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Sample records for equine infectious anaemia

  1. Biochemical studies on equine infectious anaemia.

    PubMed

    Palomba, E; Martone, F; Meduri, A; Vaccaro, A; Damiani, N

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of an outbreak of equine infectious anaemia (E.I.A.) in Campania [at Naples and Aversa (Caserta)]; it was diagnosed by clinical, pathological and serological examinations (Coggins test). Using the serum of 45 horses with E.I.A. and 11 healthy horses (controls), numerous investigations were carried out on: enzymes, intrinsic coagulation factors, lipids and other substances. The results obtained were very interesting and show that in this disease there are significant increases in many enzymes (LDH, LAP, gamma-GT, CPK, PK and ALD) and copper. Insignificant increases were found in other enzymes (SDH, GLDH, MDH, ICDH, AIP, lysozyme, cholinesterase, GOT and GPT) and also intrinsic coagulation factors, lipid substances (total cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, triglycerides) and glucose. LDH-1-isoenzyme remains unchanged, whilst AcP decreases slightly.

  2. Serosurveillance for equine infectious anaemia in the Ardahan province of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Harun; Ozan, Emre

    2010-12-01

    Equine infectious anaemia is a retroviral infection of horses. All infected horses, including those that are asymptomatic, become carriers and are infectious for life. In this study, blood samples of all equines in the province of Ardahan were collected. The material consisted of 8,947 equines, including 8,769 horses and 178 donkeys, from Ardahan province in northeastern Turkey. Blood was collected from all horses and donkeys and the sera were analysed for the presence of antibodies to equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results revealed that none of the horses and donkeys were positive for antibodies to EIAV.

  3. Equine monoclonal antibodies recognize common epitopes on variants of equine infectious anaemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Perryman, L E; O'Rourke, K I; Mason, P H; McGuire, T C

    1990-01-01

    Equine-murine xenohybridoma cells were produced using SP2/0 murine myeloma cells and splenic lymph node cells obtained from horses infected with 10(6) TCID50 of single cloned variants of equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV). The xenohybridomas secreted equine IgG monoclonal antibodies reactive with EIAV in enzyme immunoassays employing purified virus. Seven antibodies were studied in detail. They bound to viral glycoproteins (gp90 or gp45) in radioimmunoprecipitation assays, and reacted with homologous EIAV as well as five other cloned variants of EIAV. When evaluated against a single cloned variant of EIAV (EIAV-WSU5), two antibodies bound to different epitopes on gp90. The five remaining antibodies reacted with the same or overlapping epitopes on gp45. None of the antibodies exhibited viral neutralizing activity. Images Figure 2 PMID:1703988

  4. An investigation of equine infectious anaemia infection in the central Anatolia region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yapklç, O; Yavru, S; Kale, M; Bulut, O; Simşek, A; Sahna, K C

    2007-03-01

    In this study, 162 horses, 80 donkeys and 51 mule serum samples were collected in Konya city. Additionally, 64 horse serum samples from Ankara and 49 samples from Kayseri city were included in the study. A total of 406 serum samples were examined by agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for antibody to equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) and no positive result was detected.

  5. Use of an ELISA test in the eradication of an equine infectious anaemia focus.

    PubMed

    dos Reis, J K; Melo, L M; Rezende, M R; Leite, R C

    1994-05-01

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test and the classic agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test were used as diagnostic methods in the eradication of a focus of equine infectious anaemia from a herd of 86 horses. The ELISA test proved to be more sensitive, detecting positive animals earlier than the AGID test. A group of 16 animals positive only by ELISA also became positive to the AGID when retested one month later, except for 2 animals which showed clinical signs of the disease and died before retesting.

  6. Freedom from equine infectious anaemia virus infection in Spanish Purebred horses

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Fatima; Fores, Paloma; Ireland, Joanne; Moreno, Miguel A.; Newton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction No cases of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) have been reported in Spain since 1983. Factors that could increase the risk of reintroducing equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) into Spain include the recent occurrence of the disease in Europe and the absence of compulsory serological testing before importation into Spain. Aims and objectives Given the importance of the Spanish Purebred (SP) horse breeding industry in Spain, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to provide evidence of freedom from EIAV in SP stud farms in Central Spain. Materials and methods Serum samples from 555 SP horses, collected between September 2011 and November 2013, were tested using a commercially available EIAV ELISA with a published sensitivity of 100 per cent. Results All 555 samples were negative for antibody to EIAV, providing evidence of a true EIAV seroprevalence between 0 per cent and 0.53 per cent (95% CIs of the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA technique used Q10 were 100 per cent and 99.3 per cent, respectively) among the SP breeding population in Central Spain. Conclusions These findings should serve to increase confidence when exporting SP horses to other countries. PMID:26392894

  7. Molecular characterization of equine infectious anaemia virus from a major outbreak in southeastern France.

    PubMed

    Gaudaire, D; Lecouturier, F; Ponçon, N; Morilland, E; Laugier, C; Zientara, S; Hans, A

    2017-05-15

    In 2009, a major outbreak of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) was reported in the south-east of France. This outbreak affected three premises located in the Var region where the index case, a 10-year-old mare that exhibited clinical signs consistent with EIA, occurred at a riding school. Overall, more than 250 horses were tested for EIAV (equine infectious anaemia virus) antibodies, using agar gel immunodiffusion test, and 16 horses were positive in three different holdings. Epidemiological survey confirmed that the three premises were related through the purchase/sale of horses and the use of shared or nearby pastures. Molecular characterization of viruses was performed by sequencing the full gag gene sequence (1,400 bp) of the proviral DNAs retrieved from the spleen of infected animals collected post-mortem. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed epidemiological data from the field, as viruses isolated from the three premises were clustering together suggesting a common origin whereas some premises were 50 km apart. Moreover, viruses characterized during this outbreak are different from European strains described so far, underlying the high genetic diversity of EIAV in Europe. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Freedom from equine infectious anaemia virus infection in Spanish Purebred horses.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Fatima; Fores, Paloma; Ireland, Joanne; Moreno, Miguel A; Newton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    No cases of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) have been reported in Spain since 1983. Factors that could increase the risk of reintroducing equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) into Spain include the recent occurrence of the disease in Europe and the absence of compulsory serological testing before importation into Spain. Given the importance of the Spanish Purebred (SP) horse breeding industry in Spain, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to provide evidence of freedom from EIAV in SP stud farms in Central Spain. Serum samples from 555 SP horses, collected between September 2011 and November 2013, were tested using a commercially available EIAV ELISA with a published sensitivity of 100 per cent. All 555 samples were negative for antibody to EIAV, providing evidence of a true EIAV seroprevalence between 0 per cent and 0.53 per cent (95% CIs of the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA technique used Q10 were 100 per cent and 99.3 per cent, respectively) among the SP breeding population in Central Spain. These findings should serve to increase confidence when exporting SP horses to other countries.

  9. Equine lentivirus, comparative studies on four serological tests for the diagnosis of equine infectious anaemia.

    PubMed

    Bürki, F; Rossmanith, W; Rossmanith, E

    1992-11-01

    Serological diagnosis of equine infectious anemia is of necessity group-reactive, i.e. based on viral core protein p26, because viral envelope components as well as the host's immune response to them undergo rapid antigenic change. Since 1970 the agar gel-immunodiffusion test ("Coggins-test") has been the diagnostic method of choice. Recently, ELISA tests have been introduced for faster and theoretically more sensitive serodiagnosis, while Western blots have been used to clarify doubtful results obtained in Coggins-tests. A commercial competitive ELISA was found to give practically equivalent results to the Coggins-test. The sensitivity of this market product is intentionally kept marginal in order to avoid false-positive "reactor horses". Another commercial ELISA, non-competitive, gave inconsistent results, creating great turmoil among horse owners when falsely positive. Caution is also indicated when interpreting Western blots. Sera of strongly positive horses gave as many as eleven bands, of medium positives fewer bands, and of the weakest reactors solely the p26 band. Single p26 banding was, however, also encountered in 5% healthy horses, in two of them consistently over time, which are accordingly considered non-specific. In order to be interpreted as positive, a Western blot for this equine lentivirus must band with its core protein plus at least one glycoprotein, similar to the recommended criterion for a positive reading of serum samples from AIDS patients.

  10. Challenges and proposed solutions for more accurate serological diagnosis of equine infectious anaemia.

    PubMed

    Issel, C J; Scicluna, M T; Cook, S J; Cook, R F; Caprioli, A; Ricci, I; Rosone, F; Craigo, J K; Montelaro, R C; Autorino, G L

    2013-02-23

    Serological diagnosis of equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) infections has depended mainly on the agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGIDT). This study documents the presence of EIAV genetic sequences in a number of persistently infected horses and mules whose serums were interpreted as negative/equivocal on AGIDT, but positive on more than one ELISA test and in immunoblot tests. Strategies designed to take advantage of the combined strengths of the ELISA and AGIDT are shown effective in a national surveillance program for EIA in Italy where 17 per cent (25/149) of the equids considered to be infected with EIAV on combined/comparative serological data had reactions in the AGIDT that were interpreted as negative or equivocal. These data document the benefits of using a three-tiered laboratory system for the diagnosis of EIA. Although the ELISA-first strategy introduces some confusing results, the discovery of up to 20 per cent more cases of EIA makes it compelling. In our opinion, it is better and more defensible to find two samples in 1000 with resolvable but falsely positive ELISA tests for EIA than to release two to three horses in 10,000 with falsely negative test results for EIA (the rates seen in the Italian surveillance presented here).

  11. Diagnosis of equine infectious anaemia during the 2006 outbreak in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Cullinane, A; Quinlivan, M; Nelly, M; Patterson, H; Kenna, R; Garvey, M; Gildea, S; Lyons, P; Flynn, M; Galvin, P; Neylon, M; Jankowska, K

    2007-11-10

    In 2006 there was an outbreak of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) in Ireland. This paper describes the use of the diagnosis of clinical and subclinical cases of the disease. In acute cases the ELISAs and the immunoblot were more sensitive than the AGID. In one mare, fluctuating antibody levels were observed in all the serological assays before it seroconverted by AGID. Viral RNA and DNA were detected by RT-PCR and PCR in all the tissues from the infected animals examined postmortem. The PCR detected viral DNA in plasma regardless of the stage of the disease. In contrast, the RT-PCR detected RNA in only 52 per cent of the seropositive animals tested and appeared to be most sensitive for the detection of virus early in infection. Both PCR and RT-PCR demonstrated potential to detect acutely infected horses earlier than some of the official tests. The serological data suggest that the usual incubation/seroconversion period for this strain of the virus was approximately 37 days but may be more than 60 days in a few cases.

  12. Challenges and proposed solutions for more accurate serological diagnosis of equine infectious anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Issel, C. J.; Scicluna, M. T.; Cook, S. J.; Cook, R. F.; Caprioli, A.; Ricci, I.; Rosone, F.; Craigo, J. K.; Montelaro, R. C.; Autorino, G. L.

    2013-01-01

    Serological diagnosis of equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) infections has depended mainly on the agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGIDT). This study documents the presence of EIAV genetic sequences in a number of persistently infected horses and mules whose serums were interpreted as negative/equivocal on AGIDT, but positive on more than one ELISA test and in immunoblot tests. Strategies designed to take advantage of the combined strengths of the ELISA and AGIDT are shown effective in a national surveillance program for EIA in Italy where 17 per cent (25/149) of the equids considered to be infected with EIAV on combined/comparative serological data had reactions in the AGIDT that were interpreted as negative or equivocal. These data document the benefits of using a three-tiered laboratory system for the diagnosis of EIA. Although the ELISA-first strategy introduces some confusing results, the discovery of up to 20 per cent more cases of EIA makes it compelling. In our opinion, it is better and more defensible to find two samples in 1000 with resolvable but falsely positive ELISA tests for EIA than to release two to three horses in 10,000 with falsely negative test results for EIA (the rates seen in the Italian surveillance presented here). PMID:23161812

  13. Oxidant-antioxidant imbalance in horses infected with equine infectious anaemia virus.

    PubMed

    Bolfă, Pompei Florin; Leroux, Caroline; Pintea, Adela; Andrei, Sanda; Cătoi, Cornel; Taulescu, Marian; Tăbăran, Flaviu; Spînu, Marina

    2012-06-01

    This study assesses the impact of equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) infection on the oxidant/antioxidant equilibrium of horses. Blood samples from 96 Romanian horses aged 1-25 years, were divided into different groups according to their EIAV-infection status, age, and time post-seroconversion. The effect of infection on oxidative stress was estimated by measuring enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase [SOD], glutathione peroxidase [GPx] and catalase), non-enzymatic antioxidants (uric acid and carotenoids), and lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde [MDA]). Infection modified the oxidant/antioxidant equilibrium in the horses, influencing GPx and uric acid levels (P<0.05). Time post-seroconversion also contributed to oxidative stress imbalance, exhibiting a significant influence on both SOD and MDA concentrations in the blood (P<0.05). Animal age did not have a significant influence on oxidative stress. Recently infected horses (<1 year following seroconversion), and horses >5 years old, represented the most vulnerable category in terms of oxidative stress, followed by recently infected animals <5 years old. The results of this study are novel in implicating EIAV infection in the development of oxidative stress in horses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Epidemiology and genetic characterization of equine infectious anaemia virus strains isolated in Belgium in 2010.

    PubMed

    Caij, A B; Tignon, M

    2014-10-01

    In January 2010, the United Kingdom notified cases of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) in two horses introduced from Belgium. The animals came from one assembly centre in Romania and had transited through Belgium with 16 other horses. Nine of them, bought by a Belgian horse breeder, were investigated in Belgium and revealed one additional EIA-positive animal. Afterwards, the Belgian Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain (FASFC) organized a serological EIA survey of the horses introduced into Belgium from Romania between 2007 and 2009. Among the 95 horses identified, six additional serological positive cases were found that had been introduced into Belgium in 2008 (n = 4) and in 2009 (n = 2). The survey was extended to the horses in contact with the positive cases, but all contact animals were negative, indicating the absence of transmission. Virological examination performed on tissue samples collected from two seropositive animals demonstrated the presence of viral DNA of EIA virus. Phylogenetic analysis based on the sequences of EIA virus gag gene clustered the Belgian isolates with Romanian strains isolated in 2009. The presumption of a common Belgian origin could be rejected. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Detection and molecular characterisation of equine infectious anaemia virus from field outbreaks in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Kuhar, U; Završnik, J; Toplak, I; Malovrh, T

    2014-05-01

    In 2009, a surprisingly high number of animals seropositive for equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV; 26 horses from 13 farms) were detected in Slovenia. To develop a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of the proviral nucleic acid, to phylogenetically characterise the Slovenian EIAV strains and to investigate whether transmission in utero occurred. Cross-sectional clinical study. In total, 26 horses (including 2 foals and 4 pregnant mares) and 4 fetuses were examined in this study. A PCR assay using the EIAV F1 and EIAV R1 primers was designed and tested using genomic DNA extracted from 28 spleen samples, 18 whole blood samples and 17 peripheral blood leucocyte samples. Amplicons of 22 PCRs obtained from the spleen samples were subjected to direct DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. All spleen samples from 22 adult animals were positive for EIAV by PCR, whereas whole blood and the peripheral blood leucocyte samples were positive from only 4 animals. Spleen samples from foals and fetuses were negative by PCR. The Slovenian EIAV sequences could be mapped to 9 different branches of the phylogenetic tree. The PCR was able to detect different EIAV strains from spleen samples of seropositive animals detected in Slovenia. Phylogenetic analysis revealed high genetic diversity of the EIAV strains detected in Slovenia, with their closest relatives being European strains. In utero transmission in pregnant mares did not occur. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  16. Equine infectious anaemia and mechanical transmission: man and the wee beasties.

    PubMed

    Issel, C J; Foil, L D

    2015-08-01

    There is no credible evidence that the lentivirus that causes equine infectious anaemia (EIA) replicates in invertebrates. The virus persistently infects its equid hosts and is often present in blood in significant quantities. Blood-feeding arthropods thus have the potential to transfer the virus between hosts, especially if their feeding on the first host is interrupted and immediately continued on a second host. The general details and dynamics of mechanical transmission are included in this paper, as this agent presents an excellent model. Mechanical transmission can be effectively controlled if the dynamics and interactions of the host, virus and vector populations are understood. Efficient transmission is proportional to the amount of agent found in the source material, the environmental survival of the agent, the number of vector feedings, the number of interrupted feedings, vector refeeding, the proximity of infected and naive hosts, host population density, and the length of time during which vectors and hosts are in contact. Establishing firm quantitative risk estimates for EIA is impossible, mainly because the virus content in blood can change exponentially from day to day. The EIA virus can be transmitted by horse flies for at least 30 minutes after feeding on a horse with acute signs of EIA, butthe probability of a horse fly being interrupted and completing its blood feeding on a second host at a distance of 50 m is very low, and the separation of infected and uninfected equids by 200 m breaks transmission. The statements above assume that human interactions are absent or do not contribute to the risk of virus transmission; however, the risk from human interventions, such as the too-often-used procedure of administering > 200 ml of plasma to foals, can easily be more than 10(7) times greater than the risk posed by a single horse fly. Controlling EIA depends upon the identification of persistently infected equids by serological testing because other

  17. Deep sequencing and variant analysis of an Italian pathogenic field strain of equine infectious anaemia virus.

    PubMed

    Cappelli, K; Cook, R F; Stefanetti, V; Passamonti, F; Autorino, G L; Scicluna, M T; Coletti, M; Verini Supplizi, A; Capomaccio, S

    2017-03-15

    Equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus with an almost worldwide distribution that causes persistent infections in equids. Technical limitations have restricted genetic analysis of EIAV field isolates predominantly to gag sequences resulting in very little published information concerning the extent of inter-strain variation in pol, env and the three ancillary open reading frames (ORFs). Here, we describe the use of long-range PCR in conjunction with next-generation sequencing (NGS) for rapid molecular characterization of all viral ORFs and known transcription factor binding motifs within the long terminal repeat of two EIAV isolates from the 2006 Italian outbreak. These isolates were from foals believed to have been exposed to the same source material but with different clinical histories: one died 53 days post-infection (SA) while the other (DE) survived 5 months despite experiencing multiple febrile episodes. Nucleotide sequence identity between the isolates was 99.358% confirming infection with the same EIAV strain with most differences comprising single nucleotide polymorphisms in env and the second exon of rev. Although the synonymous:non-synonymous nucleotide substitution ratio was approximately 2:1 in gag and pol, the situation is reversed in env and ORF3 suggesting these sequences are subjected to host-mediated selective pressure. EIAV proviral quasispecies complexity in vivo has not been extensively investigated; however, analysis suggests it was relatively low in SA at the time of death. These results highlight advantages of NGS for molecular characterization of EIAV namely it avoids potential artefacts generated by traditional composite sequencing strategies and can provide information about viral quasispecies complexity. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. The integration of a macrophage-adapted live vaccine strain of equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) in the horse genome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Wang, Xue-Feng; Du, Cheng; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Ma, Jian; Wang, Yu-Hong; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Wang, Xiaojun

    2017-09-07

    Integration is an important feature of retroviruses and retrovirus-based therapeutic transfection vectors. The non-primate lentivirus equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) primarily targets macrophages/monocytes in vivo. Investigation of the integration features of EIAVDLV121 strains, which are adapted to donkey monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs), is of great interest. In this study, we analysed the integration features of EIAVDLV121 in equine MDMs during in vitro infection. Our previously published integration sites (IS) for EIAVFDDV13 in fetal equine dermal (FED) cells were also analysed in parallel as references. Sequencing of the host genomic regions flanking the viral IS showed that reference sequence (RefSeq) genes were preferentially targeted for integration by EIAVDLV121. Introns, AT-rich regions, long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs) and DNA transposons were also predominantly biased toward viral insertion, which is consistent with EIAVFDDV13 integration into the horse genome in FED cells. In addition, the most significantly enriched Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways, specifically gag junctions for EIAVDLV121 and tight junctions for EIAVFDDV13, are regulators of metabolic function, which is consistent with the common bioprocesses, specifically cell cycle and chromosome/DNA organization, identified by gene ontology (GO) analysis. Our results demonstrate that EIAV integration occurs in regions that harbour structural and topological features of local chromatin in both macrophages and fibroblasts. Our data on EIAV will facilitate further understanding of lentivirus infection and the development of safer and more effective gene therapy vectors.

  19. Evaluation of six serological ELISA kits available in Italy as screening tests for equine infectious anaemia surveillance.

    PubMed

    Nardini, Roberto; Autorino, Gian Luca; Issel, Charles J; Cook, R Frank; Ricci, Ida; Frontoso, Raffaele; Rosone, Francesca; Scicluna, Maria Teresa

    2017-04-14

    ELISAs are known to have a higher diagnostic sensitivity than the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) when employed for serological diagnosis of equine infectious anaemia (EIA). For this purpose, an "in-house" and five commercial ELISAs available in Italy were assessed by the National Reference Centre for EIA for their analytic specificity (Sp); precocity, defined as capability of detecting first antibodies produced during a new infection; precision based on repeatability and reproducibility, estimated from the coefficient of variation (CV); accuracy, estimated from multiple K and relative Sp and sensitivity (Se). Two serum panels, positive for non-equine retroviruses and the most frequent equine viruses, were employed to measure analytic Sp. ELISA precocity was also compared to that of one "in-house" and three commercial AGID kits, employing a panel of sera, collected weekly from horses infected with modified EIA viruses. Precision and accuracy were defined using results of a panel containing positive and negative sera examined in an inter-laboratory trial with the participation of the ten Official Laboratories. Furthermore, a questionnaire was used to assess the appropriateness of each kit for routine use. Analytic Sp was 100%, while the 75th percentile of CVs for positive sera varied from 0.4% to 12.73% for repeatability and from 1.6% to 44.87% for reproducibility. Although CV of the negative serum was constantly high, its outcome was unaltered. Relative Se ranged from 98.2% to 100%, relative Sp was constantly 100% and multiple K ranged from 0.95 to 1. Precocity differed among the assays: three kits detected 4.8% and 42.9% positive samples on 21 days post infection (dpi), all assays detected positive samples on 28 dpi, between 47.6% and 95.2%. Precocity of ELISAs was superior to that of the AGIDs except for two assays. In view of the feedback obtained from the questionnaires, all kits were considered appropriate for routine use. All ELISAs having high Se and

  20. Evolution of equine infectious anaemia in naturally infected mules with different serological reactivity patterns prior and after immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Autorino, Gian Luca; Eleni, Claudia; Manna, Giuseppe; Frontoso, Raffaele; Nardini, Roberto; Cocumelli, Cristiano; Rosone, Francesca; Caprioli, Andrea; Alfieri, Lavinia; Scicluna, Maria Teresa

    2016-06-30

    Information on equine infectious anaemia (EIA) in mules, including those with an equivocal reaction in agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGIDT), is scarce. For this, a study was conducted to evaluate the clinical, viral loads and pathological findings of two groups of naturally infected asymptomatic mules, respectively with a negative/equivocal and positive AGIDT reactivity, which were subjected to pharmacological immune suppression (IS). A non-infected control was included in the study that remained negative during the observation period. Throughout the whole study, even repeated episodes of recrudescence of EIA were observed in 9 infected mules, independently from their AGIDT reactivity. These events were generally characterised by mild, transient alterations, typical of the EIA acute form represented by hyperthermia and thrombocytopenia, in concomitance with viral RNA (vRNA) peaks that were higher in the Post-IS period, reaching values similar to those of horses during the clinical acute phase of EIA. Total tissue viral nucleic acid loads were greatest in animals with the major vRNA activity and in particular in those with negative/equivocal AGIDT reactivity. vRNA replication levels were around 10-1000 times lower than those reported in horses, with the animals still presenting typical alterations of EIA reactivation. Macroscopic lesions were absent in all the infected animals while histological alterations were characterised by lymphomonocyte infiltrates and moderate hemosiderosis in the cytoplasm of macrophages. On the basis of the above results, even mules with an equivocal/negative AGIDT reaction may act as EIAV reservoirs. Moreover, such animals could escape detection due to the low AGIDT sensitivity and therefore contribute to the maintenance and spread of the infection. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Regulation of Rev expression by the equine infectious anaemia virus tat-rev mRNA Kozak sequence and its potential influence on viral replication.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Zhang, Zeli; Yao, Qiucheng; Su, Chao; Yin, Xin; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-09-01

    Rev, an important accessory protein of equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV), induces the nuclear export of incompletely spliced viral mRNAs. Rev is translated from the tat-rev mRNA through leaky scanning of the tat CUG. In this study, the function of the Kozak sequence at the beginning of the rev ORF was investigated. Deletion or attenuation of the Kozak sequence resulted in expression of an N-terminal 11  aa-truncated Rev in addition to WT Rev. Truncated Rev displayed weaker promotion of Gag expression and processing than WT Rev. Furthermore, EIAV rescued from an infectious molecular clone (pEIAVUK3) with Kozak attenuation exhibited decreased viral replication in host cells in vitro. These results provide a new understanding of the relationship between EIAV Rev expression and viral replication.

  2. Is a diagnostic system based exclusively on agar gel immunodiffusion adequate for controlling the spread of equine infectious anaemia?

    PubMed

    Scicluna, Maria Teresa; Issel, Charles J; Cook, Frank R; Manna, Giuseppe; Cersini, Antonella; Rosone, Francesca; Frontoso, Raffaele; Caprioli, Andrea; Antognetti, Valeria; Antonetti, Valeria; Autorino, Gian Luca

    2013-07-26

    To improve the efficiency of the National equine infectious anaemia (EIA) surveillance program in Italy, a three-tiered diagnostic system has been adopted. This procedure involves initial screening by ELISA (Tier 1) with test-positive samples confirmed by the agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGIDT) (Tier 2) and, in the case of ELISA positive/AGIDT negative results, final determination by immunoblot (IB) (Tier 3). During this evaluation, 74,880 samples, principally collected from two Regions of Central Italy (Latium and Abruzzo) were examined, with 44 identified as negative in AGIDT but positive in both ELISA and IB. As the majority of these reactions occurred in mules, an observational study was conducted in this hybrid equid species to investigate if there is a correlation between plasma-associated viral loads and serological reactivity, to test the hypothesis that false-negative or very weak positive AGIDT results are associated with elite control of EIA virus (EIAV) replication accompanied by reduced transmission risks. The study animals consisted of 5 mules with positive AGIDT readings, along with another 5 giving negative or very weak positive results in this test. All mules were seropositive in Elisa and IB. Samples were collected routinely during an initial 56-day observation period, prior to dexamethasone treatment lasting 10 days, to determine the effect of immune suppression (IS) on clinical, humoral and virological responses. All mules were monitored for a further 28 days from day 0 of IS. None of the animals experienced relevant clinical responses before IS and there were no significant changes in antibody levels in ELISA, IB or AGIDT. However, plasma-associated viral-RNA (vRNA) loads, as determined using TaqMan(®) based RT-PCR, showed unexpectedly high sample to sample variation in all mules, demonstrating host-mediated control of viral replication is not constant over time. Furthermore, there was no apparent correlation between vRNA loads and antibody

  3. The persistent infection of a canine thymus cell line by equine infectious anaemia virus and preliminary data on the production of viral antigens.

    PubMed

    Bouillant, A M; Nielsen, K; Ruckerbauer, G M; Samagh, B S; Hare, W C

    1986-07-01

    Equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) was adapted to the Cf2Th cell line, a heterologous malignant line from canine thymus. A persistent infection was monitored for 100 serial passages by demonstrating the presence of virus and viral antigens at each 10th passage by electron-microscopy, immunodiffusion and immunofluorescence. Chromosome analysis of EIAV-infected cells indicated they had a karyotype resembling the control cells of similar passage history. Virus-infected cells, grown in roller cultures for 65 days without subculturing, continuously produced viral antigens into supernatant fluids which were harvested every 3-4 days. Antigen peaks were observed at approximately 12-day intervals. Immunoprecipitin lines of identity were demonstrated between ether-extracted antigens from virus-infected canine cell line and known positive EIAV antigen extracted from infected equine spleen and a commercial source. Replication of a non-oncogenic retrovirus (EIAV) resulted in the continuous release of viral antigens from a persistently infected and infinite cell line.

  4. [Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A; Meier, H P; Straub, R; Gerber, V

    2009-04-01

    Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is a reportable, eradicable epizootic disease caused by the equine lentivirus of the retrovirus family which affects equids only and occurs worldwide. The virus is transmitted by blood, mainly by sanguivorous insects. The main symptoms of the disease are pyrexia, apathy, loss of body condition and weight, anemia, edema and petechia. However, infected horses can also be inapparent carriers without any overt signs. The disease is diagnosed by serological tests like the Coggins test and ELISA tests. Presently, Switzerland is offi cially free from EIA. However, Switzerland is permanently at risk of introducing the virus as cases of EIA have recently been reported in different European countries.

  5. High genetic diversity of equine infectious anaemia virus strains from Slovenia revealed upon phylogenetic analysis of the p15 gag gene region.

    PubMed

    Kuhar, U; Malovrh, T

    2016-03-01

    The equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV), which belongs to the Retroviridae family, infects equids almost worldwide. Every year, sporadic EIAV cases are detected in Slovenia. To characterise the Slovenian EIAV strains in the p15 gag gene region phylogenetically in order to compare the Slovenian EIAV strains with EIAV strains from abroad, especially with the recently published European strains. Cross-sectional study using material derived from post mortem examination. In total, 29 EIAV serologically positive horses from 18 different farms were examined in this study. Primers were designed to amplify the p15 gag gene region. Amplicons of 28 PCRs were subjected to direct DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Altogether, 28 EIAV sequences were obtained from 17 different farms and were distributed between 4 separate monophyletic groups and 9 branches upon phylogenetic analysis. Among EIAV strains from abroad, the closest relatives to Slovenian EIAV strains were European EIAV strains from Italy. Phylogenetic analysis also showed that some animals from distantly located farms were most probably infected with the same EIAV strains, as well as animals from the same farm and animals from farms located in the same geographical region. This is the first report of such high genetic diversity of EIAV strains from one country. This led to speculation that there is a potential virus reservoir among the populations of riding horses, horses kept for pleasure and horses for meat production, with some farmers or horse-owners not following legislation, thus enabling the spread of infection with EIAV. The low sensitivity of the agar gel immunodiffusion test may also contribute to the spread of infection with EIAV, because some infected horses might have escaped detection. The results of the phylogenetic analysis also provide additional knowledge about the highly heterogeneous nature of the EIAV genome. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  6. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR and PCR assays for a novel European field isolate of equine infectious anaemia virus based on sequence determination of the gag gene.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, M; Cook, R F; Cullinane, A

    2007-05-05

    In 2006, an outbreak of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) occurred in Ireland. The initial source of the outbreak is believed to have been contaminated plasma imported from Italy. This paper presents the nucleotide sequence of the gag gene of the virus identified in Ireland (EIAV(Ire)), the first for a European strain of EIAV. Comparison of the gag gene with North American and Asian strains of the virus showed that the gag gene is less well conserved than previously believed, and that EIAV strains can have similar phenotypes despite considerable variations in genotype. On the basis of the deduced sequence of the EIAV(Ire) gag gene, highly sensitive, specific and quantitative RT-PCR and PCR assays were developed, and used to quantify the EIAV nucleic acid in postmortem tissues, plasma and secretions of infected horses. This is the first report of the detection and quantification of EIAV in nasal, buccal and genital swabs by RT-PCR.

  7. [Equine infectious anemia--a review].

    PubMed

    Haas, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    This article combines essential facts of equine infectious anemia. Beside etiology and epidemiology, emphasis is put on the clinical course and laboratory diagnosis. Finally, control measures and prophylactic issues are discussed.

  8. Equine infectious anemia and equine infectious anemia virus in 2013: a review.

    PubMed

    Cook, R F; Leroux, C; Issel, C J

    2013-11-29

    A detailed description of equine infectious anemia virus and host responses to it are presented. Current control and eradication of the infection are discussed with suggestions for improvements to increase their effectiveness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Carriers of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Coggins, L

    1984-02-01

    Presently available data continue to support the idea that once a horse is infected with equine infectious anemia virus it remains infected indefinitely. Infection may not always be demonstrated by inoculation of plasma, serum, or whole blood transfusions into susceptible recipients, but transfusions of fresh whole blood will be infective in at least 95% of the horses testing positive in the agar gel immunodiffusion test. For detection of infectivity in a small percentage of inapparent carriers, it appears necessary to inoculate washed leukocytes collected over a period of time.

  10. Selection of peptides for serological detection of equine infectious anemia.

    PubMed

    Santos, E M; Cardoso, R; Souza, G R L; Goulart, L R; Heinemann, M B; Leite, R C; Reis, J K P

    2012-08-13

    Equine infectious anemia caused by equine infectious anemia virus is an important disease due to its high severity and incidence in animals. We used a phage display library to isolate peptides that can be considered potential markers for equine infectious anemia diagnosis. We selected peptides using IgG purified from a pool comprised of 20 sera from animals naturally infected with equine infectious anemia virus. The diagnostic potential of these peptides was investigated by ELISA, Western blot and dot blot with purified IgG and serum samples. Based on the results, we chose a peptide mimetic for glycoprotein gp45 epitopes of equine infectious anemia virus, with potential for use as an antigen in indirect diagnostic assays. Synthesis of this peptide has possible applications for the development of new diagnostic tools for this disease.

  11. Propagation of equine infectious anemia virus in horse cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Grădinaru, D A; Stirbu, C; Păltineanu, D; Mironescu, D; Manolescu, N

    1981-01-01

    The Wyoming strain of equine infectious anemia virus was adapted to cell cultures by 7 passages in horse leukocytes and 14 passages in fetal equine dermal and kidney cells. The virus was made evident by electron microscopy and immunodiffusion tests with antigens prepared from culture fluids.

  12. Equine Infectious Anemia Virus from Infected Horse Serum

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hideo; Yoshino, Tomoo; Ushimi, Chuzo

    1974-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus was purified from infected horse serum samples. Electron microscope observation on negatively stained preparations of purified virus showed roughly spherical particles sized between 100 and 200 nm in diameter. In disrupted particles, an envelope was visible but no internal structure could be resolved. Since the purified virus fraction had a strong antigenic activity to antiserum in immunodiffusion reaction, these particles are thought to be the causative virus of equine infectious anemia. Images PMID:4372175

  13. Virulence determinants of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Payne, Susan L; Fuller, Frederick J

    2010-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a macrophage-tropic lentivirus that rapidly Induces disease in experimentally infected horses. Because EIAV infection and replication is centered on the monocyte/macrophage and has a pronounced acute disease stage, it is a useful model system for understanding the contribution of monocyte/macrophages to other lentivirus-induced diseases. Genetic mapping studies utilizing chimeric proviruses in which parental viruses are acutely virulent or avirulent have allowed the identification of important regions that influence acute virulence. U3 regions in the viral LTR, surface envelope (SU) protein and the accessory S2 gene strongly influence acute disease expression. While the chimeric proviruses provide insight into genes or genome regions that affect viral pathogenesis, it is then necessary to further dissect those regions to focus on specific virus-host mechanisms that lead to disease expression. The V6 region of the viral env protein is an example of one identified region that may interact with the ELR-1 receptor in an important way and we are currently identifying S2 protein motifs required for disease expression.

  14. Equine infectious anemia: prospects for control.

    PubMed

    Issel, C J; McManus, J M; Hagius, S D; Foil, L D; Adams, W V; Montelaro, R C

    1990-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia has been managed in most countries by the imposition of testing and quarantine regulations. In the United States, about 700,000 of the more than 7,000,000 horses are tested annually. As long as the status of greater than 90% of the horse population remains unknown and horses are transported and congregate in a relatively unrestricted manner, EIA will continue to exact its toll. Therefore, it is incumbent on the scientific community to continue to develop and refine practical and sensitive diagnostic tests for EIA which will be used in an expanding market, to reduce the number of untested horses and to increase the accuracy of test results. Under ideal conditions, EIA can spread rapidly in a localized population with potentially devastating results. Although strict adherence to sanitary regulations will minimize the likelihood of epizootics, the existence of a large reservoir of untested horses with occasional contact with uninfected test-negative horses will ensure the continued transmission of EIAV. The change of this transmission occurring as a result of human intervention can be eliminated but it is not possible to eliminate the threat posed by blood feeding insects. If these "chance encounters" between an untested EIAV infected horse and a test-negative horse occur under field conditions where horse flies are abundant and the proximate distance between the horses is minimal, transmission is efficient if the quantity of EIAV in the blood of the donor horse is high.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Identification of multiple equine infectious anemia antigens by immunodiffusion reactions.

    PubMed

    Malmquist, W A; Becvar, C S

    1975-10-01

    Equine infectious anemia (EIA) cell antigens prepared from infected equine spleen, equine leukocyte cultures or a persistently infected equine dermis cell line contained at least two serologically reacting components. For convenience one component was designated as soluble antigen (SA) and the other as cell-associated antigen (CAA). The SA appeared as a single component when it was prepared from EIA virus precipitated from infectious tissue culture fluid with polyethylene glycol and ether treated but it was mixed with CAA when the source was infected cells. Cytolytic or mechanical disruption of infected cells appeared to accelerate the release of CAA. Reaction to each component could be identified in double and radial immunodiffusion tests by increasing the concentrations of SA in a two-component antigenic mixture. The CAA component does not appear to affect the value of the immunodiffusion test as a diagnostic aid.

  16. Identification of multiple equine infectious anemia antigens by immunodiffusion reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Malmquist, W A; Becvar, C S

    1975-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia (EIA) cell antigens prepared from infected equine spleen, equine leukocyte cultures or a persistently infected equine dermis cell line contained at least two serologically reacting components. For convenience one component was designated as soluble antigen (SA) and the other as cell-associated antigen (CAA). The SA appeared as a single component when it was prepared from EIA virus precipitated from infectious tissue culture fluid with polyethylene glycol and ether treated but it was mixed with CAA when the source was infected cells. Cytolytic or mechanical disruption of infected cells appeared to accelerate the release of CAA. Reaction to each component could be identified in double and radial immunodiffusion tests by increasing the concentrations of SA in a two-component antigenic mixture. The CAA component does not appear to affect the value of the immunodiffusion test as a diagnostic aid. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4a. Fig. 4b. Fig. 4c. Fig. 5a. Fig. 5b. PMID:169969

  17. Characterization of isolates of equine infectious anemia virus in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tigre, Dellane Martins; Brandão, Camila Fonseca Lopes; de Paula, Fabiana Lopes; Chinalia, Fabio Alexandre; Campos, Gubio Soares; Sardi, Silvia Ines

    2017-03-01

    Equine infectious anemia is an important infectious disease that affects equids worldwide. Control of the disease is currently based on detection of anti-p26 EIAV by Agar Gel Immunodiffusion (AGID). In this work, 62 animals were examined by AGID and nested-PCR using primers for the gag gene. Fifty-three samples (85.5%) were positive by nested-PCR, whereas only 33 samples (53%) were positive for AGID. Fifteen amplicons obtained by nested-PCR were sequenced and the aligned results subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The analysis suggests that the Brazilian EIAV form a cluster with WSU5, EIAVUK and Wyoming strains from United States.

  18. Relative resistance of Pacific salmon to infectious salmon anaemia virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rolland, J.B.; Winton, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) is a major disease of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, caused by an orthomyxovirus (ISAV). Increases in global aqua culture and the international movement of fish made it important to determine if Pacific salmon are at risk. Steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and chum, O. keta, Chinook, O. tshawytscha, coho, O. kisutch, and Atlantic salmon were injected intraperitoneally with a high, medium, or low dose of a Norwegian strain of ISAV. In a second challenge, the same species, except chum salmon, were injected with a high dose of either a Canadian or the Norwegian strain. Average cumulative mortality of Atlantic salmon in trial 1 was 12% in the high dose group, 20% in the medium dose group and 16% in the low dose group. The average cumulative mortality of Atlantic salmon in trial 2 was 98%. No signs typical of ISA and no ISAV-related mortality occurred among any of the groups of Oncorhynchus spp. in either experiment, although ISAV was reisolated from some fish sampled at intervals post-challenge. The results indicate that while Oncorhynchus spp. are quite resistant to ISAV relative to Atlantic salmon, the potential for ISAV to adapt to Oncorhynchus spp. should not be ignored.

  19. Biological Characterization of Rev Variation in Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Belshan, Michael; Harris, Matthew E.; Shoemaker, Anne E.; Hope, Thomas J.; Carpenter, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Sequence analysis identified significant variation in the second exon of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) rev. Functional analysis indicated that limited amino acid variation in Rev significantly altered the export activity of the protein but did not affect Rev-dependent alternative splicing. EIAV Rev can mediate export through two independent cis-acting Rev-responsive elements (RREs), and differences among Rev variants were more pronounced when both RREs were present. Variation in Rev may be an important mechanism for regulation of virus replication in vivo and may contribute to changes in clinical disease. PMID:9557734

  20. Persistent thrombocytopenia in a case of equine infectious anemia.

    PubMed

    Cohen, N D; Carter, G K

    1991-09-15

    Persistent thrombocytopenia was detected in a horse with equine infectious anemia (EIA). The thrombocytopenia was considered to be immune-mediated, developing secondary to infection with EIA virus. Epistaxis, petechial hemorrhages, subcutaneous hematomas, and edema resolved after treatment with corticosteroids; however, the owners requested that the mare by euthanatized because of infection with EIA virus. Although clinical signs attributable to immune-mediated thrombocytopenia may resolve with appropriate treatment, horses with immune-mediated thrombocytopenia secondary to EIA have a guarded to grave prognosis, because of the risk of recurrence and transmission of the EIA virus.

  1. Studies on equine infectious anemia virus transmission by insects.

    PubMed

    Issel, C J; Foil, L D

    1984-02-01

    There are several factors involved in the mechanical transmission of equine infectious anemia (EIA) virus by insects. Large hematophagous insects, especially tabanids, which feed from extravascular sites (ie, pool feeding) appear to be the most efficient vectors. The biology of the host-seeking and blood-feeding behavior of the vectors are important variables that have been overlooked in the mechanical transmission of pathogens like EIA virus. The biology, population levels, and diversity of the vectors, in addition to the clinical status and proximity of EIA virus-infected horses maintained with susceptible animals are all important variables that contribute to EIA virus transmission in nature.

  2. Evolution of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISA virus).

    PubMed

    Plarre, Heidrun; Nylund, Are; Karlsen, Marius; Brevik, Øyvind; Sæther, Per Anton; Vike, Siri

    2012-12-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus, ISA virus (genus Isavirus, family Orthomyxoviridae), emerged in Norwegian salmon culture in the mid-80s. The genome consists of eight segments coding for at least 10 proteins. ISA viruses show many of similarities to influenza A viruses but differ in many important aspects such as the number of hosts, the host population structure and the route of transmission. The only known hosts and reservoirs for ISA viruses are salmonids found in countries surrounding the North Atlantic. In this study, four different segments of the genome of about 100 ISA viruses have been sequenced in an attempt to understand the evolution of ISA viruses and how these viruses are maintained in and transmitted between populations of farmed Atlantic salmon. The four gene segments code for the nucleoprotein (NP), the putative acid polymerase (PA), the fusion protein (F) and the haemagglutinin-esterase (HE). Analysis of these four genes showed that the substitution rates of the internal proteins (NP and PA) are lower than those of the two surface proteins (F and HE). All four segments are evolving at a lower rate than similar genes in influenza A viruses. The ISA virus populations consist of avirulent viruses and pathogenic strains with variable virulence in Atlantic salmon. Recombination resulting in inserts close to the proteolytic-cleavage site of the precursor F0 protein and deletions in the stalk region of the HE protein seem to be responsible for the transition from avirulent ISA viruses to pathogenic strains. It is also shown that reassortment is a frequent event among the dominating ISA viruses in farmed Atlantic salmon. The pattern that is obtained after phylogenetic analysis of the four gene segments from ISA viruses suggests that the variation is limited to a few distinct clades and that no major changes have occurred in the ISA virus population in Norway since the first viruses were isolated. Calculation of the time of most recent common ancestor

  3. Restriction of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus by Equine APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zielonka, Jörg; Bravo, Ignacio G.; Marino, Daniela; Conrad, Elea; Perković, Mario; Battenberg, Marion; Cichutek, Klaus; Münk, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian APOBEC3 (A3) proteins comprise a multigene family of cytidine deaminases that act as potent inhibitors of retroviruses and retrotransposons. The A3 locus on the chromosome 28 of the horse genome contains multiple A3 genes: two copies of A3Z1, five copies of A3Z2, and a single copy of A3Z3, indicating a complex evolution of multiple gene duplications. We have cloned and analyzed for expression the different equine A3 genes and examined as well the subcellular distribution of the corresponding proteins. Additionally, we have tested the functional antiretroviral activity of the equine and of several of the human and nonprimate A3 proteins against the Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), the Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and the Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2). Hematopoietic cells of horses express at least five different A3s: A3Z1b, A3Z2a-Z2b, A3Z2c-Z2d, A3Z2e, and A3Z3, whereas circulating macrophages, the natural target of EIAV, express only part of the A3 repertoire. The five A3Z2 tandem copies arose after three consecutive, recent duplication events in the horse lineage, after the split between Equidae and Carnivora. The duplicated genes show different antiviral activities against different viruses: equine A3Z3 and A3Z2c-Z2d are potent inhibitors of EIAV while equine A3Z1b, A3Z2a-Z2b, A3Z2e showed only weak anti-EIAV activity. Equine A3Z1b and A3Z3 restricted AAV and all equine A3s, except A3Z1b, inhibited SIV. We hypothesize that the horse A3 genes are undergoing a process of subfunctionalization in their respective viral specificities, which might provide the evolutionary advantage for keeping five copies of the original gene. PMID:19458006

  4. Restriction of equine infectious anemia virus by equine APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Jörg; Bravo, Ignacio G; Marino, Daniela; Conrad, Elea; Perković, Mario; Battenberg, Marion; Cichutek, Klaus; Münk, Carsten

    2009-08-01

    The mammalian APOBEC3 (A3) proteins comprise a multigene family of cytidine deaminases that act as potent inhibitors of retroviruses and retrotransposons. The A3 locus on the chromosome 28 of the horse genome contains multiple A3 genes: two copies of A3Z1, five copies of A3Z2, and a single copy of A3Z3, indicating a complex evolution of multiple gene duplications. We have cloned and analyzed for expression the different equine A3 genes and examined as well the subcellular distribution of the corresponding proteins. Additionally, we have tested the functional antiretroviral activity of the equine and of several of the human and nonprimate A3 proteins against the Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), the Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and the Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2). Hematopoietic cells of horses express at least five different A3s: A3Z1b, A3Z2a-Z2b, A3Z2c-Z2d, A3Z2e, and A3Z3, whereas circulating macrophages, the natural target of EIAV, express only part of the A3 repertoire. The five A3Z2 tandem copies arose after three consecutive, recent duplication events in the horse lineage, after the split between Equidae and Carnivora. The duplicated genes show different antiviral activities against different viruses: equine A3Z3 and A3Z2c-Z2d are potent inhibitors of EIAV while equine A3Z1b, A3Z2a-Z2b, A3Z2e showed only weak anti-EIAV activity. Equine A3Z1b and A3Z3 restricted AAV and all equine A3s, except A3Z1b, inhibited SIV. We hypothesize that the horse A3 genes are undergoing a process of subfunctionalization in their respective viral specificities, which might provide the evolutionary advantage for keeping five copies of the original gene.

  5. Immunodiffusion Studies of Purified Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hideo; Ushimi, Chuzo

    1971-01-01

    Antigenicity of purified equine infectious anemia (EIA) virus was examined by immunodiffusion against sera obtained from horses experimentally infected with EIA virus. The purified virus reacted with the infected horse serum, and virus-specific precipitating antibody was demonstrated. Furthermore, it was found that purified EIA virus reacted against the serum of horses infected with all strains of EIA virus which were antigenically different from one another. From the result, group-specific components of the virus rather than strain-specific ones were considered to be involved in the reaction. Serological reactivity was lost by adding antiserum from the infected horse to the antigen. The precipitating antibody usually appeared in the serum 1 to 2 weeks after the first febrile attack of EIA and remained for a longer period. Some characteristics of the purified antigen and specificity of the reaction for EIA are described. Images PMID:16557982

  6. Transmission of equine infectious anemia virus by Tabanus fuscicostatus.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, J A; Adams, W V; Wilson, B H; Issel, C J; Roth, E E

    1976-01-01

    The mechanical transmission of equine infectious anemia (EIA) virus by Tabanus fuscicostatus was investigated. In 1 of 7 transmission trials, a single horsefly transmitted EIA virus from an acutely infected pony to a susceptible pony. Groups of horseflies isolated for 3, 10, or 30 minutes before refeeding transmitted EIA virus, whereas those isolated for 4 or 24 hours did not. Data from field studies indicate that the home range or flight distance of horseflies may exceed 4 miles. That information together with our observations suggest that segregation of infected horses (usually defined as at least 200 yards from susceptible horses) as a control measure for EIA may not be an adequate safeguard against transmission in areas where horseflies are numerous.

  7. Equine infectious anemia prevalence in feral donkeys from Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Fernanda G; Cook, R Frank; Naves, João H F; Oliveira, Cairo H S; Diniz, Rejane S; Freitas, Francisco J C; Lima, Joseney M; Sakamoto, Sidnei M; Leite, Rômulo C; Issel, Charles J; Reis, Jenner K P

    2017-05-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Although the virus infects all members of the Equidae the vast majority of studies have been conducted in horses (Equus caballus) with comparatively little information available for other equid species. Brazil has one of the most abundant donkey (E. asinus) populations of any nation although the economic importance of these animals is declining as transportation becomes increasingly mechanized. As a result, considerable numbers of donkeys especially in the Northeast of the country have been released and allowed pursue an almost feral existence. Consequently, this large and growing population constitutes a significant risk as a reservoir for the maintenance and transmission of important equine infectious diseases such as glanders and equine arteritis virus in addition to EIAV. This study examines the prevalence of EIA in a semi-wild donkey population from Mossoró city, in Northeast Brazil, using AGID followed by cELISA, rgp90 ELISA and immunoblot (IB). Serum samples were collected from 367 donkeys without obvious EIA clinical signs. Subsequent testing revealed seropositive rates of 1.6% (6/367) in officially approved AGID tests, 3.3% (12/367) in cELISA and 14.4% (53/367) in the rgp90 ELISA. However, 88.7% (47/53) of the rgp90 ELISA positive samples were almost certainly false reactions because they failed to react with two or more antigens in IB. Consequently, the rpg90 ELISA has a similar sensitivity to AGID with donkey serum samples. Such high false positive rates have not been observed previously with serum samples from horses. Another highly significant finding is that 56.9% (33/58) of the donkey serum samples tested in IB had reactivity to EIAV p26 only. Although this could result from recent infection with the virus, it has been found that in some equids p26 only reactivity persists for extensive periods of time suggesting exposure to antigens

  8. Prospective study of progeny of inapparent equine carriers of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Issel, C J; Adams, W V; Foil, L D

    1985-05-01

    Progeny of a band of horses, positive by the agar-gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test for equine infectious anemia (EIA) antibody, were observed through their weaning over a 4-year period. Sentinels (AGID test-negative) were allowed to mingle with EIA-infected mares and their foals in pasture situations in an area with high populations of potential vectors. Of 27 adult sentinels, 8 (30%) seroconverted in annual rates ranging from 0% to 75%. In contrast, only 2 of 31 (6%) foals weaned became infected. Difference in infection rates between adult sentinels and foals was significant (chi 2, P less than 0.05). Possible explanations for differences included protective value of colostral immunity and differences in attractiveness to blood feeding vectors. Detectable colostral immunity to EIA virus in the AGID test persisted for 25 to 195 days, with a mean of 124 days.

  9. Equine infectious anemia virus replication is upregulated during differentiation of blood monocytes from acutely infected horses.

    PubMed Central

    Sellon, D C; Walker, K M; Russell, K E; Perry, S T; Covington, P; Fuller, F J

    1996-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus is a lentivirus that replicates in mature tissue macrophages of horses. Ponies were infected with equine infectious anemia virus. During febrile episodes, proviral DNA was detectable, but viral mRNA was not detectable. As cultured blood monocytes from these ponies differentiated into macrophages, viral expression was upregulated. In situ hybridization confirmed that viral transcription occurred in mature macrophages. PMID:8523576

  10. Equine monocyte-derived macrophage cultures and their applications for infectivity and neutralization studies of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Raabe, M R; Issel, C J; Montelaro, R C

    1998-03-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) has been shown to infect cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. These primary cells are intrinsically difficult to obtain, to purify and to culture in vitro for extended periods of time. As a result, most in vitro studies concerning this lentivirus make use of primary equine fibroblasts or transformed canine or feline cell lines. We describe methods that yield reproducibly pure cultures of equine blood monocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The in vitro differentiation of these cells into mature equine macrophage was verified using various cytochemical staining methods. The equine monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM) cultures were found to replicate cell-adapted and field strains of EIAV more efficiently than cultures of fully differentiated equine splenic macrophage. Having established reproducible and fully differentiated cultures of equine macrophage, in vitro assays of virus infectivity and serum neutralization were developed using the in vivo target cell of EIAV. These procedures, while developed for the EIAV system, should be equally useful for in vitro cultures of other macrophage-tropic pathogens of horses.

  11. Sero-surveillance of equine infectious anemia virus in equines in India during more than a decade (1999-2012).

    PubMed

    Malik, Praveen; Singha, Harisankar; Goyal, Sachin K; Khurana, Sandip K; Kumar, Rajender; Virmani, Nitin; Shanmugasundaram, Karuppusamy; Pandey, Shashti B; Kant, Ravi; Singh, Birendra K; Singh, Raj K

    2013-12-01

    Equine infectious anemia (EIA) is a retroviral infection of horses. Horses infected by EIA virus (EIAV) become inapparent carriers that remain asymptomatic for the remainder of their life span and serve as infection source to other horses. In this study, agar gel immunodiffusion test and ELISA were used to investigate the presence of antibodies to EIAV in equines. A total of 67,042 equine serum samples from 19 states and two union territories were tested during April 1999 to September 2012. The results revealed that none of the animals were positive for antibodies to EIAV from 1999 to December 2009. However, two EIAV sero-positive cases one each from indigenous and thoroughbred equines were detected in 2010 and 2012, respectively. Occurrence of EIA after a long gap of 11 years is indicative of reemergence of EIA in India which warrants concerted efforts in nationwide surveillance and monitoring for detection and elimination of EIAV carrier animals to prevent EIA outbreak.

  12. Equine infectious anemia in mules: virus isolation and pathogenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Spyrou, V; Papanastassopoulou, M; Psychas, V; Billinis, Ch; Koumbati, M; Vlemmas, J; Koptopoulos, G

    2003-08-29

    There appears to be a lack of information concerning responses of mules to natural infection or experimental inoculation with equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). In the present study EIAV was isolated from mules, for the first time, and its pathogenicity in naturally infected and experimentally inoculated animals was investigated. Two naturally infected (A and B) and three EIAV free mules (C, D and E) were used for this purpose. Mule A developed clinical signs, whereas mule B remained asymptomatic until the end of the study. Mules C and D were each inoculated with 10ml of blood from mule A and developed signs of the disease; they were euthanatized or died at day 22 and 25 post-inoculation, respectively. Mule E served as a negative control. The virus was isolated from the plasma samples of mules with clinical signs of the disease (A, C and D), but not from the asymptomatic mule B. Both proviral DNA and viral RNA were amplified from blood and tissues of the infected animals by nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR). Antibodies were not detected in the two experimentally infected mules until their natural death or euthanasia. Clinicopathological and laboratory findings showed that, in mules, EIAV produced clinical signs similar to those observed in horses and ponies. Nested PCR proved to be a rapid, sensitive and specific diagnostic method for the detection of EIAV, regardless of the disease stage.

  13. Infection of bone marrow macrophages by equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Swardson, C J; Lichtenstein, D L; Wang, S; Montelaro, R C; Kociba, G J

    1997-12-01

    To characterize infection of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) with equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) by determining virus production, effects on viability, and induction of cytokines. BMDM obtained from bone marrow of 6 clinically normal adult horses. BMDM were infected with EIAV at a multiplicity of infection of 8. Cell viability, percentage of cells with detectable viral protein, reverse transcriptase activity, and concentrations of infective virus (focus-forming units/ml), interleukin 6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were measured in culture supernatant samples obtained at various days after infection. Cell viability was decreased on day 4 and was maximally decreased on day 8. The number of cells with detectable viral protein and supernatant reverse transcriptase activity increased significantly on day 4 and increased until day 6. Virus concentration (focus-forming units per milliliter) peaked on day 4 after infection and was constant thereafter. Infection with EIAV caused significant induction of interleukin 6 production by BMDM. The maximal difference was seen on day 4 after infection. Control and infected BMDM produced only negligible amounts of tumor necrosis factor-alpha. BMDM are useful, as a cell population, to study the effects of infection with EIAV, including cell death and induction of interleukin 6 but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha production.

  14. Proteomic alteration of equine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Du, Cheng; Liu, Hai-Fang; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Ma, Jian; Li, Yi-Jing; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Similar to the well-studied viruses human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is another member of the Lentivirus genus in the family Retroviridae. Previous studies revealed that interactions between EIAV and the host resulted in viral evolution in pathogenicity and immunogenicity, as well as adaptation to the host. Proteomic analysis has been performed to examine changes in protein expression and/or modification in host cells infected with viruses and has revealed useful information for virus-host interactions. In this study, altered protein expression in equine monocyte-derived macrophages (eMDMs, the principle target cell of EIAV in vivo) infected with the EIAV pathogenic strain EIAV(DLV34) (DLV34) was examined using 2D-LC-MS/MS coupled with the iTRAQ labeling technique. The expression levels of 210 cellular proteins were identified to be significantly upregulated or downregulated by infection with DLV34. Alterations in protein expression were confirmed by examining the mRNA levels of eight selected proteins using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR, and by verifying the levels of ten selected proteins using parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). Further analysis of GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG)-Pathway enrichment demonstrated that these differentially expressed proteins are primarily related to the biological processes of oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding, RNA splicing, and ubiquitylation. Our results can facilitate a better understanding of the host response to EIAV infection and the cellular processes required for EIAV replication and pathogenesis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Equine Tetherin Blocks Retrovirus Release and Its Activity Is Antagonized by Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Envelope Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xin; Hu, Zhe; Gu, Qinyong; Wu, Xingliang; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Wei, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Human tetherin is a host restriction factor that inhibits replication of enveloped viruses by blocking viral release. Tetherin has an unusual topology that includes an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, a single transmembrane domain, an extracellular domain, and a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Tetherin is not well conserved across species, so it inhibits viral replication in a species-specific manner. Thus, studies of tetherin activities from different species provide an important tool for understanding its antiviral mechanism. Here, we report cloning of equine tetherin and characterization of its antiviral activity. Equine tetherin shares 53%, 40%, 36%, and 34% amino acid sequence identity with feline, human, simian, and murine tetherins, respectively. Like the feline tetherin, equine tetherin has a shorter N-terminal domain than human tetherin. Equine tetherin is localized on the cell surface and strongly blocks human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) release from virus-producing cells. The antiviral activity of equine tetherin is neutralized by EIAV envelope protein, but not by the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu, which is a human tetherin antagonist, and EIAV envelope protein does not counteract human tetherin. These results shed new light on our understanding of the species-specific tetherin antiviral mechanism. PMID:24227834

  16. Equine tetherin blocks retrovirus release and its activity is antagonized by equine infectious anemia virus envelope protein.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xin; Hu, Zhe; Gu, Qinyong; Wu, Xingliang; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Wei, Ping; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Human tetherin is a host restriction factor that inhibits replication of enveloped viruses by blocking viral release. Tetherin has an unusual topology that includes an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, a single transmembrane domain, an extracellular domain, and a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Tetherin is not well conserved across species, so it inhibits viral replication in a species-specific manner. Thus, studies of tetherin activities from different species provide an important tool for understanding its antiviral mechanism. Here, we report cloning of equine tetherin and characterization of its antiviral activity. Equine tetherin shares 53%, 40%, 36%, and 34% amino acid sequence identity with feline, human, simian, and murine tetherins, respectively. Like the feline tetherin, equine tetherin has a shorter N-terminal domain than human tetherin. Equine tetherin is localized on the cell surface and strongly blocks human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) release from virus-producing cells. The antiviral activity of equine tetherin is neutralized by EIAV envelope protein, but not by the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu, which is a human tetherin antagonist, and EIAV envelope protein does not counteract human tetherin. These results shed new light on our understanding of the species-specific tetherin antiviral mechanism.

  17. Phosphoinositides Direct Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Gag Trafficking and Release

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Fiona; Chen, Kang; Ehrlich, Lorna S.; Jin, Jing; Chen, Min H.; Medina, Gisselle N.; Symons, Marc; Montelaro, Ronald; Donaldson, Julie; Tjandra, Nico; Carter, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PI(4,5)P2), the predominant phosphoinositide on the plasma membrane, binds the matrix (MA) protein of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) with similar affinities in vitro. Interaction with PI(4,5)P2 is critical for HIV-1 assembly on the plasma membrane. EIAV has been shown to localize in internal compartments hence the significance of its interaction with PI(4,5)P2 is unclear. We therefore investigated the binding in vitro of other phosphoinositides to EIAV MA and whether intracellular association with compartments bearing these phosphoinositides was important for assembly and release of virus-like particles (VLPs) formed by Gag. In vitro, EIAV MA bound PI(3)P with higher affinity than PI(4,5)P2 as revealed by NMR spectra upon lipid titration. Gag was detected on the plasma membrane and in compartments enriched in PI(3,5)P2. Treatment of cells with YM201636, a kinase inhibitor that blocks production of PI(3,5)P2 from PI(3)P, caused Gag to co-localize with aberrant compartments and inhibited VLP release. In contrast to HIV-1, release of EIAV VLPs was not significantly diminished by co-expression with 5-phosphatase IV, an enzyme that specifically depletes PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane. However, co-expression with synaptojanin 2, a phosphatase with broader specificity, diminished VLP production. PI-binding pocket mutations caused striking budding defects, as revealed by electron microscopy. One of the mutations also modified Gag-Gag interaction, as suggested by altered bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We conclude that phosphoinositide-mediated targeting to peripheral and internal membranes is a critical factor in EIAV assembly and release. PMID:21176037

  18. Phosphoinositides direct equine infectious anemia virus gag trafficking and release.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fiona; Chen, Kang; Ehrlich, Lorna S; Jin, Jing; Chen, Min H; Medina, Gisselle N; Symons, Marc; Montelaro, Ronald; Donaldson, Julie; Tjandra, Nico; Carter, Carol A

    2011-04-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2) ], the predominant phosphoinositide (PI) on the plasma membrane, binds the matrix (MA) protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) with similar affinities in vitro. Interaction with PI(4,5)P(2) is critical for HIV-1 assembly on the plasma membrane. EIAV has been shown to localize in internal compartments; hence, the significance of its interaction with PI(4,5)P(2) is unclear. We therefore investigated the binding in vitro of other PIs to EIAV MA and whether intracellular association with compartments bearing these PIs was important for assembly and release of virus-like particles (VLPs) formed by Gag. In vitro, EIAV MA bound phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] with higher affinity than PI(4,5)P(2) as revealed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra upon lipid titration. Gag was detected on the plasma membrane and in compartments enriched in phosphatidylinositol 3,5-biphosphate [PI(3,5)P(2) ]. Treatment of cells with YM201636, a kinase inhibitor that blocks production of PI(3,5)P(2) from PI(3)P, caused Gag to colocalize with aberrant compartments and inhibited VLP release. In contrast to HIV-1, release of EIAV VLPs was not significantly diminished by coexpression with 5-phosphatase IV, an enzyme that specifically depletes PI(4,5)P(2) from the plasma membrane. However, coexpression with synaptojanin 2, a phosphatase with broader specificity, diminished VLP production. PI-binding pocket mutations caused striking budding defects, as revealed by electron microscopy. One of the mutations also modified Gag-Gag interaction, as suggested by altered bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We conclude that PI-mediated targeting to peripheral and internal membranes is a critical factor in EIAV assembly and release. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Infectious causes of equine respiratory disease on Ontario standardbred racetracks.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, J; Thorsen, J; Barnum, D A; Mitchell, W R; Ingram, D G

    1977-01-01

    Upper respiratory disease has been a serious problem in Standardbred horses on racetracks in Ontario, with outbreaks occurring once or twice annually in late winter and early spring seasons. To determine the causes of these epidemics, a 3-year investigation was carried out in which nasal swabs and serum samples were obtained at intervals from apparently healthy horses and from horses suffering from upper respiratory disease. The nasal swabs were used to isolate bacteria and viruses. The serum samples were examined for the presence and level of antibodies to equine influenza viruses and equine herpesvirus 1. None of the bacteria isolated were associated with the outbreaks of disease. Equine herpesvirus 2 was isolated 72 times from both diseased and apparently healthy horses. Equine herpesvirus 1 was isolated 10 times from horses with respiratory disease, both during and between epidemics. Influenza equine/1 virus was isolated seven times and influenza equine/2 was isolated once during severe outbreaks of upper respiratory disease. Serological evidence confirmed that influenza viruses were the causes of the major epidemics, with the equine/1 strain being involved most often. PMID:192757

  20. Risk of equine infectious disease transmission by non-race horse movements in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Yoko; Kobayashi, Sota; Nishida, Takeshi; Nishiguchi, Akiko; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki

    2010-07-01

    For determining surveillance programs or infectious disease countermeasures, risk evaluation approaches have been recently undertaken in the field of animal health. In the present study, to help establish efficient and effective surveillance and countermeasures for equine infectious diseases, we evaluated the potential risk of equine infectious disease transmission in non-race horses from the viewpoints of horse movements and health management practices by conducting a survey of non-race horse holdings. From the survey, the non-race horse population was classified into the following five sectors based on their purposes: the equestrian sector, private owner sector, exhibition sector, fattening sector and others. Our survey results showed that the equestrian and private owner sectors had the largest population sizes, and movements between and within these sectors occurred quite frequently, while there was little movement in the other sectors. Qualitative evaluation showed that the equestrian and private owner sectors had relatively high risks of equine infectious disease transmission through horse movements. Therefore, it would be effective to concentrate on these two sectors when implementing surveillance or preventative measures. Special priority should be given to the private owner sector because this sector has not implemented inspection and vaccination well compared with the equestrian sector, which possesses a high compliance rate for these practices. This qualitative risk evaluation focused on horse movements and health management practices could provide a basis for further risk evaluation to establish efficient and effective surveillance and countermeasures for equine infectious diseases.

  1. Antigenic stimulation of T lymphocytes in chronic nononcogenic retrovirus infection: equine infectious anemia.

    PubMed

    Shively, M A; Banks, K L; Greenlee, A; Klevjer-Anderson, P

    1982-04-01

    Equine infectious anemia is a chronic disease of horses caused by a nononcogenic retrovirus. Studies were undertaken to determine the types of cells involved in the in vitro lymphoproliferative response to viral antigens and the dynamics of this reaction. It was observed that reactive lymphocytes were present at unpredictable times in the peripheral blood of infected horses. This reaction was shown to be specific for the interaction of equine infectious anemia virus and T lymphocytes. Enriched B-lymphocyte populations did not divide when exposed to equine infectious anemia virus. Macrophages were depleted from the reaction by two methods: adherence to Sephadex and a combination of binding to Sephadex and adherence to complement-coated erythrocytes. Both methods reduced the number of monocytes, but only the combination of Sephadex and complement-coated cells removed the accessory cells needed for lymphocyte proliferation. We conclude that during the chronic stages of equine infectious anemia the number of antigen-reactive T lymphocytes fluctuates within the peripheral blood and that these cells require a complement-binding cell for reaction. The relationship of these cells to the lymphoproliferative stages of this disease is discussed.

  2. Development and characterization of an equine infectious anemia virus Env-pseudotyped reporter virus.

    PubMed

    Tallmadge, R L; Brindley, M A; Salmans, J; Mealey, R H; Maury, W; Carpenter, S

    2008-07-01

    We developed a replication-defective reporter virus pseudotyped with the envelope glycoprotein of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). The in vitro host range and neutralization phenotype of EIAV Env-pseudotyped virus were similar to those of replication-competent virus. An EIAV Env pseudovirus will improve antigenic characterization of viral variants and evaluation of lentivirus vaccines.

  3. Development of an equine-tropic replication-competent lentivirus assay for equine infectious anemia virus-based lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Farley, Daniel C; Bannister, Richard; Leroux-Carlucci, Marie A; Evans, Nerys E; Miskin, James E; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A

    2012-10-01

    The release of lentiviral vectors for clinical use requires the testing of vector material, production cells, and, if applicable, ex vivo-transduced cells for the presence of replication-competent lentivirus (RCL). Vectors derived from the nonprimate lentivirus equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) have been directly administered to patients in several clinical trials, with no toxicity observed to date. Because EIAV does not replicate in human cells, and because putative RCLs derived from vector components within human vector production cells would most likely be human cell-tropic, we previously developed an RCL assay using amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) as a surrogate positive control and human cells as RCL amplification/indicator cells. Here we report an additional RCL assay that tests for the presence of theoretical "equine-tropic" RCLs. This approach provides further assurance of safety by detecting putative RCLs with an equine cell-specific tropism that might not be efficiently amplified by the human cell-based RCL assay. We tested the ability of accessory gene-deficient EIAV mutant viruses to replicate in a highly permissive equine cell line to direct our choice of a suitable EIAV-derived positive control. In addition, we report for the first time the mathematical rationale for use of the Poisson distribution to calculate minimal infectious dose of positive control virus and for use in monitoring assay positive/spike control failures in accumulating data sets. No RCLs have been detected in Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant RCL assays to date, further demonstrating that RCL formation is highly unlikely in contemporary minimal lentiviral vector systems.

  4. Lessons in AIDS vaccine development learned from studies of equine infectious, anemia virus infection and immunity.

    PubMed

    Craigo, Jodi K; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2013-12-02

    Equine infectious anemia (EIA), identified in 1843 [1] as an infectious disease of horses and as a viral infection in 1904, remains a concern in veterinary medicine today. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) has served as an animal model of HIV-1/AIDS research since the original identification of HIV. Similar to other lentiviruses, EIAV has a high propensity for genomic sequence and antigenic variation, principally in its envelope (Env) proteins. However, EIAV possesses a unique and dynamic disease presentation that has facilitated comprehensive analyses of the interactions between the evolving virus population, progressive host immune responses, and the definition of viral and host correlates of immune control and vaccine efficacy. Summarized here are key findings in EIAV that have provided important lessons toward understanding long term immune control of lentivirus infections and the parameters for development of an enduring broadly protective AIDS vaccine.

