamics and equilibrium points around an asteroid with gravitational orbit-attitude coupling perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Xu, Shijie

    2016-07-01

    The strongly perturbed dynamical environment near asteroids has been a great challenge for the mission design. Besides the non-spherical gravity, solar radiation pressure, and solar tide, the orbital motion actually suffers from another perturbation caused by the gravitational orbit-attitude coupling of the spacecraft. This gravitational orbit-attitude coupling perturbation (GOACP) has its origin in the fact that the gravity acting on a non-spherical extended body, the real case of the spacecraft, is actually different from that acting on a point mass, the approximation of the spacecraft in the orbital dynamics. We intend to take into account GOACP besides the non-spherical gravity to improve the previous close-proximity orbital dynamics. GOACP depends on the spacecraft attitude, which is assumed to be controlled ideally with respect to the asteroid in this study. Then, we focus on the orbital motion perturbed by the non-spherical gravity and GOACP with the given attitude. This new orbital model can be called the attitude-restricted orbital dynamics, where restricted means that the orbital motion is studied as a restricted problem at a given attitude. In the present paper, equilibrium points of the attitude-restricted orbital dynamics in the second degree and order gravity field of a uniformly rotating asteroid are investigated. Two kinds of equilibria are obtained: on and off the asteroid equatorial principal axis. These equilibria are different from and more diverse than those in the classical orbital dynamics without GOACP. In the case of a large spacecraft, the off-axis equilibrium points can exist at an arbitrary longitude in the equatorial plane. These results are useful for close-proximity operations, such as the asteroid body-fixed hovering.

  12. Overcoming the Barrier on Time Step Size in Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Molecular Liquids.

    PubMed

    Omelyan, Igor P; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2012-01-10

    We propose and validate a new multiscale technique, the extrapolative isokinetic Nóse-Hoover chain orientational (EINO) motion multiple time step algorithm for rigid interaction site models of molecular liquids. It nontrivially combines the multiple time step decomposition operator method with a specific extrapolation of intermolecular interactions, complemented by an extended isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain approach in the presence of translational and orientational degrees of freedom. The EINO algorithm obviates the limitations on time step size in molecular dynamics simulations. While the best existing multistep algorithms can advance from a 5 fs single step to a maximum 100 fs outer step, we show on the basis of molecular dynamics simulations of the TIP4P water that our EINO technique overcomes this barrier. Specifically, we have achieved giant time steps on the order of 500 fs up to 5 ps, which now become available in the study of equilibrium and conformational properties of molecular liquids without a loss of stability and accuracy.

  13. Quantum-chemical calculations and electron diffraction study of the equilibrium molecular structure of vitamin K3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaikin, L. S.; Tikhonov, D. S.; Grikina, O. E.; Rykov, A. N.; Stepanov, N. F.

    2014-05-01

    The equilibrium molecular structure of 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (vitamin K3) having C s symmetry is experimentally characterized for the first time by means of gas-phase electron diffraction using quantum-chemical calculations and data on the vibrational spectra of related compounds.

  14. Non-equilibrium dynamics of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weigang; Tauber, Uwe

    The complex Ginzburg-Landau equation combines the quantum many-particle nonlinear Schrödinger equation with the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation or model A relaxational dynamics. It arises in quite diverse contexts that include spontaneous pattern formation out of equilibrium, chemical oscillations, multi-mode lasers, thermal convection in binary fluids, cyclic population dynamics, and driven-dissipative Bose-Einstein condensates. Indeed, the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation exhibits a remarkably rich phase diagram with intriguing dynamics. We employ detailed numerical studies as well as analytical tools such as the perturbative renormalization group and the spherical model limit to study the non-equilibrium coarsening and critical aging scaling for the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation following quenches from an initial disordered configuration to either one of the ordered phases or the critical point. This research is supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering under Award DE-FG02-09ER46613.

  15. Non-Equilibrium Dynamics of C-QED Arrays in Strong Correlation Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin-Ding; Li, Zhi-Hang; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Recently increasing interests are attracted in the physics of controlled arrays of nonlinear cavity resonators because of the rapid experimental progress achieved in cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). For a driven-dissipative two-dimentional planar C-QED array, standard Markov master equation is generally used to study the dynamics of this system. However, when in the case that the on-site photon-photon interaction enters strong correlation regime, standard Markov master equation may lead to incorrect results. In this paper we study the non-equilibrium dynamics of a two-dimentional C-QED array, which is homogeneously pumped by an external pulse, at the same time dissipation exits. We study the evolution of the average photon number of a single cavity by deriving a modified master equation to. In comparison with the standard master equation, the numerical result obtained by our newly derived master equation shows significant difference for the non-equilibrium dynamics of the system.

  16. Molecular Exchange Dynamics in Block Copolymer Micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Frank; Lu, Jie; Choi, Soohyung; Lodge, Timothy

    2012-02-01

    Poly(styrene-b-ethylene propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymers were mixed with squalane (C30H62) at 1% by weight resulting in the formation of spherical micelles. The structure and dynamics of molecular exchange were characterized by synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and time resolved small-angle neutron scattering (TR-SANS), respectively, between 100 C and 160 C. TR-SANS measurements were performed with solutions initially containing deuterium labeled micelle cores and normal cores dispersed in a contrast matched squalane. Monitoring the reduction in scattering intensity as a function of time at various temperatures revealed molecular exchange dynamics highly sensitive to the core molecular weight and molecular weight distribution. Time-temperature superposition of data acquired at different temperatures produced a single master curve for all the mixtures. Experiments conducted with isotopically labeled micelle cores, each formed from two different but relatively mondisperse PS blocks, confirmed a simple dynamical model based on first order kinetics and core Rouse single chain relaxation. These findings demonstrate a dramatic transition to nonergodicity with increasing micelle core molecular weight and confirm the origins of the logarithmic exchange kinetics in such systems.

  17. Reaction dynamics in polyatomic molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is the development of theoretical methods and models for describing the dynamics of chemical reactions, with specific interest for application to polyatomic molecular systems of special interest and relevance. There is interest in developing the most rigorous possible theoretical approaches and also in more approximate treatments that are more readily applicable to complex systems.

  18. Non-equilibrium electron transport in degenerate nitride heterostructures-dynamic screening effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. R.; Babiker, M.; Bennett, C. R.; Probert, M. I. J.

    2003-04-01

    We show how dynamic screening effects on non-equilibrium electron transport can be incorporated in the case of electronically dense GaN-based quantum wells. The theory is based on the Boltzmann equation, leading to evaluations of the momentum relaxation time and, hence, the electron mobility in these heterostructures. We find that both screening and anti-screening effects are manifest as the electron density varies. However, anti-screening dominates over a wide range of densities, with screening commencing at densities appropriate for phonon-plasmon coupling.

  19. Collisional deactivation of CF 3I - a molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svedung, Harald; Marković, Nikola; Nordholm, Sture

    1999-10-01

    The detailed mechanisms of ro-vibrational energy transfer in collisions between CF 3I and argon or propane are investigated. Molecular dynamics simulations of collisions between a reactant CF 3I molecule at energies from 50 to 200 kJ/mol with medium argon or propane at selected initial temperatures are interpreted in terms of ergodic collision limits. The intramolecular potential used for CF 3I is a Morse-stretch/harmonic-bend type function with parameters fitted to equilibrium structure, normal mode frequencies and dissociation energies. Simple generic Buckingham type pair-potentials are used for intermolecular atom-atom interactions. Energy transfer is related to (i) geometry of collision, (ii) impact parameter, (iii) number of atom-atom encounters, (iv) average dynamical hardness of interaction at atom-atom collisions, (v) number of minima in the center of mass separation and (vi) lifetime of the collisional complex. The energy transfer in our molecular dynamics calculations is compared with experimental results for the same colliders. The observed trends are interpreted in terms of detailed collisional mechanisms. Our results highlight the importance of rotational excitation and the repulsive part of the intermolecular potential.

  20. New directions in fluid dynamics: non-equilibrium aerodynamic and microsystem flows.

    PubMed

    Reese, Jason M; Gallis, Michael A; Lockerby, Duncan A

    2003-12-15

    Fluid flows that do not have local equilibrium are characteristic of some of the new frontiers in engineering and technology, for example, high-speed high-altitude aerodynamics and the development of micrometre-sized fluid pumps, turbines and other devices. However, this area of fluid dynamics is poorly understood from both the experimental and simulation perspectives, which hampers the progress of these technologies. This paper reviews some of the recent developments in experimental techniques and modelling methods for non-equilibrium gas flows, examining their advantages and drawbacks. We also present new results from our computational investigations into both hypersonic and microsystem flows using two distinct numerical methodologies: the direct simulation Monte Carlo method and extended hydrodynamics. While the direct simulation approach produces excellent results and is used widely, extended hydrodynamics is not as well developed but is a promising candidate for future more complex simulations. Finally, we discuss some of the other situations where these simulation methods could be usefully applied, and look to the future of numerical tools for non-equilibrium flows.

  1. Multiscale coupling of molecular dynamics and peridynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Qi; Li, Shaofan

    2016-10-01

    We propose a multiscale computational model to couple molecular dynamics and peridynamics. The multiscale coupling model is based on a previously developed multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics (MMMD) theory, which has three dynamics equations at three different scales, namely, microscale, mesoscale, and macroscale. In the proposed multiscale coupling approach, we divide the simulation domain into atomistic region and macroscale region. Molecular dynamics is used to simulate atom motions in atomistic region, and peridynamics is used to simulate macroscale material point motions in macroscale region, and both methods are nonlocal particle methods. A transition zone is introduced as a messenger to pass the information between the two regions or scales. We employ the "supercell" developed in the MMMD theory as the transition element, which is named as the adaptive multiscale element due to its ability of passing information from different scales, because the adaptive multiscale element can realize both top-down and bottom-up communications. We introduce the Cauchy-Born rule based stress evaluation into state-based peridynamics formulation to formulate atomistic-enriched constitutive relations. To mitigate the issue of wave reflection on the interface, a filter is constructed by switching on and off the MMMD dynamic equations at different scales. Benchmark tests of one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) wave propagations from atomistic region to macro region are presented. The mechanical wave can transit through the interface smoothly without spurious wave deflections, and the filtering process is proven to be efficient.

  2. Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations of the shock-induced chemistry of phenylacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Cawkwell, M. J. Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.

    2015-02-14

    The initial chemical events that occur during the shock compression of liquid phenylacetylene have been investigated using self-consistent tight binding molecular dynamics simulations. The extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism enabled us to compute microcanonical trajectories with precise conservation of the total energy. Our simulations revealed that the first density-increasing step under shock compression arises from the polymerization of phenylacetylene molecules at the acetylene moiety. The application of electronic structure-based molecular dynamics with long-term conservation of the total energy enabled us to identify electronic signatures of reactivity via monitoring changes in the HOMO-LUMO gap, and to capture directly adiabatic shock heating, transient non-equilibrium states, and changes in temperature arising from exothermic chemistry in classical molecular dynamics trajectories.

  3. MDMovie: a molecular dynamics viewing tool.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J P

    1996-10-01

    The graphics program MDMovie (Molecular Dynamics Movie), written in C using IRIS GL graphics library calls, is designed to facilitate the visualization and interpretation of empirical force field data. MDMovie was created and initially adapted in accord with the needs of physical chemists and thereafter became an expandable analysis tool. Capabilities include the display of chemical structure, animation of molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo trajectories, and the visual representation of various vector and scalar dynamical properties. In addition to being a research tool, MDMovie has features for creating presentation videos and hardcopy output. A library is also available for linking to Fortran simulation codes running on a remote machine and connecting to MDMovie via a socket connection. MDMovie continues to be an ongoing research project and new features are actively being added in collaboration with various research groups. Future plans include porting to OpenGL and the design of an XII-based user interface.

  4. Dynamical coupling between magnetic equilibrium and transport in tokamak scenario modelling, with application to current ramps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fable, E.; Angioni, C.; Ivanov, A. A.; Lackner, K.; Maj, O.; Medvedev, S. Yu; Pautasso, G.; Pereverzev, G. V.; Treutterer, W.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2013-07-01

    The modelling of tokamak scenarios requires the simultaneous solution of both the time evolution of the plasma kinetic profiles and of the magnetic equilibrium. Their dynamical coupling involves additional complications, which are not present when the two physical problems are solved separately. Difficulties arise in maintaining consistency in the time evolution among quantities which appear in both the transport and the Grad-Shafranov equations, specifically the poloidal and toroidal magnetic fluxes as a function of each other and of the geometry. The required consistency can be obtained by means of iteration cycles, which are performed outside the equilibrium code and which can have different convergence properties depending on the chosen numerical scheme. When these external iterations are performed, the stability of the coupled system becomes a concern. In contrast, if these iterations are not performed, the coupled system is numerically stable, but can become physically inconsistent. By employing a novel scheme (Fable E et al 2012 Nucl. Fusion submitted), which ensures stability and physical consistency among the same quantities that appear in both the transport and magnetic equilibrium equations, a newly developed version of the ASTRA transport code (Pereverzev G V et al 1991 IPP Report 5/42), which is coupled to the SPIDER equilibrium code (Ivanov A A et al 2005 32nd EPS Conf. on Plasma Physics (Tarragona, 27 June-1 July) vol 29C (ECA) P-5.063), in both prescribed- and free-boundary modes is presented here for the first time. The ASTRA-SPIDER coupled system is then applied to the specific study of the modelling of controlled current ramp-up in ASDEX Upgrade discharges.

  5. Polar solvation dynamics of lysozyme from molecular dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2012-05-01

    The solvation dynamics of a protein are believed to be sensitive to its secondary structures. We have explored such sensitivity in this article by performing room temperature molecular dynamics simulation of an aqueous solution of lysozyme. Nonuniform long-time relaxation patterns of the solvation time correlation function for different segments of the protein have been observed. It is found that relatively slower long-time solvation components of the α-helices and β-sheets of the protein are correlated with lower exposure of their polar probe residues to bulk solvent and hence stronger interactions with the dynamically restricted surface water molecules. These findings can be verified by appropriate experimental studies.

  6. Evidence for non-equilibrium dynamics in viral DNA packaging from optical tweezers measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndsen, Zachary T.; Keller, Nicholas; Smith, Douglas E.

    2013-09-01

    In many viruses molecular motors generate large forces to package DNA to high densities. The dynamics and energetics of this process is a subject of wide debate and is of interest as a model for studying confined polymer physics in general. Here we present preliminary results showing that DNA in bacteriophage phi29 undergoes nonequilibrium conformational dynamics during packaging with a relaxation time >60,000x longer than for free DNA and >3000x longer than reported for DNA confined in nanochannels. Nonequilibrium dynamics significantly increases the load on the motor, causes heterogeneity in the rates of packaging, and causes frequent pausing in motor translocation.

  7. Conformational dynamics of the molecular chaperone Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Krukenberg, Kristin A.; Street, Timothy O.; Lavery, Laura A.; Agard, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is an essential eukaryotic protein that makes up 1–2% of all cytosolic proteins. Hsp90 is vital for the maturation and maintenance of a wide variety of substrate proteins largely involved in signaling and regulatory processes. Many of these substrates have also been implicated in cancer and other diseases making Hsp90 an attractive target for therapeutics. Hsp90 is a highly dynamic and flexible molecule that can adapt its conformation to the wide variety of substrate proteins with which it acts. Large conformational rearrangements are also required for the activation of these client proteins. One driving force for these rearrangements is the intrinsic ATPase activity of Hsp90, as seen with other chaperones. However, unlike other chaperones, studies have shown that the ATPase cycle of Hsp90 is not conformationally deterministic. That is, rather than dictating the conformational state, ATP binding and hydrolysis shifts the equilibrium between a pre-existing set of conformational states in an organism-dependent manner. In vivo Hsp90 functions as part of larger heterocomplexes. The binding partners of Hsp90, co-chaperones, assist in the recruitment and activation of substrates, and many co-chaperones further regulate the conformational dynamics of Hsp90 by shifting the conformational equilibrium towards a particular state. Studies have also suggested alternative mechanisms for the regulation of Hsp90’s conformation. In this review, we discuss the structural and biochemical studies leading to our current understanding of the conformational dynamics of Hsp90 and the role that nucleotide, co-chaperones, post-translational modification and clients play in regulating Hsp90’s conformation. We also discuss the effects of current Hsp90 inhibitors on conformation and the potential for developing small molecules that inhibit Hsp90 by disrupting the conformational dynamics. PMID:21414251

  8. Structure and dynamics of concentration fluctuations in a non-equilibrium dense colloidal suspension.

    PubMed

    Giavazzi, Fabio; Savorana, Giovanni; Vailati, Alberto; Cerbino, Roberto

    2016-08-21

    Linearised fluctuating hydrodynamics describes effectively the concentration non-equilibrium fluctuations (NEF) arising during a diffusion process driven by a small concentration gradient. However, fluctuations in the presence of large gradients are not yet fully understood. Here we study the giant concentration NEF arising when a dense aqueous colloidal suspension is allowed to diffuse into an overlying layer of pure water. We use differential dynamic microscopy to determine both the statics and the dynamics of the fluctuations for several values of the wave-vector q. At small q, NEF are quenched by buoyancy, which prevents their full development and sets an upper timescale to their temporal relaxation. At intermediate q, the mean squared amplitude of NEF is characterised by a power law exponent -4, and fluctuations relax diffusively with diffusion coefficient D1. At large q, the amplitude of NEF vanishes and equilibrium concentration fluctuations are recovered, enabling a straightforward determination of the osmotic compressibility of the suspension during diffusion. In this q-range we also find that the relaxation of the fluctuations occurs with a diffusion coefficient D2 significantly different from D1. Both diffusion coefficients exhibit time-dependence with D1 increasing monotonically (by about 15%) and D2 showing the opposite behaviour (about 17% decrease). At equilibrium, the two coefficients coincide as expected. While the decrease of D2 is compatible with a diffusive evolution of the concentration profile, the increase of D1 is still not fully understood and may require considering nonlinearities that are neglected in current theories for highly stressed colloids.

  9. Structure and dynamics of concentration fluctuations in a non-equilibrium dense colloidal suspension.

    PubMed

    Giavazzi, Fabio; Savorana, Giovanni; Vailati, Alberto; Cerbino, Roberto

    2016-08-21

    Linearised fluctuating hydrodynamics describes effectively the concentration non-equilibrium fluctuations (NEF) arising during a diffusion process driven by a small concentration gradient. However, fluctuations in the presence of large gradients are not yet fully understood. Here we study the giant concentration NEF arising when a dense aqueous colloidal suspension is allowed to diffuse into an overlying layer of pure water. We use differential dynamic microscopy to determine both the statics and the dynamics of the fluctuations for several values of the wave-vector q. At small q, NEF are quenched by buoyancy, which prevents their full development and sets an upper timescale to their temporal relaxation. At intermediate q, the mean squared amplitude of NEF is characterised by a power law exponent -4, and fluctuations relax diffusively with diffusion coefficient D1. At large q, the amplitude of NEF vanishes and equilibrium concentration fluctuations are recovered, enabling a straightforward determination of the osmotic compressibility of the suspension during diffusion. In this q-range we also find that the relaxation of the fluctuations occurs with a diffusion coefficient D2 significantly different from D1. Both diffusion coefficients exhibit time-dependence with D1 increasing monotonically (by about 15%) and D2 showing the opposite behaviour (about 17% decrease). At equilibrium, the two coefficients coincide as expected. While the decrease of D2 is compatible with a diffusive evolution of the concentration profile, the increase of D1 is still not fully understood and may require considering nonlinearities that are neglected in current theories for highly stressed colloids. PMID:27425869

  10. NON-EQUILIBRIUM DYNAMICS OF MANY-BODY QUANTUM SYSTEMS: FUNDAMENTALS AND NEW FRONTIER

    SciTech Connect

    DeMille, David; LeHur, Karyn

    2013-11-27

    Rapid progress in nanotechnology and naofabrication techniques has ushered in a new era of quantum transport experiments. This has in turn heightened the interest in theoretical understanding of nonequilibrium dynamics of strongly correlated quantum systems. This project has advanced the frontiers of understanding in this area along several fronts. For example, we showed that under certain conditions, quantum impurities out of equilibrium can be reformulated in terms of an effective equilibrium theory; this makes it possible to use the gamut of tools available for quantum systems in equilibrium. On a different front, we demonstrated that the elastic power of a transmitted microwave photon in circuit QED systems can exhibit a many-body Kondo resonance. We also showed that under many circumstances, bipartite fluctuations of particle number provide an effective tool for studying many-body physics—particularly the entanglement properties of a many-body system. This implies that it should be possible to measure many-body entanglement in relatively simple and tractable quantum systems. In addition, we studied charge relaxation in quantum RC circuits with a large number of conducting channels, and elucidated its relation to Kondo models in various regimes. We also extended our earlier work on the dynamics of driven and dissipative quantum spin-boson impurity systems, deriving a new formalism that makes it possible to compute the full spin density matrix and spin-spin correlation functions beyond the weak coupling limit. Finally, we provided a comprehensive analysis of the nonequilibrium transport near a quantum phase transition in the case of a spinless dissipative resonant-level model. This project supported the research of two Ph.D. students and two postdoctoral researchers, whose training will allow them to further advance the field in coming years.

  11. Anisotropic relaxation dynamics in a dipolar Fermi gas driven out of equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, K; Frisch, A; Mark, M; Baier, S; Grimm, R; Bohn, J L; Jin, D S; Bruun, G M; Ferlaino, F

    2014-12-31

    We report on the observation of a large anisotropy in the rethermalization dynamics of an ultracold dipolar Fermi gas driven out of equilibrium. Our system consists of an ultracold sample of strongly magnetic 167Er fermions, spin polarized in the lowest Zeeman sublevel. In this system, elastic collisions arise purely from universal dipolar scattering. Based on cross-dimensional rethermalization experiments, we observe a strong anisotropy of the scattering, which manifests itself in a large angular dependence of the thermal relaxation dynamics. Our result is in good agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Furthermore, we measure the rethermalization rate as a function of temperature for different angles and find that the suppression of collisions by Pauli blocking is not influenced by the dipole orientation. PMID:25615326

  12. Observation of dynamic equilibrium cluster phase in nanoparticle-polymer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sugam; Mehan, S.; Aswal, V. K.; Schwein, R.

    2016-05-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) have been used to investigate the existence of a cluster phase in a nanoparticle-polymer system. The nanoparticle-polymer system shows an interesting reentrant phase behavior where the charge stabilized silica nanoparticles undergo particle clustering and back to individual nanoparticles as a function of polymer concentration. This kind of phase behavior is believed to be directed by opposing attractive and repulsive interactions present in the system. The phase behavior shows two narrow regions of polymer concentration immediately before and after the two-phase formation indicating the possibility of the existence of some equilibrium clusters. DLS results show a much higher size of particles than individuals in these two regions which remains unchanged even after dilution. The SANS data show the evolution of attraction with increased volume fraction of the particles supporting the dynamic nature of these clusters.

  13. Anisotropic Relaxation Dynamics in a Dipolar Fermi Gas Driven Out of Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, K.; Frisch, A.; Mark, M.; Baier, S.; Grimm, R.; Bohn, J. L.; Jin, D. S.; Bruun, G. M.; Ferlaino, F.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the observation of a large anisotropy in the rethermalization dynamics of an ultracold dipolar Fermi gas driven out of equilibrium. Our system consists of an ultracold sample of strongly magnetic Er 167 fermions, spin polarized in the lowest Zeeman sublevel. In this system, elastic collisions arise purely from universal dipolar scattering. Based on cross-dimensional rethermalization experiments, we observe a strong anisotropy of the scattering, which manifests itself in a large angular dependence of the thermal relaxation dynamics. Our result is in good agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Furthermore, we measure the rethermalization rate as a function of temperature for different angles and find that the suppression of collisions by Pauli blocking is not influenced by the dipole orientation.

  14. Role of trap-induced scales in non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly interacting trapped bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Anirban; Sensarma, Rajdeep; Sengupta, K.

    2016-08-01

    We use a time-dependent hopping expansion technique to study the non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly interacting bosons in an optical lattice in the presence of a harmonic trap characterized by a force constant K. We show that after a sudden quench of the hopping amplitude J across the superfluid (SF)-Mott insulator (MI) transition, the SF order parameter |{{Δ }\\mathbf{r}}(t)| and the local density fluctuation δ {{n}\\mathbf{r}}(t) exhibit sudden decoherence beyond a trap-induced time scale {{T}0}∼ {{K}-1/2} . We also show that after a slow linear ramp down of J, |{{Δ }\\mathbf{r}}| and the boson defect density {{P}\\mathbf{r}} display a novel non-monotonic spatial profile. Both these phenomena can be explained as consequences of trap-induced time and length scales affecting the dynamics and can be tested by concrete experiments.

  15. Modeling the dynamic equilibrium of objects weakened by thin low-strength inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Skopetskii, V.V.; Deineka, V.S.; Marchenko, O.A.

    1995-11-01

    Successful development of hydroelectric power as well as the use and protection of the resources of the Azov/Black Sea basin require formulation and solution of design and control problems for hydroengineering and coastal constructions. The authors have developed two-dimensional mathematical models of dynamic equilibrium of various hydroengineering and coastal constructions with weak thin sections of natural or artificial origin (low-strength inclusions, cracks, technological seams), where shearing strength conditions must be considered. These models are applicable to objects whose dynamic characteristics can be fully described by considering their profile cross-sections (dams, coastal slopes, wave breakers). The weak thin sections are modeled by cuts with appropriate contact conditions. Finite-element algorithms have been developed for solving the corresponding initial-boundary-value problems, and a model example has been solved.

  16. Dynamic Equilibrium Inter-annual Snow Modeling for Wyoming using Reconstructed Regional Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, N.; Johnson, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    The inland glacier retreat has often been considered as one of clearest evidences of the global warming last several decades. However, when we try to model the evolution of the inland inter-annual snow storage including glaciers using a standard energy and mass balance snow model, it is impossible to keep the snow storage constant under a constant climate condition. This study treats the inland glaciers as a dynamic equilibrium system that remains constant under static climate condition. We introduced a sub-grid scale parameterization that moves snow/ice from high elevation areas to valleys as the equilibrating factor of the system. This movement of snow/ice occurs by means of wind re-distribution, avalanches, and glaciation. The physically-based model of a dynamic equilibrium snow system at a regional scale was applied to the entire state of Wyoming for long-term simulation. The developed snow model, named RegSnow model, was coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to estimate the snow surface energy fluxes during the 33-year-long historical period for transient model calibration. The RegSnow model predicted that 82.2% of interannual snow and ice storage in Wyoming may disappear by 2100 under the RCP4.5 emission scenario based on the climate projection by CMIP5 GCMs.

  17. Molecular dynamics study of a polymeric reverse osmosis membrane.

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, E.; Walters, D. E.; Bodnar, Y. D.; Faibish, R. S.; Roux, B.

    2009-07-30

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate the properties of an atomic model of an aromatic polyamide reverse osmosis membrane. The monomers forming the polymeric membrane are cross-linked progressively on the basis of a heuristic distance criterion during MD simulations until the system interconnectivity reaches completion. Equilibrium MD simulations of the hydrated membrane are then used to determine the density and diffusivity of water within the membrane. Given a 3 MPa pressure differential and a 0.125 {micro}m width membrane, the simulated water flux is calculated to be 1.4 x 10{sup -6} m/s, which is in fair agreement with an experimental flux measurement of 7.7 x 10{sup -6} m/s.

  18. Thermal conductivity of penta-graphene from molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-10-21

    Using classical equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and applying the original Tersoff interatomic potential, we study the thermal transport property of the latest two dimensional carbon allotrope, penta-graphene. It is predicted that its room-temperature thermal conductivity is about 167 W/mK, which is much lower than that of graphene. With normal mode decomposition, the accumulated thermal conductivity with respect to phonon frequency and mean free path is analyzed. It is found that the acoustic phonons make a contribution of about 90% to the thermal conductivity, and phonons with mean free paths larger than 100 nm make a contribution over 50%. We demonstrate that the remarkably lower thermal conductivity of penta-graphene compared with graphene results from the lower phonon group velocities and fewer collective phonon excitations. Our study highlights the importance of structure-property relationship and provides better understanding of thermal transport property and valuable insight into thermal management of penta-graphene.

  19. Dynamic phase equilibrium during formation and dissociation of marine gas hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Lowell, R. P.; Germanovich, L.

    2002-12-01

    Methane gas hydrate (MGH) is stable under relatively high pressure and low temperature conditions such as those in the marine sediments near continental margins. Much attention has been focused on related issues of MGH as a potential energy resource, a possible role in submarine sediment failure, and an agent in global climate change. Particularly, there has been controversy over whether and how methane released from dissociating marine gas hydrate makes its way to the ocean and the atmosphere. Despite its apparent importance, a comprehensive understanding of how a marine MGH system dynamically adjusts itself in a changing environment is still absent. A robust theory describing phase balance and dynamic equilibrium is a necessary step toward a better understanding of the dynamic behaviors of MGH systems. We have developed a method to determine the balance and equilibrium of a three-component (water, methane, salt) four-phase (liquid, gas, hydrate, halite) gas hydrate system. Analysis shows that there are dynamic feedbacks between MGH formation/dissociation and changes in pressure, temperature and salinity. A few important observations of this study are: 1) formation of brine with gas hydrate, 2) development of water-limited situation in certain circumstances, 3) broad region of coexisting three phases of hydrate, liquid and free gas, and 4) significant over pressurization due to MGH dissociation. It is also found that 1) free gas is able to migrate through gas hydrate stability zone, 2) a layer of coexisting hydrate, liquid and free gas can resides below the BSR, and 3) significant excess pore pressure can be built up within the three-phase zone resulting from either continuous sedimentation, seafloor temperature increase, or sea level drop. We will discuss their implications to marine gas hydrate systems. The meanings of BSR and BHSZ (base of hydrate stability zone) in the context of these new findings will be discussed.

  20. Dynamic strength of molecular adhesion bonds.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, E; Ritchie, K

    1997-01-01

    In biology, molecular linkages at, within, and beneath cell interfaces arise mainly from weak noncovalent interactions. These bonds will fail under any level of pulling force if held for sufficient time. Thus, when tested with ultrasensitive force probes, we expect cohesive material strength and strength of adhesion at interfaces to be time- and loading rate-dependent properties. To examine what can be learned from measurements of bond strength, we have extended Kramers' theory for reaction kinetics in liquids to bond dissociation under force and tested the predictions by smart Monte Carlo (Brownian dynamics) simulations of bond rupture. By definition, bond strength is the force that produces the most frequent failure in repeated tests of breakage, i.e., the peak in the distribution of rupture forces. As verified by the simulations, theory shows that bond strength progresses through three dynamic regimes of loading rate. First, bond strength emerges at a critical rate of loading (> or = 0) at which spontaneous dissociation is just frequent enough to keep the distribution peak at zero force. In the slow-loading regime immediately above the critical rate, strength grows as a weak power of loading rate and reflects initial coupling of force to the bonding potential. At higher rates, there is crossover to a fast regime in which strength continues to increase as the logarithm of the loading rate over many decades independent of the type of attraction. Finally, at ultrafast loading rates approaching the domain of molecular dynamics simulations, the bonding potential is quickly overwhelmed by the rapidly increasing force, so that only naked frictional drag on the structure remains to retard separation. Hence, to expose the energy landscape that governs bond strength, molecular adhesion forces must be examined over an enormous span of time scales. However, a significant gap exists between the time domain of force measurements in the laboratory and the extremely fast scale

  1. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Santander, María; Nunez, Alvaro S.; Roldán-Molina, A.; Troncoso, Roberto E.

    2015-12-01

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation.

