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Sample records for eranos based equilibrium

  1. Sensitivity analysis of Monju using ERANOS with JENDL-4.0

    SciTech Connect

    Tamagno, P.; Van Rooijen, W. F. G.; Takeda, T.; Konomura, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper deals with sensitivity analysis using JENDL-4.0 nuclear data applied to the Monju reactor. In 2010 the Japan Atomic Energy Agency - JAEA - released a new set of nuclear data: JENDL-4.0. This new evaluation is expected to contain improved data on actinides and covariance matrices. Covariance matrices are a key point in quantification of uncertainties due to basic nuclear data. For sensitivity analysis, the well-established ERANOS [1] code was chosen because of its integrated modules that allow users to perform a sensitivity analysis of complex reactor geometries. A JENDL-4.0 cross-section library is not available for ERANOS. Therefore a cross-section library had to be made from the original nuclear data set, available as ENDF formatted files. This is achieved by using the following codes: NJOY, CALENDF, MERGE and GECCO in order to create a library for the ECCO cell code (part of ERANOS). In order to make sure of the accuracy of the new ECCO library, two benchmark experiments have been analyzed: the MZA and MZB cores of the MOZART program measured at the ZEBRA facility in the UK. These were chosen due to their similarity to the Monju core. Using the JENDL-4.0 ECCO library we have analyzed the criticality of Monju during the restart in 2010. We have obtained good agreement with the measured criticality. Perturbation calculations have been performed between JENDL-3.3 and JENDL-4.0 based models. The isotopes {sup 239}Pu, {sup 238}U, {sup 241}Am and {sup 241}Pu account for a major part of observed differences. (authors)

  2. YALINA analytical benchmark analyses using the deterministic ERANOS code system.

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Aliberti, G.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-08-31

    The growing stockpile of nuclear waste constitutes a severe challenge for the mankind for more than hundred thousand years. To reduce the radiotoxicity of the nuclear waste, the Accelerator Driven System (ADS) has been proposed. One of the most important issues of ADSs technology is the choice of the appropriate neutron spectrum for the transmutation of Minor Actinides (MA) and Long Lived Fission Products (LLFP). This report presents the analytical analyses obtained with the deterministic ERANOS code system for the YALINA facility within: (a) the collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research (JIPNR) Sosny of Belarus; and (b) the IAEA coordinated research projects for accelerator driven systems (ADS). This activity is conducted as a part of the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program and the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) of DOE/NNSA.

  3. Evaluation of AGNI SFR core neutronics parameters with VESTA and ERANOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecrabet, Fabrice; Haeck, Wim; Chaitanya Tadepalli, Sai

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents the calculation of core neutronics parameters for so called AGNI Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) model performed with ERANOS code and Monte Carlo depletion interface software VESTA. The AGNI core has been developed at IRSN for its own R&D needs, i.e. to test performance of calculation codes for safety assessment of a generation IV SFR project. The ERANOS code is used as reference code for SFR core calculations at IRSN. In this work, VESTA calculations have been performed and compared with corresponding ERANOS results. These calculations have a double purpose: mastering the use of tools for the evaluation of SFR core static neutronics parameters and validate the use of VESTA for SFR cores.

  4. Equilibrium-based bipolar neurological modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Ran; Pandurangi, Anand K; Peace, Karl E

    2006-01-01

    This work introduces an equilibrium-based dynamic model for the characterization, classification, and diagnostic analysis of bipolar disorder, a psychiatric syndrome with manic and depressive phases. The new model extends the traditional spectrum model of mood states from a static and closed world to a dynamic open-world of equilibria with a bipolar universal modus ponens (BUMP). The utility of the new model is illustrated in diagnostic analysis of depression and clinical psychopharmacology of different phases of this disorder.

  5. MCNPX, MONK, and ERANOS analyses of the YALINA booster subcritical assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Aliberti, G.; Cao, Y.; Smith, D.; Zhong, Z.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.; Serafimovich, I.

    2011-05-01

    This paper compares the numerical results obtained from various nuclear codes and nuclear data libraries with the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly (Minsk, Belarus) experimental results. This subcritical assembly was constructed to study the physics and the operation of accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADS) for transmuting the light water reactors (LWR) spent nuclear fuel. The YALINA Booster facility has been accurately modeled, with no material homogenization, by the Monte Carlo codes MCNPX (MCNP/MCB) and MONK. The MONK geometrical model matches that of MCNPX. The assembly has also been analyzed by the deterministic code ERANOS. In addition, the differences between the effective neutron multiplication factor and the source multiplication factors have been examined by alternative calculational methodologies. The analyses include the delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron lifetime, generation time, neutron flux profiles, and spectra in various experimental channels. The accuracy of the numerical models has been enhanced by accounting for all material impurities and the actual density of the polyethylene material used in the assembly (the latter value was obtained by dividing the total weight of the polyethylene by its volume in the numerical model). There is good agreement between the results from MONK, MCNPX, and ERANOS. The ERANOS results show small differences relative to the other results because of material homogenization and the energy and angle discretizations.The MCNPX results match the experimental measurements of the {sup 3}He(n,p) reaction rates obtained with the californium neutron source.

  6. Quantum gambling based on Nash-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pei; Zhou, Xiao-Qi; Wang, Yun-Long; Liu, Bi-Heng; Shadbolt, Pete; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Gao, Hong; Li, Fu-Li; O'Brien, Jeremy L.

    2017-06-01

    The problem of establishing a fair bet between spatially separated gambler and casino can only be solved in the classical regime by relying on a trusted third party. By combining Nash-equilibrium theory with quantum game theory, we show that a secure, remote, two-party game can be played using a quantum gambling machine which has no classical counterpart. Specifically, by modifying the Nash-equilibrium point we can construct games with arbitrary amount of bias, including a game that is demonstrably fair to both parties. We also report a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration using linear optics.

  7. Trunk biomechanical models based on equilibrium at a single-level violate equilibrium at other levels

    PubMed Central

    Arjmand, N.; Parnianpour, M.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate estimation of muscle forces in various occupational tasks is critical for a reliable evaluation of spinal loads and subsequent assessment of risk of injury and management of back disorders. The majority of biomechanical models of multi-segmental spine estimate muscle forces and spinal loads based on the balance of net moments at a single level with no consideration for the equilibrium at remaining levels. This work aimed to quantify the extent of equilibrium violation and alterations in estimations when such models are performed at different levels. Results are compared with those of kinematics-driven model that satisfies equilibrium at all levels and EMG data. Regardless of the method used (optimization or EMG-assisted), single-level free body diagram models yielded estimations that substantially altered depending on the level considered (i.e., level dependency). Equilibrium of net moment was also grossly violated at remaining levels with the error increasing in more demanding tasks. These models may, however, be used to estimate spinal compression forces. PMID:17136359

  8. Learning of Chemical Equilibrium through Modelling-Based Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maia, Poliana Flavia; Justi, Rosaria

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses students' learning process of chemical equilibrium from a modelling-based approach developed from the use of the "Model of Modelling" diagram. The investigation was conducted in a regular classroom (students 14-15 years old) and aimed at discussing how modelling-based teaching can contribute to students…

  9. Learning of Chemical Equilibrium through Modelling-Based Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maia, Poliana Flavia; Justi, Rosaria

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses students' learning process of chemical equilibrium from a modelling-based approach developed from the use of the "Model of Modelling" diagram. The investigation was conducted in a regular classroom (students 14-15 years old) and aimed at discussing how modelling-based teaching can contribute to students…

  10. Calculation of the Phenix end-of-life test 'Control Rod Withdrawal' with the ERANOS code

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberi, V.

    2012-07-01

    The Inst. of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) acts as technical support to French public authorities. As such, IRSN is in charge of safety assessment of operating and under construction reactors, as well as future projects. In this framework, one current objective of IRSN is to evaluate the ability and accuracy of numerical tools to foresee consequences of accidents. Neutronic studies step in the safety assessment from different points of view among which the core design and its protection system. They are necessary to evaluate the core behavior in case of accident in order to assess the integrity of the first barrier and the absence of a prompt criticality risk. To reach this objective one main physical quantity has to be evaluated accurately: the neutronic power distribution in core during whole reactor lifetime. Phenix end of life tests, carried out in 2009, aim at increasing the experience feedback on sodium cooled fast reactors. These experiments have been done in the framework of the development of the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. Ten tests have been carried out: 6 on neutronic and fuel aspects, 2 on thermal hydraulics and 2 for the emergency shutdown. Two of them have been chosen for an international exercise on thermal hydraulics and neutronics in the frame of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project. Concerning neutronics, the Control Rod Withdrawal test is relevant for safety because it allows evaluating the capability of calculation tools to compute the radial power distribution on fast reactors core configurations in which the flux field is very deformed. IRSN participated to this benchmark with the ERANOS code developed by CEA for fast reactors studies. This paper presents the results obtained in the framework of the benchmark activity. A relatively good agreement was found with available measures considering the approximations done in the modeling. The work underlines the importance of burn-up calculations in order to have a fine

  11. Equilibrium reconstruction based on core magnetic measurement and its applications on equilibrium transition in Joint-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Zhuang, G.; Jian, X.; Li, Q.; Liu, Y.; Gao, L.; Wang, Z. J.

    2014-10-01

    Evaluation and reconstruction of plasma equilibrium, especially to resolve the safety factor profile, is imperative for advanced tokamak operation and physics study. Based on core magnetic measurement by the high resolution laser polarimeter-interferometer system (POLARIS), the equilibrium of Joint-TEXT (J-TEXT) plasma is reconstructed and profiles of safety factor, current density, and electron density are, therefore, obtained with high accuracy and temporal resolution. The equilibrium reconstruction procedure determines the equilibrium flux surfaces essentially from the data of POLARIS. Refraction of laser probe beam, a major error source of the reconstruction, has been considered and corrected, which leads to improvement of accuracy more than 10%. The error of reconstruction has been systematically assessed with consideration of realistic diagnostic performance and scrape-off layer region of plasma, and its accuracy has been verified. Fast equilibrium transitions both within a single sawtooth cycle and during the penetration of resonant magnetic perturbation have been investigated.

  12. Equilibrium reconstruction based on core magnetic measurement and its applications on equilibrium transition in Joint-TEXT tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Zhuang, G. Jian, X.; Li, Q.; Liu, Y.; Gao, L.; Wang, Z. J.

    2014-10-15

    Evaluation and reconstruction of plasma equilibrium, especially to resolve the safety factor profile, is imperative for advanced tokamak operation and physics study. Based on core magnetic measurement by the high resolution laser polarimeter-interferometer system (POLARIS), the equilibrium of Joint-TEXT (J-TEXT) plasma is reconstructed and profiles of safety factor, current density, and electron density are, therefore, obtained with high accuracy and temporal resolution. The equilibrium reconstruction procedure determines the equilibrium flux surfaces essentially from the data of POLARIS. Refraction of laser probe beam, a major error source of the reconstruction, has been considered and corrected, which leads to improvement of accuracy more than 10%. The error of reconstruction has been systematically assessed with consideration of realistic diagnostic performance and scrape-off layer region of plasma, and its accuracy has been verified. Fast equilibrium transitions both within a single sawtooth cycle and during the penetration of resonant magnetic perturbation have been investigated.

  13. Equilibrium reconstruction based on core magnetic measurement and its applications on equilibrium transition in Joint-TEXT tokamak.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Zhuang, G; Jian, X; Li, Q; Liu, Y; Gao, L; Wang, Z J

    2014-10-01

    Evaluation and reconstruction of plasma equilibrium, especially to resolve the safety factor profile, is imperative for advanced tokamak operation and physics study. Based on core magnetic measurement by the high resolution laser polarimeter-interferometer system (POLARIS), the equilibrium of Joint-TEXT (J-TEXT) plasma is reconstructed and profiles of safety factor, current density, and electron density are, therefore, obtained with high accuracy and temporal resolution. The equilibrium reconstruction procedure determines the equilibrium flux surfaces essentially from the data of POLARIS. Refraction of laser probe beam, a major error source of the reconstruction, has been considered and corrected, which leads to improvement of accuracy more than 10%. The error of reconstruction has been systematically assessed with consideration of realistic diagnostic performance and scrape-off layer region of plasma, and its accuracy has been verified. Fast equilibrium transitions both within a single sawtooth cycle and during the penetration of resonant magnetic perturbation have been investigated.

  14. Benchmark of Advanced Burner Test Reactor Model Using MCNPX 2.6.0 and ERANOS 2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Allen; Travis Knight; Samuel Bays

    2011-08-01

    Significant research is currently being performed whereby fast reactor cores have been designed to burn transuranic materials reducing the volume and long-term radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel. These core and depletion models depend on various computer codes. This research used MCNPX 2.6.0 and ERANOS 2.1 to model a standard 250MWt Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) core. The intent was to benchmark criticality and burnup results from a stochastic Monte Carlo code and a deterministic depletion code using a standard ABTR model created by Argonne National Laboratory. Because each of these codes solve the transport and burnup problem differently, there is a need to benchmark the core models in order to verify results and identify root causes for significant differences in results between codes. Flux calculations in ERANOS were performed using diffusion theory, Legendre polynomial approximations (using the VARIANT module) and discrete ordinates methods. The k-effective for the higher-order transport models remained within 1000 pcm of the MCNPX model. The difference between the total heavy nuclide mass balance in ERANOS using the various flux calculations and the MCNPX depletion model was less than 0.4% out to a burnup of 1095 days (67.45 GWd/MTHM). For individual heavy nuclides, the depletion models closely matched (< 5.0 % difference) throughout the depletion for isotopes of Uranium, Neptunium and Plutonium and most of the higher transuranics. Notable exceptions were 242Am, 242Cm, 243Cm and 246Cm where differences ranged from 0.1 – 0.2% after 26 days and increased to 11 - 136% at 1095 days.

  15. "Non-equilibrium" block copolymer micelles with glassy cores: a predictive approach based on theory of equilibrium micelles.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Ramanathan

    2015-07-01

    Micelles generated in water from most amphiphilic block copolymers are widely recognized to be non-equilibrium structures. Typically, the micelles are prepared by a kinetic process, first allowing molecular scale dissolution of the block copolymer in a common solvent that likes both the blocks and then gradually replacing the common solvent by water to promote the hydrophobic blocks to aggregate and create the micelles. The non-equilibrium nature of the micelle originates from the fact that dynamic exchange between the block copolymer molecules in the micelle and the singly dispersed block copolymer molecules in water is suppressed, because of the glassy nature of the core forming polymer block and/or its very large hydrophobicity. Although most amphiphilic block copolymers generate such non-equilibrium micelles, no theoretical approach to a priori predict the micelle characteristics currently exists. In this work, we propose a predictive approach for non-equilibrium micelles with glassy cores by applying the equilibrium theory of micelles in two steps. In the first, we calculate the properties of micelles formed in the mixed solvent while true equilibrium prevails, until the micelle core becomes glassy. In the second step, we freeze the micelle aggregation number at this glassy state and calculate the corona dimension from the equilibrium theory of micelles. The condition when the micelle core becomes glassy is independently determined from a statistical thermodynamic treatment of diluent effect on polymer glass transition temperature. The predictions based on this "non-equilibrium" model compare reasonably well with experimental data for polystyrene-polyethylene oxide diblock copolymer, which is the most extensively studied system in the literature. In contrast, the application of the equilibrium model to describe such a system significantly overpredicts the micelle core and corona dimensions and the aggregation number. The non-equilibrium model suggests ways to

  16. Punctuated equilibrium based on a locally ambiguous niche.

    PubMed

    Gunji, Yukio-Pegio; Sakiyama, Tomoko; Murakami, Hisashi

    2014-09-01

    Punctuated equilibrium, recently regarded as the power law distribution of lifespan, is estimated with respect to self-organized criticality. Previous explanations were based on a global property, such as the selection of species depending on their fitness, however a particular entity defined through such global property cannot be relevant to the notion of "self". Here, we introduce local ambiguity of a niche with respect to function and define a function network by using two types of maps. Due to the local complex structure of the function network, motif and lateral connections, some species are easily replaced by others, and other species have long lives. Punctuated equilibrium can, therefore, be explained by local ambiguous interaction, which suggests the notion of self and supports the idea of self-organized criticality.

  17. Network capacity with probit-based stochastic user equilibrium problem

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lili; Wang, Jian; Zheng, Pengjun; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Among different stochastic user equilibrium (SUE) traffic assignment models, the Logit-based stochastic user equilibrium (SUE) is extensively investigated by researchers. It is constantly formulated as the low-level problem to describe the drivers’ route choice behavior in bi-level problems such as network design, toll optimization et al. The Probit-based SUE model receives far less attention compared with Logit-based model albeit the assignment result is more consistent with drivers’ behavior. It is well-known that due to the identical and irrelevant alternative (IIA) assumption, the Logit-based SUE model is incapable to deal with route overlapping problem and cannot account for perception variance with respect to trips. This paper aims to explore the network capacity with Probit-based traffic assignment model and investigate the differences of it is with Logit-based SUE traffic assignment models. The network capacity is formulated as a bi-level programming where the up-level program is to maximize the network capacity through optimizing input parameters (O-D multiplies and signal splits) while the low-level program is the Logit-based or Probit-based SUE problem formulated to model the drivers’ route choice. A heuristic algorithm based on sensitivity analysis of SUE problem is detailed presented to solve the proposed bi-level program. Three numerical example networks are used to discuss the differences of network capacity between Logit-based SUE constraint and Probit-based SUE constraint. This study finds that while the network capacity show different results between Probit-based SUE and Logit-based SUE constraints, the variation pattern of network capacity with respect to increased level of travelers’ information for general network under the two type of SUE problems is the same, and with certain level of travelers’ information, both of them can achieve the same maximum network capacity. PMID:28178284

  18. Multi-period equilibrium/near-equilibrium in electricity markets based on locational marginal prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Bertrand, Raquel

    In this dissertation we propose an equilibrium procedure that coordinates the point of view of every market agent resulting in an equilibrium that simultaneously maximizes the independent objective of every market agent and satisfies network constraints. Therefore, the activities of the generating companies, consumers and an independent system operator are modeled: (1) The generating companies seek to maximize profits by specifying hourly step functions of productions and minimum selling prices, and bounds on productions. (2) The goals of the consumers are to maximize their economic utilities by specifying hourly step functions of demands and maximum buying prices, and bounds on demands. (3) The independent system operator then clears the market taking into account consistency conditions as well as capacity and line losses so as to achieve maximum social welfare. Then, we approach this equilibrium problem using complementarity theory in order to have the capability of imposing constraints on dual variables, i.e., on prices, such as minimum profit conditions for the generating units or maximum cost conditions for the consumers. In this way, given the form of the individual optimization problems, the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions for the generating companies, the consumers and the independent system operator are both necessary and sufficient. The simultaneous solution to all these conditions constitutes a mixed linear complementarity problem. We include minimum profit constraints imposed by the units in the market equilibrium model. These constraints are added as additional constraints to the equivalent quadratic programming problem of the mixed linear complementarity problem previously described. For the sake of clarity, the proposed equilibrium or near-equilibrium is first developed for the particular case considering only one time period. Afterwards, we consider an equilibrium or near-equilibrium applied to a multi-period framework. This model embodies binary

  19. Linear irreversible heat engines based on local equilibrium assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumida, Yuki; Okuda, Koji

    2015-08-01

    We formulate an endoreversible finite-time Carnot cycle model based on the assumptions of local equilibrium and constant energy flux, where the efficiency and the power are expressed in terms of the thermodynamic variables of the working substance. By analyzing the entropy production rate caused by the heat transfer in each isothermal process during the cycle, and using the endoreversible condition applied to the linear response regime, we identify the thermodynamic flux and force of the present system and obtain a linear relation that connects them. We calculate the efficiency at maximum power in the linear response regime by using the linear relation, which agrees with the Curzon-Ahlborn (CA) efficiency known as the upper bound in this regime. This reason is also elucidated by rewriting our model into the form of the Onsager relations, where our model turns out to satisfy the tight-coupling condition leading to the CA efficiency.

  20. Acid Base Equilibrium in a Lipid/Water Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streb, Kristina K.; Ilich, Predrag-Peter

    2003-12-01

    A new and original experiment in which partition of bromophenol blue dye between water and lipid/water gel causes a shift in the acid base equilibrium of the dye is described. The dye-absorbing material is a monoglyceride food additive of plant origin that mixes freely with water to form a stable cubic phase gel; the nascent gel absorbs the dye from aqueous solution and converts it to the acidic form. There are three concurrent processes taking place in the experiment: (a) formation of the lipid/water gel, (b) absorption of the dye by the gel, and (c) protonation of the dye in the lipid/water gel environment. As the aqueous solution of the dye is a deep purple-blue color at neutral pH and yellow at acidic pH the result of these processes is visually striking: the strongly green-yellow particles of lipid/water gel are suspended in purple-blue aqueous solution. The local acidity of the lipid/water gel is estimated by UV vis spectrophotometry. This experiment is an example of host-guest (lipid/water gel dye) interaction and is suitable for project-type biophysics, physical chemistry, or biochemistry labs. The experiment requires three, 3-hour lab sessions, two of which must not be separated by more than two days.

  1. Non-equilibrium Transport in Carbon based Adsorbate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürst, Joachim; Brandbyge, Mads; Stokbro, Kurt; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2007-03-01

    We have used the Atomistix Tool Kit(ATK) and TranSIESTA[1] packages to investigate adsorption of iron atoms on a graphene sheet. The technique of both codes is based on density functional theory using local basis sets[2], and non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) to calculate the charge distribution under external bias. Spin dependent electronic structure calculations are performed for different iron coverages. These reveal adsorption site dependent charge transfer from iron to graphene leading to screening effects. Transport calculations show spin dependent scattering of the transmission which is analysed obtaining the transmission eigenchannels for each spin type. The phenomena of electromigration of iron in these systems at finite bias will be discussed, estimating the so-called wind force from the reflection[3]. [1] M. Brandbyge, J.-L. Mozos, P. Ordejon, J. Taylor, and K. Stokbro. Physical Review B (Condensed Matter and Materials Physics), 65(16):165401/11-7, 2002. [2] Jose M. Soler, Emilio Artacho, Julian D. Gale, Alberto Garcia, Javier Junquera, Pablo Ordejon, and Daniel Sanchez-Portal. Journal of Physics Condensed Matter, 14(11):2745-2779, 2002. [3] Sorbello. Theory of electromigration. Solid State Physics, 1997.

  2. An Equilibrium-Based Model of Gas Reaction and Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    2000-04-01

    During gaseous diffusion plant operations, conditions leading to the formation of flammable gas mixtures may occasionally arise. Currently, these could consist of the evaporative coolant CFC-114 and fluorinating agents such as F2 and ClF3. Replacement of CFC-114 with a non-ozone-depleting substitute is planned. Consequently, in the future, the substitute coolant must also be considered as a potential fuel in flammable gas mixtures. Two questions of practical interest arise: (1) can a particular mixture sustain and propagate a flame if ignited, and (2) what is the maximum pressure that can be generated by the burning (and possibly exploding) gas mixture, should it ignite? Experimental data on these systems, particularly for the newer coolant candidates, are limited. To assist in answering these questions, a mathematical model was developed to serve as a tool for predicting the potential detonation pressures and for estimating the composition limits of flammability for these systems based on empirical correlations between gas mixture thermodynamics and flammability for known systems. The present model uses the thermodynamic equilibrium to determine the reaction endpoint of a reactive gas mixture and uses detonation theory to estimate an upper bound to the pressure that could be generated upon ignition. The model described and documented in this report is an extended version of related models developed in 1992 and 1999.

  3. Evaporation from Soils Under Thermal Boundary Conditions: Experimental and Modeling Investigation to Compare Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Based Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, K. M.; Cihan, A.; Sakaki, T.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2010-12-01

    In the shallow subsurface immediately below the land-atmosphere interface, it is widely recognized that the movement of water vapor is closely coupled to thermal processes. However, their mutual interactions are rarely considered in most soil water modeling efforts or in practical applications where it becomes necessary to understand and predict the spatial and temporal distribution of soil moisture. The validation of numerical models that are designed to capture these processes is difficult due to the inherent complexities of the problem in field systems and the scarcity of field or laboratory data with accurately known hydraulic and thermal parameters of soils, thus limiting the testing and refinement of heat and water transfer theories. In addition, it is often assumed in traditional soil physics applications that water vapor concentration in the air adjacent to the water phase in soil pores is always in equilibrium with liquid water, i.e., vaporization occurs instantaneously, which can result in over prediction of evaporation from soil. The goal of this work is to perform controlled experiments under transient conditions of soil moisture and temperature using soil with accurately known hydraulic/thermal properties and use this data to test existing theories and develop appropriate numerical models. In this work, water vapor flow under varying temperature gradients was implemented based on a concept that allows non-equilibrium liquid/gas phase change with gas phase vapor diffusion. In order to validate this new approach, we developed a long column apparatus equipped with a network of sensors and generated data under well-controlled thermal boundary conditions at the soil surface. Water saturation, capillary pressure, temperature, relative humidity and column weight to record total mass of water in the column were continuously monitored. Results from numerical simulations based on the conventional equilibrium and non-equilibrium approaches were compared with

  4. Evidence-Based Approaches to Improving Chemical Equilibrium Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Jodi L.; Leinhardt, Gaea; Greeno, James; Koedinger, Kenneth; Klahr, David; Karabinos, Michael; Yaron, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Two suggestions for instruction in chemical equilibrium are presented, along with the evidence that supports these suggestions. The first is to use diagrams to connect chemical reactions to the effects of reactions on concentrations. The second is the use of the majority and minority species (M&M) strategy to analyze chemical equilibrium…

  5. Evidence-Based Approaches to Improving Chemical Equilibrium Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Jodi L.; Leinhardt, Gaea; Greeno, James; Koedinger, Kenneth; Klahr, David; Karabinos, Michael; Yaron, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Two suggestions for instruction in chemical equilibrium are presented, along with the evidence that supports these suggestions. The first is to use diagrams to connect chemical reactions to the effects of reactions on concentrations. The second is the use of the majority and minority species (M&M) strategy to analyze chemical equilibrium…

  6. Opicinus de Canistris: some notes from Jung's unpublished Eranos Seminar on the medieval Codex Palatinus Latinus 1993.

    PubMed

    Quaglino, Gian Piero; Romano, Augusto; Bernardini, Riccardo

    2010-06-01

    Jung held an informal seminar for a limited number of students after the end of the Eranos Conference in August, 1943. All traces of this seminar were lost until the notes taken on it by one of the students, Alwine von Keller, were found in 2006. Jung's talk consisted of a psychological commentary on a series of images in the medieval Codex Palatinus Latinus 1993, attributed to Opicinus de Canistris (1296-c.1352), a fourteenth-century Italian clergyman, mystic, miniaturist, and cartographer. Jung interpreted Opicinus' images as a series of mandalas in which the Shadow, the dark principle, does not manage to be integrated into a balanced system. Opicinus tried to settle this division into opposites, which constitutes the main problem in modern times, while remaining inside the system of Christian doctrine. However, he did not succeed in his attempt to integrate the principle of the Shadow on the doctrinal level because he was not aware of the very same division in his own unconscious. Our article points out the features in the seminar where Jung seemed to show much more originality in his interpretation than other psychoanalytic studies on Opicinus or other analytical-psychological readings of medieval Christian art.

  7. Effectiveness of Instruction Based on the Constructivist Approach on Understanding Chemical Equilibrium Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkus, Huseyin; Kadayifci, Hakki; Atasoy, Basri; Geban, Omer

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify misconceptions concerning chemical equilibrium concepts and to investigate the effectiveness of instruction based on the constructivist approach over traditional instruction on 10th grade students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts. The subjects of this study consisted of 71 10th grade…

  8. Equilibrium II: Acids and Bases. Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). Unit P3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inner London Education Authority (England).

    This unit on equilibrium is one of 10 first year units produced by the Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). The unit, which consists of two levels, focuses on the application of equilibrium principles to equilibria involving weak acids and bases, including buffer solutions and indicators. Level one uses Le Chatelier's…

  9. Effectiveness of Instruction Based on the Constructivist Approach on Understanding Chemical Equilibrium Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkus, Huseyin; Kadayifci, Hakki; Atasoy, Basri; Geban, Omer

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify misconceptions concerning chemical equilibrium concepts and to investigate the effectiveness of instruction based on the constructivist approach over traditional instruction on 10th grade students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts. The subjects of this study consisted of 71 10th grade…

  10. Equilibrium II: Acids and Bases. Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). Unit P3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inner London Education Authority (England).

    This unit on equilibrium is one of 10 first year units produced by the Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). The unit, which consists of two levels, focuses on the application of equilibrium principles to equilibria involving weak acids and bases, including buffer solutions and indicators. Level one uses Le Chatelier's…

  11. Fast equilibrium reconstruction for tokamak discharge control based on GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, X. N.; Xiao, B. J.; Luo, Z. P.; Guo, Y.

    2013-08-01

    A parallel code named P-EFIT which could complete an equilibrium reconstruction iteration in 220 µs is described. It is build with the CUDA™ architecture. Some optimization for middle-scale matrix multiplication on graphics processing unit and an algorithm which could solve block tri-diagonal linear system efficiently in parallel is described. Benchmark test is conducted. Static test proves the correctness of the P-EFIT and simulation-test proves the feasibility of using P-EFIT for real-time reconstruction with a 65 × 65 grid.

  12. Dynamical Systems Based Non Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics for Markov Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevost, Mireille

    We introduce an abstract framework concerning non-equilibrium statistical mechanics in the specific context of Markov chains. This framework encompasses both the Evans-Searles and the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorems. To support and expand on these concepts, several results are proven, among which a central limit theorem and a large deviation principle. The interest for Markov chains is twofold. First, they model a great variety of physical systems. Secondly, their simplicity allows for an easy introduction to an otherwise complicated field encompassing the statistical mechanics of Anosov and Axiom A diffeomorphisms. We give two examples relating the present framework to physical cases modelled by Markov chains. One of these concerns chemical reactions and links key concepts from the framework to their well known physical counterpart.

  13. Influence of substituent on equilibrium of benzoxazine synthesis from Mannich base and formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuyuan; Zhang, Qin; Zhou, Qianhao; Zhang, Chengxi; Zhu, Rongqi; Gu, Yi

    2014-09-14

    N-Substituted aminomethylphenol (Mannich base) and 3,4-dihydro-2H-3-substituted 1,3-benzoxazine (benzoxazine) were synthesized from substituted phenol (p-cresol, phenol, p-chlorophenol), substituted aniline (p-toluidine, aniline, p-chloroaniline) and formaldehyde to study influence of substituent on equilibrium of benzoxazine synthesis from Mannich base and formaldehyde. (1)H-NMR and charges of nitrogen and oxygen atoms illustrate effect of substituent on reactivity of Mannich base, while oxazine ring stability is characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and C-O bond order. Equilibrium constants were tested from 50 °C to 80 °C, and the results show that substituent attached to phenol or aniline has same impact on reactivity of Mannich base; however, it has opposite influence on oxazine ring stability and equilibrium constant. Compared with the phenol-aniline system, electron-donating methyl on phenol or aniline increases the charge of nitrogen and oxygen atoms in Mannich base. When the methyl group is located at para position of phenol, oxazine ring stability increases, and the equilibrium constant climbs, whereas when the methyl group is located at the para position of aniline, oxazine ring stability decreases, the benzoxazine hydrolysis tends to happen and equilibrium constant is significantly low.

  14. Using the Logarithmic Concentration Diagram, Log "C", to Teach Acid-Base Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovac, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Acid-base equilibrium is one of the most important and most challenging topics in a typical general chemistry course. This article introduces an alternative to the algebraic approach generally used in textbooks, the graphical log "C" method. Log "C" diagrams provide conceptual insight into the behavior of aqueous acid-base systems and allow…

  15. Using the Logarithmic Concentration Diagram, Log "C", to Teach Acid-Base Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovac, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Acid-base equilibrium is one of the most important and most challenging topics in a typical general chemistry course. This article introduces an alternative to the algebraic approach generally used in textbooks, the graphical log "C" method. Log "C" diagrams provide conceptual insight into the behavior of aqueous acid-base systems and allow…

  16. A Simple System for Observing Dynamic Phase Equilibrium via an Inquiry-Based Laboratory or Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Carrie A.; Andrew, Julie A.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an activity that can be used as an inquiry-based laboratory or demonstration for either high school or undergraduate chemistry students to provide a basis for understanding both vapor pressure and the concept of dynamic phase equilibrium. The activity includes a simple setup to create a closed system of only water liquid and…

  17. A Simple System for Observing Dynamic Phase Equilibrium via an Inquiry-Based Laboratory or Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Carrie A.; Andrew, Julie A.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an activity that can be used as an inquiry-based laboratory or demonstration for either high school or undergraduate chemistry students to provide a basis for understanding both vapor pressure and the concept of dynamic phase equilibrium. The activity includes a simple setup to create a closed system of only water liquid and…

  18. Two-dimensional equilibrium morphological modelling of a tidal inlet: an entropy based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nield, Joanna Marie; Walker, David John; Lambert, Martin Francis

    2005-12-01

    The management of tidal inlets requires the accurate prediction of equilibrium morphologies. In areas where the flow from rivers is highly regulated, it is important to give decision makers the ability to determine optimal flow management schemes, in order to allow tidal inlets to function as naturally as possible, and minimise the risk of inlet closure. The River Murray Mouth in South Australia is one such problem area. Drought and the retention of water for irrigation and urban water consumption have limited the amount of water entering the estuary. As a result, sediment from the coastal environment is being deposited in the mouth of the estuary, reducing the effect of further coastal interactions. Currently, situations such as this are modelled using traditional process-based methods, where wave, current, sediment transport and sediment balance modules are linked together in a time-stepping process. The modules are reapplied and assessed until a stable morphology is formed. In this paper, new options for modelling equilibrium morphologies of tidal inlets are detailed, which alleviate some of the shortfalls of traditional process-based models, such as the amplification of small errors and reliance on initial conditions. The modelling problem is approached in this paper from a different angle and involves the use of entropy based objective functions, which are optimised in order to find equilibrium morphologies. In this way, characteristics of a system at equilibrium can be recognised and a stable system predicted without having to step through time. This paper also details the use of self-organisation based modelling methods, another non-traditional model application, where local laws and feedback result in the formation of a global stable equilibrium morphology. These methods represent a different approach to traditional models, without some of the characteristics that may add to their limitations.

  19. A More Rational Treatment of the Acid-Base Equilibria Applying the Proton Condition, or the Hydroxyl Condition, in Equilibrium. How the Hydroxyls are Additive in Equilibrium: Dissolutions of Bases, Salts and Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Casado-Riobó, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    The calculus of the acid-base equilibria can be rationalized by applying the proton condition or the hydroxyl condition in every case, on solutions of strong bases, mixtures of bases, mixtures of acids and bases, and different salts. Furthermore, applying the proton condition or the hydroxyl condition in equilibrium, it is clearly pointed out that the hydroxyls in equilibrium are additive in solutions of strong bases as well as in those of weak bases.

  20. New lifting relations for estimating LBM distribution functions from corresponding macroscopic quantities, based on equilibrium and non-equilibrium moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi, M. R.; Taeibi-Rahni, M.

    2015-12-01

    Due to superior accuracy and stability of multiple relaxation time (MRT) collision operator over its single relaxation time (SRT) counterpart, new lifting relations are proposed here to construct single particle distribution functions for MRT-LBM from macroscopic variables. Using these lifting relations, a new hybrid FVM-LB method is presented (called Finite type-LB hybrid method), which is consistent with MRT-LBM. In this new hybrid method, single-particle distribution functions in MRT-LBM sub-domain boundaries are computed, using equilibrium and non-equilibrium moments. These moments are computed in Navier-Stokes/FVM sub-domain boundaries, using macroscopic variables and their derivatives. The new method is validated by solving three benchmark problems, i.e., two- and three-dimensional lid driven cavity flows and two-dimensional unsteady flow around a squared section cylinder. These problems are analyzed with pure FVM, pure LBM, and Finite type-LB hybrid method (FTLBHM) and the related results are compared with each other and with benchmark data. These comparisons clearly demonstrate the accuracy of the present novel methodology for simulating steady/unsteady flow fields in two and three dimensions.

  1. A new near-equilibrium breakdown parameter based on the Rayleigh-Onsager dissipation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, H.; Myong, R. S.; Singh, S.

    2014-12-01

    The near-equilibrium breakdown parameter is essential in quantifying the gas flow regions in which the linear Navier-Stokes-Fourier hypothesis is no longer valid. It plays a significant role in the development of a hybrid continuum/DSMC method in which computational domains need to be identified as either rarefied or continuum. There were several breakdown parameters appearing in the literature such as a semi-empirical parameter based on the spatial derivative of flow properties and a parameter based on the maximum gradient-length local Knudsen number. In this study, we present a new near-equilibrium breakdown parameter based on the degree of thermal nonequilibrium and the Rayleigh-Onsager dissipation function related to the calortropy production arising from the irreversible process in the system. The property of the new breakdown parameter is investigated by numerically solving hypersonic rarefied and low Mach microscale gas flows around a cylinder.

  2. Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers

    SciTech Connect

    Nap, R. J.; Tagliazucchi, M.; Szleifer, I.

    2014-01-14

    This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads

  3. Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers.

    PubMed

    Nap, R J; Tagliazucchi, M; Szleifer, I

    2014-01-14

    This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads

  4. Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nap, R. J.; Tagliazucchi, M.; Szleifer, I.

    2014-01-01

    This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads

  5. Equilibrium of acidifying and alkalinizing metabolic acid-base disorders in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Funk, Georg-Christian; Doberer, Daniel; Osterreicher, Christoph; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Schmid, Monika; Schneeweiss, Bruno

    2005-06-01

    Conflicting results exist with regard to metabolic acid-base status in liver cirrhosis, when the classic concept of acid-base analysis is applied. The influence of the common disturbances of water, electrolytes and albumin on acid-base status in cirrhosis has not been studied. The aim of this study was to clarify acid-base status in cirrhotic patients by analyzing all parameters with possible impact on acid-base equilibrium. Fifty stable cirrhotic patients admitted to a university hospital. Arterial acid-base status was analyzed using the principles of physical chemistry and compared with 10 healthy controls. Apart from mild hypoalbuminemic alkalosis, acid-base state was normal in Child-Pugh A cirrhosis. Respiratory alkalosis was the net acid-base disorder in Child-Pugh B and C cirrhosis with a normal overall metabolic acid-base state (Base excess-1.0 (-3.6 to 1.6) vs 1.1 (-0.2 to 1.1) mmol/l, P = 0.136, compared with healthy controls, median (interquartile range)). Absence of an apparent metabolic acid-base disorder was based on an equilibrium of hypoalbuminemic alkalosis and of dilutional acidosis and hyperchloremic acidosis. A balance of offsetting acidifying and alkalinizing metabolic acid-base disorders leaves the net metabolic acid-base status unchanged in cirrhosis.

  6. A process-based model for non-equilibrium clumped isotope effects in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. M.; Hunt, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    The equilibrium clumped isotope composition of carbonate minerals is independent of the composition of the aqueous solution. However, many carbonate minerals grow at rates that place them in a non-equilibrium regime with respect to carbon and oxygen isotopes with unknown consequences for clumped isotopes. We develop a process-based model that allows one to calculate the oxygen, carbon, and clumped isotope composition of calcite as a function of temperature, crystal growth rate, and solution pH. In the model, carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation occurs through the mass-dependent attachment/detachment kinetics of the isotopologues of HCO-3 and CO2-3 to and from the calcite surface, which in turn, influence the clumped isotope composition of calcite. At experimental and biogenic growth rates, the mineral is expected to inherit a clumped isotopic composition that is similar to that of the DIC pool, which helps to explain (1) why different organisms share the same clumped isotope versus temperature calibration curves, (2) why many inorganic calibration curves are slightly different from one another, and (3) why foraminifera, coccoliths, and deep sea corals can have near-equilibrium clumped isotope compositions but far-from-equilibrium carbon and oxygen isotope compositions. Some aspects of the model can be generalized to other mineral systems and should serve as a useful reference in future efforts to quantify kinetic clumped isotope effects.

  7. Reactive solute transport in streams. 1. Development of an equilibrium- based model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; Bencala, K.E.; Broshears, R.E.; Chapra, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    An equilibrium-based solute transport model is developed for the simulation of trace metal fate and transport in streams. The model is formed by coupling a solute transport model with a chemical equilibrium submodel based on MINTEQ. The solute transport model considers the physical processes of advection, dispersion, lateral inflow, and transient storage, while the equilibrium submodel considers the speciation and complexation of aqueous species, precipitation/dissolution and sorption. Within the model, reactions in the water column may result in the formation of solid phases (precipitates and sorbed species) that are subject to downstream transport and settling processes. Solid phases on the streambed may also interact with the water column through dissolution and sorption/desorption reactions. Consideration of both mobile (water-borne) and immobile (streambed) solid phases requires a unique set of governing differential equations and solution techniques that are developed herein. The partial differential equations describing physical transport and the algebraic equations describing chemical equilibria are coupled using the sequential iteration approach.

  8. Reactive Solute Transport in Streams: 1. Development of an Equilibrium-Based Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runkel, Robert L.; Bencala, Kenneth E.; Broshears, Robert E.; Chapra, Steven C.

    1996-02-01

    An equilibrium-based solute transport model is developed for the simulation of trace metal fate and transport in streams. The model is formed by coupling a solute transport model with a chemical equilibrium submodel based on MINTEQ. The solute transport model considers the physical processes of advection, dispersion, lateral inflow, and transient storage, while the equilibrium submodel considers the speciation and complexation of aqueous species, precipitation/dissolution and sorption. Within the model, reactions in the water column may result in the formation of solid phases (precipitates and sorbed species) that are subject to downstream transport and settling processes. Solid phases on the streambed may also interact with the water column through dissolution and sorption/desorption reactions. Consideration of both mobile (water-borne) and immobile (streambed) solid phases requires a unique set of governing differential equations and solution techniques that are developed herein. The partial differential equations describing physical transport and the algebraic equations describing chemical equilibria are coupled using the sequential iteration approach.

  9. Accelerated equilibrium core composition search using a new MCNP-based simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, Jeffrey E.; Gorman, Phillip M.; Vujic, Jasmina L.; Greenspan, Ehud

    2014-06-01

    MocDown is a new Monte Carlo depletion and recycling simulator which couples neutron transport with MCNP and transmutation with ORIGEN. This modular approach to depletion allows for flexible operation by incorporating the accelerated progression of a complex fuel processing scheme towards equilibrium and by allowing for the online coupling of thermo-fluids feedback. MocDown also accounts for the variation of decay heat with fuel isotopics evolution. In typical cases, MocDown requires just over a day to find the equilibrium core composition for a multi-recycling fuel cycle, with a self-consistent thermo-fluids solution-a task that required between one and two weeks using previous Monte Carlo-based approaches.

  10. Highly efficient hydrogen storage system based on ammonium bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium over palladium nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Su, Ji; Yang, Lisha; Lu, Mi; Lin, Hongfei

    2015-03-01

    A highly efficient, reversible hydrogen storage-evolution process has been developed based on the ammonium bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium over the same carbon-supported palladium nanocatalyst. This heterogeneously catalyzed hydrogen storage system is comparable to the counterpart homogeneous systems and has shown fast reaction kinetics of both the hydrogenation of ammonium bicarbonate and the dehydrogenation of ammonium formate under mild operating conditions. By adjusting temperature and pressure, the extent of hydrogen storage and evolution can be well controlled in the same catalytic system. Moreover, the hydrogen storage system based on aqueous-phase ammonium formate is advantageous owing to its high volumetric energy density.

  11. MINFIT: A Spreadsheet-Based Tool for Parameter Estimation in an Equilibrium Speciation Software Program.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiongfei; Giammar, Daniel E; Wang, Zimeng

    2016-10-07

    Deterpmination of equilibrium constants describing chemical reactions in the aqueous phase and at solid-water interface relies on inverse modeling and parameter estimation. Although there are existing tools available, the steep learning curve prevents the wider community of environmental engineers and chemists to adopt those tools. Stemming from classical chemical equilibrium codes, MINEQL+ has been one of the most widely used chemical equilibrium software programs. We developed a spreadsheet-based tool, which we are calling MINFIT, that interacts with MINEQL+ to perform parameter estimations that optimize model fits to experimental data sets. MINFIT enables automatic and convenient screening of a large number of parameter sets toward the optimal solutions by calling MINEQL+ to perform iterative forward calculations following either exhaustive equidistant grid search or randomized search algorithms. The combined use of the two algorithms can securely guide the searches for the global optima. We developed interactive interfaces so that the optimization processes are transparent. Benchmark examples including both aqueous and surface complexation problems illustrate the parameter estimation and associated sensitivity analysis. MINFIT is accessible at http://minfit.strikingly.com .

  12. Soil moisture storage estimation based on steady vertical fluxes under equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amvrosiadi, Nino; Bishop, Kevin; Seibert, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Soil moisture is an important variable for hillslope and catchment hydrology. There are various computational methods to estimate soil moisture and their complexity varies greatly: from one box with vertically constant volumetric soil water content to fully saturated-unsaturated coupled physically-based models. Different complexity levels are applicable depending on the simulation scale, computational time limitations, input data and knowledge about the parameters. The Vertical Equilibrium Model (VEM) is a simple approach to estimate the catchment-wide soil water storage at a daily time-scale on the basis of water table level observations, soil properties and an assumption of hydrological equilibrium without vertical fluxes above the water table. In this study VEM was extended by considering vertical fluxes, which allows conditions with evaporation and infiltration to be represented. The aim was to test the hypothesis that the simulated volumetric soil water content significantly depends on vertical fluxes. The water content difference between the no-flux, equilibrium approach and the new constant-flux approach greatly depended on the soil textural class, ranging between ∼1% for silty clay and ∼44% for sand at an evapotranspiration rate of 5 mm·d-1. The two approaches gave a mean volumetric soil water content difference of ∼1 mm for two case studies (sandy loam and organic rich soils). The results showed that for many soil types the differences in estimated storage between the no-flux and the constant flux approaches were relatively small.

  13. Equilibrium Propagation: Bridging the Gap between Energy-Based Models and Backpropagation

    PubMed Central

    Scellier, Benjamin; Bengio, Yoshua

    2017-01-01

    We introduce Equilibrium Propagation, a learning framework for energy-based models. It involves only one kind of neural computation, performed in both the first phase (when the prediction is made) and the second phase of training (after the target or prediction error is revealed). Although this algorithm computes the gradient of an objective function just like Backpropagation, it does not need a special computation or circuit for the second phase, where errors are implicitly propagated. Equilibrium Propagation shares similarities with Contrastive Hebbian Learning and Contrastive Divergence while solving the theoretical issues of both algorithms: our algorithm computes the gradient of a well-defined objective function. Because the objective function is defined in terms of local perturbations, the second phase of Equilibrium Propagation corresponds to only nudging the prediction (fixed point or stationary distribution) toward a configuration that reduces prediction error. In the case of a recurrent multi-layer supervised network, the output units are slightly nudged toward their target in the second phase, and the perturbation introduced at the output layer propagates backward in the hidden layers. We show that the signal “back-propagated” during this second phase corresponds to the propagation of error derivatives and encodes the gradient of the objective function, when the synaptic update corresponds to a standard form of spike-timing dependent plasticity. This work makes it more plausible that a mechanism similar to Backpropagation could be implemented by brains, since leaky integrator neural computation performs both inference and error back-propagation in our model. The only local difference between the two phases is whether synaptic changes are allowed or not. We also show experimentally that multi-layer recurrently connected networks with 1, 2, and 3 hidden layers can be trained by Equilibrium Propagation on the permutation-invariant MNIST task. PMID

  14. Effects of intravenous solutions on acid-base equilibrium: from crystalloids to colloids and blood components.

    PubMed

    Langer, Thomas; Ferrari, Michele; Zazzeron, Luca; Gattinoni, Luciano; Caironi, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous fluid administration is a medical intervention performed worldwide on a daily basis. Nevertheless, only a few physicians are aware of the characteristics of intravenous fluids and their possible effects on plasma acid-base equilibrium. According to Stewart's theory, pH is independently regulated by three variables: partial pressure of carbon dioxide, strong ion difference (SID), and total amount of weak acids (ATOT). When fluids are infused, plasma SID and ATOT tend toward the SID and ATOT of the administered fluid. Depending on their composition, fluids can therefore lower, increase, or leave pH unchanged. As a general rule, crystalloids having a SID greater than plasma bicarbonate concentration (HCO₃-) cause an increase in plasma pH (alkalosis), those having a SID lower than HCO₃- cause a decrease in plasma pH (acidosis), while crystalloids with a SID equal to HCO₃- leave pH unchanged, regardless of the extent of the dilution. Colloids and blood components are composed of a crystalloid solution as solvent, and the abovementioned rules partially hold true also for these fluids. The scenario is however complicated by the possible presence of weak anions (albumin, phosphates and gelatins) and their effect on plasma pH. The present manuscript summarises the characteristics of crystalloids, colloids, buffer solutions and blood components and reviews their effect on acid-base equilibrium. Understanding the composition of intravenous fluids, along with the application of simple physicochemical rules best described by Stewart's approach, are pivotal steps to fully elucidate and predict alterations of plasma acid-base equilibrium induced by fluid therapy.

  15. Model-based analysis of coupled equilibrium-kinetic processes: indirect kinetic studies of thermodynamic parameters using the dynamic data.

    PubMed

    Emami, Fereshteh; Maeder, Marcel; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2015-05-07

    Thermodynamic studies of equilibrium chemical reactions linked with kinetic procedures are mostly impossible by traditional approaches. In this work, the new concept of generalized kinetic study of thermodynamic parameters is introduced for dynamic data. The examples of equilibria intertwined with kinetic chemical mechanisms include molecular charge transfer complex formation reactions, pH-dependent degradation of chemical compounds and tautomerization kinetics in micellar solutions. Model-based global analysis with the possibility of calculating and embedding the equilibrium and kinetic parameters into the fitting algorithm has allowed the complete analysis of the complex reaction mechanisms. After the fitting process, the optimal equilibrium and kinetic parameters together with an estimate of their standard deviations have been obtained. This work opens up a promising new avenue for obtaining equilibrium constants through the kinetic data analysis for the kinetic reactions that involve equilibrium processes.

  16. Unusual dileptions at RHIC a field theoretic approach based on a non-equilibrium chiral phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, F.

    1997-09-22

    This paper contains viewgraphs on unusual dileptons at Brookhaven RHIC. A field theory approach is used based on a non-equilibrium chiral phase transformation utilizing the schroedinger and Heisenberg picture.

  17. Conjugate Acid-Base Pairs, Free Energy, and the Equilibrium Constant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Darrell H.

    1969-01-01

    Describes a method of calculating the equilibrium constant from free energy data. Values of the equilibrium constants of six Bronsted-Lowry reactions calculated by the author's method and by a conventional textbook method are compared. (LC)

  18. Conjugate Acid-Base Pairs, Free Energy, and the Equilibrium Constant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Darrell H.

    1969-01-01

    Describes a method of calculating the equilibrium constant from free energy data. Values of the equilibrium constants of six Bronsted-Lowry reactions calculated by the author's method and by a conventional textbook method are compared. (LC)

  19. Magnetic measurement based methods in determination of plasma equilibrium parameters in Damavand tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noori, E.; Sadeghi, Y.; Mehdian, H.

    2016-06-01

    Determination of plasma equilibrium parameters such as poloidal beta (βp) with half of plasma internal inductance (li) known as Shafranov parameter (asymmetry factor) (βp+𝔡li2) and edge safety factor plays very important role in primary equilibrium and stability analysis and control of tokamak plasma. In this study, the well known Shafranov semi-empirical model, based on external magnetic measurements is used to extract Shafranov parameter and effective edge safety factor in low-β operating regime of Damavand tokamak. The well known integral representation of βp+𝔡li2 was modified for non-circular tokamaks with ellipse-like cross section. After calibration of magnetic pick-up coils, Shafranov parameter was estimated with respect to the first and second Fourier harmonic of radial and poloidal components of magnetic field. The results were compared with approximate, semi-analytical determination of Shafranov parameter which is based on analytical solution of Grad-Shafranov equation (GSE). Founding evolution of Shafranov parameter, effective edge safety factor was obtained in terms of Shafranov parameter and compared with semi-empirical description. It was found that between the ramp-up and ramp-down domain of the plasma current, the result from Shafranov model is approximately in good agreement with the semi-analytical and semi-empirical benchmarks and the integral model provides more reliable trace of the Shafranov parameter in out of ramp domains of the discharge.

  20. Acid-base equilibrium dynamics in methanol and dimethyl sulfoxide probed by two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiho; Son, Hyewon; Park, Sungnam

    2015-07-21

    Two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy, which has been proven to be an excellent experimental method for studying thermally-driven chemical processes, was successfully used to investigate the acid dissociation equilibrium of HN3 in methanol (CH3OH) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for the first time. Our 2DIR experimental results indicate that the acid-base equilibrium occurs on picosecond timescales in CH3OH but that it occurs on much longer timescales in DMSO. Our results imply that the different timescales of the acid-base equilibrium originate from different proton transfer mechanisms between the acidic (HN3) and basic (N3(-)) species in CH3OH and DMSO. In CH3OH, the acid-base equilibrium is assisted by the surrounding CH3OH molecules which can directly donate H(+) to N3(-) and accept H(+) from HN3 and the proton migrates through the hydrogen-bonded chain of CH3OH. On the other hand, the acid-base equilibrium in DMSO occurs through the mutual diffusion of HN3 and N3(-) or direct proton transfer. Our 2DIR experimental results corroborate different proton transfer mechanisms in the acid-base equilibrium in protic (CH3OH) and aprotic (DMSO) solvents.

  1. Determination of thermal equilibrium in a sealed cell based on optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Sheng; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Xi-yuan; Shan, Guang-cun; Quan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    An effective method based on optical depth (OD) is presented to measure thermal equilibrium in a cell. First, the principle of determining the temperature distribution in the cell by using the OD is demonstrated. Subsequently, relevant experiments are carried out. Original experimental results showed that some gradients of OD distributions in the cell at different wavelengths and variations of the OD increased slowly along the direction of motion of the beam at a fixed wavelength. At a wavelength of 766.6839 nm, which is about 7 GHz blue shifted with respect to the potassium resonance, the average value of the OD was about 0.764 and the maximal and the minimum inhomogeneity biases among all location points were about 6.07% and 0.56%, respectively. As for the corresponding wavelengths of 766.67785 nm and 766.73004 nm, some deviations from previous results, which were caused by different absorptions of the alkali-metal atoms at different frequencies of the laser beam, were observed. The nonuniform OD values along the direction of motion of the beam reflected an inhomogeneous distribution of the temperature in the cell, which may have been caused by layout of the oven. When the layout of the oven was modified, comparative experiments comparable to these with the previous layout of the oven demonstrated that the uniformity of the temperature distribution in the cell was improved and that thermal equilibrium time was shorter by about 10 minutes. This method played an important role in determining the thermal equilibrium time in the cell.