  5. Lessons in AIDS Vaccine Development Learned from Studies of Equine Infectious, Anemia Virus Infection and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia (EIA), identified in 1843 [1] as an infectious disease of horses and as a viral infection in 1904, remains a concern in veterinary medicine today. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) has served as an animal model of HIV-1/AIDS research since the original identification of HIV. Similar to other lentiviruses, EIAV has a high propensity for genomic sequence and antigenic variation, principally in its envelope (Env) proteins. However, EIAV possesses a unique and dynamic disease presentation that has facilitated comprehensive analyses of the interactions between the evolving virus population, progressive host immune responses, and the definition of viral and host correlates of immune control and vaccine efficacy. Summarized here are key findings in EIAV that have provided important lessons toward understanding long term immune control of lentivirus infections and the parameters for development of an enduring broadly protective AIDS vaccine. PMID:24316675

  6. [Construction of an infectious clone of equine infectious anemia virus by N-glycosylation reverse-mutations].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiu'e; Quan, Yanping; Gao, Xu; Xiang, Wenhua; Zhou, Jianhua

    2008-03-01

    To elucidate the role of N-glycosylation in fetal donkey dermal cell (FDD)-attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), we constructed an N-glycosylation reverse-mutation molecular clone, pLGN191N236N246. This viral molecular clone was derived from the infectious clone pLGFD3-8 by site-directed mutagenesis. This clone was used to transfect fetal donkey dermal (FDD) cells. Infectious characteristics of transfectants were monitored by RT-PCR, indirect immune fluorescence and reverse transcriptase activity assay. After three passages in FDD cells, viral replications in the supernatant of cell cultures were detected by all the above three methods and viral particles were clearly observed by electron microscopy. The construction of the N-glycosylation reverse-mutation infectious clone provides a solid basis for further study of the mechanism of attenuated pathogenesis and increased immune protection of EIAV attenuated vaccines.

  7. Equine infectious anemia in 2014: live with it or eradicate it?

    PubMed

    Issel, Charles J; Cook, R Frank; Mealey, Robert H; Horohov, David W

    2014-12-01

    In the absence of an effective vaccine, the success of the test and removal approach for the control of equine infectious anemia (EIA) cannot be overstated, at least in those areas where testing has been traditionally routine. This article addresses 4 main aspects: what has been learned about EIA virus, host control of its replication, and inapparent carriers; international status regarding the control of EIA; diagnostic and laboratory investigation; and reducing the spread of blood-borne infections by veterinarians. An attempt is made to put these issues into practical contemporary perspectives for the equine practitioner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic study of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Gonda, M A; Charman, H P; Walker, J L; Coggins, L

    1978-05-01

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to study in detail the morphogenesis and replication of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) in cultured, persistently infected equine fetal kidney fibroblasts. The EIAV was shown by thin-section electron microscopy to resemble morphologically more closely the members of the genus Lenti-virus in the family Retroviridae than other genera. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated budding virus on only about 5% of the equine fetal kidney fibroblasts; however, the entire surface of these cells was involved in viral replication. Except where virus budding was observed, EIAV-infected cells were smooth and free of the topographic surface alterations characteristic of cells transformed by type C retroviruses. The morphologic relationship of EIAV and pathologic manifestations of EIAV infection to those of other Retroviridae are discussed.

  9. Purification and characterization of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Matheka, H D; Coggins, L; Shively, J N; Norcross, N L

    1976-01-01

    EIA virus was purified from equine fetal kidney cell cultures by PEG-precipitation, two sucrose-gradient sedimentations (5-30 per cent) and (25 to 60 per cent) centrifugation, using the immunodiffusion test to follow the procedure. Purified EIA virus had a density (20 degrees C) of 1.162 and a sedimentation constant of S20w=656. electron microscopy revealed a particle of about 100 nm in diameter with a very flexible but usually spherical shape. The dense core may be at various locations inside the membrane bound particle.

  10. Surveillance for infectious salmon anaemia virus HPR0 in marine Atlantic salmon farms across Scotland.

    PubMed

    McBeath, Alastair J A; Bain, Nicola; Snow, Michael

    2009-12-03

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) is a serious and commercially important pathogen of Atlantic salmon. Multiple viruses have been defined based on a highly polymorphic region (HPR) of the haemagglutinin-esterase (HE) protein encoded by genomic segment 6. The viruses causing disease outbreaks in farms to date all have deletions in this region with respect to a putative ancestral variant with a longer HPR (HPR0). The presence of HPR0 nucleic acid has been detected in many countries including Scotland, where it has mostly been associated with healthy wild and farmed fish. Pathogenic ISAVs appear to have been derived from HPR0 ancestors on multiple independent occasions, which suggests that the presence of HPR0 could represent a risk factor in the re-emergence of infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) disease. In order to better understand this potential risk factor, anonymous samples of gill and heart tissues from marine Atlantic salmon farms throughout Scotland were collected and screened for the presence of ISAV RNA. Since it has not been possible to isolate HPR0 in conventional ISA-permissive cell cultures, a sensitive real-time RT-PCR method was employed for the detection of viral RNA. DNA sequencing was carried out on the positive samples to determine their HPR sequence. ISAV RNA was detected in 6 samples originating from 4 different locations and sequence analysis indicated the viruses were of the HPR0 type. Full length segment 6 sequence analysis of 1 positive sample indicated that it was most similar to a European genotype sequence previously obtained from North America.

  11. Failure to propagate equine infectious anemia virus in mosquitoes and Culicoides variipennis.

    PubMed

    Shen, D T; Gorham, J R; Jones, R H; Crawford, T B

    1978-05-01

    Laboratory-colonized mosquitoes, Culex tarsalis, aedes aegypti, Culiseta inornata, and Anopheles free-borni, and the biting gnat, Culicoides variipennis, were exposed to equine infectious anemia virus. Exposure to the virus was by intrathoracic inoculation for mosquitoes and by oral ingestion of an infective blood meal through a membrane for C variipennis. After various intervals, groups of 15 to 20 insects were homogenized and inoculated into susceptible ponies. Positive immunodiffusion test results were used as criterion for equine infectious anemia infection in ponies. Virus was not detected in the 4 species of mosquitoes at 3, 6, 12, and 18 days after inoculation, or in C variipennis at 6, 8, 12, 14, 21, and 26 days after oral exposure to the virus.

  12. Extraction of equine infectious anemia immunodiffusion antigen with the aid of the chaotropic agent, thiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Hart, L T; Broussard, E A

    1973-02-01

    Immunodiffusion antigen from spleens of horses infected with equine infectious anemia virus was prepared by methods employing freeze-thaw cycles and thiocyanate treatment. Thiocyanate (0.5 M) permitted the recovery of the greatest amount of antigen. Furthermore, it was most effective for recovery of immunodiffusion antigen from spleens which yielded unsatisfactory concentrations of antigen by the conventional freeze-thaw or water-extraction methods. The reactivity of the antigen did not appear to be affected by this chemical treatment.

  13. Antibody Escape Kinetics of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Infection of Horses

    PubMed Central

    Mealey, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Lentivirus escape from neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is not well understood. In this work, we quantified antibody escape of a lentivirus, using antibody escape data from horses infected with equine infectious anemia virus. We calculated antibody blocking rates of wild-type virus, fitness costs of mutant virus, and growth rates of both viruses. These quantitative kinetic estimates of antibody escape are important for understanding lentiviral control by antibody neutralization and in developing NAb-eliciting vaccine strategies. PMID:25878104

  14. Equine infectious anemia virus resists the antiretroviral activity of equine APOBEC3 proteins through a packaging-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, Hal P; Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Oaks, J Lindsay; Carpenter, Susan; Cullen, Bryan R

    2008-12-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), uniquely among lentiviruses, does not encode a vif gene product. Other lentiviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), use Vif to neutralize members of the APOBEC3 (A3) family of intrinsic immunity factors that would otherwise inhibit viral infectivity. This suggests either that equine cells infected by EIAV in vivo do not express active A3 proteins or that EIAV has developed a novel mechanism to avoid inhibition by equine A3 (eA3). Here, we demonstrate that horses encode six distinct A3 proteins, four of which contain a single copy of the cytidine deaminase (CDA) consensus active site and two of which contain two CDA motifs. This represents a level of complexity previously seen only in primates. Phylogenetic analysis of equine single-CDA A3 proteins revealed two proteins related to human A3A (hA3A), one related to hA3C, and one related to hA3H. Both equine double-CDA proteins are similar to hA3F and were named eA3F1 and eA3F2. Analysis of eA3F1 and eA3F2 expression in vivo shows that the mRNAs encoding these proteins are widely expressed, including in cells that are natural EIAV targets. Both eA3F1 and eA3F2 inhibit retrotransposon mobility, while eA3F1 is a potent inhibitor of a Vif-deficient HIV-1 mutant and induces extensive editing of HIV-1 reverse transcripts. However, both eA3F1 and eA3F2 are weak inhibitors of EIAV. Surprisingly, eA3F1 and eA3F2 were packaged into EIAV and HIV-1 virions as effectively as hA3G, although only the latter inhibited EIAV infectivity. Moreover, all three proteins bound both the HIV-1 and EIAV nucleocapsid protein specifically in vitro. It therefore appears that EIAV has evolved a novel mechanism to specifically neutralize the biological activities of the cognate eA3F1 and eA3F2 proteins at a step subsequent to virion incorporation.

  15. Equine schlafen 11 restricts the production of equine infectious anemia virus via a codon usage-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yue-Zhi; Sun, Liu-Ke; Zhu, Dan-Tong; Hu, Zhe; Wang, Xue-Feng; Du, Cheng; Wang, Yu-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Human schlafen11 is a novel restriction factor for HIV-1 based on bias regarding relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU). Here, we report the cloning of equine schlafen11 (eSLFN11) and the characteristics of its role in restricting the production of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a retrovirus similar to HIV-1. Overexpression of eSLFN11 inhibited EIAV replication, whereas knockdown of endogenous eSLFN11 by siRNA enhanced the release of EIAV from its principal target cell. Notably, although eSLFN11 significantly suppressed expression of viral Gag protein and EIAV release into the culture medium, the levels of intracellular viral early gene proteins Tat and Rev and viral genomic RNA were unaffected. Coincidently, similar altered patterns of codon usage bias were observed for both the early and late genes of EIAV. Therefore, our data suggest that eSLFN11 restricts EIAV production by impairing viral mRNA translation via a mechanism that is similar to that employed by hSLFN11 for HIV-1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Serosurveillance of infectious agents in equines of the Central Valley of Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, D.; Romero-Zuñiga, J.J.; Dolz, G.

    2014-01-01

    Blood samples from 181 equines from the Central Valley of Costa Rica were collected in the year 2012 to determine the presence of antibodies against selected infectious agents in horses and to determine the risk factors associated with these agents. The presence of antibodies against Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV), Equine Herpes Virus 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4), West Nile Virus (WNV), Influenza A Virus (IAV), Equine Viral Arteritis Virus (EVAV), Babesia caballi, Theileria equi, Neospora caninum and Chlamydia abortus was determined using commercial assays, and risk factors associated with seropositivity to the different infectious agents was established. The most seroprevalent agent detected was EHV-4 (96.7%), followed by WNV (44.2%), and IAV (41.8%). Horses >3 years, used for work or sports, and with access to pastures, had significantly increased probability to be seropositive to WNV, whereas horses used for breeding and recreational purposes, being stabled, and without access to pastures, had significantly greater probability to be seropositive to IAV. Seroprevalence to B. caballi (19.9%) was lower than to T. equi (38.1%). For B. caballi, access to pastures was determined as a risk factor, whereas being older than 3 years was established as a risk factor for T. equi. Low seroprevalences were determined for EHV-1 (5.0%), EVAV (5.0%), C. abortus (4.8%), and N. caninum (4.4%). Mares having history of abortion were more likely to be seropositive to EHV-1, whereas horses >3 years, used for work and sports, and mares having multiple parturitions, were more likely to be seropositive to N. caninum. None of the horses were seropositive to EIAV. Earlier, only diseases caused by EIAV, WNV and piroplasmosis were reported in Costa Rica. The present study however, determined the presence of carriers for EHV-1, EHV-4, and EIAV. PMID:26623349

  17. Serosurveillance of infectious agents in equines of the Central Valley of Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, D; Romero-Zuñiga, J J; Dolz, G

    2014-01-01

    Blood samples from 181 equines from the Central Valley of Costa Rica were collected in the year 2012 to determine the presence of antibodies against selected infectious agents in horses and to determine the risk factors associated with these agents. The presence of antibodies against Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV), Equine Herpes Virus 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4), West Nile Virus (WNV), Influenza A Virus (IAV), Equine Viral Arteritis Virus (EVAV), Babesia caballi, Theileria equi, Neospora caninum and Chlamydia abortus was determined using commercial assays, and risk factors associated with seropositivity to the different infectious agents was established. The most seroprevalent agent detected was EHV-4 (96.7%), followed by WNV (44.2%), and IAV (41.8%). Horses >3 years, used for work or sports, and with access to pastures, had significantly increased probability to be seropositive to WNV, whereas horses used for breeding and recreational purposes, being stabled, and without access to pastures, had significantly greater probability to be seropositive to IAV. Seroprevalence to B. caballi (19.9%) was lower than to T. equi (38.1%). For B. caballi, access to pastures was determined as a risk factor, whereas being older than 3 years was established as a risk factor for T. equi. Low seroprevalences were determined for EHV-1 (5.0%), EVAV (5.0%), C. abortus (4.8%), and N. caninum (4.4%). Mares having history of abortion were more likely to be seropositive to EHV-1, whereas horses >3 years, used for work and sports, and mares having multiple parturitions, were more likely to be seropositive to N. caninum. None of the horses were seropositive to EIAV. Earlier, only diseases caused by EIAV, WNV and piroplasmosis were reported in Costa Rica. The present study however, determined the presence of carriers for EHV-1, EHV-4, and EIAV.

  18. Surveillance programme for important equine infectious respiratory pathogens in the USA.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, N; Kass, P H; Mapes, S; Johnson, C; Barnett, D C; Vaala, W; Gutierrez, C; McDaniel, R; Whitehead, B; Manning, J

    2011-07-02

    The prevalence and epidemiology of important viral (equine influenza virus [EIV], equine herpesvirus type 1 [EHV-1] and EHV-4) and bacterial (Streptococcus equi subspecies equi) respiratory pathogens shed by horses presented to equine veterinarians with upper respiratory tract signs and/or acute febrile neurological disease were studied. Veterinarians from throughout the USA were enrolled in a surveillance programme and were asked to collect blood and nasal secretions from equine cases with acute infectious upper respiratory tract disease and/or acute onset of neurological disease. A questionnaire was used to collect information pertaining to each case and its clinical signs. Samples were tested by real-time PCR for the presence of EHV-1, EHV-4, EIV and S equi subspecies equi. A total of 761 horses, mules and donkeys were enrolled in the surveillance programme over a 24-month study period. In total, 201 (26.4 per cent) index cases tested PCR-positive for one or more of the four pathogens. The highest detection rate was for EHV-4 (82 cases), followed by EIV (60 cases), S equi subspecies equi (49 cases) and EHV-1 (23 cases). There were 15 horses with double infections and one horse with a triple infection. The detection rate by PCR for the different pathogens varied with season and with the age, breed, sex and use of the animal.

  19. Mice transgenic for equine cyclin T1 and ELR1 are susceptible to equine infectious anemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Du, Cheng; Ma, Jian; Liu, Qiang; Li, Yun-Fei; He, Xi-Jun; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Meng, Qing-Wen; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2015-04-28

    As a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) protein superfamily, equine lentivirus receptor 1 (ELR1) has been shown to be expressed in various equine cells that are permissive for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) replication. The EIAV Tat protein (eTat) activates transcription initiated at the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter through a unique mechanism that requires the recruitment of the equine cyclin T1 (eCT1) cofactor into the viral TAR RNA target element. In vitro studies have demonstrated that mouse fibroblast cell lines (e.g., NIH 3T3 cells) that express the EIAV receptor ELR1 and eCT1 support the productive replication of EIAV. Therefore, we constructed transgenic eCT1- and ELR1-expressing mice to examine whether they support in vivo EIAV replication. For the first time, we constructed mice transgenic for ELR1 and eCT1. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis confirmed that ELR1 and eCT1 were expressed in the transgenic mouse tissues, particularly in the intestines, spleen and lymph nodes. Consistent with the results of EIAV infection in NIH 3T3 cells expressing ELR1 and eCT1, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from the transgenic mice could support EIAV replication. More importantly, this virus could infect and replicate in mouse blood monocyte-derived macrophages (mMDMs). Macrophages are the principle target cell of EIAV in its natural hosts. Furthermore, after the transgenic mice were inoculated with EIAV, the virus could be detected not only in the plasma of the circulating blood but also in multiple organs, among which, the spleen and lymph nodes were the predominant sites of EIAV replication. Finally, we found that consistent with high viral replication levels, the relevant pathological changes occurred in the spleen and lymph nodes. Our results show that mice transgenic for ELR1 and eCT1 are susceptible to EIAV infection and replication. Further, EIAV infection can cause

  20. Evolutionary mechanisms involved in the virulence of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV), a piscine orthomyxovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Markussen, Turhan Jonassen, Christine Monceyron Numanovic, Sanela Braaen, Stine Hjortaas, Monika Nilsen, Hanne Mjaaland, Siri

    2008-05-10

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) is an orthomyxovirus causing a multisystemic, emerging disease in Atlantic salmon. Here we present, for the first time, detailed sequence analyses of the full-genome sequence of a presumed avirulent isolate displaying a full-length hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) gene (HPR0), and compare this with full-genome sequences of 11 Norwegian ISAV isolates from clinically diseased fish. These analyses revealed the presence of a virulence marker right upstream of the putative cleavage site R{sub 267} in the fusion (F) protein, suggesting a Q{sub 266} {yields} L{sub 266} substitution to be a prerequisite for virulence. To gain virulence in isolates lacking this substitution, a sequence insertion near the cleavage site seems to be required. This strongly suggests the involvement of a protease recognition pattern at the cleavage site of the fusion protein as a determinant of virulence, as seen in highly pathogenic influenza A virus H5 or H7 and the paramyxovirus Newcastle disease virus.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression of infectious salmon anaemia virus segment 7.

    PubMed

    Ramly, Rimatulhana B; Olsen, Christel M; Braaen, Stine; Hansen, Elisabeth F; Rimstad, Espen

    2014-09-22

    The nuclear replication and gene splicing of orthomyxoviruses are unique among RNA viruses. Segment 7 of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) is the only segment that undergoes splicing. Two proteins are encoded by this segment, the non-structural antagonist (ISAV-NS) of the innate immune response that is translated from the unspliced collinear transcript, and a nuclear exporting protein (ISAV-NEP) that is translated from the spliced mRNA. Here we report the transcription profiles for these ISAV proteins. The appearance of the spliced ISAV-NEP mRNA was delayed and the relative amount was less but slowly accumulated to 20-30% to that of the collinear NS mRNA. In cells transfected with segment 7 the ratio between spliced and collinear mRNA was approximately 10%. A highly conserved, possible structured RNA, in the region of the 3' splicing site of the segment is speculated as being important for the regulation of the efficiency of the splicing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Infectious salmon anaemia virus infection of Atlantic salmon gill epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV), a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family, infects and causes disease in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). Previous studies have shown Atlantic salmon endothelial cells to be the primary targets of ISAV infection. However, it is not known if cells other than endothelial cells play a role in ISAV tropism. To further assess cell tropism, we examined ISAV infection of Atlantic salmon gill epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro. We demonstrated the susceptibility of epithelial cells to ISAV infection. On comparison of primary gill epithelial cell cultures with ISAV permissive fish cell cultures, we found the virus yield in primary gill epithelial cells to be comparable with that of salmon head kidney (SHK)-1 cells, but lower than TO or Atlantic salmon kidney (ASK)-II cells. Light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the primary gill cells possessed characteristics consistent with epithelial cells. Virus histochemistry showed that gill epithelial cells expressed 4-O-acetylated sialic acid which is recognized as the ISAV receptor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of ISAV infection in Atlantic salmon primary gill epithelial cells. This study thus broadens our understanding of cell tropism and transmission of ISAV in Atlantic salmon. PMID:23282149

  3. Antibody against infectious salmon anaemia virus among feral Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cipriano, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Archived sera from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) that returned to the Penobscot River (Maine), Merrimack River (Massachusetts), and Connecticut River (in Massachusetts) from 1995 to 2002 were analysed for antibodies against infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Up to 60 samples were archived per river system per year. In a given year, the number of fish sampled by ELISA for ISAV antibodies in the Penobscot River ranged from 2.9 to 11.2, and the range of salmon sampled in the Merrimack River and the Connecticut River was 31.3-100 and 20.0-67.5, respectively. Archived sera were not available for the 1995 and 2002 year classes from the Connecticut River. In all, 1141 samples were processed; 14 serum samples tested positive for antibodies to ISAV. In the Penobscot River, serum from one fish tested positive in each of the 1995 and 1999 year-class returns, and sera from two fish tested positive in the 1998 returns. In the Merrimack River, sera from four fish tested positive in each of the 1996 and 1997 returns, and sera from two fish were positive in the 2002 return. None of the archived sera from Atlantic salmon that returned to the Connecticut River tested positive. ?? 2009 United States Government, Department of the Interior.

  4. Demonstration of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) endocytosis in erythrocytes of Atlantic salmon

    PubMed Central

    Workenhe, Samuel T; Wadowska, Dorota W; Wright, Glenda M; Kibenge, Molly JT; Kibenge, Frederick SB

    2007-01-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus (ISAV) is a fish orthomyxovirus that has recently been assigned to the new genus Isavirus within the family Orthomyxoviridae. It possesses the major functional characteristics of the virus family including haemagglutinating, receptor destroying enzyme (RDE), and fusion activities associated with the virion surface proteins. It is generally accepted that ISAV agglutinates erythrocytes of several fish species and that the ISAV RDE activity dissolves this haemagglutination reaction except for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) erythrocytes. We used electron microscopy to examine the physical interaction between ISAV and erythrocytes from Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during haemagglutination. We present evidence that ISAV enters into Atlantic salmon erythrocytes. Atlantic salmon erythrocytes incubated with ISAV for 4 hours showed endocytosis of the virus particles, which is consistent with virus infection. These observations suggest that the lack of dissolution of ISAV-induced haemagglutination of Atlantic salmon erythrocytes favours virus infection of the erythrocytes. Moreover, such a haemagglutination-infection phenotype is fundamentally different from haemagglutination by avian and mammalian orthomyxoviruses, and is indicative of a different pathogenesis for the fish orthomyxovirus. PMID:17254352

  5. Host tropism of infectious salmon anaemia virus in marine and freshwater fish species.

    PubMed

    Aamelfot, M; Dale, O B; McBeath, A; Falk, K

    2015-08-01

    The aquatic orthomyxovirus infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) causes a severe disease in farmed Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L. Although some ISA outbreaks are caused by horizontal transmission of virus between farms, the source and reservoir of the virus is largely unknown and a wild host has been hypothesized. Atlantic salmon are farmed in open net-pens, allowing transmission of pathogens from wild fish and the surrounding environment to the farmed fish. In this study, a large number of fish species were investigated for ISAV host potential. For orthomyxoviruses, a specific receptor binding is the first requirement for infection; thus, the fish species were investigated for the presence of the ISAV receptor. The receptor was found to be widely distributed across the fish species. All salmonids expressed the receptor. However, only some of the cod-like and perch-like fish did, and all flat fish were negative. In the majority of the positive species, the receptor was found on endothelial cells and/or on red blood cells. The study forms a basis for further investigations and opens up the possibility for screening species to determine whether a wild host of ISAV exists. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Antibody escape kinetics of equine infectious anemia virus infection of horses.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Elissa J; Nanda, Seema; Mealey, Robert H

    2015-07-01

    Lentivirus escape from neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is not well understood. In this work, we quantified antibody escape of a lentivirus, using antibody escape data from horses infected with equine infectious anemia virus. We calculated antibody blocking rates of wild-type virus, fitness costs of mutant virus, and growth rates of both viruses. These quantitative kinetic estimates of antibody escape are important for understanding lentiviral control by antibody neutralization and in developing NAb-eliciting vaccine strategies. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Distribution of equine infectious anemia in horses in the north of Minas Gerais State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bicout, Dominique J; Carvalho, Regina; Chalvet-Monfray, Karine; Sabatier, Philippe

    2006-09-01

    The paper examines the prevalence of equine infectious anemia (EIA) in horse populations in the northern part (comprising 89 cities) of Minas Gerais State, Brazil, from January 2002 to December 2004. Data on 8,981 agar gel immunodiffusion test results from the region were used as input for a statistical and autoregressive analysis model to construct a city-level map of the distribution of EIA prevalence. The following EIA prevalence (P) levels were found: 49 cities with 0 < P < or = 0.5%, 26 with 0.5% < P < or = 1.5%, 10 with 1.5% < P < or = 5%, and 4 with 5% < P < or = 25%.

  8. Development of a high throughput, semi-automated, infectious center cell-based ELISA for Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Ezzelarab, Corin; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary A faster semi-automated 96-well microtiter plate assay to determine viral infectivity titers, or viral focal units (vfu), of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) stocks is described. Optimization of the existing method modernizes a classic virological technique for viral titer determination by quantitating EIAV in experimentally infected cells via a cell-based ELISA. To allow for automation, multiple parameters of the current assay procedures were modified resulting in an assay that required only one quarter the original amount of virus and/or serum for infectivity or neutralization assays, respectively. Equivalent reductions in the required volumes of tissue culture, cell processing, and protein detection reagents were also achieved. Additionally, the new assay decreased the time required from start to finish from 10 days to 6 days (viral titer) or 7 days (viral neutralization), while increasing the number of samples that can be processed concurrently by transition to a 96-well microtiter plate format and by automated counting. PMID:22820072

  9. Determination of buoyant density and sensitivity to chloroform and freon for the etiological agent of infectious salmonid anaemia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, K.E.; Hjeltnes, B.; Uglenes , I.; Winton, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma was collected from Atlantic salmon Salrno salar with acute infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) and used to challenge Atlantic salmon parr by intraperitoneal injection. Treatment of plasma with the lipid solvent, chloroform, showed that the etiological agent of ISA contained essential lipids, probably as a viral envelope. Some infectivity remained following treatment with freon. Injection challenges using fractions from equilibrium density gradient centrifugation of plasma from fish with acute ISA revealed a band of infectivity in the range 1.184 to 1.262 g cm-3. The band was believed to conta~n both complete ISA-virus particles and infectious particles lacking a complete envelope, nucleocapsid or genome. Density gradient centrifugation of infectious plasma for enrichment of the putative ISA virus appeared to offer a suitable method for obtaining virus-specific nucleic acid for use in the construction of cDNA libraries. 

  10. Molecular Detection, Epidemiology, and Genetic Characterization of Novel European Field Isolates of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus▿

    PubMed Central

    Cappelli, Katia; Capomaccio, Stefano; Cook, Frank R.; Felicetti, Michela; Marenzoni, Maria Luisa; Coppola, Giacomo; Verini-Supplizi, Andrea; Coletti, Mauro; Passamonti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The application of molecular diagnostic techniques along with nucleotide sequence determination to permit contemporary phylogenetic analysis of European field isolates of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) has not been widely reported. As a result, of extensive testing instigated following the 2006 outbreak of equine infectious anemia in Italy, 24 farms with a history of exposure to this disease were included in this study. New PCR-based methods were developed, which, especially in the case of DNA preparations from peripheral blood cells, showed excellent correlation with OIE-approved agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) tests for identifying EIAV-infected animals. In contrast, the OIE-recommended oligonucleotide primers for EIAV failed to react with any of the Italian isolates. Similar results were also obtained with samples from four Romanian farms. In addition, for the first time complete characterization of gag genes from five Italian isolates and one Romanian isolate has been achieved, along with acquisition of extensive sequence information (86% of the total gag gene) from four additional EIAV isolates (one Italian and three Romanian). Furthermore, in another 23 cases we accomplished partial characterization of gag gene sequences in the region encoding the viral matrix protein. Analysis of this information suggested that most Italian isolates were geographically restricted, somewhat reminiscent of the “clades” described for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Collectively this represents the most comprehensive genetic study of European EIAV isolates conducted to date. PMID:21084503

  11. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inflammation, and thickness of the alveolar septa. Expression of the p26 EIAV capsid (CA) protein has been evaluated by immunostaining. Compared to EIAV-negative horses, 52% of the EIAV-positive horses displayed a mild inflammation around the bronchioles, 22% had a moderate inflammation with inflammatory cells inside the wall and epithelial bronchiolar hyperplasia and 6.5% had a moderate to severe inflammation, with destruction of the bronchiolar epithelium and accumulation of smooth muscle cells within the pulmonary parenchyma. Changes in the thickness of the alveolar septa were also present. Expression of EIAV capsid has been evidenced in macrophages, endothelial as well as in alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, as determined by their morphology and localization. To summarize, we found lesions of interstitial lung disease similar to that observed during other lentiviral infections such as FIV in cats, SRLV in sheep and goats or HIV in children. The presence of EIAV capsid in lung epithelial cells suggests that EIAV might be responsible for the broncho-interstitial damages observed. PMID:24289102

  12. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses.

    PubMed

    Bolfa, Pompei; Nolf, Marie; Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Catoi, Cornel; Archer, Fabienne; Dolmazon, Christine; Mornex, Jean-François; Leroux, Caroline

    2013-12-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inflammation, and thickness of the alveolar septa. Expression of the p26 EIAV capsid (CA) protein has been evaluated by immunostaining. Compared to EIAV-negative horses, 52% of the EIAV-positive horses displayed a mild inflammation around the bronchioles, 22% had a moderate inflammation with inflammatory cells inside the wall and epithelial bronchiolar hyperplasia and 6.5% had a moderate to severe inflammation, with destruction of the bronchiolar epithelium and accumulation of smooth muscle cells within the pulmonary parenchyma. Changes in the thickness of the alveolar septa were also present. Expression of EIAV capsid has been evidenced in macrophages, endothelial as well as in alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, as determined by their morphology and localization. To summarize, we found lesions of interstitial lung disease similar to that observed during other lentiviral infections such as FIV in cats, SRLV in sheep and goats or HIV in children. The presence of EIAV capsid in lung epithelial cells suggests that EIAV might be responsible for the broncho-interstitial damages observed.

  13. Molecular detection, epidemiology, and genetic characterization of novel European field isolates of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Cappelli, Katia; Capomaccio, Stefano; Cook, Frank R; Felicetti, Michela; Marenzoni, Maria Luisa; Coppola, Giacomo; Verini-Supplizi, Andrea; Coletti, Mauro; Passamonti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The application of molecular diagnostic techniques along with nucleotide sequence determination to permit contemporary phylogenetic analysis of European field isolates of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) has not been widely reported. As a result, of extensive testing instigated following the 2006 outbreak of equine infectious anemia in Italy, 24 farms with a history of exposure to this disease were included in this study. New PCR-based methods were developed, which, especially in the case of DNA preparations from peripheral blood cells, showed excellent correlation with OIE-approved agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) tests for identifying EIAV-infected animals. In contrast, the OIE-recommended oligonucleotide primers for EIAV failed to react with any of the Italian isolates. Similar results were also obtained with samples from four Romanian farms. In addition, for the first time complete characterization of gag genes from five Italian isolates and one Romanian isolate has been achieved, along with acquisition of extensive sequence information (86% of the total gag gene) from four additional EIAV isolates (one Italian and three Romanian). Furthermore, in another 23 cases we accomplished partial characterization of gag gene sequences in the region encoding the viral matrix protein. Analysis of this information suggested that most Italian isolates were geographically restricted, somewhat reminiscent of the "clades" described for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Collectively this represents the most comprehensive genetic study of European EIAV isolates conducted to date.

  14. Genomic comparison between attenuated Chinese equine infectious anemia virus vaccine strains and their parental virulent strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Shuai; Lin, Yuezhi; Jiang, Chenggang; Ma, Jian; Zhao, Liping; Lv, Xiaoling; Wang, Fenglong; Shen, Rongxian; Kong, Xiangang; Zhou, Jianhua

    2011-02-01

    A lentiviral vaccine, live attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, was developed in the 1970s, and this has made tremendous contributions to the control of equine infectious anemia (EIA) in China. Four key virus strains were generated during the attenuation of the EIAV vaccine: the original Liao-Ning strain (EIAV(LN40)), a donkey-adapted virulent strain (EIAV(DV117)), a donkey-leukocyte-attenuated vaccine strain (EIAV(DLV121)), and a fetal donkey dermal cell (FDD)-adapted vaccine strain (EIAV(FDDV13)). In this study, we analyzed the proviral genomes of these four EIAV strains and found a series of consensus substitutions among these strains. These mutations provide useful information for understanding the genetic basis of EIAV attenuation. Our results suggest that multiple mutations in a variety of genes in our attenuated EIAV vaccines not only provide a basis for virulence attenuation and induction of protective immunity but also greatly reduce the risk of reversion to virulence.

  15. Correlation between the induction of Th1 cytokines by an attenuated equine infectious anemia virus vaccine and protection against disease progression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Ying; Liang, Hua; Wei, Li; Xiang, Wenhua; Shen, Rongxian; Shao, Yiming

    2007-03-01

    The equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) donkey-leukocyte attenuated vaccine (DLV) has been used to protect against equine infectious anaemia (EIA) disease for several decades in China. The attenuated mechanism and immunological protective mechanisms remain to be elucidated. To identify responses that correlate with the protection against disease, we immunized horses with DLV, followed by challenge with an EIAV wild-type strain LN. All vaccinated horses were asymptomatic and had a low level of virus replication (<10 copies ml-1). The expression level of cytokines including gamma interferon, interleukin 2 and 12 in DLV immunized horses was 5-100-fold higher than that in non-vaccinated controls (n=4, P<0.01). After challenge with virulent LN, horses vaccinated with DLV showed lower viral loads (<10(3) copies ml-1) with no temperature increase, except for one transient febrile episode in one animal. In contrast, horses in the non-vaccinated control group experienced much higher viral loads (>10(7) copies ml-1) and intermittent febrile episodes. Cytokine production in the DLV-vaccinated horses increased and attained a plateau level at approximately 50 days post-vaccination, and exceeded 10(7) copies per 10(7) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) 1-3 months post-challenge. However, non-vaccinated control horses died after several fever episodes (>or=39 degrees C), which coincided with higher viral load (10(6)-10(7) copies ml-1) and lower cytokine production (<10(4) copies per 10(7) PBMCs). The results indicate that high levels of EIAV-specific cytokines induced by the attenuated EIAV vaccine may contribute to the protective immune response against EIA disease.

  16. Genetic characterization by composite sequence analysis of a new pathogenic field strain of equine infectious anemia virus from the 2006 outbreak in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, Michelle; Cook, Frank; Kenna, Rachel; Callinan, John J; Cullinane, Ann

    2013-03-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), the causative agent of equine infectious anaemia (EIA), possesses the least-complex genomic organization of any known extant lentivirus. Despite this relative genetic simplicity, all of the complete genomic sequences published to date are derived from just two viruses, namely the North American EIAV(WYOMING) (EIAV(WY)) and Chinese EIAV(LIAONING) (EIAV(LIA)) strains. In 2006, an outbreak of EIA occurred in Ireland, apparently as a result of the importation of contaminated horse plasma from Italy and subsequent iatrogenic transmission to foals. This EIA outbreak was characterized by cases of severe, sometimes fatal, disease. To begin to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathogenic phenotype, complete proviral genomic sequences in the form of 12 overlapping PCR-generated fragments were obtained from four of the EIAV-infected animals, including two of the index cases. Sequence analysis of multiple molecular clones produced from each fragment demonstrated the extent of diversity within individual viral genes and permitted construction of consensus whole-genome sequences for each of the four viral isolates. In addition, complete env gene sequences were obtained from 11 animals with differing clinical profiles, despite exposure to a common EIAV source. Although the overall genomic organization of the Irish EIAV isolates was typical of that seen in all other strains, the European viruses possessed ≤80 % nucleotide sequence identity with either EIAV(WY) or EIAV(LIA). Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Irish EIAV isolates developed independently of the North American and Chinese viruses and that they constitute a separate monophyletic group.

  17. Immunochromatographic lateral flow test for detection of antibodies to Equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, I; Gutierrez, G; Barrandeguy, M; Trono, K

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a simple immunochromatographic lateral flow (ICLF) test for specific detection of Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) antibodies in equine sera. Viral recombinant p26 capsid protein (rp26) was used as the capture protein in the test line and as the detector reagent conjugated to colloidal gold. The performance of rp26-ICLF was evaluated, and the results obtained were compared with a commercially available agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test used as a standard of comparison according to international guidelines. The values obtained for comparative diagnostic sensitivity (98.3%), diagnostic specificity (87.4%) and concordance (92.4%) were similar to those reported for other ICLF tests for animal infectious diseases. Very good repeatability and reproducibility, as well as a total agreement with blind previous results from three proficiency test panels, were obtained, thus indicating that rp26-ICLF is a precise test. The end point of the twofold serial dilution of serum samples was the same as, and even better than, the AGID test, thus demonstrating the same analytical sensitivity as that of the reference method for EIA diagnosis. No cross-reactivity was observed when serum samples from horses with other infectious diseases were analyzed. rp26-ICLF proved to be a precise and rapid test suitable for field screening in veterinary practice, since minimal equipment and operator expertise are required. However, further research should be carried out to increase the level of sensitivity. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Western blot assay using recombinant p26 antigen for detection of equine infectious anemia virus-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, I; Gutierrez, G; Ostlund, E; Barrandeguy, M; Trono, K

    2007-12-01

    We analyzed the performance of a single-band Western blot (WB) test using recombinant p26 (rp26) capsid protein of equine infectious anemia virus. According to the results obtained, the rp26 WB test is a reliable confirmatory diagnostic tool to be used as a complementary test after an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or agar gel immunodiffusion test yielding doubtful results.

  19. Transmission of equine infectious anemia virus from horses without clinical signs of disease.

    PubMed

    Issel, C J; Adams, W V; Meek, L; Ochoa, R

    1982-02-01

    Twenty seven adult horses positive to the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test for equine infectious anemia (EIA), but with no history of clinical EIA, were used in transfusion studies to determine whether infectious EIA virus was present in 1 to 5 ml of their blood. Of 27 recipients, 21 (78%) became AGID test-positive at an average of 24 days after inoculation. Two horses that were initially negative when screened were retested and found to carry infectious virus in 5-300 ml of whole blood; the other 4 horses were not retested. Horse flies (Tabanus fuscicostatus Hine) were unable to transmit EIA virus from 10 AGID test-positive donors with no history of clinical EIA, but virus was transmitted from a pony with artificially induced acute EIA and from a horse that had recovered from a clinical attack of EIA 9 months earlier. Histopathologic changes indicative of EIA were noted in all test-positive recipients. The most consistent lesion was paracortical lymphoid hyperplasia in the splenic lymph node.

  20. Equine infectious anemia virus-infected dendritic cells retain antigen presentation capability

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Julie A.; McGuire, Travis C. . E-mail: mcguiret@vetmed.wsu.edu

    2005-05-10

    To determine if equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) were susceptible to equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection, ex vivo-generated DC were infected with virus in vitro. EIAV antigen was detected by immunofluorescence 3 days post-infection with maximum antigen being detected on day 4, whereas there was no antigen detected in DC incubated with the same amount of heat-inactivated EIAV. No cytolytic activity was observed after EIAV{sub WSU5} infection of DC. These monocyte-derived DC were more effective than macrophages and B cells in stimulating allogenic T lymphocytes. Both infected macrophages and DC stimulated similar levels of memory CTL responses in mixtures of CD8+ and CD4+ cells as detected with {sup 51}Cr-release assays indicating that EIAV infection of DC did not alter antigen presentation. However, EIAV-infected DC were more effective than infected macrophages when used to stimulate memory CTL in isolated CD8+ cells. The maintenance of antigen processing and presenting function by EIAV-infected DC in vitro suggests that this function is maintained during in vivo infection.

  1. Characterization of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Integration in the Horse Genome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Wang, Xue-Feng; Ma, Jian; He, Xi-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2015-06-19

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 has a unique integration profile in the human genome relative to murine and avian retroviruses. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is another well-studied lentivirus that can also be used as a promising retro-transfection vector, but its integration into its native host has not been characterized. In this study, we mapped 477 integration sites of the EIAV strain EIAVFDDV13 in fetal equine dermal (FED) cells during in vitro infection. Published integration sites of EIAV and HIV-1 in the human genome were also analyzed as references. Our results demonstrated that EIAVFDDV13 tended to integrate into genes and AT-rich regions, and it avoided integrating into transcription start sites (TSS), which is consistent with EIAV and HIV-1 integration in the human genome. Notably, the integration of EIAVFDDV13 favored long interspersed elements (LINEs) and DNA transposons in the horse genome, whereas the integration of HIV-1 favored short interspersed elements (SINEs) in the human genome. The chromosomal environment near LINEs or DNA transposons potentially influences viral transcription and may be related to the unique EIAV latency states in equids. The data on EIAV integration in its natural host will facilitate studies on lentiviral infection and lentivirus-based therapeutic vectors.

  2. Hybridoma cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies against equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Horenstein, A L; Glait, H M; Koss, A

    1987-02-01

    A monoclonal anti-equine infectious anemia virus (anti-EIAV) antibody (1B15) has been generated by fusion of X63 Ag 8.653 myeloma cells and spleen cells from mice hypersensitized with viral antigen p29. Ouchterlony double-diffusion analysis indicated that antibody 1B15 is of the IgG class. The specificity of the immune reaction for p29 was confirmed by cross-over immunoelectrophoresis and disc-gel electrophoresis. MAb 1B15 was used to devise a solid-phase 'capture' RIA for EIAV-p29 antigen. The antigen, bound by 1B15 adsorbed onto wells of flexible microtitre plates, was detected using a rabbit anti-p29 serum followed by a 125I-labelled tracer. The assay was applied to detected using a of virus in horse serum and infected cell culture fluids.

  3. Long terminal repeats are not the sole determinants of virulence for equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Tu, Y-B; Zhou, T; Yuan, X-F; Qiu, H-J; Xue, F; Sun, C-Q; Wang, L; Wu, D-L; Peng, J-M; Kong, X-G; Tong, G-Z

    2007-01-01

    The long terminal repeats (LTRs) of equine infectious anemia virus donkey leukocyte-attenuated virus (EIAV-DLA) were substituted with those of the wild-type EIAV-L (wt EIAV-L, the parent virus of EIAV-DLA). The resulting chimeric plasmid was designated pOK-LTR DLA/L. Purified pOK-LTR DLA/L was transfected into monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM) cultures prepared from EIAV-negative, heparinized whole blood from a donkey. Eighth-passage cell cultures developed the typical cytopathogenic effects (CPE) of EIAV infection, and virions with typical EIAV profiles were observed with an electron microscope. Horses were inoculated with the chimeric virus or EIAV-DLA and challenged with the wt EIAV-L strain six months later. All of the horses inoculated with either the chimeric virus or EIAV-DLA were protected from disease, whereas the control horses died with typical EIA symptoms.

  4. Mechanisms of equine infectious anemia virus escape from neutralizing antibody responses define epitope specificity.

    PubMed

    Sponseller, Brett A; Clark, Sandra K; Friedrich, Rachel A

    2012-08-01

    Determining mechanisms of viral escape to particular epitopes recognized by virus-neutralizing antibody can facilitate characterization of host-neutralizing antibody responses as type- versus group-specific, and provides necessary information for vaccine development. Our study reveals that a single N-glycan located in the 5' region of the Wyoming wild-type equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) principal neutralizing domain (PND) accounts for the differences in neutralization phenotype observed between PND variants, while variations in charged amino acids within the PND do not appear to play a key role in viral escape. Site-directed mutagenesis and peptide mapping of a conserved epitope to neutralizing antibody in the 3' region of the PND showed rapid selective pressure for acquisition of a 5' PND N-glycan responsible for defining the specificity of the neutralizing-antibody response.

  5. The efficacy of ELISA commercial kits for the screening of equine infectious anemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Irene; Cipolini, Fabiana; Wigdorovitz, Andrés; Trono, Karina; Barrandeguy, Maria E

    2015-01-01

    The most used and reliable indicator of Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection is the detection of its specific antibodies in horse serum. In the present study, the performance of two commercial ELISA tests for the detection of EIAV antibodies as well as the potential advantages of their use as an EIAV infection screening tool were evaluated in 302 horse serum samples. Both ELISA assays showed 100% diagnostic sensitivity, and 92.3-94.3% diagnostic specificity. Discordant results were analyzed by immunoblot. The results showed that both ELISA tests are very efficient at detecting EIAV infected animals, allowing to identify a higher number of positive horse cases. Thus, ELISA assays can be useful tools in EIA control and eradication. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. A propagating epizootic of equine infectious anemia on a horse farm.

    PubMed

    Hall, R F; Pursell, A R; Cole, J R; Youmans, B C

    1988-11-01

    An epizootic of equine infectious anemia (EIA) involved 35 horses on a farm in south Georgia. During a 126-day period, 21 of these horses became seropositive for EIA. After the initial diagnosis in July, the horses were tested every 7 to 10 days. At least one additional horse was found to be seropositive on each testing day. As soon as they were determined to be seropositive, the horses were removed from the herd and sent to slaughter. The removal of the seropositive horses, however, did not stop the epizootic. We believe the initial infection was from a 7-year-old stallion that recently had been purchased or from 1 of 2 mares that were seropositive for EIA on the first test. None of the horses had been tested for EIA at the time of purchase or within 60 days before the epizootic.

  7. Development and Characterization of an In Vivo Pathogenic Molecular Clone of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Cook, R. Frank; Leroux, Caroline; Cook, Sheila J.; Berger, Sandra L.; Lichtenstein, Drew L.; Ghabrial, Nadia N.; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Issel, Charles J.

    1998-01-01

    An infectious nonpathogenic molecular clone (19-2-6A) of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) was modified by substitution of a 3.3-kbp fragment amplified by PCR techniques from a pathogenic variant (EIAVPV) of the cell culture-adapted strain of EIAV (EIAVPR). This substitution consisted of coding sequences for 77 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus of the integrase, the S1 (encoding the second exon of tat), S2, and S3 (encoding the second exon of rev) open reading frames, the complete env gene (including the first exon of rev), and the 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR). Modified 19-2-6A molecular clones were designated EIAVPV3.3, and infection of a single pony (678) with viruses derived from a mixture of five of these molecular clones induced clinical signs of acute equine infectious anemia (EIA) at 23 days postinfection (dpi). As a consequence of this initial study, a single molecular clone, EIAVPV3.3#3 (redesignated EIAVUK), was selected for further study and inoculated into two ponies (613 and 614) and two horses (700 and 764). Pony 614 and the two horses developed febrile responses by 12 dpi, which was accompanied by a 48 to 64% reduction in platelet number, whereas pony 613 did not develop fever (40.6°C) until 76 dpi. EIAV could be isolated from the plasma of these animals by 5 to 7 dpi, and all became seropositive for antibodies to this virus by 21 dpi. Analysis of the complete nucleotide sequence demonstrated that the 3.3-kbp 3′ fragment of EIAVUK differed from the consensus sequence of EIAVPV by just a single amino acid residue in the second exon of the rev gene. Complete homology with the EIAVPV consensus sequence was observed in the hypervariable region of the LTR. However, EIAVUK was found to contain an unusual 68-bp nucleotide insertion/duplication in a normally conserved region of the LTR sequence. These results demonstrate that substitution of a 3.3-kbp fragment from the EIAVPV strain into the infectious nonpathogenic molecular clone 19-2-6A leads

  8. Development of a high throughput, semi-automated, infectious center cell-based ELISA for equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Craigo, Jodi K; Ezzelarab, Corin; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2012-11-01

    A faster semi-automated 96-well microtiter plate assay to determine viral infectivity titers, or viral focal units (vfu), of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) stocks is described. Optimization of the existing method modernizes a classic virological technique for viral titer determination by quantitating EIAV in experimentally infected cells via a cell-based ELISA. To allow for automation, multiple parameters of the current assay procedures were modified resulting in an assay that required only one quarter the original amount of virus and/or serum for infectivity or neutralization assays, respectively. Equivalent reductions in the required volumes of tissue culture, cell processing, and protein detection reagents were also achieved. Additionally, the new assay decreased the time required from start to finish from 10 days to 6 days (viral titer) or 7 days (viral neutralization), while increasing the number of samples that can be processed concurrently by transition to a 96-well microtiter plate format and by automated counting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Discovery of variant infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) of European genotype in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Kibenge, Molly Jt; Iwamoto, Tokinori; Wang, Yingwei; Morton, Alexandra; Routledge, Richard; Kibenge, Frederick Sb

    2016-01-06

    Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus (ISAV) belongs to the genus Isavirus, family Orthomyxoviridae. ISAV occurs in two basic genotypes, North American and European. The European genotype is more widespread and shows greater genetic variation and greater virulence variation than the North American genotype. To date, all of the ISAV isolates from the clinical disease, ISA, have had deletions in the highly polymorphic region (HPR) on ISAV segment 6 (ISAV-HPRΔ) relative to ISAV-HPR0, named numerically from ISAV-HPR1 to over ISAV-HPR30. ISA outbreaks have only been reported in farmed Atlantic salmon, although ISAV has been detected by RT-PCR in wild fish. It is recognized that asymptomatically ISAV-infected fish exist. There is no universally accepted ISAV RT-qPCR TaqMan® assay. Most diagnostic laboratories use the primer-probe set targeting a 104 bp-fragment on ISAV segment 8. Some laboratories and researchers have found a primer-probe set targeting ISAV segment 7 to be more sensitive. Other researchers have published different ISAV segment 8 primer-probe sets that are highly sensitive. In this study, we tested 1,106 fish tissue samples collected from (i) market-bought farmed salmonids and (ii) wild salmon from throughout British Columbia (BC), Canada, for ISAV using real time RT-qPCR targeting segment 8 and/or conventional RT-PCR with segment 8 primers and segment 6 HPR primers, and by virus isolation attempts using Salmon head kidney (SHK-1 and ASK-2) cell line monolayers. The sequences from the conventional PCR products were compared by multiple alignment and phylogenetic analyses. Seventy-nine samples were "non-negative" with at least one of these tests in one or more replicates. The ISAV segment 6 HPR sequences from the PCR products matched ISAV variants, HPR5 on 29 samples, one sample had both HPR5 and HPR7b and one matched HPR0. All sequences were of European genotype. In addition, alignment of sequences of the conventional PCR product segment 8 showed they

  10. Characterization of gene expression on genomic segment 7 of infectious salmon anaemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Kibenge, Frederick SB; Xu, Hongtao; Kibenge, Molly JT; Qian, Biao; Joseph, Tomy

    2007-01-01

    Background Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus (ISAV), an important pathogen of fish that causes disease accompanied by high mortality in marine-farmed Atlantic salmon, is the only species in the genus Isavirus, one of the five genera of the Orthomyxoviridae family. The Isavirus genome consists of eight single-stranded RNA species, and the virions have two surface glycoproteins; haemagglutinin-esterase (HE) protein encoded on segment 6 and fusion (F) protein encoded on segment 5. Based on the initial demonstration of two 5'-coterminal mRNA transcripts by RT-PCR, ISAV genomic segment 7 was suggested to share a similar coding strategy with segment 7 of influenza A virus, encoding two proteins. However, there appears to be confusion as to the protein sizes predicted from the two open reading frames (ORFs) of ISAV segment 7 which has in turn led to confusion of the predicted protein functions. The primary goal of the present work was to clone and express these two ORFs in order to assess whether the predicted protein sizes match those of the expressed proteins so as to clarify the coding assignments, and thereby identify any additional structural proteins of ISAV. Results In the present study we show that ISAV segment 7 encodes 3 proteins with estimated molecular masses of 32, 18, and 9.5 kDa. The 18-kDa and 9.5-kDa products are based on removal of an intron each from the primary transcript (7-ORF1) so that the translation continues in the +2 and +3 reading frames, respectively. The segment 7-ORF1/3 product is variably truncated in the sequence of ISAV isolates of the European genotype. All three proteins are recognized by rabbit antiserum against the 32-kDa product of the primary transcript, as they all share the N-terminal 22 amino acids. This antiserum detected a single 35-kDa protein in Western blots of purified virus, and immunoprecipitated a 32-kDa protein in ISAV-infected TO cells. Immunofluorescence staining of infected cells with the same antiserum revealed

  11. Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in horses infected with equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Clabough, D L; Gebhard, D; Flaherty, M T; Whetter, L E; Perry, S T; Coggins, L; Fuller, F J

    1991-11-01

    An adult horse infected with a virulent, cell culture-adapted strain of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) developed cyclical thrombocytopenia in which the nadir of platelet counts coincided with peak febrile responses. In order to investigate the mechanism of thrombocytopenia during acute febrile episodes, four adult horses were experimentally infected with the wild-type Wyoming strain of EIAV. Platelet counts decreased from baseline as rectal temperature increased. Serum reverse transcriptase activity increased above background levels in all horses, coincident with increase in rectal temperature. All horses developed an EIAV-specific immune response detectable by Western immunoblot by postinfection day 10. Increases in platelet-associated immunoglobulins G and M were detectable by direct fluorescent-antibody test and flow cytometric assay. Viral replication in bone marrow megakaryocytes was not detectable by in situ hybridization. Results suggest an immune-mediated mechanism of thrombocytopenia in horses infected with EIAV. Despite an inability to identify virion particles in association with platelet-bound antibody, the cyclical nature of the thrombocytopenia and the occurrence of a marked cell-free viremia concomitant with fever and thrombocytopenia suggest immune complex deposition on platelets. We propose that clearance of virus and antibody-coated platelets from the peripheral circulation by hepatic Kupffer cells and splenic macrophages may target infectious virus particles, in the form of immune complexes, to host cells most permissive for in vivo viral replication.

  12. Design and validation of an ELISA for equine infectious anemia (EIA) diagnosis using synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Soutullo, A; Verwimp, V; Riveros, M; Pauli, R; Tonarelli, G

    2001-03-20

    Three peptides derived from the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) surface proteins were synthesized to design and validate an ELISA for EIA diagnosis. Peptides identified as gp90-I and gp90-II correspond to the N- and C-terminal part of the surface glycoprotein gp90. Peptide gp45-1 overlaps the immunodominant epitope CIERTHVFC of the transmembrane glycoprotein gp45, and includes a hydrophilic chain close to the N-terminal end of this nonapeptide loop. Serum samples from 140 naturally infected horses with EIAV and a panel of 167 non-immune equine sera obtained from non-infected animals were used. Differences in reactivity between positive and negative serum samples were clearly distinguished. Samples considered weak positive to the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test were "true" positive in the ELISA. These results are consistent with the improved sensitivity of the ELISA in comparison with the AGID test. The cyclic peptide that mimics the immunodominant sequence of gp45 showed excellent reactivity, thus suggesting that its functional activity depends significantly on its conformation, since very low reactivity was observed in the linear form of the peptide. The detectability indices of positive and negative sera reached 98% when gp90-II and gp45-I synthetic peptides were used in the same assay, illustrating the high specificity and sensitivity of the assay. Our study represents a first approach for the design of a diagnostic kit, which would allow the rapid analysis of a large numbers of serum samples from horses, and could be applied in endemic areas with different prevalence of infection.

  13. Covalent conjugation of the equine infectious anemia virus Gag with SUMO.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinzhong; Wen, Shuping; Zhao, Rui; Qi, Jing; Liu, Zhao; Li, Weiwei; An, Jing; Wood, Charles; Wang, Ying

    2017-05-06

    The conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to the target protein, namely, SUMOylation, is involved in the regulation of many important biological events including host-pathogen interaction. Some viruses have evolved to exploit the host SUMOylation machinery to modify their own protein. Retroviral Gag protein plays critical roles in the viral life cycle. The HIV-1 p6 and the Moloney murine leukemia virus CA have been reported to be conjugated with SUMO. In this study, we report for the first time, to our knowledge, the covalent conjugation of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) Gag with SUMO. The C-terminal p9 domain of Gag is a main target for SUMOylation and SUMO is attached to multiple sites of p9, including K30 whose mutation abolished p9 SUMOylation completely. The SUMOylation of p9, but not the p9-K30 mutant, was also detected in equine fibroblastic cells ATCC(®) CCL-57™. Ubc9 and its C93 residue are indispensable for the SUMOylation of p9. Using confocal microscopy, it is found that EIAV Gag localizes primarily, if not exclusively, in the cytoplasm of the cell and the co-localization of EIAV Gag with Ubc9 was observed. Our findings that EIAV Gag is SUMOylated at p9-K30, together with previous findings on the defects of p9-K30 mutant in viral DNA translocation from cytoplasm to the nucleus, suggests that SUMOylation of Gag may be involved in such functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Western Blot Assay Using Recombinant p26 Antigen for Detection of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus-Specific Antibodies▿

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, I.; Gutierrez, G.; Ostlund, E.; Barrandeguy, M.; Trono, K.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the performance of a single-band Western blot (WB) test using recombinant p26 (rp26) capsid protein of equine infectious anemia virus. According to the results obtained, the rp26 WB test is a reliable confirmatory diagnostic tool to be used as a complementary test after an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or agar gel immunodiffusion test yielding doubtful results. PMID:17959820

  15. Demonstration of Antigenic Identity Between Purified Equine Infectious Anemia Virus and an Antigen Extracted from Infected Horse Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hideo; Norcross, Neil L.; Coggins, Leroy

    1972-01-01

    Antigenic relationship between purified equine infectious anemia (EIA) virus and spleen-derived antigen from EIA-infected horses was examined by immunodiffusion. Identical antigenicity of these two antigens has been proven because precipitation lines formed between the two antigens and EIA antiserum connected with each other. The results indicate that the antigenic substance derived from infected spleen is a component of EIA virus. Images PMID:4629262

  16. Detection of equine infectious anemia virus in a horse with an equivocal agar gel immunodiffusion test reaction.

    PubMed

    Issel, C J; Adams, W V

    1982-02-01

    A horse whose serum reacted equivocally in the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test for equine infectious anemia was studied over a 3-year period. The horse remained afebrile and virus was detected in only 1 of 6 horse inoculation tests. The intensity of AGID test reactions increased temporarily following this evidence for virus. Although the AGID test reaction was equivocal and 5 of the 6 transmission attempts failed, the 1 successful transmission proved the horse was infected.

  17. Oestrous cycle-dependent equine uterine immune response to induced infectious endometritis.

    PubMed

    Marth, Christina D; Firestone, Simon M; Glenton, Lisa Y; Browning, Glenn F; Young, Neil D; Krekeler, Natali

    2016-11-08

    Infectious endometritis is a major cause of reduced pregnancy rates in horses. The objectives of this study were to establish a timeline of the innate immune response in the uterus of healthy horses and to investigate the oestrous cycle effect on this. Endometrial biopsies were collected from five horses before and at 3, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after inoculation of Escherichia coli, once in oestrus and once in dioestrus. They were analysed by quantitative real-time PCR, microbiology and histology. Neutrophil numbers increased from very low levels in the absence of inflammation to severe neutrophilia 3 h after inoculation. The concentrations of mRNAs for Toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4, NOD-like receptor NLRC5, tissue inhibitor of metallopeptidases 1 (TIMP1) and chemokines CCL2, CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 were all increased 3 h after inoculation of E. coli compared to levels detected prior to inoculation. Chemokine mRNA levels remained elevated for 48 h. Concentrations of mRNAs for the antimicrobial peptides equine β-defensin 1 (EBD1), lysozyme, secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI), lipocalin 2 (LCN2), lactoferrin and uteroferrin were increased between 3 and 12 h post inoculation. The gene for secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) was expressed constitutively. P19 uterocalin mRNA levels were higher in dioestrus than in oestrus over the first 24 h of inflammation. Neutrophils and many innate immune genes responded rapidly to the introduction of E. coli into the uterus, while the oestrous cycle stage had only a relatively minor effect on the response to E. coli. This study has delineated a useful model of innate immunity in infectious endometritis of healthy animals.

  18. Nonsynonymous changes of equine lentivirus receptor-1 (ELR1) gene in amino acids involved in the interaction with equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV).

    PubMed

    Corbi-Botto, C M; Sadaba, S A; Zappa, M E; Peral-García, P; Díaz, S

    2017-06-01

    Equine lentivirus receptor-1 (ELR1) has been characterized as the specific functional receptor that mediates equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) entrance to horse macrophages. This receptor is tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 14 (TNFRSF14). The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of allelic variants in the coding sequence of equine TNFRSF14 gene by screening for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in different equine populations. Forty seven horse samples were randomly selected from a reservoir of EIAV-seropositive and seronegative samples collected from different outbreaks and regions of Argentina. DNA samples were scanned via PCR and direct sequencing of exon 3 and exon 5 of TNFRSF14 gene. A total of 21 SNPs were identified, of which 11 were located in coding sequences. Within exon 5, four SNPs caused nonsynonymous substitutions, while two other SNPs caused synonymous substitutions in crucial residues (Ser112 and Thr114) implicated in the interaction with EIAV. Despite some of exon 5 variants occurred exclusively in EIAV-positive or EIAV-negative horses, critical residues for the function of the mature protein were conserved, accounting for selective pressures in favor of preserving the specific function of TNFRSF members and the host immune response. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the existence of allelic variations involving some crucial amino acid residues in horse ELR1. Further, it could be an initial step to test the possible functional relevance and relationship of these variants with EIAV infection and disease progression as well as to develop preventive strategies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Characterization of an equine infectious anemia antigen extracted from infected horse spleen tissue.

    PubMed

    Norcross, N L; Coggins, L

    1971-11-01

    The spleens of horses infected with equine infectious anemia contain an antigen that is useful for a diagnostic immunodiffusion test. This antigen was extracted from the spleen by homogenization of the tissue, centrifugation, and precipitation from the supernatant fluid at 50% saturation with (NH(4))(2)SO(4). The antigen was purified by subjecting it to two cycles of electrophoresis in a continuous free-flow electrophoresis cell and finally filtering through a column of Sephadex G-200 gel. The antigen was found to be a small protein with a molecular weight of 27,500 and sedimentation coefficient of 2.1S. Its density was about 1.18 and its isoelectric point 5.8. At 45 to 50 C, it coagulated, losing its antigenicity. The antigen was useful for assaying antibody in the serum from infected horses by using the complement fixation test or the immunodiffusion test. Complement-fixing antibodies were found to be more transient than the precipitating antibodies.

  20. Amplification of complete gag gene sequences from geographically distinct equine infectious anemia virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Boldbaatar, Bazartseren; Bazartseren, Tsevel; Koba, Ryota; Murakami, Hironobu; Oguma, Keisuke; Murakami, Kenji; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    In the current study, primers described previously and modified versions of these primers were evaluated for amplification of full-length gag genes from different equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) strains from several countries, including the USA, Germany and Japan. Each strain was inoculated into a primary horse leukocyte culture, and the full-length gag gene was amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Each amplified gag gene was cloned into a plasmid vector for sequencing, and the detectable copy numbers of target DNA were determined. Use of a mixture of two forward primers and one reverse primer in the polymerase chain reaction enabled the amplification of all EIAV strains used in this study. However, further study is required to confirm these primers as universal for all EIAV strains. The nucleotide sequence of gag is considered highly conserved, as evidenced by the use of gag-encoded capsid proteins as a common antigen for the detection of EIAV in serological tests. However, significant sequence variation in the gag genes of different EIAV strains was found in the current study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Production of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) antigen in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    de Arruda Coutinho, Luciana Cavalcanti; de Jesus, André Luiz Santos; de Paiva Fontes, Karin Florêncio Lins; Coimbra, Eliane Campos; Mariz, Filipe Colaço; de Freitas, Antonio Carlos; de Cássia Carvalho Maia, Rita; de Castro, Roberto Soares

    2013-08-01

    Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is a persistent lentivirus infection of horses which causes a chronic clinical condition with worldwide importance in veterinary medicine. The p26 protein is usually prepared for use as an antigen in serological tests for EIA diagnosis since it is a well-conserved gene sequence and very immunogenic. In view of the ability of yeast to make post-translational modifications of proteins, this study was carried out to allow Pichia pastoris to be used for the expression of a synthetic codon-optimized EIAV p26 gene. The gene was cloned into pPICZαA vector after appropriate enzymatic digestion. P. pastoris clones transformed with the pPICZαAp26 construction were induced to produce the recombinant p26 protein (rp26) under the regulation of alcohol oxidase 1 promoter by adding methanol to the culture medium. The p26 gene expression was detected by RT-PCR and the production of rp26 was confirmed by dot blotting, Western blotting, ELISA and AGID. The P. pastoris expression system was capable of producing a functional EIAV p26 protein that can be used directly in the functionality tests without requiring laborious purification or recovery steps. This is the first reported study of EIAV p26 protein production in yeast cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Is Found in Tissue Macrophages during Subclinical Infection

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, J. Lindsay; McGuire, Travis C.; Ulibarri, Catherine; Crawford, Timothy B.

    1998-01-01

    The equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) often results in lifelong subclinical infection following early episodes of clinical disease. To identify the cellular reservoirs of EIAV during subclinical infection, horses were infected with EIAV and allowed to develop subclinical infections. Horses with acute disease served as a basis for comparison. The tissue distribution, replication status, location of infected cells, and viral load were characterized by PCR for proviral DNA and reverse transcriptase PCR for viral RNA, in situ hybridization, and in situ PCR. Proviral DNA was widespread in tissues regardless of disease status. Viral gag and env RNAs were also detected in tissues of all horses regardless of disease status. Plasma viral RNA (viremia) could be detected in some, but not all, horses with subclinical infections. In situ assays determined that a primary cellular reservoir and site of viral replication during subclinical infection is the macrophage. During subclinical infection, viral load was decreased 4- to 733-fold and there was decreased viral RNA expression within infected cells. These data indicate that viral replication continues at all times, even in horses that are clinically quiescent. Moreover, restricted viral replication at the cellular level is associated with clinical remission. PMID:9696821

  3. Detection of horses infected naturally with equine infectious anemia virus by nested polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, M M; Simard, C

    2001-05-01

    A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifying a region of the gag gene of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) was developed for the rapid and direct detection of proviral DNA from the peripheral blood of naturally infected horses and was compared with the Coggins test. DNA prepared from white blood cells of 122 field horses from 15 stables with reported cases of EIAV and one seronegative stable were analysed. Amplifications of expected size fragments were obtained by nested PCR for 88 horses using two different sets of primers targeting the gag region. The specificity of the amplified products was confirmed by hybridization using a digoxigenin-labeled probe. Gag-nested PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis distinguished two different subtypes of gag gene, A and B. Subtype A was found to be the most prevalent among the infected horses that were tested. The PCR-gag amplified sequence of subtype A shared 84.6% nucleotide and 93% deduced amino acid sequence identities with the prototype Wyoming strain whereas subtype B sequence was almost 100% identical to the prototype. Sequence analysis of gag subtype A suggests the presence of a novel EIAV variant among infected horses in Canada. The nested PCR assay developed in the present study detected more EIAV positive animals and was found as specific as the agar gel immunodiffusion (Coggins) assay and offers great potential a diagnostic test for the detection of EIAV infections in field horses.

  4. Optimization of equine infectious anemia derived vectors for hematopoietic cell lineage gene transfer.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, J P; Olsen, J C; Bunnell, B A

    2005-01-01

    Gene transfer into hematopoietic cells may allow correction of a variety of hematopoietic and metabolic disorders. Optimized HIV-1 based lentiviral vectors have been developed for improved gene transfer and transgene expression into hematopoietic cells. However, the use of HIV-1 based vectors for human gene therapy may be limited due to ethical and biosafety issues. We report that vectors based on the non-primate equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) transduce a variety of human hematopoietic cell lines and primary blood cells. To investigate optimization of gene expression in hematopoietic cells, we compared a variety of post-transcriptional elements and promoters in the context of EIAV vectors. We observed cell specific increase in the number of transgene expressing cells with the different post-transcriptional elements, whereas the use of elongation factor alpha 1 (EFalpha1) promoter resulted in significant increases in both the number of transgene expressing cells and the level of transgene protein in all cell types tested. We then demonstrate increased transduction of hematopoietic cells using a second-generation EIAV vector containing a self-inactivating EIAV LTR and the EIAV central polypurine tract (cppt). These data suggest that optimized EIAV vectors may be a suitable alternative to HIV-1 vectors for use in hematopoietic gene therapy.

  5. Evolution of the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Long Terminal Repeat during the Alteration of Cell Tropism†

    PubMed Central

    Maury, Wendy; Thompson, Robert J.; Jones, Quentin; Bradley, Sarahann; Denke, Tara; Baccam, Prasith; Smazik, Matthew; Oaks, J. Lindsay

    2005-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus with in vivo cell tropism primarily for tissue macrophages; however, in vitro the virus can be adapted to fibroblasts and other cell types. Tropism adaptation is associated with both envelope and long terminal repeat (LTR) changes, and findings strongly suggest that these regions of the genome influence cell tropism and virulence. Furthermore, high levels of genetic variation have been well documented in both of these genomic regions. However, specific EIAV nucleotide or amino acid changes that are responsible for cell tropism changes have not been identified. A study was undertaken with the highly virulent, macrophage-tropic strain of virus EIAVwyo to identify LTR changes associated with alterations in cell tropism. We found the stepwise generation of a new transcription factor binding motif within the enhancer that was associated with adaptation of EIAV to endothelial cells and fibroblasts. An LTR that contained the new motif had enhanced transcriptional activity in fibroblasts, whereas the new site did not alter LTR activity in a macrophage cell line. This finding supports a previous prediction that selection for new LTR genetic variants may be a consequence of cell-specific selective pressures. Additional investigations of the EIAVwyo LTR were performed in vivo to determine if LTR evolution could be detected over the course of a 3-year infection. Consistent with previous in vivo findings, we observed no changes in the enhancer region of the LTR over that time period, indicating that the EIAVwyo LTR was evolutionarily stable in vivo. PMID:15827180

  6. Gag genetic heterogeneity of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) in naturally infected horses in Canada.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Malliga M; Simard, Carole

    2007-11-01

    Gag genetic heterogeneity of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) variants in naturally infected horses in Canada was studied since very limited information is available on the variability of EIAV Gag sequences in public database. A phylogenetic analysis based on 414nts of Gag gene sequences amplified by a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) revealed the distinct divergence of these variants compared to other published strains in a corresponding region. Significant predicted amino acid sequence variations were also identified in an immunorelevant region within this fragment which corresponded to a previously characterized cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) epitope cluster (EC2, aa 77-119). Furthermore, alignment of the predicted full-length Gag protein gene sequences of some of these variants associated with clinical cases of EIA in Canada with the published sequences of EIAV originating from other countries revealed conserved and variant sequences in regions corresponding to other characterized CTL epitope clusters, EC1, EC3 and EC4. Conserved sequences identified among different variant strains might have an important implication for their screening and selection of putative peptide epitopes to mediate relevant immune response and cross protection against divergent field strains of EIAV.

  7. Long terminal repeat sequences from virulent and attenuated equine infectious anemia virus demonstrate distinct promoter activities.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Yuan, Xiu-Fang; Hou, Shao-Hua; Tu, Ya-Bin; Peng, Jin-Mei; Wen, Jian-Xin; Qiu, Hua-Ji; Wu, Dong-Lai; Chen, Huan-Chun; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2007-09-01

    In the early 1970s, the Chinese Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) vaccine, EIAV(DLA), was developed through successive passages of a wild-type virulent virus (EIAV(L)) in donkeys in vivo and then in donkey macrophages in vitro. EIAV attenuation and cell tropism adaptation are associated with changes in both envelope and long terminal repeat (LTR). However, specific LTR changes during Chinese EIAV attenuation have not been demonstrated. In this study, we compared LTR sequences from both virulent and attenuated EIAV strains and documented the diversities of LTR sequence from in vivo and in vitro infections. We found that EIAV LTRs of virulent strains were homologous, while EIAV vaccine have variable LTRs. Interestingly, experimental inoculation of EIAV(DLA) into a horse resulted in a restriction of the LTR variation. Furthermore, LTRs from EIAV(DLA) showed higher Tat transactivated activity than LTRs from virulent strains. By using chimeric clones of wild-type LTR and vaccine LTR, the main difference of activity was mapped to the changes of R region, rather than U3 region.