  2. Exciton dynamics in perturbed vibronic molecular aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Brüning, C.; Wehner, J.; Hausner, J.; Wenzel, M.; Engel, V.

    2015-01-01

    A site specific perturbation of a photo-excited molecular aggregate can lead to a localization of excitonic energy. We investigate this localization dynamics for laser-prepared excited states. Changing the parameters of the electric field significantly influences the exciton localization which offers the possibility for a selective control of this process. This is demonstrated for aggregates possessing a single vibrational degree of freedom per monomer unit. It is shown that the effects identified for the molecular dimer can be generalized to larger aggregates with a high density of vibronic states. PMID:26798840

  3. Thermostats and thermostat strategies for molecular dynamics simulations of nanofluidics.

    PubMed

    Yong, Xin; Zhang, Lucy T

    2013-02-28

    The thermostats in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of highly confined channel flow may have significant influences on the fidelity of transport phenomena. In this study, we exploit non-equilibrium MD simulations to generate Couette flows with different combinations of thermostat algorithms and strategies. We provide a comprehensive analysis on the effectiveness of three thermostat algorithms Nosé-Hoover chain (NHC), Langevin (LGV) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) when applied in three thermostat strategies, thermostating either walls (TW) or fluid (TF), and thermostating both the wall and fluid (TWTF). Our results of thermal and mechanical properties show that the TW strategy more closely resembles experimental conditions. The TF and TWTF systems also produce considerably similar behaviors in weakly sheared systems, but deviate the dynamics in strongly sheared systems due to the isothermal condition. The LGV and DPD thermostats used in the TF and TWTF systems provide vital ways to yield correct dynamics in coarse-grained systems by tuning the fluid transport coefficients. Using conventional NHC thermostat to thermostat fluid only produces correct thermal behaviors in weakly sheared systems, and breaks down due to significant thermal inhomogeneity in strongly sheared systems.

  4. Dissecting the molecular origins of specific protein-nucleic acid recognition: hydrostatic pressure and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Thomas W; Kosztin, Dorina; McLean, Mark A; Schulten, Klaus; Sligar, Stephen G

    2002-01-01

    The fundamental processes by which proteins recognize and bind to nucleic acids are critical to understanding cellular function. To explore the factors involved in protein-DNA recognition, we used hydrostatic pressure to perturb the binding of the BamHI endonuclease to cognate DNA, both in experiment and in molecular dynamic simulations. A new technique of high-pressure gel mobility shift analysis was used to test the effects of elevated hydrostatic pressure on the binding of BamHI to its cognate recognition sequence. Upon application of a pressure of 500 bar, the equilibrium dissociation constant of BamHI binding to the cognate site was found to increase nearly 10-fold. A challenge has been to link this type of pure thermodynamic measurement to functional events occurring at the molecular level. Thus, we used molecular dynamic simulations at both ambient and elevated pressures to reveal details of the direct and water-mediated interactions between BamHI and cognate DNA, which allow explanation of the effects of pressure on site-specific protein-DNA binding and complex stability. PMID:11751298

  5. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  6. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  7. Evaluation of molecular mass and tacticity of polyvinyl alcohol by non-equilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures of a polymer and a dye.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Correa, Enrique Javier; Beneito-Cambra, Miriam; Herrero-Martínez, José Manuel; Ramis-Ramos, Guillermo

    2011-04-22

    Non-equilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (NECEEM) has been used to characterize polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Commercial PVA samples with different molecular masses, from M(w)=15 up to 205 kDa, were used. According to the (13)C NMR spectra, the samples also differed in tacticity (stereoregularity). Mixtures of PVA and the anionic azo-dye Congo Red (CR) were injected in the presence of a borate buffer. The electropherograms gave a band and a peak due to the residual PVA-CR complex and the excess dye, respectively, plus a superimposed exponential decay due to the partial dissociation of the complex during migration. The stoichiometry of the PVA-CR complex, q=[monomer]/[dye], reached a maximum, q(sat), which depended on both M(w) and tacticity of PVA. Thus, q(sat) decreased from a molar ratio of ca. 4.9 to 3.6 at increasing M(w) values, this variation also being largely dependent on tacticity. A similar dependence of the electrophoretic mobility of the complex on both M(w) and tacticity was also observed. A possible explanation, based on the formation of a stack of CR ions inside the PVA-CR complex, was proposed and discussed. Finally, at increasing M(w) values, the stability constant of the complex increased slightly, and the pseudo-first order dissociation rate of the complex decreased, this later parameter also showing a dependence on both M(w) and tacticity.

  8. Is an intuitive convergence definition of molecular dynamics simulations solely based on the root mean square deviation possible?

    PubMed

    Knapp, B; Frantal, S; Cibena, M; Schreiner, W; Bauer, P

    2011-08-01

    Molecular dynamics is a commonly used technique in computational biology. One key issue of each molecular dynamics simulation is: When does this simulation reach equilibrium state? A widely used way to determine this is the visual and intuitive inspection of root mean square deviation (RMSD) plots of the simulation. Although this technique has been criticized several times, it is still often used. Therefore, we present a study proving that this method is not reliable at all. We conducted a survey with participants from the field in which we illustrated different RMSD plots to scientists in the field of molecular dynamics. These plots were randomized and repeated, using a statistical model and different variants of the plots. We show that there is no mutual consent about the point of equilibrium. The decisions are severely biased by different parameters. Therefore, we conclude that scientists should not discuss the equilibration of a molecular dynamics simulation on the basis of a RMSD plot.

  9. Molecular dynamic simulation methods for anisotropic liquids.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Keiko M; Yoneya, Makoto; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2004-03-22

    Methods of molecular dynamics simulations for anisotropic molecules are presented. The new methods, with an anisotropic factor in the cell dynamics, dramatically reduce the artifacts related to cell shapes and overcome the difficulties of simulating anisotropic molecules under constant hydrostatic pressure or constant volume. The methods are especially effective for anisotropic liquids, such as smectic liquid crystals and membranes, of which the stacks of layers are compressible (elastic in direction perpendicular to the layers) while the layer itself is liquid and only elastic under uniform compressive force. The methods can also be used for crystals and isotropic liquids as well.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Alpha-synuclein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammalkorpi, Maria; Schreck, Carl; Nath, Abhinav; Dewitt, David; Rhoades, Elizabeth; O'Hern, Corey

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the conformational dynamics of single alpha-synuclein proteins, which have been implicated in amyloid diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, in solution using unconstrained and constrained all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. The constraints on inter-residue separations are obtained from our single-molecule FRET measurements of eleven FRET pairs that span the protein. By comparing the simulation data satisfying different combinations of FRET constraints, we are able to identify those constraints that are most important in determining the radius of gyration and key features of the contact map of the protein.

  11. Potential and flux field landscape theory. I. Global stability and dynamics of spatially dependent non-equilibrium systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2013-09-28

    We established a potential and flux field landscape theory to quantify the global stability and dynamics of general spatially dependent non-equilibrium deterministic and stochastic systems. We extended our potential and flux landscape theory for spatially independent non-equilibrium stochastic systems described by Fokker-Planck equations to spatially dependent stochastic systems governed by general functional Fokker-Planck equations as well as functional Kramers-Moyal equations derived from master equations. Our general theory is applied to reaction-diffusion systems. For equilibrium spatially dependent systems with detailed balance, the potential field landscape alone, defined in terms of the steady state probability distribution functional, determines the global stability and dynamics of the system. The global stability of the system is closely related to the topography of the potential field landscape in terms of the basins of attraction and barrier heights in the field configuration state space. The effective driving force of the system is generated by the functional gradient of the potential field alone. For non-equilibrium spatially dependent systems, the curl probability flux field is indispensable in breaking detailed balance and creating non-equilibrium condition for the system. A complete characterization of the non-equilibrium dynamics of the spatially dependent system requires both the potential field and the curl probability flux field. While the non-equilibrium potential field landscape attracts the system down along the functional gradient similar to an electron moving in an electric field, the non-equilibrium flux field drives the system in a curly way similar to an electron moving in a magnetic field. In the small fluctuation limit, the intrinsic potential field as the small fluctuation limit of the potential field for spatially dependent non-equilibrium systems, which is closely related to the steady state probability distribution functional, is

  12. Dynamics of plateau bursting depending on the location of its equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Osinga, H M; Tsaneva-Atanasova, K T

    2010-12-01

    We present a mathematical analysis of the dynamics that underlies plateau bursting in models of endocrine cells under variation of the location of the (unstable) equilibrium around which these bursting patterns are organised. We focus primarily on the less well-studied case of pseudo-plateau bursting, but also consider the square-wave case. The behaviour of such models is explained using the theory for systems with multiple time scales and it is well known that the underlying so-called fast subsystem organises their dynamics. However, such results are valid only in a sufficiently small neighbourhood of the singular limit that defines the fast subsystem. Hence, the slow variable (intracellular calcium concentration) must be very slow, which is actually not the case for pseudo-plateau bursting. Furthermore, the theoretical predictions are also only valid for parameter values such that the equilibrium is close to a homoclinic bifurcation occuring in the fast subsystem. In the present study, we use numerical explorations to discuss what happens outside this theoretically known neighbourhood of parameter space. In particular, we consider what happens as the equilibrium moves outside a small neighbourhood of the homoclinic bifurcation that occurs in the fast subsystem, and relatively fast speeds are allowed for the slow variable which is controlled by a relatively large value of a parameter ε. The results obtained complement our earlier work [Tsaneva-Atanasova et al. (2010) J Theor Biol264, 1133-1146], which focussed on how the bursting patterns vary with the rate of change ε of the slow variable: we fix ε and move the equilibrium over the full range of the bursting regime. Our findings show that the transitions between different bursting patterns are rather similar for square-wave and pseudo-plateau bursting, provided that the value of ε for the pseudo-plateau-bursting model is chosen so that it is much larger than for the square-wave bursting model. Furthermore

  13. Satellite dynamics under the influence of gravitational and aerodynamic torques. A study of stability of equilibrium positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychev, V. A.; Gutnik, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of the rotational motion of a satellite, moving in the central Newtonian force field under the influence of gravitational and aerodynamic torques, is investigated. The paper proposes a method for determining all equilibrium positions (equilibrium orientations) of a satellite in the orbital coordinate system for specified values of aerodynamic torque and the major central moments of inertia; the sufficient conditions for their existence are obtained. For each equilibrium orientation the sufficient stability conditions are obtained using the generalized energy integral as the Lyapunov function. The detailed numerical analysis of the regions where the stability conditions of the equilibrium positions are satisfied is carried out depending on four dimensionless parameters of the problem. It is shown that, in the general case, the number of satellite's equilibrium positions, for which the sufficient stability conditions are satisfied, varies from 4 to 2 with an increase in the value of the aerodynamic torque magnitude.

  14. Molecular dynamics at constant Cauchy stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ronald E.; Tadmor, Ellad B.; Gibson, Joshua S.; Bernstein, Noam; Pavia, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    The Parrinello-Rahman algorithm for imposing a general state of stress in periodic molecular dynamics simulations is widely used in the literature and has been implemented in many readily available molecular dynamics codes. However, what is often overlooked is that this algorithm controls the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress as opposed to the true (Cauchy) stress. This can lead to misinterpretation of simulation results because (1) the true stress that is imposed during the simulation depends on the deformation of the periodic cell, (2) the true stress is potentially very different from the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff stress, and (3) the true stress can vary significantly during the simulation even if the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff is constant. We propose a simple modification to the algorithm that allows the true Cauchy stress to be controlled directly. We then demonstrate the efficacy of the new algorithm with the example of martensitic phase transformations under applied stress.

  15. Application of ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering / X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy to relate equilibrium or non-equilibrium dynamics to microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Andrew; Zhang, Fan; Levine, Lyle; Ilavsky, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) can probe microstructures over the nanometer-to-micrometer scale range. Through use of a small instrument entrance slit, X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) exploits the partial coherence of an X-ray synchrotron undulator beam to provide unprecedented sensitivity to the dynamics of microstructural change. In USAXS/XPCS studies, the dynamics of local structures in a scale range of 100 nm to 1000 nm can be related to an overall hierarchical microstructure extending from 1 nm to more than 1000 nm. Using a point-detection scintillator mode, the equilibrium dynamics at ambient temperature of small particles (which move more slowly than nanoparticles) in aqueous suspension have been quantified directly for the first time. Using a USAXS-XPCS scanning mode for non-equilibrium dynamics incipient processes within dental composites have been elucidated, prior to effects becoming detectable using any other technique. Use of the Advanced Photon Source, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory, was supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  16. THE ABUNDANCE OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN AND ITS CORRELATION WITH MIDPLANE PRESSURE IN GALAXIES: NON-EQUILIBRIUM, TURBULENT, CHEMICAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Glover, Simon C. O. E-mail: glover@uni-heidelberg.de

    2012-02-20

    Observations of spiral galaxies show a strong linear correlation between the ratio of molecular to atomic hydrogen surface density R{sub mol} and midplane pressure. To explain this, we simulate three-dimensional, magnetized turbulence, including simplified treatments of non-equilibrium chemistry and the propagation of dissociating radiation, to follow the formation of H{sub 2} from cold atomic gas. The formation timescale for H{sub 2} is sufficiently long that equilibrium is not reached within the 20-30 Myr lifetimes of molecular clouds. The equilibrium balance between radiative dissociation and H{sub 2} formation on dust grains fails to predict the time-dependent molecular fractions we find. A simple, time-dependent model of H{sub 2} formation can reproduce the gross behavior, although turbulent density perturbations increase molecular fractions by a factor of few above it. In contradiction to equilibrium models, radiative dissociation of molecules plays little role in our model for diffuse radiation fields with strengths less than 10 times that of the solar neighborhood, because of the effective self-shielding of H{sub 2}. The observed correlation of R{sub mol} with pressure corresponds to a correlation with local gas density if the effective temperature in the cold neutral medium of galactic disks is roughly constant. We indeed find such a correlation of R{sub mol} with density. If we examine the value of R{sub mol} in our local models after a free-fall time at their average density, as expected for models of molecular cloud formation by large-scale gravitational instability, our models reproduce the observed correlation over more than an order-of-magnitude range in density.

  17. Binary mixtures of rod-like colloids under shear: microscopically-based equilibrium theory and order-parameter dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lugo-Frías, Rodrigo; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2016-06-22

    This paper is concerned with the dynamics of a binary mixture of rod-like, repulsive colloidal particles driven out of equilibrium by means of a steady shear flow (Couette geometry). To this end we first derive, starting from a microscopic density functional in Parsons-Lee approximation, a mesoscopic free energy functional whose main variables are the orientational order parameter tensors. Based on this mesoscopic functional we then explore the stability of isotropic and nematic equilibrium phases in terms of composition and rod lengths. Second, by combining the equilibrium theory with the Doi-Hess approach for the order parameter dynamics under shear, we investigate the orientational dynamics of binary mixtures for a range of shear rates and coupling parameters. We find a variety of dynamical states, including synchronized oscillatory states of the two components, but also symmetry breaking behavior where the components display different in-plane oscillatory states.

  18. Binary mixtures of rod-like colloids under shear: microscopically-based equilibrium theory and order-parameter dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lugo-Frías, Rodrigo; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2016-06-22

    This paper is concerned with the dynamics of a binary mixture of rod-like, repulsive colloidal particles driven out of equilibrium by means of a steady shear flow (Couette geometry). To this end we first derive, starting from a microscopic density functional in Parsons-Lee approximation, a mesoscopic free energy functional whose main variables are the orientational order parameter tensors. Based on this mesoscopic functional we then explore the stability of isotropic and nematic equilibrium phases in terms of composition and rod lengths. Second, by combining the equilibrium theory with the Doi-Hess approach for the order parameter dynamics under shear, we investigate the orientational dynamics of binary mixtures for a range of shear rates and coupling parameters. We find a variety of dynamical states, including synchronized oscillatory states of the two components, but also symmetry breaking behavior where the components display different in-plane oscillatory states. PMID:27115342

  19. Binary mixtures of rod-like colloids under shear: microscopically-based equilibrium theory and order-parameter dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo-Frías, Rodrigo; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2016-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the dynamics of a binary mixture of rod-like, repulsive colloidal particles driven out of equilibrium by means of a steady shear flow (Couette geometry). To this end we first derive, starting from a microscopic density functional in Parsons-Lee approximation, a mesoscopic free energy functional whose main variables are the orientational order parameter tensors. Based on this mesoscopic functional we then explore the stability of isotropic and nematic equilibrium phases in terms of composition and rod lengths. Second, by combining the equilibrium theory with the Doi-Hess approach for the order parameter dynamics under shear, we investigate the orientational dynamics of binary mixtures for a range of shear rates and coupling parameters. We find a variety of dynamical states, including synchronized oscillatory states of the two components, but also symmetry breaking behavior where the components display different in-plane oscillatory states.

  20. Entropy of Liquid Water from Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanu, Leonardo; Zhang, Cui; Galli, Giulia

    2012-02-01

    The debate on the structural properties of water has been mostly based on the calculation of pair correlation functions. However, the simulation of thermodynamic and spectroscopic quantities may be of great relevance for the characterization of liquid water properties. We have computed the entropy of liquid water using a two-phase thermodynamic model and trajectories generated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations [1]. In an attempt to better understand the performance of several density functionals in simulating liquid water, we have performed ab initio molecular dynamics using semilocal, hybrid [2] and van der Waals density functionals [3]. We show that in all cases, at the experimental equilibrium density and at temperatures in the vicinity of 300 K, the computed entropies are underestimated, with respect to experiment, and the liquid exhibits a degree of tetrahedral order higher than in experiments. We also discuss computational strategies to simulate spectroscopic properties of water, including infrared and Raman spectra.[4pt] [1] C.Zhang, L.Spanu and G.Galli, J.Phys.Chem. B 2011 (in press)[0pt] [2] C.Zhang, D.Donadio, F.Gygi and G.Galli, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 1443 (2011)[0pt] [3] C.Zhang, J.Wu, G.Galli and F.Gygi, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 3061 (2011)

  1. New faster CHARMM molecular dynamics engine

    PubMed Central

    Hynninen, Antti-Pekka; Crowley, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new faster molecular dynamics (MD) engine into the CHARMM software package. The new MD engine is faster both in serial (i.e., single CPU core) and parallel execution. Serial performance is approximately two times higher than in the previous version of CHARMM. The newly programmed parallelization method allows the MD engine to parallelize up to hundreds of CPU cores. PMID:24302199

  2. Nanoindentation of Zr by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu (芦子哲), Zizhe; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Noordhoek, Mark J.; Sinnott, Susan B.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2015-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation are used to study the deformation behaviors of single crystal Zr for four different surface orientations. The comparison of results for two different potentials, an embedded atom method potential and a charged optimized many body potential, reveals the influence of stable and unstable stacking fault energy on dislocation behaviors under nanoindentation. The load-displacement curve, hardness and deformation behaviors of the various surface orientations Zr are compared and the elastic and plastic deformation behaviors are analyzed.

  3. Molecular dynamics modelling of solidification in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Belak, J.; Glosli, J.

    1997-12-31

    Molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the solidification of metals at high pressure and temperature. Constant pressure MD is applied to a simulation cell initially filled with both solid and molten metal. The solid/liquid interface is tracked as a function of time, and the data are used to estimate growth rates of crystallites at high pressure and temperature in Ta and Mg.

  4. Structure and dynamics of complex liquid water: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Indrajith V.; Natesan, Baskaran

    2015-06-01

    We have carried out detailed structure and dynamical studies of complex liquid water using molecular dynamics simulations. Three different model potentials, namely, TIP3P, TIP4P and SPC-E have been used in the simulations, in order to arrive at the best possible potential function that could reproduce the structure of experimental bulk water. All the simulations were performed in the NVE micro canonical ensemble using LAMMPS. The radial distribution functions, gOO, gOH and gHH and the self diffusion coefficient, Ds, were calculated for all three models. We conclude from our results that the structure and dynamical parameters obtained for SPC-E model matched well with the experimental values, suggesting that among the models studied here, the SPC-E model gives the best structure and dynamics of bulk water.

  5. Molecular crowding and protein enzymatic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2012-05-21

    The effects of molecular crowding on the enzymatic conformational dynamics and transport properties of adenylate kinase are investigated. This tridomain protein undergoes large scale hinge motions in the course of its enzymatic cycle and serves as prototype for the study of crowding effects on the cyclic conformational dynamics of proteins. The study is carried out at a mesoscopic level where both the protein and the solvent in which it is dissolved are treated in a coarse grained fashion. The amino acid residues in the protein are represented by a network of beads and the solvent dynamics is described by multiparticle collision dynamics that includes effects due to hydrodynamic interactions. The system is crowded by a stationary random array of hard spherical objects. Protein enzymatic dynamics is investigated as a function of the obstacle volume fraction and size. In addition, for comparison, results are presented for a modification of the dynamics that suppresses hydrodynamic interactions. Consistent with expectations, simulations of the dynamics show that the protein prefers a closed conformation for high volume fractions. This effect becomes more pronounced as the obstacle radius decreases for a given volume fraction since the average void size in the obstacle array is smaller for smaller radii. At high volume fractions for small obstacle radii, the average enzymatic cycle time and characteristic times of internal conformational motions of the protein deviate substantially from their values in solution or in systems with small density of obstacles. The transport properties of the protein are strongly affected by molecular crowding. Diffusive motion adopts a subdiffusive character and the effective diffusion coefficients can change by more than an order of magnitude. The orientational relaxation time of the protein is also significantly altered by crowding. PMID:22476233

  6. Reprint of: Out-of-equilibrium dynamics in superspin glass state of strongly interacting magnetic nanoparticle assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamae, Sawako

    2014-11-01

    Interacting magnetic nanoparticles display a wide variety of magnetic behaviors ranging from modified superparamagnetism, superspin glass to possibly, superferromagnetism. The superspin glass state is described by its slow and out-of-equilibrium magnetic behaviors akin to those found in atomic spin glasses. In this article, recent experimental findings on superspin correlation length growth and the violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem obtained in concentrated frozen ferrofluids are presented to illustrate certain out-of-equilibrium dynamics behavior in superspin glasses.

  7. From thermal equilibrium to nonequilibrium quench dynamics: A conserving approximation for the interacting resonant level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinkler-Aviv, Yuval; Schiller, Avraham; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2014-10-01

    We develop a low-order conserving approximation for the interacting resonant-level model (IRLM), and apply it to (i) thermal equilibrium, (ii) nonequilibrium steady state, and (iii) nonequilibrium quench dynamics. Thermal equilibrium is first used to carefully gauge the quality of the approximation by comparing the results with other well-studied methods, and finding good agreement for small values of the interaction. We analytically show that the power-law exponent of the renormalized level width usually derived using renormalization group approaches can also be correctly obtained in our approach in the weak interaction limit. A closed expression for the nonequilibrium steady-state current is derived and analytically and numerically evaluated. We find a negative differential conductance at large voltages, and the exponent of the power-law suppression of the steady-state current is calculated analytically at zero temperature. The response of the system to quenches is investigated for a single lead as well as for two-lead setup at finite voltage bias at particle-hole symmetry using a self-consistent two-times Keldysh Green function approach, and results are presented for the time-dependent current for different bias and contact interaction strength.

  8. Polarity, cell division, and out-of-equilibrium dynamics control the growth of epithelial structures

    PubMed Central

    Cerruti, Benedetta; Puliafito, Alberto; Shewan, Annette M.; Yu, Wei; Combes, Alexander N.; Little, Melissa H.; Chianale, Federica; Primo, Luca; Serini, Guido; Mostov, Keith E.; Celani, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The growth of a well-formed epithelial structure is governed by mechanical constraints, cellular apico-basal polarity, and spatially controlled cell division. Here we compared the predictions of a mathematical model of epithelial growth with the morphological analysis of 3D epithelial structures. In both in vitro cyst models and in developing epithelial structures in vivo, epithelial growth could take place close to or far from mechanical equilibrium, and was determined by the hierarchy of time-scales of cell division, cell–cell rearrangements, and lumen dynamics. Equilibrium properties could be inferred by the analysis of cell–cell contact topologies, and the nonequilibrium phenotype was altered by inhibiting ROCK activity. The occurrence of an aberrant multilumen phenotype was linked to fast nonequilibrium growth, even when geometric control of cell division was correctly enforced. We predicted and verified experimentally that slowing down cell division partially rescued a multilumen phenotype induced by altered polarity. These results improve our understanding of the development of epithelial organs and, ultimately, of carcinogenesis. PMID:24145168

  9. Non-equilibrium entropy and dynamics in a system with long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha Filho, T. M.

    2016-05-01

    We extend the core-halo approach of Levin et al (2014 Phys. Rep. 535, 1) for the violent relaxation of long-range interacting system with a waterbag initial condition, in the case of a widely studied Hamiltonian mean field model. The Gibbs entropy maximization principle is considered with the constraints of energy conservation and of coarse-grained Casimir invariants of the Vlasov equation. The core-halo distribution function depends only on the one-particle mean-field energy, as is expected from the Jeans theorem, and depends on a set of parameters which in our approach is completely determined without having to solve an envelope equation for the contour of the initial state, as required in the original approach. We also show that a different ansatz can be used for the core-halo distribution with similar results. This work also reveals a link between a parametric resonance causing the non-equilibrium phase transition in the model, a dynamical property, and a discontinuity of the (non-equilibrium) entropy of the system.

  10. An improved dynamic non-equilibrium wall-model for large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, George Ilhwan; Moin, Parviz

    2014-01-01

    A non-equilibrium wall-model based on unsteady 3D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations has been implemented in an unstructured mesh environment. The method is similar to that of the wall-model for structured mesh described by Wang and Moin [Phys. Fluids 14, 2043-2051 (2002)], but is supplemented by a new dynamic eddy viscosity/conductivity model that corrects the effect of the resolved Reynolds stress (resolved turbulent heat flux) on the skin friction (wall heat flux). This correction is crucial in predicting the correct level of the skin friction. Unlike earlier models, this eddy viscosity/conductivity model does not have a stress-matching procedure or a tunable free parameter, and it shows consistent performance over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The wall-model is validated against canonical (attached) transitional and fully turbulent flows at moderate to very high Reynolds numbers: a turbulent channel flow at Reτ = 2000, an H-type transitional boundary layer up to Reθ = 3300, and a high Reynolds number boundary layer at Reθ = 31 000. Application to a separated flow over a NACA4412 airfoil operating close to maximum lift is also considered to test the performance of the wall-model in complex non-equilibrium flows.

  11. Fiber Bragg grating dynamic demodulation based on non-equilibrium interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qi; Jing, Zhenguo; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Xinpu; Liu, Yun; Xing, Chuanqi; Li, Hong; Yao, Wenjuan

    2011-12-01

    Non-equilibrium interferometric Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor is suitable for the accurate measurements of high-frequency dynamic stress, vibration, etc because of its high sensitivity and high frequency response compared to other types of FBG sensors. In this paper, a Phase Generation Carrier (PGC) demodulation technique of non-equilibrium interferometric FBG sensor that based on ARCTAN algorithm by using an arctangent algorithm with a simple method, has been investigated ,which can avoid the high-frequency noise increases, the error accumulation, the integrator signal jump of the integrator and other inherent weaknesses in the system. ARCTAN has a better response characteristic of the mutant signals, especially for low-frequency large-signal that can be demodulated with a greater range. The experimental result demonstrate that implementing measured resolution can up to 10nɛ/√Hz@500Hz in vibration strain, a signal sampling rate to 100 KHz and a frequency response range up to 1 KHz. This method can improve the performance of the system greatly which has potential significance for practical sensor application.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation study of methanesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Canales, Manel; Alemán, Carlos

    2014-03-27

    A molecular dynamics simulation study of methanesulfonic acid has been carried out using a reliable force field in a large range of temperatures. Several thermodynamic, structural, and dynamical properties have been calculated and compared with the available experimental data. The density, the shear viscosity, the heat of vaporization, and the melting temperature results, calculated from this force field, are in a good agreement with the experimental data. Analysis of the influence of the hydrogen bonds in structural and dynamical properties has also been performed. The continuous and interrupted methodologies to compute hydrogen bonding lifetimes have been applied. The interrupted hydrogen bond lifetimes values are consistent with the diffusion and viscosity coefficients. The activation energies of the self-diffusion, the reorientational motions, and the hydrogen bonding lifetimes are coincident.

  13. Polymer Fluid Dynamics: Continuum and Molecular Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bird, R B; Giacomin, A J

    2016-06-01

    To solve problems in polymer fluid dynamics, one needs the equations of continuity, motion, and energy. The last two equations contain the stress tensor and the heat-flux vector for the material. There are two ways to formulate the stress tensor: (a) One can write a continuum expression for the stress tensor in terms of kinematic tensors, or (b) one can select a molecular model that represents the polymer molecule and then develop an expression for the stress tensor from kinetic theory. The advantage of the kinetic theory approach is that one gets information about the relation between the molecular structure of the polymers and the rheological properties. We restrict the discussion primarily to the simplest stress tensor expressions or constitutive equations containing from two to four adjustable parameters, although we do indicate how these formulations may be extended to give more complicated expressions. We also explore how these simplest expressions are recovered as special cases of a more general framework, the Oldroyd 8-constant model. Studying the simplest models allows us to discover which types of empiricisms or molecular models seem to be worth investigating further. We also explore equivalences between continuum and molecular approaches. We restrict the discussion to several types of simple flows, such as shearing flows and extensional flows, which are of greatest importance in industrial operations. Furthermore, if these simple flows cannot be well described by continuum or molecular models, then it is not necessary to lavish time and energy to apply them to more complex flow problems. PMID:27276553

  14. Application of optimal prediction to molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, IV, John Letherman

    2004-12-01

    Optimal prediction is a general system reduction technique for large sets of differential equations. In this method, which was devised by Chorin, Hald, Kast, Kupferman, and Levy, a projection operator formalism is used to construct a smaller system of equations governing the dynamics of a subset of the original degrees of freedom. This reduced system consists of an effective Hamiltonian dynamics, augmented by an integral memory term and a random noise term. Molecular dynamics is a method for simulating large systems of interacting fluid particles. In this thesis, I construct a formalism for applying optimal prediction to molecular dynamics, producing reduced systems from which the properties of the original system can be recovered. These reduced systems require significantly less computational time than the original system. I initially consider first-order optimal prediction, in which the memory and noise terms are neglected. I construct a pair approximation to the renormalized potential, and ignore three-particle and higher interactions. This produces a reduced system that correctly reproduces static properties of the original system, such as energy and pressure, at low-to-moderate densities. However, it fails to capture dynamical quantities, such as autocorrelation functions. I next derive a short-memory approximation, in which the memory term is represented as a linear frictional force with configuration-dependent coefficients. This allows the use of a Fokker-Planck equation to show that, in this regime, the noise is δ-correlated in time. This linear friction model reproduces not only the static properties of the original system, but also the autocorrelation functions of dynamical variables.

  15. Dynamic Implicit 3D Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Bobby; Wang, Zhen; Berrill, Mark A; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Manuel; Pernice, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multiphysics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multiphysics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent linear solver convergence.

  16. On the non-equilibrium dynamics of cavitation around the underwater projectile in variable motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Lu, C. J.; Li, J.; Chen, X.; Gong, Z. X.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the dynamic behavior of the non-equilibrium cavitation occurring around the underwater projectiles navigating with variable speed was numerically and theoretically investigated. The cavity collapse induced by the decelerating motion of the projectiles can be classified into two types: periodic oscillation and damped oscillation. In each type the evolution of the total mass of vapor in cavity are found to have strict correlation with the pressure oscillation in far field. By defining the equivalent radius of cavity, we introduce the specific kinetic energy of collapse and demonstrate that its change-rate is in good agreement with the pressure disturbance. We numerically investigated the influence of angle of attack on the collapse effect. The result shows that when the projectile decelerates, an asymmetric-focusing effect of the pressure induced by collapse occurs on its pressure side. We analytically explained such asymmetric-focusing effect.