  2. Sorption of sunset yellow dye by weak base anion exchanger-kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Wawrzkiewicz, Monika

    2011-01-01

    The sorption equilibrium and kinetics of Sunset Yellow dye in aqueous solutions on the weak base anion exchange resin Amberlite FPA51 were examined in this paper. The influences of phase contact time, solution pH, initial dye concentration and temperature were studied by the batch method. The amounts of dye sorbed at equilibrium changed from 9.9 to 48.7 mg/g with increasing initial dye concentration in the range 100-500 mg/L. The experimental data were analysed by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models of adsorption. The maximum monolayer capacity was 130.6 mg/g. The sorption free energy was equal to 14.6 kJ/mol and revealed the nature of the ion exchange mechanism in this system. The kinetic data were modelled using the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order (types 1-5) and intraparticle diffusion equations. The experimental data were well described by types 1-3 of the pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  3. Interfacial colloidal sedimentation equilibrium. II. Closure-based density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingqing; Bevan, Michael A; Ford, David M

    2007-10-28

    In Part I [R. E. Beckham and M. A. Bevan, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 164708 (2007)], results were presented for the sedimentation equilibrium of concentrated colloidal dispersions using confocal scanning laser microscopy experiments, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, and a local density approximation perturbation theory. In this paper, we extended the modeling effort on those systems to include nonlocal density functional theory (DFT), which is capable of predicting the microstructure of the sediment at length scales comparable to the colloidal particle dimension. Specifically, we use a closure-based DFT formulation to predict interfacial colloidal sedimentation equilibrium density profiles. The colloid-colloid and colloid-surface interactions were modeled with DLVO screened electrostatic potentials using parameters taken directly from the experimental work. The DFT profiles were compared to the experimental and MC results from Part I. Good agreement was found for relatively dilute interfacial colloidal fluids, but agreement was less satisfactory as interfacial layering became more pronounced for conditions approaching the onset of interfacial crystallization. We also applied DFT in an inverse sense using the measured colloid density profile to extract the underlying colloid-surface potential; this can be thought of as a microscopic analog to the well-known procedure of using the macroscopic (coarse-grained) density profile to extract the osmotic equation of state. For the dilute interfacial fluid, the inverse DFT calculations reproduced the true colloid-surface potential to within 0.5kT at all elevations.

  4. Fiber Bragg grating dynamic demodulation based on non-equilibrium interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qi; Jing, Zhenguo; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Xinpu; Liu, Yun; Xing, Chuanqi; Li, Hong; Yao, Wenjuan

    2011-12-01

    Non-equilibrium interferometric Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor is suitable for the accurate measurements of high-frequency dynamic stress, vibration, etc because of its high sensitivity and high frequency response compared to other types of FBG sensors. In this paper, a Phase Generation Carrier (PGC) demodulation technique of non-equilibrium interferometric FBG sensor that based on ARCTAN algorithm by using an arctangent algorithm with a simple method, has been investigated ,which can avoid the high-frequency noise increases, the error accumulation, the integrator signal jump of the integrator and other inherent weaknesses in the system. ARCTAN has a better response characteristic of the mutant signals, especially for low-frequency large-signal that can be demodulated with a greater range. The experimental result demonstrate that implementing measured resolution can up to 10nɛ/√Hz@500Hz in vibration strain, a signal sampling rate to 100 KHz and a frequency response range up to 1 KHz. This method can improve the performance of the system greatly which has potential significance for practical sensor application.

  5. Weak Acid Ionization Constants and the Determination of Weak Acid-Weak Base Reaction Equilibrium Constants in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyasulu, Frazier; McMills, Lauren; Barlag, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory to determine the equilibrium constants of weak acid negative weak base reactions is described. The equilibrium constants of component reactions when multiplied together equal the numerical value of the equilibrium constant of the summative reaction. The component reactions are weak acid ionization reactions, weak base hydrolysis…

  6. Weak Acid Ionization Constants and the Determination of Weak Acid-Weak Base Reaction Equilibrium Constants in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyasulu, Frazier; McMills, Lauren; Barlag, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory to determine the equilibrium constants of weak acid negative weak base reactions is described. The equilibrium constants of component reactions when multiplied together equal the numerical value of the equilibrium constant of the summative reaction. The component reactions are weak acid ionization reactions, weak base hydrolysis…

  7. Potentiometric determination of equilibrium constants of bases and perchlorates of protonated bases in glacial acetic acid using Superquad.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Romero, Giaan A; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto; Vázquez, Guillermo A; Ramírez-Silva, Ma Teresa

    2003-03-01

    The traditional method of calculating equilibrium constants in glacial acetic acid medium was developed by Kolthoff and Bruckenstein in 1957; thenceforth, and even presently, few alternatives have been made available to undertake such studies. This paper presents the results obtained with the use of the program Superquad to assess the equilibrium constants of various bases and their protonated perchlorate salts in glacial acetic media. A model of formation equilibria is proposed and fed into the program, considering the species present during an acid-base titration. The calculations of the equilibrium constants using Superquad for pyridine and diethylamine are statistically in agreement with those reported in the literature, (for pyridine: pK(B)=5.98+/-0.02, pK( PyHClO4)=5.47+/-0.02 and for diethylamine pK(B)=5.52+/-0.04, pK( DietHClO4)=4.52+/-0.07). With the use of Superquad, the values found for the aniline were pK(B)=6.95+/-0.06 and pK( AnilHClO4)=4.89+/-0.06.

  8. NMR structural study of the prototropic equilibrium in solution of Schiff bases as model compounds.

    PubMed

    Ortegón-Reyna, David; Garcías-Morales, Cesar; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia; García-Báez, Efren; Aríza-Castolo, Armando; Peraza-Campos, Ana; Martínez-Martínez, Francisco

    2013-12-31

    An NMR titration method has been used to simultaneously measure the acid dissociation constant (pKa) and the intramolecular NHO prototropic constant ΔKNHO on a set of Schiff bases. The model compounds were synthesized from benzylamine and substituted ortho-hydroxyaldehydes, appropriately substituted with electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups to modulate the acidity of the intramolecular NHO hydrogen bond. The structure in solution was established by 1H-, 13C- and 15N-NMR spectroscopy. The physicochemical parameters of the intramolecular NHO hydrogen bond (pKa, ΔKNHO and ΔΔG°) were obtained from 1H-NMR titration data and pH measurements. The Henderson-Hasselbalch data analysis indicated that the systems are weakly acidic, and the predominant NHO equilibrium was established using Polster-Lachmann δ-diagram analysis and Perrin model data linearization.

  9. Chromophore Structure of Photochromic Fluorescent Protein Dronpa: Acid-Base Equilibrium of Two Cis Configurations.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Asuka; Mizuno, Misao; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-04-07

    Dronpa is a novel photochromic fluorescent protein that exhibits fast response to light. The present article is the first report of the resonance and preresonance Raman spectra of Dronpa. We used the intensity and frequency of Raman bands to determine the structure of the Dronpa chromophore in two thermally stable photochromic states. The acid-base equilibrium in one photochromic state was observed by spectroscopic pH titration. The Raman spectra revealed that the chromophore in this state shows a protonation/deprotonation transition with a pKa of 5.2 ± 0.3 and maintains the cis configuration. The observed resonance Raman bands showed that the other photochromic state of the chromophore is in a trans configuration. The results demonstrate that Raman bands selectively enhanced for the chromophore yield valuable information on the molecular structure of the chromophore in photochromic fluorescent proteins after careful elimination of the fluorescence background.

  10. Second harmonic study of acid-base equilibrium at gold nanoparticle/aqueous interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianqiang; Mandal, Sarthak; Bronsther, Corin; Gao, Zhenghan; Eisenthal, Kenneth B.

    2017-09-01

    Interfacial acid-base equilibrium of the capping molecules is a key factor to stabilize gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in solution. In this study we used Second Harmonic (SH) generation to measure interfacial potential and obtained a surface pKa value of 3.3 ± 0.1 for the carboxyl group in mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) molecule at an AuNP/aqueous interface. This pKa value is smaller than its bulk counterpart and indicates that the charged carboxylate group is favored at the AuNP surface. The SH findings are consistent with the effects of the noble metal (gold) surface on a charge in solution, as predicted by the method of images.

  11. Chemicals loading in acetylated bamboo assisted by supercritical CO2 based on phase equilibrium data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silviana, Petermann, M.

    2015-12-01

    Indonesia has a large tropical forest. However, the deforestation still appears annually and vastly. This reason drives a use of bamboo as wood alternative. Recently, there are many modifications of bamboo in order to prolong the shelf life. Unfortunately, the processes need more chemicals and time. Based on wood modification, esterifying of bamboo was undertaken in present of a dense gas, i.e. supercritical CO2. Calculation of chemicals loading referred to ASTM D1413-99 by using the phase equilibrium data at optimum condition by a statistical design. The results showed that the acetylation of bamboo assisted by supercritical CO2 required 14.73 kg acetic anhydride/m3 of bamboo for a treatment of one hour.

  12. [The effect of spermine on acid-base equilibrium in DNA molecule].

    PubMed

    Slonitskiĭ, S V; Kuptsov, V Iu

    1990-01-01

    The influence of spermine (Sp) on the acid-induced predenaturational and denaturational transitions in the DNA molecule structure has been studied by means of circular dichroism, spectrophotometric and viscometric titration at supporting electrolyte concentration 10 mM NaCl. The data available indicate that at [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.60 (here [N] and [P] are molar concentrations of Sp nitrogen and DNA phosphours, respectively) the cooperative structural B----B(+)----S transitions are accompanied by the DNA double-helice winding. No competition for proton acceptor sites in the DNA molecule between H+ and Sp4+ cations has been observed when binding to neutral macromolecule. At 0.60 less than or equal to [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.75 the displacement of the B----B(+)----S transitions midpoints to acidic pH region has been established. This is accompanied by DNA condensation and the appearance of differential scattering of circularly polarized light. The calculations carried out in the framework of the two-variable Manning theory have shown that the acid-induced reduction of the effective polyion charge density facilitates the Sp-induced DNA condensation. It has been shown that the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule is determined by local [H+] in the 2-3 A hydrated monolayer of the macromolecule. An adequate estimation of [H+] can be obtained on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzman approach. The data obtained are consistent with recently proposed hypothesis of polyelectrolyte invariance of the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule.

  13. Stability analysis of the Gravito-Electrostatic Sheath-based solar plasma equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, P. K.; Goutam, H. P.; Lal, M.; Dwivedi, C. B.

    2016-08-01

    We present approximate solutions of non-local linear perturbational analysis for discussing the stability properties of the Gravito-Electrostatic Sheath (GES)-based solar plasma equilibrium, which is indeed non-uniform on both the bounded and unbounded scales. The relevant physical variables undergoing perturbations are the self-solar gravity, electrostatic potential and plasma flow along with plasma population density. We methodologically derive linear dispersion relation for the GES fluctuations, and solve it numerically to identify and characterize the existent possible natural normal modes. Three distinct natural normal modes are identified and named as the GES-oscillator mode, GES-wave mode and usual (classical) p-mode. In the solar wind plasma, only the p-mode survives. These modes are found to be linearly unstable in wide-range of the Jeans-normalized wavenumber, k. The local plane-wave approximation marginally limits the validity or reliability of the obtained results in certain radial- and k-domains only. The phase and group velocities, time periods of these fluctuation modes are investigated. It is interesting to note that, the oscillation time periods of these modes are 3-10 min, which match exactly with those of the observed helio-seismic waves and solar surface oscillations. The proposed GES model provides a novel physical view of the waves and oscillations of the Sun from a new perspective of plasma-wall interaction physics. Due to simplified nature of the considered GES equilibrium, it is a neonatal stage to highlight its applicability in the real Sun. The proposed GES model and subsequent fluctuation analysis need further improvements to make it more realistic.

  14. Development and Assessment of a Computer-Based Equation of State for Equilibrium Air

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Pressure .............. 25 10. High-Density Contribution to the Enthalpy Divided by the Equilibrium Enthalpy ............... 26 11. High-Density...Contribution to the Entropy Divided by the Equilibrium Entropy .................. 27 12. Relative Difference in Calculated Enthalpy for Six Temperatures for...13. Relative Difference in Calculated Enthalpy for Six Temperatures for Lowest Densities ... 33 14. Relative Difference in Calculated Enthalpy for

  15. The Effect of Context-Based Chemical Equilibrium on Grade 11 Students' Learning, Motivation and Constructivist Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ilhan, Nail; Yildirim, Ali; Yilmaz, Sibel Sadi

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, many countries have adopted a context-based approach for designing science curricula for education at all levels. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a Context-Based Chemistry Course (CBCC) as compared with traditional/existing instruction, on 11th grade students' learning about chemical equilibrium,…

  16. Hidden Conformation Events in DNA Base Extrusions: A Generalized Ensemble Path Optimization and Equilibrium Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Liaoran; Lv, Chao; Yang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    DNA base extrusion is a crucial component of many biomolecular processes. Elucidating how bases are selectively extruded from the interiors of double-strand DNAs is pivotal to accurately understanding and efficiently sampling this general type of conformational transitions. In this work, the on-the-path random walk (OTPRW) method, which is the first generalized ensemble sampling scheme designed for finite-temperature-string path optimizations, was improved and applied to obtain the minimum free energy path (MFEP) and the free energy profile of a classical B-DNA major-groove base extrusion pathway. Along the MFEP, an intermediate state and the corresponding transition state were located and characterized. The MFEP result suggests that a base-plane-elongation event rather than the commonly focused base-flipping event is dominant in the transition state formation portion of the pathway; and the energetic penalty at the transition state is mainly introduced by the stretching of the Watson-Crick base pair. Moreover to facilitate the essential base-plane-elongation dynamics, the surrounding environment of the flipped base needs to be intimately involved. Further taking the advantage of the extended-dynamics nature of the OTPRW Hamiltonian, an equilibrium generalized ensemble simulation was performed along the optimized path; and based on the collected samples, several base-flipping (opening) angle collective variables were evaluated. In consistence with the MFEP result, the collective variable analysis result reveals that none of these commonly employed flipping (opening) angles alone can adequately represent the base extrusion pathway, especially in the pre-transition-state portion. As further revealed by the collective variable analysis, the base-pairing partner of the extrusion target undergoes a series of in-plane rotations to facilitate the base-plane-elongation dynamics. A base-plane rotation angle is identified to be a possible reaction coordinate to represent

  17. Game Theory Based Security in Wireless Body Area Network with Stackelberg Security Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, M; Sivakumar, R

    2015-01-01

    Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN) is effectively used in healthcare to increase the value of the patient's life and also the value of healthcare services. The biosensor based approach in medical care system makes it difficult to respond to the patients with minimal response time. The medical care unit does not deploy the accessing of ubiquitous broadband connections full time and hence the level of security will not be high always. The security issue also arises in monitoring the user body function records. Most of the systems on the Wireless Body Area Network are not effective in facing the security deployment issues. To access the patient's information with higher security on WBAN, Game Theory with Stackelberg Security Equilibrium (GTSSE) is proposed in this paper. GTSSE mechanism takes all the players into account. The patients are monitored by placing the power position authority initially. The position authority in GTSSE is the organizer and all the other players react to the organizer decision. Based on our proposed approach, experiment has been conducted on factors such as security ratio based on patient's health information, system flexibility level, energy consumption rate, and information loss rate. Stackelberg Security considerably improves the strength of solution with higher security.

  18. Game Theory Based Security in Wireless Body Area Network with Stackelberg Security Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, M.; Sivakumar, R.

    2015-01-01

    Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN) is effectively used in healthcare to increase the value of the patient's life and also the value of healthcare services. The biosensor based approach in medical care system makes it difficult to respond to the patients with minimal response time. The medical care unit does not deploy the accessing of ubiquitous broadband connections full time and hence the level of security will not be high always. The security issue also arises in monitoring the user body function records. Most of the systems on the Wireless Body Area Network are not effective in facing the security deployment issues. To access the patient's information with higher security on WBAN, Game Theory with Stackelberg Security Equilibrium (GTSSE) is proposed in this paper. GTSSE mechanism takes all the players into account. The patients are monitored by placing the power position authority initially. The position authority in GTSSE is the organizer and all the other players react to the organizer decision. Based on our proposed approach, experiment has been conducted on factors such as security ratio based on patient's health information, system flexibility level, energy consumption rate, and information loss rate. Stackelberg Security considerably improves the strength of solution with higher security. PMID:26759829

  19. Probing autoinducer-2 based quorum sensing: the biological consequences of molecules unable to traverse equilibrium states.

    PubMed

    Tsuchikama, Kyoji; Lowery, Colin A; Janda, Kim D

    2011-09-02

    Bacteria have developed a cell-to-cell communication system, termed quorum sensing (QS), which allows for the population-dependent coordination of their behavior via the exchange of chemical signals. Autoinducer-2 (AI-2), a class of QS signals derived from 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentandione (DPD), has been revealed as a universal signaling molecule in a variety of bacterial species. In spite of considerable interest, the study of putative AI-2 based QS systems remains a challenging topic in part due to the rapid interconversion between the linear and cyclic forms of DPD. Herein, we report the design and development of efficient syntheses of carbocyclic analogues of DPD, which are locked in the cyclic form. The synthetic analogues were evaluated for the modulation of AI-2-based QS in Vibrio harveyi and Salmonella typhimurium. No agonists were uncovered in either V. harveyi or S. typhimurium assay, whereas weak to moderate antagonists were found against V. harveyi. On the basis of NMR analyses and DFT calculations, the heterocyclic oxygen atom within DPD appears necessary to promote hydration at the C3 position of cyclic DPD to afford the active tetrahydroxy species. These results also shed light on the interaction between the heterocyclic oxygen atom and receptor proteins as well as the importance of the linear form and dynamic equilibrium of DPD as crucial requirements for activation of AI-2 based QS circuits.

  20. Chasing equilibrium: measuring the intrinsic solubility of weak acids and bases.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Martin; Box, Karl

    2005-02-15

    A novel procedure is described for rapid (20-80 min) measurement of intrinsic solubility values of organic acids, bases, and ampholytes. In this procedure, a quantity of substance was first dissolved at a pH where it exists predominantly in its ionized form, and then a precipitate of the neutral (un-ionized) species was formed by changing the pH. Subsequently, the rate of change of pH due to precipitation or dissolution was monitored and strong acid and base titrant were added to adjust the pH to discover its equilibrium conditions, and the intrinsic solubility of the neutral form of the compound could then be determined. The procedure was applied to a variety of monoprotic and diprotic pharmaceutical compounds. The results were highly repeatable and had a good correlation to available published values. Data collected during the procedure provided good diagnostic information. Kinetic solubility data were also collected but provided a poor guide to the intrinsic solubility.

  1. Dynamic acid/base equilibrium in single component switchable ionic liquids and consequences on viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu, David C.; Lee, Juntaek; Lee, Mal -Soon; Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Freeman, Charles J.; Rousseau, Roger; Glezakou, Vassiliki -Alexandra

    2016-03-28

    The deployment of transformational non-aqueous CO2-capture solvent systems is encumbered by high viscosity even at intermediate uptakes. Using single-molecule CO2 binding organic liquids as a prototypical example, we identify the key molecular features controlling bulk liquid viscosity and CO2 uptake kinetics. Fast uptake kinetics arise from close proximity of the alcohol and amine sites that are involved in CO2 binding. This process results in the concerted formation of a Zwitterion containing both an alkylcarbonate and a protonated amine. The hydrogen bonding between the two functional groups ultimately determines the solution viscosity. Based on molecular simulation, this work reveals options to significantly reduce viscosity with molecular modifications that shift the proton transfer equilibrium towards a neutral acid/amine species as opposed to the ubiquitously accepted Zwitterionic state. Lastly, the molecular design concepts proposed here, for the alkyl-carbonate systems, are readily extensible to other CO2 capture technologies, such as the carbamate- or imidazole-based solvent chemistries.

  2. Dynamic acid/base equilibrium in single component switchable ionic liquids and consequences on viscosity

    DOE PAGES

    Cantu, David C.; Lee, Juntaek; Lee, Mal -Soon; ...

    2016-03-28

    The deployment of transformational non-aqueous CO2-capture solvent systems is encumbered by high viscosity even at intermediate uptakes. Using single-molecule CO2 binding organic liquids as a prototypical example, we identify the key molecular features controlling bulk liquid viscosity and CO2 uptake kinetics. Fast uptake kinetics arise from close proximity of the alcohol and amine sites that are involved in CO2 binding. This process results in the concerted formation of a Zwitterion containing both an alkylcarbonate and a protonated amine. The hydrogen bonding between the two functional groups ultimately determines the solution viscosity. Based on molecular simulation, this work reveals options tomore » significantly reduce viscosity with molecular modifications that shift the proton transfer equilibrium towards a neutral acid/amine species as opposed to the ubiquitously accepted Zwitterionic state. Lastly, the molecular design concepts proposed here, for the alkyl-carbonate systems, are readily extensible to other CO2 capture technologies, such as the carbamate- or imidazole-based solvent chemistries.« less

  3. Equilibrium Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Dario; Petazzi, Lorenzo

    2006-08-01

    We present a satellite path planning technique able to make identical spacecraft aquire a given configuration. The technique exploits a behaviour-based approach to achieve an autonomous and distributed control over the relative geometry making use of limited sensorial information. A desired velocity is defined for each satellite as a sum of different contributions coming from generic high level behaviours: forcing the final desired configuration the behaviours are further defined by an inverse dynamic calculation dubbed Equilibrium Shaping. We show how considering only three different kind of behaviours it is possible to acquire a number of interesting formations and we set down the theoretical framework to find the entire set. We find that allowing a limited amount of communication the technique may be used also to form complex lattice structures. Several control feedbacks able to track the desired velocities are introduced and discussed. Our results suggest that sliding mode control is particularly appropriate in connection with the developed technique.

  4. Pluto's atmosphere - Models based on refraction, inversion, and vapor-pressure equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, Von R.

    1989-01-01

    Viking spacecraft radio-occultation measurements indicate that, irrespective of substantial differences, the polar ice cap regions on Mars have inversions similar to those of Pluto, and may also share vapor pressure equilibrium characteristics at the surface. This temperature-inversion phenomenon occurs in a near-surface boundary layer; surface pressure-temperature may correspond to the vapor-pressure equilibrium with CH4 ice, or the temperature may be slightly higher to match the value derived from IRAS data.

  5. Pluto's atmosphere - Models based on refraction, inversion, and vapor-pressure equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, Von R.

    1989-01-01

    Viking spacecraft radio-occultation measurements indicate that, irrespective of substantial differences, the polar ice cap regions on Mars have inversions similar to those of Pluto, and may also share vapor pressure equilibrium characteristics at the surface. This temperature-inversion phenomenon occurs in a near-surface boundary layer; surface pressure-temperature may correspond to the vapor-pressure equilibrium with CH4 ice, or the temperature may be slightly higher to match the value derived from IRAS data.

  6. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C; Pace, Molly N; Kim, Young-Jin; Jardine, Philip M; Watson, David B

    2007-06-16

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing N(E) equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-N(E) kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

  7. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C.; Pace, Molly N.; Kim, Young-Jin; Jardine, Philip M.; Watson, David B.

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing NE equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M- NE kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

  8. Stages in Learning Motor Synergies: A View Based on the Equilibrium-Point Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Latash, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    This review describes a novel view on stages in motor learning based on recent developments of the notion of synergies, the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis, and the equilibrium-point hypothesis (referent configuration) that allow to merge these notions into a single scheme of motor control. The principle of abundance and the principle of minimal final action form the foundation for analyses of natural motor actions performed by redundant sets of elements. Two main stages of motor learning are introduced corresponding to (1) discovery and strengthening of motor synergies stabilizing salient performance variable(s), and (2) their weakening when other aspects of motor performance are optimized. The first stage may be viewed as consisting of two steps, the elaboration of an adequate referent configuration trajectory and the elaboration of multi-joint (multi-muscle) synergies stabilizing the referent configuration trajectory. Both steps are expected to lead to more variance in the space of elemental variables that is compatible with a desired time profile of the salient performance variable (“good variability”). Adjusting control to other aspects of performance during the second stage (for example, esthetics, energy expenditure, time, fatigue, etc.) may lead to a drop in the “good variability”. Experimental support for the suggested scheme is reviewed. PMID:20060610

  9. Stages in learning motor synergies: a view based on the equilibrium-point hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Latash, Mark L

    2010-10-01

    This review describes a novel view on stages in motor learning based on recent developments of the notion of synergies, the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis, and the equilibrium-point hypothesis (referent configuration) that allow to merge these notions into a single scheme of motor control. The principle of abundance and the principle of minimal final action form the foundation for analyses of natural motor actions performed by redundant sets of elements. Two main stages of motor learning are introduced corresponding to (1) discovery and strengthening of motor synergies stabilizing salient performance variable(s) and (2) their weakening when other aspects of motor performance are optimized. The first stage may be viewed as consisting of two steps, the elaboration of an adequate referent configuration trajectory and the elaboration of multi-joint (multi-muscle) synergies stabilizing the referent configuration trajectory. Both steps are expected to lead to more variance in the space of elemental variables that is compatible with a desired time profile of the salient performance variable ("good variability"). Adjusting control to other aspects of performance during the second stage (for example, esthetics, energy expenditure, time, fatigue, etc.) may lead to a drop in the "good variability". Experimental support for the suggested scheme is reviewed.

  10. Study on two-dimensional equilibrium structure of magnetized complex plasmas based on a Langevin dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Wei; Yang, Fang; Liu, Songfen; Shi, Feng

    2016-10-01

    A Langevin dynamics simulation method is used to study the two-dimensional (2D) equilibrium structure of complex plasmas while considering an external magnetic field. The traditional Yukawa potential and a modified Yukawa potential according to Shukla et al. [Phys. Lett. A 291, 413 (2001); Shukla and Mendonca, Phys. Scr. T113 82 (2004)] and Salimullah et al. [Phys. Plasmas 10, 3047 (2003)] respectively, are employed to account for the interaction of the charged dust particles. It is found that the collisions between neutral gas and charged dust particles have minor effects on the 2D equilibrium structure of the system. Based on the modified Yukawa potential, studies on the 2D equilibrium structure show that the traditional Yukawa potential is still suitable for describing the magnetized complex plasmas, even if the shielding distance of charged dust particles is affected by the strong external magnetic field.

  11. Non-equilibrium theory employing enthalpy-based equation of state for binary solid and porous mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, B.; Menon, S. V. G.

    2017-04-01

    A generalized enthalpy-based equation of state, which includes thermal electron excitations and non-equilibrium thermal energies, is formulated for binary solid and porous mixtures. Our approach gives rise to an extra contribution to mixture volume, in addition to those corresponding to average mixture parameters. This excess term involves the difference of thermal enthalpies of the two components, which depend on their individual temperatures. We propose to use the Hugoniot of the components to compute non-equilibrium temperatures in the mixture. These are then compared with the average temperature obtained from the mixture Hugoniot, thereby giving an estimate of non-equilibrium effects. The Birch-Murnaghan model for the zero-temperature isotherm and a linear thermal model are then used for applying the method to several mixtures, including one porous case. Comparison with experimental data on the pressure-volume Hugoniot and shock speed versus particle speed shows good agreement.

  12. Binary mixtures of rod-like colloids under shear: microscopically-based equilibrium theory and order-parameter dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lugo-Frías, Rodrigo; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2016-06-22

    This paper is concerned with the dynamics of a binary mixture of rod-like, repulsive colloidal particles driven out of equilibrium by means of a steady shear flow (Couette geometry). To this end we first derive, starting from a microscopic density functional in Parsons-Lee approximation, a mesoscopic free energy functional whose main variables are the orientational order parameter tensors. Based on this mesoscopic functional we then explore the stability of isotropic and nematic equilibrium phases in terms of composition and rod lengths. Second, by combining the equilibrium theory with the Doi-Hess approach for the order parameter dynamics under shear, we investigate the orientational dynamics of binary mixtures for a range of shear rates and coupling parameters. We find a variety of dynamical states, including synchronized oscillatory states of the two components, but also symmetry breaking behavior where the components display different in-plane oscillatory states.

  13. The Effect of Cooperative Learning Approach Based on Conceptual Change Condition on Students' Understanding of Chemical Equilibrium Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilgin, Ibrahim; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the cooperative learning approach based on conceptual change conditions over traditional instruction on 10th grade students' conceptual understanding and achievement of computational problems related to chemical equilibrium concepts. The subjects of this study consisted of 87 tenth grade…

  14. The Effect of Cooperative Learning Approach Based on Conceptual Change Condition on Students' Understanding of Chemical Equilibrium Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilgin, Ibrahim; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the cooperative learning approach based on conceptual change conditions over traditional instruction on 10th grade students' conceptual understanding and achievement of computational problems related to chemical equilibrium concepts. The subjects of this study consisted of 87 tenth grade…

  15. Efficient Nash Equilibrium Resource Allocation Based on Game Theory Mechanism in Cloud Computing by Using Auction

    PubMed Central

    Nezarat, Amin; Dastghaibifard, GH

    2015-01-01

    One of the most complex issues in the cloud computing environment is the problem of resource allocation so that, on one hand, the cloud provider expects the most profitability and, on the other hand, users also expect to have the best resources at their disposal considering the budget constraints and time. In most previous work conducted, heuristic and evolutionary approaches have been used to solve this problem. Nevertheless, since the nature of this environment is based on economic methods, using such methods can decrease response time and reducing the complexity of the problem. In this paper, an auction-based method is proposed which determines the auction winner by applying game theory mechanism and holding a repetitive game with incomplete information in a non-cooperative environment. In this method, users calculate suitable price bid with their objective function during several round and repetitions and send it to the auctioneer; and the auctioneer chooses the winning player based the suggested utility function. In the proposed method, the end point of the game is the Nash equilibrium point where players are no longer inclined to alter their bid for that resource and the final bid also satisfies the auctioneer’s utility function. To prove the response space convexity, the Lagrange method is used and the proposed model is simulated in the cloudsim and the results are compared with previous work. At the end, it is concluded that this method converges to a response in a shorter time, provides the lowest service level agreement violations and the most utility to the provider. PMID:26431035

  16. Efficient Nash Equilibrium Resource Allocation Based on Game Theory Mechanism in Cloud Computing by Using Auction.

    PubMed

    Nezarat, Amin; Dastghaibifard, G H

    2015-01-01

    One of the most complex issues in the cloud computing environment is the problem of resource allocation so that, on one hand, the cloud provider expects the most profitability and, on the other hand, users also expect to have the best resources at their disposal considering the budget constraints and time. In most previous work conducted, heuristic and evolutionary approaches have been used to solve this problem. Nevertheless, since the nature of this environment is based on economic methods, using such methods can decrease response time and reducing the complexity of the problem. In this paper, an auction-based method is proposed which determines the auction winner by applying game theory mechanism and holding a repetitive game with incomplete information in a non-cooperative environment. In this method, users calculate suitable price bid with their objective function during several round and repetitions and send it to the auctioneer; and the auctioneer chooses the winning player based the suggested utility function. In the proposed method, the end point of the game is the Nash equilibrium point where players are no longer inclined to alter their bid for that resource and the final bid also satisfies the auctioneer's utility function. To prove the response space convexity, the Lagrange method is used and the proposed model is simulated in the cloudsim and the results are compared with previous work. At the end, it is concluded that this method converges to a response in a shorter time, provides the lowest service level agreement violations and the most utility to the provider.

  17. Partition Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Michal; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    We introduce partition equilibrium and study its existence in resource selection games (RSG). In partition equilibrium the agents are partitioned into coalitions, and only deviations by the prescribed coalitions are considered. This is in difference to the classical concept of strong equilibrium according to which any subset of the agents may deviate. In resource selection games, each agent selects a resource from a set of resources, and its payoff is an increasing (or non-decreasing) function of the number of agents selecting its resource. While it has been shown that strong equilibrium exists in resource selection games, these games do not possess super-strong equilibrium, in which a fruitful deviation benefits at least one deviator without hurting any other deviator, even in the case of two identical resources with increasing cost functions. Similarly, strong equilibrium does not exist for that restricted two identical resources setting when the game is played repeatedly. We prove that for any given partition there exists a super-strong equilibrium for resource selection games of identical resources with increasing cost functions; we also show similar existence results for a variety of other classes of resource selection games. For the case of repeated games we identify partitions that guarantee the existence of strong equilibrium. Together, our work introduces a natural concept, which turns out to lead to positive and applicable results in one of the basic domains studied in the literature.

  18. Community-Based Global Health Program for Maltreated Children and Adolescents in Brazil: The Equilibrium Program

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Oliveira, Paula Approbato; Scomparini, Luciana Burim; Silva, Uiara Maria Rêgo e; Silva, Angelica Cristine; Doretto, Victoria; de Medeiros Filho, Mauro Victor; Scivoletto, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The maltreatment of children and adolescents is a global public health problem that affects high- and low-middle income countries (“LMICs”). In the United States, around 1.2 million children suffer from abuse, while in LMICs, such as Brazil, these rates are much higher (an estimated 28 million children). Exposition to early environmental stress has been associated with suboptimal physical and brain development, persistent cognitive impairment, and behavioral problems. Studies have reported that children exposed to maltreatment are at high risk of behavioral problems, learning disabilities, communication and psychiatric disorders, and general clinical conditions, such as obesity and systemic inflammation later in life. The aim of this paper is to describe The Equilibrium Program (“TEP”), a community-based global health program implemented in São Paulo, Brazil to serve traumatized and neglected children and adolescents. We will describe and discuss TEP’s implementation, highlighting its innovation aspects, research projects developed within the program as well as its population profile. Finally, we will discuss TEP’s social impact, challenges, and limitations. The program’s goal is to promote the social and family reintegration of maltreated children and adolescents through an interdisciplinary intervention program that provides multi-dimensional bio-psycho-social treatment integrated with the diverse services needed to meet the unique demands of this population. The program’s cost effectiveness is being evaluated to support the development of more effective treatments and to expand similar programs in other areas of Brazil. Policy makers should encourage early evidence-based interventions for disadvantaged children to promote healthier psychosocial environments and provide them opportunities to become healthy and productive adults. This approach has already shown itself to be a cost-effective strategy to prevent disease and promote health. PMID

  19. Community-Based Global Health Program for Maltreated Children and Adolescents in Brazil: The Equilibrium Program.

    PubMed

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Oliveira, Paula Approbato; Scomparini, Luciana Burim; Silva, Uiara Maria Rêgo E; Silva, Angelica Cristine; Doretto, Victoria; de Medeiros Filho, Mauro Victor; Scivoletto, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The maltreatment of children and adolescents is a global public health problem that affects high- and low-middle income countries ("LMICs"). In the United States, around 1.2 million children suffer from abuse, while in LMICs, such as Brazil, these rates are much higher (an estimated 28 million children). Exposition to early environmental stress has been associated with suboptimal physical and brain development, persistent cognitive impairment, and behavioral problems. Studies have reported that children exposed to maltreatment are at high risk of behavioral problems, learning disabilities, communication and psychiatric disorders, and general clinical conditions, such as obesity and systemic inflammation later in life. The aim of this paper is to describe The Equilibrium Program ("TEP"), a community-based global health program implemented in São Paulo, Brazil to serve traumatized and neglected children and adolescents. We will describe and discuss TEP's implementation, highlighting its innovation aspects, research projects developed within the program as well as its population profile. Finally, we will discuss TEP's social impact, challenges, and limitations. The program's goal is to promote the social and family reintegration of maltreated children and adolescents through an interdisciplinary intervention program that provides multi-dimensional bio-psycho-social treatment integrated with the diverse services needed to meet the unique demands of this population. The program's cost effectiveness is being evaluated to support the development of more effective treatments and to expand similar programs in other areas of Brazil. Policy makers should encourage early evidence-based interventions for disadvantaged children to promote healthier psychosocial environments and provide them opportunities to become healthy and productive adults. This approach has already shown itself to be a cost-effective strategy to prevent disease and promote health.

  20. Stable Equilibrium Based on Lévy Statistics:A Linear Boltzmann Equation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkai, Eli

    2004-06-01

    To obtain further insight on possible power law generalizations of Boltzmann equilibrium concepts, we consider stochastic collision models. The models are a generalization of the Rayleigh collision model, for a heavy one dimensional particle M interacting with ideal gas particles with a mass m<< M. Similar to previous approaches we assume elastic, uncorrelated, and impulsive collisions. We let the bath particle velocity distribution function to be of general form, namely we do not postulate a specific form of power-law equilibrium. We show, under certain conditions, that the velocity distribution function of the heavy particle is Lévy stable, the Maxwellian distribution being a special case. We demonstrate our results with numerical examples. The relation of the power law equilibrium obtained here to thermodynamics is discussed. In particular we compare between two models: a thermodynamic and an energy scaling approaches. These models yield insight into questions like the meaning of temperature for power law equilibrium, and into the issue of the universality of the equilibrium (i.e., is the width of the generalized Maxwellian distribution functions obtained here, independent of coupling constant to the bath).

  1. Entropy-based artificial viscosity stabilization for non-equilibrium Grey Radiation-Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Delchini, Marc O. Ragusa, Jean C. Morel, Jim

    2015-09-01

    The entropy viscosity method is extended to the non-equilibrium Grey Radiation-Hydrodynamic equations. The method employs a viscous regularization to stabilize the numerical solution. The artificial viscosity coefficient is modulated by the entropy production and peaks at shock locations. The added dissipative terms are consistent with the entropy minimum principle. A new functional form of the entropy residual, suitable for the Radiation-Hydrodynamic equations, is derived. We demonstrate that the viscous regularization preserves the equilibrium diffusion limit. The equations are discretized with a standard Continuous Galerkin Finite Element Method and a fully implicit temporal integrator within the MOOSE multiphysics framework. The method of manufactured solutions is employed to demonstrate second-order accuracy in both the equilibrium diffusion and streaming limits. Several typical 1-D radiation-hydrodynamic test cases with shocks (from Mach 1.05 to Mach 50) are presented to establish the ability of the technique to capture and resolve shocks.

  2. Triangular reflective equilibrium: a conscience-based method for bioethical deliberation.

    PubMed

    Barilan, Y Michael; Brusa, Margherita

    2011-07-01

    Following a discussion of some historical roots of conscience, we offer a systematized version of reflective equilibrium. Aiming at a comprehensive methodology for bioethical deliberation, we develop an expanded variant of reflective equilibrium, which we call 'triangular reflective equilibrium' and which incorporates insights from hermeneutics, critical theory and narrative ethics. We focus on a few distinctions, mainly between methods of justification in ethics and the social practice of bioethical deliberation, between coherence in ethical reasoning, personal integrity and consensus formation, and between political and moral deliberation. The ideal of deliberation is explicated as a sharing of conscience within a special commitment to sincerity and openness to persuasion. Personal growth in wisdom is an indirect by-product of the continuous practice of moral deliberation. This is explicated in the light of Sternberg's balance theory of wisdom and in the context of medicine as a profession embodying altruistic responsibilities of care in democratic and pluralistic societies. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Upscaling of Compositional Flow Simulation based on a non-Equilibrium Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, A.; Voskov, D.; Tchelepi, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    Modeling multiphase flow of large number of components in natural porous media is a challenging problem of strong interest across many disciplines. Even with the most advanced computational methods and computer platforms, compositional simulation using the fine-scale (so-called geocellular) model is often too expensive; as a result, upscaling methods for compositional flows are essential. We describe a consistent representation of the coarse-scale equations, and we introduce upscaled flow functions to account for the sub-scale variations in both the absolute and relative permeability, as well as, compressibility effects. Upscaling of the thermodynamic phase behavior is the main focus of this work. We assume instantaneous phase equilibrium at the fine scale, and we derive coarse-scale equations, in which the phase behavior is represented in a non-equilibrium form. Viscous fingering, gravity override, and channeling at the sub-grid scale are possible reasons for this non-equilibrium behavior. Coarse-scale thermodynamic functions are introduced to quantify the difference in chemical potential of each component among the different phases and to capture the deviation of coarse blocks from equilibrium. These upscaled functions transform the two-phase region of the fine-scale, formed by equilibrium tie-lines, to a modified region with tilted tie-lines. We quantify the effect of the degree of heterogeneity variance and heterogeneity patterns on the modified non-equilibrium phase space in the upscaled representation. We also analyze the interplay of phase behavior and numerical dispersion at the coarse-scale, and we demonstrate how the averaging of sub-scale heterogeneities and the use of larger grid blocks can alter the solution. The accuracy and efficiency of proposed methodology is tested for various challenging gas injection problems, and we show that the approach accurately reproduces the averaged fine-scale solutions.

  4. Effect of Non-Equilibrium Surface Thermochemistry in Simulation of Carbon Based Ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrates that coupling of a material thermal response code and a flow solver using non-equilibrium gas/surface interaction model provides time-accurate solutions for the multidimensional ablation of carbon based charring ablators. The material thermal response code used in this study is the Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal-response and AblatioN Program (TITAN), which predicts charring material thermal response and shape change on hypersonic space vehicles. Its governing equations include total energy balance, pyrolysis gas mass conservation, and a three-component decomposition model. The flow code solves the reacting Navier-Stokes equations using Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) method. Loose coupling between the material response and flow codes is performed by solving the surface mass balance in DPLR and the surface energy balance in TITAN. Thus, the material surface recession is predicted by finite-rate gas/surface interaction boundary conditions implemented in DPLR, and the surface temperature and pyrolysis gas injection rate are computed in TITAN. Two sets of nonequilibrium gas/surface interaction chemistry between air and the carbon surface developed by Park and Zhluktov, respectively, are studied. Coupled fluid-material response analyses of stagnation tests conducted in NASA Ames Research Center arc-jet facilities are considered. The ablating material used in these arc-jet tests was Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). Computational predictions of in-depth material thermal response and surface recession are compared with the experimental measurements for stagnation cold wall heat flux ranging from 107 to 1100 Watts per square centimeter.

  5. Predicting Folding Sequences Based on the Maximum Rock Strength and Mechanical Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubas, N.; Souloumiac, P.; Maillot, B.; Leroy, Y. M.

    2007-12-01

    The objective is to propose and validate simple procedures, compared to the finite-element method, to select and optimize the dominant mode of folding in fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges, and to determine its stress distribution. Mechanical equilibrium as well as the constraints due to the limited rock strength of the bulk material and of major discontinuities, such as décollements, are accounted for. The first part of the proposed procedure, which is at the core of the external approach of classical limit analysis, consists in estimating the least upper bound on the tectonic force by minimisation of the internal dissipation and part of the external work. The new twist to the method is that the optimization is also done with respect to the geometry of the evolving fold. If several folding events are possible, the dominant mode is the one leading to the least upper bound. The second part of the procedure is based on the Equilibrium Element Method, which is an application of the internal approach of limit analysis. The optimum stress field, obtained by spatial discretisation of the fold, provides the best lower bound on the tectonic force. The difference between the two bounds defines an error estimate of the exact unknown tectonic force. To show the merits of the proposed procedure, its first part is applied to predict the life span of a thrust within an accretionary prism, from its onset, its development with a relief build up and its arrest because of the onset of a more favorable new thrust (Cubas et al., 2007). This life span is sensitive to the friction angles over the ramp and the décollement. It is shown how the normal sequence of thrusting in a supercritical wedge is ended with the first out-of sequence event. The second part of the procedure provides the stress state over each thrust showing that the active back thrust is a narrow fan which dip is sensitive to the friction angle over the ramp and the amount of relief build up (Souloumiac et

  6. Heuristic-based energy landscape paving for the circular packing problem with performance constraints of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfa; Jiang, Yucong; Li, Gang; Xue, Yu; Liu, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    The optimal layout problem of circle group in a circular container with performance constraints of equilibrium belongs to a class of NP-hard problem. The key obstacle of solving this problem is the lack of an effective global optimization method. We convert the circular packing problem with performance constraints of equilibrium into the unconstrained optimization problem by using quasi-physical strategy and penalty function method. By putting forward a new updating mechanism of the histogram function in energy landscape paving (ELP) method and incorporating heuristic conformation update strategies into the ELP method, we obtain an improved ELP (IELP) method. Subsequently, by combining the IELP method and the local search (LS) procedure, we put forward a hybrid algorithm, denoted by IELP-LS, for the circular packing problem with performance constraints of equilibrium. We test three sets of benchmarks consisting of 21 representative instances from the current literature. The proposed algorithm breaks the records of all 10 instances in the first set, and achieves the same or even better results than other methods in literature for 10 out of 11 instances in the second and third sets. The computational results show that the proposed algorithm is an effective method for solving the circular packing problem with performance constraints of equilibrium.

  7. The Approach Towards Equilibrium in a Reversible Ising Dynamics Model: An Information-Theoretic Analysis Based on an Exact Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Kristian; Olbrich, Eckehard

    2017-08-01

    We study the approach towards equilibrium in a dynamic Ising model, the Q2R cellular automaton, with microscopic reversibility and conserved energy for an infinite one-dimensional system. Starting from a low-entropy state with positive magnetisation, we investigate how the system approaches equilibrium characteristics given by statistical mechanics. We show that the magnetisation converges to zero exponentially. The reversibility of the dynamics implies that the entropy density of the microstates is conserved in the time evolution. Still, it appears as if equilibrium, with a higher entropy density is approached. In order to understand this process, we solve the dynamics by formally proving how the information-theoretic characteristics of the microstates develop over time. With this approach we can show that an estimate of the entropy density based on finite length statistics within microstates converges to the equilibrium entropy density. The process behind this apparent entropy increase is a dissipation of correlation information over increasing distances. It is shown that the average information-theoretic correlation length increases linearly in time, being equivalent to a corresponding increase in excess entropy.

  8. The Approach Towards Equilibrium in a Reversible Ising Dynamics Model: An Information-Theoretic Analysis Based on an Exact Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Kristian; Olbrich, Eckehard

    2017-06-01

    We study the approach towards equilibrium in a dynamic Ising model, the Q2R cellular automaton, with microscopic reversibility and conserved energy for an infinite one-dimensional system. Starting from a low-entropy state with positive magnetisation, we investigate how the system approaches equilibrium characteristics given by statistical mechanics. We show that the magnetisation converges to zero exponentially. The reversibility of the dynamics implies that the entropy density of the microstates is conserved in the time evolution. Still, it appears as if equilibrium, with a higher entropy density is approached. In order to understand this process, we solve the dynamics by formally proving how the information-theoretic characteristics of the microstates develop over time. With this approach we can show that an estimate of the entropy density based on finite length statistics within microstates converges to the equilibrium entropy density. The process behind this apparent entropy increase is a dissipation of correlation information over increasing distances. It is shown that the average information-theoretic correlation length increases linearly in time, being equivalent to a corresponding increase in excess entropy.

  9. Atomistic-level non-equilibrium model for chemically reactive systems based on steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guanchen; Al-Abbasi, Omar; von Spakovsky, Michael R.

    2014-10-01

    This paper outlines an atomistic-level framework for modeling the non-equilibrium behavior of chemically reactive systems. The framework called steepest- entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics (SEA-QT) is based on the paradigm of intrinsic quantum thermodynamic (IQT), which is a theory that unifies quantum mechanics and thermodynamics into a single discipline with wide applications to the study of non-equilibrium phenomena at the atomistic level. SEA-QT is a novel approach for describing the state of chemically reactive systems as well as the kinetic and dynamic features of the reaction process without any assumptions of near-equilibrium states or weak-interactions with a reservoir or bath. Entropy generation is the basis of the dissipation which takes place internal to the system and is, thus, the driving force of the chemical reaction(s). The SEA-QT non-equilibrium model is able to provide detailed information during the reaction process, providing a picture of the changes occurring in key thermodynamic properties (e.g., the instantaneous species concentrations, entropy and entropy generation, reaction coordinate, chemical affinities, reaction rate, etc). As an illustration, the SEA-QT framework is applied to an atomistic-level chemically reactive system governed by the reaction mechanism F + H2 leftrightarrow FH + H.

  10. Development of a non-equilibrium quantum transport calculation method based on constrained density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han Seul; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2015-03-01

    We report on the development of a novel first-principles method for the calculation of non-equilibrium quantum transport process. Within the scheme, non-equilibrium situation and quantum transport within the open-boundary condition are described by the region-dependent Δ self-consistent field method and matrix Green's function theory, respectively. We will discuss our solutions to the technical difficulties in describing bias-dependent electron transport at complicated nanointerfaces and present several application examples. Global Frontier Program (2013M3A6B1078881), Basic Science Research Grant (2012R1A1A2044793), EDISON Program (No. 2012M3C1A6035684), and 2013 Global Ph.D fellowship program of the National Research Foundation. KISTI Supercomputing Center (KSC-2014-C3-021).

  11. Algorithm based on the Thomson problem for determination of equilibrium structures of metal nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, E.; Florez, E.; Pérez-Torres, J. F.

    2017-06-01

    A new algorithm for the determination of equilibrium structures suitable for metal nanoclusters is proposed. The algorithm performs a stochastic search of the minima associated with the nuclear potential energy function restricted to a sphere (similar to the Thomson problem), in order to guess configurations of the nuclear positions. Subsequently, the guessed configurations are further optimized driven by the total energy function using the conventional gradient descent method. This methodology is equivalent to using the valence shell electron pair repulsion model in guessing initial configurations in the traditional molecular quantum chemistry. The framework is illustrated in several clusters of increasing complexity: Cu7, Cu9, and Cu11 as benchmark systems, and Cu38 and Ni9 as novel systems. New equilibrium structures for Cu9, Cu11, Cu38, and Ni9 are reported.

  12. Equilibrium properties of dense hydrogen isotope gases based on the theory of simple fluids.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; MacElroy, J M D

    2006-08-03

    We present a new method for the prediction of the equilibrium properties of dense gases containing hydrogen isotopes. The proposed approach combines the Feynman-Hibbs effective potential method and a deconvolution scheme introduced by Weeks et al. The resulting equations of state and the chemical potentials as functions of pressure for each of the hydrogen isotope gases depend on a single set of Lennard-Jones parameters. In addition to its simplicity, the proposed method with optimized Lennard-Jones potential parameters accurately describes the equilibrium properties of hydrogen isotope fluids in the regime of moderate temperatures and pressures. The present approach should find applications in the nonlocal density functional theory of inhomogeneous quantum fluids and should also be of particular relevance to hydrogen (clean energy) storage and to the separation of quantum isotopes by novel nanomaterials.

  13. Adsorption of methylene blue onto bamboo-based activated carbon: kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Hameed, B H; Din, A T M; Ahmad, A L

    2007-03-22

    Bamboo, an abundant and inexpensive natural resource in Malaysia was used to prepare activated carbon by physiochemical activation with potassium hydroxide (KOH) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) as the activating agents at 850 degrees C for 2h. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of methylene blue dye on such carbon were then examined at 30 degrees C. Adsorption isotherm of the methylene blue (MB) on the activated carbon was determined and correlated with common isotherm equations. The equilibrium data for methylene blue adsorption well fitted to the Langmuir equation, with maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 454.2mg/g. Two simplified kinetic models including pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equation were selected to follow the adsorption processes. The adsorption of methylene blue could be best described by the pseudo-second-order equation. The kinetic parameters of this best-fit model were calculated and discussed.

  14. Non-equilibrium behaviour in coacervate-based protocells under electric-field-induced excitation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yudan; Niu, Lin; Zhu, Xiaocui; Zhao, Meiping; Zhang, Zexin; Mann, Stephen; Liang, Dehai

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous strategies are now available to generate rudimentary forms of synthetic cell-like entities, minimal progress has been made in the sustained excitation of artificial protocells under non-equilibrium conditions. Here we demonstrate that the electric field energization of coacervate microdroplets comprising polylysine and short single strands of DNA generates membrane-free protocells with complex, dynamical behaviours. By confining the droplets within a microfluidic channel and applying a range of electric field strengths, we produce protocells that exhibit repetitive cycles of vacuolarization, dynamical fluctuations in size and shape, chaotic growth and fusion, spontaneous ejection and sequestration of matter, directional capture of solute molecules, and pulsed enhancement of enzyme cascade reactions. Our results highlight new opportunities for the study of non-equilibrium phenomena in synthetic protocells, provide a strategy for inducing complex behaviour in electrostatically assembled soft matter microsystems and illustrate how dynamical properties can be activated and sustained in microcompartmentalized media. PMID:26876162

  15. Non-equilibrium behaviour in coacervate-based protocells under electric-field-induced excitation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yudan; Niu, Lin; Zhu, Xiaocui; Zhao, Meiping; Zhang, Zexin; Mann, Stephen; Liang, Dehai

    2016-02-15

    Although numerous strategies are now available to generate rudimentary forms of synthetic cell-like entities, minimal progress has been made in the sustained excitation of artificial protocells under non-equilibrium conditions. Here we demonstrate that the electric field energization of coacervate microdroplets comprising polylysine and short single strands of DNA generates membrane-free protocells with complex, dynamical behaviours. By confining the droplets within a microfluidic channel and applying a range of electric field strengths, we produce protocells that exhibit repetitive cycles of vacuolarization, dynamical fluctuations in size and shape, chaotic growth and fusion, spontaneous ejection and sequestration of matter, directional capture of solute molecules, and pulsed enhancement of enzyme cascade reactions. Our results highlight new opportunities for the study of non-equilibrium phenomena in synthetic protocells, provide a strategy for inducing complex behaviour in electrostatically assembled soft matter microsystems and illustrate how dynamical properties can be activated and sustained in microcompartmentalized media.

  16. Non-equilibrium behaviour in coacervate-based protocells under electric-field-induced excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yudan; Niu, Lin; Zhu, Xiaocui; Zhao, Meiping; Zhang, Zexin; Mann, Stephen; Liang, Dehai

    2016-02-01

    Although numerous strategies are now available to generate rudimentary forms of synthetic cell-like entities, minimal progress has been made in the sustained excitation of artificial protocells under non-equilibrium conditions. Here we demonstrate that the electric field energization of coacervate microdroplets comprising polylysine and short single strands of DNA generates membrane-free protocells with complex, dynamical behaviours. By confining the droplets within a microfluidic channel and applying a range of electric field strengths, we produce protocells that exhibit repetitive cycles of vacuolarization, dynamical fluctuations in size and shape, chaotic growth and fusion, spontaneous ejection and sequestration of matter, directional capture of solute molecules, and pulsed enhancement of enzyme cascade reactions. Our results highlight new opportunities for the study of non-equilibrium phenomena in synthetic protocells, provide a strategy for inducing complex behaviour in electrostatically assembled soft matter microsystems and illustrate how dynamical properties can be activated and sustained in microcompartmentalized media.

  17. Equilibrium characteristics of tartrate and EDTA-based electroless copper deposition baths

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasubramanian, M.; Popov, B.N.; White, R.E.; Chen, K.S.

    1997-08-01

    Electroless deposition of copper is being used for a variety of applications, one of them being the development of seed metallic layers on non-metals, which are widely used in electronic circuitry. Solution equilibrium characteristics of two electroless copper baths containing EDTA and tartrate as the complexing agents were studied as functions of pH, chelating agent and metal ion concentrations. Equilibrium diagrams were constructed for both cu-tartrate and Cu-EDTA systems. It was determined that copper is chiefly complexed as Cu(OH){sub 2}L{sub 2}{sup {minus}4} in the tartrate bath, and as CuA{sup {minus}2} in the EDTA bath, where L and A are the complexing tartrate and EDTA ligands, respectively. The operating ranges for electroless copper deposition were identified for both baths. Dependence of Cu(OH){sub 2} precipitation on the pH and species concentrations was also studied for these systems.

  18. Activity Enhancement Based on the Chemical Equilibrium of Multiple-Subunit Nitrile Hydratase from Bordetella petrii.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Liu, Ping; Lin, Lu; Zhao, Yueqin; Zhong, Wenjuan; Wu, Lunjie; Zhou, Zhemin; Sun, Weifeng

    2016-09-01

    The maturation mechanism of nitrile hydratase (NHase) of Pseudomonas putida NRRL-18668 was discovered and named as "self-subunit swapping." Since the NHase of Bordetella petrii DSM 12804 is similar to that of P. putida, the NHase maturation of B. petrii is proposed to be the same as that of P. putida. However, there is no further information on the application of NHase according to these findings. We successfully rapidly purified NHase and its activator through affinity his tag, and found that the cell extracts of NHase possessed multiple types of protein ingredients including α, β, α2β2, and α(P14K)2 who were in a state of chemical equilibrium. Furthermore, the activity was significantly enhanced through adding extra α(P14K)2 to the cell extracts of NHase according to the chemical equilibrium. Our findings are useful for the activity enhancement of multiple-subunit enzyme and for the first time significantly increased the NHase activity according to the chemical equilibrium.