  8. Prevalence and risk factors for Equine Infectious Anemia in Poconé municipality, northern Brazilian Pantanal.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alice M C M; Silva, Lucas G; Nogueira, Márcia F; Oliveira, Anderson C S; Segri, Neuber J; Ferreira, Fernando; Witter, Rute; Aguiar, Daniel M

    2013-08-01

    Serum samples collected from 547 equids in the Pantanal region of Brazil were evaluated for antibodies to Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) by the agar gel immunodiffusion test. Risk factors associated with EIAV seropositivity were evaluated and spatial dependence investigated using a Spatial Lag Model. EIAV prevalence on farms in the Pantanal was 52.0% (13/25) with adjusted prevalence between equids of 31.5% (17.4-48.8% 95% CI). Intra-herd prevalence ranged from 5.0 to 77.0%. Statistical analysis demonstrated that farms and animals in regularly flooded areas had respectively 60 and 146 fold higher chance to be sero-positive than farms and animals located in non-flooded areas. Spatial Lag Model results were generally consistent with this conclusion although there was a negative spatial correlation between farms located within in regularly inundated regions, suggesting that other factors, such as management practices, probably play a significant role in transmission of EIAV. Equids with clinical signs were 3.74-fold more likely to be sero-positive than those without clinical signs. The results of this work reveal a high prevalence of EIAV in the Pantanal area of Brazil demonstrating that equids reared in this region are at great risk of infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of equine infectious anemia virus dUTPase: growth properties of a dUTPase-deficient mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Threadgill, D S; Steagall, W K; Flaherty, M T; Fuller, F J; Perry, S T; Rushlow, K E; Le Grice, S F; Payne, S L

    1993-01-01

    The putative dUTPase domain was deleted from the polymerase (pol) gene of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) to produce a recombinant delta DUpol Escherichia coli expression cassette and a delta DU proviral clone. Expression of the recombinant delta DUpol polyprotein yielded a properly processed and enzymatically active reverse transcriptase, as determined by immunoblot analysis and DNA polymerase activity gels. Transfection of delta DU provirus into feline (FEA) cells resulted in production of virus that replicated to wild-type levels in both FEA cells and fetal equine kidney cells. In contrast, the delta DU virus replicated poorly (less than 1% of wild-type levels) in primary equine macrophage cultures, as measured by reverse transcriptase assays. Preparations of delta DU virus contained negligible dUTPase activity, which confirms that virion-associated dUTPase is encoded in the pol gene region between the RNase H domain and integrase, as has been demonstrated previously for feline immunodeficiency virus (J. H. Elder, D. L. Lerner, C. S. Hasselkus-Light, D. J. Fontenot, E. Hunter, P. A. Luciw, R. C. Montelaro, and T. R. Phillips, J. Virol. 66:1791-1794, 1992). Our results suggest that virus-encoded dUTPase is dispensable for virus replication in dividing cells in vitro but may be required for efficient replication of EIAV in nondividing equine macrophages, the natural host cells for this virus. Images PMID:8386267

  10. Infectious salmon anaemia virus nuclear export protein is encoded by a spliced gene product of genomic segment 7.

    PubMed

    Ramly, Rimatulhana Binti; Olsen, Christel M; Braaen, Stine; Rimstad, Espen

    2013-10-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) is an orthomyxovirus causing anaemia and circulatory disease with high mortality in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Orthomyxoviruses are unusual as RNA viruses as they replicate in the nucleus and some viral transcripts undergo splicing. The nuclear replication necessitates a tightly controlled nuclear import and export of viral proteins. From ISAV genomic segment 7 two known mRNAs are transcribed; one collinear with the genomic segment, coding for the non-structural protein, and one spliced transcript, S7ORF2, coding for a protein with unknown function. Here we report initial functional analysis of the S7ORF2 protein. The results indicate that S7ORF2 protein gradually accumulates in the host cell during virus replication cycle, locates predominantly in the cytoplasm and is a part of purified virus particles. Trapping of S7ORF2 in the nucleus was obtained by treatment with leptomycin B, an inhibitor of CRM1-mediated nuclear export, indicating that S7ORF2 use CRM1 for the nuclear exit. Immunofluorescent staining of cells over-expressing both S7ORF2 and matrix protein (M) showed co-localization in the nucleus. However, S7ORF2 protein was found to interact with both the viral nucleoprotein (NP) and M proteins in ISAV infected cells as well as in purified viral particles. These results indicate that the S7ORF2 could be called the ISAV nuclear export protein, ISAV/NEP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis of Protein-RNA and Protein-Peptide Interactions in Equine Infectious Anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Hyung

    2007-01-01

    Macromolecular interactions are essential for virtually all cellular functions including signal transduction processes, metabolic processes, regulation of gene expression and immune responses. This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two important macromolecular interactions involved in the relationship between Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) and its host cell in horse: (1) the interaction between the EIAV Rev protein and its binding site, the Rev-responsive element (RRE) and (2) interactions between equine MHC class I molecules and epitope peptides derived from EIAV proteins. EIAV, one of the most divergent members of the lentivirus family, has a single-stranded RNA genome and carries several regulatory and structural proteins within its viral particle. Rev is an essential EIAV regulatory encoded protein that interacts with the viral RRE, a specific binding site in the viral mRNA. Using a combination of experimental and computational methods, the interactions between EIAV Rev and RRE were characterized in detail. EIAV Rev was shown to have a bipartite RNA binding domain contain two arginine rich motifs (ARMs). The RRE secondary structure was determined and specific structural motifs that act as cis-regulatory elements for EIAV Rev-RRE interaction were identified. Interestingly, a structural motif located in the high affinity Rev binding site is well conserved in several diverse lentiviral genoes, including HIV-1. Macromolecular interactions involved in the immune response of the horse to EIAV infection were investigated by analyzing complexes between MHC class I proteins and epitope peptides derived from EIAV Rev, Env and Gag proteins. Computational modeling results provided a mechanistic explanation for the experimental finding that a single amino acid change in the peptide binding domain of the quine MHC class I molecule differentially affectes the recognitino of specific epitopes by EIAV-specific CTL. Together, the findings in this

  12. Risk of equine infectious anemia virus disease transmission through in vitro embryo production using somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Gregg, K; Polejaeva, I

    2009-08-01

    Prevention and regulation of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) disease transmission solely depend on identification, isolation, and elimination of infected animals because of lack of an effective vaccine. Embryo production via the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology uses oocytes collected mainly from untested animals, which creates a potential risk of EIAV transmission through infected embryos. The current review examines the risk of EIAV disease transmission through SCNT embryo production and transfer. Equine infectious anemia virus is a lentivirus from the family Retroviridae. Because of a lack of direct reports on this subject, relevant information gathered from close relatives of EIAV, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs), is summarized and used to predict the biological plausibility of EIAV disease transmission through transfers of the equine SCNT embryos. Based on published information regarding interaction of oocytes with lentiviruses and the sufficiency of oocyte and embryo washing procedures to prevent lentivirus transmission from in vitro-produced embryos of various species, we predicted the risk of EIAV transmission through SCNT embryo production and transfer to be very small or absent.

  13. Development of a nested PCR assay to detect equine infectious anemia proviral DNA from peripheral blood of naturally infected horses.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jian-Bao; Zhu, Wei; Cook, Frank R; Goto, Yoshitaka; Horii, Yoichiro; Haga, Takeshi

    2012-11-01

    Equine infectious anemia (EIA) has posed a major challenge and caused significant losses to the equine industry worldwide. PCR detection methods have considerable potential as an adjunct to conventional serological diagnostic techniques. However, most published PCR methods, including that recommended by the OIE, were designed using laboratory-adapted virus strains and do not function with field isolates of EIA virus (EIAV). In the present study, a nested PCR assay for detection of EIAV proviral DNA in peripheral blood cells of naturally infected horses was developed. Primer sets were designed based on conserved 5' regions of the viral genome extending from the LTR to the tat gene. Preliminary studies demonstrated that the method has a detection limit of 10 genomic copies and, when applied to a naturally EIAV-infected feral horse population, shows 100 % correlation with conventional serological diagnostic techniques. This assay provides a powerful new tool in the control of EIAV.

  14. [Expression and immunogenicity of equine infectious anemia virus membrane protein GP90].

    PubMed

    Dai, Chuan-bin; Xiao, Yao; Lu, Hong; Shen, Rong-xian; Shao, Yi-ming

    2003-03-01

    Membrane protein GP90 of China equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine strain (DLV) and its parental wild type LN strain were expressed with Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system and BALB/c mice were inoculated with purified protein, thereby to explore the availability of protein for differential diagnosis and potential for preparing genetically engineered vaccine. The authors infected donkey PBMC culture with China EIAV vaccine strain (DLV) and its parental wild type LN strain, extracted its proviral DNA as template, amplified the GP90 of DLV and LN, respectively, and expressed with Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system. The sf9 insect cells were infected with the recombinant baculovirus and the expressed proteins were purified by IMAC. BALB/c mice were inoculated with purified protein. The specific binding Abs generated in the immunized mice were determined by ELISA method. The neutralizing assay was set up to determine the neutralizing capability of the antigens generated in immunized animals. The recombinant virus expressing viral antigens was determined by Western blot. The expressed proteins were purified by IMAC resulting in the protein purity of 87%(DLV) and 82%(LN), respectively. The antibody titer of the groups with and without adjuvant was 1 600 and 800, respectively. Serial 2 fold dilutions of the immunized mice sera were reacted with 100 TCID50 of EIAV. The end point of immunization assay was to protect 50% cells form CPE caused by EIAV in donkey skin cells. The neutralizing antibody titer was in the range 40 to 80 from animal immunized with and without adjuvant. Membrane proteins of EIAV vaccine strain and wild type strain were successfully expressed in eukaryotic cell expression system according to the scheduled plan. The proteins showed strong immunogenicity and could activate animals to produce anti-EIAV specific antibody including neutralizing antibody to EIAV.

  15. Development of a Fluorescence Polarization-Based Diagnostic Assay for Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tencza, Sarah Burroughs; Islam, Kazi R.; Kalia, Vandana; Nasir, Mohammad S.; Jolley, Michael E.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2000-01-01

    The control of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infections of horses has been over the past 20 years based primarily on the identification and elimination of seropositive horses, predominantly by a standardized agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) assay in centralized reference laboratories. This screening for EIAV-seropositive horses has been to date hindered by the lack of a rapid diagnostic format that can be easily employed in the field. We describe here the development of a rapid solution-phase assay for the presence of serum antibodies to EIAV based on fluorescence polarization (FP) (patent pending). Peptides derived from antigenic regions of EIAV core and envelope proteins were initially screened for their utility as probes in an FP assay to select the best peptide antigen candidates. The FP assay was optimized to detect the presence of EIAV-specific antibodies by a change in the FP of a fluorescein-labeled immunoreactive peptide diagnostic antigen. The most sensitive and specific peptide probe was a peptide corresponding to the immunodominant region of the EIAV transmembrane protein, gp45. This probe was tested for its reactivity in the optimized FP assay with 151 AGID-positive horse sera and 106 AGID-negative serum samples. The results of these studies demonstrated that the FP assay reactivity correlated with reported AGID results in 106 of 106 negative serum samples (100% specificity) and in 135 of 151 positive serum samples (89.4% sensitivity). The FP assay was also found to have a very low background reactivity and to readily detect antibodies produced early in infection (≤3 weeks postinfection). The developed EIAV FP assay is rapid (5 to 20 min) and simple to perform and is equally suitable for use both in the field and in the diagnostic laboratory, thus providing the basis of an improved commercial diagnostic assay for EIAV infection of horses. PMID:10790112

  16. Development of a fluorescence polarization-based diagnostic assay for equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Tencza, S B; Islam, K R; Kalia, V; Nasir, M S; Jolley, M E; Montelaro, R C

    2000-05-01

    The control of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infections of horses has been over the past 20 years based primarily on the identification and elimination of seropositive horses, predominantly by a standardized agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) assay in centralized reference laboratories. This screening for EIAV-seropositive horses has been to date hindered by the lack of a rapid diagnostic format that can be easily employed in the field. We describe here the development of a rapid solution-phase assay for the presence of serum antibodies to EIAV based on fluorescence polarization (FP) (patent pending). Peptides derived from antigenic regions of EIAV core and envelope proteins were initially screened for their utility as probes in an FP assay to select the best peptide antigen candidates. The FP assay was optimized to detect the presence of EIAV-specific antibodies by a change in the FP of a fluorescein-labeled immunoreactive peptide diagnostic antigen. The most sensitive and specific peptide probe was a peptide corresponding to the immunodominant region of the EIAV transmembrane protein, gp45. This probe was tested for its reactivity in the optimized FP assay with 151 AGID-positive horse sera and 106 AGID-negative serum samples. The results of these studies demonstrated that the FP assay reactivity correlated with reported AGID results in 106 of 106 negative serum samples (100% specificity) and in 135 of 151 positive serum samples (89.4% sensitivity). The FP assay was also found to have a very low background reactivity and to readily detect antibodies produced early in infection (

  17. Serologically silent, occult equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infections in horses.

    PubMed

    Ricotti, Sonia; Garcia, Maria Inés; Veaute, Carolina; Bailat, Alejandra; Lucca, Eduardo; Cook, R Frank; Cook, Sheila J; Soutullo, Adriana

    2016-05-01

    Molecular and serological techniques for Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) diagnosis were compared using samples from 59 clinically normal horses stabled on five farms in the Santa Fe Province of Argentina. Of these 26 (44.1%) were positive in official AGID tests and/or gp45/gp90-based ELISA. Surprisingly 18 of the 33 seronegative horses were positive in a PCR against viral sequences encoding gp45 (PCR-positive/AGID-negative) with all but one remaining EIAV-antibody negative throughout a two year observation period. The gp45 PCR results are supported by fact that 7/18 of these horses were positive in the Office International des Epizooties (OIE) recommended EIAV gag gene specific PCR plus 2 of this 7 also reacted in a PCR directed predominantly against the 5' untranslated region of the viral genome. Furthermore sufficient quantities of serum were available from 8 of these horses to verify their seronegative status in sensitive Western Blot tests and demonstrate by ELISA the absence of EIAV-specific antibodies was not attributable to abnormalities in total IgG concentration. Studies involving 7 of the PCR-positive/AGID-negative horses to measure lymphocyte proliferation in the presence of PHA showed no significant differences between this group and control animals. In addition, lymphocytes from 2 of these 7 horses responded to peptides derived from gp90 and gp45. Together these results demonstrate that apparently clinically normal horses with no gross signs of immunodeficiency in terms of total IgG concentration or T helper-cell function can remain seronegative for at least 24 months while harboring EIAV specific nucleic acid sequences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Discerning an Effective Balance between Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Attenuation and Vaccine Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Li, Feng; Steckbeck, Jonathan D.; Durkin, Shannon; Howe, Laryssa; Cook, Sheila J.; Issel, Charles; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2005-01-01

    Among the diverse experimental vaccines evaluated in various animal lentivirus models, live attenuated vaccines have proven to be the most effective, thus providing an important model for examining critical immune correlates of protective vaccine immunity. We previously reported that an experimental live attenuated vaccine for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), based on mutation of the viral S2 accessory gene, elicited protection from detectable infection by virulent virus challenge (F. Li et al., J. Virol. 77:7244-7253, 2003). To better understand the critical components of EIAV vaccine efficacy, we examine here the relationship between the extent of virus attenuation, the maturation of host immune responses, and vaccine efficacy in a comparative study of three related attenuated EIAV proviral vaccine strains: the previously described EIAVUKΔS2 derived from a virulent proviral clone, EIAVUKΔS2/DU containing a second gene mutation in the virulent proviral clone, and EIAVPRΔS2 derived from a reference avirulent proviral clone. Inoculations of parallel groups of eight horses resulted in relatively low levels of viral replication (average of 102 to 103 RNA copies/ml) and a similar maturation of EIAV envelope-specific antibody responses as determined in quantitative and qualitative serological assays. However, experimental challenge of the experimentally immunized horses by our standard virulent EIAVPV strain by using a low-dose multiple exposure protocol (three inoculations with 10 median horse infective doses, administered intravenously) revealed a marked difference in the protective efficacy of the various attenuated proviral vaccine strains that was evidently associated with the extent of vaccine virus attenuation, time of viral challenge, and the apparent maturation of virus-specific immunity. PMID:15708986

  19. Discerning an effective balance between equine infectious anemia virus attenuation and vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Craigo, Jodi K; Li, Feng; Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Durkin, Shannon; Howe, Laryssa; Cook, Sheila J; Issel, Charles; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2005-03-01

    Among the diverse experimental vaccines evaluated in various animal lentivirus models, live attenuated vaccines have proven to be the most effective, thus providing an important model for examining critical immune correlates of protective vaccine immunity. We previously reported that an experimental live attenuated vaccine for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), based on mutation of the viral S2 accessory gene, elicited protection from detectable infection by virulent virus challenge (F. Li et al., J. Virol. 77:7244-7253, 2003). To better understand the critical components of EIAV vaccine efficacy, we examine here the relationship between the extent of virus attenuation, the maturation of host immune responses, and vaccine efficacy in a comparative study of three related attenuated EIAV proviral vaccine strains: the previously described EIAV(UK)DeltaS2 derived from a virulent proviral clone, EIAV(UK)DeltaS2/DU containing a second gene mutation in the virulent proviral clone, and EIAV(PR)DeltaS2 derived from a reference avirulent proviral clone. Inoculations of parallel groups of eight horses resulted in relatively low levels of viral replication (average of 10(2) to 10(3) RNA copies/ml) and a similar maturation of EIAV envelope-specific antibody responses as determined in quantitative and qualitative serological assays. However, experimental challenge of the experimentally immunized horses by our standard virulent EIAV(PV) strain by using a low-dose multiple exposure protocol (three inoculations with 10 median horse infective doses, administered intravenously) revealed a marked difference in the protective efficacy of the various attenuated proviral vaccine strains that was evidently associated with the extent of vaccine virus attenuation, time of viral challenge, and the apparent maturation of virus-specific immunity.

  20. Infection of equine monocyte-derived macrophages with an attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) strain induces a strong resistance to the infection by a virulent EIAV strain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Wang, Shan-Shan; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Liu, Hai-Fang; Liu, Qiang; Wei, Hua-Mian; Wang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Yu-Hong; Du, Cheng; Kong, Xian-Gang; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-08-09

    The Chinese attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine has successfully protected millions of equine animals from EIA disease in China. Given that the induction of immune protection results from the interactions between viruses and hosts, a better understanding of the characteristics of vaccine strain infection and host responses would be useful for elucidating the mechanism of the induction of immune protection by the Chinese attenuated EIAV strain. In this study, we demonstrate in equine monocyte-derived macrophages (eMDM) that EIAVFDDV13, a Chinese attenuated EIAV strain, induced a strong resistance to subsequent infection by a pathogenic strain, EIAVUK3. Further experiments indicate that the expression of the soluble EIAV receptor sELR1, Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and interferon β (IFNβ) was up-regulated in eMDM infected with EIAVFDDV13 compared with eMDM infected with EIAVUK3. Stimulating eMDM with poly I:C resulted in similar resistance to EIAV infection as induced by EIAVFDDV13 and was correlated with enhanced TLR3, sELR1 and IFNβ expression. The knock down of TLR3 mRNA significantly impaired poly I:C-stimulated resistance to EIAV, greatly reducing the expression of sELR1 and IFNβ and lowered the level of infection resistance induced by EIAVFDDV13. These results indicate that the induction of restraining infection by EIAVFDDV13 in macrophages is partially mediated through the up-regulated expression of the soluble viral receptor and IFNβ, and that the TLR3 pathway activation plays an important role in the development of an EIAV-resistant intracellular environment.

  1. Comparative analysis of LTR and structural genes in an equine infectious anemia virus strain isolated from a feral horse in Japan.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jianbao; Cook, Frank R; Haga, Takeshi; Horii, Yoichiro; Norimine, Junzo; Misawa, Naoaki; Goto, Yoshitaka; Zhu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Although equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) poses a major threat to the equine industry worldwide, the molecular epidemiology of this virus is poorly understood. Recently, an EIAV strain (EIAVMiyazaki2011-A) representing a new monophyletic group was discovered in feral horses in southern Japan. In the present study, the EIAVMiyazaki2011-A proviral genome is compared with evolutionarily divergent EIAV isolates to investigate conservation of functional elements or motifs within the long terminal repeats (LTRs) and structural genes. This analysis represents a significant step forward in increasing understanding of the molecular conservation and variation between geographically distinct strains of this equine lentivirus.

  2. Constitutive expression of Atlantic salmon Mx1 protein in CHSE-214 cells confers resistance to Infectious Salmon Anaemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Kibenge, Molly JT; Munir, Khalid; Kibenge, Frederick SB

    2005-01-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) is a highly fatal viral disease affecting marine-farmed Atlantic salmon which is caused by ISA virus (ISAV), a fish orthomyxovirus that has recently been assigned to the new genus Isavirus within the family Orthomyxoviridae. Mx proteins are among the interferon (IFN)-induced proteins responsible for the development of an antiviral state in vertebrate cells. We used real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cells constitutively expressing Atlantic salmon Mx1 protein (ASMx1) to examine the antiviral properties of ASMx1 against two ISAV strains, NBISA01 and HKS-36, having phenotypically different growth properties (cytopathic vs non-cytopathic) in the CHSE-214 cell line. We present evidence that ISAV is sensitive to ASMx1. CHSE-214 cells constitutively expressing ASMx1 showed increased resistance to infection with the cytopathic ISAV strain NBISA01, manifested as delayed development of cytopathic effects (CPE) and significant reduction in the severity of CPE, as well as a 10-fold reduction in virus yield. However, by real-time RT-PCR we observed no significant difference in the mean threshold cycle (Ct) values of ISAV RNA levels, suggesting that the ASMx1 activity on ISAV occurs at the post-transcription steps of virus replication, possibly in the cytoplasm. PMID:16124877

  3. Protective oral vaccination against infectious salmon anaemia virus in Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Caruffo, Mario; Maturana, Carlos; Kambalapally, Swetha; Larenas, Julio; Tobar, Jaime A

    2016-07-01

    Infectious salmon anemia (ISA) is a systemic disease caused by an orthomyxovirus, which has a significant economic impact on the production of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Currently, there are several commercial ISA vaccines available, however, those products are applied through injection, causing stress in the fish and leaving them susceptible to infectious diseases due to the injection process and associated handling. In this study, we evaluated an oral vaccine against ISA containing a recombinant viral hemagglutinin-esterase and a fusion protein as antigens. Our findings indicated that oral vaccination is able to protect Atlantic salmon against challenge with a high-virulence Chilean isolate. The oral vaccination was also correlated with the induction of IgM-specific antibodies. On the other hand, the vaccine was unable to modulate expression of the antiviral related gene Mx, showing the importance of the humoral response to the disease survival. This study provides new insights into fish protection and immune response induced by an oral vaccine against ISA, but also promises future development of preventive solutions or validation of the current existing therapies.

  4. Structural and functional characterization of rev-like transcripts of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Rosin-Arbesfeld, R; Rivlin, M; Noiman, S; Mashiah, P; Yaniv, A; Miki, T; Tronick, S R; Gazit, A

    1993-01-01

    Three cDNA clones representing structurally distinct transcripts were isolated from a cDNA library prepared from cells infected with equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) by using a probe representing the S3 open reading frame, which is thought to encode Rev. One species, designated p2/2, contained four exons and was identical to a previously described polycistronic mRNA that encodes Tat. This transcript was predicted to also direct the synthesis of a truncated form of the transmembrane protein and a putative Rev protein whose N-terminal 29 amino acids, derived from env, are linked to S3 sequences. The second cDNA, p176, also consisted of four exons which were generated by two of three of the same splicing events that occur with p2/2 but not with the Tat mRNA. The alternative splice site giving rise to the second exon of p176 results in a bicistronic message that would encode the same transmembrane and Rev proteins as p2/2. The first exon of the third transcript, p20, was identical to those of p2/2 and p176 but was spliced directly to S3. This monocistronic message could encode a second form of Rev that lacks env sequences, provided that Rev synthesis would initiate at a non-AUG codon. The coding capacity of each cDNA was assessed in a eukaryotic system using S3 antisera. Two putative Rev proteins with apparent molecular masses of 18 and 16 kDa were expressed by p2/2 and p176, while p20 expressed only a 16-kDa species. Analysis of EIAV-infected cells with S3 antisera revealed the presence of an 18-kDa protein. Surprisingly, the same protein was detected in purified virions. By using a reporter construct, the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene linked to EIAV env sequences, we were able to demonstrate greatly enhanced chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity in cells cotransfected with this construct and any of the three cDNAs. Images PMID:8394464

  5. Network simulation modeling of equine infectious anemia in the non-racehorse population in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Yoko; Kobayashi, Sota; Nishida, Takeshi; Muroga, Norihiko; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    An equine infectious anemia (EIA) transmission model was developed by constructing a network structure of horse movement patterns in a non-racehorse population. This model was then used to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of several EIA surveillance strategies. Because EIA had not been detected in Japan since 1993, it was appropriate to review the current surveillance strategy, which aims to eradicate EIA by intensive testing, and to consider alternative strategies suitable for the current EIA status in Japan. The non-racehorse population was divided into four sectors based on horse usage: the equestrian sector, private owner sector, exhibition sector, and fattening sector. To evaluate the risk of disease spread within and between sectors accompanied by horse movements, a stochastic individual-based network model was developed based on a previous survey of horse movement patterns. Surveillance parameters such as targeting sectors and frequency of testing were added into the model to compare surveillance strategies. The disease spread heterogeneously among sectors. Infection occurred mainly in the equestrian sector; the infection was less disseminated in other sectors. Therefore, we considered that the equestrian sector posed a higher risk of disease dissemination within and between sectors through horse movements. However, surveillance strategies targeting only the equestrian sector were not effective enough for early detection of the disease. Alternatively, targeting horses that moved permanently and those in the private owner sector in addition to the equestrian sector is recommended to achieve effectiveness equivalent to that of the current surveillance. In terms of surveillance efficacy, by increasing the testing interval (once yearly to once every 3 years), this testing scheme could reduce the number of tested horses to 44% of the current surveillance, while maintaining almost equivalent effectiveness. Intensive strategies targeting high

  6. Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Genomic Evolution in Progressor and Nonprogressor Ponies

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Caroline; Craigo, Jodi K.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2001-01-01

    A primary mechanism of lentivirus persistence is the ability of these viruses to evolve in response to biological and immunological selective pressures with a remarkable array of genetic and antigenic variations that constitute a perpetual natural experiment in genetic engineering. A widely accepted paradigm of lentivirus evolution is that the rate of genetic variation is correlated directly with the levels of virus replication: the greater the viral replication, the more opportunities that exist for genetic modifications and selection of viral variants. To test this hypothesis directly, we examined the patterns of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) envelope variation during a 2.5-year period in experimentally infected ponies that differed markedly in clinical progression and in steady-state levels of viral replication as indicated by plasma virus genomic RNA assays. The results of these comprehensive studies revealed for the first time similar extents of envelope gp90 variation in persistently infected ponies regardless of the number of disease cycles (one to six) and viremia during chronic disease. The extent of envelope variation was also independent of the apparent steady-state levels of virus replication during long-term asymptomatic infection, varying from undetectable to 105 genomic RNA copies per ml of plasma. In addition, the data confirmed the evolution of distinct virus populations (genomic quasispecies) associated with sequential febrile episodes during acute and chronic EIA and demonstrated for the first time ongoing envelope variation during long-term asymptomatic infections. Finally, comparison of the rates of evolution of the previously defined EIAV gp90 variable domains demonstrated distinct differences in the rates of nucleotide and amino acid sequence variation, presumably reflecting differences in the ability of different envelope domains to respond to immune or other biological selection pressures. Thus, these data suggest that EIAV

  7. Late Domain-Dependent Inhibition of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Budding

    PubMed Central

    Shehu-Xhilaga, Miranda; Ablan, Sherimay; Demirov, Dimiter G.; Chen, Chaoping; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Freed, Eric O.

    2004-01-01

    The Gag proteins of a number of different retroviruses contain late or L domains that promote the release of virions from the plasma membrane. Three types of L domains have been identified to date: Pro-Thr-Ala-Pro (PTAP), Pro-Pro-X-Tyr, and Tyr-Pro-Asp-Leu. It has previously been demonstrated that overexpression of the N-terminal, E2-like domain of the endosomal sorting factor TSG101 (TSG-5′) inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) release but does not affect the release of the PPPY-containing retrovirus murine leukemia virus (MLV), whereas overexpression of the C-terminal portion of TSG101 (TSG-3′) potently disrupts both HIV-1 and MLV budding. In addition, it has been reported that, while the release of a number of retroviruses is disrupted by proteasome inhibitors, equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) budding is not affected by these agents. In this study, we tested the ability of TSG-5′, TSG-3′, and full-length TSG101 (TSG-F) overexpression, a dominant negative form of the AAA ATPase Vps4, and proteasome inhibitors to disrupt the budding of EIAV particles bearing each of the three types of L domain. The results indicate that (i) inhibition by TSG-5′ correlates with dependence on PTAP; (ii) the release of wild-type EIAV (EIAV/WT) is insensitive to TSG-3′, whereas this C-terminal TSG101 fragment potently impairs the budding of EIAV when it is rendered PTAP or PPPY dependent; (iii) budding of all EIAV clones is blocked by dominant negative Vps4; and (iv) EIAV/WT release is not impaired by proteasome inhibitors, while EIAV/PTAP and EIAV/PPPY release is strongly disrupted by these compounds. These findings highlight intriguing similarities and differences in host factor utilization by retroviral L domains and suggest that the insensitivity of EIAV to proteasome inhibitors is conferred by the L domain itself and not by determinants in Gag outside the L domain. PMID:14694104

  8. Late domain-dependent inhibition of equine infectious anemia virus budding.

    PubMed

    Shehu-Xhilaga, Miranda; Ablan, Sherimay; Demirov, Dimiter G; Chen, Chaoping; Montelaro, Ronald C; Freed, Eric O

    2004-01-01

    The Gag proteins of a number of different retroviruses contain late or L domains that promote the release of virions from the plasma membrane. Three types of L domains have been identified to date: Pro-Thr-Ala-Pro (PTAP), Pro-Pro-X-Tyr, and Tyr-Pro-Asp-Leu. It has previously been demonstrated that overexpression of the N-terminal, E2-like domain of the endosomal sorting factor TSG101 (TSG-5') inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) release but does not affect the release of the PPPY-containing retrovirus murine leukemia virus (MLV), whereas overexpression of the C-terminal portion of TSG101 (TSG-3') potently disrupts both HIV-1 and MLV budding. In addition, it has been reported that, while the release of a number of retroviruses is disrupted by proteasome inhibitors, equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) budding is not affected by these agents. In this study, we tested the ability of TSG-5', TSG-3', and full-length TSG101 (TSG-F) overexpression, a dominant negative form of the AAA ATPase Vps4, and proteasome inhibitors to disrupt the budding of EIAV particles bearing each of the three types of L domain. The results indicate that (i) inhibition by TSG-5' correlates with dependence on PTAP; (ii) the release of wild-type EIAV (EIAV/WT) is insensitive to TSG-3', whereas this C-terminal TSG101 fragment potently impairs the budding of EIAV when it is rendered PTAP or PPPY dependent; (iii) budding of all EIAV clones is blocked by dominant negative Vps4; and (iv) EIAV/WT release is not impaired by proteasome inhibitors, while EIAV/PTAP and EIAV/PPPY release is strongly disrupted by these compounds. These findings highlight intriguing similarities and differences in host factor utilization by retroviral L domains and suggest that the insensitivity of EIAV to proteasome inhibitors is conferred by the L domain itself and not by determinants in Gag outside the L domain.

  9. Recombinant envelope protein (rgp90) ELISA for equine infectious anemia virus provides comparable results to the agar gel immunodiffusion.

    PubMed

    Reis, Jenner K P; Diniz, Rejane S; Haddad, João P A; Ferraz, Isabella B F; Carvalho, Alex F; Kroon, Erna G; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Leite, Rômulo C

    2012-03-01

    Equine infectious anemia (EIA) is an important viral infection affecting horses worldwide. The course of infection is accompanied generally by three characteristic stages: acute, chronic and inapparent. There is no effective EIA vaccine or treatment, and the control of the disease is based currently on identification of EIAV inapparent carriers by laboratory tests. Recombinant envelope protein (rgp90) was expressed in Escherichia coli and evaluated via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). There was an excellent agreement (95.42%) between the ELISA results using rgp90 and agar gel immunodiffusion test results. AGID is considered the "gold-standard" serologic test for equine infectious anemia (EIA). After 1160 serum samples were tested, the relative sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA were 96.1% and 96.4%, respectively. Moreover, analysis diagnostic accuracy of the ELISA was performed. The ELISA proved robust. Furthermore, good reproducibility was observed for the negative controls and, positive controls for all plates tested. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Individual Monitoring of Immune Response in Atlantic Salmon Salmo salar following Experimental Infection with Infectious Salmon Anaemia Virus (ISAV).

    PubMed

    Collet, Bertrand; Urquhart, Katy; Monte, Milena; Collins, Catherine; Garcia Perez, Sandro; Secombes, Chris J; Hall, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the immune response in fish over the progression of a disease is traditionally carried out by experimental infection whereby animals are killed at regular intervals and samples taken. We describe here a novel approach to infectiology for salmonid fish where blood samples are collected repeatedly in a small group of PIT-tagged animals. This approach contributes to the reduction of animals used in research and to improved data quality. Two groups of 12 PIT-tagged Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were i.p infected with Infectious Salmon Anaemia Virus (ISAV) or culture medium and placed in 1 m3 tanks. Blood samples were collected at 0, 4, 8, 12, 16, 21 and 25 days post infection. The viral load, immune and stress response were determined in individual fish by real-time quantitative PCR (QPCR) on the blood cells, as well as the haematocrit used as an indicator of haemolysis, a clinical consequence of ISAV infection. "In-tank" anaesthesia was used in order to reduce the stress related to chase and netting prior to sampling. The data were analysed using a statistical approach which is novel with respect to its use in fish immunology. The repeated blood collection procedure did not induce stress response as measured by HSP70 and HSP90 gene expression in the un-infected animals. A strong increase in viraemia as well as a significant induction of Mx and γIP gene expression were observed in the infected group. Interleukin 10 was found induced at the later stage of the infection whereas no induction of CD8 or γ IFN could be detected. These results and the advantages of this approach are discussed.

  11. Low virulent infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV-HPR0) is prevalent and geographically structured in Norwegian salmon farming.

    PubMed

    Lyngstad, Trude M; Kristoffersen, Anja B; Hjortaas, Monika J; Devold, Magnus; Aspehaug, Vidar; Larssen, Rolf B; Jansen, Peder A

    2012-11-19

    Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) is a severe disease in farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar that has caused epidemic outbreaks in most salmon-producing countries worldwide. The disease is caused by virulent ISA virus (ISAV). Low virulent variants of the virus, characterised by a full-length sequence in the highly polymorphic region of segment 6 in the virus genome, have been reported with increasing frequencies. These variants of the virus, termed HPR0, have been proposed to be ancestors of virulent ISAV. We examined this idea through studies of the phylogeographic and environmental distribution of ISAV-HPR0, as well as phylogeographic associations between virulent ISAV and ISAV-HPR0. Samples from 232 fish groups were screened for ISAV. Real-time RT-PCR was used for detection of ISAV, and the ISAV haemagglutinin esterase (HE) gene was characterised for positive samples. A Mantel test was used to test phylogeographic associations between pairs of ISAV-HPR0 HE gene sequences. A rank test was used to test associations between HE gene sequences from virulent ISAV and ISAV-HPR0. ISAV-HPR0 was detected in fish groups both in freshwater and marine environments, and in juveniles, on-grown marine salmon and broodstock salmon. Genetic and geographic distances between pairs of ISAV-HPR0 HE gene sequences were positively correlated, suggesting that the population of ISAV-HPR0 is geographically structured. Finally, we found a spatial association between fish groups with virulent ISAV (n = 21) and fish groups with ISAV-HPR0 (n = 27), supporting the hypothesis that ISAV-HPR0 may undergo a transition to virulent ISAV.

  12. Equine viperin restricts equine infectious anemia virus replication by inhibiting the production and/or release of viral Gag, Env, and receptor via distortion of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Na, Lei; Zhu, Chun-Hui; Shen, Nan; Yang, Fei; Fu, Xian-Qiu; Wang, Yu-Hong; Fu, Li-Hua; Wang, Jia-Yi; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Li, Cheng-Yao

    2014-11-01

    Viperin is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated multifunctional protein that regulates virus replication and possesses broad antiviral activity. In many cases, viperin interferes with the trafficking and budding of viral structural proteins by distorting the membrane transportation system. The lentivirus equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) has been studied extensively. In this study, we examined the restrictive effect of equine viperin (eViperin) on EIAV replication and investigated the possible molecular basis of this restriction to obtain insights into the effect of this cellular factor on retroviruses. We demonstrated that EIAV infection of primary equine monocyte-derived macrophages (eMDMs) upregulated the expression of eViperin. The overexpression of eViperin significantly inhibited the replication of EIAV in eMDMs, and knockdown of eViperin transcription enhanced the replication of EIAV in eMDMs by approximately 45.8%. Further experiments indicated that eViperin restricts EIAV at multiple steps of viral replication. The overexpression of eViperin inhibited EIAV Gag release. Both the α-helix domain and radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) domain were required for this activity. However, the essential motifs in SAM were different from those reported for the inhibition of HIV-1 Gag by human viperin. Furthermore, eViperin disrupted the synthesis of both EIAV Env and receptor, which consequently inhibited viral production and entry, respectively, and this disruption was dependent on the eViperin α-helix domain. Using immunofluorescence assays and electron microscopy, we demonstrated that the α-helix domain is responsible for the distortion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Finally, EIAV did not exhibit counteracting eViperin at the protein level. In previous studies, viperin was indicated as restricting virus replications primarily by the inhibition of virus budding. Here, we show that viperin may have multiple antiviral mechanisms, including the reduction

  13. Cloning of the genome of equine herpesvirus 4 strain TH20p as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Azab, Walid; Kato, Kentaro; Arii, Jun; Tsujimura, Koji; Yamane, Daisuke; Tohya, Yukinobu; Matsumura, Tomio; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2009-01-01

    Equine herpesvirus 4 (EHV-4) is a major cause of respiratory tract disease in horses worldwide. The generation of recombinant viruses, which would lead to understanding of viral gene functions, has been hindered by the absence of suitable cell lines and small-animal models of the infection. In the present study, the genome of EHV-4 strain TH20p was cloned as a stable and infectious BAC without any deletions of the viral genes. Mini F plasmid sequences flanked by loxP sites were inserted into the intergenic region between genes 58 and 59. Coinfection of the recombinant virus with a recombinant adenovirus expressing Cre recombinase resulted in the excision of the BAC sequences. Importantly, the resulting recombinant EHV-4 replicated comparably to the wild-type virus in fetal horse kidney cells. The recombinant EHV-4 will facilitate EHV-4 research and provide the opportunity to exploit the power of BAC technology for production of recombinant viral vaccines.

  14. Equine infectious anemia: preparation of a liquid antigen extract for the agar-gel immunodiffusion and complement-fixation tests.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, P; Bannister, G L; Carrier, S P

    1972-04-01

    An agar-gel immunodiffusion test recommended for the diagnosis of equine infectious anemia was evaluated. Our preliminary observations confirmed those of Coggins concerning the mechanism of the test and the results obtained. Furthermore, emphasis was put on the difficulties encountered in the production of spleen antigens with an optimum amount of reactivity. Acetone-ether extraction procedures for the preparation of a liquid antigen extract are described. This type of antigen was reactive in the complement-fixation test in 1:8 or greater dilution and it is proposed to use the complement-fixation test in assessing and standardizing the liquid antigen extract activity to be used in the immunodiffusion test. This antigen can also be concentrated or diluted, if required, to meet the reactivity of a standard antigen used in the test.

  15. Development of a multiplex real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV).

    PubMed

    Cook, R Frank; Cook, S J; Li, F Li; Montelaro, R C; Issel, C J

    2002-08-01

    A single-tube reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using a fluorogenic real-time PCR detection method is described for the quantitation of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) RNA in the plasma of equids. To compensate for variations inherent in sample preparation a multiplex real-time RT-PCR system was developed that permitted the simultaneous calculation of the nucleic acid recovery rate along with the copy number of viral RNA molecules. Detection of EIAV RNA was linear from 10(9) to 10(1) molecules with intra- and inter-assay variability of less than 1% at 10(8), 10(6), 10(4) and 10(2) molecules.

  16. Control of equine infectious anemia virus replication following immune reconstitution in an Arabian foal with severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mealey, Robert H.; Fraser, Darrilyn G.; Oaks, J. Lindsay; Cantor, Glenn H.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2012-01-01

    Acute infection with equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a lentivirus of horses, results in a persistent high-level viremia in Arabian foals affected with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). This observation argues against the idea that the transient nature of acute lentiviral viremia is solely a function of viral population dynamics. To extend these studies, EIAV-specific immune reconstitution was attempted prior to EIAV challenge in 2 SCID foals, using adoptively transferred virus-stimulated lymphocytes derived from persistently EIAV-infected half sibling donors. Following transfer, lymphocyte engraftment occurred in 1 foal, and EIAV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes as well as neutralizing antibody activity developed. Following a brief period of plasma viremia in this foal, EIAV replication was controlled and plasma virus could not be detected by RT-PCR or culture. These results provide further direct evidence that a specific immune response is required for termination of plasma viremia in acute lentiviral infections. PMID:11683583

  17. Equine Infectious Anemia: Preparation of a Liquid Antigen Extract for the Agar-gel Immunodiffusion and Complement-fixation Tests

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, P.; Bannister, G. L.; Carrier, S. P.

    1972-01-01

    An agar-gel immunodiffusion test recommended for the diagnosis of equine infectious anemia was evaluated. Our preliminary observations confirmed those of Coggins concerning the mechanism of the test and the results obtained. Furthermore, emphasis was put on the difficulties encountered in the production of spleen antigens with an optimum amount of reactivity. Acetone-ether extraction procedures for the preparation of a liquid antigen extract are described. This type of antigen was reactive in the complement-fixation test in 1:8 or greater dilution and it is proposed to use the complement-fixation test in assessing and standardizing the liquid antigen extract activity to be used in the immunodiffusion test. This antigen can also be concentrated or diluted, if required, to meet the reactivity of a standard antigen used in the test. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:4259924

  18. In Vitro Efficacy of Nonantibiotic Treatments on Biofilm Disruption of Gram-Negative Pathogens and an In Vivo Model of Infectious Endometritis Utilizing Isolates from the Equine Uterus

    PubMed Central

    McCue, Patrick M.; Borlee, Grace I.; Loncar, Kristen D.; Hennet, Margo L.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the ability of the equine clinical treatments N-acetylcysteine, EDTA, and hydrogen peroxide to disrupt in vitro biofilms and kill equine reproductive pathogens (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Klebsiella pneumoniae) isolated from clinical cases. N-acetylcysteine (3.3%) decreased biofilm biomass and killed bacteria within the biofilms of E. coli isolates. The CFU of recoverable P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae isolates were decreased, but the biofilm biomass was unchanged. Exposure to hydrogen peroxide (1%) decreased the biofilm biomass and reduced the CFU of E. coli isolates, K. pneumoniae isolates were observed to have a reduction in CFU, and minimal effects were observed for P. aeruginosa isolates. Chelating agents (EDTA formulations) reduced E. coli CFU but were ineffective at disrupting preformed biofilms or decreasing the CFU of P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae within a biofilm. No single nonantibiotic treatment commonly used in equine veterinary practice was able to reduce the CFU and biofilm biomass of all three Gram-negative species of bacteria evaluated. An in vivo equine model of infectious endometritis was also developed to monitor biofilm formation, utilizing bioluminescence imaging with equine P. aeruginosa isolates from this study. Following infection, the endometrial surface contained focal areas of bacterial growth encased in a strongly adherent “biofilm-like” matrix, suggesting that biofilms are present during clinical cases of infectious equine endometritis. Our results indicate that Gram-negative bacteria isolated from the equine uterus are capable of producing a biofilm in vitro, and P. aeruginosa is capable of producing biofilm-like material in vivo. PMID:26719448

  19. In Vitro Efficacy of Nonantibiotic Treatments on Biofilm Disruption of Gram-Negative Pathogens and an In Vivo Model of Infectious Endometritis Utilizing Isolates from the Equine Uterus.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Ryan A; McCue, Patrick M; Borlee, Grace I; Loncar, Kristen D; Hennet, Margo L; Borlee, Bradley R

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we evaluated the ability of the equine clinical treatments N-acetylcysteine, EDTA, and hydrogen peroxide to disrupt in vitro biofilms and kill equine reproductive pathogens (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Klebsiella pneumoniae) isolated from clinical cases. N-acetylcysteine (3.3%) decreased biofilm biomass and killed bacteria within the biofilms of E. coli isolates. The CFU of recoverable P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae isolates were decreased, but the biofilm biomass was unchanged. Exposure to hydrogen peroxide (1%) decreased the biofilm biomass and reduced the CFU of E. coli isolates, K. pneumoniae isolates were observed to have a reduction in CFU, and minimal effects were observed for P. aeruginosa isolates. Chelating agents (EDTA formulations) reduced E. coli CFU but were ineffective at disrupting preformed biofilms or decreasing the CFU of P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae within a biofilm. No single nonantibiotic treatment commonly used in equine veterinary practice was able to reduce the CFU and biofilm biomass of all three Gram-negative species of bacteria evaluated. An in vivo equine model of infectious endometritis was also developed to monitor biofilm formation, utilizing bioluminescence imaging with equine P. aeruginosa isolates from this study. Following infection, the endometrial surface contained focal areas of bacterial growth encased in a strongly adherent "biofilm-like" matrix, suggesting that biofilms are present during clinical cases of infectious equine endometritis. Our results indicate that Gram-negative bacteria isolated from the equine uterus are capable of producing a biofilm in vitro, and P. aeruginosa is capable of producing biofilm-like material in vivo.

  20. Cloning and characterization of cDNAs encoding equine infectious anemia virus tat and putative Rev proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, R M; Derse, D; Rice, N R

    1990-01-01

    We isolated and characterized six cDNA clones from an equine infectious anemia virus-infected cell line that displays a Rev-defective phenotype. With the exception of one splice site in one of the clones, all six cDNAs exhibited the same splicing pattern and consisted of four exons. Exon 1 contained the 5' end of the genome; exon 2 contained the tat gene from mid-genome; exon 3 consisted of a small section of env, near the 5' end of the env gene; and exon 4 contained the putative rev open reading frame from the 3' end of the genome. The structures of the cDNAs predict a bicistronic message in which Tat is encoded by exons 1 and 2 and the presumptive Rev protein is encoded by exons 3 and 4. tat translation appears to be initiated at a non-AUG codon within the first 15 codons of exon 1. Equine infectious anemia virus-specific tat activity was expressed in transient transfections with cDNA expression plasmids. The predicted wild-type Rev protein contains 30 env-derived amino acids and 135 rev open reading frame residues. All of the cDNAs had a frameshift in exon 4, leading to a truncated protein and thus providing a plausible explanation for the Rev-defective phenotype of the original cells. We used peptide antisera to detect the faulty protein, thus confirming the cDNA sequence, and to detect the normal protein in productively infected cells. Images PMID:2164593

  1. The risk of introduction of equine infectious anemia virus into USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada.

    PubMed

    Asseged, B D; Habtemariam, T; Tameru, B; Nganwa, D

    2012-01-15

    Deriving horse oocytes in the USA is hampered by the lack of abattoirs processing horse carcasses which could provide abundant quantities of ovaries from slaughtered mares. Therefore, several cloning industries in the USA are attempting to import cloned horse embryos from Canada. Like any agricultural commodity, cloned embryos pose a risk of introduction of exotic animal diseases into the importing country. Under such circumstances, risk assessment could provide an objective, transparent, and internationally accepted means for evaluating the risk. This quantitative risk assessment (QRA) was initiated to determine the risk of introduction of Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) into the USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada. In assessing the risk, a structured knowledge base regarding cloning in relation to Equine infectious anemia (EIA) was first developed. Based on the knowledge base, a scenario tree was developed to determine conditions (with mathematical probabilities) that could lead to the introduction and maintenance of EIAV along the cloning pathway. Parameters for the occurrence of the event at each node were estimated using published literature. Using @Risk software and setting Monte Carlo simulation at 50,000 iterations, the probability of importing an EIAV-infected cloned horse embryo was 1.8 × 10(-9) (R = 1.5 × 10(-12) to 2.9 × 10(-8)). Taking into account the current protocol for equine cloning and assuming the yield of 5 to 30 clones per year, the possible number of EIAV-infected cloned horse embryos ranged from 2.0 × 10(-10) to 9.1 × 10(-5) (Mean = 1.4×10(-6)) per year. Consequently, it would take up to 1.5 × 10(7) (R = 1.6 × 10(4) to 5.1 × 10(10)) years for EIAV to be introduced into the USA. Based on the knowledge base and our critical pathway analysis, the biological plausibility of introducing EIAV into USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada is extremely low. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The pathogenic and vaccine strains of equine infectious anemia virus differentially induce cytokine and chemokine expression and apoptosis in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yue-Zhi; Cao, Xue-Zhi; Li, Liang; Li, Li; Jiang, Cheng-Gang; Wang, Xue-Feng; Ma, Jian; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2011-09-01

    The attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine was the first attenuated lentivirus vaccine to be used in a large-scale application and has been used to successfully control the spread of equine infectious anemia (EIA) in China. To better understand the potential role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of EIAV infection and resulting immune response, we used branched DNA technology to compare the mRNA expression levels of 12 cytokines and chemokines, including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IP-10, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1, and MCP-2, in equine monocyte-derived macrophages (eMDMs) infected with the EIAV(DLV121) vaccine strain or the parental EIAV(DLV34) pathogenic strain. Infection with EIAV(DLV34) and EIAV(DLV121) both caused changes in the mRNA levels of various cytokines and chemokines in eMDMs. In the early stage of infection with EIAV(DLV34) (0-24h), the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly up-regulated, while with EIAV(DLV121), expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 was markedly up-regulated. The effects on the expression of other cytokines and chemokines were similar between these two strains of virus. During the first 4 days after infection, the expression level of IL-4 in cells infected with the pathogenic strain were significantly higher than that in cells infected with the vaccine strain, but the expression of IL-1α and IL-1β induced by the vaccine strain was significantly higher than that observed with the pathogenic strain. In addition, after 4 days of infection with the pathogenic strain, the expression levels of 5 chemokines, but not IP-10, were markedly increased in eMDMs. In contrast, the vaccine strain did not up-regulate these chemokines to this level. Contrary to our expectation, induced apoptosis in eMDMs infected with the vaccine strain was significantly higher than that infected with the pathogenic strain 4 days and 6 days after infection. Together, these

  3. Spatial and non-spatial risk factors associated with cage-level distribution of infectious salmon anaemia at three Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., farms in Maine, USA.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, L; Ellis, S; Robinson, T; Marenghi, F; Merrill, P; Hawkins, L; Giray, C; Wagner, B

    2007-02-01

    The distribution of infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) was examined among 80 cages from three Atlantic salmon grow-out farms in Maine, USA that were stocked with smolts from a single hatchery. Cage-level disease was broadly defined as one or more moribund fish testing positive for infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) by RT-PCR and a second confirmatory test (IFAT, culture or genotype sequence). Spatio-temporal and cage-level risks were explored using logistic regression and survival analysis. Non-spatial risk factors associated with ISA, or shortened survival time to disease, included increased predation, trucking company choice for smolt transfers, a finely-sedimented benthic substrate, and smaller average size of smolts at stocking. Univariable analysis identified the time-dependent spatial factor 'adjacency to newly infected cages' to be predictive of new infection in neighbouring cages 11-12 weeks later. However, none of the spatial factors, or their lags retained relevance in multiple-variable models. The results suggest a diffuse distribution of virus exposure throughout infected sites, with host-susceptibility factors probably influencing disease manifestation in individual cages. The narrow focus of the current study may limit application of the findings to other sites and year-classes. However, these data support the relevance of husbandry efforts to optimize fish health in regions affected by ISAV.

  4. Immune selection of equine infectious anemia virus env variants during the long-term inapparent stage of disease.

    PubMed

    Sponseller, Brett A; Sparks, Wendy O; Wannemuehler, Yvonne; Li, Yuxing; Antons, Amanda K; Oaks, J Lindsay; Carpenter, Susan

    2007-06-20

    The principal neutralizing domain (PND) of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is located in the V3 region of SU. Genetic variation in the PND is considered to play an important role in immune escape and EIAV persistence; however, few studies have characterized genetic variation in SU during the inapparent stage of disease. To better understand the mechanisms of virus persistence, we undertook a longitudinal study of SU variation in a pony experimentally inoculated with the virulent EIAV(Wyo). Viral RNA isolated from the inoculum and from sequential sera samples was amplified by RT-PCR, cloned, and individual clones were sequenced. Of the 147 SU clones obtained, we identified 71 distinct V3 variants that partitioned into five major non-overlapping groups, designated PND-1 to PND-5, which segregated with specific stages of clinical disease. Genotypes representative of each group were inserted into an infectious molecular clone, and chimeric viruses were tested for susceptibility to neutralization by autologous sera from successive times post-infection. Overall, there was a trend for increasing resistance to neutralizing antibody during disease progression. The PND genotype associated with recrudescence late in infection was resistant to both type-specific and broadly neutralizing antibody, and displayed a reduced replication phenotype in vitro. These findings indicate that neutralizing antibody exerts selective pressure throughout infection and suggest that viral strategies of immune evasion and persistence change in the face of an evolving and maturing host immune response.

  5. A comparison of ELISA, FAST-ELISA and gel diffusion tests for detecting antibody to equine infectious anaemia virus.

    PubMed

    Lew, A M; Thomas, L M; Huntington, P J

    1993-01-01

    Sera of sixteen horses with clinical signs of EIA from six different outbreaks and sera of 100 uninfected horses were used to validate an ELISA for EIA diagnosis. The antigen used was a recombinant protein derived from the amino-terminal portion of the transmembrane envelope protein of EIA (gp45). Reactivity between positive and negative sera could be clearly distinguished. Comparison with the traditional agar gel immunodiffusion test (commonly called the Coggins test) showed that the ELISA was superior in sensitivity. Comparison of this ELISA with the FAST-ELISA system showed that the latter was less sensitive. Although the FAST-ELISA was much faster to perform, it could not be recommended as a diagnostic test in its present form, because the margin between reactivity by a positive serum and a negative serum was not high.

  6. Construction and manipulation of a full-length infectious bacterial artificial chromosome clone of equine herpesvirus type 3 (EHV-3).

    PubMed

    Akhmedzhanov, Maksat; Scrochi, Mariela; Barrandeguy, Maria; Vissani, Aldana; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Damiani, Armando Mario

    2017-01-15

    Equine herpesvirus type 3 (EHV-3) is the causal agent of equine coital exanthema, a disease characterized by pox-like lesions on the penis of stallions and the vulva of mares. Although the complete genomic sequence of EHV-3 has been recently made available, its genomic content remains poorly characterized and the molecular mechanisms of disease development not yet elucidated. In an attempt to facilitate genetic manipulation of EHV-3, we describe here the construction of a full-length infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone of EHV-3. Mini-F vector sequences were inserted into the intergenic region between ORF19 and ORF20 (UL41 and UL40, respectively) of EHV-3 strain C175 by homologous recombination in equine dermal cells (NBL-6). DNA of the resulting recombinant virus was electroporated into E. coli and a full-length EHV-3 BAC clone was recovered. Virus reconstituted after transfection of the EHV-3 BAC into NBL-6 cells showed growth properties in vitro that were indistinguishable from those of the parental virus. To assess the feasibility of mutagenesis of the cloned EHV-3 genome, recombinant viruses targeting the glycoprotein E (gE) gene were generated using Red recombination in E. coli and in vitro growth properties of the recombinant viruses were evaluated. We first repaired the gE (ORF74) coding region, since the parental virus used for BAC cloning specifies a truncated version of the gene, and then created gE-tagged and gE-null versions of the virus. Our results demonstrated that: (i) EHV-3 can be efficiently cloned as a BAC allowing easy manipulation of its genome; (ii) gE is dispensable for EHV-3 growth in vitro and is expressed as a product of approximately 110-kDa in infected cells; (iii) viruses having a deletion compromising gE expression or with a truncation of the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains are significantly compromised with regard cell-to-cell spread. The cloning of EHV-3 as a BAC simplifies future studies to identify the role

  7. Functional replacement and positional dependence of homologous and heterologous L domains in equine infectious anemia virus replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Chen, Chaoping; Puffer, Bridget A; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2002-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated by Gag polyprotein budding assays that the Gag p9 protein of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) utilizes a unique YPDL motif as a late assembly domain (L domain) to facilitate release of the budding virus particle from the host cell plasma membrane (B. A. Puffer, L. J. Parent, J. W. Wills, and R. C. Montelaro, J. Virol. 71:6541-6546, 1997). To characterize in more detail the role of the YPDL L domain in the EIAV life cycle, we have examined the replication properties of a series of EIAV proviral mutants in which the parental YPDL L domain was replaced by a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) PTAP or Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) PPPY L domain in the p9 protein or by proviruses in which the parental YPDL or HIV-1 PTAP L domain was inserted in the viral matrix protein. The replication properties of these L-domain variants were examined with respect to Gag protein expression and processing, virus particle production, and virus infectivity. The data from these experiments indicate that (i) the YPDL L domain of p9 is required for replication competence (assembly and infectivity) in equine cell cultures, including the natural target equine macrophages; (ii) all of the functions of the YPDL L domain in the EIAV life cycle can be replaced by replacement of the parental YPDL sequence in p9 with the PTAP L-domain segment of HIV-1 p6 or the PPPY L domain of RSV p2b; and (iii) the assembly, but not infectivity, functions of the EIAV proviral YPDL substitution mutants can be partially rescued by inclusions of YPDL and PTAP L-domain sequences in the C-terminal region of the EIAV MA protein. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the EIAV YPDL L domain mediates distinct functions in viral budding and infectivity and that the HIV-1 PTAP and RSV PPPY L domains can effectively facilitate these dual replication functions in the context of the p9 protein. In light of the fact that YPDL, PTAP, and PPPY domains evidently have distinct

  8. Functional Replacement and Positional Dependence of Homologous and Heterologous L Domains in Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Chen, Chaoping; Puffer, Bridget A.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2002-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated by Gag polyprotein budding assays that the Gag p9 protein of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) utilizes a unique YPDL motif as a late assembly domain (L domain) to facilitate release of the budding virus particle from the host cell plasma membrane (B. A. Puffer, L. J. Parent, J. W. Wills, and R. C. Montelaro, J. Virol. 71:6541-6546, 1997). To characterize in more detail the role of the YPDL L domain in the EIAV life cycle, we have examined the replication properties of a series of EIAV proviral mutants in which the parental YPDL L domain was replaced by a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) PTAP or Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) PPPY L domain in the p9 protein or by proviruses in which the parental YPDL or HIV-1 PTAP L domain was inserted in the viral matrix protein. The replication properties of these L-domain variants were examined with respect to Gag protein expression and processing, virus particle production, and virus infectivity. The data from these experiments indicate that (i) the YPDL L domain of p9 is required for replication competence (assembly and infectivity) in equine cell cultures, including the natural target equine macrophages; (ii) all of the functions of the YPDL L domain in the EIAV life cycle can be replaced by replacement of the parental YPDL sequence in p9 with the PTAP L-domain segment of HIV-1 p6 or the PPPY L domain of RSV p2b; and (iii) the assembly, but not infectivity, functions of the EIAV proviral YPDL substitution mutants can be partially rescued by inclusions of YPDL and PTAP L-domain sequences in the C-terminal region of the EIAV MA protein. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the EIAV YPDL L domain mediates distinct functions in viral budding and infectivity and that the HIV-1 PTAP and RSV PPPY L domains can effectively facilitate these dual replication functions in the context of the p9 protein. In light of the fact that YPDL, PTAP, and PPPY domains evidently have distinct

  9. Health and epidemiological approaches of Trypanosoma evansi and equine infectious anemia virus in naturally infected horses at southern Pantanal.

    PubMed

    Parreira, Daniela R; Jansen, Ana M; Abreu, Urbano G P; Macedo, Gabriel C; Silva, Antônia R S; Mazur, Carlos; Andrade, Gisele B; Herrera, Heitor M

    2016-11-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) and Trypanossoma evansi are endemic in Brazilian Pantanal Biome, an important area for livestock production. In this sense, we evaluated the epidemiological single and co-infection effects of T. evansi and EIAV in naturally infected horses in the southern Pantanal wetland by serological tests and hematological assays. Both higher seroprevalence and heath poor condition of the sampled animals were associated with differences in horse management between farms. We found that the negative animals for both infectious agents (NN) represented the major group in F1 (37%), and the smallest group in F2 (19%). Furthermore, we recorded higher EIAV seroprevalence (56%) in F2, compared to F1 (38%). We observed that T. evansi infection was mostly related to young horses, as seen by their higher seroprevalence, ranging from 70.7% in the beginning of the rainy season to 81% in the end of flood period, in comparison with the values of 42% and 68%, respectively, in working animals. on the other hand, working animals showed a higher seroprevalence for EIAV (48%) in both seasons than young horses. We observed that the management of working horses could be a risk factor of EIAV infection. On the other hand, as T. evansi is maintained in the study region by many species of wild mammals, the mechanical transmission through blood-sucking vectors ensures the infection to horses since early. Our results showed that single or co-infection by EIAV and T. evansi caused different degree of anemia in the infected animals. Moreover, the health of horses in Brazilian Pantanal is also influenced by differences in horse management and environmental circumstances.

  10. Free-virus and cell-to-cell transmission in models of equine infectious anemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Allen, Linda J S; Schwartz, Elissa J

    2015-12-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus in the retrovirus family that infects horses and ponies. Two strains, referred to as the sensitive strain and the resistant strain, have been isolated from an experimentally-infected pony. The sensitive strain is vulnerable to neutralization by antibodies whereas the resistant strain is neutralization-insensitive. The sensitive strain mutates to the resistant strain. EIAV may infect healthy target cells via free virus or alternatively, directly from an infected target cell through cell-to-cell transfer. The proportion of transmission from free-virus or from cell-to-cell transmission is unknown. A system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is formulated for the virus-cell dynamics of EIAV. In addition, a Markov chain model and a branching process approximation near the infection-free equilibrium (IFE) are formulated. The basic reproduction number R0 is defined as the maximum of two reproduction numbers, R0s and R0r, one for the sensitive strain and one for the resistant strain. The IFE is shown to be globally asymptotically stable for the ODE model in a special case when the basic reproduction number is less than one. In addition, two endemic equilibria exist, a coexistence equilibrium and a resistant strain equilibrium. It is shown that if R0>1, the infection persists with at least one of the two strains. However, for small infectious doses, the sensitive strain and the resistant strain may not persist in the Markov chain model. Parameter values applicable to EIAV are used to illustrate the dynamics of the ODE and the Markov chain models. The examples highlight the importance of the proportion of cell-to-cell versus free-virus transmission that either leads to infection clearance or to infection persistence with either coexistence of both strains or to dominance by the resistant strain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative evaluation of three surveillance systems for infectious equine diseases in France and implications for future synergies.

    PubMed

    Amat, J P; Hendrikx, P; Tapprest, J; Leblond, A; Dufour, B

    2015-10-01

    It is necessary to assess surveillance systems for infectious animal diseases to ensure they meet their objectives and provide high-quality health information. Each system is generally dedicated to one disease and often comprises various components. In many animal industries, several surveillance systems are implemented separately even if they are based on similar components. This lack of synergy may prevent optimal surveillance. The purpose of this study was to assess several surveillance systems within the same industry using the semi-quantitative OASIS method and to compare the results of the assessments in order to propose improvements, including future synergies. We have focused on the surveillance of three major equine diseases in France. We have identified the mutual and specific strengths and weaknesses of each surveillance system. Furthermore, the comparative assessment has highlighted many possible synergies that could improve the effectiveness and efficiency of surveillance as a whole, including the implementation of new joint tools or the pooling of existing teams, tools or skills. Our approach is an original application of the OASIS method, which requires minimal financial resources and is not very time-consuming. Such a comparative evaluation could conceivably be applied to other surveillance systems, other industries and other countries. This approach would be especially relevant to enhance the efficiency of surveillance activities when resources are limited.

  12. Comparison of commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and agar gel immunodiffusion tests for the serodiagnosis of equine infectious anemia

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to estimate the performance characteristics (accuracy, detection limit, and precision) of commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) kits in comparison with a reference AGID kit for the detection of equine infectious anemia (EIA) antibodies in horses for regulatory use in Canada. A total of 285 positive and 315 negative samples by the reference AGID were tested blindly on 2 other AGID and 4 ELISA kits. Commercially available AGID kits for the serodiagnosis of EIA were found equivalent. The 3 ELISAs directed against antibodies to the p26 core protein also performed relatively well in comparison with the reference AGID, with excellent relative accuracy and acceptable precision. The single ELISA directed against antibodies to the gp45 trans-membrane viral protein yielded a lower relative sensitivity. The performance characteristics of the ELISAs directed against antibodies to p26 are, therefore, adequate to support the implementation of ELISA for regulatory purposes in Canada. PMID:15581219

  13. Comparison of commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and agar gel immunodiffusion tests for the serodiagnosis of equine infectious anemia.

    PubMed

    Paré, Julie; Simard, Carole

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the performance characteristics (accuracy, detection limit, and precision) of commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) kits in comparison with a reference AGID kit for the detection of equine infectious anemia (EIA) antibodies in horses for regulatory use in Canada. A total of 285 positive and 315 negative samples by the reference AGID were tested blindly on 2 other AGID and 4 ELISA kits. Commercially available AGID kits for the serodiagnosis of EIA were found equivalent. The 3 ELISAs directed against antibodies to the p26 core protein also performed relatively well in comparison with the reference AGID, with excellent relative accuracy and acceptable precision. The single ELISA directed against antibodies to the gp45 trans-membrane viral protein yielded a lower relative sensitivity. The performance characteristics of the ELISAs directed against antibodies to p26 are, therefore, adequate to support the implementation of ELISA for regulatory purposes in Canada.

  14. Rapid solid-phase radioimmunoassay for detection of equine infectious anemia viral antigen and antibodies: parameters involved in standardization.

    PubMed

    Horenstein, A L; Feinstein, R E

    1985-10-01

    Solid-phase radioimmunoassays (SPRIA) are described for the detection of equine infectious anemia (EIA) viral antigen and antibodies. Protein-antigen P29 currently used in the agar-gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test was used as antigen in the SPRIA. Rabbit sera selected from positive AGID test data were used to standardize the method. Briefly, wells of flexible microtitre plates coated with antigen were incubated with antiserum followed by a secondary labelled antibody. The radioactivity remaining in the wells after washing provided a measure of the amount of specific antibodies in the serum. When testing a group of rabbit sera, negative for EIA virus antibodies by the AGID test, in the SPRIA a range of positive reactivities was noted. The specificity of the reaction was assessed by inhibition with the antigen. The reaction of immune serum against EIA-virus antigen adsorbed to the wells, was completely inhibited by the antigen in solution. This property was applied in an indirect competitive SPRIA for the detection of viral protein P29. The detection threshold of the SPRIA for EIA virus protein was about 5 ng and about 1 ng of antibody can be detected. The assay is rapid, specific and sensitive and allows the testing of multiple serum samples with the advantage of employing a single secondary labelled antibody.

  15. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for equine infectious anemia virus detection using recombinant Pr55gag.

    PubMed

    Archambault, D; Wang, Z M; Lacal, J C; Gazit, A; Yaniv, A; Dahlberg, J E; Tronick, S R

    1989-06-01

    To provide more sensitive and convenient methods for the detection of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) employing the EIAV gag precursor (Pr55gag) produced by using recombinant DNA techniques. The antigenic reactivity of the recombinant EIAV Pr55gag was found to be equivalent to that of the virion p24gag and elicited high-titered antiserum in rabbits. When a large number of horse sera were analyzed for the presence of antibodies to EIAV by this ELISA, a radioimmunoassay for EIAV p15gag, or the standard agar gel immunodiffusion test, there was 98.7% concordance among the assays. By using the ELISA it was possible to specifically detect antibodies earlier after experimental infection of horses with EIAV than with the other two tests. A competition ELISA developed in order to detect EIAV gag antigens was found to be approximately 15 times more sensitive than the radioimmunoassay for EIAV p15gag. Antigens of other animal lentiviruses as well as those of the prototype oncovirus failed to compete in this assay.

  16. A Unique Evolution of the S2 Gene of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus in Hosts Correlated with Particular Infection Statuses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Qiang; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Du, Cheng; Tang, Yan-Dong; Na, Lei; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a member of the Lentivirus genus in the Retroviridae family that exhibits a genomic structure similar to that of HIV-1. The S2 accessory proteins play important roles in viral replication in vivo and in viral pathogenicity; however, studies on S2 evolution in vivo are limited. This study analyzed the evolutionary characteristics of the S2 gene of a pathogenic EIAV strain, EIAVLN40, in four experimentally infected horses. The results demonstrated that 14.7% (10 of 68 residues) of the stable amino acid mutations occurred longitudinally in S2 during a 150-day infection period. Further analysis revealed that six of the ten mutated residues were positively selected during the infection. Alignment and phylogenetic analyses showed that the S2 gene sequences of viruses isolated from the infected horses at the early stage of EIAVLN40 infection were highly homologous and similar to the vaccine-specific sequence. The S2 gene variants isolated from the febrile episodes and late phase of infection became homologous to the S2 gene sequence of the inoculating EIAVLN40 strain. Our results indicate that the S2 gene evolves in diversity and divergence in vivo in different stages of EIAV infection and that this evolution correlates with the pathogenicity of the virus. PMID:25390683

  17. Identification of a novel equine infectious anemia virus field strain isolated from feral horses in southern Japan.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jian-Bao; Zhu, Wei; Cook, Frank R; Goto, Yoshitaka; Horii, Yoichiro; Haga, Takeshi

    2013-02-01

    Although equine infectious anemia (EIA) was described more than 150 years ago, complete genomic sequences have only been obtained from two field strains of EIA virus (EIAV), EIAV(Wyoming) and EIAV(Liaoning). In 2011, EIA was detected within the distinctive feral Misaki horse population that inhabits the Toi-Cape area of southern Japan. Complete proviral sequences comprising a novel field strain were amplified directly from peripheral blood of one of these EIAV-infected horses and characterized by nucleotide sequencing. The complete provirus of Miyazaki2011-A strain is 8208 bp in length with an overall genomic organization typical of EIAV. However, this field isolate possesses just 77.2 and 78.7 % nucleotide sequence identity with the EIAV(Wyoming) and EIAV(Liaoning) strains, respectively, while similarity plot analysis suggested all three strains arose independently. Furthermore, phylogenetic studies using sequences obtained from all EIAV-infected Misaki horses against known viral strains strongly suggests these Japanese isolates comprise a separate monophyletic group.