  17. Gaussian-inspired auxiliary non-equilibrium thermostat (GIANT) for Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Safa; Boromand, Arman; Khani, Shaghayegh; Maia, Joao

    2015-12-01

    We present in this letter an auxiliary thermostat for non-equilibrium simulations in Dissipative Particle Dynamics based on the Gaussian distribution of particle velocities in the fluid. We demonstrate the ability of the thermostat to maintain the temperature under a wide range of shear rates and dissipative parameters, and to extend the shear rate window accessible by DPD significantly. The effect of proposed method on the viscosity of a DPD fluid is studied which is particularly of interest when the rheological behavior of a complex fluids is subject of DPD simulations. Furthermore, performance of the proposed method is compared to the ones from the well-known Lowe-Andersen scheme in regards to temperature and viscosity measurements.

  18. Stability of graphene edges under electron beam: equilibrium energetics versus dynamic effects.

    PubMed

    Kotakoski, Jani; Santos-Cottin, David; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V

    2012-01-24

    Electron beam of a transmission electron microscope can be used to alter the morphology of graphene nanoribbons and create atomically sharp edges required for applications of graphene in nanoelectronics. Using density-functional-theory-based simulations, we study the radiation hardness of graphene edges and show that the response of the ribbons to irradiation is not determined by the equilibrium energetics as assumed in previous experiments, but by kinetic effects associated with the dynamics of the edge atoms after impacts of energetic electrons. We report an unexpectedly high stability of armchair edges, comparable to that of pristine graphene, and demonstrate that the electron energy should be below ~50 keV to minimize the knock-on damage.

  19. Statistical enhancement of a dynamic equilibrium-based damage identification strategy: Theory and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Lu, Bo; Su, Zhongqing; Cheng, Li

    2015-09-01

    A previously developed damage identification strategy, named Pseudo-Excitation (PE), was enhanced using a statistical processing approach. In terms of the local dynamic equilibrium of the structural component under inspection, the distribution of its vibration displacements, which are of necessity to construct the damage index in the PE, was re-defined using sole dynamic strains based on the statistical method. On top of those advantages inheriting from the original PE compared with traditional vibration-based damage detection including the independence of baseline signals and pre-developed benchmark structures, the enhanced PE (EPE) possesses improved immunity to the interference of measurement noise. Moreover, the EPE can facilitate practical implementation of online structural health monitoring, benefiting from the use of sole strain information. Proof-of-concept numerical study was conducted to examine the feasibility and accuracy of the EPE, and the effectiveness of the proposed statistical enhancement in re-constructing the vibration displacements was evaluated under noise influence; experimental validation was followed up by characterizing multi-cracks in a beam-like structure, in which the dynamic strains were measured using Lead zirconium titanate (PZT) sensors. For comparison, the original PE, the Gapped Smoothing Method (GSM), and the EPE were respectively used to evaluate the cracks. It was observed from the damage identification results that both the GSM and EPE were able to achieve higher identification accuracy than the original PE, and the robustness of the EPE in damage identification was proven to be superior than that of the GSM.

  20. General methods for sensitivity analysis of equilibrium dynamics in patch occupancy models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.W.

    2012-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a useful tool for the study of ecological models that has many potential applications for patch occupancy modeling. Drawing from the rich foundation of existing methods for Markov chain models, I demonstrate new methods for sensitivity analysis of the equilibrium state dynamics of occupancy models. Estimates from three previous studies are used to illustrate the utility of the sensitivity calculations: a joint occupancy model for a prey species, its predators, and habitat used by both; occurrence dynamics from a well-known metapopulation study of three butterfly species; and Golden Eagle occupancy and reproductive dynamics. I show how to deal efficiently with multistate models and how to calculate sensitivities involving derived state variables and lower-level parameters. In addition, I extend methods to incorporate environmental variation by allowing for spatial and temporal variability in transition probabilities. The approach used here is concise and general and can fully account for environmental variability in transition parameters. The methods can be used to improve inferences in occupancy studies by quantifying the effects of underlying parameters, aiding prediction of future system states, and identifying priorities for sampling effort.

  1. Far-from-equilibrium magnetic granular layers: dynamic patterns, magnetic order and self-assembled swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snezhko, Alexey

    2010-03-01

    Ensembles of interacting particles subject to an external periodic forcing often develop nontrivial collective behavior and self-assembled dynamic patterns. We study emergent phenomena in magnetic granular ensembles suspended at a liquid-air and liquid-liquid interfaces and subjected to a transversal alternating magnetic field. Experiments reveal a new type of nontrivially ordered dynamic self-assembled structures (in particular, ``magnetic snakes'', ``asters'', ``clams'') emerging in such systems in a certain range of excitation parameters. These non-equilibrium dynamic structures emerge as a result of the competition between magnetic and hydrodynamic forces and have complex magnetic ordering. Transition between different self-assembled phases with parameters of external driving magnetic field is observed. I will show that above some frequency threshold magnetic snakes spontaneously break the symmetry of the self-induced surface flows (symmetry breaking instability) and turn into swimmers. Self-induced surface flows symmetry can be also broken in a controlled fashion by introduction of a large bead to a magnetic snake (bead-snake hybrid), that transforms it into a robust self-locomoting entity. Some features of the self-localized structures can be understood in the framework of an amplitude equation for parametric waves coupled to the conservation law equation describing the evolution of the magnetic particle density and the Navier-Stokes equation for hydrodynamic flows.

  2. General methods for sensitivity analysis of equilibrium dynamics in patch occupancy models.

    PubMed

    Miller, David A W

    2012-05-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a useful tool for the study of ecological models that has many potential applications for patch occupancy modeling. Drawing from the rich foundation of existing methods for Markov chain models, I demonstrate new methods for sensitivity analysis of the equilibrium state dynamics of occupancy models. Estimates from three previous studies are used to illustrate the utility of the sensitivity calculations: a joint occupancy model for a prey species, its predators, and habitat used by both; occurrence dynamics from a well-known metapopulation study of three butterfly species; and Golden Eagle occupancy and reproductive dynamics. I show how to deal efficiently with multistate models and how to calculate sensitivities involving derived state variables and lower-level parameters. In addition, I extend methods to incorporate environmental variation by allowing for spatial and temporal variability in transition probabilities. The approach used here is concise and general and can fully account for environmental variability in transition parameters. The methods can be used to improve inferences in occupancy studies by quantifying the effects of underlying parameters, aiding prediction of future system states, and identifying priorities for sampling effort. PMID:22764506

  3. Local Refinements in Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fackeldey, Konstantin; Weber, Marcus

    2014-03-01

    Quantum mechanics provide a detailed description of the physical and chemical behavior of molecules. However, with increasing size of the system the complexity rises exponentially, which is prohibitive for efficient dynamical simulation. In contrast, classical molecular dynamics procure a coarser description by using less degrees of freedom. Thus, it seems natural to seek for an adequate trade-off between accurateness and computational feasibility in the simulation of molecules. Here, we propose a novel method, which combines classical molecular simulations with quantum mechanics for molecular systems. For this we decompose the state space of the respective molecule into subsets, by employing a meshfree partition of unity. We show, that this partition allows us to localize an empirical force field and to run locally constrained classical trajectories. Within each subset, we compute the energy on the quantum level for a fixed number of spatial states (ab initio points). With these energy values from the ab initio points we have a local scattered data problem, which can be solved by the moving least squares method.

  4. Stochastic Event-Driven Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, Aleksandar Garcia, Alejandro L.; Alder, Berni J.

    2008-02-01

    A novel Stochastic Event-Driven Molecular Dynamics (SEDMD) algorithm is developed for the simulation of polymer chains suspended in a solvent. SEDMD combines event-driven molecular dynamics (EDMD) with the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The polymers are represented as chains of hard-spheres tethered by square wells and interact with the solvent particles with hard-core potentials. The algorithm uses EDMD for the simulation of the polymer chain and the interactions between the chain beads and the surrounding solvent particles. The interactions between the solvent particles themselves are not treated deterministically as in EDMD, rather, the momentum and energy exchange in the solvent is determined stochastically using DSMC. The coupling between the solvent and the solute is consistently represented at the particle level retaining hydrodynamic interactions and thermodynamic fluctuations. However, unlike full MD simulations of both the solvent and the solute, in SEDMD the spatial structure of the solvent is ignored. The SEDMD algorithm is described in detail and applied to the study of the dynamics of a polymer chain tethered to a hard-wall subjected to uniform shear. SEDMD closely reproduces results obtained using traditional EDMD simulations with two orders of magnitude greater efficiency. Results question the existence of periodic (cycling) motion of the polymer chain.

  5. Non-linear quantum-classical scheme to simulate non-equilibrium strongly correlated fermionic many-body dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kreula, J M; Clark, S R; Jaksch, D

    2016-01-01

    We propose a non-linear, hybrid quantum-classical scheme for simulating non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly correlated fermions described by the Hubbard model in a Bethe lattice in the thermodynamic limit. Our scheme implements non-equilibrium dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) and uses a digital quantum simulator to solve a quantum impurity problem whose parameters are iterated to self-consistency via a classically computed feedback loop where quantum gate errors can be partly accounted for. We analyse the performance of the scheme in an example case.

  6. Non-linear quantum-classical scheme to simulate non-equilibrium strongly correlated fermionic many-body dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kreula, J. M.; Clark, S. R.; Jaksch, D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a non-linear, hybrid quantum-classical scheme for simulating non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly correlated fermions described by the Hubbard model in a Bethe lattice in the thermodynamic limit. Our scheme implements non-equilibrium dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) and uses a digital quantum simulator to solve a quantum impurity problem whose parameters are iterated to self-consistency via a classically computed feedback loop where quantum gate errors can be partly accounted for. We analyse the performance of the scheme in an example case. PMID:27609673

  7. Non-linear quantum-classical scheme to simulate non-equilibrium strongly correlated fermionic many-body dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kreula, J M; Clark, S R; Jaksch, D

    2016-01-01

    We propose a non-linear, hybrid quantum-classical scheme for simulating non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly correlated fermions described by the Hubbard model in a Bethe lattice in the thermodynamic limit. Our scheme implements non-equilibrium dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) and uses a digital quantum simulator to solve a quantum impurity problem whose parameters are iterated to self-consistency via a classically computed feedback loop where quantum gate errors can be partly accounted for. We analyse the performance of the scheme in an example case. PMID:27609673

  8. Non-linear quantum-classical scheme to simulate non-equilibrium strongly correlated fermionic many-body dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreula, J. M.; Clark, S. R.; Jaksch, D.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a non-linear, hybrid quantum-classical scheme for simulating non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly correlated fermions described by the Hubbard model in a Bethe lattice in the thermodynamic limit. Our scheme implements non-equilibrium dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) and uses a digital quantum simulator to solve a quantum impurity problem whose parameters are iterated to self-consistency via a classically computed feedback loop where quantum gate errors can be partly accounted for. We analyse the performance of the scheme in an example case.

  9. The accuracy of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo simulations in the determination of molecular equilibrium structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shih-I.

    2004-12-01

    For a test set of 17 first-row small molecules, the equilibrium structures are calculated with Ornstein-Uhlenbeck diffusion quantum Monte Carlo simulations guiding by trial wave functions constructed from floating spherical Gaussian orbitals and spherical Gaussian geminals. To measure performance of the Monte Carlo calculations, the mean deviation, the mean absolute deviation, the maximum absolute deviation, and the standard deviation of Monte Carlo calculated equilibrium structures with respect to empirical equilibrium structures are given. This approach is found to yield results having a uniformly high quality, being consistent with empirical equilibrium structures and surpassing calculated values from the coupled cluster model with single, double, and noniterative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] with the basis sets of cc-pCVQZ and cc-pVQZ. The nonrelativistic equilibrium atomization energies are also presented to assess performance of the calculated methods. The mean absolute deviations regarding experimental atomization energy are 0.16 and 0.21 kcal/mol for the Monte Carlo and CCSD(T)/cc-pCV(56)Z calculations, respectively.

  10. Molecular Dynamics: New Frontier in Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sneha, P; Doss, C George Priya

    2016-01-01

    The field of drug discovery has witnessed infinite development over the last decade with the demand for discovery of novel efficient lead compounds. Although the development of novel compounds in this field has seen large failure, a breakthrough in this area might be the establishment of personalized medicine. The trend of personalized medicine has shown stupendous growth being a hot topic after the successful completion of Human Genome Project and 1000 genomes pilot project. Genomic variant such as SNPs play a vital role with respect to inter individual's disease susceptibility and drug response. Hence, identification of such genetic variants has to be performed before administration of a drug. This process requires high-end techniques to understand the complexity of the molecules which might bring an insight to understand the compounds at their molecular level. To sustenance this, field of bioinformatics plays a crucial role in revealing the molecular mechanism of the mutation and thereby designing a drug for an individual in fast and affordable manner. High-end computational methods, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has proved to be a constitutive approach to detecting the minor changes associated with an SNP for better understanding of the structural and functional relationship. The parameters used in molecular dynamic simulation elucidate different properties of a macromolecule, such as protein stability and flexibility. MD along with docking analysis can reveal the synergetic effect of an SNP in protein-ligand interaction and provides a foundation for designing a particular drug molecule for an individual. This compelling application of computational power and the advent of other technologies have paved a promising way toward personalized medicine. In this in-depth review, we tried to highlight the different wings of MD toward personalized medicine. PMID:26827606

  11. Molecular Dynamics: New Frontier in Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sneha, P; Doss, C George Priya

    2016-01-01

    The field of drug discovery has witnessed infinite development over the last decade with the demand for discovery of novel efficient lead compounds. Although the development of novel compounds in this field has seen large failure, a breakthrough in this area might be the establishment of personalized medicine. The trend of personalized medicine has shown stupendous growth being a hot topic after the successful completion of Human Genome Project and 1000 genomes pilot project. Genomic variant such as SNPs play a vital role with respect to inter individual's disease susceptibility and drug response. Hence, identification of such genetic variants has to be performed before administration of a drug. This process requires high-end techniques to understand the complexity of the molecules which might bring an insight to understand the compounds at their molecular level. To sustenance this, field of bioinformatics plays a crucial role in revealing the molecular mechanism of the mutation and thereby designing a drug for an individual in fast and affordable manner. High-end computational methods, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has proved to be a constitutive approach to detecting the minor changes associated with an SNP for better understanding of the structural and functional relationship. The parameters used in molecular dynamic simulation elucidate different properties of a macromolecule, such as protein stability and flexibility. MD along with docking analysis can reveal the synergetic effect of an SNP in protein-ligand interaction and provides a foundation for designing a particular drug molecule for an individual. This compelling application of computational power and the advent of other technologies have paved a promising way toward personalized medicine. In this in-depth review, we tried to highlight the different wings of MD toward personalized medicine.

  12. Hyperdynamics: Accelerated Molecular Dynamics of Infrequent Events

    SciTech Connect

    Voter, A.F.

    1997-05-01

    I derive a general method for accelerating the molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation of infrequent events in solids. A bias potential ({Delta}V{sub b}) raises the energy in regions other than the transition states between potential basins. Transitions occur at an accelerated rate and the elapsed time becomes a statistical property of the system. {Delta}V{sub b} can be constructed without knowing the location of the transition states and implementation requires only first derivatives. I examine the diffusion mechanisms of a 10-atom Ag cluster on the Ag(111) surface using a 220 {mu}s hyper-MD simulation. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. [Oligoglycine surface structures: molecular dynamics simulation].

    PubMed

    Gus'kova, O A; Khalatur, P G; Khokhlov, A R; Chinarev, A A; Tsygankova, S V; Bovin, N V

    2010-01-01

    The full-atomic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of adsorption mode for diantennary oligoglycines [H-Gly4-NH(CH2)5]2 onto graphite and mica surface is described. The resulting structure of adsorption layers is analyzed. The peptide second structure motives have been studied by both STRIDE (structural identification) and DSSP (dictionary of secondary structure of proteins) methods. The obtained results confirm the possibility of polyglycine II (PGII) structure formation in diantennary oligoglycine (DAOG) monolayers deposited onto graphite surface, which was earlier estimated based on atomic-force microscopy measurements.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of ice XII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzsák, István; Cummings, Peter T.

    1999-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on the newly discovered metastable ice XII. This new crystalline ice phase [C. Lobban, J.L. Finney, W.F. Kuhs, Nature (London) 391 (1998) 268] is proton-disordered. Thus 90 possible configurations of the unit cell can be constructed which differ only in the orientations of the water molecules. The simulation used the TIP4P potential model for water at constant temperature and density. About one-quarter of the initial configurations did not melt in the course of the simulation. This result is supportive of the experimental structure and also demonstrates the ability of this water model to study ice phases.

  15. Crystallization of nickel nanoclusters by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamati, H.; Gaminchev, K.

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the melting properties of bulk nickel and the crystallization of nickel nanocrystals via molecular dynamics using a potential in the framework of the second moment approximation of tight-binding theory. The melting behavior was simulated with the hysteresis approach by subsequently heating and cooling gradually the system over a wide range of temperatures. The crystallization of nickel nanoclusters consisting of 55, 147 and 309 atoms was achieved after repeatedly annealing and quenching the corresponding quasicrystals several times to avoid being trapped in a local energy minimum. The time over which the global minimum was reached was found to increase with the cluster size.

  16. Evaporation characteristics of thin film liquid argon in nano-scale confinement: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mohammad Nasim; Shavik, Sheikh Mohammad; Rabbi, Kazi Fazle; Haque, Mominul

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to explore the evaporation characteristics of thin liquid argon film in nano-scale confinement. The present study has been conducted to realize the nano-scale physics of simultaneous evaporation and condensation inside a confined space for a three phase system with particular emphasis on the effect of surface wetting conditions. The simulation domain consisted of two parallel platinum plates; one at the top and another at the bottom. The fluid comprised of liquid argon film at the bottom plate and vapor argon in between liquid argon and upper plate of the domain. Considering hydrophilic and hydrophobic nature of top and bottom surfaces, two different cases have been investigated: (i) Case A: Both top and bottom surfaces are hydrophilic, (ii) Case B: both top and bottom surfaces are hydrophobic. For all cases, equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) was performed to reach equilibrium state at 90 K. Then the lower wall was set to four different temperatures such as 110 K, 120 K, 130 K and 140 K to perform non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). The variation of temperature and density as well as the variation of system pressure with respect to time were closely monitored for each case. The heat fluxes normal to top and bottom walls were estimated and discussed to illuminate the effectiveness of heat transfer in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic confinement at various boundary temperatures of the bottom plate.

  17. Saltmarsh pool and tidal creek morphodynamics: Dynamic equilibrium of northern latitude saltmarshes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Carol A.; Hughes, Zoe J.; FitzGerald, Duncan M.; Hopkinson, Charles S.; Valentine, Vinton; Kolker, Alexander S.

    2014-05-01

    Many saltmarsh platforms in New England and other northern climates (e.g. Canada, northern Europe) exhibit poor drainage, creating waterlogged regions where short-form Spartina alterniflora dominates and stagnant pools that experience tidal exchange only during spring tides and storm-induced flooding events. The processes related to pool formation and tidal creek incision (via headward erosion) that may eventually drain these features are poorly understood, however it has been suggested that an increase in pool occurrence in recent decades is due to waterlogging stress from sea-level rise. We present evidence here that saltmarshes in Plum Island Estuary of Massachusetts are keeping pace with sea-level rise, and that the recent increase in saltmarsh pool area coincides with changes in drainage density from a legacy of anthropogenic ditching (reversion to natural drainage conditions). Gradients, in addition to elevation and hydroperiod, are critical for saltmarsh pool formation. Additionally, elevation and vegetative changes associated with pool formation, creek incision, subsequent drainage of pools, and recolonization by S. alterniflora are quantified. Pool and creek dynamics were found to be cyclic in nature, and represent platform elevation in dynamic equilibrium with sea level whereby saltmarsh elevation may be lowered (due to degradation of organic matter and formation of a pool), however may be regained on short timescales (101-2 yr) with creek incision into pools and restoration of tidal exchange. Rapid vertical accretion is associated with sedimentation and S. alterniflora plant recolonization.

  18. Dynamics to equilibrium in network games: individual behavior and global response.

    PubMed

    Cimini, Giulio; Castellano, Claudio; Sánchez, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Various social contexts can be depicted as games of strategic interactions on networks, where an individual's welfare depends on both her and her partners' actions. Whereas much attention has been devoted to Bayes-Nash equilibria in such games, here we look at strategic interactions from an evolutionary perspective. To this end, we present the results of a numerical simulations program for these games, which allows us to find out whether Nash equilibria are accessible by adaptation of player strategies, and in general to identify the attractors of the evolution. Simulations allow us to go beyond a global characterization of the cooperativeness at equilibrium and probe into individual behavior. We find that when players imitate each other, evolution does not reach Nash equilibria and, worse, leads to very unfavorable states in terms of welfare. On the contrary, when players update their behavior rationally, they self-organize into a rich variety of Nash equilibria, where individual behavior and payoffs are shaped by the nature of the game, the social network's structure and the players' position within the network. Our results allow to assess the validity of mean-field approaches we use to describe the dynamics of these games. Interestingly, our dynamically-found equilibria generally do not coincide with (but show qualitatively the same features of) those resulting from theoretical predictions in the context of one-shot games under incomplete information. PMID:25803275

  19. Local equilibrium solutions in simple anisotropic cosmological models, as described by relativistic fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shogin, Dmitry; Amund Amundsen, Per

    2016-10-01

    We test the physical relevance of the full and the truncated versions of the Israel–Stewart (IS) theory of irreversible thermodynamics in a cosmological setting. Using a dynamical systems method, we determine the asymptotic future of plane symmetric Bianchi type I spacetimes with a viscous mathematical fluid, keeping track of the magnitude of the relative dissipative fluxes, which determines the applicability of the IS theory. We consider the situations where the dissipative mechanisms of shear and bulk viscosity are involved separately and simultaneously. It is demonstrated that the only case in the given model when the fluid asymptotically approaches local thermal equilibrium, and the underlying assumptions of the IS theory are therefore not violated, is that of a dissipative fluid with vanishing bulk viscosity. The truncated IS equations for shear viscosity are found to produce solutions which manifest pathological dynamical features and, in addition, to be strongly sensitive to the choice of initial conditions. Since these features are observed already in the case of an oversimplified mathematical fluid model, we have no reason to assume that the truncation of the IS transport equations will produce relevant results for physically more realistic fluids. The possible role of bulk and shear viscosity in cosmological evolution is also discussed.

  20. Non-equilibrium dynamics around integrability in a one-dimensional two-component Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Druten, Nicolaas; Wicke, Philipp; Whitlock, Shannon

    2011-05-01

    We investigate a one-dimensional two-component Bose gas near the point of state-independent interactions. At this specific point the system is integrable, in the sense that exact (thermodynamic) Bethe Ansatz solutions can be applied locally. In the experiments, we employ an atom chip and the magnetically trappable clock states in 87Rb. State-dependent potentials are generated by using the polarization dependence of radio-frequency dressing. We show that this allows us to continuously and dynamically tune both the local interactions and the global trapping potential. The experimentally accessible range in interactions includes the region around the integrability point. We study the spin motion that follows upon a sudden change in the system, a quantum quench. When starting from a low-temperature, quantum-degenerate gas in the weakly interacting regime, good agreement with a Gross-Pitaevskii description is found. The experiment allows exploring regimes that go beyond such a description and opens up a novel route to the study of the relation between non-equilibrium dynamics, thermalization and the making and breaking of integrability in quantum many-body physics. Supported by FOM, NWO and EU

  1. Dynamics to equilibrium in network games: individual behavior and global response.

    PubMed

    Cimini, Giulio; Castellano, Claudio; Sánchez, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Various social contexts can be depicted as games of strategic interactions on networks, where an individual's welfare depends on both her and her partners' actions. Whereas much attention has been devoted to Bayes-Nash equilibria in such games, here we look at strategic interactions from an evolutionary perspective. To this end, we present the results of a numerical simulations program for these games, which allows us to find out whether Nash equilibria are accessible by adaptation of player strategies, and in general to identify the attractors of the evolution. Simulations allow us to go beyond a global characterization of the cooperativeness at equilibrium and probe into individual behavior. We find that when players imitate each other, evolution does not reach Nash equilibria and, worse, leads to very unfavorable states in terms of welfare. On the contrary, when players update their behavior rationally, they self-organize into a rich variety of Nash equilibria, where individual behavior and payoffs are shaped by the nature of the game, the social network's structure and the players' position within the network. Our results allow to assess the validity of mean-field approaches we use to describe the dynamics of these games. Interestingly, our dynamically-found equilibria generally do not coincide with (but show qualitatively the same features of) those resulting from theoretical predictions in the context of one-shot games under incomplete information.

  2. The deceiving Δ′: On the equilibrium dependent dynamics of nonlinear magnetic islands

    SciTech Connect

    Militello, F.; Grasso, D.; Borgogno, D.

    2014-10-15

    The linear stability parameter Δ′ is commonly used as a figure of merit for the nonlinear dynamics of the tearing mode. It is shown, through numerical simulations, that factors other than Δ′ can play a very important role in determining the evolution of nonlinear magnetic islands, even relatively close to marginal stability. In particular, two different equilibria are analysed and it is shown that, once perturbed, they have a qualitatively and quantitatively different response despite the fact that they are characterised by the same Δ′. However, the different behaviour can still be associated with linear properties of the equilibrium. It is also studied how the nonlinear and saturation phase are affected by an increasing Δ′ in the two equilibria. As the instability drive is increased, the systems move from a dynamics characterised by a “universal” generalised Rutherford equation to a Y-point configuration and then to a plasmoid unstable Y-point. Remarkably, in certain configurations the Rutherford phase is absent and the system forms a current ribbon without an X-point collapse.

  3. Eisosomes Are Dynamic Plasma Membrane Domains Showing Pil1-Lsp1 Heteroligomer Binding Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Olivera-Couto, Agustina; Salzman, Valentina; Mailhos, Milagros; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Aguilar, Pablo S.

    2015-01-01

    Eisosomes are plasma membrane domains concentrating lipids, transporters, and signaling molecules. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, these domains are structured by scaffolds composed mainly by two cytoplasmic proteins Pil1 and Lsp1. Eisosomes are immobile domains, have relatively uniform size, and encompass thousands of units of the core proteins Pil1 and Lsp1. In this work we used fluorescence fluctuation analytical methods to determine the dynamics of eisosome core proteins at different subcellular locations. Using a combination of scanning techniques with autocorrelation analysis, we show that Pil1 and Lsp1 cytoplasmic pools freely diffuse whereas an eisosome-associated fraction of these proteins exhibits slow dynamics that fit with a binding-unbinding equilibrium. Number and brightness analysis shows that the eisosome-associated fraction is oligomeric, while cytoplasmic pools have lower aggregation states. Fluorescence lifetime imaging results indicate that Pil1 and Lsp1 directly interact in the cytoplasm and within the eisosomes. These results support a model where Pil1-Lsp1 heterodimers are the minimal eisosomes building blocks. Moreover, individual-eisosome fluorescence fluctuation analysis shows that eisosomes in the same cell are not equal domains: while roughly half of them are mostly static, the other half is actively exchanging core protein subunits. PMID:25863055

  4. Dynamics to Equilibrium in Network Games: Individual Behavior and Global Response

    PubMed Central

    Cimini, Giulio; Castellano, Claudio; Sánchez, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Various social contexts can be depicted as games of strategic interactions on networks, where an individual’s welfare depends on both her and her partners’ actions. Whereas much attention has been devoted to Bayes-Nash equilibria in such games, here we look at strategic interactions from an evolutionary perspective. To this end, we present the results of a numerical simulations program for these games, which allows us to find out whether Nash equilibria are accessible by adaptation of player strategies, and in general to identify the attractors of the evolution. Simulations allow us to go beyond a global characterization of the cooperativeness at equilibrium and probe into individual behavior. We find that when players imitate each other, evolution does not reach Nash equilibria and, worse, leads to very unfavorable states in terms of welfare. On the contrary, when players update their behavior rationally, they self-organize into a rich variety of Nash equilibria, where individual behavior and payoffs are shaped by the nature of the game, the social network’s structure and the players’ position within the network. Our results allow to assess the validity of mean-field approaches we use to describe the dynamics of these games. Interestingly, our dynamically-found equilibria generally do not coincide with (but show qualitatively the same features of) those resulting from theoretical predictions in the context of one-shot games under incomplete information. PMID:25803275

  5. Topics in Non-Equilibrium Dynamics and the Emergence of Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Dalit

    The Anti-de Sitter / Conformal Field Theory (AdS/CFT) correspondence that arises in string theory has had implications for the study of phenomena across a range of subfields in physics, from spacetime geometry to the behavior of condensed matter systems. Two major themes that have featured prominently in these investigations have been the behavior of systems out of equilibrium, and the emergence of spacetime. In this thesis, aspects of these themes are considered and analyzed. The question of equilibration and thermalization in 2D conformal field theories is addressed and refined via a number of observations about local versus global thermalization in such systems, the validity of particular diagnostics of thermalization, the dependence of the equilibration behavior of a conformal field theory on its operator spectrum, and the holographic dual of the generalized Gibbs ensemble that is of interest in studies of equilibration in systems with a large number of conserved quantities. A formalism for analyzing the non-equilibrium dynamics of 1+1-dimensional conformal field theories is discussed, and its physical relevance is motivated with an example connecting such a system to an experimental system that exhibited unusual equilibration behavior. Qualitative agreement is demonstrated between the CFT picture and the experimental observations. The emergence of spacetime geometry from quantum entanglement, while largely a byproduct of considerations from holographic dualities, has also been proposed to have a direct, non-holographic manifestation. Here a particular realization of such a direct emergence is presented through a demonstration that, in the presence of quantum entanglement alone, certain observations of electric fields in the entangled system appear qualitatively the same as the corresponding observations in a physically-connected geometric spacetime, so that the entanglement effectively mimics particular features associated with geometric connectivity.

  6. Equilibrium and Dynamical Characteristics of Imidazole Langmuir Monolayers on Graphite Sheets.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Javier; Elola, M Dolores; Laria, D

    2015-07-23

    Using molecular dynamics techniques, we examine structural and dynamical characteristics of liquid-like imidazole (Im) monolayers physisorbed onto a planar graphite sheet, at T = 384 K. Our simulations reveal that molecular orientations in the saturated monolayer exhibit a bistable distribution, characterized by an inner parallel arrangement of the molecules in close contact with the substrate and a slanted alignment, in those lying in adjacent, outer locations. Compared to the results found in three-dimensional, bulk phases, the analysis of the spatial correlations between sites participating in hydrogen bonding shows a clear enhancement of the intermolecular interactions, which also leads to stronger dipolar correlations. As a result, the gross structural features of the monolayer can be cast in terms of mesoscopic domains, comprising units articulated via winding hydrogen bonds, that persist along typical time intervals of a few tens of picoseconds. On the dynamical side, a similar comparison of the characteristic decorrelation time for orientational motions shows a 4-fold increment. Contrasting, the reduction of the system dimensionality leads to a larger diffusion constant. Possible substrate-induced anisotropies in the diffusive motions are also investigated.