  19. Two-phase quasi-equilibrium in β-type Ti-based bulk metallic glass composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Pauly, S; Tang, M Q; Eckert, J; Zhang, H F

    2016-01-12

    The microstructural evolution of cast Ti/Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs) containing β-Ti still remains ambiguous. This is why to date the strategies and alloys suitable for producing such BMGCs with precisely controllable volume fractions and crystallite sizes are still rather limited. In this work, a Ti-based BMGC containing β-Ti was developed in the Ti-Zr-Cu-Co-Be system. The glassy matrix of this BMGC possesses an exceptional glass-forming ability and as a consequence, the volume fractions as well as the composition of the β-Ti dendrites remain constant over a wide range of cooling rates. This finding can be explained in terms of a two-phase quasi-equilibrium between the supercooled liquid and β-Ti, which the system attains on cooling. The two-phase quasi-equilibrium allows predicting the crystalline and glassy volume fractions by means of the lever rule and we succeeded in reproducing these values by slight variations in the alloy composition at a fixed cooling rate. The two-phase quasi-equilibrium could be of critical importance for understanding and designing the microstructures of BMGCs containing the β-phase. Its implications on the nucleation and growth of the crystalline phase are elaborated.

  20. Effect of selection and sequencing of representative wave conditions on process-based predictions of equilibrium embayed beach morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Christopher J.; Bryan, Karin R.; Gonzalez, Mauricio R.; Klein, Antonio H. F.; Winter, Christian

    2014-06-01

    In order to decrease the simulation time of morphodynamic models, often-complex wave climates are reduced to a few representative wave conditions (RWC). When applied to embayed beaches, a test of whether a reduced wave climate is representative or not is to see whether it can recreate the observed equilibrium (long-term averaged) bathymetry of the bay. In this study, the wave climate experienced at Milagro Beach, Tarragona, Spain was discretized into `average' and `extreme' RWCs. Process-based morphodynamic simulations were sequenced and merged based on `persistent' and `transient' forcing conditions, the results of which were used to estimate the equilibrium bathymetry of the bay. Results show that the effect of extreme wave events appeared to have less influence on the equilibrium of the bay compared to average conditions of longer overall duration. Additionally, the persistent seasonal variation of the wave climate produces pronounced beach rotation and tends to accumulate sediment at the extremities of the beach, rather than in the central sections. It is, therefore, important to account for directional variability and persistence in the selection and sequencing of representative wave conditions as is it essential for accurately balancing the effects beach rotation events.

  1. Two-phase quasi-equilibrium in β-type Ti-based bulk metallic glass composites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L.; Pauly, S.; Tang, M. Q.; Eckert, J.; Zhang, H. F.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructural evolution of cast Ti/Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs) containing β-Ti still remains ambiguous. This is why to date the strategies and alloys suitable for producing such BMGCs with precisely controllable volume fractions and crystallite sizes are still rather limited. In this work, a Ti-based BMGC containing β-Ti was developed in the Ti-Zr-Cu-Co-Be system. The glassy matrix of this BMGC possesses an exceptional glass-forming ability and as a consequence, the volume fractions as well as the composition of the β-Ti dendrites remain constant over a wide range of cooling rates. This finding can be explained in terms of a two-phase quasi-equilibrium between the supercooled liquid and β-Ti, which the system attains on cooling. The two-phase quasi-equilibrium allows predicting the crystalline and glassy volume fractions by means of the lever rule and we succeeded in reproducing these values by slight variations in the alloy composition at a fixed cooling rate. The two-phase quasi-equilibrium could be of critical importance for understanding and designing the microstructures of BMGCs containing the β-phase. Its implications on the nucleation and growth of the crystalline phase are elaborated. PMID:26754315

  2. Evaporation from soils under diurnal boundary conditions: Experimental and modeling investigation to evaluate Non-equilibrium-based approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, Andrew; Smits, Kathleen; Cihan, Abdullah; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2013-04-01

    Evaporation from bare soil is a key component of the hydrologic cycle and the process primarily responsible for governing water and energy exchanges between the land and atmosphere. Despite its importance, there is still a great deal of uncertainty associated with our current understanding of this complex multiphase phenomenon. A common approach when modeling the movement of liquid water, water vapor and heat in the soil immediately below the land-atmosphere interface is to assume that water vapor concentration in air is always in equilibrium with liquid water. However, this equilibrium assumption is called into question by experiments about liquid/gas phase change in porous media suggesting that the equilibrium establishment is not instantaneous; a volatilization or condensation time is observed at the macroscopic scale under certain conditions. Introduction of such a non-equilibrium mass transfer relationship is based on the Hertz-Knudsen equation (HKE) derived from the kinetic theory of gases. Multiple formulations have been presented to represent the rate of phase change between water and vapor, many relying on empirical fitting parameters due to limited experimental data. The purpose of this work is to perform an unbiased comparison between various conceptual and mathematical formulations for non-equilibrium phase change on evaporation and develop appropriate numerical models to be used in simulations. The key to such a comparison is the availability of accurate data. As such data at the scale of interest is not possible to obtain in field settings, a unique two-dimensional cell apparatus was developed. The test cell was equipped with a network of sensors for automated and continuous monitoring of soil moisture, soil and air temperature and relative humidity, and wind velocity to generate precision data. A fully-coupled numerical model to solve the governing equations for heat, liquid water and water vapor transport in soil was developed. The code implements a

  3. Renal regulation of acid-base equilibrium during chronic administration of mineral acid.

    PubMed Central

    De Sousa, R C; Harrington, J T; Ricanati, E S; Shelkrot, J W; Schwartz, W B

    1974-01-01

    load is the inability of the distal exchange mechanism to conserve the Na+ increment fully by means of H+ exchange. Escape of Na+ and K+ into the urine and the resulting stimulus to Na(+)-H+ exchange remove this constraint and are responsible for establishment of a new steady-state of acid-base equilibrium at plasma [HCO3-] levels significantly higher than those seen with HCl. The feeding of HCl in the presence of a normal salt intake led to a degree of metabolic acidosis not significantly different from that seen in dogs ingesting a low-salt diet. We suggest that the presence of dietary sodium at distal exchange sites did not enhance acid excretion because it is only after a loss of body sodium stores that sodium avidity is increased sufficiently to allow full removal of the acid load. The present findings indicate that the fundamental factors controlling acid excretion and bicarbonate reabsorption in metabolic acidosis are closely similar to those operative in metabolic alkalosis. PMID:11344560

  4. Non-equilibrium Green's function calculation for GaN-based terahertz-quantum cascade laser structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, H.; Kubis, T.; Hosako, I.; Hirakawa, K.

    2012-04-01

    We theoretically investigated GaN-based resonant phonon terahertz-quantum cascade laser (QCL) structures for possible high-temperature operation by using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. It was found that the GaN-based THz-QCL structures do not necessarily have a gain sufficient for lasing, even though the thermal backfilling and the thermally activated phonon scattering are effectively suppressed. The main reason for this is the broadening of the subband levels caused by a very strong interaction between electrons and longitudinal optical (LO) phonons in GaN.

  5. Lithium abundances of halo dwarfs based on excitation temperatures. II. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosford, A.; García Pérez, A. E.; Collet, R.; Ryan, S. G.; Norris, J. E.; Olive, K. A.

    2010-02-01

    Context. The plateau in the abundance of 7Li in metal-poor stars was initially interpreted as an observational indicator of the primordial lithium abundance. However, this observational value is in disagreement with that deduced from calculations of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), when using the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe (WMAP) baryon density measurements. One of the most important factors in determining the stellar lithium abundance is the effective temperature. In a previous study by the authors, new effective temperatures (Teff) for sixteen metal-poor halo dwarfs were derived using a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) description of the formation of Fe lines. This new Teff scale reinforced the discrepancy. Aims: For six of the stars from our previous study we calculate revised temperatures using a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) approach. These are then used to derive a new mean primordial lithium abundance in an attempt to solve the lithium discrepancy. Methods: Using the code MULTI we calculate NLTE corrections to the LTE abundances for the Fe i lines measured in the six stars, and determine new Teff's. We keep other physical parameters, i.e. log g, [Fe/H] and ξ, constant at the values calculated in Paper I. With the revised Teff scale we derive new Li abundances. We compare the NLTE values of Teff with the photometric temperatures of Ryan et al. (1999, ApJ, 523, 654), the infrared flux method (IRFM) temperatures of Meléndez & Ramírez (2004, ApJ, 615, L33), and the Balmer line wing temperatures of Asplund et al. (2006, ApJ, 644, 229). Results: We find that our temperatures are hotter than both the Ryan et al. and Asplund et al. temperatures by typically ~110-160 K, but are still cooler than the temperatures of Meléndez & Ramírez by typically ~190 K. The temperatures imply a primordial Li abundance of 2.19 dex or 2.21 dex, depending on the magnitude of collisions with hydrogen in the calculations, still well below the value of 2

  6. Equilibrium population dynamics when mating is by mutual choice based on age.

    PubMed

    Alpern, Steve; Katrantzi, Ioanna; Ramsey, David

    2014-06-01

    We consider a steady state model of mutual mate choice in which an individual's mate preferences depend on his/her age, and the preferences are over the ages of prospective mates of the opposite sex. We present a discrete time (and age) model corresponding to successive mating seasons. Males are fertile for m periods (corresponding to 'age' i=1 to m) and females for n≤m periods (they have ages j=1 to n), which is all that distinguishes the sexes. Although we can deal with arbitrary preferences, we concentrate on a simple fertility model where the common utility to a male age i and female age j who mate is the number K=min(m-i+1,n-j+1) of future periods of joint fertility. The incoming sex ratio R of age 1 males to age 1 females is given exogenously. In each period individuals are randomly (non assortatively) matched and form a mated couple by mutual consent; otherwise they go into the next period unmated and older. We derive properties of equilibrium threshold acceptance strategies and establish the existence of time-invariant age distributions. Our methods determine the age distribution of couples at marriage (mating) and the population sex ratio (OSR) at equilibrium. Since this can be determined empirically in a population, our model can be used to rule out most systems of age preferences (those not consistent with the observed distribution). This extends earlier models of mutual choice with one dimensional types of Alpern and Reyniers [1999. Strategic mating with homotypic preferences. J. Theor. Biol. 198, 71-88; 2005. Strategic mating with common preferences. J. Theor. Biol. 237, 337-354] where individuals sought, respectively, individuals with similar or high types, but in those models an individual's type was fixed over time. Under the simple fertility model, at equilibrium the maximum age of an acceptable partner is increasing in the age of the searcher. Our results relate to discussions in the literature regarding optimal parental age differences, age

  7. Equilibrium theory-based analysis of nonlinear waves in separation processes.

    PubMed

    Mazzotti, Marco; Rajendran, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Different areas of engineering, particularly separation process technology, deal with one-dimensional, nonstationary processes that under reasonable assumptions, namely negligible dispersion effects and transport resistances, are described by mathematical models consisting of systems of first-order partial differential equations. Their behavior is characterized by continuous or discontinuous composition (or thermal) fronts that propagate along the separation unit. The equilibrium theory (i.e., the approach discussed here to determine the solution to these model equations) predicts this with remarkable accuracy, despite the simplifications and assumptions. Interesting applications are in adsorption, chromatography and ion-exchange, distillation, gas injection, heat storage, sedimentation, precipitation, and dissolution waves. We show how mathematics can enlighten the engineering aspects, and we guide the researcher not only to reach a synthetic understanding of properties of fundamental and applicative interest but also to discover new, unexpected, and fascinating phenomena. The tools presented here are useful to teachers, researchers, and practitioners alike.

  8. Analysis of the equilibrium droplet shape based on an ellipsoidal droplet model.

    PubMed

    Lubarda, Vlado A; Talke, Kurt A

    2011-09-06

    The extent of a droplet's spreading over a flat, smooth solid substrate and its equilibrium height in the presence of gravity are determined approximately, without a numerical solution of the governing nonlinear differential equation, by assuming that the droplet takes on the shape of an oblate spheroidal cap and by minimizing the corresponding free energy. The comparison with the full numerical evaluations confirms that the introduced approximation and the obtained results are accurate for contact angles below about 120° and for droplet sizes on the order of the capillary length of the liquid. The flattening effect of gravity is to increase the contact radius and decrease the height of the droplet, with these being more pronounced for higher values of the Bond number.

  9. Towards Microeconomic Resource Sharing in End System Multicast Networks Based on Walrasian General Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezvani, Mohammad Hossein; Analoui, Morteza

    2010-11-01

    We have designed a competitive economical mechanism for application level multicast in which a number of independent services are provided to the end-users by a number of origin servers. Each offered service can be thought of as a commodity and the origin servers and the users who relay the service to their downstream nodes can thus be thought of as producers of the economy. Also, the end-users can be viewed as consumers of the economy. The proposed mechanism regulates the price of each service in such a way that general equilibrium holds. So, all allocations will be Pareto optimal in the sense that the social welfare of the users is maximized.

  10. Informational Equilibrium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    that for variouis standard types of equilibria* they hold. In particular, if one uses the teaporary equilibrium framework one can use the standard ...T, the integral converges toward f’ia(da) f fU(b~dc)6(a,b,c)T( asdm ) A B C which is fR (da) f d(lib,c) U0 T (cab) A BxC Me converse Is obvious

  11. Speciation and equilibrium relations of soluble aluminum in a headwater stream at base flow and during rain events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.

    1989-01-01

    In the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, the short-term dynamics of soluble aluminum in stream water sampled during rain events differed significantly from stream water sampled during base flow conditions. Three fractions of dissolved aluminum were measured. The inorganic monomeric fraction made up approximately two thirds of the total reactive aluminum at base flow, followed by the acid-soluble and organic monomeric fractions, respectively. Equilibrium modeling showed that hydroxide complexes were the most abundant form of inorganic monomeric aluminum followed by fluoride, free aluminum ion, and sulfate. The activity of inorganic monomeric aluminum at base flow appears to be in equilibrium with an Al(OH)3 phase with solubility intermediate between microcrystalline gibbsite and natural gibbsite. During two rain events, the concentration of all three aluminum fractions increased significantly. The primary cause of the transient increase in the Al(OH)3 saturation index appears to have been the neutralization of excess H+ added by soil water through reaction with stream water HCO3- at a more rapid rate than excess inorganic monomeric aluminum could be removed from solution by hydroxide mineral precipitation. -from Author

  12. A general library-based Monte Carlo technique enables equilibrium sampling of semi-atomistic protein models

    PubMed Central

    Mamonov, Artem B.; Bhatt, Divesh; Cashman, Derek J.; Ding, Ying; Zuckerman, Daniel M.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce “library based Monte Carlo” (LBMC) simulation, which performs Boltzmann sampling of molecular systems based on pre-calculated statistical libraries of molecular-fragment configurations, energies, and interactions. The library for each fragment can be Boltzmann distributed and thus account for all correlations internal to the fragment. LBMC can be applied to both atomistic and coarse-grained models, as we demonstrate in this “proof of principle” report. We first verify the approach in a toy model and in implicitly solvated poly-alanine systems. We next study five proteins, up to 309 residues in size. Based on atomistic equilibrium libraries of peptide-plane configurations, the proteins are modeled with fully atomistic backbones and simplified Gō-like interactions among residues. We show that full equilibrium sampling can be obtained in days to weeks on a single processor, suggesting that more accurate models are well within reach. For the future, LBMC provides a convenient platform for constructing adjustable or mixed-resolution models: the configurations of all atoms can be stored at no run-time cost, while an arbitrary subset of interactions is “turned on.” PMID:19594147

  13. Phase-equilibrium geobarometers for silicic rocks based on rhyolite-MELTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualda, G. A.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Begue, F.; Pamukcu, A. S.; Gravley, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Constraining the pressure of crystallization of magmas is an important but elusive task. We propose here a method to derive crystallization pressures for rocks that preserve glass compositions (either glass inclusions or matrix glass) representative of equilibration between melt, quartz, and 1 or 2 feldspars. The method relies on the shift of the quartz-feldspar saturation surface towards higher silica with decreasing pressure. The critical realization is that melt, quartz and feldspars need to be in equilibrium at the liquidus for the melt composition of interest. Thus, this method consists of calculating the saturation surfaces for quartz and feldspars using rhyolite-MELTS over a range of pressures, and searching for the pressure at which the expected assemblage (quartz+1 feldspar or quartz+2 feldspars) is found at the liquidus. We evaluate errors resulting from uncertainties in glass composition using Monte Carlo simulations, which reveal errors of ~20-45 MPa for the quartz+2 feldspars constraint and of ~25-100 MPa for the quartz+1 feldspar constraint; actual errors are likely closer to the lower bounds of these ranges. We demonstrate that the effect of fluid-saturation is more important at higher pressures (~300 MPa) than at lower pressures (~100 MPa), but reasonable pressure estimates can be derived irrespective of fluid saturation for geologically relevant H2O concentrations (>3 wt. %). And, we show that pressures calculated using the rhyolite-MELTS geobarometer compare well with those resulting from H2O-CO2 glass inclusion barometry and Al-in-hornblende barometry for an array of natural systems for which data has been compiled from the literature. We apply the rhyolite-MELTS barometer to three systems we are currently studying in detail: (1) For the Bishop Tuff (CA, USA), we find that quartz-hosted glass inclusion compositions yield indistinguishable crystallization pressures for early-erupted and late-erupted pumice, consistent with the Bishop Tuff having

  14. Equilibrium-based movement endpoints elicited from primary motor cortex using repetitive microstimulation.

    PubMed

    Van Acker, Gustaf M; Amundsen, Sommer L; Messamore, William G; Zhang, Hongyu Y; Luchies, Carl W; Cheney, Paul D

    2014-11-19

    High-frequency, long-duration intracortical microstimulation (HFLD-ICMS) is increasingly being used to deduce how the brain encodes coordinated muscle activity and movement. However, the full movement repertoire that can be elicited from the forelimb representation of primary motor cortex (M1) using this method has not been systematically determined. Our goal was to acquire a comprehensive M1 forelimb representational map of movement endpoints elicited with HFLD-ICMS, using stimulus parameters optimal for evoking stable forelimb spatial endpoints. The data reveal a 3D forelimb movement endpoint workspace that is represented in a patchwork fashion on the 2D M1 cortical surface. Although cortical maps of movement endpoints appear quite disorderly with respect to movement space, we show that the endpoint locations in the workspace evoked with HFLD-ICMS of two adjacent cortical points are closer together than would be expected if the organization were random. Although there were few obvious consistencies in the endpoint maps across the two monkeys tested, one notable exception was endpoints bringing the hand to the mouth, which was located at the boundary between the hand and face representation. Endpoints at the extremes of the monkey's workspace and locations above the head were largely absent. Our movement endpoints are best explained as resulting from coactivation of agonist and antagonist muscles driving the joints toward equilibrium positions determined by the length-tension relationships of the muscles. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3415722-13$15.00/0.

  15. Dynamic Acid/Base Equilibrium in Single Component Switchable Ionic Liquids and Consequences on Viscosity.

    PubMed

    Cantu, David C; Lee, Juntaek; Lee, Mal-Soon; Heldebrant, David J; Koech, Phillip K; Freeman, Charles J; Rousseau, Roger; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra

    2016-05-05

    The deployment of transformational nonaqueous CO2-capture solvent systems is encumbered by high viscosities even at intermediate uptakes. Using single-molecule CO2 binding organic liquids as a prototypical example, we present key molecular features that control bulk viscosity. Fast CO2-uptake kinetics arise from close proximity of the alcohol and amine sites involved in CO2 binding in a concerted fashion, resulting in a Zwitterion containing both an alkyl-carbonate and a protonated amine. The population of internal hydrogen bonds between the two functional groups determines the solution viscosity. Unlike the ion pair interactions in ionic liquids, these observations are novel and specific to a hydrogen-bonding network that can be controlled by chemically tuning single molecule CO2 capture solvents. We present a molecular design strategy to reduce viscosity by shifting the proton transfer equilibrium toward a neutral acid/amine species, as opposed to the ubiquitously accepted zwitterionic state. The molecular design concepts proposed here are readily extensible to other CO2 capture technologies.

  16. Equilibrium-Based Movement Endpoints Elicited from Primary Motor Cortex Using Repetitive Microstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Van Acker, Gustaf M.; Amundsen, Sommer L.; Messamore, William G.; Zhang, Hongyu Y.; Luchies, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency, long-duration intracortical microstimulation (HFLD-ICMS) is increasingly being used to deduce how the brain encodes coordinated muscle activity and movement. However, the full movement repertoire that can be elicited from the forelimb representation of primary motor cortex (M1) using this method has not been systematically determined. Our goal was to acquire a comprehensive M1 forelimb representational map of movement endpoints elicited with HFLD-ICMS, using stimulus parameters optimal for evoking stable forelimb spatial endpoints. The data reveal a 3D forelimb movement endpoint workspace that is represented in a patchwork fashion on the 2D M1 cortical surface. Although cortical maps of movement endpoints appear quite disorderly with respect to movement space, we show that the endpoint locations in the workspace evoked with HFLD-ICMS of two adjacent cortical points are closer together than would be expected if the organization were random. Although there were few obvious consistencies in the endpoint maps across the two monkeys tested, one notable exception was endpoints bringing the hand to the mouth, which was located at the boundary between the hand and face representation. Endpoints at the extremes of the monkey's workspace and locations above the head were largely absent. Our movement endpoints are best explained as resulting from coactivation of agonist and antagonist muscles driving the joints toward equilibrium positions determined by the length–tension relationships of the muscles. PMID:25411500

  17. Development of an identification method of pressure anisotropy based on equilibrium analysis and magnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Asahi, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Cooper, W. A.

    2013-02-15

    We evaluate the fluxes measured by the magnetic flux loops installed in LHD by using a three dimensional MHD equilibrium analysis code, ANIMEC, which enable us to directly determine the calibration function between the anisotropic pressure and the measured fluxes for the non-axisymmetric plasmas for the first time. The result indicates that the diamagnetic flux represents a nearly single-valued function of the beta perpendicular with respect to the field, and the saddle loop flux represents a nearly single-valued function of an equally weighted average of the beta values parallel and perpendicular to the field, regardless of the pressure anisotropy or the amount of energetic trapped particles. The values of the beta perpendicular to the field and the equal weighting averaged beta estimated by the single-valued functions (calibration functions) are investigated in order to clarify the magnitude of deviation from those original values, and the range of anisotropy where the beta value evaluated by the magnetic flux measurement is calculated within a 10% error.

  18. Effect of water content on the acid-base equilibrium of cyanidin-3-glucoside.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Isabel B; Freitas, Adilson; Maçanita, António L; Lima, J C

    2015-04-01

    Laser Flash Photolysis was employed to measure the deprotonation and reprotonation rate constants of cyanidin 3-monoglucoside (kuromanin) in water/methanol mixtures. It was found that the deprotonation rate constant kd decreases with decreasing water content, reflecting the lack of free water molecules around kuromanin, which may accommodate and stabilize the outgoing protons. On the other hand, the reprotonation rate constant, kp, increases with the decrease in water concentration from a value of kp = 2 × 10(10) l mol(-1) s(-1) in water up to kp = 6 × 10(10) l mol(-1) s(-1) at 5.6M water concentration in the mixture. The higher value of kp at lower water concentrations reflects the fact that the proton is not freely escaping the solvation shell of the molecule. The deprotonation rate constant decreases with decreasing water content, reflecting the lack of free water molecules around kuromanin that can accommodate the outgoing protons. Overall, the acidity constant of the flavylium cation decreases with the decrease in water concentration from pKa values of 3.8 in water to approximately 4.8 in water-depleted media, thus shifting the equilibrium towards the red-coloured form, AH(+), at low water contents. The presence, or lack, of water, will affect the colour shade (red to blue) of kuromanin. This is relevant for its role as an intrinsic food component and as a food pigment additive (E163).

  19. Predicting the equilibrium protein folding pathway: structure-based analysis of staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed

    Hilser, V J; Freire, E

    1997-02-01

    The equilibrium folding pathway of staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) has been approximated using a statistical thermodynamic formalism that utilizes the high-resolution structure of the native state as a template to generate a large ensemble of partially folded states. Close to 400,000 different states ranging from the native to the completely unfolded states were included in the analysis. The probability of each state was estimated using an empirical structural parametrization of the folding energetics. It is shown that this formalism predicts accurately the stability of the protein, the cooperativity of the folding/unfolding transition observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) or urea denaturation and the thermodynamic parameters for unfolding. More importantly, this formalism provides a quantitative account of the experimental hydrogen exchange protection factors measured under native conditions for SNase. These results suggest that the computer-generated distribution of states approximates well the ensemble of conformations existing in solution. Furthermore, this formalism represents the first model capable of quantitatively predicting within a unified framework the probability distribution of states seen under native conditions and its change upon unfolding.

  20. Comparative analysis of quantum cascade laser modeling based on density matrices and non-equilibrium Green's functions

    SciTech Connect

    Lindskog, M. Wacker, A.; Wolf, J. M.; Liverini, V.; Faist, J.; Trinite, V.; Maisons, G.; Carras, M.; Aidam, R.; Ostendorf, R.

    2014-09-08

    We study the operation of an 8.5 μm quantum cascade laser based on GaInAs/AlInAs lattice matched to InP using three different simulation models based on density matrix (DM) and non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formulations. The latter advanced scheme serves as a validation for the simpler DM schemes and, at the same time, provides additional insight, such as the temperatures of the sub-band carrier distributions. We find that for the particular quantum cascade laser studied here, the behavior is well described by simple quantum mechanical estimates based on Fermi's golden rule. As a consequence, the DM model, which includes second order currents, agrees well with the NEGF results. Both these simulations are in accordance with previously reported data and a second regrown device.

  1. Tropical forests are non-equilibrium ecosystems governed by interspecific competition based on universal 1/6 niche width.

    PubMed

    Fort, Hugo; Inchausti, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Tropical forests are mega-diverse ecosystems that display complex and non-equilibrium dynamics. However, theoretical approaches have largely focused on explaining steady-state behaviour and fitting snapshots of data. Here we show that local and niche interspecific competition can realistically and parsimoniously explain the observed non-equilibrium regime of permanent plots of nine tropical forests, in eight different countries. Our spatially-explicit model, besides predicting with accuracy the main biodiversity metrics for these plots, can also reproduce their dynamics. A central finding is that tropical tree species have a universal niche width of approximately 1/6 of the niche axis that echoes the observed widespread convergence in their functional traits enabling them to exploit similar resources and to coexist despite of having large niche overlap. This niche width yields an average ratio of 0.25 between interspecific and intraspecific competition that corresponds to an intermediate value between the extreme claims of the neutral model and the classical niche-based model of community assembly (where interspecific competition is dominant). In addition, our model can explain and yield observed spatial patterns that classical niche-based and neutral theories cannot.

  2. Generator Control Based on Equilibrium Point Analysis of Standard One-Machine Infinite-Bus System Model—Comparison with PSS—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Shunji; Zhang, Jian; Yamamoto, Hiroyoshi; Fujimoto, Koji

    We have recently proposed a new controller based on the equilibrium point analysis for model power systems. In this paper, first the Japanese standard one-machine infinite-bus system model is formulated, and the equilibrium points are analyzed. Next, complementary control inputs for AVR and GOV with limiters of the model system are determined on the basis of the analysis. Finally, it is shown that the unstable equilibrium point is eliminated by adding the proposed inputs, and then the critical clearing time can be improved in comparison with PSS of the standard model.

  3. Comparative Analysis of the Flax Immune Receptors L6 and L7 Suggests an Equilibrium-Based Switch Activation Model.

    PubMed

    Bernoux, Maud; Burdett, Hayden; Williams, Simon J; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Chunhong; Newell, Kim; Lawrence, Gregory J; Kobe, Bostjan; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Anderson, Peter A; Dodds, Peter N

    2016-01-01

    NOD-like receptors (NLRs) are central components of the plant immune system. L6 is a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing NLR from flax (Linum usitatissimum) conferring immunity to the flax rust fungus. Comparison of L6 to the weaker allele L7 identified two polymorphic regions in the TIR and the nucleotide binding (NB) domains that regulate both effector ligand-dependent and -independent cell death signaling as well as nucleotide binding to the receptor. This suggests that a negative functional interaction between the TIR and NB domains holds L7 in an inactive/ADP-bound state more tightly than L6, hence decreasing its capacity to adopt the active/ATP-bound state and explaining its weaker activity in planta. L6 and L7 variants with a more stable ADP-bound state failed to bind to AvrL567 in yeast two-hybrid assays, while binding was detected to the signaling active variants. This contrasts with current models predicting that effectors bind to inactive receptors to trigger activation. Based on the correlation between nucleotide binding, effector interaction, and immune signaling properties of L6/L7 variants, we propose that NLRs exist in an equilibrium between ON and OFF states and that effector binding to the ON state stabilizes this conformation, thereby shifting the equilibrium toward the active form of the receptor to trigger defense signaling. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative Analysis of the Flax Immune Receptors L6 and L7 Suggests an Equilibrium-Based Switch Activation Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunhong; Newell, Kim; Lawrence, Gregory J.; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Anderson, Peter A.; Dodds, Peter N.

    2016-01-01

    NOD-like receptors (NLRs) are central components of the plant immune system. L6 is a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing NLR from flax (Linum usitatissimum) conferring immunity to the flax rust fungus. Comparison of L6 to the weaker allele L7 identified two polymorphic regions in the TIR and the nucleotide binding (NB) domains that regulate both effector ligand-dependent and -independent cell death signaling as well as nucleotide binding to the receptor. This suggests that a negative functional interaction between the TIR and NB domains holds L7 in an inactive/ADP-bound state more tightly than L6, hence decreasing its capacity to adopt the active/ATP-bound state and explaining its weaker activity in planta. L6 and L7 variants with a more stable ADP-bound state failed to bind to AvrL567 in yeast two-hybrid assays, while binding was detected to the signaling active variants. This contrasts with current models predicting that effectors bind to inactive receptors to trigger activation. Based on the correlation between nucleotide binding, effector interaction, and immune signaling properties of L6/L7 variants, we propose that NLRs exist in an equilibrium between ON and OFF states and that effector binding to the ON state stabilizes this conformation, thereby shifting the equilibrium toward the active form of the receptor to trigger defense signaling. PMID:26744216

  5. A DFT based equilibrium study of a chemical mixture Tachyhydrite and their lower hydrates for long term heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A. D.; Nedea, S. V.; Zondag, H. A.; Rindt, C. C. M.; Smeulders, D. M. J.

    2016-09-01

    Chloride based salt hydrates are promising materials for seasonal heat storage. However, hydrolysis, a side reaction, deteriorates, their cycle stability. To improve the kinetics and durability, we have investigated the optimum operating conditions of a chemical mixture of CaCl2 and MgCl2 hydrates. In this study, we apply a GGA-DFT to gain insight into the various hydrates of CaMg2Cl6. We have obtained the structural properties, atomic charges and vibrational frequencies of CaMg2Cl6 hydrates. The entropic contribution and the enthalpy change are quantified from ground state energy and harmonic frequencies. Subsequently, the change in the Gibbs free energy of thermolysis was obtained under a wide range of temperature and pressure. The equilibrium product concentration of thermolysis can be used to design the seasonal heat storage system under different operating conditions.

  6. Design and Quasi-Equilibrium Analysis of a Distributed Frequency-Restoration Controller for Inverter-Based Microgrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, Nathan G; Grijalva, Prof. Santiago

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a proposed frequency restoration controller which operates as an outer loop to frequency droop for voltage-source inverters. By quasi-equilibrium analysis, we show that the proposed controller is able to provide arbitrarily small steady-state frequency error while maintaing power sharing between inverters without need for communication or centralized control. We derive rate of convergence, discuss design considerations (including a fundamental trade-off that must be made in design), present a design procedure to meet a maximum frequency error requirement, and show simulation results verifying our analysis and design method. The proposed controller will allow flexible plug-and-play inverter-based networks to meet a specified maximum frequency error requirement.

  7. Acid-base equilibrium during capnoretroperitoneoscopic nephrectomy in patients with end-stage renal failure: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Demian, A D; Esmail, O M; Atallah, M M

    2000-04-01

    We have studied the acid-base equilibrium in 12 patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF) during capnoretroperitoneoscopic nephrectomy. Bupivacaine (12 mL, 0.375%) and morphine (2mg) were given in the lumbar epidural space, and fentanyl (0.5 microg kg(-1)) and midazolam (50 microg kg(-1)) were given intravenously. Anaesthesia was induced by thiopental, maintained with halothane carried by oxygen enriched air (inspired oxygen fraction = 0.35), and ventilation was achieved with a tidal volume of 10 mL kg(-1) at a rate of 12 min(-1). This procedure resulted in a mild degree of respiratory acidosis that was cleared within 60 min. We conclude that capnoretroperitoneoscopic nephrectomy can be performed in patients with end-stage renal failure with minimal transient respiratory acidosis that can be avoided by increased ventilation.

  8. Application of equilibrium chemistry and the Williamsburg equation of state to HMX-based explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, M.; Swift, D. C.

    1999-06-01

    Thermodynamic equations of state have been demonstrated to give reasonable predictions of the species and states in the reaction products of energetic materials. The Williamsburg is a physically-based algebraic form for an equation of state. The Williamsburg is being used to interpolate and extrapolate a wide-ranging equation of state from a smaller set of chemical calculations of HMX-based explosives. These equations of state will be compared with experiments on explosive performance. Extensions to the Williamsburg form, necessary to treat processes such as carbon condensation in TATB-based explosives, will be discussed.

  9. Why and How To Teach Acid-Base Reactions without Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Terry S.

    1997-01-01

    Recommends an approach to the treatment of acid-base equilibria that involves treating each reaction as either going to completion or not occurring at all. Compares the method with the traditional approach step by step. (DDR)

  10. Immunity by equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Eberl, Gérard

    2016-08-01

    The classical model of immunity posits that the immune system reacts to pathogens and injury and restores homeostasis. Indeed, a century of research has uncovered the means and mechanisms by which the immune system recognizes danger and regulates its own activity. However, this classical model does not fully explain complex phenomena, such as tolerance, allergy, the increased prevalence of inflammatory pathologies in industrialized nations and immunity to multiple infections. In this Essay, I propose a model of immunity that is based on equilibrium, in which the healthy immune system is always active and in a state of dynamic equilibrium between antagonistic types of response. This equilibrium is regulated both by the internal milieu and by the microbial environment. As a result, alteration of the internal milieu or microbial environment leads to immune disequilibrium, which determines tolerance, protective immunity and inflammatory pathology.

  11. Mechanistic Sediment Quality Guidelines Based on Contaminant Bioavailability: Equilibrium Partitioning Sediment Benchmarks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Globally, billions of metric tons of contaminated sediments are present in aquatic systems representing a potentially significant ecological risk. Estimated costs to manage (i.e., remediate and monitor) these sediments are in the billions of U.S. dollars. Biologically-based app...

  12. Mechanistic Sediment Quality Guidelines Based on Contaminant Bioavailability: Equilibrium Partitioning Sediment Benchmarks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Globally, billions of metric tons of contaminated sediments are present in aquatic systems representing a potentially significant ecological risk. Estimated costs to manage (i.e., remediate and monitor) these sediments are in the billions of U.S. dollars. Biologically-based app...

  13. Active Learning Session Based on Didactical Engineering Framework for Conceptual Change in Students' Equilibrium and Stability Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canu, Michael; Duque, Mauricio; de Hosson, Cécile

    2017-01-01

    Engineering students on control courses lack a deep understanding of equilibrium and stability that are crucial concepts in this discipline. Several studies have shown that students find it difficult to understand simple familiar or academic static equilibrium cases as well as dynamic ones from mechanics even if they know the discipline's criteria…

  14. Active Learning Session Based on Didactical Engineering Framework for Conceptual Change in Students' Equilibrium and Stability Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canu, Michael; Duque, Mauricio; de Hosson, Cécile

    2017-01-01

    Engineering students on control courses lack a deep understanding of equilibrium and stability that are crucial concepts in this discipline. Several studies have shown that students find it difficult to understand simple familiar or academic static equilibrium cases as well as dynamic ones from mechanics even if they know the discipline's criteria…

  15. [Changes in acid-base equilibrium and water-electrolyte balance in hepatic cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Giudici Cipriani, A; Marenco, G

    1979-04-30

    The acid-base and hydroelectrolyte balance were evaluated in 116 patients with cirrhosis of the liver divided (a posteriori) into subjects without ascites, those with tractable ascites, and those with intractable ascites. Alterations were much earlier and more frequent in the pre-ascitic stage. A fall in arterial blood O2 tension also proved a poor prognostic factor. The water load test and 24-hr determination of natriuria best reflected the clinical picture and should thus act as pointers to the correct planning of treatment.

  16. Chemical Equilibrium, Unit 4: Equilibria in Acid-Base Systems. A Computer-Enriched Module for Introductory Chemistry. Student's Guide and Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Settle, Frank A., Jr.

    Presented are the teacher's guide and student materials for one of a series of self-instructional, computer-based learning modules for an introductory, undergraduate chemistry course. The student manual for this acid-base equilibria unit includes objectives, prerequisites, pretest, a discussion of equilibrium constants, and 20 problem sets.…

  17. Adair-based hemoglobin equilibrium with oxygen, carbon dioxide and hydrogen ion activity.

    PubMed

    Mateják, Marek; Kulhánek, Tomáš; Matoušek, Stanislav

    2015-04-01

    As has been known for over a century, oxygen binding onto hemoglobin is influenced by the activity of hydrogen ions (H⁺), as well as the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO₂). As is also known, the binding of both CO₂and H⁺ on terminal valine-1 residues is competitive. One-parametric situations of these hemoglobin equilibria at specific levels of H⁺, O₂or CO₂are also well described. However, we think interpolating or extrapolating this knowledge into an 'empirical' function of three independent variables has not yet been completely satisfactory. We present a model that integrates three orthogonal views of hemoglobin oxygenation, titration, and carbamination at different temperatures. The model is based only on chemical principles, Adair's oxygenation steps and Van't Hoff equation of temperature dependences. Our model fits the measurements of the Haldane coefficient and CO₂hemoglobin saturation. It also fits the oxygen dissociation curve influenced by simultaneous changes in H⁺, CO₂and O₂, which makes it a strong candidate for integration into more complex models of blood acid-base with gas transport, where any combination of mentioned substances can appear.

  18. [Annual dynamics of acid-base equilibrium indices in dairy cows].

    PubMed

    Bartko, P; Vrzgula, L; Michna, A; Rysul'ová, D

    1980-10-01

    Annual dynamics of the indices of acid-base homeostasis of blood was studied in dairy cows in two production regions, the corn production region and the potato-grain production region; venous blood was examined gasometrically by the Astrup apparatus. The examinations were performed eight times during the year and pH, pCO2, BE, PB, SB, AB and tCO2 were studied. In dairy cows from the corn production region lower values of the studied parameters were obtained than in dairy cows oriented to similar milk production in the potato-grain production region. In the corn production region besides the normal values also the lower values of the indices of acid-base balance were found, indicating the incidence of latent metabolic acidosis. A particularly critical situation occurred in the herd from the corn production region in September when the average value of blood pH was 7.35 logmolc and the following disorders were observed: clinical symptoms of metabolic acidosis, drop of milk yield, drop of milk fat content, hypomagnesemia and hypocalcemia as disorders of the mineral metabolism.

  19. Estimates of sustainable agricultural water use in northern China based on the equilibrium of groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yali, Y.; Yu, C.

    2015-12-01

    The northern plain is the important food production region in China. However, due to the lack of surface water resources, it needs overmuch exploitation of groundwater to maintain water use in agriculture, which leads to serious environmental problems. Based on the assumption that the reserves of groundwater matches the statistics and keeps on stable, the author explores the reasonable agricultural water and its spatial distribution based on the principle of sustainable utilization of water resources. According to the priorities of water resources allocation (domestic water and ecological water>industrial water>agricultural water), it is proposed to reduce agricultural water use to balance the groundwater reserves on condition that the total water supply is constant. Method: Firstly, we calculate annual average of northern groundwater reserves changes from 2004 to 2010, which is regarded as the reduction of agricultural water; Then, we estimate the food production changes using variables of typical crop water requirements and unit yields assuming that the efficiency of water use keeps the same during the entire study period; Finally, we evaluate the usage of sustainable agricultural water. The results reveal that there is a significant reduction of groundwater reserves in Haihe river basin and Xinjiang oasis regions; And the annual loss of the corn and wheat production is about 1.86 billion kg and 700 million kg respectively due to the reduction of agricultural water; What's more, in order to ensure China's food security and sustainable agricultural water use, in addition to great efforts to develop water-saving agriculture, an important adjustment in the distribution of food production is in need. This study provided a basis to the availability of agricultural water and a new perspective was put forth for an estimation of agricultural water.

  20. Force-based optimization of pseudopotentials for non-equilibrium configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Casey N.; Paikoff, Brandon C.; Md Sallih, Muhammad I.; Tackett, Alan R.; Walker, D. Greg

    2016-04-01

    We have used a multi-objective genetic algorithm to optimize pseudopotentials for force accuracy and computational efficiency. Force accuracy is determined by comparing interatomic forces generated using the pseudopotentials and forces generated using the full-potential linearized augmented-plane wave method. This force-based optimization approach is motivated by applications where interatomic forces are important, including material interfaces, crystal defects, and molecular dynamics. Our method generates Pareto sets of optimized pseudopotentials containing various compromises between accuracy and efficiency. We have tested our method for LiF, Si0.5Ge0.5, and Mo and compared the performance of our pseudopotentials with pseudopotentials available from the ABINIT library. We show that the optimization can generate pseudopotentials with comparable accuracy (in terms of force matching and equation of state) to pseudopotentials in the literature while sometimes significantly improving computational efficiency. For example, we generated pseudopotentials for one system tested that reduced computational work by 71% without loss of accuracy. These results suggest our method can be used to generate pseudopotentials on demand that are tuned for a user's specific application, affording gains in computational efficiency.

  1. Removal of Disperse Red dye by bamboo-based activated carbon: optimisation, kinetics and equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lianggui

    2013-07-01

    This research involved the use of response surface methodology (RSM) to investigate the adsorption of Disperse Red 167 dye onto the bamboo-based activated carbon activated with H3PO4 (PBAC) in a batch process. F400, a commercially available activated carbon, was used in parallel for comparison. Analysis of variance showed that input variables such as the contact time, temperature, adsorbent dosage and the interaction between the temperature and the contact time had a significant effect on the dye removal for both adsorbents. RSM results show that the optimal contact time, temperature, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage for both adsorbents were found to be 15.4 h, 50 °C, 50.0 mg L(-1) and 12.0 g L(-1), respectively. Under these optimal conditions, the removal efficiencies reached 90.23% and 92.13% for PBAC and F400, respectively, with a desirability of 0.937. The validation of the experimental results confirmed the prediction of the models derived from RSM. The adsorption followed a nonlinear pseudo-first-order model and agreed well with the Freundlich and Temkin isotherm as judged by the levels of the AICc and the Akaike weight. Furthermore, the thermodynamics analysis indicated that, for both adsorbents, the adsorption was a physical process that was spontaneous, entropy-increasing and endothermic.

  2. Modeling the Non-Equilibrium Process of the Chemical Adsorption of Ammonia on GaN(0001) Reconstructed Surfaces Based on Steepest-Entropy-Ascent Quantum Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kusaba, Akira; von Spakovsky, Michael R.; Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kakimoto, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Clearly understanding elementary growth processes that depend on surface reconstruction is essential to controlling vapor-phase epitaxy more precisely. In this study, ammonia chemical adsorption on GaN(0001) reconstructed surfaces under metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) conditions (3Ga-H and Nad-H + Ga-H on a 2 × 2 unit cell) is investigated using steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics (SEAQT). SEAQT is a thermodynamic-ensemble based, first-principles framework that can predict the behavior of non-equilibrium processes, even those far from equilibrium where the state evolution is a combination of reversible and irreversible dynamics. SEAQT is an ideal choice to handle this problem on a first-principles basis since the chemical adsorption process starts from a highly non-equilibrium state. A result of the analysis shows that the probability of adsorption on 3Ga-H is significantly higher than that on Nad-H + Ga-H. Additionally, the growth temperature dependence of these adsorption probabilities and the temperature increase due to the heat of reaction is determined. The non-equilibrium thermodynamic modeling applied can lead to better control of the MOVPE process through the selection of preferable reconstructed surfaces. The modeling also demonstrates the efficacy of DFT-SEAQT coupling for determining detailed non-equilibrium process characteristics with a much smaller computational burden than would be entailed with mechanics-based, microscopic-mesoscopic approaches. PMID:28809816

  3. Modeling the Non-Equilibrium Process of the Chemical Adsorption of Ammonia on GaN(0001) Reconstructed Surfaces Based on Steepest-Entropy-Ascent Quantum Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kusaba, Akira; Li, Guanchen; von Spakovsky, Michael R; Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kakimoto, Koichi

    2017-08-15

    Clearly understanding elementary growth processes that depend on surface reconstruction is essential to controlling vapor-phase epitaxy more precisely. In this study, ammonia chemical adsorption on GaN(0001) reconstructed surfaces under metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) conditions (3Ga-H and Nad-H + Ga-H on a 2 × 2 unit cell) is investigated using steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics (SEAQT). SEAQT is a thermodynamic-ensemble based, first-principles framework that can predict the behavior of non-equilibrium processes, even those far from equilibrium where the state evolution is a combination of reversible and irreversible dynamics. SEAQT is an ideal choice to handle this problem on a first-principles basis since the chemical adsorption process starts from a highly non-equilibrium state. A result of the analysis shows that the probability of adsorption on 3Ga-H is significantly higher than that on Nad-H + Ga-H. Additionally, the growth temperature dependence of these adsorption probabilities and the temperature increase due to the heat of reaction is determined. The non-equilibrium thermodynamic modeling applied can lead to better control of the MOVPE process through the selection of preferable reconstructed surfaces. The modeling also demonstrates the efficacy of DFT-SEAQT coupling for determining detailed non-equilibrium process characteristics with a much smaller computational burden than would be entailed with mechanics-based, microscopic-mesoscopic approaches.

  4. Uncertainty analysis for an equilibrium partitioning-based estimator of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon bioaccumulation potential in sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.U.; McFarland, V.A.

    2000-02-01

    In regulatory evaluations of contaminated sediments, an equilibrium partitioning-based screening test called theoretical bioaccumulation potential (TBP) is often performed to estimate the probable concentrations of neutral organic contaminants that would eventually accumulate in aquatic organisms from continuous exposure to a sediment. The TBP is calculated from contaminant concentration and organic carbon content of the sediment, lipid content of target organisms, and a partition coefficient, usually the biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF). However, routine applications of TBP have not included analysis of uncertainty. This paper demonstrates two methods for uncertainty analysis of TBP: a computational method that incorporates random and systematic error and a simulation method using bootstrap resampling of replicated model input parameters to calculate statistical uncertainty measures. For prediction of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bioaccumulation in bivalves exposed to contaminated sediments, uncertainty as a factor of TBP ranged from 1.2 to 4.8 using the computational method and 0.5 to 1.9 based on bootstrap 95% confidence intervals. Sensitivity analysis indicated that BSAF parameters, especially tissue contaminant concentration and lipid content, contributed most to TBP uncertainty. In bootstrap tests of significance, TBP significantly over- or underestimated actual PAH bioaccumulation in bivalves in 41% and 10% of comparisons, respectively.

  5. Prediction of the Chapman-Jouguet chemical equilibrium state in a detonation wave from first principles based reactive molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dezhou; Zybin, Sergey V; An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-01-21

    The combustion or detonation of reacting materials at high temperature and pressure can be characterized by the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state that describes the chemical equilibrium of the products at the end of the reaction zone of the detonation wave for sustained detonation. This provides the critical properties and product kinetics for input to macroscale continuum simulations of energetic materials. We propose the ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics to CJ point protocol (Rx2CJ) for predicting the CJ state parameters, providing the means to predict the performance of new materials prior to synthesis and characterization, allowing the simulation based design to be done in silico. Our Rx2CJ method is based on atomistic reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) using the QM-derived ReaxFF force field. We validate this method here by predicting the CJ point and detonation products for three typical energetic materials. We find good agreement between the predicted and experimental detonation velocities, indicating that this method can reliably predict the CJ state using modest levels of computation.

  6. Non-equilibrium Green's function calculation of AlGaAs-well-based and GaSb-based terahertz quantum cascade laser structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, H. Hosako, I.

    2015-03-16

    We investigate the performance of terahertz quantum cascade lasers (THz-QCLs) based on Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1−y}As and GaSb/AlGaSb material systems to realize higher-temperature operation. Calculations with the non-equilibrium Green's function method reveal that the AlGaAs-well-based THz-QCLs do not show improved performance, mainly because of alloy scattering in the ternary compound semiconductor. The GaSb-based THz-QCLs offer clear advantages over GaAs-based THz-QCLs. Weaker longitudinal optical phonon–electron interaction in GaSb produces higher peaks in the spectral functions of the lasing levels, which enables more electrons to be accumulated in the upper lasing level.

  7. Nonlinear relative-proportion-based route adjustment process for day-to-day traffic dynamics: modeling, equilibrium and stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenlong; Ma, Shoufeng; Tian, Junfang; Li, Geng

    2016-11-01

    Travelers' route adjustment behaviors in a congested road traffic network are acknowledged as a dynamic game process between them. Existing Proportional-Switch Adjustment Process (PSAP) models have been extensively investigated to characterize travelers' route choice behaviors; PSAP has concise structure and intuitive behavior rule. Unfortunately most of which have some limitations, i.e., the flow over adjustment problem for the discrete PSAP model, the absolute cost differences route adjustment problem, etc. This paper proposes a relative-Proportion-based Route Adjustment Process (rePRAP) maintains the advantages of PSAP and overcomes these limitations. The rePRAP describes the situation that travelers on higher cost route switch to those with lower cost at the rate that is unilaterally depended on the relative cost differences between higher cost route and its alternatives. It is verified to be consistent with the principle of the rational behavior adjustment process. The equivalence among user equilibrium, stationary path flow pattern and stationary link flow pattern is established, which can be applied to judge whether a given network traffic flow has reached UE or not by detecting the stationary or non-stationary state of link flow pattern. The stability theorem is proved by the Lyapunov function approach. A simple example is tested to demonstrate the effectiveness of the rePRAP model.

  8. The Gellyfish: An In-Situ Equilibrium-Based Sampler for Determining Multiple Free Metal Ion Concentrations in Marine Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhao; Lewis, Christopher G.; Burgess, Robert M.; Shine, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Free metal ions are usually the most bioavailable and toxic metal species to aquatic organisms, but they are difficult to measure due to their extremely low concentrations in the marine environment. Many of the current methods for determining free metal ions are complicated, time-consuming, and can only measure one metal at a time. We developed a new version of the ‘Gellyfish’, an in-situ equilibrium-based sampler, with significantly reduced equilibration time and the capability of measuring multiple free metal ions simultaneously. By calibrating the Gellyfish to account for its uptake of cationic metal complexes and validating them in multi-metal competition experiments, we were able to determine free metal ion concentrations previously collected over ten months at five locations in Boston Harbor for Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, and Cd. This work generated one of the largest free metal ion datasets and demonstrated the applicability of the Gellyfish as an easy-to-use and inexpensive tool for monitoring free ion concentrations of metal mixtures in marine ecosystems. PMID:25598362

  9. A study of the scour-fill threshold based on Lane's equilibrium relation: The lower Yellow River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiongxin

    2015-12-01

    The scour-fill threshold in river channels is an expression of scour-fill equilibrium, which may be understood as the balance between the river's sediment carrying capability and the sediment load imposed by the drainage basin. In the present study, the above capability-load relation is quantified using Lane's relation, γQJ-QsD50, wherein Q is water discharge, J is channel slope, Qs is sediment transport rate, D50 is median size of bed material, and γ is the specific weight of water. On this basis, we have established scour-fill thresholds for the lower Yellow River based on data from 141 flood events. The results show that the QsD50-γQJ relation may well distinguish between the scour and fill flood events. The following equation has been established: SDRFE = 0.00099(γQJ)0.90(QsD50)- 0.60, wherein SDRFE is channel sediment delivery ratio. From the equation, the scour-fill threshold is established as: QsD50 = 0.00001(γQJ)1.5. Starting from this formula, four possible options are proposed for sediment management of the lower Yellow River.

  10. Accelerating Multiagent Reinforcement Learning by Equilibrium Transfer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yujing; Gao, Yang; An, Bo

    2015-07-01

    An important approach in multiagent reinforcement learning (MARL) is equilibrium-based MARL, which adopts equilibrium solution concepts in game theory and requires agents to play equilibrium strategies at each state. However, most existing equilibrium-based MARL algorithms cannot scale due to a large number of computationally expensive equilibrium computations (e.g., computing Nash equilibria is PPAD-hard) during learning. For the first time, this paper finds that during the learning process of equilibrium-based MARL, the one-shot games corresponding to each state's successive visits often have the same or similar equilibria (for some states more than 90% of games corresponding to successive visits have similar equilibria). Inspired by this observation, this paper proposes to use equilibrium transfer to accelerate equilibrium-based MARL. The key idea of equilibrium transfer is to reuse previously computed equilibria when each agent has a small incentive to deviate. By introducing transfer loss and transfer condition, a novel framework called equilibrium transfer-based MARL is proposed. We prove that although equilibrium transfer brings transfer loss, equilibrium-based MARL algorithms can still converge to an equilibrium policy under certain assumptions. Experimental results in widely used benchmarks (e.g., grid world game, soccer game, and wall game) show that the proposed framework: 1) not only significantly accelerates equilibrium-based MARL (up to 96.7% reduction in learning time), but also achieves higher average rewards than algorithms without equilibrium transfer and 2) scales significantly better than algorithms without equilibrium transfer when the state/action space grows and the number of agents increases.

  11. Equilibrium Constants You Can Smell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Michael; Buckley, Amy

    1996-01-01

    Presents a simple experiment involving the sense of smell that students can accomplish during a lecture. Illustrates the important concepts of equilibrium along with the acid/base properties of various ions. (JRH)

  12. Robustness and management adaptability in tropical rangelands: a viability-based assessment under the non-equilibrium paradigm.

    PubMed

    Accatino, F; Sabatier, R; De Michele, C; Ward, D; Wiegand, K; Meyer, K M

    2014-08-01

    Rangelands provide the main forage resource for livestock in many parts of the world, but maintaining long-term productivity and providing sufficient income for the rancher remains a challenge. One key issue is to maintain the rangeland in conditions where the rancher has the greatest possibility to adapt his/her management choices to a highly fluctuating and uncertain environment. In this study, we address management robustness and adaptability, which increase the resilience of a rangeland. After reviewing how the concept of resilience evolved in parallel to modelling views on rangelands, we present a dynamic model of rangelands to which we applied the mathematical framework of viability theory to quantify the management adaptability of the system in a stochastic environment. This quantification is based on an index that combines the robustness of the system to rainfall variability and the ability of the rancher to adjust his/her management through time. We evaluated the adaptability for four possible scenarios combining two rainfall regimes (high or low) with two herding strategies (grazers only or mixed herd). Results show that pure grazing is viable only for high-rainfall regimes, and that the use of mixed-feeder herds increases the adaptability of the management. The management is the most adaptive with mixed herds and in rangelands composed of an intermediate density of trees and grasses. In such situations, grass provides high quantities of biomass and woody plants ensure robustness to droughts. Beyond the implications for management, our results illustrate the relevance of viability theory for addressing the issue of robustness and adaptability in non-equilibrium environments.

  13. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift.

  14. Nonlinear Generator Control Based on Equilibrium Point Analysis for Standard One-Machine Infinite-Bus System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Fujimoto, Koji; Kawamoto, Shunji

    The aim of this letter is to show that the unstable equilibrium point of the Japanese standard one-machine infinite-bus system model is eliminated by adding a simple nonlinear complementary control input to the AVR, and then the critical clearing time of the system can be more enhanced in comparison with the PSS by introducing the proposed nonlinear generator control.

  15. A Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy application based on Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium assumption for the elemental analysis of alexandrite gemstone and copper-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Giacomo, A.; Dell'Aglio, M.; Gaudiuso, R.; Santagata, A.; Senesi, G. S.; Rossi, M.; Ghiara, M. R.; Capitelli, F.; De Pascale, O.

    2012-04-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an appealing technique to study laser-induced plasmas (LIPs), both from the basic diagnostics point of view and for analytical applications. LIPs are complex dynamic systems, expanding at supersonic velocities and undergoing a transition between different plasma regimes. If the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) condition is valid for such plasmas, several analytical methods can be employed and fast quantitative analyses can be performed on a variety of samples. In the present paper, a discussion about LTE is carried out and an innovative application to the analysis of the alexandrite gemstone is presented. In addition, a study about the influence of plasma parameters on the performance of LTE-based methods is reported for bronze and brass targets.