  18. [Serological and clinical proof of freedom from Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) in imported and domestic horses in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A; Meier, H P; Doherr, M G; Perler, L; Zanoni, R; Gerber, V

    2009-04-01

    Since 1991, no cases of Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) have been reported in Switzerland. Risk factors for introduction of the virus into Switzerland are still present or have even increased as frequent inapparent infections, large numbers of imported horses, (since 2003) absence of compulsory testing prior to importation, EIA cases in surrounding Europe, possible illegal importation of horses, frequent short-term stays, poor knowledge of the disease among horse owners and even veterinarians. The aim of this study was to provide evidence of freedom from EIA in imported and domestic horses in Switzerland. The serum samples from 434 horses imported since 2003 as well as from 232 domestic horses fifteen years of age or older (since older horses have naturally had a longer time of being exposed to the risk of infection) were analysed using a commercially available ELISA test. All samples were seronegative, indicating that the maximum possible prevalence that could have been missed with this sample was 0.5% (95% confidence).

  19. A unique evolution of the s2 gene of equine infectious anemia virus in hosts correlated with particular infection statuses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Qiang; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Du, Cheng; Tang, Yan-Dong; Na, Lei; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2014-11-10

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a member of the Lentivirus genus in the Retroviridae family that exhibits a genomic structure similar to that of HIV-1. The S2 accessory proteins play important roles in viral replication in vivo and in viral pathogenicity; however, studies on S2 evolution in vivo are limited. This study analyzed the evolutionary characteristics of the S2 gene of a pathogenic EIAV strain, EIAVLN40, in four experimentally infected horses. The results demonstrated that 14.7% (10 of 68 residues) of the stable amino acid mutations occurred longitudinally in S2 during a 150-day infection period. Further analysis revealed that six of the ten mutated residues were positively selected during the infection. Alignment and phylogenetic analyses showed that the S2 gene sequences of viruses isolated from the infected horses at the early stage of EIAVLN40 infection were highly homologous and similar to the vaccine-specific sequence. The S2 gene variants isolated from the febrile episodes and late phase of infection became homologous to the S2 gene sequence of the inoculating EIAVLN40 strain. Our results indicate that the S2 gene evolves in diversity and divergence in vivo in different stages of EIAV infection and that this evolution correlates with the pathogenicity of the virus.

  20. Equine Piroplasmosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Equine piroplasmosis is an infectious, tick-borne disease caused by the hemoprotozoan parasites Theileria (previously Babesia) equi and Babesia caballi. Piroplasmosis affects all wild and domestic equid species and causes signs related to intravascular hemolysis and associated systemic illness. Infe...

  1. A Single Amino Acid Difference within the α-2 Domain of Two Naturally Occurring Equine MHC Class I Molecules Alters the Recognition of Gag and Rev Epitopes by Equine Infectious Anemia Virus-Specific CTL1

    PubMed Central

    Mealey, Robert H.; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Leib, Steven R.; Littke, Matt H.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2012-01-01

    Although CTL are critical for control of lentiviruses, including equine infectious anemia virus, relatively little is known regarding the MHC class I molecules that present important epitopes to equine infectious anemia virus-specific CTL. The equine class I molecule 7-6 is associated with the equine leukocyte Ag (ELA)-A1 haplotype and presents the Env-RW12 and Gag-GW12 CTL epitopes. Some ELA-A1 target cells present both epitopes, whereas others are not recognized by Gag-GW12-specific CTL, suggesting that the ELA-A1 haplotype comprises functionally distinct alleles. The Rev-QW11 CTL epitope is also ELA-A1-restricted, but the molecule that presents Rev-QW11 is unknown. To determine whether functionally distinct class I molecules present ELA-A1-restricted CTL epitopes, we sequenced and expressed MHC class I genes from three ELA-A1 horses. Two horses had the 7-6 allele, which when expressed, presented Env-RW12, Gag-GW12, and Rev-QW11 to CTL. The other horse had a distinct allele, designated 141, encoding a molecule that differed from 7-6 by a single amino acid within the α-2 domain. This substitution did not affect recognition of Env-RW12, but resulted in more efficient recognition of Rev-QW11. Significantly, CTL recognition of Gag-GW12 was abrogated, despite Gag-GW12 binding to 141. Molecular modeling suggested that conformational changes in the 141/Gag-GW12 complex led to a loss of TCR recognition. These results confirmed that the ELA-A1 haplotype is comprised of functionally distinct alleles, and demonstrated for the first time that naturally occurring MHC class I molecules that vary by only a single amino acid can result in significantly different patterns of epitope recognition by lentivirus-specific CTL. PMID:17082657

  2. The risk of introduction of equine infectious anemia virus into USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada

    PubMed Central

    Habtemariam, Tsegaye; Tameru, Berhanu; Nganwa, David

    2011-01-01

    Deriving horse oocytes in the USA is hampered by the lack of abattoirs processing horse carcasses which could provide abundant quantities of ovaries from slaughtered mares. Therefore, several cloning industries in the USA are attempting to import cloned horse embryos from Canada. Like any agricultural commodity, cloned embryos pose a risk of introduction of exotic animal diseases into the importing country. Under such circumstances, risk assessment could provide an objective, transparent, and internationally accepted means for evaluating the risk. This quantitative risk assessment (QRA) was initiated to determine the risk of introduction of Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) into USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada. In assessing the risk, a structured knowledge base regarding cloning in relation to EIA was first developed. Based on the knowledge base, a scenario tree was developed to determine conditions (with mathematical probabilities) that could lead to the introduction and maintenance of EIAV along the cloning pathway. Parameters for the occurrence of the event at each node were estimated using published literature. Using @RISK software and setting Monte Carlo simulation at 50 000 iterations, the probability of importing an EIAV-infected cloned horse embryo was 1.8×10−9 (R = 1.5×10−12 to 2.9×10−8). Taking into account the current protocol for equine cloning and assuming the yield of 5 to 30 clones per year, the possible number of EIAV-infected cloned horse embryos ranged from 2.0×10−10 to 9.1×10−5 (Mean = 1.4×10−6) per year. Consequently, it would take up to 1.5×107 (R = 1.6×104 to 5.1×1010) years for EIAV to be introduced into the USA. Based on the knowledge base and our critical pathway analysis, the biological plausibility of introducing EIAV into USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada is extremely low. PMID:21958631

  3. Development, evaluation, and laboratory validation of immunoassays for the diagnosis of equine infectious anemia (EIA) using recombinant protein produced from a synthetic p26 gene of EIA virus.

    PubMed

    Singha, Harisankar; Goyal, Sachin K; Malik, Praveen; Khurana, Sandip K; Singh, Raj K

    2013-12-01

    Equine infectious anemia (EIA)-a retroviral disease caused by equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-is a chronic, debilitating disease of horses, mules, and donkeys. EIAV infection has been reported worldwide and is recognized as pathogen of significant economic importance to the horse industry. This disease falls under regulatory control program in many countries including India. Control of EIA is based on identification of inapparent carriers by detection of antibodies to EIAV in serologic tests and "Stamping Out" policy. The current internationally accepted test for diagnosis of EIA is the agar gel immune-diffusion test (AGID), which detects antibodies to the major gag gene (p26) product. The objective of this study was to develop recombinant p26 based in-house immunoassays [enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), and AGID] for EIA diagnosis. The synthetic p26 gene of EIAV was expressed in Escherichia coli and diagnostic potential of recombinant p26 protein were evaluated in ELISA and AGID on 7,150 and 1,200 equine serum samples, respectively, and compared with commercial standard AGID kit. The relative sensitivity and specificity of the newly developed ELISA were 100 and 98.6 %, respectively. Whereas, relative sensitivity and specificity of the newly developed AGID were in complete agreement in respect to commercial AGID kit. Here, we have reported the validation of an ELISA and AGID on large number of equine serum samples using recombinant p26 protein produced from synthetic gene which does not require handling of pathogenic EIAV. Since the indigenously developed reagents would be economical than commercial diagnostic kit, the rp26 based-immunoassays could be adopted for the sero-diagnosis and control of EIA in India.

  4. Envelope Determinants of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Vaccine Protection and the Effects of Sequence Variation on Immune Recognition▿

    PubMed Central

    Tagmyer, Tara L.; Craigo, Jodi K.; Cook, Sheila J.; Even, Deborah L.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2008-01-01

    A highly effective attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine (EIAVD9) capable of protecting 100% of horses from disease induced by a homologous Env challenge strain (EIAVPV) was recently tested in ponies to determine the level of protection against divergent Env challenge strains (J. K. Craigo, B. S. Zhang, S. Barnes, T. L. Tagmyer, S. J. Cook, C. J. Issel, and R. C. Montelaro, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 104:15105-15110, 2007). An inverse correlation between challenge strain Env variation and vaccine protection from disease was observed. Given the striking differences in protective immunity, we hypothesized that analysis of the humoral and cellular immune responses to the Env protein could reveal potential determinants of vaccine protection. Neutralization activity against the homologous Env or challenge strain-specific Env in immune sera from the vaccinated ponies did not correlate with protection from disease. Cellular analysis with Env peptide pools did not reveal an association with vaccine protection from disease. However, when individual vaccine-specific Env peptides were utilized, eight cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte (CTL) peptides were found to associate closely with vaccine protection. One of these peptides also yielded the only lymphoproliferative response associated with protective immunity. The identified peptides spanned both variable and conserved regions of gp90. Amino acid divergence within the principal neutralization domain and the identified peptides profoundly affected immune recognition, as illustrated by the inability to detect cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies and the observation that certain peptide-specific CTL responses were altered. In addition to identifying potential Env determinants of EIAV vaccine efficacy and demonstrating the profound effects of defined Env variation on immune recognition, these data also illustrate the sensitivity offered by individual peptides compared to peptide pools in measuring cellular immune

  5. Transduction of photoreceptors with equine infectious anemia virus lentiviral vectors: safety and biodistribution of StarGen for Stargardt disease.

    PubMed

    Binley, Katie; Widdowson, Peter; Loader, Julie; Kelleher, Michelle; Iqball, Sharifah; Ferrige, Georgina; de Belin, Jackie; Carlucci, Marie; Angell-Manning, Diana; Hurst, Felicity; Ellis, Scott; Miskin, James; Fernandes, Alcides; Wong, Paul; Allikmets, Rando; Bergstrom, Christopher; Aaberg, Thomas; Yan, Jiong; Kong, Jian; Gouras, Peter; Prefontaine, Annick; Vezina, Mark; Bussieres, Martin; Naylor, Stuart; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A

    2013-06-12

    StarGen is an equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-based lentiviral vector that expresses the photoreceptor-specific adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter (ABCA4) protein that is mutated in Stargardt disease (STGD1), a juvenile macular dystrophy. EIAV vectors are able to efficiently transduce rod and cone photoreceptors in addition to retinal pigment epithelium in the adult macaque and rabbit retina following subretinal delivery. The safety and biodistribution of StarGen following subretinal delivery in macaques and rabbits was assessed. Regular ophthalmic examinations, IOP measurements, ERG responses, and histopathology were carried out in both species to compare control and vector-treated eyes. Tissue and fluid samples were obtained to evaluate the persistence, biodistribution, and shedding of the vector following subretinal delivery. Ophthalmic examinations revealed a slightly higher level of inflammation in StarGen compared with control treated eyes in both species. However, inflammation was transient and no overt toxicity was observed in StarGen treated eyes and there were no abnormal clinical findings. There was no StarGen-associated rise in IOP or abnormal ERG response in either rabbits or macaques. Histopathologic examination of the eyes did not reveal any detrimental changes resulting from subretinal administration of StarGen. Although antibodies to StarGen vector components were detected in rabbit but not macaque serum, this immunologic response did not result in any long-term toxicity. Biodistribution analysis demonstrated that the StarGen vector was restricted to the ocular compartment. In summary, these studies demonstrate StarGen to be well tolerated and localized following subretinal administration.

  6. Transduction of Photoreceptors With Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Lentiviral Vectors: Safety and Biodistribution of StarGen for Stargardt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Binley, Katie; Widdowson, Peter; Loader, Julie; Kelleher, Michelle; Iqball, Sharifah; Ferrige, Georgina; de Belin, Jackie; Carlucci, Marie; Angell-Manning, Diana; Hurst, Felicity; Ellis, Scott; Miskin, James; Fernandes, Alcides; Wong, Paul; Allikmets, Rando; Bergstrom, Christopher; Aaberg, Thomas; Yan, Jiong; Kong, Jian; Gouras, Peter; Prefontaine, Annick; Vezina, Mark; Bussieres, Martin; Naylor, Stuart; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. StarGen is an equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-based lentiviral vector that expresses the photoreceptor-specific adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter (ABCA4) protein that is mutated in Stargardt disease (STGD1), a juvenile macular dystrophy. EIAV vectors are able to efficiently transduce rod and cone photoreceptors in addition to retinal pigment epithelium in the adult macaque and rabbit retina following subretinal delivery. The safety and biodistribution of StarGen following subretinal delivery in macaques and rabbits was assessed. Methods. Regular ophthalmic examinations, IOP measurements, ERG responses, and histopathology were carried out in both species to compare control and vector-treated eyes. Tissue and fluid samples were obtained to evaluate the persistence, biodistribution, and shedding of the vector following subretinal delivery. Results. Ophthalmic examinations revealed a slightly higher level of inflammation in StarGen compared with control treated eyes in both species. However, inflammation was transient and no overt toxicity was observed in StarGen treated eyes and there were no abnormal clinical findings. There was no StarGen-associated rise in IOP or abnormal ERG response in either rabbits or macaques. Histopathologic examination of the eyes did not reveal any detrimental changes resulting from subretinal administration of StarGen. Although antibodies to StarGen vector components were detected in rabbit but not macaque serum, this immunologic response did not result in any long-term toxicity. Biodistribution analysis demonstrated that the StarGen vector was restricted to the ocular compartment. Conclusions. In summary, these studies demonstrate StarGen to be well tolerated and localized following subretinal administration. PMID:23620430

  7. In vivo dynamics of equine infectious anemia viruses emerging during febrile episodes: insertions/duplications at the principal neutralizing domain.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Y H; Sentsui, H; Nakaya, T; Kono, Y; Ikuta, K

    1997-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a good model for studying mechanisms generating escaped retrovirus variants. We previously sequenced the entire gp90-encoding region of 22 cDNA clones obtained from five antigenically distinct isolates (F1V to F5V) recovered during febrile episodes in horse 493 experimentally infected with the Japanese virulent EIAV strain V70. The results showed that the mutations occurred in the principal neutralizing domain (PND) by insertions/duplications. In this study, we further characterized the PND of virus isolates sequentially recovered during 22 febrile episodes in seven horses newly infected with V70 or one of the V70-derived variants. Sequencing of 70 cDNA clones derived from the 22 episodes confirmed the generation of various new viral quasispecies with insertions/duplications in the PND. Although the insertion/duplication sequences in a total of 92 cDNA clones were extensively heterogeneous, we hypothesized that all the insertions/duplications occurred during reverse transcription from viral genomic RNA to minus strand DNA. The insertion/duplication regions were derived from a part of the PND sequence, which consisted of five small units. These small units, some with various substitutions and/or deletions, were also generated, especially in regions with insertions/duplications. Of particular note was that all these virus variants, except for two cDNA variants, were generated by essentially four different duplication pathways. Thus, these results extend the significance of insertions/duplications in the PND to the novel generation of EIAV in vivo during febrile episodes. PMID:9188568

  8. Unique evolution characteristics of the envelope protein of EIAV(LN₄₀), a virulent strain of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Shuai; Lin, Yuezhi; Jiang, Chenggang; Ma, Jian; Zhao, Liping; Lv, Xiaoling; Wang, Fenglong; Shen, Rongxian; Zhou, Jianhua

    2011-04-01

    The Chinese equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) virulent strain EIAV(LN40) is derived from a naturally occurring virus by continuously passing in horses for 16 generations. Its genome sequence is 23% different from that of the American strains or the Japanese strains, and the variation of envelope gp90 surface unit (SU) is as high as 41%. In this study, evolutions of the EIAV(LN40) gp90 gene in four infected horses were analyzed. Results showed that new quasispecies arose in the early stage of infection in all EIAV(LN40)-infected horses. These quasispecies belonged to branches different from EIAV(LN40) in a phylogenetic tree. In contrast, the gp90 sequences of viruses isolated after disease onset remained in the same phylogenetic branch as EIAV(LN40), with some having exactly the same sequences. The glycosylation sites 191NSSN and 237NNTW in the V3 and V4 region present or absent simultaneously in most of the predicted amino acid sequences. Changes in the glycosylation sites within V3, V4, and V5 regions are usually associated with the disease status. Glycosylation sites (191NSSN, 237NNTW, and 280NDTS) within these three regions were present in EIAV(LN40) and most of the quasispecies isolated after, but not before disease onset. These unique evolutionary characteristics of SU have not been reported for EIAV and other lentiviruses. Our results provide a reference for a further understanding of the mechanism underlying the persistent infection and escape from immune surveillance of EIAV.

  9. Gag Protein Epitopes Recognized by CD4+ T-Helper Lymphocytes from Equine Infectious Anemia Virus-Infected Carrier Horses

    PubMed Central

    Lonning, S. M.; Zhang, W.; McGuire, T. C.

    1999-01-01

    Antigen-specific T-helper (Th) lymphocytes are critical for the development of antiviral humoral responses and the expansion of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Identification of relevant Th lymphocyte epitopes remains an important step in the development of an efficacious subunit peptide vaccine against equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a naturally occurring lentivirus of horses. This study describes Th lymphocyte reactivity in EIAV carrier horses to two proteins, p26 and p15, encoded by the relatively conserved EIAV gag gene. Using partially overlapping peptides, multideterminant and possibly promiscuous epitopes were identified within p26. One peptide was identified which reacted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from all five EIAV-infected horses, and three other peptides were identified which reacted with PBMC from four of five EIAV-infected horses. Four additional peptides containing both CTL and Th lymphocyte epitopes were also identified. Multiple epitopes were recognized in a region corresponding to the major homology region of the human immunodeficiency virus, a region with significant sequence similarity to other lentiviruses including simian immunodeficiency virus, puma lentivirus, feline immunodeficiency virus, Jembrana disease virus, visna virus, and caprine arthritis encephalitis virus. PBMC reactivity to p15 peptides from EIAV carrier horses also occurred. Multiple p15 peptides were shown to be reactive, but not all infected horses had Th lymphocytes recognizing p15 epitopes. The identification of peptides reactive with PBMC from outbred horses, some of which encoded both CTL and Th lymphocyte epitopes, should contribute to the design of synthetic peptide or recombinant vector vaccines for EIAV. PMID:10196322

  10. Functions of early (AP-2) and late (AIP1/ALIX) endocytic proteins in equine infectious anemia virus budding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoping; Vincent, Olivier; Jin, Jing; Weisz, Ora A; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2005-12-09

    The proline-rich L domains of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and other retroviruses interact with late endocytic proteins during virion assembly and budding. In contrast, the YPDL L domain of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is apparently unique in its reported ability to interact both with the mu2 subunit of the AP-2 adaptor protein complex and with ALG-2-interacting protein 1 (AIP1/Alix) protein factors involved in early and late endosome formation, respectively. To define further the mechanisms by which EIAV adapts vesicle trafficking machinery to facilitate virion production, we have examined the specificity of EIAV p9 binding to endocytic factors and the effects on virion production of alterations in early and late endocytic protein expression. The results of these studies demonstrated that (i) an approximately 300-residue region of AIP1/Alix-(409-715) was sufficient for binding to the EIAV YPDL motif; (ii) overexpression of AIP1/Alix or AP-2 mu2 subunit specifically inhibited YPDL-mediated EIAV budding; (iii) virion budding from a replication-competent EIAV variant with its L domain replaced by the HIV PTAP sequence was inhibited by wild type or mutant mu2 to a level similar to that observed when a dominant-negative mutant of Tsg101 was expressed; and (iv) overexpression or siRNA silencing of AIP1/Alix and AP-2 revealed additive suppression of YPDL-mediated EIAV budding. Taken together, these results indicated that both early and late endocytic proteins facilitate EIAV production mediated by either YPDL or PTAP L domains, suggesting a comprehensive involvement of endocytic factors in retroviral assembly and budding that can be accessed by distinct L domain specificities.

  11. Insights into vaccine development for acquired immune deficiency syndrome from crystal structures of human immunodeficiency virus-1 gp41 and equine infectious anemia virus gp45.

    PubMed

    Duan, Liangwei; Du, Jiansen; Liu, Xinqi

    2015-10-01

    An effective vaccine against acquired immune deficiency syndrome is still unavailable after dozens of years of striving. The glycoprotein gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus is a good candidate as potential immunogen because of its conservation and relatively low glycosylation. As a reference of human immunodeficiency virus gp41, gp45 from equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) could be used for comparison because both wild-type and vaccine strain of EIAV have been extensively studied. From structural studies of these proteins, the conformational changes during viral invasion could be unveiled, and a more effective acquired immune deficiency syndrome vaccine immunogen might be designed based on this information.

  12. Protective effects of broadly neutralizing immunoglobulin against homologous and heterologous equine infectious anemia virus infection in horses with severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sandra D; Leib, Steven R; Wu, Wuwei; Nelson, Robert; Carpenter, Susan; Mealey, Robert H

    2011-07-01

    Using the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) lentivirus model system, we previously demonstrated protective effects of broadly neutralizing immune plasma in young horses (foals) with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). However, in vivo selection of a neutralization-resistant envelope variant occurred. Here, we determined the protective effects of purified immunoglobulin with more potent broadly neutralizing activity. Overall, protection correlated with the breadth and potency of neutralizing activity in vitro. Four of five SCID foals were completely protected against homologous challenge, while partial protection occurred following heterologous challenge. These results support the inclusion of broadly neutralizing antibodies in lentivirus control strategies.

  13. Protective Effects of Broadly Neutralizing Immunoglobulin against Homologous and Heterologous Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Infection in Horses with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency▿

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sandra D.; Leib, Steven R.; Wu, Wuwei; Nelson, Robert; Carpenter, Susan; Mealey, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Using the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) lentivirus model system, we previously demonstrated protective effects of broadly neutralizing immune plasma in young horses (foals) with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). However, in vivo selection of a neutralization-resistant envelope variant occurred. Here, we determined the protective effects of purified immunoglobulin with more potent broadly neutralizing activity. Overall, protection correlated with the breadth and potency of neutralizing activity in vitro. Four of five SCID foals were completely protected against homologous challenge, while partial protection occurred following heterologous challenge. These results support the inclusion of broadly neutralizing antibodies in lentivirus control strategies. PMID:21543497

  14. Experimental Rhodococcus equi and equine infectious anemia virus DNA vaccination in adult and neonatal horses: Effect of IL-12, dose, and route

    PubMed Central

    Mealey, R.H.; Stone, D.M.; Hines, M.T.; Alperin, D.C.; Littke, M.H.; Leib, S.R.; Leach, S.E.; Hines, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Improving the ability of DNA-based vaccines to induce potent Type1/Th1 responses against intracellular pathogens in large outbred species is essential. Rhodoccocus equi and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) are two naturally occurring equine pathogens that also serve as important large animal models of neonatal immunity and lentiviral immune control. Neonates present a unique challenge for immunization due to their diminished immunologic capabilities and apparent Th2 bias. In an effort to augment R. equi- and EIAV-specific Th1 responses induced by DNA vaccination, we hypothesized that a dual promoter plasmid encoding recombinant equine IL-12 (rEqIL-12) would function as a molecular adjuvant. In adult horses, DNA vaccines induced R. equi- and EIAV-specific antibody and lymphoproliferative responses, and EIAV-specific CTL and tetramer-positive CD8+ T lymphocytes. These responses were not enhanced by the rEqIL-12 plasmid. In neonatal foals, DNA immunization induced EIAV-specific antibody and lymphoproliferative responses, but not CTL. The R. equi vapA vaccine was poorly immunogenic in foals even when co-administered with the IL-12 plasmid. It was concluded that DNA immunization was capable of inducing Th1 responses in horses; dose and route were significant variables, but rEqIL-12 was not an effective molecular adjuvant. Additional work is needed to optimize DNA vaccine-induced Th1 responses in horses, especially in neonates. PMID:17889970

  15. Experimental Rhodococcus equi and equine infectious anemia virus DNA vaccination in adult and neonatal horses: effect of IL-12, dose, and route.

    PubMed

    Mealey, R H; Stone, D M; Hines, M T; Alperin, D C; Littke, M H; Leib, S R; Leach, S E; Hines, S A

    2007-10-23

    Improving the ability of DNA-based vaccines to induce potent Type1/Th1 responses against intracellular pathogens in large outbred species is essential. Rhodoccocus equi and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) are two naturally occurring equine pathogens that also serve as important large animal models of neonatal immunity and lentiviral immune control. Neonates present a unique challenge for immunization due to their diminished immunologic capabilities and apparent Th2 bias. In an effort to augment R. equi- and EIAV-specific Th1 responses induced by DNA vaccination, we hypothesized that a dual promoter plasmid encoding recombinant equine IL-12 (rEqIL-12) would function as a molecular adjuvant. In adult horses, DNA vaccines induced R. equi- and EIAV-specific antibody and lymphoproliferative responses, and EIAV-specific CTL and tetramer-positive CD8+ T lymphocytes. These responses were not enhanced by the rEqIL-12 plasmid. In neonatal foals, DNA immunization induced EIAV-specific antibody and lymphoproliferative responses, but not CTL. The R. equi vapA vaccine was poorly immunogenic in foals even when co-administered with the IL-12 plasmid. It was concluded that DNA immunization was capable of inducing Th1 responses in horses; dose and route were significant variables, but rEqIL-12 was not an effective molecular adjuvant. Additional work is needed to optimize DNA vaccine-induced Th1 responses in horses, especially in neonates.

  16. Development of a widely applicable positive control strategy to support detection of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) using Taqman real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Snow, M; McKay, P; Matejusova, I

    2009-02-01

    Real-time PCR assays are being increasingly applied to the detection of fish pathogens due to their sensitivity, specificity and potential for high throughput sample processing. Such assays allow for the ready and efficient inclusion of appropriate quality controls which are fundamental to scientific integrity and to satisfying the demands of diagnostic test accreditation. In this article, we report development of a universal positive control strategy for real-time PCR assays, which has been used to support and improve a previously published method for detection of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV). The strategy employed uses an RNA mimic template, which is based on the ISAV segment 8 target sequence but includes an artificial universal positive control sequence. Inclusion of this sequence, which is targeted by a second specific probe carrying a different fluorophore to the primary assay, allows for convenient screening of all real-time PCR reactions for the presence of contaminating positive control material. The development of readily distinguishable artificial positive control material offers distinct advantages to real-time PCR assays over using control material derived from clinical material.

  17. Immune Responses and Viral Replication in Long-Term Inapparent Carrier Ponies Inoculated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Scott A.; Li, Feng; McKeon, Brian M.; Cook, Sheila J.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2000-01-01

    Persistent infection of equids by equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is typically characterized by a progression during the first year postinfection from chronic disease with recurring disease cycles to a long-term asymptomatic infection that is maintained indefinitely. The goal of the current study was to perform a comprehensive longitudinal analysis of the course of virus infection and development of host immunity in experimentally infected horses as they progressed from chronic disease to long-term inapparent carriage. We previously described the evolution of EIAV genomic quasispecies (C. Leroux, C. J. Issel, and R. C. Montelaro, J. Virol. 71:9627–9639, 1997) and host immune responses (S. A. Hammond, S. J. Cook, D. L. Lichtenstein, C. J. Issel, and R. C. Montelaro, J. Virol. 71:3840–3852, 1997) in four experimentally infected ponies during sequential disease episodes associated with chronic disease during the first 10 months postinfection. In the current study, we extended the studies of these experimentally infected ponies to 3 years postinfection to characterize the levels of virus replication and development of host immune responses associated with the progression from chronic disease to long-term inapparent infection. The results of these studies revealed over a 103-fold difference in the steady-state levels of plasma viral RNA detected during long-term inapparent infection that correlated with the severity of chronic disease, indicating different levels of control of virus replication during long-term inapparent infections. Detailed analyses of antibody and cellular immune responses in all four ponies over the 3-year course of infection revealed a similar evolution during the first year postinfection of robust humoral and cellular immunity that then remained relatively constant during long-term inapparent infection. These observations indicate that immune parameters that have previously been correlated with EIAV vaccine protection fail to provide

  18. Immune responses and viral replication in long-term inapparent carrier ponies inoculated with equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Hammond, S A; Li, F; McKeon, B M; Cook, S J; Issel, C J; Montelaro, R C

    2000-07-01

    Persistent infection of equids by equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is typically characterized by a progression during the first year postinfection from chronic disease with recurring disease cycles to a long-term asymptomatic infection that is maintained indefinitely. The goal of the current study was to perform a comprehensive longitudinal analysis of the course of virus infection and development of host immunity in experimentally infected horses as they progressed from chronic disease to long-term inapparent carriage. We previously described the evolution of EIAV genomic quasispecies (C. Leroux, C. J. Issel, and R. C. Montelaro, J. Virol. 71:9627-9639, 1997) and host immune responses (S. A. Hammond, S. J. Cook, D. L. Lichtenstein, C. J. Issel, and R. C. Montelaro, J. Virol. 71:3840-3852, 1997) in four experimentally infected ponies during sequential disease episodes associated with chronic disease during the first 10 months postinfection. In the current study, we extended the studies of these experimentally infected ponies to 3 years postinfection to characterize the levels of virus replication and development of host immune responses associated with the progression from chronic disease to long-term inapparent infection. The results of these studies revealed over a 10(3)-fold difference in the steady-state levels of plasma viral RNA detected during long-term inapparent infection that correlated with the severity of chronic disease, indicating different levels of control of virus replication during long-term inapparent infections. Detailed analyses of antibody and cellular immune responses in all four ponies over the 3-year course of infection revealed a similar evolution during the first year postinfection of robust humoral and cellular immunity that then remained relatively constant during long-term inapparent infection. These observations indicate that immune parameters that have previously been correlated with EIAV vaccine protection fail to provide

  19. Standardization of the equine infectious anemia immunodiffusion test and its application to the control of the disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pearson, J E; Knowles, R C

    1984-02-01

    In 1972 the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) established requirements that horses which had immunodiffusion antibody against equine infectious anemia could not be transported interstate. Forty-two states had regulations requiring that horses have a negative equine infectious anemia immunodiffusion test before movement. In order to standardize immunodiffusion testing, it was stipulated in the 1972 regulations that tests must be performed in approved laboratories. The approved laboratories were required to have personnel trained in the immunodiffusion test procedure, to follow the standard protocol, to use licensed reagents, successfully complete proficiency tests, and to report results to federal or state animal health officials. The number of approved laboratories was 160 in June 1983. The number of immunodiffusion tests performed in the United States increased from 82,777 in 1972 to 793,536 in 1977, and has remained at about that level. The percentage of positive samples has decreased from 3.9 in 1972 to 0.6 in 1982. Due to the laboratory standardization program, the reproducibility of test results has been excellent.

  20. Cross reaction of recombinant equine infectious anemia virus antigen to heterologous strains and application for serological survey among horses in the field.

    PubMed

    Sentsui, H; Inoshima, Y; Murakami, K; Akashi, H; Purevtseren, B; Pagmajav, O; Sugiura, T

    2001-01-01

    Cross reactivity of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) antigen prepared using a recombinant baculovirus containing the p26 gene of strain P337-V70 was examined by the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serum samples serially collected from 13 horses experimentally infected with six different EIAV strains (two or three horses per strain) were subjected to the test. Positive reactions were observed in the AGID test and ELISA before or soon after the first feverish period and continued persistently in most of the horses. The results with recombinant antigens were essentially the same as those with the virion antigen prepared from horse cell cultures both in the AGID test and ELISA. The reactivities of the antigens were further compared using serum samples collected from horses in 1999 in certain districts of Mongolia where equine infectious anemia has been prevalent, and from horses in Japan in 1973 when EIA had not been eliminated completely from Japanese horses. These results were completely concurrent. Generally, recombinant antigens have high specificity but low cross reactivity to heterologous strains. However, the present study showed that the recombinant EIAV p26 antigen has cross reactivity to the heterologous strain and is useful for diagnosis of EIA in the field.

  1. Standardization and validation of an agar gel immunodiffusion test for the diagnosis of equine infectious anemia using a recombinant p26 antigen.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, I; Gutierrez, G; Vissani, A; Rodriguez, S; Barrandeguy, M; Trono, K

    2007-04-15

    We developed and validated an agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGID) test for the diagnosis of equine infectious anemia (EIA) using as antigen the p26 protein of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) produced in the Escherichia coli expression system. The developed rp26-AGID test showed an excellent diagnostic relative sensitivity (100%) and specificity (100%) compared to a commercial AGID assay when 1855 field serum samples were analyzed. In addition, the rp26-AGID demonstrated to be a precise assay with excellent repeatability and reproducibility. In the analytical sensitivity trial, positive sera showed nearly the same endpoint dilutions for both compared tests. No positive-reactions were observed with 35 serum samples with antibodies related to other endemic agents and also with severely hemolysed samples, demonstrating that the rp26-AGID has an excellent analytical specificity. Complete concordance with blind previous results from five proficiency test panels confirmed the capability of the assay of accurate detection of EIAV antibodies. This is the first time that a recombinant AGID assay able to identify EIAV infections has been standardized and validated in Argentina according to international guidelines. Taking into account the results obtained, the p26-AGID could be adopted as an official test method for the diagnosis and control of EIA in this country.

  2. Equine infectious anemia.

    PubMed

    Sellon, D C

    1993-08-01

    The ability of EIAV to persistently infect horses in the face of a profound immune response by the host makes it a potentially devastating disease for the horse population of the United States. Its ability to evade host immune defenses by lying dormant in apparently healthy animals and by rapidly changing its antigenic determinants is proving to be a major obstacle to vaccine development. Because most infected horses appear clinically normal and a large proportion of horses in this country remain untested, the virus is not likely to be eradicated in the near future. Yet, for the same reason, because most horses infected with EIAV appear clinically normal, there is a tendency for the horse industry to become complacent in its efforts to control the virus. The cooperation of horse owners, veterinarians, and regulatory officials is necessary to keep the threat of EIA in check in the United States.

  3. Development, Characterisation and Application of Monoclonal Antibodies for the Detection and Quantification of Infectious Salmon Anaemia Virus in Plasma Samples Using Luminex Bead Array Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hoare, R.; Thompson, K. D.; Herath, T.; Collet, B.; Bron, J. E.; Adams, A.

    2016-01-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) is an orthomyxovirus that has had a significant economic impact on Atlantic salmon farming in Europe, North America and Chile. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed against Segment 3 (encoding the viral nucleoprotein, NP) of the virus. Six of the mAbs were shown to be specific to ISAV and recognised all isolates from Scotland, Norway and Canada. They reacted with ISAV in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), indirect fluorescent antibody technique (IFAT) and western blotting. They were also used to develop a novel detection method based on Luminex (Bio-Plex) bead-based flow cytometric technology for the detection of ISAV in the plasma of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) smolts experimentally infected with ISAV. Fish were challenged by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of virus at 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose (TCID50) = 2.8 x106 per animal. Virus present in plasma of infected fish, collected at 0, 4, 8, 12, 16, 21 and 28 days post infection using a non-lethal sampling method (n = 12 at each time point), was quantified using the optimised Bio-Plex assay. The results obtained with this assay were compared with absolute quantification of the virus by RT-qPCR using SYBR Green I and TaqMan chemistries. The Bio-Plex assay developed using the NP mAbs appears to be a rapid, sensitive method for detecting and quantifying ISAV in small volumes of fish plasma and has the potential to be multiplexed for the detection of other fish pathogens (e.g. during co-infections). To our knowledge this is the first report of the use of Luminex (Bio-Plex) technology for the detection of a fish pathogen. PMID:27434377

  4. Infectious Salmon Anaemia Virus (ISAV) RNA Binding Protein Encoded by Segment 8 ORF2 and Its Interaction with ISAV and Intracellular Proteins.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Christel M; Markussen, Turhan; Thiede, Bernd; Rimstad, Espen

    2016-02-18

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) is an orthomyxovirus infecting salmonid fish. The virus is adapted to low temperature and has a replication optimum between 10-15 °C. In this study the subcellular localization and protein interactions for the protein encoded by the largest open reading frame of gene segment 8 (s8ORF2) were investigated. In ISAV infected cells the s8ORF2 protein was found mainly in the cytosol but a minor fraction of cells expressed the protein in the nucleus as well. Green fluorescent protein-tagged s8ORF2 did not leak out of the cell when the plasma membrane was permeabilized, suggesting interactions with intracellular structural components. The s8ORF2 protein exists both as monomer and homodimer, and co-immunoprecipitation experiments strongly suggests it binds to the ISAV fusion-, nucleo- and matrix proteins. Two versions of s8ORF2 were detected with apparent molecular weights of 24-26 and 35 kDa in lysates of infected cells. The 35 kDa type is an early viral protein while the smaller version appears during the later phases of infection. The 24-26 kDa type was also the predominant form in viral particles. The s8ORF2 protein has previously been shown to bind RNA and interfere with interferon induction and signaling. Here we found that a fraction of the s8ORF2 protein pool in infected cells is likely to be conjugated to the interferon stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) and ubiquitin. Furthermore, several endogenous proteins pulled down by the s8ORF2 protein were identified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS).

  5. Infectious Salmon Anaemia Virus (ISAV) RNA Binding Protein Encoded by Segment 8 ORF2 and Its Interaction with ISAV and Intracellular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Christel M.; Markussen, Turhan; Thiede, Bernd; Rimstad, Espen

    2016-01-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) is an orthomyxovirus infecting salmonid fish. The virus is adapted to low temperature and has a replication optimum between 10–15 °C. In this study the subcellular localization and protein interactions for the protein encoded by the largest open reading frame of gene segment 8 (s8ORF2) were investigated. In ISAV infected cells the s8ORF2 protein was found mainly in the cytosol but a minor fraction of cells expressed the protein in the nucleus as well. Green fluorescent protein-tagged s8ORF2 did not leak out of the cell when the plasma membrane was permeabilized, suggesting interactions with intracellular structural components. The s8ORF2 protein exists both as monomer and homodimer, and co-immunoprecipitation experiments strongly suggests it binds to the ISAV fusion-, nucleo- and matrix proteins. Two versions of s8ORF2 were detected with apparent molecular weights of 24–26 and 35 kDa in lysates of infected cells. The 35 kDa type is an early viral protein while the smaller version appears during the later phases of infection. The 24–26 kDa type was also the predominant form in viral particles. The s8ORF2 protein has previously been shown to bind RNA and interfere with interferon induction and signaling. Here we found that a fraction of the s8ORF2 protein pool in infected cells is likely to be conjugated to the interferon stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) and ubiquitin. Furthermore, several endogenous proteins pulled down by the s8ORF2 protein were identified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). PMID:26901217

  6. A dual infection of infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus and a togavirus-like virus in ISA of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar in New Brunswick, Canada.

    PubMed

    Kibenge, F S; Whyte, S K; Hammell, K L; Rainnie, D; Kibenge, M T; Martin, C K

    2000-08-10

    Two viruses, infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus and a novel togavirus-like virus, were isolated from ISA disease outbreaks that were first reported as a new syndrome, haemorrhagic kidney syndrome (HKS) affecting farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. on the East coast of Canada. Laboratory confirmation of ISA diagnosis was initially complicated by isolation of only the togavirus-like agent using the CHSE-214 cell line. Here we demonstrate that a clinical sample from a disease outbreak of ISA contained a mixture of ISA virus and togavirus-like virus. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmed the presence of both viruses during serial passage of cultures in SHK-1 and CHSE-214 cells. Virus harvested at passage level 3 in both cell lines caused high mortalities and severe gross pathology consistent with ISA virus infection in experimentally inoculated Atlantic salmon parr (approximately 35 g) in freshwater, beginning 12 d post inoculation. ISA virus was detected by virus isolation from kidney and liver tissues of all dead or moribund fish tested. A comparison of virus isolation, 1-step procedure RT-PCR and RNA dot-blot hybridization for detection of ISA virus (ISAV) in fish tissues showed virus isolation to have 100% sensitivity, followed by RT-PCR (66 and 28% sensitivity in kidney and liver, respectively), with RNA dot-blot hybridization as the least sensitive method (20 and 10% sensitivity in kidney and liver, respectively). No togavirus-like virus was detected in these samples by virus isolation. Moreover, another togavirus-like virus isolate grown in CHSE-214 cells in the absence of any other detectable pathogen was non-pathogenic in experimentally inoculated fish. This study confirms that the original ISA outbreaks in New Brunswick, Canada, were caused solely by ISAV.

  7. Relationship of biosecuriy practices with the use of antibiotics for the treatment of infectious disease on U.S. equine operations.

    PubMed

    Traub-Dargatz, Josie; Kopral, Christine; Wagner, Bruce

    2012-04-01

    This study is the first report estimating, on a national basis, the use of various biosecurity practices, singly and in combination, on U.S. equine operations. Use of biosecurity practices is described for operations by risk level, based on reported exposure of resident horses to outside horses during the previous 12 months. In addition, the association between use of various biosecurity practices and use of antibiotics to treat infectious disease in both adult equids and foals is reported. The comparison of these study findings with previously reported data in the literature is limited by the fact that few estimates of biosecurity practice use on equine operations have been reported and none has been published on a national basis beyond those in the National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) equine reports. A total of 78.5% of operations had some risk of exposure of resident horses to outside horses between summer 2004 and the time of the interview in summer 2005. For the majority of biosecurity practices, there was a significant (p<0.05) difference between different exposure risk levels in the percentage of operations using the practice. A higher percentage of high- and medium-risk operations implemented a combination of 4 or more biosecurity practices compared to low-risk operations. There was less use of antibiotics to treat infectious disease in adult horses on operations that required those who visit the operation to use separate equipment, change clothes/overalls, disinfect boots and equipment, or park vehicles away from animals than on those that did not. None of the other biosecurity practices were associated with use of antibiotics in adult horses and none of the biosecurity practices included in this study was associated with use of antibiotics in foals. For adults the use of antibiotics for infectious disease increased with decreasing herd size; this trend was reversed for antibiotic use in foals. The effect of exposure risk level was different

  8. Anaemia in low-income and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Balarajan, Yarlini; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Ozaltin, Emre; Shankar, Anuraj H; Subramanian, S V

    2011-12-17

    Anaemia affects a quarter of the global population, including 293 million (47%) children younger than 5 years and 468 million (30%) non-pregnant women. In addition to anaemia's adverse health consequences, the economic effect of anaemia on human capital results in the loss of billions of dollars annually. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, clinical assessment, pathophysiology, and consequences of anaemia in low-income and middle-income countries. Our analysis shows that anaemia is disproportionately concentrated in low socioeconomic groups, and that maternal anaemia is strongly associated with child anaemia. Anaemia has multifactorial causes involving complex interaction between nutrition, infectious diseases, and other factors, and this complexity presents a challenge to effectively address the population determinants of anaemia. Reduction of knowledge gaps in research and policy and improvement of the implementation of effective population-level strategies will help to alleviate the anaemia burden in low-resource settings.

  9. Gag Protein Epitopes Recognized by ELA-A-Restricted Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes from Horses with Long-Term Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Lonning, Scott M.; McGuire, Travis C.

    1998-01-01

    Most equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-infected horses have acute clinical disease, but they eventually control the disease and become lifelong carriers. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are considered an important immune component in the control of infections with lentiviruses including EIAV, but definitive evidence for CTL in the control of disease in carrier horses is lacking. By using retroviral vector-transduced target cells expressing different Gag proteins and overlapping synthetic peptides of 16 to 25 amino acids, peptides containing at least 12 Gag CTL epitopes recognized by virus-stimulated PBMC from six long-term EIAV-infected horses were identified. All identified peptides were located within Gag matrix (p15) and capsid (p26) proteins, as no killing of target cells expressing p11 and p9 occurred. Each of the six horses had CTL recognizing at least one Gag epitope, while CTL from one horse recognized at least eight different Gag epitopes. None of the identified peptides were recognized by CTL from all six horses. Two nonamer peptide epitopes were defined from Gag p26; one (18a) was likely restricted by class I equine leukocyte alloantigen A5.1 (ELA-A5.1) molecules, and the other (28b-1) was likely restricted by ELA-A9 molecules. Sensitization of equine kidney target cells for CTLm killing required 10 nM peptide 18a and 1 nM 28b-1. The results demonstrated that diverse CTL responses against Gag epitopes were generated in long-term EIAV-infected horses and indicated that ELA-A class I molecules were responsible for the diversity of CTL epitopes recognized. This information indicates that multiple epitopes or whole proteins will be needed to induce CTL in horses with different ELA-A alleles in order to evaluate their role in controlling EIAV. PMID:9811694

  10. Development and characterization of a synthetic infectious cDNA clone of the virulent Bucyrus strain of equine arteritis virus expressing mCherry (red fluorescent protein).

    PubMed

    Mondal, Shankar P; Cook, R Frank; Chelvarajan, R Lakshman; Henney, Pamela J; Timoney, Peter J; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2016-04-01

    Strains of equine arteritis virus (EAV) differ in their virulence phenotypes, causing anywhere from subclinical infections to severe disease in horses. Here, we describe the in silico design and de novo synthesis of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of the horse-adapted virulent Bucyrus strain (VBS) of EAV encoding mCherry along with in vitro characterization of the progeny virions (EAV sVBSmCherry) in terms of host-cell tropism, replicative capacity and stability of the mCherry coding sequences following sequential passage in cell culture. The relative stability of the mCherry sequence during sequential cell culture passage coupled with a comparable host-cell range phenotype (equine endothelial cells, CD3(+) T cells and CD14(+) monocytes) to parental EAV VBS suggest that EAV-sVBSmCherry-derived virus could become a valuable research tool for identification of host-cell tropism determinants and for characterization of the viral proteins involved in virus attachment and entry into different subpopulations of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that advances in nucleic acid synthesis technology permit synthesis of complex viral genomes with overlapping genes like those of arteriviruses, thereby circumventing the need for complicated molecular cloning techniques. In summary, de novo nucleic acid synthesis technology facilitates innovative viral vector design without the tedium and risks posed by more-conventional laboratory techniques.

  11. Serodiagnosis of equine infectious anemia by agar gel immunodiffusion and ELISA using a recombinant p26 viral protein expressed in Escherichia coli as antigen.

    PubMed

    Piza, Adriana S Toledo; Pereira, Alessandra Rael; Terreran, Maria Thereza; Mozzer, Otto; Tanuri, Amílcar; Brandão, Paulo Eduardo; Richtzenhain, Leonardo José

    2007-03-17

    We used a p26 recombinant protein (p26r) from equine infectious-anemia virus (EIAV) expressed in Escherichia coli as antigen to standardize an agar-gel immunodiffusion (AGIDp26r) test and an indirect ELISA (ELISAp26r) for the detection of antibodies against EIAV in 720 equine sera from Brazil. We evaluated the tests's relative diagnostic sensitivities (relSe) and relative diagnostic specificities (relSp) against a commercial AGID kit (Idexx, USA). We used three sera panels: panel A--196 AGID-negative sera from an AIE non-endemic controlled area; panel B--194 AGID-negative sera from an AIE endemic area and panel C--330 AGID-positive sera from an AIE endemic area. ELISAp26r cut-off value was defined with TG-ROC using sera from panels A and C. AGIDp26r showed an agreement of 100% with the commercial kit. When applied to sera from panels A and C, ELISAp26r showed an agreement of 100% with the kit, but, although relSe was 100% for panel C, the ELISAp26r had relSp of 93.3%.

  12. Development and characterization of an infectious cDNA clone of the modified live virus vaccine strain of equine arteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqiang; Go, Yun Young; Huang, Chengjin M; Meade, Barry J; Lu, Zhengchun; Snijder, Eric J; Timoney, Peter J; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2012-08-01

    A stable full-length cDNA clone of the modified live virus (MLV) vaccine strain of equine arteritis virus (EAV) was developed. RNA transcripts generated from this plasmid (pEAVrMLV) were infectious upon transfection into mammalian cells, and the resultant recombinant virus (rMLV) had 100% nucleotide identity to the parental MLV vaccine strain of EAV. A single silent nucleotide substitution was introduced into the nucleocapsid gene (pEAVrMLVB), enabling the cloned vaccine virus (rMLVB) to be distinguished from parental MLV vaccine as well as other field and laboratory strains of EAV by using an allelic discrimination real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay. In vitro studies revealed that the cloned vaccine virus rMLVB and the parental MLV vaccine virus had identical growth kinetics and plaque morphologies in equine endothelial cells. In vivo studies confirmed that the cloned vaccine virus was very safe and induced high titers of neutralizing antibodies against EAV in experimentally immunized horses. When challenged with the heterologous EAV KY84 strain, the rMLVB vaccine virus protected immunized horses in regard to reducing the magnitude and duration of viremia and virus shedding but did not suppress the development of signs of EVA, although these were reduced in clinical severity. The vaccine clone pEAVrMLVB could be further manipulated to improve the vaccine efficacy as well as to develop a marker vaccine for serological differentiation of EAV naturally infected from vaccinated animals.

  13. The S2 Gene of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Is a Highly Conserved Determinant of Viral Replication and Virulence Properties in Experimentally Infected Ponies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Leroux, Caroline; Craigo, Jodi K.; Cook, Sheila J.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2000-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is genetically one of the simplest lentiviruses in that the viral genome encodes only three accessory genes, tat, rev, and S2. Although serological analyses demonstrate the expression of the S2 protein in persistently infected horses, the role of this viral gene remains undefined. We recently reported that the S2 gene is not essential for EIAV replication in primary equine macrophages, as EIAV mutants lacking the S2 gene replicate to levels similar to those of the parental virus (F. Li, B. A. Puffer, and R. C. Montelaro, J. Virol. 72:8344–8348, 1998). We now describe in vivo studies that examine the evolution and role of the S2 gene in ponies experimentally infected with EIAV. The results of these studies reveal for the first time that the S2 gene is highly conserved during persistent infection and that deletion of the S2 gene reduces viral virulence and virus replication levels compared to those of the parental virus containing a functional S2 gene. These data indicate that the EIAV S2 gene is in fact an important determinant of viral replication and pathogenic properties in vivo, despite the evident lack of S2 influence on viral replication levels in vitro. Thus, these observations suggest in vivo functions of EIAV S2 that are not adequately reflected in simple infections of cultured cells, including natural target macrophages. PMID:10590152

  14. Epitope specificity is critical for high and moderate avidity cytotoxic T lymphocytes associated with control of viral load and clinical disease in horses with equine infectious anemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Mealey, Robert H.; Zhang, Baoshan; Leib, Steven R.; Littke, Matt H.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2012-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus that causes persistent infections in horses. We hypothesized that high-avidity CTL specific for nonvariable epitopes might be associated with low viral load and minimal disease in EIAV-infected horses. To test this hypothesis, memory CTL (CTLm) responses were analyzed in two infected horses with high plasma viral loads and recurrent disease (progressors), and in two infected horses with low-to-undetectable viral loads and mild disease (nonprogressors). High-avidity CTLm in one progressor recognized an envelope gp90 epitope, and the data documented for the first time in EIAV that viral variation led to CTL escape. Each of the nonprogressors had high-to-moderate avidity CTLm directed against epitopes within Rev, including the nuclear export and nuclear localization domains. These results suggested that the epitope specificity of high- and moderate-avidity CTLm was an important determinant for disease outcome in the EIAV-infected horses examined. PMID:12954220

  15. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of a retrovirus: equine infectious anemia virus cysteine arrays are coordinated to zinc.

    PubMed

    Chance, M R; Sagi, I; Wirt, M D; Frisbie, S M; Scheuring, E; Chen, E; Bess, J W; Henderson, L E; Arthur, L O; South, T L

    1992-11-01

    Zinc finger arrays have been established as a critical structural feature of proteins involved in DNA recognition. Retroviral nucleocapsid proteins, which are involved in the binding of viral RNA, contain conserved cysteine-rich arrays that have been suggested to coordinate zinc. We provide metalloprotein structural data from an intact virus preparation that validate this hypothesis. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy of well-characterized and active preparations of equine infectious anemia virus, compared with a peptide with known coordination and in combination with available biochemical and genetic data, defines a Cys3His1 coordination environment for zinc. The average of the Zn-S distances is 2.30(1) A and that of the Zn-N distance (to histidine) is 2.01(3) A.

  16. Epitope specificity is critical for high and moderate avidity cytotoxic T lymphocytes associated with control of viral load and clinical disease in horses with equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Robert H; Zhang, Baoshan; Leib, Steven R; Littke, Matt H; McGuire, Travis C

    2003-09-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus that causes persistent infections in horses. We hypothesized that high-avidity CTL specific for nonvariable epitopes might be associated with low viral load and minimal disease in EIAV-infected horses. To test this hypothesis, memory CTL (CTLm) responses were analyzed in two infected horses with high plasma viral loads and recurrent disease (progressors), and in two infected horses with low-to-undetectable viral loads and mild disease (nonprogressors). High-avidity CTLm in one progressor recognized an envelope gp90 epitope, and the data documented for the first time in EIAV that viral variation led to CTL escape. Each of the nonprogressors had high-to-moderate avidity CTLm directed against epitopes within Rev, including the nuclear export and nuclear localization domains. These results suggested that the epitope specificity of high- and moderate-avidity CTLm was an important determinant for disease outcome in the EIAV-infected horses examined.

  17. Risk analysis of quarantine station performance: a case study of the importation of equine infectious anemia virus-infected horses into California.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, T E; McBride, M D; Hird, D W

    1998-01-01

    We examined the risk of importing and mistakenly releasing equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-infected horses into California. A computer simulation model was constructed to evaluate current and alternative quarantine station procedures; 150,000 iterations were performed to simulate 15 different scenarios of 10,000 horses imported into the state over a 14-year period. Simulation results showed that under current conditions of low EIAV prevalence in exporting countries, increasing the quarantine period would not decrease the number of EIAV-infected horses mistakenly released from quarantine. In a worst case scenario of high EIAV prevalence in exporting countries, the model predicted 10 EIAV-infected horses would be imported, of these 1 or none would escape detection and would be released mistakenly if quarantine duration were 3 or 14 days, respectively. This model may be applied to other quarantine station situations for evaluating the importation risk for EIAV and other diseases.

  18. Double-stranded-RNA-specific adenosine deaminase 1 (ADAR1) is proposed to contribute to the adaptation of equine infectious anemia virus from horses to donkeys.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Zhang, Xiang; Na, Lei; Wang, Xue-Feng; Fu, Li-Hua; Zhu, Chun-Hui; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a member of the genus Lentivirus of the family Retroviridae. Horses are the most susceptible equids to EIAV infection and are therefore the primary hosts of this virus. In contrast, infected donkeys do not develop clinically active equine infectious anemia (EIA). This phenomenon is similar to what has been observed with HIV-1, which fails to induce AIDS in non-human primates. Interestingly, Shen et al. developed a donkey-tropic pathogenic virus strain (EIAVDV117, DV117) by serially passaging a horse-tropic pathogenic strain, EIAVLN40 (LN40), in donkeys. LN40, which was generated by passaging a field isolate in horses, displayed enhanced virulence in horses but caused no clinical symptoms in donkeys. Infection with DV117 induced acute EIA in nearly 100 % of donkeys. Genomic analysis of DV117 revealed a significantly higher frequency of A-to-G substitutions when compared to LN40. Furthermore, detailed analysis of dinucleotide editing showed that A-to-G mutations had a preference for 5'TpA and 5'ApA. These results strongly implicated the activity of the adenosine deaminase, ADAR1, in this type of mutation. Further investigation demonstrated that overexpression of donkey ADAR1 increased A-to-G mutations within the genome of EIAV. Together with our previous finding that multiple mutations in multiple genes are generated in DV117 during its adaptation from horses to donkeys, the present study suggests that ADAR1-induced A-to-G mutations occur during virus adaption to related new hosts contributing to the alteration of EIAV host tropism.

  19. First detection, isolation and molecular characterization of infectious salmon anaemia virus associated with clinical disease in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Marcos G; Aedo, Alejandra; Kibenge, Molly JT; Groman, David B; Yason, Carmencita V; Grothusen, Horts; Lisperguer, Angelica; Calbucura, Marlene; Avendaño, Fernando; Imilán, Marcelo; Jarpa, Miguel; Kibenge, Frederick SB

    2008-01-01

    Background Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) is a viral disease of marine-farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) caused by ISA virus (ISAV), which belongs to the genus Isavirus, family Orthomyxoviridae. The virus is considered to be carried by marine wild fish and for over 25 years has caused major disease outbreaks in marine-farmed Atlantic salmon in the Northern hemisphere. In the Southern hemisphere, ISAV was first detected in Chile in 1999 in marine-farmed Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). In contrast to the classical presentation of ISA in Atlantic salmon, the presence of ISAV in Chile until now has only been associated with a clinical condition called Icterus Syndrome in Coho salmon and virus isolation has not always been possible. During the winter of 2007, unexplained mortalities were registered in market-size Atlantic salmon in a grow-out site located in Chiloé in Region X of Chile. We report here the diagnostic findings of the first significant clinical outbreak of ISA in marine-farmed Atlantic salmon in Chile and the first characterization of the ISAV isolated from the affected fish. Results In mid-June 2007, an Atlantic salmon marine farm site located in central Chiloé Island in Region X of Chile registered a sudden increase in mortality following recovery from an outbreak of Pisciricketsiosis, which rose to a cumulative mortality of 13.6% by harvest time. Based on the clinical signs and lesions in the affected fish, and laboratory tests performed on the fish tissues, a confirmatory diagnosis of ISA was made; the first time ISA in its classical presentation and for the first time affecting farmed Atlantic salmon in Chile. Rapid sequencing of the virus-specific RT-PCR products amplified from the fish tissues identified the virus to belong to the European genotype (Genotype I) of the highly polymorphic region (HPR) group HPR 7b, but with an 11-amino acid insert in the fusion glycoprotein, and ability to cause cytopathic effects (CPE) in CHSE-214 cell line

  20. Detection and Induction of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Responses by Use of Recombinant Retroviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Lonning, S. M.; Zhang, W.; Leib, S. R.; McGuire, T. C.

    1999-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) appear to be critical in resolving or reducing the severity of lentivirus infections. Retroviral vectors expressing the Gag/Pr or SU protein of the lentivirus equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) were constructed and used to evaluate EIAV-specific CTL responses in horses. Three promoters, cytomegalovirus, simian virus SV40, and Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MoMSV) long terminal repeat (LTR), were used, and there was considerable variation in their ability to direct expression of Gag/Pr and SU. Vectors expressing EIAV proteins under the direction of MoMSV LTR and using the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) Env for internalization were efficient at transducing equine kidney (EK) target cells and were effective targets for EIAV-specific CTL lysis. CTL from EIAV-infected horses caused lysis of retroviral vector-transduced EK cells expressing either Gag/Pr or SU in an ELA-A-restricted manner. In contrast, lysis of recombinant vaccinia virus-infected EK cells expressing Gag/Pr and SU/TM was often non-LA-A restricted. Five horses were immunized by direct intramuscular injection with a mixture of retroviral vectors expressing Gag/Pr or SU, and one responded with EIAV-specific CTL. This result indicates that retroviral vector stimulation of CTL in horses needs to be optimized, perhaps by inclusion of appropriate cytokine genes in the constructs. However, the studies demonstrated that retroviral vector-transduced target cells were very effective for in vitro dissection of EIAV-specific CTL responses. PMID:10074123

  1. Development and evaluation of a new lateral flow assay for simultaneous detection of antibodies against African Horse Sickness and Equine Infectious Anemia viruses.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sofia; Sastre, Patricia; Pérez, Teresa; Tapia, Istar; Barrandeguy, María; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José M; Sánchez-Matamoros, Almudena; Wigdorovitz, Andrés; Sanz, Antonio; Rueda, Paloma

    2016-11-01

    African horse sickness (AHS) and equine infectious anemia (EIA) are both notifiable equid specific diseases that may present similar clinical signs. Considering the increased global movement of horses and equine products over the past decades, together with the socio-economic impact of previous AHS and EIA outbreaks, there is a clear demand for an early discrimination and a strict control of their transmission between enzootic and AHS/EIA-free regions. Currently, the individual control and prevention of AHS or EIA relies on a series of measures, including the restriction of animal movements, vector control, and the use of several laboratory techniques for viral identification, amongst others. Despite being widely employed in surveillance programmes and in the control of animal movements, the available serological assays can only detect AHS- or EIA-specific antibodies individually. In this work, a duplex lateral flow assay (LFA) for simultaneous detection and differentiation of specific antibodies against AHS virus (AHSV) and EIA virus (EIAV) was developed and evaluated with experimental and field serum samples. The duplex LFA was based on the AHSV-VP7 outer core protein and the EIAV-P26 major core protein. The results indicated that the duplex LFA presented a good analytical performance, detecting simultaneously and specifically antibodies against AHSV and EIAV. The initial diagnostic evaluation revealed a good agreement with results from the AHS and EIA tests prescribed by the OIE, and it highlighted the usefulness of the new AHSV/EIAV duplex LFA for an on-field and point-of-care first diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Safety and biodistribution of an equine infectious anemia virus-based gene therapy, RetinoStat(®), for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Binley, Katie; Widdowson, Peter S; Kelleher, Michelle; de Belin, Jackie; Loader, Julie; Ferrige, Georgina; Carlucci, Marie; Esapa, Margaret; Chipchase, Daniel; Angell-Manning, Diana; Ellis, Scott; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos; Miskin, James; Bantseev, Vlad; Nork, T Michael; Miller, Paul; Naylor, Stuart

    2012-09-01

    RetinoStat(®) is an equine infectious anemia virus-based lentiviral gene therapy vector that expresses the angiostatic proteins endostatin and angiostatin that is delivered via a subretinal injection for the treatment of the wet form of age-related macular degeneration. We initiated 6-month safety and biodistribution studies in two species; rhesus macaques and Dutch belted rabbits. After subretinal administration of RetinoStat the level of human endostatin and angiostatin proteins in the vitreous of treated rabbit eyes peaked at ∼1 month after dosing and remained elevated for the duration of the study. Regular ocular examinations revealed a mild to moderate transient ocular inflammation that resolved within 1 month of dosing in both species. There were no significant long-term changes in the electroretinograms or intraocular pressure measurements in either rabbits or macaques postdosing compared with the baseline reading in RetinoStat-treated eyes. Histological evaluation did not reveal any structural changes in the eye although there was an infiltration of mononuclear cells in the vitreous, retina, and choroid. No antibodies to any of the RetinoStat vector components or the transgenes could be detected in the serum from either species, and biodistribution analysis demonstrated that the RetinoStat vector was maintained within the ocular compartment. In summary, these studies found RetinoStat to be well tolerated, localized, and capable of persistent expression after subretinal delivery.

  3. [Study of the correlation between the plasma viral load and protective immunity induced by the equine infectious anemia attenuated vaccine and its parental virulent strain].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xue-Zhi; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Li, Li; Jiang, Cheng-Gang; Zhao, Li-Ping; Lv, Xiao-Ling; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2010-03-01

    The threshold hypothesis of attenuated lentiviral vaccine considers that the type of host response to infections of lentiviruses depends on the viral load. To evaluate the correlation between viral loads of the attenuated vaccine strain of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) and their effects to induce protective immunity, longitudinal plasma viral loads in groups of horses inoculated with either an attenuated EIAV vaccine strain (EIAV(DLV125)) or sub-lethal dose of an EIAV virulent strain (EIAV(LN40)) were compared. Similar levels of plasma viral loads ranging from 10(3)-10(5) copies/mL were detected from samples of these two groups of animals (P > 0.05) during 23 weeks post the inoculation. However, different responses to the challenge performed thereafter with lethal dose of the EIAV virulent strain were observed from the groups of horses inoculated with either EIAV(DLV125) or sub-lethal dose of EIAV(LN40). The protective efficiency was 67% (3 of 4 cases) and 0 (none of 2 cases), respectively. Our results implicate that the viral load of EIAV attenuated vaccine is not the primary factor, or at least not the solo primary factor, to determine the establishment of immune protection.

  4. Detection, molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of full-length equine infectious anemia (EIAV) gag genes isolated from Shackleford Banks wild horses.

    PubMed

    Capomaccio, S; Willand, Z A; Cook, S J; Issel, C J; Santos, E M; Reis, J K P; Cook, R F

    2012-06-15

    The genetically distinct wild horse herds inhabiting Shackleford Banks, North Carolina are probably the direct descendents of Spanish stock abandoned after failed attempts to settle mid-Atlantic coastal regions of North America in the Sixteenth Century. In a 1996 island survey, 41% of the gathered horses were discovered seropositive for Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) with additional cases identified in 1997 and 1998. As a result of their unique genetic heritage, EIAV seropositive individuals identified in the two latter surveys were transferred to a quarantine facility on the mainland. In September 2008 two of the horses SB1 and SB2 after 10 and 11 years in quarantine respectively, developed clinical signs of EIA. In the case of SB2 these were so severe that the only humane option was euthanasia. Although SB1, survived it experienced a second clinical episode one month later. In May 2009, a third horse in quarantine, SB3, developed extremely severe clinical EIA and was euthanized. This demonstrates naturally infected long-term inapparent carriers can experience recrudescence of very severe disease many years after initial exposure to EIAV. Phylogenetic analysis of complete EIAV gag gene sequences obtained from each of three Shackleford horses demonstrated they were infected with very closely related viruses. Although these were distinguishable from all other strains examined, they belong to a monophyletic group comprising almost exclusively of New World isolates that is distinct from a number of recently characterized Central European EIAV strains. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Reverse mutation of the virulence-associated S2 gene does not cause an attenuated equine infectious anemia virus strain to revert to pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xu; Jiang, Cheng-Gang; Wang, Xue-Feng; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Ma, Jian; Han, Xiu-E; Zhao, Li-Ping; Shen, Rong-Xian; Xiang, Wen-Hua; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2013-09-01

    The contribution of S2 accessory gene of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) to the virulence of pathogenic strains was investigated in the present study by reverse mutation of all four consensus S2 mutation sites in an attenuated EIAV proviral strain, FDDV3-8, to the corresponding sequences of a highly pathogenic strain DV117. The S2 reverse-mutated recombinant strain FDDVS2r1-2-3-4 replicated with similar kinetics to FDDV3-8 in cultivated target cells. In contrast to the results of other studies of EIAV with dysfunctional S2, reverse mutation of S2 only transiently and moderately increased the plasma viral load of inoculated horses, and induction of transient immunosuppression did not boost viral pathogenicity. In addition, inoculation of FDDVS2r1-2-3-4 induced partial protection to a challenge pathogenic virus. These results suggest that the attenuated EIAV vaccine strain with multiple mutations in multiple genes will not easily revert to a virulent phenotype. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Studies with equine infectious anemia virus: transmission attempts by mosquitoes and survival of virus on vector mouthparts and hypodermic needles, and in mosquito tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Williams, D L; Issel, C J; Steelman, C D; Adams, W V; Benton, C V

    1981-09-01

    Biological and mechanical transmission trials with Psorophora columbiae (Dyar and Knab) and Aedes sollicitans (Walker) and ponies acutely infected with equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) were negative. The EIAV antigen was detected by radioimmunoassay in Ae sollicitans immediately after the mosquitoes had fed on an acutely ill pony, but not 14 days after feeding. Psorophora columbiae mosquitoes had detectable EIAV antigen as determined by radioimmunoassay 24 hours after they fed on an acutely ill pony; this antigen was not detected again until 6 days after feeding and was still detected 14 days after feeding. The EIAV was detected on hypodermic needles held at 25 C for 96 hours, but was not detected 120 hours after the needles were dipped in solutions of EIAV. The virus was detected on the mouthparts of mosquitoes for 1 hour after they had fed on an EIAV-rich medium, but was not detected 4 hours after feeding. Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say ovarian cells maintained the infectivity of EIAV for 10 weekly passages, but no evidence for virus multiplication was obtained.

  7. Suppression of neovascularization of donor corneas by transduction with equine infectious anemia virus-based lentiviral vectors expressing endostatin and angiostatin.

    PubMed

    Parker, Maria; Bellec, Jessica; McFarland, Trevor; Scripps, Vicky; Appukuttan, Binoy; Hartzell, Matt; Yeager, Austen; Hady, Thomas; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Stout, Tim; Ellis, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Corneal transplantation is the oldest and one of the most successful transplant procedures with a success rate in many studies in excess of 90%. The high success rate is mainly attributable to the relatively immune-privileged status of the eye and the fact that the cornea is largely avascular. However, the success rate in patients with failed grafts is much lower such that regrafting is frequently the top indication for corneal transplantation in many centers. Neovascularization is the most important risk factor for rejection, as it allows access of the immune system to the donor tissue, compromising immune privilege of the graft/eye. We have developed a process to modify donor corneal tissue to prevent rejection by a single exposure to a gene therapy vector before surgery (EncorStat(®)). The vector used is based on clinically relevant equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-derived lentiviral platform and contains genes for two potently angiostatic genes, endostatin and angiostatin. We show that incubation of rabbit, primate, and human corneal tissue with the EIAV vector mediates strong, stable expression in the corneal endothelium. We have optimized this process to maximize transduction and, once this is complete, maximize the removal of free vector before transplant. Rabbit corneas treated with two different antiangiogenic expression vectors (EIAV-EndoAngio and to a lesser extent EIAV-Endo:k5) significantly suppressed neovascularization in a rabbit model of corneal rejection. As a result, corneal opacity, edema, and inflammatory infiltrates were reduced in these corneas. This study demonstrates that angiogenesis is a suitable target to prevent corneal rejection, and provides the first proof-of-concept data for the development of EncorStat, an ex vivo gene therapy treatment to prevent corneal rejection.

  8. Detection of equine infectious anemia viral RNA in plasma samples from recently infected and long-term inapparent carrier animals by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Langemeier, J L; Cook, S J; Cook, R F; Rushlow, K E; Montelaro, R C; Issel, C J

    1996-01-01

    Control of equine infectious anemia (EIA) is currently based on detection of anti-EIA virus (EIAV) antibodies. However, serologic diagnostic methods may give false-negative results in infected horses that fail to respond adequately or are in the early stages of infection. We developed a reverse transcriptase nested PCR (RT-nPCR) assay for the detection of viral gag gene sequences in plasma from EIAV-infected horses. The ability of RT-nPCR to detect field strains of EIAV was investigated by assaying plasma samples from 71 horses stabled on EIA quarantine ranches. Positive PCR signals were detected in 63 of 63 horses with EIAV antibody test-positive histories on approved serologic tests, demonstrating that RT-nPCR was probably directed against highly conserved sequences in the viral genome. The RT-nPCR assay, agar gel immunodiffusion test, and conventional virus isolation were compared for detection of early infection in 12 experimentally infected ponies. Viral gag sequences were detected in all 12 animals by 3 days postinfection (p.i.) by RT-nPCR, whereas virus could not be routinely isolated on cell culture until 9 to 13 days p.i. and EIAV antibodies could not be detected by agar gel immunodiffusion until 20 to 23 days p.i. Finally, specificity of the RT-nPCR assay was examined by testing plasma from 43 horses with serologic test-negative histories and no known contact with EIAV-infected animals. Viral gag sequences were not detectable in this control group. These data suggest that the EIAV RT-nPCR assay effectively detects EIAV and is more sensitive than current standard methods for detection of early stages of infection. PMID:8735102

  9. Serological method using recombinant S2 protein to differentiate equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-infected and EIAV-vaccinated horses.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sha; Issel, Charles J; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2004-11-01

    We recently reported a highly protective attenuated live virus vaccine for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) based on a proviral construct (EIAVUKDeltaS2) with a genetically engineered mutation in the viral S2 gene that eliminates expression of this accessory protein. While the EIAVUKDeltaS2 vaccine provides protection from detectable infection by experimental challenge with highly virulent virus, the potential for commercial application of this vaccine is complicated by the fact that horses inoculated with the EIAVUKDeltaS2 vaccine strain become seropositive in various reference diagnostic assays based on detection of antibodies to virion core or envelope proteins. To address this issue, we describe here the development and optimization of a new serologic EIAV diagnostic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect serum antibodies to the EIAV S2 protein that are produced in infected horses but not in horses inoculated with the EIAVUKDeltaS2 vaccine virus. The test S2 protein antigen was developed using the S2 gene sequence from the EIAVUK strain of virus and a series of modifications to facilitate production and purification of the diagnostic antigen, designated HS2G. Using this HS2G as antigen, we describe the development of an affinity ELISA that provides a sensitive and specific detection of S2-specific serum antibodies in experimentally and field-infected horses (22 of 24), without detectable reactivity with immune serum from uninfected (12 of 12) or vaccinated (29 of 29) horses. These data indicate that the S2-based diagnostic ELISA has the potential to accurately differentiate horses infected with EIAV from horses inoculated with an attenuated EIAV vaccine strain with a mutant S2 gene.