  7. Hybrid molecular-continuum simulations using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott

    2015-01-01

    We present a new multiscale simulation methodology for coupling a region with atomistic detail simulated via molecular dynamics (MD) to a numerical solution of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations obtained from smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD). In this approach, chemical potential gradients emerge due to differences in resolution within the total system and are reduced by introducing a pairwise thermodynamic force inside the buffer region between the two domains where particles change from MD to SDPD types. When combined with a multi-resolution SDPD approach, such as the one proposed by Kulkarni et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234105 (2013)], this method makes it possible to systematically couple atomistic models to arbitrarily coarse continuum domains modeled as SDPD fluids with varying resolution. We test this technique by showing that it correctly reproduces thermodynamic properties across the entire simulation domain for a simple Lennard-Jones fluid. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach is also suitable for non-equilibrium problems by applying it to simulations of the start up of shear flow. The robustness of the method is illustrated with two different flow scenarios in which shear forces act in directions parallel and perpendicular to the interface separating the continuum and atomistic domains. In both cases, we obtain the correct transient velocity profile. We also perform a triple-scale shear flow simulation where we include two SDPD regions with different resolutions in addition to a MD domain, illustrating the feasibility of a three-scale coupling.

  8. Hybrid molecular-continuum simulations using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott

    2015-01-28

    We present a new multiscale simulation methodology for coupling a region with atomistic detail simulated via molecular dynamics (MD) to a numerical solution of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations obtained from smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD). In this approach, chemical potential gradients emerge due to differences in resolution within the total system and are reduced by introducing a pairwise thermodynamic force inside the buffer region between the two domains where particles change from MD to SDPD types. When combined with a multi-resolution SDPD approach, such as the one proposed by Kulkarni et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234105 (2013)], this method makes it possible to systematically couple atomistic models to arbitrarily coarse continuum domains modeled as SDPD fluids with varying resolution. We test this technique by showing that it correctly reproduces thermodynamic properties across the entire simulation domain for a simple Lennard-Jones fluid. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach is also suitable for non-equilibrium problems by applying it to simulations of the start up of shear flow. The robustness of the method is illustrated with two different flow scenarios in which shear forces act in directions parallel and perpendicular to the interface separating the continuum and atomistic domains. In both cases, we obtain the correct transient velocity profile. We also perform a triple-scale shear flow simulation where we include two SDPD regions with different resolutions in addition to a MD domain, illustrating the feasibility of a three-scale coupling.

  9. Violation of fluctuation-dissipation theorem in the off-equilibrium dynamics of a system with non additive interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, O. A.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.; Nieto, F.; Roma, F.

    2011-03-24

    In this work we study the critical equilibrium properties and the off-equilibrium dynamics of an Ising system with non additive interactions. The traditional assumption of additivity is modified for one more general, where the energy of exchange J between two spins depends on their neighbourhood. First, for several non additive situations, we calculated the critical temperature T{sub c} by using paralell tempering Monte Carlo in the canonical assemble and standard finite-size scaling techniques. Then, we carry out a quench from infinite temperature to a low temperature below T{sub c}(off-equilibrium dynamics protocol) and we compute two-time correlation and response functions. We find a violation of fluctuation-dissipation theorem like coarsening systems. All this was done for several waiting time and several non additive situations. Finally, we analyze the scaling of correlation and response functions for a critical quench from infinite temperature.

  10. Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, N. J.; Hoyle, R. B.

    2012-08-01

    Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman ["A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions," J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378 (1956)], 10.1021/j150544a010 on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods.

  11. MDLab: a molecular dynamics simulation prototyping environment.

    PubMed

    Cickovski, Trevor; Chatterjee, Santanu; Wenger, Jacob; Sweet, Christopher R; Izaguirre, Jesús A

    2010-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation involves solving Newton's equations of motion for a system of atoms, by calculating forces and updating atomic positions and velocities over a timestep Deltat. Despite the large amount of computing power currently available, the timescale of MD simulations is limited by both the small timestep required for propagation, and the expensive algorithm for computing pairwise forces. These issues are currently addressed through the development of efficient simulation methods, some of which make acceptable approximations and as a result can afford larger timesteps. We present MDLab, a development environment for MD simulations built with Python which facilitates prototyping, testing, and debugging of these methods. MDLab provides constructs which allow the development of propagators, force calculators, and high level sampling protocols that run several instances of molecular dynamics. For computationally demanding sampling protocols which require testing on large biomolecules, MDL includes an interface to the OpenMM libraries of Friedrichs et al. which execute on graphical processing units (GPUs) and achieve considerable speedup over execution on the CPU. As an example of an interesting high level method developed in MDLab, we present a parallel implementation of the On-The-Fly string method of Maragliano and Vanden-Eijnden. MDLab is available at http://mdlab.sourceforge.net.

  12. Molecular dynamics of the excitatory synapse.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Shigeo

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics of synapses are one of the most important factors that control the remodeling of synaptic connection and efficacy of transmission. This chapter focuses on the dynamics of postsynaptic molecular machinery and describes the imaging technologies important for quantitative analyses of synapses, their application to the postsynaptic molecules, and the insights obtained from these analyses. New visualization techniques, such as super-resolution microscopy, will become an indispensable approach to reveal submicron changes of synaptic molecules. New methods of monitoring protein interactions will also be integrated with experimental paradigms of synaptic plasticity. Cell biological analyses, together with cutting-edge imaging technologies, have been applied to the studies of nascent synapse formation, synapse maintenance, and activity-dependent synapse remodeling. From these studies, a variety of new concepts emerged, such as local assembly of postsynaptic scaffolds, presence of "transport packets" of postsynaptic receptors, heterogeneity of actin movement within spines, and activity-free fluctuation of PSD/spine sizes. These new concepts are useful in understanding specific properties of postsynaptic functions and should be integrated in future to build a realistic model of the postsynaptic organization that can explain its remarkable stability and tunability. PMID:22351054

  13. Structure and Dynamics of Cellulose Molecular Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Howard; Zhang, Xin; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mao, Yimin; Briber, Robert

    Molecular dissolution of microcrystalline cellulose has been achieved through mixing with ionic liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc), and organic solvent dimethylformamide (DMF). The mechanism of cellulose dissolution in tertiary mixtures has been investigated by combining quasielastic and small angle neutron scattering (QENS and SANS). As SANS data show that cellulose chains take Gaussian-like conformations in homogenous solutions, which exhibit characteristics of having an upper critical solution temperature, the dynamic signals predominantly from EMIMAc molecules indicate strong association with cellulose in the dissolution state. The mean square displacement quantities support the observation of the stoichiometric 3:1 EMIMAc to cellulose unit molar ratio, which is a necessary criterion for the molecular dissolution of cellulose. Analyses of dynamics structure factors reveal the temperature dependence of a slow and a fast process for EMIMAc's bound to cellulose and in DMF, respectively, as well as a very fast process due possibly to the rotational motion of methyl groups, which persisted to near the absolute zero.

  14. Marsh Pool and Tidal Creek Morphodynamics: Dynamic Equilibrium of New England Saltmarshes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C.; FitzGerald, D. M.; Hughes, Z. J.

    2012-12-01

    Under natural conditions, high saltmarsh platforms in New England exhibit poor drainage, creating waterlogged pannes (where short-form Spartina alterniflora dominates) and stagnant pools that experience tidal exchange only during spring tides and storm-induced flooding events. It is well accepted that a legacy of ditching practices (either for agriculture or mosquito control purposes) provide "overdrainage" of saltmarshes (after Redfield, 1972) and a shift in biogeochemical conditions: lowering of groundwater tables, aeration of soil, and decrease in preserved belowground biomass. Analysis of historical imagery in the Plum Island Estuary of Massachusetts reveals closure and decrease in length of anthropogenic ditches in recent decades is closely linked to marsh pool evolution. Field analyses including stratigraphic transects and elevation surveys suggest these marshes are reverting to natural drainage conditions. Further, an important dynamic interaction exists between saltmarsh pools and natural tidal creeks: creeks incise into pool areas, causing drainage of the pools, and formation of an unvegetated mudflat which can be rapidly recolonized by halophytic Spartina alterniflora vegetation. It was determined that pool and creek dynamics are cyclic in nature. The marsh platform is in dynamic equilibrium with respect to elevation and sea-level whereby marsh elevation may be lost (due to degradation of organic matter and formation of a pool) however may be regained (by creek incision into pools, restoration of tidal exchange, and rapid vertical accretion with Spartina alterniflora recolonization. Since vertical accretion in saltmarshes is a function of both organic and inorganic contributions to the marsh subsurface, it is hypothesized that cannibalization of existing muds is supplying inorganic material in this sediment starved system.

  15. Implementation of Green's function molecular dynamics: An extension to LAMMPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ling Ti; Bartels, Guido; Campañá, Carlos; Denniston, Colin; Müser, Martin H.

    2009-06-01

    reducing the problem from three dimensions to two dimensions without compromising the physical essence of the problem. Solution method: See "Nature of problem". Restrictions: The mean equilibrium positions of the GFMD surface atoms must be in a plane and be periodic in the plane, so that the Born-von Karman boundary condition can be used. In addition, only deformation within the harmonic regime is expected in the surface layer during Green's function molecular dynamics. Running time: FixGFC varies from minutes to days, depending on the system size, the numbers of processors used, and the complexity of the force field. FixGFMD varies from seconds to days depending on the system size and numbers of processors used. References: [1] C. Campañá, M.H. Müser, Phys. Rev. B 74 (2006) 075420.

  16. Dynamic transitions in molecular dynamics simulations of supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xiaojun; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Two dynamic transitions or crossovers, one at a low temperature (T* ≈ 1006 K) and the other at a high temperature (T0 ≈ 1384 K), are shown to emerge in supercooled liquid silicon using molecular dynamics simulations. The high-temperature transition (T0) marks the decoupling of stress, density, and energy relaxation mechanisms. At the low-temperature transition (T*), depending on the cooling rate, supercooled silicon can either undergo a high-density-liquid to low-density-liquid (HDL-LDL) phase transition or experience an HDL-HDL crossover. Dynamically heterogeneous domains that emerge with supercooling become prominent across the HDL-HDL transition at 1006 K, with well-separated mobile and immobile regions. Interestingly, across the HDL-LDL transition, the most mobile atoms form large prominent aggregates while the least mobile atoms get spatially dispersed akin to that in a crystalline state. The attendant partial return to spatial uniformity with the HDL-LDL phase transition indicates a dynamic mechanism for relieving the frustration in supercooled states.

  17. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2011-07-11

    The Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference focuses on all aspects of molecular collisions--experimental & theoretical studies of elastic, inelastic, & reactive encounters involving atoms, molecules, ions, clusters, & surfaces--as well as half collisions--photodissociation, photo-induced reaction, & photodesorption. The scientific program for the meeting in 2011 included exciting advances in both the core & multidisciplinary forefronts of the study of molecular collision processes. Following the format of the 2009 meeting, we also invited sessions in special topics that involve interfacial dynamics, novel emerging spectroscopies, chemical dynamics in atmospheric, combustion & interstellar environments, as well as a session devoted to theoretical & experimental advances in ultracold molecular samples. Researchers working inside & outside the traditional core topics of the meeting are encouraged to join the conference. We invite contributions of work that seeks understanding of how inter & intra-molecular forces determine the dynamics of the phenomena under study. In addition to invited oral sessions & contributed poster sessions, the scientific program included a formal session consisting of five contributed talks selected from the submitted poster abstracts. The DMC has distinguished itself by having the Herschbach Medal Symposium as part of the meeting format. This tradition of the Herschbach Medal was first started in the 2007 meeting chaired by David Chandler, based on a generous donation of funds & artwork design by Professor Dudley Herschbach himself. There are two such awards made, one for experimental & one for theoretical contributions to the field of Molecular Collision Dynamics, broadly defined. The symposium is always held on the last night of the meeting & has the awardees are asked to deliver an invited lecture on their work. The 2011 Herschbach Medal was dedicated to the contributions of two long standing leaders in Chemical Physics, Professor

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of wear processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hualiang

    Wear has been recognized as a vital problem in many industries. It results in a loss of durability, reliability, and efficiency and costs tens of billions of dollars annually. Significant effort has been devoted in both experimental and theoretical studies. However, the mechanisms of wear are still poorly understood and therefore wear control is far behind its demand. One way to study wear process is via computer simulation, which has become more powerful with the rapid development in computer facilities and efficient algorithms. It allows observation of atomic scale deformation and therefore it is a very good tool to study wear mechanisms at the nano-scale. This study presents a series of molecular dynamic simulation of some nano-scale wear processes, such as indentation and plowing, with the goal of exploring the factors that affect wear and predicting wear for different conditions. Molecular Dynamics simulations were carried out on a system that includes an aluminum substrate and a hard tip. Embedded atom method (EAM) and Lennard-Jones potentials were used to describe interactions between atoms. For nano-indentation simulations, both constant indent force and constant loading speed were applied to study the wear mechanisms as well as material properties. Some phenomenon, such as jump-to-contact, local melting, and dislocation nucleation were observed. More importantly, the effects of system temperature, indent force, substrate orientation, tip-substrate bond, indenter shape, boundary condition, and defect concentrations of the substrate were systematically investigated during indentation. The results are in qualitative agreement with limited experimental data. Similar simulations were carried out for plowing. The effects of plowing force, substrate orientation, the tip-substrate bond, and alloy elements are discussed based on the simulation results. In addition, a simple analytic model of plowing behavior is provided. The model reveals two parameters, static

  19. Out-of-equilibrium dynamics in the cytoskeleton of the living cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenormand, Guillaume; Bursac, Predrag; Butler, James P.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2007-10-01

    We report here measurements of rheological properties of the human airway smooth muscle cell using forced nanoscale motions of Arg-Gly-Asp RGD-coated microbeads tightly bound to the cytoskeleton. With changes of forcing amplitude, the storage modulus showed small but systematic nonlinearities, especially after treatment with a contractile agonist. In a dose-dependent manner, a large oscillatory shear applied from a few seconds up to 400s caused the cytoskeleton matrix to soften, a behavior comparable to physical rejuvenation observed in certain inert soft materials; the stiffness remained constant for as long as the large oscillatory shear was maintained, but suddenly fell with shear cessation. Stiffness then followed a slow scale-free recovery, a phenomenon comparable to physical aging. However, acetylated low-density lipoprotein acLDL-coated microbeads, which connect mainly to scavenger receptors, did not show similar out-of-equilibrium behaviors. Taken together, these data demonstrate in the cytoskeleton of the living cell behaviors with all the same signatures as that of soft inert condensed systems. This unexpected intersection of condensed matter physics and cytoskeletal biology suggests that trapping, intermittency, and approach to kinetic arrest represent central mesoscale features linking underlying molecular events to integrative cellular functions.

  20. Detecting Allosteric Networks Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, S; Wereszczynski, J

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric networks allow enzymes to transmit information and regulate their catalytic activities over vast distances. In principle, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can be used to reveal the mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon; in practice, it can be difficult to discern allosteric signals from MD trajectories. Here, we describe how MD simulations can be analyzed to reveal correlated motions and allosteric networks, and provide an example of their use on the coagulation enzyme thrombin. Methods are discussed for calculating residue-pair correlations from atomic fluctuations and mutual information, which can be combined with contact information to identify allosteric networks and to dynamically cluster a system into highly correlated communities. In the case of thrombin, these methods show that binding of the antagonist hirugen significantly alters the enzyme's correlation landscape through a series of pathways between Exosite I and the catalytic core. Results suggest that hirugen binding curtails dynamic diversity and enforces stricter venues of influence, thus reducing the accessibility of thrombin to other molecules. PMID:27497176

  1. Bifurcation of stationary manifolds formed in the neighborhood of the equilibrium in a dynamic system of cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakovorotny, Vilor L.; Lukyanov, Alexandr D.; Gubanova, Alexandra A.; Hristoforova, Veronica V.

    2016-04-01

    The problems related to nonlinear dynamics of material processing by cutting are reviewed in this study. A mathematical model of a dynamic system that considers the dynamic link, formed by the cutting process, is proposed. The following key features of the dynamic links are examined: the dependence of the cutting forces on the area of the shear layer, lag of forces with respect to the elastic deformation displacement of the tool relative to the workpiece, the restrictions imposed on the movement of the tool toward the rear end of the instrument with the treated part of the workpiece, the dependence of the forces on the cutting speed, and the change of force components at varying angles of the tool with respect to the direction of movement of the tool relative to the workpiece. The dynamic subsystem of the tool is presented by a linear dynamic system in the plane normal to the cutting surface. The focus of this study is on the analysis of attracting sets formed near the equilibrium point (orbitally asymptotically stable limit cycles, two-dimensional invariant tori, and chaotic attractors). It is shown that by considering the bending deformation of the tool, there is a possibility of branching of equilibrium points during changes of control parameters. Data on the bifurcations of the parametric space and the space of control parameters are shown. The general laws of buckling equilibrium of the system are reviewed.

  2. Dynamic relaxation of a levitated nanoparticle from a non-equilibrium steady state.

    PubMed

    Gieseler, Jan; Quidant, Romain; Dellago, Christoph; Novotny, Lukas

    2014-05-01

    Fluctuation theorems are a generalization of thermodynamics on small scales and provide the tools to characterize the fluctuations of thermodynamic quantities in non-equilibrium nanoscale systems. They are particularly important for understanding irreversibility and the second law in fundamental chemical and biological processes that are actively driven, thus operating far from thermal equilibrium. Here, we apply the framework of fluctuation theorems to investigate the important case of a system relaxing from a non-equilibrium state towards equilibrium. Using a vacuum-trapped nanoparticle, we demonstrate experimentally the validity of a fluctuation theorem for the relative entropy change occurring during relaxation from a non-equilibrium steady state. The platform established here allows non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to be studied experimentally for arbitrary steady states and can be extended to investigate quantum fluctuation theorems as well as systems that do not obey detailed balance.

  3. Non-equilibrium magnetic colloidal dispersions at liquid-air interfaces: dynamic patterns, magnetic order and self-assembled swimmers.

    PubMed

    Snezhko, Alexey

    2011-04-20

    Colloidal dispersions of interacting particles subjected to an external periodic forcing often develop nontrivial self-assembled patterns and complex collective behavior. A fundamental issue is how collective ordering in such non-equilibrium systems arises from the dynamics of discrete interacting components. In addition, from a practical viewpoint, by working in regimes far from equilibrium new self-organized structures which are generally not available through equilibrium thermodynamics can be created. In this review spontaneous self-assembly phenomena in magnetic colloidal dispersions suspended at liquid-air interfaces and driven out of equilibrium by an alternating magnetic field are presented. Experiments reveal a new type of nontrivially ordered self-assembled structures emerging in such systems in a certain range of excitation parameters. These dynamic structures emerge as a result of the competition between magnetic and hydrodynamic forces and have complex unconventional magnetic ordering. Nontrivial self-induced hydrodynamic fields accompany each out-of-equilibrium pattern. Spontaneous symmetry breaking of the self-induced surface flows leading to a formation of self-propelled microstructures has been discovered. Some features of the self-localized structures can be understood in the framework of the amplitude equation (Ginzburg-Landau type equation) for parametric waves coupled to the conservation law equation describing the evolution of the magnetic particle density and the Navier-Stokes equation for hydrodynamic flows. To understand the fundamental microscopic mechanisms governing self-assembly processes in magnetic colloidal dispersions at liquid-air interfaces a first-principle model for a non-equilibrium self-assembly is presented. The latter model allows us to capture in detail the entire process of out-of-equilibrium self-assembly in the system and reproduces most of the observed phenomenology.

  4. Water harvesting using a conducting polymer: A study by molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ostwal, Mayur M.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Tsotsis, Theodore T.

    2009-06-15

    The results of extensive molecular simulations of adsorption and diffusion of water vapor in polyaniline, made conducting by doping it with HCl or HBr over a broad range of temperatures, are reported. The atomistic model of the polymers was generated using energy minimization, equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, and two different force fields. The computed sorption isotherms are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. The computed activation energies for the diffusion of water molecules in the polymers also compare well with what has been reported in the literature. The results demonstrate the potential of conducting polyaniline for water harvesting from air.

  5. Iteration Scheme for Implicit Calculations of Kinetic and Equilibrium Chemical Reactions in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramshaw, J. D.; Chang, C. H.

    1995-02-01

    An iteration scheme for the implicit treatment of equilibrium chemical reactions in partial equilibrium flow has previously been described (J. D. Ramshaw and A. A. Amsden, J. Comput. Phys.59, 484 (1985); 71 , 224 (1987)). Here we generalize this scheme to kinetic reactions as well as equilibrium reactions. This extends the applicability of the scheme to problems with kinetic reactions that are fast in some regions of the flow field but slow in others. The resulting scheme thereby provides a single unified framework for the implicit treatment of an arbitrary number of coupled equilibrium and kinetic reactions in chemically reacting fluid flow.

  6. Non-equilibrium sedimentation of colloids: confocal microscopy and Brownian dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Matthias; Royall, C. Patrick; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2008-12-01

    Experimental and computational details are presented for an investigation of the transient time evolution of colloidal dispersions confined in a horizontal slit pore and under the influence of gravity (Royall et al 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 188304). We demonstrate that the interparticle interactions can be well described by those of effective hard spheres by comparing experimental results for the pair distribution function obtained in the homogeneous part of the settling system to the theoretical result for hard spheres in equilibrium. Using an effective hard sphere diameter that is 10% larger than that obtained by static light scattering takes account of the (screened) electrostatic repulsion between particles. As a simple computational model, we use Brownian dynamics computer simulations with hard sphere pair interactions and investigate the time evolution of the one-body density profile during sedimentation. We show that an 'intrinsic clock', that ticks only when trial moves are accepted, facilitates high accuracy of the time evolution of the density profile, even when using relatively large integration time steps for the Langevin equations of motion.

  7. Magnetospheric substorm: Loss of the magnetoplasma equilibrium as a nonlinear dynamical bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropotkin, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    The fast onset of a substorm—a substorm "explosion"—is usually associated with the moment of stability loss of the magnetoplasma equilibrium in the geomagnetic tail. The origination of such a process either from the near-Earth part of the plasma sheet or from its remote part, which is highly stretched into the tail, is now being studied theoretically and verified experimentally (at the present time, in the THEMIS project). In the first case, the resulting disturbance must have the form of a ballooning mode; in the second case, of tearing perturbation. However, in both cases, this stability loss, i.e., a quick breakdown in the balance, replacing the slow quasi-static evolution of configuration, can only occur as a nonlinear process. Taking into account the specific properties of the configuration and possible disturbances in it, we indicate why such a process cannot be the previously proposed "substorm detonation." It is shown that a suitable mathematical model is a nonlinear dynamical bifurcation occurring on a small time scale, with a delay relative to the moment of passing the marginally stable state.

  8. Dynamic equilibrium dissolution of complex nonaqueous phase liquid mixtures into the aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Schluep, Mathias; Gälli, René; Imboden, Dieter M; Zeyer, Josef

    2002-07-01

    Human health risks posed by hazardous substances seeping from a pool of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) into groundwater change over time because the more soluble compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) dissolve faster into the aqueous phase than less soluble compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Long-term dissolution from diesel fuel into the aqueous phase was determined experimentally in a continuous flow-through system using the slow-stirring method. The data obtained are interpreted using a dynamic equilibrium dissolution model based on Raoult's law. The predicted temporal development of aqueous concentrations are in good agreement with the experimental results. When a compound in the NAPL approaches complete depletion, a tailing behavior is observed, which is assigned to nonequilibrium effects, such as mass transfer limitations in the NAPL phase. The model predicted an increase of the mean molar mass of the diesel fuel of 1.5% over the entire experimental period. It should be noted that, if the dissolution process were to proceed further, the change in the mean molar mass could become significant and render the simple model inaccurate. Yet the simple model supports the assessment of initial action after a contamination event as well as the planning of long-term remedial strategies. PMID:12109733

  9. An improved dynamic non-equilibrium wall-model for large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, George Ilhwan; Moin, Parviz

    2013-11-01

    A non-equilibrium wall-model based on unsteady 3D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations has been implemented in an unstructured mesh environment. The method is similar to that of the wall-model described by Wang and Moin [Phys. Fluids 14, 2043-2051, (2002)], but is supplemented by a new dynamic eddy viscosity/conductivity model that corrects the effect of the resolved Reynolds stress (resolved turbulent heat flux) on the skin friction (wall heat flux). This correction is crucial for accurate prediction of the skin friction and wall heat flux. Unlike earlier models, this eddy viscosity/conductivity model does not have a stress-matching procedure or a tunable free parameter, and it shows consistent performance over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The wall-model is validated against canonical (attached) transitional and fully turbulent flows at moderate to very high Reynolds number: a turbulent channel flow at Reτ = 2000, an H-type transitional boundary layer up to Reθ = 3300, and a high Reynolds number boundary layer at Reθ = 31000. An application to the flow over NACA4412 airfoil is ongoing and hopefully will be presented. This work was supported by the Winston and Fu-Mei Stanford Graduate Fellowship, NASA Aeronautics Scholarship Program, and NASA under the Subsonic Fixed-Wing Program and the Boeing Company.

  10. Dynamic implicit 3D adaptive mesh refinement for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    B. Philip; Z. Wang; M.A. Berrill; M. Birke; M. Pernice

    2014-04-01

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered often exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multi-physics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multi-physics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton–Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  11. Dynamic equilibrium dissolution of complex nonaqueous phase liquid mixtures into the aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Schluep, Mathias; Gälli, René; Imboden, Dieter M; Zeyer, Josef

    2002-07-01

    Human health risks posed by hazardous substances seeping from a pool of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) into groundwater change over time because the more soluble compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) dissolve faster into the aqueous phase than less soluble compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Long-term dissolution from diesel fuel into the aqueous phase was determined experimentally in a continuous flow-through system using the slow-stirring method. The data obtained are interpreted using a dynamic equilibrium dissolution model based on Raoult's law. The predicted temporal development of aqueous concentrations are in good agreement with the experimental results. When a compound in the NAPL approaches complete depletion, a tailing behavior is observed, which is assigned to nonequilibrium effects, such as mass transfer limitations in the NAPL phase. The model predicted an increase of the mean molar mass of the diesel fuel of 1.5% over the entire experimental period. It should be noted that, if the dissolution process were to proceed further, the change in the mean molar mass could become significant and render the simple model inaccurate. Yet the simple model supports the assessment of initial action after a contamination event as well as the planning of long-term remedial strategies.

  12. Equilibrium and dynamic methods when comparing an English text and its Esperanto translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausloos, M.

    2008-11-01

    A comparison of two English texts written by Lewis Carroll, one (Alice in Wonderland), also translated into Esperanto, the other (Through the Looking Glass) are discussed in order to observe whether natural and artificial languages significantly differ from each other. One dimensional time series like signals are constructed using only word frequencies (FTS) or word lengths (LTS). The data is studied through (i) a Zipf method for sorting out correlations in the FTS and (ii) a Grassberger-Procaccia (GP) technique based method for finding correlations in LTS. The methods correspond to an equilibrium and a dynamic approach respectively to human texts features. There are quantitative statistical differences between the original English text and its Esperanto translation, but the qualitative differences are very minutes. However different power laws are observed with characteristic exponents for the ranking properties, and the phase space attractor dimensionality. The Zipf exponent can take values much less than unity (∼0.50 or 0.30) depending on how a sentence is defined. This variety in exponents can be conjectured to be an intrinsic measure of the book style or purpose, rather than the language or author vocabulary richness, since a similar exponent is obtained whatever the text. Moreover the attractor dimension r is a simple function of the so called phase space dimension n, i.e., r=nλ, with λ=0.79. Such an exponent could also be conjectured to be a measure of the author style versatility, - here well preserved in the translation.

  13. The non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of a simple geophysical fluid dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkley, Wim; Severijns, Camiel

    2014-05-01

    Lorenz [1] has devised a dynamical system that has proved to be very useful as a benchmark system in geophysical fluid dynamics. The system in its simplest form consists of a periodic array of variables that can be associated with an atmospheric field on a latitude circle. The system is driven by a constant forcing, is damped by linear friction and has a simple advection term that causes the model to behave chaotically if the forcing is large enough. Our aim is to predict the statistics of Lorenz' model on the basis of a given average value of its total energy - obtained from a numerical integration - and the assumption of statistical stationarity. Our method is the principle of maximum entropy [2] which in this case reads: the information entropy of the system's probability density function shall be maximal under the constraints of normalization, a given value of the average total energy and statistical stationarity. Statistical stationarity is incorporated approximately by using `stationarity constraints', i.e., by requiring that the average first and possibly higher-order time-derivatives of the energy are zero in the maximization of entropy. The analysis [3] reveals that, if the first stationarity constraint is used, the resulting probability density function rather accurately reproduces the statistics of the individual variables. If the second stationarity constraint is used as well, the correlations between the variables are also reproduced quite adequately. The method can be generalized straightforwardly and holds the promise of a viable non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of the forced-dissipative systems of geophysical fluid dynamics. [1] E.N. Lorenz, 1996: Predictability - A problem partly solved, in Proc. Seminar on Predictability (ECMWF, Reading, Berkshire, UK), Vol. 1, pp. 1-18. [2] E.T. Jaynes, 2003: Probability Theory - The Logic of Science (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge). [3] W.T.M. Verkley and C.A. Severijns, 2014: The maximum entropy

  14. Equilibrium Response and Transient Dynamics Datasets from VEMAP: Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP) was a large, collaborative, multi-agency program to simulate and understand ecosystem dynamics for the continental U.S. The project involved the development of common data sets for model input including a high-resolution topographically-adjusted climate history of the U.S. from 1895-1993 on a 0.5? grid, with soils and vegetation cover. The vegetation cover data set includes a detailed agricultural data base based on USDA statistics and remote sensing, as well as natural vegetation (also derived from satellite imagery). Two principal model experiments were run. First, a series of ecosystem models were run from 1895 to 1993 to simulate current ecosystem biogeochemistry. Second, these same models were integrated forward using the output from two climate system models (CCC (Canadian Climate Centre) and Hadley Centre models) using climate results translated into the VEMAP grid and re-adjusted for high-resolution topography for the simulated period 1994-2100.[Quoted from http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/findings.html] The VEMAP Data Portal is a central collection of files maintained and serviced by the NCAR Data Group. These files (the VEMAP Community Datasets) represent a complete and current collection of VEMAP data files. All data files available through the Data Portal have undergone extensive quality assurance.[Taken from http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html] Users of the VEMAP Portal can access input files of numerical data that include monthly and daily files of geographic data, soil and site files, scenario files, etc. Model results from Phase I, the Equilibrium Response datasets, are available through the NCAR anonymous FTP site at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/vresults.html. Phase II, Transient Dynamics, include climate datasets, models results, and analysis tools. Many supplemental files are also available from the main data page at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html.

  15. Raman spectroscopic studies on the dynamic and equilibrium processes in binary mixtures containing methanol and acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besnard, Marcel; Isabel Cabaço, M.; Strehle, Frank; Yarwood, Jack

    1992-06-01

    Raman isotropic band profiles of the ν 2 mode of acetonitrile in binary mixtures with methanol have been studied over the whole concentration range and between 196 and 330 K. Attempts have been made to understand the spectral behaviour in terms of variations in vibrational dephasing as a function of environment and in terms of rapid chemical exchange between complexed and non-complexed acetonitrile molecules. If exchange dynamics are assumed to be important it is found that the dissociation rate constant ( k21) for this reaction is of the order of 10 11 s -1. This rate seems unrealistically high although similar rates have been obtained for other hydrogen-bonded systems. Nevertheless, the band shape changes dramatically across the temperature range and this demonstrates clearly that a "merging" band profile does not necessarily prove that exchange dynamic processes are important. Bandwidth and frequency shifts across the concentration range could be attributed to increases in exchange rate as the amount of methanol increases or the temperature increases. However, the most probable explanation is that there is a change in vibrational dephasing rate due to environmental fluctuations. We clearly demonstrate that even at 0.001 molar fraction of CH 3CN in CH 3OH a finite number of CH 3CN molecules are "free" (on the vibrational timescale) from the hydrogen-bonded interaction. An explanation for this rather surprising behaviour has been sought (and found) in terms of multiple hydrogen-bonding equilibria in this system. The effect has been shown to be associated with extensive methanol aggregation. An equilibrium model has been devised which predicts accurately the relative intensities of the two ν(CN) bands and the unusual behaviour in binary mixtures of this type.