  16. [Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in genetic epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Hu, Yonghua

    2010-01-01

    Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test is the base of genetic epidemiology. The new methods for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test involve: X chromosome-linked single nucleotide polymorphism Hardy-Weinberg test, inbreeding coefficient (F) test, an incomplete enumeration algorithm for an exact test of Hardy-Weinberg proportions with multiple alleles, and graphical tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium based on the ternary plot. It is necessary to conduct Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test in genetic epidemiology studies and adjust the associations as deviation of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium occurs.

  17. NMR spectroscopic studies of a TAT-derived model peptide in imidazolium-based ILs: influence on chemical shifts and the cis/trans equilibrium state.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Mrestani-Klaus, Carmen; Bordusa, Frank

    2017-09-13

    NMR spectroscopy was used to study systematically the impact of imidazolium-based ionic liquid (IL) solutions on a TAT-derived model peptide containing Xaa-Pro peptide bonds. The selected IL anions cover a wide range of the Hofmeister series of ions. Based on highly resolved one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra individual (1)H and (13)C peptide chemical shift differences were analysed and a classification of IL anions according to the Hofmeister series was derived. The observed chemical shift changes indicate significant interactions between the peptide and the ILs. In addition, we examined the impact of different ILs towards the cis/trans equilibrium state of the Xaa-Pro peptide bonds. In this context, the IL cations appear to be of exceptional importance for inducing an alteration of the native cis/trans equilibrium state of Xaa-Pro bonds in favour of the trans-isomers.

  18. Determination of equilibrium constants and computational interaction energies for adducts of [Rh2(RCO2)(4-n)(PC)n] (n = 0-2) with Lewis bases.

    PubMed

    Hirva, Pipsa; Esteban, Julio; Lloret, Julio; Lahuerta, Pascual; Pérez-Prieto, Julia

    2007-04-02

    Properties of dirhodium catalysts with cyclometalated aryl phosphine ligands have been studied. We report here the study of the acid-base reaction of Rh2(RCO2)2(PC)2(H2O)2 catalysts (PC = cyclometalated aryl phosphine) with different Lewis bases. The determination of the equilibrium constants of these reactions can be used to study to which extent the properties of the axial coordination site of the catalyst, considered the active site, are affected by modification of the metalated phosphines, the carboxylate ligands, or the incoming axial ligand. The trends in the computational density functional theory interaction energies show good agreement with the major trends in the equilibrium constants, thus enabling a further study of the influence of the modification of the ligand core.

  19. Equilibrium sampling by re-weighting non-equilibrium simulation trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting

    2015-12-01

    With the traditional equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space in complex systems, which are separated into some metastable conformational regions by high free energy barriers. The applied non-equilibrium process in simulations could enhance the transitions among these conformational regions, and the associated non-equilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE), then the global equilibrium distribution can be reproduced. However, the original JE requires the initial distribution of the non-equilibrium process is equilibrium, which largely limits the application of the non-equilibrium method in equilibrium sampling. By extending the previous method, the reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED), which re-weights many equilibrium simulation trajectories from arbitrary initial distribution to reproduce the global equilibrium, to non-equilibrium simulations, we present a method, named as re-weighted non-equilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to generalize the JE in the non-equilibrium trajectories started from an arbitrary initial distribution, thus provide an efficient method to reproduce the equilibrium distribution based on multiple independent (short) non-equilibrium trajectories. We have illustrated the validity of the RNED in a one-dimensional toy model and in a Lennard-Jones system to detect the liquid-solid phase coexistence.

  20. Non-equilibrium Statistical Mechanics Based on the Free Energy Landscape and Its Application to Glassy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagaki, Takashi

    2017-08-01

    Extending the concept of the Ginzburg-Landau theory of phase transition to non-equilibrium systems, I present a free energy landscape (FEL) formalism of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and show that the FEL formalism provides a framework for unified description of thermodynamic and dynamic properties of non-equilibrium systems. I first show that a conditional free energy Φ (T,V,N,{ Ri} ) can be defined as a function of configuration {Ri} of a given average position of atoms so that the probability of finding the configuration {Ri} is in proportion to \\exp [ - Φ (T,V,N,{ Ri} )/kBT]. Thermodynamic quantities in quasi-equilibrium states are given by their average over the configuration, and the temperature dependence of the FEL manifests itself in the temperature derivatives of thermodynamic quantities. As an example, I discuss the entropy and the specific heat, focusing on the contributions due to configuration and the temperature dependence of the FEL, and show that an additional contribution due to the temperature dependence of the FEL exists in the specific heat. I generalize the FEL formalism so that time dependent phenomena can be analyzed in a frame work similar to the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory. I introduce a time-dependent probability function of configuration and describe its time dependence by a Fokker-Planck equation which guarantees that the probability function satisfies the initial condition and the proper long-time limit. The time dependence of a physical quantity is given by its average over the time-dependent distribution function. In order to show the robustness of the FEL formalism in explaining thermodynamic and dynamic effects in a unified frame work, I discuss several phenomena found in super-cooled liquids on the basis of the FEL formalism which includes glass transition singularities, slow relaxations, cooling rate dependence of the specific heat, the ac specific heat, temperature dependence of the crystallization time and

  1. Understanding of surface pit formation mechanism of GaN grown in MOCVD based on local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi-Yuan, Gao; Xiao-Wei, Xue; Jiang-Jiang, Li; Xun, Wang; Yan-Hui, Xing; Bi-Feng, Cui; De-Shu, Zou

    2016-06-01

    Frank’s theory describes that a screw dislocation will produce a pit on the surface, and has been evidenced in many material systems including GaN. However, the size of the pit calculated from the theory deviates significantly from experimental result. Through a careful observation of the variations of surface pits and local surface morphology with growing temperature and V/III ratio for c-plane GaN, we believe that Frank’s model is valid only in a small local surface area where thermodynamic equilibrium state can be assumed to stay the same. If the kinetic process is too vigorous or too slow to reach a balance, the local equilibrium range will be too small for the center and edge of the screw dislocation spiral to be kept in the same equilibrium state. When the curvature at the center of the dislocation core reaches the critical value 1/r 0, at the edge of the spiral, the accelerating rate of the curvature may not fall to zero, so the pit cannot reach a stationary shape and will keep enlarging under the control of minimization of surface energy to result in a large-sized surface pit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204009 and 61204011) and the Beijing Municipal Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 4142005).

  2. Evaporation and condensation in soils: Experimental and modeling investigation to compare non-equilibrium-based approaches under different atmospheric boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, A.; Smits, K. M.; Cihan, A.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Evaporation and condensation in bare soils govern water and energy fluxes between the land and atmosphere. Despite their importance to the hydrologic cycle, there is great uncertainty associated with our understanding of these complex multiphase phenomena. At the representative elementary volume scale, phase change (i.e. evaporation/condensation) between water vapor and liquid water is commonly evaluated in soil hydrology using the equilibrium assumption. The equilibrium-based approach assumes that within the soil pores, phase change occurs instantaneously. However, finite volatilization/condensation times have been observed experimentally under certain conditions calling into question the validity of using the equilibrium assumption for all possible land-atmospheric interaction scenarios. The use of non-equilibrium mass transfer relationships is based on the Hertz-Knudsen (HK) equation derived from the kinetic theory of gases. Multiple formulations have been posited to numerically represent phase change between water vapor and liquid water, many relying on empirical fitting parameters. The purpose of this investigation was to perform an unbiased comparison between the various non-equilibrium phase change formulations using a fully coupled heat and mass transfer model that simulates the processes of evaporation/condensation from soils using precision generated laboratory data. A non-isothermal solution was implemented in a numerical model to account for five different non-equilibrium phase change formulations reported in literature. A series of five experiments were performed using a unique laboratory system consisting of a soil tank with controlled airflow boundary conditions at the soil surface. The apparatus was equipped with a sensor network for continuous and autonomous collection of soil moisture, soil and air temperature, relative humidity, and wind velocity data. Soil surface conditions (e.g. temperature, diurnal variations and wind speed) and initial

  3. Distinguishing between keto-enol and acid-base forms of firefly oxyluciferin through calculation of excited-state equilibrium constants.

    PubMed

    Falklöf, Olle; Durbeej, Bo

    2014-11-15

    Although recent years have seen much progress in the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the bioluminescence of fireflies, there is to date no consensus on the precise contributions to the light emission from the different possible forms of the chemiexcited oxyluciferin (OxyLH2) cofactor. Here, this problem is investigated by the calculation of excited-state equilibrium constants in aqueous solution for keto-enol and acid-base reactions connecting six neutral, monoanionic and dianionic forms of OxyLH2. Particularly, rather than relying on the standard Förster equation and the associated assumption that entropic effects are negligible, these equilibrium constants are for the first time calculated in terms of excited-state free energies of a Born-Haber cycle. Performing quantum chemical calculations with density functional theory methods and using a hybrid cluster-continuum approach to describe solvent effects, a suitable protocol for the modeling is first defined from benchmark calculations on phenol. Applying this protocol to the various OxyLH2 species and verifying that available experimental data (absorption shifts and ground-state equilibrium constants) are accurately reproduced, it is then found that the phenolate-keto-OxyLH(-) monoanion is intrinsically the preferred form of OxyLH2 in the excited state, which suggests a potential key role for this species in the bioluminescence of fireflies.

  4. Equilibrium-phase MR angiography: Comparison of unspecific extracellular and protein-binding gadolinium-based contrast media with respect to image quality.

    PubMed

    Erb-Eigner, Katharina; Taupitz, Matthias; Asbach, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare contrast and image quality of whole-body equilibrium-phase high-spatial-resolution MR angiography using a non-protein-binding unspecific extracellular gadolinium-based contrast medium with that of two contrast media with different protein-binding properties. 45 patients were examined using either 15 mL of gadobutrol (non-protein-binding, n = 15), 32 mL of gadobenate dimeglumine (weakly protein binding, n = 15) or 11 mL gadofosveset trisodium (protein binding, n = 15) followed by equilibrium-phase high-spatial-resolution MR-angiography of four consecutive anatomic regions. The time elapsed between the contrast injection and the beginning of the equilibrium-phase image acquisition in the respective region was measured and was up to 21 min. Signal intensity was measured in two vessels per region and in muscle tissue. Relative contrast (RC) values were calculated. Vessel contrast, artifacts and image quality were rated by two radiologists in consensus on a five-point scale. Compared with gadobutrol, gadofosveset trisodium revealed significantly higher RC values only when acquired later than 15 min after bolus injection. Otherwise, no significant differences between the three contrast media were found regarding vascular contrast and image quality. Equilibrium-phase high-spatial-resolution MR-angiography using a weakly protein-binding or even non-protein-binding contrast medium is equivalent to using a stronger protein-binding contrast medium when image acquisition is within the first 15 min after contrast injection, and allows depiction of the vasculature with high contrast and image quality. The protein-binding contrast medium was superior for imaging only later than 15 min after contrast medium injection. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. A Differential Evolution Algorithm Based on Nikaido-Isoda Function for Solving Nash Equilibrium in Nonlinear Continuous Games

    PubMed Central

    He, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    A differential evolution algorithm for solving Nash equilibrium in nonlinear continuous games is presented in this paper, called NIDE (Nikaido-Isoda differential evolution). At each generation, parent and child strategy profiles are compared one by one pairwisely, adapting Nikaido-Isoda function as fitness function. In practice, the NE of nonlinear game model with cubic cost function and quadratic demand function is solved, and this method could also be applied to non-concave payoff functions. Moreover, the NIDE is compared with the existing Nash Domination Evolutionary Multiplayer Optimization (NDEMO), the result showed that NIDE was significantly better than NDEMO with less iterations and shorter running time. These numerical examples suggested that the NIDE method is potentially useful. PMID:27589229

  6. Refining Tungsten Purification by Electron Beam Melting Based on the Thermal Equilibrium Calculation and Tungsten Loss Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Luping; Liu, Wensheng; Ma, Yunzhu; Liu, Ye; Liu, Shuhua

    2015-10-01

    Electron beam melting (EBM) technology has been considered as one of the key steps for preparing high purity tungsten, and reasonable setting of process parameters is the premise. In this paper, the optimum process parameters obtained from thermal equilibrium calculation and evaporation loss control of tungsten are presented. Effective power is closely related to melting temperature, and the required power for maintaining the superheating melt linearly increases with the increase of melt superheat temperature. The evaporation loss behavior of tungsten is significantly influenced by melting rate and melting temperature. Analysis of experiments show that the best results are realized at melting rate of 1.82 g/s, melting temperature of 4200 K, and the corresponding melting power of 130 kW, in which the main impurity elements in tungsten, such as As, Cd, Mg and Sn, present high removal ratio of 90%, 95%, 85.7% and 90%, respectively.

  7. Electrospray mass spectrometry of some proteins and the aqueous solution acid/base equilibrium model in the negative ion detection mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Blanc, J. C. Y.; Guevremont, R.; Siu, K. W. M.

    1993-06-01

    Basic solutions of myoglobin, [beta]-lactoglobulin, pepsin and ubiquitin have been examined by means of electrospray mass spectrometry in the negative ion detection mode. The distribution of protein ions in the mass spectra was found to correlate well with the distribution of protein species in solution calculated from published titration data. These results lend further credibility to an earlier proposed aqueous solution acid/base equilibrium model, which relates the "bellshape" ion distribution observed in the electrospray mass spectrometry of proteins to the distribution of protein ions in solution.

  8. Shape characteristics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fractal clusters.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Marc L; Douglas, Jack F

    2013-07-28

    It is often difficult in practice to discriminate between equilibrium and non-equilibrium nanoparticle or colloidal-particle clusters that form through aggregation in gas or solution phases. Scattering studies often permit the determination of an apparent fractal dimension, but both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters in three dimensions frequently have fractal dimensions near 2, so that it is often not possible to discriminate on the basis of this geometrical property. A survey of the anisotropy of a wide variety of polymeric structures (linear and ring random and self-avoiding random walks, percolation clusters, lattice animals, diffusion-limited aggregates, and Eden clusters) based on the principal components of both the radius of gyration and electric polarizability tensor indicates, perhaps counter-intuitively, that self-similar equilibrium clusters tend to be intrinsically anisotropic at all sizes, while non-equilibrium processes such as diffusion-limited aggregation or Eden growth tend to be isotropic in the large-mass limit, providing a potential means of discriminating these clusters experimentally if anisotropy could be determined along with the fractal dimension. Equilibrium polymer structures, such as flexible polymer chains, are normally self-similar due to the existence of only a single relevant length scale, and are thus anisotropic at all length scales, while non-equilibrium polymer structures that grow irreversibly in time eventually become isotropic if there is no difference in the average growth rates in different directions. There is apparently no proof of these general trends and little theoretical insight into what controls the universal anisotropy in equilibrium polymer structures of various kinds. This is an obvious topic of theoretical investigation, as well as a matter of practical interest. To address this general problem, we consider two experimentally accessible ratios, one between the hydrodynamic and gyration radii, the other

  9. An investigation of equilibrium concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prozan, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A different approach to modeling of the thermochemistry of rocket engine combustion phenomena is presented. The methodology described is based on the hypothesis of a new variational principle applicable to compressible fluid mechanics. This hypothesis is extended to treat the thermochemical behavior of a reacting (equilibrium) gas in an open system.

  10. The effect of parameters of equilibrium-based 3-D biomechanical models on extracted muscle synergies during isometric lumbar exertion.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, A H; Sedaghat-Nejad, E; Rashedi, E; Sedighi, A; Arjmand, N; Parnianpour, M

    2016-04-11

    A hallmark of more advanced models is their higher details of trunk muscles represented by a larger number of muscles. The question is if in reality we control these muscles individually as independent agents or we control groups of them called "synergy". To address this, we employed a 3-D biomechanical model of the spine with 18 trunk muscles that satisfied equilibrium conditions at L4/5, with different cost functions. The solutions of several 2-D and 3-D tasks were arranged in a data matrix and the synergies were computed by using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) algorithms. Variance accounted for (VAF) was used to evaluate the number of synergies that emerged by the analysis, which were used to reconstruct the original muscle activations. It was showed that four and six muscle synergies were adequate to reconstruct the input data of 2-D and 3-D torque space analysis. The synergies were different by choosing alternative cost functions as expected. The constraints affected the extracted muscle synergies, particularly muscles that participated in more than one functional tasks were influenced substantially. The compositions of extracted muscle synergies were in agreement with experimental studies on healthy participants. The following computational methods show that the synergies can reduce the complexity of load distributions and allow reduced dimensional space to be used in clinical settings.

  11. Multigrain sedimentation/erosion model based on cross-shore equilibrium sediment distribution: Application to nourishment design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangjun; Dyt, Chris; Griffiths, Cedric

    2006-05-01

    In the light of global warming and sea level rise there are many coastal beaches that suffer from erosion. Beach nourishment has become a common practice to maintain the sediment balance on a shore-face. In this paper, a three-dimensional numerical model for evaluating long-term impact of beach nourishment projects has been developed. The model addresses the longstanding complex issue of coastal morphology and sediment grain size distribution from an unconventional angle, which exploits the strong links between grain size distribution and the prevailing transport direction of each sediment constituent under 'average' wave and storm action. The present model predicts the redistribution of nourished sediment according to the subtle clues implied by equilibrium distribution curves and latest coastal wave transformation theories. After verification against recent field observations in Terschelling, The Netherlands, the model was used to predict long-term effects of different beach nourishment strategies. It was found that: (a) given the source sediment available in Terschelling the tactics of large volume and less frequent implementation are better than otherwise; and (b) from a pure engineering point of view, waterline nourishment outperforms offshore trough nourishment. The model offers an additional tool for coastal engineers to evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness and the optimization of dumping locations for beach nourishment projects. It is also a useful tool for stratigraphic modelling of shallow-marine sedimentation in conjunction with sea level changes.

  12. Removal of aluminium from aqueous solutions using PAN-based adsorbents: characterisation, kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Aly, Zaynab; Graulet, Adrien; Scales, Nicholas; Hanley, Tracey

    2014-03-01

    Economic adsorbents in bead form were fabricated and utilised for the adsorption of Al(3+) from aqueous solutions. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) beads, PAN powder and the thermally treated PAN beads (250 °C/48 h/Ar and 600 °C/48 h/Ar-H2) were characterised using different techniques including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, specific surface analysis (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller), thermogravimetric analysis as well as scanning electron microscopy. Effects of pH, contact time, kinetics and adsorption isotherms at different temperatures were investigated in batch mode experiments. Aluminium kinetic data best fit the Lagergren pseudo-second-order adsorption model indicating a one-step, surface-only, adsorption process with chemisorption being the rate limiting step. Equilibrium adsorption data followed a Langmuir adsorption model with fairly low monolayer adsorption capacities suitable for freshwater clean-up only. Various constants including thermodynamic constants were evaluated from the experimental results obtained at 20, 40 and 60 °C. Positive values of ΔH° indicated that the adsorption of Al(3+) onto all three adsorbents was endothermic with less energy input required for PAN powder compared to PAN beads and low-temperature thermally treated PAN. Negative ΔG° values indicated that the aluminium adsorption process was spontaneous for all adsorbents examined.

  13. Soft-spring wall based non-periodic boundary conditions for non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of dense fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatage, Dhairyashil; Tomar, Gaurav Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2015-03-28

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations require imposition of non-periodic boundary conditions (NPBCs) that seamlessly account for the effect of the truncated bulk region on the simulated MD region. Standard implementation of specular boundary conditions in such simulations results in spurious density and force fluctuations near the domain boundary and is therefore inappropriate for coupled atomistic-continuum calculations. In this work, we present a novel NPBC model that relies on boundary atoms attached to a simple cubic lattice with soft springs to account for interactions from particles which would have been present in an untruncated full domain treatment. We show that the proposed model suppresses the unphysical fluctuations in the density to less than 1% of the mean while simultaneously eliminating spurious oscillations in both mean and boundary forces. The model allows for an effective coupling of atomistic and continuum solvers as demonstrated through multiscale simulation of boundary driven singular flow in a cavity. The geometric flexibility of the model enables straightforward extension to nonplanar complex domains without any adverse effects on dynamic properties such as the diffusion coefficient.

  14. Getting Freshman in Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Various aspects of chemical equilibrium were discussed in six papers presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982). These include student problems in understanding hydrolysis, helping students discover/uncover topics, equilibrium demonstrations, instructional strategies, and flaws to kinetic…

  15. Getting Freshman in Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Various aspects of chemical equilibrium were discussed in six papers presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982). These include student problems in understanding hydrolysis, helping students discover/uncover topics, equilibrium demonstrations, instructional strategies, and flaws to kinetic…

  16. Equilibrium of KSTAR Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K.-I.; Lee, D.-K.; Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.; Hahn, S. H.; Lao, L.; Kstar Team

    2011-10-01

    We have installed the EFIT code on our computing system and made some modification to reconstruct the plasma equilibrium of KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research). KSTAR PF and TF coil systems use a CICC (Cable-In-Conduit Conductor) type superconductor. The CICC jacket material for most PF and all TF coils is Incoloy 908, which is a magnetic material with relative magnetic permeability greater than 10 in low external field. We newly introduced Diamagnetic Loop and variational Motion Stark Effect signals to equilibrium reconstruction. In this paper, we present some results of equilibrium reconstruction with the EFIT code, assess the effects of newly introduced diagnsotics signal on the equilibrium reconstruction and compare the EFIT results with the various diagnostics data in various plasma conditions including H- and L- modes. In addition, we will show the Incoloy908 effects on the plasma equilibrium.

  17. Phase-equilibrium geobarometers for silicic rocks based on rhyolite-MELTS. Part 2: application to Taupo Volcanic Zone rhyolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégué, Florence; Gualda, Guilherme A. R.; Ghiorso, Mark S.; Pamukcu, Ayla S.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Gravley, Darren M.; Deering, Chad D.; Chambefort, Isabelle

    2014-11-01

    Constraining the pressure of crystallisation of large silicic magma bodies gives important insight into the depth and vertical extent of magmatic plumbing systems; however, it is notably difficult to constrain pressure at the level of detail necessary to understand shallow magmatic systems. In this study, we use the recently developed rhyolite-MELTS geobarometer to constrain the crystallisation pressures of rhyolites from the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ). As sanidine is absent from the studied deposits, we calculate the pressures at which quartz and feldspar are found to be in equilibrium with melt now preserved as glass (the quartz +1 feldspar constraint of Gualda and Ghiorso, Contrib Mineral Petrol 168:1033. doi:10.1007/s00410-014-1033-3. 2014). We use glass compositions (matrix glass and melt inclusions) from seven eruptive deposits dated between ~320 and 0.7 ka from four distinct calderas in the central TVZ, and we discuss advantages and limitations of the rhyolite-MELTS geobarometer in comparison with other geobarometers applied to the same eruptive deposits. Overall, there is good agreement with other pressure estimates from the literature (amphibole geobarometry and H2O-CO2 solubility models). One of the main advantages of this new geobarometer is that it can be applied to both matrix glass and melt inclusions—regardless of volatile saturation. The examples presented also emphasise the utility of this method to filter out spurious glass compositions. Pressure estimates obtained with the new rhyolite-MELTS geobarometer range between ~250 to ~50 MPa, with a large majority at ~100 MPa. These results confirm that the TVZ hosts some of the shallowest rhyolitic magma bodies on the planet, resulting from the extensional tectonic regime and thinning of the crust. Distinct populations with different equilibration pressures are also recognised, which is consistent with the idea that multiple batches of eruptible magma can be present in the crust at the same time and

  18. Ab initio path-integral calculations of kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects on base-catalyzed RNA transphosphorylation models.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Xu, Yuqing; York, Darrin M

    2014-06-30

    Detailed understandings of the reaction mechanisms of RNA catalysis in various environments can have profound importance for many applications, ranging from the design of new biotechnologies to the unraveling of the evolutionary origin of life. An integral step in the nucleolytic RNA catalysis is self-cleavage of RNA strands by 2'-O-transphosphorylation. Key to elucidating a reaction mechanism is determining the molecular structure and bonding characteristics of transition state. A direct and powerful probe of transition state is measuring isotope effects on biochemical reactions, particularly if we can reproduce isotope effect values from quantum calculations. This article significantly extends the scope of our previous joint experimental and theoretical work in examining isotope effects on enzymatic and nonenzymatic 2'-O-transphosphorylation reaction models that mimic reactions catalyzed by RNA enzymes (ribozymes), and protein enzymes such as ribonuclease A (RNase A). Native reactions are studied, as well as reactions with thio substitutions representing chemical modifications often used in experiments to probe mechanism. Here, we report and compare results from eight levels of electronic-structure calculations for constructing the potential energy surfaces in kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects (KIE and EIE) computations, including a "gold-standard" coupled-cluster level of theory [CCSD(T)]. In addition to the widely used Bigeleisen equation for estimating KIE and EIE values, internuclear anharmonicity and quantum tunneling effects were also computed using our recently developed ab initio path-integral method, that is, automated integration-free path-integral method. The results of this work establish an important set of benchmarks that serve to guide calculations of KIE and EIE for RNA catalysis.

  19. Thermodynamic theory of equilibrium fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, Y.

    2015-12-15

    The postulational basis of classical thermodynamics has been expanded to incorporate equilibrium fluctuations. The main additional elements of the proposed thermodynamic theory are the concept of quasi-equilibrium states, a definition of non-equilibrium entropy, a fundamental equation of state in the entropy representation, and a fluctuation postulate describing the probability distribution of macroscopic parameters of an isolated system. Although these elements introduce a statistical component that does not exist in classical thermodynamics, the logical structure of the theory is different from that of statistical mechanics and represents an expanded version of thermodynamics. Based on this theory, we present a regular procedure for calculations of equilibrium fluctuations of extensive parameters, intensive parameters and densities in systems with any number of fluctuating parameters. The proposed fluctuation formalism is demonstrated by four applications: (1) derivation of the complete set of fluctuation relations for a simple fluid in three different ensembles; (2) fluctuations in finite-reservoir systems interpolating between the canonical and micro-canonical ensembles; (3) derivation of fluctuation relations for excess properties of grain boundaries in binary solid solutions, and (4) derivation of the grain boundary width distribution for pre-melted grain boundaries in alloys. The last two applications offer an efficient fluctuation-based approach to calculations of interface excess properties and extraction of the disjoining potential in pre-melted grain boundaries. Possible future extensions of the theory are outlined.

  20. A non-equilibrium Monte Carlo renormalization-group approach based upon the microscopic master equation applied to the three-state driven lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Ivan T.; McKay, Susan R.

    2005-12-01

    We present a general position-space renormalization-group approach for systems in steady states far from equilibrium and illustrate its application to the three-state driven lattice gas. The method is based upon the possibility of a closed form representation of the parameters controlling transition rates of the system in terms of the steady state probability distribution of small clusters, arising from the application of the master equations to small clusters. This probability distribution on various length scales is obtained through a Monte Carlo algorithm on small lattices, which then yields a mapping between parameters on different length scales. The renormalization-group flows indicate the phase diagram, analogous to equilibrium treatments. For the three-state driven lattice gas, we have implemented this procedure and compared the resulting phase diagrams with those obtained directly from simulations. Results in general show the expected topology with one exception. For high densities, an unexpected additional fixed point emerges, which can be understood qualitatively by comparing it with the fixed point of the fully asymmetric exclusion process.

  1. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems.

  2. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems.

  3. Chemical Principles Revisited: Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes: (1) Law of Mass Action; (2) equilibrium constant and ideal behavior; (3) general form of the equilibrium constant; (4) forward and reverse reactions; (5) factors influencing equilibrium; (6) Le Chatelier's principle; (7) effects of temperature, changing concentration, and pressure on equilibrium; and (8) catalysts and equilibrium. (JN)

  4. Response reactions: equilibrium coupling.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Eufrozina A; Nagypal, Istvan

    2006-06-01

    It is pointed out and illustrated in the present paper that if a homogeneous multiple equilibrium system containing k components and q species is composed of the reactants actually taken and their reactions contain only k + 1 species, then we have a unique representation with (q - k) stoichiometrically independent reactions (SIRs). We define these as coupling reactions. All the other possible combinations with k + 1 species are the coupled reactions that are in equilibrium when the (q - k) SIRs are in equilibrium. The response of the equilibrium state for perturbation is determined by the coupling and coupled equilibria. Depending on the circumstances and the actual thermodynamic data, the effect of coupled equilibria may overtake the effect of the coupling ones, leading to phenomena that are in apparent contradiction with Le Chatelier's principle.

  5. Thermodynamics "beyond" local equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Jose; Rubi, Miguel

    2002-03-01

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics has shown its applicability in a wide variety of different situations pertaining to fields such as physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. As successful as it is, however, its current formulation considers only systems close to equilibrium, those satisfying the so-called local equilibrium hypothesis. Here we show that diffusion processes that occur far away from equilibrium can be viewed as at local equilibrium in a space that includes all the relevant variables in addition to the spatial coordinate. In this way, nonequilibrium thermodynamics can be used and the difficulties and ambiguities associated with the lack of a thermodynamic description disappear. We analyze explicitly the inertial effects in diffusion and outline how the main ideas can be applied to other situations. [J.M.G. Vilar and J.M. Rubi, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 11081-11084 (2001)].

  6. Lysozyme adsorption in pH-responsive hydrogel thin-films: the non-trivial role of acid-base equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Narambuena, Claudio F; Longo, Gabriel S; Szleifer, Igal

    2015-09-07

    We develop and apply a molecular theory to study the adsorption of lysozyme on weak polyacid hydrogel films. The theory explicitly accounts for the conformation of the network, the structure of the proteins, the size and shape of all the molecular species, their interactions as well as the chemical equilibrium of each titratable unit of both the protein and the polymer network. The driving forces for adsorption are the electrostatic attractions between the negatively charged network and the positively charged protein. The adsorption is a non-monotonic function of the solution pH, with a maximum in the region between pH 8 and 9 depending on the salt concentration of the solution. The non-monotonic adsorption is the result of increasing negative charge of the network with pH, while the positive charge of the protein decreases. At low pH the network is roughly electroneutral, while at sufficiently high pH the protein is negatively charged. Upon adsorption, the acid-base equilibrium of the different amino acids of the protein shifts in a nontrivial fashion that depends critically on the particular kind of residue and solution composition. Thus, the proteins regulate their charge and enhance adsorption under a wide range of conditions. In particular, adsorption is predicted above the protein isoelectric point where both the solution lysozyme and the polymer network are negatively charged. This behavior occurs because the pH in the interior of the gel is significantly lower than that in the bulk solution and it is also regulated by the adsorption of the protein in order to optimize protein-gel interactions. Under high pH conditions we predict that the protein changes its charge from negative in the solution to positive within the gel. The change occurs within a few nanometers at the interface of the hydrogel film. Our predictions show the non-trivial interplay between acid-base equilibrium, physical interactions and molecular organization under nanoconfined conditions

  7. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  8. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  9. Localization of flunitrazepam in artificial membranes. A spectrophotometric study about the effect the polarity of the medium exerts on flunitrazepam acid-base equilibrium.

    PubMed

    García, D A; Perillo, M A

    1997-02-21

    In the present paper we tried to test the hypothesis that nonspecific flunitrazepam-membrane interactions are consistent with drug molecules accommodated between lipid molecules, becoming an integral part of the bilayer. We developed a spectrophotometric method to determine FNTZH+ equilibrium dissociation constant and applied it to the study of the acid-base equilibria of this drug in homogeneous media of different polarity. In these conditions, pK decreased with the decrement in the dielectric constant (D) of the media. These results, analyzed under the light of the theory developed by Fernandez and Fromherz (1977; J. Phys. Chem. 81, 1755-1761) let us infer that flunitrazepam is localized a region with D = 60. This D value is lower that Dwater = 78 and higher than D of hydrocarbon chains zone (D = 2-5) and would correspond to D of the region of polar groups. This result is compatible with the hypothesis.

  10. Convective quasi-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, J.-I.; Plant, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    The concept of convective quasi-equilibrium (CQE) is a key ingredient in order to understand the role of deep moist convection in the atmosphere. It has been used as a guiding principle to develop almost all convective parameterizations and provides a basic theoretical framework for large-scale tropical dynamics. The CQE concept as originally proposed by Arakawa and Schubert (1974) is systematically reviewed from wider perspectives. Various interpretations and extensions of Arakawa and Schubert's CQE are considered both in terms of a thermodynamic analogy and as a dynamical balance. The thermodynamic interpretations can be more emphatically embraced as a homeostasis. The dynamic balance interpretations can be best understood by analogy with the slow manifold. Various criticisms of CQE can be avoided by taking the dynamic balance interpretation. Possible limits of CQE are also discussed, including the importance of triggering in many convective situations, as well as the possible self-organized criticality of tropical convection. However, the most intriguing aspect of the CQE concept is that in spite of many observational tests supporting and interpreting it in many different senses, it has never been established in a robust manner based on a systematic analysis of the cloud work function budget by observations as was originally defined.

  11. Napoleon Is in Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Rob

    2015-03-01

    It has been said that the cell is the test tube of the twenty-first century. If so, the theoretical tools needed to quantitatively and predictively describe what goes on in such test tubes lag sorely behind the stunning experimental advances in biology seen in the decades since the molecular biology revolution began. Perhaps surprisingly, one of the theoretical tools that has been used with great success on problems ranging from how cells communicate with their environment and each other to the nature of the organization of proteins and lipids within the cell membrane is statistical mechanics. A knee-jerk reaction to the use of statistical mechanics in the description of cellular processes is that living organisms are so far from equilibrium that one has no business even thinking about it. But such reactions are probably too hasty given that there are many regimes in which, because of a separation of timescales, for example, such an approach can be a useful first step. In this article, we explore the power of statistical mechanical thinking in the biological setting, with special emphasis on cell signaling and regulation. We show how such models are used to make predictions and describe some recent experiments designed to test them. We also consider the limits of such models based on the relative timescales of the processes of interest.

  12. Napoleon Is in Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Rob

    2015-03-01

    It has been said that the cell is the test tube of the twenty-first century. If so, the theoretical tools needed to quantitatively and predictively describe what goes on in such test tubes lag sorely behind the stunning experimental advances in biology seen in the decades since the molecular biology revolution began. Perhaps surprisingly, one of the theoretical tools that has been used with great success on problems ranging from how cells communicate with their environment and each other to the nature of the organization of proteins and lipids within the cell membrane is statistical mechanics. A knee-jerk reaction to the use of statistical mechanics in the description of cellular processes is that living organisms are so far from equilibrium that one has no business even thinking about it. But such reactions are probably too hasty given that there are many regimes in which, because of a separation of timescales, for example, such an approach can be a useful first step. In this article, we explore the power of statistical mechanical thinking in the biological setting, with special emphasis on cell signaling and regulation. We show how such models are used to make predictions and describe some recent experiments designed to test them. We also consider the limits of such models based on the relative timescales of the processes of interest.

  13. Novel free-boundary equilibrium and transport solver with theory-based models and its validation against ASDEX Upgrade current ramp scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fable, E.; Angioni, C.; Casson, F. J.; Told, D.; Ivanov, A. A.; Jenko, F.; McDermott, R. M.; Medvedev, S. Yu; Pereverzev, G. V.; Ryter, F.; Treutterer, W.; Viezzer, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2013-12-01

    Tokamak scenario development requires an understanding of the properties that determine the kinetic profiles in non-steady plasma phases and of the self-consistent evolution of the magnetic equilibrium. Current ramps are of particular interest since many transport-relevant parameters explore a large range of values and their impact on transport mechanisms has to be assessed. To this purpose, a novel full-discharge modelling tool has been developed, which couples the transport code ASTRA (Pereverzev et al 1991 IPP Report 5/42) and the free boundary equilibrium code SPIDER (Ivanov et al 2005 32nd EPS Conf. on Plasma Physics vol 29C (ECA) P-5.063 and http://epsppd.epfl.ch/Tarragona/pdf/P5_063.pdf), utilizing a specifically designed coupling scheme. The current ramp-up phase can be accurately and reliably simulated using this scheme, where a plasma shape, position and current controller is applied, which mimics the one of ASDEX Upgrade. Transport of energy is provided by theory-based models (e.g. TGLF (Staebler et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 055909)). A recipe based on edge-relevant parameters (Scott 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 1845) is proposed to resolve the low current phase of the current ramps, where the impact of the safety factor on micro-instabilities could make quasi-linear approaches questionable in the plasma outer region. Current ramp scenarios, selected from ASDEX Upgrade discharges, are then simulated to validate both the coupling with the free-boundary evolution and the prediction of profiles. Analysis of the underlying transport mechanisms is presented, to clarify the possible physics origin of the observed L-mode empirical energy confinement scaling. The role of toroidal micro-instabilities (ITG, TEM) and of non-linear effects is discussed.

  14. Toxicokinetics and toxicity of sediment-associated pyrene and phenanthrene in Diporeia spp. : Examination of equilibrium-partitioning theory and residue-based effects for assessing hazard

    SciTech Connect

    Landrum, P.F.; Dupuis, W.S. . Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab.); Kukkonen, J. . Dept. of Biology)

    1994-11-01

    The amphipod Diporeia spp. was exposed to pyrene or phenanthrene-dosed sediments for month-long exposures. Phenanthrene was only slightly toxic with 12 [+-] 3% mortality at the highest sediment dose (0.62 [mu]mol g[sup [minus]1]). Failure to attain and maintain toxic residue body burdens, based on a nonpolar narcosis concentration of approximately 6 [mu]mol g[sup [minus]1], accounts for the low mortality. Phenanthrene toxicokinetic parameters were essentially constant among all doses and consistent with previous measures. Sediment concentration was a poor representation of dose for mortality by pyrene. The relative pyrene distribution among the < 63-[mu]m particles increased in the smallest-sized particles at larger doses. An apparent stimulation of pyrene accumulation was observed as a peak in uptake clearance values between sediment concentrations of 0.16 and 0.26 [mu]mol g[sup [minus]1] dry sediment. The pyrene particle-size distribution and the variation in kinetics with dose provide a partial explanation for the poor representation of dose by the sediment concentration. The pyrene body burdens provided a good dose response yielding LD50 values of 6.3 and 9.4 [mu]mol g[sup [minus]1] for two experiments. These values are consistent with the residue concentrations for 50% mortality by a nonpolar narcosis mechanism. Comparing the experimental and predicted equilibrium partitioning-based sediment concentrations for 50% mortality, the equilibrium prediction overestimates the toxic pyrene sediment concentration by approximately a factor of ten. Diporeia behavior, differential particle-size distribution, and kinetic limitations appear as likely reasons for the variation between calculated and observed concentrations required to produce mortality.

  15. Heterogeneous equilibrium between the condensed phase and vapor of aprotonic solvents and electrolytes based on them II. Solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidym, I. L.; Gurevich, I. G.; Shchitnikov, V. K.; Dubasova, V. S.; Tumanov, B. I.

    1982-06-01

    Experimental results for the saturated vapor pressure of mixtures of organic solvents with electrolytes based on them are given, together with thermodynamic characteristics of the vaporization process calculated on this basis.

  16. Temporal Evolution of Non-equilibrium Gamma’ Precipitates in a Rapidly Quenched Nickel Base Superalloy (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    González-Carrasco, Phase separation in PM 2000™ Fe-base ODS alloy: Experimental study at the atomic level, Materials Science and Engineering: A. 490 (2008... Simmons , Y. Wang, M. Mills, Formation of multimodal size distributions of γ′ in a nickel-base superalloy during interrupted continuous cooling, Scr...diffraction method, Materials Science and Engineering: A. 528 (2010) 32-36. [28] Y. Wen, J. Simmons , C. Shen, C. Woodward, Y. Wang, Phase-field modeling of

  17. Influence of steady-state alterations in acid-base equilibrium on the fate of administered bicarbonate in the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Adrogué, H J; Brensilver, J; Cohen, J J; Madias, N E

    1983-01-01

    Previous workers have shown that metabolic acidosis increases the apparent space through which administered bicarbonate is distributed. This finding has been ascribed to the accompanying acidemia and to the consequent availability of a large quantity of hydrogen ion that accumulates on nonbicarbonate tissue buffers during the development of acidosis. To test this hypothesis, bicarbonate space was measured in dogs with a broad range of steady-state plasma [HCO-3] in association with alkalemia as well as with acidemia. Appropriate combinations of pH and plasma [HCO-3] were achieved by pretreating the animals to produce graded degrees of each of the four cardinal, chronic acid-base disorders. Metabolic acidosis (n = 15) was produced by prolonged HCl-feeding; metabolic alkalosis (n = 17) by diuretics and a chloride-free diet; and respiratory acidosis (n = 9) and alkalosis (n = 8) by means of an environmental chamber. Animals with normal acid-base status (n = 4) were also studied. Sodium bicarbonate (5 mmol/kg) was infused over 10 min to the unanesthetized animals; observations were carried out over 90 min. The results obtained from animals with metabolic acid-base disturbances demonstrated an inverse relationship between bicarbonate space and initial plasma pH, confirming the previous findings of others. By contrast, the results obtained in animals with respiratory acid-base disturbances demonstrated a direct relationship between bicarbonate space and initial plasma pH. The pooled data revealed that bicarbonate space is, in fact, quite independent of the initial pH but is highly correlated with the initial level of extracellular [HCO-3]; dogs with low extracellular [HCO-3] (congruent to 10 meq/liter) whether acidemic or alkalemic, have a bicarbonate space that is 25% larger than normal and some 50% larger than in dogs with high extracellular [HCO-3] (congruent to 50 meq/liter). We conclude from these results that the increased bicarbonate space in metabolic acidosis

  18. Optical fluoride sensor based on monomer-dimer equilibrium of scandium(III)-octaethylporphyrin in a plasticized polymeric film.

    PubMed

    Kang, Youngjea; Kampf, Jeff W; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2007-08-29

    A fluoride-selective optical sensor based on scandium(III)-octaethylporphyrin (Sc(III)OEP) as an ionophore within a plasticized PVC film is described. The presence of fluoride ion in the aqueous sample phase increases the formation of a difluoro-bridged Sc(III)OEP dimer species in the polymer film. The ability of the Sc(III) porphyrin to form the dimeric structure in the presence of fluoride is confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. For more practical sensing applications, a pH chromoionophore (ETH 7075) is added to the plasticized PVC film along with Sc(III)OEP and the observed optical response is based on coextraction of protons with sample phase fluoride to create the dimeric porphyrin and a protonated chromoionophore species. The selectivity pattern observed is F- > ClO4(-), SCN-, NO3(-) > Br-, Cl-. Only organic salicylate is a significant interferent. Fast and reversible fluoride response is observed over the range of 10(-4) to 10(-2) M fluoride, allowing use of the sensing film in a waveguide configuration for flow-injection measurements.

  19. Optical Fluoride Sensor Based on Monomer-Dimer Equilibrium of Scandium(III)-Octaethylporphyrin in a Plasticized Polymeric Film

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Youngjea; Kampf, Jeff W.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    A fluoride-selective optical sensor based on scandium(III) octaethylporphyrin (Sc(III)OEP) as an ionophore within a plasticized PVC film is described. The presence of fluoride ion in the aqueous sample phase increases the formation of a difluoro-bridged Sc(III)OEP dimer species in the polymer film. The ability of the Sc(III) porphyrin to form the dimeric structure in the presence of fluoride is confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. For more practical sensing applications, a pH chromoionophore (ETH 7075) is added to the plasticized PVC film along with Sc(III)OEP and the observed optical response is based on co-extraction of protons with sample phase fluoride to create the dimeric porphyrin and a protonated chromoionophore species. The selectivity pattern observed is F-≫ClO4-, SCN-, NO3->Br-, Cl-. Only organic salicylate is a significant interferent. Fast and reversible fluoride response is observed over the range of 10-4 ~10-2 M fluoride, allowing use of the sensing film in a waveguide configuration for flow-injection measurements. PMID:17719905

  20. A Lakatosian Conceptual Change Teaching Strategy Based on Student Ability to Build Models with Varying Degrees of Conceptual Understanding of Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niaz, M.

    The main objective of this study is to construct a Lakatosian teaching strategy that can facilitate conceptual change in students'' understanding of chemical equilibrium. The strategy is based on the premise that cognitive conflicts must have been engendered by the students themselves in trying to cope with different problem solving strategies. Results obtained (based on Venezuelan freshman students) show that the performance of the experimental group of students was generally better (especially on the immediate post tests) than that of the control group. It is concluded that a conceptual change teaching strategy must take into consideration the following aspects: a) core beliefs of the students in the topic (cf. ''hard core'', Lakatos 1970); b) exploration of the relationship between core beliefs and student alternative conceptions (misconceptions); c) cognitive complexity of the core belief can be broken down into a series of related and probing questions; d) students resist changes in their core beliefs by postulating ''auxiliary hypotheses'' in order to resolve their contradictions; e) students'' responses based on their alternative conceptions must be considered not as wrong, but rather as models, perhaps in the same sense as used by scientists to break the complexity of a problem; and f) students'' misconceptions be considered as alternative conceptions (theories) that compete with the present scientific theories and at times recapitulate theories scientists held in the past.

  1. Determination of nonaxisymmetric equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Elkin, D.

    1980-01-01

    The Princeton Equilibrium Code is modified to determine the equilibrium surfaces for a large aspect ratio toroidal system with helical magnetic fields. The code may easily be made to include any variety of modes. Verification of the code is made by comparison with an analytic solution for l = 3. Previously observed shifting of the magnetic axis with increasing pressure or with a changed externally applied vertical field is obtained. The case l = 0, a bumpy torus, gives convergence only for the lenient convergence tolerance of epsilon/sub b/ = 1.0 x 10-/sup 2/.

  2. Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2005-01-01

    Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics fills a niche in the market by providing a comprehensive introduction to a new, emerging topic in the field. The importance of non-equilibrium thermodynamics is addressed in order to fully understand how a system works, whether it is in a biological system like the brain or a system that develops plastic. In order to fully grasp the subject, the book clearly explains the physical concepts and mathematics involved, as well as presenting problems and solutions; over 200 exercises and answers are included. Engineers, scientists, and applied mathematicians can all use the book to address their problems in modelling, calculating, and understanding dynamic responses of materials.

  3. Large-scale screening of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage from first-principles calculations based on equilibrium reaction thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Chul; Kulkarni, Anant D; Johnson, J Karl; Sholl, David S

    2011-04-21

    Systematic thermodynamics calculations based on density functional theory-calculated energies for crystalline solids have been a useful complement to experimental studies of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides. We report the most comprehensive set of thermodynamics calculations for mixtures of light metal hydrides to date by performing grand canonical linear programming screening on a database of 359 compounds, including 147 compounds not previously examined by us. This database is used to categorize the reaction thermodynamics of all mixtures containing any four non-H elements among Al, B, C, Ca, K, Li, Mg, N, Na, Sc, Si, Ti, and V. Reactions are categorized according to the amount of H(2) that is released and the reaction's enthalpy. This approach identifies 74 distinct single step reactions having that a storage capacity >6 wt.% and zero temperature heats of reaction 15 ≤ΔU(0)≤ 75 kJ mol(-1) H(2). Many of these reactions, however, are likely to be problematic experimentally because of the role of refractory compounds, B(12)H(12)-containing compounds, or carbon. The single most promising reaction identified in this way involves LiNH(2)/LiH/KBH(4), storing 7.48 wt.% H(2) and having ΔU(0) = 43.6 kJ mol(-1) H(2). We also examined the complete range of reaction mixtures to identify multi-step reactions with useful properties; this yielded 23 multi-step reactions of potential interest.

  4. Fluorescent sensor for imidazole derivatives based on monomer-dimer equilibrium of a zinc porphyrin complex in a polymeric film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Yang, Ronghua; Liu, Feng; Li, Ke'an

    2004-12-15

    A new zinc(II) porphyrin conjugate with an appended pyrene subunit has been synthesized and shown to exhibit significant and analytical usefulness for fluorescence sensing toward imidazole derivatives. The molecular recognition was based on the bridging interaction of the imidazole ring of analyte with the zinc(II) center of the porphyrin, while the transduction signal for the recognition process was the pyrene excimer fluorescence. The sensor was constructed and applied for fluorescence assay of histidine in aqueous solution by immobilizing the sensing material in a plasticized PVC membrane. When the membrane was bathed in an alkaline solution void of histidine, zinc(II) porphyrin was present in the monomer form, and pyrene emitted monomer fluorescence at 378 and 397 nm. With the presence of histidine in the sample solution, histidine was extracted into the membrane phase and bridged with the Zn(II) center of the porphyrin, causing the monomer porphyrin to be converted to its dimeric species. Since the formation of porphyrin dimer was accompanied by the enhancement of pyrene excimer emission at 454 nm, the chemical recognition process could be directly translated into a fluorescent signal. With the optode membrane M1 described, histidine in sample solution from 6.76 x 10(-7) to 5.01 x 10(-3) M can be determined. The limit of detection was 1.34 x 10(-7) M. The optical selectivity coefficient obtained for histidine over biologically relevant amino acids and anions met the selectivity requirements for the determination of histidine in biological samples. Serum histidine values obtained by the optode membrane fell in the normal range of the content reported in the literature and were in good agreement with those obtained by HPLC.

  5. Base Catalytic Approach: A Promising Technique for the Activation of Biochar for Equilibrium Sorption Studies of Copper, Cu(II) Ions in Single Solute System

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abdul; Chowdhury, Zaira Zaman; Zain, Sharifuddin Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the feasibility of catalytically pretreated biochar derived from the dried exocarp or fruit peel of mangostene with Group I alkali metal hydroxide (KOH). The pretreated char was activated in the presence of carbon dioxide gas flow at high temperature to upgrade its physiochemical properties for the removal of copper, Cu(II) cations in single solute system. The effect of three independent variables, including temperature, agitation time and concentration, on sorption performance were carried out. Reaction kinetics parameters were determined by using linear regression analysis of the pseudo first, pseudo second, Elovich and intra-particle diffusion models. The regression co-efficient, R2 values were best for the pseudo second order kinetic model for all the concentration ranges under investigation. This implied that Cu(II) cations were adsorbed mainly by chemical interactions with the surface active sites of the activated biochar. Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models were used to interpret the equilibrium data at different temperature. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the sorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. The surface area of the activated sample was 367.10 m2/g, whereas before base activation, it was only 1.22 m2/g. The results elucidated that the base pretreatment was efficient enough to yield porous carbon with an enlarged surface area, which can successfully eliminate Cu(II) cations from waste water. PMID:28788595

  6. Determination of equilibrium constant of amino carbamate adduct formation in sisomicin by a high pH based high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wlasichuk, Kenneth B; Tan, Li; Guo, Yushen; Hildebrandt, Darin J; Zhang, Hao; Karr, Dane E; Schmidt, Donald E

    2015-01-01

    Amino carbamate adduct formation from the amino group of an aminoglycoside and carbon dioxide has been postulated as a mechanism for reducing nephrotoxicity in the aminoglycoside class compounds. In this study, sisomicin was used as a model compound for amino carbamate analysis. A high pH based reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method is used to separate the amino carbamate from sisomicin. The carbamate is stable as the breakdown is inhibited at high pH and any reactive carbon dioxide is removed as the carbonate. The amino carbamate was quantified and the molar fraction of amine as the carbamate of sisomicin was obtained from the HPLC peak areas. The equilibrium constant of carbamate formation, Kc, was determined to be 3.3 × 10(-6) and it was used to predict the fraction of carbamate over the pH range in a typical biological systems. Based on these results, the fraction of amino carbamate at physiological pH values is less than 13%, and the postulated mechanism for nephrotoxicity protection is not valid. The same methodology is applicable for other aminoglycosides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Estimation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in the water column based on tissue residues in mussels and salmon: An equilibrium partitioning approach

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, J.M.; Burns, W.A.

    1996-12-01

    Equilibrium partitioning was used to estimate concentrations of dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the water column from PAH residues in tissues of mussels and juvenile pink salmon collected from coastal marine waters affected by the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Estimated concentrations were within factors of 2 to 5 for fish and 5 to 10 for mussels of average total dissolved and particulate PAHs measured in concurrent water samples. Temporal trends of estimated and measured water-column PAH concentrations were comparable. Water-column PAH concentrations estimated from residues in tissues of mussels (Mytilus trossulus) were higher than estimates based on residues in tissues of juvenile pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). Possible reasons for this difference include seasonal variations in mussel lipid content, differences in PAH uptake and depuration rates between fish and mussels, differences in how fish and mussels interact with particulate oil, and possible short exposure times for juvenile pink salmon. All of these factors may play a role. In any event, estimates of dissolved PAHs in the water column, based on PAH residues in either fish or mussel tissue, confirm that PAH concentrations generally did not exceed water quality standards for protection of marine life.

  8. Princeton spectral equilibrium code: PSEC

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, K.M.; Jardin, S.C.

    1984-03-01

    A fast computer code has been developed to calculate free-boundary solutions to the plasma equilibrium equation that are consistent with the currents in external coils and conductors. The free-boundary formulation is based on the minimization of a mean-square error epsilon while the fixed-boundary solution is based on a variational principle and spectral representation of the coordinates x(psi,theta) and z(psi,theta). Specific calculations using the Columbia University Torus II, the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) geometries are performed.

  9. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are…

  10. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are…

  11. Local equilibrium in bird flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Ginelli, Francesco; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Viale, Massimiliano; Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The correlated motion of flocks is an example of global order emerging from local interactions. An essential difference with respect to analogous ferromagnetic systems is that flocks are active: animals move relative to each other, dynamically rearranging their interaction network. This non-equilibrium characteristic has been studied theoretically, but its impact on actual animal groups remains to be fully explored experimentally. Here, we introduce a novel dynamical inference technique, based on the principle of maximum entropy, which accommodates network rearrangements and overcomes the problem of slow experimental sampling rates. We use this method to infer the strength and range of alignment forces from data of starling flocks. We find that local bird alignment occurs on a much faster timescale than neighbour rearrangement. Accordingly, equilibrium inference, which assumes a fixed interaction network, gives results consistent with dynamical inference. We conclude that bird orientations are in a state of local quasi-equilibrium over the interaction length scale, providing firm ground for the applicability of statistical physics in certain active systems.

  12. Local equilibrium in bird flocks.

    PubMed

    Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Castello, Lorenzo Del; Ginelli, Francesco; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Viale, Massimiliano; Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The correlated motion of flocks is an instance of global order emerging from local interactions. An essential difference with analogous ferromagnetic systems is that flocks are active: animals move relative to each other, dynamically rearranging their interaction network. The effect of this off-equilibrium element is well studied theoretically, but its impact on actual biological groups deserves more experimental attention. Here, we introduce a novel dynamical inference technique, based on the principle of maximum entropy, which accodomates network rearrangements and overcomes the problem of slow experimental sampling rates. We use this method to infer the strength and range of alignment forces from data of starling flocks. We find that local bird alignment happens on a much faster timescale than neighbour rearrangement. Accordingly, equilibrium inference, which assumes a fixed interaction network, gives results consistent with dynamical inference. We conclude that bird orientations are in a state of local quasi-equilibrium over the interaction length scale, providing firm ground for the applicability of statistical physics in certain active systems.

  13. Stochastic approach to equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tomé, Tânia; de Oliveira, Mário J

    2015-04-01

    We develop the stochastic approach to thermodynamics based on stochastic dynamics, which can be discrete (master equation) and continuous (Fokker-Planck equation), and on two assumptions concerning entropy. The first is the definition of entropy itself and the second the definition of entropy production rate, which is non-negative and vanishes in thermodynamic equilibrium. Based on these assumptions, we study interacting systems with many degrees of freedom in equilibrium or out of thermodynamic equilibrium and how the macroscopic laws are derived from the stochastic dynamics. These studies include the quasiequilibrium processes; the convexity of the equilibrium surface; the monotonic time behavior of thermodynamic potentials, including entropy; the bilinear form of the entropy production rate; the Onsager coefficients and reciprocal relations; and the nonequilibrium steady states of chemical reactions.