  10. Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Envelope Evolution In Vivo during Persistent Infection Progressively Increases Resistance to In Vitro Serum Antibody Neutralization as a Dominant Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Laryssa; Leroux, Caroline; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2002-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection of horses is characterized by well-defined waves of viremia associated with the sequential evolution of distinct viral populations displaying extensive envelope gp90 variation; however, a correlation of in vivo envelope evolution with in vitro serum neutralization phenotype remains undefined. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to utilize a previously defined panel of natural variant EIAV envelope isolates from sequential febrile episodes to characterize the effects of envelope variation during persistent infection on viral neutralization phenotypes and to define the determinants of EIAV envelope neutralization specificity. To assess the neutralization phenotypes of the sequential EIAV envelope variants, we determined the sensitivity of five variant envelopes to neutralization by a longitudinal panel of immune serum from the source infected pony. The results indicated that the evolution of the EIAV envelope sequences observed during sequential febrile episodes produced an increasingly neutralization-resistant phenotype. To further define the envelope determinants of EIAV neutralization specificity, we examined the neutralization properties of a panel of chimeric envelope constructs derived from reciprocal envelope domain exchanges between selected neutralization-sensitive and neutralization-resistant envelope variants. These results indicated that the EIAV gp90 V3 and V4 domains individually conferred serum neutralization resistance while other envelope segments in addition to V3 and V4 were evidently required for conferring total serum neutralization sensitivity. These data clearly demonstrate for the first time the influence of sequential gp90 variation during persistent infection in increasing envelope neutralization resistance, identify the gp90 V3 and V4 domains as the principal determinants of antibody neutralization resistance, and indicate distinct complex cooperative envelope domain interactions in

  11. Detection of equine infectious anemia viral RNA in plasma samples from recently infected and long-term inapparent carrier animals by PCR.

    PubMed

    Langemeier, J L; Cook, S J; Cook, R F; Rushlow, K E; Montelaro, R C; Issel, C J

    1996-06-01

    Control of equine infectious anemia (EIA) is currently based on detection of anti-EIA virus (EIAV) antibodies. However, serologic diagnostic methods may give false-negative results in infected horses that fail to respond adequately or are in the early stages of infection. We developed a reverse transcriptase nested PCR (RT-nPCR) assay for the detection of viral gag gene sequences in plasma from EIAV-infected horses. The ability of RT-nPCR to detect field strains of EIAV was investigated by assaying plasma samples from 71 horses stabled on EIA quarantine ranches. Positive PCR signals were detected in 63 of 63 horses with EIAV antibody test-positive histories on approved serologic tests, demonstrating that RT-nPCR was probably directed against highly conserved sequences in the viral genome. The RT-nPCR assay, agar gel immunodiffusion test, and conventional virus isolation were compared for detection of early infection in 12 experimentally infected ponies. Viral gag sequences were detected in all 12 animals by 3 days postinfection (p.i.) by RT-nPCR, whereas virus could not be routinely isolated on cell culture until 9 to 13 days p.i. and EIAV antibodies could not be detected by agar gel immunodiffusion until 20 to 23 days p.i. Finally, specificity of the RT-nPCR assay was examined by testing plasma from 43 horses with serologic test-negative histories and no known contact with EIAV-infected animals. Viral gag sequences were not detectable in this control group. These data suggest that the EIAV RT-nPCR assay effectively detects EIAV and is more sensitive than current standard methods for detection of early stages of infection.

  12. Serological Method Using Recombinant S2 Protein To Differentiate Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV)-Infected and EIAV-Vaccinated Horses

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sha; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2004-01-01

    We recently reported a highly protective attenuated live virus vaccine for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) based on a proviral construct (EIAVUKΔS2) with a genetically engineered mutation in the viral S2 gene that eliminates expression of this accessory protein. While the EIAVUKΔS2 vaccine provides protection from detectable infection by experimental challenge with highly virulent virus, the potential for commercial application of this vaccine is complicated by the fact that horses inoculated with the EIAVUKΔS2 vaccine strain become seropositive in various reference diagnostic assays based on detection of antibodies to virion core or envelope proteins. To address this issue, we describe here the development and optimization of a new serologic EIAV diagnostic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect serum antibodies to the EIAV S2 protein that are produced in infected horses but not in horses inoculated with the EIAVUKΔS2 vaccine virus. The test S2 protein antigen was developed using the S2 gene sequence from the EIAVUK strain of virus and a series of modifications to facilitate production and purification of the diagnostic antigen, designated HS2G. Using this HS2G as antigen, we describe the development of an affinity ELISA that provides a sensitive and specific detection of S2-specific serum antibodies in experimentally and field-infected horses (22 of 24), without detectable reactivity with immune serum from uninfected (12 of 12) or vaccinated (29 of 29) horses. These data indicate that the S2-based diagnostic ELISA has the potential to accurately differentiate horses infected with EIAV from horses inoculated with an attenuated EIAV vaccine strain with a mutant S2 gene. PMID:15539516

  13. Equine infectious anemia viral vector-mediated codelivery of endostatin and angiostatin driven by retinal pigmented epithelium-specific VMD2 promoter inhibits choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Kachi, Shu; Binley, Katie; Yokoi, Katsutoshi; Umeda, Naoyasu; Akiyama, Hideo; Muramatu, Daisuke; Iqball, Sharifah; Kan, On; Naylor, Stuart; Campochiaro, Peter A

    2009-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a nonprimate lentivirus that does not cause human disease. Subretinal injection into mice of a recombinant EIAV lentiviral vector in which lacZ is driven by a CMV promoter (EIAV CMV LacZ) resulted in rapid and strong expression of LacZ in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells and some other cells including ganglion cells, resulting in the presence of 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside within the optic nerve. Substitution of the RPE-specific promoter from the vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2) gene for the CMV promoter resulted in prolonged (at least 1 year) expression of LacZ that was restricted to RPE cells, albeit reduced 6- to 10-fold compared with the CMV promoter. Similarly, the amount of FLAG-tagged endostatin detected in eyes injected with the EIAV VMD2 Endo(FLAG) vector was similar to that seen in eyes injected with a vector that expressed both endostatin and angiostatin [EIAV VMD2 Endo(FLAG)/Angio]; expression was approximately 6-fold lower than with identical vectors in which the CMV promoter drove expression. Compared with murine eyes treated with a control EIAV vector, subretinal injection of EIAV vectors expressing murine endostatin alone or in combination with angiostatin driven by either the CMV or VMD2 promoter caused significant suppression of choroidal neovascularization (NV) at laser-induced rupture sites in Bruch's membrane. These data support proceeding toward clinical studies with EIAV-based gene therapy for choroidal NV, using the VMD2 promoter to selectively drive expression of a combination of endostatin and angiostatin in RPE cells.

  14. Use of heavy water (D2O) in developing thermostable recombinant p26 protein based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serodiagnosis of equine infectious anemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Singha, Harisankar; Goyal, Sachin K; Malik, Praveen; Singh, Raj K

    2014-01-01

    Thermostabilizing effect of heavy water (D2O) or deuterium oxide has been demonstrated previously on several enzymes and vaccines like oral poliovirus vaccine and influenza virus vaccine. In view of the above observations, effect of heavy water on in situ thermostabilization of recombinant p26 protein on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for serodiagnosis of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection was investigated in the present study. The carbonate-bicarbonate coating buffer was prepared in 60% and 80% D2O for coating the p26 protein in 96-well ELISA plate and thermal stability was examined at 4 °C, 37 °C, 42 °C, and 45 °C over a storage time from 2 weeks to 10 months. A set of positive serum (n = 12) consisting of strong, medium, and weak titer strength (4 samples in each category) and negative serum (n = 30) were assessed in ELISA during the study period. At each time point, ELISA results were compared with fresh plate to assess thermal protective effect of D2O. Gradual increase in the stabilizing effect of 80% D2O at elevated temperature (37 °C < 42 °C < 45 °C) was observed. The 80% D2O provides the thermal protection to rp26 protein in ELISA plate up to 2 months of incubation at 45 °C. The findings of the present study have the future implication of adopting cost effective strategies for generating more heat tolerable ELISA reagents with extended shelf life.

  15. Selection of a rare neutralization-resistant variant following passive transfer of convalescent immune plasma in equine infectious anemia virus-challenged SCID horses.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sandra D; Leib, Steven R; Carpenter, Susan; Mealey, Robert H

    2010-07-01

    Vaccines preventing HIV-1 infection will likely elicit antibodies that neutralize diverse strains. However, the capacity for lentiviruses to escape broadly neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is not completely understood, nor is it known whether NAbs alone can control heterologous infection. Here, we determined that convalescent immune plasma from a horse persistently infected with equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) neutralized homologous virus and several envelope variants containing heterologous principal neutralizing domains (PND). Plasma was infused into young horses (foals) affected with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), followed by challenge with a homologous EIAV stock. Treated SCID foals were protected against clinical disease, with complete prevention of infection occurring in one foal. In three SCID foals, a novel neutralization-resistant variant arose that was found to preexist at a low frequency in the challenge inoculum. In contrast, SCID foals infused with nonimmune plasma developed acute disease associated with high levels of the predominant challenge virus. Following transfer to an immunocompetent horse, the neutralization-resistant variant induced a single febrile episode and was subsequently controlled in the absence of type-specific NAb. Long-term control was associated with the presence of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Our results demonstrate that immune plasma with neutralizing activity against heterologous PND variants can prevent lentivirus infection and clinical disease in the complete absence of T cells. Importantly, however, rare neutralization-resistant envelope variants can replicate in vivo under relatively broad selection pressure, highlighting the need for protective lentivirus vaccines to elicit NAb responses with increased breadth and potency and/or CTL that target conserved epitopes.

  16. Infection with equine infectious anemia virus vaccine strain EIAVDLV121 causes no visible histopathological lesions in target organs in association with restricted viral replication and unique cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Ma, Jian; Wang, Xue-Feng; Xiao, Fei; Li, Li-Jia; Zhang, Jiao-Er; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Du, Cheng; He, Xi-Jun; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2016-02-01

    The live equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine strain EIAVDLV121 was developed by in vitro attenuation of a virulent strain, EIAVLN40, in the 1970s, and it has been demonstrated to induce protective immunity under laboratory and natural EIAV infection conditions. The detailed biological features of this attenuated virus remain to be further investigated. Experimental inoculation with EIAVDLV121 did not result in clinical symptoms even with immunosuppressive treatment in our previous studies. Here, we further investigated whether the replication of the vaccine strain EIAVDLV121 in experimentally infected horses causes histopathological lesions to develop in the targeted organs. Both the lungs and the spleen have been demonstrated to support EIAV replication. By evaluating the gross macroscopic and histological changes, we found that EIAVDLV121 did not cause detectable histopathological lesions and that it replicated several hundred times more slowly than its parental virulent strain, EIAVLN40, in tissues. Immunochemical assays of these tissues indicated that the primary target cells of EIAVDLV121 were monocytes/macrophages, but that EIAVLN40 also infected alveolar epithelial cells and vascular endothelial cells. In addition, both of these viral strains promoted the up- and down-regulation of the expression of various cytokines and chemokines, implicating the potential involvement of these cellular factors in the pathological outcomes of EIAV infection and host immune responses. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the EIAV vaccine strain does not cause obvious histopathological lesions or clinical symptoms and that it induces a unique cytokine response profile. These features are considered essential for EIAVDLV121 to function as an effective live vaccine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The determination of in vivo envelope-specific cell-mediated immune responses in equine infectious anemia virus-infected ponies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chong; Cook, Frank R.; Cook, Sheila J.; Craigo, Jodi K.; Even, Deborah L.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Horohov, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Distinct from human lentivirus infection, equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-infected horses will eventually enter an inapparent carrier state in which virus replication is apparently controlled by adaptive immune responses. Although recrudescence of disease can occur after immune suppression, the actual immune correlate associated with protection has yet to be determined. Therefore, EIAV provides a model for investigating immune-mediated protective mechanisms against lentivirus infection. Here, we have developed a method to monitor EIAV-envelope specific cellular immunity in vivo. An EIA carrier horse with no clinical signs infected 7 years ago and 4 related experimental ponies infected 6 months previously were used in this study. Forty-four 20-mer peptides, representing the entire surface unit protein (gp90) of EIAV, were combined into 14 peptide pools and intradermally injected into the neck of EIAV-infected horses. An identical volume of saline alone was injected into a fifteenth site as a negative control. After 48 h, those sites with palpable infiltrations were measured prior to the collection of 2 mm and 4 mm punch biopsies. Total RNA was extracted from each 2 mm biopsy for determination of CD3 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) mRNA expression by real-time PCR. The 4 mm skin biopsies were formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded for immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining for CD3, CD20, CD25 and MAC387 (macrophage marker). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained prior to the injection and tested for in vitro reactivity against the same peptides. Histological examination showed that some of the envelope peptides elicited a lymphocytic cellular infiltration at the injection site, as evidenced by positive staining for CD3. Gp90 peptide-specific increases in CD3 and IFN-γ gene expression were also detected in the injection sites. Furthermore, differences were found between in vivo and in vitro responses to gp90 specific peptides. These results demonstrate a

  18. Tissue Sites of Persistent Infection and Active Replication of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus during Acute Disease and Asymptomatic Infection in Experimentally Infected Equids

    PubMed Central

    Harrold, Sharon M.; Cook, Sheila J.; Cook, R. Frank; Rushlow, Keith E.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2000-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection of horses is characterized by recurring cycles of disease and viremia that typically progress to an inapparent infection in which clinical symptoms are absent as host immune responses maintain control of virus replication indefinitely. The dynamics of EIAV viremia and its association with disease cycles have been well characterized, but there has been to date no comprehensive quantitative analyses of the specific tissue sites of EIAV infection and replication in experimentally infected equids during acute disease episodes and during asymptomatic infections in long-term inapparent carriers. To characterize the in vivo site(s) of viral infection and replication, we developed a quantitative competitive PCR assay capable of detecting 10 copies of viral DNA and a quantitative competitive reverse transcription-PCR assay with a sensitivity of about 30 copies of viral singly spliced mRNA. Animals were experimentally infected with one of two reference viruses: the animal-passaged field isolate designated EIAVWyo and the virulent cell-adapted strain designated EIAVPV. Tissues and blood cells were isolated during the initial acute disease or from asymptomatic animals and analyzed for viral DNA and RNA levels by the respective quantitative assays. The results of these experiments demonstrated that the appearance of clinical symptoms in experimentally infected equids coincided with rapid widespread seeding of viral infection and replication in a variety of tissues. During acute disease, the predominant cellular site of viral infection and replication was the spleen, which typically accounted for over 90% of the cellular viral burden. In asymptomatic animals, viral DNA and RNA persisted in virtually all tissues tested, but at extremely low levels, a finding indicative of tight but incomplete immune control of EIAV replication. During all disease states, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were found to harbor less than 1% of

  19. The determination of in vivo envelope-specific cell-mediated immune responses in equine infectious anemia virus-infected ponies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chong; Cook, Frank R; Cook, Sheila J; Craigo, Jodi K; Even, Deborah L; Issel, Charles J; Montelaro, Ronald C; Horohov, David W

    2012-08-15

    Distinct from human lentivirus infection, equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-infected horses will eventually enter an inapparent carrier state in which virus replication is apparently controlled by adaptive immune responses. Although recrudescence of disease can occur after immune suppression, the actual immune correlate associated with protection has yet to be determined. Therefore, EIAV provides a model for investigating immune-mediated protective mechanisms against lentivirus infection. Here, we have developed a method to monitor EIAV-envelope specific cellular immunity in vivo. An EIA carrier horse with no clinical signs infected 7 years ago and 4 related experimental ponies infected 6 months previously were used in this study. Forty-four 20-mer peptides, representing the entire surface unit protein (gp90) of EIAV, were combined into 14 peptide pools and intradermally injected into the neck of EIAV-infected horses. An identical volume of saline alone was injected into a fifteenth site as a negative control. After 48 h, those sites with palpable infiltrations were measured prior to the collection of 2mm and 4mm punch biopsies. Total RNA was extracted from each 2mm biopsy for determination of CD3 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) mRNA expression by real-time PCR. The 4mm skin biopsies were formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded for immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining for CD3, CD20, CD25 and MAC387 (macrophage marker). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained prior to the injection and tested for in vitro reactivity against the same peptides. Histological examination showed that some of the envelope peptides elicited a lymphocytic cellular infiltration at the injection site, as evidenced by positive staining for CD3. Gp90 peptide-specific increases in CD3 and IFN-γ gene expression were also detected in the injection sites. Furthermore, differences were found between in vivo and in vitro responses to gp90 specific peptides. These results demonstrate a

  20. In vivo evolution of the gp90 gene and consistently low plasma viral load during transient immune suppression demonstrate the safety of an attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Jiang, Chenggang; Lin, Yuezhi; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhao, Liping; Xiang, Wenhua; Shao, Yiming; Shen, Rongxian; Kong, Xiangang; Zhou, Jianhua

    2009-01-01

    To study the in vivo evolution of the attenuated Chinese equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, viral gp90 gene variation and virus replication in immunosuppressed hosts were investigated. The results showed that after vaccination, the gp90 gene followed an evolutionary trend of declining diversity. The trend coincided with the maturation of immunity to EIAV, and eventually, the gp90 gene became highly homologous. The sequences of these predominant quasispecies were consistently detected up to 18 months after vaccination. Furthermore, after transient immune suppression with dexamethasone, the plasma viral RNA copy number of the vaccine strain in three vaccinated ponies remained consistently below the "pathogenic threshold" level, while the viral load increased by 25,000-fold in the positive control of an inapparent carrier of the parental virulent strain. This study is the first to provide evidence for the safety of an attenuated lentiviral vaccine with decreased genomic diversity and consistently low viral replication under suppressed immunity.

  1. Dual Mutation Events in the Haemagglutinin-Esterase and Fusion Protein from an Infectious Salmon Anaemia Virus HPR0 Genotype Promote Viral Fusion and Activation by an Ubiquitous Host Protease.

    PubMed

    Fourrier, Mickael; Lester, Katherine; Markussen, Turhan; Falk, Knut; Secombes, Christopher J; McBeath, Alastair; Collet, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    In Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV), deletions in the highly polymorphic region (HPR) in the near membrane domain of the haemagglutinin-esterase (HE) stalk, influence viral fusion. It is suspected that selected mutations in the associated Fusion (F) protein may also be important in regulating fusion activity. To better understand the underlying mechanisms involved in ISAV fusion, several mutated F proteins were generated from the Scottish Nevis and Norwegian SK779/06 HPR0. Co-transfection with constructs encoding HE and F were performed, fusion activity assessed by content mixing assay and the degree of proteolytic cleavage by western blot. Substitutions in Nevis F demonstrated that K276 was the most likely cleavage site in the protein. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions at three sites and two insertions, all slightly upstream of K276, increased fusion activity. Co-expression with HE harbouring a full-length HPR produced high fusion activities when trypsin and low pH were applied. In comparison, under normal culture conditions, groups containing a mutated HE with an HPR deletion were able to generate moderate fusion levels, while those with a full length HPR HE could not induce fusion. This suggested that HPR length may influence how the HE primes the F protein and promotes fusion activation by an ubiquitous host protease and/or facilitate subsequent post-cleavage refolding steps. Variations in fusion activity through accumulated mutations on surface glycoproteins have also been reported in other orthomyxoviruses and paramyxoviruses. This may in part contribute to the different virulence and tissue tropism reported for HPR0 and HPR deleted ISAV genotypes.

  2. Equine keratomycosis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Wada, Shinya; Hobo, Seiji; Ode, Hirotaka; Niwa, Hidekazu; Moriyama, Hidekazu

    2013-01-01

    To describe the incidence, clinical progress, visual outcome, and laboratory findings of equine keratomycosis in Japan.  Retrospective study of the medical records of horses clinically and mycologically diagnosed with keratomycosis at the Equine Hospitals of the Japan Racing Association from 2005 to 2011. The diagnosis of keratomycosis was confirmed in eight horses (40.0% of the 20 horses with infectious keratitis from which fungi and/or bacteria were isolated). Fungi recovered from corneal swabs were identified as Aspergillus flavus (4), Aspergillus niger (1), Fusarium solani (1), and Mortierella wolfii (2). All horses were treated medically with topical antifungals, and one horse was also treated surgically. The median of treatment period was 40 days. Two horses were rendered blind in the affected eye and the others retained vision. Equine keratomycosis comprises a considerable portion of infectious keratitis in Japan, and the causative fungi that we isolated had been isolated previously from horses with keratomycosis in other regions with the exception of M. wolfii. Culture and cytological examination of corneal lesions should be immediately performed on eyes with signs of keratitis, particularly on those not improving with antibacterial medication, as early initiation of aggressive antifungal treatment tended to result in better outcome and shorter treatment period. © 2012 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  3. Anaemia in older persons.

    PubMed

    den Elzen, W P J; Gussekloo, J

    2011-06-01

    Anaemia is common in older individuals and, because of its association with various negative outcomes, adequate diagnosis and treatment is important. The present review focuses on prominent factors included in diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms for anaemia. Although pernicious anaemia is associated with severe vitamin B12 deficiency, evidence of an association between subnormal vitamin B12 and anaemia in older persons in the general population is limited and inconclusive. Accumulating evidence suggests that clinicians should at least reconsider the risks of a low vitamin B12 level before starting vitamin B12 supplementation in older individuals. Although clinicians may be reluctant to measure ferritin in older individuals due to its acute phase properties, such measurements are important in older persons with anaemia, especially in those with signs of inflammation. While a severe age-related decline in renal function may lead to a blunted erythropoietin response and anaemia, elevated erythropoietin levels are associated with increased mortality. More studies are needed to identify the clinical relevance and therapeutic implications of low and high erythropoietin levels in older persons. In contrast to other age-related diseases, telomere length is not associated with anaemia in older individuals in the general population. In conclusion, many issues regarding the aetiology of anaemia in old age remain unresolved. Because current guidelines on anaemia are based on the classic notions of the aetiology of anaemia, they may need to be revised for the highest age groups.

  4. [Anaemia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Leischker, Andreas Herbert; Fetscher, Sebastian; Kolb, Gerald Franz

    2016-07-01

    In the elderly, even mild anaemia leads to significantly decreased quality of life and reduced survival rate. Therefore even mild anaemias should be worked up especially in the elderly. More than 75 % of all anaemias have a specific and treatable cause.Differential diagnosis of anaemia in the elderly is much more challenging compared to the differential diagnosis in younger patients: in older patients often more than one dysfunction is responsible for the anaemia simultaneously. Many routine laboratory parameters are changed by ageing and are therefore only of limited value for diagnosis of anaemia. Soluble transferinreceptor and hepcidin are two parameters feasible for differential diagnosis of the causes of anaemia in the elderly.The most common cause of iron deficiency anaemia in the elderly is gastrointestinal bleeding. Many causes for gastrointestinal bleeding -like angiodysplasia of the colon - can readily be treated with endoscopic therapy. For this reason, colonoscopy is part of the standard workup for elderly patients with iron-deficient anaemia (IDA) if no contraindications exist.Therapy of anaemia is based on the specific cause or the causes. In IDA, the first step other than causal treatment is to replace iron orally. If this is not tolerated because of side effects or does not lead to a sufficient rise in the haemoglobin level, intravenous iron replacement therapy is indicated. Folic acid deficiency is generally treated orally, whereas vitamin B12 deficiency is generally treated by the parenteral - preferably subcutaneous - route. In anaemia due to chronic renal failure and anaemia due to myelodysplastic syndromes, the underlying cause must be treated, furthermore erythropoiesis-stimulating agents can be indicated.

  5. Serological survey of equine viral diseases in Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Pagamjav, Ochir; Kobayashi, Keiko; Murakami, Hironobu; Tabata, Yuji; Miura, Yasuo; Boldbaatar, Bazartseren; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2011-04-01

    Three hundred sera were collected from horses in various parts of Mongolia in 2007 and seroepidemiological surveys for several equine viruses performed on them. Equid herpesvirus 1 and equine rhinitis A virus were prevalent, and equine arteritis virus and equid herpesvirus 3 were detected over a wide area though their rates of antibody-positivity were not high. Equine infectious anemia was distributed locally. The rates of horses antibody-positive for Japanese encephalitis virus and equine influenza virus were low, but these were detected. Bovine coronavirus antibodies were detected at a high rate, but it was not clear whether they were due to horse coronavirus.

  6. Dual infections with low virulent chicken infectious anaemia virus (lvCIAV) and intermediate infectious bursal disease virus (iIBDV) in young chicks increase lvCIAV in thymus and bursa while decreasing lymphocyte disorders induced by iIBDV.

    PubMed

    Vaziry, Asaad; Silim, Amer; Bleau, Christian; Frenette, Diane; Lamontagne, Lucie

    2013-04-01

    The use of attenuated vaccines or the occurrence of low virulent T-lymphotropic or B-lymphotropic viruses in flocks may alter the immune responses of young chicks in spite of the absence of clinical signs. Infections with a low virulent T-lymphotropic chicken infectious anaemia virus (lvCIAV) followed by infection with an intermediate B-lymphotropic infectious bursal disease virus (iIBDV) were conducted in specific pathogen free chicks. Thirty-six 1-day-old chicks were infected with the lvCIAV strain (CAV-VAC®) and a similar number of chicks were inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline. At 14 days after lvCIAV infection, one group of 18 lvCIAV-infected chicks and one group of 18 uninfected chicks were infected with an iIBDV strain. At 4, 7 and 14 days post infection with iIBDV, six chicks from each group were euthanized and lymphoid organs were collected. Detection of lvCIAV and iIBDV genomes was conducted by polymerase chain reaction and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Double-labelled lymphoid subsets from the thymus, spleen and bursa were studied by cytofluorometric analysis. The results reveal that previous infection with lvCIAV increases the occurrence of the lvCIAV and iIBDV genome in thymus and/or bursa without the occurrence of clinical signs in dually lvCIAV/iIBDV-infected chicks. However, the decreases of B cells in spleen and bursa and increases of T-cell subsets in bursa observed in chicks infected with iIBDV did not occur in chicks previously infected with lvCIAV. Taken together, these results suggest that previous infection of young chicks with lvCIAV decreases lymphoid disorders induced by iIBDV while subsequent iIBDV infection increases the lvCIAV genome in lymphoid organs.

  7. An unexpected cause for aplastic anaemia in an elderly woman.

    PubMed

    Phua, C K; Marimuthu, K; Teo, H Y; Ong, K H; Leo, Y S

    2013-02-01

    Aplastic anaemia is a rare clinical syndrome associated with diminished or absent precursors in the bone marrow. Acquired aplastic anaemia secondary to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is very rare. We present a 71-year-old woman with severe aplastic anaemia secondary to HIV infection, which was after extensive exclusion of other causes. She achieved undetectable viral load after 5 months of combination antiretroviral therapy but remains profoundly pancytopenic, complicated by recurrent infectious and bleeding complications. HIV infection should be considered in patients with pancytopenia.

  8. Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) in Chilean Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) aquaculture: emergence of low pathogenic ISAV-HPR0 and re-emergence of virulent ISAV-HPR∆: HPR3 and HPR14

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstact Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) is a serious disease of marine-farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) caused by ISA virus (ISAV), which belongs to the genus Isavirus, family Orthomyxoviridae. ISA is caused by virulent ISAV strains with deletions in a highly polymorphic region (HPR) of the hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) protein (designated virulent ISAV-HPR∆). This study shows the historic dynamics of ISAV-HPR∆ and ISAV-HPR0 in Chile, the genetic relationship among ISAV-HPR0 reported worldwide and between ISAV-HPR0 and ISAV-HPR∆ in Chile, and reports the 2013 ISA outbreak in Chile. The first ISA outbreak in Chile occurred from mid-June 2007 to 2010 and involved the virulent ISAV-HPR7b, which was then replaced by a low pathogenic ISAV-HPR0 variant. We analyzed this variant in 66 laboratory-confirmed ISAV-HPR0 cases in Chile in comparison to virulent ISAV-HPR∆ that caused two new ISA outbreaks in April 2013. Multiple alignment and phylogenetic analysis of HE sequences from all ISAV-HPR0 viruses allowed us to identify three genomic clusters, which correlated with three residue patterns of ISAV-HPR0 (360PST362, 360PAN362 and 360PAT362) in HPR. The virus responsible for the 2013 ISAV-HPR∆ cases in Chile belonged to ISAV-HPR3 and ISAV-HPR14, and in phylogenetic analyses, both clustered with the ISAV-HPR0 found in Chile. The ISAV-HPR14 had the ISAV-HPR0 residue pattern 360PAT362, which is the only type of ISAV-HPR0 variant found in Chile. This suggested to us that the 2013 ISAV-HPR∆ re-emerged from ISAV-HPR0 that is enzootic in Chilean salmon aquaculture and were not new introductions of virulent ISAV-HPR∆ to Chile. The clinical presentations and diagnostic evidence of the 2013 ISA cases indicated a mixed infection of ISAV with the ectoparasite Caligus rogercresseyi and the bacterium Piscirickettsia salmonis, which underscores the need for active ISAV surveillance in areas where ISAV-HPR0 is enzootic, to ensure early detection and control of new ISA

  9. VIRUS-SPECIFIC POLYSOMES IN CELLS INFECTED WITH THE VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS, *RIBOSOMES, *TISSUE CULTURE CELLS, RIBOSOMES, GROWTH(PHYSIOLOGY), INFECTIOUS DISEASES, ARBOVIRUSES, VIRUSES, NUCLEIC ACIDS, BIOSYNTHESIS, USSR, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE.

  10. Early detection of dominant Env-specific and subdominant Gag-specific CD8+ lymphocytes in equine infectious anemia virus-infected horses using major histocompatibility complex class I/peptide tetrameric complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mealey, Robert H.; Sharif, Amin; Ellis, Shirley A.; Littke, Matt H.; Leib, Steven R.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2012-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are critical for control of lentiviruses, including equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). Measurement of equine CTL responses has relied on chromium-release assays, which do not allow accurate quantitation. Recently, the equine MHC class I molecule 7-6, associated with the ELA-A1 haplotype, was shown to present both the Gag-GW12 and Env-RW12 EIAV CTL epitopes. In this study, 7-6/Gag-GW12 and 7-6/Env-RW12 MHC class I/peptide tetrameric complexes were constructed and used to analyze Gag-GW12- and Env-RW12-specific CTL responses in two EIAV-infected horses (A2164 and A2171). Gag-GW12 and Env-RW12 tetramer-positive CD8+ cells were identified in nonstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells as early as 14 days post-EIAV inoculation, and frequencies of tetramer-positive cells ranged from 0.4% to 6.7% of nonstimulated peripheral blood CD8+ cells during the 127-day study period. Although both horses terminated the initial viremic peak, only horse A2171 effectively controlled viral load. Neutralizing antibody was present during the initial control of viral load in both horses, but the ability to maintain control correlated with Gag-GW12-specific CD8+ cells in A2171. Despite Env-RW12 dominance, Env-RW12 escape viral variants were identified in both horses and there was no correlation between Env-RW12-specific CD8+ cells and control of viral load. Although Gag-GW12 CTL escape did not occur, a Gag-GW12 epitope variant arose in A2164 that was recognized less efficiently than the original epitope. These data indicate that tetramers are useful for identification and quantitation of CTL responses in horses, and suggest that the observed control of EIAV replication and clinical disease was associated with sustained CTL recognition of Gag-specific epitopes. PMID:15979679

  11. Early detection of dominant Env-specific and subdominant Gag-specific CD8+ lymphocytes in equine infectious anemia virus-infected horses using major histocompatibility complex class I/peptide tetrameric complexes.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Robert H; Sharif, Amin; Ellis, Shirley A; Littke, Matt H; Leib, Steven R; McGuire, Travis C

    2005-08-15

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are critical for control of lentiviruses, including equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). Measurement of equine CTL responses has relied on chromium-release assays, which do not allow accurate quantitation. Recently, the equine MHC class I molecule 7-6, associated with the ELA-A1 haplotype, was shown to present both the Gag-GW12 and Env-RW12 EIAV CTL epitopes. In this study, 7-6/Gag-GW12 and 7-6/Env-RW12 MHC class I/peptide tetrameric complexes were constructed and used to analyze Gag-GW12- and Env-RW12-specific CTL responses in two EIAV-infected horses (A2164 and A2171). Gag-GW12 and Env-RW12 tetramer-positive CD8+ cells were identified in nonstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells as early as 14 days post-EIAV inoculation, and frequencies of tetramer-positive cells ranged from 0.4% to 6.7% of nonstimulated peripheral blood CD8+ cells during the 127-day study period. Although both horses terminated the initial viremic peak, only horse A2171 effectively controlled viral load. Neutralizing antibody was present during the initial control of viral load in both horses, but the ability to maintain control correlated with Gag-GW12-specific CD8+ cells in A2171. Despite Env-RW12 dominance, Env-RW12 escape viral variants were identified in both horses and there was no correlation between Env-RW12-specific CD8+ cells and control of viral load. Although Gag-GW12 CTL escape did not occur, a Gag-GW12 epitope variant arose in A2164 that was recognized less efficiently than the original epitope. These data indicate that tetramers are useful for identification and quantitation of CTL responses in horses, and suggest that the observed control of EIAV replication and clinical disease was associated with sustained CTL recognition of Gag-specific epitopes.

  12. Severe malarial anaemia.

    PubMed

    Casals-Pascual, C; Roberts, D J

    2006-03-01

    This review describes the importance of severe malarial anaemia as a public health problem, and the clinical and pathophysiological aspects of this syndrome. The review also highlights the recent advances in our understanding of the epidemiological, clinical, cellular and molecular aspects of severe malarial anaemia.

  13. Equine influenza diagnosis: sample collection and transport.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Thomas M; Reedy, Stephanie E

    2014-01-01

    In horses, presumptive diagnosis of equine influenza is commonly made on the basis of clinical signs. This alone is insufficient for confirmation of equine influenza, because other equine infectious respiratory diseases can in some degree have similar clinical presentations. Surveillance and control of equine influenza also necessitate detection of subclinical cases. Effective diagnosis of equine influenza virus infection is critically dependent on obtaining adequate specimens of virus-containing respiratory secretions for testing. These specimens are also valuable as sources for isolation of virus strains for antigenic characterization and potential inclusion in vaccines. Both nasal swabs and nasopharyngeal swabs are employed in horses. These differ little in their invasiveness, but nasopharyngeal swabs typically yield more virus than nasal swabs and are superior diagnostic specimens. Methods for obtaining nasopharyngeal swab specimens are described.

  14. Equine deep stromal abscesses (51 cases - 2004-2009)--Part 2: the histopathology and immunohistochemical aspect with attention to the histopathologic diagnosis, vascular response, and infectious agents.

    PubMed

    de Linde Henriksen, Michala; Andersen, Pia Haubro; Mietelka, Kristy; Farina, Lisa; Thomsen, Preben D; Plummer, Caryn E; Mangan, Brendan G; Heegaard, Steffen; Coleman, James K; Toft, Nils; Brooks, Dennis E

    2014-07-01

    To investigate histopathologic and immunohistochemical aspects of equine deep stromal abscesses (DSA) with a focus on the histopathologic diagnosis, presumptive etiology, and the immunohistochemical expression of three angiogenesis-related factors: vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). Paraffin-embedded biopsy samples from 51 DSA. The biopsies were collected from full-thickness penetrating keratoplasty or split-thickness lamellar keratoplasty surgeries at the University of Florida Veterinary Medical Center in the period from 2004 to 2009. The histopathologic and immunohistochemical findings were tested for association between each other. Prevalence calculation and test for association with qualitative data analysis was used for data evaluation. Fungal hyphae were found histologically in 47.1% (n = 24) of the DSA cases. Histopathologically, most fungal DSA showed suppurative keratitis (n = 34; 66.7%) and little to no stromal vascularization infiltrating the abscess (negative association, P = 0.005). All three angiogenesis-related factors were expressed to some degree in DSA tissue. A negative association between VEGF-A and PEDF when compared to the presence of fungal hyphae (P < 0.001, P = 0.023) indicated that cases positive for these two factors will most probably not have fungal hyphae present. Abnormally decreased VEGF-A expression is suggested as the reason for the slow vascularization and delayed resolution of fungal DSA, whereas PEDF and IL-ra did not seem to have any influence on the vascularization process. Clinical and histopathologic characteristics of DSA make it possible to suggest an etiology for an equine DSA with an unknown etiology. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  15. Pre-operative anaemia.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, B; Richards, T

    2015-01-01

    Pre-operative anaemia is a relatively common finding, affecting a third of patients undergoing elective surgery. Traditionally associated with chronic disease, management has historically focused on the use of blood transfusion as a solution for anaemia in the peri-operative period. Data from large series now suggest that anaemia is an independent risk associated with poor outcome in both cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. Furthermore, blood transfusion does not appear to ameliorate this risk, and in fact may increase the risk of postoperative complications and hospital length of stay. Consequently, there is a need to identify, diagnose and manage pre-operative anaemia to reduce surgical risk. Discoveries in the pathways of iron metabolism have found that chronic disease can cause a state of functional iron deficiency leading to anaemia. The key iron regulatory protein hepcidin, activated in response to inflammation, inhibits absorption of iron from the gastrointestinal tract and further reduces bioavailability of iron stores for red cell production. Consequently, although iron stores (predominantly ferritin) may be normal, the transport of iron either from the gastrointestinal tract or iron stores to the bone marrow is inhibited, leading to a state of 'functional' iron deficiency and subsequent anaemia. Since absorption from the gastrointestinal tract is blocked, increasing oral iron intake is ineffective, and studies are now looking at the role of intravenous iron to treat anaemia in the surgical setting. In this article, we review the incidence and impact of anaemia on the pre-operative patient. We explain how anaemia may be caused by functional iron deficiency, and how iron deficiency anaemia may be diagnosed and treated.

  16. A Live Attenuated Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Proviral Vaccine with a Modified S2 Gene Provides Protection from Detectable Infection by Intravenous Virulent Virus Challenge of Experimentally Inoculated Horses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Craigo, Jodi K.; Howe, Laryssa; Steckbeck, Jonathan D.; Cook, Sheila; Issel, Charles; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2003-01-01

    Previous evaluations of inactivated whole-virus and envelope subunit vaccines to equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) have revealed a broad spectrum of efficacy ranging from highly type-specific protection to severe enhancement of viral replication and disease in experimentally immunized equids. Among experimental animal lentivirus vaccines, immunizations with live attenuated viral strains have proven most effective, but the vaccine efficacy has been shown to be highly dependent on the nature and severity of the vaccine virus attenuation. We describe here for the first time the characterization of an experimental attenuated proviral vaccine, EIAVUKΔS2, based on inactivation of the S2 accessory gene to down regulate in vivo replication without affecting in vitro growth properties. The results of these studies demonstrated that immunization with EIAVUKΔS2 elicited mature virus-specific immune responses by 6 months and that this vaccine immunity provided protection from disease and detectable infection by intravenous challenge with a reference virulent biological clone, EIAVPV. This level of protection was observed in each of the six experimental horses challenged with the reference virulent EIAVPV by using a low-dose multiple-exposure protocol (three administrations of 10 median horse infectious doses [HID50], intravenous) designed to mimic field exposures and in all three experimentally immunized ponies challenged intravenously with a single inoculation of 3,000 HID50. In contrast, naïve equids subjected to the low- or high-dose challenge develop a detectable infection of challenge virus and acute disease within several weeks. Thus, these data demonstrate that the EIAV S2 gene provides an optimal site for modification to achieve the necessary balance between attenuation to suppress virulence and replication potential to sufficiently drive host immune responses to produce vaccine immunity to viral exposure. PMID:12805423

  17. Validation according to OIE criteria of a monoclonal, recombinant p26-based, serologic competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as screening method in surveillance programs for the detection of Equine infectious anemia virus antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nardini, Roberto; Autorino, Gian Luca; Ricci, Ida; Frontoso, Raffaele; Rosone, Francesca; Simula, Massimiliano; Scicluna, Maria Teresa

    2016-03-01

    The Italian National Reference Center for equine infectious anemia (CRAIE; Rome, Italy) developed and validated a monoclonal, recombinant p26-based competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) for the detection of EIA virus antibodies employing the 2010 criteria of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). The following parameters were evaluated: cutoff values, repeatability, reproducibility, concordance, analytical sensitivity (Se), absolute analytical specificity (Sp), and diagnostic Se and Sp. Positive and negative predictive values were also defined in relation to the estimated prevalence. When the cELISA was used as a screening test for 96,468 samples in the Italian EIA surveillance program, 17% more EIA cases were detected than by the agar gel immunodiffusion test, and the apparent diagnostic Sp estimated from these samples was 99.8%, which was more than the diagnostic Sp (80.2%) estimated from validation. The high Se and Sp of the cELISA confirm its fit for purpose as a screening test. © 2015 The Author(s).

  18. Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) isolated from the ISA disease outbreaks in Chile diverged from ISAV isolates from Norway around 1996 and was disseminated around 2005, based on surface glycoprotein gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Kibenge, Frederick SB; Godoy, Marcos G; Wang, Yingwei; Kibenge, Molly JT; Gherardelli, Valentina; Mansilla, Soledad; Lisperger, Angelica; Jarpa, Miguel; Larroquete, Geraldine; Avendaño, Fernando; Lara, Marcela; Gallardo, Alicia

    2009-01-01

    Background Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus (ISAV) is a pathogen of marine-farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar); a disease first diagnosed in Norway in 1984. For over 25 years ISAV has caused major disease outbreaks in the Northern hemisphere, and remains an emerging fish pathogen because of the asymptomatic infections in marine wild fish and the potential for emergence of new epidemic strains. ISAV belongs to the family Orthomyxoviridae, together with influenza viruses but is sufficiently different to be assigned to its own genus, Isavirus. The Isavirus genome consists of eight single-stranded RNA species, and the virions have two surface glycoproteins; fusion (F) protein encoded on segment 5 and haemagglutinin-esterase (HE) protein encoded on segment 6. However, comparision between different ISAV isolates is complicated because there is presently no universally accepted nomenclature system for designation of genetic relatedness between ISAV isolates. The first outbreak of ISA in marine-farmed Atlantic salmon in the Southern hemisphere occurred in Chile starting in June 2007. In order to describe the molecular characteristics of the virus so as to understand its origins, how ISAV isolates are maintained and spread, and their virulence characteristics, we conducted a study where the viral sequences were directly amplified, cloned and sequenced from tissue samples collected from several ISA-affected fish on the different fish farms with confirmed or suspected ISA outbreaks in Chile. This paper describes the genetic characterization of a large number of ISAV strains associated with extensive outbreaks in Chile starting in June 2007, and their phylogenetic relationships with selected European and North American isolates that are representative of the genetic diversity of ISAV. Results RT-PCR for ISAV F and HE glycoprotein genes was performed directly on tissue samples collected from ISA-affected fish on different farms among 14 fish companies in Chile during the

  19. Solution structure of the equine infectious anemia virus p9 protein: a rationalization of its different ALIX binding requirements compared to the analogous HIV-p6 protein.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok; Bruns, Karsten; Röder, René; Henklein, Peter; Votteler, Jörg; Wray, Victor; Schubert, Ulrich

    2009-12-17

    The equine infection anemia virus (EIAV) p9 Gag protein contains the late (L-) domain required for efficient virus release of nascent virions from the cell membrane of infected cell. In the present study the p9 protein and N- and C-terminal fragments (residues 1-21 and 22-51, respectively) were chemically synthesized and used for structural analyses. Circular dichroism and 1H-NMR spectroscopy provide the first molecular insight into the secondary structure and folding of this 51-amino acid protein under different solution conditions. Qualitative 1H-chemical shift and NOE data indicate that in a pure aqueous environment p9 favors an unstructured state. In its most structured state under hydrophobic conditions, p9 adopts a stable helical structure within the C-terminus. Quantitative NOE data further revealed that this alpha-helix extends from Ser-27 to Ser-48, while the N-terminal residues remain unstructured. The structural elements identified for p9 differ substantially from that of the functional homologous HIV-1 p6 protein. These structural differences are discussed in the context of the different types of L-domains regulating distinct cellular pathways in virus budding. EIAV p9 mediates virus release by recruiting the ALG2-interacting protein X (ALIX) via the YPDL-motif to the site of virus budding, the counterpart of the YPXnL-motif found in p6. However, p6 contains an additional PTAP L-domain that promotes HIV-1 release by binding to the tumor susceptibility gene 101 (Tsg101). The notion that structures found in p9 differ form that of p6 further support the idea that different mechanisms regulate binding of ALIX to primary versus secondary L-domains types.

  20. Anaemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Goonewardene, Malik; Shehata, Mishkat; Hamad, Asma

    2012-02-01

    Anaemia in pregnancy, defined as a haemoglobin concentration (Hb) < 110 g/L, affects more than 56 million women globally, two thirds of them being from Asia. Multiple factors lead to anaemia in pregnancy, nutritional iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) being the commonest. Underlying inflammatory conditions, physiological haemodilution and several factors affecting Hb and iron status in pregnancy lead to difficulties in establishing a definitive diagnosis. IDA is associated with increased maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, and long-term adverse effects in the new born. Strategies to prevent anaemia in pregnancy and its adverse effects include treatment of underlying conditions, iron and folate supplementation given weekly for all menstruating women including adolescents and daily for women during pregnancy and the post partum period, and delayed clamping of the umbilical cord at delivery. Oral iron is preferable to intravenous therapy for treatment of IDA. B12 and folate deficiencies in pregnancy are rare and may be due to inadequate dietary intake with the latter being more common. These vitamins play an important role in embryo genesis and hence any relative deficiencies may result in congenital abnormalities. Finding the underlying cause are crucial to the management of these deficiencies. Haemolytic anaemias rare also rare in pregnancy, but may have life-threatening complications if the diagnosis is not made in good time and acted upon appropriately.

  1. Anaemia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Gómez Ramírez, Susana; Remacha Sevilla, Ángel Francisco; Muñoz Gómez, Manuel

    2017-07-22

    Anaemia is common in the elderly and is associated with an increased risk of physical, functional, and cognitive impairment, hospitalisation and mortality. Although it is unknown whether anaemia is a causal factor or a subrogated marker of worse health status, its correction can improve the patients' physical and functional capacity. Detection, classification, and treatment of anaemia should be a priority for the health system. The main causes of anaemia in the elderly are nutritional deficiencies and chronic disease, with or without kidney failure, although some cases are of indeterminate origin. Medical history and physical examination help to clarify its aetiology. A diagnostic algorithm based on data from the lab allows anaemia classification with a therapeutic orientation. Supplements of iron and maturation factors, as well as erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, constitute the mainstay of treatment, along with that of the underlying disease, whereas red blood cell transfusion should be reserved for severe cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Micronutrients and Anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Jamil, Kazi M.; Rahman, Ahmed Shafiqur; Bardhan, P.K.; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Chowdhury, Fahima; Sarker, Shafiqul Alam; Khan, Ali Miraj; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2008-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies and anaemia remain as major health concerns for children in Bangladesh. Among the micronutrient interventions, supplementation with vitamin A to children aged less than five years has been the most successful, especially after distribution of vitamin A was combined with National Immunization Days. Although salt sold in Bangladesh is intended to contain iodine, much of the salt does not contain iodine, and iodine deficiency continues to be common. Anaemia similarly is common among all population groups and has shown no sign of improvement even when iron-supplementation programmes have been attempted. It appears that many other causes contribute to anaemia in addition to iron deficiency. Zinc deficiency is a key micronutrient deficiency and is covered in a separate paper because of its importance among new child-health interventions. PMID:18831229

  3. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  4. Hepcidin and anaemia.

    PubMed

    Means, Robert T

    2004-12-01

    The anaemia of chronic disease (ACD) is a common haematologic syndrome characterized by hypoferraemia with adequate reticuloendothelial iron stores. Frequently, serum ferritin concentration in these patients is elevated. The pathogenesis of ACD involves abnormalities in red cell survival, the erythropoietic response to anaemia, and in iron metabolism. Hepcidin is an antibacterial protein produced in the liver which can be found in blood or urine, and which participates in host defense. Recent studies have demonstrated that hepcidin is a key regulator of iron balance in the intestinal mucosa, and that abnormalities in hepcidin gene expression are associated with clinical abnormalities in iron parameters and, in some cases, with anaemia. Hepcidin is an acute-phase reacting protein, and it has been suggested that hepcidin is the key mediator of ACD. Investigation of hepcidin production in either serum or urine demonstrates a strong correlation with serum ferritin concentration. Differences between the hepcidin concentrations observed in ACD (or syndromes resembling ACD) and those observed in iron deficiency may depend on the definition used for the anaemia syndrome. It seems very likely that hepcidin is a major contributor to iron abnormalities characteristic of ACD; whether it contributes to the pathogenesis of the syndrome in a broader sense remains to be determined by further investigation.

  5. Malarial anaemia and nitric oxide induced megaloblastic anaemia: a review on the causes of malarial anaemia.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Prasanna

    2009-06-01

    Direct destruction and ineffective erythropoesis does not adequately explain the cause of anaemia in malaria. It is possible that there are more other mechanisms involved besides the causes described till date in malarial anaemia. The effect of NO on erythropoesis and a major haematological abnormality (microcytic/normocytic/megaloblastic picture) can significantly be observed on repeated exposure. In addition, NO can inhibit the enzyme methionine synthase so functional vit B12 deficiency state may occur which can lead to megaloblastic anaemia. This review will focus on causation of malarial anaemia and nitric oxide induced megaloblastic anaemia.

  6. Iron-deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Cook, J D

    1994-12-01

    Iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a common clinical problem throughout the world and an enormous public health problem in developing countries. The cornerstone of the laboratory identification of IDA is a low haemoglobin and serum ferritin concentration although a normal serum ferritin does exclude IDA. When the serum ferritin is normal in an anaemic patient with iron-deficient erythropoiesis, it is common practise to perform a bone marrow examination to diagnose IDA. The recent introduction of serum transferrin receptor measurements is a useful alternative for distinguishing IDA from the anaemia of chronic disease because the serum receptor concentration is usually elevated in patients with IDA but normal in patients with anaemia due to inflammation or neoplasia. It is helpful for the clinican to be aware of the causes of physiological IDA. The most important are increased rate of body growth, excessive menstrual blood loss, pregnancy, regular blood donation, intensive endurance training, chronic aspirin use and a vegetarian diet. Without these, a careful search for unsuspected gastrointestinal blood loss must be made and even when the suspicion of physiological IDA is high, it is prudent to screen for fecal occult blood. In most patients, IDA responds promptly to oral iron therapy. Patients who experience troublesome side-effects with oral iron might benefit from a gastric delivery system for oral iron which eliminates nausea and vomiting and improves iron absorption when given with food.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Controlling equine influenza: Traditional to next generation serological assays.

    PubMed

    Kinsley, Rebecca; Scott, Simon D; Daly, Janet M

    2016-05-01

    Serological assays provide an indirect route for the recognition of infectious agents via the detection of antibodies against the infectious agent of interest within serum. Serological assays for equine influenza A virus can be applied for different purposes: diagnosing infections; subtyping isolates; surveillance of circulating strains; and to evaluate the efficacy of vaccines before they reach the market. Haemagglutination inhibition (HI) and single radial haemolysis (SRH) assays are most commonly used in the equine field. This review outlines how both these assays together with virus neutralization (VN) and ELISA are performed, interpreted and applied for the control of equine influenza, giving the limitations and advantages of each. The pseudotyped virus neutralization assay (PVNA) is also discussed as a promising prospect for the future of equine influenza virus serology.

  8. Equine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Landolt, Gabriele A

    2014-12-01

    For decades the horse has been viewed as an isolated or "dead-end" host for influenza A viruses, with equine influenza virus being considered as relatively stable genetically. Although equine influenza viruses are genetically more stable than those of human lineage, they are by no means in evolutionary stasis. Moreover, recent transmission of equine-lineage influenza viruses to dogs also challenges the horse's status as a dead-end host. This article reviews recent developments in the epidemiology and evolution of equine influenza virus. In addition, the clinical presentation of equine influenza infection, diagnostic techniques, and vaccine recommendations are briefly summarized.

  9. Anaemia in inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Günter; Schett, Georg

    2013-04-01

    Anaemia is frequently observed in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Depending on its severity, anaemia negatively affects cardiovascular performance, physical activity and the quality of life of patients. However, anaemia is considered to be a symptom of the underlying inflammatory disease and, thus, neglected as a complex medical condition that warrants specific diagnosis and treatment. Although inflammation-induced alterations in iron homeostasis and erythropoiesis have a dominant role in the pathogenesis of this type of anaemia, multiple other factors such as chronic blood loss, haemolysis, disease and treatment-associated adverse effects or vitamin deficiencies can also take part in the development of anaemia. Accordingly, the prevalence of anaemia is positively associated with the severity of the underlying disease. This Review will summarize epidemiological data on anaemia in inflammatory rheumatic diseases, along with a detailed description of underlying pathophysiological pathways, available diagnostic tools and practical diagnostic strategies. Discussion of established and newly emerging treatment regimens, as well as the need for further research in this clinically relevant field, will also be included.

  10. [Anaemia in chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Hradec, J

    2010-08-01

    Anaemia is a relatively frequent co-morbidity of chronic heart as well as chronic renal failure. In both conditions, it represents a strong and independent predictor of increased morbidity and mortality. Aetiology of this anaemia is multi-factorial. A number of various factors play a role in its development, e.g. inadequate erythropoietin production in the kidneys, bone marrow inhibition, iron deficiency as well as haemodilution associated with fluid retention. Treatment strategies aim at two directions. One is the stimulation of erythropoiesis with recombinant human erythropoietin or its analogues such as darbepoetin alpha. The other involves iron substitution, administered preferably intravenously for improved efficacy and tolerability. Clinical studies evaluating treatment of anaemia in chronic heart failure with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents conducted so far were ofa small scale, were not controlled with placebo and usually assessed proxy parameters. Their results suggested that effective treatment of anaemia in patients with chronic heart failure improves exertion tolerance, clinical status (NYHA class) as well as the quality of life and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Recently completed TREAT study was the first large morbidity and mortality study evaluating treatment of anaemia with an erythropoietin analogue compared to placebo. On a sample of more than 4000 patients with diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure and significant anaemia, this study has shown that effective treatment of anaemia with darbepoetin alpha did not affect at all the incidence of cardiovascular and renal events; on the other hand, it had lead to a nearly two-fold increase in the incidence of cerebrovascular events. Some doubts about the safety of treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents have occurred in the past based on the studies of anaemia treatment in patients with cancer and renal diseases. An answer to the question whether the treatment of anaemia

  11. [Pregnancy-induced haemolytic anaemia].

    PubMed

    Karagiozova, J; Masseva, A; Ivanov, St; Marinov, B; Kulinska, R; Boiadjiev, D; Jordanova, D

    2014-01-01

    This is the clinical case of a primiparous eight month pregnant female, presenting with symptoms of pregnancy-induced acute haemolytic anaemia (haemolytic aneamia provoked by an immune mechanism, intra- and extra-erythrocyte defects, and HELLP syndrome were excluded). The anaemia progressed to become life-threatening for both the pregnant women and the foetus, which brought the following questions into consideration: diagnosis of anaemia during pregnancy; dosing of corticosteroid therapy; possibility of giving birth to a viable foetus and prognosis for next pregnancies. Owing to the inter-disciplinary efforts, the life and health of this pregnant woman were preserved, but the foetus was lost.

  12. Induction and Characterization of Immune Responses in Small Animals Using a Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEE) Replicon System, Expressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Envelope Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Montelaro, and C. J. Issel. 1995. Enhanced sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies in a variant of equine infectious anemia virus is linked to amino acid...371-8. 64 36. Davis, N. L., L. V. Willis, J. F. Smith, and R. E. Johnston. 1989. In vitro synthesis of infectious venezuelan equine encephalitis...Characterization of Immune Responses in small animals using a Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEE) Replicon System, Expressing Human

  13. Equine Arteritis Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    03. Nidovirales : 03.004. Arteriviridae : 03.004.0. {03.004.0. unknown} : 03.004.0.01. Arterivirus : 03.004.0.01.001. Equine arteritis virus will be published online. The article details the phenotypic and genotypic makeup of equine arteritis virus (EAV), and summarizes its biological properties....

  14. Severe acquired anaemia in Africa: new concepts.

    PubMed

    van Hensbroek, Michael B; Jonker, Femkje; Bates, Imelda

    2011-09-01

    Severe anaemia is common in Africa. It has a high mortality and particularly affects young children and pregnant women. Recent research provides new insights into the mechanisms and causes of severe acquired anaemia and overturns accepted dogma. Deficiencies of vitamin B12 and vitamin A, but not of iron or folic acid, are associated with severe anaemia. Bacterial infections and, in very young children, hookworm infections are also common in severe anaemia. Irrespective of the aetiology, the mechanism causing severe anaemia is often red cell production failure. Severe anaemia in Africa is therefore a complex multi-factorial syndrome, which, even in an individual patient, is unlikely to be amenable to a single intervention. Policies and practices concerning anaemia diagnosis, treatment and prevention need to be substantially revised if we are to make a significant impact on the huge burden of severe anaemia in Africa.

  15. [Aplastic anaemia associated with pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Bozhinova, S; Kirovakov, Zl; Porozhanova, K; Kostova, S; Bozhinov, P

    2012-01-01

    Aplastic anaemia is rear disease caused by destruction of pluripotent stem cells in bone marrow. Pregnancy is one of the main factor that lead to immunosuppression. During pregnancy aplastic anaemia could be life-threatening for both mother and child, because of the variety of complications like bleeding and infections. We introduce the first case of pregnant woman with aplastic anaemia in Bulgaria. The woman was diagnosed in 12-13 gestational week. All biometric characteristics of the foetus were normal. The patient was consulted with oncohaematologists, pediatricians, specialists of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, and intensivists. Methylprednisolone, antibiotics, packed cells and platelet transfusions were initiated. However, the moment for interruption of the pregnancy was missed (first trimester). The woman developed a fever and vomited bloody material. Despite the optimal supportive treatment, the patient died. The pathoanatomy diagnose is Aplastic anaemia, induced by the pregnancy. From our experience with that case and other references from the literature we conclude that all pregnant woman with aplastic anaemia should interrupt their pregnancy during first trimester. In those patients who are diagnosed at later terms of pregnancy very supportive infusions and immunosuppressive therapy should be made, including antithymocyte globulin and/or cyclosporine. Women with no improvement from that therapy should achieve a bone-marrow transplantation.

  16. Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious diseases kill more people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living ... live NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  17. Maternal anaemia in West and Central Africa: time for urgent action.

    PubMed

    Ayoya, Mohamed Ag; Bendech, Mohamed Ag; Zagré, Noel Marie; Tchibindat, Félicité

    2012-05-01

    To review the prevalence, severity and determinants of anaemia among women in West and Central Africa (WCA) and raise awareness among policy makers and programme planners in the region. Systematic descriptive review of data in the public domain of the ORC Macro MEASURE Demographic and Health Surveys, national nutrition surveys, oral and technical communications at regional meetings, studies published in scientific journals, and WHO and UNICEF databases. West and Central Africa region. Women of childbearing age. The prevalence of anaemia among pregnant and non-pregnant women is higher than 50 % and 40 %, respectively, in all countries. Within countries, this prevalence varies by living setting (rural v. urban), women's age and education. Across countries, socio-economic and climatic differences have no apparent association with the prevalence of anaemia among women. Several factors contribute either alone or jointly to the high rates of maternal anaemia in this region. These include widespread nutritional deficiencies; high incidence of infectious diseases; low access to and poor quality of health services; low literacy rates; ineffective design, implementation and evaluation of anaemia control programmes; and poverty. Addressing the multiple causes and minimizing the consequences of anaemia on maternal and child health and development in WCA require integrated multifactorial and multisectoral strategies. This also calls for unprecedented, historical and stronger political will and commitment that put adolescent girls and maternal health at the centre of the development agenda.

  18. Pillar III--optimisation of anaemia tolerance.

    PubMed

    Meier, Jens; Gombotz, Hans

    2013-03-01

    In the case of acute bleeding, the use of the anaemia tolerance of a patient enables the physician to either avoid blood transfusions or delay them after bleeding has ceased. This concept is the cornerstone of the third pillar of modern patient blood management programmes. Its efficacy depends on the degree of utilisation of anaemia tolerance, which is not constant but depends on the compensatory capacity of the individual patient in a given situation. Fortunately, the specifications of anaemia tolerance can be influenced by the anaesthesiologist. This article presents the concept of anaemia tolerance and highlights the options for how anaemia tolerance can be optimised in the pre-, intra-, and postoperative periods.

  19. Eastern Equine Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Image of Culiseta melanura mosquito, photo taken by Jason Williams, reproduced by permission from the Virginia Mosquito Control Association. Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is ...

  20. Marketing your equine practice.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Robert P

    2009-12-01

    The take-home message in marketing your equine practice is simple: understand your position in the target market and the buying behavior of your current and prospective customers. Time well spent on analysis and evaluation of options can maximize customer value in the services and products you offer. This allows you to capture profit and to attain your personal and professional goals as an equine practitioner.

  1. Applied equine genetics

    PubMed Central

    FINNO, C. J.; BANNASCH, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Genome sequencing of the domestic horse and subsequent advancements in the field of equine genomics have led to an explosion in the development of tools for mapping traits and diseases and evaluating gene expression. The objective of this review is to discuss the current progress in the field of equine genomics, with specific emphasis on assembly and analysis of the reference sequence and subsequent sequencing of a Quarter Horse mare; the genomic tools currently available to researchers and their implications in genomic investigations in the horse; the genomics of Mendelian and non-Mendelian traits; the genomics of performance traits and considerations regarding genetic testing in the horse. The whole-genome sequencing of a Quarter Horse mare has provided additional variants within the equine genome that extend past single nucleotide polymorphisms to include insertions/deletions and copy number variants. Equine single nucleotide polymorphism arrays have allowed for the investigation of both simple and complex genetic traits while DNA microarrays have provided a tool for examining gene expression across various tissues and with certain disease conditions. Recently, next-generation sequencing has become more affordable and both whole-genome DNA sequencing and transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing are methodologies that are being applied to equine genomic research. Research in the field of equine genomics continues to expand rapidly as the cost of genotyping and sequencing decreases, resulting in a need for quality bioinformatics software and expertise to appropriately handle both the size and complexity of these data. PMID:24802051

  2. Anaemia in advanced chronic fasciolosis.

    PubMed

    Valero, M A; Gironès, N; García-Bodelón, M A; Periago, M V; Chico-Calero, I; Khoubbane, M; Fresno, M; Mas-Coma, S

    2008-10-01

    The association between fasciolosis-induced anaemia and related factors has been quantified in a rodent model. Haematological parameters were analysed in Wistar rats at 20 and 60 weeks post-infection (p.i.). Pigment stones and bile specimens were collected. Serum IgG1, IgG2a and IgE were determined in rat serum samples. Cytokine levels have been correlated with haematological parameters. The screening for gastrointestinal bleeding was carried out. Bacteriological bile cultures revealed viable bacteria in 53.8% of specimens at 60 weeks p.i. The results show that the type of anaemia in fasciolosis might be considered a biomarker of the chronicity period of the disease, changing from normocytic to macrocytic in the early chronic period (20 weeks p.i.) and to microcytic in the advanced chronic period (60 weeks p.i.). Likewise, changing from normochromic in the early chronic period to hypochromic in the advanced chronic period. Multivariate analysis suggested an association between anaemia and the following factors: fluke burden, eggs per gram of faeces, body area of parasite, presence of blood in faeces, IgG1 and eosinophil levels, and % of splenic weight. Of all variables analysed, the fluke burden is the one which presents the highest anaemia risk, even exceeding the variable presence of blood in faeces. The development of anaemia appears to be complex and may involve multiple mechanisms. However, to the mechanisms that until now explain Fascioliosis-related anaemia (compensatory increase in erythrocyte production and a continuous drain on iron stores resulting from the parasites' blood-sucking activities) the following causes ought to be added: haemolysis of red blood cells, the general effects of inflammation on erythropoiesis, concomitant parasitic and bacterial infections and pre-morbid nutritional abnormalities. Extrapolation to human fasciolosis is discussed. The results of the rodent model lead to the assumption that a high risk of anaemia in subjects with a

  3. [A neonate with anaemia of prematurity: zinc protoporphyrin identifies iron deficiency anaemia without iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    van der Feen, Diederik E; van Hillegersberg, Jacqueline L A M; Schippers, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Anaemia is a common problem in premature infants and is generally easy to treat with iron supplementation. If the anaemia persists despite appropriate correction of deficiencies, more extensive evaluation is required. We describe a case of a premature male infant with a production-deficient anaemia without metabolic deficiencies, eventually identified as anaemia of prematurity. This type of anaemia is commonly diagnosed but its highly variable and complex aetiology and phenotype are often poorly understood. A probable explanation for the anaemia of prematurity in this case was a transient iron incorporation defect, identifiable by high levels of zinc protoporphyrin.

  4. Infection control in equine critical care settings.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Brandy A; Morley, Paul S

    2014-08-01

    There is a recognizable standard of practice for infection control in veterinary medicine. Effort must be given to control and prevention of infectious disease transmission within a facility and among animal populations. In the critical care setting, patients typically have a high degree of systemic illness and immune compromise, are commonly subjected to invasive procedures and placement of indwelling devices, and frequently receive antimicrobials and gastric protectants. Every equine critical care unit is distinctive in its physical and operational features and the types of patients that are managed. Infection control programs must therefore be tailored to each facility's needs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Therapeutics for Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, Nicola; Tobin, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis is an infectious disease of the central nervous system caused by Sarcocystis neurona or Neospora hughesi. Affected horses routinely present with progressive and asymmetrical neurologic deficits. The diagnosis relies on the presence of neurologic signs, ruling out other neurologic disorders, and the detection of intrathecally derived antibodies to either S neurona and/or N hughesi. Recommended treatment is use of an FDA-approved anticoccidial drug formulation. Medical and supportive treatment is provided based on the severity of neurologic deficits and complications. This article focuses on recent data related to diagnosis, pharmacologic treatment, and prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Equine learning behaviour.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jack; Arkins, Sean

    2007-09-01

    Scientists and equestrians continually seek to achieve a clearer understanding of equine learning behaviour and its implications for training. Behavioural and learning processes in the horse are likely to influence not only equine athletic success but also the usefulness of the horse as a domesticated species. However given the status and commercial importance of the animal, equine learning behaviour has received only limited investigation. Indeed most experimental studies on equine cognitive function to date have addressed behaviour, learning and conceptualization processes at a moderately basic cognitive level compared to studies in other species. It is however, likely that the horses with the greatest ability to learn and form/understand concepts are those, which are better equipped to succeed in terms of the human-horse relationship and the contemporary training environment. Within equitation generally, interpretation of the behavioural processes and training of the desired responses in the horse are normally attempted using negative reinforcement strategies. On the other hand, experimental designs to actually induce and/or measure equine learning rely almost exclusively on primary positive reinforcement regimes. Employing two such different approaches may complicate interpretation and lead to difficulties in identifying problematic or undesirable behaviours in the horse. The visual system provides the horse with direct access to immediate environmental stimuli that affect behaviour but vision in the horse is of yet not fully investigated or understood. Further investigations of the equine visual system will benefit our understanding of equine perception, cognitive function and the subsequent link with learning and training. More detailed comparative investigations of feral or free-ranging and domestic horses may provide useful evidence of attention, stress and motivational issues affecting behavioural and learning processes in the horse. The challenge for

  7. Pathogenesis of Aerosolized Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Infection in Guinea Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    infected animals and humans [1-3]. The related alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) and western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) also...viruses [4] and experimental studies in animals have demonstrated that all three alphaviruses are infectious by the aerosol route and are considered a...associ- ated with EEEV infection are the most severe of any alphavirus , with an estimated mortality rate in humans of 30% for the North American strains

  8. Identification of broadly recognized, T helper 1 lymphocyte epitopes in an equine lentivirus

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Darrilyn G; Oaks, J Lindsay; Brown, Wendy C; McGuire, Travis C

    2002-01-01

    Equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) is a horse lentivirus causing lifelong, persistent infection. During acute infection, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are probably involved in terminating plasma viraemia. However, only a few EIAV CTL epitopes, restricted to fewer horse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I alleles, are known. As interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-secreting CD4+, T helper 1 (Th1) lymphocytes promote CTL activity and help maintain memory CTL, identifying broadly recognized EIAV Th1 epitopes would contribute significantly to vaccine strategies seeking to promote strong CTL responses among horses with varying class I haplotypes. To this end, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 10 MHC disparate, EIAV-infected horses were tested in T-lymphocyte proliferation assays for recognition of peptides from the Gag p26 capsid region and a portion of Pol. Both regions are highly conserved among EIAV isolates, and this Pol region is 51–63% homologueous to other lentiviral Pol proteins. Seven of 10 horses recognized peptide Gag 221–245, and peptides Gag 242–261 and Pol 323–344 were recognized by five and four horses, respectively. Furthermore, the Gag peptides were recognized by two additional horses after resolving their initial plasma viraemia, indicating that these two peptides can be immunodominant early in infection. Gag peptide-responsive PBMC produced only IFN-γ, indicating a Th1 response, while Pol 323–344-responsive PBMC produced IFN-γ both with and without interleukin-4. PBMC from uninfected horses failed to either proliferate or secrete cytokines in response to peptide stimulation. Finally, CD4+ T lymphocytes were required for proliferation responses, as shown by assays using CD4- versus CD8-depleted PBMC. PMID:11918691

  9. Detection of West Nile Virus and other common equine viruses in three locations from the Leeward Islands, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Bolfa, Pompei; Jeon, Isaac; Loftis, Amanda; Leslie, Teresa; Marchi, Silvia; Sithole, Fortune; Beck, Cecile; Lecollinet, Sylvie; Zientara, Stephan; Hans, Aymeric; Issel, Charles J

    2017-10-01

    Equines in the West Indies are used for recreational purposes, tourism industry, racing and agriculture or can be found in feral populations. Little is known in the Caribbean basin about the prevalence of some major equine infectious diseases, some with zoonotic potential, listed as reportable by the OIE. Our objective was to study the prevalence of antibodies for West Nile Virus (WNV), Equine Herpes Virus-1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4), Equine Influenza (EI), Equine Viral Arteritis (EVA) and Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) using a retrospective serological convenience study. We used 180 equine serum samples, 140 from horses and 40 from donkeys in St. Kitts, Nevis, and Sint Eustatius, collected between 2006 and 2015 that were tested with ELISA kits and virus neutralization (for WNV and EVA). Combining ELISA with virus neutralization testing, 25 (13.8%) equine sera were WNV positive (a mixture of indigenous and imported equines) and 3 sera (1.6%) showed doubtful results. For EHV-1, 41 equines (23.7%), mean age 6.7 years, were seropositive. For EHV-4, 138 equines were found seropositive (82.8%), mean age 6.3 years. For EI, 49 equines (27.2%), mean age 7.5 years, were seropositive on ELISA, some previously vaccinated horses. No antibodies against EAV were found on virus neutralization testing, although one animal (0.6%), was EAV positive on ELISA. All samples were EIAV negative. The seroprevalence for EHV-1 and EHV-4 is similar to other parts of the world. For the first time in the study location serologic evidence of antibodies against WNV and EI is reported. This was found in both indigenous and imported animals, highlighting the need for developing proper surveillance plans based on complementary methods of virus detection. Further studies will be needed to define the prevalence, rates of transmission, characterize local virus strains, and study their impact on these populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Reticulocytes in the diagnosis of anaemia].