  16. Linear response subordination to intermittent energy release in off-equilibrium aging dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Simon; Sibani, Paolo

    2008-03-01

    The interpretation of experimental and numerical data describing off-equilibrium aging dynamics crucially depends on the connection between spontaneous and induced fluctuations. The hypothesis that linear response fluctuations are statistically subordinated to irreversible outbursts of energy, so-called quakes, leads to predictions for the average values and the fluctuation spectra of physical observables in reasonable agreement with experimental results (see e.g. Sibani et al 2006 Phys. Rev. B 74 224407). Using simulational data from a simple but representative Ising model with plaquette interactions, direct statistical evidence supporting the subordination hypothesis is presented and discussed in this work. Both energy and magnetic fluctuations are analyzed, with and without an external magnetic field present. In all cases, fluctuation spectra have a Gaussian zero centered component. For large negative values, the energy spectrum additionally features an intermittent tail describing the quakes. In the magnetization spectrum, two intermittent tails are present. These are symmetric around zero for zero-field, but asymmetric in other cases. The field has thus a biasing effect on the spontaneous intermittent magnetic fluctuations. Furthermore, the field has a negligible effect on the energy fluctuation spectra. From the observed strict temporal correlation between quakes and intermittent magnetization fluctuations, it is possible to conclude that the linear response is controlled by the quakes and inherits their temporal statistics. On this basis, the information culled from intermittent linear response data can be analyzed in the same way as spontaneous thermal energy fluctuations. The latter have a central rôle in thermally activated dynamics, but are harder to measure than linear response data.

  17. Fiber lubrication: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyi

    Molecular and mesoscopic level description of friction and lubrication remains a challenge because of difficulties in the phenomenological understanding of to the behaviors of solid-liquid interfaces during sliding. Fortunately, there is the computational simulation approach opens an opportunity to predict and analyze interfacial phenomena, which were studied with molecular dynamics (MD) and mesoscopic dynamics (MesoDyn) simulations. Polypropylene (PP) and cellulose are two of most common polymers in textile fibers. Confined amorphous surface layers of PP and cellulose were built successfully with xenon crystals which were used to compact the polymers. The physical and surface properties of the PP and cellulose surface layers were investigated by MD simulations, including the density, cohesive energy, volumetric thermal expansion, and contact angle with water. The topology method was employed to predict the properties of poly(alkylene glycol) (PAG) diblock copolymers and Pluronic triblock copolymers used as lubricants on surfaces. Density, zero shear viscosity, shear module, cohesive energy and solubility parameter were predicted with each block copolymer. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the interaction energy per unit contact area of block copolymer melts with PP and cellulose surfaces. The interaction energy is defined as the ratio of interfacial interaction energy to the contact area. Both poly(proplene oxide) (PPO) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) segments provided a lipophilic character to both PP and cellulose surfaces. The PPO/PEO ratio and the molecular weight were found to impact the interaction energy on both PP and cellulose surfaces. In aqueous solutions, the interaction energy is complicated due to the presence of water and the cross interactions between the multiple molecular components. The polymer-water-surface (PWS) calculation method was proposed to calculate such complex systems. In a contrast with a vacuum condition, the presence

  18. Development of semiclassical molecular dynamics simulation method.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroki; Nanbu, Shinkoh; Teranishi, Yoshiaki; Ohta, Ayumi

    2016-04-28

    Various quantum mechanical effects such as nonadiabatic transitions, quantum mechanical tunneling and coherence play crucial roles in a variety of chemical and biological systems. In this paper, we propose a method to incorporate tunneling effects into the molecular dynamics (MD) method, which is purely based on classical mechanics. Caustics, which define the boundary between classically allowed and forbidden regions, are detected along classical trajectories and the optimal tunneling path with minimum action is determined by starting from each appropriate caustic. The real phase associated with tunneling can also be estimated. Numerical demonstration with use of a simple collinear chemical reaction O + HCl → OH + Cl is presented in order to help the reader to well comprehend the method proposed here. Generalization to the on-the-fly ab initio version is rather straightforward. By treating the nonadiabatic transitions at conical intersections by the Zhu-Nakamura theory, new semiclassical MD methods can be developed. PMID:27067383

  19. Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Krack, Matthias; Bertolus, Marjorie

    2015-10-10

    Molecular dynamics simulation is well suited to study primary damage production by irradiation, defect interactions with fission gas atoms, gas bubble nucleation, grain boundary effects on defect and gas bubble evolution in nuclear fuel, and the resulting changes in thermo-mechanical properties. In these simulations, the forces on the ions are dictated by interaction potentials generated by fitting properties of interest to experimental data. The results obtained from the present generation of potentials are qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different. There is a need to refine existing potentials to provide a better representation of the performance of polycrystalline fuel under a variety of operating conditions, and to develop models that are equipped to handle deviations from stoichiometry. In addition to providing insights into fundamental mechanisms governing the behaviour of nuclear fuel, MD simulations can also provide parameters that can be used as inputs for mesoscale models.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Gold Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercolessi, F.; Bartolini, A.; Garofalo, M.; Parrinello, M.; Tosatti, E.

    1987-01-01

    In the glue model the total cohesion of a metal is determined by a pairwise atom-atom effective interaction plus a many-body force (the "glue") which is introduced to ensure optimal coordination. Using parameters optimized for gold, we have studied the structural behaviour of the low index surfaces Au(100), Au(110) and Au(111). We have used a simulated annealing strategy based on molecular dynamics to search the lowest surface energy configuration. In all cases the optimal structures are found to be reconstructed, and remarkably similar to some experimentally suggested reconstruction models. The main driving mechanism is the formation of close-packed triangular surface layers favoured by the glue term.

  1. Extended Lagrangian free energy molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Steneteg, Peter; Bock, Nicolas

    2011-10-28

    Extended free energy Lagrangians are proposed for first principles molecular dynamics simulations at finite electronic temperatures for plane-wave pseudopotential and local orbital density matrix-based calculations. Thanks to the extended Lagrangian description, the electronic degrees of freedom can be integrated by stable geometric schemes that conserve the free energy. For the local orbital representations both the nuclear and electronic forces have simple and numerically efficient expressions that are well suited for reduced complexity calculations. A rapidly converging recursive Fermi operator expansion method that does not require the calculation of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for the construction of the fractionally occupied density matrix is discussed. An efficient expression for the Pulay force that is valid also for density matrices with fractional occupation occurring at finite electronic temperatures is also demonstrated.

  2. Development of semiclassical molecular dynamics simulation method.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroki; Nanbu, Shinkoh; Teranishi, Yoshiaki; Ohta, Ayumi

    2016-04-28

    Various quantum mechanical effects such as nonadiabatic transitions, quantum mechanical tunneling and coherence play crucial roles in a variety of chemical and biological systems. In this paper, we propose a method to incorporate tunneling effects into the molecular dynamics (MD) method, which is purely based on classical mechanics. Caustics, which define the boundary between classically allowed and forbidden regions, are detected along classical trajectories and the optimal tunneling path with minimum action is determined by starting from each appropriate caustic. The real phase associated with tunneling can also be estimated. Numerical demonstration with use of a simple collinear chemical reaction O + HCl → OH + Cl is presented in order to help the reader to well comprehend the method proposed here. Generalization to the on-the-fly ab initio version is rather straightforward. By treating the nonadiabatic transitions at conical intersections by the Zhu-Nakamura theory, new semiclassical MD methods can be developed.

  3. Assessing Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Solvatochromism Modeling.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Tobias

    2015-08-20

    For the modeling of solvatochromism with an explicit representation of the solvent molecules, the quality of preceding molecular dynamics simulations is crucial. Therefore, the possibility to apply force fields which are derived with as little empiricism as possible seems desirable. Such an approach is tested here by exploiting the sensitive solvatochromism of p-nitroaniline, and the use of reliable excitation energies based on approximate second-order coupled cluster results within a polarizable embedding scheme. The quality of the various MD settings for four different solvents, water, methanol, ethanol, and dichloromethane, is assessed. In general, good agreement with the experiment is observed when polarizable force fields and special treatment of hydrogen bonding are applied. PMID:26220273

  4. Molecular dynamics studies of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyon-Jee

    The thermodynamic, structural, and mechanical properties of metallic glasses are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Molecular dynamics provides a computational framework to simulate the movement of interacting atoms in response to external perturbations, such as changes in temperature or pressure. In this thesis, a Sutton-Chen potential was chosen to describe the many-body interactions in metals and alloys. Our first application for this approach is to develop a simple model to derive the thermodynamic properties of metallic alloys (Chapter 2). Based on this model, we demonstrate that the glass transition is thermodynamically sensitive to differences between atomic radii and that there is an optimal difference for glass formation. Next, we extend these simulations to elucidate the details of structural organization in the glass (Chapter 3). We find that the liquid phase is characterized by a local five-fold symmetry, which becomes more prominent as the glass phase forms. This five-fold symmetry is related to the formation of icosahedral structures. The mechanical properties of glasses are also investigated and it is found that shear localization, which accompanies a sharp drop in the stress-strain curve, occurs at 45 degree with respect to the loading axis (Chapter 4). The generation of free volume is found to be the dominant mechanism that leads to shear localization, rather than adiabatic heating. Finally, generic first principle potentials are constructed to guide the experimental development of AlTiNi based metallic glasses (Chapter 5). Together, the results from these simulations improve our understanding of the thermodynamic, structural, and mechanical properties of metallic glasses and will aid computer-driven materials design.

  5. Aneesur Rahman Prize Talk: Dynamics of Entangled Polymer Melts: Perceptive from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grest, Gary S.

    2008-03-01

    Twenty years ago at the APS March Meeting, Kurt Kremer and I presented the first numerical evidence from computer simulations that the reptation model of Edwards and de Gennes correctly describes the dynamics of entangled linear polymer melts. For chains longer than the entanglement length Ne, the monomers of a chain move predominantly along their own contour. The distinctive signature of reptation dynamics, which we observed, was that on intermediate time scales, the mean squared displacement of a monomer increases with time as t^ 1/4. Though these early simulations were limited to chains of a few Ne, they demonstrated the potential of computer simulations to contribute to our understanding of polymer dynamics. Here I will review the progress over the past twenty years and present an outlook for the future in modeling entangled polymer melts and networks. With present day computers coupled with efficient parallel molecular dynamics codes, it is now possible to follow the equilibrium dynamics of chains of length 10-20Ne from the early Rouse regime to the long time diffusive regime. Result of these simulations support the earlier results obtained on chains of only a few Ne. Further evidence for the tube models of polymer dynamics has been obtained by identifying the primitive path mesh that characterizes the microscopic topological state of the computer- generated conformations of the chains. In particular, the plateau moduli derived on the basis of this analysis quantitatively reproduce experimental data for a wide spectrum of entangled polymer liquids including semi-dilute theta solutions of synthetic polymers, the corresponding dense melts, and solutions of semi-flexible (bio)polymers such as f-actin or suspensions of rodlike viruses. We also find that in agreement with the reptation model, the stress, end-to-end distance and entanglement length of an entangled melt subjected to uniaxial elongation, all relax on the same time scale.

  6. Snapshot of the equilibrium dynamics of a drug bound to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Daniel G.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Challa, J. Reddy; Patel, Disha; Troxler, Thomas; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2013-03-01

    The anti-AIDS drug rilpivirine undergoes conformational changes to bind HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), which is an essential enzyme for the replication of HIV. These changes allow it to retain potency against mutations that otherwise would render the enzyme resistant. Here we report that water molecules play an essential role in this binding process. Femtosecond experiments and theory expose the molecular level dynamics of rilpivirine bound to HIV-1 RT. Two nitrile substituents, one on each arm of the drug, are used as vibrational probes of the structural dynamics within the binding pocket. Two-dimensional vibrational echo spectroscopy reveals that one nitrile group is unexpectedly hydrogen-bonded to a mobile water molecule, not identified in previous X-ray structures. Ultrafast nitrile-water dynamics are confirmed by simulations. A higher (1.51 Å) resolution X-ray structure also reveals a water-drug interaction network. Maintenance of a crucial anchoring hydrogen bond may help retain the potency of rilpivirine against pocket mutations despite the structural variations they cause.

  7. The energy pump and the origin of the non-equilibrium flux of the dynamical systems and the networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liufang; Shi, Hualin; Feng, Haidong; Wang, Jin

    2012-04-28

    The global stability of dynamical systems and networks is still challenging to study. We developed a landscape and flux framework to explore the global stability. The potential landscape is directly linked to the steady state probability distribution of the non-equilibrium dynamical systems which can be used to study the global stability. The steady state probability flux together with the landscape gradient determines the dynamics of the system. The non-zero probability flux implies the breaking down of the detailed balance which is a quantitative signature of the systems being in non-equilibrium states. We investigated the dynamics of several systems from monostability to limit cycle and explored the microscopic origin of the probability flux. We discovered that the origin of the probability flux is due to the non-equilibrium conditions on the concentrations resulting energy input acting like non-equilibrium pump or battery to the system. Another interesting behavior we uncovered is that the probabilistic flux is closely related to the steady state deterministic chemical flux. For the monostable model of the kinetic cycle, the analytical expression of the probabilistic flux is directly related to the deterministic flux, and the later is directly generated by the chemical potential difference from the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. For the limit cycle of the reversible Schnakenberg model, we also show that the probabilistic flux is correlated to the chemical driving force, as well as the deterministic effective flux. Furthermore, we study the phase coherence of the stochastic oscillation against the energy pump, and argue that larger non-equilibrium pump results faster flux and higher coherence. This leads to higher robustness of the biological oscillations. We also uncovered how fluctuations influence the coherence of the oscillations in two steps: (1) The mild fluctuations influence the coherence of the system mainly through the probability flux while

  8. From molecular dynamics to hydrodynamics: a novel Galilean invariant thermostat.

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, Simeon D; Groot, Robert D

    2005-03-15

    This paper proposes a novel thermostat applicable to any particle-based dynamic simulation. Each pair of particles is thermostated either (with probability P) with a pairwise Lowe-Andersen thermostat [C. P. Lowe, Europhys. Lett. 47, 145 (1999)] or (with probability 1-P) with a thermostat that is introduced here, which is based on a pairwise interaction similar to the Nosé-Hoover thermostat. When the pairwise Nosé-Hoover thermostat dominates (low P), the liquid has a high diffusion coefficient and low viscosity, but when the Lowe-Andersen thermostat dominates, the diffusion coefficient is low and viscosity is high. This novel Nosé-Hoover-Lowe-Andersen thermostat is Galilean invariant and preserves both total linear and angular momentum of the system, due to the fact that the thermostatic forces between each pair of the particles are pairwise additive and central. We show by simulation that this thermostat also preserves hydrodynamics. For the (noninteracting) ideal gas at P = 0, the diffusion coefficient diverges and viscosity is zero, while for P > 0 it has a finite value. By adjusting probability P, the Schmidt number can be varied by orders of magnitude. The temperature deviation from the required value is at least an order of magnitude smaller than in dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), while the equilibrium properties of the system are very well reproduced. The thermostat is easy to implement and offers a computational efficiency better than (DPD), with better temperature control and greater flexibility in terms of adjusting the diffusion coefficient and viscosity of the simulated system. Applications of this thermostat include all standard molecular dynamic simulations of dense liquids and solids with any type of force field, as well as hydrodynamic simulation of multiphase systems with largely different bulk viscosities, including surface viscosity, and of dilute gases and plasmas.

  9. Accelerated electronic structure-based molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawkwell, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The initiation and progression of shock-induced chemistry in organic materials at moderate temperatures and pressures are slow on the time scales available to regular molecular dynamics simulations. Accessing the requisite time scales is particularly challenging if the interatomic bonding is modeled using accurate yet expensive methods based explicitly on electronic structure. We have combined fast, energy conserving extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the parallel replica accelerated molecular dynamics formalism to study the relatively sluggish shock-induced chemistry of benzene around 13-20 GPa. We model interatomic bonding in hydrocarbons using self-consistent tight binding theory with an accurate and transferable parameterization. Shock compression and its associated transient, non-equilibrium effects are captured explicitly by combining the universal liquid Hugoniot with a simple shrinking-cell boundary condition. A number of novel methods for improving the performance of reactive electronic structure-based molecular dynamics by adapting the self-consistent field procedure on-the-fly will also be discussed. The use of accelerated molecular dynamics has enabled us to follow the initial stages of the nucleation and growth of carbon clusters in benzene under thermodynamic conditions pertinent to experiments.

  10. From molecular systems to continuum solids: A multiscale structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Qi; Li, Shaofan

    2015-08-01

    We propose a concurrent multiscale molecular dynamics for molecular systems in order to apply macroscale mechanical boundary conditions such as traction and average displacement for solid state materials, which is difficult to do in traditional molecular dynamics where boundary conditions are applied in terms of forces and displacements on selected particles. The multiscale model is systematically constructed in terms of multiscale structures of kinematics, force field, and dynamical equations. The idea is to extend the Anderson-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics to the cases that have arbitrary finite domain and boundary, thus the model is capable of solving inhomogeneous, non-equilibrium problems. The macroscale stress loading on a representative volume element with periodic boundary condition is generalized to all kinds of macroscale mechanical boundary conditions. Unlike most multiscale techniques, our theory is aimed at understanding fundamental physics rather than achieving computing efficiency. Examples of problems with prescribed average displacements and surface tractions are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed multiscale molecular dynamics.

  11. Students' Understanding of Equilibrium and Stability: The Case of Dynamic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canu, Michaël; de Hosson, Cécile; Duque, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Engineering students in control courses have been observed to lack an understanding of equilibrium and stability, both of which are crucial concepts in this discipline. The introduction of these concepts is generally based on the study of classical examples from Newtonian mechanics supplemented with a control system. Equilibrium and stability are…

  12. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  13. Molecular-dynamic study of liquid ethylenediamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabaev, N. K.; Kraevskii, S. V.; Rodnikova, M. N.; Solonina, I. A.

    2016-10-01

    Models of liquid ethylenediamine (ED) are built using the molecular dynamics approach at temperatures of 293-363 K and a size of 1000 molecules in a basic cell as a cuboid. The structural and dynamic characteristics of liquid ED versus temperature are derived. The gauche conformation of the ED molecule that is characteristic of the gas phase is shown to transition easily into the trans conformation of the molecules in the liquid. NH···N hydrogen bonds are analyzed in liquid ED. The number of H-bonds per ED molecule is found to vary from 5.02 at 293 K to 3.86 at 363 K. The lifetimes in the range of the temperatures and dissociation activation energy for several H-bonds in liquid ED are found to range from 0.574 to 4.524 ps at 293 K; the activation energies are 8.8 kJ/mol for 50% of the H-bonds and 16.3 kJ/mol for 6.25% of them. A weaker and more mobile spatial grid of H-bonds in liquid ED is observed, compared to data calculated earlier for monoethanolamine.

  14. Extending the molecular size in accurate quantum-chemical calculations: the equilibrium structure and spectroscopic properties of uracil.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Barone, Vincenzo

    2011-04-21

    The equilibrium structure of uracil has been investigated using both theoretical and experimental data. With respect to the former, quantum-chemical calculations at the coupled-cluster level in conjunction with a triple-zeta basis set have been carried out. Extrapolation to the basis set limit, performed employing the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and inclusion of core-correlation and diffuse-function corrections have also been considered. Based on the available rotational constants for various isotopic species together with corresponding computed vibrational corrections, the semi-experimental equilibrium structure of uracil has been determined for the first time. Theoretical and semi-experimental structures have been found in remarkably good agreement, thus pointing out the limitations of previous experimental determinations. Molecular and spectroscopic properties of uracil have then been studied by means of the composite computational approach introduced for the molecular structure evaluation. Among the results achieved, we mention the revision of the dipole moment. On the whole, it has been proved that the computational procedure presented is able to provide parameters with the proper accuracy to support experimental investigations of large molecules of biological interest.

  15. Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics: A Foundation for Multiscale Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Internal coordinates such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles (BAT) are natural coordinates for describing a bonded molecular system. However, the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods that are widely used for proteins, DNA, and polymers are based on Cartesian coordinates owing to the mathematical simplicity of the equations of motion. However, constraints are often needed with Cartesian MD simulations to enhance the conformational sampling. This makes the equations of motion in the Cartesian coordinates differential-algebraic, which adversely impacts the complexity and the robustness of the simulations. On the other hand, constraints can be easily placed in BAT coordinates by removing the degrees of freedom that need to be constrained. Thus, the internal coordinate MD (ICMD) offers an attractive alternative to Cartesian coordinate MD for developing multiscale MD method. The torsional MD method is a special adaptation of the ICMD method, where all the bond lengths and bond angles are kept rigid. The advantages of ICMD simulation methods are the longer time step size afforded by freezing high frequency degrees of freedom and performing a conformational search in the more important low frequency torsional degrees of freedom. However, the advancements in the ICMD simulations have been slow and stifled by long-standing mathematical bottlenecks. In this review, we summarize the recent mathematical advancements we have made based on spatial operator algebra, in developing a robust long time scale ICMD simulation toolkit useful for various applications. We also present the applications of ICMD simulations to study conformational changes in proteins and protein structure refinement. We review the advantages of the ICMD simulations over the Cartesian simulations when used with enhanced sampling methods and project the future use of ICMD simulations in protein dynamics. PMID:25517406

  16. Thermal Transport in Fullerene Derivatives Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Wang, Xiaojia; Kumar, Satish

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the effects of alkyl chain on the thermal properties of fullerene derivatives, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to predict the thermal conductivity of fullerene (C60) and its derivative phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The results of non-equilibrium MD simulations show a length-dependent thermal conductivity for C60 but not for PCBM. The thermal conductivity of C60, obtained from the linear extrapolation of inverse conductivity vs. inverse length curve, is 0.2  W m−1 K−1 at room temperature, while the thermal conductivity of PCBM saturates at ~0.075  W m−1 K−1 around 20 nm. The different length-dependence behavior of thermal conductivity indicates that the long-wavelength and low-frequency phonons have large contribution to the thermal conduction in C60. The decrease in thermal conductivity of fullerene derivatives can be attributed to the reduction in group velocities, the decrease of the frequency range of acoustic phonons, and the strong scattering of low-frequency phonons with the alkyl chains due to the significant mismatch of vibrational density of states in low frequency regime between buckyball and alkyl chains in PCBM. PMID:26238607

  17. Thermodynamics and kinetics of large-time-step molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rao, Francesco; Spichty, Martin

    2012-02-15

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide essential information about the thermodynamics and kinetics of proteins. Technological advances in both hardware and algorithms have seen this method accessing timescales that used to be unreachable only few years ago. The quest to simulate slow, biologically relevant macromolecular conformational changes, is still open. Here, we present an approximate approach to increase the speed of MD simulations by a factor of ∼4.5. This is achieved by using a large integration time step of 7 fs, in combination with frozen covalent bonds and look-up tables for nonbonded interactions of the solvent. Extensive atomistic MD simulations for a flexible peptide in water show that the approach reproduces the peptide's equilibrium conformational changes, preserving the essential properties of both thermodynamics and kinetics. Comparison of this approximate method with state-of-the-art implicit solvation simulations indicates that the former provides a better description of the underlying free-energy surface. Finally, simulations of a 33-residue peptide show that these fast MD settings are readily applicable to investigate biologically relevant systems.

  18. Rare event molecular dynamics simulations of plasma induced surface ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Sharia, Onise; Holzgrafe, Jeffrey; Park, Nayoung; Henkelman, Graeme

    2014-08-21

    The interaction of thermal Ar plasma particles with Si and W surfaces is modeled using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. At plasma energies above the threshold for ablation, the ablation yield can be calculated directly from MD. For plasma energies below threshold, the ablation yield becomes exponentially low, and direct MD simulations are inefficient. Instead, we propose an integration method where the yield is calculated as a function of the Ar incident kinetic energy. Subsequent integration with a Boltzmann distribution at the temperature of interest gives the thermal ablation yield. At low plasma temperatures, the ablation yield follows an Arrhenius form in which the activation energy is shown to be the threshold energy for ablation. Interestingly, equilibrium material properties, including the surface and bulk cohesive energy, are not good predictors of the threshold energy for ablation. The surface vacancy formation energy is better, but is still not a quantitative predictor. An analysis of the trajectories near threshold shows that ablation occurs by different mechanisms on different material surfaces, and both the mechanism and the binding of surface atoms determine the threshold energy.

  19. Rare event molecular dynamics simulations of plasma induced surface ablation.

    PubMed

    Sharia, Onise; Holzgrafe, Jeffrey; Park, Nayoung; Henkelman, Graeme

    2014-08-21

    The interaction of thermal Ar plasma particles with Si and W surfaces is modeled using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. At plasma energies above the threshold for ablation, the ablation yield can be calculated directly from MD. For plasma energies below threshold, the ablation yield becomes exponentially low, and direct MD simulations are inefficient. Instead, we propose an integration method where the yield is calculated as a function of the Ar incident kinetic energy. Subsequent integration with a Boltzmann distribution at the temperature of interest gives the thermal ablation yield. At low plasma temperatures, the ablation yield follows an Arrhenius form in which the activation energy is shown to be the threshold energy for ablation. Interestingly, equilibrium material properties, including the surface and bulk cohesive energy, are not good predictors of the threshold energy for ablation. The surface vacancy formation energy is better, but is still not a quantitative predictor. An analysis of the trajectories near threshold shows that ablation occurs by different mechanisms on different material surfaces, and both the mechanism and the binding of surface atoms determine the threshold energy. PMID:25149805

  20. Modeling the economic costs of disasters and recovery: analysis using a dynamic computable general equilibrium model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, W.; Li, N.; Wu, J.-D.; Hao, X.-L.

    2014-04-01

    Disaster damages have negative effects on the economy, whereas reconstruction investment has positive effects. The aim of this study is to model economic causes of disasters and recovery involving the positive effects of reconstruction activities. Computable general equilibrium (CGE) model is a promising approach because it can incorporate these two kinds of shocks into a unified framework and furthermore avoid the double-counting problem. In order to factor both shocks into the CGE model, direct loss is set as the amount of capital stock reduced on the supply side of the economy; a portion of investments restores the capital stock in an existing period; an investment-driven dynamic model is formulated according to available reconstruction data, and the rest of a given country's saving is set as an endogenous variable to balance the fixed investment. The 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake is selected as a case study to illustrate the model, and three scenarios are constructed: S0 (no disaster occurs), S1 (disaster occurs with reconstruction investment) and S2 (disaster occurs without reconstruction investment). S0 is taken as business as usual, and the differences between S1 and S0 and that between S2 and S0 can be interpreted as economic losses including reconstruction and excluding reconstruction, respectively. The study showed that output from S1 is found to be closer to real data than that from S2. Economic loss under S2 is roughly 1.5 times that under S1. The gap in the economic aggregate between S1 and S0 is reduced to 3% at the end of government-led reconstruction activity, a level that should take another four years to achieve under S2.

  1. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gottwald, Fabian; Karsten, Sven; Ivanov, Sergei D. Kühn, Oliver

    2015-06-28

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into a few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation, which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection technique. Within this framework, a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here, we discuss that this task is more naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importantly, we show that the rigid bond approach leads to a systematic overestimation of relaxation times, unless the system under study consists of a harmonic bath bi-linearly coupled to the relevant degrees of freedom.

  2. Thermal transpiration: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T, Joe Francis; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal transpiration is a phenomenon where fluid molecules move from the cold end towards the hot end of a channel under the influence of longitudinal temperature gradient alone. Although the phenomenon of thermal transpiration is observed at rarefied gas conditions in macro systems, the phenomenon can occur at atmospheric pressure if the characteristic dimensions of the channel is less than 100 nm. The flow through these nanosized channels is characterized by the free molecular flow regimes and continuum theory is inadequate to describe the flow. Thus a non-continuum method like molecular dynamics (MD) is necessary to study such phenomenon. In the present work, MD simulations were carried out to investigate the occurance of thermal transpiration in copper and platinum nanochannels at atmospheric pressure conditions. The mean pressure of argon gas confined inside the nano channels was maintained around 1 bar. The channel height is maintained at 2nm. The argon atoms interact with each other and with the wall atoms through the Lennard-Jones potential. The wall atoms are modelled using an EAM potential. Further, separate simulations were carried out where a Harmonic potential is used for the atom-atom interaction in the platinum channel. A thermally insulating wall was introduced between the low and high temperature regions and those wall atoms interact with fluid atoms through a repulsive potential. A reduced cut off radius were used to achieve this. Thermal creep is induced by applying a temperature gradient along the channel wall. It was found that flow developed in the direction of the increasing temperature gradient of the wall. An increase in the volumetric flux was observed as the length of the cold and the hot regions of the wall were increased. The effect of temperature gradient and the wall-fluid interaction strength on the flow parameters have been studied to understand the phenomenon better.

  3. Thermal transpiration: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    T, Joe Francis; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2014-12-09

    Thermal transpiration is a phenomenon where fluid molecules move from the cold end towards the hot end of a channel under the influence of longitudinal temperature gradient alone. Although the phenomenon of thermal transpiration is observed at rarefied gas conditions in macro systems, the phenomenon can occur at atmospheric pressure if the characteristic dimensions of the channel is less than 100 nm. The flow through these nanosized channels is characterized by the free molecular flow regimes and continuum theory is inadequate to describe the flow. Thus a non-continuum method like molecular dynamics (MD) is necessary to study such phenomenon. In the present work, MD simulations were carried out to investigate the occurance of thermal transpiration in copper and platinum nanochannels at atmospheric pressure conditions. The mean pressure of argon gas confined inside the nano channels was maintained around 1 bar. The channel height is maintained at 2nm. The argon atoms interact with each other and with the wall atoms through the Lennard-Jones potential. The wall atoms are modelled using an EAM potential. Further, separate simulations were carried out where a Harmonic potential is used for the atom-atom interaction in the platinum channel. A thermally insulating wall was introduced between the low and high temperature regions and those wall atoms interact with fluid atoms through a repulsive potential. A reduced cut off radius were used to achieve this. Thermal creep is induced by applying a temperature gradient along the channel wall. It was found that flow developed in the direction of the increasing temperature gradient of the wall. An increase in the volumetric flux was observed as the length of the cold and the hot regions of the wall were increased. The effect of temperature gradient and the wall-fluid interaction strength on the flow parameters have been studied to understand the phenomenon better.

  4. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice

  5. Finite-Temperature Non-equilibrium Quasicontinuum Method based on Langevin Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Marian, J; Venturini, G; Hansen, B; Knap, J; Ortiz, M; Campbell, G

    2009-05-08

    The concurrent bridging of molecular dynamics and continuum thermodynamics presents a number of challenges, mostly associated with energy transmission and changes in the constitutive description of a material across domain boundaries. In this paper, we propose a framework for simulating coarse dynamic systems in the canonical ensemble using the Quasicontinuum method (QC). The equations of motion are expressed in reduced QC coordinates and are strictly derived from dissipative Lagrangian mechanics. The derivation naturally leads to a classical Langevin implementation where the timescale is governed by vibrations emanating from the finest length scale occurring in the computational cell. The equations of motion are integrated explicitly via Newmark's ({beta} = 0; {gamma} = 1/2) method, leading to a robust numerical behavior and energy conservation. In its current form, the method only allows for wave propagations supported by the less compliant of the two meshes across a heterogeneous boundary, which requires the use of overdamped dynamics to avoid spurious heating due to reflected vibrations. We have applied the method to two independent crystallographic systems characterized by different interatomic potentials (Al and Ta) and have measured thermal expansion in order to quantify the vibrational entropy loss due to homogenization. We rationalize the results in terms of system size, mesh coarseness, and nodal cluster diameter within the framework of the quasiharmonic approximation. For Al, we find that the entropy loss introduced by mesh coarsening varies linearly with the element size, and that volumetric effects are not critical in driving the anharmonic behavior of the simulated systems. In Ta, the anomalies of the interatomic potential employed result in negative and zero thermal expansion at low and high temperatures, respectively.