  14. A Lakatosian Conceptual Change Teaching Strategy Based on Student Ability To Build Models with Varying Degrees of Conceptual Understanding of Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor

    1998-01-01

    Reports on a study that constructs a Lakatosian teaching strategy that can facilitate conceptual change in students' understanding of chemical equilibrium. Results indicate that the experimental group performed better on tests. Contains 81 references. (DDR)

  15. Local Nash Equilibrium in Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yichao; Aziz-Alaoui, M. A.; Bertelle, Cyrille; Guan, Jihong

    2014-08-01

    Nash equilibrium is widely present in various social disputes. As of now, in structured static populations, such as social networks, regular, and random graphs, the discussions on Nash equilibrium are quite limited. In a relatively stable static gaming network, a rational individual has to comprehensively consider all his/her opponents' strategies before they adopt a unified strategy. In this scenario, a new strategy equilibrium emerges in the system. We define this equilibrium as a local Nash equilibrium. In this paper, we present an explicit definition of the local Nash equilibrium for the two-strategy games in structured populations. Based on the definition, we investigate the condition that a system reaches the evolutionary stable state when the individuals play the Prisoner's dilemma and snow-drift game. The local Nash equilibrium provides a way to judge whether a gaming structured population reaches the evolutionary stable state on one hand. On the other hand, it can be used to predict whether cooperators can survive in a system long before the system reaches its evolutionary stable state for the Prisoner's dilemma game. Our work therefore provides a theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary stable state in the gaming populations with static structures.

  16. Local Nash equilibrium in social networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichao; Aziz-Alaoui, M A; Bertelle, Cyrille; Guan, Jihong

    2014-08-29

    Nash equilibrium is widely present in various social disputes. As of now, in structured static populations, such as social networks, regular, and random graphs, the discussions on Nash equilibrium are quite limited. In a relatively stable static gaming network, a rational individual has to comprehensively consider all his/her opponents' strategies before they adopt a unified strategy. In this scenario, a new strategy equilibrium emerges in the system. We define this equilibrium as a local Nash equilibrium. In this paper, we present an explicit definition of the local Nash equilibrium for the two-strategy games in structured populations. Based on the definition, we investigate the condition that a system reaches the evolutionary stable state when the individuals play the Prisoner's dilemma and snow-drift game. The local Nash equilibrium provides a way to judge whether a gaming structured population reaches the evolutionary stable state on one hand. On the other hand, it can be used to predict whether cooperators can survive in a system long before the system reaches its evolutionary stable state for the Prisoner's dilemma game. Our work therefore provides a theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary stable state in the gaming populations with static structures.

  17. Generalized thermodynamic relations for a system experiencing heat and mass diffusion in the far-from-equilibrium realm based on steepest entropy ascent.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanchen; von Spakovsky, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a nonequilibrium thermodynamic model for the relaxation of a local, isolated system in nonequilibrium using the principle of steepest entropy ascent (SEA), which can be expressed as a variational principle in thermodynamic state space. The model is able to arrive at the Onsager relations for such a system. Since no assumption of local equilibrium is made, the conjugate fluxes and forces are intrinsic to the subspaces of the system's state space and are defined using the concepts of hypoequilibrium state and nonequilibrium intensive properties, which describe the nonmutual equilibrium status between subspaces of the thermodynamic state space. The Onsager relations are shown to be a thermodynamic kinematic feature of the system independent of the specific details of the micromechanical dynamics. Two kinds of relaxation processes are studied with different constraints (i.e., conservation laws) corresponding to heat and mass diffusion. Linear behavior in the near-equilibrium region as well as nonlinear behavior in the far-from-equilibrium region are discussed. Thermodynamic relations in the equilibrium and near-equilibrium realm, including the Gibbs relation, the Clausius inequality, and the Onsager relations, are generalized to the far-from-equilibrium realm. The variational principle in the space spanned by the intrinsic conjugate fluxes and forces is expressed via the quadratic dissipation potential. As an application, the model is applied to the heat and mass diffusion of a system represented by a single-particle ensemble, which can also be applied to a simple system of many particles. Phenomenological transport coefficients are also derived in the near-equilibrium realm.

  18. Equilibrium capillary forces with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sprakel, J; Besseling, N A M; Leermakers, F A M; Cohen Stuart, M A

    2007-09-07

    We present measurements of equilibrium forces resulting from capillary condensation. The results give access to the ultralow interfacial tensions between the capillary bridge and the coexisting bulk phase. We demonstrate this with solutions of associative polymers and an aqueous mixture of gelatin and dextran, with interfacial tensions around 10 microN/m. The equilibrium nature of the capillary forces is attributed to the combination of a low interfacial tension and a microscopic confinement geometry, based on nucleation and growth arguments.

  19. Analyzing the equilibrium states of a quasi-neutral spatially inhomogeneous system of charges above a liquid dielectric film based on the first principles of quantum statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytvynenko, D. M.; Slyusarenko, Yu V.

    2017-08-01

    A theory of quasi-neutral equilibrium states of charges above a liquid dielectric surface is developed. This theory is based on the first principles of quantum statistics for systems comprising many identical particles. The proposed approach involves applying the variational principle, modified for the considered systems, and the Thomas-Fermi model. In the terms of the developed theory self-consistency equations are obtained. These equations provide the relation between the main parameters describing the system: the potential of the static electric field, the distribution function of charges and the surface profile of the liquid dielectric. The equations are used to study the phase transition in the system to a spatially periodic state. The proposed method can be applied in analyzing the properties of the phase transition in the system in relation to the spatially periodic states of wave type. Using the analytical and numerical methods, we perform a detailed study of the dependence of the critical parameters of such a phase transition on the thickness of the liquid dielectric film. Some stability criteria for the new asymmetric phase of the studied system are discussed.

  20. A New Methodology for Open Pit Slope Design in Karst-Prone Ground Conditions Based on Integrated Stochastic-Limit Equilibrium Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Cao, Ping; Ma, Guowei; Fan, Wenchen; Meng, Jingjing; Li, Kaihui

    2016-07-01

    Using the Chengmenshan Copper Mine as a case study, a new methodology for open pit slope design in karst-prone ground conditions is presented based on integrated stochastic-limit equilibrium analysis. The numerical modeling and optimization design procedure contain a collection of drill core data, karst cave stochastic model generation, SLIDE simulation and bisection method optimization. Borehole investigations are performed, and the statistical result shows that the length of the karst cave fits a negative exponential distribution model, but the length of carbonatite does not exactly follow any standard distribution. The inverse transform method and acceptance-rejection method are used to reproduce the length of the karst cave and carbonatite, respectively. A code for karst cave stochastic model generation, named KCSMG, is developed. The stability of the rock slope with the karst cave stochastic model is analyzed by combining the KCSMG code and the SLIDE program. This approach is then applied to study the effect of the karst cave on the stability of the open pit slope, and a procedure to optimize the open pit slope angle is presented.

  1. The Effects of Probenecid and Thiazides and Their Combination on the Urinary Excretion of Electrolytes and on Acid-base Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, D. A.; Yendt, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    The effects of commonly used therapeutic doses of hydrochlorothiazide and probenecid, given singly and in combination, on the urinary excretion of monovalent and divalent ions and on acid-base equilibrium were studied in four patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria. Probenecid had no effect on the urinary excretion of monovalent ions but resulted in a sustained increase in the urinary excretion of calcium, magnesium and citrate and a temporary increase in the urinary excretion of ammonium, in addition to its well-known effects on uric acid metabolism. A temporary fall in serum phosphorus levels was also observed. Probenecid also modified the response to hydrochlorothiazide in that the urinary excretion of calcium, magnesium and citrate was greater during combined therapy than when hydrochlorothiazide was administered alone. Probenecid prevented or abolished the increase in serum uric acid levels associated with the use of thiazide but did not modify the effects of hydrochlorothiazide on the urinary excretion of sodium, chloride, potassiu, phosphorus, ammonium, titratable acid and bicarbonate. PMID:5469617

  2. Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccotti, Giovanni; Kapral, Raymond; Sergi, Alessandro

    Statistical mechanics provides a well-established link between microscopic equilibrium states and thermodynamics. If one considers systems out of equilibrium, the link between microscopic dynamical properties and non-equilibrium macroscopic states is more difficult to establish [1,2]. For systems lying near equilibrium, linear response theory provides a route to derive linear macroscopic laws and the microscopic expressions for the transport properties that enter the constitutive relations. If the system is displaced far from equilibrium, no fully general theory exists to treat such systems. By restricting consideration to a class of non-equilibrium states which arise from perturbations (linear or non-linear) of an equilibrium state, methods can be developed to treat non-equilibrium states. Furthermore, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulation methods can be devised to provide estimates for the transport properties of these systems.

  3. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  4. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-08-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are applied. Equilibrium can be approached from different distributions of balls in the container under different conditions. The Le Châtelier principle can be demonstrated. Kinetic concepts can be demonstrated by changing the nature of the barrier, either changing the height or by having various sized holes in the barrier. Thermodynamic concepts can be demonstrated by taping over some or all of the openings and restricting air flow into container on either side of the barrier.

  5. Solids Far from Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godrèche, C.

    2011-03-01

    Preface; 1. Shape and growth of crystals P. Nozières; 2. Instabilities of planar solidification fronts B. Caroli, C. Caroli and B. Roulet; 3. An introduction to the kinetics of first-order phase transition J. S. Langer; 4. Dendritic growth and related topics Y. Pomeau and M. Ben Amar; 5. Growth and aggregation far from equilibrium L. M. Sander; 6. Kinetic roughening of growing surfaces J. Krug and H. Spohn; Acknowledgements; References; Index.

  6. Non-equilibrium proteins.

    PubMed

    Klonowski, W

    2001-07-01

    There exist no methodical studies concerning non-equilibrium systems in cellular biology. This paper is an attempt to partially fill this shortcoming. We have undertaken an extensive data-mining operation in the existing scientific literature to find scattered information about non-equilibrium subcellular systems, in particular concerning fast proteins, i.e. those with short turnover half-time. We have advanced the hypothesis that functionality in fast proteins emerges as a consequence of their intrinsic physical instability that arises due to conformational strains resulting from co-translational folding (the interdependence between chain elongation and chain folding during biosynthesis on ribosomes). Such intrinsic physical instability, a kind of conformon (Klonowski-Klonowska conformon, according to Ji, (Molecular Theories of Cell Life and Death, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, 1991)) is probably the most important feature determining functionality and timing in these proteins. If our hypothesis is true, the turnover half-time of fast proteins should be positively correlated with their molecular weight, and some experimental results (Ames et al., J. Neurochem. 35 (1980) 131) indeed demonstrated such a correlation. Once the native structure (and function) of a fast protein macromolecule is lost, it may not be recovered--denaturation of such proteins will always be irreversible; therefore, we searched for information on irreversible denaturation. Only simulation and modeling of protein co-translational folding may answer the questions concerning fast proteins (Ruggiero and Sacile, Med. Biol. Eng. Comp. 37 (Suppl. 1) (1999) 363). Non-equilibrium structures may also be built up of protein subunits, even if each one taken by itself is in thermodynamic equilibrium (oligomeric proteins; sub-cellular sol-gel dissipative network structures).

  7. Molecular equilibrium with condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, C. M.; Huebner, W. F.

    1990-02-01

    Minimization of the Gibbs energy of formation for species of chemical elements and compounds in their gas and condensed phases determines their relative abundances in a mixture in chemical equilibrium. The procedure is more general and more powerful than previous abundance determinations in multiphase astrophysical mixtures. Some results for astrophysical equations of state are presented, and the effects of condensation on opacity are briefly indicated.

  8. Equilibrium Electroconvective Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, I.; Zaltzman, B.

    2015-03-01

    Since its prediction 15 years ago, hydrodynamic instability in concentration polarization at a charge-selective interface has been attributed to nonequilibrium electro-osmosis related to the extended space charge which develops at the limiting current. This attribution had a double basis. On the one hand, it has been recognized that neither equilibrium electro-osmosis nor bulk electroconvection can yield instability for a perfectly charge-selective solid. On the other hand, it has been shown that nonequilibrium electro-osmosis can. The first theoretical studies in which electro-osmotic instability was predicted and analyzed employed the assumption of perfect charge selectivity for the sake of simplicity and so did the subsequent studies of various time-dependent and nonlinear features of electro-osmotic instability. In this Letter, we show that relaxing the assumption of perfect charge selectivity (tantamount to fixing the electrochemical potential of counterions in the solid) allows for the equilibrium electroconvective instability. In addition, we suggest a simple experimental test for determining the true, either equilibrium or nonequilibrium, origin of instability in concentration polarization.

  9. Theoretical calculations of homoconjugation equilibrium constants in systems modeling acid-base interactions in side chains of biomolecules using the potential of mean force.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Joanna; Makowski, Mariusz; Liwo, Adam; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2005-02-01

    The potentials of mean force (PMFs) were determined for systems forming cationic and anionic homocomplexes composed of acetic acid, phenol, isopropylamine, n-butylamine, imidazole, and 4(5)-methylimidazole, and their conjugated bases or acids, respectively, in three solvents with different polarity and hydrogen-bonding propensity: acetonitrile (AN), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and water (H(2)O). For each pair and each solvent a series of umbrella-sampling molecular dynamics simulations with the AMBER force field, explicit solvent, and counterions added to maintain a zero net charge of a system were carried out and the PMF was calculated by using the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (WHAM). Subsequently, homoconjugation-equilibrium constants were calculated by numerical integration of the respective PMF profiles. In all cases but imidazole stable homocomplexes were found to form in solution, which was manifested as the presence of contact minima corresponding to hydrogen-bonded species in the PMF curves. The calculated homoconjugation constants were found to be greater for complexes with the OHO bridge (acetic acid and phenol) than with the NHN bridge and they were found to decrease with increasing polarity and hydrogen-bonding propensity of the solvent (i.e., in the series AN > DMSO > H(2)O), both facts being in agreement with the available experimental data. It was also found that interactions with counterions are manifested as the broadening of the contact minimum or appearance of additional minima in the PMF profiles of the acetic acid-acetate, phenol/phenolate system in acetonitrile, and the 4(5)-methylimidazole/4(5)-methylimidzole cation conjugated base system in dimethyl sulfoxide. (c) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The transformation dynamics towards equilibrium in non-equilibrium w/w/o double emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Youchuang; Mak, Sze Yi; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2016-10-01

    We use a glass-based microfluidic device to generate non-equilibrium water-in-water-in-oil (w/w/o) double emulsions and study how they transform into equilibrium configurations. The method relies on using three immiscible liquids, with two of them from the phase-separated aqueous two-phase systems. We find that the transformation is accompanied by an expansion rim, while the characteristic transformation speed of the rim mainly depends on the interfacial tension between the innermost and middle phases, as well as the viscosity of the innermost phase when the middle phase is non-viscous. Remarkably, the viscosity of the outermost phase has little effect on the transformation speed. Our results account for the dynamics of non-equilibrium double emulsions towards their equilibrium structure and suggest a possibility to utilize the non-equilibrium drops to synthesize functional particles.

  11. Structural design using equilibrium programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple nonlinear programming methods are combined in the method of equilibrium programming. Equilibrium programming theory has been appied to problems in operations research, and in the present study it is investigated as a framework to solve structural design problems. Several existing formal methods for structural optimization are shown to actually be equilibrium programming methods. Additionally, the equilibrium programming framework is utilized to develop a new structural design method. Selected computational results are presented to demonstrate the methods.

  12. Higher-order compositional modeling of three-phase flow in 3D fractured porous media based on cross-flow equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2013-10-01

    Numerical simulation of multiphase compositional flow in fractured porous media, when all the species can transfer between the phases, is a real challenge. Despite the broad applications in hydrocarbon reservoir engineering and hydrology, a compositional numerical simulator for three-phase flow in fractured media has not appeared in the literature, to the best of our knowledge. In this work, we present a three-phase fully compositional simulator for fractured media, based on higher-order finite element methods. To achieve computational efficiency, we invoke the cross-flow equilibrium (CFE) concept between discrete fractures and a small neighborhood in the matrix blocks. We adopt the mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to approximate convective Darcy fluxes and the pressure equation. This approach is the most natural choice for flow in fractured media. The mass balance equations are discretized by the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method, which is perhaps the most efficient approach to capture physical discontinuities in phase properties at the matrix-fracture interfaces and at phase boundaries. In this work, we account for gravity and Fickian diffusion. The modeling of capillary effects is discussed in a separate paper. We present the mathematical framework, using the implicit-pressure-explicit-composition (IMPEC) scheme, which facilitates rigorous thermodynamic stability analyses and the computation of phase behavior effects to account for transfer of species between the phases. A deceptively simple CFL condition is implemented to improve numerical stability and accuracy. We provide six numerical examples at both small and larger scales and in two and three dimensions, to demonstrate powerful features of the formulation.

  13. An analytical model of crater count equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Minton, David A.; Fassett, Caleb I.

    2017-06-01

    Crater count equilibrium occurs when new craters form at the same rate that old craters are erased, such that the total number of observable impacts remains constant. Despite substantial efforts to understand this process, there remain many unsolved problems. Here, we propose an analytical model that describes how a heavily cratered surface reaches a state of crater count equilibrium. The proposed model formulates three physical processes contributing to crater count equilibrium: cookie-cutting (simple, geometric overlap), ejecta-blanketing, and sandblasting (diffusive erosion). These three processes are modeled using a degradation parameter that describes the efficiency for a new crater to erase old craters. The flexibility of our newly developed model allows us to represent the processes that underlie crater count equilibrium problems. The results show that when the slope of the production function is steeper than that of the equilibrium state, the power law of the equilibrium slope is independent of that of the production function slope. We apply our model to the cratering conditions in the Sinus Medii region and at the Apollo 15 landing site on the Moon and demonstrate that a consistent degradation parameterization can successfully be determined based on the empirical results of these regions. Further developments of this model will enable us to better understand the surface evolution of airless bodies due to impact bombardment.

  14. A numerical study of EGS heat extraction process based on a thermal non-equilibrium model for heat transfer in subsurface porous heat reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiliang; Jiang, Fangming

    2016-02-01

    With a previously developed numerical model, we perform a detailed study of the heat extraction process in enhanced or engineered geothermal system (EGS). This model takes the EGS subsurface heat reservoir as an equivalent porous medium while it considers local thermal non-equilibrium between the rock matrix and the fluid flowing in the fractured rock mass. The application of local thermal non-equilibrium model highlights the temperature-difference heat exchange process occurring in EGS reservoirs, enabling a better understanding of the involved heat extraction process. The simulation results unravel the mechanism of preferential flow or short-circuit flow forming in homogeneously fractured reservoirs of different permeability values. EGS performance, e.g. production temperature and lifetime, is found to be tightly related to the flow pattern in the reservoir. Thermal compensation from rocks surrounding the reservoir contributes little heat to the heat transmission fluid if the operation time of an EGS is shorter than 15 years. We find as well the local thermal equilibrium model generally overestimates EGS performance and for an EGS with better heat exchange conditions in the heat reservoir, the heat extraction process acts more like the local thermal equilibrium process.

  15. Thermal equilibrium of goats.

    PubMed

    Maia, Alex S C; Nascimento, Sheila T; Nascimento, Carolina C N; Gebremedhin, Kifle G

    2016-05-01

    The effects of air temperature and relative humidity on thermal equilibrium of goats in a tropical region was evaluated. Nine non-pregnant Anglo Nubian nanny goats were used in the study. An indirect calorimeter was designed and developed to measure oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, methane production and water vapour pressure of the air exhaled from goats. Physiological parameters: rectal temperature, skin temperature, hair-coat temperature, expired air temperature and respiratory rate and volume as well as environmental parameters: air temperature, relative humidity and mean radiant temperature were measured. The results show that respiratory and volume rates and latent heat loss did not change significantly for air temperature between 22 and 26°C. In this temperature range, metabolic heat was lost mainly by convection and long-wave radiation. For temperature greater than 30°C, the goats maintained thermal equilibrium mainly by evaporative heat loss. At the higher air temperature, the respiratory and ventilation rates as well as body temperatures were significantly elevated. It can be concluded that for Anglo Nubian goats, the upper limit of air temperature for comfort is around 26°C when the goats are protected from direct solar radiation.

  16. Phase-equilibrium geobarometers for silicic rocks based on rhyolite-MELTS—Part 3: Application to the Peach Spring Tuff (Arizona-California-Nevada, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamukcu, Ayla S.; Gualda, Guilherme A. R.; Ghiorso, Mark S.; Miller, Calvin F.; McCracken, Reba G.

    2015-03-01

    Establishing the depths of magma accumulation is critical to understanding how magmas evolve and erupt, but developing methods to constrain these pressures is challenging. We apply the new rhyolite-MELTS phase-equilibria geobarometer—based on the equilibrium between melt, quartz, and two feldspars—to matrix glass compositions from Peach Spring Tuff (Arizona-California-Nevada, USA) high-silica rhyolite. We compare the results to those from amphibole geothermobarometry, projection of glass compositions onto the haplogranitic ternary, and glass SiO2 geobarometry. Quartz + 2 feldspar rhyolite-MELTS pressures span a relatively small range (185-230 MPa), consistent with nearly homogeneous crystal compositions, and are similar to estimates based on projection onto the haplogranitic ternary (250 ± 50 MPa) and on glass SiO2 (255-275 MPa). Amphibole geothermobarometry gives much wider pressure ranges (temperature-independent: ~65-300 MPa; temperature-dependent: ~75-295 MPa; amphibole-only: ~80-950 MPa); average Anderson and Smith (Am Mineral 80:549-559, 1995) + Blundy and Holland (Contrib Miner Petrol 104:208-224, 1990) or Holland and Blundy (Contrib Miner Petrol 116:433-447, 1994—Thermometer A, B) pressures are most similar to phase-equilibria results (~220, 210, 190 MPa, respectively). Crystallization temperatures determined previously with rhyolite-MELTS (742 °C), Zr-in-sphene (769 ± 20 °C), and zircon saturation (770-780 °C) geothermometry are similar, but temperatures from amphibole geothermometry (~450-955 °C) are notably different; the average Anderson and Smith + Holland and Blundy (1994—Thermometer B; ~710 °C) temperature is most consistent with previous estimates. The rhyolite-MELTS geobarometer effectively culls glass compositions affected by alteration or analytical issues; Peach Spring glass compositions that yield pressure estimates reveal a tight range of plausible Na2O and K2O contents, suggesting that low Na2O and high K2O contents of many

  17. Equilibrium of nematic vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoli, Gaetano; Vergori, Luigi

    2010-11-01

    A variational scheme is proposed which allows the derivation of a concise and elegant formulation of the equilibrium equations for closed fluid membranes, endowed with a nematic microstructure. The nematic order is described by an in-plane nematic director and a degree of orientation, as customary in the theory of uniaxial nematics. The only constitutive ingredient in this scheme is a free-energy density which depends on the vesicle geometry and order parameters. The stress and the couple stress tensors related to this free-energy density are provided. As an application of the proposed scheme, a certain number of special theories are deduced: soap bubbles, lipid vesicles, chiral and achiral nematic membranes, and nematics on curved substrates.

  18. Statistical physics ""Beyond equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    The scientific challenges of the 21st century will increasingly involve competing interactions, geometric frustration, spatial and temporal intrinsic inhomogeneity, nanoscale structures, and interactions spanning many scales. We will focus on a broad class of emerging problems that will require new tools in non-equilibrium statistical physics and that will find application in new material functionality, in predicting complex spatial dynamics, and in understanding novel states of matter. Our work will encompass materials under extreme conditions involving elastic/plastic deformation, competing interactions, intrinsic inhomogeneity, frustration in condensed matter systems, scaling phenomena in disordered materials from glasses to granular matter, quantum chemistry applied to nano-scale materials, soft-matter materials, and spatio-temporal properties of both ordinary and complex fluids.

  19. Equilibrium Star Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan C.; Krumholz, Mark R.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2006-04-01

    We argue that rich star clusters take at least several local dynamical times to form and so are quasi-equilibrium structures during their assembly. Observations supporting this conclusion include morphologies of star-forming clumps, momentum flux of protostellar outflows from forming clusters, age spreads of stars in the Orion Nebula cluster (ONC) and other clusters, and the age of a dynamical ejection event from the ONC. We show that these long formation timescales are consistent with the expected star formation rate in turbulent gas, as recently evaluated by Krumholz & McKee. Finally, we discuss the implications of these timescales for star formation efficiencies, the disruption of gas by stellar feedback, mass segregation of stars, and the longevity of turbulence in molecular clumps.

  20. Dynamic and equilibrium performance of sensors based on short peptide ligands for affinity adsorption of human IgG using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Islam, Nafisa; Shen, Fei; Gurgel, Patrick V; Rojas, Orlando J; Carbonell, Ruben G

    2014-08-15

    This paper characterizes the potential of novel hexameric peptide ligands for on-line IgG detection in bioprocesses. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) was used to study the binding of human IgG to the hexameric peptide ligand HWRGWV, which was covalently grafted to alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on gold surfaces. Peptide coupling on SAMs was verified, followed by covalent grafting of peptides with a removable Fmoc or acetylated N-termini via their C-termini to produce active peptide SPR sensors that were tested for IgG binding. The dynamics and extent of peptide-IgG binding were compared with results from a conventional system using protein A attached on a gold surface via disulfide monolayers. IgG binding to protein A on disulfide monolayers yielded equilibrium dissociation constants of 1.4×10(-7)M. The corresponding dissociation constant value for the acetylated version of the peptide (Ac-HWRGWV) supported on alkanethiol SAM was 5.8×10(-7)M and that for HWRGWV on the alkanethiol SAM (after de-protection of Fmoc-HWRGWVA) was 1.2×10(-6)M. Maximum IgG binding capacities, Qm of 6.7, 3.8, and 4.1mgm(-2) were determined for the protein A and the two forms of HWRGWV-based biosensors, respectively. Real-time data for the kinetics of adsorption were used to determine the apparent rate constants for adsorption and desorption. The results were analyzed to understand the mechanism of IgG binding to the protein and peptide ligands. It was found that the peptide-IgG binding was reaction controlled, however the protein A-IgG binding mechanism was partially mass transfer (diffusion) controlled. The adsorption rate constants, ka, for the protein A ligand increased with decreasing concentration of analyte and the peptide ligand ka values was constant at different IgG concentrations and flow rates.

  1. Exploring Chemical Equilibrium with Poker Chips: A General Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    A hands-on laboratory exercise at the general chemistry level introduces students to chemical equilibrium through a simulation that uses poker chips and rate equations. More specifically, the exercise allows students to explore reaction tables, dynamic chemical equilibrium, equilibrium constant expressions, and the equilibrium constant based on…

  2. Exploring Chemical Equilibrium with Poker Chips: A General Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    A hands-on laboratory exercise at the general chemistry level introduces students to chemical equilibrium through a simulation that uses poker chips and rate equations. More specifically, the exercise allows students to explore reaction tables, dynamic chemical equilibrium, equilibrium constant expressions, and the equilibrium constant based on…

  3. Iron isotope fractionation between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite revisited: New insights based on a multi-direction approach to equilibrium and isotopic exchange rate modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frierdich, Andrew J.; Beard, Brian L.; Reddy, Thiruchelvi R.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2014-08-01

    The Fe isotope compositions of naturally occurring Fe oxide minerals provide insights into biogeochemical processes that occur in modern and ancient environments. Key to understanding isotopic variations in such minerals is knowledge of the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation factors between common minerals and aqueous Fe species. Because experimental measurements of isotopic fractionation may reflect a combination of kinetic and equilibrium fractionations during rapid dissolution and precipitation, even in experiments that employ the three-isotope method, assessment of the attainment of equilibrium is often difficult. Here, we re-examine Fe isotope exchange, via a 57Fe tracer, and natural mass-dependent fractionation, through changes in initial 56Fe/54Fe ratios, between aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq) and goethite. This approach uses the three-isotope method, but is distinct in its evaluation of kinetic isotope fractionation and the attainment of equilibrium by: (i) employing a multi-direction approach to equilibrium at 22 °C via reaction of three Fe(II)aq solutions that had different initial 56Fe/54Fe ratios, (ii) conducting isotopic exchange experiments at elevated temperature (50 °C), and (iii) modifying the rate of isotopic exchange through a combination of trace-element substitutions and particle coarsening to evaluate corresponding temporal changes in fractionation trajectories that may reflect changing instantaneous fractionation factors. We find that rapid isotopic exchange produces kinetic isotope effects between Fe(II)aq and goethite, which shifts the 56Fe/54Fe ratios of Fe(II)aq early in reactions toward that of goethite, indicating that the instantaneous Fe(II)aq-goethite fractionation factor under kinetic conditions is small. Importantly, however, this kinetic fractionation is “erased” with continued reaction, and this is evident by the congruence for multiple-exchange trajectories of distinct initial Fe(II)aq solutions toward the same final value

  4. On applicability of the photochemical-equilibrium approach for retrieval of O and H mesospheric distributions from the satellite-based measurements of the airglow emission and ozone concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigin, Alexander; Belikovich, Mikhail; Kulikov, Mikhail

    2016-04-01

    Atomic oxygen and hydrogen are known to be among key components for the photochemistry and energy balance of the Earth's atmosphere between approximately 80 and 100 km altitude (mesopause region). Therefore, obtaining information about the vertical distributions of O and H concentrations is an important task in studies of this region. Solving of this problem is rather difficult due to the absence of regular methods which allow one to direct measurements of distributions of these components in mesosphere. However, indirect methods used to retrieve O and H distributions from the satellite-based measurements of the OH and O2(1D) airglow emission, as well as the data of IR and microwave O3 measurements have a sufficiently long development history. These methods are rooted in the use of the condition of photochemical equilibrium of ozone density in the range of altitudes from 50 to 100 km. A significant factor is that an insufficient volume of such measurement data forces researchers to use approximate ("truncated") photochemical-equilibrium conditions. In particular, it is assumed that in the daytime the ozone production reaction is perfectly balanced by ozone photodissociation, whereas during the night the only ozone sink is the reaction of ozone with atomic hydrogen, which, in its turn, leads to formation of excited OH and airglow emission of the latter. The presentation analyzes applicability of the photochemical-equilibrium conditions both in the total and truncated forms for description of the spatio-temporal evolution of mesospheric ozone during a year. The analysis is based on year-long time series generated by a 3D chemical transport model, which reproduces correctly various types of atmosphere dynamics in the range of altitudes from 50 to 100 km. These data are used to determine statistics of the ratio between the correct (calculated dynamically) distributions of the O3 density and its uncontracted and truncated equilibrium values for the conditions of the

  5. Controlled perturbation of the thermodynamic equilibrium by microfluidic separation of porphyrin-based aggregates in a multi-component self-assembling system.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Floris; Meijer, E W

    2013-03-04

    In a microfluidic H-cell, a multi-component self-assembled system is brought out-of-equilibrium by changing the bimodal composition of porphyrin stacks and pyridine-capped dimers. Driven by their different diffusivities, diffusion-controlled separation in methylcyclohexane reveals different compositions when detected in-line and off-line, which demonstrates the kinetic behaviour of this metastable system. The microfluidic technique also proves to be highly equipped to determine diffusion constants of the different assemblies.

  6. Neoclassical equilibrium in gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Nguyen, C.; Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Ghendrih, Ph.

    2009-06-15

    This paper presents a set of model collision operators, which reproduce the neoclassical equilibrium and comply with the constraints of a full-f global gyrokinetic code. The assessment of these operators is based on an entropy variational principle, which allows one to perform a fast calculation of the neoclassical diffusivity and poloidal velocity. It is shown that the force balance equation is recovered at lowest order in the expansion parameter, the normalized gyroradius, hence allowing one to calculate correctly the radial electric field. Also, the conventional neoclassical transport and the poloidal velocity are reproduced in the plateau and banana regimes. The advantages and drawbacks of the various model operators are discussed in view of the requirements for neoclassical and turbulent transport.

  7. Neoclassical equilibrium in gyrokinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Nguyen, C.; Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Ghendrih, Ph.

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents a set of model collision operators, which reproduce the neoclassical equilibrium and comply with the constraints of a full-f global gyrokinetic code. The assessment of these operators is based on an entropy variational principle, which allows one to perform a fast calculation of the neoclassical diffusivity and poloidal velocity. It is shown that the force balance equation is recovered at lowest order in the expansion parameter, the normalized gyroradius, hence allowing one to calculate correctly the radial electric field. Also, the conventional neoclassical transport and the poloidal velocity are reproduced in the plateau and banana regimes. The advantages and drawbacks of the various model operators are discussed in view of the requirements for neoclassical and turbulent transport.

  8. Equilibrium Policy Proposals with Abstentions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    AB I I I EQUILIBRIUM POLICY PROPOSALS WITH ABSTENTIONS* by Peter Coughlin** 1. Introduction Spatial analyses of economic policy formation in elections...alternative in S at which there is a local equilibrium when the incumbent must defend the status quo. 5. Applications to Related Spatial Voting Models...York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Hestenes, M. [19751, Optimization Theoy, New York: Wiley. Hinich, M. [1977], " Equilibrium in Spatial Voting: The Median

  9. Grinding kinetics and equilibrium states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opoczky, L.; Farnady, F.

    1984-01-01

    The temporary and permanent equilibrium occurring during the initial stage of cement grinding does not indicate the end of comminution, but rather an increased energy consumption during grinding. The constant dynamic equilibrium occurs after a long grinding period indicating the end of comminution for a given particle size. Grinding equilibrium curves can be constructed to show the stages of comminution and agglomeration for certain particle sizes.

  10. The Nash equilibrium: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Charles A.; Roth, Alvin E.

    2004-01-01

    In 1950, John Nash contributed a remarkable one-page PNAS article that defined and characterized a notion of equilibrium for n- person games. This notion, now called the “Nash equilibrium,” has been widely applied and adapted in economics and other behavioral sciences. Indeed, game theory, with the Nash equilibrium as its centerpiece, is becoming the most prominent unifying theory of social science. In this perspective, we summarize the historical context and subsequent impact of Nash's contribution. PMID:15024100

  11. Communication: Microphase equilibrium and assembly dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Yuan; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Despite many attempts, ordered equilibrium microphases have yet to be obtained in experimental colloidal suspensions. The recent computation of the equilibrium phase diagram of a microscopic, particle-based microphase former [Zhuang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 098301 (2016)] has nonetheless found such mesoscale assemblies to be thermodynamically stable. Here, we consider their equilibrium and assembly dynamics. At intermediate densities above the order-disorder transition, we identify four different dynamical regimes and the structural changes that underlie the dynamical crossovers from one disordered regime to the next. Below the order-disorder transition, we also find that periodic lamellae are the most dynamically accessible of the periodic microphases. Our analysis thus offers a comprehensive view of the dynamics of disordered microphases and a route to the assembly of periodic microphases in a putative well-controlled, experimental system.

  12. Analytic prediction of airplane equilibrium spin characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The nonlinear equations of motion are solved algebraically for conditions for which an airplane is in an equilibrium spin. Constrained minimization techniques are employed in obtaining the solution. Linear characteristics of the airplane about the equilibrium points are also presented and their significance in identifying the stability characteristics of the equilibrium points is discussed. Computer time requirements are small making the method appear potentially applicable in airplane design. Results are obtained for several configurations and are compared with other analytic-numerical methods employed in spin prediction. Correlation with experimental results is discussed for one configuration for which a rather extensive data base was available. A need is indicated for higher Reynolds number data taken under conditions which more accurately simulate a spin.

  13. Chemical Equilibrium Composition of Aqueous Systems

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-30

    MINEQL is a subroutine package to calculate equilibrium composition of an aqueous system, accounting for mass transfer. MINEQL-EIR contains an additional base on enthalpy and heat capacity data and has the option to do calculations at temperatures different from 25 degrees C.

  14. Forebody and base region real gas flow in severe planetary entry by a factored implicit numerical method. II - Equilibrium reactive gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davy, W. C.; Green, M. J.; Lombard, C. K.

    1981-01-01

    The factored-implicit, gas-dynamic algorithm has been adapted to the numerical simulation of equilibrium reactive flows. Changes required in the perfect gas version of the algorithm are developed, and the method of coupling gas-dynamic and chemistry variables is discussed. A flow-field solution that approximates a Jovian entry case was obtained by this method and compared with the same solution obtained by HYVIS, a computer program much used for the study of planetary entry. Comparison of surface pressure distribution and stagnation line shock-layer profiles indicates that the two solutions agree well.

  15. Thermodynamic efficiency out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivak, David; Crooks, Gavin

    2011-03-01

    Molecular-scale machines typically operate far from thermodynamic equilibrium, limiting the applicability of equilibrium statistical mechanics to understand their efficiency. Thermodynamic length analysis relates a non-equilibrium property (dissipation) to equilibrium properties (equilibrium fluctuations and their relaxation time). Herein we demonstrate that the thermodynamic length framework follows directly from the assumptions of linear response theory. Uniting these two frameworks provides thermodynamic length analysis a firmer statistical mechanical grounding, and equips linear response theory with a metric structure to facilitate the prediction and discovery of optimal (minimum dissipation) paths in complicated free energy landscapes. To explore the applicability of this theoretical framework, we examine its accuracy for simple bistable systems, parametrized to model single-molecule force-extension experiments. Through analytic derivation of the equilibrium fluctuations and numerical calculation of the dissipation and relaxation time, we verify that thermodynamic length analysis (though derived in a near-equilibrium limit) provides a strikingly good approximation even far from equilibrium, and thus provides a useful framework for understanding molecular motor efficiency.

  16. Equilibrium states for hyperbolic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Vanessa; Viana, Marcelo

    2017-02-01

    We prove the existence of finitely many ergodic equilibrium states for local homeomorphisms and hyperbolic potentials. We also deal with partially hyperbolic skew-products over non-uniformly expanding maps with uniform contraction on the fibre. For these systems we prove the existence and finiteness of the equilibrium states associated with a class of Hölder continuous potentials.

  17. Rapid-Equilibrium Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberty, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid-equilibrium rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are especially useful because if experimental data can be fit by these simpler rate equations, the Michaelis constants can be interpreted as equilibrium constants. However, for some reactions it is necessary to use the more complicated steady-state rate equations. Thermodynamics is…

  18. [Oculomotor equilibrium and aviation activities].

    PubMed

    Maille, M; Pedeprat Lamechinou, P; Corbe, C; Manent, P J

    1989-01-01

    A good oculomotor equilibrium warrants flight safety. It is indeed directly linked with depth vision an may decompensate, causing a deficit or a diplopia. It is therefore very important to screen pilots carefully and to have periodical examinations to check the oculomotor equilibrium.

  19. Rapid-Equilibrium Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberty, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid-equilibrium rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are especially useful because if experimental data can be fit by these simpler rate equations, the Michaelis constants can be interpreted as equilibrium constants. However, for some reactions it is necessary to use the more complicated steady-state rate equations. Thermodynamics is…

  20. [Dichotomizing method applied to calculating equilibrium constant of dimerization system].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guo-zhong; Ye, Zhi-xiang

    2002-06-01

    The arbitrary trivariate algebraic equations are formed based on the combination principle. The univariata algebraic equation of equilibrium constant kappa for dimerization system is obtained through a series of algebraic transformation, and it depends on the properties of monotonic functions whether the equation is solvable or not. If the equation is solvable, equilibrium constant of dimerization system is obtained by dichotomy and its final equilibrium constant of dimerization system is determined according to the principle of error of fitting. The equilibrium constants of trisulfophthalocyanine and biosulfophthalocyanine obtained with this method are 47,973.4 and 30,271.8 respectively. The results are much better than those reported previously.

  1. Equilibrium Shape of Colloidal Crystals.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Ray M; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2015-10-27

    Assembling colloidal particles into highly ordered configurations, such as photonic crystals, has significant potential for enabling a broad range of new technologies. Facilitating the nucleation of colloidal crystals and developing successful crystal growth strategies require a fundamental understanding of the equilibrium structure and morphology of small colloidal assemblies. Here, we report the results of a novel computational approach to determine the equilibrium shape of assemblies of colloidal particles that interact via an experimentally validated pair potential. While the well-known Wulff construction can accurately capture the equilibrium shape of large colloidal assemblies, containing O(10(4)) or more particles, determining the equilibrium shape of small colloidal assemblies of O(10) particles requires a generalized Wulff construction technique which we have developed for a proper description of equilibrium structure and morphology of small crystals. We identify and characterize fully several "magic" clusters which are significantly more stable than other similarly sized clusters.

  2. Updated Coronal Equilibrium Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryans, Paul; Badnell, N. R.; Gorczyca, T. W.; Laming, J. M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Savin, D. W.

    2006-06-01

    Reliably interpreting solar spectra requires accurate ionization balance calculations. However, much of the atomic data needed for these calculations have not been generated using modern theoretical methods and are often highly suspect. This translates directly into the reliability of the collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) calculations. We make use of state-of-the-art calculations of dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for the hydrogenic through Na-like ions of all elements from He through to Zn. We also make use of state-of-the-art radiative recombination (RR) rate coefficient calculations for the bar e through Na-like ions of all elements from H to Zn. Here we present improved CIE calculations for temperatures from 1e4 to 1e9 K using our data and the recommended electron impact ionization data of Mazzotta et al. (1998, A&AS, 133, 403) for elements up through Ni and Mazzotta (private communication) for Cu and Zn. DR and RR data for ionization stages that have not been updated are also taken from these two additional sources. We compare our calculated fractional ionic abundances using these data with those presented by Mazzotta et al. for all elements from H to Ni. The differences in peak fractional abundance are up to 60%. We also compare with the fractional ionic abundances for Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni derived from the modern DR calculations of Gu (2003a, ApJ, 590, 1131; 2004, ApJ, 153, 389) for the H-like through Na-like ions, and the RR calculations of Gu (2003b, ApJ, 589, 1085) for the bare through F-like ions. These results are in better agreement with our work, with differences in peak fractional abundance of less than 10%. This work was supported in part by the NASA Solar SR&T and LWS programs, theOffice of Naval Research, and PPARC.

  3. Development of a model using the MATLAB System identification toolbox to estimate (222)Rn equilibrium factor from CR-39 based passive measurements.

    PubMed

    Abo-Elmagd, M; Sadek, A M

    2014-12-01

    Can and Bare method is a widely used passive method for measuring the equilibrium factor F through the determination of the track density ratio between bare (D) and filtered (Do) detectors. The dimensions of the used diffusion chamber are altering the deposition ratios of Po-isotopes on the chamber walls as well as the ratios of the existing alpha emitters in air. Then the measured filtered track density and therefore the resultant equilibrium factor is changed according to the diffusion chamber dimensions. For this reason, high uncertainty was expected in the measured F using different diffusion chambers. In the present work, F is derived as a function of both track density ratio (D/Do) and the dimensions of the used diffusion chambers (its volume to the total internal surface area; V/A). The accuracy of the derived formula was verified using the black-box modeling technique via the MATLAB System identification toolbox. The results show that the uncertainty of the calculated F by using the derived formula of F (D/Do, V/A) is only 5%. The obtained uncertainty ensures the quality of the derived function to calculate F using diffusion chambers with wide range of dimensions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Using Analogies to Prevent Misconceptions about Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin Pekmez, Esin

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to find the effectiveness of using analogies to prevent misconceptions about chemical equilibrium. Nineteen analogies, which were based on dynamic aspects of chemical equilibrium and application of Le Chatelier's principle, were developed. The participations of this study consisted of 11th grade students (n: 151)…

  5. Understanding Chemical Reaction Kinetics and Equilibrium with Interlocking Building Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Carrie A.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reaction kinetics and equilibrium are essential core concepts of chemistry but are challenging topics for many students, both at the high school and undergraduate university level. Visualization at the molecular level is valuable to aid understanding of reaction kinetics and equilibrium. This activity provides a discovery-based method to…

  6. Using Analogies to Prevent Misconceptions about Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin Pekmez, Esin

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to find the effectiveness of using analogies to prevent misconceptions about chemical equilibrium. Nineteen analogies, which were based on dynamic aspects of chemical equilibrium and application of Le Chatelier's principle, were developed. The participations of this study consisted of 11th grade students (n: 151)…

  7. Understanding Chemical Reaction Kinetics and Equilibrium with Interlocking Building Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Carrie A.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reaction kinetics and equilibrium are essential core concepts of chemistry but are challenging topics for many students, both at the high school and undergraduate university level. Visualization at the molecular level is valuable to aid understanding of reaction kinetics and equilibrium. This activity provides a discovery-based method to…

  8. Caloric and entropic temperatures in non-equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, D.; Restuccia, L.

    2016-10-01

    We examine the non-equilibrium consequences of two different definitions of temperature in systems out of equilibrium: one is based on the internal energy (caloric temperature), and the other one on the entropy (entropic temperature). We discuss the relation between the values obtained from these two definitions in ideal gases and in two-level systems.

  9. Equilibrium solutions for microscopic stochastic systems in population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lachowicz, Mirosław; Ryabukha, Tatiana

    2013-06-01

    The present paper deals with the problem of existence of equilibrium solutions of equations describing the general population dynamics at the microscopic level of modified Liouville equation (individually--based model) corresponding to a Markov jump process. We show the existence of factorized equilibrium solutions and discuss uniqueness. The conditions guaranteeing uniqueness or non-uniqueness are proposed under the assumption of periodic structures.

  10. Non-equilibrium microrheology of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ming-Tzo; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Intracellular stresses generated by molecular motors can actively modify cytoskeletal network and change intracellular mechanical properties. We study the out-of-equilibrium microrheology in living cells using endogenous organelle particles as probes. This paper reports measurements of the intracellular mechanical properties using passive, particle-tracking and active, optical tweezers-based microrheology approaches. Using arguments based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we compared the results from both approaches to distinguish thermal and non-thermal mechanical fluctuations in living cells.

  11. Non-equilibrium supramolecular polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Leira-Iglesias, Jorge; Markvoort, Albert J; de Greef, Tom F A; Hermans, Thomas M

    2017-03-28

    Supramolecular polymerization has been traditionally focused on the thermodynamic equilibrium state, where one-dimensional assemblies reside at the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The pathway and rate to reach the equilibrium state are irrelevant, and the resulting assemblies remain unchanged over time. In the past decade, the focus has shifted to kinetically trapped (non-dissipative non-equilibrium) structures that heavily depend on the method of preparation (i.e., pathway complexity), and where the assembly rates are of key importance. Kinetic models have greatly improved our understanding of competing pathways, and shown how to steer supramolecular polymerization in the desired direction (i.e., pathway selection). The most recent innovation in the field relies on energy or mass input that is dissipated to keep the system away from the thermodynamic equilibrium (or from other non-dissipative states). This tutorial review aims to provide the reader with a set of tools to identify different types of self-assembled states that have been explored so far. In particular, we aim to clarify the often unclear use of the term "non-equilibrium self-assembly" by subdividing systems into dissipative, and non-dissipative non-equilibrium states. Examples are given for each of the states, with a focus on non-dissipative non-equilibrium states found in one-dimensional supramolecular polymerization.

  12. Bifurcation of equilibrium points in the potential of heterogeneous Itokawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, L.; Wang, X.; Baoyin, H.; Li, J.

    2017-09-01

    The bifurcation of equilibrium points in the potential of heterogeneous 25143 Itokawa is investigated in this paper. First, we introduce a method improving upon the conventional polyhedral method to model a heterogeneous asteroid based on the process of disassembly and re-combination. Secondly, we compare the equilibrium points and zero-velocity curves of the homogeneous and heterogeneous cases. Moreover, a variable bulk density ratio δ of two regions is introduced to investigate the evolution of the equilibrium points. It is found that the number of equilibrium points experiences two changes when the ratio varies from 1 to 2.5. Specifically, a new pair of equilibrium points appears at a ratio δ1 = 1.5036, and another pair merges and then disappears at a ratio δ2 = 2.1785. Therefore, the number of equilibrium points changes from five to seven and then returns to five with increasing ratio δ. The topological structure of the equilibrium points is also investigated to achieve a better understanding of the dynamic environment around a heterogeneous body. An in-depth study of the positions and stabilities of the equilibrium points outside may facilitate a better choice of orbits in missions near heterogeneous bodies. Moreover, the investigation of the equilibrium points inside may reflect the internal structure and pressure of the body in a different manner than in the homogeneous case.

  13. Chemical Equilibrium, Unit 3: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations. A Computer-Enriched Module for Introductory Chemistry. Student's Guide and Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Cynthia J.

    Presented are the teacher's guide and student materials for one of a series of self-instructional, computer-based learning modules for an introductory, undergraduate chemistry course. The student manual for this unit on chemical equilibrium calculations includes objectives, prerequisites, a discussion of the equilibrium constant (K), and ten…

  14. Equilibrium ignition for ICF capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, K.S.; Colgate, S.A.; Johnson, N.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Menikoff, R.; Petschek, A.G. )

    1994-10-05

    In comparing high-gain ICF targets using cryogenic DT for a pusher with equilibrium ignition targets using high-[ital Z] pushers which contain the radiation, we point to the intrinsic advantages of the latter. Equilibrium or volume ignition sacrifices high gain for lower losses, lower ignition temperature, lower implosion velocity, and lower sensitivity of the more robust capsule to small fluctuations and asymmetries in the drive system. The reduction in gain is about a factor of 2.5, which is small enough to make the more robust equilibrium ignition an atractive alternative. [copyright] 1994 [ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics

  15. Interregional equilibrium with heterogeneous labor.

    PubMed

    Michel, P; Perrot, A; Thisse J-f

    1996-02-01

    "The impact of labor migration on interregional equilibrium is studied when workers are heterogeneous in productivity and regional mobility. The skilled respond to market disequilibrium by moving into the most attractive region. The unskilled are immobile in the short-run and move with the skilled in the long-run. Both regions have a neoclassical production function affected by an externality depending on the number of skilled. Workers move according to the utility differential when regional amenities vary with population or according to the wage differential. The equilibrium pattern depends on the unskilled's mobility and on migration incentives. Typically, regional imbalance characterizes the equilibrium which is often suboptimal."

  16. Modeling of phase equilibrium and vapor adsorption on carbon black based on a combination of a lattice theory and equation of state.

    PubMed

    Ustinov, E A; Do, D D

    2002-09-15

    A thermodynamic approach is developed in this paper to describe the behavior of a subcritical fluid in the neighborhood of vapor-liquid interface and close to a graphite surface. The fluid is modeled as a system of parallel molecular layers. The Helmholtz free energy of the fluid is expressed as the sum of the intrinsic Helmholtz free energies of separate layers and the potential energy of their mutual interactions calculated by the 10-4 potential. This Helmholtz free energy is described by an equation of state (such as the Bender or Peng-Robinson equation), which allows us a convenient means to obtain the intrinsic Helmholtz free energy of each molecular layer as a function of its two-dimensional density. All molecular layers of the bulk fluid are in mechanical equilibrium corresponding to the minimum of the total potential energy. In the case of adsorption the external potential exerted by the graphite layers is added to the free energy. The state of the interface zone between the liquid and the vapor phases or the state of the adsorbed phase is determined by the minimum of the grand potential. In the case of phase equilibrium the approach leads to the distribution of density and pressure over the transition zone. The interrelation between the collision diameter and the potential well depth was determined by the surface tension. It was shown that the distance between neighboring molecular layers substantially changes in the vapor-liquid transition zone and in the adsorbed phase with loading. The approach is considered in this paper for the case of adsorption of argon and nitrogen on carbon black. In both cases an excellent agreement with the experimental data was achieved without additional assumptions and fitting parameters, except for the fluid-solid potential well depth. The approach has far-reaching consequences and can be readily extended to the model of adsorption in slit pores of carbonaceous materials and to the analysis of multicomponent adsorption

  17. Philicities, Fugalities, and Equilibrium Constants.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Herbert; Ofial, Armin R

    2016-05-17

    The mechanistic model of Organic Chemistry is based on relationships between rate and equilibrium constants. Thus, strong bases are generally considered to be good nucleophiles and poor nucleofuges. Exceptions to this rule have long been known, and the ability of iodide ions to catalyze nucleophilic substitutions, because they are good nucleophiles as well as good nucleofuges, is just a prominent example for exceptions from the general rule. In a reaction series, the Leffler-Hammond parameter α = δΔG(⧧)/δΔG° describes the fraction of the change in the Gibbs energy of reaction, which is reflected in the change of the Gibbs energy of activation. It has long been considered as a measure for the position of the transition state; thus, an α value close to 0 was associated with an early transition state, while an α value close to 1 was considered to be indicative of a late transition state. Bordwell's observation in 1969 that substituent variation in phenylnitromethanes has a larger effect on the rates of deprotonation than on the corresponding equilibrium constants (nitroalkane anomaly) triggered the breakdown of this interpretation. In the past, most systematic investigations of the relationships between rates and equilibria of organic reactions have dealt with proton transfer reactions, because only for few other reaction series complementary kinetic and thermodynamic data have been available. In this Account we report on a more general investigation of the relationships between Lewis basicities, nucleophilicities, and nucleofugalities as well as between Lewis acidities, electrophilicities, and electrofugalities. Definitions of these terms are summarized, and it is suggested to replace the hybrid terms "kinetic basicity" and "kinetic acidity" by "protophilicity" and "protofugality", respectively; in this way, the terms "acidity" and "basicity" are exclusively assigned to thermodynamic properties, while "philicity" and "fugality" refer to kinetics

  18. Generalized convective quasi-equilibrium principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi; Plant, Robert S.

    2016-03-01

    A generalization of Arakawa and Schubert's convective quasi-equilibrium principle is presented for a closure formulation of mass-flux convection parameterization. The original principle is based on the budget of the cloud work function. This principle is generalized by considering the budget for a vertical integral of an arbitrary convection-related quantity. The closure formulation includes Arakawa and Schubert's quasi-equilibrium, as well as both CAPE and moisture closures as special cases. The formulation also includes new possibilities for considering vertical integrals that are dependent on convective-scale variables, such as the moisture within convection. The generalized convective quasi-equilibrium is defined by a balance between large-scale forcing and convective response for a given vertically-integrated quantity. The latter takes the form of a convolution of a kernel matrix and a mass-flux spectrum, as in the original convective quasi-equilibrium. The kernel reduces to a scalar when either a bulk formulation is adopted, or only large-scale variables are considered within the vertical integral. Various physical implications of the generalized closure are discussed. These include the possibility that precipitation might be considered as a potentially-significant contribution to the large-scale forcing. Two dicta are proposed as guiding physical principles for the specifying a suitable vertically-integrated quantity.

  19. Equilibrium molecular thermodynamics from Kirkwood sampling.

    PubMed

    Somani, Sandeep; Okamoto, Yuko; Ballard, Andrew J; Wales, David J

    2015-05-21

    We present two methods for barrierless equilibrium sampling of molecular systems based on the recently proposed Kirkwood method (J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 130, 134102). Kirkwood sampling employs low-order correlations among internal coordinates of a molecule for random (or non-Markovian) sampling of the high dimensional conformational space. This is a geometrical sampling method independent of the potential energy surface. The first method is a variant of biased Monte Carlo, where Kirkwood sampling is used for generating trial Monte Carlo moves. Using this method, equilibrium distributions corresponding to different temperatures and potential energy functions can be generated from a given set of low-order correlations. Since Kirkwood samples are generated independently, this method is ideally suited for massively parallel distributed computing. The second approach is a variant of reservoir replica exchange, where Kirkwood sampling is used to construct a reservoir of conformations, which exchanges conformations with the replicas performing equilibrium sampling corresponding to different thermodynamic states. Coupling with the Kirkwood reservoir enhances sampling by facilitating global jumps in the conformational space. The efficiency of both methods depends on the overlap of the Kirkwood distribution with the target equilibrium distribution. We present proof-of-concept results for a model nine-atom linear molecule and alanine dipeptide.

  20. [Good laboratory practice of equilibrium solubility measurement].