    PubMed

    Heiligers-Duckers, Connie; Werner, Philo T; van Drunen, Marlea E P

    2013-01-01

    Reticulocytes are immature erythrocytes; the number of reticulocytes in the peripheral blood reflects erythropoietic activity. Two cases are described to illustrate the use of the reticulocyte count in the diagnostic workup of anaemia. The first patient was a 62-year-old woman presenting with fatigue. Laboratory evaluation showed severe macrocytic anaemia, thrombocytopaenia and the presence of schistocytes. A low reticulocyte count suggested decreased erythropoiesis underlying the anaemia; this led to the diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency. The second patient, a 52-year-old woman, also presented with fatigue and macrocytic anaemia. A high reticulocyte count indicated increased erythrocyte degradation, and the patient was eventually diagnosed with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. The role of reticulocytes in the differential diagnostic workup of anaemia was explored on the basis of these case descriptions. The test methodology, analytical performance, reference values and pitfalls were discussed, as well as the reticulocyte indices and their use in monitoring therapy.

  11. Antiherpetic Drugs in Equine Medicine.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Lara K

    2017-04-01

    Since vaccination may not prevent disease, antiherpetic drugs have been investigated for the therapy of several equine herpesviruses. Drug efficacy has been assessed in horses with disease, but most evidence is in vitro, in other species, or empirical. Oral valacyclovir is most often administered in the therapy of equine herpesvirus type-1 (EHV-1) to protect adult horses from equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy, while oral acyclovir is frequently administered for EHV-5 infection in the therapy of equine multinodular pulmonary fibrosis. Other antiherpetic drugs are promising but require further investigation. Several topical drugs are also empirically used in the therapy of equine viral keratitis.

  12. Megaloblastic anaemia in vegetarian Asians.

    PubMed

    Matthews, J H; Wood, J K

    1984-01-01

    Of 27 Asians with a megaloblastic bone marrow, 22 (81%) had nutritional deficiency of vitamin B12 (NMA), while five (19%) had true pernicious anaemia (PA). All the patients were Hindu vegetarians except for a single Muslim who had PA. Dietary intakes of calories, protein, iron, vitamin B12 and folate were below the recommended level in both groups. The PA group had lower levels of serum B12 and higher levels of serum folate than the NMA group. Despite low levels of red cell folate (RCF) in the NMA patients, the abnormality in deoxyuridine (dU) suppression was always corrected by vitamin B12. The dU suppressed value showed a significant inverse relationship to the RCF level. Nutritional deficiency of vitamin B12 is the most common cause of megaloblastic anaemia in Hindu vegetarians but the incidence of true PA is higher than previously thought and may approximate to that of the white population.

  13. Biological characterization of Nigerian chicken anaemia virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Oluwayelu, D O; Olaleye, O D; Todd, D

    2010-12-01

    Chicken anaemia virus (CAV) DNA was extracted from thymus, liver and bone marrow samples obtained from broiler and pullet chicken flocks in southwestern Nigeria, which presented with clinical signs and lesions suggestive of both infectious bursal disease and chicken infectious anaemia. While CAV was successfully isolated in MDCC-MSB1 cells from four of the pooled tissue samples, the remaining two samples failed to grow in cells. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) characterization using four MAbs produced against the reference Cuxhaven-1 (Cux-1) CAV isolate showed that Nigerian CAV isolates are antigenically related to each other and to the Cux-1 virus. Pathogenicity studies with the Cux-1 virus and one of the Nigerian isolates (NGR-1) revealed that NGR-1 was more pathogenic that the former. We conclude that although Nigerian CAV isolates are antigenically related to each other, they differ in terms of cell culture growth characteristics and probably pathogenicity. These findings further confirm that CAV exists and can no longer be ignored in poultry disease diagnosis in Nigeria. Cases hitherto diagnosed as IBD may actually be CIA or a co-infection of the two.

  14. Alpha(+)-thalassaemia and malarial anaemia.

    PubMed

    Danquah, Ina; Mockenhaupt, Frank P

    2008-11-01

    The mechanisms by which alpha(+)-thalassaemia protects against severe malaria, and severe malarial anaemia in particular, are poorly understood. A recent report proposes that the increased count of microcytic and hypochromic erythrocytes in alpha(+)-thalassaemia reduces the haemoglobin decline during acute malaria and, thus, reduces the risk of anaemia. This mechanism might add to further alpha(+)-thalassaemic attributes that are involved in the attenuation of anaemia caused by both acute and chronic Plasmodium infections.

  15. Variant congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia with ringed sideroblasts.

    PubMed

    Brien, W F; Mant, M J; Etches, W S

    1985-01-01

    A family is described with mild anaemia characterized by marked dyserythropoiesis and by prominent ringed sideroblasts. Inheritance is autosomal recessive. Other features include marked microcytosis, poikilocytosis, mild haemolysis, slightly increased haemoglobin A2, bone marrow erythroid hyperplasia and non-specific structural abnormalities of erythroid precursors on electron microscopy. This appears to be a previously unreported type of hereditary anaemia with both dyserythropoiesis and ringed sideroblasts. We propose the designation 'variant congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia with ringed sideroblasts'.

  16. Standing equine sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Barakzai, Safia Z; Dixon, Padraic M

    2014-04-01

    Trephination of the equine sinuses is a common surgical procedure in sedated standing horses. Standing sinus flap surgery has become increasingly popular in equine referral hospitals and offers several advantages over sinusotomy performed under general anesthesia, including reduced patient-associated risks and costs; less intraoperative hemorrhage, allowing better visualization of the operative site; and allows surgeons to take their time. Other minimally invasive surgical procedures include sinoscopic surgery, balloon sinuplasty, and transnasal laser sinonasal fenestration. Despite the procedure used, appropriate indications for surgery, good patient selection, and familiarity with regional anatomy and surgical techniques are imperative for good results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prepartum anaemia: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Milman, Nils

    2008-12-01

    This review focuses on the occurrence, prevention and treatment of anaemia during pregnancy in Western societies. Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is the most prevalent deficiency disorder and the most frequent form of anaemia in pregnant women. Minor causes of anaemia are folate and vitamin B12 deficiency, haemoglobinopathy and haemolytic anaemia. Anaemia is defined as haemoglobin of <110 g/L in the first and third trimester and <105 g/L in the second trimester. The diagnosis relies on haemoglobin, a full blood count and plasma ferritin, which can be supported by plasma transferrin saturation and serum soluble transferrin receptor. Among fertile, non-pregnant women, approximately 40% have ferritin of anaemia in the third trimester ranges 14-52% in women taking placebo and 0-25% in women taking iron supplements, dependent on the doses of iron. In studies incorporating serum ferritin, the frequency of IDA in placebo-treated women ranges 12-17% and in iron-supplemented women 0-3%. Requirements for absorbed iron increase during pregnancy from 0.8 mg/day in the first trimester to 7.5 mg/day in the third trimester, on the average approximately 4.4 mg/day, and dietary measures are inadequate to reduce the frequency of prepartum IDA. However, IDA is efficiently prevented by oral iron supplements in doses of 30-40 mg ferrous iron taken between meals from early pregnancy to delivery. Treatment of IDA should aim at replenishing body iron deficits by oral and/or intravenous administration of iron. In women with slight to moderate IDA, i.e. haemoglobin of 90-105 g/L, treatment with oral ferrous iron of approximately 100 mg/day between meals is the therapeutic option in the first and second trimester; haemoglobin should be checked after 2 weeks and provided an increase of >or=10 g/L, oral iron therapy has proved effective and

  18. Growth differentiation factor 15 in anaemia of chronic disease, iron deficiency anaemia and mixed type anaemia.

    PubMed

    Theurl, Igor; Finkenstedt, Armin; Schroll, Andrea; Nairz, Manfred; Sonnweber, Thomas; Bellmann-Weiler, Rosa; Theurl, Milan; Seifert, Markus; Wroblewski, Victor J; Murphy, Anthony T; Witcher, Derrick; Zoller, Heinz; Weiss, Günter

    2010-02-01

    Recently, the iron and erythropoiesis-controlled growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) has been shown to inhibit the expression of hepcidin in beta-thalassaemia patients, thereby increasing iron absorption despite iron overload. To access the diagnostic and pathogenic impact of GDF15 in inflammatory anaemia the association of GDF15 expression with serum iron parameters and hepcidin was studied in patients suffering from iron deficiency anaemia (IDA), anaemia of chronic disease (ACD) and ACD subjects with true iron deficiency (ACD/IDA). GDF15 was significantly increased in both ACD and ACD/IDA, but not in IDA subjects as compared to controls. In contrast, hepcidin levels were significantly lower in IDA and ACD/IDA subjects than in ACD patients. IDA and ACD/IDA, but not ACD, showed an association between GDF15 and soluble transferrin receptor, an indicator of iron requirement for erythropoiesis. However, GDF15 did not correlate to hepcidin in either patient group. While GDF15 levels were linked to the needs for erythropoiesis and iron homeostasis in IDA, the immunity-driven increase of GDF15 may not primarily affect iron homeostasis and hepcidin expression. This indicates that other ACD-related factors may overcome the regulatory effects of GDF15 on hepcidin expression during inflammation.

  19. Intermittent preventive antimalarial treatment for children with anaemia.

    PubMed

    Athuman, Mwaka; Kabanywanyi, Abdunoor M; Rohwer, Anke C

    2015-01-13

    Anaemia is a global public health problem. Children under five years of age living in developing countries (mostly Africa and South-East Asia) are highly affected. Although the causes for anaemia are multifactorial, malaria has been linked to anaemia in children living in malaria-endemic areas. Administering intermittent preventive antimalarial treatment (IPT) to children might reduce anaemia, since it could protect children from new Plasmodium parasite infection (the parasites that cause malaria) and allow their haemoglobin levels to recover. To assess the effect of IPT for children with anaemia living in malaria-endemic areas. We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Central of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE; and LILACS. We also searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trial Registry Platform and metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) for ongoing trials up to 4 December 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of IPT on children with anaemia. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We analysed data by conducting meta-analyses, stratifying data according to whether participants received iron supplements or not. We used GRADE to assess the quality of evidence. Six trials with 3847 participants met our inclusion criteria. Trials were conducted in areas of low malaria endemicity (three trials), and moderate to high endemicity (three trials). Four trials were in areas of seasonal malaria transmission. Iron was given to all children in two trials, and evaluated in a factorial design in a further two trials.IPT for children with anaemia probably has little or no effect on the proportion anaemic at 12 weeks follow-up (four trials, 2237 participants, (moderate quality evidence).IPT in anaemic children probably increases the mean change in haemoglobin levels from baseline to follow-up at 12 weeks on

  20. Review of equine piroplasmosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Equine piroplasmosis is caused by one of two erythrocytic parasites Babesia caballi or Theileria equi. Although the genus of the latter remains controversial the most recent designation, Theileria is utilized in this review. Shared pathogenesis includes tick-borne transmission and erythrolysis leadi...

  1. Intermittent preventive antimalarial treatment for children with anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Athuman, Mwaka; Kabanywanyi, Abdunoor M; Rohwer, Anke C

    2015-01-01

    Background Anaemia is a global public health problem. Children under five years of age living in developing countries (mostly Africa and South-East Asia) are highly affected. Although the causes for anaemia are multifactorial, malaria has been linked to anaemia in children living in malaria-endemic areas. Administering intermittent preventive antimalarial treatment (IPT) to children might reduce anaemia, since it could protect children from new Plasmodium parasite infection (the parasites that cause malaria) and allow their haemoglobin levels to recover. Objectives To assess the effect of IPT for children with anaemia living in malaria-endemic areas. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Central of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE; and LILACS. We also searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trial Registry Platform and metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) for ongoing trials up to 4 December 2014. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of IPT on children with anaemia. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We analysed data by conducting meta-analyses, stratifying data according to whether participants received iron supplements or not. We used GRADE to assess the quality of evidence. Main results Six trials with 3847 participants met our inclusion criteria. Trials were conducted in areas of low malaria endemicity (three trials), and moderate to high endemicity (three trials). Four trials were in areas of seasonal malaria transmission. Iron was given to all children in two trials, and evaluated in a factorial design in a further two trials. IPT for children with anaemia probably has little or no effect on the proportion anaemic at 12 weeks follow-up (four trials, 2237 participants, (moderate quality evidence). IPT in anaemic

  2. Infectious disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of viewgraphs on the Johnson Space Center's work on infectious disease. It addresses their major concern over outbreaks of infectious disease that could jeopardize the health, safety and/or performance of crew members engaged in long duration space missions. The Antarctic environment is seen as an analogous location on Earth and a good place to carry out such infectious disease studies and methods for proposed studies as suggested.

  3. The anaemia of Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax threatens nearly half the world’s population and is a significant impediment to achievement of the millennium development goals. It is an important, but incompletely understood, cause of anaemia. This review synthesizes current evidence on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, treatment and consequences of vivax-associated anaemia. Young children are at high risk of clinically significant and potentially severe vivax-associated anaemia, particularly in countries where transmission is intense and relapses are frequent. Despite reaching lower densities than Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax causes similar absolute reduction in red blood cell mass because it results in proportionately greater removal of uninfected red blood cells. Severe vivax anaemia is associated with substantial indirect mortality and morbidity through impaired resilience to co-morbidities, obstetric complications and requirement for blood transfusion. Anaemia can be averted by early and effective anti-malarial treatment. PMID:22540175

  4. The anaemia of Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Nicholas M; Anstey, Nicholas M; Buffet, Pierre A; Poespoprodjo, Jeanne R; Yeo, Tsin W; White, Nicholas J; Price, Ric N

    2012-04-27

    Plasmodium vivax threatens nearly half the world's population and is a significant impediment to achievement of the millennium development goals. It is an important, but incompletely understood, cause of anaemia. This review synthesizes current evidence on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, treatment and consequences of vivax-associated anaemia. Young children are at high risk of clinically significant and potentially severe vivax-associated anaemia, particularly in countries where transmission is intense and relapses are frequent. Despite reaching lower densities than Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax causes similar absolute reduction in red blood cell mass because it results in proportionately greater removal of uninfected red blood cells. Severe vivax anaemia is associated with substantial indirect mortality and morbidity through impaired resilience to co-morbidities, obstetric complications and requirement for blood transfusion. Anaemia can be averted by early and effective anti-malarial treatment.

  5. Pernicious anaemia in the textile industry.

    PubMed Central

    Roman, E; Beral, V; Sanjose, S; Schilling, R; Watson, A

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to examine whether the observed excess mortality from anaemia in textile and clothing workers was associated with any specific anaemia type or occupational activity. The design was a death certificate based case-control study of textile and clothing workers who died in England and Wales in the years surrounding the decennial censuses of 1961, 1971, and 1981. The main outcome measures were type of anaemia, place of residence, place of birth, and occupation. The frequency of the different types of anaemia in textile and clothing workers differed from that of England and Wales with relatively more deaths from pernicious anaemia than in the country as a whole (74 observed v 55 expected deaths). Within the industry, those whose death was attributed to pernicious anaemia were more than twice as likely as other textile and clothing workers to have worked in textile mills (odds ratio = 2.4, 95% confidence interval 1.4-4.2). These results could not be explained by age, sex, place of residence, or place of birth, and review of the death certificates did not suggest that pernicious anaemia as a cause of death had been recorded in error. Historical support for the finding was found in the Registrar General's 1931 decennial supplement on occupational mortality, in which the standardised mortality ratio from pernicious anaemia in male textile mill workers was estimated to be twice that of the general population. In conclusion, occupational factors, specifically work in textile mills, could be implicated in the pathogenesis of pernicious anaemia. The aetiology of this disease is not well understood and further study of pernicious anaemia in textile mill workers is required. PMID:2039748

  6. Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... washing also helps protect you from most infectious diseases. Symptoms Each infectious disease has its own specific signs and symptoms. General ... person who passes the germ may have no symptoms of the disease, but may simply be a carrier. Animal to ...

  7. Equine recurrent uveitis: Human and equine perspectives.

    PubMed

    Malalana, Fernando; Stylianides, Amira; McGowan, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    Equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is a spontaneous disease characterised by repeated episodes of intraocular inflammation. The epidemiology of ERU has not been fully elucidated, but the condition appears to be much more common in horses than is recurrent uveitis in humans, especially in certain breeds and geographical regions. Both humans and horses show a similarly altered immune response and a marked autoimmune response as the primary disease pathophysiology. However, an inciting cause is not always clear. Potential inciting factors in horses include microbial agents such as Leptospira spp. Microbial factors and genetic predisposition to the disease may provide clues as to why the horse appears so susceptible to this disease. The aim of this review is to discuss the immunology and genetics of ERU, compare the disease in horses with autoimmune anterior uveitis in humans, and discuss potential reasons for the increased prevalence in the horse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ferritin and iron studies in anaemia and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ying Y; Uprichard, James

    2017-01-01

    Anaemia is a condition in which the number of red cells necessary to meet the body's physiological requirements is insufficient. Iron deficiency anaemia and the anaemia of chronic disease are the two most common causes of anaemia worldwide;(1) iron homeostasis plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of both diseases. An understanding of how iron studies can be used to distinguish between these diseases is therefore essential not only for diagnosis but also in guiding management. This review will primarily focus on iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disease; however, iron overload in anaemia will also be briefly discussed.

  9. Equine grass sickness.

    PubMed

    Pirie, R S; Jago, R C; Hudson, N P H

    2014-09-01

    Equine grass sickness (EGS; equine dysautonomia) is a polyneuronopathy affecting both the central and the peripheral nervous systems of horses. As the name implies, EGS almost exclusively affects grazing horses, resulting in the development of a characteristic array of clinical signs, most of which can be attributed to neuronal degeneration in the autonomic and enteric nervous systems. Varying disease severities occur, largely determined by the extent of neuronal degeneration in the myenteric and submucous plexuses of the enteric nervous system. Extensive neuronal degeneration, as seen in acute and subacute forms of EGS, results in intestinal dysmotility, the severity of which is incompatible with survival. In comparison, a proportion of chronic forms of EGS, characterised by less severe neuronal degeneration, will survive. Despite extensive research efforts since EGS was first reported over 100 years ago, the precise aetiology remains elusive. This article reviews much of the scientific literature on EGS, covering epidemiology, pathology, diagnosis, treatment and aetiological hypotheses. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  10. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  11. Potential vectors of equine arboviruses in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Archer, D.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing concern about the increasing risk of disease outbreaks caused by arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) in both human beings and animals. There are several mosquito-borne viral diseases that cause varying levels of morbidity and mortality in horses and that can have substantial welfare and economic ramifications. While none has been recorded in the UK, vector species for some of these viruses are present, suggesting that UK equines may be at risk. The authors undertook, therefore, the first study of mosquito species on equine premises in the UK. Mosquito magnet traps and red-box traps were used to sample adults, and larvae were collected from water sources such as tyres, buckets, ditches and pools. Several species that are known to be capable of transmitting important equine infectious arboviruses were trapped. The most abundant, with a maximum catch of 173 in 72 hours, was Ochlerotatus detritus, a competent vector of some flaviviruses; the highest densities were found near saltmarsh habitats. The most widespread species, recorded at >75 per cent of sites, was Culiseta annulata. This study demonstrates that potential mosquito vectors of arboviruses, including those known to be capable of infecting horses, are present and may be abundant on equine premises in the UK. PMID:27694545

  12. Anaemia of Prematurity: Pathophysiology & Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Ronald G

    2010-01-01

    Most infants with birth weight <1.0 kg are given multiple red blood cell (RBC) transfusions within the first few weeks of life. The anaemia of prematurity is caused by untimely birth occuring before placental iron transport and fetal erythropoiesis are complete, by phlebotomy blood losses taken for laboratory testing, by low plasma levels of erythropoietin due to both diminished production and accelerated catabolism, by rapid body growth and need for commensurate increase in red cell volume/mass, and by disorders causing RBC losses due to bleeding and/or hemolysis. RBC transfusions are the mainstay of therapy with recombinant human erythropoietin largely unused because it fails to substantially diminish RBC transfusion needs — despite exerting substantial erythropoietic effects on neonatal marrow. PMID:20817366

  13. Progressive systemic sclerosis and autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Sumithran, E.

    1976-01-01

    The development of progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) in a patient with established autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is described. Points favouring an immunological aetiology for PSS are reviewed and discussed. PMID:1264941

  14. Prevalence & consequences of anaemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, K

    2009-11-01

    Prevalence of anaemia in India is among the highest in the world. Prevalence of anaemia is higher among pregnant women and preschool children. Even among higher income educated segments of population about 50 per cent of children, adolescent girls and pregnant women are anaemic. Inadequate dietary iron, folate intake due to low vegetable consumption, perhaps low B12 intake and poor bioavailability of dietary iron from the fibre, phytate rich Indian diets are the major factors responsible for high prevalence of anaemia. Increased requirement of iron during growth and pregnancy and chronic blood loss contribute to higher prevalence in specific groups. In India, anaemia is directly or indirectly responsible for 40 per cent of maternal deaths. There is 8 to 10-fold increase in MMR when the Hb falls below 5 g/dl. Early detection and effective management of anaemia in pregnancy can contribute substantially to reduction in maternal mortality. Maternal anaemia is associated with poor intrauterine growth and increased risk of preterm births and low birth weight rates. This in turn results in higher perinatal morbidity and mortality, and higher infant mortality rate. A doubling of low birth weight rate and 2 to 3 fold increase in the perinatal mortality rates is seen when the Hb is <8 g/dl. Intrauterine growth retardation and low birth weight inevitably lead to poor growth trajectory in infancy, childhood and adolescence and contribute to low adult height. Parental height and maternal weight are determinants of intrauterine growth and birth weight. Thus maternal anaemia contributes to intergenerational cycle of poor growth in the offspring. Early detection and effective management of anaemia in pregnancy can lead to substantial reduction in undernutrition in childhood, adolescence and improvement in adult height.

  15. Anaemia among adults in Kassala, Eastern Sudan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The increased heterogeneity in the distribution of social and biological risk factors makes the epidemiology of anaemia a real challenge. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Kassala, Eastern Sudan during the period of January — March 2011 to investigate the prevalence and predictors of anaemia among adults (> 15 years old). Findings Out of 646, 234 (36.2%) adults had anaemia; 68 (10.5%); 129 (20.0%) and 37 (5.7%) had mild, moderate and severe anaemia, respectively. In logistic regression analyses, age (OR = 1.0, CI = 0.9–1, P = 0.7), rural vs. urban residency (OR = 0.9, CI = 0.7–1.3, P = 0.9), female vs. male gender (OR = 0.8, CI = 0.6–1.1, P = 0.3), educational level ≥ secondary level vs. < secondary level (OR = 1.0, CI = 0.6–1.6, P = 0.8) and Hudandawa vs. non-Hudandawa ethnicity (OR = 0.8, CI = 0.6–1, P = 0.1) were not associated with anaemia. Conclusion There was a high prevalence of anaemia in this setting, anaemia affected adults regardless to their age, sex and educational level. Therefore, anaemia is needed to be screened for routinely and supplements have to be employed in this setting. PMID:22537662

  16. No increased mortality risk in older persons with unexplained anaemia.

    PubMed

    Willems, Jorien M; den Elzen, Wendy P J; Vlasveld, L Tom; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; de Craen, Anton J M; Blauw, Gerard J

    2012-07-01

    in older persons, anaemia is associated with a number of unfavourable outcomes. In approximately 30% of older persons with anaemia, the cause of the anaemia is unexplained. We assessed the clinical differences between subjects with explained and unexplained anaemia and investigated whether these subjects have different mortality patterns compared with subjects without anaemia. observational prospective follow-up study. the Leiden 85-plus study. four hundred and ninety-one persons aged 86 years. the study population was divided in three groups: (i) no anaemia (reference group, n=377), (ii) explained anaemia (iron deficiency, folate deficiency, vitamin B12 deficiency, signs of myelodysplastic syndrome or renal failure, n=74) and (iii) unexplained anaemia, (n=40). Mortality risks were estimated with Cox-proportional hazard models. haemoglobin levels were significantly lower in subjects with explained anaemia than in subjects with unexplained anaemia (P<0.01). An increased risk for mortality was observed in subjects with explained anaemia [HR: 1.93 (95% CI: 1.47-2.52), P<0.001], but not in subjects with unexplained anaemia [HR: 1.19 (95% CI: 0.85-1.69), P=0.31]. Adjusted analyses (sex, co-morbidity, MMSE, institutionalised and smoking) did not change the observed associations for both explained and unexplained anaemic subjects. older subjects with unexplained anaemia had similar survival compared with non-anaemic subjects. Increased mortality risks were observed in subjects with explained anaemia compared with non-anaemic subjects.

  17. Cleavage site and Ectodomain of HA2 sub-unit sequence of three equine influenza virus isolated in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Boukharta, Mohamed; Zakham, Fathiah; Touil, Nadia; Elharrak, Mehdi; Ennaji, Moulay Mustapha

    2014-07-12

    The equine influenza (EI) is an infectious and contagious disease of the upper respiratory tract of horses. Two outbreaks were notified in Morocco during 1997 and 2004 respectively in Nador and Essaouira. The aims of the present study concern the amino acids sequences comparison with reference strain A/equine/Miami/1963(H3N8) of the HA2 subunit including the cleavage site of three equine influenza viruses (H3N8) isolated in Morocco: A/equine/Nador/1/1997(H3N8), A/equine/Essaouira/2/2004 (H3N8) and A/equine/Essaouira/3/2004 (H3N8). The obtained results demonstrated that the substitutions were located at Ectodomain (ED) and transmembrane domain (TD), and they have only one arginine in cleavage site (HA1-PEKQI-R329-GI-HA2). In the Ectodomain, the mutation N/1542/T deleted the NGT glycosylation site at position 154 for both strains A/equine/Essaouira/2/2004(H3N8) and A/equine/Essaouira/3/2004(H3N8). Except for mutation D/1602/Y of the A/equine/Nador/1/1997(H3N8) strain, the other mutations were involved in non conserved sites. While the transmembrane domain (TM) of the strain A/equine/Essaouira/3/2004(H3N8) exhibits a substitution at residue C/1992/F. For the A/equine/Nador/1/1997(H3N8) strain the HA2 shows a mutation at residue M/2072/L. Three Moroccan strains reveals a common substitution at the residue E/2112/Q located between transmembrane domain TM and the cytoplasmic domain (CD). The given nature virulence of three Moroccan strains, the identified and reported mutations certainly played a permissive role of infection viral process.

  18. Epidemiology of rare anaemias in Europe.

    PubMed

    Gulbis, Beatrice; Eleftheriou, Androulla; Angastiniotis, Michael; Ball, Sarah; Surrallés, Jordi; Castella, María; Heimpel, Hermann; Hill, Anita; Corrons, Joan-Lluis Vives

    2010-01-01

    Registry and epidemiological data of Rare Anaemias (RA) in Europe is in general still incomplete and/or partially documented. One important issue is the increasing prevalence of haemoglobin disorders (HD) due to migrations from high prevalence areas. The size of the problem, particularly for sickle cell disease (SCD), is already having an impact on health services in many European countries. The best known cause of rare anaemias associated with congenital haemolytic anaemia (CHA) in Europe is Hereditary Spherocytosis (HS) a red blood cell (RBC) membrane defect with a prevalence of 1 to 5 cases per 10.000 individuals. Some other causes of CHA are extremely rare and only few individual cases have been described worldwide (i.e. some RBC enzymopathies). Congenital defects of erythropoiesis are less frequent Diamond-Blackfan Anaemia (DBA) and Fanconi Anaemia (FA) exhibit a very low prevalence ranging from 4 to 7 per million live births. Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anaemia (CDA), a genetically heterogenous group, is still less frequent and exhibits a large variability of frequency depending on the European region: 0.1-3.0 cases per million births In addition many cases are known from a large autosomal dominant family in Sweden. Although incidence of Paroxysmal Nocturnal Haemoglobinuria (PNH) in Europe is still unknown, data collection from different sources has given quotes of 1 case per 100,000 individuals to 5 cases per million births.

  19. An equine pain face

    PubMed Central

    Gleerup, Karina B; Forkman, Björn; Lindegaard, Casper; Andersen, Pia H

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the existence of an equine pain face and to describe this in detail. Study design Semi-randomized, controlled, crossover trial. Animals Six adult horses. Methods Pain was induced with two noxious stimuli, a tourniquet on the antebrachium and topical application of capsaicin. All horses participated in two control trials and received both noxious stimuli twice, once with and once without an observer present. During all sessions their pain state was scored. The horses were filmed and the close-up video recordings of the faces were analysed for alterations in behaviour and facial expressions. Still images from the trials were evaluated for the presence of each of the specific pain face features identified from the video analysis. Results Both noxious challenges were effective in producing a pain response resulting in significantly increased pain scores. Alterations in facial expressions were observed in all horses during all noxious stimulations. The number of pain face features present on the still images from the noxious challenges were significantly higher than for the control trial (p = 0.0001). Facial expressions representative for control and pain trials were condensed into explanatory illustrations. During pain sessions with an observer present, the horses increased their contact-seeking behavior. Conclusions and clinical relevance An equine pain face comprising ‘low’ and/or ‘asymmetrical’ ears, an angled appearance of the eyes, a withdrawn and/or tense stare, mediolaterally dilated nostrils and tension of the lips, chin and certain facial muscles can be recognized in horses during induced acute pain. This description of an equine pain face may be useful for improving tools for pain recognition in horses with mild to moderate pain. PMID:25082060

  20. Hepatitis Due to Equine Abortion Virus. Comparison Between the Liver Histology in Human, Canine, Duckling, and Equine Viral Hepatitis1

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, W. M.; Nilsson, M. R.

    1966-01-01

    Five livers of equine fetuses, aborted due to the action of equine abortion virus, five livers from men, two of whom died of epidemic hepatitis and three obtained by needle biopsies, 5 livers of dogs with infectious canine hepatitis and 7 livers of ducklings that had hepatitis, were studied histopathologically. The foals' livers were studied by several staining methods and the others by H. E. only. The results indicate that the lesions are quite similar in the four species with the appearance of nuclear inclusion bodies only in foals and dogs. The strong staining properties of the nuclear inclusion bodies in infectious canine hepatitis and the weak staining properties of the equine virus abortion reveal that the protein-DNA association is different resulting in a different electropolarity. The lesions in foals are of two main types, one a Necrotic-Mosaic Type in which the hepatocyte degeneration is irregularly distributed within the hepatic lobules and the other an Hyperplastic Type in which marked regeneration occurs. In the Hyperplastic Type the practical absence of plasmocytes in foals' livers might suggest that if the newborn is a female, abortions may occur later in life because the virus remained alive in colts which were born in an immune tolerance state. Histologically the picture in the livers of aborted foals assume features of a viral hepatitis similar to the viral hepatitis in men, dogs and ducklings. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 8.Fig. 9. PMID:4225286

  1. Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Howe, Daniel K; MacKay, Robert J; Reed, Stephen M

    2014-12-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) can be caused by either of 2 related protozoan parasites, Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi, although S. neurona is the most frequent etiologic pathogen. Horses are commonly infected, but clinical disease occurs infrequently; the factors influencing disease occurrence are not well understood. Risk factors for the development of EPM include the presence of opossums and prior stressful health-related events. Attempts to reproduce EPM experimentally have reliably induced antibody responses in challenged horses but have not consistently produced acute neurologic disease. Diagnosis and options for treatment of EPM have improved over the past decade. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Update on equine allergies.

    PubMed

    Fadok, Valerie A

    2013-12-01

    Horses develop many skin and respiratory disorders that have been attributed to allergy. These disorders include pruritic skin diseases, recurrent urticaria, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and reactive airway disease. Allergen-specific IgE has been detected in these horses, and allergen-specific immunotherapy is used to ameliorate clinical signs. The best understood atopic disease in horses is insect hypersensitivity, but the goal of effective treatment with allergen-specific immunotherapy remains elusive. In this review, updates in pathogenesis of allergic states and a brief mention of the new data on what is known in humans and dogs and how that relates to equine allergic disorders are discussed.

  3. Advances in equine dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Baratt, Robert

    2013-08-01

    Although diagnostic images can be obtained with traditional rare-earth film-screen combinations, digital radiography (DR) has enhanced the ability of the general practitioner to obtain diagnostic radiographs of the equine head. With the widespread availability of DR in equine practices, the practitioner can more readily learn the correct positioning for the various projections of the equine head that are used to evaluate the dentition and sinuses. Digital systems provide rapid processing of the image, enabling the practitioner to correct positioning errors and retake the image without significant delay.

  4. Therapeutics for Equine Endocrine Disorders.

    PubMed

    Durham, Andy E

    2017-04-01

    Equine endocrine disease is commonly encountered by equine practitioners. Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) and equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) predominate. The most logical therapeutic approach in PPID uses dopamine agonists; pergolide mesylate is the most common. Bromocryptine and cabergoline are alternative drugs with similar actions. Drugs from other classes have a poor evidence basis, although cyproheptadine and trilostane might be considered. EMS requires management changes as the primary approach; reasonable justification for use of drugs such as levothyroxine and metformin may apply. Therapeutic options exist in rare cases of diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, hyperthyroidism, and critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Equine metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R; Keen, J; McGowan, C

    2015-08-15

    Laminitis is one of the most common and frustrating clinical presentations in equine practice. While the principles of treatment for laminitis have not changed for several decades, there have been some important paradigm shifts in our understanding of laminitis. Most importantly, it is essential to consider laminitis as a clinical sign of disease and not as a disease in its own right. Once this shift in thinking has occurred, it is logical to then question what disease caused the laminitis. More than 90 per cent of horses presented with laminitis as their primary clinical sign will have developed it as a consequence of endocrine disease; most commonly equine metabolic syndrome (EMS). Given the fact that many horses will have painful protracted and/or chronic recurrent disease, a good understanding of the predisposing factors and how to diagnose and manage them is crucial. Current evidence suggests that early diagnosis and effective management of EMS should be a key aim for practising veterinary surgeons to prevent the devastating consequences of laminitis. This review will focus on EMS, its diagnosis and management.

  6. Equine metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, R.; Keen, J.; McGowan, C.

    2015-01-01

    Laminitis is one of the most common and frustrating clinical presentations in equine practice. While the principles of treatment for laminitis have not changed for several decades, there have been some important paradigm shifts in our understanding of laminitis. Most importantly, it is essential to consider laminitis as a clinical sign of disease and not as a disease in its own right. Once this shift in thinking has occurred, it is logical to then question what disease caused the laminitis. More than 90 per cent of horses presented with laminitis as their primary clinical sign will have developed it as a consequence of endocrine disease; most commonly equine metabolic syndrome (EMS). Given the fact that many horses will have painful protracted and/or chronic recurrent disease, a good understanding of the predisposing factors and how to diagnose and manage them is crucial. Current evidence suggests that early diagnosis and effective management of EMS should be a key aim for practising veterinary surgeons to prevent the devastating consequences of laminitis. This review will focus on EMS, its diagnosis and management. PMID:26273009

  7. Predictors of anaemia and iron deficiency in HIV-infected pregnant women in Tanzania: a potential role for vitamin D and parasitic infections

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Julia L; Mehta, Saurabh; Duggan, Christopher P; Spiegelman, Donna; Aboud, Said; Kupka, Roland; Msamanga, Gernard I; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2012-01-01

    Objective Anaemia is common during pregnancy, and prenatal Fe supplementation is the standard of care. However, the persistence of anaemia despite Fe supplementation, particularly in HIV infection, suggests that its aetiology may be more complex and warrants further investigation. The present study was conducted to examine predictors of incident haematological outcomes in HIV-infected pregnant women in Tanzania. Design Prospective cohort study. Cox proportional hazards and binomial regression models were used to identify predictors of incident haematological outcomes: anaemia (Hb < 110 g/l), severe anaemia (Hb < 85 g/l) and hypochromic microcytosis, during the follow-up period. Setting Antenatal clinics in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Subjects Participants were 904 HIV-infected pregnant women enrolled in a randomized trial of vitamins (1995–1997). Results Malaria, pathogenic protozoan and hookworm infections at baseline were associated with a two-fold increase in the risk of anaemia and hypochromic microcytosis during follow-up. Higher baseline erythrocyte sedimentation rate and CD8 T-cell concentrations, and lower Hb concentrations and CD4 T-cell counts, were independent predictors of incident anaemia and Fe deficiency. Low baseline vitamin D (<32 ng/ml) concentrations predicted a 1·4 and 2·3 times greater risk of severe anaemia and hypochromic microcytosis, respectively, during the follow-up period. Conclusions Parasitic infections, vitamin D insufficiency, low CD4 T-cell count and high erythrocyte sedimentation rate were the main predictors of anaemia and Fe deficiency in pregnancy and the postpartum period in this population. A comprehensive approach to prevent and manage anaemia, including micronutrient supplementation and infectious disease control, is warranted in HIV-infected women in resource-limited settings – particularly during the pre- and postpartum periods. PMID:22014374

  8. [Severe aplastic anaemia in six children after non-A-E hepatitis without hepatic failure].

    PubMed

    Tschiedel, E; Gierenz, N; Wieland, R; Wulff, B; Ballauff, A

    2010-08-01

    Aplastic anaemia can coincide with non-A-E hepatitis. Treatment follows a standardised study protocol of the German Society of Paediatric Oncology and Haematology (GPOH). Patients receive immunosuppression and/or bone marrow transplantation. We present six cases of aplastic anaemia after non-A-E hepatitis with different courses. In four of these children illness first presented with acute gastroenteritis. Five out of six children fully recovered, two of these with immunosuppression alone, three after bone marrow transplantation. One patient died due to complications of the bone marrow transplantation. In two patients steroid therapy was carried out to treat the hepatitis. This did not have any effect on the course of their aplastic anemia. We emphasise this common combination of aplastic anemia following non-A-E hepatitis. This overview underlines the necessity of regular blood testing after non-A-E hepatitis. Often gastroenteritis seems to precede illness thus perhaps indicating an infectious trigger.

  9. Ophthalmology in equine ambulatory practice.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Ann E

    2012-04-01

    Equine practitioners examine patient eyes on a daily basis. Indications range from inspection of normal anatomy to treatment of traumatized eyes to workups of sight threatening inflammatory or neoplastic ocular conditions. Assessment of equine eyes requires practitioners to take time to create a good "exam room" in the field and administer appropriate restraint, sedation and/or regional anesthesia to facilitate thorough examination. Accurate diagnosis and treatment of equine eye problems requires skill in ocular surface staining and cytology, and basic proficiency in standing surgery. Expertise in digital photography optimizes client education and case management. As some equine eye problems benefit from intense medical treatment or advanced surgical care, practitioners should be familiar with the options offered at specialty centers, and recognize cases that would benefit from referral. Finally, blindness is not uncommon in horses. Practitioners can counsel clients that own blind horses on the best options for managing sight loss.

  10. Psychosocial Equine Program for Veterans.

    PubMed

    Ferruolo, David M

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of all combat veterans suffer from serious psychological disorders and reintegration issues. Veterans shy away from typical talk therapy and are seeking alternative treatments. Equine-facilitated mental health therapy has shown promise in treating veterans with depressive and anxiety disorders and reintegration issues. This article reports on an institutional review board-approved pilot program designed to address the mental health needs of veterans. Furthermore, this article discusses future directions for evolving development of equine treatment programming.

  11. Advances in equine immunology: Havemeyer workshop reports from Santa Fe, New Mexico, and Hortobagy, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Marti, Eliane; Horohov, David W; Antzak, Doug F; Lazary, Sandor; Paul Lunn, D

    2003-02-10

    The horse has been human kind's most important partner throughout history. Similarly, in the field of immunology, many critical scientific advances have depended on the horse. Equine immunology today is an active and important field of study, with a focus on control of many common infectious diseases and immunopathologic conditions of broad comparative interest. In 2001 two major equine immunology workshops were held, in Santa Fe, USA, and in Hortobagy, Hungary, with major sponsorship from the Havemeyer Foundation. This report summarizes the scientific themes and foci of those meetings. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Science B.V.

  12. Equine glanders in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Arun, S; Neubauer, H; Gürel, A; Ayyildiz, G; Kusçu, B; Yesildere, T; Meyer, H; Hermanns, W

    1999-03-06

    In the course of an epidemiological study of glanders on a number of Turkish islands in the Sea of Marmara, 1128 horses were examined by using the intracutaneous mallein test. Thirty-five (3-1 per cent) developed an increase in rectal temperature and a swelling at the point of injection. Ten of these horses were killed and glanders was confirmed in five cases by the presence of lesions and by the immunohistological demonstration of the causative agent, Burkholderia mallei. Clinical and pathological findings indicated that in all cases the infection was restricted to the mucous membrane of the nasal cavity with its parasinus, the nostrils and the upper lips. It was confirmed that equine glanders is endemic in Turkey.

  13. Severe megaloblastic anaemia in an infant.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Vera; Dias, Alexandra; Brito, Maria João; Galvão, Isabel; Ferreira, Gonçalo Cordeiro

    2011-05-16

    Vitamin B(12) or cobalamin deficiency, a rare clinical entity in pediatric age, is found most exclusively in breastfed infants, whose mothers are strictly vegetarian non-supplemented or with pernicious anaemia. In this article, the authors describe a 10-month-old infant admitted for vomiting, refusal to eat and prostration. The infant was exclusively breastfed and difficulties in introduction of new foods were reported. Failure to thrive since 5 months of age was also noticed. Laboratory evaluation revealed severe normocytic normochromic anaemia and cobalamin deficit. A diagnosis of α-thalassemia trait was also made. Maternal investigation showed autoimmune pernicious anaemia. This case shows the severity of vitamin B(12) deficiency and the importance of adopting adequate and precocious measures in order to prevent potentially irreversible neurologic damage.

  14. Infectious Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Infectious uveitis is one of the most common and visually devastating causes of uveitis in the US and worldwide. This review provides a summary of the identification, treatment, and complications associated with certain forms of viral, bacterial, fungal, helminthic, and parasitic uveitis. In particular, this article reviews the literature on identification and treatment of acute retinal necrosis due to herpes simplex virus, varicella virus, and cytomegalovirus. While no agreed-upon treatment has been identified, the characteristics of Ebola virus panuveitis is also reviewed. In addition, forms of parasitic infection such as Toxoplasmosis and Toxocariasis are summarized, as well as spirochetal uveitis. Syphilitic retinitis is reviewed given its increase in prevalence over the last decade. The importance of early identification and treatment of infectious uveitis is emphasized. Early identification can be achieved with a combination of maintaining a high suspicion, recognizing certain clinical features, utilizing multi-modal imaging, and obtaining specimens for molecular diagnostic testing. PMID:26618074

  15. Haemoglobin and anaemia in the SMART study

    PubMed Central

    Mocroft, A; Lifson, AR; Touloumi, G; Neuhaus, J; Fox, Z; Palfreeman, A; Vjecha, M; Hodder, S; De Wit, S; Lundgren, JD; Phillips, AN

    2014-01-01

    Background Data from randomized trials on the development of anaemia after interruption of therapy is not well described. Methods 2248 patients from the SMART study were included. We used Cox proportional hazards models to investigate development of new (≤12 mg/dl for females, ≤14 mg/dl for males) or worsening (≤8 mg/dl if anaemic at randomization) anaemia and poisson regression analyses to explore the relationship between anaemia and the development of AIDS, death or non-AIDS events. Results 759 patients developed new or worsening anaemia; 420/1106 (38.0%) in the drug conservation (DC) arm and 339/1127 (30.1%) in the virologic suppression (VS) arm; p<0.0001. At 4 months after randomization, patients in the DC arm had a significantly increased risk of developing new or worsening anaemia (adjusted relative hazard 1.56, 95% CI 1.28–1.89). Currently anaemic patients had an increased incidence of AIDS (adjusted IRR 2.31; 95% CI 1.34–3.98), death (2.19; 95% CI 1.23–3.87) and non-AIDS events (2.98; 95% CI 2.01–4.40) compared to non-anaemic patients. Conclusions Patients who interrupted cART had a higher risk of new or worsening anaemia. Anaemic patients had a higher incidence of AIDS, non-AIDS defining events or deaths, possibly due to deteriorating health and subclinical disease. PMID:21555815

  16. Effect of maternal anaemia on birth weight.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muhammad Owais; Kalsoom, Umay; Sughra, Ume; Hadi, Usman; Imran, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Anaemia is a common medical problem in pregnancy. The extent up to which, maternal anaemia effects maternal and neonatal health is still uncertain. Maternal anaemia is commonly considered a risk factor for low birth weight (LBW) babies. Some studies have demonstrated a strong association between low haemoglobin before delivery and LBW babies. However, others have not found a significant association. Therefore, there is insufficient information to assess the overall adverse impact of anaemia during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to determine whether maternal anaemia would affect the birth weight of the baby and compare this with that of non-anaemic mothers. It was a cross-sectional comparative study carried out at the maternity ward of Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi. One hundred subjects divided into two groups each containing 50 subjects on the basis of consecutive non probability sampling were included in the study. Group-A included 50 Anaemic pregnant women and Group-B 50 non-anaemic pregnant women. Information was collected by direct interviewing method through a precoded structured questionnaire. The Hb level and birth weights were taken from the labour room record. The mean age of the mothers in anaemic group was found to be older than the non anaemic group, i.e., (29.44 versus 27.98), though the difference was statistically non significant. The number of low birth weight infants (64%) was statistically very highly significantly more (p<0.001) in the anaemic group of mothers than the non anaemic group (10%). The results of this study show an association of maternal anaemia in pregnancy with increased risk of LBW babies.

  17. Equine Assisted Psychotherapy: The Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association's Model Overview of Equine-Based Modalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notgrass, Clayton G.; Pettinelli, J. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association's (EAGALA) experiential model called "Equine Assisted Psychotherapy" (EAP). EAGALA's model is based on the Association for Experiential Education's (AEE) tenets and is focused on the learner's experience with horses. Drawing on the historical use of equines in the…

  18. Equine Assisted Psychotherapy: The Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association's Model Overview of Equine-Based Modalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notgrass, Clayton G.; Pettinelli, J. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association's (EAGALA) experiential model called "Equine Assisted Psychotherapy" (EAP). EAGALA's model is based on the Association for Experiential Education's (AEE) tenets and is focused on the learner's experience with horses. Drawing on the historical use of equines in the…

  19. Infectious diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Diarrhea caused by enteric infections is a major factor in morbidity and mortality worldwide. An estimated 2–4 billion episodes of infectious diarrhea occur each year and are especially prevalent in infants. This review highlights the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying diarrhea associated with the three classes of infectious agents, i.e., bacteria, viruses and parasites. Several bacterial pathogens have been chosen as model organisms, including Vibrio cholerae as a classical example of secretory diarrhea, Clostridium difficile and Shigella species as agents of inflammatory diarrhea and selected strains of pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) to discuss the recent advances in alteration of epithelial ion absorption. Many of the recent studies addressing epithelial ion transport and barrier function have been carried out using viruses and parasites. Here, we focus on the rapidly developing field of viral diarrhea including rotavirus, norovirus and astrovirus infections. Finally we discuss Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica as examples of parasitic diarrhea. Parasites have a greater complexity than the other pathogens and are capable of creating molecules similar to those produced by the host, such as serotonin and PGE2. The underlying mechanisms of infectious diarrhea discussed include alterations in ion transport and tight junctions as well as the virulence factors, which alter these processes either through direct effects or indirectly through inflammation and neurotransmitters. PMID:21327112

  20. [Malignant thymoma associated with severe aplastic anaemia].

    PubMed

    Escobosa Sánchez, O M; Herrero Hernández, A; Acha García, T

    2009-01-01

    Malignant thymoma is a very rare neoplasm in paediatric patients; it is usually associated with para-neoplastic syndromes, the most frequent is myasthenia gravis; some haematological abnormalities may also be present, such as pure red cell aplasia or aplastic anaemia. We report a 12-year-old boy suffering from a very large thymoma, treated with multiple chemotherapy, and who developed a severe aplastic anaemia after surgery. He had a poor response to immunosuppressive treatment and later developed massive pulmonary bleeding as a complication.

  1. Megaloblastic anaemia in a vegetarian Hindu community.

    PubMed

    Chanarin, I; Malkowska, V; O'Hea, A M; Rinsler, M G; Price, A B

    1985-11-23

    138 Indian patients with megaloblastic haemopoiesis were studied. All were lifelong vegetarians. The diagnosis was nutritional cobalamin deficiency in 95 and pernicious anaemia in 20; only 4 patients had folate deficiency. A third had intestinal malabsorption, 20 had features of osteomalacia, and 87 were iron deficient. Tuberculosis was diagnosed in 17. Cobalamin deficiency may have contributed to these complications via intestinal malabsorption and impaired bacterial killing of phagocytosed bacilli by cobalamin-deficient macrophages. The frequency of pernicious anaemia was the same in Indian subjects as in Caucasians.

  2. Erythropoietin-dependent anaemia: a possible complication of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hadjadj, S; Torremocha, F; Fanelli, A; Brizard, A; Bauwens, M; Maréchaud, R

    2001-06-01

    We report the case of a 52-year-old woman with long-term type 1 diabetes mellitus, complicated with proliferative retinopathy, autonomic neuropathy and microalbuminuria and moderate renal failure. A normochromic, normocytic are generative anaemia had been diagnosed for three years. Clinical and biological investigations for the aetiology of anaemia remained normal or negative. Anaemia was associated with a concentration of erythropoietin (EPO) in the normal range, but inappropriately low regarding anaemia. Treatment with recombinant EPO induced a rapid increase in haemoglobin level and improved the patient's quality of life. The role of diabetic neuropathy in the genesis of anaemia, in conjunction with a modest renal impairment is discussed.

  3. [Insufficient evidence supporting iron supplementation in anaemia during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Wiegerinck, Melanie M; Mol, Ben Willem J

    2012-01-01

    The Royal Dutch Organization of Midwives (KNOV) recently presented their practice guideline 'Anaemia in midwifery practice'. The guideline identified available evidence on diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of anaemia in pregnancy. Anaemia based on iron deficiency and subsequent treatment with iron supplementation are probably the most frequent aspects of care for pregnant women. However, there is surprisingly enough no evidence of the efficacy of iron supplementation treatment on relevant clinical outcomes in pregnant women with anaemia. We plead to make the next guideline a multidisciplinary one. Such a guideline may lead to a large pragmatic trial evaluating the efficacy of iron supplementation treatment for patients with anaemia.

  4. Multiagent Vaccines Vectored by Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicon Elicits Immune Responses to Marburg Virus and Protection Against Anthrax and Botulinum Neurotoxin in Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    formulations of individual Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus replicon- vectored vaccines against a bacterial disease, anthrax; a viral disease...here the results of using formulations of individual Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus replicon-vectored vaccines against a bacterial disease...on days 0, 35, and 70 with the indicated vaccines. Ne b Infectious units were used to measure VRP and milliliters were used to measur c The

  5. Anaemia, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia among blood donors in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Jeremiah, Zaccheaus Awortu; Koate, Baribefe Banavule

    2010-04-01

    There is paucity of information on the effect of blood donation on iron stores in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. The present study was, therefore, designed to assess, using a combination of haemoglobin and iron status parameters, the development of anaemia and prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in this area of Nigeria. Three hundred and forty-eight unselected consecutive whole blood donors, comprising 96 regular donors, 156 relatives of patients and 96 voluntary donors, constituted the study population. Three haematological parameters (haemoglobin, packed cell volume, and mean cell haemoglobin concentration) and four biochemical iron parameters (serum ferritin, serum iron, total iron binding capacity and transferrin saturation) were assessed using standard colorimetric and ELISA techniques. The prevalence of anaemia alone (haemoglobin <11.0 g/dL) was 13.7%. The prevalence of isolated iron deficiency (serum ferritin <12 ng/mL) was 20.6% while that of iron-deficiency anaemia (haemoglobin <11.0 g/dL + serum ferritin <12.0 ng/mL) was 12.0%. Among the three categories of the donors, the regular donors were found to be most adversely affected as shown by the reduction in mean values of both haematological and biochemical iron parameters. Interestingly, anaemia, iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anaemia were present almost exclusively among regular blood donors, all of whom were over 35 years old. Anaemia, iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anaemia are highly prevalent among blood donors in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. It will be necessary to review the screening tests for the selection of blood donors and also include serum ferritin measurement for the routine assessment of blood donors, especially among regular blood donors.

  6. Anaemia, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia among blood donors in Port Harcourt, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Jeremiah, Zaccheaus Awortu; Koate, Baribefe Banavule

    2010-01-01

    Background There is paucity of information on the effect of blood donation on iron stores in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. The present study was, therefore, designed to assess, using a combination of haemoglobin and iron status parameters, the development of anaemia and prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in this area of Nigeria. Materials and Methods Three hundred and forty-eight unselected consecutive whole blood donors, comprising 96 regular donors, 156 relatives of patients and 96 voluntary donors, constituted the study population. Three haematological parameters (haemoglobin, packed cell volume, and mean cell haemoglobin concentration) and four biochemical iron parameters (serum ferritin, serum iron, total iron binding capacity and transferrin saturation) were assessed using standard colorimetric and ELISA techniques. Results The prevalence of anaemia alone (haemoglobin <11.0 g/dL) was 13.7%. The prevalence of isolated iron deficiency (serum ferritin <12 ng/mL) was 20.6% while that of iron-deficiency anaemia (haemoglobin <11.0 g/dL + serum ferritin <12.0 ng/mL) was 12.0%. Among the three categories of the donors, the regular donors were found to be most adversely affected as shown by the reduction in mean values of both haematological and biochemical iron parameters. Interestingly, anaemia, iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anaemia were present almost exclusively among regular blood donors, all of whom were over 35 years old. Conclusion Anaemia, iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anaemia are highly prevalent among blood donors in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. It will be necessary to review the screening tests for the selection of blood donors and also include serum ferritin measurement for the routine assessment of blood donors, especially among regular blood donors. PMID:20383305

  7. Benefits and risks of iron therapy for chronic anaemias.

    PubMed

    Weiss, G; Gordeuk, V R

    2005-12-01

    Iron is used widely for the treatment of anaemias with iron-restricted erythropoiesis. This intervention can be both beneficial and detrimental depending on the type of the underlying process. While in iron deficiency anaemia (IDA), the most frequent anaemia in the world, iron is the therapy of choice, this intervention can be harmful in the anaemia of chronic disease or anaemia associated with renal failure, the most common anaemias in hospitalized adult patients in Western countries. Iron is able to negatively affect cell-mediated immune effector mechanisms directed against invading microorganisms and tumour cells while at the same time, as an essential nutrient, it can stimulate the proliferation of these unwanted cells. In addition, iron catalyses the formation of toxic radicals leading to tissue damage or the promotion of cardiovascular events. Thus, it is essential to correctly diagnose the precise cause of anaemia and to consider the benefits and hazards of targeted iron therapy.

  8. ELA-DRA polymorphisms are not associated with Equine Arteritis Virus infection in horses from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Kalemkerian, P B; Metz, G E; Peral-Garcia, P; Echeverria, M G; Giovambattista, G; Díaz, S

    2012-12-01

    Polymorphisms at Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes have been associated with resistance/susceptibility to infectious diseases in domestic animals. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate whether polymorphisms of the DRA gene the Equine Lymphocyte Antigen is associated with susceptibility to Equine Arteritis Virus (EAV) infection in horses in Argentina. The equine DRA gene was screened for polymorphisms using Pyrosequencing® Technology which allowed the detection of three ELA-DRA exon 2 alleles. Neither allele frequencies nor genotypic differentiation exhibited any statistically significant (P-values=0.788 and 0.745) differences between the EAV-infected and no-infected horses. Fisher's exact test and OR calculations did not show any significant association. As a consequence, no association could be established between the serological condition and ELA-DRA.

  9. Iron incorporation and post-malaria anaemia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Iron supplementation is employed to treat post-malarial anaemia in environments where iron deficiency is common. Malaria induces an intense inflammatory reaction that stalls reticulo-endothelial macrophagal iron recycling from haemolysed red blood cells and inhibits oral iron absorption, but the mag...

  10. Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia in Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mihir B; Nanjapp, Veena; Devaraj, H S; Sindhu, K S

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma though its association with Non- Hodgkin's lymphoma is well known. It is usually detected at the time of diagnosis when it accompanies Hodgkin's and rarely precedes it. It is a warm immune hemolytic anemia which is responsive to steroids and rituximab. We hereby report a case of advanced Hodgkin's disease who presented as AIHA.

  11. Fetal anaemia due to pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Gilsanz, F; Vega, M A; Gómez-Castillo, E; Ruiz-Balda, J A; Omeñaca, F

    1993-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency was diagnosed in an infant by umbilical vessel sampling at 30 weeks' gestation. Although three previous hydropic siblings had been stillborn or died in the neonatal period, this infant survived with transfusion dependent haemolytic anaemia. Prompt fetal diagnosis of pyruvate kinase deficiency is feasible and allows better management of hydrops fetalis due to this disorder. PMID:8285758

  12. Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia in a newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Motta, M; Cavazza, A; Migliori, C; Chirico, G

    2003-07-01

    The case is reported of an infant with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia of perinatal onset. Combined treatment with steroids and cyclosporin was necessary to improve haemolysis and reduce the high transfusion requirements. Treatment was discontinued at 13 months of age. The child was healthy at the follow up at 24 and 36 months of age.

  13. Anaemia during pregnancy in southern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Marchant, T; Armstrong Schellenberg, J R M; Edgar, T; Ronsmans, C; Nathan, R; Abdulla, S; Mukasa, O; Urassa, H; Lengeler, C

    2002-07-01

    Anaemia in pregnancy is associated with maternal morbidity and mortality and is a risk factor for low birth-weight. Of 507 pregnant women recruited in a community, cross-sectional study in southern Tanzania, 11% were severely anaemic (<8 g haemoglobin/dl). High malarial parasitaemia [odds ratio (OR)=2.3] and iron deficiency (OR=2.4) were independent determinants of anaemia. Never having been married (OR=2.9) was the most important socio-economic predictor of severe anaemia. A subject recruited in the late dry season was six times more likely to be severely anaemic than a subject recruited in the early dry season. Compared with the women who were not identified as severely anaemic, the women with severe anaemia were more likely to present at mother-and-child-health (MCH) clinics early in the pregnancy, to seek medical attention beyond the MCH clinics, and to report concerns about their own health. Pregnancy-related food taboos in the study area principally restrict the consumption of fish and meat. Effective anti-malaria and iron-supplementation interventions are available but are not currently in place; improvements in the mechanisms for the delivery of such interventions are urgently required. Additionally, opportunities for contacting the target groups beyond the clinic environment need to be developed.

  14. Recovery from post-operative anaemia.

    PubMed

    Wallis, J P; Wells, A W; Whitehead, S; Brewster, N

    2005-10-01

    Acceptance of lower transfusion thresholds and shorter post-operative stays results in patients leaving hospital after surgery with lower haemoglobin (Hb) than previously. We undertook a prospective observational study to assess the haematological response to post-operative anaemia and to determine the utility of quality of life (QoL) measures in assessing the impact of anaemia on such patients. Thirty patients undergoing unilateral hip arthroplasty had blood samples taken and QoL questionnaires administered pre-operatively and at 7, 28 and 56 days post-operatively. Increased erythropoiesis was evident at day 7 post-operatively. Approximately two-thirds of the post-operative Hb deficit was corrected by day 28. There was evidence of functional iron deficiency in more than one-quarter of patients at day 56. QoL scores used did not show any relationship with Hb in the post-operative period. Red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3DPG) levels increased in proportion to the degree of post-operative anaemia. We concluded that substantial recovery of Hb occurs between day 7 and day 28 post-operatively. Complete recovery of Hb may be delayed beyond day 56 due to development of iron deficiency. Patients are at significant risk of developing post-operative iron deficiency depending on operative blood loss and pre-operative iron stores. Increased red cell 2,3DPG may offset the effect of anaemia on oxygen delivery. We found no evidence that anaemia produces a measurable effect on chosen QoL scores in the post-operative period.

  15. Can hemozoin alone cause host anaemia?

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Wang, Su-Wen; Jin, Chang-Long; Zeng, Xiao-Li; Piao, Xing-Yu; Bai, Ling; Tang, Dan-Li; Ji, Chang-Le

    2016-12-01

    Both schistosomes and malaria parasites produce hemozoin and cause host anaemia. However, the relationship between anaemia and hemozoin is unclear. Although some studies have proposed that hemozoin is related to anaemia in malaria patients, whether hemozoin alone can cause anaemia in patients infected by malaria parasites or schistosomes is uncertain. To investigate the effect of hemozoin on hosts, β-haematin was injected intravenously to normal mice. Then, liver and spleen tissues were observed. Mouse blood was examined. Red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs) and haemoglobin were analysed. Macrophage changes in the spleens and marrow cells were compared using immunofluorescence and H&E or Giemsa stain, respectively. We found that after 15 injections of β-haematin, a large amount of β-haematin was observed to deposit in the livers and spleens. Splenomegaly and bone marrow mild hyperplasia were detected. The average number of RBCs, average number of WBCs and average concentration of haemoglobin decreased significantly from 9.36 × 10(12) cells/L to 8.7 × 10(12) cells/L, 3.8 × 10(9) cells/L to 1.7 × 10(9) cells/L and 142.8 g/L to 131.8 g/L, respectively. In specific, the number of macrophages in the spleens greatly increased after β-haematin infection. The results showed that injections of β-haematin alone can cause anaemia possibly through hypersplenism.

  16. Equine neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Url, A; Bauder, B; Thalhammer, J; Nowotny, N; Kolodziejek, J; Herout, N; Fürst, S; Weissenböck, H

    2001-04-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) is an inherited, neurodegenerative disorder with fatal outcome in humans. It has also been described in some animal species; this is the first report of NCL in equines. Three horses showed developmental retardation, slow movements and loss of appetite at the age of six months. Neurological symptoms, as well as visual failure in one case, were noticed at the age of 1 year. Due to slowly progressing deterioration, euthanasia was indicated 1.5 years after onset of conspicuous behavior. At necropsy, slight flattening of the gyri and discoloring of the brain was noticed. Histopathology revealed eosinophilic, autofluorescent material in the perikarya of neurons throughout the brain and spinal cord. Identical material was found in neurons of retina, submucous and myenteric ganglia, as well as in glial cells. Immunohistochemistry, using antiserum against subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase, showed positive signals in neurons and glial cells. Electron microscopical studies revealed fingerprint profiles mixed with rectilinear structures in markedly enlarged lysosomes of neurons and renal tubules, and rectilinear structures mixed with curvilinear bodies in macrophages and lymphocytes of lymph nodes. Thus, our study presents the first occurrence of lysosomal storage disease in horses, further characterized by immunohistochemical and electron microscopical investigations as NCL.

  17. Equine herpes myeloencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kohn, C W; Fenner, W R

    1987-08-01

    The neurologic form of EHV-1 infection appears to be the result of central nervous system infarction caused by vasculitis, which is initiated in endothelial cells of small blood vessels. The etiologic agent is equine herpesvirus-1, subtype 1. There is some evidence to suggest that the neurologic form of the disease actually results from reactivation of a previous infection. Whether the vasculitis that causes the central nervous system injury is the direct result of the infection or an immune response to the infection has not been determined. The clinical signs are rapid in onset, nonprogressive, and many horses may improve. The diagnosis must often remain tentative, particularly in horses that recover, because there is no single reliable confirmatory test. The prognosis is generally good, although recovery may be slow and incomplete. Supportive therapy is essential, and administration of corticosteroids may be useful. There is no specific therapy for the virus or for the vasculitis. Currently no vaccine can be claimed to protect against the central nervous system form of the disease. Vaccination is recommended, however, to reduce the incidence of respiratory disease, abortion, and neonatal death on the farm. Repeated vaccination is necessary to maintain presumably protective antibody concentrations. Vaccination every 3 to 4 months may decrease the incidence of EHV-1 infection on the farm and therefore may indirectly prevent the occurrence of the neurologic form of the disease.

  18. A Review of Equine Laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Dean A.

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery in the human was first identified in mid 900's. The procedure as is more commonly practiced now was first reported in 1912. There have been many advances and new techniques developed in the past 100 years. Equine laparoscopy, was first reported in the 1970's, and similarly has undergone much transformation in the last 40 years. It is now considered the standard of care in many surgical techniques such as cryptorchidectomy, ovariectomy, nephrosplenic space ablation, standing abdominal exploratory, and many other reproductive surgeries. This manuscript describes the history of minimally invasive surgery, and highlights many of the techniques that are currently performed in equine surgery. Special attention is given to instrumentation, ligating techniques, and the surgical principles of equine minimally invasive surgery. PMID:23762585

  19. Equine corneal surgery and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Denis, Heidi M

    2004-08-01

    Corneal disease is common in equine ophthalmology and requires vigilant monitoring and appropriate therapy to optimize the outcome. Many equine corneal diseases, particularly those that progress rapidly, may benefit from surgical intervention. These include descemetoceles, deep corneal lacerations and ulcers, corneal perforation/iris prolapse, ulcerative keratitis, corneal stromal abscesses, and corneoscleral neoplasia. Indications for corneal transplantation include optical, tectonic, therapeutic, and cosmetic purposes. Corneal transplantation is most often implemented in equine patients for tectonic and therapeutic reasons when a cornea is compromised by corneal stromal abscess, iris prolapse, or neoplasia. This article provides an outline of when to consider surgical intervention for corneal disease, the procedures available and expected outcomes, and how appropriate early surgical intervention can dramatically improve the end result.

  20. Equine cloning: applications and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vanderwall, Dirk K; Woods, Gordon L; Roser, Janet F; Schlafer, Donald H; Sellon, Debra C; Tester, David F; White, Kenneth L

    2006-01-01

    Cloning is one of several new assisted reproductive techniques being developed for clinical use in the equine industry. Potential uses of equine cloning include: (1) the preservation of genetics from individual animals that would otherwise not be able to reproduce, such as geldings; (2) the preservation of genetic material of endangered and/or exotic species, such as the Mongolian wild horse (Przewalski's horse); and (3) because of the companion animal role that horses fill for some individuals, it is likely that some horse owners will have individual animals cloned for emotional fulfillment. Although equine cloning has been successful, like other species, it remains a very inefficient process (<3% success). In most species, the inefficiency of cloning results from a high incidence of embryonic, fetal and/or placental developmental abnormalities that contribute to extremely high rates of embryonic loss, abortion and stillbirths throughout gestation and compromised neonatal health after birth. The present review describes some of the ultrasonographic, endocrinological and histopathological characteristics of successful (produced viable offspring) and unsuccessful (resulted in pregnancy failure) cloned equine (mule and horse) pregnancies we have produced. A total of 21 cloned mule pregnancies were established using fetal fibroblast cells, whereas a total of seven cloned horse pregnancies were established using adult cumulus cells. Three of the cloned mule conceptuses were carried to term, resulting in the birth of three healthy clones. This information adds to an accumulating body of knowledge about the outcome of cloned equine pregnancies, which will help to establish when, and perhaps why, many cloned equine pregnancies fail.

  1. PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODIES AGAINST INFLUENZA VIRUS IN NON-VACCINATED EQUINES FROM THE BRAZILIAN PANTANAL

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Lucas Gaíva E; Borges, Alice Mamede Costa Marques; Villalobos, Eliana Monteforte Cassaro; Lara, Maria do Carmo Custodio Souza Hunold; Cunha, Elenice Maria Siquetin; de Oliveira, Anderson Castro Soares; Braga, Ísis Assis; Aguiar, Daniel Moura

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of antibodies against Equine Influenza Virus (EIV) was determined in 529 equines living on ranches in the municipality of Poconé, Pantanal area of Brazil, by means of the hemagglutination inhibition test, using subtype H3N8 as antigen. The distribution and possible association among positive animal and ranches were evaluated by the chi-square test, spatial autoregressive and multiple linear regression models. The prevalence of antibodies against EIV was estimated at 45.2% (95% CI 30.2 - 61.1%) with titers ranging from 20 to 1,280 HAU. Seropositive equines were found on 92.0% of the surveyed ranches. Equine from non-flooded ranches (66.5%) and negativity in equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) (61.7%) were associated with antibodies against EIV. No spatial correlation was found among the ranches, but the ones located in non-flooded areas were associated with antibodies against EIV. A negative correlation was found between the prevalence of antibodies against EIV and the presence of EIAV positive animals on the ranches. The high prevalence of antibodies against EIV detected in this study suggests that the virus is circulating among the animals, and this statistical analysis indicates that the movement and aggregation of animals are factors associated to the transmission of the virus in the region. PMID:25351542

  2. Prevalence of antibodies against influenza virus in non-vaccinated equines from the Brazilian Pantanal.

    PubMed

    Gaíva e Silva, Lucas; Borges, Alice Mamede Costa Marques; Villalobos, Eliana Monteforte Cassaro; Lara, Maria do Carmo Custodio Souza Hunold; Cunha, Elenice Maria Siquetin; de Oliveira, Anderson Castro Soares; Braga, Isis Assis; Aguiar, Daniel Moura

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of antibodies against Equine Influenza Virus (EIV) was determined in 529 equines living on ranches in the municipality of Poconé, Pantanal area of Brazil, by means of the hemagglutination inhibition test, using subtype H3N8 as antigen. The distribution and possible association among positive animal and ranches were evaluated by the chi-square test, spatial autoregressive and multiple linear regression models. The prevalence of antibodies against EIV was estimated at 45.2% (95% CI 30.2 - 61.1%) with titers ranging from 20 to 1,280 HAU. Seropositive equines were found on 92.0% of the surveyed ranches. Equine from non-flooded ranches (66.5%) and negativity in equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) (61.7%) were associated with antibodies against EIV. No spatial correlation was found among the ranches, but the ones located in non-flooded areas were associated with antibodies against EIV. A negative correlation was found between the prevalence of antibodies against EIV and the presence of EIAV positive animals on the ranches. The high prevalence of antibodies against EIV detected in this study suggests that the virus is circulating among the animals, and this statistical analysis indicates that the movement and aggregation of animals are factors associated to the transmission of the virus in the region.