  6. How Dynamic Visualization Technology Can Support Molecular Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Dalit

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study aimed at exploring the advantages of dynamic visualization for the development of better understanding of molecular processes. We designed a technology-enhanced curriculum module in which high school chemistry students conduct virtual experiments with dynamic molecular visualizations of solid, liquid, and…

  7. Observable-dependence of the effective temperature in off-equilibrium diatomic molecular liquids.

    PubMed

    Ninarello, Andrea Saverio; Gnan, Nicoletta; Sciortino, Francesco

    2014-11-21

    We discuss the observable-dependence of the effective temperature Teff, defined via the fluctuation-dissipation relation, of an out-of-equilibrium system composed by homonuclear dumbbell molecules. Teff is calculated by evaluating the fluctuation and the response for two observables associated, respectively, to translational and to rotational degrees of freedom, following a sudden temperature quench. We repeat our calculations for different dumbbell elongations ζ. At high elongations (ζ > 0.4), we find the same Teff for the two observables. At low elongations (ζ ⩽ 0.4), only for very deep quenches Teff coincides. The observable-dependence of Teff for low elongations and shallow quenches stresses the importance of a strong coupling between orientational and translational variables for a consistent definition of the effective temperature in glassy systems.

  8. Observable-dependence of the effective temperature in off-equilibrium diatomic molecular liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninarello, Andrea Saverio; Gnan, Nicoletta; Sciortino, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    We discuss the observable-dependence of the effective temperature Teff, defined via the fluctuation-dissipation relation, of an out-of-equilibrium system composed by homonuclear dumbbell molecules. Teff is calculated by evaluating the fluctuation and the response for two observables associated, respectively, to translational and to rotational degrees of freedom, following a sudden temperature quench. We repeat our calculations for different dumbbell elongations ζ. At high elongations (ζ > 0.4), we find the same Teff for the two observables. At low elongations (ζ ⩽ 0.4), only for very deep quenches Teff coincides. The observable-dependence of Teff for low elongations and shallow quenches stresses the importance of a strong coupling between orientational and translational variables for a consistent definition of the effective temperature in glassy systems.

  9. Study of silicon crystal surface formation based on molecular dynamics simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barinovs, G.; Sabanskis, A.; Muiznieks, A.

    2014-04-01

    The equilibrium shape of <110>-oriented single crystal silicon nanowire, 8 nm in cross-section, was found from molecular dynamics simulations using LAMMPS molecular dynamics package. The calculated shape agrees well to the shape predicted from experimental observations of nanocavities in silicon crystals. By parametrization of the shape and scaling to a known value of {111} surface energy, Wulff form for solid-vapor interface was obtained. The Wulff form for solid-liquid interface was constructed using the same model of the shape as for the solid-vapor interface. The parameters describing solid-liquid interface shape were found using values of surface energies in low-index directions known from published molecular dynamics simulations. Using an experimental value of the liquid-vapor interface energy for silicon and graphical solution of Herring's equation, we constructed angular diagram showing relative equilibrium orientation of solid-liquid, liquid-vapor and solid-vapor interfaces at the triple phase line. The diagram gives quantitative predictions about growth angles for different growth directions and formation of facets on the solid-liquid and solid-vapor interfaces. The diagram can be used to describe growth ridges appearing on the crystal surface grown from a melt. Qualitative comparison to the ridges of a Float zone silicon crystal cone is given.

  10. The Role of Anharmonicity and Nuclear Quantum Effects in the Pyridine Molecular Crystal: An ab initio Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Hsin-Yu; Distasio, Robert A., Jr.; Santra, Biswajit; Car, Roberto

    Molecular crystal structure prediction has posed a substantial challenge to first-principles methods and requires sophisticated electronic structure methods to determine the stabilities of nearly degenerate polymorphs. In this work, we demonstrate that the anharmonicity from van der Waals interactions is relevant to the finite-temperature structures of pyridine and pyridine-like molecular crystals. Using such an approach, we find that the equilibrium structures are well captured with classical ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD), despite the presence of light atoms such as hydrogen. Employing path integral AIMD simulations, we demonstrate that the success of classical AIMD results from a separation of nuclear quantum effects between the intermolecular and intramolecular degrees of freedom. In this separation, the quasiclassical and anharmonic intermolecular degrees of freedom determine the equilibrium structure, while the quantum and harmonic intramolecular degrees of freedom are averaging to the correct intramolecular structure. This work has been supported by the Department of Energy under Grants No. DE-FG02-05ER46201 and DE-SC0008626.

  11. Inducible formation of breast cancer stem cells and their dynamic equilibrium with non-stem cancer cells via IL6 secretion

    PubMed Central

    Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Hirsch, Heather A.; Wang, Guannan; Struhl, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Tumors are often heterogeneous, being composed of multiple cell types with different phenotypic and molecular properties. Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are a highly tumorigenic cell type found in developmentally diverse tumors or cancer cell lines, and they are often resistant to standard chemotherapeutic drugs. The origins of CSCs and their relationships to nonstem cancer cells (NSCCs) are poorly understood. In an inducible breast oncogenesis model, CSCs are generated from nontransformed cells at a specific time during the transformation process, but CSC formation is not required for transformation. MicroRNA profiles indicate that CSCs and NSCCs are related, but different cell types arising from a common nontransformed population. Interestingly, medium from the transformed population stimulates NSCCs to become CSCs, and conversion of NSCCs to CSCs occurs in mouse xenografts. Furthermore, IL6 is sufficient to convert NSCCs to CSCs in genetically different breast cell lines, human breast tumors, and a prostate cell line. Thus, breast and prostate CSCs and NSCCs do not represent distinct epigenetic states, and these CSCs do not behave as or arise from classic stem cells. Instead, tumor heterogeneity involves a dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and NSCCs mediated by IL6 and activation of the inflammatory feedback loop required for oncogenesis. This dynamic equilibrium provides an additional rationale for combining conventional chemotherapy with metformin, which selectively inhibits CSCs. PMID:21220315

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of pressure shocks in liquid phase nitromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNatt, Michael David

    The dynamic energy transfer processes present in liquid nitromethane (NM) under pressure shock loading conditions have been investigated by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics methods using a previously developed, fully flexible NM force field (Sorescu, D. C.; Rice, B. M.; Thompson, D. L. J. Phys. Chem. B 2000, 104, 8406). Generally good qualitative agreement with the corresponding experimental values was found for sound speeds (C) as a function of temperature. This is true as well for the PVT Hugoniot data calculated for the shock compressed zones behind our simulated shock fronts. The predicted C( T) are, however, ˜13--30% higher than experiment (Lysne, P. C.; Hardesty, D. R. J. Chem. Phys. 1973, 59, 6512) and our predicted densities for the shock compressed area behind fronts are consistently 4--10% lower than experiment (Winey, J. M.; Duvall, G. E.; Knudson, M. D.; Gupta, Y. M. J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 113, 7492). Accurate Hugoniot pressures are predicted by our simulations at all three initial temperatures (T i) studied. The Ti simulated for this work (255, 300, 350 K) span virtually the entire experimental ambient pressure liquid temperature range of NM (˜ 244--373 K). Thus combining and comparing our results with those of Winey et al. based on empirical equations of state work, opens up a considerable range of possible further tests and developments of our NM force field. This is particularly important in regards to the intermolecular force field due to its intended purpose of being applicable to a wide range of nitro and nitramine energetic compounds. Also, within the timeframes of our simulations (< 10 ps) the kinetic energy behind our shock fronts does not achieve equilibrium conditions as determined by the classical theory of equipartition.

  13. Studying the Unfolding Kinetics of Proteins under Pressure Using Long Molecular Dynamic Simulation Runs

    PubMed Central

    Chara, Osvaldo; Grigera, José Raúl

    2008-01-01

    The usefulness of computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulation has been extensively established for studying systems in equilibrium. Nevertheless, its application to complex non-equilibrium biological processes such as protein unfolding has been generally regarded as producing results which cannot be interpreted straightforwardly. In the present study, we present results for the kinetics of unfolding of apomyoglobin, based on the analysis of long simulation runs of this protein in solution at 3 kbar (1 atm = 1.01325, bar = 101 325 Pa). We hereby demonstrate that the analysis of the data collected within a simulated time span of 0.18 μs suffices for producing results, which coincide remarkably with the available unfolding kinetics experimental data. This not only validates molecular dynamics simulation as a valuable alternative for studying non-equilibrium processes, but also enables a detailed analysis of the actual structural mechanism which underlies the unfolding process of proteins under elusive denaturing conditions such as high pressure. PMID:19669536

  14. Dynamics of nitrogen dissociation from direct molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Paolo; Schwartzentruber, Thomas E.; Bender, Jason D.; Candler, Graham V.

    2016-08-01

    We present a molecular-level investigation of nitrogen dissociation at high temperature. The computational technique, called direct molecular simulation (DMS), solely relies on an ab initio potential energy surface and both N2+N2 and N +N2 processes are simulated as they concurrently take place in an evolving nonequilibrium gas system. Quasiclassical trajectory calculations (QCT) reveal that dissociation rate coefficients calculated at thermal equilibrium, i.e., assuming Boltzmann energy distributions, are approximately equal (within less than 15%) for both N2+N2 and N +N2 collisions for the range of temperatures considered. The DMS (nonequilibrium) results indicate, however, that the presence of atomic nitrogen significantly affects the dissociation rate of molecular nitrogen, but indirectly. In fact, the presence of atomic nitrogen causes an important reduction of the vibrational relaxation time of N2, by almost one order of magnitude. This, in turn, speeds up the replenishment of high-v states that are otherwise significantly depleted if only N2+N2 collisions are considered. Because of the strong favoring of dissociation from high-v states, this results in dissociation rates that are 2-3 times higher when significant atomic nitrogen is present compared to systems composed of mainly diatomic nitrogen, such as during the initial onset of dissociation. Specifically, we find that exchange events occur frequently during N +N2 collisions and that such exchange collisions constitute an effective mechanism of scrambling the internal energy states, resulting in multiquantum jumps in vibrational energy levels that effectively promote energy transfers. The resulting vibrational relaxation time constant we calculate for N +N2 collisions is significantly lower than the widely used Millikan-White model. Significant discrepancies are found between predictions of the Park two-temperature model (using the Millikan-White vibrational relaxation model) and the DMS results for

  15. Rempi Studies of Molecular Reaction Dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, John Forbes

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Resonance-Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionisation (REMPI qv.) is used to prepare and probe systems undergoing unimolecular decomposition. It is shown that the highly efficient state selective nature of the REMPI process is well suited to both highly dynamical situations such as the "A-Band" dissociation of MeI at around 280nm and to the slower "Quasi-statistical" dissociations of the mainifold of states of the MeI(+) cation. In the study of the neutral dissociation we attempt to extract the population distributions of the quantum states "by implication" as has been done previously. We demonstrate the failings of the time-of-flight technique in being unable to do this effectively. A comparison with previous studies is made. We report the first rotationally resolved spectrum of a polyatomic (N atoms > 2) photofragment (Me from the "A-Band" photodissociation of MeI) and propose a mechanism to account for the observed differences of the rotational populations in the different dissociation channels. Two-photon linestrength theory incorporating alignment effects is extended to symmetric tops to analyse the data. The pre-dissociation dynamics of a high lying Rydberg state of the methyl radical have been extracted as part of a spectroscopic study performed on CH _3 and CD_3. The dynamics are compared to existing studies on the near-neighbours NH_3 and ND_3 with some apparent correlation. In the dissociations of the A and B states of the MeI(+) cation we are able to provide some more evidence for existing ideas that the A state dissociates by rapid inter-conversion to highly excited levels of the ground state whereas the B state dissociates in a more direct manner. We identify two existing features in the REMPI spectrum of MeI in the "A-Band" region as molecular Rydberg resonances and show that an interesting competition exists between the direct photodissociation and the "virtual" state involved in

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of unsaturated lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Alexander L.; Balabaev, Nikolay K.

    2001-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out for bilayers of lipid molecules having stearic acid (C18:0) chain in position '3-D' (using the nomenclature of M. Sundaralingam, 1972) and fatty acid chain C18:0, C18:1(omega 9), C18:2(omega 6), C18:3(omega 3), C20:4(omega 6) or C22:6(omega 3) in position '2-D'. To investigate the properties of the bilayers two models were considered. In the first model, the simulation cells of the bilayers consisted of 96 phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules and 2304 water molecules: 48 lipid molecules per layer and 24 H2O molecules per lipid. The water was modeled by explicit TIP3P water molecules. In the second model, the head group of the lipid molecules was treated as an effective sphere -- diacylglycerolipids (DGs) were considered, the interface of each monolayer was modeled by a flat surface; no water molecules were present explicitly. The bilayers consisted of 48 X 2 equals 96 glycerolipids arranged in a rectangular simulation cell. Various properties of the bilayers -- the C-H bond order parameter -SCH profiles of the hydrocarbon tails, the root-mean-square values of the positional fluctuations of the lipid chain carbons, mass density distributions of lipid molecules and water along the normals were investigated.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of unsaturated lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Alexander L.; Balabaev, Nikolay K.

    2000-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out for bilayers of lipid molecules having stearic acid (C18:0) chain in position '3-D' (using the nomenclature of M. Sundaralingam, 1972) and fatty acid chain C18:0, C18:1(omega 9), C18:2(omega 6), C18:3(omega 3), C20:4(omega 6) or C22:6(omega 3) in position '2-D'. To investigate the properties of the bilayers two models were considered. In the first model, the simulation cells of the bilayers consisted of 96 phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules and 2304 water molecules: 48 lipid molecules per layer and 24 H2O molecules per lipid. The water was modeled by explicit TIP3P water molecules. In the second model, the head group of the lipid molecules was treated as an effective sphere -- diacylglycerolipids (DGs) were considered, the interface of each monolayer was modeled by a flat surface; no water molecules were present explicitly. The bilayers consisted of 48 X 2 equals 96 glycerolipids arranged in a rectangular simulation cell. Various properties of the bilayers -- the C-H bond order parameter -SCH profiles of the hydrocarbon tails, the root-mean-square values of the positional fluctuations of the lipid chain carbons, mass density distributions of lipid molecules and water along the normals were investigated.

  18. Molecular chaperone-mediated nuclear protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Freeman, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    Homeostasis requires effective action of numerous biological pathways including those working along a genome. The variety of processes functioning in the nucleus is considerable, yet the number of employed factors eclipses this total. Ideally, individual components assemble into distinct complexes and serially operate along a pathway to perform work. Adding to the complexity is a multitude of fluctuating internal and external signals that must be monitored to initiate, continue or halt individual activities. While cooperative interactions between proteins of the same process provide a mechanism for rapid and precise assembly, the inherent stability of such organized structures interferes with the proper timing of biological events. Further prolonging the longevity of biological complexes are crowding effects resulting from the high concentration of intracellular macromolecules. Hence, accessory proteins are required to destabilize the various assemblies to efficiently transition between structures, avoid off-pathway competitive interactions, and to terminate pathway activity. We suggest that molecular chaperones have evolved, in part, to manage these challenges by fostering a general and continuous dynamic protein environment within the nucleus. PMID:24694369

  19. Molecular chaperone-mediated nuclear protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Freeman, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    Homeostasis requires effective action of numerous biological pathways including those working along a genome. The variety of processes functioning in the nucleus is considerable, yet the number of employed factors eclipses this total. Ideally, individual components assemble into distinct complexes and serially operate along a pathway to perform work. Adding to the complexity is a multitude of fluctuating internal and external signals that must be monitored to initiate, continue or halt individual activities. While cooperative interactions between proteins of the same process provide a mechanism for rapid and precise assembly, the inherent stability of such organized structures interferes with the proper timing of biological events. Further prolonging the longevity of biological complexes are crowding effects resulting from the high concentration of intracellular macromolecules. Hence, accessory proteins are required to destabilize the various assemblies to efficiently transition between structures, avoid off-pathway competitive interactions, and to terminate pathway activity. We suggest that molecular chaperones have evolved, in part, to manage these challenges by fostering a general and continuous dynamic protein environment within the nucleus.

  20. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-08-14

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion. PMID:27431975

  1. Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe; Dudas, Gytis; Gregory, Victoria; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01914.001 PMID:24497547

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Coulomb Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Bringa, E M

    2002-05-17

    A swift ion creates a track of electronic excitations in the target material. A net repulsion inside the track can cause a ''Coulomb Explosion'', which can lead to damage and sputtering of the material. Here we report results from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of Coulomb explosion for a cylindrical track as a function of charge density and neutralization/quenching time, {tau}. Screening by the free electrons is accounted for using a screened Coulomb potential for the interaction among charges. The yield exhibits a prompt component from the track core and a component, which dominates at higher excitation density, from the heated region produced. For the cases studied, the number of atoms ejected per incident ion, i.e. the sputtering yield Y, is quadratic with charge density along the track as suggested by simple models. Y({tau} = 0.2 Debye periods) is nearly 20% of the yield when there is no neutralization ({tau} {yields} {infinity}). The connections between ''Coulomb explosions'', thermal spikes and measurements of electronic sputtering are discussed.

  3. Fracture simulations via massively parallel molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, B.L.; Abraham, F.F.; Ravelo, R.

    1993-09-01

    Fracture simulations at the atomistic level have heretofore been carried out for relatively small systems of particles, typically 10,000 or less. In order to study anything approaching a macroscopic system, massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) must be employed. In two spatial dimensions (2D), it is feasible to simulate a sample that is 0.1 {mu}m on a side. We report on recent MD simulations of mode I crack extension under tensile loading at high strain rates. The method of uniaxial, homogeneously expanding periodic boundary conditions was employed to represent tensile stress conditions near the crack tip. The effects of strain rate, temperature, material properties (equation of state and defect energies), and system size were examined. We found that, in order to mimic a bulk sample, several tricks (in addition to expansion boundary conditions) need to be employed: (1) the sample must be pre-strained to nearly the condition at which the crack will spontaneously open; (2) to relieve the stresses at free surfaces, such as the initial notch, annealing by kinetic-energy quenching must be carried out to prevent unwanted rarefactions; (3) sound waves emitted as the crack tip opens and dislocations emitted from the crack tip during blunting must be absorbed by special reservoir regions. The tricks described briefly in this paper will be especially important to carrying out feasible massively parallel 3D simulations via MD.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of gold nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanting

    We have carried out Molecular Dynamics simulations to study the thermal stability and melting behavior of gold nanoclusters and gold nanorods. The surface is found to play a very important role in both gold nanomaterials. Upon cooling from the liquid, we find that gold nanoclusters with 600-3000 atoms crystallize into a Mackay icosahedron. Upon heating, the {111} facets on the surface of the Mackay icosahedral gold nanoclusters soften but do not premelt below the bulk melting temperature. We attribute this surface softening to the increasing mobility of vertex and edge atoms with temperature, which leads to inter-layer and intra-layer diffusion, and a shrinkage of the average facet size. Upon heating, our simulated gold nanorods undergo a shape transformation preceding the melting transition. The shape transformation is induced by a minimization of the surface free energy, and is accompanied by a complete reconstruction of the internal structure driven by the surface change. During the transformation, the atoms on the end caps of the rod move to the sides of the rods, leading the rods to be shorter and wider. After the transformation, the surface of the stable intermediate state rod is mostly covered by the more stable {111} facets, other than the less stable {110} and {100} facets covering the sides of the initial constructed rod.

  5. Molecular dynamics studies of lanthanum chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W.; Bopp, Ph. ); Probst, M.M. ); Spohr, E. ); Lin, J.L. )

    1990-05-31

    Molecular dynamics studies are reported for LaCl{sub 3} solutions at two different concentrations and temperatures, and for isolated aqueous La{sup 3+} ions. Ion-water clusters La(H{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup 3+} with n = 61 and n = 100 and systems consisting of one ion and 100 or 200 water molecules in the usual periodic box, as well as solutions of 7 (4) cations and 21 (12) anions in 190 (200) water molecules, corresponding to 2 and 1.1 m solutions, respectively, were investigated. The 2 m solution was investigated at two different temperatures. The results for the static structure, with special emphasis on the hydration structure of the La{sup 3+} ion, are discussed in terms of radial distribution functions and resulting hydration numbers, and various other correlations. These results are compared with X-ray data and discussed in light of the hydration numbers observed for aqueous ions in general.

  6. Efficient compression of molecular dynamics trajectory files.

    PubMed

    Marais, Patrick; Kenwood, Julian; Smith, Keegan Carruthers; Kuttel, Michelle M; Gain, James

    2012-10-15

    We investigate whether specific properties of molecular dynamics trajectory files can be exploited to achieve effective file compression. We explore two classes of lossy, quantized compression scheme: "interframe" predictors, which exploit temporal coherence between successive frames in a simulation, and more complex "intraframe" schemes, which compress each frame independently. Our interframe predictors are fast, memory-efficient and well suited to on-the-fly compression of massive simulation data sets, and significantly outperform the benchmark BZip2 application. Our schemes are configurable: atomic positional accuracy can be sacrificed to achieve greater compression. For high fidelity compression, our linear interframe predictor gives the best results at very little computational cost: at moderate levels of approximation (12-bit quantization, maximum error ≈ 10(-2) Å), we can compress a 1-2 fs trajectory file to 5-8% of its original size. For 200 fs time steps-typically used in fine grained water diffusion experiments-we can compress files to ~25% of their input size, still substantially better than BZip2. While compression performance degrades with high levels of quantization, the simulation error is typically much greater than the associated approximation error in such cases.

  7. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I.

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  8. Analyzing slowly exchanging protein conformations by ion mobility mass spectrometry: study of the dynamic equilibrium of prolyl oligopeptidase.

    PubMed

    López, Abraham; Vilaseca, Marta; Madurga, Sergio; Varese, Monica; Tarragó, Teresa; Giralt, Ernest

    2016-07-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMMS) is a biophysical technique that allows the separation of isobaric species on the basis of their size and shape. The high separation capacity, sensitivity and relatively fast time scale measurements confer IMMS great potential for the study of proteins in slow (µs-ms) conformational equilibrium in solution. However, the use of this technique for examining dynamic proteins is still not generalized. One of the major limitations is the instability of protein ions in the gas phase, which raises the question as to what extent the structures detected reflect those in solution. Here, we addressed this issue by analyzing the conformational landscape of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) - a model of a large dynamic enzyme in the µs-ms range - by native IMMS and compared the results obtained in the gas phase with those obtained in solution. In order to interpret the experimental results, we used theoretical simulations. In addition, the stability of POP gaseous ions was explored by charge reduction and collision-induced unfolding experiments. Our experiments disclosed two species of POP in the gas phase, which correlated well with the open and closed conformations in equilibrium in solution; moreover, a gas-phase collapsed form of POP was also detected. Therefore, our findings not only support the potential of IMMS for the study of multiple co-existing conformations of large proteins in slow dynamic equilibrium in solution but also stress the need for careful data analysis to avoid artifacts. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S. K.; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-01

    solvent, we performed in this work the classical molecular dynamics simulation on a realistic model solution with the peptide embedded in an explicit water environment, and calculated its dynamic properties both as an outcome of the simulations, and by the diffusion theory in reduced statistical-mechanical approach within HBA on the premise that the mode-coupling approach to the diffusion theory can give both the long-range and local dynamics starting from equilibrium averages which were obtained from detailed atomistic simulations.

  10. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S. K.; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-14

    solvent, we performed in this work the classical molecular dynamics simulation on a realistic model solution with the peptide embedded in an explicit water environment, and calculated its dynamic properties both as an outcome of the simulations, and by the diffusion theory in reduced statistical-mechanical approach within HBA on the premise that the mode-coupling approach to the diffusion theory can give both the long-range and local dynamics starting from equilibrium averages which were obtained from detailed atomistic simulations.

  11. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S K; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-14

    solvent, we performed in this work the classical molecular dynamics simulation on a realistic model solution with the peptide embedded in an explicit water environment, and calculated its dynamic properties both as an outcome of the simulations, and by the diffusion theory in reduced statistical-mechanical approach within HBA on the premise that the mode-coupling approach to the diffusion theory can give both the long-range and local dynamics starting from equilibrium averages which were obtained from detailed atomistic simulations. PMID:24628208

  12. On the vapor-liquid equilibrium of attractive chain fluids with variable degree of molecular flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Westen, Thijs; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; Gross, Joachim

    2015-06-01

    We study the isotropic (vapor and liquid) phase behavior of attractive chain fluids. Special emphasis is placed on the role of molecular flexibility, which is studied by means of a rod-coil model. Two new equations of state (EoSs) are developed for square-well- (SW) and Lennard-Jones (LJ) chain fluids. The EoSs are developed by applying the perturbation theory of Barker and Henderson (BH) to a reference fluid of hard chain molecules. The novelty of the approach is based on (1) the use of a recently developed hard-chain reference EoS that explicitly incorporates the effects of molecular flexibility, (2) the use of recent molecular simulation data for the radial distribution function of hard-chain fluids, and (3) a newly developed effective segment size, which effectively accounts for the soft repulsion between segments of LJ chains. It is shown that the effective segment size needs to be temperature-, density-, and chain-length dependent. To obtain a simplified analytical EoS, the perturbation terms are fitted by polynomials in density (SW and LJ), chain length (SW and LJ), and temperature (only for LJ). It is shown that the equations of state result in an accurate description of molecular simulation data for vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) and isotherms of fully flexible SW- and LJ chain fluids and their mixtures. To evaluate the performance of the equations of state in describing the effects of molecular flexibility on VLE, we present new Monte Carlo simulation results for the VLE of rigid linear- and partially flexible SW- and LJ chain fluids. For SW chains, the developed EoS is in a good agreement with simulation results. For increased rigidity of the chains, both theory and simulations predict an increase of the VL density difference and a slight increase of the VL critical temperature. For LJ chains, the EoS proves incapable of reproducing part of these trends.

  13. On the vapor-liquid equilibrium of attractive chain fluids with variable degree of molecular flexibility.

    PubMed

    van Westen, Thijs; Vlugt, Thijs J H; Gross, Joachim

    2015-06-14

    We study the isotropic (vapor and liquid) phase behavior of attractive chain fluids. Special emphasis is placed on the role of molecular flexibility, which is studied by means of a rod-coil model. Two new equations of state (EoSs) are developed for square-well- (SW) and Lennard-Jones (LJ) chain fluids. The EoSs are developed by applying the perturbation theory of Barker and Henderson (BH) to a reference fluid of hard chain molecules. The novelty of the approach is based on (1) the use of a recently developed hard-chain reference EoS that explicitly incorporates the effects of molecular flexibility, (2) the use of recent molecular simulation data for the radial distribution function of hard-chain fluids, and (3) a newly developed effective segment size, which effectively accounts for the soft repulsion between segments of LJ chains. It is shown that the effective segment size needs to be temperature-, density-, and chain-length dependent. To obtain a simplified analytical EoS, the perturbation terms are fitted by polynomials in density (SW and LJ), chain length (SW and LJ), and temperature (only for LJ). It is shown that the equations of state result in an accurate description of molecular simulation data for vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) and isotherms of fully flexible SW- and LJ chain fluids and their mixtures. To evaluate the performance of the equations of state in describing the effects of molecular flexibility on VLE, we present new Monte Carlo simulation results for the VLE of rigid linear- and partially flexible SW- and LJ chain fluids. For SW chains, the developed EoS is in a good agreement with simulation results. For increased rigidity of the chains, both theory and simulations predict an increase of the VL density difference and a slight increase of the VL critical temperature. For LJ chains, the EoS proves incapable of reproducing part of these trends.

  14. A benchmark study of molecular structure by experimental and theoretical methods: Equilibrium structure of thymine from microwave rotational constants and coupled-cluster computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Natalja; Demaison, Jean; Ksenafontov, Denis N.; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Accurate equilibrium, re, structures of thymine have been determined using two different, and to some extent complementary techniques. The composite ab initio Born-Oppenheimer, re(best ab initio), structural parameters are obtained from the all-electron CCSD(T) and MP2 geometry optimizations using Gaussian basis sets up to quadruple-zeta quality. The semi-experimental mixed estimation method, where internal coordinates are fitted concurrently to equilibrium rotational constants and geometry parameters obtained from a high level of electronic structure theory. The equilibrium rotational constants are derived from experimental effective ground-state rotational constants and rovibrational corrections based on a quantum-chemical cubic force field. Equilibrium molecular structures accurate to 0.002 Å and 0.2° have been determined. This work is one of a few accurate equilibrium structure determinations for large molecules. The poor behavior of Kraitchman's equations is discussed.

  15. Punctuated equilibrium and shock waves in molecular models of biological evolution.

    PubMed

    Saakian, David B; Ghazaryan, Makar H; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2014-08-01

    We consider the dynamics in infinite population evolution models with a general symmetric fitness landscape. We find shock waves, i.e., discontinuous transitions in the mean fitness, in evolution dynamics even with smooth fitness landscapes, which means that the search for the optimal evolution trajectory is more complicated. These shock waves appear in the case of positive epistasis and can be used to represent punctuated equilibria in biological evolution during long geological time scales. We find exact analytical solutions for discontinuous dynamics at the large-genome-length limit and derive optimal mutation rates for a fixed fitness landscape to send the population from the initial configuration to some final configuration in the fastest way.

  16. Molecular dynamics in cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra deconvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bossis, Fabrizio; Palese, Luigi L.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase molecular dynamics serve to predict Moessbauer lineshape widths. {yields} Half height widths are used in modeling of Lorentzian doublets. {yields} Such spectral deconvolutions are useful in detecting the enzyme intermediates. -- Abstract: In this work low temperature molecular dynamics simulations of cytochrome c oxidase are used to predict an experimentally observable, namely Moessbauer spectra width. Predicted lineshapes are used to model Lorentzian doublets, with which published cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra were simulated. Molecular dynamics imposed constraints to spectral lineshapes permit to obtain useful information, like the presence of multiple chemical species in the binuclear center of cytochrome c oxidase. Moreover, a benchmark of quality for molecular dynamic simulations can be obtained. Despite the overwhelming importance of dynamics in electron-proton transfer systems, limited work has been devoted to unravel how much realistic are molecular dynamics simulations results. In this work, molecular dynamics based predictions are found to be in good agreement with published experimental spectra, showing that we can confidently rely on actual simulations. Molecular dynamics based deconvolution of Moessbauer spectra will lead to a renewed interest for application of this approach in bioenergetics.

  17. An investigation of molecular dynamics simulation and molecular docking: interaction of citrus flavonoids and bovine β-lactoglobulin in focus.