    PubMed

    Baka, Edit

    2011-01-01

    The biggest part of my PhD work was the standardization of the classical saturation shake-flask solubility method. During the experiments we examined systematically which parameters have significant influence on the solubility value and how large experimental error (standard deviation) is caused by them in the solubility method. Hydrochlorothiazide was used as model compound. Modification in temperature, sedimentation time, composition of aqueous buffer and the technique of separation of solid and liquid phases were found to influence the equilibrium solubility results strongly. However, variations in the amount of solid excess and stirring time were found to have less influence. Based on this standardization study, we developed a new shorter (36 hours) protocol for measurements of equilibrium solubility of drug molecules. The new protocol was validated with the aid of 6 structurally different compounds. The equilibrium solubility was measured by both (standard and new) protocols. The results were in good agreement, so the shorter protocol can be applied to measure the equilibrium solubility of drug compounds.

  1. Equilibrium Molecular Thermodynamics from Kirkwood Sampling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present two methods for barrierless equilibrium sampling of molecular systems based on the recently proposed Kirkwood method (J. Chem. Phys.2009, 130, 134102). Kirkwood sampling employs low-order correlations among internal coordinates of a molecule for random (or non-Markovian) sampling of the high dimensional conformational space. This is a geometrical sampling method independent of the potential energy surface. The first method is a variant of biased Monte Carlo, where Kirkwood sampling is used for generating trial Monte Carlo moves. Using this method, equilibrium distributions corresponding to different temperatures and potential energy functions can be generated from a given set of low-order correlations. Since Kirkwood samples are generated independently, this method is ideally suited for massively parallel distributed computing. The second approach is a variant of reservoir replica exchange, where Kirkwood sampling is used to construct a reservoir of conformations, which exchanges conformations with the replicas performing equilibrium sampling corresponding to different thermodynamic states. Coupling with the Kirkwood reservoir enhances sampling by facilitating global jumps in the conformational space. The efficiency of both methods depends on the overlap of the Kirkwood distribution with the target equilibrium distribution. We present proof-of-concept results for a model nine-atom linear molecule and alanine dipeptide. PMID:25915525

  2. Hydraulic non-equilibrium during infiltration induced by structural connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Steffen; Vanderborght, Jan; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2012-08-01

    Water infiltration into heterogeneous, structured soil leads to hydraulic non-equilibrium across the infiltration front. That is, the water content and pressure head are not in equilibrium according to some static water retention curve. The water content increases more rapidly in more conductive regions followed by a slow relaxation towards an equilibrium state behind the front. An extreme case is preferential infiltration into macropores. Since flow paths adapt to the structural heterogeneity of the porous medium, there is a direct link between structure and non-equilibrium. The aim of our study is to develop an upscaled description of water dynamics which conserves the macroscopic effects of non-equilibrium and which can be directly linked to structural properties of the material. A critical question is how to define averaged state variables at the larger scale. We propose a novel approach based on flux-weighted averaging of pressure head, and compare its performance to alternative methods for averaging. Further, we suggest some meaningful indicators of hydraulic non-equilibrium that can be related to morphological characteristics of infiltration fronts in quantitative terms. These methods provide a sound basis to assess the impact of structural connectivity on hydraulic non-equilibrium. We demonstrate our approach using numerical case studies for infiltration into two-dimensional heterogeneous media using three different structure models with distinct differences in connectivity. Our results indicate that an increased isotropic, short-range connectivity reduces non-equilibrium, whereas anisotropic structures that are elongated in the direction of flow enforce it. We observe a good agreement between front morphology and effective hydraulic non-equilibrium. A detailed comparison of averaged state variables with results from an upscaled model that includes hydraulic non-equilibrium outlines potential improvements in the description of non-equilibrium dynamics

  3. Equilibrium and Orientation in Cephalopods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budelmann, Bernd-Ulrich

    1980-01-01

    Describes the structure of the equilibrium receptor system in cephalopods, comparing it to the vertebrate counterpart--the vestibular system. Relates the evolution of this complex system to the competition of cephalopods with fishes. (CS)

  4. Equilibrium ignition for ICF capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, K.S.; Colgate, S.A.; Johnson, N.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Menikoff, R.; Petschek, A.G.

    1993-12-31

    There are two fundamentally different approaches to igniting DT fuel in an ICF capsule which can be described as equilibrium and hot spot ignition. In both cases, a capsule which can be thought of as a pusher containing the DT fuel is imploded until the fuel reaches ignition conditions. In comparing high-gain ICF targets using cryogenic DT for a pusher with equilibrium ignition targets using high-Z pushers which contain the radiation. The authors point to the intrinsic advantages of the latter. Equilibrium or volume ignition sacrifices high gain for lower losses, lower ignition temperature, lower implosion velocity and lower sensitivity of the more robust capsule to small fluctuations and asymmetries in the drive system. The reduction in gain is about a factor of 2.5, which is small enough to make the more robust equilibrium ignition an attractive alternative.

  5. Simulations for Teaching Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddle, Penelope A.; White, Margaret Dawn; Rogers, Fiona

    2000-07-01

    This paper outlines a systematic approach to teaching chemical equilibrium using simulation experiments that address most known alternate conceptions in the topic. Graphs drawn using the data from the simulations are identical to those obtained using real experimental data for reactions that go to equilibrium. This allows easy mapping of the analogy to the target. The requirements for the simulations are simple and inexpensive, making them accessible to even the poorest schools. The simulations can be adapted for all levels, from pupils who are first encountering equilibrium through students in tertiary education to qualified teachers who have experienced difficulty in teaching the topic. The simulations were piloted on four very different audiences. Minor modifications were then made before the Equilibrium Games as reported in this paper were tested on three groups of subjects: a Grade 12 class, college students, and university Chemistry I students. Marked improvements in understanding of the concept were shown in two of the three sets of subjects.

  6. Equilibrium and Orientation in Cephalopods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budelmann, Bernd-Ulrich

    1980-01-01

    Describes the structure of the equilibrium receptor system in cephalopods, comparing it to the vertebrate counterpart--the vestibular system. Relates the evolution of this complex system to the competition of cephalopods with fishes. (CS)

  7. A search for equilibrium states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    An efficient search algorithm is described for the location of equilibrium states in a search set of states which differ from one another only by the choice of pure phases. The algorithm has three important characteristics: (1) it ignores states which have little prospect for being an improved approximation to the true equilibrium state; (2) it avoids states which lead to singular iteration equations; (3) it furnishes a search history which can provide clues to alternative search paths.

  8. Edge equilibrium code for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujing; Drozdov, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-15

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids.

  9. Relevance of equilibrium in multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, Takuya; Ono, Akira

    2009-01-15

    The relevance of equilibrium in a multifragmentation reaction of very central {sup 40}Ca + {sup 40}Ca collisions at 35 MeV/nucleon is investigated by using simulations of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). Two types of ensembles are compared. One is the reaction ensemble of the states at each reaction time t in collision events simulated by AMD, and the other is the equilibrium ensemble prepared by solving the AMD equation of motion for a many-nucleon system confined in a container for a long time. The comparison of the ensembles is performed for the fragment charge distribution and the excitation energies. Our calculations show that there exists an equilibrium ensemble that well reproduces the reaction ensemble at each reaction time t for the investigated period 80{<=}t{<=}300 fm/c. However, there are some other observables that show discrepancies between the reaction and equilibrium ensembles. These may be interpreted as dynamical effects in the reaction. The usual static equilibrium at each instant is not realized since any equilibrium ensemble with the same volume as that of the reaction system cannot reproduce the fragment observables.

  10. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  11. Transferable Anisotropic United-Atom Force Field Based on the Mie Potential for Phase Equilibrium Calculations: n-Alkanes and n-Olefins.

    PubMed

    Hemmen, Andrea; Gross, Joachim

    2015-09-03

    A new transferable force field parametrization for n-alkanes and n-olefins is proposed in this work. A united-atom approach is taken, where hydrogen atoms are lumped with neighboring atoms to single interaction sites. A comprehensive study is conducted for alkanes, optimizing van der Waals force field parameters in 6 dimensions. A Mie n-6 potential is considered for the van der Waals interaction, where for n-alkanes we simultaneously optimize the energy parameters ϵCH3 and ϵCH2 as well as the size parameters σCH3 and σCH2 of the CH3(sp(3)) and CH2(sp(3)) groups. Further, the repulsive exponent n of the Mie n-6 potential is varied. Moreover, we investigate the bond length toward the terminal CH3 group as a degree of freedom. According to the AUA (anisotropic united-atom) force field, the bond length between the terminal CH3 group and the neighboring interaction site should be increased by Δl compared with the carbon-carbon distance in order to better account for the hydrogen atoms. The parameter Δl is considered as a degree of freedom. The intramolecular force field parametrization is taken from existing force fields. A single objective function for the optimization is defined as squared relative deviations in vapor pressure and in liquid density of propane, n-butane, n-hexane, and n-octane. A similar study is also done for olefins, where the objective function includes 1-butene, 1-hexene, 1-octene, cis-2-pentene, and trans-2-pentene. Molecular simulations are performed in the grand canonical ensemble with transition-matrix sampling where the phase equilibrium properties are obtained with the histogram reweighting technique. The 6-dimensional optimization of strongly correlated parameters is possible, because the analytic PC-SAFT equation of state is used to locally correlate simulation results. The procedure is iterative but leads to very efficient convergence. An implementation is proposed, where the converged result is not affected (disturbed) by the

  12. Hydraulic non-equilibrium during infiltration induced by structural connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, S.; Vanderborght, J.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2012-04-01

    Water infiltration into heterogeneous, structured soil leads to hydraulic non-equilibrium across the infiltration front. That is the water content and water potential is not in equilibrium according to some static water retention curve. The water content increases more rapidly in more conductive regions followed by a slow relaxation towards an equilibrium state. An extreme case is preferential infiltration into macro-pores. As flow paths adapt to the structural heterogeneity of the subsurface, there is a direct link between structure and non-equilibrium. The aim of our study is to develop an upscaled description of water dynamics which conserves the macroscopic effects of non-equilibrium and which can be linked to structural properties of the material. However, this relationship cannot be rigorously examined without an upscaling approach that conserves non-equilibrium during averaging of state variables. We achieve this with a novel approach, that is based on flux-weighted averaging of hydraulic potential, and compare its performance to existing averaging approaches by means of infiltration simulations. Further, we set up some meaningful indicators of hydraulic non-equilibrium that can be easily compared to morphological characteristics of the infiltration front. These methods provide a sound basis to assess the impact of structural connectivity on hydraulic non-equilibrium. We generate several realizations of two-dimensional random fields originating from three heterogeneity models with distinct differences in connectivity of high-K areas and conduct infiltration simulations with them. Our results indicate, that an increased isotropic, short-range connectivity reduces non-equilibrium, whereas anisotropic, macropore-like structures enforce it. We observed a good agreement between front morphology and upscaled non-equilibrium. Our findings encourage to use flux-weighted potentials for upscaling of state variables during transient conditions. We demonstrate, that

  13. Hydraulic non-equilibrium during infiltration induced by structural connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, S.; Vogel, H.

    2011-12-01

    Water infiltration into heterogeneous, structured soil leads to hydraulic non-equilibrium across the infiltration front. That is the water content and water potential is not in equilibrium according to some static water retention curve. The water content increases more rapidly in more conductive regions followed by a slow relaxation towards an equilibrium state. An extreme case is preferential infiltration into macro-pores. As flowpaths adapt to the structural heterogeneity of the subsurface, there is a direct link between structure and non-equilibrium. The aim of our study is to develop an upscaled description of water dynamics which conserves the macroscopic effects of non-equilibrium and which can be linked to structural properties of the material. However, this relationship cannot be rigorously examined without an upscaling approach that conserves non-equilibrium during averaging of state variables. We achieve this with a novel approach, that is based on flux-weighted averaging of hydraulic potential, and compare its performance to existing averaging approaches by means of infiltration simulations. Further, we set up some meaningful indicators of hydraulic non-equilibrium that can be easily compared to morphological characteristics of the infiltration front. These methods provide a sound basis to assess the impact of structural connectivity on hydraulic non-equilibrium. We generate several realizations of two-dimensional random fields originating from three heterogeneity models with distinct differences in connectivity of high-K areas and conduct infiltration simulations with them. Our results indicate, that an increased isotropic, short-range connectivity reduces non-equilibrium, whereas anisotropic, macropore-like structures enforce it. We observed a good agreement between front morphology and upscaled non-equilibrium. Our findings encourage to use flux-weighted potentials for upscaling of state variables during transient conditions. We demonstrate, that this

  14. Non-equilibrium dynamics from RPMD and CMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Ralph; Song, Kai; Shi, Qiang; Althorpe, Stuart C.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the calculation of approximate non-equilibrium quantum time correlation functions (TCFs) using two popular path-integral-based molecular dynamics methods, ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) and centroid molecular dynamics (CMD). It is shown that for the cases of a sudden vertical excitation and an initial momentum impulse, both RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs for linear operators that are exact for high temperatures, in the t = 0 limit, and for harmonic potentials; the subset of these conditions that are preserved for non-equilibrium TCFs of non-linear operators is also discussed. Furthermore, it is shown that for these non-equilibrium initial conditions, both methods retain the connection to Matsubara dynamics that has previously been established for equilibrium initial conditions. Comparison of non-equilibrium TCFs from RPMD and CMD to Matsubara dynamics at short times reveals the orders in time to which the methods agree. Specifically, for the position-autocorrelation function associated with sudden vertical excitation, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O (t4) and O (t1) , respectively; for the position-autocorrelation function associated with an initial momentum impulse, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O (t5) and O (t2) , respectively. Numerical tests using model potentials for a wide range of non-equilibrium initial conditions show that RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs with an accuracy that is comparable to that for equilibrium TCFs. RPMD is also used to investigate excited-state proton transfer in a system-bath model, and it is compared to numerically exact calculations performed using a recently developed version of the Liouville space hierarchical equation of motion approach; again, similar accuracy is observed for non-equilibrium and equilibrium initial conditions.

  15. Non-equilibrium dynamics from RPMD and CMD.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Ralph; Song, Kai; Shi, Qiang; Althorpe, Stuart C; Miller, Thomas F

    2016-11-28

    We investigate the calculation of approximate non-equilibrium quantum time correlation functions (TCFs) using two popular path-integral-based molecular dynamics methods, ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) and centroid molecular dynamics (CMD). It is shown that for the cases of a sudden vertical excitation and an initial momentum impulse, both RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs for linear operators that are exact for high temperatures, in the t = 0 limit, and for harmonic potentials; the subset of these conditions that are preserved for non-equilibrium TCFs of non-linear operators is also discussed. Furthermore, it is shown that for these non-equilibrium initial conditions, both methods retain the connection to Matsubara dynamics that has previously been established for equilibrium initial conditions. Comparison of non-equilibrium TCFs from RPMD and CMD to Matsubara dynamics at short times reveals the orders in time to which the methods agree. Specifically, for the position-autocorrelation function associated with sudden vertical excitation, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O(t(4)) and O(t(1)), respectively; for the position-autocorrelation function associated with an initial momentum impulse, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O(t(5)) and O(t(2)), respectively. Numerical tests using model potentials for a wide range of non-equilibrium initial conditions show that RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs with an accuracy that is comparable to that for equilibrium TCFs. RPMD is also used to investigate excited-state proton transfer in a system-bath model, and it is compared to numerically exact calculations performed using a recently developed version of the Liouville space hierarchical equation of motion approach; again, similar accuracy is observed for non-equilibrium and equilibrium initial conditions.

  16. Uniform Convergence to Equilibrium for Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolley, François; Gentil, Ivan; Guillin, Arnaud

    2013-05-01

    We study the long time asymptotics of a nonlinear, nonlocal equation used in the modelling of granular media. We prove a uniform exponential convergence to equilibrium for degenerately convex and nonconvex interaction or confinement potentials, improving in particular results by J. A. Carrillo, R. J. McCann and C. Villani. The method is based on studying the dissipation of the Wasserstein distance between a solution and the steady state.

  17. Application of novel, low-cost, laterite-based adsorbent for removal of lead from water: Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Somak; De, Sirshendu

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by carcinogenic heavy metal, e.g., lead is an important issue and possibility of using a natural rock, laterite, is explored in this work to mitigate this problem. Treated laterite (TL- prepared using hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide) was successfully utilized for this purpose. The adsorbent was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) to highlight its physical and chemical properties. Optimized equilibrium conditions were 1 g L(-1) adsorbent concentration, 0.26 mm size and a pH of 7 ± 0.2. Monolayer adsorption capacity of lead on treated laterite was 15 mg/g, 14.5 and 13 mg g(-1) at temperatures of 303 K, 313 K and 323 K, respectively. The adsorption was exothermic and physical in nature. At 303 K, value of effective diffusivity of (De) and mass transfer co-efficient (Kf) of lead onto TL were 6.5 × 10(-10) m(2)/s and 3.3 × 10(-4) m/s, respectively (solved from shrinking core model of adsorption kinetics). Magnesium and sulphate show highest interference effect on the adsorption of lead by TL. Efficacy of the adsorbent has been verified using real-life contaminated groundwater. Thus, this work demonstrates performance of a cost-effective media for lead removal.

  18. Spin-polarization and spin-dependent logic gates in a double quantum ring based on Rashba spin-orbit effect: Non-equilibrium Green's function approach

    SciTech Connect

    Eslami, Leila Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi

    2014-02-28

    Spin-dependent electron transport in an open double quantum ring, when each ring is made up of four quantum dots and threaded by a magnetic flux, is studied. Two independent and tunable gate voltages are applied to induce Rashba spin-orbit effect in the quantum rings. Using non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, we study the effects of electron-electron interaction on spin-dependent electron transport and show that although the electron-electron interaction induces an energy gap, it has no considerable effect when the bias voltage is sufficiently high. We also show that the double quantum ring can operate as a spin-filter for both spin up and spin down electrons. The spin-polarization of transmitted electrons can be tuned from −1 (pure spin-down current) to +1 (pure spin-up current) by changing the magnetic flux and/or the gates voltage. Also, the double quantum ring can act as AND and NOR gates when the system parameters such as Rashba coefficient are properly adjusted.

  19. Equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium mechanics of living mammalian cytoplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Satish Kumar; Guo, Ming

    2017-10-01

    Living cells are intrinsically non-equilibrium systems. They are driven out of equilibrium by the activity of the molecular motors and other enzymatic processes. This activity along with the ever present thermal agitation results in intracellular fluctuations inside the cytoplasm. In analogy to Brownian motion, the material property of the cytoplasm also influences the characteristics of these fluctuations. In this paper, through a combination of experimentation and theoretical analysis, we show that intracellular fluctuations are indeed due to non-thermal forces at relatively long time-scales, however, are dominated solely by thermal forces at relatively short time-scales. Thus, the cytoplasm of living mammalian cells behaves as an equilibrium material at short time-scales. The mean square displacement of these intracellular fluctuations scales inversely with the cytoplasmic shear modulus in this short time-scale equilibrium regime, and is inversely proportional to the square of the cytoplasmic shear modulus in the long time-scale out-of-equilibrium regime. Furthermore, we deploy passive microrheology based on these fluctuations to extract the mechanical property of the cytoplasm at the high-frequency regime. We show that the cytoplasm of living mammalian cells is a weak elastic gel in this regime; this is in an excellent agreement with an independent micromechanical measurement using optical tweezers.

  20. Mapping Isobaric Aging onto the Equilibrium Phase Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niss, Kristine

    2017-09-01

    The linear volume relaxation and the nonlinear volume aging of a glass-forming liquid are measured, directly compared, and used to extract the out-of-equilibrium relaxation time. This opens a window to investigate how the relaxation time depends on temperature, structure, and volume in parts of phase space that are not accessed by the equilibrium liquid. It is found that the temperature dependence of relaxation time is non-Arrhenius even in the isostructural case—challenging the Adam-Gibbs entropy model. Based on the presented data and the idea that aging happens through quasiequilibrium states, we suggest a mapping of the out-of-equilibrium states during isobaric aging to the equilibrium phase diagram. This mapping implies the existence of isostructural lines in the equilibrium phase diagram. The relaxation time is found to depend on the bath temperature, density, and a just single structural parameter, referred to as an effective temperature.

  1. Spatial variability and trends in Younger Dryas equilibrium line altitudes across the European Alps using a hypsometrically based ELA model: results and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, D. G.; Rupper, S.; Schaefer, J. M.; Finkel, R. C.; Maurer, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Alpine glaciers constitute an important component of terrestrial paleoclimate records due to, among other characteristics, their high sensitivity to climate change, near global extent, and their integration of myriad climate variables into a single, easily detected signal. Because the glacier equilibrium line altitude (ELA) provides a more explicit representation of climate than many other glacier properties, ELA methods allow for more direct comparisons of multiple glaciers within or between regions. Such comparisons allow for more complete investigations of the ultimate causes of mountain glaciation during specific events. Many studies however tend to focus on a limited number of sites, and employ a large variety of different techniques for ELA reconstruction between studies, making wider climate implications more tenuous. Methods of ELA reconstruction that can be rapidly and consistently applied to an arbitrary number of paleo-glaciers would provide a more accurate portrayal of the changes in climate across a given region. Here we present ELA reconstructions from Egesen Stadial moraines across the European Alps using an ELA model accounting for differences in glacier width, glacier shape, bed topography, ice thickness, and glacier length, including several glaciers constrained to the Younger Dryas using surface exposure dating techniques. We compare reconstructed Younger Dryas ELA values to modern ELA values using the same model, or using end of summer snowline estimates where no glacier is currently present. We further provide uncertainty estimates on the ΔELA using bootstrapped Monte Carlo simulations for the various input parameters. Preliminary results compare favorably to previous glacier studies of the European Younger Dryas, but provide greater context from many glaciers across the region as a whole. Such results allow for a more thorough investigation of the spatial variability and trends in climate during the Younger Dryas across the European Alps, and

  2. Neural network differential equation and plasma equilibrium solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Milligen, B. Ph.; Tribaldos, V.; Jiménez, J. A.

    1995-11-01

    A new generally applicable method to solve differential equations, based on neural networks, is proposed. Straightforward to implement, finite differences and coordinate transformations are not used. The neural network provides a flexible and compact base for representing the solution, found through the global minimization of an error functional. As a proof of principle, a two-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic plasma equilibrium is solved. Since no particular topology is assumed, the technique is especially promising for the three-dimensional plasma equilibrium problem.

  3. Equilibrium Partitioning Sediment Benchmarks (ESBs) for the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes procedures to determine the concentrations of nonionic organic chemicals in sediment interstitial waters. In previous ESB documents, the general equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen for the derivation of sediment benchmarks because it accounts for the varying bioavailability of chemicals in different sediments and allows for the incorporation of the appropriate biological effects concentration. This provides for the derivation of benchmarks that are causally linked to the specific chemical, applicable across sediments, and appropriately protective of benthic organisms.  This equilibrium partitioning sediment benchmark (ESB) document was prepared by scientists from the Atlantic Ecology Division, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, and Western Ecology Division, the Office of Water, and private consultants. The document describes procedures to determine the interstitial water concentrations of nonionic organic chemicals in contaminated sediments. Based on these concentrations, guidance is provided on the derivation of toxic units to assess whether the sediments are likely to cause adverse effects to benthic organisms. The equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen because it is based on the concentrations of chemical(s) that are known to be harmful and bioavailable in the environment.  This document, and five others published over the last nine years, will be useful for the Program Offices, including Superfund, a

  4. Equilibrium Partitioning Sediment Benchmarks (ESBs) for the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes procedures to determine the concentrations of nonionic organic chemicals in sediment interstitial waters. In previous ESB documents, the general equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen for the derivation of sediment benchmarks because it accounts for the varying bioavailability of chemicals in different sediments and allows for the incorporation of the appropriate biological effects concentration. This provides for the derivation of benchmarks that are causally linked to the specific chemical, applicable across sediments, and appropriately protective of benthic organisms.  This equilibrium partitioning sediment benchmark (ESB) document was prepared by scientists from the Atlantic Ecology Division, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, and Western Ecology Division, the Office of Water, and private consultants. The document describes procedures to determine the interstitial water concentrations of nonionic organic chemicals in contaminated sediments. Based on these concentrations, guidance is provided on the derivation of toxic units to assess whether the sediments are likely to cause adverse effects to benthic organisms. The equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen because it is based on the concentrations of chemical(s) that are known to be harmful and bioavailable in the environment.  This document, and five others published over the last nine years, will be useful for the Program Offices, including Superfund, a

  5. Equilibrium properties on the EAST superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, J. P.; Wan, B. N.; Lao, L. L.; Shen, B.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Menard, J.; Sun, Y. W.; Duan, Y. M.; Li, J. H.; Xiao, B. J.; Gong, X. Z.; Gong

    2009-06-01

    The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) has a major radius of R0 = 1.75 m and a midplane halfwidth of 0.5 m. It has been operated with a toroidal magnetic field B0 = 2 T and Ip ≤ 500 kA. The evolution of the plasma equilibrium is analysed between discharges by Equilibrium Fitting Code (EFIT). Limiter, single-null and double-null diverted configurations have been produced. A plasma elongation in the range 1.3 ≤ κ ≤ 1.9 and a triangularity in the range 0.1 ≤ δ ≤ 0.55 have been sustained. The operation space of elongated discharges is also presented based on the EAST database.

  6. Tuning universality far from equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Markus; Nowak, Boris; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Possible universal dynamics of a many-body system far from thermal equilibrium are explored. A focus is set on meta-stable non-thermal states exhibiting critical properties such as self-similarity and independence of the details of how the respective state has been reached. It is proposed that universal dynamics far from equilibrium can be tuned to exhibit a dynamical transition where these critical properties change qualitatively. This is demonstrated for the case of a superfluid two-component Bose gas exhibiting different types of long-lived but non-thermal critical order. Scaling exponents controlled by the ratio of experimentally tuneable coupling parameters offer themselves as natural smoking guns. The results shed light on the wealth of universal phenomena expected to exist in the far-from-equilibrium realm. PMID:23928853

  7. Detecting temperature fluctuations at equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Purushottam D

    2015-05-21

    The Gibbs and the Boltzmann definition of temperature agree only in the macroscopic limit. The ambiguity in identifying the equilibrium temperature of a finite-sized 'small' system exchanging energy with a bath is usually understood as a limitation of conventional statistical mechanics. We interpret this ambiguity as resulting from a stochastically fluctuating temperature coupled with the phase space variables giving rise to a broad temperature distribution. With this ansatz, we develop the equilibrium statistics and dynamics of small systems. Numerical evidence using an analytically tractable model shows that the effects of temperature fluctuations can be detected in the equilibrium and dynamical properties of the phase space of the small system. Our theory generalizes statistical mechanics to small systems relevant in biophysics and nanotechnology.

  8. Equilibrium in a Production Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarolla, Maria B.; Haussmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-06-15

    Consider a closed production-consumption economy with multiple agents and multiple resources. The resources are used to produce the consumption good. The agents derive utility from holding resources as well as consuming the good produced. They aim to maximize their utility while the manager of the production facility aims to maximize profits. With the aid of a representative agent (who has a multivariable utility function) it is shown that an Arrow-Debreu equilibrium exists. In so doing we establish technical results that will be used to solve the stochastic dynamic problem (a case with infinite dimensional commodity space so the General Equilibrium Theory does not apply) elsewhere.

  9. Adiabatic evolution of plasma equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Grad, H.; Hu, P. N.; Stevens, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    A new theory of plasma equilibrium is introduced in which adiabatic constraints are specified. This leads to a mathematically nonstandard structure, as compared to the usual equilibrium theory, in which prescription of pressure and current profiles leads to an elliptic partial differential equation. Topologically complex configurations require further generalization of the concept of adiabaticity to allow irreversible mixing of plasma and magnetic flux among islands. Matching conditions across a boundary layer at the separatrix are obtained from appropriate conservation laws. Applications are made to configurations with planned islands (as in Doublet) and accidental islands (as in Tokamaks). Two-dimensional, axially symmetric, helically symmetric, and closed line equilibria are included. PMID:16578729

  10. A collision history-based approach to Sensitivity/Perturbation calculations in the continuous energy Monte Carlo code SERPENT

    SciTech Connect

    Giuseppe Palmiotti

    2015-05-01

    In this work, the implementation of a collision history-based approach to sensitivity/perturbation calculations in the Monte Carlo code SERPENT is discussed. The proposed methods allow the calculation of the eects of nuclear data perturbation on several response functions: the eective multiplication factor, reaction rate ratios and bilinear ratios (e.g., eective kinetics parameters). SERPENT results are compared to ERANOS and TSUNAMI Generalized Perturbation Theory calculations for two fast metallic systems and for a PWR pin-cell benchmark. New methods for the calculation of sensitivities to angular scattering distributions are also presented, which adopts fully continuous (in energy and angle) Monte Carlo estimators.

  11. Study Modules for Calculus-Based General Physics. [Includes Modules 11-14: Collisions; Equilibrium of Rigid Bodies; Rotational Dynamics; and Fluid Mechanics].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Robert G., Ed.; And Others

    This is part of a series of 42 Calculus Based Physics (CBP) modules totaling about 1,000 pages. The modules include study guides, practice tests, and mastery tests for a full-year individualized course in calculus-based physics based on the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). The units are not intended to be used without outside materials;…

  12. Adsorption properties of kaolinite-based nanocomposites for Fe and Mn pollutants from aqueous solutions and raw ground water: kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Mohamed; Hassouna, Mohamed E M; Nasief, Fadya M; AbuKhadra, Mostafa R

    2017-08-17

    Raw kaolinite was used in the synthesis of metakaolinite/carbon nanotubes (K/CNTs) and kaolinite/starch (K/starch) nanocomposites. Raw kaolinite and the synthetic composites were characterized using XRD, SEM, and TEM techniques. The synthetic composites were used as adsorbents for Fe and Mn ions from aqueous solutions and natural underground water. The adsorption by the both composites is highly pH dependent and achieves high efficiency within the neutral pH range. The experimental adsorption data for the uptake of Fe and Mn ions by K/CNTs were found to be well represented by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model rather than the intra-particle diffusion model or Elovich model. For the adsorption using K/starch, the uptake results of Fe ions was well fitted by the second-order model, whereas the uptake of Mn ions fitted well to the Elovich model rather than pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion models The equilibrium studies revealed the excellent fitting of the removal of Fe and Mn ions by K/CNTs and Fe using K/starch with the Langmuir isotherm model rather than with Freundlich and Temkin models. But the adsorption of Mn ions by K/starch is well fitted with Freundlich rather than Temkin and Langmuir isotherm models. The thermodynamic studies reflected the endothermic nature and the exothermic nature for the adsorption by K/CNTs and K/starch nanocomposites, respectively. Natural ground water contaminated by 0.4 mg/L Fe and 0.5 mg/L Mn was treated at the optimum conditions of pH 6 and 120 min contact time. Under these conditions, 92.5 and 72.5% Fe removal efficiencies were achieved using 20 mg of K/CNTs and K/starch nanocomposites, respectively. Also, K/CNTs nanocomposite shows higher efficiency in the removal of Mn ions as compared to K/starch nanocomposite.

  13. Chemical Principles Revisited: Using the Equilibrium Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the concept of equilibrium in chemical systems, particularly in relation to predicting the position of equilibrium, predicting spontaneity of a reaction, quantitative applications of the equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, determination of the solubility product constant, common-ion effect, and dissolution of precipitates.…

  14. Equilibrium Principles: A Game for Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonson, Lionel J., Jr.; Lewis, Don L.

    1999-04-01

    The laboratory exercise is a game using marked sugar cubes as dice. The game emphasizes the dynamic character of equilibrium. Forward and reverse rate-constant values are used to calculate an equilibrium constant and to predict equilibrium populations. Predicted equilibrium populations are compared with experimental results.

  15. Magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    Self-consistent magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure is obtained by employing an iterative metric method for solving the inverse equilibrium equation in an optimal flux coordinate system. A method of determining plasma parallel and perpendicular pressures from either analytic particle distribution or particle distribution measured along the satellite's path is presented. The numerical results of axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibrium including the effects of finite beta, pressure anisotropy, and boundary conditions are presented for a bi-Maxwellian particle distribution. For the isotropic pressure cases, the finite beta effect produces an outward expansion of the constant magnetic flux surfaces in relation to the dipole field lines, and along the magnetic field the toroidal ring current is maximum at the magnetic equator. The effect of pressure anisotropy is found to further expand the flux surfaces outward. Along the magnetic field lines the westward ring current can be peak away from the equator due to an eastward current contribution resulting from pressure anisotropy. As pressure anisotropy increases, the peak westward current can become more singular. The outer boundary flux surface has significant effect on the magnetospheric equilibrium. For the outer flux boundary resembling dayside compressed flux surface due to solar wind pressure, the deformation of the magnetic field can be quite different from that for the outer flux boundary resembling the tail-like surface. 23 refs., 17 figs.

  16. Understanding Thermal Equilibrium through Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-01-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 "Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education" pp 169-72) we…

  17. Understanding Thermal Equilibrium through Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-01-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 "Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education" pp 169-72) we…

  18. Equilibrium Distribution Functions: Another Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waite, Boyd A.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses equilibrium distribution functions and provides an alternative "derivation" that allows the student, with the help of a computer, to gain intuitive insight as to the nature of distributions in general and the precise nature of the dominance of the Boltzmann distribution. (JN)

  19. Quantifying mixing using equilibrium reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, Philip M.; Posner, Jonathan D.

    2009-03-01

    A method of quantifying equilibrium reactions in a microchannel using a fluorometric reaction of Fluo-4 and Ca2+ ions is presented. Under the proper conditions, equilibrium reactions can be used to quantify fluid mixing without the challenges associated with constituent mixing measures such as limited imaging spatial resolution and viewing angle coupled with three-dimensional structure. Quantitative measurements of CaCl and calcium-indicating fluorescent dye Fluo-4 mixing are measured in Y-shaped microchannels. Reactant and product concentration distributions are modeled using Green's function solutions and a numerical solution to the advection-diffusion equation. Equilibrium reactions provide for an unambiguous, quantitative measure of mixing when the reactant concentrations are greater than 100 times their dissociation constant and the diffusivities are equal. At lower concentrations and for dissimilar diffusivities, the area averaged fluorescence signal reaches a maximum before the species have interdiffused, suggesting that reactant concentrations and diffusivities must be carefully selected to provide unambiguous, quantitative mixing measures. Fluorometric equilibrium reactions work over a wide range of pH and background concentrations such that they can be used for a wide variety of fluid mixing measures including industrial or microscale flows.

  20. Generalized Convective Quasi-Equilibrium Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi; Plant, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Arakawa and Schubert proposed convective quasi-equilibrium as a basic principle for closing their spectrum mass-flux convection parameterization. In deriving this principle, they show that the cloud work function is a key variable that controls the growth of convection. Thus, this closure hypothesis imposes a steadiness of the cloud work function tendency. This presentation shows how this principle can be generalized so that it can also encompasses both the CAPE and the moisture-convergence closures. Note that the majority of the current mass-flux convection parameterization invokes a CAPE closure, whereas the moisture-convergence closure was extremely popular historically. This generalization, in turn, includes both closures as special cases of convective quasi-equilibrium. This generalization further suggests wide range of alternative possibilities for convective closure. In general, a vertical integral of any function depending on both large-scale and convective-scale variables can be adopted as an alternative closure variables, leading to an analogous formulation as Arakawa and Schubert's convective quasi-equilibrium formulation. Among those, probably the most fascinating possibility is to take a vertical integral of the convective-scale moisture for the closure. Use of a convective-scale variable for closure has a particular appeal by not suffering from a loss of predictability of any large-scale variables. That is a main problem with any of the current convective closures, not only for the moisture-convergence based closure as often asserted.

  1. TEA: A Code Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature-pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows & Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  2. Delicate Balances: Striving for Curricular and Instructional Equilibrium in a Second-Grade, Literature/Strategy-Based Classroom. Reading Research Report No. 83.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, James F.; Ivey, Gay

    Previous research has examined either the effects of strategy instruction or the effects of literature-based instruction on children's literacy learning. Much less is known, however, about the combination of teacher-led strategy instruction within a literature-based framework. A qualitative case study explored what diverse second-grade students…

  3. Biochemical thermodynamics and rapid-equilibrium enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Alberty, Robert A

    2010-12-30

    Biochemical thermodynamics is based on the chemical thermodynamics of aqueous solutions, but it is quite different because pH is used as an independent variable. A transformed Gibbs energy G' is used, and that leads to transformed enthalpies H' and transformed entropies S'. Equilibrium constants for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are referred to as apparent equilibrium constants K' to indicate that they are functions of pH in addition to temperature and ionic strength. Despite this, the most useful way to store basic thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions is to give standard Gibbs energies of formation, standard enthalpies of formation, electric charges, and numbers of hydrogen atoms in species of biochemical reactants like ATP. This makes it possible to calculate standard transformed Gibbs energies of formation, standard transformed enthalpies of formation of reactants (sums of species), and apparent equilibrium constants at desired temperatures, pHs, and ionic strengths. These calculations are complicated, and therefore, a mathematical application in a computer is needed. Rapid-equilibrium enzyme kinetics is based on biochemical thermodynamics because all reactions in the mechanism prior to the rate-determining reaction are at equilibrium. The expression for the equilibrium concentration of the enzyme-substrate complex that yields products can be derived by applying Solve in a computer to the expressions for the equilibrium constants in the mechanism and the conservation equation for enzymatic sites. In 1979, Duggleby pointed out that the minimum number of velocities of enzyme-catalyzed reactions required to estimate the values of the kinetic parameters is equal to the number of kinetic parameters. Solve can be used to do this with steady-state rate equations as well as rapid-equilibrium rate equations, provided that the rate equation is a polynomial. Rapid-equilibrium rate equations can be derived for complicated mechanisms that involve several reactants

  4. Concurrent fractional and equilibrium crystallisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Lian-Kun

    2012-06-01

    This paper proposes the concept of concurrent fractional and equilibrium crystallisation (CFEC) in a multi-phase magmatic system in light of experimental results on diffusivities of elements and other species in minerals and melts. A group of equations are presented to describe how the concentrations of an element or isotope change in fractionated solid, equilibrated solid, melt, liquid, and gas phases, as well as in magma, as a function of distribution coefficients and mass fractions during the CFEC process. CFEC model is a generalised and unified formulation that is valid, not only for pure fractional crystallisation (FC) and perfect equilibrium crystallisation (EC) singly, as two of its limiting end-member cases, but also for the geologically more important process of concurrent fractional and equilibrium crystallisation. The concept that both fractional and equilibrium crystallisation can operate concurrently in a magmatic system, for a given element, among different minerals, and even within different-sized crystal grains of the very same mineral phase, is of fundamental importance in deepening our current understanding of magmatic differentiation processes. CFEC probably occurs more frequently in the natural world than either pure fractional or perfect equilibrium crystallisation alone, as a result of the interplay of varying diffusivities of elements under diverse physicochemical conditions, different residence time and growth rates of mineral phases in magmas, and varying grain sizes within each phase and among different phases. The marked systematic variations in trace element concentrations in the melts of the Bishop Tuff have long been perplexing and difficult to reconcile with existing models of differentiation. CFEC, which is able to better explain the scatter trends in a systematic way than fractional crystallisation, is considered to be the cause.

  5. Non-Equilibrium Properties from Equilibrium Free Energy Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Calculating free energy in computer simulations is of central importance in statistical mechanics of condensed media and its applications to chemistry and biology not only because it is the most comprehensive and informative quantity that characterizes the eqUilibrium state, but also because it often provides an efficient route to access dynamic and kinetic properties of a system. Most of applications of equilibrium free energy calculations to non-equilibrium processes rely on a description in which a molecule or an ion diffuses in the potential of mean force. In general case this description is a simplification, but it might be satisfactorily accurate in many instances of practical interest. This hypothesis has been tested in the example of the electrodiffusion equation . Conductance of model ion channels has been calculated directly through counting the number of ion crossing events observed during long molecular dynamics simulations and has been compared with the conductance obtained from solving the generalized Nernst-Plank equation. It has been shown that under relatively modest conditions the agreement between these two approaches is excellent, thus demonstrating the assumptions underlying the diffusion equation are fulfilled. Under these conditions the electrodiffusion equation provides an efficient approach to calculating the full voltage-current dependence routinely measured in electrophysiological experiments.

  6. Contributions of equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters to viscosity in concentrated protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangapani, Prasad; Hudson, Steven; Pathak, Jai; Migler, Kalman

    2013-03-01

    Equilibrium and non-equilibrium clustering are ubiquitous phenomena in soft matter physics and are typically observed in systems ranging from colloidal suspensions to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Such phenomena are central to understanding and preventing irreversible aggregation in addition to controlling viscosity challenges related to formulation and drug delivery of protein therapeutics. Curiously, little work has been done in exploring the cluster size dependence of low-shear viscosity and intrinsic viscosity in protein solutions in a controlled manner. In this work, we carefully control cluster size of reversible and irreversible clusters formed by globular proteins or monoclonal antibodies over a concentration range of 2 mg/mL-500 mg/mL and pH from 3-9. We find a marked dependence of low-shear viscosity on cluster size using custom-designed silicon-based microfluidic viscometers. Measurements of cluster sizes using static light scattering reveal a correlation of low shear viscosity as well as intrinsic viscosity with the average cluster size. We model the composition dependence of viscosity for the case of equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters using an adaptation of a model recently presented by Minton for protein mixtures.

  7. Methane on Mars: Thermodynamic Equilibrium and Photochemical Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Summers, M. E.; Ewell, M.

    2010-01-01

    The detection of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars by Mars Express and Earth-based spectroscopy is very surprising, very puzzling, and very intriguing. On Earth, about 90% of atmospheric ozone is produced by living systems. A major question concerning methane on Mars is its origin - biological or geological. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations indicated that methane cannot be produced by atmospheric chemical/photochemical reactions. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for three gases, methane, ammonia (NH3) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in the Earth s atmosphere are summarized in Table 1. The calculations indicate that these three gases should not exist in the Earth s atmosphere. Yet they do, with methane, ammonia and nitrous oxide enhanced 139, 50 and 12 orders of magnitude above their calculated thermodynamic equilibrium concentration due to the impact of life! Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations have been performed for the same three gases in the atmosphere of Mars based on the assumed composition of the Mars atmosphere shown in Table 2. The calculated thermodynamic equilibrium concentrations of the same three gases in the atmosphere of Mars is shown in Table 3. Clearly, based on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, methane should not be present in the atmosphere of Mars, but it is in concentrations approaching 30 ppbv from three distinct regions on Mars.

  8. An Experimental Evaluation of Programed Instruction as One of Two Review Techniques for Two-Year College Students Concerned with Solving Acid-Base Chemical Equilibrium Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharon, Jared Bear

    The major purpose of this study was to design and evaluate a programed instructional unit for a first year college chemistry course. The topic of the unit was the categorization and solution of acid-base equilibria problems. The experimental programed instruction text was used by 41 students and the fifth edition of Schaum's Theory and Problems of…

  9. Fundamental Research in Engineering Education. Development of Concept Questions and Inquiry-Based Activities in Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer: An Example for Equilibrium vs. Steady-State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigeant, Margot; Prince, Michael; Nottis, Katharyn

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the use of inquiry-based instruction to promote the understanding of critical concepts in thermodynamics and heat transfer. Significant research shows that students frequently enter our courses with tightly held misconceptions about the physical world that are not effectively addressed through traditional instruction. Students'…

  10. Fundamental Research in Engineering Education. Development of Concept Questions and Inquiry-Based Activities in Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer: An Example for Equilibrium vs. Steady-State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigeant, Margot; Prince, Michael; Nottis, Katharyn

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the use of inquiry-based instruction to promote the understanding of critical concepts in thermodynamics and heat transfer. Significant research shows that students frequently enter our courses with tightly held misconceptions about the physical world that are not effectively addressed through traditional instruction. Students'…

  11. Non-equilibrium in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietroni, M.

    2009-02-01

    All the non-trivial features of the Universe we see around us, such as particles, stars, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies, are the result of non-equilibrium processes in the cosmic evolution. These lectures aim to provide some general background in cosmology and to examine specific, and notable, examples of departures from thermal equilibrium. They are organized as follows: 1) Overview of the thermal history of the Universe after the Big Bang: the relevant time-scales and the mechanism of particle decoupling from the themal bath; 2) Explicit examples of cosmic relics: nucleosynthesis, photons and the cosmic microwave background, neutrinos, and cold dark matter; 3) Baryogenesis: the generation of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe; 4) The formation of cosmic structures (galaxies, clusters of galaxies): from the Vlasov equation to the renormalization group.

  12. Korshunov instantons out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, M.; Gutman, D. B.

    2016-04-01

    Zero-dimensional dissipative action possesses nontrivial minima known as Korshunov instantons. They have been known so far only for imaginary time representation that is limited to equilibrium systems. In this work we reconstruct and generalise Korshunov instantons using real-time Keldysh approach. This allows us to formulate the dissipative action theory for generic nonequilibrium conditions. Possible applications of the theory to transport in strongly biased quantum dots are discussed.

  13. Adaptive Implicit Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Bobby; Wang, Zhen; Berrill, Mark A; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Manuel; Pernice, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We describe methods for accurate and efficient long term time integra- tion of non-equilibrium radiation diffusion systems: implicit time integration for effi- cient long term time integration of stiff multiphysics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while control- ling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  14. Experimental determination of thermodynamic equilibrium in biocatalytic transamination.

    PubMed

    Tufvesson, Pär; Jensen, Jacob S; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Woodley, John M

    2012-08-01

    The equilibrium constant is a critical parameter for making rational design choices in biocatalytic transamination for the synthesis of chiral amines. However, very few reports are available in the scientific literature determining the equilibrium constant (K) for the transamination of ketones. Various methods for determining (or estimating) equilibrium have previously been suggested, both experimental as well as computational (based on group contribution methods). However, none of these were found suitable for determining the equilibrium constant for the transamination of ketones. Therefore, in this communication we suggest a simple experimental methodology which we hope will stimulate more accurate determination of thermodynamic equilibria when reporting the results of transaminase-catalyzed reactions in order to increase understanding of the relationship between substrate and product molecular structure on reaction thermodynamics.

  15. Equilibrium and kinetics in metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    The equilibrium model for metamorphism is founded on the metamorphic facies principle, the repeated association of the same mineral assemblages in rocks of different bulk composition that have been metamorphosed together. Yet, for any metamorphic process to occur, there must be some degree of reaction overstepping (disequilibrium) to initiate reaction. The magnitude and variability of overstepping, and the degree to which it is either a relatively minor wrinkle or a more substantive challenge to the interpretation of metamorphic rocks using the equilibrium model, is an active area of current research. Kinetic barriers to reaction generally diminish with rising temperature due to the Arrhenius relation. In contrast, the rate of build-up of the macroscopic energetic driving force needed to overcome kinetic barriers to reaction, reaction affinity, does not vary uniformly with temperature, instead varying from reaction to reaction. High-entropy reactions that release large quantities of H2O build up reaction affinity more rapidly than low-entropy reactions that release little or no H2O, such that the former are expected to be overstepped less than the latter. Some consequences include: (1) metamorphic reaction intervals may be discrete rather than continuous, initiating at the point that sufficient reaction affinity has built up to overcome kinetic barriers; (2) metamorphic reaction intervals may not correspond in a simple way to reaction boundaries in an equilibrium phase diagram; (3) metamorphic reactions may involve metastable reactions; (4) metamorphic 'cascades' are possible, in which stable and metastable reactions involving the same reactant phases may proceed simultaneously; and (5) fluid generation, and possibly fluid presence in general, may be episodic rather than continuous, corresponding to discrete intervals of reaction. These considerations bear on the interpretation of P-T-t paths from metamorphic mineral assemblages and textures. The success of the

  16. Multicomponent Equilibrium Models for Testing Geothermometry Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, D. Craig; Palmer, Carl D.; Smith, Robert W.; McLing, Travis L.

    2013-02-01

    Geothermometry is an important tool for estimating deep reservoir temperature from the geochemical composition of shallower and cooler waters. The underlying assumption of geothermometry is that the waters collected from shallow wells and seeps maintain a chemical signature that reflects equilibrium in the deeper reservoir. Many of the geothermometers used in practice are based on correlation between water temperatures and composition or using thermodynamic calculations based a subset (typically silica, cations or cation ratios) of the dissolved constituents. An alternative approach is to use complete water compositions and equilibrium geochemical modeling to calculate the degree of disequilibrium (saturation index) for large number of potential reservoir minerals as a function of temperature. We have constructed several “forward” geochemical models using The Geochemist’s Workbench to simulate the change in chemical composition of reservoir fluids as they migrate toward the surface. These models explicitly account for the formation (mass and composition) of a steam phase and equilibrium partitioning of volatile components (e.g., CO2, H2S, and H2) into the steam as a result of pressure decreases associated with upward fluid migration from depth. We use the synthetic data generated from these simulations to determine the advantages and limitations of various geothermometry and optimization approaches for estimating the likely conditions (e.g., temperature, pCO2) to which the water was exposed in the deep subsurface. We demonstrate the magnitude of errors that can result from boiling, loss of volatiles, and analytical error from sampling and instrumental analysis. The estimated reservoir temperatures for these scenarios are also compared to conventional geothermometers. These results can help improve estimation of geothermal resource temperature during exploration and early development.

  17. Morphodynamic equilibrium of alluvial estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambroni, Nicoletta; Bolla Pittaluga, Michele; Canestrelli, Alberto; Lanzoni, Stefano; Seminara, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of the longitudinal bed profile of an estuary, with given plan-form configuration, subject to given tidal forcing at the mouth and prescribed values of water and sediment supply from the river is investigated numerically. Our main goal is to ascertain whether, starting from some initial condition, the bed evolution tends to reach a unique equilibrium configuration asymptotically in time. Also, we investigate the morphological response of an alluvial estuary to changes in the tidal range and hydrologic forcing (flow and sediment supply). Finally, the solution helps characterizing the transition between the fluvially dominated region and the tidally dominated region of the estuary. All these issues play an important role also in interpreting how the facies changes along the estuary, thus helping to make correct paleo-environmental and sequence-stratigraphic interpretations of sedimentary successions (Dalrymple and Choi, 2007). Results show that the model is able to describe a wide class of settings ranging from tidally dominated estuaries to fluvially dominated estuaries. In the latter case, the solution is found to compare satisfactory with the analytical asymptotic solution recently derived by Seminara et al. (2012), under the hypothesis of fairly 'small' tidal oscillations. Simulations indicate that the system always moves toward an equilibrium configuration in which the net sediment flux in a tidal cycle is constant throughout the estuary and equal to the constant sediment flux discharged from the river. For constant width, the bed equilibrium profile of the estuarine channel is characterized by two distinct regions: a steeper reach seaward, dominated by the tide, and a less steep upstream reach, dominated by the river and characterized by the undisturbed bed slope. Although the latter reach, at equilibrium, is not directly affected by the tidal wave, however starting from an initial uniform stream with the constant 'fluvial' slope, the final

  18. Torque equilibrium attitude control for Skylab reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, J. R.; Kennel, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    All the available torque equilibrium attitudes (most were useless from the standpoint of lack of electrical power) and the equilibrium seeking method are presented, as well as the actual successful application during the 3 weeks prior to Skylab reentry.

  19. Label-free solution-based kinetic study of aptamer-small molecule interactions by kinetic capillary electrophoresis with UV detection revealing how kinetics control equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jiayin; Krylova, Svetlana M; Reinstein, Oren; Johnson, Philip E; Krylov, Sergey N

    2011-11-15

    Here we demonstrate a label-free solution-based approach for studying the kinetics of biopolymer-small molecule interactions. The approach utilizes kinetic capillary electrophoresis (KCE) separation and UV light absorption detection of the unlabeled small molecule. In this proof-of-concept work, we applied KCE-UV to study kinetics of interaction between a small molecule and a DNA aptamer. From the kinetic analysis of a series of aptamers, we found that dissociation rather than binding controls the stability of the complex. Because of its label-free features and generic nature, KCE-UV promises to become a practical tool for challenging kinetic studies of biopolymer-small molecule interactions.

  20. Synthesis, characterization, equilibrium study and biological activity of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) complexes of polydentate Schiff base ligand.

    PubMed

    El-Sherif, Ahmed A; Shehata, Mohamed R; Shoukry, Mohamed M; Barakat, Mohammad H

    2012-10-01

    Schiff base ligand, 1,4-bis[(2-hydroxybenzaldehyde)propyl]piperazine (BHPP), and its Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) metal complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance and spectral (IR and UV-vis) studies. The ground state of BHPP ligand was investigated using the BUILDER module of MOE. Metal complexes are formed in the 1:1 (M:L) ratio as found from the elemental analysis and found to have the general formula [ML]·nH(2)O, where M=Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II), L=BHPP. In all the studied complexes, the (BHPP) ligand behaves as a hexadentate divalent anion with coordination involving the two azomethine nitrogen's, the two nitrogen atoms of piperazine ring and the two deprotonated phenolic OH-groups. The magnetic and spectral data indicates octahedral geometry of metal(II) complexes. The ligand and their metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities using the disc diffusion method against the selected bacteria and fungi. They were found to be more active against Gram-positive than Gram-negative bacteria. Protonation constants of (BHPP) ligand and stability constants of its Cu(2+), Co(2+) and Ni(2+) complexes were determined by potentiometric titration method in 50% DMSO-water solution at ionic strength of 0.1 M sodium nitrate. It has been observed that the protonated Schiff base ligand (BHPP) have four protonation constants. The divalent metal ions Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Co(2+) form 1:1 complexes.

  1. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium metal-ceramic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Y.; Merkle, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    Metal-ceramic interfaces in thermodynamic equilibrium (Au/ZrO{sub 2}) and non-equilibrium (Au/MgO) have been studied by TEM and HREM. In the Au/ZrO{sub 2} system, ZrO{sub 2} precipitates formed by internal oxidation of a 7%Zr-Au alloy show a cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase. It appears that formation of the cubic ZrO{sub 2} is facilitated by alignment with the Au matrix. Most of the ZrO{sub 2} precipitates have a perfect cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the Au matrix. The large number of interfacial steps observed in a short-time annealing experiment indicate that the precipitates are formed by the ledge growth mechanism. The lowest interfacial energy is indicated by the dominance of closed-packed (111) Au/ZrO{sub 2} interfaces. In the Au/MgO system, composite films with small MgO smoke particles embedded in a Au matrix were prepared by a thin film technique. HREM observations show that most of the Au/MgO interfaces have a strong tendency to maintain a dense lattice structure across the interfaces irrespective of whether the interfaces are incoherent of semi-coherent. This indicates that there may be relatively strong bond between MgO and Au.

  2. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium metal-ceramic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Y.; Merkle, K.L.

    1991-12-31

    Metal-ceramic interfaces in thermodynamic equilibrium (Au/ZrO{sub 2}) and non-equilibrium (Au/MgO) have been studied by TEM and HREM. In the Au/ZrO{sub 2} system, ZrO{sub 2} precipitates formed by internal oxidation of a 7%Zr-Au alloy show a cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase. It appears that formation of the cubic ZrO{sub 2} is facilitated by alignment with the Au matrix. Most of the ZrO{sub 2} precipitates have a perfect cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the Au matrix. The large number of interfacial steps observed in a short-time annealing experiment indicate that the precipitates are formed by the ledge growth mechanism. The lowest interfacial energy is indicated by the dominance of closed-packed [111] Au/ZrO{sub 2} interfaces. In the Au/MgO system, composite films with small MgO smoke particles embedded in a Au matrix were prepared by a thin film technique. HREM observations show that most of the Au/MgO interfaces have a strong tendency to maintain a dense lattice structure across the interfaces irrespective of whether the interfaces are incoherent of semi-coherent. This indicates that there may be relatively strong bond between MgO and Au.

  3. Open problems in non-equilibrium physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kusnezov, D.

    1997-09-22

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: approaches to non-equilibrium statistical mechanics; classical and quantum processes in chaotic environments; classical fields in non-equilibrium situations: real time dynamics at finite temperature; and phase transitions in non-equilibrium conditions.