  3. [Infectious mononucleosis].

    PubMed

    Berger, C

    2003-10-01

    Infectious mononucleosis (IM) is the manifestation of primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV persisting after infection for a life-time infects > 90% of the adult population. Primary infection mostly asymptomatic in young children manifests in teenagers and young adults in about 50% as IM with fever, sore throat, generalized lymphadenopathy, frequently hepatosplenomegaly and blood lymphocytosis with the characteristic atypical lymphocytes. Clinical presentation, typical lymphocytosis and heterophile antibodies are diagnostic. Atypical cases may need to be confirmed by specific serology. IM is a self-limiting lymphoproliferation regressing within 2-3 weeks. Complications are rare and may involve many different organs. Severe cases are very uncommon, except in patients with inborn or acquired immunodeficiency carrying a substantially higher risk for severe courses, pogredient lymphoproliferation and lymphoma.

  4. Anaemia in chronic heart failure: more awareness is required.

    PubMed

    Pisaniello, A D; Wong, D T L; Kajani, I; Robinson, K; Shakib, S

    2013-09-01

    To determine the characteristics of anaemic patients, how well anaemia is investigated and its contributing factors in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Retrospective analysis of longitudinal data collected during routine management of patients admitted with CHF at an Australian tertiary hospital. One thousand and twenty-one patients admitted with CHF between 1997 and 2005 were included. Anaemia was defined as a haemoglobin concentration <110 g/L. Data were compared between anaemic and non-anaemic patients. The prevalence of anaemia among patients with CHF was 20.3% in our study. These patients were more likely to be older, female, and have a higher prevalence of chronic renal failure and peripheral vascular disease. Despite previous studies reporting a higher mortality rate among CHF patients with anaemia, only 60% of patients had basic investigations for anaemia (i.e. iron studies, vitamin B12, folate and thyroid function testing). The cause of anaemia is usually multifactorial with 63.8% of patients having at least two factors contributing to their anaemia. Chronic renal failure, iron deficiency and anaemia of chronic disease were the most common contributors. These factors were not predicted based on abnormalities in mean corpuscular volume. Patients with anaemia had a longer length of stay in hospital. Anaemia in patients with CHF is common but not well investigated. The aetiology of anaemia is usually multifactorial and not easily predicted. Patients with anaemia and CHF have poorer outcomes. There needs to be more awareness among clinicians about the importance of investigating and treating anaemia in patients with CHF. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  5. National Equine Forum: Taking up the reins on equine issues.

    PubMed

    2015-04-04

    Gill Harris reports from this year's National Equine Forum, where one of the main themes was the horse industry and government. The forum, held in London on March 5, was attended by more than 200 people with a connection to the equestrian industry. Lord de Mauley, parliamentary undersecretary of state for natural environment and science at Defra, set the course of the proceedings.

  6. Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis.

    PubMed

    MacKay, R J; Granstrom, D E; Saville, W J; Reed, S M

    2000-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the parasite life cycle, epidemiology, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of EPM are reviewed. The NAHMS Equine '98 study and a controlled retrospective study from The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine identified a number of risk factors associated with development of the disease. The national annual incidence of EPM was 1% or less depending on the primary use of the animals. Increased disease risk was associated with age (1-5 and > 13 years of age), season (lowest in winter months and increasing with ambient temperature), previous stressful events, the presence of opossums, the use of nonsurface water drinking systems, and failure to restrict wildlife access to feed. Horses that received treatment were 10 times more likely to improve, and those that improved were 50 times more likely to survive. A number of recent studies confirmed that horses can be experimentally infected with S. neurona; however, large numbers of sporocysts are apparently necessary to achieve infection, and clinical signs and abnormal CNS histology are only seen inconsistently. Results suggest that CNS infection and positive CSF immunoblot findings may be transient phenomena among naturally infected horses. Although immunosuppression may be involved in the development of EPM, some element of the immune response seems to be necessary for the development of clinical signs. Use of the standard immunoblot test for the detection of anti-S. neurona antibodies in CSF continues to provide the most useful adjunct to a detailed neurologic examination for the diagnosis of EPM. Test sensitivity and specificity were 89% in 295 horses euthanatized because of neurologic disease, of which 123 were confirmed cases of EPM. The PPV was 85%, and the NVP was 92%. A number of promising new EPM treatments are under investigation. In addition to standard SDZ/PYR therapy, toltrazuril, ponazuril, diclazuril, and NTZ have shown promise as

  7. Vector ecology of equine piroplasmosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Equine piroplasmosis (EP) is a disease of equidae including horses, donkeys, mules and zebras caused by either of two protozoan parasites, Theileria equi or Babesia caballi. These parasites are biologically transmitted between hosts via tick-vectors and although they have inherent differences, they ...

  8. Survey of Australian equine veterinarians evaluating their biosecurity training and perceptions and opinions about the management of the 2007 equine influenza outbreak.

    PubMed

    Schemann, K; Toribio, J-A L M L; Taylor, M R; Ward, M P; Dhand, N K

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the level of biosecurity training among Australian equine veterinarians and to assess their perceptions of biosecurity and infectious disease risk and their opinions about the management of the 2007 equine influenza (EI) outbreak. Cross-sectional study. A survey was conducted among equine veterinarians attending the 2010 annual conference of the Equine Veterinarians Australia (EVA) in New South Wales, Australia. Data were collected using a self-completed questionnaire and analysed using Fisher's exact tests to assess veterinarians' levels of biosecurity training, their perceptions of infectious disease and views regarding the 2007 EI outbreak management. A total of 46 of the 196 (23.5%) attending veterinarians completed the questionnaire. Significantly greater proportions of recently graduated veterinarians received theoretical and practical biosecurity training at veterinary schools than their older counterparts. The majority of respondents considered their likelihood of spreading infectious diseases from one client's horse to another to be low (84%). More than half (58%) of the veterinarians considered that hand-washing/wearing gloves was very effective in preventing disease spread. However, around one-quarter (27%) reported a degree of reservation about the practicality of performing general biosecurity practices in everyday working life. Overall, veterinarians were satisfied with the EI outbreak response, but had mixed opinions about the control measures and communications used. Levels of biosecurity training and the frequency of biosecurity advice provided by veterinarians have increased over time, although the practicality of biosecurity practices is a concern for some veterinarians. Further investigations of the barriers to the use of various biosecurity practices are required in order to inform training programs. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  9. Sideroblastic anaemia. A review of seven paediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Hamel, B C; Schretlen, E D

    1982-03-01

    Sideroblastic Anaemias are characterised by a) chronic hypochromic anemia, b) ringed sideroblasts in the bone marrow, c) an increase in total body iron, d) ineffective erythropoiesis and e) often abnormal concentrations of F.E.P. A classification of Sideroblastic Anaemia is given and the pathophysiology of Sideroblastic Anaemia is discussed. A series of seven paediatric cases with Sideroblastic Anaemia is presented and the results of studies of the iron, vitamin B6 and porphyrin metabolism are discussed. In two cases arguments for an ALA-synthetase deficiency are given. All five males were diagnosed as hereditary X-linked Sideroblastic Anaemia, one female as I.R.S.A. and the other female, who showed the features of the X-linked type, as congenital Sideroblastic Anaemia.

  10. Gastroscopic follow up of pernicious anaemia patients.

    PubMed Central

    Sjöblom, S M; Sipponen, P; Järvinen, H

    1993-01-01

    To assess the value of gastroscopic cancer surveillance of patients with pernicious anaemia, 56 patients were re-endoscoped and biopsied after three years. In addition, changes in the density of fundic mucosal endocrine cells were evaluated morphometrically. Two cases (3.6%) of early gastric cancer and two cases of small gastric carcinoid tumours (3.6%) were detected in addition to the five carcinoids that had been found at the initial endoscopic screening. Nodular argyrophil cell hyperplasia and morphometric density of argyrophil cells were not stable phenomena: nodular hyperplasias regressed in five patients, remained similar in six, and progressed to a small carcinoid tumour in one. Serum gastrin concentrations did not correlate well with changes in the endocrine cell density. Regular endoscopic surveillance for gastric cancer may be beneficial and realistic in young patients with pernicious anaemia while the importance of fundic endocrine cell hyperplasia and that of small gastric carcinoids need further study. PMID:8432447

  11. Tissue antibodies in idiopathic autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Blajchman, M. A.

    1971-01-01

    Sera from patients with idiopathic autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA) were studied, by the immunofluorescent technique, for the presence of circulating organ-specific and non-organ-specific autoantibodies. In patients with warm AIHA there was an increased incidence in the non-organ-specific autoantibodies, compared to normal controls: In 15% of sera studied there were antinuclear antibodies detectable, and in 5% antimitochondrial antibodies were present. In cold AIHA, however, the frequency of these autoantibodies was not increased. The incidence of organ-specific autoantibodies was normal in both cold and warm AIHA. No correlation was found between the occurrence of these autoantibodies and pattern of serum immunoglobulin concentration, specific serological feature, or clinical manifestation. The significance of the increased incidence of tissue autoantibodies and their relation to autoimmune haemolytic anaemia remains to be elucidated, but in some way may be due to increased immunological reactivity. PMID:4931855

  12. Anaemia, iron deficiency and susceptibility to infections.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Femke A M; Boele van Hensbroek, Michaël

    2014-11-01

    Anaemia, iron deficiency and infections are three major causes of childhood morbidity and mortality throughout the world, although they predominantly occur in resource limited settings. As the three conditions may have the same underlying aetiologies, they often occur simultaneously and may interact. Being an essential component in erythropoiesis, iron is also essential for proper functioning of the host immune system as well as an essential nutrient for growth of various pathogens, including non-typhoid salmonella. This has resulted in a treatment dilemma in which iron is needed to treat the iron deficient anaemia and improve the immune system of the host (child), but the same treatment may also put the child at an increased, potentially fatal, infection risk.

  13. Pernicious anaemia and cancer risk in Denmark.

    PubMed Central

    Mellemkjaer, L.; Gridley, G.; Møller, H.; Hsing, A. W.; Linet, M. S.; Brinton, L. A.; Olsen, J. H.

    1996-01-01

    A cohort of 5072 patients with pernicious anaemia was identified in the Danish Hospital Discharge Register from 1977 to 1989 and, through linkage to the Danish Cancer Registry, the occurrence of cancer in the cohort was determined up to 1991. Observed numbers of cancer cases during 1-15 years of follow-up were compared with expected numbers based on national incidence rates. Besides the well-established increased risk for stomach cancer, the analysis also revealed a 2-fold increase in the relative risk for cancer of the buccal cavity and pharynx among pernicious anaemia patients in accordance with previous studies; previously reported elevated risks for other digestive tract cancers were not confirmed. There was a non-significantly increased risk for lymphatic and haematological malignancy but the risk tended to disappear after 5 years of follow-up, indicating a possible selection bias. Decreased risks for cervical cancer and non-melanoma skin cancer were also seen. PMID:8611439

  14. An uncommon cause of anaemia: Sheehan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Melchardt, Thomas; Namberger, Konrad; Weiss, Lukas; Egle, Alexander; Faber, Viktoria; Greil, Richard

    2010-12-01

    Ischemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum haemorrhage called Sheehan's syndrome is a rare cause of hypopituitarism in the western world, but much more common in developing countries. A 45-year-old female patient being a war refugee from Chechnya with severe anaemia and fatigue was diagnosed at our outpatient department with Sheehan's syndrome after severe postpartum haemorrhage and emergency hysterectomy 15 years ago. Panhypopituitarism was adequately treated with substitution of hydrocortisone, thyroxine and transdermal oestrogen which resulted in haemoglobin increase to nearly normal levels and symptoms improved immediately. Severe anaemia caused by panhypopituitarism shows the importance of the hormonal system for erythropoiesis. Clinical and basic scientific evidence indicates thyroidal hormones to be the main cause.

  15. The pattern for common anaemia among Saudi children.

    PubMed

    el-Hazmi, M A; Warsy, A S

    1999-08-01

    Anaemia is of frequent occurrence in children in different parts of the world and poses a significant health problem. A few isolated reports indicate that anaemia occurs at a high prevalence rate in Saudi Arabia though the actual prevalence in several regions is not known. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of different types of anaemias in Saudi children in different areas of the country. Blood samples were collected from 5381 children less than 14 years of age, and haematological analysis and red cell indices were determined. The results of haematological parameters were used to group the children as anaemic (Hb < 11.2 g/dl) and non-anaemic (Hb > 11.2 g/dl) and the red cell indices were used to classify the anaemia as hypochromic-microcytic, normochromic-normocytic, and normochromic-macrocytic. The overall prevalence of anaemia in Saudi children was 24.8 per cent. The prevalence was highest in the children from the Eastern province (41.3 per cent) and lowest in the central province (16.5 per cent). Within each province differences were obvious in the prevalence of anaemias in the different areas. The majority of the anaemia in the eastern and south-western provinces was hypochromic-microcytic, while in the north-western and central provinces normochromic-normocytic anaemia occurred most frequently. Macrocytic anaemia was not encountered in any of the screened areas of the central province and many areas of the eastern province. However, in north-western and south-western provinces it occurred at a frequency of 0.15-3.4 per cent. The data show that anaemia is a frequent problem in Saudi children living in different parts of Saudi Arabia and emphasizes the need for nutritional and genetic assessment to determine the nutritional contributions to anaemias and hence the correction of nutritional anaemias by proper dietary intervention.

  16. Musculoskeletal disorders in sickle cell anaemia--unusual associations.

    PubMed

    Umesh, Soumya; Ajit, Nisha Elizabeth; Shobha, Vineeta; Nazuralla, Syed; Ross, Cecil; Choudhury, Ratnamala

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell anaemia coexisting with gout is a rare clinical association, as is gout and eosinophilia. This report records the second case of chronic tophaceous deposits in Sickle cell anaemia. The patient also had eosinophilia in association with gout. Skeletal fluorosis was an incidental finding in this patient. Treatment with packed cell transfusions, hydroxyurea and colchicine lead to the resolution of anaemia and symptoms of acute gout.

  17. Prevalence and aetiology of anaemia in lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, J; Singh, R K Bikramjit; Saxena, R; Gupta, R; Vivekanandan, S; Sreenivas, V; Raina, V; Sharma, A; Kumar, L

    2013-01-01

    We prospectively studied the prevalence, type and causes of anaemia in newly diagnosed patients with lymphoid malignancies. Between January 2007 and June 2008, a total of 316 newly diagnosed, consecutive patients (aged 15 years or above) of Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia with anaemia (haemoglobin <11 g/dl), were analysed to determine the prevalence and a subgroup of 46 patients was analysed for the cause of anaemia. Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia were the diagnoses in 81 (25.8%), 203 (64.7%) and 30 (9.6%) patients, respectively. Anaemia was present in 134 patients (42.4%). Anaemia of chronic disease was present in 33/46 (71.7%) and iron deficiency in 18/46 (39.1%) patients. Vitamin B12 and/or folate deficiency was detected in 10/46 (21.7%) patients (B12 deficiency alone in 7, folate deficiency alone in 1 and combined B12 and folate deficiency in 2). Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia was detected in 5/46 (10.9%) although direct Coombs test was positive in 17/46 (37%) patients. Among patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, anaemia due to bone marrow involvement was present in 16/40 (40%). In most patients with bone marrow involvement, anaemia was due to other causes. In only 3 patients, anaemia was attributable to bone marrow involvement alone. Anaemia was multifactorial in 18/46 (39.1%) patients. Nutritional deficiency alone or in combination was present in 22/46 (47.8%) patients. Anaemia is common in lymphoid malignancies at initial presentation. Besides managing anaemia of chronic disease and bone marrow involvement, nutritional and autoimmune causes should be ruled out. Copyright 2013, NMJI.

  18. Diagnosis of anaemia: old things rearranged.

    PubMed

    Halwachs-Baumann, Gabriele

    2012-11-01

    Anaemia is one of the most leading causes of morbidity and mortality, as declared by the World Health Organisation. This syndrome is characterised by low haemoglobin levels and nonspecific clinical symptoms such as weakness, fatigue and dyspnoea. The symptoms are unspecific as the underlying causes are heterogeneous. Thus, good knowledge of the useful biomarkers and their correct assignment is needed to allow rapid and targeted diagnosis.

  19. Radioimmunoassay of gastrin: studies in pernicious anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Hansky, J.; Korman, M. G.; Soveny, C.; John, D. J. B. St

    1971-01-01

    Serum gastrin levels in patients with pernicious anaemia were measured by immunoassay in the fasting state, following gastric perfusion with 0·9% saline, 0·1N hydrochloric acid, and solutions of increasing acidity, and after the intravenous injection or infusion of secretin. The fasting serum gastrin level was measured in 21 patients with pernicious anaemia and found to be elevated at 1,036 ± 215 pg per ml. Gastric perfusion with saline (pH 4·7) caused a mean fall in serum gastrin of 30% in four patients; perfusion with hydrochloric acid caused a further slight fall. Perfusion with solutions of increasing acidity resulted in a sharp fall in serum gastrin levels when the acidity was changed from pH 6 to pH 4. A single intravenous injection of secretin produced a mean maximal fall of 44% in the serum gastrin level in four patients, whereas continuous infusion of secretin produced a fall of 35% in four other patients. These studies suggest that the gastrin-secreting cells of the stomach are not affected by the atrophic process in pernicious anaemia and remain subject to the regulating control of acid and secretin. PMID:5548565

  20. Management of anaemia and other treatment complications.

    PubMed

    Hézode, Christophe

    2013-09-30

    Antiviral treatment for hepatitis C virus infection has dramatically changed with the advent of triple therapy including telaprevir or boceprevir, which is associated with a new spectrum of adverse events. These may lead to dosage reduction and early discontinuation of therapy. An increase in the frequency and severity of anaemia was reported in clinical trials for both drugs, and skin disorders including rash and pruritus occurred more frequently with the telaprevir-based regimen. The first-line management of anaemia is ribavirin dose reductions. In cirrhotic patients, aggressive ribavirin dosage reductions, erythropoietin alpha and blood transfusions are effective in managing anaemia. Several deaths and cases of severe infections and hepatic decompensation were reported in cirrhotics treated in real-life setting. Patients with platelet count ≤ 100,000/mm(3) and serum albumin < 35 g/L should not be treated with triple therapy as it is related to a high risk of developing severe complications. The management of rashes, if well planned, does not require telaprevir discontinuation. However, approximately 5% of rashes were severe and a few cases were classified as severe cutaneous adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation. Successful treatment can be enhanced by a strong patient support network including a multidisciplinary team.

  1. Prevalence of Anaemia among Postnatal Mothers in Coastal Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwan, Darshan; Kumar, Ashwini; Kamath, Asha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Postpartum is the most neglected period in reproductive cycle of woman. Prevalence of anaemia in developing countries ranges from 50-95%. Aim To estimate the prevalence of anaemia among postnatal mothers. Setting and design A community based cross-sectional study among recently delivered mothers residing in field practice area of Department of Community Medicine, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal, India. Materials and Methods The study sample included 401 respondents who were selected using stratified random sampling with proportionate allocation from all rural health centres. Data was collected by personal interviews followed by haemoglobin estimation by indirect cyanomethaemoglobin method. Results The prevalence of postnatal anaemia was 26.5% (Anaemia = Hb<12gm/dl). There were no cases of severe anaemia. Postnatal anaemia was predominantly seen in mothers of age < 20 years and half of the mothers with inter-pregnancy intervals less than two years were found to be anaemic. Illiteracy was identified as a significant variable (OR=11.23, 95% CI = 1.90-65.08) for postpartum anaemia. Conclusion The prevalence of anaemia was significantly lower in the present study; however sustained efforts have to be made to further lower the prevalence of postnatal anaemia in order to promote the health and well-being of women. PMID:26894096

  2. Determinants of anaemia among pregnant women in rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mbule, Marjorie A; Byaruhanga, Yusuf B; Kabahenda, Magaret; Lubowa, Abdulrahman

    2013-01-01

    In spite of intervention efforts, in Uganda, as in other developing countries, high levels of anaemia among pregnant women continue. Anaemia among women of reproductive age (15-49 years) is a matter of national concern. This study was carried out to assess determinants of anaemia in Kiboga district. This was a single cross-sectional, descriptive survey. The anaemia status of the pregnant women was determined by measuring their haemoglobin levels. Possible determinant factors including socio-economic characteristics, knowledge, attitudes, practices and food intake were assessed using a structured questionnaire. Results showed that the prevalence of anaemia among pregnant women in Kiboga district was high enough (63.1%) to be described as a severe public health problem. The uptake and utilisation of the public-health intervention package to combat anaemia in pregnancy was low, with iron/folic acid supplementation at 13.2%, use of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria 45.4%, and use of de-worming medicines 14.5%. Women from households without a functional radio were 2.07 times more likely be anaemic (95%CI, 1.08-3.00) compared with women from households where there was a functional radio. There was little awareness and functional knowledge about anaemia among pregnant women. The high prevalence of anaemia observed in Kiboga district can be attributed to poverty and limited access to nutrition and health education information which lead to low uptake and utilization of the public-health intervention package to combat anaemia in pregnancy.

  3. The anaemia of cancer: death by a thousand cuts.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Jerry L

    2005-07-01

    Cancer has a negative systemic impact on its host in addition to its local or metastatic effects, and no cancer complication is more ubiquitous than anaemia, a condition for which there is now a specific remedy, the recombinant growth factor erythropoietin. This is not a trivial therapeutic consideration, because cancer-associated anaemia has an adverse influence on survival regardless of tumour type. However, the pharmacological correction of anaemia with recombinant erythropoietin could promote tumour growth, whereas the use of tumour-necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand as antitumour agents could exacerbate anaemia, thereby perpetuating tissue hypoxia and tumour progression.

  4. Potential risk of equine herpes virus 1 (EHV-1) transmission by equine embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Hebia, I; Fiéni, F; Duchamp, G; Destrumelle, S; Pellerin, J-L; Zientara, S; Vautherot, J-F; Bruyas, J-F

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the 10 wash cycles proposed by the International Embryo Transfer Society (IETS) for bovine embryos efficiently decontaminated equine embryos exposed to equine herpes virus 1 (EHV-1) in vitro. Donor mares and stallions were individually screened and shown to be negative for the virus by PCR detection of EHV-1 DNA in blood leukocytes, semen, and uterine lavages in which embryos were recovered. Twenty embryos were recovered and randomly assigned to one of two groups: 10 embryos were exposed for 24h to infectious EHV-1 at 10(6)TCID(50)/ml, and 10 embryos were used as negative controls. Exposed embryos were washed in accordance with IETS recommendations for ruminant and porcine embryos, before being incubated for 24 h with semiconfluent rabbit kidney (RK13) cells to detect any cytopathic effects (CPE), and finally tested for the presence of EHV-1 viral DNA by PCR. The embryo washing media were also assayed for the virus on RK 13 cells and by PCR. Control embryos were neither exposed to the virus nor washed. EHV-1 was not found in the control embryos, or in the last five washes of the exposed embryos. However, the virus was detected in 7/10 of the embryos exposed to EHV-1 for 24h, as well as in the first five washes of the embryos. The gradual disappearance of EHV-1 from the 10 successive wash solutions from the exposed embryos and the detection of viral DNA in 7/10 washed embryos by PCR, demonstrated that the washing procedure was unable to remove EHV-1 and suggested that EHV-1 could be attached to the acellular layer surrounding embryos (zona pellucida or capsule) or had penetrated the embryo.

  5. Timing of umbilical cord-clamping and infant anaemia: the role of maternal anaemia.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Brittany; Penny, Mary E; Maheu-Giroux, Mathieu; Casapía, Martín; Aguilar, Eder; Silva, Hermánn; Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary M; Joseph, Serene A; Gagnon, Anita; Rahme, Elham; Gyorkos, Theresa W

    2013-05-01

    Evidence from randomized controlled trials has shown that delayed cord-clamping is beneficial to infant iron status. The role of maternal anaemia in this relationship, however, has not been established. To determine the effect of maternal anaemia at delivery on the association between timing of umbilical cord-clamping and infant anaemia at 4 and 8 months of age. A cohort of pregnant women admitted to the labour room of Hospital Iquitos (Iquitos, Peru) and their newborns were recruited into the study during two time periods (18 May to 3 June and 6-20 July 2009). Between the two recruitment periods, the hospital's policy changed from early to delayed umbilical cord-clamping. Maternal haemoglobin levels were measured before delivery, and the time between delivery and cord-clamping was recorded at delivery for the entire cohort. Mother-infant pairs were followed-up at 4 (n = 207) and 8 months (n = 184) post partum. Infant haemoglobin levels were measured at follow-up visits. Data were analysed using logistic regression models. The prevalence of maternal anaemia (Hb <11.0 g/dl) at delivery was 22%. Infant haemoglobin levels at 4 and 8 months of age were 10.4 g/dl and 10.3 g/dl, respectively. Infant haemoglobin levels did not differ significantly between infants born to anaemic mothers and those born to non-anaemic mothers at either 4 or 8 months of age. However, the association between the timing of cord-clamping and infant anaemia was modified by the mother's anaemia status. Significant benefits of delayed cord-clamping in preventing anaemia were found in infants born to anaemic mothers at both 4 months (aOR = 0.59, 95% CI 0.36-0.99) and 8 months (aOR = 0.38, 95% CI 0.19-0.76) of age. The study contributes additional evidence in support of delayed cord-clamping. This intervention is likely to have most public health impact in areas with a high prevalence of anaemia during pregnancy.

  6. RNA extraction from equine samples for equine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2014-01-01

    The primary goals of this chapter are to discuss common viral RNA isolation and purification methods that are routinely used by various diagnostic laboratories, to highlight the advantages and drawbacks of each method, and to identify the most suitable and reliable method to increase the sensitivity and specificity of RT-PCR assays for the detection of equine influenza virus (EIV) in clinical specimens. Our experiences and review of literature show that magnetic bead-based nucleic extraction methods (manual and automatic) work well for isolation and purification of EIV RNA from nasal swab specimens. Furthermore, most of the information presented in this chapter could be directly applicable to isolation and purification of nucleic acids (both DNA and RNA) from other equine clinical samples.

  7. Megaloblastic anaemia: prevalence and causative factors.

    PubMed

    Khanduri, Uma; Sharma, Archna

    2007-01-01

    Megaloblastic anaemia is not uncommon in India, but data are insufficient regarding its prevalence, and causative and precipitating factors. We did a prospective study to document such data for patients of megaloblastic anaemia. All patients presenting to our hospital over a period of 6 months with a haemoglobin < 10 g/dl and/or mean corpuscular volume > 95 fL and blood film findings consistent with megaloblastosis were included in the study. Demographic data, diet, drug intake, previous blood transfusion and presenting symptoms were recorded. Clinical findings were obtained from medical records of patients. Complete blood counts, blood film examination, reticulocyte count and cobalamin and folate assays were done. Results of liver function tests and bone marrow slides were available for review. Megaloblastic anaemia was diagnosed in 175 patients with anaemia. Assays were done on 120 patients (55 were lost to follow up) and results showed cobalamin deficiency in 78 patients (65%), combined cobalamin and folate deficiency in 20 patients (12%) and pure folate deficiency in 8 patients (6%). Fifteen per cent of patients had normal or high values of both vitamins, having received blood or haematinics before the diagnosis was established. The peak incidence of megaloblastic anaemia was in the age group of 10-30 years (48%), with female preponderance (71%). The predominant symptoms were fatigue, anorexia and gastritis, low grade fever, shortness of breath, palpitations and mild jaundice. Twenty-five per cent of patients were on acid-suppressing medication and 15% had previous transfusion for anaemia. Eighty-seven per cent of patients with cobalamin deficiency and 75% with folate deficiency were lactovegetarians. In the combined deficiency cohort, 71% were vegetarians and 29% were occasional non-vegetarians. Physical findings were pallor (85%), glossitis (29%), mild icterus (25%) and hyperpigmentation (18%). Abnormal haematological findings were mean corpuscular volume 77

  8. Surveillance of equine respiratory viruses in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Mendez, Andrés; Viel, Laurent; Hewson, Joanne; Doig, Paul; Carman, Susy; Chambers, Thomas; Tiwari, Ashish; Dewey, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and implement an active surveillance program for the early and rapid detection of equine influenza viruses in Ontario. For this purpose, from October 2003 to October 2005, nasopharyngeal swabs and acute and convalescent serum samples were collected from 115 client-owned horses in 23 outbreaks of respiratory disease in Ontario. Sera were paired and tested for antibody to equine influenza 1 (AE1-H7N7), equine influenza 2 (AE2-H3N8), equine herpesvirus 1 and 4 (EHV1 and EHV4), and equine rhinitis A and B (ERAV and ERBV). Overall, the cause-specific morbidity rate of equine influenza virus in the respiratory outbreaks was 56.5% as determined by the single radial hemolysis (SRH) test. The AE2-H3N8 was isolated from 15 horses in 5 outbreaks. A 4-fold increase in antibody levels or the presence of a high titer against ERAV or ERBV was observed in 10 out of 13 outbreaks in which AE2-H3N8 was diagnosed as the primary cause of disease. In conclusion, AE2-H3N8 was found to be an important contributor to equine respiratory viral disease. Equine rhinitis A and B (ERAV and ERBV) represented an important component in the equine respiratory disease of performing horses. PMID:21197227

  9. Renal function and anaemia in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Pinto de Carvalho, Leonardo; McCullough, Peter A; Gao, Fei; Sim, Ling Ling; Tan, Huay Cheem; Foo, David; Ooi, Yau Wei; Richards, A Mark; Chan, Mark Y; Yeo, Tiong-Cheng

    2013-09-30

    Impaired renal function and anaemia are common among patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). While both conditions are known independent risk factors for increased mortality, their interaction as risk factors for increased mortality in AMI is unclear. We studied 5395 subjects hospitalized for AMI between January 2000 and December 2005. An estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) was defined as impaired GFR and GFR ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) was defined as preserved GFR. Anaemia was defined as <13 g/dL (males) and <12 g/dL (females). The odds ratio (OR) for one-year mortality and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated by logistic regression. We identified 758 (14%) patients with impaired GFR and anaemia, 1105 (20.5%) patients with impaired GFR without anaemia, 465 (8.6%) patients with preserved GFR and anaemia, and 3012 (55.8%) patients with preserved GFR without anaemia; one-year mortality rates were 56.5%, 41.8%, 31.8% and 10.3% respectively in these 4 groups. Among patients with impaired GFR, anaemia was associated with an adjusted OR of 1.47 (95% CI=1.17-1.85) for one-year mortality, while among patients with preserved GFR, anaemia was associated with a higher adjusted OR of 2.07 (95% CI=1.54-2.76) for one-year mortality, interaction P<0.001. The combination of impaired GFR and anaemia confers greater than five-fold increased risk of mortality after AMI. The differential effect of anaemia among patients with impaired and preserved GFR on mortality suggests that in patients with preserved GFR anaemia confers a greater relative hazard than in patients with impaired renal function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transfusion and Treatment of severe anaemia in African children (TRACT): a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mpoya, Ayub; Kiguli, Sarah; Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Opoka, Robert O; Engoru, Charles; Mallewa, Macpherson; Chimalizeni, Yami; Kennedy, Neil; Kyeyune, Dorothy; Wabwire, Benjamin; M'baya, Bridon; Bates, Imelda; Urban, Britta; von Hensbroek, Michael Boele; Heyderman, Robert; Thomason, Margaret J; Uyoga, Sophie; Williams, Thomas N; Gibb, Diana M; George, Elizabeth C; Walker, A Sarah; Maitland, Kathryn

    2015-12-29

    In sub-Saharan Africa, where infectious diseases and nutritional deficiencies are common, severe anaemia is a common cause of paediatric hospital admission, yet the evidence to support current treatment recommendations is limited. To avert overuse of blood products, the World Health Organisation advocates a conservative transfusion policy and recommends iron, folate and anti-helminthics at discharge. Outcomes are unsatisfactory with high rates of in-hospital mortality (9-10%), 6-month mortality and relapse (6%). A definitive trial to establish best transfusion and treatment strategies to prevent both early and delayed mortality and relapse is warranted. TRACT is a multicentre randomised controlled trial of 3954 children aged 2 months to 12 years admitted to hospital with severe anaemia (haemoglobin < 6 g/dl). Children will be enrolled over 2 years in 4 centres in Uganda and Malawi and followed for 6 months. The trial will simultaneously evaluate (in a factorial trial with a 3 x 2 x 2 design) 3 ways to reduce short-term and longer-term mortality and morbidity following admission to hospital with severe anaemia in African children. The trial will compare: (i) R1: liberal transfusion (30 ml/kg whole blood) versus conservative transfusion (20 ml/kg) versus no transfusion (control). The control is only for children with uncomplicated severe anaemia (haemoglobin 4-6 g/dl); (ii) R2: post-discharge multi-vitamin multi-mineral supplementation (including folate and iron) versus routine care (folate and iron) for 3 months; (iii) R3: post-discharge cotrimoxazole prophylaxis for 3 months versus no prophylaxis. All randomisations are open. Enrolment to the trial started September 2014 and is currently ongoing. Primary outcome is cumulative mortality to 4 weeks for the transfusion strategy comparisons, and to 6 months for the nutritional support/antibiotic prophylaxis comparisons. Secondary outcomes include mortality, morbidity (haematological correction, nutritional and

  11. General method for the detection and in vitro expansion of equine cytolytic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hammond, S A; Issel, C J; Montelaro, R C

    1998-04-01

    Equine immunological research is hindered by the lack of a simple yet reliable general protocol by which to assay CTL activity specific for viral or parasitic antigens. We present here the first comprehensive analysis of the parameters necessary to reliably culture equine T cells and to analyze the antigen specific cytolytic activity of T lymphocytes utilizing the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection of outbred ponies as a source for in vivo primed T lymphocytes. Effective long-term in vitro culture of equine T cells was determined to require minimally 200 U/ml of recombinant human IL-2. We demonstrated that pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulated PBMC generated large quantities of MHC class I and MHC class II expressing autologous lymphoblasts that were used initially to activate and expand antigen specific T lymphocytes and later to serve as a source of target cells in standard chromium release assays. The source of antigen expressed by the PWM lymphoblasts was a recombinant vaccinia virus vector which carried sequences encoding various antigens of interest, but most specifically, the envelope glycoprotein of EIAV. Secondary in vitro stimulation of the T lymphocytes by autologous PWM lymphoblasts expressing EIAV envelope glycoprotein was maximal using a ratio of 10 T cells to one stimulator cell. After antigen stimulation, responding T lymphocytes had antigen specific cytolytic activity and were of both the CD4 and CD8 lineage. The methodology presented here should provide an effective and reliable means by which to analyze the cytolytic activity of equine T lymphocytes to other foreign antigens. Furthermore, we suggest that this method derived for the equine animal model should be applicable to other mammalian and avian model systems that currently lack an effective means by which to analyze antigen specific CTL activity.

  12. Vector ecology of equine piroplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Scoles, Glen A; Ueti, Massaro W

    2015-01-07

    Equine piroplasmosis is a disease of Equidae, including horses, donkeys, mules, and zebras, caused by either of two protozoan parasites, Theileria equi or Babesia caballi. These parasites are biologically transmitted between hosts via tick vectors, and although they have inherent differences they are categorized together because they cause similar pathology and have similar morphologies, life cycles, and vector relationships. To complete their life cycle, these parasites must undergo a complex series of developmental events, including sexual-stage development in their tick vectors. Consequently, ticks are the definitive hosts as well as vectors for these parasites, and the vector relationship is restricted to a few competent tick species. Because the vector relationship is critical to the epidemiology of these parasites, we highlight current knowledge of the vector ecology of these tick-borne equine pathogens, emphasizing tick transmissibility and potential control strategies to prevent their spread.

  13. Ethics in equine practice economics.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Terry D

    2009-12-01

    Ethics is a valuable standard for the structure of equine practice. It relies on sound moral character, beginning with the leaders in the practice. The leadership in each practice regularly needs to review its role in promoting ethical standards. This is not new information but deserves to be revisited with emphasis at this particular time in our society. Nothing less than commitment to grass root stability offers any hope to reverse those actions.

  14. Nutritional anaemia — a major controllable public health problem

    PubMed Central

    Baker, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    Nutritional anaemia, due chiefly to iron deficiency, is widely prevalent in many parts of the world. There is increasing evidence that even mild anaemia affects health and reduces productivity and that a high prevalence of anaemia has profound socioeconomic consequences. The pathogenesis of nutritional anaemia is now reasonably well understood. Measures avilable for combating it include: therapeutic supplementation for accessible population groups with a high prevalence of anaemia, such as pregnant women and schoolchildren; iron fortification of one or more widely consumed foodstuffs; management of those conditions, such as hookworm infestation, that increase requirements for haemopoietic nutrients; and education of the public, and of all categories of health personnel, regarding the importance of anaemia and the ways of controlling it. Experience has shown that there is no simple solution to the problem and in each area where iron deficiency anaemia is prevalent it will probably be necessary to develop and combine many or all of these measures. In each community it will be necessary to introduce these measures so that their effectiveness can first be studied in a pilot trial. When this has been successfully completed it should be followed by a field trial under realistic conditions, and only when this has proved successful should a regional or national programme be introduced. However, the problem is complex and it is only by sustained effort of all concerned that it will prove possible to develop adequate public health control of nutritional anaemia. PMID:310714

  15. NURSE STAFFING AND RENAL ANAEMIA OUTCOMES IN HAEMODIALYSIS CARE.

    PubMed

    Erlingmark, Julia; Hedström, Mariann; Lindberg, Magnus

    2016-09-01

    Current trends in renal anaemia management place greater emphasis, and thus increased workload, on the role of the nurse in haemodialysis settings. However, there is little evidence that demonstrates the relationship between nurse staffing and patient outcomes. To describe nurse staffing in haemodialysis settings, its relationship with target levels of renal anaemia management and to describe target level achievement for different ways of organising anaemia management. Cross-sectional audit. Forty (out of 78) haemodialysis centres in Sweden reported quality assurance data. The numbers of bedside registered nurses, licensed nurse assistants and patients undergoing haemodialysis during a predefined morning shift; type of anaemia management and achieved target levels of anaemia management. The mean patient:registered nurse ratio was 2.4 and the mean patient:nurse assistant ratio was 12.8. There were no significant relationships between registered nurse staffing and target level achievement. On average, 45.6% of the patients had haemoglobin within the target levels at centres applying nurse-driven anaemia management, compared with 47.3% at physician-driven centres. These cross-sectional data suggest that renal anaemia outcomes are unrelated to the patient:registered nurse ratio. There is, however, room for improvement in renal anaemia management in the units included in this study, particularly the achievement of target levels of haemoglobin and transferrin saturation. © 2016 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  16. Giant lymph node hyperplasia of the mediastinum and refractory anaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Geary, C G; Fox, H

    1978-01-01

    An example is described of the syndrome of refractory anaemia in association with the plasma cell variant of giant lymph node hyperplasia of the mediastinum; the anaemia responded to removal of the lymphoid mass. The entity of giant lymph node hyperplasia is discussed and its relationship to the haematological syndrome is considered. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:690239

  17. Malaria and anaemia in pregnancy in Enugu, south east Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ekejindu, I M; Udigwe, G O; Chijioke, I R C

    2006-03-01

    Malaria and anaemia contribute tremendously to maternal and prenatal morbidity and mortality. This study was carried out to document the magnitude of the problem in pregnancy with a view to identifying areas of intervention. The subjects were 108 consecutive pregnant women aged 18 to 44 years recruited from the antenatal clinics. 23 (21.3%) had malaria, 35 (32.4%) had anaemia while 20(18.5%) had both malaria and anaemia. The highest incidence of malaria occurred in the second trimester, while anaemia was most prevalent in the third trimester (62.86%) and among primigravidae (37.14%). All the cases of malaria were due to plasmodium falciparum. Six out of the 20 women with both anemia and malaria were admitted and treated. Two low birth weight babies were delivered among the malaria and anaemia group. The incidence rates of malaria and anaemia were 215 and 327 per 1000 pregnant women respectively while the incidence rate of anaemia due to malaria was 571 per 1000 infected pregnant women. There is a need for a more effective intervention to reduce the incidence of both malaria and anaemia in pregnancy.

  18. Maternal risk factors for childhood anaemia in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Habte, Dereje; Asrat, Kalid; Magafu, Mgaywa G M D; Ali, Ibrahim M; Benti, Tadele; Abtew, Wubeshet; Tegegne, Girma; Abera, Dereje; Shiferaw, Solomon

    2013-09-01

    A total of 8260 children between the ages of 6-59 months were analyzed to identify the risk factors associated with childhood anaemia in Ethiopia. The overall mean (SD/standard deviation) haemoglobin (Hgb) level among the under-five children was 10.7 (2.2) g/dl and 50.3% were anaemic. Childhood anaemia demonstrated an increasing trend with maternal anaemia levels of mild, moderate and severe anaemia: odds ratio of 1.82, 2.16 and 3.73 respectively (p< 0.01). Children whose mothers had no formal education were 1.38 times more likely to be anaemic (p<0.01). The poorest and poorer wealth index groups had 1.52 and 1.25 increased odds of childhood anaemia respectively (p< 0.01). Childhood anaemia in Ethiopia is a severe public health problem. Maternal anaemia and socio-economic status were found to be associated with anaemia in children. A holistic approach of addressing mothers and children is of paramount importance.

  19. Anaemia and heart failure: statement of the problem.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Basil S; Karkabi, Basheer; Jaffe, Ronen; Yuval, Rita; Flugelman, Moshe Y; Halon, David A

    2005-07-01

    While advances in treatment strategies and pharmacotherapy have produced a dramatic reduction in the mortality of patients with heart failure during the past 15 years, there is still a major challenge to improve patient well being, reduce hospitalizations and reduce mortality further. The prevalence of heart failure is not decreasing, and heart failure is currently a cause for hospitalization in >25% of admissions to internal medicine and cardiology departments. It has recently become apparent that anaemia is present in 20-30% of patients with heart failure, and the severity of anaemia has important implications regarding outcome and prognosis. Anaemia may be due to a number of causes, including iron and vitamin deficiency, insidious blood loss, haemodilution, renal impairment and bone marrow depression with resistance to erythropoietin. In the presence of a damaged heart and often coronary artery disease, anaemia may worsen contractile ability and systolic function, while the necessary volume load and ventricular hypertrophy which accompany anaemia contribute to diastolic dysfunction. Preliminary data show that appropriate treatment of anaemia, based on correction of the underlying cause, with, in most patients, the addition of exogenous erythropoietin and iron therapy, improves ventricular function and clinical status. Treatment of anaemia has opened a new frontier in the management of heart failure. We await the results of ongoing clinical trials for more detailed information regarding appropriate haemoglobin targets, choice of medication and dosing and the degree of improvement that may be expected when the issue of anaemia is properly addressed.

  20. Using clinical signs to diagnose anaemia in African children.

    PubMed Central

    Luby, S. P.; Kazembe, P. N.; Redd, S. C.; Ziba, C.; Nwanyanwu, O. C.; Hightower, A. W.; Franco, C.; Chitsulo, L.; Wirima, J. J.; Olivar, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Anaemia is a serious and common problem among young children in sub-Saharan Africa. As a first step towards developing guidelines for its recognition and treatment, we conducted a study to evaluate the ability of health workers to use clinical findings to identify children with anaemia. Health care workers examined a total of 1104 children under 5 years of age at two hospital-based outpatient clinics in rural Malawi. Blood samples were taken to determine haemoglobin concentrations. Pallor of the conjunctiva, tongue, palm or nail beds was 66% sensitive and 68% specific in distinguishing children with moderate a anaemia (haemoglobin concentration, 5-8 g/dl) and 93% sensitive and 57% specific in distinguishing those with severe anaemia (haemoglobin concentration, < 5 g/dl). Even without laboratory support, which is often unavailable in rural Africa, clinical findings can identify the majority of children with anaemia. PMID:7554019

  1. Prevalence of anaemia in pregnancy in Jima town, southwestern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Desalegn, S

    1993-10-01

    A prospective study of the prevalence of anaemia in pregnancy among 279 first-time attendants of the antenatal care clinic at Jima Health Centre, Jima, Ethiopia was carried out from August 20 to December 15, 1991. The overall prevalence of anaemia was 41.9%, the rates being 56.8% and 35.9% for rural and urban residents respectively. The mean haemoglobin level was 10.9 gm/dl and 6.4 gm/dl for the whole group and anaemic women respectively. The majority (74.3%) had moderate anaemia; 2.5% had severe anaemia. The rate of anaemia was higher among the illiterate and in those who did not practice family planning of any sort and in the third trimester, and increased with parity.

  2. Platelet monoamine oxidase activity in megaloblastic anaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Glover, V; Sandler, M; Hughes, A; Hoffbrand, A V

    1980-01-01

    Platelet monoamine oxidase activity has been measured in 17 patients with megaloblastic anaemia due to either vitamin B12 or folate deficiency, and in 20 healthy subjects. There was a highly significant increase in patients compared with controls. In two patients, platelet activity decreased following successful treatment. A significant correlation between platelet activity and the severity of bone marrow megaloblastic change, assessed by the deoxyuridine suppression test and bone marrow morphology, was also observed. If the change in activity also occurs in the nervous system, this may contribute to the mental disturbance associated with vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. PMID:7430361

  3. [Asthenia or anaemia. What is the diagnosis?].

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Shea, A L

    2012-04-01

    Giardiasis is one of the most frequent parasitic infections in the world that must be considered in every patient with persistent diarrhoea or digestive tract and/or malabsorption symptoms after a foreign trip or in the immigrant population, although its presentation is not always the typical. A 25 year old woman from Equatorial Guinea was seen at the clinic due to several months of asthenia. The Laboratory analyses showed normocytic and normochromic anaemia and high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Throughout the presentation of the case report the differential diagnoses of asthenia, normocytic and normochromic anemia and high ESR will be discussed until the final diagnosis of giardiasis was made.

  4. Iron therapy for pre-operative anaemia.

    PubMed

    Ng, Oliver; Keeler, Barrie D; Mishra, Amitabh; Simpson, Alastair; Neal, Keith; Brookes, Matthew J; Acheson, Austin G

    2015-12-22

    Pre-operative anaemia is common and occurs in up to 76% of patients. It is associated with increased peri-operative allogeneic blood transfusions, longer hospital lengths of stay and increased morbidity and mortality. Iron deficiency is one of the most common causes of this anaemia. Oral iron therapy has traditionally been used to treat anaemia but newer, safer parenteral iron preparations have been shown to be more effective in other conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, chronic heart failure and post-partum haemorrhage. A limited number of studies look at iron therapy for the treatment of pre-operative anaemia. The aim of this Cochrane review is to summarise the evidence for use of iron supplementation, both enteral and parenteral, for the management of pre-operative anaemia. The objective of this review is to evaluate the effects of pre-operative iron therapy (enteral or parenteral) in reducing the need for allogeneic blood transfusions in anaemic patients undergoing surgery. We ran the search on 25 March 2015. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), Ovid MEDLINE(R), Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE(R) Daily and Ovid OLDMEDLINE(R), EMBASE Classic and EMBASE (Ovid), CINAHL Plus (EBSCO), PubMed, clinical trials registries, conference abstracts, and we screened reference lists. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which compared pre-operative iron monotherapy to placebo, no treatment, standard of care or another form of iron therapy for anaemic adults undergoing surgery. Anaemia was defined by haemoglobin values less than 13 g/dL for males and 12 g/dL for non-pregnant females. Data were collected by two authors on the proportion of patients who receive a blood transfusion, amount of blood transfused per patient (units) and haemoglobin measured as continuous variables at pre-determined time-points: pre

  5. Prevalence of anaemia in older persons: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gaskell, Helen; Derry, Sheena; Andrew Moore, R; McQuay, Henry J

    2008-01-01

    Background Ageing populations will impact on healthcare provision, especially since extra years are not necessarily spent in good health. It is important to identify and understand the significance of common medical problems in older people. Anaemia may be one such problem. We report on the prevalence of anaemia in cohorts of elderly people in the general population. The presence of anaemia is associated with a worse prognosis for both morbidity and mortality. Methods Electronic searching and reference lists of published reports were used to identify studies that reported on prevalence of anaemia in cohorts of at least 100 individuals predominantly aged 65 years and over living in developed countries, together with criteria used to define anaemia. Studies of anaemia prevalence in specific disease groups or published before 1980 were excluded. Prevalence data for the entire cohort, for men and women separately and for different age bands were extracted. Results Forty-five studies contributed data. Thirty-four studies (n = 85,409) used WHO criteria to define anaemia. The weighted mean prevalence was 17% (3–50%) overall, and 12% (3–25%) in studies based in the community (27, n = 69,975), 47% (31–50%) in nursing homes (3, n = 1481), and 40% (40–72%) in hospital admissions (4, n = 13,953). Anaemia prevalence increased with age, was slightly higher in men than women, and was higher in black people than white. Most individuals classified as anaemic using WHO criteria were only mildly anaemic. Conclusion Anaemia, as defined by WHO criteria, is common in older people living in the community and particularly common in nursing home residents and hospital admissions. Predicted demographic changes underline the need to understand more about anaemia in older people. PMID:18194534

  6. Anaemia in rheumatoid arthritis: can we afford to ignore it?

    PubMed

    Bloxham, E; Vagadia, V; Scott, K; Francis, G; Saravanan, V; Heycock, C; Rynne, M; Hamilton, J; Kelly, C A

    2011-09-01

    INTRODUCTION Anaemia is common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Clinicians may focus on rheumatological issues and assume anaemia of chronic disease (ACD). This study challenged this assumption and investigated the causes of anaemia in a large cohort of RA patients to assess its implications. METHODS The hospital where the study was conducted monitors regular full blood count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) monthly in all RA patients on disease modifying drugs to assess efficacy and safety. A computerised system identifies and records abnormal results. The database for 2009 was interrogated to find all patients with two consecutive haemoglobin values <11 g/dl. Using a proforma, patients were defined as having iron deficiency anaemia (IDA), ACD, macrocytic anaemia (MCA) or another cause. All results of further tests investigating the anaemia were recorded. RESULTS Among 2000 RA patients on the system, 199 (10%) were identified as having anaemia over a year. Of these, 90 had IDA, 78 had ACD, 25 had MCA, and 6 had postoperative anaemia. Among 90 patients with IDA, investigations were performed in 53, with 23 normal. An explanation for IDA was found in 30: gastrointestinal bleeding in 25, gynaecological blood loss in 3, and urinary bleeding in 2. Among 78 patients with ACD, response to intensification of RA treatment occurred in 45, but erythropoietin therapy was required in 9. Within the 25 patients with MCA, 12 had unrecognised vitamin B(12) deficiency, 4 drug induced changes, 3 myeloid malignancy, 2 hypothyroidism, and 2 alcoholism. CONCLUSIONS Anaemia in RA is common, multifactorial, and potentially both serious and correctable. Established malignancy was present in 10 patients and premalignancy in a further 10 (10% of total). Treatable causes were commonly identified. Clinicians need to investigate the nature and cause of persistent anaemia, and must not assume it to be simply ACD without evidence.

  7. Anaemia and severe malarial anaemia burden in febrile Gabonese children: a nine-year health facility based survey.

    PubMed

    Bouyou-Akotet, Marielle Karine; Mawili Mboumba, Denise Patricia; Kendjo, Eric; Mbadinga, Fanckie; Obiang-Bekale, Nestor; Mouidi, Pacome; Kombila, Maryvonne

    2013-12-15

    Anaemia remains a major cause of poor health in children and pregnant women living in sub-Saharan Africa. Malaria is one of the main causes of anaemia in endemic countries. At the time of decreasing Plasmodium falciparum infection prevalence among children, it was essential to analyze the evolution of anaemia and severe malarial anaemia (SMA), the most frequent clinical manifestation of severe malaria, in Gabon. Yearly recorded haemoglobin levels of febrile children aged below11 years, who benefitted from microscopic malaria diagnosis, were retrospectively analyzed to determine the evolution of anaemia and SMA prevalence throughout a nine-year period between 2000 and 2008. Anaemia prevalence remained high both in P. falciparum-infected children (between 87.6% and 90.7%) and in uninfected children (between 73.5% and 82.6%). Although the risk of developing severe anaemia ranged between 1.9 [0.9-3.8] in 2000 and 3.0 [1.3-6.5] in 2007, SMA prevalence did not significantly change during the study period, varying from 6.0% to 8.0%. From 2001, the frequency of SMA was comparable between children younger than five years of age and children older than five years of age. The decreasing malaria prevalence previously observed in Gabon between 2000 and 2008 was not associated with a significant reduction of anaemia and SMA burden among children. Furthermore, other factors such as nutritional deficiencies, which may not be negligible, must be investigated in this vulnerable population.

  8. Platelet aggregating material from equine arterial tissue

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, Morris D.

    1983-02-22

    Novel hemostatic agent comprises equine arterial fibrillar collagen in a carrier. The agent is useful for the aggregation of platelets for clinical diagnostic tests and for the clotting of blood, such as for controlling bleeding in warm blooded species. The fibrillar collagen is obtained by extracting homogenized equine arterial tissue with aqueous solutions followed by extensive dialysis.

  9. Equine Management and Production. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This package contains the instructor's manual, instructor's resource package, and student workbook for a 1-year introductory course in equine management and production. The course emphasizes the skills needed to manage small one- or two-horse facilities and to enter postsecondary equine education programs. The instructor's manual presents basic…

  10. Platelet aggregating material from equine arterial tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.D.

    1983-02-22

    Novel hemostatic agent comprises equine arterial fibrillar collagen in a carrier. The agent is useful for the aggregation of platelets for clinical diagnostic tests and for the clotting of blood, such as for controlling bleeding in warm blooded species. The fibrillar collagen is obtained by extracting homogenized equine arterial tissue with aqueous solutions followed by extensive dialysis. No Drawings

  11. Equine Management and Production. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This package contains the instructor's manual, instructor's resource package, and student workbook for a 1-year introductory course in equine management and production. The course emphasizes the skills needed to manage small one- or two-horse facilities and to enter postsecondary equine education programs. The instructor's manual presents basic…

  12. Diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia in hospital patients: Use of the reticulocyte haemoglobin content to differentiate iron deficiency anaemia from anaemia of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Schapkaitz, Elise; Buldeo, Suvarna; Mahlangu, Johnny Ndoni

    2015-11-20

    The diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia in hospital patients with chronic infections and inflammation presents a challenge. Recently laboratory tests such as the reticulocyte haemoglobin content, which are independent of infection and inflammation, have become available for routine diagnostic use.

  13. Immunogenicity and clinical protection against equine influenza by gene-based DNA vaccination of ponies

    PubMed Central

    Ault, Alida; Zajac, Alyse M.; Kong, Wing-Pui; Gorres, J. Patrick; Royals, Michael; Wei, Chih-Jen; Bao, Saran; Yang, Zhi-yong; Reedy, Stephanie E.; Sturgill, Tracy L.; Page, Allen E.; Donofrio-Newman, Jennifer; Adams, Amanda A.; Balasuriya, Udeni B.R.; Horohov, David W.; Chambers, Thomas M.; Nabel, Gary J.; Rao, Srinivas S.

    2012-01-01

    Equine influenza A (H3N8) virus is a leading cause of infectious respiratory disease in horses causing widespread morbidity and economic losses. As with influenza in other species, equine influenza strains continuously mutate, requiring constant re-evaluation of current vaccines and development of new vaccines. Current inactivated (killed) vaccines, while efficacious, only offer limited protection against multiple strains and require frequent boosts. Ongoing research into new vaccine technologies, including gene-based vaccines, aims to increase the neutralization potency, breadth, and duration of protective immunity of new or existing vaccines. In these hypothesis-generating experiments, we demonstrate that a DNA vaccine expressing the hemagglutinin protein of equine H3N8 influenza virus generates homologous and heterologous immune responses, and protects against clinical disease and viral replication following homologous H3N8 infection in horses. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a needle-free delivery device is as efficient and effective as conventional parenteral injection using a needle and syringe. The observed trends in this study drive the hypothesis that DNA vaccines offer a safe, effective, and promising alternative approach for veterinary vaccines against influenza, and applicable to combat equine influenza. PMID:22449425

  14. Infection control and biosecurity in equine disease control.

    PubMed

    Weese, J S

    2014-11-01

    Infectious diseases are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in horses, along with economic costs and broader impacts associated with the loss of members of a species that generates income, acts as a working animal and is a companion. Endemic diseases continue to challenge, emerging diseases are an ever-present threat and outbreaks can be both destructive and disruptive. While infectious diseases can never be completely prevented, measures can be introduced to restrict the entry of pathogens into a population or limit the implications of the presence of a pathogen. Objective research regarding infection control and biosecurity in horses is limited, yet a variety of practical infection prevention and control measures can be used. Unfortunately, infection control can be challenging, because of the nature of the equine industry (e.g. frequent horse movement) and endemic pathogens, but also because of lack of understanding or motivation to try to improve practices. Recognition of the basic concepts of infection control and biosecurity, and indeed the need for measures to control infectious diseases, is the foundation for successful infection prevention and control.

  15. Acquired hypochromic and microcytic sideroblastic anaemia responsive to pyridoxine with low value of free erythrocyte protoporphyrin: a possible subgroup of idiopathic acquired sideroblastic anaemia (IASA).

    PubMed

    Takeda, Y; Sawada, H; Sawai, H; Toi-Matsuda, T; Tashima, M; Okuma, M; Watanabe, S; Ohmori, S; Kondo, M

    1995-05-01

    Patients with idiopathic acquired sideroblastic anaemia (IASA) usually show macrocytic or normocytic anaemia and increased free erythrocyte protoporphyrin (FEP). The mean cell haemoglobin concentration is normal or slightly low. Here we report a pyridoxine-responsive IASA patient with microcytic and hypochromic anaemia and low FEL level; these features are usually seen in cases of hereditary sideroblastic anaemia. Microcytosis increased during therapy. There may be a subgroup of IASA with microcytic and hypochromic anaemia, low normal FEP and some response to pyridoxine like hereditary sideroblastic anaemia.

  16. Agammaglobulinaemia and co-existent pernicious anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, S. D.; Goldberg, L. S.; Fudenberg, H. H.; Goldberg, S. B.

    1970-01-01

    Immunological studies were performed on a woman with agammaglobulinaemia and coexistent pernicious anaemia, on her two daughters who had recurrent sinusitis, and on her husband. Serum levels of IgG, IgA and IgM were markedly reduced in the patient, whereas both daughters had a marked selective deficiency of IgA. Autoantibodies to intrinsic factor and to the gastric parietal cell were absent in these subjects, but the serum of one daughter contained thyroid autoantibodies. Assessment of the in vitro response of lymphocytes to four phytomitogens (phytohaemagglutinin, pokeweed, wax-bean and Concanavalin A) showed an altered response to Concanavalin A and an essentially normal response profile to the other mitogens. These responses differed significantly from those of eight agammaglobulinaemic patients without coexistent autoimmune disease, suggesting that subtle immune differences may exist between these two groups of patients. The findings suggest that at least three immunological aberrations in this family were under genetic control; these included abnormalities in serum immunoglobulin levels, altered in vitro lymphocyte response to Concanavalin A and an autoimmune concomitant of pernicious anaemia. PMID:5435714

  17. Antibodies to actin in autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), autoreactive antibodies directed against red blood cells are up-regulated, leading to erythrocyte death. Mycoplasma suis infections in pigs induce AIHA of both the warm and cold types. The aim of this study was to identify the target autoantigens of warm autoreactive IgG antibodies. Sera from experimentally M. suis-infected pigs were screened for autoreactivity. Results Actin-reactive antibodies were found in the sera of 95% of all animals tested. The reactivity was species-specific, i.e. reactivity with porcine actin was significantly higher than with rabbit actin. Sera of animals previously immunised with the M. suis adhesion protein MSG1 showed reactivity with actin prior to infection with M. suis indicating that molecular mimicry is involved in the specific autoreactive mechanism. A potentially cross-reactive epitope was detected. Conclusions This is the first report of autoreactive anti-actin antibodies involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. PMID:20353574

  18. Haem arginate treatment for hereditary sideroblastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Volin, L

    1989-01-01

    It has been shown that haem arginate treatment increases blood cell counts, improves the sideroblast status of the bone marrow and normalises decreased activities of haem synthesising enzymes in some patients with acquired sideroblastic anaemia, or with other types of myelodysplastic syndromes. 4 patients with hereditary sideroblastic anaemia (HSA), belonging to two families, were therefore treated with haem arginate infusions, 3 mg/kg, on 4 consecutive days, and thereafter weekly for 10 wk. No effect was observed on the mildly anaemic haemoglobin levels or on the red cell counts. However, the initially low or low-normal myeloid to erythroid ratio in the marrow increased in all patients. A consistent decrease in the percentage of ring sideroblasts and other abnormal sideroblasts was seen in 1 patient (Family A), and a temporary decrease of abnormal sideroblasts took place during the most intensive treatment period in 2 other patients (Family B). Two of three initially abnormal haem synthesising enzyme activities became normal in Family A, whereas no clearly consistent effects on the haem synthesising enzymes were observed in Family B. The present study shows that haem arginate infusions can normalise the activities of haem synthesising enzymes in some patients with HSA. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of haem infusions on the iron balance of these patients.

  19. Globin chain synthesis ratios in sideroblastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Peters, R E; May, A; Jacobs, A

    1983-02-01

    Globin synthesis ratios were measured on reticulocytes from nine patients with primary acquired sideroblastic anaemia (SA), four patients with hereditary or congenital SA, two patients with secondary acquired SA and three patients with iron deficiency (ID). Ten of the samples from patients with SA and all the samples from patients with ID had normal ratios. Samples from three patients had significantly abnormal ratios, one from a patient with SA and acquired Hb H disease (alpha/beta 0 X 26), one from a patient with secondary acquired SA (alpha/beta 0 X 88), and one from a patient who went on to develop acute myeloblastic leukaemia (alpha/beta 1 X 36). Globin synthesis was stimulated by 100 microM haem similarly in normal, SA and ID reticulocytes. Any limitation of globin synthesis in SA and ID is therefore not easily reversible by adding haem. Inhibition of haem synthesis in nonsideroblastic reticulocytes using 4 mM isonicotinic acid hydrazide for 1 h incubation affected neither total globin synthesis nor the alpha/beta ratio. These results contradict the view that decreased haem synthesis decreases globin chain synthesis and decreases the alpha/beta globin chain synthesis ratios in human reticulocytes. Previously reported findings that haem could reverse globin chain synthesis inhibition in SA were good evidence for a primary deficiency of haem synthesis in the erythroblasts of these patients. Our inability to substantiate these findings emphasizes the need for a re-evaluation of the aetiology of sideroblastic anaemia.

  20. [Maternal anaemia: effect on the newborn].

    PubMed

    Toure-Fall, A O; Gadji, M; Diop, S; Dieye, T; Thiam, D; Diakhate, L

    2004-01-01

    Pregnancy increases considerably iron needs in mother and her foetus. The purpose of our study is to measure the effect of maternal anaemia on the foetus and the effect of iron supplementation on the maternal and foetal reserves. Therefore, we conducted a three-month cross sectional study at the gynaecological and obstetrics clinics of Aristide Le Dantec Hospital. Ninety-five women aged 16 to 43 years old and having an haemoglobin rate < 11 g/dl were recruited. Most of them were primipares. Among them 69 had a low ferritinemia (< 50 ng/ml), 36, a ferritinemia collapsed (< 30 ng/ml) and 13 virtually non-existent reserves (< 12 ng/ml). All newborns were born in terms with an apgar score >/= in 93 of them. Among them 24 had anemia (rate of haemoglobin < 14 g/dl) and 54.7% a low ferritinemia. There is no relationship between the maternal and foetal rates of haemoglobin; 74% of newborn had a normal rate of haemoglobin. Among 36 women with low ferritinemia only two gave birth to a newborn without iron reserves. In our study, among 68 women who received iron regularly, 41 had normal reserves and 43 gave birth to a newborn with high ferritinemia. There is significant difference between the women having received iron during their pregnancy and those not supplemented as regards the effect on newborn (p = 0.00001). The prevention of iron deficiency and anaemia can be done by the iron systematic and premat supplementation.

  1. Envelope Determinants of Equine Lentiviral Vaccine Protection

    PubMed Central

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Ezzelarab, Corin; Cook, Sheila J.; Chong, Liu; Horohov, David; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Lentiviral envelope (Env) antigenic variation and associated immune evasion present major obstacles to vaccine development. The concept that Env is a critical determinant for vaccine efficacy is well accepted, however defined correlates of protection associated with Env variation have yet to be determined. We reported an attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine study that directly examined the effect of lentiviral Env sequence variation on vaccine efficacy. The study identified a significant, inverse, linear correlation between vaccine efficacy and increasing divergence of the challenge virus Env gp90 protein compared to the vaccine virus gp90. The report demonstrated approximately 100% protection of immunized ponies from disease after challenge by virus with a homologous gp90 (EV0), and roughly 40% protection against challenge by virus (EV13) with a gp90 13% divergent from the vaccine strain. In the current study we examine whether the protection observed when challenging with the EV0 strain could be conferred to animals via chimeric challenge viruses between the EV0 and EV13 strains, allowing for mapping of protection to specific Env sequences. Viruses containing the EV13 proviral backbone and selected domains of the EV0 gp90 were constructed and in vitro and in vivo infectivity examined. Vaccine efficacy studies indicated that homology between the vaccine strain gp90 and the N-terminus of the challenge strain gp90 was capable of inducing immunity that resulted in significantly lower levels of post-challenge virus and significantly delayed the onset of disease. However, a homologous N-terminal region alone inserted in the EV13 backbone could not impart the 100% protection observed with the EV0 strain. Data presented here denote the complicated and potentially contradictory relationship between in vitro virulence and in vivo pathogenicity. The study highlights the importance of structural conformation for immunogens and emphasizes the need for

  2. The Pathophysiologic Basis of Anaemia in Patients with Malignant Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Umma A; Yusuf, Aminu A; Ahmed, Sagir G

    2016-09-01

    Cancer patients frequently present with anaemia that may result from the direct or indirect effects of the tumor or its treatment. Anaemia is an independent adverse prognostic factor that exerts negative influence on quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Anaemia in malignant disorders often arises from an interplay of multiple aetiological and pathophysiologic mechanisms. Understanding these mechanisms will help the oncologist identify and treat specific causes of the anaemia thereby minimizing the use of blood transfusion, which is associated with many adverse effects. This paper reviewed the various aetiological and pathophysiologic mechanisms of anaemia in cancer patients including direct and indirect tumour effects that lead to reduced red cell production or increased red cell destruction via a myriad of mechanisms ranging from marrow infiltration and cancer-associated acute myelonecrosis to chronic inflammation, blood loss, iron, folate, vitamin B12 and other nutrients deficiencies, malignancy related renal injury, pure red cell aplasia, hypersplenism, haemophagocytic syndrome, red cell autoantibody production, non-immune red cell fragmentation and cytotoxic therapy-induced erythroid cell apoptosis and eryptosis. Hence anaemia in cancer patients is attributable to a wide spectrum of aetiological factors with multiple and sometimes overlapping pathophysiologic mechanisms. It is therefore necessary for the oncologists to thoroughly investigate all cases of anaemia with the aim of identifying the actual causative factors in order to offer more sustainable cause-specific treatment modalities that will minimize the use of blood transfusion with its attendant adverse effects.

  3. Anaemia of Chronic Disease: An In-Depth Review.

    PubMed

    Madu, Anazoeze Jude; Ughasoro, Maduka Donatus

    2017-01-01

    Anaemia is the most common haematological disorder affecting humanity and is usually observed in chronic disease states such as non-specific anaemia, which may cause diagnostic difficulties. In chronically ill patients with anaemia, this has a negative impact on quality of life as well as survival. This paper aims at reviewing the pathogenesis of this form of anaemia with a view to suggesting future targets for therapeutic intervention. The ability to diagnose this disorder depends on the ability of the physician to correlate the possible clinical pathways of the underlying disease with the patients' ferrokinetic state. It is important to rule out iron deficiency and other causes of anaemia as misdiagnosis will in most cases lead to refractoriness to standard therapy. The cytokines and acute-phase proteins play important roles in the pathogenesis of anaemia of chronic disease. Alterations in the metabolism of iron via the molecule hepcidin and ferritin are largely responsible for the consequent anaemia. Concomitant iron deficiency might be present and could affect the diagnosis and therapeutic protocol. Treatment options involve the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, blood transfusion, and iron supplementation, in addition to treating the underlying disease. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Detection of peginesatide in equine serum using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for doping control purposes.

    PubMed

    Möller, Ines; Thomas, Andreas; Wingender, Anke; Machnik, Marc; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and its recombinant analogues are suspected to be illicitly administered to horses for performance enhancing purposes and, consequently, prohibited in equine sports. Recently, a new erythropoiesis-stimulating agent, peginesatide (Omontys, formerly referred to as Hematide), belonging to the upcoming class of EPO-mimetic peptides, received approval for the treatment of anaemia in humans with chronic kidney disease on dialysis. As the pegylated dimeric peptide of approximately 45 kDa without sequence homology to EPO is not detectable by conventional EPO detection assays, specific methods are bound to be established for horse sports drug testing. Thus, by fortifying equine serum with peginesatide, an approach consisting of a proteolytic digestion with subtilisin after protein precipitation was developed, eventually targeting a proteotypic and xenobiotic pentapeptide which is easily accessible to liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The method was validated for qualitative purposes and demonstrated to be specific, precise (relative standard deviations below 14%), sensitive (limit of detection 10 ng mL(-1)) and linear. Being simple, cost-effective and readily transferable to other doping control laboratories, a mass spectrometric assay for the detection of therapeutic concentrations of peginesatide in equine serum is, in terms of preventive doping research, applicable to routine analysis shortly after approval of the drug.

  5. Equine proliferative enteropathy: a cause of weight loss, colic, diarrhoea and hypoproteinaemia in foals on three breeding farms in Canada.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, J P; Drolet, R; Parsons, D; Leguillette, R; Sauvageau, R; Shapiro, J; Houle, L; Hallé, G; Gebhart, C J

    2000-09-01

    Proliferative enteropathy (PE) is a transmissible enteric disease caused by Lawsonia intracellularis. An outbreak of equine PE was diagnosed in foals from 3 breeding farms. Most foals had been weaned prior to the appearance of clinical signs, which included depression, rapid and marked weight loss, subcutaneous oedema, diarrhoea and colic. Poor body condition with a rough haircoat and a potbellied appearance were common findings in affected foals. Respiratory tract infection, dermatitis and intestinal parasitism were also found in some foals. Haematological and plasma biochemical abnormalities included hypoproteinaemia, transient leucocytosis, anaemia and increased serum creatinine kinase concentration. Postmortem diagnosis of PE was confirmed on 4 foals based on the presence of characteristic intracellular bacteria within the apical cytoplasm of proliferating crypt epithelial cells of the intestinal mucosa, using silver stains, and by results of PCR analysis and immunohistochemistry. Antemortem diagnosis of equine PE was based on the clinical signs, hypoproteinaemia and the exclusion of common enteric infections. Faecal PCR analysis was positive for the presence of L. intracellularis in 6 of 18 foals tested while the serum of all 7 foals with PE serologically evaluated had antibodies against L. intracellularis. Most foals were treated with erythromycin estolate alone or combined with rifampin for a minimum of 21 days. Additional symptomatic treatments were administered when indicated. All but one foal treated with erythromycin survived the infection. This study indicates that equine PE should be included in the differential diagnosis of outbreaks of rapid weight loss, diarrhoea, colic and hypoproteinaemia in weanling foals.