    PubMed

    Sahihi, M; Ghayeb, Y

    2014-08-01

    Citrus flavonoids are natural compounds with important health benefits. The study of their interaction with a transport protein, such as bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG), at the atomic level could be a valuable factor to control their transport to biological sites. In the present study, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation methods were used to investigate the interaction of hesperetin, naringenin, nobiletin and tangeretin as citrus flavonoids and BLG as transport protein. The molecular docking results revealed that these flavonoids bind in the internal cavity of BLG and the BLG affinity for binding the flavonoids follows naringenin>hesperetin>tangeretin>nobiletin. The docking results also indicated that the BLG-flavonoid complexes are stabilized through hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bond interactions and π-π stacking interactions. The analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories showed that the root mean square deviation (RMSD) of various systems reaches equilibrium and fluctuates around the mean value at various times. Time evolution of the radius of gyration, total solvent accessible surface of the protein and the second structure of protein showed as well that BLG and BLG-flavonoid complexes were stable around 2500ps, and there was not any conformational change as for BLG-flavonoid complexes. Further, the profiles of atomic fluctuations indicated the rigidity of the ligand binding site during the simulation.

  18. Investigating the Equilibrium Melting Temperature of Polyethylene Using the Non-Linear Hoffman-Weeks Analysis: Effect of Molecular Weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Marand, Herve

    The limiting equilibrium melting temperature for infinite molar mass linear polyethylene, Tmo , has been a point of controversy for about five decades. On one hand, Broadhurst and Flory-Vrij extrapolated melting data for short alkanes to a value of ca. 145oC. On the other hand, Wunderlich proposed a value of 141oC from melting studies of extended-chain PE crystals formed under high pressure. While a difference in Tmo by 4oC might seem superfluous, it has significant implication for the analysis of the temperature and chain length dependences of crystal growth kinetic data. In this work we estimate the equilibrium melting temperatures, Tm for three linear narrow molecular weight distribution polyethylenes using the non-linear Hoffman-Weeks treatment. The resulting Tm values thus obtained are significantly lower than these predicted by the Flory-Vrij treatment and are within experimental uncertainty indistinguishable from those reported by Wunderlich and Hikosaka et al. Our results also suggest that the constant C2 in the expression for the undercooling dependence of the initial lamellar thickness (lg*= C1/ ΔT + C2) increases linearly with chain length.

  19. CO2, energy and economy interactions: A multisectoral, dynamic, computable general equilibrium model for Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yoonyoung

    While vast resources have been invested in the development of computational models for cost-benefit analysis for the "whole world" or for the largest economies (e.g. United States, Japan, Germany), the remainder have been thrown together into one model for the "rest of the world." This study presents a multi-sectoral, dynamic, computable general equilibrium (CGE) model for Korea. This research evaluates the impacts of controlling COsb2 emissions using a multisectoral CGE model. This CGE economy-energy-environment model analyzes and quantifies the interactions between COsb2, energy and economy. This study examines interactions and influences of key environmental policy components: applied economic instruments, emission targets, and environmental tax revenue recycling methods. The most cost-effective economic instrument is the carbon tax. The economic effects discussed include impacts on main macroeconomic variables (in particular, economic growth), sectoral production, and the energy market. This study considers several aspects of various COsb2 control policies, such as the basic variables in the economy: capital stock and net foreign debt. The results indicate emissions might be stabilized in Korea at the expense of economic growth and with dramatic sectoral allocation effects. Carbon dioxide emissions stabilization could be achieved to the tune of a 600 trillion won loss over a 20 year period (1990-2010). The average annual real GDP would decrease by 2.10% over the simulation period compared to the 5.87% increase in the Business-as-Usual. This model satisfies an immediate need for a policy simulation model for Korea and provides the basic framework for similar economies. It is critical to keep the central economic question at the forefront of any discussion regarding environmental protection. How much will reform cost, and what does the economy stand to gain and lose? Without this model, the policy makers might resort to hesitation or even blind speculation. With

  20. Effect of pH on dynamic and equilibrium surface tension of dissolve organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arye, Gilboa; Trifonov, Pavel; Ilani, Talli

    2014-05-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the terrestrial environment may originate from the decomposition of soil organic matter accumulated from the degradation of vegetative residues, the release of root exudates, the lysis of microorganisms and addition of organic wastes, such as livestock manure, biosolids, and different composted organic residues, or from irrigation with wastewater. The structure of DOM macromolecules is known to vary with the following aqueous solution properties: ionic strength, the nature of the inorganic ions, pH and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration. In aqueous solution, the DOM molecules are amphiphilic, that is, it possesses both hydrophilic and hydrophobic functional groups in the same molecule. This simultaneous presence, gave rise to the conceptual surfactant like model for DOM which has been studies in conjunction with the equilibrium surface tension at the liquid-air interface (STeq, mN/m). Measurements of STeq of DOM solution were reported in a relatively small number of studies for the conditions of the aqueous solution (e.g., temperature, pH, ionic strength, the valence of the metal ions, and DOC concentration). All studies demonstrate the decrease in STeq with increase aqueous concentration of the DOC. The effect of pH, however, exhibit contradictory results. Specifically, for a given DOC concentration, the patterns reported for STeq versus pH were different. With increasing pH values, STeq has been reported to decrease, increase or exhibit a minimum. These contradictory results have been attributed to the different DOC concentration examined in each of the studies. In current study we hypothesized that the inconsistent results of STeq vs. pH may also stem from the adsorption kinetics of the DOM amphiphilic molecules at the liquid air interface, which can be evaluated form dynamic surface tension measurements (STt). The STt is approaching STeq values and commonly exhibiting an exponential decay pattern. If for different p

  1. Molecular simulation of the thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon.

    PubMed

    Vlasiuk, Maryna; Frascoli, Federico; Sadus, Richard J

    2016-09-14

    The thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon are comprehensively studied using ab initio, empirical, and semi-classical intermolecular potentials and classical Monte Carlo simulations. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations for isochoric heat capacity and structural properties are also reported for two empirical potentials and one ab initio potential. The isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal pressure coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and the speed of sound are reported and compared with experimental data for the entire range of liquid densities from the triple point to the critical point. Lustig's thermodynamic approach is formally extended for temperature-dependent intermolecular potentials. Quantum effects are incorporated using the Feynman-Hibbs quantum correction, which results in significant improvement in the accuracy of predicted thermodynamic properties. The new Feynman-Hibbs version of the Hellmann-Bich-Vogel potential predicts the isochoric heat capacity to an accuracy of 1.4% over the entire range of liquid densities. It also predicts other thermodynamic properties more accurately than alternative intermolecular potentials.

  2. Molecular simulation of the thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasiuk, Maryna; Frascoli, Federico; Sadus, Richard J.

    2016-09-01

    The thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon are comprehensively studied using ab initio, empirical, and semi-classical intermolecular potentials and classical Monte Carlo simulations. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations for isochoric heat capacity and structural properties are also reported for two empirical potentials and one ab initio potential. The isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal pressure coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and the speed of sound are reported and compared with experimental data for the entire range of liquid densities from the triple point to the critical point. Lustig's thermodynamic approach is formally extended for temperature-dependent intermolecular potentials. Quantum effects are incorporated using the Feynman-Hibbs quantum correction, which results in significant improvement in the accuracy of predicted thermodynamic properties. The new Feynman-Hibbs version of the Hellmann-Bich-Vogel potential predicts the isochoric heat capacity to an accuracy of 1.4% over the entire range of liquid densities. It also predicts other thermodynamic properties more accurately than alternative intermolecular potentials.

  3. Molecular simulation of the thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon.

    PubMed

    Vlasiuk, Maryna; Frascoli, Federico; Sadus, Richard J

    2016-09-14

    The thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon are comprehensively studied using ab initio, empirical, and semi-classical intermolecular potentials and classical Monte Carlo simulations. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations for isochoric heat capacity and structural properties are also reported for two empirical potentials and one ab initio potential. The isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal pressure coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and the speed of sound are reported and compared with experimental data for the entire range of liquid densities from the triple point to the critical point. Lustig's thermodynamic approach is formally extended for temperature-dependent intermolecular potentials. Quantum effects are incorporated using the Feynman-Hibbs quantum correction, which results in significant improvement in the accuracy of predicted thermodynamic properties. The new Feynman-Hibbs version of the Hellmann-Bich-Vogel potential predicts the isochoric heat capacity to an accuracy of 1.4% over the entire range of liquid densities. It also predicts other thermodynamic properties more accurately than alternative intermolecular potentials. PMID:27634265

  4. Equilibrium molecular theory of two-dimensional adsorbate drops on surfaces of heterogeneous adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2016-08-01

    A molecular statistical theory for calculating the linear tension of small multicomponent droplets in two-dimensional adsorption systems is developed. The theory describes discrete distributions of molecules in space (on a scale comparable to molecular size) and continuous distributions of molecules (at short distances inside cells) in their translational and vibrational motions. Pair intermolecular interaction potentials (the Mie type potential) in several coordination spheres are considered. For simplicity, it is assumed that distinctions in the sizes of mixture components are slight and comparable to the sizes of adsorbent adsorption centers. Expressions for the pressure tensor components inside small droplets on the heterogeneous surface of an adsorbent are obtained, allowing calculations of the thermodynamic characteristics of a vapor-fluid interface, including linear tension. Problems in refining the molecular theory are discussed: describing the properties of small droplets using a coordination model of their structure, considering the effect an adsorbate has on the state of a near-surface adsorbent region, and the surface heterogeneity factor in the conditions for the formation of droplets.

  5. Combined molecular dynamics-spin dynamics simulations of bcc iron

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Meewanage Dilina N; Yin, Junqi; Landau, David P; Nicholson, Don M; Stocks, George Malcolm; Eisenbach, Markus; Brown, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Using a classical model that treats translational and spin degrees of freedom on an equal footing, we study phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron with combined molecular and spin dynamics methods. The atomic interactions are modeled via an empirical many-body potential while spin dependent interactions are established through a Hamiltonian of the Heisenberg form with a distance dependent magnetic exchange interaction obtained from first principles electronic structure calculations. The temporal evolution of translational and spin degrees of freedom was determined by numerically solving the coupled equations of motion, using an algorithm based on the second order Suzuki-Trotter decomposition of the exponential operators. By calculating Fourier transforms of space- and time-displaced correlation functions, we demonstrate that the the presence of lattice vibrations leads to noticeable softening and damping of spin wave modes. As a result of the interplay between lattice and spin subsystems, we also observe additional longitudinal spin wave excitations, with frequencies which coincide with that of the longitudinal lattice vibrations.

  6. Consistent temperature coupling with thermal fluctuations of smooth particle hydrodynamics and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ganzenmüller, Georg C; Hiermaier, Stefan; Steinhauser, Martin O

    2012-01-01

    We propose a thermodynamically consistent and energy-conserving temperature coupling scheme between the atomistic and the continuum domain. The coupling scheme links the two domains using the DPDE (Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy) thermostat and is designed to handle strong temperature gradients across the atomistic/continuum domain interface. The fundamentally different definitions of temperature in the continuum and atomistic domain - internal energy and heat capacity versus particle velocity - are accounted for in a straightforward and conceptually intuitive way by the DPDE thermostat. We verify the here-proposed scheme using a fluid, which is simultaneously represented as a continuum using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics, and as an atomistically resolved liquid using Molecular Dynamics. In the case of equilibrium contact between both domains, we show that the correct microscopic equilibrium properties of the atomistic fluid are obtained. As an example of a strong non-equilibrium situation, we consider the propagation of a steady shock-wave from the continuum domain into the atomistic domain, and show that the coupling scheme conserves both energy and shock-wave dynamics. To demonstrate the applicability of our scheme to real systems, we consider shock loading of a phospholipid bilayer immersed in water in a multi-scale simulation, an interesting topic of biological relevance.

  7. Non-equilibrium Dynamics in the Quantum Brownian Oscillator and the Second Law of Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ilki

    2012-01-01

    We initially prepare a quantum linear oscillator weakly coupled to a bath in equilibrium at an arbitrary temperature. We disturb this system by varying a Hamiltonian parameter of the coupled oscillator, namely, either its spring constant or mass according to an arbitrary but pre-determined protocol in order to perform external work on it. We then derive a closed expression for the reduced density operator of the coupled oscillator along this non-equilibrium process as well as the exact expression pertaining to the corresponding quasi-static process. This immediately allows us to analytically discuss the second law of thermodynamics for non-equilibrium processes. Then we derive a Clausius inequality and obtain its validity supporting the second law, as a consistent generalization of the Clausius equality valid for the quasi-static counterpart, introduced in (Kim and Mahler in Phys. Rev. E 81:011101, 2010, [1]).

  8. Energetics and dynamics in MbCN: CN--vibrational relaxation from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, Jonas; Meuwly, Markus

    2007-01-11

    The dynamics of the cyanide anion bound to sperm-whale myoglobin is investigated using atomistic simulations. With density-functional theory, a 2D potential energy surface for the cyanide-heme complex is calculated. Two deep minima with a stabilization energy of approximately 50 kcal/mol corresponding to two different binding orientations (Fe-CN and Fe-NC) of the ligand are found. The Fe-CN conformation is favored over Fe-NC by several kcal/mol. Mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations show that the binding orientation affects the bond strength of the ligand, with a significantly different bond length and a 25 cm-1 shift in the fundamental CN-frequency. For the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, a 3-center fluctuating charge model for the Fe-CN unit is developed that captures polarization and ligand-metal charge transfer. Stability arguments based on the energetics around the active site and the CN- frequency shifts suggest that the Fe-CN conformation with epsilon-protonation of His epsilon 64 are most likely, which is in agreement with experiment. Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium MD simulations are carried out to investigate the relaxation time scale and possible relaxation pathways in bound MbCN. The nonequilibrium MD simulations with a vibrationally excited ligand reveal that vibrational relaxation takes place on a time scale of hundreds of picoseconds within the active site. This finding supports the hypothesis that the experimentally observed relaxation rate (3.6 ps) reflects the repopulation of the electronic ground state.

  9. Charge-dependent conformations and dynamics of pamam dendrimers revealed by neutron scattering and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin

    , at neutral condition, the exterior residues folding back into interior would necessarily lead to higher entropy and equivalently lower free energy and thereby is energetically favored. As one decreases the pH condition of PAMAM dendrimers, the constituent residues would carry positive charges. The resultant inter-residue Coulomb repulsion would naturally result in conformational evolution. We found from CVSANS analysis that when dendrimers are charged by different acids, this conformational evolution is not the same. For dendrimers charged by DCl, the mass is seen to relocate from molecular interior to periphery. Nevertheless, those acidified by D 2SO4 exhibit surprisingly minor structural change under variation of molecular charge. To explain the above observation, we performed MD simulations and calculated the excess free energy of Cl- and SO 42- counterions. The binding between sulfate ions and charged amines of PAMAM dendrimers are found to be much stronger than the case for chlorides. This more energetic binding would serve as better screening effect among charged residues. Consequently, electrostatic repulsion triggered outstretching tendency is effectively diminished. In order to make direct comparison between MD simulations and neutron scattering experiments, we proposed and implemented a rigorous method, which incorporates the contribution from those invasive water molecules, to calculate scattering functions of a single PAMAM dendrimer using equilibrium MD trajectories. The bridge between neutron scattering experiments and MD simulation is successfully established. Aside from structural comparisons between MD simulations and experiments, we utilized MD simulation to decipher the previously reported QENS experimental observation that the segmental dynamics of PAMAM dendrimer would enhance with increasing molecular charge. We pursued the mechanism from the perspective of hydrocarbon component of dendrimer and solvent (water) interaction as a form similar to

  10. Molecular dynamics of biaxial nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarman, Sten

    1996-01-01

    We devise a constraint algorithm that makes the angular velocity of the director of a liquid crystal a constant of motion. When the angular velocity is set equal to zero, a director based coordinate system becomes an inertial frame. This is a great advantage because most thermodynamic properties and time correlation functions of a liquid crystal are best expressed relative to a director based coordinate system. One also prevents the director reorientation from interfering with the tails of the time correlation functions. When the angular velocity is forced to be zero the constraints do not do any work on the system. This makes it possible to prove that ensemble averages of phase functions and time correlation functions are unaffected by the director constraint torques. The constraint algorithm also facilitates generalization of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics algorithms to liquid crystal phases. In order to test the algorithm numerically we have simulated a biaxial nematic phase of a variant of the Gay-Berne fluid [J. G. Gay and B. J. Berne, J. Chem. Phys. 74, 3316 (1981)]. The director constraint algorithm works very well. We have calculated the velocity autocorrelation functions and the self diffusion coefficients. In a biaxial nematic liquid crystal there are three independent components of the self-diffusion tensor. They have been found to be finite and different thus proving that we really simulate a liquid rather than a solid and that the symmetry is biaxial. Simulation of biaxial liquid crystals requires fairly large systems. We have therefore developed an algorithm that we run on a parallel computer instead of an ordinary work station.

  11. Parameter passing between molecular dynamics and continuum models for droplets on solid substrates: the static case.

    PubMed

    Tretyakov, Nikita; Müller, Marcus; Todorova, Desislava; Thiele, Uwe

    2013-02-14

    We study equilibrium properties of polymer films and droplets on a solid substrate employing particle-based simulation techniques (molecular dynamics) and a continuum description. Parameter-passing techniques are explored that facilitate a detailed comparison of the two models. In particular, the liquid-vapor, solid-liquid, and solid-vapor interface tensions, and the Derjaguin or disjoining pressure are determined by molecular dynamics simulations. This information is then introduced into continuum descriptions accounting for (i) the full curvature and (ii) a long-wave approximation of the curvature (thin film model). A comparison of the dependence of the contact angle on droplet size indicates that the theories agree well if the contact angles are defined in a compatible manner. PMID:23425491

  12. A comparison of molecular dynamics and diffuse interface model predictions of Lennard-Jones fluid evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Barbante, Paolo; Frezzotti, Aldo; Gibelli, Livio

    2014-12-09

    The unsteady evaporation of a thin planar liquid film is studied by molecular dynamics simulations of Lennard-Jones fluid. The obtained results are compared with the predictions of a diffuse interface model in which capillary Korteweg contributions are added to hydrodynamic equations, in order to obtain a unified description of the liquid bulk, liquid-vapor interface and vapor region. Particular care has been taken in constructing a diffuse interface model matching the thermodynamic and transport properties of the Lennard-Jones fluid. The comparison of diffuse interface model and molecular dynamics results shows that, although good agreement is obtained in equilibrium conditions, remarkable deviations of diffuse interface model predictions from the reference molecular dynamics results are observed in the simulation of liquid film evaporation. It is also observed that molecular dynamics results are in good agreement with preliminary results obtained from a composite model which describes the liquid film by a standard hydrodynamic model and the vapor by the Boltzmann equation. The two mathematical model models are connected by kinetic boundary conditions assuming unit evaporation coefficient.

  13. Synthetic and computational studies on factors controlling structures of molecular triangles and squares and their equilibrium in solutions.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Kazuhiro; Kasai, Ko; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2010-02-15

    Reactions of (en*)Pd(NO(3))(2) (en* = N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine)with a series of organic bridging ligands of pyrazine, 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene, 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)acetylene, and 1,4-bis(4-pyridyl)benzene are carried out to investigate factors controlling the supramolecular structures and the equilibrium between the molecular triangles and the squares in solutions. The molecular structures of solid triangular [(en*)Pd(L(n))](3)(NO(3))(6) with 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene and 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)acetylene bridging ligands are determined by X-ray crystallography: [(en*)Pd(1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene)](3)(NO(3))(6), monoclinic Pn (No. 7), a = 17.3242(3) A, b = 15.0804(3) A, c = 17.3223(3) A, beta = 103.5100(10) degrees , V = 4400.33(14) A(3), Z = 2; [(en*)Pd(1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)acetylene)](3)(NO(3))(6), orthorhombic Aba2 (No. 41), a = 14.6642(3) A, b = 27.8763(5) A, c = 21.4233(4) A, V = 8757.5(3) A(3), Z = 4. In contrast, an infinite chain structure of {[(en*)Pd(pyrazine)](NO(3))}(infinity) (monoclinic P2(1)/m (No. 11), a = 14.4740(7) A, b = 8.9209(3) A, c = 28.9705(13) A, beta = 89.974(2) degrees , V = 3740.7(3) A(3), Z = 2) is observed with the shortest pyrazine. The steric hindrance between the supporting and the bridging ligands or the neighboring supporting ligands would contribute to the formation of the infinite chain complex 1. The N(Py)-Pd-N(Py) angles in the solid molecular triangles monotonically increased closely to 90 degrees with the increase in the lengths of the bridging ligands, indicating the relaxation of the steric hindrance between the supporting and the bridging ligands. The structures of the molecular triangles and squares in solutions are optimized with density functional theory (DFT) calculations using the conductor-like polarizable continuum model (C-PCM), and the resulting structures are almost the same as those in the solid state. The (1)H NMR spectra indicate that (i) the equilibrium between the molecular triangles and the squares is

  14. Investigating the Magnetic Interaction with Geomag and Tracker Video Analysis: Static Equilibrium and Anharmonic Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onorato, P.; Mascheretti, P.; DeAmbrosis, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe how simple experiments realizable by using easily found and low-cost materials allow students to explore quantitatively the magnetic interaction thanks to the help of an Open Source Physics tool, the Tracker Video Analysis software. The static equilibrium of a "column" of permanents magnets is carefully investigated by…

  15. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems. PMID:27078486

  16. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems.

  17. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems.

  18. A model of lipid-free Apolipoprotein A-I revealed by iterative molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Lei, Dongsheng; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-03-20

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I), the major protein component of high-density lipoprotein, has been proven inversely correlated to cardiovascular risk in past decades. The lipid-free state of apo A-I is the initial stage which binds to lipids forming high-density lipoprotein. Molecular models of lipid-free apo A-I have been reported by methods like X-ray crystallography and chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry (CCL/MS). Through structural analysis we found that those current models had limited consistency with other experimental results, such as those from hydrogen exchange with mass spectrometry. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we also found those models could not reach a stable equilibrium state. Therefore, by integrating various experimental results, we proposed a new structural model for lipidfree apo A-I, which contains a bundled four-helix N-terminal domain (1–192) that forms a variable hydrophobic groove and a mobile short hairpin C-terminal domain (193–243). This model exhibits an equilibrium state through molecular dynamics simulation and is consistent with most of the experimental results known from CCL/MS on lysine pairs, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and hydrogen exchange. This solution-state lipid-free apo A-I model may elucidate the possible conformational transitions of apo A-I binding with lipids in high-density lipoprotein formation.

  19. A model of lipid-free Apolipoprotein A-I revealed by iterative molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Xing; Lei, Dongsheng; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-03-20

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I), the major protein component of high-density lipoprotein, has been proven inversely correlated to cardiovascular risk in past decades. The lipid-free state of apo A-I is the initial stage which binds to lipids forming high-density lipoprotein. Molecular models of lipid-free apo A-I have been reported by methods like X-ray crystallography and chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry (CCL/MS). Through structural analysis we found that those current models had limited consistency with other experimental results, such as those from hydrogen exchange with mass spectrometry. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we also found those models could not reach a stable equilibrium state. Therefore,more » by integrating various experimental results, we proposed a new structural model for lipidfree apo A-I, which contains a bundled four-helix N-terminal domain (1–192) that forms a variable hydrophobic groove and a mobile short hairpin C-terminal domain (193–243). This model exhibits an equilibrium state through molecular dynamics simulation and is consistent with most of the experimental results known from CCL/MS on lysine pairs, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and hydrogen exchange. This solution-state lipid-free apo A-I model may elucidate the possible conformational transitions of apo A-I binding with lipids in high-density lipoprotein formation.« less

  20. A Model of Lipid-Free Apolipoprotein A-I Revealed by Iterative Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing; Lei, Dongsheng; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I), the major protein component of high-density lipoprotein, has been proven inversely correlated to cardiovascular risk in past decades. The lipid-free state of apo A-I is the initial stage which binds to lipids forming high-density lipoprotein. Molecular models of lipid-free apo A-I have been reported by methods like X-ray crystallography and chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry (CCL/MS). Through structural analysis we found that those current models had limited consistency with other experimental results, such as those from hydrogen exchange with mass spectrometry. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we also found those models could not reach a stable equilibrium state. Therefore, by integrating various experimental results, we proposed a new structural model for lipid-free apo A-I, which contains a bundled four-helix N-terminal domain (1–192) that forms a variable hydrophobic groove and a mobile short hairpin C-terminal domain (193–243). This model exhibits an equilibrium state through molecular dynamics simulation and is consistent with most of the experimental results known from CCL/MS on lysine pairs, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and hydrogen exchange. This solution-state lipid-free apo A-I model may elucidate the possible conformational transitions of apo A-I binding with lipids in high-density lipoprotein formation. PMID:25793886

  1. Small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics structural study of gelling DNA nanostars.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Castanon, J; Bomboi, F; Rovigatti, L; Zanatta, M; Paciaroni, A; Comez, L; Porcar, L; Jafta, C J; Fadda, G C; Bellini, T; Sciortino, F

    2016-08-28

    DNA oligomers with properly designed sequences self-assemble into well defined constructs. Here, we exploit this methodology to produce bulk quantities of tetravalent DNA nanostars (each one composed of 196 nucleotides) and to explore the structural signatures of their aggregation process. We report small-angle neutron scattering experiments focused on the evaluation of both the form factor and the temperature evolution of the scattered intensity at a nanostar concentration where the system forms a tetravalent equilibrium gel. We also perform molecular dynamics simulations of one isolated tetramer to evaluate the form factor numerically, without resorting to any approximate shape. The numerical form factor is found to be in very good agreement with the experimental one. Simulations predict an essentially temperature-independent form factor, offering the possibility to extract the effective structure factor and its evolution during the equilibrium gelation. PMID:27586949

  2. Small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics structural study of gelling DNA nanostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Castanon, J.; Bomboi, F.; Rovigatti, L.; Zanatta, M.; Paciaroni, A.; Comez, L.; Porcar, L.; Jafta, C. J.; Fadda, G. C.; Bellini, T.; Sciortino, F.

    2016-08-01

    DNA oligomers with properly designed sequences self-assemble into well defined constructs. Here, we exploit this methodology to produce bulk quantities of tetravalent DNA nanostars (each one composed of 196 nucleotides) and to explore the structural signatures of their aggregation process. We report small-angle neutron scattering experiments focused on the evaluation of both the form factor and the temperature evolution of the scattered intensity at a nanostar concentration where the system forms a tetravalent equilibrium gel. We also perform molecular dynamics simulations of one isolated tetramer to evaluate the form factor numerically, without resorting to any approximate shape. The numerical form factor is found to be in very good agreement with the experimental one. Simulations predict an essentially temperature-independent form factor, offering the possibility to extract the effective structure factor and its evolution during the equilibrium gelation.

  3. The Adaptively Biased Molecular Dynamics method revisited: New capabilities and an application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Babin, Volodymyr; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste

    2015-09-01

    The free energy is perhaps one of the most important quantity required for describing biomolecular systems at equilibrium. Unfortunately, accurate and reliable free energies are notoriously difficult to calculate. To address this issue, we previously developed the Adaptively Biased Molecular Dynamics (ABMD) method for accurate calculation of rugged free energy surfaces (FES). Here, we briefly review the workings of the ABMD method with an emphasis on recent software additions, along with a short summary of a selected ABMD application based on the B-to-Z DNA transition. The ABMD method, along with current extensions, is currently implemented in the AMBER (ver.10-14) software package.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of interparticle spacing and many-body effect in gold supracrystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, X P; Ni, Y; He, L H

    2016-04-01

    Interparticle spacing in supracrystals is a crucial parameter for photoelectric applications as it dominates the transport rates between neighboring nanoparticles (NPs). Based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate interparticle spacing in alkylthiol-stabilized gold supracrystals as a function of the NP size, ligand length and external pressure. The repulsive many-body interactions in the supracrystals are also quantified by comparing the interparticle spacing with that between two individual NPs at equilibrium. Our results are consistent with available experiments, and are expected to help precise control of interparticle spacing in supracrystal devices.

  5. Self-interstitial clusters in radiation damage accumulation: coupled molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monasterio, Paul R.; Yip, Sidney; Yildiz, Bilge

    2013-04-01

    Self-interstitial interactions causing volume expansion in bcc Fe are studied through an idealized microstructure evolution model in which only self-interstial atoms (SIAs) are inserted. Using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and a metadynamics algorithm, meta-stable SIA clusters are observed to nucleate and grow into dislocation loops or localized amorphous phases, both contributing to swelling behavior persisting well beyond the atomistic time scale. A non-monotonic local density variation with dose rate is found and attributed to competing evolutions of different defective structures.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of interparticle spacing and many-body effect in gold supracrystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, X P; Ni, Y; He, L H

    2016-04-01

    Interparticle spacing in supracrystals is a crucial parameter for photoelectric applications as it dominates the transport rates between neighboring nanoparticles (NPs). Based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate interparticle spacing in alkylthiol-stabilized gold supracrystals as a function of the NP size, ligand length and external pressure. The repulsive many-body interactions in the supracrystals are also quantified by comparing the interparticle spacing with that between two individual NPs at equilibrium. Our results are consistent with available experiments, and are expected to help precise control of interparticle spacing in supracrystal devices. PMID:26909856

  7. Simulating Picosecond X-ray Diffraction from shocked crystals by Post-processing Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kimminau, G; Nagler, B; Higginbotham, A; Murphy, W; Park, N; Hawreliak, J; Kadau, K; Germann, T C; Bringa, E M; Kalantar, D; Lorenzana, H; Remington, B; Wark, J

    2008-06-19

    Calculations of the x-ray diffraction patterns from shocked crystals derived from the results of Non-Equilibrium-Molecular-Dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented. The atomic coordinates predicted by the NEMD simulations combined with atomic form factors are used to generate a discrete distribution of electron density. A Fast-Fourier-Transform (FFT) of this distribution provides an image of the crystal in reciprocal space, which can be further processed to produce quantitative simulated data for direct comparison with experiments that employ picosecond x-ray diffraction from laser-irradiated crystalline targets.

  8. Diffusion and separation of CH4/N2 in pillared graphene nanomaterials: A molecular dynamics investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Sainan; Lu, Xiaoqing; Wu, Zhonghua; Jin, Dongliang; Guo, Chen; Wang, Maohuai; Wei, Shuxian

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion and separation of CH4/N2 in pillared graphene were investigated by molecular dynamics. The pillared graphene with (6, 6) carbon nanotube (CNT) exhibited the higher diffusion and selectivity of CH4 over N2 than that with (7, 7) CNT due to the cooperative effect of pore topological characteristics and interaction energy. The stronger interaction facilitated CH4 to enter CNT prior to N2, and higher pressure promoted CH4 to pass CNT more easily. The relative concentrations profiles showed that CH4 reached equilibrium state faster than N2 at low pressure. Our results highlight potential use of pillared graphene in gas purification and separation.

  9. Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I.; Winey, J. Michael; Gupta, Yogendra Mohan; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd; Quevedo, Hernan J.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

  10. Frontiers in molecular dynamics simulations of DNA.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Alberto; Luque, F Javier; Orozco, Modesto

    2012-02-21

    It has been known for decades that DNA is extremely flexible and polymorphic, but our knowledge of its accessible conformational space remains limited. Structural data, primarily from X-ray diffraction studies, is sparse in comparison to the manifold configurations possible, and direct experimental examinations of DNA's flexibility still suffer from many limitations. In the face of these shortcomings, molecular dynamics (MD) is now an essential tool in the study of DNA. It affords detailed structural and dynamical insights, which explains its recent transition from a small number of highly specialized laboratories to a large variety of groups dealing with challenging biological problems. MD is now making an irreversible journey to the mainstream of research in biology, with the attendant opportunities and challenges. But given the speed with which MD studies of DNA have spread, the roots remain somewhat shallow: in many cases, there is a lack of deep knowledge about the foundations, strengths, and limits of the technique. In this Account, we discuss how MD has become the most important source of structural and flexibility data on DNA, focusing on advances since 2007 of atomistic MD in the description of DNA under near-physiological conditions and highlighting the possibilities and shortcomings of the technique. The evolution in the field over the past four years is a prelude to the ongoing revolution. The technique has gained in robustness and predictive power, which when coupled with the spectacular improvements in software and hardware has enabled the tackling of systems of increasing complexity. Simulation times of microseconds have now been achieved, with even longer times when specialized hardware is used. As a result, we have seen the first real-time simulation of large conformational transitions, including folding and unfolding of short DNA duplexes. Noteworthy advances have also been made in the study of DNA-ligand interactions, and we predict that a global

  11. CHARACTERIZING COUPLED CHARGE TRANSPORT WITH MULTISCALE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Jessica

    2011-08-31

    This is the final progress report for Award DE-SC0004920, entitled 'Characterizing coupled charge transport with multi scale molecular dynamics'. The technical abstract will be provided in the uploaded report.