  4. Equilibrium figures of dwarf planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaux, Nicolas; Chambat, Frederic; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Baguet, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Dwarf planets including transneptunian objects (TNO) and Ceres are >500 km large and display a spheroidal shape. These protoplanets are left over from the formation of the solar System about 4.6 billion years ago and their study could improve our knowledge of the early solar system. They could be formed in-situ or migrated to their current positions as a consequence of large-scale solar system dynamical evolution. Quantifying their internal composition would bring constraints on their accretion environment and migration history. That information may be inferred from studying their global shapes from stellar occultations or thermal infrared imaging. Here we model the equilibrium shapes of isolated dwarf planets under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium that forms the basis for interpreting shape data in terms of interior structure. Deviations from hydrostaticity can shed light on the thermal and geophysical history of the bodies. The dwarf planets are generally fast rotators spinning in few hours, so their shape modeling requires numerically integration with Clairaut's equations of rotational equilibrium expanded up to third order in a small parameter m, the geodetic parameter, to reach an accuracy better than a few kilometers depending on the spin velocity and mean density. We also show that the difference between a 500-km radius homogeneous model described by a MacLaurin ellipsoid and a stratified model assuming silicate and ice layers can reach several kilometers in the long and short axes, which could be measurable. This type of modeling will be instrumental in assessing hydrostaticity and thus detecting large non-hydrostatic contributions in the observed shapes.

  5. A survey of upwind methods for flows with equilibrium and non-equilibrium chemistry and thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, B.; Garrett, J.; Cinnella, P.

    1989-01-01

    Several versions of flux-vector split and flux-difference split algorithms were compared with regard to general applicability and complexity. Test computations were performed using curve-fit equilibrium air chemistry for an M = 5 high-temperature inviscid flow over a wedge, and an M = 24.5 inviscid flow over a blunt cylinder for test computations; for these cases, little difference in accuracy was found among the versions of the same flux-split algorithm. For flows with nonequilibrium chemistry, the effects of the thermodynamic model on the development of flux-vector split and flux-difference split algorithms were investigated using an equilibrium model, a general nonequilibrium model, and a simplified model based on vibrational relaxation. Several numerical examples are presented, including nonequilibrium air chemistry in a high-temperature shock tube and nonequilibrium hydrogen-air chemistry in a supersonic diffuser.

  6. Equilibrium Sampling in Biomolecular Simulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrium sampling of biomolecules remains an unmet challenge after more than 30 years of atomistic simulation. Efforts to enhance sampling capability, which are reviewed here, range from the development of new algorithms to parallelization to novel uses of hardware. Special focus is placed on classifying algorithms — most of which are underpinned by a few key ideas — in order to understand their fundamental strengths and limitations. Although algorithms have proliferated, progress resulting from novel hardware use appears to be more clear-cut than from algorithms alone, partly due to the lack of widely used sampling measures. PMID:21370970

  7. Conformations of Proteins in Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheletti, Cristian; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos

    2001-08-01

    We introduce a simple theoretical approach for an equilibrium study of proteins with known native-state structures. We test our approach with results on well-studied globular proteins, chymotrypsin inhibitor (2ci2), barnase, and the alpha spectrin SH3 domain, and present evidence for a hierarchical onset of order on lowering the temperature with significant organization at the local level even at high temperatures. A further application to the folding process of HIV-1 protease shows that the model can be reliably used to identify key folding sites that are responsible for the development of drug resistance.

  8. Equilibrium of nucleotides in the dogfish brain.

    PubMed

    Andjus, Radoslav K; Dzakula, Zeljko; Marjanović, Marina

    2005-06-01

    In the past, the results of experiments on the time course of concentration changes of adenylates, phosphocreatine, and free creatine in muscle appeared compatible with an equilibrium hypothesis involving only the Lohmann and the myokinase reactions. Other reports, however, denied the applicability of the equilibrium hypothesis to the same tissue. The controversy may have been due to the high probability of experimental errors since time sampling was performed at second intervals. We presently test the hypothesis in the living brain of the small-spotted dogfish shark (Scyliorhinus canicula), an animal-model allowing for timing of sampling at hourly intervals. According to our earlier work, the dogfish shark can easily be resuscitated 8.2 h on average after being brought into the state of "suspended animation" at 0 degree C body temperature and exposed, out of water, to an atmosphere of nitrogen gas. To obtain a complete mathematical description of the time course of concentration changes of brain adenylates and phosphocreatine, we devised a kinetic model based on principles of classical multicompartmental analysis and biochemical kinetics. Model testing of the equilibrium hypothesis resulted in very good agreement between the hypothesis and our experimental data. Time-course modeling, achieved by simultaneously fitting the time series of our data by the set of four equations constituting our model resulted in an excellent agreement between data points and the computed curves. Finally, modeling of the depletion profiles of brain energy status concerning three of its descriptors (energy charge, total adenylate, and primary energy stores expressed in high-energy phosphate equivalents) allowed for a correlation to be established between energy status and the "revival time," a valuable physiological descriptor of tolerance.

  9. Diffusion and thermodynamic equilibrium under pressure variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulas, Evangelos; Tajčmanová, Lucie; Vrijmoed, Johannes; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    Pressure is one of the most fundamental variables in mineral thermodynamics. In that respect, pressure-sensitive mineral reactions provide an important constraint on pressure under which the rock was developed. One implicit assumption when interpreting such pressure estimates is that the state-of-stress is close to hydrostatic, homogeneous and that the differential stress is negligible. Recent spectroscopic data from the mineral scale documenting pressure variations do not support this assumption. In addition to observations, mechanical models (numerical and analytical) suggest that rocks can develop and maintain heterogeneous pressure distributions at geological time scales. The recently developed unconventional barometry explains chemical zoning in minerals as a result of a pressure variation. We focus to apply the unconventional barometry in cases where chemical zoning in minerals cannot be explained by sluggish kinetics. In that respect, the unconventional barometry offers an alternative view of the chemical zoning which is consistent with thermodynamic equilibrium. However, to distinguish between a pressure-controlled chemical zoning and a zoning reflecting an incomplete chemical reaction is still challenging, especially for multicomponent systems. In this contribution, different types of chemical zoning are discussed. We investigate plagioclase rims around kyanite from an amphibolitized eclogite from Rhodope Metamorphic Complex (Greece-Bulgaria) as a case study and compare them with similar published textures from the Bohemian Massif. Mineral microstructures and phase equilibrium suggest that both rocks experienced near-isothermal decompression at high (>700C) temperatures. However, several distinct microstructural features suggest the development and/or the decay of mechanically maintained heterogeneous pressure distributions. We discuss our results and interpretations based on phase-equilibrium modeling, unconventional barometry and diffusion modeling under

  10. Are the Concepts of Dynamic Equilibrium and the Thermodynamic Criteria for Spontaneity, Nonspontaneity, and Equilibrium Compatible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Raff, Lionel M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic spontaneity-equilibrium criteria require that in a single-reaction system, reactions in either the forward or reverse direction at equilibrium be nonspontaneous. Conversely, the concept of dynamic equilibrium holds that forward and reverse reactions both occur at equal rates at equilibrium to the extent allowed by kinetic…

  11. Are the Concepts of Dynamic Equilibrium and the Thermodynamic Criteria for Spontaneity, Nonspontaneity, and Equilibrium Compatible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Raff, Lionel M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic spontaneity-equilibrium criteria require that in a single-reaction system, reactions in either the forward or reverse direction at equilibrium be nonspontaneous. Conversely, the concept of dynamic equilibrium holds that forward and reverse reactions both occur at equal rates at equilibrium to the extent allowed by kinetic…

  12. The geometry of structural equilibrium.

    PubMed

    McRobie, Allan

    2017-03-01

    Building on a long tradition from Maxwell, Rankine, Klein and others, this paper puts forward a geometrical description of structural equilibrium which contains a procedure for the graphic analysis of stress resultants within general three-dimensional frames. The method is a natural generalization of Rankine's reciprocal diagrams for three-dimensional trusses. The vertices and edges of dual abstract 4-polytopes are embedded within dual four-dimensional vector spaces, wherein the oriented area of generalized polygons give all six components (axial and shear forces with torsion and bending moments) of the stress resultants. The relevant quantities may be readily calculated using four-dimensional Clifford algebra. As well as giving access to frame analysis and design, the description resolves a number of long-standing problems with the incompleteness of Rankine's description of three-dimensional trusses. Examples are given of how the procedure may be applied to structures of engineering interest, including an outline of a two-stage procedure for addressing the equilibrium of loaded gridshell rooves.

  13. Non-equilibrium Majorana fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Sergey

    2017-06-01

    Non-equilibrium physics of random events, or fluctuations, is a unique fingerprint of a given system. Here we demonstrate that in non-interacting systems with dynamics driven essentially by Majorana states the effective charge {e}* , characterizing the electric current fluctuations, is fractional. This is in contrast to non-interacting Dirac systems with the trivial electronic charge {e}* =e. In the Majorana state, however, we predict two different fractional effective charges at low and high energies, {e}{{l}}* =e/2 and {e}{{h}}* =3e/2, accessible at low and high bias voltages, respectively. We show that while the low-energy effective charge {e}{{l}}* is sensitive to thermal fluctuations of the current, the high-energy effective charge {e}{{h}}* is robust against thermal noise. A unique fluctuation signature of Majorana fermions is therefore encoded in the high-voltage tails of the electric current noise easily accessible in experiments on strongly non-equilibrium systems even at high temperatures.

  14. The geometry of structural equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Building on a long tradition from Maxwell, Rankine, Klein and others, this paper puts forward a geometrical description of structural equilibrium which contains a procedure for the graphic analysis of stress resultants within general three-dimensional frames. The method is a natural generalization of Rankine’s reciprocal diagrams for three-dimensional trusses. The vertices and edges of dual abstract 4-polytopes are embedded within dual four-dimensional vector spaces, wherein the oriented area of generalized polygons give all six components (axial and shear forces with torsion and bending moments) of the stress resultants. The relevant quantities may be readily calculated using four-dimensional Clifford algebra. As well as giving access to frame analysis and design, the description resolves a number of long-standing problems with the incompleteness of Rankine’s description of three-dimensional trusses. Examples are given of how the procedure may be applied to structures of engineering interest, including an outline of a two-stage procedure for addressing the equilibrium of loaded gridshell rooves. PMID:28405361

  15. Modulation and Salt-Induced Reverse Modulation of the Excited-State Proton-Transfer Process of Lysozymized Pyranine: The Contrasting Scenario of the Ground-State Acid-Base Equilibrium of the Photoacid.

    PubMed

    Das, Ishita; Panja, Sudipta; Halder, Mintu

    2016-07-28

    Here we report on the excited-state behavior in terms of the excited-state proton-transfer (ESPT) reaction as well as the ground-state acid-base property of pyranine [8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (HPTS)] in the presence of an enzymatic protein, human lysozyme (LYZ). HPTS forms a 1:1 ground-state complex with LYZ having the binding constant KBH = (1.4 ± 0.05) × 10(4) M(-1), and its acid-base equilibrium gets shifted toward the deprotonated conjugate base (RO(-)), resulting in a downward shift in pKa. This suggests that the conjugate base (RO(-)) is thermodynamically more favored over the protonated (ROH) species inside the lysozyme matrix, resulting in an increased population of the deprotonated form. However, for the release of the proton from the excited photoacid, interestingly, the rate of proton transfer gets slowed down due to the "slow" acceptor biological water molecules present in the immediate vicinity of the fluorophore binding region inside the protein. The observed ESPT time constants, ∼140 and ∼750 ps, of protein-bound pyranine are slower than in bulk aqueous media (∼100 ps, single exponential). The molecular docking study predicts that the most probable binding location of the fluorophore is in a region near to the active site of the protein. Here we also report on the effect of external electrolyte (NaCl) on the reverse modulation of ground-state prototropy as well as the ESPT process of the protein-bound pyranine. It is found that there is a dominant role of electrostatic forces in the HPTS-LYZ interaction process, because an increase in ionic strength by the addition of NaCl dislodges the fluorophore from the protein pocket to the bulk again. The study shows a considerably different perspective of the perturbation offered by the model macromolecular host used, unlike the available literature reports on the concerned photoacid.

  16. Dynamic Stability of Equilibrium Capillary Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, William M.; Kim, Inwon C.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate a model for contact angle motion of quasi-static capillary drops resting on a horizontal plane. We prove global in time existence and long time behavior (convergence to equilibrium) in a class of star-shaped initial data for which we show that topological changes of drops can be ruled out for all times. Our result applies to any drop which is initially star-shaped with respect to a small ball inside the drop, given that the volume of the drop is sufficiently large. For the analysis, we combine geometric arguments based on the moving-plane type method with energy dissipation methods based on the formal gradient flow structure of the problem.

  17. Structural design using equilibrium programming formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    1995-01-01

    Solutions to increasingly larger structural optimization problems are desired. However, computational resources are strained to meet this need. New methods will be required to solve increasingly larger problems. The present approaches to solving large-scale problems involve approximations for the constraints of structural optimization problems and/or decomposition of the problem into multiple subproblems that can be solved in parallel. An area of game theory, equilibrium programming (also known as noncooperative game theory), can be used to unify these existing approaches from a theoretical point of view (considering the existence and optimality of solutions), and be used as a framework for the development of new methods for solving large-scale optimization problems. Equilibrium programming theory is described, and existing design techniques such as fully stressed design and constraint approximations are shown to fit within its framework. Two new structural design formulations are also derived. The first new formulation is another approximation technique which is a general updating scheme for the sensitivity derivatives of design constraints. The second new formulation uses a substructure-based decomposition of the structure for analysis and sensitivity calculations. Significant computational benefits of the new formulations compared with a conventional method are demonstrated.

  18. Non-equilibrium many body dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.; Gyulassy, M.

    1997-09-22

    This Riken BNL Research Center Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Many Body Physics was held on September 23-25, 1997 as part of the official opening ceremony of the Center at Brookhaven National Lab. A major objective of theoretical work at the center is to elaborate on the full spectrum of strong interaction physics based on QCD, including the physics of confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, the parton structure of hadrons and nuclei, and the phenomenology of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions related to the up-coming experiments at RHIC. The opportunities and challenges of nuclear and particle physics in this area naturally involve aspects of the many body problem common to many other fields. The aim of this symposium was to find common theoretical threads in the area of non-equilibrium physics and modern transport theories. The program consisted of invited talks on a variety topics from the fields of atomic, condensed matter, plasma, astrophysics, cosmology, and chemistry, in addition to nuclear and particle physics. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the database for contributions to this workshop.

  19. Structural design using equilibrium programming formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    1995-06-01

    Solutions to increasingly larger structural optimization problems are desired. However, computational resources are strained to meet this need. New methods will be required to solve increasingly larger problems. The present approaches to solving large-scale problems involve approximations for the constraints of structural optimization problems and/or decomposition of the problem into multiple subproblems that can be solved in parallel. An area of game theory, equilibrium programming (also known as noncooperative game theory), can be used to unify these existing approaches from a theoretical point of view (considering the existence and optimality of solutions), and be used as a framework for the development of new methods for solving large-scale optimization problems. Equilibrium programming theory is described, and existing design techniques such as fully stressed design and constraint approximations are shown to fit within its framework. Two new structural design formulations are also derived. The first new formulation is another approximation technique which is a general updating scheme for the sensitivity derivatives of design constraints. The second new formulation uses a substructure-based decomposition of the structure for analysis and sensitivity calculations. Significant computational benefits of the new formulations compared with a conventional method are demonstrated.

  20. Gyrokinetic statistical absolute equilibrium and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian-Zhou; Hammett, Gregory W.

    2010-12-01

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: a finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N+1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  1. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  2. Revealing patterns of cultural transmission from frequency data: equilibrium and non-equilibrium assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crema, Enrico R.; Kandler, Anne; Shennan, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    A long tradition of cultural evolutionary studies has developed a rich repertoire of mathematical models of social learning. Early studies have laid the foundation of more recent endeavours to infer patterns of cultural transmission from observed frequencies of a variety of cultural data, from decorative motifs on potsherds to baby names and musical preferences. While this wide range of applications provides an opportunity for the development of generalisable analytical workflows, archaeological data present new questions and challenges that require further methodological and theoretical discussion. Here we examine the decorative motifs of Neolithic pottery from an archaeological assemblage in Western Germany, and argue that the widely used (and relatively undiscussed) assumption that observed frequencies are the result of a system in equilibrium conditions is unwarranted, and can lead to incorrect conclusions. We analyse our data with a simulation-based inferential framework that can overcome some of the intrinsic limitations in archaeological data, as well as handle both equilibrium conditions and instances where the mode of cultural transmission is time-variant. Results suggest that none of the models examined can produce the observed pattern under equilibrium conditions, and suggest. instead temporal shifts in the patterns of cultural transmission.

  3. Revealing patterns of cultural transmission from frequency data: equilibrium and non-equilibrium assumptions

    PubMed Central

    Crema, Enrico R.; Kandler, Anne; Shennan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A long tradition of cultural evolutionary studies has developed a rich repertoire of mathematical models of social learning. Early studies have laid the foundation of more recent endeavours to infer patterns of cultural transmission from observed frequencies of a variety of cultural data, from decorative motifs on potsherds to baby names and musical preferences. While this wide range of applications provides an opportunity for the development of generalisable analytical workflows, archaeological data present new questions and challenges that require further methodological and theoretical discussion. Here we examine the decorative motifs of Neolithic pottery from an archaeological assemblage in Western Germany, and argue that the widely used (and relatively undiscussed) assumption that observed frequencies are the result of a system in equilibrium conditions is unwarranted, and can lead to incorrect conclusions. We analyse our data with a simulation-based inferential framework that can overcome some of the intrinsic limitations in archaeological data, as well as handle both equilibrium conditions and instances where the mode of cultural transmission is time-variant. Results suggest that none of the models examined can produce the observed pattern under equilibrium conditions, and suggest. instead temporal shifts in the patterns of cultural transmission. PMID:27974814

  4. Using nonequilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (NECEEM) for simultaneous determination of concentration and equilibrium constant.

    PubMed

    Kanoatov, Mirzo; Galievsky, Victor A; Krylova, Svetlana M; Cherney, Leonid T; Jankowski, Hanna K; Krylov, Sergey N

    2015-03-03

    Nonequilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (NECEEM) is a versatile tool for studying affinity binding. Here we describe a NECEEM-based approach for simultaneous determination of both the equilibrium constant, K(d), and the unknown concentration of a binder that we call a target, T. In essence, NECEEM is used to measure the unbound equilibrium fraction, R, for the binder with a known concentration that we call a ligand, L. The first set of experiments is performed at varying concentrations of T, prepared by serial dilution of the stock solution, but at a constant concentration of L, which is as low as its reliable quantitation allows. The value of R is plotted as a function of the dilution coefficient, and dilution corresponding to R = 0.5 is determined. This dilution of T is used in the second set of experiments in which the concentration of T is fixed but the concentration of L is varied. The experimental dependence of R on the concentration of L is fitted with a function describing their theoretical dependence. Both K(d) and the concentration of T are used as fitting parameters, and their sought values are determined as the ones that generate the best fit. We have fully validated this approach in silico by using computer-simulated NECEEM electropherograms and then applied it to experimental determination of the unknown concentration of MutS protein and K(d) of its interactions with a DNA aptamer. The general approach described here is applicable not only to NECEEM but also to any other method that can determine a fraction of unbound molecules at equilibrium.

  5. Local non-equilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Jinwoo, Lee; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-01-16

    Local Shannon entropy lies at the heart of modern thermodynamics, with much discussion of trajectory-dependent entropy production. When taken at both boundaries of a process in phase space, it reproduces the second law of thermodynamics over a finite time interval for small scale systems. However, given that entropy is an ensemble property, it has never been clear how one can assign such a quantity locally. Given such a fundamental omission in our knowledge, we construct a new ensemble composed of trajectories reaching an individual microstate, and show that locally defined entropy, information, and free energy are properties of the ensemble, or trajectory-independent true thermodynamic potentials. We find that the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution and Landauer's principle can be generalized naturally as properties of the ensemble, and that trajectory-free state functions of the ensemble govern the exact mechanism of non-equilibrium relaxation.

  6. Equilibrium calculations of firework mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.; Tanaka, Katsumi; Iida, Mitsuaki; Matsunaga, Takehiro

    1994-12-31

    Thermochemical equilibrium calculations have been used to calculate detonation conditions for typical firework components including three report charges, two display charges, and black powder which is used as a fuse or launch charge. Calculations were performed with a modified version of the TIGER code which allows calculations with 900 gaseous and 600 condensed product species at high pressure. The detonation calculations presented in this paper are thought to be the first report on the theoretical study of firework detonation. Measured velocities for two report charges are available and compare favorably to predicted detonation velocities. However, the measured velocities may not be true detonation velocities. Fast deflagration rather than an ideal detonation occurs when reactants contain significant amounts of slow reacting constituents such as aluminum or titanium. Despite such uncertainties in reacting pyrotechnics, the detonation calculations do show the complex nature of condensed phase formation at elevated pressures and give an upper bound for measured velocities.

  7. Local non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jinwoo, Lee; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Local Shannon entropy lies at the heart of modern thermodynamics, with much discussion of trajectory-dependent entropy production. When taken at both boundaries of a process in phase space, it reproduces the second law of thermodynamics over a finite time interval for small scale systems. However, given that entropy is an ensemble property, it has never been clear how one can assign such a quantity locally. Given such a fundamental omission in our knowledge, we construct a new ensemble composed of trajectories reaching an individual microstate, and show that locally defined entropy, information, and free energy are properties of the ensemble, or trajectory-independent true thermodynamic potentials. We find that the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution and Landauer's principle can be generalized naturally as properties of the ensemble, and that trajectory-free state functions of the ensemble govern the exact mechanism of non-equilibrium relaxation. PMID:25592077

  8. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mina; Tománek, David

    2010-11-17

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  9. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mina; Tomanek, David

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  10. Nanomechanics Model for Static Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghoon

    2002-09-01

    This study presented a computational technique to model and simulate atomistic behavior of materials under static loads, Interatomic potential energy was used to maintain equilibrium among atoms under static loads and constraints, In addition, the atomistic model was coupled with the finite element analysis model so that more flexible loads and constraints could be applied to the atomistic model A multi-scale technique was also presented for some single wall nanotubes of both zigzag and armchair and then their effective stiffness were estimated Those designed nanotubes are woven into fabric composites, which can be used in various military applications including body armored, vehicles, and infantry transportation vehicles because advanced nano- composites could be much lighter and stronger than current ones, Some example problems were presented to illustrate the developed technique for the nano-composites and SWNTs, The proposed technique for nanomechanics can be used for design and analysis of materials at the atomic or molecular level,

  11. Equilibrium avalanches in spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Müller, Markus; Wiese, Kay Jörg

    2012-06-01

    We study the distribution of equilibrium avalanches (shocks) in Ising spin glasses which occur at zero temperature upon small changes in the magnetic field. For the infinite-range Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model, we present a detailed derivation of the density ρ(ΔM) of the magnetization jumps ΔM. It is obtained by introducing a multicomponent generalization of the Parisi-Duplantier equation, which allows us to compute all cumulants of the magnetization. We find that ρ(ΔM)˜ΔM-τ with an avalanche exponent τ=1 for the SK model, originating from the marginal stability (criticality) of the model. It holds for jumps of size 1≪ΔMequilibrium dynamics of the SK model. For finite-range models, using droplet arguments, we obtain the prediction τ=(df+θ)/dm where df,dm, and θ are the fractal dimension, magnetization exponent, and energy exponent of a droplet, respectively. This formula is expected to apply to other glassy disordered systems, such as the random-field model and pinned interfaces. We make suggestions for further numerical investigations, as well as experimental studies of the Barkhausen noise in spin glasses.

  12. Approximate Equilibrium Shapes for Spinning, Gravitating Rubble Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Sharma, I.; Jenkins, J. T.

    2007-10-01

    Approximate Equilibrium Shapes for Spinning, Gravitating Rubble Asteroids Joseph A. Burns, Ishan Sharma and James T. Jenkins Many asteroids are thought to be particle aggregates held together principally by self-gravity. Here we study those equilibrium shapes of spinning asteroids that are permitted for rubble piles. As in the case of spinning fluid masses, not all shapes may be compatible with a granular rheology. We take the asteroid to always be an ellipsoid with an interior modeled as a rigid-plastic, cohesion-less material. Using an approximate volume-averaged procedure, based on the classical method of moments, we investigate the dynamical process by which such objects may achieve equilibrium. First, to instill confidence in our approach, we have collapsed our dynamical approach to its statical limit to re-derive regions in spin-shape parameter space that allow equilibrium solutions to exist. Not surprisingly, our results duplicate static results reported by Holsapple (Icarus 154 [2001], 432; 172 [2004], 272) since the two sets of final equations match, although the formalisms to reach these expressions differ. We note that the approach applied here was obtained independently by I.S. in his Ph.D. dissertation (Cornell University, 2004); it provides a general, though approximate, framework that is amenable to systematic improvements and flexible enough to incorporate the dynamical effects of a changing shape, different rheologies and complex rotational histories. To demonstrate the power of our technique, we investigate the non-equilibrium dynamics of rigid-plastic, spinning, prolate asteroids to watch the simultaneous histories of shape and spin rate for rubble piles. We have succeeded in recovering most results of Richardson et al. (Icarus 173 [2004], 349), who obtained equilibrium shapes by studying numerically the passage into equilibrium of aggregates containing discrete, interacting, frictionless, spherical particles. Our mainly analytical approach aids

  13. The stochastic link equilibrium strategy and algorithm for flow assignment in communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yang; Zhou, Xia

    2005-11-01

    Based on the mature user equilibrium (UE) theory in transportation field as well as the similarity of network flow between transportation and communication, in this paper, the user equilibrium theory was applied to communication networks, and how to apply the stochastic user equilibrium (SUE) to flow assigning in generalized communication networks was further studied. The stochastic link equilibrium (SLE) flow assignment strategy was proposed in this paper, the algorithm of SLE flow assignment was also provided. Both analyses and simulation based on the given algorithm proved that the optimal flow assignment in networks can be achieved by using this algorithm.

  14. Equilibrium Structure of Tantalum Oxygen Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgic, S. Sentürk; Caliskan, M.

    2007-04-01

    We determine a refined model for the interionic interactions in TaOn clusters by an analysis of data on their molecular structures. The potential energy function of an ionic cluster we adopt is based on the interionic force model proposed by Akdeniz and Tosi. The microscopic model used for Tantalum oxygen clusters incorporates the Born Model of cohesion and shell model for vibrational motions and crystal defects. Electron shell deformability is described through the effective valences, the electric and overlap polarizabilities of the oxygens, the electric polarizability of the tantalum ions. The two different overlap repulsive energy form have been tested. The molecular structure of clusters in equilibrium have been shown. It has been found in a good agreement for the bond lengths and bond angles by comparing with those obtained by chemical structure calculations and experimental data Thus the applicability of interionic model is tested for transition metal oxide clusters.

  15. Approach to Equilibrium for the Stochastic NLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebowitz, J. L.; Mounaix, Ph.; Wang, W.-M.

    2013-07-01

    We study the approach to equilibrium, described by a Gibbs measure, for a system on a d-dimensional torus evolving according to a stochastic nonlinear Schrödinger equation (SNLS) with a high frequency truncation. We prove exponential approach to the truncated Gibbs measure both for the focusing and defocusing cases when the dynamics is constrained via suitable boundary conditions to regions of the Fourier space where the Hamiltonian is convex. Our method is based on establishing a spectral gap for the non self-adjoint Fokker-Planck operator governing the time evolution of the measure, which is uniform in the frequency truncation N. The limit N →∞ is discussed.

  16. LAPS discretization and solution of plasma equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missanelli, Maria; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Guo, Zehua; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xianzhu

    2011-10-01

    LAPS provides spectral element discretization for solving steady state plasma profiles. Our initial focus is on its implementation for two dimensional open magnetic field equilibria in linear and toroidal geometries. The linear geometry is an axisymmetric magnetic mirror with anisotropic pressure. The toroidal case is a tokamak scrape-off layer plasma. Structured grids are produced by the grid generation package in LAPS. The spectral element discretization uses modal bases over quadrilateral elements. A Newton-Krylov solver implemented with the Portable, Extensible Toolkits for Scientific Computing PETSc is applied to iteratively converge the solution. Care has been taken in the code design to separate the grid generation, spectral element discretization, and (non)linear solver from the user-specified equilibrium equations, so the LAPS infrastructure can be easily used for different applications. Work supported by DOE OFES.

  17. Dynamic Protonation Equilibrium of Solvated Acetic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Wei; Frigato, Tomaso; Straatsma, TP; Helms, Volkhard H.

    2007-04-13

    For the first time, the dynamic protonation equilibrium between an amino acid side chain analogue and bulk water as well as the diffusion properties of the excess proton were successfully reproduced through unbiased computer simulations. During a 50 ns Q-HOP MD simulation, two different regimes of proton transfer were observed. Extended phases of frequent proton swapping between acetic acid and nearby water were separated by phases where the proton freely diffuses in the simulation box until it is captured again by acetic acid. The pKa of acetic acid was calculated around 3.0 based on the relative population of protonated and deprotonated states and the diffusion coefficient of excess proton was computed from the average mean squared displacement in the simulation. Both calculated values agree well with the experimental measurements.

  18. Punctuated equilibrium dynamics in human communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dan; Han, Xiao-Pu; Wei, Zong-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2015-10-01

    A minimal model based on network incorporating individual interactions is proposed to study the non-Poisson statistical properties of human behavior: individuals in system interact with their neighbors, the probability of an individual acting correlates to its activity, and all the individuals involved in action will change their activities randomly. The model reproduces varieties of spatial-temporal patterns observed in empirical studies of human daily communications, providing insight into various human activities and embracing a range of realistic social interacting systems, particularly, intriguing bimodal phenomenon. This model bridges priority queueing theory and punctuated equilibrium dynamics, and our modeling and analysis is likely to shed light on non-Poisson phenomena in many complex systems.

  19. Nash equilibrium and multi criterion aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhili; Zhang, Lianhe

    2016-06-01

    Game theory and its particular Nash Equilibrium (NE) are gaining importance in solving Multi Criterion Optimization (MCO) in engineering problems over the past decade. The solution of a MCO problem can be viewed as a NE under the concept of competitive games. This paper surveyed/proposed four efficient algorithms for calculating a NE of a MCO problem. Existence and equivalence of the solution are analyzed and proved in the paper based on fixed point theorem. Specific virtual symmetric Nash game is also presented to set up an optimization strategy for single objective optimization problems. Two numerical examples are presented to verify proposed algorithms. One is mathematical functions' optimization to illustrate detailed numerical procedures of algorithms, the other is aerodynamic drag reduction of civil transport wing fuselage configuration by using virtual game. The successful application validates efficiency of algorithms in solving complex aerodynamic optimization problem.

  20. Strange attractors with various equilibrium types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprott, J. C.

    2015-07-01

    Of the eight types of hyperbolic equilibrium points in three-dimensional flows, one is overwhelmingly dominant in dissipative chaotic systems. This paper shows examples of chaotic systems for each of the eight types as well as one without any equilibrium and two that are nonhyperbolic. The systems are a generalized form of the Nosé-Hoover oscillator with a single equilibrium point. Six of the eleven cases have hidden attractors, and six of them exhibit multistability for the chosen parameters.

  1. Regularized Mathematical Programs with Stochastic Equilibrium Constraints: Estimating Structural Demand Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-23

    equilibrium constraints involving only single-valued Lipschitz continuous functions. In addition, sampling has the further effect of replacing the...constraints, based on regularization, that replaces them by equilibrium constraints involving only single-valued Lipschitz continuous functions. In addition...only single-valued Lipschitz continuous functions. In addition, sampling has the further effect of replacing the ‘simplified’ equilibrium constraints by

  2. Explicit Integration of Extremely Stiff Reaction Networks: Partial Equilibrium Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, Mike W; Billings, J. J.; Hix, William Raphael

    2013-01-01

    In two preceding papers [1,2] we have shown that, when reaction networks are well removed from equilibrium, explicit asymptotic and quasi-steady-state approximations can give algebraically stabilized integration schemes that rival standard implicit methods in accuracy and speed for extremely stiff systems. However, we also showed that these explicit methods remain accurate but are no longer competitive in speed as the network approaches equilibrium. In this paper we analyze this failure and show that it is associated with the presence of fast equilibration timescales that neither asymptotic nor quasi-steady-state approximations are able to remove efficiently from the numerical integration. Based on this understanding, we develop a partial equilibrium method to deal effectively with the new partial equilibrium methods, give an integration scheme that plausibly can deal with the stiffest networks, even in the approach to equilibrium, with accuracy and speed competitive with that of implicit methods. Thus we demonstrate that algebraically stabilized explicit methods may offer alternatives to implicit integration of even extremely stiff systems, and that these methods may permit integration of much larger networks than have been feasible previously in a variety of fields.

  3. Novel mapping in non-equilibrium stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heseltine, James; Kim, Eun-jin

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the time-evolution of a non-equilibrium system in view of the change in information and provide a novel mapping relation which quantifies the change in information far from equilibrium and the proximity of a non-equilibrium state to the attractor. Specifically, we utilize a nonlinear stochastic model where the stochastic noise plays the role of incoherent regulation of the dynamical variable x and analytically compute the rate of change in information (information velocity) from the time-dependent probability distribution function. From this, we quantify the total change in information in terms of information length { L } and the associated action { J }, where { L } represents the distance that the system travels in the fluctuation-based, statistical metric space parameterized by time. As the initial probability density function’s mean position (μ) is decreased from the final equilibrium value {μ }* (the carrying capacity), { L } and { J } increase monotonically with interesting power-law mapping relations. In comparison, as μ is increased from {μ }*,{ L } and { J } increase slowly until they level off to a constant value. This manifests the proximity of the state to the attractor caused by a strong correlation for large μ through large fluctuations. Our proposed mapping relation provides a new way of understanding the progression of the complexity in non-equilibrium system in view of information change and the structure of underlying attractor.

  4. Development of equilibrium raindrop size distribution in natural rain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pio D'Adderio, Leo; Porcu, Federico; Tokay, Ali

    2015-04-01

    The NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission dual-frequency precipitation radar retrieval has adopted a three-parameter gamma distribution to retrieve the raindrop size distribution (DSD) from dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) measurements. Recent analysis from disdrometric measurements collected during GPM ground validation (GV) field experiments shows that the three-parameter gamma distribution does not well fit the observed spectra in the presence of collisional break-up, i.e. when the DSD reaches the equilibrium stage. An automatic algorithm is used to select equilibrium DSD in six datasets for a total number of more than 12,000 minutes with rain rate higher than 5 mmh-1 collected from 2-DVD disdrometers. The algorithm is based on the analysis of the DSD slope in the interval 1.0-2.5 mm diameter. The 1-minute time series are studied in order to assess the conditions more favorable for equilibrium DSD to take place, showing the transition between the one-peak DSD to the 2-peak DSD, for selected case studies, over a wide range of rainrate values. The results are discussed in terms of precipitation type and intensity, showing a very rapid onset and dissipation of equilibrium DSD conditions. The temporal evolution of some DSD parameters is also analyzed, and, for two of the six datasets (MC3E and Wallops), was also possible to evaluate the small-scale spatial structure of equilibrium DSD.

  5. DSMC predictions of non-equilibrium reaction rates.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2010-04-01

    A set of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) chemical-reaction models recently proposed by Bird and based solely on the collision energy and the vibrational energy levels of the species involved is applied to calculate nonequilibrium chemical-reaction rates for atmospheric reactions in hypersonic flows. The DSMC non-equilibrium model predictions are in good agreement with theoretical models and experimental measurements. The observed agreement provides strong evidence that modeling chemical reactions using only the collision energy and the vibrational energy levels provides an accurate method for predicting non-equilibrium chemical-reaction rates.

  6. Equilibrium coexistence of three amphiboles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, P.; Jaffe, H.W.; Klein, C.; Ross, M.

    1969-01-01

    Electron probe and wet chemical analyses of amphibole pairs from the sillimanite zone of central Massachusetts and adjacent New Hampshire indicated that for a particular metamorphic grade there should be a restricted composition range in which three amphiboles can coexist stably. An unequivocal example of such an equilibrium three amphibole rock has been found in the sillimanite-orthoclase zone. It contains a colorless primitive clinoamphibole, space group P21/m, optically and chemically like cummingtonite with blue-green hornblende exsolution lamellae on (100) and (-101) of the host; blue-green hornblende, space group C2/m, with primitive cummingtonite exsolution lamellae on (100) and (-101) of the host; and pale pinkish tan anthophyllite, space group Pnma, that is free of visible exsolution lamellae but is a submicroscopic intergrowth of two orthorhombic amphiboles. Mutual contacts and coarse, oriented intergrowths of two and three host amphiboles indicate the three grew as an equilibrium assemblage prior to exsolution. Electron probe analyses at mutual three-amphibole contacts showed little variation in the composition of each amphibole. Analyses believed to represent most closely the primary amphibole compositions gave atomic proportions on the basis of 23 oxygens per formula unit as follows: for primitive cummingtonite (Na0.02Ca0.21- Mn0.06Fe2+2.28Mg4.12Al0.28) (Al0.17Si7.83), for hornblende (Na0.35Ca1.56Mn0.02Fe1.71Mg2.85Al0.92) (Al1.37Si6.63), and for anthophyllite (Na0.10Ca0.06Mn0.06Fe2.25Mg4.11Al0.47) (Al0.47Si7.53). The reflections violating C-symmetry, on X-ray single crystal photographs of the primitive cummingtonite, are weak and diffuse, and suggest a partial inversion from a C-centered to a primitive clinoamphibole. Single crystal photographs of the anthophyllite show split reflections indicating it is an intergrowth of about 80% anthophyllite and about 20% gedrite which differ in their b crystallographic dimensions. Split reflections are

  7. EASI - EQUILIBRIUM AIR SHOCK INTERFERENCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    New research on hypersonic vehicles, such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP), has raised concerns about the effects of shock-wave interference on various structural components of the craft. State-of-the-art aerothermal analysis software is inadequate to predict local flow and heat flux in areas of extremely high heat transfer, such as the surface impingement of an Edney-type supersonic jet. EASI revives and updates older computational methods for calculating inviscid flow field and maximum heating from shock wave interference. The program expands these methods to solve problems involving the six shock-wave interference patterns on a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge with an equilibrium chemically reacting gas mixture (representing, for example, the scramjet cowl of the NASP). The inclusion of gas chemistry allows for a more accurate prediction of the maximum pressure and heating loads by accounting for the effects of high temperature on the air mixture. Caloric imperfections and specie dissociation of high-temperature air cause shock-wave angles, flow deflection angles, and thermodynamic properties to differ from those calculated by a calorically perfect gas model. EASI contains pressure- and temperature-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties to determine heating rates, and uses either a calorically perfect air model or an 11-specie, 7-reaction reacting air model at equilibrium with temperatures up to 15,000 K for the inviscid flowfield calculations. EASI solves the flow field and the associated maximum surface pressure and heat flux for the six common types of shock wave interference. Depending on the type of interference, the program solves for shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction, expansion-fan/boundary-layer interaction, attaching shear layer or supersonic jet impingement. Heat flux predictions require a knowledge (from experimental data or relevant calculations) of a pertinent length scale of the interaction. Output files contain flow

  8. CO2 and humidity removal system for extended Shuttle missions - CO2, H2O, and trace contaminant equilibrium testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. H.; Kissinger, L. D.

    1977-01-01

    The equilibrium relationships for the co-adsorption of CO2 and H2O on an amine coated acrylic ester are presented. The equilibrium data collection and reduction techniques are discussed. Based on the equilibrium relationship, other modes of operation of systems containing HS-C are discussed and specific space applications for HS-C are presented. Equilibrium data for 10 compounds which are found as trace contaminants in closed environments are also presented.

  9. CO2 and humidity removal system for extended Shuttle missions - CO2, H2O, and trace contaminant equilibrium testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. H.; Kissinger, L. D.

    1977-01-01

    The equilibrium relationships for the co-adsorption of CO2 and H2O on an amine coated acrylic ester are presented. The equilibrium data collection and reduction techniques are discussed. Based on the equilibrium relationship, other modes of operation of systems containing HS-C are discussed and specific space applications for HS-C are presented. Equilibrium data for 10 compounds which are found as trace contaminants in closed environments are also presented.

  10. Equilibrium Distribution of Mutators in the Single Fitness Peak Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Deeds, Eric J.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2003-09-01

    This Letter develops an analytically tractable model for determining the equilibrium distribution of mismatch repair deficient strains in unicellular populations. The approach is based on the single fitness peak model, which has been used in Eigen’s quasispecies equations in order to understand various aspects of evolutionary dynamics. As with the quasispecies model, our model for mutator-nonmutator equilibrium undergoes a phase transition in the limit of infinite sequence length. This “repair catas­trophe” occurs at a critical repair error probability of ɛr=Lvia/L, where Lvia denotes the length of the genome controlling viability, while L denotes the overall length of the genome. The repair catastrophe therefore occurs when the repair error probability exceeds the fraction of deleterious mutations. Our model also gives a quantitative estimate for the equilibrium fraction of mutators in Escherichia coli.

  11. The use of Bayesian inversion to resolve plasma equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Hole, M. J.; Nessi, G. von; Pretty, D.; Howard, J.; Blackwell, B.; Svensson, J.; Appel, L. C.

    2010-10-15

    Recently, Bayesian probability theory has been used at a number of experiments to fold uncertainties and interdependencies in the diagnostic data and forward models, together with prior knowledge of the state of the plasma, to increase accuracy of inferred physics variables. A new probabilistic framework, MINERVA, based on Bayesian graphical models, has been used at JET and W7-AS to yield predictions of internal magnetic structure. A feature of the framework is the Bayesian inversion for poloidal magnetic flux without the need for an explicit equilibrium assumption. Building on this, we discuss results from a new project to develop Bayesian inversion tools that aim to (1) distinguish between competing equilibrium theories, which capture different physics, using the MAST spherical tokamak, and (2) test the predictions of MHD theory, particularly mode structure, using the H-1 Heliac. Specifically, we report on correction of the motional Stark effect, pickup coils, flux-loop constrained Bayesian inferred equilibrium for varying toroidal flux.

  12. The use of bayesian inversion to resolve plasma equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Hole, M J; von Nessi, G; Pretty, D; Howard, J; Blackwell, B; Svensson, J; Appel, L C

    2010-10-01

    Recently, bayesian probability theory has been used at a number of experiments to fold uncertainties and interdependencies in the diagnostic data and forward models, together with prior knowledge of the state of the plasma, to increase accuracy of inferred physics variables. A new probabilistic framework, MINERVA, based on bayesian graphical models, has been used at JET and W7-AS to yield predictions of internal magnetic structure. A feature of the framework is the bayesian inversion for poloidal magnetic flux without the need for an explicit equilibrium assumption. Building on this, we discuss results from a new project to develop bayesian inversion tools that aim to (1) distinguish between competing equilibrium theories, which capture different physics, using the MAST spherical tokamak, and (2) test the predictions of MHD theory, particularly mode structure, using the H-1 Heliac. Specifically, we report on correction of the motional Stark effect, pickup coils, flux-loop constrained bayesian inferred equilibrium for varying toroidal flux.

  13. Spectral Quasi-Equilibrium Manifold for Chemical Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kooshkbaghi, Mahdi; Frouzakis, Christos E; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Karlin, Iliya V

    2016-05-26

    The Spectral Quasi-Equilibrium Manifold (SQEM) method is a model reduction technique for chemical kinetics based on entropy maximization under constraints built by the slowest eigenvectors at equilibrium. The method is revisited here and discussed and validated through the Michaelis-Menten kinetic scheme, and the quality of the reduction is related to the temporal evolution and the gap between eigenvalues. SQEM is then applied to detailed reaction mechanisms for the homogeneous combustion of hydrogen, syngas, and methane mixtures with air in adiabatic constant pressure reactors. The system states computed using SQEM are compared with those obtained by direct integration of the detailed mechanism, and good agreement between the reduced and the detailed descriptions is demonstrated. The SQEM reduced model of hydrogen/air combustion is also compared with another similar technique, the Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium (RCCE). For the same number of representative variables, SQEM is found to provide a more accurate description.

  14. V3FIT: Three-Dimensional MHD Equilibrium Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, James D.; Shields, John; Hirshman, S. P.; Lazarus, E. A.; Lao, L.; Knowlton, S. F.

    2007-11-01

    V3FIT is a three-dimensional MHD equilibrium reconstruction code, based on the VMEC equilibrium code. V3FIT is a general and easily extensible reconstruction code, designed so that information from many types of diagnostics can be used to determine the equilibrium. The first diagnostics included in V3FIT were magnetic diagnostics. We will present results on reconstruction using microwave interferometers and polarimeters as diagnostics. We will also show comparisons between V3FIT and EFIT reconstructions using experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. This work is supported in part by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER54692B and a US DOE Postdoctoral Research Fellowship.

  15. Time-resolved measurements of equilibrium profiles in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, B. H.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Yates, T. F.; Anderson, J. K.; Caspary, K.; McCollam, K. J.; Prager, S. C.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Craig, D.

    2007-11-01

    Based on the high-speed, three-wave, far-infrared polarimeter-interferometer measurement of Bpol profiles and external coil measurements of Btave and Btw, a new method is developed to derive Btor and other equilibrium profiles (J// and q) with high time resolution. Using Faraday's law, the inductive electric field (E//) profile is also deduced from the temporal derivatives of the time-resolved magnetic field profiles. The derived B(0) values have excellent agreement with direct measurements using a Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic. Evolution of equilibrium profiles during single sawtooth events in MST, both the slow linear ramp and crash phases, are presented. Profile scaling with plasma current Ip and reversal parameter F is also explored. MHD stability is tested from the spatial gradients of the J// and q profiles, and correlation with fluctuation mode amplitude is investigated. Future improvements to equilibrium reconstruction are expected by measuring Btor(r,t) directly via Cotton-Mouton interferometry.

  16. Clarifying the Concept of Equilibrium in Chemically Reacting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    Offers a critique of the conventional approach to teaching of equilibrium in chemically reacting systems and outlines a more satisfactory approach. This approach is based not in kinetics but in the basic principles of thermodynamics. The approach is especially useful for the advanced student. (Author/JN)

  17. SCREENED COULOMB FORMULATION OF THE IONIZATION EQUILIBRIUM EQUATION OF STATE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The ionization equilibrium equation of state (IEEOS) is formulated relative to the numerical solutions of the Schrodinger equation with the complete...for hydrogen and iron, where pressures at high densities and temperature are compared with pressures from the equation of state based upon the Thomas...IEEOS represents a significant improvement over the TFD equation of state . (Author)

  18. Equilibrium-Staged Separations Using Matlab and Mathematica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binous, Housam

    2008-01-01

    We show a new approach, based on the utilization of Matlab and Mathematica, for solving liquid-liquid extraction and binary distillation problems. In addition, the author shares his experience using these two softwares to teach equilibrium staged separations at the National Institute of Applied Sciences and Technology. (Contains 7 figures.)

  19. Composition and Thermodynamic Properties of Air in Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeckel, W E; Weston, Kenneth C

    1958-01-01

    Charts have been prepared relating the thermodynamic properties of air in chemical equilibrium for temperatures to 15,000 degrees k and for pressures 10(-5) to 10 (plus 4) atmospheres. Also included are charts showing the composition of air, the isentropic exponent, and the speed of sound. These charts are based on thermodynamic data calculated by the National Bureau of Standards.

  20. Microcomputer Calculation of Equilibrium Constants from Molecular Parameters of Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venugopalan, Mundiyath

    1989-01-01

    Lists a BASIC program which computes the equilibrium constant as a function of temperature. Suggests use by undergraduates taking a one-year calculus-based physical chemistry course. Notes the program provides for up to four species, typically two reactants and two products. (MVL)

  1. Equilibrium-Staged Separations Using Matlab and Mathematica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binous, Housam

    2008-01-01

    We show a new approach, based on the utilization of Matlab and Mathematica, for solving liquid-liquid extraction and binary distillation problems. In addition, the author shares his experience using these two softwares to teach equilibrium staged separations at the National Institute of Applied Sciences and Technology. (Contains 7 figures.)

  2. Non equilibrium statistical mechanics of geophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, F.

    2012-04-01

    Onsager first proposed to explain the self organization of turbulent flows using the statistical mechanics framework. Generalization of those ideas to the class of 2D-Euler and Quasi-Gestrophic models led to the Robert-Sommeria-Miller theory. This approach was successful in modeling many geophysical phenomena: the Great Red Spot of Jupiter [2, 1], drift of mesoscale ocean vortices [3, 1], self-organization of Quasi-Geostrophic dynamics in mid-basin jets similar to the Gulf-Stream and the Kuroshio [3, 1], and so on. However, this type of equilibrium theories fail to take into account forces and dissipation. This is a strong limitation for many geophysical phenomena. Interestingly, it is possible to circumvent these difficulties using the most modern theoretical development of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics: large deviation [4] and instanton theories. As an example, we will discuss geophysical turbulent flows which have more than one attractor (bistability or mutistability). For instance, paths of the Kuroshio [5], the Earth's magnetic field reversal, atmospheric flows [6], MHD experiments [7], 2D turbulence experiments [8, 9], 3D flows [10] show this kind of behavior. On Navier-Stokes and Quasi-Geostrophic turbulent flows, we predict the conditions for existence of rare transitions between attractors, and the dynamics of those transitions. We discuss how these results are probably connected to the long debated existence of multi-stability in the atmosphere and oceans, and how non-equilibrium statistical mechanics can allow to settle this issue. Generalization of statistical mechanics to more comprehensive hydrodynamical models, which include gravity wave dynamics and allow for the possibility of energy transfer through wave motion, would be extremely interesting. Namely, both are essential in understanding energy balance of geophysical flows. However, due to difficulties in essential theoretical parts of the statistical mechanics approach, previous methods

  3. Non-Equilibrium Effects on Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilbum

    Understanding non-equilibrium effects of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers is essential in order to build cost efficient and reliable hypersonic vehicles. It is well known that non-equilibrium effects on the boundary layers are notable, but our understanding of the effects are limited. The overall goal of this study is to improve the understanding of non-equilibrium effects on hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. A new code has been developed for direct numerical simulations of spatially developing hypersonic turbulent boundary layers over a flat plate with finite-rate reactions. A fifth-order hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme with a low dissipation finite-difference scheme is utilized in order to capture stiff gradients while resolving small motions in turbulent boundary layers. The code has been validated by qualitative and quantitative comparisons of two different simulations of a non-equilibrium flow and a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer. With the validated code, direct numerical simulations of four different hypersonic turbulent boundary layers, perfect gas and non-equilibrium flows of pure oxygen and nitrogen, have been performed. In order to rule out uncertainties in comparisons, the same inlet conditions are imposed for each species, and then mean and turbulence statistics as well as near-wall turbulence structures are compared at a downstream location. Based on those comparisons, it is shown that there is no direct energy exchanges between internal and turbulent kinetic energies due to thermal and chemical non-equilibrium processes in the flow field. Instead, these non-equilibria affect turbulent boundary layers by changing the temperature without changing the main characteristics of near-wall turbulence structures. This change in the temperature induces the changes in the density and viscosity and the mean flow fields are then adjusted to satisfy the conservation laws. The perturbation fields are modified according to

  4. A Unified Kinetics and Equilibrium Experiment: Rate Law, Activation Energy, and Equilibrium Constant for the Dissociation of Ferroin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattar, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) is the basis of a suite of four experiments spanning 5 weeks. Students determine the rate law, activation energy, and equilibrium constant for the dissociation of the complex ion in acid solution and base dissociation constant for phenanthroline. The focus on one chemical system simplifies a daunting set of…

  5. A Unified Kinetics and Equilibrium Experiment: Rate Law, Activation Energy, and Equilibrium Constant for the Dissociation of Ferroin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattar, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) is the basis of a suite of four experiments spanning 5 weeks. Students determine the rate law, activation energy, and equilibrium constant for the dissociation of the complex ion in acid solution and base dissociation constant for phenanthroline. The focus on one chemical system simplifies a daunting set of…

  6. Path integral evaluation of equilibrium isotope effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Tomáš; Vaníček, Jiří

    2009-07-01

    A general and rigorous methodology to compute the quantum equilibrium isotope effect is described. Unlike standard approaches, ours does not assume separability of rotational and vibrational motions and does not make the harmonic approximation for vibrations or rigid rotor approximation for the rotations. In particular, zero point energy and anharmonicity effects are described correctly quantum mechanically. The approach is based on the thermodynamic integration with respect to the mass of isotopes and on the Feynman path integral representation of the partition function. An efficient estimator for the derivative of free energy is used whose statistical error is independent of the number of imaginary time slices in the path integral, speeding up calculations by a factor of ˜60 at 500 K and more at room temperature. We describe the implementation of the methodology in the molecular dynamics package AMBER 10. The method is tested on three [1,5] sigmatropic hydrogen shift reactions. Because of the computational expense, we use ab initio potentials to evaluate the equilibrium isotope effects within the harmonic approximation and then the path integral method together with semiempirical potentials to evaluate the anharmonicity corrections. Our calculations show that the anharmonicity effects amount up to 30% of the symmetry reduced reaction free energy. The numerical results are compared with recent experiments of Doering et al., [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128, 9080 (2006); J. Am. Chem. Soc.129, 2488 (2007)] confirming the accuracy of the most recent measurement on 2,4,6,7,9-pentamethyl-5-(5,5-H22)methylene-11,11a-dihydro-12H-naphthacene as well as concerns about compromised accuracy, due to side reactions, of another measurement on 2-methyl-10-(10,10-H22)methylenebicyclo[4.4.0]dec-1-ene.

  7. SOME MODELS OF STEADY STATE DYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    output is maximized, interest rate equals population growth rate and real wage equals output per worker. The second equilibrium called here a sigma...equilibrium because it depends on, peoples propensity to save, has output less than maximum and interest rate either greater than (deflationary) or less than

  8. Zeroth Law, Entropy, Equilibrium, and All That

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2008-01-01

    The place of the zeroth law in the teaching of thermodynamics is examined in the context of the recent discussion by Gislason and Craig of some problems involving the establishment of thermal equilibrium. The concept of thermal equilibrium is introduced through the zeroth law. The relation between the zeroth law and the second law in the…

  9. Spin equilibrium in strongly magnetized accreting stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, C. R.

    2017-09-01

    Strongly magnetized accreting stars are often hypothesized to be in 'spin equilibrium' with their surrounding accretion flows, which requires that the accretion rate changes more slowly than it takes the star to reach spin equilibrium. This is not true for most magnetically accreting stars, which have strongly variable accretion outbursts on time-scales much shorter than the time it would take to reach spin equilibrium. This paper examines how accretion outbursts affect the time a star takes to reach spin equilibrium and its final equilibrium spin period. I consider several different models for angular momentum loss - either carried away in an outflow, lost to a stellar wind, or transferred back to the accretion disc (the 'trapped disc'). For transient sources, the outflow scenario leads to significantly longer times to reach spin equilibrium (∼10 ×), and shorter equilibrium spin periods than would be expected from spin equilibrium arguments, while the 'trapped disc' does not. The results suggest that disc trapping plays a significant role in the spin evolution of strongly magnetic stars, with some caveats for young stellar objects.

  10. Zeroth Law, Entropy, Equilibrium, and All That

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2008-01-01

    The place of the zeroth law in the teaching of thermodynamics is examined in the context of the recent discussion by Gislason and Craig of some problems involving the establishment of thermal equilibrium. The concept of thermal equilibrium is introduced through the zeroth law. The relation between the zeroth law and the second law in the…

  11. Far from Equilibrium: The Gas Pendulum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltzberg, Leonard J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the importance of studying the far-from-equilibrium phenomena in college chemistry. Presents a system using the gas pendulum which displays all of the essential characteristics of dissipative systems. Promotes the use of the gas pendulum as a teaching example of a nonlinear far-from-equilibrium process. (TW)

  12. Far from Equilibrium: The Gas Pendulum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltzberg, Leonard J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the importance of studying the far-from-equilibrium phenomena in college chemistry. Presents a system using the gas pendulum which displays all of the essential characteristics of dissipative systems. Promotes the use of the gas pendulum as a teaching example of a nonlinear far-from-equilibrium process. (TW)

  13. Equilibrium theory of island biogeography: A review

    Treesearch

    Angela D. Yu; Simon A. Lei

    2001-01-01

    The topography, climatic pattern, location, and origin of islands generate unique patterns of species distribution. The equilibrium theory of island biogeography creates a general framework in which the study of taxon distribution and broad island trends may be conducted. Critical components of the equilibrium theory include the species-area relationship, island-...