  6. Anaemia prevalence may be reduced among countries that fortify flour.

    PubMed

    Barkley, Jonathan S; Wheeler, Kathleen S; Pachón, Helena

    2015-07-01

    The effectiveness of flour fortification in reducing anaemia prevalence is equivocal. The goal was to utilise the existing national-level data to assess whether anaemia in non-pregnant women was reduced after countries began fortifying wheat flour, alone or in combination with maize flour, with at least Fe, folic acid, vitamin A or vitamin B12. Nationally representative anaemia data were identified through Demographic and Health Survey reports, the WHO Vitamin and Mineral Nutrition Information System database and other national-level nutrition surveys. Countries with at least two anaemia surveys were considered for inclusion. Within countries, surveys were excluded if altitude was not consistently adjusted for, or if the blood-draw site (e.g. capillary or venous) or Hb quantification method (e.g. HemoCue or Cyanmethaemoglobin) differed. Anaemia prevalence was modelled for countries that had pre- and post-fortification data (n 12) and for countries that never fortified flour (n 20) using logistic regression models that controlled for time effects, human development index (HDI) and endemic malaria. After adjusting for HDI and malaria, each year of fortification was associated with a 2.4% reduction in the odds of anaemia prevalence (PR 0.976, 95% CI 0.975, 0.978). Among countries that never fortified, no reduction in the odds of anaemia prevalence over time was observed (PR 0.999, 95% CI 0.997, 1.002). Among both fortification and non-fortification countries, HDI and malaria were significantly associated with anaemia (P,0.001). Although this type of evidence precludes a definitive conclusion, results suggest that after controlling for time effects, HDI and endemic malaria, anaemia prevalence has decreased significantly in countries that fortify flour with micronutrients, while remaining unchanged in countries that do not.

  7. [Coexistence of Addison-Biermer's anaemia with endocrine glands' dysfunctions].

    PubMed

    Kuliszkiewicz-Janus, Malgorzata; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grazyna; Rózycka, Beata; Dereń, Izabela

    2004-11-01

    Addison-Biermer's anaemia is an autoimmune disease. It may coexist with other auto-aggressive diseases, precede them or join the other existing autoimmune diseases. It most often accompanies the Hashimoto disease but also may coexist polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PGA). Three types of PGA are distinguished: PGA1--Blizzard's Syndrome, PGA2--Schmidt's Syndrome, and PGA3. The latter, unlike the remaining ones, is characterized by normal function of adrenal glands. Addison-Biermer's anaemia occurrence may be often difficult to diagnose as coexisting illnesses might ouflage its clinical symptoms. The aim of this paper was to analyse patients with different types of PGA with coexisting Addison-Biermer's anaemia. Group of 24 individuals was analysed: 2 women with PGA1, 10 patients with PGA2, 10 patients with PGA3. In 2 remaining ones PGA was not confirmed. Addison-Biermer's anaemia occurred in 7 patients (2 with PGA2 and 5 with PGA3 syndrome). Decreased concentration of vitamin B12 was diagnosed in 3 individuals among 24 examined patients (1 with type 3 and 2 with type 2), as well in 2 patients with unconfirmed PGA. Addison-Biermer's anaemia was not observed in patients with PGA1. We observed that megaloblastic anaemia occurred characteristic schedule depending on appearance of autoimmune diseases: in PGA2--many years after other immunopathies were found, in PGA3--as first auto-aggressive disease. Our analysis suggests the necessity of detailed check-ups on patients with Addison-Biermer's anaemia, as with time they may develop other diseases, especially hypothyroidism and/or PGA failure. On the contrary, in individuals with thyroid gland diseases and PGA syndromes further checkups should be megaloblastic anaemia-sensitive. In both cases it is important to consider substitutive treatment. The possibility of family coexisting both pernicious anaemia and autoimmune endocrinopathies needs diagnostics of members of the patient's family.

  8. Anaemia and congestive heart failure early post-renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Borrows, Richard; Loucaidou, Marina; Chusney, Gary; Borrows, Sarah; Tromp, Jen Van; Cairns, Tom; Griffith, Megan; Hakim, Nadey; McLean, Adam; Palmer, Andrew; Papalois, Vassilios; Taube, David

    2008-05-01

    Anaemia is common following renal transplantation and is associated with the development of congestive heart failure (CHF). However the prevalence of anaemia in the first year following transplantation and the association between anaemia occurring early and the development of CHF have been understudied. In this study, 132 incident patients undergoing tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil-based renal transplantation were studied for the prevalence of, and risk factors for, anaemia and CHF in the early period post transplantation. Anaemia occurred in 94.5% and 53.1% of patients at 1 week and 12 months, respectively, and was associated with allograft dysfunction, hypoalbuminaemia, higher mycophenolic acid (MPA) levels, bacterial infection and hypoalbuminaemia. The association with hypoalbuminaemia may reflect the presence of chronic inflammation post-transplantation. Of patients displaying haemoglobin <11 g/dl, 41.1% and 29.4% were treated with erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs) at 1 and 12 months respectively. CHF developed in 26 patients beyond 1 month post-transplantation, with echocardiographic left ventricular systolic function preserved in all but one. CHF was associated with anaemia and lower haemoglobin, allograft dysfunction, duration of dialysis and left ventricular hypertrophy on echocardiography prior to transplantation, suggesting the aetiology of CHF may involve the interplay of diastolic cardiac dysfunction, pre-load mismatch and after-load mismatch. Modification of risk factors may improve anaemia management post transplantation. Reducing the prevalence of anaemia may in turn reduce the incidence of CHF-these observations support the need for clinical trials to determine how anaemia management may impact CHF incidence.

  9. Complications of equine oral surgery.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Padraic M; Hawkes, Claire; Townsend, Neil

    2008-12-01

    The vast majority of equine oral procedures are dental-related and, unless great care is taken, almost all such procedures have the potential to cause marked short- or long-term damage to other oral structures. This review of the more common complications of oral surgery begins at the rostral oral cavity with procedures of the incisors, and then moves caudally to deal with complications related to procedures of wolf teeth and cheek teeth, including salivary duct disruption and dental sinusitis. Finally, complications associated with maxillary and mandibular fractures are discussed.

  10. VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS IN MAN

    PubMed Central

    Casals, J.; Curnen, Edward C.; Thomas, Lewis

    1943-01-01

    A filterable agent was isolated from the blood and from washings of the upper respiratory passages of a young laboratory worker during a mild, acute, febrile illness. This agent was identified as a strain of Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus. Circulating specific complement-fixing and neutralizing antibodies not present in sera withdrawn during the acute phase of illness were demonstrated in sera obtained during convalescence. A fellow laboratory worker who became similarly ill simultaneously also developed during convalescence specific circulating antibodies not present prior to illness. PMID:19871301

  11. Low birth weight and fetal anaemia as risk factors for infant morbidity in rural Malawi.

    PubMed

    Kalanda, Boniface; Verhoeff, Francine; le Cessie, Saskia; Brabin, John

    2009-06-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) and fetal anaemia (FA) are common in malaria endemic areas. To investigate the incidence of infectious morbidity in infants in rural Malawi in relation to birth weight and fetal anaemia, a cohort of babies was followed for a year on the basis of LBW (<2500) and FA (cord haemoglobin < 12.5 g/dl). A matched group of normal birth weight (NBW), non-anaemic (NFA) new-borns were enrolled as controls. Morbidity episodes were recorded at 4-weekly intervals and at each extra visit made to a health centre with any illness. Infants in the NBW NFA group experienced an average of 1.15 (95% C.I. 0.99, 1.31), 1.04 (0.89, 1.19), 0.92 (0.73, 1.11) episodes per year of malaria, respiratory infection and diarrhoea respectively. Corresponding values for the LBW FA group were 0.83 (0.5, 1.16), 0.82 (0.5, 1.16) and 0.76 (0.33, 1.19). FA was not associated with a higher incidence of morbidity, but was significantly associated with a shorter time to first illness episode (p = 0.014). LBW was not a significant risk factor for higher morbidity incidence. LBW and FA were not significant risk factors for incidence of illness episodes in infants.

  12. Identifying predictors of childhood anaemia in north-east India.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sanku; Goswami, Sankar; Dey, Tanujit

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the factors that influence the occurrence of childhood anaemia in North-East India by exploring dataset of the Reproductive and Child Health-II Survey (RCH-II). The study population consisted of 10,137 children in the age-group of 0-6 year(s) from North-East India to explore the predictors of childhood anaemia by means of different background characteristics, such as place of residence, religion, household standard of living, literacy of mother, total children ever born to a mother, age of mother at marriage. Prevalence of anaemia among children was taken as a polytomous variable. The predicted probabilities of anaemia were established via multinomial logistic regression model. These probabilities provided the degree of assessment of the contribution of predictors in the prevalence of childhood anaemia. The mean haemoglobin concentration in children aged 0-6 year(s) was found to be 11.85 g/dL, with a standard deviation of 5.61 g/dL. The multiple logistic regression analysis showed that rural children were at greater risk of severe (OR = 2.035; p = 0.003) and moderate (OR = 1.23; p = 0.003) anaemia. All types of anaemia (severe, moderate, and mild) were more prevalent among Hindu children (OR = 2.971; p = 0.000), (OR = 1.195; p = 0.010), and (OR = 1.201; p = 0.011) than among children of other religions whereas moderate (OR = 1.406; p = 0.001) and mild (OR = 1.857; p=0.000) anaemia were more prevalent among Muslim children. The fecundity of the mother was found to have significant effect on anaemia. Women with multiple children were prone to greater risk of anaemia. The multiple logistic regression analysis also confirmed that children of literate mothers were comparatively at lesser risk of severe anaemia. Mother's age at marriage had a significant effect on anaemia of their children as well.

  13. Hepatitis-associated aplastic anaemia: a poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Vivian; Calado, Rita; Palaré, Maria João; Ferrão, Anabela; Morais, Anabela

    2013-02-13

    A 13-year-old boy presented with spontaneous skin and mucosal bleeds 3 weeks after acute hepatitis of unknown aetiology. Laboratory analyses revealed pancytopenia and bone marrow biopsy that confirmed the diagnosis of aplastic anaemia. Other causes of congenital and acquired aplastic anaemia were excluded. He was diagnosed with hepatitis-associated aplastic anaemia. He developed a critical clinical condition, becoming totally dependent on erythrocyte and platelet transfusions, and severe neutropenia, which led to invasive bacterial infection. He died due to sepsis with multiple organ failure 3 months after admission.

  14. Assessment of anaemia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bari, M A; Sutradhar, S R; Sarker, C N; Ahmed, S; Miah, A H; Alam, M K; Hasan, M J; Tariquzzaman, M; Shamsi, S

    2013-04-01

    The present cross-sectional study was conducted in the Department of Medicine, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Mymensingh from December 2009 to November 2010 to find out the association of iron deficiency, in anaemia with rheumatoid arthritis and to find a sensitive and less invasive marker to differentiate iron deficiency anaemia from the anaemia of chronic disease. A total of 45 patients of rheumatoid arthritis were provisionally included in the study. Of them, 12 patients were excluded as they did not allow for aspirating the bone marrow, leaving 33 patients to complete the study. The mean age of the patients was 42.6 years (22-66 years) with female to male ratio being roughly 3:1. Majority (97%) of the patients presented weakness followed by 78.8% dizziness, 54.5% palpitation, 24.2% pallor, 12.1% breathlessness, another 12.1% smooth tongue and 6.1% nail change. About 79% of the patients were positive for RA test and nearly 70% of patient had moderate anaemia. The mean serum ferritin was significantly reduced in patients with hypochromic with or without microcytic anaemia than that with normocytic normochromic anaemia (p<0.001). While total iron binding capacity was found to be significantly increased in patients with iron deficiency anaemia than that in patients with anaemia of chronic disease (p<0.021). The serum iron level was considerably reduced in the former group than that in the later group (p<0.066). Bone marrow iron grading revealed 48.5% of the patients with iron depleted and 51.5% with iron repleted. Serum ferritin level of patients with iron depleted bone marrow was significantly decreased than that in patients with iron repleted bone marrow (p<0.001). Serum iron level of the former group was also reduced than that of the later group (p<0.133). Total iron binding capacity was significantly raised in patients with iron depleted group than that in patients with iron repleted group (p<0.001). The study finds that anaemia of chronic disease and

  15. Recurrent aphthous ulcers in Fanconi's anaemia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Otan, Feyza; Açikgöz, Gokhan; Sakallioglu, Umur; Ozkan, Burcu

    2004-05-01

    Fanconi's anaemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is clinically characterized by aplastic anaemia, congenital malformations of the renal, cardiac, skeletal and skin structures, and an increased predisposition to malignancies. Patients with FA often present with bleeding and infection, which are symptoms related to thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. There are few reports of the oral manifestations of FA. We describe oral aphthous ulcerations in two siblings with FA. There was a rapid improvement and healing of ulcers after blood transfusions and increased haemoglobin levels. This may support the role of severe anaemia in oral ulcerations.

  16. [Severe macrocytic anaemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism in a vegan].

    PubMed

    Førland, Elizabeth Siren Bjerga; Lindberg, Mats Jacob Hermansson

    2015-08-10

    Nutritional deficiency anaemia in vegans is common and usually due to lack of vitamin B12, as this vitamin is found almost exclusively in animal-based food products. In this case report we present a 39-year-old male vegan with severe macrocytic anaemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency as well as secondary hyperparathyroidism due to severe vitamin D deficiency. We want to emphasize the importance of a detailed nutritional history for patients with anaemia, and the need for vitamin B12 and vitamin D supplements for people who comply with a vegan diet.

  17. Infectious mononucleosis #3 (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious mononucleosis is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. It is a viral infection causing high temperature, sore throat, and swollen lymph glands. Infectious mononucleosis can be contagious if the infected ...

  18. Infectious Disease Proteome Biomarkers: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Charles L.

    2011-12-31

    Research for the DOE Infectious Disease Proteome Biomarkers focused on Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEEV). RVFV and VEEV are Category A and B pathogens respectively. Among the priority threats, RVFV and VEEV rank high in their potential for being weaponized and introduced to the United States, spreading quickly, and having a large health and economic impact. In addition, they both have live attenuated vaccine, which allows work to be performed at BSL-2. While the molecular biology of RVFV and VEEV are increasingly well-characterized, little is known about its host-pathogen interactions. Our research is aimed at determining critical alterations in host signaling pathways to identify therapeutics targeted against the host.

  19. Anaemia is typical of pregnancies: capturing community perception and management of anaemia in pregnancy in Anambra State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Onyeneho, Nkechi G; Igweonu, Obianuju U

    2016-08-31

    Anaemia during pregnancy continues to constitute significant challenge to maternal health in Nigeria and contributes substantially to the worsening maternal mortality ratio (MMR) in Nigeria despite a global reduction in MMR in response to effort to improve safe motherhood. The incidence of anaemia during pregnancy is still high (>40 %) in Nigeria, and attitudes and management practices are yet unclear as the peoples' understanding of the phenomenon remains unclear. This study explored the perceptions/attitudes on anaemia during pregnancy and practices to prevent and/or manage it in Anambra State. In-depth interview and focus group discussion data were collected from health workers and mothers who delivered within 6 months preceding the study and from mothers and husbands of women who delivered within 6 months preceding the study, respectively. The people expressed some knowledge of anaemia, being common in pregnancies. However, some expressed the view that anaemia being a typical sign of pregnancy cannot be prevented. Some mothers expressed desire for focused antenatal care services to control anaemia but lamented the attitude of the health workers, who make access to these interventions difficult. Control of anaemia in pregnancy should start with providing health education to pregnant women and their partners, who reinforce what the women are told during antenatal care, and with training health workers for friendlier attitudes to clients.

  20. Infectious folliculitis and dermatophytosis.

    PubMed

    Weese, J Scott; Yu, Anthony A

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial, dermatophilosis, and superficial ringworm infections are common skin diseases noted in equine dermatology. The ability to recognize and accurately diagnose the skin condition is key to selecting an appropriate and successful treatment regimen. Addressing underlying etiology, environmental management, and infection control play a crucial role in preventing relapse of clinical signs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Autoimmune mechanisms in pernicious anaemia & thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Osborne, David; Sobczyńska-Malefora, Agata

    2015-09-01

    Pernicious anaemia (PA) and some types of thyroid disease result from autoimmune processes. The autoimmune mechanisms in these conditions have not been fully elucidated. This review discusses the autoimmune mechanisms involved in PA and how these affect diagnosis and disease progression. In addition to gastric antibodies, antibodies to the vitamin B12 binding protein transcobalamin which can result in high serum B12 levels are also addressed with regard to how they affect clinical practice. The role of autoimmune susceptibility is investigated by comparing PA to one of its most common comorbidities, autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Thyroid disease (although not exclusively AITD) and B12 deficiency are both also implicated in the pathology of hyperhomocysteinemia, an elevated homocysteine in plasma. Since hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular occlusive disease, this review also addresses how thyroid disease in particular leads to changes in homocysteine levels.

  2. The G cells in pernicious anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Julia M.; Coulling, I.; Doe, W.; Pearse, A. G. E.

    1971-01-01

    An indirect immunofluorescence technique, using the globulin fraction of rabbit antihuman gastrin serum, was applied to formalin-fixed material obtained by suction biopsy from the fundic mucosa of nine cases of pernicious anaemia. Cytochemical tests for endocrine polypeptide cells of the APUD series, in which the G cell is included, were carried out in parallel with immunofluorescence and with ultrastructural observations. G cells were present, in large numbers, in five of the nine cases studied. In the remaining four cases the predominantly intestinalized glands contained only enterochromaffin in cells. Because of their low gastrin content (immunofluorescence), low secretion granule content (cytochemistry), and the associated ultrastructural findings, it is suggested that the G cells of the fundic mucosa are in a state of high synthetic and high secretory activity. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4930156

  3. Preparation of equine isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bakala, A; Karlik, W; Wiechetek, M

    2003-01-01

    In this study a detailed description of the equine hepatocyte isolation procedure is presented. Livers were obtained from horses slaughtered at the local slaughterhouse. For blood removal and liver preservation the following steps are suggested: perfusion with the oxygenated HBSS (0-2 degrees C, with continuous flow of 500-800 ml/min for 3-6 min), protection from ischemia injury by flushing with ice-cold University of Wisconsin Solution (UW, flow rate of 500-800 ml/min), and finally immersion of the liver lobe in UW solution (2 degrees C) during its transport to the laboratory. For equine isolated hepatocyte preparation a "three-step" perfusion procedure was elaborated: rewarming, chelating and collagenase perfusion. We found optimal cell yield and viability under the following conditions: rewarming with UW (38 degrees C) for 8-14 min, chelating with calcium free Hanks' Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS, 38 degrees C) supplemented with 1 mM ethylene glycol-bis[beta-aminoethyl esther]-N,N,N'N'-tetracetic acid at the flow rate of 450 ml/min for 6 min and enzymatic digestion with HBSS supplemented with 0.1% collagenase at 38 degrees C and 450 ml/min flow rate for 8-27 min. These conditions consistently generated cell harvests of 21 x 10(6)+/-4.86 cells/g of perfused liver tissue with viability of 82.7%+/-10.2.

  4. Equine uveitis: a UK perspective.

    PubMed

    Lowe, R C

    2010-03-01

    Uveitis in the equine population of the UK does not appear to be as prevalent or disastrous as seen across regions of Europe and the USA. Some cases perceived to be recurrent uveitis may be poorly resolved single episodes of uveitis and care should be taken not to make the diagnosis of recurrence without ensuring effective control of the initial episode. Leptospira spp. appear to play only a minor role ERU in the UK which is probably the main reason for the prevalence of the disease being much lower compared to the USA and mainland Europe. Actual data are relatively few on the ground as far as disease surveillance in concerned. This has 2 implications. Firstly unless we are able to effectively monitor the levels of uveitic disease, it will be difficult to pick up early changes in the trend which may allow quicker intervention. Secondly, it is difficult to secure funding for further research if the prevalence of the problem is poorly defined. This may leave the UK equine population at risk should the disease profile suddenly alter for the worse.

  5. Equine influenza - surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Cullinane, Ann; Elton, Debra; Mumford, Jenny

    2010-11-01

    Equine influenza virus (EIV) is considered the most important respiratory virus of horses because it is highly contagious and has the potential to disrupt major equestrian events. Equine influenza (EI) can be controlled by vaccination but it has been demonstrated repeatedly in the field that antigenic drift impacts on vaccine efficacy. EI surveillance maintains awareness of emergence and international spread of antigenic variants. It not only serves as an early warning system for horse owners, trainers and veterinary clinicians but is fundamental to influenza control programmes based on vaccination. Data on outbreaks of EI and strain characterisation is reviewed annually by an Expert Surveillance Panel (ESP) including representatives from OIE and WHO. This panel makes recommendations on the need to update vaccines based on analysis of evidence of disease in well vaccinated horses, antigenic changes, genetic changes and when possible, experimental challenge data. However, the disparity in the level of surveillance and virus collection in different countries results in potentially biased information about the relative prevalence of different viruses. There is a need for increased surveillance on a global level and a greater awareness of the benefits of updating the vaccines. The vaccine companies have traditionally been slow to respond to the ESP recommendations. Veterinary clinicians have a major role to play in purchasing vaccines with epidemiologically relevant strains and promoting their benefits to their clients. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Equine salmonellosis in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Juffo, Gregory Duarte; Bassuino, Daniele Mariath; Gomes, Danilo Carloto; Wurster, Fabiana; Pissetti, Caroline; Pavarini, Saulo Petinatti; Driemeier, David

    2017-03-01

    The Salmonella sp. genus is identified in several species, and the zoonosis it causes is one of the most important types worldwide. The specifics of salmonellosis vary according to the function of the serovar involved, the species affected, age and predisposing factors. However, few cases of equine salmonellosis have been reported. This study presents ten confirmed salmonellosis cases in equines in southern Brazil. Six were adult animals with stress factors preceding the disease, while four were foals, three of which presented with hyperacute manifestations. The main clinical signs were diarrhea, anorexia, and hyperthermia. Lesions varied in distribution and severity, although fibrinonecrotic or necrohemorrhagic enteritis was observed in all animals, mainly in the large intestine (large colon and cecum-8/10) and small intestine (3/10). Substantial liquid content, mainly hemorrhagic, was observed in all animals. The most characteristic microscopic lesion was mucosa necrosis, which is often accompanied by fibrin deposition, followed by necrosis of follicular centers and vascular changes. Bacterial isolation revealed seven isolates. Five were serotyped, and the serovars Typhimurium and Anatum were associated with two cases each, while Muenster was associated with a case whose lesion pattern varied. Immunohistochemical staining was positive in all cases. All diagnoses were based on the clinical history, macroscopic and histological lesions, and the bacterial isolation and/or immunostaining associated with histological lesions.

  7. Equine disease events resulting from international horse movements: Systematic review and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, M; Münstermann, S; de Guindos, I; Timoney, P

    2016-09-01

    An analysis of the factors leading to equine disease events was used to support the development of international recommendations for mitigating the risk of disease dissemination through sport horse movements (high health, high performance - 'HHP' horses). A review was undertaken to identify the factors resulting in equine disease events following international movement of horses to draw lessons in support of the development of international recommendations for the safe movements of a specific subpopulation of horses: the HHP sport horses. Systematic review carried out in accordance with the PRISMA statement. The review covered disease events that occurred from 1995 to 2014, identified from the databases of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and international surveillance reports. Overall, 54 disease events were identified, of which 7 were contained in post arrival quarantine and the others resulted in the introduction of pathogens into importing countries. For 81% of the introductions, the OIE recommendations applicable to the diseases involved had not been complied with. Subclinical infections are a challenge for international trade: 88% of the regulated movements that resulted in introductions involved infected horses that showed no clinical signs at the time of import. Biosecurity and management practices in resident equine populations were identified as important mitigating factors in preventing disease spread to the local horse population. The global increase in international horse movements, if not appropriately regulated and supervised by competent veterinary authorities and respective equine industry partners, could potentially lead to increased global spread of infectious equine diseases. Appropriate mitigation measures and compliance with OIE import recommendations for specific diseases can significantly reduce this risk. The recommendations proposed under the HHP approach take into account the mitigation measures identified by this review as

  8. [Familial pyridoxine-responsive sideroblastic anaemia. One case (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Garbarz, M; Bernard, J F; Boivin, P

    1980-11-22

    In a 24-year old man presenting with hypochromic microcytic anaemia, low reticulocyte count, increased serum iron and bone marrow erythroid hyperplasia with numerous ringed sideroblasts, the diagnosis of sideroblastic anaemia was confirmed by radioisotope study and bone marrow electron microscopy. The hereditary nature of the disease was demonstrated by the presence of microcytosis and increased serum iron in the mother and two sisters of the patient. One of the two sisters also had anaemia and abnormal ringed sideroblasts in her bone marrow. Her haemoglobin values and those of the propositus returned to normal under pyridoxine treatment, but hypochromia and abnormal sideroblasts persisted. This case of familial pyridoxine-responsive sideroblastic anaemia is consisted with X-chromosome-mediated transmission. The incomplete effect of pyridoxine suggests a congenital deficiency of some pyridoxine metabolism enzyme or another, as yet unidentified mechanism.

  9. Rare Offshoot of a Common Malady Anaemia and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Vishak; Balanthimogru, Prashantha; Mani, Arun; Ruman, Shehzad

    2016-01-01

    Haematological manifestations are one of the rarer presentations of tuberculosis and are usually of normocytic normochromic type. An association of Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia (AIHA) with active pulmonary tuberculosis is an exceeding rare entity, though anaemia and tuberculosis commonly co-exist. We report a patient with sputum negative pulmonary tuberculosis with associated Coomb’s positive AIHA. The patient responded well to Anti- Tubercular Therapy (ATT) and low dose steroids tapered over a month. PMID:27656489

  10. Rare Offshoot of a Common Malady Anaemia and Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kolla, Gautham; Acharya, Vishak; Balanthimogru, Prashantha; Mani, Arun; Ruman, Shehzad

    2016-08-01

    Haematological manifestations are one of the rarer presentations of tuberculosis and are usually of normocytic normochromic type. An association of Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia (AIHA) with active pulmonary tuberculosis is an exceeding rare entity, though anaemia and tuberculosis commonly co-exist. We report a patient with sputum negative pulmonary tuberculosis with associated Coomb's positive AIHA. The patient responded well to Anti- Tubercular Therapy (ATT) and low dose steroids tapered over a month.

  11. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus, Southern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Franco, José G.; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Freier, Jerome E.; Cordova, Dionicio; Clements, Tamara; Moncayo, Abelardo; Kang, Wenli; Gomez-Hernandez, Carlos; Rodriguez-Dominguez, Gabriela; Ludwig, George V.

    2004-01-01

    Equine epizootics of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) occurred in the southern Mexican states of Chiapas in 1993 and Oaxaca in 1996. To assess the impact of continuing circulation of VEE virus (VEEV) on human and animal populations, serologic and viral isolation studies were conducted in 2000 to 2001 in Chiapas State. Human serosurveys and risk analyses indicated that long-term endemic transmission of VEEV occurred among villages with seroprevalence levels of 18% to 75% and that medical personnel had a high risk for VEEV exposure. Seroprevalence in wild animals suggested cotton rats as possible reservoir hosts in the region. Virus isolations from sentinel animals and genetic characterizations of these strains indicated continuing circulation of a subtype IE genotype, which was isolated from equines during the recent VEE outbreaks. These data indicate long-term enzootic and endemic VEEV circulation in the region and continued risk for disease in equines and humans. PMID:15663847

  12. Alpha thalassemia among sickle cell anaemia patients in Kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Lubega, Irene; Ndugwa, Christopher M; Mworozi, Edison A; Tumwine, James K

    2015-06-01

    Sickle cell anaemia is prevalent in sub Saharan Africa. While α+-thalassaemia is known to modulate sickle cell anaemia, its magnitude and significance in Uganda have hitherto not been described. To determine the prevalence of α+thalassaemia among sickle cell anaemia patients in Mulago Hospital and to describe the clinical and laboratory findings in these patients. A cross sectional study was carried out on patients with sickle cell anaemia in Kampala. Dried blood spots were used to analyze for the deletional α+ thalassaemia using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Of the 142 patients with sickle cell anaemia, 110 (77.5%) had the αα+thalassaemia deletion. The gene frequency of (-α) was 0.425. Ninety one percent (100/110) of those with α+thalassaemia were heterozygous (αα/α-). Amongst the patients older than 60 months, 15 (83.3%) of those without αα+thalassaemia had significant hepatomegaly of greater than 4 cm compared to 36 (45.6%) of those with α+thalassaemia (p=0.003). The gene frequency of (-α) of 0.425 noted in this study is higher than that reported from many places in Africa. Concurrent alpha thalassemia might be a protective trait against significant hepatomegaly in sickle cell anaemia patients more than 60 months of age at Mulago hospital.

  13. Intraclutch variation in avian eggshell pigmentation: the anaemia hypothesis.

    PubMed

    De Coster, Greet; De Neve, Liesbeth; Lens, Luc

    2012-10-01

    Many passerine species lay eggs that are speckled with dark protoporphyrin pigmentation. Because protoporphyrin is mainly derived from the blood, we here formulate and test a new hypothesis that links an increase in anaemia along the laying sequence to within-clutch variation in egg pigmentation. More intense pigmentation is expected if pigments accumulate during enhanced red blood cell production in response to anaemia. Reduced pigmentation is expected if pigments are derived from the degradation of red blood cells that circulate in smaller numbers due to blood loss. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated anaemia in great tit (Parus major) females by infesting the nests with hen fleas (Ceratophyllus gallinae) prior to egg laying. Polychromatophil (i.e., immature red blood cells) percentage, as a measure of blood cell production, was positively correlated with parasite load confirming that female great tits experienced stronger anaemia when infested with haematophagous parasites during egg laying. We found a positive relationship between spot darkness and laying order that weakened under high parasite load. This result suggests that anaemia in females due to blood-sucking parasites led to diminished protoporphyrin from disintegrated red blood cells and hence a decreased deposition of protoporphyrin. However, the overall increase in pigment darkness along the laying sequence suggests that pigments also accumulate by enhanced red blood cell production caused by anaemia due to egg production itself.

  14. Renal anaemia: recent developments and future directions for improved management.

    PubMed

    Mahon, A; Bennett, L

    2007-01-01

    The global burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associated anaemia is substantial. With the increasing numbers of patients that are likely to be affected in the future, approaches are required to improve anaemia management without increasing the workload of renal units. Advocating early treatment may improve patient outcomes and nurses are in an ideal position to identify and manage anaemia at an early stage in patients with CKD. In addition, adopting a multidisciplinary approach, alongside nephrologists, diabetologists, cardiologists, social workers, nutritionists and pharmacists, may allow nurses to detect and treat anaemia earlier in patients with CKD. Maintaining awareness of factors associated with decreased erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) efficacy (e.g. iron deficiency or poor nutritional status) is also important. To reduce the burden on healthcare providers, anaemia management could be simplified by extending the administration interval of ESAs. Recent studies have explored the clinical efficacy of administration of currently available agents at intervals of up to once monthly in highly selected, stable patients. The use of an ESA that can control anaemia while maintaining haemoglobin levels within guideline ranges with extended administration intervals in all patients without the need for additional screening or stepwise dose adjustments with attendant monitoring may help improve patient care while reducing the workload of healthcare providers.

  15. Presence and Characterisation of Anaemia in Diabetic Foot Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J. A.; Oddy, M. J.; Richards, T.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is the commonest cause of severe limb ischaemia in the western world. In diabetes mellitus, anaemia is frequently unrecognized, yet studies have shown that it is twice as common in diabetics compared with nondiabetics. We aimed to assess the incidence of anaemia and further classify the iron deficiency seen in a high-risk DFU patient group. Methods. An observational study was undertaken in a multidisciplinary diabetic foot clinic setting. All patients with DFU attending over a four-month period were included. Anaemia was defined as haemoglobin (Hb) levels <12 g/dL. Iron deficiency was classified according to definitions of AID (absolute iron deficiency) and FID (functional iron deficiency). Results. 27 patients had DFU; 14 (51.9%) were anaemic; two (7.41%) had severe anaemia (Hb < 10 g/dL). No patient had B12 or Folate deficiency. In patients with anaemia, there was significant spread of indices. Only one patient had “textbook” absolute iron deficiency (AID) defined as low Hb, MCV, MCH, and ferritin. Functional iron deficiency (FID) was seen in a further seven patients (25.5%). Conclusion. Anaemia and iron deficiency are a common problem in patients with DFU. With current clinical markers, it is incredibly difficult to determine causal relationships and further in-depth scientific study is required. PMID:25197565

  16. Alphaviral equine encephalomyelitis (Eastern, Western and Venezuelan).

    PubMed

    Aréchiga-Ceballos, N; Aguilar-Setién, A

    2015-08-01

    Summary Alphaviral equine encephalomyelitis is a mosquito-borne infection that causes severe neurological disease and fatalities in horses and humans in the Americas. Consequently, the equine alphaviruses (Eastern, Western and Venezuelan) are of considerable concern worldwide and are notifiable to the World Organisation for Animal Health. In addition, these diseases are considered a potent potential biological weapon, emphasising the need to develop an effective vaccine. Alphaviral equine encephalomyelitis is caused by Eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus (EEEV), Western equine encephalomyelitis virus (WEEV) or Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus (VEEV), which are related members of the Alphavirus genus in the Togaviridae family. Although related, the three viruses are genetically and antigenically distinct. The disease is characterised by fever, anorexia, depression and clinical signs of encephalomyelitis, and may be fatal in up to 90% of cases, for both humans and horses, particularly in the case of EEE. Surviving horses develop lifelong immunity but may have permanent neuropathology. The aim of this paper is to analyse the scientific information available on the evolution of EEE, WEE and VEE, and any potential vaccines.

  17. Anaemia in Pregnancy Is Associated with Advanced HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nandlal, Vikesh; Moodley, Dhayendre; Grobler, Anneke; Bagratee, Jayanthilall; Maharaj, Niren R.; Richardson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaemia is a common clinical finding in HIV infected women and has been associated with advanced disease. The use of antiretroviral drugs such as Zidovudine (ZDV) either for prevention of mother to child transmission (MTCT) of HIV or used in combination with other antiretrovirals have been implicated in the development or increased severity of anaemia. We report the prevalence, type, severity and incidence of anaemia in a cohort of HIV infected women who initiated antiretroviral prophylaxis or treatment during pregnancy. Methods and Materials This is a retrospective cohort data analysis of 408 HIV infected pregnant women who participated in a breastfeeding intervention study (HPTN 046 Study, ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00074412) in South Africa. Women initiated zidovudine prophylaxis for PMTCT or triple antiretroviral treatment in pregnancy according to the standard of care. Laboratory and clinical data in pregnancy, <72 hours and 2 weeks postdelivery were extracted from the main database and analysed. Results The mean Hb concentration was 10.6 g/dL at baseline and 262/408 (64.2%) women were diagnosed with anaemia (Hb<11 g/dL) in pregnancy, 48/146 (32.9%) subsequently developed anaemia intrapartum or postpartum and 89/310 (28.7%) of all cases of anaemia remained unresolved by 2 weeks postdelivery. In a univariate analysis, CD4 count and gravidity were significant risk factors for anaemia in pregnancy, RR 1.41; 1.23–1.61 (p<0.001) and 1.10; 1.01–1.18 (p = 0.02) respectively. After adjusting for antiretroviral regimen, age and gravidity in a multivariable analysis, only the CD4 count remains a significant risk factor for anaemia in pregnancy and postdelivery. Conclusion In conclusion, anaemia was most common among women in the advanced stage of HIV infection (CD4<200 cells/mm3). There was no evidence of an association between ZDV or triple ARVs and anaemia. PMID:25222119

  18. Application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for diagnosis of equine herpes virus-1 (EHV-1).

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Singh, B K; Yadav, M P

    1996-11-01

    Fifty aborted foetus samples were diagnosed for the presence of equine herpes virus-1 (EHV-1) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Specific primer pair for amplification of a particular segment of EHV-1 DNA in gc region having 3 Hae III restriction endonuclease sites was used. A 409 base pair segment obtained as PCR amplification product in 9 samples was digested with Hae III to confirm the presence of EHV-1 as the infectious agent in aborted tissues. It was observed that PCR technique was more sensitive, specific and rapid than the conventional virological diagnostic methods.

  19. Role of horse flies in transmission of wquine infectious anemia from carrier ponies.

    PubMed

    Kemen, M J; McClain, D S; Matthysse, J G

    1978-02-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus was transmitted from an acutely ill and an inapparently infected pony to uninfected ponies by the interrupted feeding of horse flies (tabanids). Transmission from acutely ill ponies was not accomplished following: (1) the interrupted feeding of a single horse fly, (2) bites of horse flies that had fed on an acutely affected pony 24 hours earlier, (3) bites of horse flies that had oviposited after feeding on an acutely affected pony, or (4) the inoculation of larval material derived from horse flies that had fed to repletion. It was concluded that horse fly transmission of equine infectious anemia virus is mechanical only and that infected horses that are free of clinical signs can be a source of virus for insect transmission.

  20. Anaemia in elective orthopaedic surgery - Royal Adelaide Hospital, Australia.

    PubMed

    Kearney, B; To, J; Southam, K; Howie, D; To, B

    2016-01-01

    An anaemia clinic was established to improve the preoperative management of elective orthopaedic patients scheduled for arthroplasty. This paper is a report on the first 100 patients assessed. To assess the incidence and causes of anaemia in patients on a waiting list for elective arthroplasty in a public hospital and to assess the impact of anaemia detection in this patient population. Patients attending an Anaemia Clinic for elective orthopaedic surgical patients, during March 2010 to June 2013 were studied. Outcome measures included change in haemoglobin preoperative results and perioperative transfusion rates by preoperative haemoglobin. Seventeen per cent of patients scheduled for elective surgery were found to be anaemic. Of the 100 patients who attended, approximately half were found to be iron deficient and the remainder had anaemia of chronic disease. Serum ferritin <30 µg/L alone did not identify iron deficiency in 80% of patients with iron deficiency. Patients with iron deficient anaemia were able to be treated, in all cases, to achieve a significant increase in preoperative haemoglobin. The general unavailability of erythropoietin limited effective intervention for the non-iron-deficient anaemic patients. Seven patients had their surgery cancelled because of the screening programme. Half of the anaemic patients in a joint replacement screening clinic were iron deficient, and treatment was effective in improving the pre-operative haemoglobin and reducing perioperative transfusion rates. This screening process should improve patient outcome. Another important finding in this group of patients is that ferritin levels cannot be reliably used as the sole indicator in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia in this group of patients undergoing elective arthroplasty. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  1. Susceptibility of Peruvian Mosquitoes to Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    VECTOR/PATHOGEN/HOST INTERACTION, TRANSMISSION Susceptibility of Peruvian Mosquitoes to Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus M. J. TURELL,1 M. L...the Amazon Basin, near Iquitos, Peru, and used in experimental studies to evaluate their susceptibility to strains of eastern equine encephalitis virus...enzootic vector of EEEV in this region. KEY WORDS Peru, eastern equine encephalitis virus, transmission, mosquito Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV

  2. The complex pathophysiology of acquired aplastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Y; Katsanis, E

    2015-06-01

    Immune-mediated destruction of haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) plays a central role in the pathophysiology of acquired aplastic anaemia (aAA). Dysregulated CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells, CD4(+) T cells including T helper type 1 (Th1), Th2, regulatory T cells and Th17 cells, natural killer (NK) cells and NK T cells, along with the abnormal production of cytokines including interferon (IFN)-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, induce apoptosis of HSPCs, constituting a consistent and defining feature of severe aAA. Alterations in the polymorphisms of TGF-β, IFN-γ and TNF-α genes, as well as certain human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, may account for the propensity to immune-mediated killing of HSPCs and/or ineffective haematopoiesis. Although the inciting autoantigens remain elusive, autoantibodies are often detected in the serum. In addition, recent studies provide genetic and molecular evidence that intrinsic and/or secondary deficits in HSPCs and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells may underlie the development of bone marrow failure.

  3. Biomarkers for equine joint injury and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    McIlwraith, C Wayne; Kawcak, Christopher E; Frisbie, David D; Little, Christopher B; Clegg, Peter D; Peffers, Mandy J; Karsdal, Morten A; Ekman, Stina; Laverty, Sheila; Slayden, Richard A; Sandell, Linda J; Lohmander, L Stefan; Kraus, Virginia B

    2017-09-16

    We report the results of a symposium aimed at identifying validated biomarkers that can be used to complement clinical observations for diagnosis and prognosis of joint injury leading to equine osteoarthritis (OA). Biomarkers might also predict pre-fracture change that could lead to catastrophic bone failure in equine athletes. The workshop was attended by leading scientists in the fields of equine and human musculoskeletal biomarkers to enable cross-disciplinary exchange and improve knowledge in both. Detailed proceedings with strategic planning was written, added to, edited and referenced to develop this manuscript. The most recent information from work in equine and human osteoarthritic biomarkers was accumulated, including the use of personalized healthcare to stratify OA phenotypes, transcriptome analysis of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and meniscal injuries in the human knee. The spectrum of "wet" biomarker assays that are antibody based that have achieved usefulness in both humans and horses, imaging biomarkers and the role they can play in equine and human OA was discussed. Prediction of musculoskeletal injury in the horse remains a challenge, and the potential usefulness of spectroscopy, metabolomics, proteomics, and development of biobanks to classify biomarkers in different stages of equine and human OA were reviewed. The participants concluded that new information and studies in equine musculoskeletal biomarkers have potential translational value for humans and vice versa. OA is equally important in humans and horses, and the welfare issues associated with catastrophic musculoskeletal injury in horses add further emphasis to the need for good validated biomarkers in the horse. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Case–control study of anaemia among middle-aged and elderly women in three rural areas of China

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pengkun; Li, Lixiang; Man, Qingqing; Wang, Chunrong; Meng, Liping; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To propose a feasible suggestion to reduce the high prevalence of anaemia in middle-aged and elderly women by investigating risk factors, particularly nutritional factors, and analysing the effect on anaemia in three different rural areas of China. Design A case–control study. Setting Three counties of China. Participants Women aged 50–75 years in the three counties. Main outcome measures Adjusted OR (95% CI) of anaemia associated with diet, lifestyle and blood biochemical indices. Results Compared with controls, women with anaemia had lower body mass index (22.1 (3.2) kg/m2 vs 23.2 (3.5) kg/m2; p<0.001), a higher experience of shortage of food (45.0% vs 36.5%; p<0.001), less soy food intake (0.5 (0.3, 26.7) g/day vs 5.6 (0.4, 27.8) g/day; p<0.048), lower serum iron (13.4 (5.4) μmol/L vs 16.4 (5.7) μmol/L; p<0.001), lower ferritin (109.6 (85.6) ng/mL vs 131.0 (92.0) ng/mL; p<0.001), lower transferrin saturation levels (22.5 (9.5)% vs 26.8 (9.6)%; p<0.001) and higher levels of free erythrocyte protoporphyrin (42.4 (21.2) μg/dL vs 39.6 (17.8) μg/dL; p<0.001). Anaemia was significantly associated with BMI(OR=0.90, 95% CI (0.87 to 0.92)), food shortage experience (OR=1.39, 95% CI (1.15 to 1.69)), total protein (OR=0.66, 95%CI (0.54 to 0.80)), Albumin (OR=0.72, 95%CI (0.59 to 0.87)) in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that body mass index, experience of food shortage, total protein and albumin were independently related to anaemia. Conclusions Among middle-aged and elderly women in rural China, the nutrition status of anaemic cases is far below that of controls. Lower body mass index and a greater experience of food shortage are closely related to anaemia. Improving the blood protein status by consuming protein-sufficient foods such as soy food is a feasible approach for elderly anaemic women. Further research is needed on the effect of chronic inflammation and infectious disease on anaemia in elderly women in

  5. Check list of the helminths of equines in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gürler, Ali Tümay; Bölükbaş, Cenk Soner; Açici, Mustafa; Umur, Sinasi

    2010-01-01

    Helminths of equines are one of the most important agents of parasitic diseases. Therefore, many studies have been conducted on helminths of equines in Turkey. In this article, a check list and prevalence rates of helminths of equines in Turkey have been given.

  6. Training Law Enforcement Officials on Responding to Equine Calls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kathleen P.; Stauffer, Gary; Stauffer, Monte; Anderson, Doug; Biodrowski, Kristie

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of equine abuse/neglect cases is an ongoing issue. However, officials responding to equine cases are rarely experienced in handling horses. Therefore, workshops teaching basic horse husbandry were offered to better equip and prepare officials to respond to equine cases. Trainings consisted of both classroom and hands-on sessions.…

  7. Training Law Enforcement Officials on Responding to Equine Calls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kathleen P.; Stauffer, Gary; Stauffer, Monte; Anderson, Doug; Biodrowski, Kristie

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of equine abuse/neglect cases is an ongoing issue. However, officials responding to equine cases are rarely experienced in handling horses. Therefore, workshops teaching basic horse husbandry were offered to better equip and prepare officials to respond to equine cases. Trainings consisted of both classroom and hands-on sessions.…

  8. 9 CFR 317.9 - Labeling of equine products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling of equine products. 317.9... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION LABELING, MARKING DEVICES, AND CONTAINERS General § 317.9 Labeling of equine products. The immediate containers of any equine products shall be labeled to show the kinds of animals...

  9. 9 CFR 317.9 - Labeling of equine products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labeling of equine products. 317.9... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION LABELING, MARKING DEVICES, AND CONTAINERS General § 317.9 Labeling of equine products. The immediate containers of any equine products shall be labeled to show the kinds of animals...

  10. Novel approaches to treatment of sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Steinberg; Mitchell

    1999-11-01

    Sickle cell anaemia, a chronic and often debilitating disease, results from homozygosity for a single amino acid substitution in the beta-globin subunit of the haemoglobin molecule. Sickle haemoglobin (HbS), the product of this mutation, polymerises when deoxygenated, thus damaging the red blood cell and causing vaso-occlusive complications and haemolytic anaemia. Most cases of sickle cell anaemia are found in Africa. Until recently, treatment was directed at the management of disease complications. Patients with central nervous system events undergo exchange transfusions followed by chronic transfusion programmes. Patients with painful episodes, which result in many days missed from work and school are treated with narcotics and aggressive hydration. Novel therapy for sickle cell anaemia is designed to prevent complications through targeting disease mechanisms. Hydroxyurea is given to severely affected sickle cell anaemia patients in an attempt to prevent painful episodes, reduce hospital days, improve the patients' overall quality of life, and perhaps to prevent or provide some degree of end-organ damage stabilisation. Other novel therapies, such as bone marrow transplantation and gene therapy, pursue a cure. For these novel therapies to be effective on a global basis they must be amenable to underdeveloped and poorer countries of the world.

  11. Epidemiology of anaemia among pregnant women in Geizera, central Sudan.

    PubMed

    Abdelgadir, M A; Khalid, A R; Ashmaig, A L; Ibrahim, A R M; Ahmed, A-Aziz M; Adam, I

    2012-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted between August and September 2010 at the antenatal care clinic of the Araba Waeshreen Hospital (Geizera), central Sudan. Sociodemographic, medical, obstetric and use of pica information were gathered. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Haemoglobin levels were measured and blood films and stools were examined for malaria and schistosomiasis. Out of the 292 women, 119 (40.8%) had anaemia (HB < 11 g/dl); eight (2.7%) had severe anaemia (HB < 7 g/dl). One patient had a positive blood film for malaria. A total of 38 (13.0%) out of the 292 pregnant women had S. mansoni infections. While age, parity, gestational age, education, occupation, interpregnancy interval and BMI were not associated with anaemia, pica (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.0-2.9, p = 0.02) and S. mansoni infections (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.2-6.7, p = 0.01) were significantly associated with anaemia using univariate and multivariate analyses. The high prevalence of anaemia among these women needs to be controlled through preventive measurement of S. mansoni infections and health education to prevent practising pica.

  12. Anaemia in kidney disease: harnessing hypoxia responses for therapy.

    PubMed

    Koury, Mark J; Haase, Volker H

    2015-07-01

    Improved understanding of the oxygen-dependent regulation of erythropoiesis has provided new insights into the pathogenesis of anaemia associated with renal failure and has led to the development of novel therapeutic agents for its treatment. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2 is a key regulator of erythropoiesis and iron metabolism. HIF-2 is activated by hypoxic conditions and controls the production of erythropoietin by renal peritubular interstitial fibroblast-like cells and hepatocytes. In anaemia associated with renal disease, erythropoiesis is suppressed due to inadequate erythropoietin production in the kidney, inflammation and iron deficiency; however, pharmacologic agents that activate the HIF axis could provide a physiologic approach to the treatment of renal anaemia by mimicking hypoxia responses that coordinate erythropoiesis with iron metabolism. This Review discusses the functional inter-relationships between erythropoietin, iron and inflammatory mediators under physiologic conditions and in relation to the pathogenesis of renal anaemia, as well as recent insights into the molecular and cellular basis of erythropoietin production in the kidney. It furthermore provides a detailed overview of current clinical experience with pharmacologic activators of HIF signalling as a novel comprehensive and physiologic approach to the treatment of anaemia.

  13. About Infectious Mononucleosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Epstein-Barr Virus and Infectious Mononucleosis Note: Javascript is disabled or ... About CDC.gov . EBV and Mono Home About Epstein-Barr Virus About Infectious Mononucleosis For Healthcare Providers Laboratory Testing ...

  14. [Infectious diseases research].

    PubMed

    Carratalà, Jordi; Alcamí, José; Cordero, Elisa; Miró, José M; Ramos, José Manuel

    2008-12-01

    There has been a significant increase in research activity into infectious diseases in Spain in the last few years. The Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) currently has ten study groups, with the cooperation of infectious diseases specialists and microbiologists from different centres, with significant research activity. The program of Redes Temáticas de Investigación Cooperativa en Salud (Special Topics Cooperative Health Research Networks) is an appropriate framework for the strategic coordination of research groups from the Spanish autonomous communities. The Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI) and the Network for Research in AIDS (RIS) integrate investigators in Infectious Diseases from multiple groups, which continuously perform important research projects. Research using different experimental models in infectious diseases, in numerous institutions, is an important activity in our country. The analysis of the recent scientific production in Infectious Diseases shows that Spain has a good position in the context of the European Union. The research activity in Infectious Diseases carried out in our country is a great opportunity for the training of specialists in this area of knowledge.

  15. Fifty years of the British Equine Veterinary Association as a facilitator of progress in equine clinical science.

    PubMed

    Silver, I A; Jeffcott, L B; Rossdale, P D

    2011-09-01

    The British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) was established in 1961 and launched the Equine Veterinary Journal (EVJ) in 1968. This review outlines some of the major advances in equine science and practice that have occurred in that time and the role played by the Journal in facilitating those developments. © 2011 EVJ Ltd.

  16. Iron deficiency anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: National Consultant for Gastroenterology Working Group Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Bartnik, Witold; Gonciarz, Maciej; Kłopocka, Maria; Linke, Krzysztof; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Radwan, Piotr; Reguła, Jarosław; Rydzewska, Grażyna

    2014-01-01

    Anaemia is a common complication associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). It substantially impairs quality of life, makes therapy more complicated, and increases costs of treatment. It seems that anaemia therapy is suboptimal in this group of patients in the Polish population. The recommendations presented below provide iron deficiency anaemia management clues in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25395998

  17. Anaemia in heart failure: a common interaction with renal insufficiency called the cardio-renal anaemia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, A; Gallotta, M; Iovine, F; Nuti, R; Silverberg, D S

    2008-02-01

    Although many studies have found a high prevalence of anaemia in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), few have carefully examined the relationship between the CHF and the prevalence of anaemia and chronic renal insufficiency (CRI). Patients with advanced renal failure, significant anaemia, diffuse atherosclerosis, respiratory disease and more elderly patients have been systematically excluded from the great majority of the randomised clinical trials. Both anaemia and renal insufficiency are very common associated diseases associated with increased mortality, morbidity and rate of hospitalisation in CHF patients. Impaired renal function is associated with adverse outcomes because it represents a marker of coexistent disease and more diffuse atherosclerosis. In patients with CHF, progressive renal dysfunction leads to a decrease in erythropoietin (EPO) levels with reduced erythrocyte production from bone marrow. This may explain the common association between CHF, anaemia and CRI in clinical practice. The normalisation of haemoglobin concentration by EPO in patients with CHF and CRI results in improved exercise capacity by increasing oxygen delivery and improving cardiac function. In this review, we describe the mechanisms linking anaemic status, CRI and CHF, the prognostic relevance of each disease, treatment implications, and potential benefit of EPO administration.

  18. Human fascioliasis and anaemia in Dakahlia Governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Shazly, Atef M; El-Nahas, Hala A; Abdel-Mageed, A A; El Beshbishi, S N; Azab, M S; Abou El Hasan, M; Arafa, Wafaa A S; Morsy, Tosson A

    2005-08-01

    Fasciola infection (fascioliasis) appeared to be endemic in Egypt. Stool samples of fourty eight patients were coprologically diagnosed. According to Fasciola egg counting per gram stool, the severity of infection was divided into light infection in 60.5%, moderate in 27.1% and severe infection in 12.5%. No significant correlation was detected between severity of infection and patients' sex. Complete blood picture, reticylocytic count, serum iron, immunological assays as anti-nuclear, anti-smooth muscle antibody, anti-mitochondrial anti-body, anti-DNA tests and rheumatoid factor and occult blood in stool were investigated. Normocytic normochromic anaemia was detected in 62.5% of the fascioliasis patients, microcytic hypochromic anaemia in 31.3% and macrocytic one in 6.3%. Highly significant negative correlation (R = -0.68) was detected between haemoglobin concentration and egg count per gram faeces. Human fascioliasis was associated with normocytic normochromic anaemia and to a lesser extent microcytic hypochromic anemia.

  19. [Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia: a review and report of four cases].

    PubMed

    Nyilas, Renáta; Székely, Borbála; Váróczy, László; Simon, Zsófia; Árokszállási, Anita; Illés, Árpád; Gergely, Lajos

    2015-03-01

    Treatment of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is still a challenge to clinicians. Even today it may be lethal. Half of the cases are secondary due to an underlying disease, and the others are primary or idiopathic cases. According to the specificity and type of autoantibodies there are warm and cold type forms of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. The hallmark of the diagnosis is to detect the presence of haemolysis by clinical and laboratory signs and detect the underlying autoantibodies. Treatment of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is still a challenge to clinicians. We still loose patients due to excessive haemolysis or severe infections caused by immunosuppression. First line treatment is corticosteroids. Other immunosuppressive agents like: cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, cyclosporine or the off label rituximab can be used in case of corticosteroid refractoriness. Splenectomy is a considerable option in selective cases. The authors discuss treatment options and highlight difficulties by presenting 4 cases.

  20. Warm antibody autoimmune haemolytic anaemia associated with ovarian teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Raimundo, Pedro Oliveira; Coelho, Susana; Cabeleira, Alexandra; Dias, Luis; Gonçalves, Manuela; Almeida, Julio

    2010-01-01

    The ovarian cystic teratoma is a rare cause of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia by warm antibodies, resistant to corticotherapy, with few case reports published in the medical literature. We present a case of a 45-year-old woman admitted to hospital due to general weakness. Laboratory studies revealed macrocytic anaemia, biochemical parameters of haemolysis and peripheral spherocytosis. The direct Coombs test was positive. Viral serologies, anti-nuclear antibodies, anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies and β2-microglobulin were negative. CT scan of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis showed a heterogeneous right anexial lesion. The patient was treated with corticotherapy without improvement of anaemia. Regression of extra-vascular haemolysis and normalisation of haemoglobin was obtained only after laparoscopic splenectomy and right ooforectomy, and the histopathology of the right anexial mass revealed a cystic teratoma. Previously published cases controlled the haemolysis by surgically removing the lesion associated with splenectomy. PMID:22750920

  1. Frequency of anaemia in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus at tertiary care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Mumtaz Ali; Memon, Iqbal; Ghori, Rafi Ahmed

    2010-10-01

    To analyze the frequency and causes of anaemia in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients attending in department of medicine at tertiary care hospitals. This retrospective, descriptive and analytical study was planned to analyze the frequency and causes of anaemia in SLE patients attending the department of medicine at (MMC) and (LUMHS) hospitals during the period of Jan 2006 to Nov 2008. The criteria used in this study were from the American College of Rheumatology. Investigations recorded were blood complete picture, absolute values, peripheral smear, and reticulocyte count in all patients of anaemia. These investigations were necessary to analyse the cases of anaemia in SLE. All investigations were not done in all cases. Patients with hypochromic microcytic anaemia were advised to have serum iron and ferritin levels, seven patients with macrocytic anaemia were advised to have direct and indirect coomb's test, LFTs, serum LDH, serum B12 and folate levels. Patients with normochromic and normocytic anaemia were considered to have anaemia of chronic disease. Bone marrow aspiration and Hb electrophoresis were done in two patients with anaemia of chronic disease. Thirty adult patients were included in this study. Special proforma were prepared to record the information from case sheets of patients including basic information, symptomatology and laboratory investigations. Severity and various types of anaemias were recorded. Anaemia was graded according to severity, as mild (Hb 10-12 G/dl), Moderate (Hb 8-10 G/dl) and severe (Hb < 8 G/dl). Haemoglobinopathies and other types of anaemias were excluded from study. Thirty adult diagnosed patients of SLE, were included. Their ages ranged from twenty years to fifty years at time of presentation. The mean age +/- SD (range) was 28 +/- 6.22 (20-50) years and median age was 31 years. Out of thirty patients, twenty seven (90%) were females and three (10%) were males. Twenty eight (93.33%) patients presented with anaemia

  2. Thrombotic microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia and antiphospholipid antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, G; Bucciarelli, S; Cervera, R; Lozano, M; Reverter, J; de la Red, G; Gil, V; Ingelmo, M; Font, J; Asherson, R

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the clinical and laboratory features of patients with thrombotic microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia (TMHA) associated with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Methods: A computer assisted (PubMed) search of the literature was performed to identify all cases of TMHA associated with aPL from 1983 to December 2002. Results: 46 patients (36 female) with a mean (SD) age at presentation of TMHA of 34 (15) years were reviewed. Twenty eight (61%) patients had primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). TMHA was the first clinical manifestation of APS in 26 (57%) patients. The clinical presentations were haemolytic-uraemic syndrome (26%), catastrophic APS (23%), acute renal failure (15%), malignant hypertension (13%), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (13%), and HELLP (haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count in association with eclampsia) syndrome (4%). Lupus anticoagulant was detected in 86% of the episodes of TMHA, and positive anticardiolipin antibodies titres in 89%. Steroids were the most common treatment (69% of episodes), followed by plasma exchange (PE) (62%), anticoagulant or antithrombotic agents (48%), immunosuppressive agents (29%), and immunoglobulins (12%). Recovery occurred in only 10/29 (34%) episodes treated with steroids, and in 19/27 (70%) episodes treated with PE. Death occurred in 10/46 (22%) patients. Conclusions: The results emphasise the need for systematic screening for aPL in all patients with clinical and laboratory features of TMHA. The existence of TMHA in association with an APS forces one to rule out the presence of the catastrophic variant of this syndrome. PE is indicated as a first line of treatment for all patients with TMHA associated with aPL. PMID:15140782

  3. Chimeric viruses containing the N-terminal ectodomains of GP5 and M proteins of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome do not change the cellular tropism of equine arteritis virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are members of family Arteriviridae; they share many biological properties but differ significantly in cellular tropism. Using an infectious cDNA clone of EAV, we engineered a panel of six chimeric viruses b...

  4. [Stroke in paediatric patients with sickle-cell anaemia].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Díaz, Judit; Camacho-Salas, Ana; Núñez-Enamorado, Noemí; Carro-Rodríguez, Miguel A; Sánchez-Galán, Victoria; Martínez de Aragón, Ana; Simón-De Las Heras, Rogelio

    2014-08-16

    Sickle-cell anaemia is the severe homozygotic form of drepanocytosis, a genetic disorder that often occurs among black people and which is characterised by the production of haemoglobin S, chronic hemolytic anaemia and tissue ischaemia due to alterations in blood flow. A quarter of the patients presented neurological manifestations; 8-10% of children will have a stroke. AIM. To analyse the cases of stroke in children with sickle-cell anaemia in our centre. We conducted a retrospective descriptive study of children with sickle-cell anaemia and stroke. Five patients (two Dominicans and three Guineans) with sickle-cell anaemia and stroke; one patient suffered two episodes of stroke. The mean age was 27 months. Five of the episodes were ischaemic infarctions. Stroke was the initial form of presentation of drepanocytosis on three occasions. Two of the strokes occurred within a context of pneumococcal meningitis. Four of the patients had previously reported fever. The initial clinical picture was hemiparesis in four cases. Mean haemoglobin on diagnosing the stroke was 6.5 g/dL. Transcranial ultrasound imaging revealed alterations in three patients and, in all the patients, magnetic resonance imaging revealed lesions, which were bilateral in half the cases. Following the stroke, a hypertransfusion regimen protocol was established and only one patient presented a new stroke. This same patient went on to develop moya-moya disease and was submitted to an indirect revascularisation; the patient progressed well, without presenting any new ischaemic events. Drepanocytosis is a disease that is emerging in our setting as a result of immigration. It should be suspected in cases of paediatric strokes associated to anaemia, above all in black children under the age of five who were not submitted to neonatal screening.

  5. Anaemia control: lessons from the flour fortification programme.

    PubMed

    Sadighi, J; Mohammad, K; Sheikholeslam, R; Amirkhani, M A; Torabi, P; Salehi, F; Abdolahi, Z

    2009-12-01

    Anaemia is an important public health problem in Iran; therefore, a programme of flour fortification with iron was launched in two pilot provinces. The present study was conducted in January 2009 to evaluate the effectiveness and process of this programme. A 'before-and-after study' was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the flour fortification programme, and the process of the programme was evaluated using a cross-sectional study. To evaluate the effectiveness of the programme, blood haemoglobin and ferritin levels were measured in sample populations from Bushehr and Golestan provinces. The target population was women aged 15-49 years. Iron content was measured in samples of flour and bread to evaluate the flour fortification process in these two national pilot provinces. The total study population was 600 women from Bushehr province and 652 women from Golestan province. Similar trends were found in the indicators of anaemia/iron deficiency among the women studied in both provinces. The flour fortification programme only appears to have had a beneficial effect on ferritin levels (iron deficiency) in the two provinces. The prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia before and after the intervention did not differ significantly in either province. Interestingly, the prevalence of anaemia (low haemoglobin) was significantly higher after the intervention in women from both provinces. The coverage of fortified flour and bread was 90% and 98.7% in Bushehr province, and 94.1% and 95% in Golestan province, respectively. In areas where anaemia is not mainly due to iron deficiency, an iron fortification programme might decrease the prevalence of iron deficiency without affecting the prevalence of anaemia.

  6. Anaemia and cognitive performances in the elderly: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Andro, M; Le Squere, P; Estivin, S; Gentric, A

    2013-09-01

    Anaemia defined as a haemoglobin level <13 g/dl in men and <12 g/dl in women is common in older people and associated with numerous health consequences. The aim of this study was to systematically review all published data from the past 30 years that studied the association between anaemia and cognitive performance in people aged 65 years and over. An English and French Medline and Cochrane Library search ranging from 1979 to 2011 indexed under the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms 'haemoglobin' or 'anaemia' combined with the terms 'dementia' or 'cognition disorders' or 'memory disorders' or 'orientation' or 'executive functions' or 'attention' or 'brain' or 'neuropsychological tests' was performed. Ninety-eight studies were selected. The following specific conditions were excluded: cancer, chronic kidney diseases, chronic heart disease and post-operative cognitive dysfunction. Five observational studies and six prospective cohort studies were included in the final analysis. According to the studies, the number of participants ranged from 302 to 2250 community-dwelling older people aged 55 years or over. Four studies considered the association between haemoglobin concentration and global cognitive functions, another three examined the association between haemoglobin concentration and the incidence of dementia, and four studies evaluated some specific aspects of cognition. A significant positive association was shown between anaemia and global cognitive decline as well as the incidence of dementia. A significant association was also shown between anaemia and executive functions. This systematic review shows a probable association between anaemia and cognitive performances, particularly with executive functions.

  7. Diabetes mellitus with normal renal function is associated with anaemia.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Chagai; Dovrish, Zamir; Koren-Morag, Nira; Bornstein, Gil; Leibowitz, Avshalom

    2014-05-01

    Anaemia is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), usually related to renal failure. There is scarce information as to the levels of haemoglobin (Hb) and the rate of anaemia in diabetic patients with normal renal function. We, therefore, evaluated haemoglobin levels and the rate of anaemia in diabetic subjects with normal renal functions [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) > 60 mL/min]. The charts of 9250 subjects who attended the Institute of Periodic Medical Examinations at the Chaim Sheba Medical Center for a routine yearly check-up were reviewed. Four hundred and forty-five subjects with type 2 DM and normal renal function were indentified and compared with those without DM who were routinely examined at the same time. Subjects' electronic records were used to build a biochemical and clinical database. Mean haemoglobin levels were lower in subjects with DM than in those without (14.2 vs. 14.7 g/dL, respectively; p < 0.001). Anaemia was observed in 48 (10.8%) subjects in the diabetic group and in only 12 (2.7%) in the nondiabetic group (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that age, gender, history of gastrointestinal disease, use of beta blockers, renal function and DM were independent determinants of haemoglobin levels. After adjustment for age, gender, history of gastrointestinal tract diseases and renal function, DM remained a significant determinant of anaemia with an odds ratio of 2.15 (confidence interval: 1.07-4.31). Anaemia is more common in diabetic patients even when eGFR > 60 mL/min. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Recent advances in equine reproduction.

    PubMed

    Dawson, F L

    1977-01-01

    Mares rarely ovulate in winter; ovulation is induced by increase in daylight length. Ova accumulate in the oviducts of unserved mares. During pregnancy, corpora lutea accumulate; all regress together at mid pregnancy. Plasma progesterone levels rise and oestrogen levels fall towards the end of pregnancy. Methods are available for early termination of pregnancy and for induction of parturition. Pregnancy can be diagnosed efficiently by rectal examination, and by immunological assay of pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin. Service at the foal heat is associated with an increased prevalence of early embryonic death; twinning is the commonest single cause of abortion. Spontaneous prolonged dioestrus is common in summer but may be effectively treated. Bacterial endometritis may result mainly from secondary pathogenic activity by organisms of the normal uterine flora; diagnosis by endometrial smear examination is accurate and methods of treatment have improved. The virus of horse pox has been identified, and the occurrence of equine infection with Mycoplasma has been confirmed. In the male, recent work has emphasized that reproductive function is seasonal. The presence or absence of an undescended testis can now be accurately determined.

  9. Epidemiological study of equine piroplasmosis in Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Xuan, Xuenan; Battsetseg, Badgar; Igarashi, Ikuo; Battur, Banzragch; Batsukh, Zayat; Bayambaa, Badarch; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2005-01-04

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the occurrence of equine piroplasmosis in Mongolia, a country in which the disease occurs epidemically in different climatic conditions. Antibodies to Babesia equi and B. caballi were determined in serum samples of 254 pastured horses in different locations of Mongolia using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with recombinant antigens. One hundred and eighty-five (72.8%) and 102 (40.1%) of all serum samples were positive for B. equi and B. caballi infections, respectively. In addition, 78 (30.7%) samples were positive for both B. equi and B. caballi infections. These results indicate that equine piroplasmosis is widespread in Mongolia. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing an epidemiological study on equine piroplasmosis in different geographic regions in Mongolia.

  10. Equine influenza--a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Cullinane, A; Newton, J R

    2013-11-29

    To date, equine influenza outbreaks have been reported all over the world with the exception of a small number of island nations including New Zealand and Iceland. Influenza is endemic in Europe and North America and is considered to be of potentially major economic significance to the equine industry worldwide. The importation of subclinically infected vaccinated horses, and inadequate quarantine procedures have resulted in several major outbreaks in susceptible populations for example, in Australia (2007) when more than 76,000 horses on over 10,000 properties were reported as infected. This review summarises the current understanding of, and recent research on, equine influenza, including epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, laboratory diagnosis, management and prevention. Recent advances in diagnostic techniques are discussed as are the merits of different vaccination regimes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Aerosol therapy in the equine species.

    PubMed

    Duvivier, D H; Votion, D; Vandenput, S; Lekeux, P

    1997-11-01

    Inhalation therapy plays an increasing role in the management of equine respiratory disorders. This alternative to systematic treatment permits a high concentration of medication to act locally while minimizing side effects and residues. In human medicine, literature in this field is prolific and continuously renewed, whereas in veterinary medicine, applications of aerosol therapy are less extensive. This review considers the principles of action of the different types of devices used for inhalation, i.e., nebulization, metered-dose inhalation and dry powder inhalation, describes the technical and practical requirements for their use in the equine species and considers the advantages and disadvantages of each inhalation device. The pharmacological agents currently administered to horses by inhalation are also discussed. Perspectives of aerosol therapy in the equine species, including aerosols already used in human medicine and their potential applications for horses are described.

  12. Pulmonary ultrasonographic abnormalities associated with naturally occurring equine influenza virus infection in standardbred racehorses.

    PubMed

    Gross, Diane K; Morley, Paul S; Hinchcliff, Kenneth W; Reichle, Jean K; Slemons, Richard D

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if naturally occurring acute infectious upper respiratory disease (IRD) caused by equine influenza virus is associated with ultrasonographically detectable pleural and pulmonary abnormalities in horses. Standardbred racehorses were evaluated for signs of IRD, defined as acute coughing or mucopurulent nasal discharge. For every horse with IRD (n = 16), 1 or 2 horses with no signs of IRD and the same owner or trainer (n = 30) were included. Thoracic ultrasonography was performed within 5-10 days of the onset of clinical disease in horses with IRD. Horses without IRD were examined at the same time as the horses with IRD with which they were enrolled. The rank of the ultrasound scores of horses with IRD was compared to that of horses without IRD. Equine influenza virus was identified as the primary etiologic agent associated with IRD in this study. Mild lung consolidation and peripheral pulmonary irregularities were found in 11 (69%) of 16 of the horses with IRD and 11 (37%) of 30 of control horses. Lung consolidation (median score = 1) and peripheral irregularities scores (median score = 1) were greater in horses with IRD compared to horses without IRD (median score = 0; P < .05). Pleural effusion was not observed. Equine influenza virus infection can result in abnormalities of the equine lower respiratory tract. Despite the mild nature of IRD observed in this study, lung consolidation and peripheral pulmonary irregularities were more commonly observed in horses with clinical signs of IRD. Further work is needed to determine the clinical significance of these ultrasonographic abnormalities.

  13. Developing a service for children with iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Bartle, Catherine

    The IDEAS (Iron Deficiency Early Anaemia Services) project is a programme aimed at detecting and offering a system of care for children with iron deficiency anaemia. It is designed and run by health visitors and nurses in an inner-city area of Bradford. Children with low haemoglobin are referred by the health visitor to the specialist nurse-led clinic. Dietary advice consistent with tradition and culture is given and appropriate referrals made to the GP for iron supplementation, and to the consultant paediatrician or haemoglobinopathy adviser when appropriate. An important development has been the identification of a previously undiagnosed abnormal haemoglobin trait.

  14. Advanced imaging in equine dental disease.