  12. Dynamics of Fragmentation: Developing a non-Equilibrium Mechanism for Impact-loading tests on Rock Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, H.; Griffith, W. A.; Barber, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Formation of fragments as the result of dynamic processes associated with impulsive loads has been the subject of numerous studies ranging from shaped-charge jet break up and rock blasting to bolide impacts, and, more recently, earthquake rupture. The dynamic strength of solids is varies as a strong function of loading rate, and, in completely failed solids, the characteristic size of fragments is related to the loading dynamics. In this study, we present some novel results using fragmentation of an "order" parameter in an isotropic body, while we use a non-equilibrium thermodynamic formulation to infer characteristics of the fragments. The order parameter is related to general rigidity of the system and is investigated in 3D space including amplitude and phase modes. To this end, we use the idea of the formation of topological defects in the course of rapid pressure changes and show that a power-law scaling describes transient strength versus inverse of the stress-ramp time. Furthermore, we illustrate that the coefficient of this power-law is deeply connected to relaxation (healing) time of the body. In addition, we show that dynamic polarization patterns of the dynamic cracks are analogous to the transition from ferrimagnets to paramagnets, providing insight to the dynamics of microscopic-scale catastrophic failure. This connection helps us to use the Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM) to infer the size of fragments from loading rate when considering a linear loading ramp. The idea behind the KZM is to compare the relaxation time (or healing time of the system in equilibrium) with the timescale of change of the control parameter (ɛ). In addition, we discuss a case where inherent defects are present prior to the impulse load and discuss the effect of impurities on the scaling coefficients. To support our approach, we use the results of fast-loading experiments on Westerly Granite supported by recording multiple acoustic emissions.

  13. Rapid exploration of configuration space with diffusion-map-directed molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenwei; Rohrdanz, Mary A; Clementi, Cecilia

    2013-10-24

    The gap between the time scale of interesting behavior in macromolecular systems and that which our computational resources can afford often limits molecular dynamics (MD) from understanding experimental results and predicting what is inaccessible in experiments. In this paper, we introduce a new sampling scheme, named diffusion-map-directed MD (DM-d-MD), to rapidly explore molecular configuration space. The method uses a diffusion map to guide MD on the fly. DM-d-MD can be combined with other methods to reconstruct the equilibrium free energy, and here, we used umbrella sampling as an example. We present results from two systems: alanine dipeptide and alanine-12. In both systems, we gain tremendous speedup with respect to standard MD both in exploring the configuration space and reconstructing the equilibrium distribution. In particular, we obtain 3 orders of magnitude of speedup over standard MD in the exploration of the configurational space of alanine-12 at 300 K with DM-d-MD. The method is reaction coordinate free and minimally dependent on a priori knowledge of the system. We expect wide applications of DM-d-MD to other macromolecular systems in which equilibrium sampling is not affordable by standard MD.

  14. Masses, luminosities and dynamics of galactic molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, P. M.; Rivolo, A. R.; Mooney, T. J.; Barrett, J. W.; Sage, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies takes place in molecular clouds and the Milky Way is the only galaxy in which it is possible to resolve and study the physical properties and star formation activity of individual clouds. The masses, luminosities, dynamics, and distribution of molecular clouds, primarily giant molecular clouds in the Milky Way are described and analyzed. The observational data sets are the Massachusetts-Stony Brook CO Galactic Plane Survey and the IRAS far IR images. The molecular mass and infrared luminosities of glactic clouds are then compared with the molecular mass and infrared luminosities of external galaxies.

  15. Nanoscale temperature measurements using non-equilibrium Brownian dynamics of a levitated nanosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millen, J.; Deesuwan, T.; Barker, P.; Anders, J.

    2014-06-01

    Einstein realized that the fluctuations of a Brownian particle can be used to ascertain the properties of its environment. A large number of experiments have since exploited the Brownian motion of colloidal particles for studies of dissipative processes, providing insight into soft matter physics and leading to applications from energy harvesting to medical imaging. Here, we use heated optically levitated nanospheres to investigate the non-equilibrium properties of the gas surrounding them. Analysing the sphere's Brownian motion allows us to determine the temperature of the centre-of-mass motion of the sphere, its surface temperature and the heated gas temperature in two spatial dimensions. We observe asymmetric heating of the sphere and gas, with temperatures reaching the melting point of the material. This method offers opportunities for accurate temperature measurements with spatial resolution on the nanoscale, and provides a means for testing non-equilibrium thermodynamics.

  16. Dynamic equilibrium under vibrations of H2 liquid-vapor interface at various gravity levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandikota, G.; Chatain, D.; Lyubimova, T.; Beysens, D.

    2014-06-01

    Horizontal vibration applied to the support of a simple pendulum can deviate from the equilibrium position of the pendulum to a nonvertical position. A similar phenomenon is expected when a liquid-vapor interface is subjected to strong horizontal vibration. Beyond a threshold value of vibrational velocity the interface should attain an equilibrium position at an angle to the initial horizontal position. In the present paper experimental investigation of this phenomenon is carried out in a magnetic levitation device to study the effect of the vibration parameters, gravity acceleration, and the liquid-vapor density on the interface position. The results compare well with the theoretical expression derived by Wolf [G. H. Wolf, Z. Phys. B 227, 291 (1969), 10.1007/BF01397662].

  17. Dynamic equilibrium under vibrations of H₂ liquid-vapor interface at various gravity levels.

    PubMed

    Gandikota, G; Chatain, D; Lyubimova, T; Beysens, D

    2014-06-01

    Horizontal vibration applied to the support of a simple pendulum can deviate from the equilibrium position of the pendulum to a nonvertical position. A similar phenomenon is expected when a liquid-vapor interface is subjected to strong horizontal vibration. Beyond a threshold value of vibrational velocity the interface should attain an equilibrium position at an angle to the initial horizontal position. In the present paper experimental investigation of this phenomenon is carried out in a magnetic levitation device to study the effect of the vibration parameters, gravity acceleration, and the liquid-vapor density on the interface position. The results compare well with the theoretical expression derived by Wolf [G. H. Wolf, Z. Phys. B 227, 291 (1969)].

  18. Dynamic equilibrium under vibrations of H₂ liquid-vapor interface at various gravity levels.

    PubMed

    Gandikota, G; Chatain, D; Lyubimova, T; Beysens, D

    2014-06-01

    Horizontal vibration applied to the support of a simple pendulum can deviate from the equilibrium position of the pendulum to a nonvertical position. A similar phenomenon is expected when a liquid-vapor interface is subjected to strong horizontal vibration. Beyond a threshold value of vibrational velocity the interface should attain an equilibrium position at an angle to the initial horizontal position. In the present paper experimental investigation of this phenomenon is carried out in a magnetic levitation device to study the effect of the vibration parameters, gravity acceleration, and the liquid-vapor density on the interface position. The results compare well with the theoretical expression derived by Wolf [G. H. Wolf, Z. Phys. B 227, 291 (1969)]. PMID:25019875

  19. Insights into photodissociation dynamics of acetaldehyde from ab initio calculations and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Shilu; Fang Weihai

    2009-08-07

    In the present paper we report a theoretical study on mechanistic photodissociation of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO). Stationary structures for H{sub 2} and CO eliminations in the ground state (S{sub 0}) have been optimized with density functional theory method, which is followed by the intrinsic reaction coordinate and ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to confirm the elimination mechanism. Equilibrium geometries, transition states, and intersection structures for the C-C and C-H dissociations in excited states were determined by the complete-active-space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method. Based on the CASSCF optimized structures, the potential energy profiles for the dissociations were refined by performing the single-point calculations using the multireference configuration interaction method. Upon the low-energy irradiation of CH{sub 3}CHO (265 nm<{lambda}<318 nm), the T{sub 1} C-C bond fission following intersystem crossing from the S{sub 1} state is the predominant channel and the minor channel, the ground-state elimination to CH{sub 4}+CO after internal conversion (IC) from S{sub 1} to S{sub 0}, could not be excluded. With the photon energy increasing, another pathway of IC, achieved via an S{sub 1}/S{sub 0} intersection point resulting from the S{sub 1} C-C bond fission, becomes accessible and increases the yield of CH{sub 4}+CO.

  20. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  1. Non-equilibrium reaction and relaxation dynamics in a strongly interacting explicit solvent: F + CD{sub 3}CN treated with a parallel multi-state EVB model

    SciTech Connect

    Glowacki, David R.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Harvey, Jeremy N.

    2015-07-28

    We describe a parallelized linear-scaling computational framework developed to implement arbitrarily large multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) calculations within CHARMM and TINKER. Forces are obtained using the Hellmann-Feynman relationship, giving continuous gradients, and good energy conservation. Utilizing multi-dimensional Gaussian coupling elements fit to explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory, we built a 64-state MS-EVB model designed to study the F + CD{sub 3}CN → DF + CD{sub 2}CN reaction in CD{sub 3}CN solvent (recently reported in Dunning et al. [Science 347(6221), 530 (2015)]). This approach allows us to build a reactive potential energy surface whose balanced accuracy and efficiency considerably surpass what we could achieve otherwise. We ran molecular dynamics simulations to examine a range of observables which follow in the wake of the reactive event: energy deposition in the nascent reaction products, vibrational relaxation rates of excited DF in CD{sub 3}CN solvent, equilibrium power spectra of DF in CD{sub 3}CN, and time dependent spectral shifts associated with relaxation of the nascent DF. Many of our results are in good agreement with time-resolved experimental observations, providing evidence for the accuracy of our MS-EVB framework in treating both the solute and solute/solvent interactions. The simulations provide additional insight into the dynamics at sub-picosecond time scales that are difficult to resolve experimentally. In particular, the simulations show that (immediately following deuterium abstraction) the nascent DF finds itself in a non-equilibrium regime in two different respects: (1) it is highly vibrationally excited, with ∼23 kcal mol{sup −1} localized in the stretch and (2) its post-reaction solvation environment, in which it is not yet hydrogen-bonded to CD{sub 3}CN solvent molecules, is intermediate between the non-interacting gas-phase limit and the solution-phase equilibrium limit. Vibrational

  2. Non-equilibrium reaction and relaxation dynamics in a strongly interacting explicit solvent: F + CD3CN treated with a parallel multi-state EVB model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowacki, David R.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Harvey, Jeremy N.

    2015-07-01

    We describe a parallelized linear-scaling computational framework developed to implement arbitrarily large multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) calculations within CHARMM and TINKER. Forces are obtained using the Hellmann-Feynman relationship, giving continuous gradients, and good energy conservation. Utilizing multi-dimensional Gaussian coupling elements fit to explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory, we built a 64-state MS-EVB model designed to study the F + CD3CN → DF + CD2CN reaction in CD3CN solvent (recently reported in Dunning et al. [Science 347(6221), 530 (2015)]). This approach allows us to build a reactive potential energy surface whose balanced accuracy and efficiency considerably surpass what we could achieve otherwise. We ran molecular dynamics simulations to examine a range of observables which follow in the wake of the reactive event: energy deposition in the nascent reaction products, vibrational relaxation rates of excited DF in CD3CN solvent, equilibrium power spectra of DF in CD3CN, and time dependent spectral shifts associated with relaxation of the nascent DF. Many of our results are in good agreement with time-resolved experimental observations, providing evidence for the accuracy of our MS-EVB framework in treating both the solute and solute/solvent interactions. The simulations provide additional insight into the dynamics at sub-picosecond time scales that are difficult to resolve experimentally. In particular, the simulations show that (immediately following deuterium abstraction) the nascent DF finds itself in a non-equilibrium regime in two different respects: (1) it is highly vibrationally excited, with ˜23 kcal mol-1 localized in the stretch and (2) its post-reaction solvation environment, in which it is not yet hydrogen-bonded to CD3CN solvent molecules, is intermediate between the non-interacting gas-phase limit and the solution-phase equilibrium limit. Vibrational relaxation of the nascent DF results in a spectral

  3. Non-equilibrium reaction and relaxation dynamics in a strongly interacting explicit solvent: F + CD3CN treated with a parallel multi-state EVB model.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, David R; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Harvey, Jeremy N

    2015-07-28

    We describe a parallelized linear-scaling computational framework developed to implement arbitrarily large multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) calculations within CHARMM and TINKER. Forces are obtained using the Hellmann-Feynman relationship, giving continuous gradients, and good energy conservation. Utilizing multi-dimensional Gaussian coupling elements fit to explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory, we built a 64-state MS-EVB model designed to study the F + CD3CN → DF + CD2CN reaction in CD3CN solvent (recently reported in Dunning et al. [Science 347(6221), 530 (2015)]). This approach allows us to build a reactive potential energy surface whose balanced accuracy and efficiency considerably surpass what we could achieve otherwise. We ran molecular dynamics simulations to examine a range of observables which follow in the wake of the reactive event: energy deposition in the nascent reaction products, vibrational relaxation rates of excited DF in CD3CN solvent, equilibrium power spectra of DF in CD3CN, and time dependent spectral shifts associated with relaxation of the nascent DF. Many of our results are in good agreement with time-resolved experimental observations, providing evidence for the accuracy of our MS-EVB framework in treating both the solute and solute/solvent interactions. The simulations provide additional insight into the dynamics at sub-picosecond time scales that are difficult to resolve experimentally. In particular, the simulations show that (immediately following deuterium abstraction) the nascent DF finds itself in a non-equilibrium regime in two different respects: (1) it is highly vibrationally excited, with ∼23 kcal mol(-1) localized in the stretch and (2) its post-reaction solvation environment, in which it is not yet hydrogen-bonded to CD3CN solvent molecules, is intermediate between the non-interacting gas-phase limit and the solution-phase equilibrium limit. Vibrational relaxation of the nascent DF results in a spectral

  4. Disrupting the dynamic equilibrium of ORAI channels determines the phenotype of malignant cells

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Abeele, Fabien; Dubois, Charlotte; Shuba, Yaroslav; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    We recently unraveled a finely tuned oncogenic mechanism in which genetic and tumor microenvironment alterations act together on a crucial calcium signaling pathway. This pathway involves an interconnected equilibrium of calcium channels functioning like a binary star system in which ORAI1 homomers and ORAI1/3 heteromers are two companion stars under the influence of each other that orbit around the cancer hallmarks of apoptosis resistance and enhanced proliferation. PMID:27308432

  5. Molecular polymorphism: microwave spectra, equilibrium structures, and an astronomical investigation of the HNCS isomeric family.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Brett A; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Thorwirth, Sven; Brünken, Sandra; Lattanzi, Valerio; Neill, Justin L; Spezzano, Silvia; Yu, Zhenhong; Zaleski, Daniel P; Remijan, Anthony J; Pate, Brooks H; McCarthy, Michael C

    2016-08-10

    The rotational spectra of thioisocyanic acid (HNCS), and its three energetic isomers (HSCN, HCNS, and HSNC) have been observed at high spectral resolution by a combination of chirped-pulse and Fabry-Pérot Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy between 6 and 40 GHz in a pulsed-jet discharge expansion. Two isomers, thiofulminic acid (HCNS) and isothiofulminic acid (HSNC), calculated here to be 35-37 kcal mol(-1) less stable than the ground state isomer HNCS, have been detected for the first time. Precise rotational, centrifugal distortion, and nitrogen hyperfine coupling constants have been determined for the normal and rare isotopic species of both molecules; all are in good agreement with theoretical predictions obtained at the coupled cluster level of theory. On the basis of isotopic spectroscopy, precise molecular structures have been derived for all four isomers by correcting experimental rotational constants for the effects of rotation-vibration interaction calculated theoretically. Formation and isomerization pathways have also been investigated; the high abundance of HSCN relative to ground state HNCS, and the detection of strong lines of SH using CH3CN and H2S, suggest that HSCN is preferentially produced by the radical-radical reaction HS + CN. A radio astronomical search for HSCN and its isomers has been undertaken toward the high-mass star-forming region Sgr B2(N) in the Galactic Center with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope. While we find clear evidence for HSCN, only a tentative detection of HNCS is proposed, and there is no indication of HCNS or HSNC at the same rms noise level. HSCN, and tentatively HNCS, displays clear deviations from a single-excitation temperature model, suggesting weak masing may be occurring in some transitions in this source. PMID:27478937

  6. Molecular polymorphism: microwave spectra, equilibrium structures, and an astronomical investigation of the HNCS isomeric family.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Brett A; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Thorwirth, Sven; Brünken, Sandra; Lattanzi, Valerio; Neill, Justin L; Spezzano, Silvia; Yu, Zhenhong; Zaleski, Daniel P; Remijan, Anthony J; Pate, Brooks H; McCarthy, Michael C

    2016-08-10

    The rotational spectra of thioisocyanic acid (HNCS), and its three energetic isomers (HSCN, HCNS, and HSNC) have been observed at high spectral resolution by a combination of chirped-pulse and Fabry-Pérot Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy between 6 and 40 GHz in a pulsed-jet discharge expansion. Two isomers, thiofulminic acid (HCNS) and isothiofulminic acid (HSNC), calculated here to be 35-37 kcal mol(-1) less stable than the ground state isomer HNCS, have been detected for the first time. Precise rotational, centrifugal distortion, and nitrogen hyperfine coupling constants have been determined for the normal and rare isotopic species of both molecules; all are in good agreement with theoretical predictions obtained at the coupled cluster level of theory. On the basis of isotopic spectroscopy, precise molecular structures have been derived for all four isomers by correcting experimental rotational constants for the effects of rotation-vibration interaction calculated theoretically. Formation and isomerization pathways have also been investigated; the high abundance of HSCN relative to ground state HNCS, and the detection of strong lines of SH using CH3CN and H2S, suggest that HSCN is preferentially produced by the radical-radical reaction HS + CN. A radio astronomical search for HSCN and its isomers has been undertaken toward the high-mass star-forming region Sgr B2(N) in the Galactic Center with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope. While we find clear evidence for HSCN, only a tentative detection of HNCS is proposed, and there is no indication of HCNS or HSNC at the same rms noise level. HSCN, and tentatively HNCS, displays clear deviations from a single-excitation temperature model, suggesting weak masing may be occurring in some transitions in this source.

  7. Non-Equilibrium Dynamics of an Atomic Gas Coupled to a Synthetic Thermal Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Craig; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Jianshi; Gemelke, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    One takes for Granted that thermal equilibrium can be established between two bodies by bringing them into physical contact with one another - viewed externally however, any statistical reservoir must therefore interact in ways such that the exchange of conserved quantities satisfy basic constraints which define the equilibrium it and any attached bodies reach. We describe the experimental construction of a ``synthetic thermal body,'' engineered by controlling the spatio-temporal modulation of nominally conservative optical, radio-frequency, and microwave couplings of a 87 Rb neutral atomic gas carrying hyperfine-spin to a spin-dependent spatially and temporally disordered bath. We measure the out-of-equilibrium response through its resultant diffusive motion, extracting drift and diffusion parameters, and making comparison to the Einstein-Smoluchowski and generalized fluctuation-dissipation relations. We discuss new limits on temperature and density for direct cooling by suitably engineered baths, by simultaneously avoiding the constraints of photon-recoil and density-dependent losses from light-assisted collisional processes in traditional laser cooling, and discuss new avenues in quantum simulation by coupling atomic gasses to statistically-generated and open environments.

  8. Dynamic scaling for the growth of non-equilibrium fluctuations during thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Cerbino, Roberto; Sun, Yifei; Donev, Aleksandar; Vailati, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion processes are widespread in biological and chemical systems, where they play a fundamental role in the exchange of substances at the cellular level and in determining the rate of chemical reactions. Recently, the classical picture that portrays diffusion as random uncorrelated motion of molecules has been revised, when it was shown that giant non-equilibrium fluctuations develop during diffusion processes. Under microgravity conditions and at steady-state, non-equilibrium fluctuations exhibit scale invariance and their size is only limited by the boundaries of the system. In this work, we investigate the onset of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations induced by thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity, a regime not accessible to analytical calculations but of great relevance for the understanding of several natural and technological processes. A combination of state of the art simulations and experiments allows us to attain a fully quantitative description of the development of fluctuations during transient diffusion in microgravity. Both experiments and simulations show that during the onset the fluctuations exhibit scale invariance at large wave vectors. In a broader range of wave vectors simulations predict a spinodal-like growth of fluctuations, where the amplitude and length-scale of the dominant mode are determined by the thickness of the diffuse layer. PMID:26419420

  9. Dynamic scaling for the growth of non-equilibrium fluctuations during thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerbino, Roberto; Sun, Yifei; Donev, Aleksandar; Vailati, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    Diffusion processes are widespread in biological and chemical systems, where they play a fundamental role in the exchange of substances at the cellular level and in determining the rate of chemical reactions. Recently, the classical picture that portrays diffusion as random uncorrelated motion of molecules has been revised, when it was shown that giant non-equilibrium fluctuations develop during diffusion processes. Under microgravity conditions and at steady-state, non-equilibrium fluctuations exhibit scale invariance and their size is only limited by the boundaries of the system. In this work, we investigate the onset of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations induced by thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity, a regime not accessible to analytical calculations but of great relevance for the understanding of several natural and technological processes. A combination of state of the art simulations and experiments allows us to attain a fully quantitative description of the development of fluctuations during transient diffusion in microgravity. Both experiments and simulations show that during the onset the fluctuations exhibit scale invariance at large wave vectors. In a broader range of wave vectors simulations predict a spinodal-like growth of fluctuations, where the amplitude and length-scale of the dominant mode are determined by the thickness of the diffuse layer.

  10. Dynamic scaling for the growth of non-equilibrium fluctuations during thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Cerbino, Roberto; Sun, Yifei; Donev, Aleksandar; Vailati, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion processes are widespread in biological and chemical systems, where they play a fundamental role in the exchange of substances at the cellular level and in determining the rate of chemical reactions. Recently, the classical picture that portrays diffusion as random uncorrelated motion of molecules has been revised, when it was shown that giant non-equilibrium fluctuations develop during diffusion processes. Under microgravity conditions and at steady-state, non-equilibrium fluctuations exhibit scale invariance and their size is only limited by the boundaries of the system. In this work, we investigate the onset of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations induced by thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity, a regime not accessible to analytical calculations but of great relevance for the understanding of several natural and technological processes. A combination of state of the art simulations and experiments allows us to attain a fully quantitative description of the development of fluctuations during transient diffusion in microgravity. Both experiments and simulations show that during the onset the fluctuations exhibit scale invariance at large wave vectors. In a broader range of wave vectors simulations predict a spinodal-like growth of fluctuations, where the amplitude and length-scale of the dominant mode are determined by the thickness of the diffuse layer. PMID:26419420

  11. Dynamic scaling for the growth of non-equilibrium fluctuations during thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Cerbino, Roberto; Sun, Yifei; Donev, Aleksandar; Vailati, Alberto

    2015-09-30

    Diffusion processes are widespread in biological and chemical systems, where they play a fundamental role in the exchange of substances at the cellular level and in determining the rate of chemical reactions. Recently, the classical picture that portrays diffusion as random uncorrelated motion of molecules has been revised, when it was shown that giant non-equilibrium fluctuations develop during diffusion processes. Under microgravity conditions and at steady-state, non-equilibrium fluctuations exhibit scale invariance and their size is only limited by the boundaries of the system. In this work, we investigate the onset of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations induced by thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity, a regime not accessible to analytical calculations but of great relevance for the understanding of several natural and technological processes. A combination of state of the art simulations and experiments allows us to attain a fully quantitative description of the development of fluctuations during transient diffusion in microgravity. Both experiments and simulations show that during the onset the fluctuations exhibit scale invariance at large wave vectors. In a broader range of wave vectors simulations predict a spinodal-like growth of fluctuations, where the amplitude and length-scale of the dominant mode are determined by the thickness of the diffuse layer.

  12. Static and dynamic length scales in supercooled liquids: insights from molecular dynamics simulations of water and tri-propylene oxide.

    PubMed

    Klameth, F; Henritzi, P; Vogel, M

    2014-04-14

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to study static and dynamic length scales in molecular supercooled liquids, in particular, water. For a determination of these scales, we use equilibrium configurations and pin appropriate subsets of molecules so as to obtain random matrices, cylindrical pores, and slit confinements. Static length scales ξ(s) are determined by analyzing overlap correlation functions for various fractions of pinned molecules or distances to the confining walls. For water in all confinements and for propylene oxide trimers in random geometry, a linear increase of ξ(s) with inverse temperature is found. Dynamic length scales ξ(d) are determined by analogous analysis of fraction-dependent or position-resolved correlation times of structural relaxation. While ξ(d) continuously grows upon cooling in the cylindrical and slit confinements, we find no evidence for a temperature dependence in random matrices, implying that molecular dynamics in parsed volumes is qualitatively different from that in bulk liquids. Finally, we study possible connections between the growth of the static and dynamic length scales and the slowdown of the structural relaxation of the supercooled bulk liquids. For water, we observe a linear relation between ln τ(α) and ξ(s)²/T in the whole accessible range down to the critical temperature of mode-coupling theory, T(c). In the weakly supercooled regime, the same relation holds also for ξ(d), as obtained from cylindrical and slit confinements, but deviations from this behavior are observed near T(c). The results are discussed in connection with random first-order theory and experimental studies of liquid dynamics in nanoscopic confinements and binary mixtures.

  13. Elucidation of molecular dynamics of invasive species of rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated rice fields are aggressively invaded by weedy rice in the U.S. and worldwide. Weedy rice results in loss of yield and seed contamination. The molecular dynamics of the evolutionary adaptive traits of weedy rice are not fully understood. To understand the molecular basis and identify the i...

  14. Attosecond molecular dynamics: fact or fiction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lépine, Franck; Ivanov, Misha Y.; Vrakking, Marc J. J.

    2014-03-01

    The emerging application of attosecond techniques to molecular systems allows the role of electronic coherence in the control of chemical reactions to be investigated. Prompt ionization of molecules by an attosecond pulse may induce charge migration across a molecular structure on attosecond to few-femtosecond timescales, thereby possibly determining the subsequent relaxation pathways that a molecule may take. We discuss how proposals for this 'charge-directed reactivity' fit within the current understanding of quantum control and review the current state of the art of attosecond molecular science. Specifically, we review the role of electronic coherence and coupling of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in high-harmonic spectroscopy and in the first attosecond pump-probe experiments on molecular systems.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of interfacial adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Yarovsky, I.; Chaffee, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Chromium salts are often used in the pretreatment stages of steel painting processes in order to improve adhesion at the metal oxide/primer interface. Although well established empirically, the chemical basis for the improved adhesion conferred by chromia is not well understood. A molecular level understanding of this behaviour should provide a foundation for the design of materials offering improved adhesion control. Molecular modelling of adhesion involves simulation and analysis of molecular behaviour at the interface between two interacting phases. The present study concerns behaviour at the boundary between the metal coated steel surface (with or without chromium pretreatment) and an organic primer based on a solid epoxide resin produced from bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin. An epoxy resin oligomer of molecular weight 3750 was used as the model for the primer.

  16. Molecular Structure and Equilibrium Forces of Bovine Submaxillary Mucin Adsorbed at a Solid-Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Zappone, Bruno; Patil, Navinkumar J; Madsen, Jan B; Pakkanen, Kirsi I; Lee, Seunghwan

    2015-04-21

    By combining dynamic light scattering, circular dichroism spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and surface force apparatus, the conformation of bovine submaxillary mucin in dilute solution and nanomechanical properties of mucin layers adsorbed on mica have been investigated. The samples were prepared by additional chromatographic purification of commercially available products. The mucin molecule was found to have a z-average hydrodynamic diameter of ca. 35 nm in phosphate buffered solution, without any particular secondary or tertiary structure. The contour length of the mucin is larger than, yet of the same order of magnitude as the diameter, indicating that the molecule can be modeled as a relatively rigid polymeric chain due to the large persistence length of the central glycosylated domain. Mucin molecules adsorbed abundantly onto mica from saline buffer, generating polymer-like, long-ranged, repulsive, and nonhysteretic forces upon compression of the adsorbed layers. Detailed analysis of such forces suggests that adsorbed mucins had an elongated conformation favored by the stiffness of the central domain. Acidification of aqueous media was chosen as means to reduce mucin-mucin and mucin-substrate electrostatic interactions. The hydrodynamic diameter in solution did not significantly change when the pH was lowered, showing that the large persistence length of the mucin molecule is due to steric hindrance between sugar chains, rather than electrostatic interactions. Remarkably, the force generated by an adsorbed layer with a fixed surface coverage also remained unaltered upon acidification. This observation can be linked to the surface-protective, pH-resistant role of bovine submaxillary mucin in the variable environmental conditions of the oral cavity. PMID:25806669

  17. Visualizing Functional Motions of Membrane Transporters with Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling and molecular simulation techniques have become an integral part of modern molecular research. Various areas of molecular sciences continue to benefit from, indeed rely on, the unparalleled spatial and temporal resolutions offered by these technologies, to provide a more complete picture of the molecular problems at hand. Because of the continuous development of more efficient algorithms harvesting ever-expanding computational resources, and the emergence of more advanced and novel theories and methodologies, the scope of computational studies has expanded significantly over the past decade, now including much larger molecular systems and far more complex molecular phenomena. Among the various computer modeling techniques, the application of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and related techniques has particularly drawn attention in biomolecular research, because of the ability of the method to describe the dynamical nature of the molecular systems and thereby to provide a more realistic representation, which is often needed for understanding fundamental molecular properties. The method has proven to be remarkably successful in capturing molecular events and structural transitions highly relevant to the function and/or physicochemical properties of biomolecular systems. Herein, after a brief introduction to the method of MD, we use a number of membrane transport proteins studied in our laboratory as examples to showcase the scope and applicability of the method and its power in characterizing molecular motions of various magnitudes and time scales that are involved in the function of this important class of membrane proteins. PMID:23298176

  18. The Computer Simulation of Liquids by Molecular Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, W.

    1987-01-01

    Proposes a mathematical computer model for the behavior of liquids using the classical dynamic principles of Sir Isaac Newton and the molecular dynamics method invented by other scientists. Concludes that other applications will be successful using supercomputers to go beyond simple Newtonian physics. (CW)

  19. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  20. Relationship between dynamical entropy and energy dissipation far from thermodynamic equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Green, Jason R; Costa, Anthony B; Grzybowski, Bartosz A; Szleifer, Igal

    2013-10-01

    Connections between microscopic dynamical observables and macroscopic nonequilibrium (NE) properties have been pursued in statistical physics since Boltzmann, Gibbs, and Maxwell. The simulations we describe here establish a relationship between the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy and the energy dissipated as heat from a NE system to its environment. First, we show that the Kolmogorov-Sinai or dynamical entropy can be separated into system and bath components and that the entropy of the system characterizes the dynamics of energy dissipation. Second, we find that the average change in the system dynamical entropy is linearly related to the average change in the energy dissipated to the bath. The constant energy and time scales of the bath fix the dynamical relationship between these two quantities. These results provide a link between microscopic dynamical variables and the macroscopic energetics of NE processes.