  14. Equilibrium Tail Distribution Due to Touschek Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Nash,B.; Krinsky, S.

    2009-05-04

    Single large angle Coulomb scattering is referred to as Touschek scattering. In addition to causing particle loss when the scattered particles are outside the momentum aperture, the process also results in a non-Gaussian tail, which is an equilibrium between the Touschek scattering and radiation damping. Here we present an analytical calculation for this equilibrium distribution.

  15. A general equilibrium analysis of partial-equilibrium welfare measures: The case of climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Kokoski, M.F.; Smith, V.K. )

    1987-06-01

    This paper uses computable general equilibrium models to demonstrate that partial-equilibrium welfare measures can offer reasonable approximations of the true welfare changes for large exogenous changes. With consistency in the size and direction of the indirect price effects associated with large shocks, single sector partial-equilibrium measures will exhibit small errors. Otherwise the errors can be substantial and difficult to sign.

  16. Implementing an Equilibrium Law Teaching Sequence for Secondary School Students to Learn Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghirardi, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Regis, Alberto; Roletto, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    A didactic sequence is proposed for the teaching of chemical equilibrium law. In this approach, we have avoided the kinetic derivation and the thermodynamic justification of the equilibrium constant. The equilibrium constant expression is established empirically by a trial-and-error approach. Additionally, students learn to use the criterion of…

  17. Implementing an Equilibrium Law Teaching Sequence for Secondary School Students to Learn Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghirardi, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Regis, Alberto; Roletto, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    A didactic sequence is proposed for the teaching of chemical equilibrium law. In this approach, we have avoided the kinetic derivation and the thermodynamic justification of the equilibrium constant. The equilibrium constant expression is established empirically by a trial-and-error approach. Additionally, students learn to use the criterion of…

  18. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization

    PubMed Central

    Anzà, F.; Vedral, V.

    2017-01-01

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light. PMID:28266646

  19. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzà, F.; Vedral, V.

    2017-03-01

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light.

  20. Disturbances in equilibrium function after major earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Motoyasu; Endo, Nobutaka; Osada, Yoshihisa; Kim, Yoshiharu; Kuriyama, Kenichi

    2012-10-01

    Major earthquakes were followed by a large number of aftershocks and significant outbreaks of dizziness occurred over a large area. However it is unclear why major earthquake causes dizziness. We conducted an intergroup trial on equilibrium dysfunction and psychological states associated with equilibrium dysfunction in individuals exposed to repetitive aftershocks versus those who were rarely exposed. Greater equilibrium dysfunction was observed in the aftershock-exposed group under conditions without visual compensation. Equilibrium dysfunction in the aftershock-exposed group appears to have arisen from disturbance of the inner ear, as well as individual vulnerability to state anxiety enhanced by repetitive exposure to aftershocks. We indicate potential effects of autonomic stress on equilibrium function after major earthquake. Our findings may contribute to risk management of psychological and physical health after major earthquakes with aftershocks, and allow development of a new empirical approach to disaster care after such events.

  1. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization.

    PubMed

    Anzà, F; Vedral, V

    2017-03-07

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light.

  2. Probing local equilibrium in nonequilibrium fluids.

    PubMed

    del Pozo, J J; Garrido, P L; Hurtado, P I

    2015-08-01

    We use extensive computer simulations to probe local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in a quintessential model fluid, the two-dimensional hard-disks system. We show that macroscopic LTE is a property much stronger than previously anticipated, even in the presence of important finite-size effects, revealing a remarkable bulk-boundary decoupling phenomenon in fluids out of equilibrium. This allows us to measure the fluid's equation of state in simulations far from equilibrium, with an excellent accuracy comparable to the best equilibrium simulations. Subtle corrections to LTE are found in the fluctuations of the total energy which strongly point to the nonlocality of the nonequilibrium potential governing the fluid's macroscopic behavior out of equilibrium.

  3. How Far from Equilibrium Is Active Matter?

    PubMed

    Fodor, Étienne; Nardini, Cesare; Cates, Michael E; Tailleur, Julien; Visco, Paolo; van Wijland, Frédéric

    2016-07-15

    Active matter systems are driven out of thermal equilibrium by a lack of generalized Stokes-Einstein relation between injection and dissipation of energy at the microscopic scale. We consider such a system of interacting particles, propelled by persistent noises, and show that, at small but finite persistence time, their dynamics still satisfy a time-reversal symmetry. To do so, we compute perturbatively their steady-state measure and show that, for short persistent times, the entropy production rate vanishes. This endows such systems with an effective fluctuation-dissipation theorem akin to that of thermal equilibrium systems. Last, we show how interacting particle systems with viscous drags and correlated noises can be seen as in equilibrium with a viscoelastic bath but driven out of equilibrium by nonconservative forces, hence providing energetic insight into the departure of active systems from equilibrium.

  4. How Far from Equilibrium Is Active Matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Étienne; Nardini, Cesare; Cates, Michael E.; Tailleur, Julien; Visco, Paolo; van Wijland, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    Active matter systems are driven out of thermal equilibrium by a lack of generalized Stokes-Einstein relation between injection and dissipation of energy at the microscopic scale. We consider such a system of interacting particles, propelled by persistent noises, and show that, at small but finite persistence time, their dynamics still satisfy a time-reversal symmetry. To do so, we compute perturbatively their steady-state measure and show that, for short persistent times, the entropy production rate vanishes. This endows such systems with an effective fluctuation-dissipation theorem akin to that of thermal equilibrium systems. Last, we show how interacting particle systems with viscous drags and correlated noises can be seen as in equilibrium with a viscoelastic bath but driven out of equilibrium by nonconservative forces, hence providing energetic insight into the departure of active systems from equilibrium.

  5. Comparison of equilibrium and non-equilibrium distribution coefficients for the human drug carbamazepine in soil.

    PubMed

    Williams, C F; Watson, J E; Nelson, S D

    2014-01-01

    The distribution coefficient (KD) for the human drug carbamazepine was measured using a non-equilibrium technique. Repacked soil columns were prepared using an Airport silt loam (Typic Natrustalf) with an average organic matter content of 2.45%. Carbamazepine solutions were then leached through the columns at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mL min(-1) representing average linear velocities of 1.8, 3.5 and 5.3 cm h(-1) respectively. Each flow rate was replicated three times and three carbamazepine pulses were applied to each column resulting in a total of 9 columns with 27 total carbamazepine pulses. Breakthrough curves were used to determine KD using the parameter fitting software CXTFIT. Results indicate that as flow rate decreased from 5.3 to 1.8 cm h(-1), KD increased an average of 21%. Additionally, KD determined by column leaching (14.7-22.7 L kg(-1)) was greater than KD determined by a 2h batch equilibrium adsorption (12.6 L kg(-1)). Based on these KD's carbamazepine would be generally characterized as non-mobile in the soil investigated. However, repeated carbamazepine applications resulted in an average 22% decrease in KD between the first and third applications. Decreasing KD is attributed to differences in sorption site kinetics and carbamazepine residence time in contact with the soil. This would indicate that the repeated use of reclaimed wastewater at high application rates for long-term irrigation or groundwater recharge has the potential to lead to greater transport of carbamazepine than KD determined by batch equilibrium would predict.

  6. Response to Contradiction: Conflict Resolution Strategies Used by Students in Solving Problems of Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor

    2001-01-01

    Illustrates how a novel problem of chemical equilibrium based on a closely related sequence of items can facilitate students' conceptual understanding. Students were presented with a chemical reaction in equilibrium to which a reactant was added as an external effect. Three studies were conducted to assess alternative conceptions. (Author/SAH)

  7. Students' Understanding of Equilibrium and Stability: The Case of Dynamic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canu, Michaël; de Hosson, Cécile; Duque, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Engineering students in control courses have been observed to lack an understanding of equilibrium and stability, both of which are crucial concepts in this discipline. The introduction of these concepts is generally based on the study of classical examples from Newtonian mechanics supplemented with a control system. Equilibrium and stability are…

  8. Students' Understanding of Equilibrium and Stability: The Case of Dynamic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canu, Michaël; de Hosson, Cécile; Duque, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Engineering students in control courses have been observed to lack an understanding of equilibrium and stability, both of which are crucial concepts in this discipline. The introduction of these concepts is generally based on the study of classical examples from Newtonian mechanics supplemented with a control system. Equilibrium and stability are…

  9. Response to Contradiction: Conflict Resolution Strategies Used by Students in Solving Problems of Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor

    2001-01-01

    Illustrates how a novel problem of chemical equilibrium based on a closely related sequence of items can facilitate students' conceptual understanding. Students were presented with a chemical reaction in equilibrium to which a reactant was added as an external effect. Three studies were conducted to assess alternative conceptions. (Author/SAH)

  10. Teaching Chemical Equilibrium with the Jigsaw Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doymus, Kemal

    2008-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of cooperative learning (jigsaw) versus individual learning methods on students’ understanding of chemical equilibrium in a first-year general chemistry course. This study was carried out in two different classes in the department of primary science education during the 2005-2006 academic year. One of the classes was randomly assigned as the non-jigsaw group (control) and other as the jigsaw group (cooperative). Students participating in the jigsaw group were divided into four “home groups” since the topic chemical equilibrium is divided into four subtopics (Modules A, B, C and D). Each of these home groups contained four students. The groups were as follows: (1) Home Group A (HGA), representin g the equilibrium state and quantitative aspects of equilibrium (Module A), (2) Home Group B (HGB), representing the equilibrium constant and relationships involving equilibrium constants (Module B), (3) Home Group C (HGC), representing Altering Equilibrium Conditions: Le Chatelier’s principle (Module C), and (4) Home Group D (HGD), representing calculations with equilibrium constants (Module D). The home groups then broke apart, like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, and the students moved into jigsaw groups consisting of members from the other home groups who were assigned the same portion of the material. The jigsaw groups were then in charge of teaching their specific subtopic to the rest of the students in their learning group. The main data collection tool was a Chemical Equilibrium Achievement Test (CEAT), which was applied to both the jigsaw and non-jigsaw groups The results indicated that the jigsaw group was more successful than the non-jigsaw group (individual learning method).

  11. The Conceptual Change Approach to Teaching Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canpolat, Nurtac; Pinarbasi, Tacettin; Bayrakceken, Samih; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a conceptual change approach over traditional instruction on students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts (e.g. dynamic nature of equilibrium, definition of equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, qualitative interpreting of equilibrium constant, changing the reaction conditions). This…

  12. The Conceptual Change Approach to Teaching Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canpolat, Nurtac; Pinarbasi, Tacettin; Bayrakceken, Samih; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a conceptual change approach over traditional instruction on students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts (e.g. dynamic nature of equilibrium, definition of equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, qualitative interpreting of equilibrium constant, changing the reaction conditions). This…

  13. A general framework for ion equilibrium calculations in compacted bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birgersson, Martin

    2017-03-01

    An approach for treating chemical equilibrium between compacted bentonite and aqueous solutions is presented. The treatment is based on conceptualizing bentonite as a homogeneous mixture of water and montmorillonite, and assumes Gibbs-Donnan membrane equilibrium across interfaces to external solutions. An equation for calculating the electrostatic potential difference between bentonite and external solution (Donnan potential) is derived and solved analytically for some simple systems. The solutions are furthermore analyzed in order to illuminate the general mechanisms of ion equilibrium and their relation to measurable quantities. A method is suggested for estimating interlayer activity coefficients based on the notion of an interlayer ionic strength. Using this method, several applications of the framework are presented, giving a set of quantitative predictions which may be relatively simply tested experimentally, e.g.: (1) the relative amount of anions entering the bentonite depends approximately on the square-root of the external concentration for a 1:2 salt (e.g. CaCl2). For a 1:1 salt (e.g. NaCl) the dependence is approximately linear, and for a 1:2 salt (e.g. Na2SO4) the dependence is approximately quadratic. (2) Bentonite contains substantially more nitrate as compared to chloride if equilibrated with the two salt solutions at equal external concentration. (3) Potassium bentonite generally contains more anions as compared to sodium bentonite if equilibrated at the same external concentration. (4) The anion concentration ratio in two bentonite samples of different cations (but with the same density and cation exchange capacity) resembles the ion exchange selectivity coefficient for that specific cation pair. The results show that an adequate treatment of chemical equilibrium between interlayers and bulk solutions are essential when modeling compacted bentonite, and that activity corrections generally are required for relevant ion equilibrium calculations. It

  14. 3D Equilibrium Reconstructions in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.; Ferraro, N. W.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; King, J. D.; Hirshman, H. P.; Lazarus, E. A.; Sontag, A. C.; Hanson, J.; Trevisan, G.

    2013-10-01

    Accurate and efficient 3D equilibrium reconstruction is needed in tokamaks for study of 3D magnetic field effects on experimentally reconstructed equilibrium and for analysis of MHD stability experiments with externally imposed magnetic perturbations. A large number of new magnetic probes have been recently installed in DIII-D to improve 3D equilibrium measurements and to facilitate 3D reconstructions. The V3FIT code has been in use in DIII-D to support 3D reconstruction and the new magnetic diagnostic design. V3FIT is based on the 3D equilibrium code VMEC that assumes nested magnetic surfaces. V3FIT uses a pseudo-Newton least-square algorithm to search for the solution vector. In parallel, the EFIT equilibrium reconstruction code is being extended to allow for 3D effects using a perturbation approach based on an expansion of the MHD equations. EFIT uses the cylindrical coordinate system and can include the magnetic island and stochastic effects. Algorithms are being developed to allow EFIT to reconstruct 3D perturbed equilibria directly making use of plasma response to 3D perturbations from the GATO, MARS-F, or M3D-C1 MHD codes. DIII-D 3D reconstruction examples using EFIT and V3FIT and the new 3D magnetic data will be presented. Work supported in part by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-95ER54309 and DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  15. Temperature lapse rates at restricted thermodynamic equilibrium. Part II: Saturated air and further discussions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björnbom, Pehr

    2016-03-01

    In the first part of this work equilibrium temperature profiles in fluid columns with ideal gas or ideal liquid were obtained by numerically minimizing the column energy at constant entropy, equivalent to maximizing column entropy at constant energy. A minimum in internal plus potential energy for an isothermal temperature profile was obtained in line with Gibbs' classical equilibrium criterion. However, a minimum in internal energy alone for adiabatic temperature profiles was also obtained. This led to a hypothesis that the adiabatic lapse rate corresponds to a restricted equilibrium state, a type of state in fact discussed already by Gibbs. In this paper similar numerical results for a fluid column with saturated air suggest that also the saturated adiabatic lapse rate corresponds to a restricted equilibrium state. The proposed hypothesis is further discussed and amended based on the previous and the present numerical results and a theoretical analysis based on Gibbs' equilibrium theory.

  16. The sensitivity of tokamak magnetohydrodynamics stability on the edge equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L. J.; Kotschenreuther, M. T.; Valanju, P.

    2017-10-01

    Due to the X-point singularity, the safety factor tends to infinity as approaching to the last closed flux surface. The numerical treatments of the near X-point behavior become challenging both for equilibrium and stability. The usual solution is to cut off a small fraction of edge region for system stability evaluation or simply use an up-down symmetric equilibrium without X-point as an approximation. In this work, we assess the sensitivity of this type of equilibrium treatments on the stability calculation. It is found that the system stability can depend strongly on the safety factor value (qa) at the edge after the cutting-off. When the edge safety factor value falls in the vicinity of a rational mode number (referred to as the resonant gap), the system becomes quite unstable due to the excitation of the peeling type modes. Instead, when the edge safety factor is outside the resonant gaps, the system is much more stable and the predominant modes become the usual external kink (or ballooning and infernal) type. It is also found that the resonant gaps become smaller and smaller as qa increases. The ideal magnetohydrodynamic peeling ballooning stability diagram is widely used to explain the experimental observations, and the current results indicate that the conventional peeling ballooning stability diagram based on the simplified equilibrium needs to be reexamined.

  17. Equilibrium limit of thermal conduction and boundary scattering in nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Justin B; Kınacı, Alper; Sevik, Cem; Çağın, Tahir

    2014-06-28

    Determining the lattice thermal conductivity (κ) of nanostructures is especially challenging in that, aside from the phonon-phonon scattering present in large systems, the scattering of phonons from the system boundary greatly influences heat transport, particularly when system length (L) is less than the average phonon mean free path (MFP). One possible route to modeling κ in these systems is through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, inherently including both phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering effects in the classical limit. Here, we compare current MD methods for computing κ in nanostructures with both L ⩽ MFP and L ≫ MFP, referred to as mean free path constrained (cMFP) and unconstrained (uMFP), respectively. Using a (10,0) CNT (carbon nanotube) as a benchmark case, we find that while the uMFP limit of κ is well-defined through the use of equilibrium MD and the time-correlation formalism, the standard equilibrium procedure for κ is not appropriate for the treatment of the cMFP limit because of the large influence of boundary scattering. To address this issue, we define an appropriate equilibrium procedure for cMFP systems that, through comparison to high-fidelity non-equilibrium methods, is shown to be the low thermal gradient limit to non-equilibrium results. Further, as a means of predicting κ in systems having L ≫ MFP from cMFP results, we employ an extrapolation procedure based on the phenomenological, boundary scattering inclusive expression of Callaway [Phys. Rev. 113, 1046 (1959)]. Using κ from systems with L ⩽ 3 μm in the extrapolation, we find that the equilibrium uMFP κ of a (10,0) CNT can be predicted within 5%. The equilibrium procedure is then applied to a variety of carbon-based nanostructures, such as graphene flakes (GF), graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), CNTs, and icosahedral fullerenes, to determine the influence of size and environment (suspended versus supported) on κ. Concerning the GF and GNR systems, we find that

  18. An Elementary Discussion of Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Carl W.

    1988-01-01

    This discussion uses a more difficult reaction as the prototype to derive the standard equation for chemical equilibrium. It can be used by students who can understand and use partial derivatives. (CW)

  19. Spreadsheet Templates for Chemical Equilibrium Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshi, Bhairav D.

    1993-01-01

    Describes two general spreadsheet templates to carry out all types of one-equation chemical equilibrium calculations encountered by students in undergraduate chemistry courses. Algorithms, templates, macros, and representative examples are presented to illustrate the approach. (PR)

  20. Equilibrium Reconstruction on the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel A. Lazerson, D. Gates, D. Monticello, H. Neilson, N. Pomphrey, A. Reiman S. Sakakibara, and Y. Suzuki

    2012-07-27

    Equilibrium reconstruction is commonly applied to axisymmetric toroidal devices. Recent advances in computational power and equilibrium codes have allowed for reconstructions of three-dimensional fields in stellarators and heliotrons. We present the first reconstructions of finite beta discharges in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The plasma boundary and magnetic axis are constrained by the pressure profile from Thomson scattering. This results in a calculation of plasma beta without a-priori assumptions of the equipartition of energy between species. Saddle loop arrays place additional constraints on the equilibrium. These reconstruction utilize STELLOPT, which calls VMEC. The VMEC equilibrium code assumes good nested flux surfaces. Reconstructed magnetic fields are fed into the PIES code which relaxes this constraint allowing for the examination of the effect of islands and stochastic regions on the magnetic measurements.

  1. Radiative-dynamical equilibrium states for Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, L. M.; Stone, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    In order to obtain accurate estimates of the radiative heating that drives motions in Jupiter's atmosphere, previous radiative equilibrium calculations are improved by including the NH3 opacities and updated results for the pressure-induced opacities. These additions increase the radiative lapse rate near the top of the statically unstable region and lead to a fairly constant radiative lapse rate below the tropopause. The radiative-convective equilibrium temperature structure consistent with these changes is calculated, but it differs only slightly from earlier calculations. The radiative equilibrium calculations are used to calculate whether equilibrium states can occur on Jupiter which are similar to the baroclinic instability regimes on the earth and Mars. The results show that Jupiter's dynamical regime cannot be of this kind, except possibly at very high latitudes, and that its regime must be a basically less stable one than this kind.

  2. Rapid Equilibrium-Ordered Enzyme Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Thomas R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (1) characteristic initial velocity behavior (considering the five-step reaction sequence for rapid equilibrium-order bisubstrate mechanisms); (2) dead-end inhibition; (3) inhibition by single products; and (4) an activator as a leading reactant. (JN)

  3. Intermittent many-body dynamics at equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, C.; Campbell, D. K.; Flach, S.

    2017-06-01

    The equilibrium value of an observable defines a manifold in the phase space of an ergodic and equipartitioned many-body system. A typical trajectory pierces that manifold infinitely often as time goes to infinity. We use these piercings to measure both the relaxation time of the lowest frequency eigenmode of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain, as well as the fluctuations of the subsequent dynamics in equilibrium. The dynamics in equilibrium is characterized by a power-law distribution of excursion times far off equilibrium, with diverging variance. Long excursions arise from sticky dynamics close to q -breathers localized in normal mode space. Measuring the exponent allows one to predict the transition into nonergodic dynamics. We generalize our method to Klein-Gordon lattices where the sticky dynamics is due to discrete breathers localized in real space.

  4. Points of Equilibrium in Electrostatic Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Peter J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the electric field line pattern for four equal charges of the same sign placed at the corners of a square. The electric field intensity and the point of equilibrium are interpreted, taking into account three dimensions. (HM)

  5. Edge Equilibrium Code (EEC) For Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujling

    2014-02-24

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids

  6. The Theory of Variances in Equilibrium Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, Leonid E.; Lewandowski, Jerome; Foley, Elizabeth L.; Levinton, Fred M.; Yuh, Howard Y.; Drozdov, Vladimir; McDonald, Darren

    2008-01-14

    The theory of variances of equilibrium reconstruction is presented. It complements existing practices with information regarding what kind of plasma profiles can be reconstructed, how accurately, and what remains beyond the abilities of diagnostic systems. The σ-curves, introduced by the present theory, give a quantitative assessment of quality of effectiveness of diagnostic systems in constraining equilibrium reconstructions. The theory also suggests a method for aligning the accuracy of measurements of different physical nature.

  7. Inferring unstable equilibrium configurations from experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgin, L. N.; Wiebe, R.; Spottswood, S. M.; Beberniss, T.

    2016-09-01

    This research considers the structural behavior of slender, mechanically buckled beams and panels of the type commonly found in aerospace structures. The specimens were deflected and then clamped in a rigid frame in order to exhibit snap-through. That is, the initial equilibrium and the buckled (snapped-through) equilibrium configurations both co-existed for the given clamped conditions. In order to transit between these two stable equilibrium configurations (for example, under the action of an externally applied load), it is necessary for the structural component to pass through an intermediate unstable equilibrium configuration. A sequence of sudden impacts was imparted to the system, of various strengths and at various locations. The goal of this impact force was to induce relatively intermediate-sized transients that effectively slowed-down in the vicinity of the unstable equilibrium configuration. Thus, monitoring the velocity of the motion, and specifically its slowing down, should give an indication of the presence of an equilibrium configuration, even though it is unstable and not amenable to direct experimental observation. A digital image correlation (DIC) system was used in conjunction with an instrumented impact hammer to track trajectories and statistical methods used to infer the presence of unstable equilibria in both a beam and a panel.

  8. Approaches to the Treatment of Equilibrium Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2003-10-01

    Perturbations from equilibrium are treated in the textbooks by a combination of Le Châtelier's principle, the comparison of the equilibrium constant K with the reaction quotient Q,and the kinetic approach. Each of these methods is briefly reviewed. This is followed by derivations of the variation of the equilibrium value of the extent of reaction, ξeq, with various parameters on which it depends. Near equilibrium this relationship can be represented by a straight line. The equilibrium system can be regarded as moving on this line as the parameter is varied. The slope of the line depends on quantities like enthalpy of reaction, volume of reaction and so forth. The derivation shows that these quantities pertain to the equilibrium system, not the standard state. Also, the derivation makes clear what kind of assumptions underlie our conclusions. The derivation of these relations involves knowledge of thermodynamics that is well within the grasp of junior level physical chemistry students. The conclusions that follow from the derived relations are given as subsidiary rules in the form of the slope of ξeq, with T, p, et cetera. The rules are used to develop a visual way of predicting the direction of shift of a perturbed system. This method can be used to supplement one of the other methods even at the introductory level.

  9. New aspects of the equilibrium pole tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.; Steinberg, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A new spherical harmonic algorithm is developed for the calculation of the loading and self-gravitating equilibrium pole tide. Based on a suggestion of Dahlen (1976), this approach minimizes the distortions in tide height caused by an incomplete representation of the ocean function. With slight modification this approach easily could be used to compute self-gravitating and loading lunisolar tides as well. Using the algorithm, the static pole tide is compared with tide observations at a variety of locations around the world, and statistically significant evidence for pole tide enhancements is found in midocean as well as the shallow seas. Also included is a reinvestigation of the effect of the static tide on the Chandler-wobble period. The difference between the wobble period of an oceanless elastic earth with a fluid core (Smith and Dahlen, 1981) and the period of an earth minus static oceans yields a 7.4-day discrepancy. It is concluded from tide observations that much of the discrepancy can probably be accounted for by nonequilibrium pole-tide behavior in the deep oceans.

  10. A theoretical analysis of vertical flow equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    1992-01-01

    The assumption of Vertical Flow Equilibrium (VFE) and of parallel flow conditions, in general, is often applied to the modeling of flow and displacement in natural porous media. However, the methodology for the development of the various models is rather intuitive, and no rigorous method is currently available. In this paper, we develop an asymptotic theory using as parameter the variable R{sub L} = (L/H){radical}(k{sub V})/(k{sub H}). It is rigorously shown that present models represent the leading order term of an asymptotic expansion with respect to 1/R{sub L}{sup 2}. Although this was numerically suspected, it is the first time that is is theoretically proved. Based on the general formulation, a series of models are subsequently obtained. In the absence of strong gravity effects, they generalize previous works by Zapata and Lake (1981), Yokoyama and Lake (1981) and Lake and Hirasaki (1981), on immiscible and miscible displacements. In the limit of gravity-segregated flow, we prove conditions for the fluids to be segregated and derive the Dupuit and Dietz (1953) approximations. Finally, we also discuss effects of capillarity and transverse dispersion.

  11. A theoretical analysis of vertical flow equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    1992-01-01

    The assumption of Vertical Flow Equilibrium (VFE) and of parallel flow conditions, in general, is often applied to the modeling of flow and displacement in natural porous media. However, the methodology for the development of the various models is rather intuitive, and no rigorous method is currently available. In this paper, we develop an asymptotic theory using as parameter the variable R{sub L} = (L/H){radical}(k{sub V})/(k{sub H}). It is rigorously shown that present models represent the leading order term of an asymptotic expansion with respect to 1/R{sub L}{sup 2}. Although this was numerically suspected, it is the first time that is is theoretically proved. Based on the general formulation, a series of models are subsequently obtained. In the absence of strong gravity effects, they generalize previous works by Zapata and Lake (1981), Yokoyama and Lake (1981) and Lake and Hirasaki (1981), on immiscible and miscible displacements. In the limit of gravity-segregated flow, we prove conditions for the fluids to be segregated and derive the Dupuit and Dietz (1953) approximations. Finally, we also discuss effects of capillarity and transverse dispersion.

  12. Pre-equilibrium studies in monoisotopic praseodymium

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.P.; Mustafa, M.M.; Sankarcharyulu, M.G.V.

    1994-12-31

    Measurement and analysis of excitation functions in {alpha}-induced reactions has become an important tool for studying the pre-equilibrium (PE) phenomenon. As part of the programme of precise measurement and analysis of excitation functions in reactions for a large number of nuclei, the authors report the measurement of excitation functions for the reactions {sup 141}Pr({alpha},n){sup 144}Pm and {sup 141}Pr({alpha},2n){sup 143}Pm in the energy range from threshold to {approx}40 MeV. To the best of their knowledge, these excitation functions have been measured for the first time. Measurements have been performed using stacked foil activation technique. The irradiation has been carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Calcutta, India using the {alpha}-beam of {approx} 40 MeV. The post irradiation analysis has been done using the HPGe detector coupled to the ORTEC`s PC based multichannel analyser. The analysis of the excitation functions has been carried out using the semi-classical computer codes ACT and ALICE-82. These codes use Hauser-Feshbach/ Welsskopf-Ewing formalism for compound nucleus calculations and exciton/hybrid model for simulating PE contributions. The quantum mechanical statistical multistep code EXIFON has also been used for the analysis of these excitation functions. The comparison of results with different codes will be presented.

  13. Support of the extremal measure in a vector equilibrium problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapik, M. A.

    2006-08-01

    A generalization of the Mhaskar-Saff functional is obtained for a vector equilibrium problem with an external field. As an application, the supports of the equilibrium measures are found in a special vector equilibrium problem with Nikishin matrix.

  14. Complementary relations in non-equilibrium stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-jin; Nicholson, S. B.

    2015-08-01

    We present novel complementary relations in non-equilibrium stochastic processes. Specifically, by utilising path integral formulation, we derive statistical measures (entropy, information, and work) and investigate their dependence on variables (x, v), reference frames, and time. In particular, we show that the equilibrium state maximises the simultaneous information quantified by the product of the Fisher information based on x and v while minimising the simultaneous disorder/uncertainty quantified by the sum of the entropy based on x and v as well as by the product of the variances of the PDFs of x and v. We also elucidate the difference between Eulerian and Lagrangian entropy. Our theory naturally leads to Hamilton-Jacobi relation for forced-dissipative systems.

  15. Knowledge Management through the Equilibrium Pattern Model for Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarirete, Akila; Noble, Elizabeth; Chikh, Azeddine

    Contemporary students are characterized by having very applied learning styles and methods of acquiring knowledge. This behavior is consistent with the constructivist models where students are co-partners in the learning process. In the present work the authors developed a new model of learning based on the constructivist theory coupled with the cognitive development theory of Piaget. The model considers the level of learning based on several stages and the move from one stage to another requires learners' challenge. At each time a new concept is introduced creates a disequilibrium that needs to be worked out to return back to its equilibrium stage. This process of "disequilibrium/equilibrium" has been analyzed and validated using a course in computer networking as part of Cisco Networking Academy Program at Effat College, a women college in Saudi Arabia. The model provides a theoretical foundation for teaching especially in a complex knowledge domain such as engineering and can be used in a knowledge economy.

  16. CET89 - CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM WITH TRANSPORT PROPERTIES, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B.

    1994-01-01

    Scientists and engineers need chemical equilibrium composition data to calculate the theoretical thermodynamic properties of a chemical system. This information is essential in the design and analysis of equipment such as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical processing equipment. The substantial amount of numerical computation required to obtain equilibrium compositions and transport properties for complex chemical systems led scientists at NASA's Lewis Research Center to develop CET89, a program designed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of these systems. CET89 is a general program which will calculate chemical equilibrium compositions and mixture properties for any chemical system with available thermodynamic data. Generally, mixtures may include condensed and gaseous products. CET89 performs the following operations: it 1) obtains chemical equilibrium compositions for assigned thermodynamic states, 2) calculates dilute-gas transport properties of complex chemical mixtures, 3) obtains Chapman-Jouguet detonation properties for gaseous species, 4) calculates incident and reflected shock properties in terms of assigned velocities, and 5) calculates theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion. The rocket performance function allows the option of assuming either a finite area or an infinite area combustor. CET89 accommodates problems involving up to 24 reactants, 20 elements, and 600 products (400 of which may be condensed). The program includes a library of thermodynamic and transport properties in the form of least squares coefficients for possible reaction products. It includes thermodynamic data for over 1300 gaseous and condensed species and transport data for 151 gases. The subroutines UTHERM and UTRAN convert thermodynamic and transport data to unformatted form for faster processing. The program conforms to the FORTRAN 77 standard, except for

  17. CET89 - CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM WITH TRANSPORT PROPERTIES, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B.

    1994-01-01

    Scientists and engineers need chemical equilibrium composition data to calculate the theoretical thermodynamic properties of a chemical system. This information is essential in the design and analysis of equipment such as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical processing equipment. The substantial amount of numerical computation required to obtain equilibrium compositions and transport properties for complex chemical systems led scientists at NASA's Lewis Research Center to develop CET89, a program designed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of these systems. CET89 is a general program which will calculate chemical equilibrium compositions and mixture properties for any chemical system with available thermodynamic data. Generally, mixtures may include condensed and gaseous products. CET89 performs the following operations: it 1) obtains chemical equilibrium compositions for assigned thermodynamic states, 2) calculates dilute-gas transport properties of complex chemical mixtures, 3) obtains Chapman-Jouguet detonation properties for gaseous species, 4) calculates incident and reflected shock properties in terms of assigned velocities, and 5) calculates theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion. The rocket performance function allows the option of assuming either a finite area or an infinite area combustor. CET89 accommodates problems involving up to 24 reactants, 20 elements, and 600 products (400 of which may be condensed). The program includes a library of thermodynamic and transport properties in the form of least squares coefficients for possible reaction products. It includes thermodynamic data for over 1300 gaseous and condensed species and transport data for 151 gases. The subroutines UTHERM and UTRAN convert thermodynamic and transport data to unformatted form for faster processing. The program conforms to the FORTRAN 77 standard, except for

  18. On the transition of a non-equilibrium system to an equilibrium system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, E. G. D.

    2015-07-01

    It is shown that the most important feature of Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics is not the entropy production, but the organization of the currents in order to flow. This is also needed to obtain the maximum entropy in the equilibrium state, as is required by Equilibrium Thermodynamics. This article is supplemented with comments by Hong Qian and Yves Pomeau and a final reply by the author.

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Relativistic Figures of Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mars, M.

    2009-08-01

    Compact fluid bodies in equilibrium under its own gravitational field are abundant in the Universe and a proper treatment of them can only be carried out using the full theory of General Relativity. The problem is of enormous complexity as it involves two very different regimes, namely the interior and the exterior of the fluid, coupled through the surface of the body. This problem is very challenging both from a purely theoretical point of view, as well as regarding the obtaining of realistic models and the description of their physical properties. It is therefore an excellent piece of news that the book 'Relativistic Figures of Equilibrium' by R Meinel, M Ansorg, A Kleinwächter, G Neugebauer and D Petroff has been recently published. This book approaches the topic in depth and its contents will be of interest to a wide range of scientists working on gravitation, including theoreticians in general relativity, mathematical physicists, astrophysicists and numerical relativists. This is an advanced book that intends to present some of the present-day results on this topic. The most basic results are presented rather succinctly, and without going into the details, of their derivations. Although primarily not intended to serve as a textbook, the presentation is nevertheless self-contained and can therefore be of interest both for experts on the field as well as for anybody wishing to learn more about rotating self-gravitating compact bodies in equilibrium. It should be remarked, however, that this book makes a rather strong selection of topics and concentrates fundamentally on presenting the main results obtained by the authors during their research in this field. The book starts with a chapter where the fundamental aspects of rotating fluids in equilibrium, including its thermodynamic properties, are summarized. Of particular interest are the so-called mass-shedding limit, which is the limit where the body is rotating so fast that it is on the verge of starting

  20. Near-equilibrium dumb-bell-shaped figures for cohesionless small bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descamps, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    In a previous paper (Descamps, P. [2015]. Icarus 245, 64-79), we developed a specific method aimed to retrieve the main physical characteristics (shape, density, surface scattering properties) of highly elongated bodies from their rotational lightcurves through the use of dumb-bell-shaped equilibrium figures. The present work is a test of this method. For that purpose we introduce near-equilibrium dumb-bell-shaped figures which are base dumb-bell equilibrium shapes modulated by lognormal statistics. Such synthetic irregular models are used to generate lightcurves from which our method is successfully applied. Shape statistical parameters of such near-equilibrium dumb-bell-shaped objects are in good agreement with those calculated for example for the Asteroid (216) Kleopatra from its dog-bone radar model. It may suggest that such bilobed and elongated asteroids can be approached by equilibrium figures perturbed be the interplay with a substantial internal friction modeled by a Gaussian random sphere.

  1. EAST equilibrium current profile reconstruction using polarimeter-interferometer internal measurement constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, J. P.; Lao, L. L.; Liu, H. Q.; Ding, W. X.; Zeng, L.; Luo, Z. P.; Ren, Q. L.; Huang, Y.; Huang, J.; Brower, D. L.; Hanada, K.; Chen, D. L.; Sun, Y. W.; Shen, B.; Gong, X. Z.; Xiao, B. J.; Wan, B. N.

    2017-03-01

    The first equilibrium reconstruction of EAST current-density profile based on internal Faraday rotation measurements provided by the POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) diagnostic is demonstrated using the EFIT equilibrium reconstruction code. EFIT incorporates 11 simultaneous line-integrated density and Faraday effect measurements from POINT to self-consistently reconstruct the equilibrium toroidal current density profile using a Faraday rotation reconstruction algorithm. It is shown that the POINT measurements can be applied to improve the accuracy of core plasma current density and q profile on EAST. Comparisons of magnetic surfaces and the q profile reconstructed using external magnetic data against those using magnetic and POINT data are presented. Equilibrium reconstructions using POINT data are found to be consistent with sawtooth phenomena. The sensitivity of equilibrium reconstruction to POINT measurements indicates Faraday rotation provides important constraints for determining the current profile.

  2. Numerical study of ion orbits in EAST plasmas with a current-reversal equilibrium configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yi-jun; Gong, Xue-yu; Hu, Ye-ming; Li, Xin-xia

    2015-06-01

    By solving the Grad-Shafranov equation in the cylindrical coordinate system, we numerically obtain the tokamak plasma equilibrium configurations of the conventional mode and the high-to-lowfield-side current-reversal equilibrium mode (HL-CREC) by using the discharge parameters for the Experimental Advanced Superconductor Tokamak (EAST). By coupling with the particle's motion equation, we obtain the orbits of trapped particles and passing particles under both equilibrium configurations. We find that the orbit of the passing particle in the HL-CREC is wholly confined on the low-field side and that the half width of the banana orbit of trapped particles increases greatly compared with those in the conventional equilibrium configuration. In addition, the ion loss is studied based on the Monte Carlo method. The results show that for ions near the plasma edge, a much high ion loss rate can be obtained in HL-CREC than that in the conventional equilibrium configuration.

  3. Classifying magnetic and superfluid equilibrium states in magnets with the spin s = 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevskii, M. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    Based on the method of quasiaverages, we classify magnetic and superfluid equilibrium states in magnets with the spin s = 1. Under certain simplifications, assumptions about the residual symmetry of degenerate states and the transformation properties of order parameter operators under transformations generated by additive integrals of motions lead to linear algebraic equations for a classification of the equilibrium means of the order parameters. We consider different cases of the magnetic SO(3) or SU(3) symmetry breaking and obtain solutions for the vector and tensor order parameters for particular forms of the parameters of the residual symmetry generators. We study the equilibriums of magnets with simultaneously broken phase and magnetic symmetries. We find solutions of the classification equations for superfluid equilibrium states and establish relations between the parameters of the residual symmetry generator that allow the thermodynamic coexistence of nonzero equilibrium means of the order parameters.

  4. On equilibrium structures of the water molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Császár, Attila G.; Czakó, Gábor; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Tennyson, Jonathan; Szalay, Viktor; Shirin, Sergei V.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Polyansky, Oleg L.

    2005-06-01

    Equilibrium structures are fundamental entities in molecular sciences. They can be inferred from experimental data by complicated inverse procedures which often rely on several assumptions, including the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Theory provides a direct route to equilibrium geometries. A recent high-quality ab initio semiglobal adiabatic potential-energy surface (PES) of the electronic ground state of water, reported by Polyansky et al. [Polyansky et al.Science 299, 539 (2003)] and called CVRQD here, is analyzed in this respect. The equilibrium geometries resulting from this direct route are deemed to be of higher accuracy than those that can be determined by analyzing experimental data. Detailed investigation of the effect of the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation suggests that the concept of an isotope-independent equilibrium structure holds to about 3×10-5Å and 0.02° for water. The mass-independent [Born-Oppenheimer (BO)] equilibrium bond length and bond angle on the ground electronic state PES of water is reBO=0.95782Å and θeBO=104.485°, respectively. The related mass-dependent (adiabatic) equilibrium bond length and bond angle of H2O16 is read=0.95785Å and θead=104.500°, respectively, while those of D2O16 are read=0.95783Å and θead=104.490°. Pure ab initio prediction of J =1 and 2 rotational levels on the vibrational ground state by the CVRQD PESs is accurate to better than 0.002cm-1 for all isotopologs of water considered. Elaborate adjustment of the CVRQD PESs to reproduce all observed rovibrational transitions to better than 0.05cm-1 (or the lower ones to better than 0.0035cm-1) does not result in noticeable changes in the adiabatic equilibrium structure parameters. The expectation values of the ground vibrational state rotational constants of the water isotopologs, computed in the Eckart frame using the CVRQD PESs and atomic masses, deviate from the experimentally measured ones only marginally, especially for A0 and B0. The

  5. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium emission of complex fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, D.R.

    1989-08-01

    Complex fragment emission (Z{gt}2) has been studied in the reactions of 50, 80, and 100 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C, and 80 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au. Charge, angle, and energy distributions were measured inclusively and in coincidence with other complex fragments, and were used to extract the source rapidities, velocity distributions, and cross sections. The experimental emission velocity distributions, charge loss distributions, and cross sections have been compared with calculations based on statistical compound nucleus decay. The binary signature of the coincidence events and the sharpness of the velocity distributions illustrate the primarily 2-body nature of the {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C reaction mechanism between 50 and 100 MeV/u. The emission velocities, angular distributions, and absolute cross sections of fragments of 20{le}Z{le}35 at 50 MeV/u, 19{le}Z{le}28 at 80 MeV/u, and 17{le}Z{le}21 at 100 MeV/u indicate that these fragments arise solely from the binary decay of compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion reactions in which the {sup 139}La projectile picks up about one-half of the {sup 12}C target. In the 80 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au reactions, the disappearance of the binary signature in the total charge and velocity distributions suggests and increase in the complex fragment and light charged particle multiplicity with increasing target mass. As in the 80 and 100 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C reactions, the lighter complex fragments exhibit anisotropic angular distributions and cross sections that are too large to be explained exclusively by statistical emission. 143 refs., 67 figs.

  6. Aerospace Applications of Non-Equilibrium Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonequilibrium plasma/non-thermal plasma/cold plasmas are being used in a wide range of new applications in aeronautics, active flow control, heat transfer reduction, plasma-assisted ignition and combustion, noise suppression, and power generation. Industrial applications may be found in pollution control, materials surface treatment, and water purification. In order for these plasma processes to become practical, efficient means of ionization are necessary. A primary challenge for these applications is to create a desired non-equilibrium plasma in air by preventing the discharge from transitioning into an arc. Of particular interest is the impact on simulations and experimental data with and without detailed consideration of non-equilibrium effects, and the consequences of neglecting non-equilibrium. This presentation will provide an assessment of the presence and influence of non-equilibrium phenomena for various aerospace needs and applications. Specific examples to be considered will include the forward energy deposition of laser-induced non-equilibrium plasmoids for sonic boom mitigation, weakly ionized flows obtained from pulsed nanosecond discharges for an annular Hall type MHD generator duct for turbojet energy bypass, and fundamental mechanisms affecting the design and operation of novel plasma-assisted reactive systems in dielectric liquids (water purification, in-pipe modification of fuels, etc.).

  7. A Computationally Efficient Multicomponent Equilibrium Solver for Aerosols (MESA)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Peters, Len K.

    2005-12-23

    This paper describes the development and application of a new multicomponent equilibrium solver for aerosol-phase (MESA) to predict the complex solid-liquid partitioning in atmospheric particles containing H+, NH4+, Na+, Ca2+, SO4=, HSO4-, NO3-, and Cl- ions. The algorithm of MESA involves integrating the set of ordinary differential equations describing the transient precipitation and dissolution reactions for each salt until the system satisfies the equilibrium or mass convergence criteria. Arbitrary values are chosen for the dissolution and precipitation rate constants such that their ratio is equal to the equilibrium constant. Numerically, this approach is equivalent to iterating all the equilibrium reactions simultaneously with a single iteration loop. Because CaSO4 is sparingly soluble, it is assumed to exist as a solid over the entire RH range to simplify the algorithm for calcium containing particles. Temperature-dependent mutual deliquescence relative humidity polynomials (valid from 240 to 310 K) for all the possible salt mixtures were constructed using the comprehensive Pitzer-Simonson-Clegg (PSC) activity coefficient model at 298.15 K and temperature-dependent equilibrium constants in MESA. Performance of MESA is evaluated for 16 representative mixed-electrolyte systems commonly found in tropospheric aerosols using PSC and two other multicomponent activity coefficient methods – Multicomponent Taylor Expansion Method (MTEM) of Zaveri et al. [2004], and the widely-used Kusik and Meissner method (KM), and the results are compared against the predictions of the Web-based AIM Model III or available experimental data. Excellent agreement was found between AIM, MESA-PSC, and MESA-MTEM predictions of the multistage deliquescence growth as a function of RH. On the other hand, MESA-KM displayed up to 20% deviations in the mass growth factors for common salt mixtures in the sulfate-poor cases while significant discrepancies were found in the predicted multistage

  8. Equilibrium composition of interphase boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Wynblatt, P.

    1990-01-01

    Two modeling approaches have been used to investigate segregation effects at interphase boundaries. The first approach is based on the nearest neighbor bond model, used in conjunction with the regular solution approximation, and is an extension of an earlier framework developed to address segregation phenomena at free surfaces. In order to model a semicoherent interphase boundary, we have employed a second modeling approach, based on Monte Carol simulation, in conjunction with the embedded atom method (EAM). The EAM is a powerful new method for describing interatomic interactions in metallic systems. It includes certain many-body interactions that depend on the local environment of an atom. The Monte Carol approach has been applied to semicoherent interphase boundaries in Cu-Ag-Au alloys dilute in Au. These alloys consist of coexisting Cu-rich and Ag-rich phases, which differ in lattice constant by about 12%, such that good matching across in interface occurs when nine structural units of the Cu-rich phase are opposed to eight structural units of the Ag-rich phase. Thus far, interfaces with two different orientations have been studied: {l brace}001{r brace}-Cu//{l brace}001{r brace}-Ag, {l angle}110{r angle}-Cu//{l angle}110{r angle}-Ag; and {l brace}111{r brace}-Cu//{l brace}111{r brace}-Ag, {l angle}110{r angle}-Cu//{l angle}110{r angle}-Ag. These two interfaces will be referred to as the (001) and (111) interphase boundaries, for short. 18 refs.

  9. Cognition and equilibrium regulation in development and aging.

    PubMed

    Labouvie-Vief, Gisela

    2009-01-01

    Changes in emotion-cognition relationships in later life comprise a pattern of both vulnerabilities and strengths. To integrate this pattern of diversity, I propose a neo-Piagetian extension of the concepts of equilibrium and disequilibrium processes to the relationship beyond cognition to encompass emotional activation and arousal, and beyond youth to the full life span. Beginning with a simple, Cannon-type equilibrium based on the response to increasing deviation from ideal end states of correcting through tension reduction, a more complex model is outlined that additionally uses tension amplification aimed at enlargement of the range over which stability is maintained, i.e., permits processes of developmental progression. Parallel to cognitive development, emotional development is described as the emergence of more complex cognitive-affective structures out of original automatic, biologically based ones. In that process, tension thresholds are raised, and the functional range over which equilibrium can be maintained is widened, as higher-order representations become part of the regulatory network. These progressive movements provide well automated emotion regulation whose effectiveness increases well into middle and late life. In contrast to development, aging is ultimately characterized by a lowering of tension thresholds similar to developmental regression. However, as in the purely intellectual realm, that process is offset by the previous automatization and crystallization of cognitive-affective schemas becomes evident only as a result of increasing constraints on fluid capacities, as in advancing age and/or high load of cognitive effort and/or emotional activation.

  10. Novel liquid equilibrium valving on centrifugal microfluidic CD platform.

    PubMed

    Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Arof, Hamzah; Madou, Marc

    2013-01-01

    One of the main challenges faced by researchers in the field of microfluidic compact disc (CD) platforms is the control of liquid movement and sequencing during spinning. This paper presents a novel microfluidic valve based on the principle of liquid equilibrium on a rotating CD. The proposed liquid equilibrium valve operates by balancing the pressure produced by the liquids in a source and a venting chamber during spinning. The valve does not require external forces or triggers, and is able to regulate burst frequencies with high accuracy. In this work, we demonstrate that the burst frequency can be significantly raised by making just a small adjustment of the liquid height in the vent chamber. Finally, the proposed valve ng method can be used separately or combined with other valving methods in advance microfluidic processes.

  11. Molecular kinetic analysis of a local equilibrium Carnot cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumida, Yuki; Okuda, Koji

    2017-07-01

    We identify a velocity distribution function of ideal gas particles that is compatible with the local equilibrium assumption and the fundamental thermodynamic relation satisfying the endoreversibility. We find that this distribution is a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution with a spatially uniform temperature and a spatially varying local center-of-mass velocity. We construct the local equilibrium Carnot cycle of an ideal gas, based on this distribution, and show that the efficiency of the present cycle is given by the endoreversible Carnot efficiency using the molecular kinetic temperatures of the gas. We also obtain an analytic expression of the efficiency at maximum power of our cycle under a small temperature difference. Our theory is also confirmed by a molecular dynamics simulation.

  12. Equilibrium radiative heating tables for aerobraking in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, Lin C.; Sutton, Kenneth; Brauns, Frank

    1990-01-01

    Studies currently underway for Mars missions often envision the use of aerobraking for orbital capture at Mars. These missions generally involve blunt-nosed vehicles to dissipate the excess energy of the interplanetary transfer. Radiative heating may be of importance in these blunt-body flows because of the highly energetic shock layer around the blunt nose. In addition, the Martian atmosphere contains CO2, whose dissociation products are known to include strong radiators. An inviscid, equilibrium, stagnation point, radiation-coupled flow-field code has been developed for investigating blunt-body atmospheric entry. The method has been compared with ground-based and flight data for air, and reasonable agreement has been found. In the present work, the method was applied to a matrix of conditions in the Martian atmosphere. These conditions encompass most trajectories of interest for Mars exploration spacecraft. The predicted equilibrium radiative heating to the stagnation point of the vehicle is presented.

  13. Interfaces at equilibrium: A guide to fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Marmur, Abraham

    2016-05-20

    The fundamentals of the thermodynamics of interfaces are reviewed and concisely presented. The discussion starts with a short review of the elements of bulk thermodynamics that are also relevant to interfaces. It continues with the interfacial thermodynamics of two-phase systems, including the definition of interfacial tension and adsorption. Finally, the interfacial thermodynamics of three-phase (wetting) systems is discussed, including the topic of non-wettable surfaces. A clear distinction is made between equilibrium conditions, in terms of minimizing energies (internal, Gibbs or Helmholtz), and equilibrium indicators, in terms of measurable, intrinsic properties (temperature, chemical potential, pressure). It is emphasized that the equilibrium indicators are the same whatever energy is minimized, if the boundary conditions are properly chosen. Also, to avoid a common confusion, a distinction is made between systems of constant volume and systems with drops of constant volume.

  14. Non-equilibrium quantum heat machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicki, Robert; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David

    2015-11-01

    Standard heat machines (engine, heat pump, refrigerator) are composed of a system (working fluid) coupled to at least two equilibrium baths at different temperatures and periodically driven by an external device (piston or rotor) sometimes called the work reservoir. The aim of this paper is to go beyond this scheme by considering environments which are stationary but cannot be decomposed into a few baths at thermal equilibrium. Such situations are important, for example in solar cells, chemical machines in biology, various realizations of laser cooling or nanoscopic machines driven by laser radiation. We classify non-equilibrium baths depending on their thermodynamic behavior and show that the efficiency of heat machines powered by them is limited by the generalized Carnot bound.

  15. Answer Sets in a Fuzzy Equilibrium Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schockaert, Steven; Janssen, Jeroen; Vermeir, Dirk; de Cock, Martine

    Since its introduction, answer set programming has been generalized in many directions, to cater to the needs of real-world applications. As one of the most general “classical” approaches, answer sets of arbitrary propositional theories can be defined as models in the equilibrium logic of Pearce. Fuzzy answer set programming, on the other hand, extends answer set programming with the capability of modeling continuous systems. In this paper, we combine the expressiveness of both approaches, and define answer sets of arbitrary fuzzy propositional theories as models in a fuzzification of equilibrium logic. We show that the resulting notion of answer set is compatible with existing definitions, when the syntactic restrictions of the corresponding approaches are met. We furthermore locate the complexity of the main reasoning tasks at the second level of the polynomial hierarchy. Finally, as an illustration of its modeling power, we show how fuzzy equilibrium logic can be used to find strong Nash equilibria.

  16. KSTAR Equilibrium Reconstruction with EFIT Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Kwang-Il; Lee, D. K.; Hahn, S. H.; Lao, L. L.

    2007-11-01

    For application to the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) device, we have made some modification to the EFIT code and installed it on our computing system. The main function of EFIT is reconstruction of plasma equilibrium using discharge data. After every discharge, the code will be automatically run for a chosen time array and the results will be stored in the same way as experimental data will be. An MDSplus system will be used as the data storage for KSTAR; therefore, the EFIT reads experimental data from the MDSplus server and writes the results to it. We have added some subroutines to EFIT for direct link with the MDSplus server and also converted EFIT to Fortran 95 form. Test runs of the code will be made by using plasma simulator in the KSTAR plasma control system. This paper will also present some results of equilibrium data obtained with the equilibrium mode of EFIT.

  17. Equilibrium reconstruction using EFIT code for KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Kwang-Il; Lee, D. K.; Jeon, Y. M.; Hahn, S. H.; Lao, L. L.

    2006-10-01

    For application to the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) device, we have made some modification to the EFIT code and installed it on our computing system. The main function of EFIT is reconstruction of plasma equilibrium using discharge data. After every discharge, the code will be run for a chosen time array and the results will be stored in the same way as experimental data will be. An MDSplus system will be used as the data storage for KSTAR; therefore, the EFIT reads experimental data from the MDSplus server and writes the results to it. We have added some subroutines to EFIT for direct link with the MDSplus server and also converted it to Fortran 95 form. Test runs of the code will be made by using the KSTAR plasma control system. This paper will also present results of equilibrium data obtained with the equilibrium mode of EFIT.

  18. Isodynamic axisymmetric equilibrium near the magnetic axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenin, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    Plasma equilibrium near the magnetic axis of an axisymmetric toroidal magnetic confinement system is described in orthogonal flux coordinates. For the case of a constant current density in the vicinity of the axis and magnetic surfaces with nearly circular cross sections, expressions for the poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components are obtained in these coordinates by using expansion in the reciprocal of the aspect ratio. These expressions allow one to easily derive relationships between quantities in an isodynamic equilibrium, in which the absolute value of the magnetic field is constant along the magnetic surface (Palumbo's configuration).

  19. Asymptotic stability estimates near an equilibrium point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas, H. Scott; Meyer, Kenneth R.; Palacián, Jesús F.; Yanguas, Patricia

    2017-07-01

    We use the error bounds for adiabatic invariants found in the work of Chartier, Murua and Sanz-Serna [3] to bound the solutions of a Hamiltonian system near an equilibrium over exponentially long times. Our estimates depend only on the linearized system and not on the higher order terms as in KAM theory, nor do we require any steepness or convexity conditions as in Nekhoroshev theory. We require that the equilibrium point where our estimate applies satisfy a type of formal stability called Lie stability.

  20. Isodynamic axisymmetric equilibrium near the magnetic axis

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenin, V. V.

    2013-08-15

    Plasma equilibrium near the magnetic axis of an axisymmetric toroidal magnetic confinement system is described in orthogonal flux coordinates. For the case of a constant current density in the vicinity of the axis and magnetic surfaces with nearly circular cross sections, expressions for the poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components are obtained in these coordinates by using expansion in the reciprocal of the aspect ratio. These expressions allow one to easily derive relationships between quantities in an isodynamic equilibrium, in which the absolute value of the magnetic field is constant along the magnetic surface (Palumbo’s configuration)